Science.gov

Sample records for accelerometer scale factor

  1. Linearity enhancement of scale factor in an optical interrogated micromechanical accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Feng, Lishuang; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Yang

    2016-08-01

    A method to reduce the residual stress of support arms in an optical interrogated micromechanical accelerometer is proposed in order to enhance the linearity of the scale factor of the accelerometer. First, the behavior of residual stress in support arms is analyzed in detail, and the simulation of shape curvature caused by residual stress in aluminum-made support arms is completed using finite element analysis. Then, by comparing two different materials of support arms (aluminum-made and silicon-made support arms), a modified fabrication is introduced in order to reduce the unexpected residual stress in support arms. Finally, based on contrast experiments, the linearity of the scale factor of accelerometers with aluminum-made and silicon-made support arms is measured using the force feedback test system, respectively. Results show that the linearity of the scale factor of the accelerometer with silicon-made support arms is 0.85%, which is reduced about an order of magnitude compared to that of the accelerometer with aluminum-made support arms with the linearity of scale factor of 7.48%; linearity enhancement of the scale factor is validated. This allows accuracy improvement of the optical interrogated micromechanical accelerometer in the application of inertial navigation and positioning. PMID:27505396

  2. Innovative self-calibration method for accelerometer scale factor of the missile-borne RINS with fiber optic gyro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Lei; Liu, Zengjun; Zhang, Yiming

    2016-09-19

    The calibration of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) is a key technique to improve the preciseness of the inertial navigation system (INS) for missile, especially for the calibration of accelerometer scale factor. Traditional calibration method is generally based on the high accuracy turntable, however, it leads to expensive costs and the calibration results are not suitable to the actual operating environment. In the wake of developments in multi-axis rotational INS (RINS) with optical inertial sensors, self-calibration is utilized as an effective way to calibrate IMU on missile and the calibration results are more accurate in practical application. However, the introduction of multi-axis RINS causes additional calibration errors, including non-orthogonality errors of mechanical processing and non-horizontal errors of operating environment, it means that the multi-axis gimbals could not be regarded as a high accuracy turntable. As for its application on missiles, in this paper, after analyzing the relationship between the calibration error of accelerometer scale factor and non-orthogonality and non-horizontal angles, an innovative calibration procedure using the signals of fiber optic gyro and photoelectric encoder is proposed. The laboratory and vehicle experiment results validate the theory and prove that the proposed method relaxes the orthogonality requirement of rotation axes and eliminates the strict application condition of the system. PMID:27661867

  3. ACCELEROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-11-25

    A device, commonly known as an accelerometer, is described which may be utllized for measuring acceleratlon with high sensitivity and accuracy tbroughout a relatively wlde range of values. In general, the accelerometer consists of an assembly, including an electric motor stator and a mass element located away from the axis of rotation of the stator, rotatably mounted on a support, and an electric motor rotor positioned within the stator and rotatable thereln. An electrlcal switching circuit controlled by the movement of the stator lntermittently energizes the rotor winding and retards move ment of the stator, and a centrifugal switch is rotatable with the rotor to operate upon attainment of a predetermined rotor rotational velocity.

  4. Factors associated with participant compliance in studies using accelerometers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul H; Macfarlane, Duncan J; Lam, T H

    2013-09-01

    Participant compliance is an important issue in studies using accelerometers. Some participants wear the accelerometer for the duration specified by the researchers but many do not. We investigated a range of demographic factors associated with participant compliance in obtaining analyzable accelerometer data. A total of 3601 participants (aged 47.6±13.1 years, 44.6% male) were included. They were asked to wear an accelerometer (ActiGraph) for four consecutive days after completing a household survey during March 2009-January 2011 in Hong Kong. Participants wore the accelerometer on average for 13.9h in a 24-h day. No significant difference was found between males and females (p=0.38). Using log-linear regression, it was found that older participants (0.5% more wearing hours for each year of age, p<0.001), those with full-time job (p<0.01), with tertiary education (p<0.01), non-smokers (p<0.01) and with high self-reported health (p<0.05) wore the accelerometer for more hours. These results provide details for estimating compliance rates for samples with different characteristics and thus sample size calculation to account for participant compliance. PMID:23688408

  5. Using Accelerometers to Measure Physical Activity in Large-Scale Epidemiologic Studies: Issues and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Lee, I-Min; Shiroma, Eric J

    2013-01-01

    Background Current guidelines for aerobic activity require that adults carry out ≥150 minutes/week of moderate-intensity physical activity, with a large body of epidemiologic evidence showing this level of activity to decrease the incidence of many chronic diseases. Less is known about whether light-intensity activities also have such benefits, and whether sedentary behavior is an independent predictor of increased risks of these chronic diseases, as imprecise assessments of these behaviours and cross-sectional study designs have limited knowledge to date. Methods Recent technological advances in assessment methods have made the use of movement sensors, such as the accelerometer, feasible for use in longitudinal, large-scale epidemiologic studies. Several such studies are collecting sensor-assessed, objective measures of physical activity with the aim of relating these to the development of clinical endpoints. This is a relatively new area of research; thus, in this paper, we use the Women’s Health Study (WHS) as a case study to illustrate challenges related to data collection, data processing, and analyses of the vast amount of data collected. Results The WHS plans to collect 7 days of accelerometer-assessed physical activity and sedentary behavior in ~18,000 women aged ≥62 years. Several logistical challenges exist in collecting data; nonetheless as of 31 August 2013, 11,590 women have already provided some data. Additionally, the WHS experience on data reduction and data analyses can help inform other similar large-scale epidemiologic studies. Conclusions Important data on the health effects of light-intensity activity and sedentary behaviour will emerge from large-scale epidemiologic studies collecting objective assessments of these behaviours. PMID:24297837

  6. Design and Implementation of a Micromechanical Silicon Resonant Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Libin; Yang, Hui; Gao, Yang; Zhao, Liye; Liang, Jinxing

    2013-01-01

    The micromechanical silicon resonant accelerometer has attracted considerable attention in the research and development of high-precision MEMS accelerometers because of its output of quasi-digital signals, high sensitivity, high resolution, wide dynamic range, anti-interference capacity and good stability. Because of the mismatching thermal expansion coefficients of silicon and glass, the micromechanical silicon resonant accelerometer based on the Silicon on Glass (SOG) technique is deeply affected by the temperature during the fabrication, packaging and use processes. The thermal stress caused by temperature changes directly affects the frequency output of the accelerometer. Based on the working principle of the micromechanical resonant accelerometer, a special accelerometer structure that reduces the temperature influence on the accelerometer is designed. The accelerometer can greatly reduce the thermal stress caused by high temperatures in the process of fabrication and packaging. Currently, the closed-loop drive circuit is devised based on a phase-locked loop. The unloaded resonant frequencies of the prototype of the micromechanical silicon resonant accelerometer are approximately 31.4 kHz and 31.5 kHz. The scale factor is 66.24003 Hz/g. The scale factor stability is 14.886 ppm, the scale factor repeatability is 23 ppm, the bias stability is 23 μg, the bias repeatability is 170 μg, and the bias temperature coefficient is 0.0734 Hz/°C. PMID:24256978

  7. Design and implementation of a micromechanical silicon resonant accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Libin; Yang, Hui; Gao, Yang; Zhao, Liye; Liang, Jinxing

    2013-01-01

    The micromechanical silicon resonant accelerometer has attracted considerable attention in the research and development of high-precision MEMS accelerometers because of its output of quasi-digital signals, high sensitivity, high resolution, wide dynamic range, anti-interference capacity and good stability. Because of the mismatching thermal expansion coefficients of silicon and glass, the micromechanical silicon resonant accelerometer based on the Silicon on Glass (SOG) technique is deeply affected by the temperature during the fabrication, packaging and use processes. The thermal stress caused by temperature changes directly affects the frequency output of the accelerometer. Based on the working principle of the micromechanical resonant accelerometer, a special accelerometer structure that reduces the temperature influence on the accelerometer is designed. The accelerometer can greatly reduce the thermal stress caused by high temperatures in the process of fabrication and packaging. Currently, the closed-loop drive circuit is devised based on a phase-locked loop. The unloaded resonant frequencies of the prototype of the micromechanical silicon resonant accelerometer are approximately 31.4 kHz and 31.5 kHz. The scale factor is 66.24003 Hz/g. The scale factor stability is 14.886 ppm, the scale factor repeatability is 23 ppm, the bias stability is 23 μg, the bias repeatability is 170 μg, and the bias temperature coefficient is 0.0734 Hz/°C.

  8. Accelerometers for Precise GNSS Orbit Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugentobler, Urs; Schlicht, Anja

    2016-07-01

    The solar radiation pressure is the largest non-gravitational acceleration on GNSS satellites limiting the accuracy of precise orbit models. Other non-gravitational accelerations may be thrusts for station keeping maneuvers. Accelerometers measure the motion of a test mass that is shielded against satellite surface forces with respect to a cage that is rigidly connected to the satellite. They can thus be used to measure these difficult-to-model non-gravitational accelerations. Accelerometers however typically show correlated noise as well as a drift of the scaling factors converting measured voltages to accelerations. The scaling thus needs to be regularly calibrated. The presented study is based on several simulated scenarios including orbit determination of accelerometer-equipped Galileo satellites. It shall evaluate different options on how to accommodate accelerometer measurements in the orbit integrator, indicate to what extent currently available accelerometers can be used to improve the modeling of non-gravitational accelerations on GNSS satellites for precise orbit determination, and assess the necessary requirements for an accelerometer that can serve this purpose.

  9. New scale factor measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousso, Raphael

    2012-07-01

    The computation of probabilities in an eternally inflating universe requires a regulator or “measure.” The scale factor time measure truncates the Universe when a congruence of timelike geodesics has expanded by a fixed volume factor. This definition breaks down if the generating congruence is contracting—a serious limitation that excludes from consideration gravitationally bound regions such as our own. Here we propose a closely related regulator which is well defined in the entire spacetime. The new scale factor cutoff restricts to events with a scale factor below a given value. Since the scale factor vanishes at caustics and crunches, this cutoff always includes an infinite number of disconnected future regions. We show that this does not lead to divergences. The resulting measure combines desirable features of the old scale factor cutoff and of the light-cone time cutoff, while eliminating some of the disadvantages of each.

  10. Measurement of the quality factor of a new low-frequency differential accelerometer for testing the equivalence principle.

    PubMed

    Iafolla, V; Lefevre, C; Fiorenza, E; Santoli, F; Nozzoli, S; Magnafico, C; Lucente, M; Lucchesi, D; Peron, R; Shapiro, I I; Glashow, S; Lorenzini, E C

    2014-01-01

    A cryogenic differential accelerometer has been developed to test the weak equivalence principle to a few parts in 10(15) within the framework of the general relativity accuracy test in an Einstein elevator experiment. The prototype sensor was designed to identify, address, and solve the major issues associated with various aspects of the experiment. This paper illustrates the measurements conducted on this prototype sensor to attain a high quality factor (Q ∼ 10(5)) at low frequencies (<20 Hz). Such a value is necessary for reducing the Brownian noise to match the target acceleration noise of 10(-14) g/√Hz, hence providing the desired experimental accuracy. PMID:24517790

  11. Use of accelerometers as an ergonomic assessment method for arm acceleration-a large-scale field trial.

    PubMed

    Estill, C F; MacDonald, L A; Wenzl, T B; Petersen, M R

    2000-09-01

    Ergonomists need easy-to-use, quantitative job evaluation methods to assess risk factors for upper extremity work-related musculoskeletal disorders in field-based epidemiology studies. One device that may provide an objective measure of exposure to arm acceleration is a wrist-worn accelerometer or activity monitor. A field trial was conducted to evaluate the performance of a single-axis accelerometer using an industrial population (n=158) known to have diverse upper limb motion characteristics. The second phase of the field trial involved an examination of the relationship between more traditional observation-based ergonomic exposure measures and the monitor output among a group of assembly-line production employees (n=48) performing work tasks with highly stereotypic upper limb motion patterns. As expected, the linear acceleration data obtained from the activity monitor showed statistically significant differences between three occupational groups known observationally to have different upper limb motion requirements. Among the assembly-line production employees who performed different short-cycle assembly work tasks, statistically significant differences were also observed. Several observation-based ergonomic exposure measures were found to explain differences in the acceleration measure among the production employees who performed different jobs: hand and arm motion speed, use of the hand as a hammer, and, negatively, resisting forearm rotation from the torque of a power tool. The activity monitors were found to be easy to use and non-intrusive, and to be able to distinguish arm acceleration among groups with diverse upper limb motion characteristics as well as between different assembly job tasks where arm monitors were performed repeatedly at a fixed rate.

  12. Passive Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, Robert J.; Baugher, Charles; Alexander, Iwan

    1992-01-01

    Motion of ball in liquid indicates acceleration. Passive accelerometer measures small accelerations along cylindrical axis. Principle of operation based on Stokes' law. Provides accurate measurements of small quasi-steady accelerations. Additional advantage, automatically integrates out unwanted higher-frequency components of acceleration.

  13. Large-scale traveling atmospheric disturbances (LSTADs) in the thermosphere inferred from CHAMP, GRACE, and SETA accelerometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruinsma, Sean L.; Forbes, Jeffrey M.

    2010-08-01

    Densities derived from accelerometer measurements on the GRACE, CHAMP, and Air Force/SETA satellites near 490, 390, and 220 km, respectively, are used to elucidate global-scale characteristics of traveling atmospheric disturbances (TADs). Several characteristics elucidated in numerical simulations are confirmed in this study, namely: (1) propagation speeds increase from the lower thermosphere to the upper thermosphere; (2) propagation to the equator and even into the opposite hemisphere can occur; (3) greater attenuation of TADs occurs during daytime and at higher levels of solar activity (i.e., more wave activity during nighttime and solar minimum), presumably due to the greater influence of ion drag. In addition, we find that the occurrence of significant TAD activity emanating from the auroral regions does not reflect a clear relation with the level of planetary magnetic activity as measured by Kp. There is also evidence of waves originating in the tropics, presumably due to convective sources; to some extent this may contribute to the Kp and solar flux relationships noted above. Further elucidation of local time, season, and altitude dependences of TAD propagation characteristics may be forthcoming from density measurements from the GOCE and Swarm missions.

  14. An electrostatically rebalanced micromechanical accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxenhorn, Burton; Greiff, Paul

    The design and test performance of a low-cost micromechanical accelerometer (MA) with integral electrodes, developed for use with the vibratory micromechanical gyro described by Boxenhorn and Greiff (1988), are reported. The MA is a monolithic Si device of size 300 x 600 microns and comprises a torsional pendulum with capacitive readout and an electrostatic torquer. Data from 360-deg sweep tests performed in a g-field are presented in tables and graphs and discussed in detail. Results include bandwidth about 1 Hz, scale-factor error 480 ppm, stable bias of 260 microg over 203 min, and temperature effect 2100 microg/C on bias and -123 ppm/C on scale factor.

  15. A new z-axis resonant micro-accelerometer based on electrostatic stiffness.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Xingjun; Dai, Bo; Liu, Xiaojun

    2015-01-05

    Presented in the paper is the design, the simulation, the fabrication and the experiment of a new z-axis resonant accelerometer based on the electrostatic stiffness. The new z-axis resonant micro-accelerometer, which consists of a torsional accelerometer and two plane resonators, decouples the sensing movement of the accelerometer from the oscillation of the plane resonators by electrostatic stiffness, which will improve the performance. The new structure and the sensitive theory of the acceleration are illuminated, and the equation of the scale factor is deduced under ideal conditions firstly. The Ansys simulation is implemented to verify the basic principle of the torsional accelerometer and the plane resonator individually. The structure simulation results prove that the effective frequency of the torsional accelerometer and the plane resonator are 0.66 kHz and 13.3 kHz, respectively. Then, the new structure is fabricated by the standard three-mask deep dry silicon on glass (DDSOG) process and encapsulated by parallel seam welding. Finally, the detecting and control circuits are designed to achieve the closed-loop self-oscillation, to trace the natural frequency of resonator and to measure the system frequency. Experimental results show that the new z-axis resonant accelerometer has a scale factor of 31.65 Hz/g, a bias stability of 727 µg and a dynamic range of over 10 g, which proves that the new z-axis resonant micro-accelerometer is practicable.

  16. Optimal GPS/accelerometer integration algorithm for monitoring the vertical structural dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaolin; Wang, Jian; Han, Houzeng

    2014-11-01

    The vertical structural dynamics is a crucial factor for structural health monitoring (SHM) of civil structures such as high-rise buildings, suspension bridges and towers. This paper presents an optimal GPS/accelerometer integration algorithm for an automated multi-sensor monitoring system. The closed loop feedback algorithm for integrating the vertical GPS and accelerometer measurements is proposed based on a 5 state extended KALMAN filter (EKF) and then the narrow moving window Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis is applied to extract structural dynamics. A civil structural vibration is simulated and the analysed result shows the proposed algorithm can effectively integrate the online vertical measurements produced by GPS and accelerometer. Furthermore, the accelerometer bias and scale factor can also be estimated which is impossible with traditional integration algorithms. Further analysis shows the vibration frequencies detected in GPS or accelerometer are all included in the integrated vertical defection time series and the accelerometer can effectively compensate the short-term GPS outages with high quality. Finally, the data set collected with a time synchronised and integrated GPS/accelerometer monitoring system installed on the Nottingham Wilford Bridge when excited by 15 people jumping together at its mid-span are utilised to verify the effectiveness of this proposed algorithm. Its implementations are satisfactory and the detected vibration frequencies are 1.720 Hz, 1.870 Hz, 2.104 Hz, 2.905 Hz and also 10.050 Hz, which is not found in GPS or accelerometer only measurements.

  17. Characterization of a MEMS Accelerometer for Inertial Navigating Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, R.D.

    1999-02-12

    Inertial MEMS sensors such as accelerometers and angular rotation sensing devices continue to improve in performance as advances in design and processing are made. Present state-of-the-art accelerometers have achieved performance levels in the laboratory that are consistent with requirements for successful application in tactical weapon navigation systems. However, sensor performance parameters that are of interest to the designer of inertial navigation systems are frequently not adequately addressed by the MEMS manufacturer. This paper addresses the testing and characterization of a MEMS accelerometer from an inertial navigation perspective. The paper discusses test objectives, data reduction techniques and presents results from the test of a three-axis MEMS accelerometer conducted at Sandia National Laboratories during 1997. The test was structured to achieve visibility and characterization of the accelerometer bias and scale factor stability overtime and temperature. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the US Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Variometric Tests for Accelerometer Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Urso, M. G.; Barbati, N.

    2012-08-01

    We present a comprehensive review of several variometric tests recently carried out on a home-made measurement system composed of a tern of low-cost accelerometer sensors of MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) type equipped with autonomous electric supply and wireless transmission. The most important parameters characterizing the systematic errors, i.e. bias, scale factor and thermal correction factor, have been evaluated by calibration tests based upon the so-called "six -positions" static test proposed by the IEEE 517 Standard. In this way the system optimal configuration has been defined in terms of data acquisition frequency and of scale factor. In addition to such tests, partly documented elsewhere, the results of some sensitivity tests on the influence of external environmental factors are also presented. With the aim of employing the proposed MEMS-based system as a device for monitoring the onset of slope landslides, some further tests have been carried out in order to measure the inclination of rigid objects which the sensors have been fixed to. The most significant results of the tests are illustrated and discussed.

  19. Measurement of Impact Acceleration: Mouthpiece Accelerometer Versus Helmet Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Michael; Halstead, P. David; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Barlow, David

    2007-01-01

    Context: Instrumented helmets have been used to estimate impact acceleration imparted to the head during helmet impacts. These instrumented helmets may not accurately measure the actual amount of acceleration experienced by the head due to factors such as helmet-to-head fit. Objective: To determine if an accelerometer attached to a mouthpiece (MP) provides a more accurate representation of headform center of gravity (HFCOG) acceleration during impact than does an accelerometer attached to a helmet fitted on the headform. Design: Single-factor research design in which the independent variable was accelerometer position (HFCOG, helmet, MP) and the dependent variables were g and Severity Index (SI). Setting: Independent impact research laboratory. Intervention(s): The helmeted headform was dropped (n = 168) using a National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE) drop system from the standard heights and impact sites according to NOCSAE test standards. Peak g and SI were measured for each accelerometer position during impact. Main Outcome Measures: Upon impact, the peak g and SI were recorded for each accelerometer location. Results: Strong relationships were noted for HFCOG and MP measures, and significant differences were seen between HFCOG and helmet g measures and HFCOG and helmet SI measures. No statistically significant differences were noted between HFCOG and MP g and SI measures. Regression analyses showed a significant relationship between HFCOG and MP measures but not between HFCOG and helmet measures. Conclusions: Upon impact, MP acceleration (g) and SI measurements were closely related to and more accurate in measuring HFCOG g and SI than helmet measurements. The MP accelerometer is a valid method for measuring head acceleration. PMID:17597937

  20. GPS-Based Reduced Dynamic Orbit Determination Using Accelerometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanHelleputte, Tom; Visser, Pieter

    2007-01-01

    Currently two gravity field satellite missions, CHAMP and GRACE, are equipped with high sensitivity electrostatic accelerometers, measuring the non-conservative forces acting on the spacecraft in three orthogonal directions. During the gravity field recovery these measurements help to separate gravitational and non-gravitational contributions in the observed orbit perturbations. For precise orbit determination purposes all these missions have a dual-frequency GPS receiver on board. The reduced dynamic technique combines the dense and accurate GPS observations with physical models of the forces acting on the spacecraft, complemented by empirical accelerations, which are stochastic parameters adjusted in the orbit determination process. When the spacecraft carries an accelerometer, these measured accelerations can be used to replace the models of the non-conservative forces, such as air drag and solar radiation pressure. This approach is implemented in a batch least-squares estimator of the GPS High Precision Orbit Determination Software Tools (GHOST), developed at DLR/GSOC and DEOS. It is extensively tested with data of the CHAMP and GRACE satellites. As accelerometer observations typically can be affected by an unknown scale factor and bias in each measurement direction, they require calibration during processing. Therefore the estimated state vector is augmented with six parameters: a scale and bias factor for the three axes. In order to converge efficiently to a good solution, reasonable a priori values for the bias factor are necessary. These are calculated by combining the mean value of the accelerometer observations with the mean value of the non-conservative force models and empirical accelerations, estimated when using these models. When replacing the non-conservative force models with accelerometer observations and still estimating empirical accelerations, a good orbit precision is achieved. 100 days of GRACE B data processing results in a mean orbit fit of

  1. The role of accelerometer data calibration within GRACE gravity field recovery: Results from ITSG-Grace2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, Beate; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten

    2016-11-01

    For more than 14 years, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission has provided information about Earth's gravity field with unprecedented accuracy. The twin satellites GRACE-A and GRACE-B are both equipped with a three-axis electrostatic accelerometer, measuring the non-gravitational forces acting on the spacecraft. In order to make use of the uncalibrated Level-1B accelerometer (ACC1B) data during gravity field recovery, bias and scale parameters have to be estimated. The proposed calibration method is a two-step approach and makes use of modeled non-conservative accelerations. The simulated non-conservative accelerations serve as reference for the a priori accelerometer calibration, i.e. for the ACC1B data. During gravity field recovery the calibration parameters are re-estimated. Several calibration parameters for the GRACE accelerometers using different methods have already been published. The aim of our study was primarily to analyze the temperature-dependent behavior of the accelerometer scale factors and biases, and the impact of the parametrization of scale factors and biases on the recovered gravity field solutions; but not to obtain calibrated accelerometer data. Within the ITSG-Grace2016 release, the accelerometer biases are estimated daily using uniform cubic basis splines (UCBS), the scale factors are also estimated daily using a fully-populated scale factor matrix. Therefore, not only the scale factors in along-track, cross-track, and radial direction are estimated, but also the non-orthogonality of the accelerometer axes (cross-talk) and the misalignment between the Accelerometer Frame (AF) and Science Reference Frame (SRF) are taken into account. The time evolution of the estimated calibration parameters over the whole GRACE period (2002-04 to 2016-01) shows a clear temperature-dependency for both scale factors and biases. Using this new approach, the estimates of the C20 coefficient significantly improve, with results now

  2. New accelerometers under development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wald, Jerry; Tehrani, M.

    1990-01-01

    The commercial viability of the Space Station requires that it provide a micro-g, or submicro-g environment to users. This represents significant improvement over existing systems. Attainment of the lowest micro-g levels requires isolation systems. Passive and active systems have been evaluated. Best performance is achieved using active approaches where accelerometer sensors close feedback loops. Two emerging accelerometer technologies are presented that have promise for meeting performance goals while achieving reductions of package size, weight, and power. The technologies addressed are Honeywell's design concept for an optical cavity locking accelerometer and the recent development of an integrated silicon accelerometer for government applications.

  3. Ultracold-Atom Accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed class of accelerometers and related motion sensors based on use of ultracold atoms as inertial components of motion transducers. Ultracold atoms supplant spring-and-mass components of older accelerometers. As used here, "ultracold atoms" means atoms with kinetic energies equivalent to temperatures equal to or less than 20 mK. Acclerometers essentially frictionless. Primary advantage high sensitivity.

  4. Measurement Method of Magnetic Field for the Wire Suspended Micro-Pendulum Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yongle; Li, Leilei; Hu, Ning; Pan, Yingjun; Ren, Chunhua

    2015-01-01

    Force producer is one of the core components of a Wire Suspended Micro-Pendulum Accelerometer; and the stability of permanent magnet in the force producer determines the consistency of the acceleration sensor’s scale factor. For an assembled accelerometer; direct measurement of magnetic field strength is not a feasible option; as the magnetometer probe cannot be laid inside the micro-space of the sensor. This paper proposed an indirect measurement method of the remnant magnetization of Micro-Pendulum Accelerometer. The measurement is based on the working principle of the accelerometer; using the current output at several different scenarios to resolve the remnant magnetization of the permanent magnet. Iterative Least Squares algorithm was used for the adjustment of the data due to nonlinearity of this problem. The calculated remnant magnetization was 1.035 T. Compared to the true value; the error was less than 0.001 T. The proposed method provides an effective theoretical guidance for measuring the magnetic field of the Wire Suspended Micro-Pendulum Accelerometer; correcting the scale factor and temperature influence coefficients; etc. PMID:25871721

  5. Measurement method of magnetic field for the wire suspended micro-pendulum accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongle; Li, Leilei; Hu, Ning; Pan, Yingjun; Ren, Chunhua

    2015-04-13

    Force producer is one of the core components of a Wire Suspended Micro-Pendulum Accelerometer; and the stability of permanent magnet in the force producer determines the consistency of the acceleration sensor's scale factor. For an assembled accelerometer; direct measurement of magnetic field strength is not a feasible option; as the magnetometer probe cannot be laid inside the micro-space of the sensor. This paper proposed an indirect measurement method of the remnant magnetization of Micro-Pendulum Accelerometer. The measurement is based on the working principle of the accelerometer; using the current output at several different scenarios to resolve the remnant magnetization of the permanent magnet. Iterative Least Squares algorithm was used for the adjustment of the data due to nonlinearity of this problem. The calculated remnant magnetization was 1.035 T. Compared to the true value; the error was less than 0.001 T. The proposed method provides an effective theoretical guidance for measuring the magnetic field of the Wire Suspended Micro-Pendulum Accelerometer; correcting the scale factor and temperature influence coefficients; etc.

  6. How errors in the calibration of GRACE accelerometers affect the estimates of temporal gravity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tregoning, P.; McClusky, S.; Purcell, A. P.; McQueen, H.

    2015-12-01

    Non-gravitational accelerations acting on each of the GRACE satellites are measured in the along-track, cross-track and radial directions by the accelerometers onboard each satellite. The calibration of the observed non-gravitational accelerations requires determining a scaling factor and (at least) an offset for the observations in each of the three directions. We demonstrate in this presentation how small errors in the scale factors used to calibrate the accelerometer observations affect the noise level in the estimated temporal gravity field. We performed a parameter space search to find the optimal scale factors that generated the smallest prefit range-rate residuals and found that we can model the satellite orbits without the use of any empirical parameters, whilst still being able to identify the temporal gravity field signal in the prefit KBRR residuals. We will describe some physical conditions when the satellites are in the shadow of the Earth that we use to constrain the estimates of calibration biases and scales and show how the noise level of the estimated temporal gravity field varies with and without the use of the optimal calibration values for the accelerometer observations. A similar approach will be both required and effective to calibrate the accelerometers onboard the GRACE Follow-On mission.

  7. Electrostatic Accelerometer for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On Mission (GRACE FO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, Eddy; Christophe, Bruno; Foulon, Bernard; Boulanger, Damien; Liorzou, Françoise; Lebat, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    The GRACE FO mission, led by the JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), is an Earth-orbiting gravity mission, continuation of the GRACE mission, that will produce an accurate model of the Earth's gravity field variation providing global climatic data during five year at least. The mission involves two satellites in a loosely controlled tandem formation, with a micro-wave link measuring the inter-satellites distance variation. Non-uniformities in the distribution of the Earth's mass cause the distance between the two satellites to vary. This variation is measured to recover gravity, after substracting the non-gravitational contributors, as the residual drag. ONERA (the French Aerospace Lab) is developing and manufacturing electrostatic accelerometers measuring this residual drag applied on the satellites. The accelerometer is composed of two main parts: the Sensor Unit (including the Sensor Unit Mechanics and the Front-End Electronic Unit) and the Interface Control Unit. In the Accelerometer Core, located in the Sensor Unit Mechanics, the proof mass is levitated and maintained in a center of an electrode cage by electrostatic forces. Thus, any drag acceleration applied on the satellite involves a variation on the servo-controlled electrostatic suspension of the mass. The voltage on the electrodes providing this electrostatic force is the measurement output of the accelerometer. The impact of the accelerometer defaults (geometry, electronic and parasitic forces) leads to bias, misalignment and scale factor error, non-linearity and noise. Some of these accelerometer defaults are characterized by tests with micro-gravity pendulum bench and with drops in ZARM catapult. Besides, a thermal stability is needed for the accelerometer core and front-end electronics to avoid bias and scale factor variation. To reach this stability, the sensor unit is enclosed in a thermal box designed by Astrium, spacecraft manufacturer. The accelerometers are designed to endure mechanical

  8. Factor Composition of the Suicide Intent Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mieczkowski, Tammy A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Analyzed Suicide Intent Scale using data from 98 psychiatric inpatients who had attempted suicide. Analysis resulted in two-factor solution: Lethal Intent factor contained items pertaining to subjective level of lethal intent; Planning factor contained items related to objective planning for attempt. Findings suggest that Suicide Intent Scale can…

  9. Huygens HASI servo accelerometer: A review and lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathi, B.; Ball, A. J.; Colombatti, G.; Ferri, F.; Leese, M. R.; Towner, M. C.; Withers, P.; Fulchigioni, M.; Zarnecki, J. C.

    2009-10-01

    The servo accelerometer constituted a vital part of the Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument (HASI): flown aboard the Huygens probe, it operated successfully during the probe's entry, descent, and landing on Titan, on 14th January 2005. This paper reviews the Servo accelerometer, starting from its development/assembly in the mid-1990s, to monitoring its technical performance through its seven-year long in-flight (or cruise) journey, and finally its performance in measuring acceleration (or deceleration) upon encountering Titan's atmosphere. The aim of this article is to review the design, ground tests, in-flight tests and operational performance of the Huygens servo accelerometer. Techniques used for data analysis and lessons learned that may be useful for accelerometry payloads on future planetary missions are also addressed. The main finding of this review is that the conventional approach of having multiple channels to cover a very broad measurement range: from 10 -6g to the order of 10 g (where g=Earth's surface gravity, 9.8 m/s 2), with on-board software deciding which of the channels to telemeter depending on the magnitude of the measured acceleration, works well. However, improvements in understanding the potential effects of the sensor drifts and ageing on the measurements can be achieved in future missions by monitoring the 'scale factor' - a measure of such sensors' sensitivity, along with the already implemented monitoring of the sensor's offset during the in-flight phase.

  10. Compact Circuit Preprocesses Accelerometer Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Compact electronic circuit transfers dc power to, and preprocesses ac output of, accelerometer and associated preamplifier. Incorporated into accelerometer case during initial fabrication or retrofit onto commercial accelerometer. Made of commercial integrated circuits and other conventional components; made smaller by use of micrologic and surface-mount technology.

  11. Double resonator cantilever accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, Dale R.

    1984-01-01

    A digital quartz accelerometer includes a pair of spaced double-ended tuning forks fastened at one end to a base and at the other end through a spacer mass. Transverse movement of the resonator members stresses one and compresses the other, providing a differential frequency output which is indicative of acceleration.

  12. Double resonator cantilever accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, D.R.

    1982-09-23

    A digital quartz accelerometer includes a pair of spaced double-ended tuning forks fastened at one end to a base and at the other end through a spacer mass. Transverse movement of the resonator members stresses one and compresses the other, providing a differential frequency output which is indicative of acceleration.

  13. Superconducting Rebalance Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torti, R. P.; Gerver, M.; Leary, K. J.; Jagannathan, S.; Dozer, D. M.

    1996-01-01

    A multi-axis accelerometer which utilizes a magnetically-suspended, high-TC proof mass is under development. The design and performance of a single axis device which is stabilized actively in the axial direction but which utilizes ring magnets for passive radial stabilization is discussed. The design of a full six degree-of-freedom device version is also described.

  14. Scientific improvement proposed in the realisation of the electrostatic accelerometer for the GRACE Follow-On mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christophe, B.; Foulon, B.; Boulanger, D.; Liorzou, F.; Lebat, V.; Perrot, E.

    2012-12-01

    The return of experience of the SuperSTAR instrument operating since ten years on board the twin GRACE satellites, as the new development of the six GRADIO accelerometers composing the three axis gravity gradiometer of the GOCE ESA mission, have been used to improve the design of the accelerometers for the future GRACE Follow-On mission. The instruments shall exhibit a more accurate pre launch calibration. On anti-seimic pendulum, ONERA will match the scale factor of the two flight models. Then during common drop of the accelerometers in the Zarm tower in catapult configuration, the bias will be estimated. These ground calibrations should improve the post-processing of the accelerometer data, in particular by allowing a good discrimination between scale factor and bias. In addition to thermal stability improvement through a modification of the design, thermal sensors will be mounted around the electrode cage to have a better survey of the temperature and gradient of temperature around the accelerometer. The download of these housekeepings could be used for improving the post-processing of the data.

  15. Improving the Factor Structure of Psychological Scales

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xijuan; Savalei, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Many psychological scales written in the Likert format include reverse worded (RW) items in order to control acquiescence bias. However, studies have shown that RW items often contaminate the factor structure of the scale by creating one or more method factors. The present study examines an alternative scale format, called the Expanded format, which replaces each response option in the Likert scale with a full sentence. We hypothesized that this format would result in a cleaner factor structure as compared with the Likert format. We tested this hypothesis on three popular psychological scales: the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale, the Conscientiousness subscale of the Big Five Inventory, and the Beck Depression Inventory II. Scales in both formats showed comparable reliabilities. However, scales in the Expanded format had better (i.e., lower and more theoretically defensible) dimensionalities than scales in the Likert format, as assessed by both exploratory factor analyses and confirmatory factor analyses. We encourage further study and wider use of the Expanded format, particularly when a scale’s dimensionality is of theoretical interest. PMID:27182074

  16. Factor composition of the Suicide Intent Scale.

    PubMed

    Mieczkowski, T A; Sweeney, J A; Haas, G L; Junker, B W; Brown, R P; Mann, J J

    1993-01-01

    An exploratory analysis of the Suicide Intent Scale was performed on a sample of 98 psychiatric inpatients who had made suicide attempts. The factor analysis was performed using a method for polychotomous data, and resulted in a two-factor solution. The Lethal Intent factor contained items pertaining to the subjective level of lethal intent, while the Planning factor contained items largely related to objective planning for the attempt. Preliminary analysis of these factors suggest that the Suicide Intent Scale can be used to evaluate two separate aspects of suicidal behavior.

  17. Low G accelerometer testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, M. S.

    1972-01-01

    Eight different types of low-g accelerometer tests are covered on the Bell miniature electrostatically suspended accelerometer (MESA) which is known to be sensitive to less than 10 to the minus 7th power earth's gravity. These tests include a mass attracting scheme, Leitz dividing head, Wild theodolite, precision gage blocks, precision tiltmeters, Hilger Watts autocollimator, Razdow Mark 2 autocollimator, and laser interferometer measuring system. Each test is described and a comparison of the results is presented. The output of the MESA was as linear and consistent as any of the available devices were capable of measuring. Although the extent of agreement varied with the test equipment used, it can only be concluded that the indicated errors were attributable to the test equipment coupled with the environmental conditions.

  18. Python microgravity accelerometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijhawan, V.; Arrott, A. P.; Grimes, R. S.

    1989-01-01

    A microgravity accelerometer system developed for use in the Space Shuttle middeck locker is described. The system, known as PYTHON, is a microcomputer-based digital acceleration-measurement system that uses primarily off-the-shelf qualified space hardware and modular software. It can be operated on-board in real time and on the ground either during the flight or post-flight. The sensor head consists of an accelerometer, which measures acceleration in three orthogonal axes, and an internal thermister for temperature compensation; threshold and resolution are better than 0.000001 g. The results of acceleration measurements with PYTHON carried out during parabolic maneuvers aboard the NASA's KC-135 aircraft are presented.

  19. ATS-6 - Flight accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattson, R.; Honeycutt, G.; Lindner, F.

    1975-01-01

    The Applications Technology Satellite-6 (ATS-6) flight accelerometers were designed to provide data for verifying the basic spacecraft vibration modes during launch, to update the analytical model of the ATA structure, and to provide a capability for detection and diagnosis of inflight and anomalies. The experiment showed accelerations less than 2.5 g during liftoff and 1.1 g or less during staging with frequencies below 80 Hz. Measured values were generally within 1 g of predicted.

  20. Fiber optic micro accelerometer

    SciTech Connect

    Swierkowski, Steve P.

    2005-07-26

    An accelerometer includes a wafer, a proof mass integrated into the wafer, at least one spring member connected to the proof mass, and an optical fiber. A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially reflective surface on the proof mass and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. The two partially reflective surfaces are used to detect movement of the proof mass through the optical fiber, using an optical detection system.

  1. Levitated micro-accelerometer.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Schmidt, Carrie Frances; Peterson, Kenneth Allen; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Renn, Rosemarie A.; Peter, Frank J.; Kinney, Ragon D.; Gilkey, Jeffrey C.

    2004-06-01

    The objective is a significant advancement in the state-of-the-art of accelerometer design for tactical grade (or better) applications. The design goals are <1 milli-G bias stability across environments and $200 cost. This quantum leap in performance improvement and cost reduction can only be achieved by a radical new approach, not incremental improvements to existing concepts. This novel levitated closed-loop accelerometer is implemented as a hybrid micromachine. The hybrid approach frees the designer from the limitations of any given monolithic process and dramatically expands the available design space. The design can be tailored to the dynamic range, resolution, bandwidth, and environmental requirements of the application while still preserving all of the benefits of monolithic MEMS fabrication - extreme precision, small size, low cost, and low power. An accelerometer was designed and prototype hardware was built, driving the successful development and refinement of several 'never been done before' fabrication processes. Many of these process developments are commercially valuable and are key enablers for the realization of a wide variety of useful micro-devices. While controlled levitation of a proof mass has yet to be realized, the overall design concept remains sound. This was clearly demonstrated by the stable and reliable closed-loop control of a proof mass at the test structure level. Furthermore, the hybrid MEMS implementation is the most promising approach for achieving the ambitious cost and performance targets. It is strongly recommended that Sandia remain committed to the original goal.

  2. A Simple Accelerometer Calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, R. A.; Islamy, M. R. F.; Munir, M. M.; Latief, H.; Irsyam, M.; Khairurrijal

    2016-08-01

    High possibility of earthquake could lead to the high number of victims caused by it. It also can cause other hazards such as tsunami, landslide, etc. In that case it requires a system that can examine the earthquake occurrence. Some possible system to detect earthquake is by creating a vibration sensor system using accelerometer. However, the output of the system is usually put in the form of acceleration data. Therefore, a calibrator system for accelerometer to sense the vibration is needed. In this study, a simple accelerometer calibrator has been developed using 12 V DC motor, optocoupler, Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) and AVR 328 microcontroller as controller system. The system uses the Pulse Wave Modulation (PWM) form microcontroller to control the motor rotational speed as response to vibration frequency. The frequency of vibration was read by optocoupler and then those data was used as feedback to the system. The results show that the systems could control the rotational speed and the vibration frequencies in accordance with the defined PWM.

  3. Capacitive Position Sensor For Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, Thomas R.; Kaiser, William J.; Kenny, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    Capacitive position sensor measures displacement of proof mass in prototype accelerometer described in "Single-Crystal Springs for Accelerometers" (NPO-18795). Sensor is ultrasensitive, miniature device operating at ultra-high frequency and described in more detail in "Ultra-High-Frequency Capacitive Displacement Sensor," (NPO-18675). Advances in design and fabrication of prototype accelerometer also applicable to magnetometers and other sensors in which sensed quantities measured in terms of deflections of small springs.

  4. Smartphone MEMS accelerometers and earthquake early warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Q.; Allen, R. M.; Schreier, L.; Kwon, Y. W.

    2015-12-01

    The low cost MEMS accelerometers in the smartphones are attracting more and more attentions from the science community due to the vast number and potential applications in various areas. We are using the accelerometers inside the smartphones to detect the earthquakes. We did shake table tests to show these accelerometers are also suitable to record large shakings caused by earthquakes. We developed an android app - MyShake, which can even distinguish earthquake movements from daily human activities from the recordings recorded by the accelerometers in personal smartphones and upload trigger information/waveform to our server for further analysis. The data from these smartphones forms a unique datasets for seismological applications, such as earthquake early warning. In this talk I will layout the method we used to recognize earthquake-like movement from single smartphone, and the overview of the whole system that harness the information from a network of smartphones for rapid earthquake detection. This type of system can be easily deployed and scaled up around the global and provides additional insights of the earthquake hazards.

  5. Electrostatic Accelerometer for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On Mission (GRACE FO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebat, V.; Foulon, B.; Christophe, B.

    2013-12-01

    The GRACE FO mission, led by the JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), is an Earth-orbiting gravity mission, continuation of the GRACE mission, that will produce an accurate model of the Earth's gravity field variation providing global climatic data during five year at least. The mission involves two satellites in a loosely controlled tandem formation, with a micro-wave link measuring the inter-satellites distance variation. Non-uniformities in the distribution of the Earth's mass cause the distance between the two satellites to vary. This variation is measured to recover gravity, after subtracting the non-gravitational contributors, as the residual drag. ONERA (the French Aerospace Lab) is developing, manufacturing and testing electrostatic accelerometers measuring this residual drag applied on the satellites. The accelerometer is composed of two main parts: the Sensor Unit (including the Sensor Unit Mechanics and the Front-End Electronic Unit) and the Interface Control Unit. In the Accelerometer Core, located in the Sensor Unit Mechanics, the proof mass is levitated and maintained in a center of an electrode cage by electrostatic forces. Thus, any drag acceleration applied on the satellite involves a variation on the servo-controlled electrostatic suspension of the mass. The voltage on the electrodes providing this electrostatic force is the measurement output of the accelerometer. The impact of the accelerometer defaults (geometry, electronic and parasitic forces) leads to bias, misalignment and scale factor error, non-linearity and noise. Some of these accelerometer defaults are characterized by tests with micro-gravity pendulum bench and with drops in ZARM catapult. Besides, a thermal stability is needed for the accelerometer core and front-end electronics to avoid bias and scale factor variation, and reached by a thermal box designed by Astrium, spacecraft manufacturer. The accelerometers are designed to endure the launch vibrations and the thermal environment at

  6. Properties of the scale factor measure

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Freivogel, Ben; Yang, I-S.

    2009-03-15

    We show that in expanding regions, the scale factor measure can be reformulated as a local measure: Observations are weighted by integrating their physical density along a geodesic that starts in the longest-lived metastable vacuum. This explains why some of its properties are similar to those of the causal-diamond measure. In particular, both measures are free of Boltzmann brains, subject to nearly the same conditions on vacuum stability. However, the scale factor measure assigns a much smaller probability to the observed value of the cosmological constant. The probability decreases further, similar to the inverse sixth power of the primordial density contrast, if the latter is allowed to vary.

  7. The MESA accelerometer for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, William G.; Dietrich, Robert W.

    1990-01-01

    An electrostatically suspended proof mass in the Miniature Electrostatic Accelerometer (MESA) is used to measure acceleration in the submicro-g range. Since no fixed mechanical suspension (such as springs or strings) is used, the constrainment scaling can be changed electrically after being placed in orbit. A single proof mass can sense accelerations in three axes simultaneously. It can survive high-g pyrotechnic-generated shocks and launch environments while unpowered.

  8. Dual-Cantilever-Beam Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Emmitt A.; Speckhart, Frank H.

    1988-01-01

    Sensitivity to velocity changes along beam axis reduced. Weighted-end cantilever beams of accelerometer deflected equally by acceleration in y direction. When acceleration to right as well as up or down, right beam deflected more, while left beam deflected less. Bridge circuit averages outputs of strain gauges measuring deflections, so cross-axis sensitivity of accelerometer reduced. New device simple and inexpensive.

  9. Single-Axis Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis Stephen (Inventor); Capo-Lugo, Pedro A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A single-axis accelerometer includes a housing defining a sleeve. An object/mass is disposed in the sleeve for sliding movement therein in a direction aligned with the sleeve's longitudinal axis. A first piezoelectric strip, attached to a first side of the object and to the housing, is longitudinally aligned with the sleeve's longitudinal axis. The first piezoelectric strip includes a first strip of a piezoelectric material with carbon nanotubes substantially aligned along a length thereof. A second piezoelectric strip, attached to a second side of the object and to the housing, is longitudinally aligned with the sleeve's longitudinal axis. The second piezoelectric strip includes a second strip of the piezoelectric material with carbon nanotubes substantially aligned along a length thereof. A voltage sensor is electrically coupled to at least one of the first and second piezoelectric strips.

  10. Vibrational scaling factors for transition metal carbonyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assefa, M. K.; Devera, J. L.; Brathwaite, A. D.; Mosley, J. D.; Duncan, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    Vibrational frequencies for a selected set of transition metal carbonyl complexes are computed with various forms of density functional theory (B3LYP, BP86, M06, and M06-L), employing several different basis sets. The computed frequencies for the carbonyl stretches are compared to the experimental values obtained from gas phase infrared spectra of isolated neutrals and ions. Recommended carbonyl-stretch scaling factors which are developed vary significantly for different functionals, but there is little variation with basis set. Scaled frequencies compared to experimental spectra for cobalt and tantalum carbonyl cations reveal additional variations in multiplet patterns and relative band intensities for different functionals.

  11. Ultraminiature resonator accelerometer

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, D.R.; Kravitz, S.H.; Vianco, P.T.

    1996-04-01

    A new family of microminiature sensors and clocks is being developed with widespread application potential for missile and weapons applications, as biomedical sensors, as vehicle status monitors, and as high-volume animal identification and health sensors. To satisfy fundamental technology development needs, a micromachined clock and an accelerometer have initially been undertaken as development projects. A thickness-mode quartz resonator housed in a micromachined silicon package is used as the frequency-modulated basic component of the sensor family. Resonator design philosophy follows trapped energy principles and temperature compensation methodology through crystal orientation control, with operation in the 20--100 MHz range, corresponding to quartz wafer thicknesses in the 75--15 micron range. High-volume batch-processing manufacturing is utilized, with package and resonator assembly at the wafer level. Chemical etching of quartz, as well as micromachining of silicon, achieves the surface and volume mechanical features necessary to fashion the resonating element and the mating package. Integration of the associated oscillator and signal analysis circuitry into the silicon package is inherent to the realization of a size reduction requirement. A low temperature In and In/Sn bonding technology allows assembly of the dissimilar quartz and silicon materials, an otherwise challenging task. Unique design features include robust vibration and shock performance, capacitance sensing with micromachined diaphragms, circuit integration, capacitance-to-frequency transduction, and extremely small dimensioning. Accelerometer sensitivities were measured in the 1--3 ppm/g range for the milligram proof-mass structures employed in the prototypes evaluated to date.

  12. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES: Characteristics of a novel biaxial capacitive MEMS accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linxi, Dong; Yongjie, Li; Haixia, Yan; Lingling, Sun

    2010-05-01

    A novel MEMS accelerometer with grid strip capacitors is developed. The mechanical and electrical noise can be reduced greatly for the novel structure design. ANSOFT-Maxwell software was used to analyze the fringing electric field of the grid strip structure and its effects on the designed accelerometer. The effects of the width, thickness and overlapping width of the grid strip on the sensing capacitance are analyzed by using the ANSOFT-Maxwell software. The results show that the parameters have little effect on the characteristics of the presented accelerometer. The designed accelerometer was fabricated based on deep RIE and silicon-glass bonding processes. The preliminary tested sensitivities are 0.53 pF/g and 0.49 pF/g in the x and y axis directions, respectively. A resonator with grid strip structure was also fabricated whose tested quality factor is 514 in air, which proves that the grid strip structure can reduce mechanical noise.

  13. NASA Ultra-Sensitive Miniature Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavracky, Paul M.; Hartley, Frank T.

    1994-01-01

    Using micro-machined silicon technology, an ultra-sensitive miniature acce.,rometer can be constructed which meets the requirements for microgravity experiments in the space environment.Such an accelerometer will have a full scale sensitivity of 1C2 g a resolution of lC8 g, low cross axis sensitivity, and low temperature sensitivity. Mass of the device is approximately five grams and its footprint is 2 cm x 2 cm. Innovative features of the accelerometer, which are patented, are: electrostatic caging to withstand handling shock up to 150 g, in-situ calibration, in situ performance characterization, and both static and dynamic compensation. The transducer operates on a force balance principle wherein the displacement of the proof mass is monitored by measuring tunneling electron current flow between a conductive tip, and a fixed platen. The four major parts of the accelerometer are tip die, incorporating the tunneling tip and four field plates for controlling pitch and roll of the proof mass; two proof mass dies, attached to the surrounding frame by sets of four leg" springs; and a force plate die. The four parts are fuse-bonded into a complete assembly. External electrical connections are made at bond pads on the front surface of the force plate die. Materials and processes used in the construction of the transducer are compatible with volume production.

  14. Status of Electrostatic Accelerometer Development for Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On Mission (GRACE FO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, Eddy; Boulanger, Damien; Christophe, Bruno; Foulon, Bernard; Liorzou, Françoise; Lebat, Vincent; Huynh, Phuong-Anh

    2015-04-01

    The GRACE FO mission, led by the JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), is an Earth-orbiting gravity mission, continuation of the GRACE mission, which will produce an accurate model of the Earth's gravity field variation providing global climatic data during five years at least. The mission involves two satellites in a loosely controlled tandem formation, with a micro-wave link measuring the inter-satellites distance variation. Earth's mass distribution non-uniformities cause variations of the inter-satellite distance. This variation is measured to recover gravity, after subtracting the non-gravitational contributors, as the residual drag. ONERA (the French Aerospace Lab) is developing, manufacturing and testing electrostatic accelerometers measuring this residual drag applied on the satellites. The accelerometer is composed of two main parts: the Sensor Unit (including the Sensor Unit Mechanics - SUM - and the Front-End Electronic Unit - FEEU) and the Interface Control Unit - ICU. In the Accelerometer Core, located in the Sensor Unit Mechanics, the proof mass is levitated and maintained at the center of an electrode cage by electrostatic forces. Thus, any drag acceleration applied on the satellite involves a variation on the servo-controlled electrostatic suspension of the mass. The voltage on the electrodes providing this electrostatic force is the measurement output of the accelerometer. The impact of the accelerometer defaults (geometry, electronic and parasitic forces) leads to bias, misalignment and scale factor error, non-linearity and noise. Some of these accelerometer defaults are characterized by tests with micro-gravity pendulum bench on ground and with drops in ZARM catapult. The Critical Design Review was achieved successfully on September 2014. The Engineering Model (EM) was integrated and tested successfully, with ground levitation, drops, Electromagnetic Compatibility and thermal vacuum. The integration of the first Flight Model has begun on December 2014

  15. Tests Results of the Electrostatic Accelerometer Flight Models for Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On Mission (GRACE FO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, E.; Boulanger, D.; Christophe, B.; Foulon, B.; Lebat, V.; Huynh, P. A.; Liorzou, F.

    2015-12-01

    The GRACE FO mission, led by the JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), is an Earth-orbiting gravity mission, continuation of the GRACE mission, which will produce an accurate model of the Earth's gravity field variation providing global climatic data during five years at least. The mission involves two satellites in a loosely controlled tandem formation, with a micro-wave link measuring the inter-satellites distance variation. Earth's mass distribution non-uniformities cause variations of the inter-satellite distance. This variation is measured to recover gravity, after subtracting the non-gravitational contributors, as the residual drag. ONERA (the French Aerospace Lab) is developing, manufacturing and testing electrostatic accelerometers measuring this residual drag applied on the satellites. The accelerometer is composed of two main parts: the Sensor Unit (including the Sensor Unit Mechanics - SUM - and the Front-End Electronic Unit - FEEU) and the Interface Control Unit - ICU. In the Accelerometer Core, located in the Sensor Unit Mechanics, the proof mass is levitated and maintained at the center of an electrode cage by electrostatic forces. Thus, any drag acceleration applied on the satellite involves a variation on the servo-controlled electrostatic suspension of the mass. The voltage on the electrodes providing this electrostatic force is the output measurement of the accelerometer. The impact of the accelerometer defaults (geometry, electronic and parasitic forces) leads to bias, misalignment and scale factor error, non-linearity and noise. Some of these accelerometer defaults are characterized by tests with micro-gravity pendulum bench on ground and with drops in ZARM catapult. The Critical Design Review was achieved successfully on September 2014. The Engineering Model (EM) was integrated and tested successfully, with ground levitation, drops, Electromagnetic Compatibility and thermal vacuum. The integration of the two Flight Models was done on July 2015. The

  16. GOCE Accelerometers Data Revisited: Stability And Detector Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, J.; Christophe, B.; Foulon, B.

    2013-12-01

    We report on our analyses of Gravity field and steady- state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) data aiming to characterize the stability and the noise of GOCE's ac- celerometers. We first measure science and detector co- herence signals, which allow us to infer the role of the accelerometers Digital Voltage Amplifiers and measure- ment chanel in the overall quadratic factor and scale fac- tor; we show that their temporal stability is as low as ex- pected. We then investigate the effect of the aliasing of high frequency detector's noise on the measured noise, in an attempt to explain why the measured noise is higher than originally expected. We find that although this alias- ing explains part of the higher noise, it does not account for the total of the difference seen between the expected and the measured noise.

  17. The LISA accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, M.; Touboul, P.

    2003-10-01

    In the frame of investigating the fundamental nature of gravity, the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission could open the way to a new kind of observations unreachable from ground. The experiment, based on a V-formation of six drag-free spacecraft, uses the cubic proof masses of inertial sensors to reflect the laser light, acting as reference mirrors of a 5 × 10 9 m arm length interferometer. The proof masses are also used as inertial references for the drag-free control of the spacecraft which constitute in return a shield against external forces. Derived from space electrostatic accelerometers developed at ONERA, such as GRADIO for the ESA ARISTOTELES and now GOCE mission (Bernard and Touboul, 1991), the proposed LISA sensor should shield its proof mass from any accelerometric disturbance at a level of 10 -15ms-2Hz- 1/2. The accurate capacitive sensing of the mass provides its position relative to the satellite with a resolution better than 10 -9m Hz- 1/2 in order to control the satellite orbit and to minimise the disturbances induced by the satellite self gravity or by the proof mass charge. The sensor configuration and accomodation has to be specifically optimised for the mission requirements. Fortunately, the sensor will benefit from the thermal stability of the LISA optical bench environment, i.e. 10 -6K Hz- 1/2, and of the selected materials that exhibit a very low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), ensuring a high geometrical stability. Apart from the modeling and the evaluation of the flight characteristics, the necessary indirect ground demonstration of the performance and the interfaces with the drag-free control will have to be considered in detail in the future.

  18. Wearable accelerometer in clinical use.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Toshiyo

    2005-01-01

    To improve the equality of life, we must prevent the falls in both healthy elderly and patients with the cerebrovascular diseases. Wearable accelerometer was applied to monitor. In this paper, we introduced two different clinical applications. On is fall detector and the other is monitoring device for screening test. 1) We have developed body-worn accelerometer with data loggers and monitored the daily of life in patient with Parkinson disease. The patients wore the device and monitored falls while walking and standing. As a result, we could obtain fall times for a long period. 2) The ability of walking and standing have been evaluated by Timed up & go test. We used telemetry with accelerometer. The stability of walking could be evaluated by the acceleration signals. The simple body-won device can be useful for fall study.

  19. Dual-Element Tunneling Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, William J.; Kenny, Thomas W.; Rockstad, Howard K.; Reynolds, Joseph K.

    1994-01-01

    Improved micromachined tunneling accelerometer contains two deflecting transducer elements: One an elastically supported proof mass having relatively low resonant frequency; other cantilever tunneling transducer that tracks displacement of proof mass and has relatively high resonant frequency ({sup a} 10 kHz). Deflection voltage generated by circuit like described in "Wideband Feedback Circuit for Tunneling Sensor" (NPO-18866). Accelerometers of this type suited for underwater acoustic measurements, detecting vibrations associated with malfunctions in vehicles, detecting seismic signals, monitoring and controlling vibrations in structures, and other applications.

  20. Electrostatic Accelerometer for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On Mission (GRACE FO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, Eddy; Boulanger, Damien; Christophe, Bruno; Foulon, Bernard; Liorzou, Françoise; Lebat, Vincent

    2014-05-01

    The GRACE FO mission, led by the JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), is an Earth-orbiting gravity mission, continuation of the GRACE mission, that will produce an accurate model of the Earth's gravity field variation providing global climatic data during five year at least. The mission involves two satellites in a loosely controlled tandem formation, with a micro-wave link, and optionally a laser link, measuring the inter-satellites distance variation. Non-uniformities in the distribution of the Earth's mass cause the distance between the two satellites to vary. This variation is measured to recover gravity, after subtracting the non-gravitational contributors, as the residual drag. ONERA (the French Aerospace Lab) is developing, manufacturing and testing electrostatic accelerometers measuring this residual drag applied on the satellites. The accelerometer is composed of two main parts: the Sensor Unit (including the Sensor Unit Mechanics - SUM - and the Front-End Electronic Unit - FEEU) and the Interface Control Unit. In the Accelerometer Core, located in the Sensor Unit Mechanics, the proof mass is levitated and maintained in a center of an electrode cage by electrostatic forces. Thus, any drag acceleration applied on the satellite involves a variation on the servo-controlled electrostatic suspension of the mass. The voltage on the electrodes providing this electrostatic force is the measurement output of the accelerometer. The Preliminary Design Review was achieved successfully on November 2013. The FEEU Engineering Model is under test. Preliminary results on electronic unit will be compared with the expected performance. The integration of the SUM Engineering Model and the first ground levitation of the proof-mass will be presented. The impact of the accelerometer defaults (geometry, electronic and parasitic forces) leads to bias, misalignment and scale factor error, non-linearity and noise. Some of these accelerometer defaults are characterized by tests with

  1. ISA accelerometer and Moon science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, Valerio; Peron, Roberto; Santoli, Francesco; Fiorenza, Emiliano; Lefevre, Carlo; Nozzoli, Sergio; Reale, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    In recent years the Moon has become again a target for exploration activities, as shown by many performed, ongoing or foreseen missions. The reason for this new wave are manifold. The knowledge of formation and evolution of the Moon to current state is important in order to trace the overall history of Solar System. An effective driving factor is the possibility of building a human settlement on its surface, with all the related issues of environment characterization, safety, resources, communication and navigation. Our natural satellite is also an important laboratory for fundamental physics: Lunar Laser Ranging is continuing to provide important data that constrain possible theories of gravitation. All these topics are providing stimulus and inspirations for new experiments. ISA (Italian Spring Accelerometer) can provide an important tool for lunar studies. Thanks to its structure (three one-dimensional sensors assembled in a composite structure) it works both in-orbit and on-ground, with the same configuration. It therefore can be used onboard a spacecraft, as a support to a radio science mission, and on the surface of the Moon, as a seismometer. The first option has been explorated in the context of MAGIA (Missione Altimetrica Gravimetrica geochImica lunAre), a proposal for an exploration mission with a noteworthy part dedicated to gravimetry and fundamental physics. The second option is candidate to be hosted on NASA ILN (International Lunar Network) and ESA First Lunar Lander. After a description of the instrument, both of them will be described and discussed, giving emphasis on the integration of the instrument with the other components of the respective experiments.

  2. Low Frequency Noise Measurement and Analysis of Capacitive Micro-Accelerometers: Temperature Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd-Yasin, Faisal; Nagel, David J.; Ong, D. S.; Korman, Can E.; Chuah, H. T.

    2008-06-01

    A noise measurements of micro-accelerometers were performed using a special measurement system. A common spectral behavior of noise is found, with 1/ f noise dominating at low frequencies and white thermal noise being the limiting factor at higher frequencies. A temperature dependent and an acceleration dependant of the noise are found in the accelerometers, in agreement and contract of the theories, respectively.

  3. Improved assembly processes for the Quartz Digital Accelerometer cantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, A.M.; Gebert, C.T.

    1990-07-01

    This report covers the development of improved assembly processes for the Quartz Digital Accelerometer cantilever. In this report we discuss improved single-assembly tooling, the development of tooling and processes for precision application of polyimide adhesive, the development of the wafer scale assembly procedure, and the application of eutectic bonding to cantilever assembly. 2 refs., 17 figs.

  4. Design and Process Considerations for a Tunneling Tip Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul M. Zavracky, Bob McClelland, Keith Warner, Neil Sherman, Frank Hartley

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss issues related to the fabrication of a bulk micromachined single axis accelerometer. The accelerometer is designed to have a full scale range of ten millig and a sensitivity of tens of nanog. During the process, three distinctly different die are fabricated. These are subsequently assembled using an ally bonding technique. During the bonding operation, electrical contacts are made between layers. The accelerometer is controlled by electrostatic force plates above and below the proof mass. The lower electrode has a dual role. In operation, it provides a necessary control electrode. When not in operation, it is used to clamp the proof mass and prevents its motion. Results of the fabrication process and initial testing of the clamping function are reported.

  5. Scale factor characteristics of laser gyroscopes of different sizes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhenfang; Lu, Guangfeng; Hu, Shomin; Wang, Zhiguo; Luo, Hui

    2016-04-01

    The scale factor correction characteristics of two ring laser gyroscopes of different sizes are investigated systematically in this paper. The variation in the scale factor can reach 144 or 70 ppm for square gyroscopes with arm lengths of 8.4 cm or 15.6 cm, respectively, during frequency tuning. A dip in the scale factor is observed at the line center of the gain characteristic for both gyroscope sizes. When a different longitudinal mode is excited, the scale factor behavior remains the same, but the scale factor values differ slightly from those derived from geometric prediction. The scale factor tends to decrease with increasing discharge current, but the sensitivity of the scale factor to variations in the excitation decreases with increasing discharge current. PMID:27131697

  6. Scale factor characteristics of laser gyroscopes of different sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhenfang; Lu, Guangfeng; Hu, Shomin; Wang, Zhiguo; Luo, Hui

    2016-04-01

    The scale factor correction characteristics of two ring laser gyroscopes of different sizes are investigated systematically in this paper. The variation in the scale factor can reach 144 or 70 ppm for square gyroscopes with arm lengths of 8.4 cm or 15.6 cm, respectively, during frequency tuning. A dip in the scale factor is observed at the line center of the gain characteristic for both gyroscope sizes. When a different longitudinal mode is excited, the scale factor behavior remains the same, but the scale factor values differ slightly from those derived from geometric prediction. The scale factor tends to decrease with increasing discharge current, but the sensitivity of the scale factor to variations in the excitation decreases with increasing discharge current.

  7. Accelerometer having integral fault null

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An improved accelerometer is introduced. It comprises a transducer responsive to vibration in machinery which produces an electrical signal related to the magnitude and frequency of the vibration; and a decoding circuit responsive to the transducer signal which produces a first fault signal to produce a second fault signal in which ground shift effects are nullified.

  8. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Cancer Locus of Control Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Jessica W.; Donatelle, Rebecca J.; Acock, Alan C.

    2002-01-01

    Conducted a confirmatory factor analysis of the Cancer Locus of Control scale (M. Watson and others, 1990), administered to 543 women with a history of breast cancer. Results support a three-factor model of the scale and support use of the scale to assess control dimensions. (SLD)

  9. Factors Affecting Scale Adhesion on Steel Forgings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitterman, J. A.; Bacco, R. P.; Boggs, W. E.

    1982-04-01

    Occasionally, undesirable "sticky" adherent scale forms on low-carbon steel during reheating for hot forging. The mechanical abrading or chemical pickling required to remove this scale adds appreciably to the fabrication cost. Characterization of the steel-scale system by metallographic examination, x-ray diffraction, and electron-probe microanalysis revealed that nickel, silicon, and/or sulfur might be involved in the mechanism of sticky-scale formation. Laboratory reheating tests were conducted on steels with varied concentrations of nickel and silicon in atmospheres simulating those resulting from burning natural gas or sulfur-bearing fuels. Subsequent characterization of the scale formed during the tests tends to confirm that the composition of the steel, especially increased nickel and silicon contents, and the presence of the sulfur in the furnace atmosphere cause the formation of this undesirable scale.

  10. Multiple-stage integrating accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Devaney, Howard F.

    1986-01-01

    An accelerometer assembly is provided for use in activating a switch in response to multiple acceleration pulses in series. The accelerometer includes a housing forming a chamber. An inertial mass or piston is slidably disposed in the chamber and spring biased toward a first or reset position. A damping system is also provided to damp piston movement in response to first and subsequent acceleration pulses. Additionally, a cam, including a Z-shaped slot, and cooperating follower pin slidably received therein are mounted to the piston and the housing. The middle or cross-over leg of the Z-shaped slot cooperates with the follower pin to block or limit piston movement and prevent switch activation in response to a lone acceleration pulse. The switch of the assembly is only activated after two or more separate acceleration pulses are sensed and the piston reaches the end of the chamber opposite the reset position.

  11. Multiple-stage integrating accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Devaney, H.F.

    1984-06-27

    An accelerometer assembly is provided for use in activating a switch in response to multiple acceleration pulses in series. The accelerometer includes a housing forming a chamber. An inertial mass or piston is slidably disposed in the chamber and spring biased toward a first or reset position. A damping system is also provided to damp piston movement in response to first and subsequent acceleration pulses. Additionally, a cam, including a Z-shaped slot, and cooperating follower pin slidably received therein are mounted to the piston and the housing. The middle or cross-over leg of the Z-shaped slot cooperates with the follower pin to block or limit piston movement and prevent switch activation in response to a lone acceleration pulse. The switch of the assembly is only activated after two or more separate acceleration pulses are sensed and the piston reaches the end of the chamber opposite the reset position.

  12. Factor Structure of the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornick, Jessica E.

    2015-01-01

    The current study utilized exercise self-efficacy ratings from undergraduate students to assess the factor structure of the Self-Efficacy to Regulate Exercise Scale (Bandura, 1997, 2006). An exploratory factor analysis (n = 759) indicated a two-factor model solution and three separate confirmatory factor analyses (n = 1,798) supported this…

  13. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Accelerometer Experiment Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, G. M.; Bougher, S. W.; Theriot, M. E.; Zurek, R. W.; Blanchard, R. C.; Tolson, R. H.; Murphy, J. R.

    2007-05-01

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) launched on August 12, 2005, designed for aerobraking, achieved Mars Orbital Insertion (MOI), March 10, 2006. Atmospheric density decreases exponentially with increasing height. By small propulsive adjustments of the apoapsis orbital velocity, periapsis altitude is fine tuned to the density surface that safely used the atmosphere of Mars to aerobrake over 400 orbits. MRO periapsis precessed from the South Pole at 6pm LST to near the equator at 3am LST. Meanwhile, apoapsis was brought dramatically from 40,000km at MOI to 460 km at aerobraking completion (ABX) August 30, 2006. After ABX, a few small propulsive maneuvers established the Primary Science Orbit (PSO), which without aerobraking would have required an additional 400 kg of fuel. Each of the 400 plus aerobraking orbits provided a vertical structure and distribution of density, scale heights, and temperatures, along the orbital path, providing key in situ insight into various upper atmosphere (greater than 100 km) processes. One of the major questions for scientists studying Mars is: "Where did the water go?" Honeywell's substantially improved electronics package for its IMU (QA-2000 accelerometer, gyro, electronics) maximized accelerometer sensitivities at the requests of The George Washington University, JPL, and Lockheed Martin. The improved accelerometer sensitivities allowed density measurements to exceed 200km, at least 40 km higher than with Mars Odyssey (MO). This extended vertical structures from MRO into the neutral lower exosphere, a region where various processes may allow atmospheric gasses to escape. Over the eons, water may have been lost in both near the surface and in the upper atmosphere. Thus the water balance throughout the entire atmosphere from subsurface to exosphere may both be critical. Comparisons of data from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), MO and MRO help characterize key temporal and spatial cycles including: winter polar warming, planetary scale

  14. Factor Structure of the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amir, Nader; Foa, Edna B.; Coles, Meredith E.

    1997-01-01

    The dimensions underlying the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) (W. Goodman and others, 1989) were examined by performing a confirmatory factor analysis of the scale using responses from 404 patients. Results support a two-factor model of obsessive-compulsive symptoms, reflecting degree of disturbance and severity of symptoms. (SLD)

  15. Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Se-Kang; Davison, Mark L.; Frisby, Craig L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) parameterization of the Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) model to demonstrate validation of profile pattern hypotheses derived from multidimensional scaling (MDS). Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) is an exploratory method for identifying major…

  16. Revision and Factor Analysis of a Death Anxiety Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorson, James A.; Powell, F. C.

    Earlier research on death anxiety using the 34-item scale developed by Nehrke-Templer-Boyar (NTB) indicated that females and younger persons have significantly higher death anxiety. To simplify a death anxiety scale for use with different age groups, and to determine the conceptual factors actually measured by the scale, a revised 25-item…

  17. Speech activity detection using accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Matic, Aleksandar; Osmani, Venet; Mayora, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    The level of social activity is linked to the overall wellbeing and to various disorders, including stress. In this regard, a myriad of automatic solutions for monitoring social interactions have been proposed, usually including audio data analysis. Such approaches often face legal and ethical issues and they may also raise privacy concerns in monitored subjects thus affecting their natural behaviour. In this paper we present an accelerometer-based speech detection which does not require capturing sensitive data while being an easily applicable and a cost-effective solution.

  18. Exploratory Factor Analysis of African Self-Consciousness Scale Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhagwat, Ranjit; Kelly, Shalonda; Lambert, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    This study replicates and extends prior studies of the dimensionality, convergent, and external validity of African Self-Consciousness Scale scores with appropriate exploratory factor analysis methods and a large gender balanced sample (N = 348). Viable one- and two-factor solutions were cross-validated. Both first factors overlapped significantly…

  19. A triaxial accelerometer monkey algorithm for optimal sensor placement in structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jingqing; Feng, Shuo; Liu, Wei

    2015-06-01

    Optimal sensor placement (OSP) technique is a vital part of the field of structural health monitoring (SHM). Triaxial accelerometers have been widely used in the SHM of large-scale structures in recent years. Triaxial accelerometers must be placed in such a way that all of the important dynamic information is obtained. At the same time, the sensor configuration must be optimal, so that the test resources are conserved. The recommended practice is to select proper degrees of freedom (DOF) based upon several criteria and the triaxial accelerometers are placed at the nodes corresponding to these DOFs. This results in non-optimal placement of many accelerometers. A ‘triaxial accelerometer monkey algorithm’ (TAMA) is presented in this paper to solve OSP problems of triaxial accelerometers. The EFI3 measurement theory is modified and involved in the objective function to make it more adaptable in the OSP technique of triaxial accelerometers. A method of calculating the threshold value based on probability theory is proposed to improve the healthy rate of monkeys in a troop generation process. Meanwhile, the processes of harmony ladder climb and scanning watch jump are proposed and given in detail. Finally, Xinghai NO.1 Bridge in Dalian is implemented to demonstrate the effectiveness of TAMA. The final results obtained by TAMA are compared with those of the original monkey algorithm and EFI3 measurement, which show that TAMA can improve computational efficiency and get a better sensor configuration.

  20. Superconducting six-axis accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, H. J.

    1990-01-01

    A new superconducting accelerometer, capable of measuring both linear and angular accelerations, is under development at the University of Maryland. A single superconducting proof mass is magnetically levitated against gravity or any other proof force. Its relative positions and orientations with respect to the platform are monitored by six superconducting inductance bridges sharing a single amplifier, called the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). The six degrees of freedom, the three linear acceleration components and the three angular acceleration components, of the platform are measured simultaneously. In order to improve the linearity and the dynamic range of the instrument, the demodulated outputs of the SQUID are fed back to appropriate levitation coils so that the proof mass remains at the null position for all six inductance bridges. The expected intrinsic noise of the instrument is 4 x 10(exp -12)m s(exp -2) Hz(exp -1/2) for linear acceleration and 3 x 10(exp -11) rad s(exp -2) Hz(exp -1/2) for angular acceleration in 1-g environment. In 0-g, the linear acceleration sensitivity of the superconducting accelerometer could be improved by two orders of magnitude. The design and the operating principle of a laboratory prototype of the new instrument is discussed.

  1. Status of Electrostatic Accelerometer Development for Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-on Mission (GRACE FO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebat, V.; Boulanger, D.; Christophe, B.; Foulon, B.; Liorzou, F.; Perrot, E.; Huynh, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    The GRACE FO mission, led by the JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), is an Earth-orbiting gravity mission, continuation of the GRACE mission, which will produce an accurate model of the Earth's gravity field variation providing global climatic data during five years at least. The mission involves two satellites in a loosely controlled tandem formation, with a micro-wave link measuring the inter-satellites distance variation. Earth's mass distribution non-uniformities cause variations of the inter-satellite distance. This variation is measured to recover gravity, after subtracting the non-gravitational contributors, as the residual drag. ONERA (the French Aerospace Lab) is developing, manufacturing and testing electrostatic accelerometers measuring this residual drag applied on the satellites. The accelerometer is composed of two main parts: the Sensor Unit (including the Sensor Unit Mechanics - SUM - and the Front-End Electronic Unit - FEEU) and the Interface Control Unit - ICU. In the Accelerometer Core, located in the Sensor Unit Mechanics, the proof mass is levitated and maintained at the center of an electrode cage by electrostatic forces. Thus, any drag acceleration applied on the satellite involves a variation on the servo-controlled electrostatic suspension of the mass. The voltage on the electrodes providing this electrostatic force is the measurement output of the accelerometer. The impact of the accelerometer defaults (geometry, electronic and parasitic forces) leads to bias, misalignment and scale factor error, non-linearity and noise. Some of these accelerometer defaults are characterized by tests with micro-gravity pendulum bench on ground and with drops in ZARM catapult. The Preliminary Design Review was achieved successfully on November 2013. The Engineering Model (EM) was integrated successfully and is under test, with ground levitation, drops, Electromagnetic Compatibility and thermal vacuum. The complete EM tests will be achieved on October 2014. The

  2. The development of an optical fiber accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalnuovo, S. A.; Sleefe, G. E.; James, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    We describe the design and operation of an optical fiber accelerometer intended for environments inhospitable to electronic components. An overview of the device is presented along with descriptions of the optical, electronic, and mechanical components. The performance of the current prototype is equivalent to state of the art piezoelectric accelerometers. Improvements to the current design are discussed.

  3. Display-And-Alarm Circuit For Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Compact accelerometer assembly consists of commercial accelerometer retrofit with display-and-alarm circuit. Provides simple means for technician attending machine to monitor vibrations. Also simpifies automatic safety shutdown by providing local alarm or shutdown signal when vibration exceeds preset level.

  4. Interinstrument Reliability of the RT3 Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneman, Michiel

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the interinstrument reliability of six RT3 accelerometers for measuring physical activities. Each of the six healthy participants, mean age 36.1 years (SD 9.4), carried six RT3 accelerometers (same type and same producer) simultaneously placed ventrally at the waist belt. The participants performed three…

  5. Quantitative evaluation of gait ataxia by accelerometers.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Shinichi; Yabe, Ichiro; Matsushima, Masaaki; Ito, Yoichi M; Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Hidenao

    2015-11-15

    An appropriate biomarker for spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) has not been identified. Here, we performed gait analysis on patients with pure cerebellar type SCD and assessed whether the obtained data could be used as a neurophysiological biomarker for cerebellar ataxia. We analyzed 25 SCD patients, 25 patients with Parkinson's disease as a disease control, and 25 healthy control individuals. Acceleration signals during 6 min of walking and 1 min of standing were measured by two sets of triaxial accelerometers that were secured with a fixation vest to the middle of the lower and upper back of each subject. We extracted two gait parameters, the average and the coefficient of variation of motion trajectory amplitude, from each acceleration component. Then, each component was analyzed by correlation with the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) and the Berg Balance Scale (BBS). Compared with the gait control of healthy subjects and concerning correlation with severity and disease specificity, our results suggest that the average amplitude of medial-lateral (upper back) of straight gait is a physiological biomarker for cerebellar ataxia. Our results suggest that gait analysis is a quantitative and concise evaluation scale for the severity of cerebellar ataxia.

  6. A Factor Analytic Study of the Internet Usage Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monetti, David M.; Whatley, Mark A.; Hinkle, Kerry T.; Cunningham, Kerry T.; Breneiser, Jennifer E.; Kisling, Rhea

    2011-01-01

    This study developed an Internet Usage Scale (IUS) for use with adolescent populations. The IUS is a 26-item scale that measures participants' beliefs about how their Internet usage impacts their behavior. The sample for this study consisted of 947 middle school students. An exploratory factor analysis with varimax rotation was conducted on the…

  7. Education Participation Scale Factor Structure for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boshier, Roger; Riddell, Gail

    1978-01-01

    Motivating factors for participation in adult education were analyzed with a short form of the Education Participation Scale, using data from a population of older adults enrolled in adult education programs in Vancouver, British Columbia. It appears that this scale may be useful in planning programs for older adults. (MF)

  8. A Novel Digital Closed Loop MEMS Accelerometer Utilizing a Charge Pump.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yixing; Dong, Jingxin; Chi, Baoyong; Liu, Yunfeng

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel digital closed loop microelectromechanical system (MEMS) accelerometer with the architecture and experimental evaluation. The complicated timing diagram or complex power supply in published articles are circumvented by using a charge pump system of adjustable output voltage fabricated in a 2P4M 0.35 µm complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process, therefore making it possible for interface circuits of MEMS accelerometers to be integrated on a single die on a large scale. The output bitstream of the sigma delta modulator is boosted by the charge pump system and then applied on the feedback comb fingers to form electrostatic forces so that the MEMS accelerometer can operate in a closed loop state. Test results agree with the theoretical formula nicely. The nonlinearity of the accelerometer within ±1 g is 0.222% and the long-term stability is about 774 µg.

  9. A Novel Digital Closed Loop MEMS Accelerometer Utilizing a Charge Pump

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yixing; Dong, Jingxin; Chi, Baoyong; Liu, Yunfeng

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel digital closed loop microelectromechanical system (MEMS) accelerometer with the architecture and experimental evaluation. The complicated timing diagram or complex power supply in published articles are circumvented by using a charge pump system of adjustable output voltage fabricated in a 2P4M 0.35 µm complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process, therefore making it possible for interface circuits of MEMS accelerometers to be integrated on a single die on a large scale. The output bitstream of the sigma delta modulator is boosted by the charge pump system and then applied on the feedback comb fingers to form electrostatic forces so that the MEMS accelerometer can operate in a closed loop state. Test results agree with the theoretical formula nicely. The nonlinearity of the accelerometer within ±1 g is 0.222% and the long-term stability is about 774 µg. PMID:26999157

  10. Reliability, Validity, and Factor Structure of the Imaginative Capability Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Chaoyun; Chia, Tsorng-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Three studies were combined to test the reliability, validity, and factor structure of the imaginative capability scale (ICS). The ICS was a new self-report measure, which was developed to be empirically valid and easy to administer. Study 1 consisted in an exploratory factor analysis to determine the most appropriate structure of the ICS in a…

  11. A Factor Analysis of the Discipline Efficacy Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Rebecca McMahon; Kazelskis, Richard; Reeves-Kazelskis, Carolyn

    The Discipline Efficacy Scale (DES) was designed to measure personal and general teacher efficacy beliefs about student discipline. A confirmatory factor analysis of the proposed two-factor model was carried out using a sample of 206 junior- and senior-level preservice teacher education students. Goodness of fit measures did not suggest a good fit…

  12. Factor Structure of Japanese Versions of Two Emotional Intelligence Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukuda, Eriko; Saklofske, Donald H.; Tamaoka, Katsuo; Fung, Tak Shing; Miyaoka, Yayoi; Kiyama, Sachiko

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the psychometric properties of two emotional intelligence measures translated into Japanese. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted to examine the factor structure of a Japanese version of the Wong and Law Emotional Intelligence Scale (WLEIS) completed by 310 Japanese university students. A second study employed CFA…

  13. The BepiColombo mission to Mercury: ISA accelerometer on-ground and in-flight calibration procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, V.; Lucchesi, D.; Fiorenza, E.; Lucente, M.; Lefevre, C.; Magnafico, C.; Peron, R.; Santoli, F.; Nozzoli, S.; Argada, A.

    2012-04-01

    The key role of the Italian Spring Accelerometer (ISA) in the radio science measurements of the ESA BepiColombo mission to Mercury is to remove, aposteriori, the non-gravitational accelerations acting on the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) due to the very strong radiation environment around Mercury. This presentation is devoted to describe the main on-ground and in-flight calibration procedures that are necessary to guarantee the accelerometer performance in order to reach the very ambitious objectives of the Radio Science Experiments (RSE) of the ESA mission: the accelerometer sensitivity has to be 10-8 m/s2/√Hz in the frequency band 3·10-5 -10-1 Hz. ISA is a three axes torsional accelerometer and the calibration procedures are necessary in order to estimate scale factors and axes misalignments and couplings. The on-ground calibration procedures are primarily finalized to the determination of the actuator transducer factor of the proof-masses capacitor plates and to the determination of the proof-masses axes orthogonality and orientation with respect to a reference optical cube. The in-flight calibration procedures are devoted to the determination of the accelerometer pick-up transducer factors, which are different from those determined on-ground during the calibration of ISA's actuators, and to the determination of the axes alignment in order to check if launch shocks have produced possible variations with respect to their nominal orientation in the MPO body-fixed frame as determined during the pre-launch characterization and calibration. A by-product of the in-flight calibration procedures is the determination of ISA proof-masses position with respect to spacecraft effective center-of-mass. This allows to check if the MPO center-of-mass variations are in line with on-ground estimates based on fuel consumption computations and the mass distribution of the spacecraft appendices and movable parts, as in the case of the orientation of the solar array panels and

  14. Hybridizing matter-wave and classical accelerometers

    SciTech Connect

    Lautier, J.; Volodimer, L.; Hardin, T.; Merlet, S.; Lours, M.; Pereira Dos Santos, F.; Landragin, A.

    2014-10-06

    We demonstrate a hybrid accelerometer that benefits from the advantages of both conventional and atomic sensors in terms of bandwidth (DC to 430 Hz) and long term stability. First, the use of a real time correction of the atom interferometer phase by the signal from the classical accelerometer enables to run it at best performance without any isolation platform. Second, a servo-lock of the DC component of the conventional sensor output signal by the atomic one realizes a hybrid sensor. This method paves the way for applications in geophysics and in inertial navigation as it overcomes the main limitation of atomic accelerometers, namely, the dead times between consecutive measurements.

  15. GRADIO three-axis electrostatic accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, A.

    1987-01-01

    Dedicated accelerometers for satellite gravity gradiometry (GRADIO project) are described. The design profits from experience acquired with the CACTUS accelerometer payload of the satellite CASTOR-D5B and studies of highly accurate accelerometers for inertial navigation. The principle of operation, based on a three-axis electrostatic suspension of a cubic proof mass, is well suited for the measurements of accelerations less than 0.0001 m/sec/sec. A resolution better than 10 to the minus 11th power m/sec/sec/sq root Hz is expected.

  16. Single-Crystal Springs For Accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, Thomas R.; Kaiser, William J.; Kenny, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal noise reduced, enabling use of smaller proof masses. Spring-and-mass accelerometers in which springs made of single-crystal material being developed. In spring-and-mass accelerometer, proof mass attached to one end of spring, and acceleration of object at other end of spring measured in terms of deflection of spring, provided frequency spectrum of acceleration lies well below resonant frequency of spring-and-proof-mass system. Use of single-crystal spring materials instead of such polycrystalline spring materials as ordinary metals makes possible to construct highly sensitive accelerometers (including seismometers) with small proof masses.

  17. Hybridizing matter-wave and classical accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lautier, J.; Volodimer, L.; Hardin, T.; Merlet, S.; Lours, M.; Pereira Dos Santos, F.; Landragin, A.

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate a hybrid accelerometer that benefits from the advantages of both conventional and atomic sensors in terms of bandwidth (DC to 430 Hz) and long term stability. First, the use of a real time correction of the atom interferometer phase by the signal from the classical accelerometer enables to run it at best performance without any isolation platform. Second, a servo-lock of the DC component of the conventional sensor output signal by the atomic one realizes a hybrid sensor. This method paves the way for applications in geophysics and in inertial navigation as it overcomes the main limitation of atomic accelerometers, namely, the dead times between consecutive measurements.

  18. Calibration of Gyros with Temperature Dependent Scale Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belur, Sheela V.; Harman, Richard

    2001-01-01

    The general problem of gyro calibration can be stated as the estimation of the scale factors, misalignments, and drift-rate biases of the gyro using the on-orbit sensor measurements. These gyro parameters have been traditionally treated as temperature-independent in the operational flight dynamics ground systems at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), a scenario which has been successfully applied in the gyro calibration of a large number of missions. A significant departure from this is the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) mission where, due to the high thermal variations expected during the mission phase, it is necessary to model the scale factors as functions of temperature. This paper addresses the issue of gyro calibration for the MAP gyro model using a manufacturer-supplied model of the variation of scale factors with temperature. The problem is formulated as a least squares problem and solved using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm in the MATLAB(R) library function NLSQ. The algorithm was tested on simulated data with Gaussian noise for the quaternions as well as the gyro rates and was found to consistently converge close to the true values. Significant improvement in accuracy was noticed due to the estimation of the temperature-dependent scale factors as against constant scale factors.

  19. Data replicating the factor structure and reliability of commonly used measures of resilience: The Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, Resilience Scale, and Scale of Protective Factors.

    PubMed

    Madewell, A N; Ponce-Garcia, E; Martin, S E

    2016-09-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the article entitled "Assessing Resilience in Emerging Adulthood: The Resilience Scale (RS), Connor Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC), and Scale of Protective Factors (SPF)" (Madewell and Ponce-Garcia, 2016) [1]. The data were collected from a sample of 451 college students from three universities located in the Southwestern region of the United States: 374 from a large public university and 67 from two smaller regional universities. The data from the three universities did not significantly differ in terms of demographics. The data represent participant responses on six measurements to include the Resilience Scale-25 (RS-25), Resilience Scale-14 (RS-14), Connor Davidson Resilience Scale-25 (CD-RISC-25), Connor Davidson Resilience Scale-10 (CD-RISC-10), Scale of Protective Factors-24 (SPF-24), and the Life Stressor Checklist Revised (LSC-R). PMID:27583346

  20. Data replicating the factor structure and reliability of commonly used measures of resilience: The Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, Resilience Scale, and Scale of Protective Factors.

    PubMed

    Madewell, A N; Ponce-Garcia, E; Martin, S E

    2016-09-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the article entitled "Assessing Resilience in Emerging Adulthood: The Resilience Scale (RS), Connor Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC), and Scale of Protective Factors (SPF)" (Madewell and Ponce-Garcia, 2016) [1]. The data were collected from a sample of 451 college students from three universities located in the Southwestern region of the United States: 374 from a large public university and 67 from two smaller regional universities. The data from the three universities did not significantly differ in terms of demographics. The data represent participant responses on six measurements to include the Resilience Scale-25 (RS-25), Resilience Scale-14 (RS-14), Connor Davidson Resilience Scale-25 (CD-RISC-25), Connor Davidson Resilience Scale-10 (CD-RISC-10), Scale of Protective Factors-24 (SPF-24), and the Life Stressor Checklist Revised (LSC-R).

  1. The scale factor in a Universe with dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazhin, M. V.; Sazhina, O. S.

    2016-04-01

    The solution of the Friedmann cosmological equations for the scale factor in a model of the Universe containing matter having the equation of state of dust and dark energy is considered. The equation-of-state parameter of the dark energy is taken to be an arbitrary constant w = -1.006 ± 0.045, whose value is constrained by the current observational limits. An exact solution for the scale factor as a function of physical time and conformal time is obtained. Approximate solutions have been found for the entire admissible conformal time interval with an accuracy better than 1%, which exceeds the accuracy of the determined global parameters of our Universe. This is the first time an exact solution for the scale factor describing the evolution of the Universe in a unified way, beginning with the matter-dominated epoch and ending with the infinitely remote future, has been obtained.

  2. High sensitivity cymbal-based accelerometer

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Chengliang; Lam, K.H.; Choy, S.H.; Chan, H.L. W.; Zhao, X.-Z.; Choy, C.L.

    2006-03-15

    A high sensitivity piezoelectric accelerometer has been developed by replacing the conventional piezoelectric rings with a cymbal transducer. The sensitivity of the cymbal-based accelerometers containing cymbal transducers with different endcap thicknesses and different seismic masses has been measured as a function of driving frequency. Due to the high d{sub 33}{sup '} coefficient of the cymbal transducers, the cymbal-based accelerometers have a high sensitivity of {approx}97 pC/ms{sup -2} with the amplitude rise of 2.85% (<1 dB) at one-third of the mounted resonance frequency (3.38 kHz). The effect of the seismic mass, the resonance frequency, and d{sub 33}{sup '} coefficient of the cymbal transducers on the sensitivity and the frequency range of the cymbal-based accelerometers are reported.

  3. Accelerometer Measurements in the Amusement Park.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reno, Charles; Speers, Robert R.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the use of the Texas Instruments' calculator-based laboratory (CBL) and Vernier accelerometer for measuring the vector sum of the gravitational field and the acceleration of amusement park rides. (JRH)

  4. Citizen sensors for SHM: use of accelerometer data from smartphones.

    PubMed

    Feng, Maria; Fukuda, Yoshio; Mizuta, Masato; Ozer, Ekin

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitous smartphones have created a significant opportunity to form a low-cost wireless Citizen Sensor network and produce big data for monitoring structural integrity and safety under operational and extreme loads. Such data are particularly useful for rapid assessment of structural damage in a large urban setting after a major event such as an earthquake. This study explores the utilization of smartphone accelerometers for measuring structural vibration, from which structural health and post-event damage can be diagnosed. Widely available smartphones are tested under sinusoidal wave excitations with frequencies in the range relevant to civil engineering structures. Large-scale seismic shaking table tests, observing input ground motion and response of a structural model, are carried out to evaluate the accuracy of smartphone accelerometers under operational, white-noise and earthquake excitations of different intensity. Finally, the smartphone accelerometers are tested on a dynamically loaded bridge. The extensive experiments show satisfactory agreements between the reference and smartphone sensor measurements in both time and frequency domains, demonstrating the capability of the smartphone sensors to measure structural responses ranging from low-amplitude ambient vibration to high-amplitude seismic response. Encouraged by the results of this study, the authors are developing a citizen-engaging and data-analytics crowdsourcing platform towards a smartphone-based Citizen Sensor network for structural health monitoring and post-event damage assessment applications.

  5. Citizen sensors for SHM: use of accelerometer data from smartphones.

    PubMed

    Feng, Maria; Fukuda, Yoshio; Mizuta, Masato; Ozer, Ekin

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitous smartphones have created a significant opportunity to form a low-cost wireless Citizen Sensor network and produce big data for monitoring structural integrity and safety under operational and extreme loads. Such data are particularly useful for rapid assessment of structural damage in a large urban setting after a major event such as an earthquake. This study explores the utilization of smartphone accelerometers for measuring structural vibration, from which structural health and post-event damage can be diagnosed. Widely available smartphones are tested under sinusoidal wave excitations with frequencies in the range relevant to civil engineering structures. Large-scale seismic shaking table tests, observing input ground motion and response of a structural model, are carried out to evaluate the accuracy of smartphone accelerometers under operational, white-noise and earthquake excitations of different intensity. Finally, the smartphone accelerometers are tested on a dynamically loaded bridge. The extensive experiments show satisfactory agreements between the reference and smartphone sensor measurements in both time and frequency domains, demonstrating the capability of the smartphone sensors to measure structural responses ranging from low-amplitude ambient vibration to high-amplitude seismic response. Encouraged by the results of this study, the authors are developing a citizen-engaging and data-analytics crowdsourcing platform towards a smartphone-based Citizen Sensor network for structural health monitoring and post-event damage assessment applications. PMID:25643056

  6. Citizen Sensors for SHM: Use of Accelerometer Data from Smartphones

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Maria; Fukuda, Yoshio; Mizuta, Masato; Ozer, Ekin

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitous smartphones have created a significant opportunity to form a low-cost wireless Citizen Sensor network and produce big data for monitoring structural integrity and safety under operational and extreme loads. Such data are particularly useful for rapid assessment of structural damage in a large urban setting after a major event such as an earthquake. This study explores the utilization of smartphone accelerometers for measuring structural vibration, from which structural health and post-event damage can be diagnosed. Widely available smartphones are tested under sinusoidal wave excitations with frequencies in the range relevant to civil engineering structures. Large-scale seismic shaking table tests, observing input ground motion and response of a structural model, are carried out to evaluate the accuracy of smartphone accelerometers under operational, white-noise and earthquake excitations of different intensity. Finally, the smartphone accelerometers are tested on a dynamically loaded bridge. The extensive experiments show satisfactory agreements between the reference and smartphone sensor measurements in both time and frequency domains, demonstrating the capability of the smartphone sensors to measure structural responses ranging from low-amplitude ambient vibration to high-amplitude seismic response. Encouraged by the results of this study, the authors are developing a citizen-engaging and data-analytics crowdsourcing platform towards a smartphone-based Citizen Sensor network for structural health monitoring and post-event damage assessment applications. PMID:25643056

  7. Scale factors to quantify and predict the field scale variability of heavy metal sorption in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Han; Boettcher, Juergen; Utermann, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Many studies report the close relationship between heavy metal sorption in soil and physicochemical soil properties. Since 1980s pedotransfer functions (PTF) were developed to predict the heavy metal sorption in soil, based on the Freundlich sorption isotherm with parameters K and n, and physicochemical soil properties. An important application of PTFs is to predict sorption behavior at larger scales (e.g. soil units) from easily measurable soil properties, but PTFs were also applied to predict the spatial variability of sorption at the field scale. A new method to quantify the spatial variability of heavy metal sorption in soils at the field scale is the calculation of scale factors (SF). This method reduces the broad spread of the sorption isotherms into an average relation, but saves the variation through the scale factors. For physicochemical soil properties scale factors can also be calculated. Scale factors from sorption isotherms and physicochemical soil properties are correlated. SF of isotherms are indirectly related to the Freundlich parameters K and n, but PTF directly and solely predict K. That is the reason, why SF in contrast to PTF were found in an earlier study with an acidic sandy soil under forest to increase the accuracy of model predictions. The two prediction methods, SF and PTF, were both evaluated for an agricultural field on a more or less homogeneous Luvisol developed in loess near Hannover, Germany. Samples were taken from the A and B horizon (each 50 samples) along a 250 m transect. Sorption isotherms for heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn) and soil properties as pH, CEC, organic carbon content, texture were measured, and scale factors were calculated. In our contribution we will present results on (1) the accuracy of PTF and SF to predict the field average sorption behavior of the soil, (2) a comparative numerical simulation of field scale heavy metal transport with spatially variable sorption behavior in unsaturated soil described by both

  8. Detecting gunshots using wearable accelerometers.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, Charles E

    2014-01-01

    Gun violence continues to be a staggering and seemingly intractable issue in many communities. The prevalence of gun violence among the sub-population of individuals under court-ordered community supervision provides an opportunity for intervention using remote monitoring technology. Existing monitoring systems rely heavily on location-based monitoring methods, which have incomplete geographic coverage and do not provide information on illegal firearm use. This paper presents the first results demonstrating the feasibility of using wearable inertial sensors to recognize wrist movements and other signals corresponding to firearm usage. Data were collected from accelerometers worn on the wrists of subjects shooting a number of different firearms, conducting routine daily activities, and participating in activities and tasks that could be potentially confused with firearm discharges. A training sample was used to construct a combined detector and classifier for individual gunshots, which achieved a classification accuracy of 99.4 percent when tested against a hold-out sample of observations. These results suggest the feasibility of using inexpensive wearable sensors to detect firearm discharges.

  9. Optomechanical accelerometers and gravity gradiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Felipe

    2016-04-01

    Compact optical cavities can be combined with highly stable mechanical oscillators to yield accelerometers and gravity gradiometers of exquisite sensitivity, which are also traceable to the SI. We have incorporated Fabry-Pérot fiber-optic micro-cavities onto low-loss monolithic fused-silica mechanical oscillators for gradiometry, acceleration, and force sensing. These devices consist solely of a glass oscillator and fiber optics to inject and read out the coherent optical signal, making them very simple and compatible with space applications. We have demonstrated displacement sensitivities better than 200 am/√Hz with these fiber-optic micro-sensors. This translates into broadband acceleration noise floors below 100 nano-g/√Hz over a 10kHz, when combined with compact high frequency mechanical oscillators. Similarly, we have developed monolithic oscillators with resonance frequencies near and below 10 Hz, yielding measurement sensitivities better than 10-9 m/s2. We will introduce our sensor concepts and present results on our fiber-optic displacement sensors and novel optomechanical devices.

  10. Detecting Gunshots Using Wearable Accelerometers

    PubMed Central

    Loeffler, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    Gun violence continues to be a staggering and seemingly intractable issue in many communities. The prevalence of gun violence among the sub-population of individuals under court-ordered community supervision provides an opportunity for intervention using remote monitoring technology. Existing monitoring systems rely heavily on location-based monitoring methods, which have incomplete geographic coverage and do not provide information on illegal firearm use. This paper presents the first results demonstrating the feasibility of using wearable inertial sensors to recognize wrist movements and other signals corresponding to firearm usage. Data were collected from accelerometers worn on the wrists of subjects shooting a number of different firearms, conducting routine daily activities, and participating in activities and tasks that could be potentially confused with firearm discharges. A training sample was used to construct a combined detector and classifier for individual gunshots, which achieved a classification accuracy of 99.4 percent when tested against a hold-out sample of observations. These results suggest the feasibility of using inexpensive wearable sensors to detect firearm discharges. PMID:25184416

  11. High G MEMS integrated accelerometer

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, B.R.; Barron, C.C.; Montague, S.; Smith, J.H.; Murray, J.R.; Christenson, T.R.; Bateman, V.I.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a surface micromachined accelerometer for measuring very high levels of acceleration (up to 50,000 G). Both the mechanical and electronic portions of the sensor were integrated on a single substrate using a process developed at Sandia National Laboratories. In this process, the mechanical components of the sensor were first fabricated at the bottom of a trench etched into the water substrate. The trench was then filled with oxide and sealed to protect the mechanical components during subsequent microelectronics processing. The wafer surface was then planarized in preparation for CMOS processing using Chemical Mechanical Polishing (CMP). Next, the CMOS electronics were fabricated on areas of the wafer adjacent to the embedded structures. Finally, the mechanical structures were released and the sensor tested. The mechanical structure of the sensor consisted of two polysilicon plate masses suspended by multiple springs (cantilevered beam structures) over corresponding polysilicon plates fixed to the substrate to form two parallel plate capacitors. The first polysilicon plate mass was suspended using compliant springs (cantilever beams) and acted as a variable capacitor during sensor acceleration. The second polysilicon plate mass was suspended using very stiff springs and acted as a fixed capacitor during acceleration. Acceleration was measured by comparing the capacitance of the variable capacitor (compliant suspension) with the fixed capacitance (stiff suspension).

  12. An Empirical Comparison of Factor, Image, Component, and Scale Scores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fava, Joseph L.; Velicer, Wayne F.

    1992-01-01

    Principal component, image component, three types of factor score estimates, and one scale score method were compared over different levels of variables, saturations, sample sizes, variable to component ratios, and pattern rotations. There were virtually no overall differences among methods, with the average correlation between matched scores…

  13. Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale: Two Factors or Method Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomas, Jose M.; Oliver, Amparo

    1999-01-01

    Results of a study with 640 Spanish high school students suggest the existence of a global self-esteem factor underlying responses to Rosenberg's (M. Rosenberg, 1965) Self-Esteem Scale, although the inclusion of method effects is needed to achieve a good model fit. Method effects are associated with item wording. (SLD)

  14. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Work Locus of Control Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Joseph E.; Jose, Paul E.; Brough, Paula

    2006-01-01

    Original formulations of the Work Locus of Control Scale (WLCS) proposed a unidimensional structure of this measure; however, more recently, evidence for a two-dimensional structure has been reported, with separate subscales for internal and external loci of control. The current study evaluates the one- and two-factor models with confirmatory…

  15. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Professional Opinion Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greeno, Elizabeth J.; Hughes, Anne K.; Hayward, R. Anna; Parker, Karen L.

    2007-01-01

    The Professional Opinion Scale (POS) was developed to measure social work values orientation. Objective: A confirmatory factor analysis was performed on the POS. Method: This cross-sectional study used a mailed survey design with a national random (simple) sample of members of the National Association of Social Workers. Results: The study…

  16. [Cross validity of the UCLA Loneliness Scale factorization].

    PubMed

    Borges, Africa; Prieto, Pedro; Ricchetti, Giacinto; Hernández-Jorge, Carmen; Rodríguez-Naveiras, Elena

    2008-11-01

    Loneliness is an unpleasant experience that takes place when a person's network of social relationships is significantly deficient in quality and quantity, and it is associated with negative feelings. Loneliness is a fundamental construct that provides information about several psychological processes, especially in the clinical setting. It is well known that this construct is related to isolation and emotional loneliness. One of the most well-known psychometric instruments to measure loneliness is the revised UCLA Loneliness Scale, which has been factorized in several populations. A controversial issue related to the UCLA Loneliness Scale is its factor structure, because the test was first created based on a unidimensional structure; however, subsequent research has proved that its structure may be bipolar or even multidimensional. In the present work, the UCLA Loneliness Scale was completed by two populations: Spanish and Italian undergraduate university students. Results show a multifactorial structure in both samples. This research presents a theoretically and analytically coherent bifactorial structure. PMID:18940104

  17. CHAMP Tracking and Accelerometer Data Analysis Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank G.; Luthcke, S. B.; Rowlands, D. D.; Pavlis, D. E.; Colombo, O. L.; Ray, Richard D.; Thompson, B.; Nerem, R. S.; Williams, Teresa A.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The CHAMP (Challenging Minisatellite Payload) mission's unique combination of sensors and orbit configuration will enable unprecedented improvements in modeling and understanding the Earth's static gravity field and its temporal variations. CHAMP is the first of two missions (GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) to be launched in the later part of '01) that combine a new generation of GPS (Global Positioning System) receivers, a high precision three axis accelerometer, and star cameras for the precision attitude determination. In order to isolate the gravity signal for science investigations, it is necessary to perform a detailed reduction and analysis of the GPS and SLR tracking data in conjunction with the accelerometer and attitude data. Precision orbit determination based on the GPS and SLR (Satellite Laser Ranging) tracking data will isolate the orbit perturbations, while the accelerometer data will be used to distinguish the surface forces from those due to the geopotential (static, and time varying). In preparation for the CHAMP and GRACE missions, extensive modifications have been made to NASA/GSFC's GEODYN orbit determination software to enable the simultaneous reduction of spacecraft tracking (e.g. GPS and SLR), three axis accelerometer and precise attitude data. Several weeks of CHAMP tracking and accelerometer data have been analyzed and the results will be presented. Precision orbit determination analysis based on tracking data alone in addition to results based on the simultaneous reduction of tracking and accelerometer data will be discussed. Results from a calibration of the accelerometer will be presented along with the results from various orbit determination strategies. Gravity field modeling status and plans will be discussed.

  18. Feelings about culture scales: development, factor structure, reliability, and validity.

    PubMed

    Maffini, Cara S; Wong, Y Joel

    2015-04-01

    Although measures of cultural identity, values, and behavior exist in the multicultural psychological literature, there is currently no measure that explicitly assesses ethnic minority individuals' positive and negative affect toward culture. Therefore, we developed 2 new measures called the Feelings About Culture Scale--Ethnic Culture and Feelings About Culture Scale--Mainstream American Culture and tested their psychometric properties. In 6 studies, we piloted the measures, conducted factor analyses to clarify their factor structure, and examined reliability and validity. The factor structure revealed 2 dimensions reflecting positive and negative affect for each measure. Results provided evidence for convergent, discriminant, criterion-related, and incremental validity as well as the reliability of the scales. The Feelings About Culture Scales are the first known measures to examine both positive and negative affect toward an individual's ethnic culture and mainstream American culture. The focus on affect captures dimensions of psychological experiences that differ from cognitive and behavioral constructs often used to measure cultural orientation. These measures can serve as a valuable contribution to both research and counseling by providing insight into the nuanced affective experiences ethnic minority individuals have toward culture.

  19. Characterizing performance of ultra-sensitive accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebesta, Henry

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of methodology and test results pertaining to the characterization of ultra sensitive accelerometers. Two issues are of primary concern. The terminology ultra sensitive accelerometer is used to imply instruments whose noise floors and resolution are at the state of the art. Hence, the typical approach of verifying an instrument's performance by measuring it with a yet higher quality instrument (or standard) is not practical. Secondly, it is difficult to find or create an environment with sufficiently low background acceleration. The typical laboratory acceleration levels will be at several orders of magnitude above the noise floor of the most sensitive accelerometers. Furthermore, this background must be treated as unknown since the best instrument available is the one to be tested. A test methodology was developed in which two or more like instruments are subjected to the same but unknown background acceleration. Appropriately selected spectral analysis techniques were used to separate the sensors' output spectra into coherent components and incoherent components. The coherent part corresponds to the background acceleration being measured by the sensors being tested. The incoherent part is attributed to sensor noise and data acquisition and processing noise. The method works well for estimating noise floors that are 40 to 50 dB below the motion applied to the test accelerometers. The accelerometers being tested are intended for use as feedback sensors in a system to actively stabilize an inertial guidance component test platform.

  20. µSTAR accelerometer, a fundamental physic package for future interplanetary missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Agnes; Christophe, Bruno; Foulon, Bernard

    In the frame of Cosmic Vision selection, one resolution from the Fundamental Physic Advisory Group of ESA was to use an accelerometer on a future Solar-System mission. This paper described such accelerometer which can be implemented in the future Laplace or Tandem mission pre-selected by ESA. Space Fundamental Physic experiments require to know if the spacecraft follows a geodesic or not. For such purpose, an accelerometer is mandatory, either to control the spacecraft for following a geodesic, as in Microscope or LISA, or to have the measurement of the nongravitational forces acting on the spacecraft, in order to reconstruct on ground the geodesic motion of the spacecraft. The verification of the General Relativity at scale of the Solar System requires also accurate acceleration measurement at low frequency. For this purpose, ONERA has designed µSTAR accelerometer with an objective of performance of 10-10 m/s2 in DC. The µSTAR electrostatic accelerometer is based on ONERA expertise in the field of accelerometry and gravimetry (CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions). Ready-to-fly technology is used with original improvements aimed at reducing power consumption, size and weight. µSTAR has a noise better than 10-11 m/s2 in the frequency bandwidth 1 mHz - 100 mHz, but suffers a maximal bias of 5×10-6 m/s2 due to the imperfection of manufacturing. To correct it, a bias rejection system is associated with the accelerometer so as to ensure high performance at very low frequency. This system consists of a flip mechanism which allows a 180° rotation of the accelerometer to be carried out at regularly spaced times. As a consequence, the measured acceleration is a crenel signal which can be distinguished from the accelerometer bias in the frequency domain. Then, demodulation and filtering technics can be applied on the signal leading to the recovery of the original aceleration undergone by the spacecraft. The paper will conclude on the difficulty of implementation of such

  1. Classification of Cosmic Scale Factor via Noether Gauge Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhangeer, Adil; Shamir, M. Farasat; Naz, Tayyaba; Iftikhar, Nazish

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a complete classification of Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) spacetime by using approximate Noether approach is presented. Considered spacetime is discussed for three different types of universe i.e. flat, open and closed. Different forms of cosmic scale factor a with respect to the nature of the universe, which posses the nontrivial Noether gauge symmetries (NGS) are reported. The perturbed Lagrangian corresponding to FRW metric in the Noether equation is used to get Noether operators. For different types of universe minimal and maximal set of Noether operators are reported. A list of Noether operators is also computed which is not only independent from the choice of the cosmic scale factor but also from the type of universe. Further, corresponding energy type first integral of motions are also calculated.

  2. Legal factors affecting the financing of small scale hydroelectric projects

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.H.; Ringo, M.J.; Forgione, N.

    1983-09-01

    An introduction to the major business organizational options open to small-scale hydroelectric (SSH) projects is given. The major federal income tax treatments of these options are compared. Significant general federal income tax factors affecting SSH projects are reintroduced and explained. Some of the special federal income tax problem areas in SSH development are isolated. Tax benefit flow through or transfer mechanisms are discussed. Tax exempt financing opportunities for private SSH projects are reviewed. (MHR)

  3. Piezoelectric accelerometers for ultrahigh temperature application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shujun; Jiang, Xiaoning; Lapsley, Michael; Moses, Paul; Shrout, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    High temperature sensors are of major importance to aerospace and energy related industries. In this letter, a high temperature monolithic compression-mode piezoelectric accelerometer was fabricated using YCa4O(BO3)3 (YCOB) single crystals. The performance of the sensor was tested as function of temperature up to 1000 °C and over a frequency range of 100-600 Hz. The accelerometer prototype was found to possess sensitivity of 2.4±0.4 pC/g, across the measured temperature and frequency range, indicating a low temperature coefficient. Furthermore, the sensor exhibited good stability over an extended dwell time at 900 °C, demonstrating that YCOB piezoelectric accelerometers are promising candidates for high temperature sensing applications.

  4. Piezoelectric accelerometers for ultrahigh temperature application

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shujun; Moses, Paul; Shrout, Thomas R.; Jiang Xiaoning; Lapsley, Michael

    2010-01-04

    High temperature sensors are of major importance to aerospace and energy related industries. In this letter, a high temperature monolithic compression-mode piezoelectric accelerometer was fabricated using YCa{sub 4}O(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} (YCOB) single crystals. The performance of the sensor was tested as function of temperature up to 1000 deg. C and over a frequency range of 100-600 Hz. The accelerometer prototype was found to possess sensitivity of 2.4+-0.4 pC/g, across the measured temperature and frequency range, indicating a low temperature coefficient. Furthermore, the sensor exhibited good stability over an extended dwell time at 900 deg. C, demonstrating that YCOB piezoelectric accelerometers are promising candidates for high temperature sensing applications.

  5. Fiber optic accelerometer based on clamped beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wentao; Li, Fang

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a fiber optic accelerometer (FOA) based on camped beam is proposed. The clamped beam is used as the elastic element and a mass installed on the clamped beam is used as the inertial element. The accelerometer is based on a fiber optic Michelson interferometer and has a sensing arm and a reference arm. The optical fiber of the sensing arm is wrapped on the clamped beam and the mass, which are both cylinder shaped. The sensitivity of the FOA is analyzed based on the theory of elasticity; the frequency response is analyzed based on the theory of vibration. Experiment is carried out to test the performance of the fiber optic accelerometer. The experiment results show a high sensitivity and a flat frequency response within the low frequency range of 5-250 Hz, which agrees well with the theoretical result.

  6. ROLE OF SCALE FACTOR DURING TENSILE TESTING OF SMALL SPECIMENS

    SciTech Connect

    Gussev, Maxim N; Busby, Jeremy T; Field, Kevin G; Sokolov, Mikhail A; Gray, Mr. Sean

    2014-01-01

    The influence of scale factor (tensile specimen geometry and dimensions) on mechanical test results was investigated for different widely used types of small specimens (SS-1, SS-2, SS-3, and SS-J3) and a set of materials. It was found that the effect of scale factor on the accurate determination of yield stress, ultimate tensile stress, and uniform elongation values was weak; however, clear systematic differences were observed and should be accounted for during interpretation of results. In contrast, total elongation values were strongly sensitive to variations in specimen geometry. Modern experimental methods like digital image correlation allow the impact of scale factor to be reduced. Using these techniques, it was shown that true stress true strain curves describing strain-hardening behavior were very close for different specimen types. The limits of miniaturization are discussed, and an ultra-miniature specimen concept was suggested and evaluated. This type of specimen, as expected, may be suitable for SEM and TEM in situ testing.

  7. Designing Electrostatic Accelerometers for Next Gravity Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Phuong-Anh; Foulon, Bernard; Christophe, Bruno; Liorzou, Françoise; Boulanger, Damien; Lebat, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Square cuboid electrostatic accelerometers sensor core have been used in various combinations in recent and still flying missions (CHAMP, GRACE, GOCE). ONERA is now in the process of delivering such accelerometers for the GRACE Follow-On mission. The goal is to demonstrate the performance benefits of an interferometry laser ranging method for future low-low satellite to satellite missions. The electrostatic accelerometer becoming thus the system main performance limiter, we propose for future missions a new symmetry which will allow for three ultrasensitive axes instead of two. This implies no performance ground testing, as the now cubic proof-mass will be too heavy, but only free fall tests in catapult mode, taking advantage of the additional microgravity testing time offered by the updated ZARM tower. The updated mission will be in better adequacy with the requirements of a next generation of smaller and drag compensated micro-satellites. In addition to the measurement of the surface forces exerted on the spacecraft by the atmospheric drag and by radiation pressures, the accelerometer will become a major part of the attitude and orbit control system by acting as drag free sensor and by accurately measuring the angular accelerations. ONERA also works on a hybridization of the electrostatic accelerometer with an atomic interferometer to take advantage of the absolute nature of the atomic interferometer acceleration measurement and its great accuracy in the [5-100] mHz bandwidth. After a description of the improvement of the GRACE-FO accelerometer with respect to the still in-orbit previous models and a status of its development, the presentation will describe the new cubic configuration and how its operations and performances can be verified in the Bremen drop tower.

  8. Passive Accelerometer System Measurements on MIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1997-01-01

    The Passive Accelerometer System (PAS) is a simple moving ball accelerometer capable of measuring the small magnitude steady relative acceleration that occurs in a low earth orbit spacecraft due to atmospheric drag and the earth's gravity gradient. The acceleration is measured by recording the average velocity of the spherical ball over a suitable time increment. A modified form of Stokes law is used to convert the average velocity into an acceleration. PAS was used to measure acceleration on the MIR space station and on the first United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-1). The PAS measurement on MIR revealed remarkably low acceleration levels in the SPEKTR module.

  9. A Self-Diagnostic System for the M6 Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, Patrick M.; Lekki, John

    2001-01-01

    The design of a Self-Diagnostic (SD) accelerometer system for the Space Shuttle Main Engine is presented. This retrofit system connects diagnostic electronic hardware and software to the current M6 accelerometer system. This paper discusses the general operation of the M6 accelerometer SD system and procedures for developing and evaluating the SD system. Signal processing techniques using M6 accelerometer diagnostic data are explained. Test results include diagnostic data responding to changing ambient temperature, mounting torque and base mounting impedance.

  10. Strong Motion Seismograph Based On MEMS Accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Y.; Hu, X.

    2013-12-01

    The MEMS strong motion seismograph we developed used the modularization method to design its software and hardware.It can fit various needs in different application situation.The hardware of the instrument is composed of a MEMS accelerometer,a control processor system,a data-storage system,a wired real-time data transmission system by IP network,a wireless data transmission module by 3G broadband,a GPS calibration module and power supply system with a large-volumn lithium battery in it. Among it,the seismograph's sensor adopted a three-axis with 14-bit high resolution and digital output MEMS accelerometer.Its noise level just reach about 99μg/√Hz and ×2g to ×8g dynamically selectable full-scale.Its output data rates from 1.56Hz to 800Hz. Its maximum current consumption is merely 165μA,and the device is so small that it is available in a 3mm×3mm×1mm QFN package. Furthermore,there is access to both low pass filtered data as well as high pass filtered data,which minimizes the data analysis required for earthquake signal detection. So,the data post-processing can be simplified. Controlling process system adopts a 32-bit low power consumption embedded ARM9 processor-S3C2440 and is based on the Linux operation system.The processor's operating clock at 400MHz.The controlling system's main memory is a 64MB SDRAM with a 256MB flash-memory.Besides,an external high-capacity SD card data memory can be easily added.So the system can meet the requirements for data acquisition,data processing,data transmission,data storage,and so on. Both wired and wireless network can satisfy remote real-time monitoring, data transmission,system maintenance,status monitoring or updating software.Linux was embedded and multi-layer designed conception was used.The code, including sensor hardware driver,the data acquisition,earthquake setting out and so on,was written on medium layer.The hardware driver consist of IIC-Bus interface driver, IO driver and asynchronous notification driver. The

  11. Application of Accelerometer Data to Mars Odyssey Aerobraking and Atmospheric Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolson, R. H.; Keating, G. M.; George, B. E.; Escalera, P. E.; Werner, M. R.; Dwyer, A. M.; Hanna, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    Aerobraking was an enabling technology for the Mars Odyssey mission even though it involved risk due primarily to the variability of the Mars upper atmosphere. Consequently, numerous analyses based on various data types were performed during operations to reduce these risk and among these data were measurements from spacecraft accelerometers. This paper reports on the use of accelerometer data for determining atmospheric density during Odyssey aerobraking operations. Acceleration was measured along three orthogonal axes, although only data from the component along the axis nominally into the flow was used during operations. For a one second count time, the RMS noise level varied from 0.07 to 0.5 mm/s2 permitting density recovery to between 0.15 and 1.1 kg per cu km or about 2% of the mean density at periapsis during aerobraking. Accelerometer data were analyzed in near real time to provide estimates of density at periapsis, maximum density, density scale height, latitudinal gradient, longitudinal wave variations and location of the polar vortex. Summaries are given of the aerobraking phase of the mission, the accelerometer data analysis methods and operational procedures, some applications to determining thermospheric properties, and some remaining issues on interpretation of the data. Pre-flight estimates of natural variability based on Mars Global Surveyor accelerometer measurements proved reliable in the mid-latitudes, but overestimated the variability inside the polar vortex.

  12. Dual Accelerometer Usage Strategy for Onboard Space Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanetti, Renato; D'Souza, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This work introduces a dual accelerometer usage strategy for onboard space navigation. In the proposed algorithm the accelerometer is used to propagate the state when its value exceeds a threshold and it is used to estimate its errors otherwise. Numerical examples and comparison to other accelerometer usage schemes are presented to validate the proposed approach.

  13. Three-axis MEMS Accelerometer for Structural Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbin, E.; Koleda, A.; Nesterenko, T.; Vtorushin, S.

    2016-01-01

    Microelectromechanical system accelerometers are widely used for metrological measurements of acceleration, tilt, vibration, and shock in moving objects. The paper presents the analysis of MEMS accelerometer that can be used for the structural inspection. ANSYS Multiphysics platform is used to simulate the behavior of MEMS accelerometer by employing a finite element model and MATLAB/Simulink tools for modeling nonlinear dynamic systems.

  14. Assessment of Differing Definitions of Accelerometer Nonwear Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evenson, Kelly R.; Terry, James W., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Measuring physical activity with objective tools, such as accelerometers, is becoming more common. Accelerometers measure acceleration multiple times within a given frequency and summarize this as a count over a pre-specified time period or epoch. The resultant count represents acceleration over the epoch length. Accelerometers eliminate biases…

  15. The underlying factor structure of National Institutes of Health Stroke scale: an exploratory factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Zandieh, Ali; Kahaki, Zahra Zeynali; Sadeghian, Homa; Pourashraf, Maryam; Parviz, Sara; Ghaffarpour, Majid; Ghabaee, Mojdeh

    2012-03-01

    The underlying structure of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) as the most widely used scale in clinical trials has been the focus of little attention. The aim of the current study was to elucidate the clustering pattern of NIHSS items in ischemic stroke patients. A series of 152 consecutive patients with first-ever ischemic strokes admitted to a university affiliated hospital were enrolled. NIHSS score was estimated on admission and correlation coefficients between its items were calculated. Further, exploratory factor analysis was used to study the clustering pattern of NIHSS items. Extinction neglect, visual field, and facial palsy were weakly associated with other NIHSS items. Factor analysis led to a four-factor structure. Factors 1 and 3 were determined by left brain function as items of right arm and leg motor, language and dysarthria loaded on both of them. By contrast, factor 2 reflected right brain involvement. Since visual field and ataxia loaded on factor 4, this factor was primarily associated with posterior strokes. Our study shows that a four-factor structure model is plausible for NIHSS. Further, for the first time, a single distinct factor is identified for posterior strokes. PMID:22023373

  16. Factors affecting economies of scale in combined sewer systems.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Max; Wolfram, Martin; Anja, Herlyn

    2010-01-01

    A generic model is introduced that represents the combined sewer infrastructure of a settlement quantitatively. A catchment area module first calculates the length and size distribution of the required sewer pipes on the basis of rain patterns, housing densities and area size. These results are fed into the sewer-cost module in order to estimate the combined sewer costs of the entire catchment area. A detailed analysis of the relevant input parameters for Swiss settlements is used to identify the influence of size on costs. The simulation results confirm that an economy of scale exists for combined sewer systems. This is the result of two main opposing cost factors: (i) increased construction costs for larger sewer systems due to larger pipes and increased rain runoff in larger settlements, and (ii) lower costs due to higher population and building densities in larger towns. In Switzerland, the more or less organically grown settlement structures and limited land availability emphasise the second factor to show an apparent economy of scale. This modelling approach proved to be a powerful tool for understanding the underlying factors affecting the cost structure for water infrastructures.

  17. Improving the Factor Structure of Psychological Scales: The Expanded Format as an Alternative to the Likert Scale Format

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xijuan; Savalei, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Many psychological scales written in the Likert format include reverse worded (RW) items in order to control acquiescence bias. However, studies have shown that RW items often contaminate the factor structure of the scale by creating one or more method factors. The present study examines an alternative scale format, called the Expanded format,…

  18. Low-Cost Accelerometers for Physics Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannoni, Maurizio; Straulino, Samuele

    2007-01-01

    The implementation of a modern game-console controller as a data acquisition interface for physics experiments is discussed. The investigated controller is equipped with three perpendicular accelerometers and a built-in infrared camera to evaluate its own relative position. A pendulum experiment is realized as a demonstration of the proposed…

  19. Intermonitor variability of GT3X accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Santos-Lozano, A; Torres-Luque, G; Marín, P J; Ruiz, J R; Lucia, A; Garatachea, N

    2012-12-01

    The main purpose of this study was to assess the inter-monitor reliability of the tri-axial GT3X Actigraph accelerometer over a range of physical activities (PA). This device collects motion data on each of the vertical (Y), horizontal right-left (X), and horizontal front-back (Z) axes and also calculates the vector summed value √X(2)+Y(2)+Z(2) known as 'vector magnitude' (VM). 8 GT3X accelerometers were worn at the same time by the same participant. Accelerometers were placed back-to-front, all facing forward and in sets of 4 securely taped together, attached to a belt and allocating each block above either left or right hip at waist level. Inter-monitor reliability was assessed during 6 conditions: rest, walking (4 and 6 km·h(-1)), running (8 and 10 km·h(-1)) and repeated sit-to-stand (40 times·min(-1)). The intra-class correlation coefficients were high for X, Y and Z axes (i.e., all ≥ 0.925) and for VM (≥ 0.946). In conclusion, we found good inter-instrument reliability of the GT3X accelerometer across all planes, yet our results also suggest that the X and Z axes do not provide further benefits over the 'traditional' Y-axis to assess the movement in typical PA.

  20. Micro-Accelerometers Monitor Equipment Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    Glenn Research Center awarded SBIR funding to Ann Arbor, Michigan-based Evigia Systems to develop a miniaturized accelerometer to account for gravitational effects in space experiments. The company has gone on to implement the technology in its suite of prognostic sensors, which are used to monitor the integrity of industrial machinery. As a result, five employees have been hired.

  1. Miniature piezoelectric triaxial accelerometer measures cranial accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deboo, G. J.; Rogallo, V. L.

    1966-01-01

    Tiny triaxial accelerometer whose sensing elements are piezoelectric ceramic beams measures human cranial accelerations when a subject is exposed to a centrifuge or other simulators of g environments. This device could be considered for application in dental, medical, and automotive safety research.

  2. Factors affecting the predictive validity of the Braden Scale.

    PubMed

    Capobianco, M L; McDonald, D D

    1996-01-01

    This descriptive correlational study explored the predictive validity of the Braden Scale and factors affecting it A Braden score was determined within 4 hours of admission for 50 adult medical/surgical inpatients. Independent skin assessments were made three times a week and at discharge. Fourteen patients (28%) developed pressure ulcers. A Braden score cutoff of 18 or less resulted in a 71% sensitivity, 83% specificity, 63% predictive value of a positive test, and 88% predictive value of a negative test. Three of the four patients incorrectly predicted to be not at risk scored "inadequate" on the nutrition subscale. Two of the four also were underweight. Of the six patients incorrectly predicted at risk for a pressure ulcer, three had been placed on air mattresses and were receiving levothyroxine (Synthroid). This study provides further evidence of the Braden Scale's predictive validity. The results suggest that patients who are underweight or getting inadequate nutrition be considered at increased risk for pressure ulcers.

  3. Distributed Computing and MEMS Accelerometers: The Quake Catcher Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, J. F.; Cochran, E. S.; Christensen, C.; Jakka, R. S.

    2008-12-01

    Recent advances in distributed computing provide exciting opportunities for seismic data collection. We are in the early stages of implementing a high density, low cost strong-motion network for rapid response and early warning by placing accelerometers in schools, homes, offices, government buildings, fire houses and more. The Quake Catcher Network (QCN) employs existing networked laptops and desktops to form a dense, distributed computing seismic network. Costs for this network are minimal because the QCN uses 1) strong motion sensors (accelerometers) already internal to many laptops and 2) low-cost universal serial bus (USB) accelerometers for use with desktops. The Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC!) provides a free, proven paradigm for involving the public in large-scale computational research projects. The QCN leverages public participation to fully implement the seismic network. As such engaging the public to participate in seismic data collection is not only an integral part of the project, but an added value to the QCN. The software provides the client-user with a screen-saver displaying seismic data recorded on their laptop or recently detected earthquakes. Furthermore, this project installs sensors in K-12 classrooms as an educational tool for teaching science. Through a variety of interactive experiments students can learn about earthquakes and the hazards earthquakes pose. In the first six months of limited release of the QCN software, we successfully received triggers and waveforms from laptops near the M 4.7 April 25, 2008 earthquake in Reno, Nevada and the M 5.4 July 29, 2008 earthquake in Chino, California (as well as a few 3.6 and higher events). This fall we continued to expand the network further by installing seismometers in K-12 schools, museums, and government buildings in the greater Los Angeles basin and the San Francisco Bay Area. By summer 2009 we expect to have 1000 USB sensors deployed in California, in addition

  4. The scaling of safety factor in spider draglines.

    PubMed

    Ortlepp, Christine; Gosline, John M

    2008-09-01

    This study documents the effect of body mass on the size and strength of draglines produced by the orb-weaving spider Araneus diadematus and the jumping spider Salticus scenicus. Silk samples obtained from individuals spanning the range from first-instar juveniles to gravid adults were tested to determine both the properties of the silk material and the strength and static safety factor of the draglines produced by each individual spider. Analysis of material properties indicates that the tensile strength and extensibility of the silks employed by each species are identical over the entire size range of the species. Analysis of the breaking forces for individual draglines, however, indicates that the draglines scale allometrically with the spider's body mass. For Araneus, breaking force (N) scales with body mass (kg) as Fmax=11.2M0.786, and the static safety factor (S(BW)=Fmax/Mg) scales as S(BW)=1.14M(-0.214). For Salticus, Fmax=0.363M0.66 and S(BW)=0.037M(-0.34). Thus, static safety factors decrease as these spiders grow, with values falling to 4-6 for adult Araneus and to 1-2 for adult Salticus. Analysis of these results suggests that the safety lines produced by these two species are not able to absorb the impact energy of most falls with a fixed length of pre-existing silk, except in the smallest of the Araneus spiders. It is therefore likely that both spiders must draw new silk from their spinnerets during falls to keep the dynamic loads on their safety-lines below failure levels. PMID:18723542

  5. Flight calibration assessment of HiRAP accelerometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Larman, Kevin T.; Moast, Christina D.

    1993-01-01

    A flight derived method of calibrating the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP) flight data has been developed and is discussed for Shuttle Orbiter missions STS-35 and STS-40. These two mission data sets have been analyzed using ground calibration factors and flight derived calibration factors. This flight technique evolved early in the flight program when it was recognized that ground calibration factors are insufficient to determine absolute low-acceleration levels. The application of flight calibration factors to the data sets from these missions produced calibrated acceleration levels within an accuracy of less than +/- 1.5 microgravity of zero during a time in the flight when the acceleration level was known to be less than 1.0 microgravity. This analysis further confirms the theory that flight calibrations are required in order to obtain the absolute measurement of low-frequency, low-acceleration flight signals.

  6. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Sport Organizational Effectiveness Scale.

    PubMed

    Karteroliotis, Konstantinos; Papadimitriou, Dimitra

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the factorial validity of the 5-factor model of sport organizational effectiveness developed by Papadimitriou and Taylor. This questionnaire has 33 items which assess five composite effectiveness dimensions pertinent to the operation of sport organizations: calibre of the board and external liaisons, interest in athletes, internal procedures, long term planning, and sport science support. The multiple constituency approach was used as a theoretical framework for developing this scale. Data were obtained from respondents affiliated with 20 Greek national sport organizations with a questionnaire. Analysis indicated that the 5-factor model of effectiveness is workable in assessing the organizational performance of nonprofit sport organizations. The application of the multiple constituency approach in studying sport organizational effectiveness was also suggested.

  7. Factor analysis of the Iowa family interaction rating scales.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Hannah C; Bradbury, Thomas N; Trail, Thomas E; Karney, Benjamin R

    2011-12-01

    Observational coding systems are uniquely suited for investigating interactional processes in couples and families, but their validity in diverse populations is unknown. We addressed this issue by applying factor analysis to interactional data collected from couples in low-income neighborhoods and coded with the widely used Iowa Family Interaction Rating Scales (IFIRS). Our sample of 414 low-income, ethnically diverse newlywed couples each provided 24-min samples of problem-solving and social support behavior. Interrater reliabilities were strong, and the resultant factors--reflecting positive, negative, and effective communication--were very similar to those obtained with White middle-class samples. Additionally, couples were more negative, less positive, and less effective in problem-solving conversations than in socially supportive conversations, further supporting the validity of the IFIRS in this population. We conclude by discussing the strengths and shortcomings of the IFIRS when used in a low-income, ethnically diverse population.

  8. In-orbit demonstration of novel solid state micro-accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulzer, Gerhard; de Coulon, Yves; Roussel, Philippe; Trischberger, Manfred

    A self-contained sensor package comprising twelve solid state micro-accelerometers with its support system was built under ESA contract and flown in a Get-Away-Special canister onboard the Columbia orbiter during the STS-40 mission. The aim of this experiment is to characterize these novel accelerometers in space in μ-gravity environment and to prove the technology's potential in space applications. The successful flight on 6 June 1991 returned excellent calibration data of the accelerometers and gave insight into the real μ-gravity level of the Space Shuttle. Whilst the demonstrated sensitivity is in the order of 50 × 10 -9g in the equivalent noise bandwidth, the residual gravitational disturbances of the Shuttle are at least a factor of 10 above. Current and future space projects will benefit from the ultrasensitive small size, low weight, low power sensors.

  9. In-orbit demonstration of novel Solid State Micro-Accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulzer, Gerhard; de Coulon, Yves; Roussel, Philippe; Trischberger, Manfred

    1991-10-01

    A selfcontained sensor package comprising 12 Solid State Micro-Accelerometers with its support system flown in a Get-Away-Special canister onboard the Columbia orbiter during the STS 40 mission. The aim of this experiment is to characterize these novel accelerometers in space in microgravity environment and to prove the technology's potential in space applications. The successful flight on 6th June 1991 returned excellent calibration data of the accelerometer and gave insight into the real microgravity level of the Space Shuttle. While the demonstrated sensitivity is in the order of 50 x 10 exp -9 g, the residual gravitational disturbances of the Shuttle are at least a factor of 10 above. Current and future space projects will benefit from the ultrasensitive small size, low weight/low power sensors.

  10. Moisture-Induced Alumina Scale Spallation: The Hydrogen Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2009-01-01

    For some time our community has been concerned with interfacial spallation of protective alumina scales, not just upon immediate cooldown, but as a time-delayed phenomenon. Moisture-induced delayed spallation (MIDS) and desktop spallation (DTS) of TBC's refer to this process. It is most apparent for relatively adherent alumina scales that have survived cool down in a dry environment, built up considerable thickness and strain energy, and have been somewhat damaged, such as by cyclic oxidation cracking. Indeed, a "sweet zone" can be defined that maximizes the observed effect as a function of all the relevant factors. Moisture has been postulated to serve as a source of interfacial hydrogen embrittlement derived from reaction with aluminum in the alloy at an exposed interface. The purpose of this monograph is to trace the close analogy of this phenomenon to other hydrogen effects, such as embrittlement of aluminides and blistering of alloys and anodic alumina films. A formalized, top-down, logic tree structure is presented as a guide to this discussion. A theoretical basis for interfacial weakening by hydrogen is first cited, as are demonstrations of hydrogen as a reaction product or detected interfacial species. Further support is provided by critical experiments that produce the same moisture effect, but by isolating hydrogen from other potential causative factors. These experiments include tests in H2-containing atmospheres or cathodic hydrogen charging.

  11. Moisture-Induced Alumina Scale Spallation: The Hydrogen Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2010-01-01

    For some time the oxidation community has been concerned with interfacial spallation of protective alumina scales, not just upon immediate cool down, but as a time-delayed phenomenon. Moisture-induced delayed spallation (MIDS) and desktop spallation (DTS) of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) refer to this process. It is most apparent for relatively adherent alumina scales that have survived initial cool down in a dry environment, have built up considerable thickness and strain energy, and have been somewhat damaged, such as by cyclic oxidation cracking. Indeed, a "sensitive zone" can be described that maximizes the observed effect as a function of all the relevant factors. Moisture has been postulated to serve as a source of interfacial hydrogen embrittlement. Hydrogen is derived from reaction with aluminum in the alloy at an exposed interface. The purpose of this monograph is to trace the close analogy of this phenomenon to other hydrogen-induced effects, such as embrittlement of aluminides and blistering of alloys and anodic alumina films. A formalized, top-down, logic-tree structure is presented as a guide to this discussion. A theoretical basis for interfacial weakening by hydrogen is first cited, as are demonstrations of hydrogen detection as a reaction product or interfacial species. Further support is provided by critical experiments that recreate the moisture effect, but by isolating hydrogen from other potential causative factors. These experiments include tests in H 2-containing atmospheres or cathodic hydrogen charging. Accordingly, they strongly indicate that interfacial hydrogen, derived from moisture, is the key chemical species accounting for delayed alumina scale spallation.

  12. MGRA: Motion Gesture Recognition via Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Feng; You, Shujuan; Wei, Meiyu; Zhang, Yongtuo; Guo, Zhongwen

    2016-01-01

    Accelerometers have been widely embedded in most current mobile devices, enabling easy and intuitive operations. This paper proposes a Motion Gesture Recognition system (MGRA) based on accelerometer data only, which is entirely implemented on mobile devices and can provide users with real-time interactions. A robust and unique feature set is enumerated through the time domain, the frequency domain and singular value decomposition analysis using our motion gesture set containing 11,110 traces. The best feature vector for classification is selected, taking both static and mobile scenarios into consideration. MGRA exploits support vector machine as the classifier with the best feature vector. Evaluations confirm that MGRA can accommodate a broad set of gesture variations within each class, including execution time, amplitude and non-gestural movement. Extensive evaluations confirm that MGRA achieves higher accuracy under both static and mobile scenarios and costs less computation time and energy on an LG Nexus 5 than previous methods. PMID:27089336

  13. Characterization of accelerometer mountings in shock environments

    SciTech Connect

    Boatman, V.I.; Solomon, O.M. Jr.

    1986-08-01

    This report describes the shock test characterization of four accelerometer mounting techniques which are: adiprene and wax, polysulfide rubber and wax, restrained adiprene, and hard mount. The mountings have all been used in field tests, and the shock testing provides some simulation of the field test environments. The characteristics of these mountings are analyzed in the time-domain and in the frequency-domain and are compared to the response of a reference accelerometer at two different shock levels, approximately 2 kg and 7 kg. While soft mounting techniques can be used to guarantee acceleratometers survival in severe mechanical environments, this report documents the tested mounting materials to be highly nonlinear. These nonlinearities result in significant data distortion at frequencies above a few hundred hertz.

  14. Multi-Axis Accelerometer Calibration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, Tom; Parker, Peter

    2010-01-01

    A low-cost, portable, and simplified system has been developed that is suitable for in-situ calibration and/or evaluation of multi-axis inertial measurement instruments. This system overcomes facility restrictions and maintains or improves the calibration quality for users of accelerometer-based instruments with applications in avionics, experimental wind tunnel research, and force balance calibration applications. The apparatus quickly and easily positions a multi-axis accelerometer system into a precisely known orientation suitable for in-situ quality checks and calibration. In addition, the system incorporates powerful and sophisticated statistical methods, known as response surface methodology and statistical quality control. These methods improve calibration quality, reduce calibration time, and allow for increased calibration frequency, which enables the monitoring of instrument stability over time.

  15. MGRA: Motion Gesture Recognition via Accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Hong, Feng; You, Shujuan; Wei, Meiyu; Zhang, Yongtuo; Guo, Zhongwen

    2016-01-01

    Accelerometers have been widely embedded in most current mobile devices, enabling easy and intuitive operations. This paper proposes a Motion Gesture Recognition system (MGRA) based on accelerometer data only, which is entirely implemented on mobile devices and can provide users with real-time interactions. A robust and unique feature set is enumerated through the time domain, the frequency domain and singular value decomposition analysis using our motion gesture set containing 11,110 traces. The best feature vector for classification is selected, taking both static and mobile scenarios into consideration. MGRA exploits support vector machine as the classifier with the best feature vector. Evaluations confirm that MGRA can accommodate a broad set of gesture variations within each class, including execution time, amplitude and non-gestural movement. Extensive evaluations confirm that MGRA achieves higher accuracy under both static and mobile scenarios and costs less computation time and energy on an LG Nexus 5 than previous methods. PMID:27089336

  16. Accurate Telescope Mount Positioning with MEMS Accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, L.; Jaskó, A.; Pál, A.; Csépány, G.

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes the advantages and challenges of applying microelectromechanical accelerometer systems (MEMS accelerometers) in order to attain precise, accurate, and stateless positioning of telescope mounts. This provides a completely independent method from other forms of electronic, optical, mechanical or magnetic feedback or real-time astrometry. Our goal is to reach the subarcminute range which is considerably smaller than the field-of-view of conventional imaging telescope systems. Here we present how this subarcminute accuracy can be achieved with very cheap MEMS sensors and we also detail how our procedures can be extended in order to attain even finer measurements. In addition, our paper discusses how can a complete system design be implemented in order to be a part of a telescope control system.

  17. Testing the mapping between redshift and cosmic scale factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtak, Radosław; Prada, Francisco

    2016-05-01

    The canonical redshift-scale factor relation, 1/a = 1 + z, is a key element in the standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model of the big bang cosmology. Despite its fundamental role, this relation has not yet undergone any observational tests since Lemaître and Hubble established the expansion of the Universe. It is strictly based on the assumption of the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker metric describing a locally homogeneous and isotropic universe and that photons move on null geodesics of the metric. Thus any violation of this assumption, within general relativity or modified gravity, can yield a different mapping between the model redshift z = 1/a - 1 and the actually observed redshift zobs, i.e. zobs ≠ z. Here, we perform a simple test of consistency for the standard redshift-scale factor relation by determining simultaneous observational constraints on the concordance ΛCDM cosmological parameters and a generalized redshift mapping z = f(zobs). Using current baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and Type Ia supernova (SN) data we demonstrate that the generalized redshift mapping is strongly degenerated with dark energy. Marginalization over a class of monotonic functions f(zobs) changes substantially degeneracy between matter and dark energy density: the density parameters become anticorrelated with nearly vertical axis of degeneracy. Furthermore, we show that current SN and BAO data, analysed in a framework with the generalized redshift mapping, do not constrain dark energy unless the BAO data include the measurements from the Ly α forest of high-redshift quasars.

  18. The GRADIO accelerometer - Design and development status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, A.; Touboul, P.

    The concept of Satellite Gravity Gradiometry based on differential microaccelerometry has been proposed by ONERA in the early eighties. Since 1986, an important effort is devoted to the development of the GRADIO accelerometers. Their configuration has been optimized for the ARISTOTELES mission with the objective of 0.01 Eotvos resolution for an integrating time of 4 s. The achieved resolution, better than 10 exp -9 G, is limited by the actual stability of alignments on the testing equipment.

  19. A novel differential optical fiber accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Shaohua; Zhao, Jiang; Hong, Guangwei; Jia, Bo

    2013-08-01

    The development of sensitive fiber-optic accelerometers is a subject of continuing interest. To acquire high resolution, Michelson phase interferometric techniques are widely adopted. Among the variety structures, the compliant cylinder approach is particularly attractive due to its high sensitivity that is defined as the induced phase shift per applied acceleration. While the two arms of Michelson interferometer should be at the same optical path, it is inconvenient to adjust the two arms' length to equal, also the polarization instability and phase random drift will cause a signal decline. To overcome these limitations, a novel optical fiber accelerometer based on differential interferometric techniques is proposed and investigated. The interferometer is a Sagnac-like white light interferometer, which means the bandwidth of laser spectrum can be as wide as tens nanometers. This interferometer was firstly reported by Levin in 1990s. Lights are divided to two paths before entering the coupler. To induce time difference, one passes through a delay arm and another goes a direct arm. After modulated by the sensing component, they reflect to opposite arm. The sensing part is formed by a seismic mass that is held to only one compliant cylinder, where the single-mode optical fiber is wrapped tightly. When sticking to vibrations, the cylinder compresses or stretches as a spring. The corresponding changes in cylinder circumference lead to strain in the sensing fibers, which is detected as an optical phase shift by the interferometer. The lights from two arms reach the vibration source at different time, sensing a different accelerate speed; produce a different optic path difference. Integrating the dissimilarity of the accelerated speed by time can obtain the total acceleration graph. A shaker's vibration has been tested by the proposed accelerometer referring to a standard piezoelectric accelerometer. A 99.8% linearity of the optical phase shift to the ground acceleration

  20. Micromachined accelerometer design, modeling and validation

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, B.R.; Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Montague, S.; Murray, J.R.; Rey, D.; Smith, J.H.

    1998-04-01

    Micromachining technologies enable the development of low-cost devices capable of sensing motion in a reliable and accurate manner. The development of various surface micromachined accelerometers and gyroscopes to sense motion is an ongoing activity at Sandia National Laboratories. In addition, Sandia has developed a fabrication process for integrating both the micromechanical structures and microelectronics circuitry of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) on the same chip. This integrated surface micromachining process provides substantial performance and reliability advantages in the development of MEMS accelerometers and gyros. A Sandia MEMS team developed a single-axis, micromachined silicon accelerometer capable of surviving and measuring very high accelerations, up to 50,000 times the acceleration due to gravity or 50 k-G (actually measured to 46,000 G). The Sandia integrated surface micromachining process was selected for fabrication of the sensor due to the extreme measurement sensitivity potential associated with integrated microelectronics. Measurement electronics capable of measuring at to Farad (10{sup {minus}18} Farad) changes in capacitance were required due to the very small accelerometer proof mass (< 200 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} gram) used in this surface micromachining process. The small proof mass corresponded to small sensor deflections which in turn required very sensitive electronics to enable accurate acceleration measurement over a range of 1 to 50 k-G. A prototype sensor, based on a suspended plate mass configuration, was developed and the details of the design, modeling, and validation of the device will be presented in this paper. The device was analyzed using both conventional lumped parameter modeling techniques and finite element analysis tools. The device was tested and performed well over its design range.

  1. High performance MEMS accelerometers for concrete SHM applications and comparison with COTS accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavitha, S.; Joseph Daniel, R.; Sumangala, K.

    2016-01-01

    Accelerometers used for civil and huge mechanical structural health monitoring intend to measure the shift in the natural frequency of the monitored structures (<100 Hz) and such sensors should have large sensitivity and extremely low noise floor. Sensitivity of accelerometers is inversely proportional to the frequency squared. Commercial MEMS (Micro Electro-Mechanical System) accelerometers that are generally designed for large bandwidth (e.g 25 kHz in ADXL150) have poor sensor level sensitivity and therefore uses complex signal conditioning electronics to achieve large sensitivity and low noise floor which in turn results in higher cost. In this work, an attempt has been made to design MEMS capacitive and piezoresistive accelerometers for smaller bandwidth using IntelliSuite and CoventorWare MEMS tools respectively. The various performance metrics have been obtained using simulation experiments and the results show that these sensors have excellent voltage sensitivity, noise performance and high resolution at sensor level and are even superior to commercial MEMS accelerometers.

  2. Accelerometer Data Analysis and Presentation Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Hrovat, Kenneth; McPherson, Kevin; Moskowitz, Milton E.; Reckart, Timothy

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center's Principal Investigator Microgravity Services project analyzes Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment and Space Acceleration Measurement System data for principal investigators of microgravity experiments. Principal investigators need a thorough understanding of data analysis techniques so that they can request appropriate analyses to best interpret accelerometer data. Accelerometer data sampling and filtering is introduced along with the related topics of resolution and aliasing. Specific information about the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment and Space Acceleration Measurement System data sampling and filtering is given. Time domain data analysis techniques are discussed and example environment interpretations are made using plots of acceleration versus time, interval average acceleration versus time, interval root-mean-square acceleration versus time, trimmean acceleration versus time, quasi-steady three dimensional histograms, and prediction of quasi-steady levels at different locations. An introduction to Fourier transform theory and windowing is provided along with specific analysis techniques and data interpretations. The frequency domain analyses discussed are power spectral density versus frequency, cumulative root-mean-square acceleration versus frequency, root-mean-square acceleration versus frequency, one-third octave band root-mean-square acceleration versus frequency, and power spectral density versus frequency versus time (spectrogram). Instructions for accessing NASA Lewis Research Center accelerometer data and related information using the internet are provided.

  3. MEMS accelerometers in accurate mount positioning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, László; Pál, András.; Jaskó, Attila

    2014-07-01

    In order to attain precise, accurate and stateless positioning of telescope mounts we apply microelectromechanical accelerometer systems (also known as MEMS accelerometers). In common practice, feedback from the mount position is provided by electronic, optical or magneto-mechanical systems or via real-time astrometric solution based on the acquired images. Hence, MEMS-based systems are completely independent from these mechanisms. Our goal is to investigate the advantages and challenges of applying such devices and to reach the sub-arcminute range { that is well smaller than the field-of-view of conventional imaging telescope systems. We present how this sub-arcminute accuracy can be achieved with very cheap MEMS sensors. Basically, these sensors yield raw output within an accuracy of a few degrees. We show what kind of calibration procedures could exploit spherical and cylindrical constraints between accelerometer output channels in order to achieve the previously mentioned accuracy level. We also demonstrate how can our implementation be inserted in a telescope control system. Although this attainable precision is less than both the resolution of telescope mount drive mechanics and the accuracy of astrometric solutions, the independent nature of attitude determination could significantly increase the reliability of autonomous or remotely operated astronomical observations.

  4. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Educators' Attitudes toward Educational Research Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozturk, Mehmet Ali

    2011-01-01

    This article reports results of a confirmatory factor analysis performed to cross-validate the factor structure of the Educators' Attitudes Toward Educational Research Scale. The original scale had been developed by the author and revised based on the results of an exploratory factor analysis. In the present study, the revised scale was given to…

  5. A Factor Analysis of the Laurelton Self-Concept Scale. Volume 1, Number 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Robert H.; Budoff, Milton

    Items from the Laurelton Self Concept Scale (LSCS) and the Locus of Control Scale for Children were administered to 172 male and female educable mental retardates to examine the LSCS by R factor analysis. It was found that the Self Concept Scale is factor analyzable when appropriately administered to educables. The small factors grouped into…

  6. Factors influencing scores on the Social Responsiveness Scale

    PubMed Central

    Hus, Vanessa; Bishop, Somer; Gotham, Katherine; Huerta, Marisela; Lord, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Background The Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) is a parent-completed screening questionnaire often used to measure ASD severity. Although child characteristics are known to influence scores from other ASD-symptom measures, as well as parent-questionnaires more broadly, there has been limited consideration of how non-ASD-specific factors may affect interpretation of SRS scores. Previous studies have explored effects of behavior problems on SRS specificity, but have not addressed influences on the use of the SRS as a quantitative measure of ASD-symptoms. Method Raw scores (SRS-Raw) from parent-completed SRS were analyzed for 2,368 probands with ASD and 1,913 unaffected siblings. Regression analyses were used to assess associations between SRS scores and demographic, language, cognitive, and behavior measures. Results For probands, higher SRS-Raw were associated with greater non-ASD behavior problems, higher age, and more impaired language and cognitive skills, as well as scores from other parent report measures of social development and ASD-symptoms. For unaffected siblings, having more behavior problems predicted higher SRS-Raw; male gender, younger age and poorer adaptive social and expressive communication skills also showed small, but significant effects. Conclusions When using the SRS as a quantitative phenotype measure, the influence of behavior problems, age, and expressive language or cognitive level on scores must be considered. If effects of non-ASD-specific factors are not addressed, SRS scores are more appropriately interpreted as indicating general levels of impairment, than as severity of ASD-specific symptoms or social impairment. Further research is needed to consider how these factors influence the SRS’ sensitivity and specificity in large, clinical samples including individuals with disorders other than ASD. PMID:22823182

  7. A biomimetic accelerometer inspired by the cricket's clavate hair.

    PubMed

    Droogendijk, H; de Boer, M J; Sanders, R G P; Krijnen, G J M

    2014-08-01

    Crickets use so-called clavate hairs to sense (gravitational) acceleration to obtain information on their orientation. Inspired by this clavate hair system, a one-axis biomimetic accelerometer has been developed and fabricated using surface micromachining and SU-8 lithography. An analytical model is presented for the design of the accelerometer, and guidelines are derived to reduce responsivity due to flow-induced contributions to the accelerometer's output. Measurements show that this microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) hair-based accelerometer has a resonance frequency of 320 Hz, a detection threshold of 0.10 ms(-2) and a dynamic range of more than 35 dB. The accelerometer exhibits a clear directional response to external accelerations and a low responsivity to airflow. Further, the accelerometer's physical limits with respect to noise levels are addressed and the possibility for short-term adaptation of the sensor to the environment is discussed. PMID:24920115

  8. A biomimetic accelerometer inspired by the cricket's clavate hair

    PubMed Central

    Droogendijk, H.; de Boer, M. J.; Sanders, R. G. P.; Krijnen, G. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Crickets use so-called clavate hairs to sense (gravitational) acceleration to obtain information on their orientation. Inspired by this clavate hair system, a one-axis biomimetic accelerometer has been developed and fabricated using surface micromachining and SU-8 lithography. An analytical model is presented for the design of the accelerometer, and guidelines are derived to reduce responsivity due to flow-induced contributions to the accelerometer's output. Measurements show that this microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) hair-based accelerometer has a resonance frequency of 320 Hz, a detection threshold of 0.10 ms−2 and a dynamic range of more than 35 dB. The accelerometer exhibits a clear directional response to external accelerations and a low responsivity to airflow. Further, the accelerometer's physical limits with respect to noise levels are addressed and the possibility for short-term adaptation of the sensor to the environment is discussed. PMID:24920115

  9. Factorial Structure of the Career Decision Scale: Incremental Validity of the Five-Factor Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldt, Ronald C.; Ferry, Ashley; Bullock, Melinda; Camarotti-Carvalho, Ana; Collingwood, Melinda; Eilers, Scott; Meyer, Luke; Nurre, Emily; Woelfel, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    For comparison of one-, three-, and four-factor structures of the Indecision scale of the Career Decision Scale, results of confirmatory factor analysis (N = 686) indicated the best fit for the three-factor structure. Multiple regression analysis results indicated incremental validity of the five-factor model for predicting dimensions of career…

  10. A new accelerometer recording system for shuttle use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenberg, Byron

    1990-01-01

    Microgravity investigators are interested in enhancing the capabilities and improving the information return from accelerometers used in microgravity research. In addition to improving the accelerometer sensor, efforts should be directed towards using recent advances in microprocessor technology and system design techniques to improve sensor calibration and temperature compensation, online data display and analysis, and data reduction and information storage. Results from the above areas of investigation should be combined in an integrated design for a spaceflight microgravity accelerometer package.

  11. Plastic latching accelerometer based on bistable compliant mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, B. J.; Carron, C. J.; Jensen, B. D.; Hawkins, A. R.; Schultz, S. M.

    2007-10-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication, and testing of a miniature latching accelerometer that does not require electrical power. Latching is attained by using a bistable compliant mechanism that switches from one mechanical position to another when the force on the accelerometer exceeds a threshold value. Accelerometers were fabricated by laser cutting the compliant mechanism switch out of both ABS and Delrin plastic sheets. Packaging consisted of gluing the single compliant layer to a supporting substrate. The switching thresholds of the accelerometers were varied from 10g to 800g by varying the surface area of the free moving section between 100 and 500 mm2.

  12. A three-axis ultrasensitive accelerometer for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, A.

    A three-axis ultrasensitive accelerometer ASTRE (Accelerometre Spatial Triaxial Electrostatique) is a simplified version of the GRADIO accelerometer designed for the ARISTOTELES mission, which operates by measuring the force provided by a three-axis electrostatic suspension of the proof-mass. It covers the g-spectrum from 10 exp -8 to 10 exp -4 in the frequency range dc to 5 Hz. A dedicated test bench was developed in order to preserve the accelerometer from the seismic noise. The paper presents the performance parameters of the ASTRE accelerometer and some of the design schemes.

  13. Measurement of sensor axis misalignment in fibre-optic accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeFreitas, J. M.; Wooler, J. P. F.; Nash, P. J.

    2006-07-01

    A method is described for the measurement of sensor axis misalignment relative to its mounting can for a fibre-optic accelerometer. The accelerometers investigated were based on the common cylindrical compliant mandrel design and mounted accelerometers showed typical angular misalignments of 2°. The influence of the misalignment on cross-axis sensitivity is also described for accelerometers orthogonally mounted in a three-component package. This paper was presented at the 13th International Conference on Sensors and Their Applications, held in Chatham, Kent, on 6-7 September 2005.

  14. Microcantilevers with embedded accelerometers for dynamic atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shaik, Nurul Huda; Raman, Arvind; Reifenberger, Ronald G.

    2014-02-24

    The measurement of the intermittent interaction between an oscillating nanotip and the sample surface is a key challenge in dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Accelerometers integrated onto AFM cantilevers can directly measure this interaction with minimal cantilever modification but have been difficult to realize. Here, we design and fabricate high frequency bandwidth accelerometers on AFM cantilevers to directly measure the tip acceleration in commercial AFM systems. We demonstrate a simple way of calibrating such accelerometers and present experiments using amplitude modulated AFM on freshly cleaved mica samples in water to study the response of the accelerometer.

  15. The GRADIO accelerometer: Design and development status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Alain; Touboul, M. P.

    1991-12-01

    The concept of Satellite Gravity Gradiometry (SGG) based on differential microaccelerometry as proposed in the early eighties is summarized. Work devoted to the development of the GRADIO accelerometers is described. The configuration was optimized for the Aristoteles mission with the objective of increasing resolution for an integrating time of 4 s. Thanks to the selected three axis configuration, very sensitive differential tests were carried out between two very representative laboratory models, in directions perpendicular to gravity. The resolution of these tests, limited by the actual stability of alignments of the testing equipment is described.

  16. A high-sensitivity biaxial resonant accelerometer with two-stage microleverage mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hong; Zhao, Jiuxuan; Ju, Bing-Feng; Xie, Jin

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a design and experimental evaluation of a micro-electro-mechanical system biaxial resonant accelerometer with two-stage microleverage mechanisms. The device incorporates two pairs of double-ended tuning fork resonators coupled to a single proof mass. The two-stage microleverage mechanisms possess a higher amplification factor than single-stage microleverage mechanisms, so that the proposed accelerometer has a high level of sensitivity. In addition, a low level of cross-axis sensitivity is realized because of the decoupling beams. The accelerometer is theoretically analyzed and then simulated in the system level by the finite element method. The device is fabricated in a silicon-on-insulator wafer. The experimental results demonstrate that the average differential sensitivity of the resonant accelerometer is 275 Hz g-1 at a resonant frequency of 290 kHz under a polarization voltage of 5 V. The measured cross-axis sensitivity is lower than 3.4%.

  17. Cosmological General Relativity with Scale Factor and Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Firmin J.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper the four-dimensional (4-D) space-velocity Cosmological General Relativity of Carmeli is developed by a general solution of the Einstein field equations. The Tolman metric is applied in the form where g μν is the metric tensor. We use comoving coordinates x α = ( x 0, x 1, x 2, x 3) = ( τv, r, θ, ϕ), where τ is the Hubble-Carmeli time constant, v is the universe expansion velocity and r, θ and ϕ are the spatial coordinates. We assume that μ and R are each functions of the coordinates τv and r. The vacuum mass density ρ Λ is defined in terms of a cosmological constant Λ, where the Carmeli gravitational coupling constant κ = 8 πG/ c 2 τ 2, where c is the speed of light in vacuum. This allows the definitions of the effective mass density and effective pressure where ρ is the mass density and p is the pressure. Then the energy-momentum tensor where u μ = (1,0,0,0) is the 4-velocity. The Einstein field equations are taken in the form where R μν is the Ricci tensor, κ = 8 πG/ c 2 τ 2 is Carmeli's gravitation constant, where G is Newton's constant and the trace T = g αβ T αβ . By solving the field equations (6) a space-velocity cosmology is obtained analogous to the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker space-time cosmology. We choose an equation of state such that with an evolving state parameter where R v = R v ( v) is the scale factor and w 0 and w a are constants. Carmeli's 4-D space-velocity cosmology is derived as a special case.

  18. Calibrating Accelerometers Using an Electromagnetic Launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Erik Timpson

    2012-05-13

    A Pulse Forming Network (PFN), Helical Electromagnetic Launcher (HEML), Command Module (CM), and Calibration Table (CT) were built and evaluated for the combined ability to calibrate an accelerometer. The PFN has a maximum stored energy of 19.25 kJ bank and is fired by a silicon controlled rectifier (SCR), with appropriate safety precautions. The HEML is constructed out of G-10 fiberglass and is designed to accelerate 600 grams to 10 meters per second. The CM is microcontroller based running Arduino Software. The CM has a keypad input and 7 segment outputs of the bank voltage and desired voltage. After entering a desired bank voltage, the CM controls the charge of the PFN. When the two voltages are equal it allows the fire button to send a pulse to the SCR to fire the PFN and in turn, the HEML. The HEML projectile's tip hits a target that is held by the CT. The CT consists of a table to hold the PFN and HEML, a vacuum chuck, air bearing, velocity meter and catch pot. The Target is held with the vacuum chuck awaiting impact. After impact, the air bearing allows the target to fall freely for the velocity meter to get an accurate reading. A known acceleration is determined from the known change in velocity of the target. Thus, if an accelerometer was attached to the target, the measured value can be compared to the known value.

  19. Classification of sporting activities using smartphone accelerometers.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Edmond; Monaghan, David; O'Connor, Noel E

    2013-04-19

    In this paper we present a framework that allows for the automatic identification of sporting activities using commonly available smartphones. We extract discriminative informational features from smartphone accelerometers using the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). Despite the poor quality of their accelerometers, smartphones were used as capture devices due to their prevalence in today's society. Successful classification on this basis potentially makes the technology accessible to both elite and non-elite athletes. Extracted features are used to train different categories of classifiers. No one classifier family has a reportable direct advantage in activity classification problems to date; thus we examine classifiers from each of the most widely used classifier families. We investigate three classification approaches; a commonly used SVM-based approach, an optimized classification model and a fusion of classifiers. We also investigate the effect of changing several of the DWT input parameters, including mother wavelets, window lengths and DWT decomposition levels. During the course of this work we created a challenging sports activity analysis dataset, comprised of soccer and field-hockey activities. The average maximum F-measure accuracy of 87% was achieved using a fusion of classifiers, which was 6% better than a single classifier model and 23% better than a standard SVM approach.

  20. Assessment of gait kinetics using triaxial accelerometers.

    PubMed

    Fortune, Emma; Morrow, Melissa M; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2014-10-01

    Repeated durations of dynamic activity with high ground reaction forces (GRFs) and loading rates (LRs) can be beneficial to bone health. To fully characterize dynamic activity in relation to bone health, field-based measurements of gait kinetics are desirable to assess free-living lower-extremity loading. The study aims were to determine correlations of peak vertical GRF and peak vertical LR with ankle peak vertical accelerations, and of peak resultant GRF and peak resultant LR with ankle peak resultant accelerations, and to compare them to correlations with tibia, thigh, and waist accelerations. GRF data were collected as ten healthy subjects (26 [19-34] years) performed 8-10 walking trials at velocities ranging from 0.19 to 3.05 m/s while wearing ankle, tibia, thigh, and waist accelerometers. While peak vertical accelerations of all locations were positively correlated with peak vertical GRF and LR (r² > .53, P < .001), ankle peak vertical accelerations were the most correlated (r² > .75, P < .001). All peak resultant accelerations were positively correlated with peak resultant GRF and LR (r² > .57, P < .001), with waist peak resultant acceleration being the most correlated (r² > .70, P < .001). The results suggest that ankle or waist accelerometers give the most accurate peak GRF and LR estimates and could be useful tools in relating physical activity to bone health.

  1. Classification of Sporting Activities Using Smartphone Accelerometers

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Edmond; Monaghan, David; O'Connor, Noel E.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a framework that allows for the automatic identification of sporting activities using commonly available smartphones. We extract discriminative informational features from smartphone accelerometers using the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). Despite the poor quality of their accelerometers, smartphones were used as capture devices due to their prevalence in today's society. Successful classification on this basis potentially makes the technology accessible to both elite and non-elite athletes. Extracted features are used to train different categories of classifiers. No one classifier family has a reportable direct advantage in activity classification problems to date; thus we examine classifiers from each of the most widely used classifier families. We investigate three classification approaches; a commonly used SVM-based approach, an optimized classification model and a fusion of classifiers. We also investigate the effect of changing several of the DWT input parameters, including mother wavelets, window lengths and DWT decomposition levels. During the course of this work we created a challenging sports activity analysis dataset, comprised of soccer and field-hockey activities. The average maximum F-measure accuracy of 87% was achieved using a fusion of classifiers, which was 6% better than a single classifier model and 23% better than a standard SVM approach. PMID:23604031

  2. Assessment of gait kinetics using triaxial accelerometers.

    PubMed

    Fortune, Emma; Morrow, Melissa M; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2014-10-01

    Repeated durations of dynamic activity with high ground reaction forces (GRFs) and loading rates (LRs) can be beneficial to bone health. To fully characterize dynamic activity in relation to bone health, field-based measurements of gait kinetics are desirable to assess free-living lower-extremity loading. The study aims were to determine correlations of peak vertical GRF and peak vertical LR with ankle peak vertical accelerations, and of peak resultant GRF and peak resultant LR with ankle peak resultant accelerations, and to compare them to correlations with tibia, thigh, and waist accelerations. GRF data were collected as ten healthy subjects (26 [19-34] years) performed 8-10 walking trials at velocities ranging from 0.19 to 3.05 m/s while wearing ankle, tibia, thigh, and waist accelerometers. While peak vertical accelerations of all locations were positively correlated with peak vertical GRF and LR (r² > .53, P < .001), ankle peak vertical accelerations were the most correlated (r² > .75, P < .001). All peak resultant accelerations were positively correlated with peak resultant GRF and LR (r² > .57, P < .001), with waist peak resultant acceleration being the most correlated (r² > .70, P < .001). The results suggest that ankle or waist accelerometers give the most accurate peak GRF and LR estimates and could be useful tools in relating physical activity to bone health. PMID:25010675

  3. Evaluating the Turkish Version of the Discipline Efficacy Scale (DES): Translation Adequacy and Factor Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurt, Hakan; Ekici, Gulay

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to adapt the discipline efficacy scale to Turkish language, and conduct the validity and reliability analysis of the adapted scale. The scale was applied to 157 teacher candidates. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to reveal the construct validity of the scale. The results of the exploratory…

  4. Fine scale spatial variability of microbial pesticide degradation in soil: scales, controlling factors, and implications

    PubMed Central

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Badawi, Nora; Aamand, Jens; Smets, Barth F.

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide biodegradation is a soil microbial function of critical importance for modern agriculture and its environmental impact. While it was once assumed that this activity was homogeneously distributed at the field scale, mounting evidence indicates that this is rarely the case. Here, we critically examine the literature on spatial variability of pesticide biodegradation in agricultural soil. We discuss the motivations, methods, and main findings of the primary literature. We found significant diversity in the approaches used to describe and quantify spatial heterogeneity, which complicates inter-studies comparisons. However, it is clear that the presence and activity of pesticide degraders is often highly spatially variable with coefficients of variation often exceeding 50% and frequently displays non-random spatial patterns. A few controlling factors have tentatively been identified across pesticide classes: they include some soil characteristics (pH) and some agricultural management practices (pesticide application, tillage), while other potential controlling factors have more conflicting effects depending on the site or the pesticide. Evidence demonstrating the importance of spatial heterogeneity on the fate of pesticides in soil has been difficult to obtain but modeling and experimental systems that do not include soil's full complexity reveal that this heterogeneity must be considered to improve prediction of pesticide biodegradation rates or of leaching risks. Overall, studying the spatial heterogeneity of pesticide biodegradation is a relatively new field at the interface of agronomy, microbial ecology, and geosciences and a wealth of novel data is being collected from these different disciplinary perspectives. We make suggestions on possible avenues to take full advantage of these investigations for a better understanding and prediction of the fate of pesticides in soil. PMID:25538691

  5. Fine scale spatial variability of microbial pesticide degradation in soil: scales, controlling factors, and implications.

    PubMed

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Badawi, Nora; Aamand, Jens; Smets, Barth F

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide biodegradation is a soil microbial function of critical importance for modern agriculture and its environmental impact. While it was once assumed that this activity was homogeneously distributed at the field scale, mounting evidence indicates that this is rarely the case. Here, we critically examine the literature on spatial variability of pesticide biodegradation in agricultural soil. We discuss the motivations, methods, and main findings of the primary literature. We found significant diversity in the approaches used to describe and quantify spatial heterogeneity, which complicates inter-studies comparisons. However, it is clear that the presence and activity of pesticide degraders is often highly spatially variable with coefficients of variation often exceeding 50% and frequently displays non-random spatial patterns. A few controlling factors have tentatively been identified across pesticide classes: they include some soil characteristics (pH) and some agricultural management practices (pesticide application, tillage), while other potential controlling factors have more conflicting effects depending on the site or the pesticide. Evidence demonstrating the importance of spatial heterogeneity on the fate of pesticides in soil has been difficult to obtain but modeling and experimental systems that do not include soil's full complexity reveal that this heterogeneity must be considered to improve prediction of pesticide biodegradation rates or of leaching risks. Overall, studying the spatial heterogeneity of pesticide biodegradation is a relatively new field at the interface of agronomy, microbial ecology, and geosciences and a wealth of novel data is being collected from these different disciplinary perspectives. We make suggestions on possible avenues to take full advantage of these investigations for a better understanding and prediction of the fate of pesticides in soil.

  6. Technical Reliability Assessment of the Actigraph GT1M Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Pedro; Mota, Jorge; Esliger, Dale; Welk, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the Actigraph GT1M (Pensacola, FL, USA) accelerometer activity count and step functions. Fifty GT1M accelerometers were initialized to collect simultaneous acceleration counts and steps data using 15-sec epochs. All reliability testing was completed using a mechanical shaker plate to…

  7. Identification of Accelerometer Nonwear Time and Sedentary Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Melody; Badland, Hannah M.; Schofield, Grant M.; Shepherd, Janine

    2011-01-01

    The primary aim of the current study was to investigate the accuracy of various automated rules for determining accelerometer nonwear time in a sample of predominantly desk-based office workers (using their self-reported nonwear times as a criterion). Second, the authors examined the effect of applying these rules to accelerometer data retention…

  8. Validation of a wireless accelerometer network for energy expenditure measurement.

    PubMed

    Montoye, Alexander H K; Dong, Bo; Biswas, Subir; Pfeiffer, Karin A

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate a wireless network of accelerometers and compare it to a hip-mounted accelerometer for predicting energy expenditure in a semi-structured environment. Adults (n = 25) aged 18-30 engaged in 14 sedentary, ambulatory, exercise, and lifestyle activities over a 60-min protocol while wearing a portable metabolic analyser, hip-mounted accelerometer, and wireless network of three accelerometers worn on the right wrist, thigh, and ankle. Participants chose the order and duration of activities. Artificial neural networks were created separately for the wireless network and hip accelerometer for energy expenditure prediction. The wireless network had higher correlations (r = 0.79 vs. r = 0.72, P < 0.01) but similar root mean square error (2.16 vs. 2.09 METs, P > 0.05) to the hip accelerometer. Measured (from metabolic analyser) and predicted energy expenditure from the hip accelerometer were significantly different for the 3 of the 14 activities (lying down, sweeping, and cycle fast); conversely, measured and predicted energy expenditure from the wireless network were not significantly different for any activity. In conclusion, the wireless network yielded a small improvement over the hip accelerometer, providing evidence that the wireless network can produce accurate estimates of energy expenditure in adults participating in a range of activities.

  9. Investigating the Factor Structure of the Blog Attitude Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahsavar, Zahra; Tan, Bee Hoon; Aryadoust, S. Vahid

    2010-01-01

    Due to the wide application of advanced technology in education, many attitude scales have been developed to evaluate learners' attitudes toward educational tools. However, with the rapid development of emerging technologies, using blogs as one of the Web 2.0 tools is still in its infancy and few blog attitude scales have been developed yet.…

  10. Factor Structure of Child Behavior Scale Scores in Peruvian Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Erin L.; Schaefer, Barbara A.; Soto, Cesar Merino; Simmons, Crystal S.; Anguiano, Rebecca; Brett, Jeremy; Holman, Alea; Martin, Justin F.; Hata, Heidi K.; Roberts, Kimberly J.; Mello, Zena R.; Worrell, Frank C.

    2011-01-01

    Behavior rating scales aid in the identification of problem behaviors, as well as the development of interventions to reduce such behavior. Although scores on many behavior rating scales have been validated in the United States, there have been few such studies in other cultural contexts. In this study, the structural validity of scores on a…

  11. An Exploratory Investigation of the Factor Structure of the Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales (RIAS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dombrowski, Stefan C.; Watkins, Marley W.; Brogan, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the factor structure of the Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales (RIAS) using rigorous exploratory factor analytic and factor extraction procedures. The results of this study indicate that the RIAS is a single factor test. Despite these results, higher order factor analysis using the Schmid-Leiman procedure indicates…

  12. Factor Structure of the Social Appearance Anxiety Scale in Turkish Early Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Ertugrul; Topkaya, Nursel

    2015-01-01

    Although the Social Appearance Anxiety Scale (SAAS) is most often validated with the use of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) on undergraduate students, exploratory factor analysis and multiple factor retention decision criteria necessitate the analysis of underlying factor structure to prevent over and under factoring as well as to reveal…

  13. Problems with Single Interest Scales: Implications of the General Factor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracey, Terence J. G.

    2012-01-01

    The presence of the general factor in interest and self-efficacy assessment and its meaning are reviewed. The general factor is found in all interest and self-efficacy assessment and has been viewed as (a) a nuisance factor with little effect on assessment, (b) a variable having substantive meaning and thus worthy of including in interpretation,…

  14. High sensitivity optical waveguide accelerometer based on Fano resonance.

    PubMed

    Wan, Fenghua; Qian, Guang; Li, Ruozhou; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Tong

    2016-08-20

    An optical waveguide accelerometer based on tunable asymmetrical Fano resonance in a ring-resonator-coupled Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) is proposed and analyzed. A Fano resonance accelerometer has a relatively large workspace of coupling coefficients with high sensitivity, which has potential application in inertial navigation, missile guidance, and attitude control of satellites. Due to the interference between a high-Q resonance pathway and a coherent background pathway, a steep asymmetric line shape is generated, which greatly improves the sensitivity of this accelerometer. The sensitivity of the accelerometer is about 111.75 mW/g. A 393-fold increase in sensitivity is achieved compared with a conventional MZI accelerometer and is approximately equal to the single ring structure.

  15. High sensitivity optical waveguide accelerometer based on Fano resonance.

    PubMed

    Wan, Fenghua; Qian, Guang; Li, Ruozhou; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Tong

    2016-08-20

    An optical waveguide accelerometer based on tunable asymmetrical Fano resonance in a ring-resonator-coupled Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) is proposed and analyzed. A Fano resonance accelerometer has a relatively large workspace of coupling coefficients with high sensitivity, which has potential application in inertial navigation, missile guidance, and attitude control of satellites. Due to the interference between a high-Q resonance pathway and a coherent background pathway, a steep asymmetric line shape is generated, which greatly improves the sensitivity of this accelerometer. The sensitivity of the accelerometer is about 111.75 mW/g. A 393-fold increase in sensitivity is achieved compared with a conventional MZI accelerometer and is approximately equal to the single ring structure. PMID:27556984

  16. Factor Structure of the Student-Teacher Relationship Scale for Norwegian School-Age Children Explored with Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drugli, May Britt; Hjemdal, Odin

    2013-01-01

    The validity of the Student-Teacher Relationship Scale (STRS) was examined in a national sample of 863 Norwegian schoolchildren in grades 1-7 (aged 6-13). The original factor structure of the STRS was tested by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The CFA results did not support the original three-factor structure of the STRS. Subsequent CFA of the…

  17. A high performance, variable capacitance accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilner, L. Bruce

    1988-12-01

    A variable capacitance acceleration sensor is described. Manufactured using silicon microfabrication techniques, the sensor uses a midplane, flat plate suspension, gas damping, and overrange stops. The sensor is assembled from three silicon wafers, using anodic bonds to inlays of borosilicate glass. Typical sensor properties are 7-pF active capacitance, 3-pF tare capacitance, a response of 0.05 pF/G, a resonance frequency of 3.4 kHz, and damping 0.7 critical. It is concluded that this sensor, with appropriate electronics, forms an accelerometer with an order-of-magnitude greater sensitivity-bandwidth product than a comparable piezoresistive acclerometer, and with extraordinary shock resistance.

  18. Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analyses of the Multicultural Teaching Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yan; Montgomery, Diane

    2011-01-01

    The ongoing conceptual controversy of cultural competence for preservice teachers led to the current study that explored the underlying structure of cultural competence through exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis methods. A total of 793 preservice teachers from two large Midwestern universities completed the…

  19. Validation study of Polar V800 accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Vicente, Adrián; De Cocker, Katrien; Garatachea, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Background The correct quantification of physical activity (PA) and energy expenditure (EE) in daily life is an important target for researchers and professionals. The objective of this paper is to study the validity of the Polar V800 for the quantification of PA and the estimation of EE against the ActiGraph (ActiTrainer) in healthy young adults. Methods Eighteen Caucasian active people (50% women) aged between 19–23 years wore an ActiTrainer on the right hip and a Polar V800 on the preferred wrist during 7 days. Paired samples t-tests were used to analyze differences in outcomes between devices, and Pearson’s correlation coefficients to examine the correlation between outcomes. The agreement was studied using the Bland-Altman method. Also, the association between the difference and the magnitude of the measurement (heteroscedasticity) was examined. Sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC value) were calculated to evaluate the ability of the devices to accurately define a person who fulfills the recommendation of 10,000 daily steps. Results The devices significantly differed from each other on all outcomes (P<0.05), except for Polar V800’s alerts vs. ActiTrainer’s 1 hour sedentary bouts (P=0.595) and Polar V800’s walking time vs. ActiTrainer’s lifestyle time (P=0.484). Heteroscedasticity analyses were significant for all outcomes, except for Kcal and sitting time. The ROC-AUC value was fair (0.781±0.048) and the sensitivity and specificity was 98% and 58%, respectively. Conclusions The Polar V800 accelerometer has a comparable validity to the accelerometer in free-living conditions, regarding “1 hour sedentary bouts” and “V800’s walking time vs. ActiTrainer’s lifestyle time” in young adults. PMID:27570772

  20. Development of wafer-level-packaging technology for simultaneous sealing of accelerometer and gyroscope under different pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aono, T.; Suzuki, K.; Kanamaru, M.; Okada, R.; Maeda, D.; Hayashi, M.; Isono, Y.

    2016-10-01

    This research demonstrates a newly developed anodic bonding-based wafer-level-packaging technique to simultaneously seal an accelerometer in the atmosphere and a gyroscope in a vacuum with a glass cap for micro-electromechanical systems sensors. It is necessary for the accelerometer, with a damping oscillator, to be sealed in the atmosphere to achieve a high-speed response. As the gyroscope can achieve high sensitivity with a large displacement at the resonant frequency without air-damping, the gyroscope must be sealed in a vacuum. The technique consists of three processing steps: the first bonding step in the atmosphere for the accelerometer, the pressure control step and the second bonding step in a vacuum for the gyroscope. The process conditions were experimentally determined to achieve higher shear strength at the interface of the packaging. The packaging performance of the accelerometer and gyroscope after wafer-level packaging was also investigated using a laser Doppler velocimeter at room temperature. The amplitude at the resonant frequency of the accelerometer was reduced by air damping, and the quality factor of the gyroscope showed a value higher than 1000. The reliability of the gyroscope was also confirmed by a thermal cyclic test and an endurance test at high humidity and high temperature.

  1. Flip Chip Bonding of a Quartz MEMS-Based Vibrating Beam Accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jinxing; Zhang, Liyuan; Wang, Ling; Dong, Yuan; Ueda, Toshitsugu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a novel method to assemble a micro-accelerometer by a flip chip bonding technique is proposed and demonstrated. Both the main two parts of the accelerometer, a double-ended tuning fork and a base-proof mass structure, are fabricated using a quartz wet etching process on Z cut quartz wafers with a thickness of 100 μm and 300 μm, respectively. The finite element method is used to simulate the vibration mode and optimize the sensing element structure. Taking advantage of self-alignment function of the flip chip bonding process, the two parts were precisely bonded at the desired joint position via AuSn solder. Experimental demonstrations were performed on a maximum scale of 4 × 8 mm² chip, and high sensitivity up to 9.55 Hz/g with a DETF resonator and a Q value of 5000 in air was achieved. PMID:26340632

  2. Flip Chip Bonding of a Quartz MEMS-Based Vibrating Beam Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jinxing; Zhang, Liyuan; Wang, Ling; Dong, Yuan; Ueda, Toshitsugu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a novel method to assemble a micro-accelerometer by a flip chip bonding technique is proposed and demonstrated. Both the main two parts of the accelerometer, a double-ended tuning fork and a base-proof mass structure, are fabricated using a quartz wet etching process on Z cut quartz wafers with a thickness of 100 μm and 300 μm, respectively. The finite element method is used to simulate the vibration mode and optimize the sensing element structure. Taking advantage of self-alignment function of the flip chip bonding process, the two parts were precisely bonded at the desired joint position via AuSn solder. Experimental demonstrations were performed on a maximum scale of 4 × 8 mm2 chip, and high sensitivity up to 9.55 Hz/g with a DETF resonator and a Q value of 5000 in air was achieved. PMID:26340632

  3. Flip Chip Bonding of a Quartz MEMS-Based Vibrating Beam Accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jinxing; Zhang, Liyuan; Wang, Ling; Dong, Yuan; Ueda, Toshitsugu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a novel method to assemble a micro-accelerometer by a flip chip bonding technique is proposed and demonstrated. Both the main two parts of the accelerometer, a double-ended tuning fork and a base-proof mass structure, are fabricated using a quartz wet etching process on Z cut quartz wafers with a thickness of 100 μm and 300 μm, respectively. The finite element method is used to simulate the vibration mode and optimize the sensing element structure. Taking advantage of self-alignment function of the flip chip bonding process, the two parts were precisely bonded at the desired joint position via AuSn solder. Experimental demonstrations were performed on a maximum scale of 4 × 8 mm² chip, and high sensitivity up to 9.55 Hz/g with a DETF resonator and a Q value of 5000 in air was achieved.

  4. Self Diagnostic Accelerometer Testing on the C-17 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokars, Roger P.; Lekki, John D.

    2013-01-01

    The self diagnostic accelerometer (SDA) developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center was tested for the first time in an aircraft engine environment as part of the Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research (VIPR) program. The VIPR program includes testing multiple critical flight sensor technologies. One such sensor, the accelerometer, measures vibrations to detect faults in the engine. In order to rely upon the accelerometer, the health of the accelerometer must be ensured. The SDA is a sensor system designed to actively determine the accelerometer structural health and attachment condition, in addition to vibration measurements. The SDA uses a signal conditioning unit that sends an electrical chirp to the accelerometer and recognizes changes in the response due to changes in the accelerometer health and attachment condition. To demonstrate the SDAs flight worthiness and robustness, multiple SDAs were mounted and tested on a C-17 aircraft engine. The engine test conditions varied from engine off, to idle, to maximum power. The SDA attachment conditions were varied from fully tight to loose. The newly developed SDA health algorithm described herein uses cross correlation pattern recognition to discriminate a healthy from a faulty SDA. The VIPR test results demonstrate for the first.

  5. Vibration sensing in smart machine rotors using internal MEMS accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Samuel; Cole, Matthew O. T.; Keogh, Patrick S.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a novel topology for enhanced vibration sensing in which wireless MEMS accelerometers embedded within a hollow rotor measure vibration in a synchronously rotating frame of reference. Theoretical relations between rotor-embedded accelerometer signals and the vibration of the rotor in an inertial reference frame are derived. It is thereby shown that functionality as a virtual stator-mounted displacement transducer can be achieved through appropriate signal processing. Experimental tests on a prototype rotor confirm that both magnitude and phase information of synchronous vibration can be measured directly without additional stator-mounted key-phasor sensors. Displacement amplitudes calculated from accelerometer signals will become erroneous at low rotational speeds due to accelerometer zero-g offsets, hence a corrective procedure is introduced. Impact tests are also undertaken to examine the ability of the internal accelerometers to measure transient vibration. A further capability is demonstrated, whereby the accelerometer signals are used to measure rotational speed of the rotor by analysing the signal component due to gravity. The study highlights the extended functionality afforded by internal accelerometers and demonstrates the feasibility of internal sensor topologies, which can provide improved observability of rotor vibration at externally inaccessible rotor locations.

  6. Recent Results from CHAMP Tracking and Accelerometer Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthcke, S. B.; Rowlands, D. D.; Lemoine, F. G.; Nerem, R. S.; Thompson, B.; Pavlis, E.; Williams, T. A.; Colombo, O. L.; Chao, Benjamin F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The CHAMP mission's unique combination of sensors and orbit configuration will enable unprecedented improvements in modeling and understanding the Earth's static gravity field and its temporal variations. CHAMP is the first of two missions (GRACE to be launched in the early part of 02') that combine a new generation of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, a high precision three-axis accelerometer, and star cameras for the precision attitude determination. In order to isolate the gravity signal for science investigations, it is necessary to perform a detailed reduction and analysis of the GPS and Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) tracking data in conjunction with the accelerometer and attitude data. Precision orbit determination based on the GPS and SLR tracking data will isolate the orbit perturbations, while the accelerometer data will be used to distinguish the non-gravitational forces from those due to the geopotential (static, and time varying). In preparation for the CHAMP and GRACE missions, extensive modifications have been made to NASA/GSFC's GEODYN orbit determination software to enable the simultaneous reduction of spacecraft tracking (e.g. GPS and SLR), three-axis accelerometer and precise attitude data. Several weeks of CHAMP tracking and accelerometer data have been analyzed and the results will be presented. Precision orbit determination analysis based on tracking data alone in addition to results based on the simultaneous reduction of tracking and accelerometer data will be discussed. Results from a calibration of the accelerometer will be presented along with the results from various orbit determination strategies.

  7. Revisiting the Leadership Scale for Sport: Examining Factor Structure Through Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Weisheng; Rodriguez, Fernando M; Won, Doyeon

    2016-10-01

    This study examines the factor structure of the shortened version of the Leadership Scale for Sport, through a survey of 201 collegiate swimmers at National Collegiate Athletic Association Division II and III institutions, using both exploratory structural equation modeling and confirmatory factor analysis. Both exploratory structural equation modeling and confirmatory factor analysis showed that a five-factor solution fit the data adequately. The sizes of factor loadings on target factors substantially differed between the confirmatory factor analysis and exploratory structural equation modeling solutions. In addition, the inter-correlations between factors of the Leadership Scale for Sport and the correlations with athletes' satisfaction were found to be inflated in the confirmatory factor analysis solution. Overall, the findings provide evidence of the factorial validity of the shortened Leadership Scale for Sport.

  8. Developing a Scale on "Factors Regarding Curriculum Alignment"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bay, Erdal

    2016-01-01

    "Curriculum alignment" is the compatibility between a country's centralized curriculum determined by the ministry of education and what teachers do during the teaching process. However, it is observed that teachers do not exactly implement the curriculum. The purpose of this study is to develop a scale that will determine the factors…

  9. Scale Bias as a Factor in Mood Adjective Checklists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, J. F.; Tiller, Dale K.

    1987-01-01

    A visual analogue mood scale was developed that included an option indicating subjects didn't understand the meaning of an adjective in an item. The item content significantly affected responses, raising questions about the adequacy of recently proposed affective taxonomies that were based on restricted samples of emotion-descriptive adjectives.…

  10. Acquiescent Responding in Balanced Multidimensional Scales and Exploratory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano; Rodriguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2006-01-01

    Personality tests often consist of a set of dichotomous or Likert items. These response formats are known to be susceptible to an agreeing-response bias called acquiescence. The common assumption in balanced scales is that the sum of appropriately reversed responses should be reasonably free of acquiescence. However, inter-item correlation (or…

  11. A Factor Analysis of the Research Self-Efficacy Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bieschke, Kathleen J.; And Others

    Counseling professionals' and counseling psychology students' interest in performing research seems to be waning. Identifying the impediments to graduate students' interest and participation in research is important if systematic efforts to engage them in research are to succeed. The Research Self-Efficacy Scale (RSES) was designed to measure…

  12. Transcultural Factors in Hypnotizability Scales: Limits and Prospects.

    PubMed

    Champigny, Claire M; Raz, Amir

    2015-10-01

    Hypnotic suggestibility--loosely termed hypnotizability--is difficult to assess across cultures. Investigators often use translated research instruments to guide their inquiry in disparate geographic locations. Present-day hypnosis researchers rely heavily on two primary scales that are more than half a century old: the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale: Form C (SHSS:C) (Weitzenhoffer & Hilgard, 1959) and the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility: Form A (HGSHS:A) (Shor & Orne, 1962). Scholars typically translate these scales to measure hypnotizability transculturally. This approach, however, operates under the specious assumption that the concept of hypnotizability is largely monolithic or universal across cultures. Whereas translations likely conserve the linguistic content, they may arguably imply different cultural meanings and historical subtexts. Whereas social scientists acknowledge the importance of qualitative and phenomenological accounts in the study of altered consciousness, including suggestibility, researchers interested in hypnotizability consider the impact of findings from anthropology and ethnography too little. Clinicians and scholars of hypnosis would stand to benefit from incorporating the insights afforded by transcultural research in the overarching investigation of a concept as nuanced as hypnotizability.

  13. Predicting Human Movement with Multiple Accelerometers Using Movelets

    PubMed Central

    He, Bing; Bai, Jiawei; Zipunnikov, Vadim V.; Koster, Annemarie; Caserotti, Paolo; Lange-Maia, Brittney; Glynn, Nancy W.; Harris, Tamara B.; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The study aims were: 1) to develop transparent algorithms that use short segments of training data for predicting activity types; and 2) to compare prediction performance of proposed algorithms using single accelerometers and multiple accelerometers. Methods Sixteen participants (age, 80.6 yr (4.8 yr); BMI, 26.1 kg·m−2 (2.5 kg·m−2)) performed fifteen life-style activities in the laboratory, each wearing three accelerometers at the right hip, left and right wrists. Triaxial accelerometry data were collected at 80 Hz using Actigraph GT3X+. Prediction algorithms were developed, which, instead of extracting features, build activity specific dictionaries composed of short signal segments called movelets. Three alternative approaches were proposed to integrate the information from the multiple accelerometers. Results With at most several seconds of training data per activity, the prediction accuracy at the second-level temporal resolution was very high for lying, standing, normal/fast walking, and standing up from a chair (the median prediction accuracy ranged from 88.2% to 99.9% based on the single-accelerometer movelet approach). For these activities wrist-worn accelerometers performed almost as well as hip-worn accelerometers (the median difference in accuracy between wrist and hip ranged from −2.7% to 5.8%). Modest improvements in prediction accuracy were achieved by integrating information from multiple accelerometers. Discussion and conclusions It is possible to achieve high prediction accuracy at the secondlevel temporal resolution with very limited training data. To increase prediction accuracy from the simultaneous use of multiple accelerometers, a careful selection of integrative approaches is required. PMID:25134005

  14. Higher-Order Exploratory Factor Analysis of the Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales with a Referred Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jason M.; Canivez, Gary L.; Lindstrom, Will; Hatt, Clifford V.

    2007-01-01

    The factor structure of the Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales (RIAS; [Reynolds, C.R., & Kamphaus, R.W. (2003). "Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales". Lutz, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources, Inc.]) was investigated with a large (N=1163) independent sample of referred students (ages 6-18). More rigorous factor extraction criteria…

  15. Factor Structure and Scale Reliabilities of the Adjective Check List Across Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Stephen H.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Investigated factor structure and scale reliabilities of Gough's Adjective Check List (ACL) and their stability over time. Employees in a community mental health center completed the ACL twice, separated by a one-year interval. After each administration, separate factor analyses were computed. All scales had highly significant test-retest…

  16. Type of development and application of integrating accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hongxia; Li, Ting; Liu, Guangpu; Yu, Hongying

    2000-05-01

    In this paper a new technique is suggested to solve the problem of measuring the vibration parameters in bad conditions with strong shock, that is, using integrating accelerometers repacked with normal inertial accelerometers to measure vibration acceleration signal of rocket launcher and then integrating velocity and displacement parameters. After the problems of integral accuracy have been solved, various vibration parameters are obtained to meet the needs of a certain project. By analysis, this integrating accelerometer has been testified to be a very practical sensor with surplus value in measuring vibration parameters in bad condition with strong shock.

  17. USML-1 microgravity glovebox experiment no. 1 Passive Accelerometer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Rogers, Melissa J. B.

    1995-01-01

    The passive accelerometer system (PAS) is a simple moving ball accelerometer capable of measuring the small magnitude steady relative acceleration that occurs in a low earth orbit spacecraft due to atmospheric drag and the earth's gravity gradient. The accelerometer can be used when the spacecraft continuously rotates during the orbit such that some line of reference in the craft always points along the vector connecting the earth's mass center with the spacecraft mass center. PAS was used successfully on the first United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-1).

  18. Factorization in large-scale many-body calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Calvin W.; Ormand, W. Erich; Krastev, Plamen G.

    2013-08-07

    One approach for solving interacting many-fermion systems is the configuration-interaction method, also sometimes called the interacting shell model, where one finds eigenvalues of the Hamiltonian in a many-body basis of Slater determinants (antisymmetrized products of single-particle wavefunctions). The resulting Hamiltonian matrix is typically very sparse, but for large systems the nonzero matrix elements can nonetheless require terabytes or more of storage. An alternate algorithm, applicable to a broad class of systems with symmetry, in our case rotational invariance, is to exactly factorize both the basis and the interaction using additive/multiplicative quantum numbers; such an algorithm recreates the many-body matrix elements on the fly and can reduce the storage requirements by an order of magnitude or more. Here, we discuss factorization in general and introduce a novel, generalized factorization method, essentially a ‘double-factorization’ which speeds up basis generation and set-up of required arrays. Although we emphasize techniques, we also place factorization in the context of a specific (unpublished) configuration-interaction code, BIGSTICK, which runs both on serial and parallel machines, and discuss the savings in memory due to factorization.

  19. Factorization in large-scale many-body calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Calvin W.; Ormand, W. Erich; Krastev, Plamen G.

    2013-08-07

    One approach for solving interacting many-fermion systems is the configuration-interaction method, also sometimes called the interacting shell model, where one finds eigenvalues of the Hamiltonian in a many-body basis of Slater determinants (antisymmetrized products of single-particle wavefunctions). The resulting Hamiltonian matrix is typically very sparse, but for large systems the nonzero matrix elements can nonetheless require terabytes or more of storage. An alternate algorithm, applicable to a broad class of systems with symmetry, in our case rotational invariance, is to exactly factorize both the basis and the interaction using additive/multiplicative quantum numbers; such an algorithm recreates the many-body matrix elementsmore » on the fly and can reduce the storage requirements by an order of magnitude or more. Here, we discuss factorization in general and introduce a novel, generalized factorization method, essentially a ‘double-factorization’ which speeds up basis generation and set-up of required arrays. Although we emphasize techniques, we also place factorization in the context of a specific (unpublished) configuration-interaction code, BIGSTICK, which runs both on serial and parallel machines, and discuss the savings in memory due to factorization.« less

  20. Scaling of Gene Expression with Transcription-Factor Fugacity

    PubMed Central

    Weinert, Franz M.; Brewster, Robert C.; Rydenfelt, Mattias; Phillips, Rob; Kegel, Willem K.

    2015-01-01

    The proteins associated with gene regulation are often shared between multiple pathways simultaneously. By way of contrast, models in regulatory biology often assume these pathways act independently. We demonstrate a framework for calculating the change in gene expression for the interacting case by decoupling repressor occupancy across the cell from the gene of interest by way of a chemical potential. The details of the interacting regulatory architecture are encompassed in an effective concentration, and thus, a single scaling function describes a collection of gene expression data from diverse regulatory situations and collapses it onto a single master curve. PMID:25554908

  1. A multi-factor Rasch scale for artistic judgment.

    PubMed

    Bezruczko, Nikolaus

    2002-01-01

    Measurement properties are reported for a combined scale of abstract and figurative artistic judgment aptitude items. Abstract items are synthetic, rule-based images from Visual Designs Test which implements a statistical algorithm to control design complexity and redundancy, and figurative items are canvas paintings in five styles, Fauvism, Post-Impressionism, Surrealism, Renaissance, and Baroque especially created for this research. The paintings integrate syntactic structure from VDT Abstract designs with thematic content for each style at four levels of complexity while controlling redundancy. Trained test administrators collected preference for synthetic abstract designs and authentic figurative art from 462 examinees in Johnson O'Connor Research Foundation testing offices in Boston, New York, Chicago, and Dallas. The Rasch model replicated measurement properties for VDT Abstract items and identified an item hierarchy that was statistically invariant between genders and generally stable across age for new, authentic figurative items. Further examination of the figurative item hierarchy revealed that complexity interacts with style and meaning. Sound measurement properties for a combined VDT Abstract and Figurative scale shows promise for a comprehensive artistic judgment construct. PMID:12486307

  2. The vertical accelerometer, a new instrument for air navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laboccetta, Letterio

    1923-01-01

    This report endeavors to show the possibility of determining the rate of acceleration and the advantage of having such an accelerometer in addition to other aviation instruments. Most of the discussions concern balloons.

  3. Instrument sequentially samples ac signals from several accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, C. P.

    1967-01-01

    Scanner circuit sequentially samples the ac signals from accelerometers used in conducting noise vibration tests, and provides a time-averaged output signal. The scanner is used in conjunction with other devices for random noise vibration tests.

  4. Development of an accelerometer-based underwater acoustic intensity sensor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang; Gabrielson, Thomas B; Lauchle, Gerald C

    2004-12-01

    An underwater acoustic intensity sensor is described. This sensor derives acoustic intensity from simultaneous, co-located measurement of the acoustic pressure and one component of the acoustic particle acceleration vector. The sensor consists of a pressure transducer in the form of a hollow piezoceramic cylinder and a pair of miniature accelerometers mounted inside the cylinder. Since this sensor derives acoustic intensity from measurement of acoustic pressure and acoustic particle acceleration, it is called a p-a intensity probe. The sensor is ballasted to be nearly neutrally buoyant. It is desirable for the accelerometers to measure only the rigid body motion of the assembled probe and for the effective centers of the pressure sensor and accelerometer to be coincident. This is achieved by symmetric disposition of a pair of accelerometers inside the ceramic cylinder. The response of the intensity probe is determined by comparison with a reference hydrophone in a predominantly reactive acoustic field.

  5. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Portuguese Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21.

    PubMed

    Apóstolo, João Luís Alves; Tanner, Barry Allen; Arfken, Cynthia Lee

    2012-01-01

    To determine which of three published models best characterizes the factor structure of the Portuguese version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 and to assess its validity and reliability. Confirmatory factor analysis of Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 for 1,297 adult, primary care outpatients (66.7% female, Mage = 48.57 years) comparing 3 models. The relationship between the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule was analyzed. The correlated 3-factor model fit the data best. The scale demonstrated good internal consistency, with alpha scores of the subscales ranging from 0.836 to 0.897. Correlation with the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule was positive and moderate with the negative affect scale; it was negative and limited with the positive affect. These findings support the correlated 3-factor structure. The test demonstrated adequate reliability and construct validity, which supports its use for screening in primary care settings with Portuguese speakers.

  6. Factor structure of the Italian version of the religious fundamentalism scale.

    PubMed

    Carlucci, Leonardo; Tommasi, Marco; Saggino, Aristide

    2013-02-01

    The Religious Fundamentalism Scale was applied to an Italian group, composed of 250 participants, to assess if it could be considered a reliable measure of fundamentalism. All participants professed to be believers of the Catholic religion. The overall group was split randomly into two smaller groups. The data of the first group were analyzed with an exploratory factor analysis (EFA) to test the factor structure of the Italian version of the scale. The data of the second sample were analyzed with a confirmatory factor analysis, to test the factor structure that emerged from EFA. Results indicated a two-dimensional structure, composed of two correlated factors apparently representing believing and skeptical attitudes.

  7. Input-output stability for accelerometer control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Morris, K. A.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that, although accelerometer control systems are not well-posed in the sense of Salamon, a well-defined input-output relation exists. It is established that the output of an accelerometer control system can be described by the convolution of the input and a distribution. This distribution is Laplace transformable, and the Laplace transform of the distribution is the transfer function of the system.

  8. Examination of the Factor Structure and Concurrent Validity of the Langer Mindfulness/Mindlessness Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haigh, Emily A. P.; Moore, Michael T.; Kashdan, Todd B.; Fresco, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Langer's theory of mindfulness proposes that a mindful person seeks out and produces novelty, is attentive to context, and is flexible in thought and behavior. In three independent studies, the factor structure of the Langer Mindfulness/Mindlessness Scale was examined. Confirmatory factor analysis failed to replicate the four-factor model and a…

  9. The conners' Abbreviated Teacher Rating Scale: a factor analysis study in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Brito, G N

    1987-01-01

    A total of 1068 school children were rated by their teachers on the Conners' Abbreviated Teacher Rating Scale (CATRS). The data were subjected to factor analysis using the principal components solution with orthogonal rotation and the varimax criterion. Three factors with eigenvalues greater than unity were extracted. The factor structure of the CATRS in Brazil was compared to reports from other countries.

  10. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Academic Motivation Scale with Black College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cokley, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The factor structure of the Academic Motivation Scale (AMS) was examined with a sample of 578 Black college students. A confirmatory factor analysis of the AMS was conducted. Results indicated that the hypothesized seven-factor model did not fit the data. Implications for future research with the AMS are discussed.

  11. Dimensionality of the Chinese Dyadic Adjustment Scale Based on Confirmatory Factor Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Cheung, C. K.

    2008-01-01

    Based on the responses of 1,501 Chinese married adults to the Chinese version of the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (C-DAS), confirmatory factor analyses showed that four factors were abstracted from the C-DAS (Dyadic Consensus, Dyadic Cohesion, Dyadic Satisfaction and Affectional Expression) and these four primary factors were subsumed under a…

  12. Factor Structure of the Korean Version of Wong and Law's Emotional Intelligence Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukuda, Eriko; Saklofske, Donald H.; Tamaoka, Katsuo; Lim, Hyunjung

    2012-01-01

    This study reports the factor structure of a Korean version of the 16-item Wong and Law Emotional Intelligence Scale (WLEIS) for a sample of 161 Korean university students. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the four-factor model of the WLEIS: (1) self-emotional appraisal, (2) others' emotional appraisal, (3) use of emotion, and (4) regulation…

  13. Multilevel Confirmatory Factor Analysis of a Scale Measuring Interagency Collaboration of Children's Mental Health Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dedrick, Robert F.; Greenbaum, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    Multilevel confirmatory factor analysis was used to evaluate the factor structure underlying the 12-item, three-factor "Interagency Collaboration Activities Scale" (ICAS) at the informant level and at the agency level. Results from 378 professionals (104 administrators, 201 service providers, and 73 case managers) from 32 children's mental health…

  14. [The Japanese version of the Parenting Scale: factor structure and psychometric properties].

    PubMed

    Itani, Tomomi

    2010-12-01

    The Parenting Scale is a measure of parenting practices that has been shown in studies in the United States to have sound psychometric properties. This study examined the psychometric properties and factor structure of a Japanese translation of the Parenting Scale. A community sample of 529 mothers with children from 4 to 8 years old completed the Japanese translation of the Parenting Scale. An exploratory factor analysis identified two factors labeled "Over-reactivity" (10-items) and "Laxness" (8-items), which closely resembled two of the factor analyses, using data from a clinical sample (N=167). The factors were significantly correlated with measures of child behavior, with mothers' efficacy, and with mothers' general health and mental health. Suggestions for future research and clinical use of the Japanese scale are discussed.

  15. Design, Simulation and Fabrication of Triaxial MEMS High Shock Accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenhai; Shi, Zhiguo; Yang, Zhan; Xie, Zhihong; Zhang, Donghong; Cai, De; Li, Kejie; Shen, Yajing

    2015-04-01

    On the basis of analyzing the disadvantage of other structural accelerometer, three-axis high g MEMS piezoresistive accelerometer was put forward in order to apply to the high-shock test field. The accelerometer's structure and working principle were discussed in details. The simulation results show that three-axis high shock MEMS accelerometer can bear high shock. After bearing high shock impact in high-shock shooting test, three-axis high shock MEMS accelerometer can obtain the intact metrical information of the penetration process and still guarantee the accurate precision of measurement in high shock load range, so we can not only analyze the law of stress wave spreading and the penetration rule of the penetration process of the body of the missile, but also furnish the testing technology of the burst point controlling. The accelerometer has far-ranging application in recording the typical data that projectile penetrating hard target and furnish both technology guarantees for penetration rule and defend engineering.

  16. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Scales for Diagnosing Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (SCALES)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryser, Gail R.; Campbell, Hilary L.; Miller, Brian K.

    2010-01-01

    The diagnostic criteria for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder have evolved over time with current versions of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual", (4th edition), text revision, ("DSM-IV-TR") suggesting that two constellations of symptoms may be present alone or in combination. The SCALES instrument for diagnosing attention deficit…

  17. Performance of several low-cost accelerometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, J.R.; Allen, R.M.; Chung, A. I.; Cochran, E.S.; Guy, R.; Hellweg, M.; Lawrence, J. F.

    2014-01-01

    Several groups are implementing low‐cost host‐operated systems of strong‐motion accelerographs to support the somewhat divergent needs of seismologists and earthquake engineers. The Advanced National Seismic System Technical Implementation Committee (ANSS TIC, 2002), managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with other network operators, is exploring the efficacy of such systems if used in ANSS networks. To this end, ANSS convened a working group to explore available Class C strong‐motion accelerometers (defined later), and to consider operational and quality control issues, and the means of annotating, storing, and using such data in ANSS networks. The working group members are largely coincident with our author list, and this report informs instrument‐performance matters in the working group’s report to ANSS. Present examples of operational networks of such devices are the Community Seismic Network (CSN; csn.caltech.edu), operated by the California Institute of Technology, and Quake‐Catcher Network (QCN; Cochran et al., 2009; qcn.stanford.edu; November 2013), jointly operated by Stanford University and the USGS. Several similar efforts are in development at other institutions. The overarching goals of such efforts are to add spatial density to existing Class‐A and Class‐B (see next paragraph) networks at low cost, and to include many additional people so they become invested in the issues of earthquakes, their measurement, and the damage they cause.

  18. Pendulous assembly for use in an accelerometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, R.A.

    1991-08-27

    This patent describes a pendulous assembly for use in an accelerometer or other such device which senses forces acting on the device in a particular direction. It comprises a proofmass; and means supporting one end of the proofmass for pivotal movement about a given axis back and forth through a resting plane which contains the proofmass when the proofmass is at rest in the absence of any of the forces, the supporting means including: a frame and means for mounting the frame to a main support forming part of the force sensing device, an isolation bridge; isolation bridge flexure means connecting the isolation bridge with a section of the frame for pivotal movement of the isolation bridge back and forth about the given axis; and proofmass flexure means separate from and substantially unconnected with the isolation bridge flexure means, the proofmass flexure means comprising a pair of proofmass flexures connecting the proofmass with the isolation bridge for pivotal movement of the proofmass back and forth about the given axis; the isolation bridge flexure means and the proofmass flexure means being aligned along the given axis with the isolation bridge flexure means positioned between the proofmass flexures.

  19. Emission factors from small scale appliances burning wood and pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozgen, Senem; Caserini, Stefano; Galante, Silvia; Giugliano, Michele; Angelino, Elisabetta; Marongiu, Alessandro; Hugony, Francesca; Migliavacca, Gabriele; Morreale, Carmen

    2014-09-01

    Four manually fed (6-11 kW) firewood burning and two automatic wood pellets (8.8-25 kW) residential heating appliances were tested under real-world operating conditions in order to determine emission factors (EFs) of macropollutants, i.e., carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), particulate matter (PM) and trace pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and dioxins. The results were examined for the influence of different factors (i.e., type of wood, appliance and combustion cycle). The experimental EFs were also compared with the values proposed by the European emission inventory guidebook used in the local inventory in order to evaluate their representativeness of real world emissions. The composite macropollutant EFs for manually fed appliances were: for CO 5858 g GJ-1, for NOx 122 g GJ-1, NMHC 542 g GJ-1, PM 254 g GJ-1, whereas emissions were much lower for automatic pellets appliances: CO 219 g GJ-1, for NOx 66 g GJ-1, NMHC 5 g GJ-1, PM 85 g GJ-1. The highest emissions were generally observed for the open fireplace, however traditional and advanced stoves have the highest overall CO EFs. Especially for the advanced stove real-world emissions are far worse than those measured under cycles used for type testing of residential solid fuel appliances. No great difference is observed for different firewood types in batch working appliances, diversely the quality of the pellets is observed to influence directly the emission performance of the automatic appliances. Benzo(b)fluoranthene is the PAH with the highest contribution (110 mg GJ-1 for manual appliances and 2 mg GJ-1 for automatic devices) followed by benzo(a)pyrene (77 mg GJ-1 for manual appliances and 0.8 mg GJ-1 for automatic devices).

  20. Iranian Version of the Mini-Mental Adjustment to Cancer Scale: Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties.

    PubMed

    Patoo, Mozhgan; Allahyari, Abbas Ali; Moradi, Ali Reza; Payandeh, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Mental adjustment to cancer is known as a psychological, physical, and psychological health variable among cancer patients. The present study examines the factor structure and psychometric properties of the Mini-Mental Adjustment to Cancer scale (Mini-MAC) in a sample of Iranian adults who suffer from cancer. The sample consists of 320 cancer patients selected through non-random convenient sampling procedure from the hospitals and clinics in the cities of Kermanshah and Shiraz in Iran, using the Mini-MAC scale. One hundred of these patients also completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale. Statistical methods used to analyze the data included confirmatory and exploratory factor analysis, discriminate validity, and Cronbach alpha coefficients for internal consistency. Factor analysis confirms five factors in the Mini-MAC. The values of fit indices are within the acceptable range. Significant correlations between the Mini-MAC and other measures also show that this scale has discriminate validity. Alpha coefficients for the subscales are Helplessness/Hopelessness,.94; Cognitive Avoidance.76; Anxious Preoccupation,.90; Fatalism,.77; Fighting Spirit.80; and total scale.84, respectively. The results confirm the five-factor structure of the Persian Mini-MAC scale and also prove that it is a reliable and valid scale. They show that this scale has sufficient power to measure different aspects of mental adjustment in patients with cancer. PMID:26600241

  1. Brazilian version of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy: psychometric properties and factor analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Empathy is a central characteristic of medical professionalism and has recently gained attention in medical education research. The Jefferson Scale of Empathy is the most commonly used measure of empathy worldwide, and to date it has been translated in 39 languages. This study aimed to adapt the Jefferson Scale of Empathy to the Brazilian culture and to test its reliability and validity among Brazilian medical students. Methods The Portuguese version of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy was adapted to Brazil using back-translation techniques. This version was pretested among 39 fifth-year medical students in September 2010. During the final fifth- and sixth-year Objective Structured Clinical Examination (October 2011), 319 students were invited to respond to the scale anonymously. Cronbach’s alpha, exploratory factor analysis, item-total correlation, and gender comparisons were performed to check the reliability and validity of the scale. Results The student response rate was 93.7% (299 students). Cronbach’s coefficient for the scale was 0.84. A principal component analysis confirmed the construct validity of the scale for three main factors: Compassionate Care (first factor), Ability to Stand in the Patient’s Shoes (second factor), and Perspective Taking (third factor). Gender comparisons did not reveal differences in the scores between female and male students. Conclusions The adapted Brazilian version of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy proved to be a valid, reliable instrument for use in national and cross-cultural studies in medical education. PMID:22873730

  2. Disentangling Wording and Substantive Factors in the Spiritual Well-Being Scale

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the extent to which the Spiritual Well-Being Scale (SWBS) may help to meet the need for multidimensional, psychometrically sophisticated measures of spiritual and religious traits. Although the various forms of validity of the scale have, for the most part, been supported by psychometric studies, conflicting evidence surrounding its dimensionality has called into question its structural validity. Specifically, numerous authors have suggested that a more appropriate factor structure for the SWBS includes further substantive factors in addition to the 2 factors that the scale was originally intended to measure. In the current study, we attempted to resolve these debates using a combination of exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis based investigations in the Lothian Birth Cohort, 1921 study. Our analyses suggested that the additional factors suggested in previous studies may not have reflected substantive constructs; but rather, common variance due to methodological factors. PMID:26366248

  3. Automatic compensation for the errors of a gyroscopic linear integrating accelerometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bezvesil`naya, E.N.

    1995-10-01

    The method of least squares and the Kalman filter are the basis for developing algorithms and studying the errors of estimation of the state of a gyroscopic linear integrating accelerometer with digital processing of the data. The article considers the development of algorithms for self-compensation of the errors of a gyroscopic linear integrating accelerometer (GLIA). One of the promising applications of a gyroscopic linear integrating accelerometer is its use as a sensing element for an aviration gravimetric system. At the same time, a GLIA has errors due to nonlinear distortions of the path of the sensing element or gyroscope, the nonzero damping factor of precessional oscillations due to viscous friction moments acting frequency of the precessional oscillations used in the estimation algorithms and the frequency of the precessional oscillations of the gyroscope, and the disturbances that affect the law of motion of the gyroscope. These errors may have an unacceptably large effect (roughly 0.5 g) if not taken into account. The goal here, therefore, is to obtain an algorithm of automatic compensation for the indicated errors. Such a problem has not hitherto been formulated and solved in the theory and practice of gravimetric measurements.

  4. Design and analysis of a novel virtual gyroscope with multi-gyroscope and accelerometer array.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhang; Liu, Chaojun; Yu, Shuai; Zhang, Shengzhi; Liu, Sheng

    2016-08-01

    A new virtual gyroscope with multi-gyroscope and accelerometer array (MGAA) is proposed in this article for improving the performance of angular rate measurement. Outputs of the virtual gyroscope are obtained by merging the signals from gyroscopes and accelerometers through a novel Kalman filter, which intentionally takes the consideration of the MEMS gyroscope error model and kinematics theory of rigid body. A typical configuration of the virtual gyroscope, consisting of four accelerometers and three gyroscopes mounted on designated positions, is initiated to verify the feasibility of the virtual gyroscope with MGAA. Static test and dynamic test are performed subsequently to evaluate its performance. The angular random walk (ARW) and bias instability, two static performance parameters of gyroscope, are reduced from 0.019°/√s and 14.4°/h to 0.0074°/√s and 8.7°/h, respectively. The average root mean square error (RMSE) is reduced from 0.274°/s to 0.133°/s under dynamic test. Compared with the published multi-gyroscope array method, the virtual gyroscope proposed here has a better performance both in static and dynamic tests, with improvement factors of ARW and RMSE about 44.1% and 44.5% higher, respectively.

  5. Design and analysis of a novel virtual gyroscope with multi-gyroscope and accelerometer array.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhang; Liu, Chaojun; Yu, Shuai; Zhang, Shengzhi; Liu, Sheng

    2016-08-01

    A new virtual gyroscope with multi-gyroscope and accelerometer array (MGAA) is proposed in this article for improving the performance of angular rate measurement. Outputs of the virtual gyroscope are obtained by merging the signals from gyroscopes and accelerometers through a novel Kalman filter, which intentionally takes the consideration of the MEMS gyroscope error model and kinematics theory of rigid body. A typical configuration of the virtual gyroscope, consisting of four accelerometers and three gyroscopes mounted on designated positions, is initiated to verify the feasibility of the virtual gyroscope with MGAA. Static test and dynamic test are performed subsequently to evaluate its performance. The angular random walk (ARW) and bias instability, two static performance parameters of gyroscope, are reduced from 0.019°/√s and 14.4°/h to 0.0074°/√s and 8.7°/h, respectively. The average root mean square error (RMSE) is reduced from 0.274°/s to 0.133°/s under dynamic test. Compared with the published multi-gyroscope array method, the virtual gyroscope proposed here has a better performance both in static and dynamic tests, with improvement factors of ARW and RMSE about 44.1% and 44.5% higher, respectively. PMID:27587149

  6. A wafer level vacuum encapsulated capacitive accelerometer fabricated in an unmodified commercial MEMS process.

    PubMed

    Merdassi, Adel; Yang, Peng; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P

    2015-01-01

    We present the design and fabrication of a single axis low noise accelerometer in an unmodified commercial MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) process. The new microfabrication process, MEMS Integrated Design for Inertial Sensors (MIDIS), introduced by Teledyne DALSA Inc. allows wafer level vacuum encapsulation at 10 milliTorr which provides a high Quality factor and reduces noise interference on the MEMS sensor devices. The MIDIS process is based on high aspect ratio bulk micromachining of single-crystal silicon layer that is vacuum encapsulated between two other silicon handle wafers. The process includes sealed Through Silicon Vias (TSVs) for compact design and flip-chip integration with signal processing circuits. The proposed accelerometer design is sensitive to single-axis in-plane acceleration and uses a differential capacitance measurement. Over ±1 g measurement range, the measured sensitivity was 1 fF/g. The accelerometer system was designed to provide a detection resolution of 33 milli-g over the operational range of ±100 g. PMID:25815451

  7. A wafer level vacuum encapsulated capacitive accelerometer fabricated in an unmodified commercial MEMS process.

    PubMed

    Merdassi, Adel; Yang, Peng; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P

    2015-01-01

    We present the design and fabrication of a single axis low noise accelerometer in an unmodified commercial MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) process. The new microfabrication process, MEMS Integrated Design for Inertial Sensors (MIDIS), introduced by Teledyne DALSA Inc. allows wafer level vacuum encapsulation at 10 milliTorr which provides a high Quality factor and reduces noise interference on the MEMS sensor devices. The MIDIS process is based on high aspect ratio bulk micromachining of single-crystal silicon layer that is vacuum encapsulated between two other silicon handle wafers. The process includes sealed Through Silicon Vias (TSVs) for compact design and flip-chip integration with signal processing circuits. The proposed accelerometer design is sensitive to single-axis in-plane acceleration and uses a differential capacitance measurement. Over ±1 g measurement range, the measured sensitivity was 1 fF/g. The accelerometer system was designed to provide a detection resolution of 33 milli-g over the operational range of ±100 g.

  8. Estimation of seismic response of buildings with a few accelerometers without input data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yu; Mita, Akira

    2016-04-01

    To assess the health of buildings, maximum inter-story drift angle is recognized as an important indicator. If we have to estimate maximum inter-story drift angle very precisely, we need to install accelerometers on all floors. However, it is not realistic due to the cost. In many methods to estimate the response using small number of accelerometers, the excitation (input) is assumed to be available. However, in some cases, some sensors including the input sensor may not be available. Thus, in this paper, we propose a method for the estimating inter-story drift angle using small number of accelerometers without knowing input information. The proposed method is based on two assumptions. One is that the response is represented by the superposition of the response of only lower modes. The other is that mode vectors and participation factors are available from the structural design model. Based on the assumption, first, we estimate modal frequencies and damping ratios using the subspace method from obtained acceleration data. Second, we decompose observed acceleration data to each mode by solving simultaneous equations using pseudo-inverse matrix. Third, we calculate mode response by focusing on the vibration equation of each mode. It was verified that this method could successfully estimate the modal response as well as the inter-story drift angles.

  9. Design and analysis of a novel virtual gyroscope with multi-gyroscope and accelerometer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhang; Liu, Chaojun; Yu, Shuai; Zhang, Shengzhi; Liu, Sheng

    2016-08-01

    A new virtual gyroscope with multi-gyroscope and accelerometer array (MGAA) is proposed in this article for improving the performance of angular rate measurement. Outputs of the virtual gyroscope are obtained by merging the signals from gyroscopes and accelerometers through a novel Kalman filter, which intentionally takes the consideration of the MEMS gyroscope error model and kinematics theory of rigid body. A typical configuration of the virtual gyroscope, consisting of four accelerometers and three gyroscopes mounted on designated positions, is initiated to verify the feasibility of the virtual gyroscope with MGAA. Static test and dynamic test are performed subsequently to evaluate its performance. The angular random walk (ARW) and bias instability, two static performance parameters of gyroscope, are reduced from 0.019°/√s and 14.4°/h to 0.0074°/√s and 8.7°/h, respectively. The average root mean square error (RMSE) is reduced from 0.274°/s to 0.133°/s under dynamic test. Compared with the published multi-gyroscope array method, the virtual gyroscope proposed here has a better performance both in static and dynamic tests, with improvement factors of ARW and RMSE about 44.1% and 44.5% higher, respectively.

  10. A Wafer Level Vacuum Encapsulated Capacitive Accelerometer Fabricated in an Unmodified Commercial MEMS Process

    PubMed Central

    Merdassi, Adel; Yang, Peng; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P.

    2015-01-01

    We present the design and fabrication of a single axis low noise accelerometer in an unmodified commercial MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) process. The new microfabrication process, MEMS Integrated Design for Inertial Sensors (MIDIS), introduced by Teledyne DALSA Inc. allows wafer level vacuum encapsulation at 10 milliTorr which provides a high Quality factor and reduces noise interference on the MEMS sensor devices. The MIDIS process is based on high aspect ratio bulk micromachining of single-crystal silicon layer that is vacuum encapsulated between two other silicon handle wafers. The process includes sealed Through Silicon Vias (TSVs) for compact design and flip-chip integration with signal processing circuits. The proposed accelerometer design is sensitive to single-axis in-plane acceleration and uses a differential capacitance measurement. Over ±1 g measurement range, the measured sensitivity was 1fF/g. The accelerometer system was designed to provide a detection resolution of 33 milli-g over the operational range of ±100 g. PMID:25815451

  11. Examination of the factor structure and concurrent validity of the Langer Mindfulness/Mindlessness Scale.

    PubMed

    Haigh, Emily A P; Moore, Michael T; Kashdan, Todd B; Fresco, David M

    2011-03-01

    Langer's theory of mindfulness proposes that a mindful person seeks out and produces novelty, is attentive to context, and is flexible in thought and behavior. In three independent studies, the factor structure of the Langer Mindfulness/Mindlessness Scale was examined. Confirmatory factor analysis failed to replicate the four-factor model and a subsequent exploratory factor analysis revealed the presence of a two-factor (mindfulness and mindlessness) solution. Study 2 demonstrated that the two factors assessed discrete constructs and were not merely products of acquiescence. Support was also found for a nine-item, one-factor model comprised solely of mindfulness items. On comparing models, Study 3 suggested the superiority of the one-factor mindfulness model. Finally, a preliminary investigation of the concurrent validity of the revised nine-item Langer Mindfulness/Mindlessness Scale is presented. The current article offers researchers a revised version of a mindfulness measure derived from a cognitive perspective.

  12. Italian spring accelerometer (ISA) a high sensitive accelerometer for ``BepiColombo'' ESA CORNERSTONE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, V.; Nozzoli, S.

    2001-12-01

    The targets of the ESA CORNERSTONE mission to Mercury "BepiColombo" are concerned with both planetary and magnetospheric physics and to test some aspects of the general relativity. A payload devoted to a set of experiments named radio science is located within one of the three proposed modules, the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO). In particular, a high sensitivity accelerometer ( a min<10 -9√g/ Hz in the range 10 -4- 10 -1 Hz) will measure the inertial acceleration acting on the MPO. Such data, together with tracking data are used to evaluate the purely gravitational trajectory of the MPO, transforming it to a virtual drag-free satellite system. The ISA accelerometer, considered for this mission, is a well-studied instrument developed at the Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (IFSI), with the financial support of the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI). A prototype of such an instrument was constructed, matching the requirements of the radio science experiment. Results of the study concerning the use of ISA in the BepiColombo mission are reported here, particular care being devoted to the description of the instrument and to its sensitivity and thermal stabilisation.

  13. A toxic equivalency factor scale for polychlorinated dibenzofurans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tysklind, M.; Tillitt, D.; Eriksson, L.; Lundgren, K.; Rappe, C.

    1994-01-01

    The ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) induction of 20 polychiorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) was examined in the H4IIE rat hepatoma cell bioassay. The selection of the compounds tested was based on a multivariate chemical characterization laying the groundwork for covering the whole chemical series of PCDFs. The EROD induction potency was found to vary in ED50 values from 25 to 100,000,000 pg/mg, i.e., nearly seven orders of magnitude. The response of the bioassay was calibrated against the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, enabling the corresponding toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) to be calculated. In order to establish a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) for the TEF values, 37 physicochemical descriptor variables were used to chemically characterize the 87 tetra- to octachlorinated PCDFs. Using partial least-squares modeling on a training set of 10 congeners, a QSAR model with sound predictive power was obtained. The QSAR model was validated with a validation set of additional 10 congeners. The predicted TEFs indicate that a large number of congeners are potent EROD inducers.

  14. Reliability issues of an accelerometer under environmental stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Petra; Pressecq, Francis; Perez, Guy; Lafontan, Xavier; Nicot, Jean Marc; Esteve, Daniel; Fourniols, Jean Yves; Camon, Henri; Oudea, Coumar

    2003-12-01

    COTS (Commercial-off-the-shelf) MEMS components are very interesting for space applications because they are lightweight, small, economic in energy, cheap and available in short delays. The reliability of MEMS COTS that are used out of their intended domain of operation (such as a space application) might be assured by a reliability methodology derived from the Physics of Failure approach. In order to use this approach it is necessary to create models of MEMS components that take into consideration environmental stresses and thus can be used for lifetime prediction. Unfortunately, today MEMS failure mechanisms are not well understood today and therefore a preliminary work is necessary to determine influent factors and physical phenomena. The model development is based on a good knowledge of the process parameters (Young"s modulus, stress…), environmental tests and appropriated modeling approaches, such a finite element analysis (FEA) and behavioural modeling. In order to do the environmental tests and to analyse MEMS behaviour, we have developed the Environmental MEMS Analyzer EMA 3D. The described methodology has been applied to a Commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) accelerometer, the ADXL150. A first level behavioral model was created and then refined in the following steps by the enrichment with experimental results and finite element simulations.

  15. Reliability issues of an accelerometer under environmental stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Petra; Pressecq, Francis; Perez, Guy; Lafontan, Xavier; Nicot, Jean Marc; Esteve, Daniel; Fourniols, Jean Yves; Camon, Henri; Oudea, Coumar

    2004-01-01

    COTS (Commercial-off-the-shelf) MEMS components are very interesting for space applications because they are lightweight, small, economic in energy, cheap and available in short delays. The reliability of MEMS COTS that are used out of their intended domain of operation (such as a space application) might be assured by a reliability methodology derived from the Physics of Failure approach. In order to use this approach it is necessary to create models of MEMS components that take into consideration environmental stresses and thus can be used for lifetime prediction. Unfortunately, today MEMS failure mechanisms are not well understood today and therefore a preliminary work is necessary to determine influent factors and physical phenomena. The model development is based on a good knowledge of the process parameters (Young"s modulus, stress...), environmental tests and appropriated modeling approaches, such a finite element analysis (FEA) and behavioural modeling. In order to do the environmental tests and to analyse MEMS behaviour, we have developed the Environmental MEMS Analyzer EMA 3D. The described methodology has been applied to a Commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) accelerometer, the ADXL150. A first level behavioral model was created and then refined in the following steps by the enrichment with experimental results and finite element simulations.

  16. Factor Structure and Invariance across Gender of the Devereux Early Childhood Assessment Protective Factor Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogg, Julia A.; Brinkman, Tara M.; Dedrick, Robert F.; Carlson, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Early childhood social-emotional assessment has traditionally focused on risk factors or psychopathology, and has less frequently examined protective factors that may serve to promote positive developmental outcomes for children. To advance conceptual models that include protective factors as key explanatory constructs, there is a need for…

  17. Factors and Clusters for the Brazelton Scale: An Investigation of the Dimensions of Neonatal Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Joseph L.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Examines the psychometric properties of two procedures for reducing data from the Brazelton Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale: factor and cluster analysis. The sample consisted of 85 male and 77 female newborns. (RH)

  18. TMFA: A FORTRAN Program for Three-Mode Factor Analysis and Individual Differences Multidimensional Scaling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redfield, Joel

    1978-01-01

    TMFA, a FORTRAN program for three-mode factor analysis and individual-differences multidimensional scaling, is described. Program features include a variety of input options, extensive preprocessing of input data, and several alternative methods of analysis. (Author)

  19. Reliability and factor validity of a Farsi version of The Positive and Negative Perfectionism Scale.

    PubMed

    Besharat, Mohammad Ali

    2009-08-01

    This study investigated reliability and factor validity of a Farsi version of the Positive and Negative Perfectionism Scale in 606 undergraduate students (257 men, 349 women) from the University of Tehran. All participants were asked to complete the scale, along with the General Health Questionnaire (Goldberg, 1972) and the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory (Coopersmith, 1967). Findings indicated good internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and construct validity of the two-factor structure of the Farsi version of the Positive and Negative Perfectionism Scale. These factors were similar to the factors found in previous studies and were accordingly labeled Positive Perfectionism and Negative Perfectionism. The results provide evidence for applicability of the scale and its cross-cultural validity.

  20. Testing gravity beyond the standard model: status of GAP, an electrostatic accelerometer for interplanetary fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, Joel; Christophe, Bruno; Liorzou, Françoise

    Theories beyond the standard model aim to face several challenges: connect gravitation with the other three known forces, and shed light on dark matter and dark energy. Although General Relativity has been incredibly successful at passing laboratory / Solar System scales tests to date, it is a classical theory (hence, incompatible with quantum physics scales) and it fails at explaining large scale astrophysical observations such as galaxy rotation curves and the accelerated expansion of the Universe without introducing dark matter and dark energy. Thus, most theories beyond the standard model explore modifications to General Relativity. Those modifications, whether they consist in adding an extra scalar field or adding a scale-dependence to the gravitation laws, allow us to predict small deviations from General Relativity at laboratory / Solar System scales. For instance, such a deviation could have explained the Pioneer anomaly, where the Pioneer probes were measured to undergo an unexpected acceleration. Although this anomaly has recently been accounted for by an instrumental thermal radiation, precise measurements of the non-gravitational forces applied to the probes would have helped decide whether the observed behavior was due to gravitational or non-gravitational physics. As a result, several missions have been proposed to embark an accelerometer on-board an interplanetary probe. Indeed, an accelerometer will measure the non-gravitational accelerations applied to the probe, thereby separating the potentially measured departures from a pure geodetic trajectory into their gravitational and non-gravitational components, and allowing us to easily constrain General Relativity in deep space. The Gravity Advanced Package (GAP) is an instrument developed for this purpose. It is composed of a 3-axes electrostatic accelerometer called MicroSTAR and a rotating platform called Bias Rejection System. It aims to provide an unbiased measurement of a spacecraft's non

  1. Ionospheric Delay Compensation Using a Scale Factor Based on an Altitude of a Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Hui (Inventor); Savoy, John (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    In one embodiment, a method for ionospheric delay compensation is provided. The method includes determining an ionospheric delay based on a signal having propagated from the navigation satellite to a location below the ionosphere. A scale factor can be applied to the ionospheric delay, wherein the scale factor corresponds to a ratio of an ionospheric delay in the vertical direction based on an altitude of the satellite navigation system receiver. Compensation can be applied based on the ionospheric delay.

  2. Relative performance of several inexpensive accelerometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, John R.; Rogers, John A.

    1995-01-01

    We examined the performance of several low-cost accelerometers for highly cost-driven applications in recording earthquake strong motion. We anticipate applications for such sensors in providing the lifeline and emergency-response communities with an immediate, comprehensive picture of the extent and characteristics of likely damage. We also foresee their use as 'filler' instruments sited between research-grade instruments to provide spatially detailed and near-field records of large earthquakes (on the order of 1000 stations at 600-m intervals in San Fernando Valley, population 1.2 million, for example). The latter applications would provide greatly improved attenuation relationships for building codes and design, the first examples of mainshock information (that is, potentially nonlinear regime) for microzonation, and a suite of records for structural engineers. We also foresee possible applications in monitoring structural inter-story drift during earthquakes, possibly leading to local and remote alarm functions as well as design criteria. This effort appears to be the first of its type at the USGS. It is spurred by rapid advances in sensor technology and the recognition of potential non-classical applications. In this report, we estimate sensor noise spectra, relative transfer functions and cross-axis sensitivity of six inexpensive sensors. We tested three micromachined ('silicon-chip') sensors in addition to classical force-balance and piezoelectric examples. This sample of devices is meant to be representative, not comprehensive. Sensor noise spectra were estimated by recording system output with the sensor mounted on a pneumatically supported 545-kg optical-bench isolation table. This isolation table appears to limit ground motion to below our system noise level. These noise estimates include noise introduced by signal-conditioning circuitry, the analog-to-digital converter (ADC), and noise induced in connecting wiring by ambient electromagnetic fields in

  3. [Effect of environmental factors on fish community structure in the Huntai River Basin at multiple scales].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-li; Li, Yan-fen; Xu, Zong-xue

    2014-09-01

    In June 2012, fishes was investigated at 65 sampling sites in the Huntai River basin in Northeast of China. Forty species were collected, belonging to 9 orders, 14 families,33 genera. Cobitidae and Cyprinidae were the dominant fishes in the community structure in the Huntai River basin, accounting for 13. 21% and 65. 83% of the fish community, respectively. There were two types of spatial distribution of fish community, one was distributed in the head water and tributaries in the upstream, and the other was in the plain rivers. Nemachilus nudus, Cobitis granoei and Phoxinus lagowskii dominated the local community in the upper reaches of the Dahuofang Reservoir and shenwo River, while Carassius ayratus and Hemiculter leucisculdus dominated the local community in the plain rivers. CCA (canonical correspondence analysis) was used to distinguish the primary environmental variables that affected the fish community structure. The results indicated fish community was mainly affected by environment factors at watershed and reach scales. Proportions of woodland and urban land, and altitude were three important environmental factors affecting the fish community at the watershed scale. Dissolved oxygen, total nitrogen, pH and habitat inhomogeneity significantly affected the fish community at the reach scale, whereas substrate didn't show significant influence at the microhabitat scale. Environmental factors at watershed scale explained 7. 66% of the variation of fish community structure, environmental factors at reach scale explained 10. 57% of the variation of fish community structure. Environmental factors at reach scale influenced the fish community more significantly.

  4. Factor Structure of Scores from the Conners' Rating Scales-Revised among Nepali Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendergast, Laura L.; Vandiver, Beverly J.; Schaefer, Barbara A.; Cole, Pamela M.; Murray-Kolb, Laura E.; Christian, Parul

    2014-01-01

    This study used exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses to examine the structures of scores from the Conners' Teacher and Parent Rating Scales-Revised (CTRS-R and CPRS-R, respectively; Conners, 1997). The scales were administered to 1,835 parents and 1,387 teachers of children in Nepal's Sarlahi district, a region where no other measures of…

  5. Factor Analysis of the Revised Wechsler Memory Scale Tests in a Neuropsychological Battery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Elbert W.

    1982-01-01

    The Revised Wechsler Memory Scale, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale subtests, and Halstead-Reitan battery were factor analyzed. Five types of memory were isolated: immediate verbal, recent verbal, recent figural, figural learning, and verbal learning storage. Loadings of memory and nonmemory tests indicate a closer relationship between some of…

  6. Examination of the Spanish Trait Meta-Mood Scale-24 Factor Structure in a Mexican Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdivia Vázquez, Juan Antonio; Rubio Sosa, Juan Carlos A.; French, Brian F.

    2015-01-01

    The Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS) is an emotional intelligence (EI) assessment originally developed for the U.S. population. This scale measures three EI factors--attention, clarity, and repair--to evaluate how an individual perceives one's own EI skills. Although the TMMS has been adapted for use in several languages and cultures, the structure of…

  7. Motivations and Characteristics of Adult Students: Factor Stability and Construct Validity of the Educational Participation Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujita-Starck, Pamela J.

    1996-01-01

    Data from 1,142 adult students confirmed the seven-factor typology of the Educational Participation Scale. Reliability of scales was acceptable. Construct validity was tested by predicting membership in three curricular groups: arts/leisure, personal development, and professional development. Results revealed distinctive characteristics and…

  8. Assessing the Unidimensionality of Psychological Scales: Using Multiple Criteria from Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slocum-Gori, Suzanne L.; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2011-01-01

    Whenever one uses a composite scale score from item responses, one is tacitly assuming that the scale is dominantly unidimensional. Investigating the unidimensionality of item response data is an essential component of construct validity. Yet, there is no universally accepted technique or set of rules to determine the number of factors to retain…

  9. Agri-Environmental Resource Management by Large-Scale Collective Action: Determining KEY Success Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uetake, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Large-scale collective action is necessary when managing agricultural natural resources such as biodiversity and water quality. This paper determines the key factors to the success of such action. Design/Methodology/Approach: This paper analyses four large-scale collective actions used to manage agri-environmental resources in Canada and…

  10. Factor Analysis of the Nowicki-Strickland Locus of Control Scale: Why Is Replication So Difficult?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watters, Derek A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Factor analysis problems of scales with dichotomous items were illustrated using the Nowicki-Strickland Locus of Control Scale for Children. A different solution than that of R. E. Lindal and P. H. Venables (1983) was obtained, despite using similar samples--2 random samples of 671 and 674 male seventh and eighth graders. (SLD)

  11. The Teacher Efficacy for Inclusive Practices (TEIP) Scale: Dimensionality and Factor Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Mi-Hwa; Dimitrov, Dimiter M.; Das, Ajay; Gichuru, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    The "Teacher Efficacy for Inclusive Practices" (TEIP) scale is designed to measure teacher-self efficacy to teach in inclusive classrooms. The original study identified three scale factors: "efficacy in using inclusive instruction" ("EII"), "efficacy in collaboration" ("EC"), and "efficacy in…

  12. Calorimetric validation of the Caltrac accelerometer during level walking.

    PubMed

    Balogun, J A; Martin, D A; Clendenin, M A

    1989-06-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to compare the Caltrac accelerometer output with measured energy expenditure (Ee). Twenty-five volunteers (10 men, 15 women) walked on a level motor-driven treadmill at four different speeds (54, 81, 104, and 130 m.min-1) with the Caltrac device affixed to the waistline. Each of the four experimental trials lasted eight minutes, and the testing was completed within an hour. During the test, oxygen consumption (VO2) (in L.min-1 and in mL.kg-1.min-1) and nonprotein respiratory exchange ratio were monitored by the Beckman Horizon metabolic cart. The accelerometer output at the end of each exercise bout was also monitored and subsequently divided by 8 to convert the readings to counts.min-1. The mean VO2 (L.min-1) at steady state (ie, 6th-8th minutes of exercise) was converted to a caloric value. We obtained a moderate correlation coefficient (r) of .76 between the accelerometer output and the VO2 (mL.kg-1.min-1) and a high correlation coefficient of .92 between the Ee and the accelerometer readings. The Caltrac accelerometer output (counts.min-1) was significantly higher (p less than .01) than the Ee (kcal.min-1) at the four walking speeds. The difference between the accelerometer output and the Ee ranged from 13.3% to 52.9%. The data were further analyzed with linear, polynomial, multiple, and stepwise regression models. The results of the analyses revealed that the Caltrac accelerometer output is a valid predictor of Ee during level walking when the appropriate regression equation is used to adjust the values.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Spatially varying relationships between land-cover change and driving factors at multiple sampling scales.

    PubMed

    Du, Shihong; Wang, Qiao; Guo, Luo

    2014-05-01

    Modeling the relationships between environment, human activity, and natural conditions is very important for understanding human-environment interactions. This study aims at examining how these relationships vary over spatial sampling scales and investigating the spatially varying relationships between land-cover changes and driving factors, as well as the variations in the relationships at different sampling scales in the Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture of Qinghai Province, P.R. China. Regular sampling methods are used first to generate eight sets of data points at different scales, and then the values for land-cover changes and the factors are extracted for these data points. Geographically weighted regression (GWR) model is applied to analyze the relationships between land-cover changes and the factors at different sampling scales. The results indicate that the influences of the factors (e.g. the signs, significances, and values of coefficients) change greatly over different sampling scales; similarly, for different types of land-cover changes, the contributions of the factors also vary. Generally, roads, rivers, and lakes contribute greatly to land-cover changes, while villages, temples, and elevations contribute less. A possible reason is that the densities of roads, rivers, and lakes is much greater than those of villages and temples, and the populations in temples and villages are too small to have much effect on land-cover changes. The results demonstrate that the sampling scales have an important influence on the relationships between land-cover change and the factors. PMID:24603033

  14. Spatially varying relationships between land-cover change and driving factors at multiple sampling scales.

    PubMed

    Du, Shihong; Wang, Qiao; Guo, Luo

    2014-05-01

    Modeling the relationships between environment, human activity, and natural conditions is very important for understanding human-environment interactions. This study aims at examining how these relationships vary over spatial sampling scales and investigating the spatially varying relationships between land-cover changes and driving factors, as well as the variations in the relationships at different sampling scales in the Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture of Qinghai Province, P.R. China. Regular sampling methods are used first to generate eight sets of data points at different scales, and then the values for land-cover changes and the factors are extracted for these data points. Geographically weighted regression (GWR) model is applied to analyze the relationships between land-cover changes and the factors at different sampling scales. The results indicate that the influences of the factors (e.g. the signs, significances, and values of coefficients) change greatly over different sampling scales; similarly, for different types of land-cover changes, the contributions of the factors also vary. Generally, roads, rivers, and lakes contribute greatly to land-cover changes, while villages, temples, and elevations contribute less. A possible reason is that the densities of roads, rivers, and lakes is much greater than those of villages and temples, and the populations in temples and villages are too small to have much effect on land-cover changes. The results demonstrate that the sampling scales have an important influence on the relationships between land-cover change and the factors.

  15. Traveling Atmospheric Disturbances (TADs) in the thermosphere inferred from accelerometer data at three altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruinsma, Sean; Forbes, Jeffrey

    2010-05-01

    Densities derived from accelerometer measurements on the GRACE, CHAMP and Air Force/SETA satellites near 490, 390, and 220 km, respectively, are used to elucidate global-scale characteristics of traveling atmospheric disturbances. The accelerometers on the CHAMP and GRACE satellites have made it possible to accumulate near-continuous records of thermosphere density between about 320 and 490 km since May 2001, and July 2002, respectively. They have recorded the response to virtually every significant geomagnetic storm during this period. CHAMP and GRACE are in (near) polar and quasi-circular orbits, sampling 24 hr local time approximately every 4 and 5 months, respectively. These capabilities offer unique opportunities to study the temporal and latitudinal responses of the thermosphere to geomagnetic disturbances. The Air Force/SETA accelerometer data have also been processed, but the analysis is more complicated due to data gaps. Significant and unambiguous TAD activity in the observed response of the thermosphere was detected for about 25 events with CHAMP and GRACE, and less than 10 with SETA. The atmospheric variability is evaluated by de-trending the data, allowing the extraction of specific ranges in horizontal scale, and analyzing density "residuals". The scale of the perturbation is decisive for its lifetime and relative amplitude. Sometimes the disturbances represent wave-like structures propagating far from the source, and these so-called ‘TADs' were detected and described for the May 2003 storm for the first time. Some TADs traveled over the pole into the opposite hemisphere; this was found in both CHAMP and GRACE data. Most TADs propagate equatorward, but poleward propagating TADs have on occasion been detected too. The estimated speeds and amplitudes of the observed TADs, and their dependence on altitude and solar and geomagnetic activity in particular, will be presented in this poster.

  16. [Social capital in rural areas: adaptation to Spanish and factor validation of a scale].

    PubMed

    Fernández Niño, Julián Alfredo; Pinzón Flórez, Carlos Eduardo; Moreno Montoya, José; Cepeda Gil, Magda Cristiana; Idrovo Velandia, Alvaro Javier

    2014-07-01

    Social capital is considered a structural determinant of social development and wellbeing. Its cognitive component assesses the degree of confidence of the population in their systems for social organization, as well as community interactions to coordinate social responses to social problems. There are few available scales for measuring this construct. This work presents the adaptation to Spanish and psychometric validation of a scale for measuring social capital in a rural setting. The Wang Social Cognitive Scale was also adapted to Spanish. 1200 questionnaires were applied to adults in 12 villages of the municipality of Tierra Alta, (Colombia) recruited by random sampling. Factor analysis of the scale was performed based on a polychoric correlation matrix. Exploratory factor analysis suggests the existence of two principal factors distributed as follows: 7 items for factor 1, trust (eigenvalue 3.23) and 2 items, for factor 2, distrust (eigenvalue 1.40). As observed by Wang, Q9 and Q10 could be ambiguous questions which do not contribute enough to either of the factors. The first factor validation to Spanish language of the Wang Social Capital Scale is presented in the social context of rural Colombia.

  17. [Social capital in rural areas: adaptation to Spanish and factor validation of a scale].

    PubMed

    Fernández Niño, Julián Alfredo; Pinzón Flórez, Carlos Eduardo; Moreno Montoya, José; Cepeda Gil, Magda Cristiana; Idrovo Velandia, Alvaro Javier

    2014-07-01

    Social capital is considered a structural determinant of social development and wellbeing. Its cognitive component assesses the degree of confidence of the population in their systems for social organization, as well as community interactions to coordinate social responses to social problems. There are few available scales for measuring this construct. This work presents the adaptation to Spanish and psychometric validation of a scale for measuring social capital in a rural setting. The Wang Social Cognitive Scale was also adapted to Spanish. 1200 questionnaires were applied to adults in 12 villages of the municipality of Tierra Alta, (Colombia) recruited by random sampling. Factor analysis of the scale was performed based on a polychoric correlation matrix. Exploratory factor analysis suggests the existence of two principal factors distributed as follows: 7 items for factor 1, trust (eigenvalue 3.23) and 2 items, for factor 2, distrust (eigenvalue 1.40). As observed by Wang, Q9 and Q10 could be ambiguous questions which do not contribute enough to either of the factors. The first factor validation to Spanish language of the Wang Social Capital Scale is presented in the social context of rural Colombia. PMID:25014299

  18. Investigation of scaling and inhibition mechanisms and the influencing factors in static and dynamic inhibition tests

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, M.D.; Jamieson, E.; Hammonds, P.

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents results of some recent laboratory study on barium sulfate scale inhibition in oilfield brines and investigation of several factors potentially effecting scale inhibition efficiency. In addition to well known mechanisms of scale nucleation inhibition and crystal growth retardation, dispersion/anti-conglomeration appears to be a significant inhibition mechanism associated with some scale inhibitors, which may play an important role in a dynamic flowing system. The contamination of a brine by an organic chelating agent such as EDTA or citric acid did not, in this study, show any significant effect on the barium sulfate inhibition efficiency of any of the three generically different scale inhibitors included. Experiments show that, in a properly enclosed system, the pH of an oilfield brine even with hydrogen bicarbonate presence can be sufficiently buffered with acetic acid. These new results are believed to be useful in evaluating/selecting scale inhibitors and improving barium sulfate scale inhibition test methods.

  19. Characterizing scale-specific environmental factors affecting soil organic carbon along two landscape transects.

    PubMed

    She, Dongli; Cao, Yutong; Chen, Qian; Yu, Shuang'en

    2016-09-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is one of the most important soil properties affecting many other soil and environmental properties and processes. In order to understand and manage SOC effectively, it is important to identify the scale-specific main factors affecting SOC distributions, which in this study occurred in a watershed on the Loess Plateau. Two transects were selected that passed along the upper slopes on each side of the main gully of the Liudaogou watershed. Transect 1 (3411-m length) had 27 sampling sites at 131-m intervals; transect 2 (3597 m length) had 30 sampling sites at 124-m intervals. The two transects were chosen in order to compare landscape patterns of differing complexity that were in close proximity, which reduced the effects of factors that would be caused by different locations. The landscape of transect 1 was more complex due to the greater diversity in cultivation. Multivariate empirical mode decomposition (MEMD) decomposed the total variation in SOC and five selected environmental factors into four intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) and a residual according to the scale of occurrence. Scale-specific correlation analysis was used to identify significant relationships between SOC and the environmental factors. The dominant scales were those that were the largest contributors to the total SOC variance; for transect 1, this was the IMF 1 (scale of 403 m), whereas for transect 2, it was the medium scale of the IMF 2 (scale of 688 m). For both transects, vegetation properties (vegetation cover and aboveground biomass) were the main factors affecting SOC distributions at their respective dominant scales. At each scale, the main effective factors could be identified although at the larger scales, their contributions to the overall variance were almost negligible. The distributions of SOC and the factors affecting it were found to be scale dependent. The results of this study highlighted the suitability of the MEMD method in revealing the main scale

  20. Evaluation of shock isolation techniques for a piezoresistive accelerometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Bell, R.G.; Davie, N.T. )

    1989-06-01

    Sandia conducts impact testing for a variety of structures. In this slapdown test, one end of the cask impacts the hard concrete target, then the structure rotates so that the other end of the cask impacts the target. During an impact test, metal to metal contact may occur within the structure and produce high frequency, high amplitude shock inputs. The high frequency portion of this transient vibration has been observed to excite the accelerometer resonance even though this resonance exceeds 350 kHz. The amplitude of the resonating accelerometer response can be so large that the data are clipped and are rendered useless. If the data are not clipped, a digital filter must be applied to eliminate the undesired accelerometer resonant response. If possible, it is more desirable to prevent excitation of the accelerometer resonance, This may be accomplished by mechanically isolating the accelerometer from the high frequency excitation without degrading the transducer response in the bandwidth of interest which is usually 10 kHz or less. To achieve this desirable isolation, two mounting configurations were designed and characterized. The objective of this paper is to describe the evaluation technique and to discuss the shock isolation properties of each mounting configuration. One configuration was actually used in a field test of bomb impacting a target. 4 figs.

  1. One testing method of dynamic linearity of an accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jing-Yu; Guo, Wei-Guo; Tan, Xue-Ming; Shi, Yun-Bo

    2015-09-01

    To effectively test dynamic linearity of an accelerometer over a wide rang of 104 g to about 20 × 104g, one published patent technology is first experimentally verified and analysed, and its deficient is presented, then based on stress wave propagation theory on the thin long bar, the relation between the strain signal and the corresponding acceleration signal is obtained, one special link of two coaxial projectile is developed. These two coaxial metal cylinders (inner cylinder and circular tube) are used as projectiles, to prevent their mutual slip inside the gun barrel during movement, the one end of two projectiles is always fastened by small screws. Ti6-AL4-V bar with diameter of 30 mm is used to propagate loading stress pulse. The resultant compression wave can be measured by the strain gauges on the bar, and a half -sine strain pulse is obtained. The measuring accelerometer is attached on the other end of the bar by a vacuum clamp. In this clamp, the accelerometer only bear compression wave, the reflected tension pulse make the accelerometer off the bar. Using this system, dynamic linearity measurement of accelerometer can be easily tested in wider range of acceleration values. And a really measuring results are presented.

  2. Optimal Placement of Accelerometers for the Detection of Everyday Activities

    PubMed Central

    Cleland, Ian; Kikhia, Basel; Nugent, Chris; Boytsov, Andrey; Hallberg, Josef; Synnes, Kåre; McClean, Sally; Finlay, Dewar

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an investigation to determine the optimal placement of accelerometers for the purpose of detecting a range of everyday activities. The paper investigates the effect of combining data from accelerometers placed at various bodily locations on the accuracy of activity detection. Eight healthy males participated within the study. Data were collected from six wireless tri-axial accelerometers placed at the chest, wrist, lower back, hip, thigh and foot. Activities included walking, running on a motorized treadmill, sitting, lying, standing and walking up and down stairs. The Support Vector Machine provided the most accurate detection of activities of all the machine learning algorithms investigated. Although data from all locations provided similar levels of accuracy, the hip was the best single location to record data for activity detection using a Support Vector Machine, providing small but significantly better accuracy than the other investigated locations. Increasing the number of sensing locations from one to two or more statistically increased the accuracy of classification. There was no significant difference in accuracy when using two or more sensors. It was noted, however, that the difference in activity detection using single or multiple accelerometers may be more pronounced when trying to detect finer grain activities. Future work shall therefore investigate the effects of accelerometer placement on a larger range of these activities. PMID:23867744

  3. Using Multilevel Factor Analysis with Clustered Data: Investigating the Factor Structure of the Positive Values Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Francis L.; Cornell, Dewey G.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in multilevel modeling techniques now make it possible to investigate the psychometric properties of instruments using clustered data. Factor models that overlook the clustering effect can lead to underestimated standard errors, incorrect parameter estimates, and model fit indices. In addition, factor structures may differ depending on…

  4. Factor Structure Analysis of the Schutte Self-Report Emotional Intelligence Scale on International Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Kok-Mun; Wang, Chuang; Kim, Do-Hong; Bodenhorn, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    The authors investigated the factor structure of the Schutte Self-Report Emotional Intelligence (SSREI) scale on international students. Via confirmatory factor analysis, the authors tested the fit of the models reported by Schutte et al. and five other studies to data from 640 international students in the United States. Results show that…

  5. Factor Structure of Scores on the State Version of the Four Dimension Mood Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Vernon H.; Shepherd, Alex J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the factor structure of scores on the Four Dimension Mood Scale (4DMS) developed by Huelsman, Nemanick, and Munz in response to criticisms of the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule. The results showed that the factor structure of 4DMS scores obtained with a sample of U.K. residents assessed for state affect corresponded…

  6. Confirming the Factor Structure of the Cognitive Test Anxiety Scale: Comparing the Utility of Three Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassady, Jerrell C.; Finch, W. Holmes

    2014-01-01

    This study validated the factor structure of a popular assessment of learner's cognitive test anxiety. Following recent findings in a study with Argentinean students' use of the Spanish version of the Cognitive Test Anxiety Scale (CTAS), this study tested the factor structure using data from 742 students who completed the original…

  7. Validation of the Social Appearance Anxiety Scale: Factor, Convergent, and Divergent Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinson, Cheri A.; Rodebaugh, Thomas L.

    2011-01-01

    The Social Appearance Anxiety Scale (SAAS) was created to assess fear of overall appearance evaluation. Initial psychometric work indicated that the measure had a single-factor structure and exhibited excellent internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and convergent validity. In the current study, the authors further examined the factor,…

  8. Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of the Injection Phobia Scale-Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Sawchuk, Craig N.; Moretz, Melanie W.; David, Bieke; Armstrong, Thomas; Ciesielski, Bethany G.

    2010-01-01

    The present investigation examined the factor structure and psychometric properties of the Injection Phobia Scale-Anxiety (IPS-Anx). Principal components analysis of IPS-Anx items in Study 1 (n = 498) revealed a 2-factor structure consisting of Distal Fear and Contact Fear. However, CFA results in Study 2 (n = 567) suggest that a 1-factor…

  9. Children's Perception of Interparental Conflict Scale (CPIC): Factor Structure and Invariance across Adolescents and Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moura, Octavio; dos Santos, Rute Andrade; Rocha, Magda; Matos, Paula Mena

    2010-01-01

    The Children's Perception of Interparental Conflict Scale (CPIC) is based on the cognitive-contextual framework for understanding interparental conflict. This study investigates the factor validity and the invariance of two factor models of CPIC within a sample of Portuguese adolescents and emerging adults (14 to 25 years old; N = 677). At the…

  10. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of Cross Racial Identity Scale (CRIS) Scores: Testing the Expanded Nigrescence Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worrell, Frank C.; Watson, Stevie

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the authors tested the viability of the expanded nigrescence (NT-E) model as operationalized by Cross Racial Identity Scale (CRIS) scores using confirmatory factor analyses. Participants were 594 Black college students from the Southeastern United States. Results indicated a good fit for NT-E's proposed six-factor structure.…

  11. Factor Structure of the Rorschach Prognostic Rating Scale and Its Relation to Therapeutic Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auerbach, Stephen M.; Edinger, Jack D.

    1976-01-01

    This study evaluated the factor structure of the Rorschach Prognostic Rating Scale (RPRS) in order to: (a) test the assumption that the RPRS represents a unitary response system and (b) determine the efficacy of employing population specific factor scores as predictors of therapy outcome. (Author/NG)

  12. Factor Analysis of the Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation With Female Suicide Attempters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Ronald R.; DeLisle, Michelle M.

    2005-01-01

    A sample of 119 female suicide attempters completed the Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation (BSS). Although confirmatory common factor analyses of BSS items failed to support previously hypothesized one-, two-, or three-factor models, confirmatory principal components analyses substantiated hypothesized one- and two-dimensional models. Heuristics for…

  13. The Three Domains of Disgust Scale: Factor Structure, Psychometric Properties, and Conceptual Limitations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Adams, Thomas; Ciesielski, Bethany; David, Bieke; Sarawgi, Shivali; Broman-Fulks, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    This investigation examined the measurement properties of the Three Domains of Disgust Scale (TDDS). Principal components analysis in Study 1 (n = 206) revealed three factors of Pathogen, Sexual, and Moral Disgust that demonstrated excellent reliability, including test-retest over 12 weeks. Confirmatory factor analyses in Study 2 (n = 406)…

  14. Homework Management Scale: Confirming the Factor Structure with Middle School Students in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Jianzhong; Fan, Xitao; Du, Jianxia

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a psychometric evaluation of the Homework Management Scale (HMS) for mathematics, consisting of five subscales for measuring homework management strategies. Confirmatory factor analyses were conducted with a sample of middle school students (N = 796). Results indicated that the factor structure of the Chinese version of the HMS…

  15. Factor Structure of the Acute Stress Disorder Scale in a Sample of Hurricane Katrina Evacuees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmondson, Donald; Mills, Mary Alice; Park, Crystal L.

    2010-01-01

    Acute stress disorder (ASD) is a poorly understood and controversial diagnosis (A. G. Harvey & R. A. Bryant, 2002). The present study used confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to test the factor structure of the most widely used self-report measure of ASD, the Acute Stress Disorder Scale (R. A. Bryant, M. L. Moulds, & R. M. Guthrie, 2000), in a…

  16. The Development of the Scale of Protective Factors: Resilience in a Violent Trauma Sample.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Garcia, Elisabeth; Madewell, Amy N; Kennison, Shelia M

    2015-01-01

    This research developed the Scale of Protective Factors (SPF-24) to measure protective factors contributing to resilience. We investigated the factor structure of 35 items. After exploratory factor analysis, we subjected 25 items representing 2 social-interpersonal and 2 cognitive-individual factors to confirmatory factor analysis. The sample consisted of 942 college students from 3 studies and 2 institutions. To examine the diagnostic function of the SPF, we used clinical criteria to identify a subsample of participants who had experienced violent trauma and scored low, moderate, or high on an established resilience scale. Results showed that the low-resilient group scored significantly lower on all subscales of the SPF with marked differences in prioritizing/planning behavior. Implications for the research and clinical settings are discussed. PMID:26300467

  17. Scale-model charge-transfer technique for measuring enhancement factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kositsky, J.; Nanevicz, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    Determination of aircraft electric field enhancement factors is crucial when using airborne field mill (ABFM) systems to accurately measure electric fields aloft. SRI used the scale model charge transfer technique to determine enhancement factors of several canonical shapes and a scale model Learjet 36A. The measured values for the canonical shapes agreed with known analytic solutions within about 6 percent. The laboratory determined enhancement factors for the aircraft were compared with those derived from in-flight data gathered by a Learjet 36A outfitted with eight field mills. The values agreed to within experimental error (approx. 15 percent).

  18. [Exploratory factor analysis and psychometric properties of the Valencia Scale on attitudes and beliefs toward hypnosis].

    PubMed

    Capafons, Antonio; Morales, Claudia; Espejo, Begoña; Cabañas, Sonia

    2006-11-01

    Exploratory factor analysis and psychometric properties of the valencia scale on attitudes and beliefs toward hypnosis. Therapist version. This investigation examines the psychometric properties and factor structure of the Valencia Scale on Attitudes and Beliefs toward Hypnosis-Therapist version. Data from 775 professional psychologists belonging to the Spanish Association of Psychologists were used for the exploratory factor analysis (EFA). Retest included data from 426 participants who answered to the test. The EFA revealed eight factors (Fear, Memory, Help, Control, Collaboration, Interest, Magic and Marginal). Each factor showed good internal consistency and reliability, similar to the client version of this scale. ANOVA indicate that some variables (having scientific knowledge, having received practical information on hypnosis, to use hypnosis, and to show interest in receiving more theoretical and practical information on hypnosis), tend to reduce inadequate beliefs and negative attitudes toward hypnosis. Our results provide the basis for carrying out confirmatory factor analysis and studies of convergent validity on the scale, and of the sensitivity of the scale to change.

  19. Comparing the factor structure of the Wisconsin Schizotypy Scales and the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Gross, Georgina M; Mellin, Juliann; Silvia, Paul J; Barrantes-Vidal, Neus; Kwapil, Thomas R

    2014-10-01

    Schizotypy is a multidimensional construct that captures the expression of schizophrenic symptoms and impairment from subclinical levels to full-blown psychosis. The present study examined the comparability of the factor structure of 2 leading psychometric measures of schizotypy: the Wisconsin Schizotypy Scales (WSS) and the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ). Both the SPQ and WSS purportedly capture the multidimensional structure of schizotypy; however, whether they are measuring comparable factors has not been empirically demonstrated. This study provided support for a 2-factor model with positive and negative factors underlying the WSS; however, contrary to previous findings, the best fit for the SPQ was for a 4-factor model using confirmatory factor analysis, and a 2-factor model using exploratory factor analysis. The WSS factors were relatively distinct, whereas those underlying the SPQ showed high overlap. The WSS positive and SPQ cognitive-perceptual factors appeared to tap comparable constructs. However, the WSS negative and SPQ interpersonal factors appeared to tap somewhat different constructs based on their correlation and their patterns of associations with other schizotypy dimensions and the Five-Factor Model-suggesting that the SPQ interpersonal factor may not adequately tap negative or deficit schizotypy. Although the SPQ offers the advantage over the WSS of having a disorganization factor, it is not clear that this SPQ factor is actually distinct from positive schizotypy. Existing measures should be used with caution and new measures based on a priori theories are necessary to further understand the factor structure of schizotypy.

  20. Testing the Factor Structure of a Scale to Assess African American Acculturation: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Robert J.; Brown, Tiffany L.; Peterson, N. Andrew; Snowden, Lonnie; Hines, Alice

    2009-01-01

    Research has pointed to the important role that acculturation plays in understanding a range of physical health behaviors as well as psychological functioning, but only a few studies have attempted to establish reliable and valid measures of African American acculturation. The scale developed by Snowden and Hines (1999) to assess African American…

  1. Initial Borehole Accelerometer Array Observations Near the North Portal of the ESF

    SciTech Connect

    David von Seggern

    2005-08-17

    This report addresses observed ground motions at the site of the proposed surface facilities associated with the designated repository for high-level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In 2003 an accelerometer array was installed at three boreholes on the pad of the north portal of the ESF (Exploratory Studies Facility) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, by the Nevada Seismological Laboratory (NSL). These boreholes, roughly 150 m apart and initially used for extensive geological and geophysical surveys, were ideal locations to measure the subsurface ground motions at the proposed site of surface facilities such as the Waste Handling Building. Such measurements will impact the design of the facilities. Accelerometer emplacement depths of approximately 15 m from the surface and then at the bottom of the boreholes, roughly 100 m, were chosen. Accelerometers were also placed at the surface next to the boreholes, for a total of nine accelerometers, all three-component. Data recording was accomplished with onsite recorders, with the onsite data transmitted to a central computer at a trailer on the pad. All requirements were met to qualify these data as ''Q''. Due to the lack of significant recordings during 2003, several low signal-to-noise (S/N) quality events were chosen for processing. The maximum horizontal peak ground acceleration (PGA) recorded at the pad was approximately 1 cm/s2 in 2003; the corresponding peak ground velocity (PGV) was approximately 0.01 cm/s. PGA and PGV were obtained at all nine accelerometers for most of these events, and spectra were computed. Ground motion amplitudes varied significantly across the boreholes. Higher ground amplifications were observed at the surface for the two boreholes that penetrated a thick amount ({approx} 30 m) of fill and Quaternary alluvium compared to the one that had less than 2 m of such. Additionally, surface-to-deep recordings showed as much as a factor of five amplification at these two boreholes. Signal

  2. The New Factor Structure of the Korean Version of the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (K-DERS) Incorporating Method Factor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Yongrae; Hong, Sehee

    2013-01-01

    The factor structure of the Korean version of the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale was examined. Rather than the six-factor model, the five-factor model with a method factor was supported. This result suggests that the AWARENESS and CLARITY factors can be combined into one construct, controlling for the method factor. (Contains 1 figure.)

  3. Factor Structure and Reliability of the Revised Conflict Tactics Scales' (CTS2) 10-Factor Model in a Community-Based Female Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yun, Sung Hyun

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the factor structure and reliability of the revised Conflict Tactics Scales' (CTS2) 10-factor model in a community-based female sample (N = 261). The underlying factor structure of the 10-factor model was tested by the confirmatory multiple group factor analysis, which demonstrated complex factor cross-loadings…

  4. Terrestrial Applications of a Nano-g Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    1996-01-01

    The ultra-sensitive accelerometer, developed for NASA to monitor the microgravity environments of Space Shuttle, five orbiters and Space Station, needed to measure accelerations up to 10 mg with an absolute accuracy of 10 nano-g (10(exp -8)g) for at least two orbits (10(exp 4) seconds) to resolve accelerations associated with orbital drag. Also, the accelerometers needed to have less than 10(exp -9) F.S. off-axis sensitivity; to be thermally and magnetically inert; to be immune to quiescent shock, and to have an in-situ calibration capability. Multi-axis compact seismometers, designs that have twelve decades of dynamic range will be described. Density profilometers, precision gradiometers, gyros and vibration isolation designs and applications will be discussed. Finally, examples of transformations of the accelerometer into sensitive anemometers and imaging spectrometers will be presented.

  5. Description of the three axis low-g accelerometer package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amalavage, A. J.; Fikes, E. H.; Berry, E. H.

    1978-01-01

    The three axis low-g accelerometer package designed for use on the Space Processing Application Rocket (SPAR) Program is described. The package consists of the following major sections: (1) three Kearfott model 2412 accelerometers mounted in an orthogonal triad configuration on a temperature controlled, thermally isolated cube, (2) the accelerometer servoelectronics (printed circuit cards PC-6 through PC-12), and (3) the signal conditioner (printed circuit cards PC-15 and PC-16). The measurement range is 0 + or - 0.031 g with a quantization of 1.1 x 10 to the 7th power g. The package was flown successfully on six SPAR launches with the Black Brant booster. These flights provide approximately 300 s of free fall or zero-g environment.

  6. The ISA accelerometer for BepiColombo mission .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, V.; Fiorenza, E.; Lefevre, C.; Nozzoli, S.; Peron, R.; Reale, A.; Santoli, F.

    The Italian Spring Accelerometer (ISA) will give a fundamental contribution to the Radio Science Experiments of BepiColombo mission, enabling substantial improvement of the knowledge of Mercury's orbit and rotation, and of the relativistic dynamics in the solar system. ISA is a three-axis accelerometer devoted to the measurement of the non-gravitational acceleration of Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO), whose knowledge is important in order to fully exploit the quality of the tracking data. ISA shall have an intrinsic noise level of (10^{-9} m/s^2/&sqrt;{Hz}) in the (3 \\cdot 10^{-5}) Hz to (10^{-1}) Hz frequency range, to guarantee the fulfilment of the RSE scientific goals. A comprehensive presentation of ISA accelerometer is given, including details about its scientific and technological features, the updated measurement error budget, the ongoing experimental activities and foreseen calibration and science operations strategies.

  7. Accelerometer Method and Apparatus for Integral Display and Control Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting mechanical vibrations and outputting a signal in response thereto. Art accelerometer package having integral display and control functions is suitable for mounting upon the machinery to be monitored. Display circuitry provides signals to a bar graph display which may be used to monitor machine conditions over a period of time. Control switches may be set which correspond to elements in the bar graph to provide an alert if vibration signals increase in amplitude over a selected trip point. The circuitry is shock mounted within the accelerometer housing. The method provides for outputting a broadband analog accelerometer signal, integrating this signal to produce a velocity signal, integrating and calibrating the velocity signal before application to a display driver, and selecting a trip point at which a digitally compatible output signal is generated.

  8. Accelerometer Method and Apparatus for Integral Display and Control Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting mechanical vibrations and outputting a signal in response thereto is discussed. An accelerometer package having integral display and control functions is suitable for mounting upon the machinery to be monitored. Display circuitry provides signals to a bar graph display which may be used to monitor machine conditions over a period of time. Control switches may be set which correspond to elements in the bar graph to provide an alert if vibration signals increase in amplitude over a selected trip point. The circuitry is shock mounted within the accelerometer housing. The method provides for outputting a broadband analog accelerometer signal, integrating this signal to produce a velocity signal, integrating and calibrating the velocity signal before application to a display driver, and selecting a trip point at which a digitally compatible output signal is generated.

  9. Adapting MCM-D technology to a piezoresistive accelerometer packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, A.; Plaza, J. A.; Cabruja, E.; Esteve, J.

    2003-07-01

    A silicon-on-silicon multichip module for a piezoresistive accelerometer is presented in this paper. This packaging technology, a type of wafer level packaging, offers fully complementary metal-oxide semiconductor compatible silicon substrates, so a pre-amplification stage can be included at substrate level. The electrical contacts and a partial sealing of the sensor mobile structures are performed at the same step using flip-chip technology, so the cost is reduced. As accelerometers are stress-sensitive devices, great care must be taken in the fabrication process and materials. Thus, test structures have been included to study the packaging effects. In this paper we report on the compatibility of accelerometer and wafer level packaging technologies.

  10. Micromachined force-balance feedback accelerometer with optical displacement detection

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Langlois, Eric; Baker, Michael; Okandan, Murat; Anderson, Robert

    2014-07-22

    An accelerometer includes a proof mass and a frame that are formed in a handle layer of a silicon-on-an-insulator (SOI). The proof mass is separated from the frame by a back-side trench that defines a boundary of the proof mass. The accelerometer also includes a reflector coupled to a top surface of the proof mass. An optical detector is located above the reflector at the device side. The accelerometer further includes at least one suspension spring. The suspension spring has a handle anchor that extends downwards from the device side to the handle layer to mechanically support upward and downward movement of the proof mass relative to a top surface of the proof mass.

  11. Optical accelerometer design based on laser self-mixing interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying; Li, Xingfei; Kou, Ke; Zhang, Limin

    2015-03-01

    A novel optical accelerometer based on laser self-mixing effect is presented and experimentally demonstrated, which consists of a mass-loaded elastic-beam assembly and laser self-mixing interferometer. Under external acceleration, an inertial force is applied to the mass, flexible beams deflect from their equilibrium position. The deflection can be read out by the self-mixing interferometer. In order to reduce the impact of higher harmonic, wavelet analysis is introduced to remove singular points. Preliminary results indicate that the resolution is 0.19μg/Hz1/2 within a bandwidth of 100Hz. The optical accelerometer has the potential to achieve high-precision, compact accelerometers.

  12. Extracting Time-Accurate Acceleration Vectors From Nontrivial Accelerometer Arrangements.

    PubMed

    Franck, Jennifer A; Blume, Janet; Crisco, Joseph J; Franck, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Sports-related concussions are of significant concern in many impact sports, and their detection relies on accurate measurements of the head kinematics during impact. Among the most prevalent recording technologies are videography, and more recently, the use of single-axis accelerometers mounted in a helmet, such as the HIT system. Successful extraction of the linear and angular impact accelerations depends on an accurate analysis methodology governed by the equations of motion. Current algorithms are able to estimate the magnitude of acceleration and hit location, but make assumptions about the hit orientation and are often limited in the position and/or orientation of the accelerometers. The newly formulated algorithm presented in this manuscript accurately extracts the full linear and rotational acceleration vectors from a broad arrangement of six single-axis accelerometers directly from the governing set of kinematic equations. The new formulation linearizes the nonlinear centripetal acceleration term with a finite-difference approximation and provides a fast and accurate solution for all six components of acceleration over long time periods (>250 ms). The approximation of the nonlinear centripetal acceleration term provides an accurate computation of the rotational velocity as a function of time and allows for reconstruction of a multiple-impact signal. Furthermore, the algorithm determines the impact location and orientation and can distinguish between glancing, high rotational velocity impacts, or direct impacts through the center of mass. Results are shown for ten simulated impact locations on a headform geometry computed with three different accelerometer configurations in varying degrees of signal noise. Since the algorithm does not require simplifications of the actual impacted geometry, the impact vector, or a specific arrangement of accelerometer orientations, it can be easily applied to many impact investigations in which accurate kinematics need to

  13. Sparse factors for the positive and negative syndrome scale: Which symptoms and stage of illness?

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ariana; Wilcox, Marsha; Savitz, Adam; Chung, Hearee; Li, Qingqin; Salvadore, Giacomo; Wang, Dai; Nuamah, Isaac; Riese, Steven P.; Bilder, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) is frequently described with five latent factors, yet published factor models consistently fail to replicate across samples and related disorders. We hypothesize that (1) a subset of the PANSS, instead of the entire PANSS scale, would produce the most replicable five-factor models across samples, and that (2) the PANSS factor structure may be different depending on the treatment phase, influenced by the responsiveness of the positive symptoms to treatment. Using exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis and cross validation on baseline and post-treatment observations from 3647 schizophrenia patients, we show that five-factor models fit best across samples when substantial subsets of the PANSS items are removed. The optimal model at baseline (five factors) omits 12 items: Motor Retardation, Grandiosity, Somatic Concern, Lack of Judgment and Insight, Difficulty in Abstract Thinking, Mannerisms and Posturing, Disturbance of Volition, Preoccupation, Disorientation, Excitement, Guilt Feelings and Depression. The PANSS factor models fit differently before and after patients have been treated. Patients with larger treatment response in positive symptoms have larger variations in factor structure across treatment stage than the less responsive patients. Negative symptom scores better predict the positive symptoms scores after treatment than before treatment. We conclude that sparse factor models replicate better on new samples, and the underlying disease structure of Schizophrenia changes upon treatment. PMID:25613662

  14. An Approach to Identify Site Response Directivity of Accelerometer Sites and Application to the Iranian Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Gaudio, Vincenzo; Pierri, Pierpaolo; Rajabi, Ali M.

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, several workers have found numerous cases of sites characterised by significant azimuthal variation of dynamic response to seismic shaking. The causes of this phenomenon are still unclear, but are possibly related to combinations of geological and geomorphological factors determining a polarisation of resonance effects. To improve their comprehension, it would be desirable to extend the database of observations on this phenomenon. Thus, considering that unrevealed cases of site response directivity can be "hidden" among the sites of accelerometer networks, we developed a two-stage approach of data mining from existing strong motion databases to identify sites affected by directional amplification. The proposed procedure first calculates Arias Intensity tensor components from accelerometer recordings of each site to determine mean directional variations of total shaking energy. Then, at the sites where a significant anisotropy appears in ground motion, azimuthal variations of HVSR values (spectral ratios between horizontal and vertical components of recordings) are analysed to confirm the occurrence of site resonance conditions. We applied this technique to a database of recordings acquired by accelerometer stations in the Iranian area. The results of this investigation pointed out some sites affected by directional resonance that appear to be correlated to the orientation of local tectonic lineaments, these being mostly transversal to the direction of maximum shaking. Comparing Arias Intensities observed at these sites with theoretical estimates provided by ground motion prediction equations, the presence of significant site amplifications was confirmed. The magnitude of the amplification factors appear to be correlated to the results of HVSR analysis, even though the pattern of dispersion of HVSR values suggests that while high peak values of spectral ratios are indicative of strong amplifications, lower values do not necessarily imply lower

  15. A bimorph flexural-disk accelerometer for underwater use

    SciTech Connect

    Moffett, M.B.; Powers, J.M.

    1996-04-01

    Design equations, based on Ralph Woollett{close_quote}s 1960 report [{open_quote}{open_quote}The Flexural Disk Transducer,{close_quote}{close_quote} U.S. Navy Underwater Sound Laboratory Research Report No. 490], are presented for a bimorph accelerometer. Figures-of-merit are compared for PZT-4, PZT-5A, PZT-5H, PZT-8 piezoceramics, and PVDF-TrFE copolymer. Neutrally buoyant, spherical and cylindrical accelerometer configurations can be designed to meet bandwidth, sensitivity, and depth requirements. Experimental results for PZT-8 bimorphs indicate that simply-supported edge conditions are easily achievable. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Monitoring the Dynamic Deformation of the Bridge Structures by Accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipták, Imrich

    2013-10-01

    The paper presents current trends in determining the dynamic deformations of bridge structures through the exploitation of geodetic measurements by accelerometers. The main aim of the paper is to demonstrate the practical application of these measurements on the cycling bridge over the river Morava in Devínska Nová Ves. Possibilities for the processing and analysis of accelerometer measurements by spectral analysis are described. An evaluation of the results is realized based on the modal characteristics from a numerical model designed by the finite element method.

  17. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Delirium Rating Scale Revised-98 (DRS-R98).

    PubMed

    Thurber, Steven; Kishi, Yasuhiro; Trzepacz, Paula T; Franco, Jose G; Meagher, David J; Lee, Yanghyun; Kim, Jeong-Lan; Furlanetto, Leticia M; Negreiros, Daniel; Huang, Ming-Chyi; Chen, Chun-Hsin; Kean, Jacob; Leonard, Maeve

    2015-01-01

    Principal components analysis applied to the Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98 contributes to understanding the delirium construct. Using a multisite pooled international delirium database, the authors applied confirmatory factor analysis to Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98 scores from 859 adult patients evaluated by delirium experts (delirium, N=516; nondelirium, N=343). Confirmatory factor analysis found all diagnostic features and core symptoms (cognitive, language, thought process, sleep-wake cycle, motor retardation), except motor agitation, loaded onto factor 1. Motor agitation loaded onto factor 2 with noncore symptoms (delusions, affective lability, and perceptual disturbances). Factor 1 loading supports delirium as a single construct, but when accompanied by psychosis, motor agitation's role may not be solely as a circadian activity indicator. PMID:25923855

  18. The Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale for nursing education revisited: a confirmatory factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Murray J; King, Jennie

    2010-01-01

    The Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale for Nursing Education (SDLRSNE) was initially developed as an alternative to Guglielmino's [Guglielmino, L.M. 1977. Development of the Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale. Unpublished Doctoral Dissertation, University of Georgia. Dissertation Abstracts International, vol. 38 (11a), p. 6467] Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale. The aim of this study was to re-examine the factor structure of the subscales of the SDLRSNE and provide evidence of its validity. Data was collected using a cross-sectional survey of 227 first year undergraduate nursing students. To examine the factor structure of the SDLRSNE three one-factor congeneric models, each representing a different subscale, were tested with maximum likelihood confirmatory factor analysis. The model fit indices of the three one-factor congeneric models indicate that the resultant models fit the data well, providing support for the factorial validity of the SDLRSNE. Of the 40 items, 11 items had to be removed from the analyses as they failed to provide good fit with their subscales. Further research investigating the factor validity of the SDLRSNE is encouraged, specifically to examine the stability of the items across factors using multi-factor models. PMID:19541394

  19. Scale-dependent factors affecting North American river otter distribution in the midwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jeffress, Mackenzie R.; Paukert, C.P.; Whittier, Joanna B.; Sandercock, B.K.; Gipson, P.S.

    2011-01-01

    The North American river otter (Lontra canadensis) is recovering from near extirpation throughout much of its range. Although reintroductions, trapping regulations and habitat improvements have led to the reestablishment of river otters in the Midwest, little is known about how their distribution is influenced by local- and landscape-scale habitat. We conducted river otter sign surveys from Jan. to Apr. in 2008 and 2009 in eastern Kansas to assess how local- and landscape-scale habitat factors affect river otter occupancy. We surveyed three to nine 400-m stretches of stream and reservoir shorelines for 110 sites and measured local-scale variables (e.g., stream order, land cover types) within a 100 m buffer of the survey site and landscape-scale variables (e.g., road density, land cover types) for Hydrological Unit Code 14 watersheds. We then used occupancy models that account for the probability of detection to estimate occupancy as a function of these covariates using Program PRESENCE. The best-fitting model indicated river otter occupancy increased with the proportion of woodland cover and decreased with the proportion of cropland and grassland cover at the local scale. Occupancy also increased with decreased shoreline diversity, waterbody density and stream density at the landscape scale. Occupancy was not affected by land cover or human disturbance at the landscape scale. Understanding the factors and scale important to river otter occurrence will be useful in identifying areas for management and continued restoration. ?? 2011, American Midland Naturalist.

  20. The factor structure of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale in individuals with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Schönberger, Michael; Ponsford, Jennie

    2010-10-30

    There is a lack of validated scales for screening for anxiety and depression in individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The purpose of this study was to examine the factor structure of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in individuals with TBI. A total of 294 individuals with TBI (72.1% male; mean age 37.1 years, S.D. 17.5, median post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) duration 17 days) completed the HADS 1 year post-injury. A series of confirmatory factor analyses was conducted to examine the fit of a one-, two- and three-factor solution, with and without controlling for item wording effects (Multi-Trait Multi-Method approach). The one-, two- or three-factor model fit the data only when controlling for negative item wording. The results are in support of the validity of the original anxiety and depression subscales of the HADS and demonstrate the importance of evaluating item wording effects when examining the factor structure of a questionnaire. The results would also justify the use of the HADS as a single scale of emotional distress. However, even though the three-factor solution fit the data, alternative scales should be used if the purpose of the assessment is to measure stress symptoms separately from anxiety and depression.

  1. Fabrication of a Miniaturized ZnO Nanowire Accelerometer and Its Performance Tests.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Chan; Song, Sangho; Kim, Jaehwan

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a miniaturized piezoelectric accelerometer suitable for a small haptic actuator array. The accelerometer is made with zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowire (NW) grown on a copper wafer by a hydrothermal process. The size of the accelerometer is 1.5 × 1.5 mm², thus fitting the 1.8 × 1.8 mm² haptic actuator array cell. The detailed fabrication process of the miniaturized accelerometer is illustrated. Performance evaluation of the fabricated accelerometer is conducted by comparing it with a commercial piezoelectric accelerometer. The output current of the fabricated accelerometer increases linearly with the acceleration. The miniaturized ZnO NW accelerometer is feasible for acceleration measurement of small and lightweight devices. PMID:27649184

  2. Fabrication of a Miniaturized ZnO Nanowire Accelerometer and Its Performance Tests

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Chan; Song, Sangho; Kim, Jaehwan

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a miniaturized piezoelectric accelerometer suitable for a small haptic actuator array. The accelerometer is made with zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowire (NW) grown on a copper wafer by a hydrothermal process. The size of the accelerometer is 1.5 × 1.5 mm2, thus fitting the 1.8 × 1.8 mm2 haptic actuator array cell. The detailed fabrication process of the miniaturized accelerometer is illustrated. Performance evaluation of the fabricated accelerometer is conducted by comparing it with a commercial piezoelectric accelerometer. The output current of the fabricated accelerometer increases linearly with the acceleration. The miniaturized ZnO NW accelerometer is feasible for acceleration measurement of small and lightweight devices. PMID:27649184

  3. Improved Signal Processing Technique Leads to More Robust Self Diagnostic Accelerometer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokars, Roger; Lekki, John; Jaros, Dave; Riggs, Terrence; Evans, Kenneth P.

    2010-01-01

    The self diagnostic accelerometer (SDA) is a sensor system designed to actively monitor the health of an accelerometer. In this case an accelerometer is considered healthy if it can be determined that it is operating correctly and its measurements may be relied upon. The SDA system accomplishes this by actively monitoring the accelerometer for a variety of failure conditions including accelerometer structural damage, an electrical open circuit, and most importantly accelerometer detachment. In recent testing of the SDA system in emulated engine operating conditions it has been found that a more robust signal processing technique was necessary. An improved accelerometer diagnostic technique and test results of the SDA system utilizing this technique are presented here. Furthermore, the real time, autonomous capability of the SDA system to concurrently compensate for effects from real operating conditions such as temperature changes and mechanical noise, while monitoring the condition of the accelerometer health and attachment, will be demonstrated.

  4. Fabrication of a Miniaturized ZnO Nanowire Accelerometer and Its Performance Tests.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Chan; Song, Sangho; Kim, Jaehwan

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a miniaturized piezoelectric accelerometer suitable for a small haptic actuator array. The accelerometer is made with zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowire (NW) grown on a copper wafer by a hydrothermal process. The size of the accelerometer is 1.5 × 1.5 mm², thus fitting the 1.8 × 1.8 mm² haptic actuator array cell. The detailed fabrication process of the miniaturized accelerometer is illustrated. Performance evaluation of the fabricated accelerometer is conducted by comparing it with a commercial piezoelectric accelerometer. The output current of the fabricated accelerometer increases linearly with the acceleration. The miniaturized ZnO NW accelerometer is feasible for acceleration measurement of small and lightweight devices.

  5. Plant community assembly at small scales: Spatial vs. environmental factors in a European grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Sebastian; Hempel, Stefan; Ristow, Michael; Rillig, Matthias C.; Kowarik, Ingo; Caruso, Tancredi

    2015-02-01

    Dispersal limitation and environmental conditions are crucial drivers of plant species distribution and establishment. As these factors operate at different spatial scales, we asked: Do the environmental factors known to determine community assembly at broad scales operate at fine scales (few meters)? How much do these factors account for community variation at fine scales? In which way do biotic and abiotic interactions drive changes in species composition? We surveyed the plant community within a dry grassland along a very steep gradient of soil characteristics like pH and nutrients. We used a spatially explicit sampling design, based on three replicated macroplots of 15 × 15, 12 × 12 and 12 × 12 m in extent. Soil samples were taken to quantify several soil properties (carbon, nitrogen, plant available phosphorus, pH, water content and dehydrogenase activity as a proxy for overall microbial activity). We performed variance partitioning to assess the effect of these variables on plant composition and statistically controlled for spatial autocorrelation via eigenvector mapping. We also applied null model analysis to test for non-random patterns in species co-occurrence using randomization schemes that account for patterns expected under species interactions. At a fine spatial scale, environmental factors explained 18% of variation when controlling for spatial autocorrelation in the distribution of plant species, whereas purely spatial processes accounted for 14% variation. Null model analysis showed that species spatially segregated in a non-random way and these spatial patterns could be due to a combination of environmental filtering and biotic interactions. Our grassland study suggests that environmental factors found to be directly relevant in broad scale studies are present also at small scales, but are supplemented by spatial processes and more direct interactions like competition.

  6. ISA - An Accelerometer to Detect the Disturbing Accelerations Acting on the Mercury Planetary Orbiter of the BepiColombo ESA Cornerstone Mission to Mercury: on Ground Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, V.; Lucchesi, D. M.; Nozzoli, S.; Santoli, F.; Fois, M.; Persichini, M.

    2006-06-01

    To reach the ambitious goals of the Radio Science Experiment of the BepiColombo space mission to Mercury, among which the planet structure and rotation and test Einstein's theory of General Relativity (GR) to an unprecedented accuracy, an accelerometer has been selected to fly on-board the MPO (Mercury Planetary Orbiter), the main spacecraft of the two to be placed around the innermost planet of our solar system around 2017. The key role of the on-board accelerometer is to remove from the list of unknowns the non-gravitational accelerations that disturbs the pure gravitational orbit of the MPO spacecraft in the strong radiation environment of Mercury. In this way the ``corrected'' orbit of the MPO may be regarded as a geodesic in the field of Mercury. Then, thanks to the very precise tracking from Earth, the possibility to study Mercury's center-of-mass around the Sun and estimate several parameters related to the planet structure and verify the theory of GR. The selected accelerometer named ISA (Italian Spring Accelerometer) is an high sensitive instrument with an intrinsic noise of 10-10 g⊕ / Hz (with g⊕ ≅ 9.8 m / s2) in the frequency band 3 . 10-5 -10-1 Hz. ISA is a three axis accelerometer with a characteristic configuration, in order to minimize the disturbing accelerations due to the gravity-gradients and the apparent forces on the Nadir pointing MPO spacecraft. Because of the complex and strong radiation environment of Mercury, the modelling of the non-gravitational acceleration is quite difficult, while, with the use of ISA accelerometer we are able to gain a factor 100 in accuracy. In this brief paper we will focus on the characteristics of the ISA accelerometer, on its positioning on-board the MPO and in particularly to the techniques for on ground calibration, avoiding the effects of the Earth gravity.

  7. Factor structure of the acute stress disorder scale in a sample of Hurricane Katrina evacuees.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Donald; Mills, Mary Alice; Park, Crystal L

    2010-06-01

    Acute stress disorder (ASD) is a poorly understood and controversial diagnosis (A. G. Harvey & R. A. Bryant, 2002). The present study used confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to test the factor structure of the most widely used self-report measure of ASD, the Acute Stress Disorder Scale (R. A. Bryant, M. L. Moulds, & R. M. Guthrie, 2000), in a sample of Hurricane Katrina evacuees relocated to a Red Cross emergency shelter in Austin, Texas. Results indicated that the proposed 4-factor structure did not fit the data well. However, an alternate 2-factor model did fit the data well. This model included a second-order Distress factor (onto which the Reexperiencing, Arousal, and Avoidance factors loaded strongly) that was positively correlated with the Dissociation factor. Implications for the ASD construct and its measurement are discussed.

  8. Control factors and scale analysis of annual river water, sediments and carbon transport in China

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chunlin; Wang, Genxu; Sun, Xiangyang; Chang, Ruiying; Mao, Tianxu

    2016-01-01

    Under the context of dramatic human disturbances on river system, the processes that control the transport of water, sediment, and carbon from river basins to coastal seas are not completely understood. Here we performed a quantitative synthesis for 121 sites across China to find control factors of annual river exports (Rc: runoff coefficient; TSSC: total suspended sediment concentration; TSSL: total suspended sediment loads; TOCL: total organic carbon loads) at different spatial scales. The results indicated that human activities such as dam construction and vegetation restoration might have a greater influence than climate on the transport of river sediment and carbon, although climate was a major driver of Rc. Multiple spatial scale analyses indicated that Rc increased from the small to medium scale by 20% and then decreased at the sizable scale by 20%. TSSC decreased from the small to sizeable scale but increase from the sizeable to large scales; however, TSSL significantly decreased from small (768 g·m−2·a−1) to medium spatial scale basins (258 g·m−2·a−1), and TOCL decreased from the medium to large scale. Our results will improve the understanding of water, sediment and carbon transport processes and contribute better water and land resources management strategies from different spatial scales. PMID:27166177

  9. Control factors and scale analysis of annual river water, sediments and carbon transport in China.

    PubMed

    Song, Chunlin; Wang, Genxu; Sun, Xiangyang; Chang, Ruiying; Mao, Tianxu

    2016-01-01

    Under the context of dramatic human disturbances on river system, the processes that control the transport of water, sediment, and carbon from river basins to coastal seas are not completely understood. Here we performed a quantitative synthesis for 121 sites across China to find control factors of annual river exports (Rc: runoff coefficient; TSSC: total suspended sediment concentration; TSSL: total suspended sediment loads; TOCL: total organic carbon loads) at different spatial scales. The results indicated that human activities such as dam construction and vegetation restoration might have a greater influence than climate on the transport of river sediment and carbon, although climate was a major driver of Rc. Multiple spatial scale analyses indicated that Rc increased from the small to medium scale by 20% and then decreased at the sizable scale by 20%. TSSC decreased from the small to sizeable scale but increase from the sizeable to large scales; however, TSSL significantly decreased from small (768 g·m(-2)·a(-1)) to medium spatial scale basins (258 g·m(-2)·a(-1)), and TOCL decreased from the medium to large scale. Our results will improve the understanding of water, sediment and carbon transport processes and contribute better water and land resources management strategies from different spatial scales. PMID:27166177

  10. Control factors and scale analysis of annual river water, sediments and carbon transport in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chunlin; Wang, Genxu; Sun, Xiangyang; Chang, Ruiying; Mao, Tianxu

    2016-05-01

    Under the context of dramatic human disturbances on river system, the processes that control the transport of water, sediment, and carbon from river basins to coastal seas are not completely understood. Here we performed a quantitative synthesis for 121 sites across China to find control factors of annual river exports (Rc: runoff coefficient; TSSC: total suspended sediment concentration; TSSL: total suspended sediment loads; TOCL: total organic carbon loads) at different spatial scales. The results indicated that human activities such as dam construction and vegetation restoration might have a greater influence than climate on the transport of river sediment and carbon, although climate was a major driver of Rc. Multiple spatial scale analyses indicated that Rc increased from the small to medium scale by 20% and then decreased at the sizable scale by 20%. TSSC decreased from the small to sizeable scale but increase from the sizeable to large scales; however, TSSL significantly decreased from small (768 g·m‑2·a‑1) to medium spatial scale basins (258 g·m‑2·a‑1), and TOCL decreased from the medium to large scale. Our results will improve the understanding of water, sediment and carbon transport processes and contribute better water and land resources management strategies from different spatial scales.

  11. Finger Tapping Clinimetric Score Prediction in Parkinson's Disease Using Low-Cost Accelerometers

    PubMed Central

    Stamatakis, Julien; Ambroise, Jérome; Crémers, Julien; Sharei, Hoda; Delvaux, Valérie; Macq, Benoit; Garraux, Gaëtan

    2013-01-01

    The motor clinical hallmarks of Parkinson's disease (PD) are usually quantified by physicians using validated clinimetric scales such as the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS). However, clinical ratings are prone to subjectivity and inter-rater variability. The PD medical community is therefore looking for a simple, inexpensive, and objective rating method. As a first step towards this goal, a triaxial accelerometer-based system was used in a sample of 36 PD patients and 10 age-matched controls as they performed the MDS-UPDRS finger tapping (FT) task. First, raw signals were epoched to isolate the successive single FT movements. Next, eighteen FT task movement features were extracted, depicting MDS-UPDRS features and accelerometer specific features. An ordinal logistic regression model and a greedy backward algorithm were used to identify the most relevant features in the prediction of MDS-UPDRS FT scores, given by 3 specialists in movement disorders (SMDs). The Goodman-Kruskal Gamma index obtained (0.961), depicting the predictive performance of the model, is similar to those obtained between the individual scores given by the SMD (0.870 to 0.970). The automatic prediction of MDS-UPDRS scores using the proposed system may be valuable in clinical trials designed to evaluate and modify motor disability in PD patients. PMID:23690760

  12. Research on novel MEMS shear beam strain gauge and PZT accelerometer based on deep RIE process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu

    2000-10-01

    In this thesis research, the design and processing of a shear beam strain gauge and a PZT accelerometer MEMS device have been investigated in order to understand the effects of chip geometry and processing methods on the performance of these two kinds of MEMS chips. The thesis provides a theoretical analysis using an area-moment method coupled with silicon piezoresistance characteristics to analyze the stresses and the strain state and the piezoresistance effect on the resistors that formed a Wheatstone bridge in the shear beam; the analysis also demonstrates the relation between the dimensions of key chip structures and the device sensitivity. A processing including ion implantation plus drive-in and metalization was investigated in order to attain high sensitivity and good ohmic contact characteristics for a single-step implantation process. A photolithography process, using photo resists of about 30 mum thickness, was developed and investigated for Deep RIE etching in order to form the microstructure. As a result of the design and processing work, the strain gauge device showed good linearity over a +/-300 mum/m range, good temperature characteristics over 13--54°C, low transverse sensitivity and a gauge factor 10 times larger than the foil gauge cousin. The thesis presents the processing research on PZT accelerometer. The research involved compatible process development in order to integrate a PZT capacitor structure (with thick PZT film) into the silicon microstructure. The thesis also presents investigation of wet bulk micromachining processes and Deep RIE process. The thesis discusses the process and behavior of different mask layers for different approaches. The factors that affect the aspect ratio of Si during the DRIE process are also discussed. Accelerometers showed good sensitivities (2.04 PC/g) with a bandwidth of 8kHz. Future work based on these investigations has been proposed to improve the devices performance.

  13. Self-noise models of five commercial strong-motion accelerometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ringler, Adam; Evans, John R.; Hutt, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    To better characterize the noise of a number of commonly deployed accelerometers in a standardized way, we conducted noise measurements on five different models of strong‐motion accelerometers. Our study was limited to traditional accelerometers (Fig. 1) and is in no way exhaustive.

  14. Do climate factors govern soil microbial community composition and biomass at a regional scale?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, L.; Guo, C.; Lü, X.; Yuan, S.; Wang, R.

    2014-12-01

    Soil microbial communities play important role in organic matter decomposition, nutrient cycling and vegetation dynamic. However, little is known about factors driving soil microbial community composition at large scales. The objective of this study was to determine whether climate dominates among environmental factors governing microbial community composition and biomass at a regional scale. Here, we compared soil microbial communities using phospholipid fatty acid method across 7 land use types from 23 locations in North-East China Transect (850 km x 50 km). The results showed that soil water availability and land use changes exhibited the dominant effects on soil microbial community composition and biomass at the regional scale, while climate factors (expressed as a function of large-scale spatial variation) did not show strong relationships with distribution of microbial community composition. Likewise, factors such as spatial structure, soil texture, nutrient availability and vegetation types were not important. Wetter soils had higher contributions of gram-positive bacteria, whereas drier soils had higher contributions of gram-negative bacteria and fungi. Heavily disturbed soils had lower contributions of gram-negative bacteria and fungi than historically disturbed and undisturbed soils. The lowest microbial biomass appeared in the wettest and driest soils. In conclusion, dominant climate factors, commonly known to structure distribution of macroorganisms, were not the most important drivers governing regional pattern of microbial communities because of inclusion of irrigated and managed practices. In comparison, soil water regime and land use types appear to be primary determinants of microbial community composition and biomass.

  15. Social Support and Peer Norms Scales for Physical Activity in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Jiying; Robbins, Lorraine B.; Resnicow, Ken; Bakhoya, Marion

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate psychometric properties of a Social Support and Peer Norms Scale in 5th-7th grade urban girls. Methods Baseline data from 509 girls and test-retest data from another 94 girls in the Midwestern US were used. Results Cronbach's alpha was .83 for the Social Support Scale and .72 for the Peer Norms Scale, whereas test-re-test reliability was .78 for both scales. Exploratory factor analysis suggested a single factor structure for the Social Support Scale, and a 3-factor structure for the Peer Norms Scale. Social support was correlated with accelerometer-measured physical activity (r = .13, p = .006), and peer norms (r = .50, p < .0001). Conclusions Both scales have adequate psychometric properties. PMID:25207514

  16. Multiculturally Sensitive Mental Health Scale (MSMHS): development, factor analysis, reliability, and validity.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ruth Chu-Lien; Green, Kathy E

    2011-12-01

    Effectively and efficiently diagnosing African Americans' mental health has been a chronically unresolved challenge. To meet this challenge we developed a tool to better understand African Americans' mental health: the Multiculturally Sensitive Mental Health Scale (MSMHS). Three studies reporting the development and initial validation of the MSMHS were conducted with African American student samples. First, an exploratory factor analysis of an initial item pool yielded 5 factors assessing subscales of perceived racism, depression, well-being, anxiety, and suicidal thoughts. Second, a confirmatory factor analysis supported the MSMHS's 5-dimensional factor structure. Third, test-retest reliability, internal consistency, and validity coefficients supported the viability, use, and potential for continued development of this new instrument. Implications for theory and research on multicultural mental health scales are discussed.

  17. The Obsessive Compulsive Cocaine Scale: Assessment of Factor Structure, Reliability, and Validity

    PubMed Central

    Jardin, Bianca F.; LaRowe, Steven D.; Hall, Brian J.; Malcolm, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    The present study assessed the factor structure, reliability, test retest, convergent validity, and predictive validity of the Obsessive Compulsive Cocaine Scale (OCCS), a newly developed questionnaire adapted from the Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale (OCDS). The questionnaire was administered to 189 cocaine-dependent individuals participating in two medication treatment trials for cocaine dependence. Confirmatory factor analysis of this measure revealed that it primarily assesses two factors, obsessions and compulsions. In addition, the data provided strong support for the internal consistency, test-retest reliability, predictive validity, and convergent validity of this two-factor measure. Overall, the data provide support for the psychometric strength of a modified version of the OCDS specifically designed to assess obsessive and compulsive cocaine use among those with cocaine dependence. PMID:21862227

  18. Study on the accuracy factors of large-scale photogrammetry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Dong, Mingli; Lu, Naiguang

    2011-05-01

    In photogrammetry system, the Base-Distance Ratio, the Image Scale, and the Image Standard Error, which construct the network strength of the system, are the main accuracy factors. In this paper, the normal and convergent network configurations of the photogrammetry are studied and the Network Strength, which presents the strength and accuracy of the camera station network, is expressed with the accuracy factors mentioned above. In order to verify the validation of this expression, the large-scale 3D reference field is designed and used to test the effects of these accuracy factors. The experimental results show that the relationship between the accuracy and the factors is consistent with the expression. These conclusions will guide the photogrammetric work to reduce the system errors.

  19. Study on the accuracy factors of large-scale photogrammetry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Dong, Mingli; Lu, Naiguang

    2010-12-01

    In photogrammetry system, the Base-Distance Ratio, the Image Scale, and the Image Standard Error, which construct the network strength of the system, are the main accuracy factors. In this paper, the normal and convergent network configurations of the photogrammetry are studied and the Network Strength, which presents the strength and accuracy of the camera station network, is expressed with the accuracy factors mentioned above. In order to verify the validation of this expression, the large-scale 3D reference field is designed and used to test the effects of these accuracy factors. The experimental results show that the relationship between the accuracy and the factors is consistent with the expression. These conclusions will guide the photogrammetric work to reduce the system errors.

  20. The Obsessive Compulsive Cocaine Scale: assessment of factor structure, reliability, and validity.

    PubMed

    Jardin, Bianca F; Larowe, Steven D; Hall, Brian J; Malcolm, Robert J

    2011-12-01

    The present study assessed the factor structure, reliability, test retest, convergent validity, and predictive validity of the Obsessive Compulsive Cocaine Scale (OCCS), a newly developed questionnaire adapted from the Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale (OCDS). The questionnaire was administered to 189 cocaine-dependent individuals participating in two medication treatment trials for cocaine dependence. Confirmatory factor analysis of this measure revealed that it primarily assesses two factors, obsessions and compulsions. In addition, the data provided strong support for the internal consistency, test-retest reliability, predictive validity, and convergent validity of this two-factor measure. Overall, the data provide support for the psychometric strength of a modified version of the OCDS specifically designed to assess obsessive and compulsive cocaine use among those with cocaine dependence.

  1. Validation of an accelerometer for measuring sport performance.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kimitake; Smith, Sarah L; Sands, William A

    2009-01-01

    Weightlifting technique is a well-studied subject with regard to standard biomechanical analysis that includes barbell velocity as well as barbell trajectory, but kinematic data such as barbell acceleration have not often been reported. Real-time or near-real-time feedback can be more helpful to coaches and athletes than delayed feedback. The purpose of this study was to validate measures obtained by a commercially available accelerometer in comparison with kinematic data derived from video. The hypothesis was that there would be a high positive relationship between accelerometer data and acceleration measures derived from video records of a barbell high-pull movement. Accelerometer values and kinematic data from high-speed video were obtained from 7 volunteers performing 2 trials each of a barbell high-pull. The results showed that the accelerometer measures were highly correlated with derived acceleration data from video (r = 0.94-0.99). On the basis of these results, the device was considered to be validated; thus, the unit may be a useful tool to measure acceleration during real-time training sessions rather than only reserved for collecting data in a laboratory setting. This device can be a valuable tool to provide instant feedback to coaches and athletes to assess individual barbell acceleration performance.

  2. Silicon-micromachined accelerometers for space inertial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, I.; Islam, R.; Kanakaraju, K.; Jain, Yashwant K.; Alex, T. K.

    1999-11-01

    Accelerometers are key components of various motion control systems ranging in use from inertial guidance of rockets and satellite launch vehicles to safety applications in the automotive industry. The accelerometers that are used for spare inertial systems are characterized by high resolution, small bandwidth, large working range and excellent linearity. Current advances in this field are based on silicon micromachining. Silicon bulk and surface micromachined accelerometers offer advantages of reduced size and weight, less power consumption and the use of a fabrication process derived form an already well established semiconductor fab technology. Of the various approaches to silicon micromachined accelerometers, two are in a well advanced state of development. The first is the capacitive force balanced type and the second the piezoresistive type. The capacitive approach has the advantage of higher stability and resolution and lower temperature coefficients. But it requires proximal detection circuitry to prevent parasitics to overwhelm the circuit. A new approach reported recently uses a silicon micromachined cantilever beam which acts as a Fabry Perot interferometer when light form an optical fiber is impinged on it. In this paper we overview all the approaches and try to select a suitable candidate for use in space borne inertial systems.

  3. Standardizing accelerometer-based activity monitor calibration and output reporting.

    PubMed

    Coolbaugh, Crystal L; Hawkins, David A

    2014-08-01

    Wearable accelerometer-based activity monitors (AMs) are used to estimate energy expenditure and ground reaction forces in free-living environments, but a lack of standardized calibration and data reporting methods limits their utility. The objectives of this study were to (1) design an inexpensive and easily reproducible AM testing system, (2) develop a standardized calibration method for accelerometer-based AMs, and (3) evaluate the utility of the system and accuracy of the calibration method. A centrifuge-type device was constructed to apply known accelerations (0-8g) to each sensitive axis of 30 custom and two commercial AMs. Accelerometer data were recorded and matrix algebra and a least squares solution were then used to determine a calibration matrix for the custom AMs to convert raw accelerometer output to units of g's. Accuracy was tested by comparing applied and calculated accelerations for custom and commercial AMs. AMs were accurate to within 4% of applied accelerations. The relatively inexpensive AM testing system (< $100) and calibration method has the potential to improve the sharing of AM data, the ability to compare data from different studies, and the accuracy of AM-based models to estimate various physiological and biomechanical quantities of interest in field-based assessments of physical activity.

  4. Estimating Energy Expenditure with the RT3 Triaxial Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddison, Ralph; Jiang, Yannan; Vander Hoorn, Stephen; Mhurchu, Cliona Ni; Lawes, Carlene M. M.; Rodgers, Anthony; Rush, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    The RT3 is a relatively new triaxial accelerometer that has replaced the TriTrac. The aim of this study was to validate the RT3 against doubly labeled water (DLW) in a free-living, mixed weight sample of adults. Total energy expenditure (TEE) was measured over a 15-day period using DLW. Activity-related energy expenditure (AEE) was estimated by…

  5. Diurnal Cycles of Tree Mass Obtained Using Accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llamas, R. A.; Niemeier, J. J.; Kruger, A.; Lintz, H. E.; Kleinknecht, G. J.; Miller, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    We used a non-invasive technique to estimate the mass of trees using accelerometers. The technique was inspired by Selker et al., 2011 who performed experiments with an oak tree to estimate the time-varying canopy mass. The technique consists of placing an accelerometer on the trunk of a live tree. The resonance frequency is related to the mass of the tree. Wind drives the tree and the accelerometer data are analyzed to obtain estimates of the resonance frequency and mass of the tree. In addition to wind speed and direction, we also collected ambient temperature and rain accumulation using co-located instruments. We collected data for 3 months using several accelerometers configured for different sampling rates. Analysis of the data revealed diurnal cycles in temperature, wind speed, and tree mass derived from the tree resonance frequency. We used the Welch method for power spectral density estimation to obtain hourly estimates of the tree resonance frequency. Our hypothesis is that the mass diurnal cycle is related to the tree water content.

  6. Joint angle estimation with accelerometers for dynamic postural analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianting; Kharboutly, Haissam; Benali, Abderraouf; Benamar, Faïz; Bouzit, Mourad

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents a new accelerometer based method for estimating the posture of a subject standing on a dynamic perturbation platform. The induced perturbation is used to study the control mechanisms as well as the balance requirements that regulate the upright standing. These perturbations are translated into different intensity levels of speed and acceleration along longitudinal and lateral directions of motion. In our method, the human posture is modeled by a tridimensional, three-segment inverted pendulum which simultaneously takes into account both the anterior-posterior and medio-lateral strategies of hip and ankle. Four tri-axial accelerometers are used her, one accelerometer is placed on the platform, and the other three are attached to a human subject. Based on the results, the joint angle estimated compare closely to measurements from magnetic encoders placed on an articulated arm joint. The results were also comparable to those found when using a high-end optical motion capture system coupled with advanced biomechanical simulation software. This paper presents the comparisons of our accelerometer-based method with encoder and optical marker based method of the estimated joint angles under different dynamics perturbations. PMID:26338097

  7. Integrated smart actuator containing a monolithic coformed accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsaro, Robert D.; Houston, Brian H.; Klunder, Joseph D.

    1997-05-01

    A general need exists for inexpensive finite-area transducer arrays which intrinsically combine acoustic or vibration sensing with area actuation. Such combination transducers are particularly needed in active sound and vibration control and smart-materials applications. Commercial areas of interest include advanced underwater, aerospace or robotic-sensing applications. To be economically attractive they must be relatively simple to manufacture from reasonable cost materials. One promising new technology for such applications is injection-molded 1-3 composite piezo- ceramics, pioneered by Material Systems Inc. This transducer material is well suited for use as the low-cost actuator component of such a smart actuator. The challenge of this study was to design an inexpensive accelerometer which could be injection molded along with the actuator as an interspersed array. This paper describes a monolithic accelerometer which is suitable for fabrication by injection-molding as an integrated co-formed actuator component. Experimental results are presented for actuator/accelerometer arrays and issues related to the design and use of accelerometers in close proximity to an actuator are discussed.

  8. Micromachined low frequency rocking accelerometer with capacitive pickoff

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Simon, Jonathon N.; McConaghy, Charles F.

    2001-01-01

    A micro electro mechanical sensor that uses capacitive readout electronics. The sensor involves a micromachined low frequency rocking accelerometer with capacitive pickoff fabricated by deep reactive ion etching. The accelerometer includes a central silicon proof mass, is suspended by a thin polysilicon tether, and has a moving electrode (capacitor plate or interdigitated fingers) located at each end the proof mass. During movement (acceleration), the tethered mass moves relative to the surrounding packaging, for example, and this defection is measured capacitively by a plate capacitor or interdigitated finger capacitor, having the cooperating fixed electrode (capacitor plate or interdigitated fingers) positioned on the packaging, for example. The micromachined rocking accelerometer has a low frequency (<500 Hz), high sensitivity (.mu.G), with minimal power usage. The capacitors are connected to a power supply (battery) and to sensor interface electronics, which may include an analog to digital (A/D) converter, logic, RF communication link, antenna, etc. The sensor (accelerometer) may be, for example, packaged along with the interface electronics and a communication system in a 2".times.2".times.2" cube. The proof mass may be asymmetric or symmetric. Additional actuating capacitive plates may be used for feedback control which gives a greater dynamic range.

  9. Joint angle estimation with accelerometers for dynamic postural analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianting; Kharboutly, Haissam; Benali, Abderraouf; Benamar, Faïz; Bouzit, Mourad

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents a new accelerometer based method for estimating the posture of a subject standing on a dynamic perturbation platform. The induced perturbation is used to study the control mechanisms as well as the balance requirements that regulate the upright standing. These perturbations are translated into different intensity levels of speed and acceleration along longitudinal and lateral directions of motion. In our method, the human posture is modeled by a tridimensional, three-segment inverted pendulum which simultaneously takes into account both the anterior-posterior and medio-lateral strategies of hip and ankle. Four tri-axial accelerometers are used her, one accelerometer is placed on the platform, and the other three are attached to a human subject. Based on the results, the joint angle estimated compare closely to measurements from magnetic encoders placed on an articulated arm joint. The results were also comparable to those found when using a high-end optical motion capture system coupled with advanced biomechanical simulation software. This paper presents the comparisons of our accelerometer-based method with encoder and optical marker based method of the estimated joint angles under different dynamics perturbations.

  10. Factor Analysis of the Omega Scale: A Scale Designed To Measure the Attitudes of College Students toward Their Own Deaths and the Disposition of Their Bodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staik, Irene M.

    A study was undertaken to provide a factor analysis of the Omega Scale, a 25-item, Likert-type scale developed in 1984 to assess attitudes toward death and funerals and other body disposition practices. The Omega Scale was administered to 250 students enrolled in introductory psychology classes at two higher education institutions in Alabama.…

  11. GAP on EJSM: an accelerometer for accurate gravity and atmospheric measurements of Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenoir, Benjamin; Christophe, Bruno

    2010-05-01

    The Gravity Advanced Package (GAP) is an electrostatic accelerometer with a bias calibration system proposed on EJSM Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO) for fundamental physics objectives - more precisely for testing the law of gravity at the scale of the solar system - and for planetary objectives. GAP can provide decisive information during the planetary phase of the mission. During the orbit of JGO around Ganymede or the flyby of Callisto, such an instrument will measure the non-gravitational forces acting on the spacecraft, mainly due to the atmosphere. By combining these measurements with the ones provided by the radio-science instrument, which measures the total acceleration of the spacecraft, the gravitational forces acting on the spacecraft can be derived without using any model of the atmosphere. This is a major contribution of GAP to the mission considering the low altitude and the size of the solar panel, which would otherwise require precise models. Indeed, the presence of the instrument on board would provide data to better understand the atmosphere and the gravity field of Ganymede and Callisto. This combination of measurements from the accelerometer and from radio-science is similar to what is currently done for determining precise model of the Earth gravity potential with CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions. The GAP instrument is proposed by the ONERA team which has already built the 9 accelerometers in orbit for these geodetic missions. The presentation will describe the scientific objectives of the instrument with a review of the impact of the non-gravitational forces on the gravity measurement of Jupiter's moons. Then, a description of the instrument with its performance will be given, as well as the requirements for its implementation in the spacecraft.

  12. Vibrational frequency scaling factors for correlation consistent basis sets and the methods CC2 and MP2 and their spin-scaled SCS and SOS variants

    SciTech Connect

    Friese, Daniel H.; Törk, Lisa; Hättig, Christof

    2014-11-21

    We present scaling factors for vibrational frequencies calculated within the harmonic approximation and the correlated wave-function methods coupled cluster singles and doubles model (CC2) and Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) with and without a spin-component scaling (SCS or spin-opposite scaling (SOS)). Frequency scaling factors and the remaining deviations from the reference data are evaluated for several non-augmented basis sets of the cc-pVXZ family of generally contracted correlation-consistent basis sets as well as for the segmented contracted TZVPP basis. We find that the SCS and SOS variants of CC2 and MP2 lead to a slightly better accuracy for the scaled vibrational frequencies. The determined frequency scaling factors can also be used for vibrational frequencies calculated for excited states through response theory with CC2 and the algebraic diagrammatic construction through second order and their spin-component scaled variants.

  13. Construct validation of the readiness for interprofessional learning scale: a Rasch and factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Brett; Brown, Ted; Boyle, Malcolm

    2012-07-01

    In order to improve efficiency and collaboration in healthcare service provision, it is recommended that students engage in interprofessional education; that is, learning with, from and about professions other than one's own profession. Such endeavors are often impeded by pre-existing attitudes; therefore, self-reporting scales such as the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) have often been used in studies to gauge perspectives. The original 19-item version of the RIPLS was completed by 418 undergraduate healthcare students from a large Australian University. A principal component analysis with a varimax rotation was first carried out followed by Rasch model analyses on the RIPLS data. A four-factor solution was produced by the initial factor analysis, which did not correspond to the original three-factor solution identified by the RIPLS authors. The subsequent Rasch analyses of the four-factor structure produced two misfitting items, and reconfirmed a four-factor solution. The 17-item four-factor RIPLS demonstrated a good fit to the Rasch model and exhibited good reliability and dimensionality. A four-factor RIPLS solution was identified and confirmed via two statistical approaches. Two items were found not to fit the new RIPLS four-factor structure and it is recommended that they be discarded. Further refinement of the RIPLS is recommended. PMID:22458602

  14. Accelerometer method and apparatus for integral display and control functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Vibration analysis has been used for years to provide a determination of the proper functioning of different types of machinery, including rotating machinery and rocket engines. A determination of a malfunction, if detected at a relatively early stage in its development, will allow changes in operating mode or a sequenced shutdown of the machinery prior to a total failure. Such preventative measures result in less extensive and/or less expensive repairs, and can also prevent a sometimes catastrophic failure of equipment. Standard vibration analyzers are generally rather complex, expensive, and of limited portability. They also usually result in displays and controls being located remotely from the machinery being monitored. Consequently, a need exists for improvements in accelerometer electronic display and control functions which are more suitable for operation directly on machines and which are not so expensive and complex. The invention includes methods and apparatus for detecting mechanical vibrations and outputting a signal in response thereto. The apparatus includes an accelerometer package having integral display and control functions. The accelerometer package is suitable for mounting upon the machinery to be monitored. Display circuitry provides signals to a bar graph display which may be used to monitor machine condition over a period of time. Control switches may be set which correspond to elements in the bar graph to provide an alert if vibration signals increase over the selected trip point. The circuitry is shock mounted within the accelerometer housing. The method provides for outputting a broadband analog accelerometer signal, integrating this signal to produce a velocity signal, integrating and calibrating the velocity signal before application to a display driver, and selecting a trip point at which a digitally compatible output signal is generated. The benefits of a vibration recording and monitoring system with controls and displays readily

  15. Examining the Effect of Reverse Worded Items on the Factor Structure of the Need for Cognition Scale

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Ramsha; Savalei, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Reverse worded (RW) items are often used to reduce or eliminate acquiescence bias, but there is a rising concern about their harmful effects on the covariance structure of the scale. Therefore, results obtained via traditional covariance analyses may be distorted. This study examined the effect of the RW items on the factor structure of the abbreviated 18-item Need for Cognition (NFC) scale using confirmatory factor analysis. We modified the scale to create three revised versions, varying from no RW items to all RW items. We also manipulated the type of the RW items (polar opposite vs. negated). To each of the four scales, we fit four previously developed models. The four models included a 1-factor model, a 2-factor model distinguishing between positively worded (PW) items and RW items, and two 2-factor models, each with one substantive factor and one method factor. Results showed that the number and type of the RW items affected the factor structure of the NFC scale. Consistent with previous research findings, for the original NFC scale, which contains both PW and RW items, the 1-factor model did not have good fit. In contrast, for the revised scales that had no RW items or all RW items, the 1-factor model had reasonably good fit. In addition, for the scale with polar opposite and negated RW items, the factor model with a method factor among the polar opposite items had considerably better fit than the 1-factor model. PMID:27305001

  16. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Drive for Muscularity Scale-S (DMS-S) and Male Body Attitudes Scale-S (MBAS-S) among male university students in Buenos Aires.

    PubMed

    Compte, Emilio J; Sepúlveda, Ana R; de Pellegrin, Yolanda; Blanco, Miriam

    2015-06-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that men express body dissatisfaction differently than women. Although specific instruments that address body dissatisfaction in men have been developed, only a few have been validated in Latin-American male populations. The aim of this study was to reassess the factor structure of the Spanish versions of the Drive for Muscularity Scale (DMS-S) and the Male Body Attitudes Scale (MBAS-S) in an Argentinian sample. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 423 male students to examine: the factorial structure (confirmatory factor analysis), the internal consistency reliability, and the concurrent, convergent and discriminant validity of both scales. Results replicated the two factor structures for the DMS-S and MBAS-S. Both scales showed excellent levels of internal consistency, and various measures of construct validity indicated that the DMS-S and MBAS-S were acceptable and valid instruments to assess body dissatisfaction in Argentinian males. PMID:25828841

  17. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Drive for Muscularity Scale-S (DMS-S) and Male Body Attitudes Scale-S (MBAS-S) among male university students in Buenos Aires.

    PubMed

    Compte, Emilio J; Sepúlveda, Ana R; de Pellegrin, Yolanda; Blanco, Miriam

    2015-06-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that men express body dissatisfaction differently than women. Although specific instruments that address body dissatisfaction in men have been developed, only a few have been validated in Latin-American male populations. The aim of this study was to reassess the factor structure of the Spanish versions of the Drive for Muscularity Scale (DMS-S) and the Male Body Attitudes Scale (MBAS-S) in an Argentinian sample. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 423 male students to examine: the factorial structure (confirmatory factor analysis), the internal consistency reliability, and the concurrent, convergent and discriminant validity of both scales. Results replicated the two factor structures for the DMS-S and MBAS-S. Both scales showed excellent levels of internal consistency, and various measures of construct validity indicated that the DMS-S and MBAS-S were acceptable and valid instruments to assess body dissatisfaction in Argentinian males.

  18. Factor Structure of the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale for Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Masia-Warner, Carrie; Heidgerken, Amanda D.; Fisher, Paige H.; Pincus, Donna B.; Liebowitz, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the factor structure of the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale for Children and Adolescents (LSAS-CA). The LSAS-CA was administered to 225 children and adolescents as a component of various clinical studies. In addition, other measures of psychopathology and impairment were administered to a subgroup of the…

  19. Dimensionality of the Chinese Positive Youth Development Scale: Confirmatory Factor Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Ma, Cecilia M. S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the dimensionality and factorial invariance of the Chinese Positive Youth Development Scale (CPYDS) using multigroup confirmatory factor analyses (MCFA). Secondary 1 students (N = 5,649) responded to the CPYDS in the context of a positive youth development program. Results showed that there are 15 basic dimensions of the CPYDS…

  20. College Students and Condom Attitude: Validation of the Multi-Factor Attitude toward Condoms Scale (MFACS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollub, Ariane V.; Reece, Michael; Herbenick, Debby; Hensel, Devon J.; Middlestadt, Susan E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Sexually transmitted infections and the human immunodeficiency virus incidence rates remain high among college-aged individuals. This study examined the validity and reliability of the Multi-Factor Attitude toward Condoms Scale (MFACS). Participants: Participants were recruited from a large midwestern university during February and…

  1. Assessing Disharmony and Disaffection in Intimate Relationships: Revision of the Marital Satisfaction Inventory Factor Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrington, Rachael L.; Mitchell, Alexandra E.; Castellani, Angela M.; Joseph, Jana I.; Snyder, Douglas K.; Gleaves, David H.

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has identified 2 broad components of distress in intimate relationships: overt conflict, or "disharmony", and emotional distance, or "disaffection". Using confirmatory factor analysis, the authors derived 2 broadband scales of disharmony and disaffection from the Marital Satisfaction Inventory-Revised (D. K. Snyder, 1997),…

  2. Defining Distinct Negative Beliefs about Uncertainty: Validating the Factor Structure of the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sexton, Kathryn A.; Dugas, Michel J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the factor structure of the English version of the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale (IUS; French version: M. H. Freeston, J. Rheaume, H. Letarte, M. J. Dugas, & R. Ladouceur, 1994; English version: K. Buhr & M. J. Dugas, 2002) using a substantially larger sample than has been used in previous studies. Nonclinical undergraduate…

  3. Confirmatory Factor Analytical Study of the Revised Developmental Work Personality Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Alex W. K.; O'Sullivan, Deirdre; Strauser, David R.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated psychometric properties of the Revised Developmental Work Personality Scale (RDWPS). Results yielded a 14-item three-factor model that aligns with the original DWPS and fits the data very well. RDWPS scores were useful in predicting the resolution of Erikson's fourth stage of development, indicating construct validity.…

  4. Factor Structure and Construct Validity of the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayers, Steven L.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to examine the underlying structure of negative symptoms of schizophrenia as measured by the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS). CFA results from the assessment of 401 patients were largely supported by CFA results from a second assessment of 345 patients. (SLD)

  5. Methods and Measures: Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Multidimensional Scaling for Construct Validation of Cognitive Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker-Drob, Elliot M.; Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2009-01-01

    Although factor analysis is the most commonly-used method for examining the structure of cognitive variable interrelations, multidimensional scaling (MDS) can provide visual representations highlighting the continuous nature of interrelations among variables. Using data (N = 8,813; ages 17-97 years) aggregated across 38 separate studies, MDS was…

  6. Factor Structure of the Restricted Academic Situation Scale: Implications for ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karama, Sherif; Amor, Leila Ben; Grizenko, Natalie; Ciampi, Antonio; Mbekou, Valentin; Ter-Stepanian, Marina; Lageix, Philippe; Baron, Chantal; Schwartz, George; Joober, Ridha

    2009-01-01

    Background: To study the factor structure of the Restricted Academic Situation Scale (RASS), a psychometric tool used to assess behavior in children with ADHD, 117 boys and 21 girls meeting "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed.; "DSM-IV") criteria for ADHD and aged between 6 and 12 years were recruited. Assessments were…

  7. Factor Structure of the New Imaginary Audience Scale in a Sample of Female College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuterbach, James M.

    2007-01-01

    The New Imaginary Audience Scale (NIAS; Lapsley, FitzGerald, Rice, & Jackson, 1989) has been used as a research tool with both high school and college aged samples, yet there is no structural validity evidence for its use with college students. This study examined the structural validity of the NIAS via an exploratory factor analysis, using a…

  8. Landscape-scale variation in an anthropogenic factor shapes immune gene variation within a wild population.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Quevedo, Catalina; Davies, Richard G; Phillips, Karl P; Spurgin, Lewis G; Richardson, David S

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the spatial scale at which selection acts upon adaptive genetic variation in natural populations is fundamental to our understanding of evolutionary ecology, and has important ramifications for conservation. The environmental factors to which individuals of a population are exposed can vary at fine spatial scales, potentially generating localized patterns of adaptation. Here, we compared patterns of neutral and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) variation within an island population of Berthelot's pipit (Anthus berthelotii) to assess whether landscape-level differences in pathogen-mediated selection generate fine-scale spatial structuring in these immune genes. Specifically, we tested for spatial associations between the distribution of avian malaria, and the factors previously shown to influence that distribution, and MHC variation within resident individuals. Although we found no overall genetic structure across the population for either neutral or MHC loci, we did find localized associations between environmental factors and MHC variation. One MHC class I allele (ANBE48) was directly associated with malaria infection risk, while the presence of the ANBE48 and ANBE38 alleles within individuals correlated (positively and negatively, respectively) with distance to the nearest poultry farm, an anthropogenic factor previously shown to be an important determinant of disease distribution in the study population. Our findings highlight the importance of considering small spatial scales when studying the patterns and processes involved in evolution at adaptive loci. PMID:27411090

  9. Factor Structure and Differential Validity of the Expanded Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Adrian; Donnell, Alison J.; Young, Tony R.

    2004-01-01

    The Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) is one of the most widely used measures in psychiatric outcome and clinical psychopharmacology research. To date, however, research on the psychometric properties of the expanded version of the BPRS (BPRS-E) has been limited. An exploratory factor analysis (n = 360) using maximum likelihood extraction with…

  10. The Factor Structure of Preschool Learning Behaviors Scale Scores in Peruvian Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Kathryn R.; Schaefer, Barbara A.; Merino, Cesar; Worrell, Frank C.

    2009-01-01

    The factor structure of the Escala de Conductas de Aprendizaje Preescolar (ECAP), a Spanish translation of the Preschool Learning Behaviors Scale (PLBS), was examined in this study. Children aged 2 to 6 years (N = 328) enrolled in public and private preschools in the Republic of Peru were rated by classroom teachers on the frequency of observable,…

  11. Unrestricted Factor Analytic Procedures for Assessing Acquiescent Responding in Balanced, Theoretically Unidimensional Personality Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Pere J.; Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano; Chico, Eliseo

    2003-01-01

    This article describes and proposes an unrestricted factor analytic procedure to: (a) assess the dimensionality and structure of a balanced personality scale taking into account the potential effects of acquiescent responding, and (b) correct the individual trait estimates for acquiescence. The procedure can be considered as an extension of ten…

  12. Factor Validation of the Addiction Severity Index Scale Structure in Persons With Concurrent Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie, Shawn R.; el-Guebaly, Nady; Coulson, Ronaye; Hodgins, David; Mansley, Chrystal

    2004-01-01

    Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test the scale structure of the Addiction Severity Index (ASI) in a sample of 1,802 substance abusers (43% alcohol dependent) with a concurrent psychiatric disorder (46% with mood disorders). The fit of the original composite score model based on the work of P. L. McGahan, J. A. Griffith, R. Parente, & A.…

  13. Landscape-scale variation in an anthropogenic factor shapes immune gene variation within a wild population.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Quevedo, Catalina; Davies, Richard G; Phillips, Karl P; Spurgin, Lewis G; Richardson, David S

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the spatial scale at which selection acts upon adaptive genetic variation in natural populations is fundamental to our understanding of evolutionary ecology, and has important ramifications for conservation. The environmental factors to which individuals of a population are exposed can vary at fine spatial scales, potentially generating localized patterns of adaptation. Here, we compared patterns of neutral and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) variation within an island population of Berthelot's pipit (Anthus berthelotii) to assess whether landscape-level differences in pathogen-mediated selection generate fine-scale spatial structuring in these immune genes. Specifically, we tested for spatial associations between the distribution of avian malaria, and the factors previously shown to influence that distribution, and MHC variation within resident individuals. Although we found no overall genetic structure across the population for either neutral or MHC loci, we did find localized associations between environmental factors and MHC variation. One MHC class I allele (ANBE48) was directly associated with malaria infection risk, while the presence of the ANBE48 and ANBE38 alleles within individuals correlated (positively and negatively, respectively) with distance to the nearest poultry farm, an anthropogenic factor previously shown to be an important determinant of disease distribution in the study population. Our findings highlight the importance of considering small spatial scales when studying the patterns and processes involved in evolution at adaptive loci.

  14. Teacher Reporting Attitudes Scale (TRAS): Confirmatory and Exploratory Factor Analyses with a Malaysian Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choo, Wan Yuen; Walsh, Kerryann; Chinna, Karuthan; Tey, Nai Peng

    2013-01-01

    The Teacher Reporting Attitude Scale (TRAS) is a newly developed tool to assess teachers' attitudes toward reporting child abuse and neglect. This article reports on an investigation of the factor structure and psychometric properties of the short form Malay version of the TRAS. A self-report cross-sectional survey was conducted with 667…

  15. Societal Factors Impacting Child Welfare: Validating the Perceptions of Child Welfare Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auerbach, Charles; Zeitlin, Wendy; Augsberger, Astraea; McGowan, Brenda G.; Claiborne, Nancy; Lawrence, Catherine K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This research examines the psychometric properties of the Perceptions of Child Welfare Scale (PCWS). This instrument is designed to assess child welfare workers' understanding of how society views their role and their work. Methods: Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was utilized to analyze data on 538 child welfare workers. Results:…

  16. The Factor Structure and Screening Utility of the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodebaugh, Thomas L.; Woods, Carol M.; Heimberg, Richard G.; Liebowitz, Michael R.; Schneier, Franklin R.

    2006-01-01

    The widely used Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS; R. P. Mattick & J. C. Clarke, 1998) possesses favorable psychometric properties, but questions remain concerning its factor structure and item properties. Analyses included 445 people with social anxiety disorder and 1,689 undergraduates. Simple unifactorial models fit poorly, and models that…

  17. Factor Analytic Study of the Children's Yale?Brown Obsessive?Compulsive Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Geffken, Gary R.; Bagner, Daniel M.; Soto, Ohel; Sajid, Muhammad; Allen, Pam; Killiany, Erin M.; Goodman, Wayne K.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Children's Yale?Brown Obsessive?Compulsive Scale (CY?BOCS; Scahill et al., 1997). Participants were 82 children and adolescents diagnosed with obsessive?compulsive disorder (OCD). Confirmatory factor analyses of 2 previously found models (Obsessions and Compulsions; Disturbance and Severity)…

  18. Factor Structure and Correlates of the Dissociative Experiences Scale in a Large Offender Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Mark A.; Poythress, Norman G.; Lilienfeld, Scott O.; Douglas, Kevin S.

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined the psychometric properties, factor structure, and construct validity of the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) in a large offender sample (N = 1,515). Although the DES is widely used with community and clinical samples, minimal work has examined offender samples. Participants were administered self-report and interview…

  19. The Factor Structure and Sources of Variation Underlying the Social Learning Environment Rating Scales: Monograph 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warshow, Joyce P.; Bepko, Raymond A.

    Seventeen intermediate level classes for the educable mentally retarded were involved in an investigation of the factor structure of the Social Learning Environment Rating Scale (SLERS), an instrument designed to quantify teacher-student behavior based on the Social Learning Curriculum (SLC). The 17 classes were observed implementing six…

  20. An Examination of the Factor Structures of the Computer Attitude Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, John B.; Moroz, Pauline A.

    1997-01-01

    This study, utilizing data from 208 educators, obtained estimates of the reliability of the four subscale version of the 40-item Computer Attitude Scale (CAS); provided detailed information regarding the factor patterns of the CAS subscales; and provided evidence about the differential validity of the CAS among four groups with differing intensity…

  1. An Examination of the Factor Structures of the Computer Attitude Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, John B.; Moroz, Pauline A.

    The first study described in this paper estimates the reliability of the four subscale versions of the 40-item Computer Attitude Scale (CAS), an instrument designed to measure attitudes toward learning about and using computers. It provides detailed information about the factor patterns of CAS subscales and evidence of the differential validity of…

  2. Factor Analysis of the McCarthy Scales of Children's Abilities on Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiebe, Michael J.; Watkins, Ernest O.

    1980-01-01

    The McCarthy Scales of Children's Abilities (MSCA) was subjected to factor analysis to determine the test's validity. Results suggest that clinical interpretation should be made cautiously until further exploration of the construct validity and sex differences in the MSCA can be conducted. (Author)

  3. Homework Distraction Scale: Confirming the Factor Structure With Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Jianzhong; Fan, Xitao; Du, Jianxia

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the current investigation was to evaluate psychometric properties of the Homework Distraction Scale (HDS) using 796 middle school students. Results from confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) supported the presence of two distinct yet related subscales for the HDS: Conventional Distraction and Tech-Related Distraction. Results of…

  4. Trauma Resilience Scale: Validation of Protective Factors Associated with Adaptation following Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madsen, Machelle D.; Abell, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The Trauma Resilience Scale (TRS), assessing protective factors associated with positive adaptation following violence, was tested in three waves of data collection. Empirical and theoretical literature shaped subscale and item formation emphasizing resilience following physical abuse, sexual abuse, intimate partner violence, and/or a…

  5. Factor analysis of responses to the Irrational Beliefs Scale in a sample of Iraqi university students.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Namir; Ismail, Hairul Nizam

    2004-06-01

    In a study of irrational beliefs within a university population, 282 male and 238 female students responded to the 33-item Students' Irrational Beliefs Scale, and their responses were factor analyzed. Analysis suggested six dimensions could explain 39.5% of the variance. These dimensions were Perfectionism, Negativism, Blame Proneness, Escapism, Anxious Over Concern, and Absolute Demands.

  6. An Evaluation of the Factor Structure of the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Bronwyn; Pallant, Julie; Harvey, David

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate whether the six-factor structure of the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale could be replicated in a community-based sample. A sample of 255 adult participants (55.7% female, 44.3% male) ranging in age from 18 to 78 (mean = 37.0) completed the questionnaire. Based on the screen test and parallel…

  7. Factor Analytic Validation of the Ford, Wolvin, and Chung Listening Competence Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickelson, William T.; Welch, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    This research begins to independently and quantitatively validate the Ford, Wolvin, and Chung (2000) Listening Competency Scale. Reliability and Confirmatory Factor analyses were conducted on two independent samples. The reliability estimates were found to be below those reported by Ford, Wolvin, and Chung (2000) and below acceptable levels for…

  8. Predicting the cosmological constant with the scale-factor cutoff measure

    SciTech Connect

    De Simone, Andrea; Guth, Alan H.; Salem, Michael P.; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2008-09-15

    It is well known that anthropic selection from a landscape with a flat prior distribution of cosmological constant {lambda} gives a reasonable fit to observation. However, a realistic model of the multiverse has a physical volume that diverges with time, and the predicted distribution of {lambda} depends on how the spacetime volume is regulated. A very promising method of regulation uses a scale-factor cutoff, which avoids a number of serious problems that arise in other approaches. In particular, the scale-factor cutoff avoids the 'youngness problem' (high probability of living in a much younger universe) and the 'Q and G catastrophes' (high probability for the primordial density contrast Q and gravitational constant G to have extremely large or small values). We apply the scale-factor cutoff measure to the probability distribution of {lambda}, considering both positive and negative values. The results are in good agreement with observation. In particular, the scale-factor cutoff strongly suppresses the probability for values of {lambda} that are more than about 10 times the observed value. We also discuss qualitatively the prediction for the density parameter {omega}, indicating that with this measure there is a possibility of detectable negative curvature.

  9. General Factor Loadings and Specific Effects of the Differential Ability Scales, Second Edition Composites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynard, Jennifer L.; Floyd, Randy G.; Acklie, Teresa J.; Houston, Lawrence, III

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the "g" loadings and specific effects of the core and diagnostic composite scores from the Differential Abilities Scales, Second Edition (DAS-II; Elliott, 2007a). Scores from a subset of the DAS-II standardization sample for ages 3:6 to 17:11 were submitted to principal factor analysis. Four composites,…

  10. Factor Structure of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale (Fourth Ed.) for Gifted Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCallum, R. Steve; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Administration of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale (fourth edition) to 60 elementary school students (in grades four, five, and six) resulted in means consistent with their gifted status. Factor analyses, including LISREL confirmatory analysis, offered only partial support to the Binet model. (TJH)

  11. A new method for testing the scale-factor performance of fiber optical gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhengxin; Yu, Haicheng; Li, Jing; Li, Chao; Shi, Haiyang; Zhang, Bingxin

    2015-10-01

    Fiber optical gyro (FOG) is a kind of solid-state optical gyroscope with good environmental adaptability, which has been widely used in national defense, aviation, aerospace and other civilian areas. In some applications, FOG will experience environmental conditions such as vacuum, radiation, vibration and so on, and the scale-factor performance is concerned as an important accuracy indicator. However, the scale-factor performance of FOG under these environmental conditions is difficult to test using conventional methods, as the turntable can't work under these environmental conditions. According to the phenomenon that the physical effects of FOG produced by the sawtooth voltage signal under static conditions is consistent with the physical effects of FOG produced by a turntable in uniform rotation, a new method for the scale-factor performance test of FOG without turntable is proposed in this paper. In this method, the test system of the scale-factor performance is constituted by an external operational amplifier circuit and a FOG which the modulation signal and Y waveguied are disconnected. The external operational amplifier circuit is used to superimpose the externally generated sawtooth voltage signal and the modulation signal of FOG, and to exert the superimposed signal on the Y waveguide of the FOG. The test system can produce different equivalent angular velocities by changing the cycle of the sawtooth signal in the scale-factor performance test. In this paper, the system model of FOG superimposed with an externally generated sawtooth is analyzed, and a conclusion that the effect of the equivalent input angular velocity produced by the sawtooth voltage signal is consistent with the effect of input angular velocity produced by the turntable is obtained. The relationship between the equivalent angular velocity and the parameters such as sawtooth cycle and so on is presented, and the correction method for the equivalent angular velocity is also presented by

  12. Exploratory factor structure of the neurological evaluation scale in black africans with first episode schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ojagbemi, Akin; Emsley, Robin; Gureje, Oye

    2016-01-01

    While the organization of neurological soft signs (NSS) in schizophrenia into Sensory integration, Motor coordination, and Motor sequencing, is functionally ‘meaningful’, it has not been confirmed by empirical methods such as factor analysis. Data on the exploratory factor analysis of the Neurological Evaluation scale in Black Africans with first episode schizophrenia are presented in this report. Data on the confirmatory factor structure of NSS in this population as well as their interpretation can be found in the work by Ojagbemi et al. (2015) [7]. PMID:26900592

  13. Potential Application Of Radionuclide Scaling Factors To High Level Waste Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Reboul, S. H.

    2013-09-30

    Production sources, radiological properties, relative solubilities in waste, and laboratory analysis techniques for the forty-five radionuclides identified in Hanford's Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Feed Acceptance Data Quality Objectives (DQO) document are addressed in this report. Based on Savannah River Site (SRS) experience and waste characteristics, thirteen of the radionuclides are judged to be candidates for potential scaling in High Level Waste (HLW) based on the concentrations of other radionuclides as determined through laboratory measurements. The thirteen radionuclides conducive to potential scaling are: Ni-59, Zr-93, Nb-93m, Cd-113m, Sn-121m, Sn-126, Cs-135, Sm-151, Ra-226, Ra-228, Ac-227, Pa-231, and Th-229. The ability to scale radionuclides is useful from two primary perspectives: 1) it provides a means of checking the radionuclide concentrations that have been determined by laboratory analysis; and 2) it provides a means of estimating radionuclide concentrations in the absence of a laboratory analysis technique or when a complex laboratory analysis technique fails. Along with the rationale for identifying and applying the potential scaling factors, this report also provides examples of using the scaling factors to estimate concentrations of radionuclides in current SRS waste and into the future. Also included in the report are examples of independent laboratory analysis techniques that can be used to check results of key radionuclide analyses. Effective utilization of radionuclide scaling factors requires understanding of the applicable production sources and the chemistry of the waste. As such, the potential scaling approaches identified in this report should be assessed from the perspective of the Hanford waste before reaching a decision regarding WTP applicability.

  14. Variability in Physical Activity Assessed with Accelerometer Is an Independent Predictor of Mortality in CHF Patients

    PubMed Central

    Melin, Michael; Hagerman, Inger; Gonon, Adrian; Gustafsson, Thomas; Rullman, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Aims Patients with heart failure often display a distinct pattern of walking characterized by short step-length and frequent short pauses. In the current study we sought to explore if qualitative aspects of movement have any additive value to established factors to predict all-cause mortality in patients with advanced heart failure. Methods and results 60 patients with advanced heart failure (NYHA III, peak VO2 <20 ml/kg and LVEF <35%) underwent symptom-limited CPX, echocardiography and routine chemistry. Physical activity was assessed using an accelerometer worn attached to the waist during waking hours for 7 consecutive days. The heart-failure survival score (HFSS) was calculated for each patient. All accelerometer-derived variables were analyzed with regard to all-cause mortality and added to a baseline model utilizing HFSS scores. HFSS score was significantly associated with the incidence of death (P<0.001; c-index 0.71; CI, 0.67–0.73). The addition of peak skewness to the HFSS model significantly improved the predictive ability with an increase in c-index to 0.74 (CI, 0.69–0.78), likelihood ratio P<0.02, establishing skewness as a predictor of increased event rates when accounting for baseline risk. Conclusion The feature skewness, a measure of asymmetry in the intensity level of periods of high physical activity, was identified to be predictive of all-cause mortality independent of the established prognostic model–HFSS and peak VO2. The findings from the present study emphasize the use of accelerometer analysis in clinical practice to make more accurate prognoses in addition to extract features of physical activity relevant to functional classification. PMID:27054323

  15. Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of the Work-Family Balance Scale in an Urban Chinese Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Huiping; Yip, Paul S. F.; Chi, Peilian; Chan, Kinsun; Cheung, Yee Tak; Zhang, Xiulan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the factor structure of the Work-Family Balance Scale (WFBS) and examine its reliability and validity in use in the urban Chinese population. The scale was validated using a sample of 605 urban Chinese residents from 7 cities. Exploratory factor analysis identified two factors: work-family conflict and…

  16. Teacher Reporting Attitudes Scale (TRAS): confirmatory and exploratory factor analyses with a Malaysian sample.

    PubMed

    Choo, Wan Yuen; Walsh, Kerryann; Chinna, Karuthan; Tey, Nai Peng

    2013-01-01

    The Teacher Reporting Attitude Scale (TRAS) is a newly developed tool to assess teachers' attitudes toward reporting child abuse and neglect. This article reports on an investigation of the factor structure and psychometric properties of the short form Malay version of the TRAS. A self-report cross-sectional survey was conducted with 667 teachers in 14 randomly selected schools in Selangor state, Malaysia. Analyses were conducted in a 3-stage process using both confirmatory (stages 1 and 3) and exploratory factor analyses (stage 2) to test, modify, and confirm the underlying factor structure of the TRAS in a non-Western teacher sample. Confirmatory factor analysis did not support a 3-factor model previously reported in the original TRAS study. Exploratory factor analysis revealed an 8-item, 4-factor structure. Further confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated appropriateness of the 4-factor structure. Reliability estimates for the four factors-commitment, value, concern, and confidence-were moderate. The modified short form TRAS (Malay version) has potential to be used as a simple tool for relatively quick assessment of teachers' attitudes toward reporting child abuse and neglect. Cross-cultural differences in attitudes toward reporting may exist and the transferability of newly developed instruments to other populations should be evaluated.

  17. Distress Tolerance Scale: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis Among Daily Cigarette Smokers.

    PubMed

    Leyro, Teresa M; Bernstein, Amit; Vujanovic, Anka A; McLeish, Alison C; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2011-03-01

    The present investigation evaluated the factor structure of the Distress Tolerance Scale (DTS; Simons and Gaher 2005) among a sample of 173 (54.9% males) daily cigarette smokers (M=16.64 cigarettes per day, SD=7.83). Comparison of a single higher-order model and a hierarchical multidimensional model was conducted using confirmatory factor analyses (CFA). In addition, evaluation of the internal consistency and convergent and discriminant validity of the better-fitting model was completed. CFA of the DTS indicated a single second-order factor of distress tolerance, and four lower-order factors including Tolerance, Appraisal, Absorption, and Regulation; each factor demonstrated acceptable levels of internal consistency. In addition, the DTS displayed good convergent and discriminant validity with theoretically relevant smoking and affect variables. Results are discussed in terms of explicating the latent structure of distress tolerance, as measured by the DTS, within the context of smoking research.

  18. Accelerometer-derived activity correlates with volitional swimming speed in lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thiem, J.D.; Dawson, J.W.; Gleiss, A.C.; Martins, E.G.; Haro, Alexander J.; Castro-Santos, Theodore R.; Danylchuk, A.J.; Wilson, R.P.; Cooke, S.J.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying fine-scale locomotor behaviours associated with different activities is challenging for free-swimming fish.Biologging and biotelemetry tools can help address this problem. An open channel flume was used to generate volitionalswimming speed (Us) estimates of cultured lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens Rafinesque, 1817) and these were paired withsimultaneously recorded accelerometer-derived metrics of activity obtained from three types of data-storage tags. This studyexamined whether a predictive relationship could be established between four different activity metrics (tail-beat frequency(TBF), tail-beat acceleration amplitude (TBAA), overall dynamic body acceleration (ODBA), and vectorial dynamic body acceleration(VeDBA)) and the swimming speed of A. fulvescens. Volitional Us of sturgeon ranged from 0.48 to 2.70 m·s−1 (0.51–3.18 bodylengths (BL) · s−1). Swimming speed increased linearly with all accelerometer-derived metrics, and when all tag types werecombined, Us increased 0.46 BL·s−1 for every 1 Hz increase in TBF, and 0.94, 0.61, and 0.94 BL·s−1 for every 1g increase in TBAA,ODBA, and VeDBA, respectively. Predictive relationships varied among tag types and tag-specific parameter estimates of Us arepresented for all metrics. This use of acceleration data-storage tags demonstrated their applicability for the field quantificationof sturgeon swimming speed.

  19. Microgravity Level Measurement of the Beijing Drop Tower Using a Sensitive Accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T. Y.; Wu, Q. P.; Sun, B. Q.; Han, F. T.

    2016-08-01

    Drop tower is the most common ground-based facility to provide microgravity environment and widely used in many science experiments. A differential space accelerometer has been proposed to test the spin-gravity interaction between rotating extended bodies onboard a drag-free satellite. In order to assist design and test of this inertial sensor in a series of ground- based pre-flight experiments, it is very important to know accurately the residual acceleration of drop towers. In this report, a sensitive instrument for this purpose was built with a high-performance servo quartz accelerometer, and the dedicated interface electronics design providing small full-scale range and high sensitivity, up to 136.8 V/g0. The residual acceleration at the Beijing drop tower was measured using two different drop capsules. The experimental result shows that the microgravity level of the free-falling double capsule is better than 2 × 10‑4g0 (Earth’s gravity). The measured data in this report provides critical microgravity information for design of the following ground experiments.

  20. Microgravity Level Measurement of the Beijing Drop Tower Using a Sensitive Accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Liu, T Y; Wu, Q P; Sun, B Q; Han, F T

    2016-08-17

    Drop tower is the most common ground-based facility to provide microgravity environment and widely used in many science experiments. A differential space accelerometer has been proposed to test the spin-gravity interaction between rotating extended bodies onboard a drag-free satellite. In order to assist design and test of this inertial sensor in a series of ground- based pre-flight experiments, it is very important to know accurately the residual acceleration of drop towers. In this report, a sensitive instrument for this purpose was built with a high-performance servo quartz accelerometer, and the dedicated interface electronics design providing small full-scale range and high sensitivity, up to 136.8 V/g0. The residual acceleration at the Beijing drop tower was measured using two different drop capsules. The experimental result shows that the microgravity level of the free-falling double capsule is better than 2 × 10(-4)g0 (Earth's gravity). The measured data in this report provides critical microgravity information for design of the following ground experiments.

  1. Microgravity Level Measurement of the Beijing Drop Tower Using a Sensitive Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, T. Y.; Wu, Q. P.; Sun, B. Q.; Han, F. T.

    2016-01-01

    Drop tower is the most common ground-based facility to provide microgravity environment and widely used in many science experiments. A differential space accelerometer has been proposed to test the spin-gravity interaction between rotating extended bodies onboard a drag-free satellite. In order to assist design and test of this inertial sensor in a series of ground- based pre-flight experiments, it is very important to know accurately the residual acceleration of drop towers. In this report, a sensitive instrument for this purpose was built with a high-performance servo quartz accelerometer, and the dedicated interface electronics design providing small full-scale range and high sensitivity, up to 136.8 V/g0. The residual acceleration at the Beijing drop tower was measured using two different drop capsules. The experimental result shows that the microgravity level of the free-falling double capsule is better than 2 × 10−4g0 (Earth’s gravity). The measured data in this report provides critical microgravity information for design of the following ground experiments. PMID:27530726

  2. Microgravity Level Measurement of the Beijing Drop Tower Using a Sensitive Accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Liu, T Y; Wu, Q P; Sun, B Q; Han, F T

    2016-01-01

    Drop tower is the most common ground-based facility to provide microgravity environment and widely used in many science experiments. A differential space accelerometer has been proposed to test the spin-gravity interaction between rotating extended bodies onboard a drag-free satellite. In order to assist design and test of this inertial sensor in a series of ground- based pre-flight experiments, it is very important to know accurately the residual acceleration of drop towers. In this report, a sensitive instrument for this purpose was built with a high-performance servo quartz accelerometer, and the dedicated interface electronics design providing small full-scale range and high sensitivity, up to 136.8 V/g0. The residual acceleration at the Beijing drop tower was measured using two different drop capsules. The experimental result shows that the microgravity level of the free-falling double capsule is better than 2 × 10(-4)g0 (Earth's gravity). The measured data in this report provides critical microgravity information for design of the following ground experiments. PMID:27530726

  3. Investigation of the Factor Structure of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV): Exploratory and Higher Order Factor Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canivez, Gary L.; Watkins, Marley W.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the factor structure of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV; D. Wechsler, 2008a) standardization sample using exploratory factor analysis, multiple factor extraction criteria, and higher order exploratory factor analysis (J. Schmid & J. M. Leiman, 1957) not included in the WAIS-IV Technical and…

  4. A high and low noise model for strong motion accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, J. F.; Cauzzi, C.; Olivieri, M.

    2010-12-01

    We present reference noise models for high-quality strong motion accelerometer installations. We use continuous accelerometer data acquired by the Swiss Seismological Service (SED) since 2006 and other international high-quality accelerometer network data to derive very broadband (50Hz-100s) high and low noise models. The proposed noise models are compared to the Peterson (1993) low and high noise models designed for broadband seismometers; the datalogger self-noise; background noise levels at existing Swiss strong motion stations; and typical earthquake signals recorded in Switzerland and worldwide. The standard strong motion station operated by the SED consists of a Kinemetrics Episensor (2g clip level; flat acceleration response from 200 Hz to DC; <155dB dynamic range) coupled with a 24-bit Nanometrics Taurus datalogger. The proposed noise models are based on power spectral density (PSD) noise levels for each strong motion station computed via PQLX (McNamara and Buland, 2004) from several years of continuous recording. The 'Accelerometer Low Noise Model', ALNM, is dominated by instrument noise from the sensor and datalogger. The 'Accelerometer High Noise Model', AHNM, reflects 1) at high frequencies the acceptable site noise in urban areas, 2) at mid-periods the peak microseismal energy, as determined by the Peterson High Noise Model and 3) at long periods the maximum noise observed from well insulated sensor / datalogger systems placed in vault quality sites. At all frequencies, there is at least one order of magnitude between the ALNM and the AHNM; at high frequencies (> 1Hz) this extends to 2 orders of magnitude. This study provides remarkable confirmation of the capability of modern strong motion accelerometers to record low-amplitude ground motions with seismic observation quality. In particular, an accelerometric station operating at the ALNM is capable of recording the full spectrum of near source earthquakes, out to 100 km, down to M2. Of particular

  5. Estimation of the respiratory ventilation rate of preschool children in daily life using accelerometers.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Junko; Tanaka, Shigeho; Tanaka, Chiaki; Hikihara, Yuki; Aoki, Yasunobu; Yonemoto, Junzo

    2011-01-01

    Inhalation rate is an essential factor for determining the inhaled dose of air pollutants. Here, accelerometers were used to develop regression equations for predicting the minute ventilation rate (V(E)) to estimate the daily inhalation rate in young children. Body acceleration and heart rate were measured in 29 Japanese preschool children (6 yr of age) during nine different levels of activities (lying down, sitting, standing, playing with plastic bricks, walking, building with blocks, climbing stairs, ball tossing, and running) using the Actical omnidirectional accelerometer, the ActivTracer triaxial accelerometer, and a heart rate monitor. Measurements were calibrated against the V(E) measured by the Douglas bag method. ActivTracer accelerometer measurements gave a strong correlation with V(E) (Pearson's r = 0.913), which was marginally stronger than that for the Actical counts (r = 0.886) and comparable to the correlation between heart rate and logarithmic V(E) (r = 0.909). According to the linear regression equation, the V(E) for lying down, sitting, standing, playing with plastic bricks, walking, and running was overestimated by 14-60% by the Actical and by 14-37% by the ActivTracer. By comparison, for building with blocks, climbing stairs, and ball tossing, the V(E) was underestimated by 19-23% by the Actical and by 13-18% by the ActivTracer. When these three activities were excluded, a stronger correlation was found between the V(E) and ActivTracer measurements (r = 0.949); this correlation was 0.761 for the three excluded activities. Discriminant analysis showed that the ratio between vertical and horizontal acceleration obtained by the ActivTracer could discriminate walking from building with blocks, climbing stairs, and ball tossing with a sensitivity of 75%. The error in estimating V(E) was considerably improved for the ActivTracer measurements by the use of two regression equations developed for each type of activity. PMID:21305887

  6. PHASER 2.10 methodology for dependence, importance, and sensitivity: The role of scale factors, confidence factors, and extremes

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.A.

    1996-09-01

    PHASER (Probabilistic Hybrid Analytical System Evaluation Routine) is a software tool that has the capability of incorporating subjective expert judgment into probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) along with conventional data inputs. An earlier report described the PHASER methodology, but only gave a cursory explanation about how dependence was incorporated in Version 1.10 and about how ``Importance`` and ``Sensitivity`` measures were to be incorporated in Version 2.00. A more detailed description is given in this report. The basic concepts involve scale factors and confidence factors that are associated with the stochastic variability and subjective uncertainty (which are common adjuncts used in PSA), and the safety risk extremes that are crucial to safety assessment. These are all utilized to illustrate methodology for incorporating dependence among analysis variables in generating PSA results, and for Importance and Sensitivity measures associated with the results that help point out where any major sources of safety concern arise and where any major sources of uncertainty reside, respectively.

  7. Neighborhood Street Scale Elements, Sedentary Time and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Inactive Ethnic Minority Women

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Rebecca E.; Mama, Scherezade K.; Adamus-Leach, Heather J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cardiometabolic risk factors such as obesity, excess percent body fat, high blood pressure, elevated resting heart rate and sedentary behavior have increased in recent decades due to changes in the environment and lifestyle. Neighborhood micro-environmental, street scale elements may contribute to health above and beyond individual characteristics of residents. Purpose To investigate the relationship between neighborhood street scale elements and cardiometabolic risk factors among inactive ethnic minority women. Method Women (N = 410) completed measures of BMI, percent body fat, blood pressure, resting heart rate, sedentary behavior and demographics. Trained field assessors completed the Pedestrian Environment Data Scan in participants’ neighborhoods. Data were collected from 2006–2008. Multiple regression models were conducted in 2011 to estimate the effect of environmental factors on cardiometabolic risk factors. Results Adjusted regression models found an inverse association between sidewalk buffers and blood pressure, between traffic control devices and resting heart rate, and a positive association between presence of pedestrian crossing aids and BMI (ps<.05). Neighborhood attractiveness and safety for walking and cycling were related to more time spent in a motor vehicle (ps<.05). Conclusions Findings suggest complex relationships among micro-environmental, street scale elements that may confer important cardiometabolic benefits and risks for residents. Living in the most attractive and safe neighborhoods for physical activity may be associated with longer times spent sitting in the car. PMID:23236434

  8. Engaging in large-scale digital health technologies and services. What factors hinder recruitment?

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Siobhan; Mair, Frances S; McGee-Lennon, Marilyn; Bouamrane, Matt-Mouley; O'Donnell, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Implementing consumer oriented digital health products and services at scale is challenging and a range of barriers to reaching and recruiting users to these types of solutions can be encountered. This paper describes the experience of implementers with the rollout of the Delivering Assisted Living Lifestyles at Scale (dallas) programme. The findings are based on qualitative analysis of baseline and midpoint interviews and project documentation. Eight main themes emerged as key factors which hindered participation. These include how the dallas programme was designed and operationalised, constraints imposed by partnerships, technology, branding, and recruitment strategies, as well as challenges with the development cycle and organisational culture. PMID:25991155

  9. Optical accelerometer based on grating interferometer with phase modulation technique.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuangshuang; Zhang, Juan; Hou, Changlun; Bai, Jian; Yang, Guoguang

    2012-10-10

    In this paper, an optical accelerometer based on grating interferometer with phase modulation technique is proposed. This device architecture consists of a laser diode, a sensing chip and an optoelectronic processing circuit. The sensing chip is a sandwich structure, which is composed of a grating, a piezoelectric translator and a micromachined silicon structure consisting of a proof mass and four cantilevers. The detected signal is intensity-modulated with phase modulation technique and processed with a lock-in amplifier for demodulation. Experimental results show that this optical accelerometer has acceleration sensitivity of 619 V/g and high-resolution acceleration detection of 3 μg in the linear region. PMID:23052079

  10. Guidelines for Standardized Testing of Broadband Seismometers and Accelerometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutt, Charles R.; Evans, John R.; Followill, Fred; Nigbor, Robert L.; Wielandt, Erhard

    2010-01-01

    Testing and specification of seismic and earthquake-engineering sensors and recorders has been marked by significant variations in procedures and selected parameters. These variations cause difficulty in comparing such specifications and test results. In July 1989, and again in May 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey hosted international pub-lic/private workshops with the goal of defining widely accepted guidelines for the testing of seismological inertial sensors, seismometers, and accelerometers. The Proceedings of the 2005 workshop have been published and include as appendix 6 the report of the 1989 workshop. This document represents a collation and rationalization of a single set of formal guidelines for testing and specifying broadband seismometers and accelerometers.

  11. A simple intensity modulation based fiber-optic accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guozhen, Yao; Yongqian, Li; Zhi, Yang

    2016-05-01

    A fiber-optic accelerometer with simple structure and high performance based on intensity modulation is proposed. Using only a length of single mode fiber compressed by a cantilever, the intensity of reflected light is modulated by the vibration acceleration applied to it. The effects of the fiber location, the dimension parameters of the cantilever on frequency response and sensitivity are investigated. The experimental results demonstrate that the accelerometer has a flat frequency response over a 4700 Hz bandwidth and a sensitivity of 21.24 mV/g with a cantilever dimension of 30 × 8 × 1.6 mm3 and a distance of 5 mm between the fiber location and the suspended cantilever end; the coefficient of determination is better than 0.999. In addition, the effect of temperature and the stability of the sensing system are investigated.

  12. A method for extracting human gait series from accelerometer signals based on the ensemble empirical mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Mao-Jing; Zhuang, Jian-Jun; Hou, Feng-Zhen; Zhan, Qing-Bo; Shao, Yi; Ning, Xin-Bao

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) is applied to analyse accelerometer signals collected during normal human walking. First, the self-adaptive feature of EEMD is utilised to decompose the accelerometer signals, thus sifting out several intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) at disparate scales. Then, gait series can be extracted through peak detection from the eigen IMF that best represents gait rhythmicity. Compared with the method based on the empirical mode decomposition (EMD), the EEMD-based method has the following advantages: it remarkably improves the detection rate of peak values hidden in the original accelerometer signal, even when the signal is severely contaminated by the intermittent noises; this method effectively prevents the phenomenon of mode mixing found in the process of EMD. And a reasonable selection of parameters for the stop-filtering criteria can improve the calculation speed of the EEMD-based method. Meanwhile, the endpoint effect can be suppressed by using the auto regressive and moving average model to extend a short-time series in dual directions. The results suggest that EEMD is a powerful tool for extraction of gait rhythmicity and it also provides valuable clues for extracting eigen rhythm of other physiological signals.

  13. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Statistical Anxiety Rating Scale With Online Graduate Students.

    PubMed

    DeVaney, Thomas A

    2016-04-01

    The Statistical Anxiety Rating Scale was examined using data from a convenience sample of 450 female and 65 male students enrolled in online, graduate-level introductory statistics courses. The mean age of the students was 33.1 (SD = 8.2), and 58.3% had completed six or fewer online courses. The majority of students were enrolled in education or counseling degree programs. Confirmatory factor analysis using unweighted least squares estimation was used to test three proposed models, and alpha coefficients were used to examine the internal consistency. The confirmatory factor analysis results supported the six-factor structure and indicated that proper models should include correlations among the six factors or two second-order factors (anxiety and attitude). Internal consistency estimates ranged from .82 to .95 and were consistent with values reported by previous researchers. The findings suggest that, when measuring statistics anxiety of online students using Statistical Anxiety Rating Scale, researchers and instructors can use scores from the individual subscales or generate two composite scores, anxiety and attitude, instead of a total score. PMID:27154380

  14. Impact of different economic factors on biological invasions on the global scale.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen; Cheng, Xinyue; Xu, Rumei

    2011-04-13

    Social-economic factors are considered as the key to understand processes contributing to biological invasions. However, there has been few quantified, statistical evidence on the relationship between economic development and biological invasion on a worldwide scale. Herein, using principal factor analysis, we investigated the relationship between biological invasion and economic development together with biodiversity for 91 economies throughout the world. Our result indicates that the prevalence of invasive species in the economies can be well predicted by economic factors (R(2) = 0.733). The impact of economic factors on the occurrence of invasive species for low, lower-middle, upper-middle and high income economies are 0%, 34.3%, 46.3% and 80.8% respectively. Greenhouse gas emissions (CO(2), Nitrous oxide, Methane and Other greenhouse gases) and also biodiversity have positive relationships with the global occurrence of invasive species in the economies on the global scale. The major social-economic factors that are correlated to biological invasions are different for various economies, and therefore the strategies for biological invasion prevention and control should be different.

  15. Estimating electric field enhancement factors on an aircraft utilizing a small scale model: A method evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easterbrook, Calvin C.; Rudolph, Terence; Easterbrook, Kevin

    1988-01-01

    A method for obtaining field enhancement factors at specific points on an aircraft utilizing a small scale model was evaluated by measuring several canonical shapes. Comparison of the form factors obtained by analytical means with measurements indicate that the experimental method has serious flaws. Errors of 200 to 300 percent were found between analytical values and measured values. As a result of the study, the analytical method is not recommended for calibration of field meters located on aircraft, and should not be relied upon in any application where the local spatial derivatives of the electric field on the model are large over the dimensions of the sensing probe.

  16. An exploratory analysis of the factor structure of the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale-Form A (DAS).

    PubMed

    Moore, Michael T; Fresco, David M; Segal, Zindel V; Brown, Timothy A

    2014-10-01

    A number of studies have attempted to identify the factor structure of the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS). However, no studies have done so using a clinical sample of outpatients likely to generalize to the clinical trials in which the DAS is commonly used. The current investigation utilized exploratory structural equation modeling in an outpatient sample (N = 982) and found support for a one-factor solution (composed of 19 items). This solution was largely confirmed in a second outpatient sample (N = 301). Construct validity was demonstrated in correlations with measures of depression, social interaction anxiety, and symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

  17. An exploratory analysis of the factor structure of the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale-Form A (DAS).

    PubMed

    Moore, Michael T; Fresco, David M; Segal, Zindel V; Brown, Timothy A

    2014-10-01

    A number of studies have attempted to identify the factor structure of the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS). However, no studies have done so using a clinical sample of outpatients likely to generalize to the clinical trials in which the DAS is commonly used. The current investigation utilized exploratory structural equation modeling in an outpatient sample (N = 982) and found support for a one-factor solution (composed of 19 items). This solution was largely confirmed in a second outpatient sample (N = 301). Construct validity was demonstrated in correlations with measures of depression, social interaction anxiety, and symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder. PMID:24577308

  18. Statistical Analysis of Instantaneous Frequency Scaling Factor as Derived From Optical Disdrometer Measurements At KQ Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zemba, Michael; Nessel, James; Houts, Jacquelynne; Luini, Lorenzo; Riva, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The rain rate data and statistics of a location are often used in conjunction with models to predict rain attenuation. However, the true attenuation is a function not only of rain rate, but also of the drop size distribution (DSD). Generally, models utilize an average drop size distribution (Laws and Parsons or Marshall and Palmer. However, individual rain events may deviate from these models significantly if their DSD is not well approximated by the average. Therefore, characterizing the relationship between the DSD and attenuation is valuable in improving modeled predictions of rain attenuation statistics. The DSD may also be used to derive the instantaneous frequency scaling factor and thus validate frequency scaling models. Since June of 2014, NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) have jointly conducted a propagation study in Milan, Italy utilizing the 20 and 40 GHz beacon signals of the Alphasat TDP#5 Aldo Paraboni payload. The Ka- and Q-band beacon receivers provide a direct measurement of the signal attenuation while concurrent weather instrumentation provides measurements of the atmospheric conditions at the receiver. Among these instruments is a Thies Clima Laser Precipitation Monitor (optical disdrometer) which yields droplet size distributions (DSD); this DSD information can be used to derive a scaling factor that scales the measured 20 GHz data to expected 40 GHz attenuation. Given the capability to both predict and directly observe 40 GHz attenuation, this site is uniquely situated to assess and characterize such predictions. Previous work using this data has examined the relationship between the measured drop-size distribution and the measured attenuation of the link]. The focus of this paper now turns to a deeper analysis of the scaling factor, including the prediction error as a function of attenuation level, correlation between the scaling factor and the rain rate, and the temporal variability of the drop size

  19. Statistical Analysis of Instantaneous Frequency Scaling Factor as Derived From Optical Disdrometer Measurements At KQ Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zemba, Michael; Nessel, James; Houts, Jacquelynne; Luini, Lorenzo; Riva, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The rain rate data and statistics of a location are often used in conjunction with models to predict rain attenuation. However, the true attenuation is a function not only of rain rate, but also of the drop size distribution (DSD). Generally, models utilize an average drop size distribution (Laws and Parsons or Marshall and Palmer [1]). However, individual rain events may deviate from these models significantly if their DSD is not well approximated by the average. Therefore, characterizing the relationship between the DSD and attenuation is valuable in improving modeled predictions of rain attenuation statistics. The DSD may also be used to derive the instantaneous frequency scaling factor and thus validate frequency scaling models. Since June of 2014, NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) have jointly conducted a propagation study in Milan, Italy utilizing the 20 and 40 GHz beacon signals of the Alphasat TDP#5 Aldo Paraboni payload. The Ka- and Q-band beacon receivers provide a direct measurement of the signal attenuation while concurrent weather instrumentation provides measurements of the atmospheric conditions at the receiver. Among these instruments is a Thies Clima Laser Precipitation Monitor (optical disdrometer) which yields droplet size distributions (DSD); this DSD information can be used to derive a scaling factor that scales the measured 20 GHz data to expected 40 GHz attenuation. Given the capability to both predict and directly observe 40 GHz attenuation, this site is uniquely situated to assess and characterize such predictions. Previous work using this data has examined the relationship between the measured drop-size distribution and the measured attenuation of the link [2]. The focus of this paper now turns to a deeper analysis of the scaling factor, including the prediction error as a function of attenuation level, correlation between the scaling factor and the rain rate, and the temporal variability of the drop

  20. Magnetic torquer induced disturbing signals within GRACE accelerometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterseim, Nadja; Flury, Jakob; Schlicht, Anja

    2012-05-01

    The GRACE (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment) gravity field satellite mission was launched in 2002. Although many investigations have been carried out, not all disturbances and perturbations upon satellite instruments and sensors are resolved yet. In this work the issue of acceleration disturbances onboard of GRACE due to magnetic torquers is investigated and discussed. Each of the GRACE satellites is equipped with a three-axes capacitive accelerometer to measure non-gravitational forces acting on the spacecraft. We used 10 Hz Level 1a raw accelerometer data in order to determine the impact of electric current changes on the accelerometer. After reducing signals which are induced by highly dominating processes in the low frequency range, such as thermospheric drag and solar radiation pressure, which can easily be done by applying a high-pass filter, disturbing signals from onboard instruments such as thruster firing events or heater switch events need to be removed from the previously filtered data. Afterwards the spikes which are induced by the torquers can be very well observed. Spikes vary in amplitude with respect to an increasing or decreasing current used for magnetic torquers, and can be as large as 20 nm/s2. Furthermore, we were able to set up a model for the spikes of each scenario with which we were able to compute model spike time series. With these time series the spikes can successfully be removed from the 10 Hz raw accelerometer data. Spectral analysis of the time series reveal that an influence onto gravity field determination due to these effects is very unlikely, but can theoretically not be excluded.

  1. A New Force Balanced Accelerometer Using Tunneling Tip Position Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavracky, P.; Hartley, F.; Sherman, N.; Warner, K.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we report the initial development of a single-axis bulk micromachined accelerometer. The device employs an electron tunneling tip as a position detector in a force feedback control system. Control electrodes are placed above and below the proof mass and act as electrostatic force plates. Using the force plates, the position of the proof mass relative to the tunneling tip can be controlled.

  2. Teaching elementary mechanics using a simple 'bubble tube' accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, C. A.

    1986-09-01

    Most people would probably like a direct-reading accelerometer which will give acceleration immediately and which may be used to confirm Newton's second law quickly and simply without the need for the excessive use of ticker timers. The article describes such an instrument for use in these experiments and in many others too: in particular, it enables what might be thought of as a revolutionary approach to circular motion.

  3. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Valencia Scale on Attitudes and Beliefs toward Hypnosis, Therapist version.

    PubMed

    Capafons, Antonio; Espejo, Begoña; Mendoza, M Elena

    2008-07-01

    Health professionals' beliefs and attitudes toward hypnosis may make them reluctant to use it or even to foster misapplications and iatrogenic uses of hypnosis. The Valencia Scale on Attitudes and Beliefs toward Hypnosis-Therapist version (VSABH-T) is a specific instrument to evaluate therapists' attitudes and beliefs. The aims of this study are to evaluate the 8-factor structure of the VSABH-T proposed from a confirmatory perspective. The sample comprised 1,661 licensed psychologists who are members of the Spanish Psychological Association for the initial test and 787 for the retest. Results confirmed the 8-factor structure obtained in a previous exploratory study, namely: Fear, Memory, Help, Control, Collaboration, Interest, Magic, and Marginal. The scale also showed adequate psychometric properties, including good internal consistency and test-retest reliability.

  4. Micromachined Accelerometers With Optical Interferometric Read-Out and Integrated Electrostatic Actuation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Neal A; Okandan, Murat; Littrell, Robert; Serkland, Darwin K; Keeler, Gordon A; Peterson, Ken; Bicen, Baris; Garcia, Caesar T; Degertekin, F Levent

    2008-02-01

    A micromachined accelerometer device structure with diffraction-based optical detection and integrated electrostatic actuation is introduced. The sensor consists of a bulk silicon proof mass electrode that moves vertically with respect to a rigid diffraction grating backplate electrode to provide interferometric detection resolution of the proof-mass displacement when illuminated with coherent light. The sensor architecture includes a monolithically integrated electrostatic actuation port that enables the application of precisely controlled broadband forces to the proof mass while the displacement is simultaneously and independently measured optically. This enables several useful features such as dynamic self-characterization and a variety of force-feedback modalities, including alteration of device dynamics in situ. These features are experimentally demonstrated with sensors that have been optoelectronically integrated into sub-cubic-millimeter volumes using an entirely surface-normal, rigid, and robust embodiment incorporating vertical cavity surface emitting lasers and integrated photodetector arrays. In addition to small form factor and high acceleration resolution, the ability to self-characterize and alter device dynamics in situ may be advantageous. This allows periodic calibration and in situ matching of sensor dynamics among an array of accelerometers or seismometers configured in a network.

  5. A novel accelerometer based on the first kind of ferrofluid levitation principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jie; Chen, Yibiao; Li, Zhenkun; Zhang, Tianqi; Li, Decai

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a novel accelerometer exploiting the first kind of ferrofluid levitation principle is presented. The device consists of a piston-shaped container filled with ferrofluid surrounding a nonmagnetic insulating rod, which has the same shape as the container and is regarded as an inertial mass. Two annular magnets outside the container are used to create a non-uniform magnetic field which generates a powerful restoring force acting on the nonmagnetic rod. Under the influence of the external acceleration, two coils can detect the change of the volume distribution of the ferrofluid and transmit the voltage signal, which is proportional to the displacement of the nonmagnetic rod. The determination of the working range, linearity and sensitivity depends on the restoring force, thus these factors affecting the restoring force are sufficiently investigated by calculation and experiment. Furthermore, the comparison between numerical calculations and experimental measurements shows a good agreement. The static characteristics of the accelerometer are obtained by using an optimized structure.

  6. Rarefied aerodynamics and upper atmospheric flight results from the Orbiter High Resolution Accelerometer Package experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, R. C.; Larman, K. T.

    1987-01-01

    Data from the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP) experiment on the Space Shuttle Orbiter have been analyzed for 10 flights to produce lift-drag (L/D) ratios in the free molecule, transition, and continuum flow flight regimes. Freestream density is also obtained in the altitude range from 60 km to 160 km using an aerodynamic model based upon earlier flight analysis of accelerometer data. The results of the L/D analysis of the latest four flights have been compared with the aerodynamic model developed from the first six HiRAP missions. The new data agree with the established flight-derived model, thereby validating earlier analysis. However, the arithmetic mean of the 10 flight-derived L/D values in the free molecular flow regime is 0.053 (+ or - 0.1) as compared to the initial value of 0.10 (+ or - 0.3), determined from STS-6. Updates to the Orbiter aerodynamic model values and calibration factors have been incorporated into the density calculations for all 10 flights to provide realistic absolute density. The derived density altitude profiles, which have been normalized to the U.S. Standard Atmosphere 1976, are characterized by a large amplitude wave pattern relative to the standard as seen in the initial flight analysis.

  7. Scales

    MedlinePlus

    Scales are a visible peeling or flaking of outer skin layers. These layers are called the stratum ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Eczema , ringworm , and psoriasis ...

  8. Calibration and Validation of a Wrist- and Hip-Worn Actigraph Accelerometer in 4-Year-Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Elin; Larisch, Lisa-Marie; Marcus, Claude; Hagströmer, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To determine time spent at different physical activity intensities, accelerometers need calibration. The aim of this study was to develop and cross-validate intensity thresholds for the Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometer for wrist and hip placement in four-year-old children. Methods In total 30 children (49 months, SD 3.7) were recruited from five preschools in Stockholm. Equipped with an accelerometer on the wrist and another on the hip, children performed three indoor activities and one free-play session while being video recorded. Subsequently, physical activity intensity levels were coded every 5th second according to the Children’s Activity Rating Scale. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves was used to develop wrist and hip intensity thresholds, the upper threshold for sedentary, and lower threshold for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), for the vertical axis (VA) and for the vector magnitude (VM). A leave-one-out method was used to cross-validate the thresholds. Results Intensity thresholds for wrist placement were ≤ 178 (VA) and ≤ 328 (VM) for sedentary and ≥ 871 (VA) and ≥ 1393 (VM) counts/5 seconds for MVPA. The corresponding thresholds for hip placement were ≤ 43 (VA) and ≤ 105 (VM) for sedentary and ≥ 290 (VA) and ≥ 512 (VM) for MVPA. The quadratic weighted Kappa was 0.92 (95% CI 0.91–0.93) (VA) and 0.95 (95% CI 0.94–0.96) (VM) for the wrist-worn accelerometer and 0.76 (98% CI 0.74–0.77) and 0.86 (95% CI 0.85–0.87) for the hip-worn. Conclusion Using wrist placement and the VM when measuring physical activity with accelerometry in 4-year-old children is recommended. PMID:27617962

  9. Meta-analysis of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale Factor Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Alan

    2005-01-01

    A meta-analysis (N=17,620; k=26) of factor analyses of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) was conducted. Analysis of the 12 items from Overall et al.'s (J. E. Overall, L. E. Hollister, & P. Pichot, 1974) 4 subscales found support for his 4 subscales. Analysis of all 18 BPRS items found 4 components similar to those of Overall et al. In a…

  10. The Disgust Scale: Item Analysis, Factor Structure, and Suggestions for Refinement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Williams, Nathan L.; Tolin, David F.; Abramowitz, Jonathan S.; Sawchuk, Craig N.; Lohr, Jeffrey M.; Elwood, Lisa S.

    2007-01-01

    In the 4 studies presented (N = 1,939), a converging set of analyses was conducted to evaluate the item adequacy, factor structure, reliability, and validity of the Disgust Scale (DS; J. Haidt, C. McCauley, & P. Rozin, 1994). The results suggest that 7 items (i.e., Items 2, 7, 8, 21, 23, 24, and 25) should be considered for removal from the DS.…

  11. Determination of gait events using an externally mounted shank accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Jonathan; Hobbs, Sarah J; Protheroe, Laurence; Edmundson, Christopher J; Greenhalgh, Andrew

    2013-02-01

    Biomechanical analysis requires the determination of specific foot contact events. This is typically achieved using force platform information; however, when force platforms are unavailable, alternative methods are necessary. A method was developed for the determination of gait events using an accelerometer mounted to the distal tibia, measuring axial accelerations. The aim of the investigation was to determine the efficacy of this method. Sixteen participants ran at 4.0 m/s ± 5%. Synchronized tibial accelerations and vertical ground reaction forces were sampled at 1000 Hz as participants struck a force platform with their dominant foot. Events determined using the accelerometer, were compared with the corresponding events determined using the force platform. Mean errors of 1.68 and 5.46 ms for average and absolute errors were observed for heel strike and of -3.59 and 5.00 ms for toe-off. Mean and absolute errors of 5.18 and 11.47 ms were also found for the duration of the stance phase. Strong correlations (r = .96) were also observed between duration of stance obtained using the two different methods. The error values compare favorably to other alternative methods of predicting gait events. This suggests that shank-mounted accelerometers can be used to accurately and reliably detect gait events.

  12. Determination of gait events using an externally mounted shank accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Jonathan; Hobbs, Sarah J; Protheroe, Laurence; Edmundson, Christopher J; Greenhalgh, Andrew

    2013-02-01

    Biomechanical analysis requires the determination of specific foot contact events. This is typically achieved using force platform information; however, when force platforms are unavailable, alternative methods are necessary. A method was developed for the determination of gait events using an accelerometer mounted to the distal tibia, measuring axial accelerations. The aim of the investigation was to determine the efficacy of this method. Sixteen participants ran at 4.0 m/s ± 5%. Synchronized tibial accelerations and vertical ground reaction forces were sampled at 1000 Hz as participants struck a force platform with their dominant foot. Events determined using the accelerometer, were compared with the corresponding events determined using the force platform. Mean errors of 1.68 and 5.46 ms for average and absolute errors were observed for heel strike and of -3.59 and 5.00 ms for toe-off. Mean and absolute errors of 5.18 and 11.47 ms were also found for the duration of the stance phase. Strong correlations (r = .96) were also observed between duration of stance obtained using the two different methods. The error values compare favorably to other alternative methods of predicting gait events. This suggests that shank-mounted accelerometers can be used to accurately and reliably detect gait events. PMID:23462448

  13. Optical Readout of Micro-Accelerometer Code Features

    SciTech Connect

    Dickey, Fred M.; Holswade, Scott C.; Polosky, Marc A.; Shagam, Richard N.; Sullivan, Charles T.

    1999-07-08

    Micromachine accelerometers offer a way to enable critical functions only when a system encounters a particular acceleration environment. This paper describes the optical readout of a surface micromachine accelerometer containing a unique 24-bit code. The readout uses waveguide-based optics, which are implemented as a photonic integrated circuit (PIC). The PIC is flip-chip bonded over the micromachine, for a compact package. The shuttle moves 500 {micro}m during readout, and each code element is 17 {micro}m wide. The particular readout scheme makes use of backscattered radiation from etched features in the accelerometer shuttle. The features are etched to create corner reflectors that return radiation back toward the source for a one bit. For a zero bit, the shuttle is not etched, and the radiation scatters forward, away from the detector. This arrangement provides a large signal difference between a one and zero signal, since the zero signal returns virtually no signal to the detector. It is thus superior to schemes that interrogate the code vertically, which have a limited contrast between a one and a zero. Experimental results are presented for mock shuttle features etched into a silicon substrate. To simulate the shuttle moving under a fixed PIC, a commercially available waveguide source was scanned over the mock code.

  14. Enabling and challenging factors in institutional reform: The case of SCALE-UP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foote, Kathleen; Knaub, Alexis; Henderson, Charles; Dancy, Melissa; Beichner, Robert J.

    2016-06-01

    While many innovative teaching strategies exist, integration into undergraduate science teaching has been frustratingly slow. This study aims to understand the low uptake of research-based instructional innovations by studying 21 successful implementations of the Student Centered Active Learning with Upside-down Pedagogies (SCALE-UP) instructional reform. SCALE-UP significantly restructures the classroom environment and pedagogy to promote highly active and interactive instruction. Although originally designed for university introductory physics courses, SCALE-UP has spread to many other disciplines at hundreds of departments around the world. This study reports findings from in-depth, open-ended interviews with 21 key contact people involved with successful secondary implementations of SCALE-UP throughout the United States. We defined successful implementations as those who restructured their pedagogy and classroom and sustained and/or spread the change. Interviews were coded to identify the most common enabling and challenging factors during reform implementation and compared to the theoretical framework of Kotter's 8-step Change Model. The most common enabling influences that emerged are documenting and leveraging evidence of local success, administrative support, interaction with outside SCALE-UP user(s), and funding. Many challenges are linked to the lack of these enabling factors including difficulty finding funding, space, and administrative and/or faculty support for reform. Our focus on successful secondary implementations meant that most interviewees were able to overcome challenges. Presentation of results is illuminated with case studies, quotes, and examples that can help secondary implementers with SCALE-UP reform efforts specifically. We also discuss the implications for policy makers, researchers, and the higher education community concerned with initiating structural change.

  15. Factors Driving Potential Ammonia Oxidation in Canadian Arctic Ecosystems: Does Spatial Scale Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Samiran

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation is a major process in nitrogen cycling, and it plays a key role in nitrogen limited soil ecosystems such as those in the arctic. Although mm-scale spatial dependency of ammonia oxidizers has been investigated, little is known about the field-scale spatial dependency of aerobic ammonia oxidation processes and ammonia-oxidizing archaeal and bacterial communities, particularly in arctic soils. The purpose of this study was to explore the drivers of ammonia oxidation at the field scale in cryosols (soils with permafrost within 1 m of the surface). We measured aerobic ammonia oxidation potential (both autotrophic and heterotrophic) and functional gene abundance (bacterial amoA and archaeal amoA) in 279 soil samples collected from three arctic ecosystems. The variability associated with quantifying genes was substantially less than the spatial variability observed in these soils, suggesting that molecular methods can be used reliably evaluate spatial dependency in arctic ecosystems. Ammonia-oxidizing archaeal and bacterial communities and aerobic ammonia oxidation were spatially autocorrelated. Gene abundances were spatially structured within 4 m, whereas biochemical processes were structured within 40 m. Ammonia oxidation was driven at small scales (<1m) by moisture and total organic carbon, whereas gene abundance and other edaphic factors drove ammonia oxidation at medium (1 to 10 m) and large (10 to 100 m) scales. In these arctic soils heterotrophs contributed between 29 and 47% of total ammonia oxidation potential. The spatial scale for aerobic ammonia oxidation genes differed from potential ammonia oxidation, suggesting that in arctic ecosystems edaphic, rather than genetic, factors are an important control on ammonia oxidation. PMID:22081570

  16. Generation of Bondarenko F factors with MCNP5 for use in scale transport codes

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, S.; Maldonado, G. I.

    2012-07-01

    Generally there are three methods of cross-section processing available when using the Scale computer code. They are NITAWL, BONAMI, and CENTRM, with CENTRM being the most common and accurate, but computationally expensive. In order to improve the accuracy of BONAMI (which uses the Bondarenko Method), new Bondarenko/F Factors were to be generated that will smooth out the current F Factors that are being generated using CENTRM. The case discussed here involves using a dedicated Monte Carlo code (MCNP5) to calculate the transport solution from which shielded cross-sections can be produced directly for the transport geometry/mesh. A simple program was created to parse and collect the tallied cross-sections from the MCNP output, which was fed into a modified CLAROL input (a module that replaces or adds data in an AMPX master library), which used the cross-sections obtained from MCNP to calculate new F-factors and update the SCALE library. This approach allows the use of other methods to generate the shielded cross-sections and for easy comparison to existing results. Initial proof-of-principle calculations were carried out for an various cases using various transport solvers, such as NEWT, KENO, and XSDRN, with BONAMI in SCALE. Poor results were obtained using cross-sections generated using infinite homogeneous cases, but good results were obtained by using pin cells in an infinite lattice. (authors)

  17. Factors controlling gully erosion at different spatial and temporal scales in rangelands of SW Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Gutiérrez, Á.; Schnabel, S.; Lavado Contador, J. F.; Pulido Fernández, M.

    2009-04-01

    Gully erosion has been recognized as an important soil degradation process in rangelands of SW Spain. However, little is known about gullying processes at different spatial and temporal scales in these areas. Three different approaches were used in this paper to analyze the factors determining gully erosion intensity and rates at different spatial and temporal scales in rangelands of SW Spain. The first approach was based on the monitoring of a permanent valley bottom gully and continuous measurement of rainfall and discharge during the period 2001-2007 in the Parapuños experimental basin. Parapuños is a small catchment (99.5 ha) representative of dehesa land use, with an undulated topography and Mediterranean climate. Gully erosion volume was obtained by means of 28 fixed cross sections measured with a frequency of 6 months. Discharge and rainfall were monitored using a water depth probe installed in a weir at the outlet of the catchment and 6 tipping bucket rain gauges, respectively. The second approach was based on analyzing the development of the same permanent gully located in Parapuños using six series of aerial ortophotographs for the period 1945-2006. This methodology allowed to relate gully evolution with land use and vegetation cover changes. Finally, a relatively new data mining technique, called Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS), was applied to construct a model capable of predicting the location of gullies at the regional scale. A large database composed of 36 independent variables related to topography, lithology, soils, rainfall, land use and vegetation cover was used. This statistical technique allowed to determine the importance of the variables involved. This database was gathered in 46 farms representative of rangelands of SW Spain in Extremadura, covering a surface area of 35,459 ha. Farms were quite diverse although their main characteristics were undulating landforms, acid rocks (schists, greywackes and granites), and

  18. Defining distinct negative beliefs about uncertainty: validating the factor structure of the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Kathryn A; Dugas, Michel J

    2009-06-01

    This study examined the factor structure of the English version of the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale (IUS; French version: M. H. Freeston, J. Rhéaume, H. Letarte, M. J. Dugas, & R. Ladouceur, 1994; English version: K. Buhr & M. J. Dugas, 2002) using a substantially larger sample than has been used in previous studies. Nonclinical undergraduate students and adults from the community (M age = 23.74 years, SD = 6.36; 73.0% female and 27.0% male) who participated in 16 studies in the Anxiety Disorders Laboratory at Concordia University in Montreal, Canada were randomly assigned to 2 datasets. Exploratory factor analysis with the 1st sample (n = 1,230) identified 2 factors: the beliefs that "uncertainty has negative behavioral and self-referent implications" and that "uncertainty is unfair and spoils everything." This 2-factor structure provided a good fit to the data (Bentler-Bonett normed fit index = .96, comparative fit index = .97, standardized root-mean residual = .05, root-mean-square error of approximation = .07) upon confirmatory factor analysis with the 2nd sample (n = 1,221). Both factors showed similarly high correlations with pathological worry, and Factor 1 showed stronger correlations with generalized anxiety disorder analogue status, trait anxiety, somatic anxiety, and depressive symptomatology. PMID:19485672

  19. Validity and reliability of the braden scale and the influence of other risk factors: a multi-centre prospective study.

    PubMed

    Halfens, R J; Van Achterberg, T; Bal, R M

    2000-08-01

    The Braden scale is one of the most intensively studied risk assessment scales used in identifying the risk of developing pressure sores. However, not all studies show that the sensitivity and specificity of this scale is sufficient. This study, therefore, investigated whether adding new risk factors can enhance the sensitivity and specificity of the Braden scale. The Braden scale was tested in a prospective multi-centre design. The nurses of 11 wards filled in the Braden scale every 5 days for each patient who was admitted without pressure sores and who had a probable stay of at least 10 days. Based on a literature study and in-depth interviews with experts, the Braden scale was extended by the risk factor blood circulation. In addition, other risk factors, which are more or less stable patient characteristics, were measured during the admission of the patient. Independent research assistants measured the presence of pressure sores twice a week. As the external criterion for the risk of developing pressure sores, the presence of pressure sores and/or the use of preventive activities was used. Results showed that the original Braden scale was a reliable instrument and that the sensitivity and specificity was sufficient. However, reformulating the factors moisture and nutrition, and adding the risk factor age could enhance the sensitivity and specificity. Furthermore, results showed that the factors sensory perception, and friction and shear were especially important risk factors for the Braden scale. In fact, using only the factors sensory perception, friction and shear, moisture (a reformulated factor) and age give the highest explained variance of the risk of developing pressure sores. The added risk factor blood circulation, did not enhance the sensitivity and specificity of the original Braden scale. Suggestions are given on how to use risk assessment scales in practice.

  20. Comparison of Four Actigraph Accelerometers During Walking and Running

    PubMed Central

    John, Dinesh; Tyo, Brian; Bassett, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Currently, researchers can use the Actigraph 7164 or one of three different versions of the Actigraph GT1M to objectively measure physical activity. Purpose To determine if differences exist between activity counts from the Actigraph 7164 and the three versions of the GT1M at given walking and running speeds. Methods Ten male participants (23.6 ± 2.7 yrs) completed treadmill walking and running at ten different speeds (3-minute stages) while wearing either the Actigraph 7164 and the latest GT1M (GT1M-V3) or GT1M version one (GT1M-V1) and GT1M version two (GT1M-V2). Participants walked at 3, 5, and at 7 km˙hr−1 followed by running at 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, and 20 km˙hr−1. The accelerometers were worn on an elastic belt around the waist over the left and right hips. Testing was performed on different days using a counterbalanced within-subjects design to account for potential differences attributable to accelerometer placement. At each speed, a one-way repeated measures ANOVA was used to examine differences between activity counts in counts˙min−1(cpm). Post-hoc pairwise comparisons with Bonferroni adjustments were used where appropriate. Results There were no significant differences between activity counts at any given walking or running speed (p<0.05). At all running speeds, activity counts from the Actigraph 7164 and GT1M-V2 displayed the lowest and highest values, respectively. Output from all accelerometers peaked at 14 km˙hr−1 (mean range: 8974 ± 677 to 9412 ± 982 cpm) and then gradually declined at higher speeds. The mean difference score at peak output between the Actigraph 7164 and GT1M-V2 was 439 ± 565 cpm. Conclusions There were no statistically significant differences between outputs from all the accelerometers indicating that researchers can select any of the four Actigraph accelerometers to do research. PMID:19927022

  1. The Temporal Focus Scale: Factor Structure and Association with Alcohol Use in a Sample of Northern Irish School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Michael T.; Percy, Andrew; Goudie, Andrew J.; Sumnall, Harry R.; Cole, Jon C.

    2012-01-01

    The Temporal Focus Scale (TFS) is a 12-item self-report measure of cognitive engagement with the temporal domains of past, present and future. Developed in college student samples, a three-factor structure with adequate reliability and validity was documented in a series of independent studies. We tested the factor structure of the scale in a…

  2. The X-factor in Galaxies: I. Dependence on Environment and Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Feldmann, Robert; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; /Chicago U., EFI /Chicago U.

    2011-12-01

    Characterizing the conversion factor between CO emission and column density of molecular hydrogen, X{sub CO}, is crucial in studying the gaseous content of galaxies, its evolution, and relation to star formation. In most cases the conversion factor is assumed to be close to that of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in the Milky Way, except possibly for mergers and star-bursting galaxies. However, there are physical grounds to expect that it should also depend on the gas metallicity, surface density, and strength of the interstellar radiation field. The X{sub CO} factor may also depend on the scale on which CO emission is averaged due to effects of limited resolution. We study the dependence of X{sub CO} on gas properties and averaging scale using a model that is based on a combination of results of sub-pc scale magneto-hydrodynamic simulations and on the gas distribution from self-consistent cosmological simulations of galaxy formation. Our model predicts X{sub CO} {approx} 2 - 4 x 10{sup 20} K{sup -1} cm{sup -2} km{sup -1} s, consistent with the Galactic value, for interstellar medium conditions typical for the Milky Way. For such conditions the predicted X{sub CO} varies by only a factor of two for gas surfaced densities in the range {Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}} {approx} 50-500 M{sub {circle_dot}} pc{sup -2}. However, the model also predicts that more generally on the scale of GMCs, X{sub CO} is a strong function of metallicity, and depends on the column density and the interstellar UV flux. We show explicitly that neglecting these dependencies in observational estimates can strongly bias the inferred distribution of H2 column densities of molecular clouds to have a narrower and offset range compared to the true distribution. We find that when averaged on {approx} kpc scales the X-factor depends only weakly on radiation field and column density, but is still a strong function of metallicity. The predicted metallicity dependence can be approximated as X{sub CO} {proportional

  3. The accuracy of climate models' simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of grid scale correction factors

    DOE PAGES

    Winterhalter, Wade E.

    2011-09-01

    Global climate change is expected to impact biological populations through a variety of mechanisms including increases in the length of their growing season. Climate models are useful tools for predicting how season length might change in the future. However, the accuracy of these models tends to be rather low at regional geographic scales. Here, I determined the ability of several atmosphere and ocean general circulating models (AOGCMs) to accurately simulate historical season lengths for a temperate ectotherm across the continental United States. I also evaluated the effectiveness of regional-scale correction factors to improve the accuracy of these models. I foundmore » that both the accuracy of simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of the correction factors to improve the model's accuracy varied geographically and across models. These results suggest that regional specific correction factors do not always adequately remove potential discrepancies between simulated and historically observed environmental parameters. As such, an explicit evaluation of the correction factors' effectiveness should be included in future studies of global climate change's impact on biological populations.« less

  4. Regional-scale calculation of the LS factor using parallel processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Tang, Guoan; Jiang, Ling; Zhu, A.-Xing; Yang, Jianyi; Song, Xiaodong

    2015-05-01

    With the increase of data resolution and the increasing application of USLE over large areas, the existing serial implementation of algorithms for computing the LS factor is becoming a bottleneck. In this paper, a parallel processing model based on message passing interface (MPI) is presented for the calculation of the LS factor, so that massive datasets at a regional scale can be processed efficiently. The parallel model contains algorithms for calculating flow direction, flow accumulation, drainage network, slope, slope length and the LS factor. According to the existence of data dependence, the algorithms are divided into local algorithms and global algorithms. Parallel strategy are designed according to the algorithm characters including the decomposition method for maintaining the integrity of the results, optimized workflow for reducing the time taken for exporting the unnecessary intermediate data and a buffer-communication-computation strategy for improving the communication efficiency. Experiments on a multi-node system show that the proposed parallel model allows efficient calculation of the LS factor at a regional scale with a massive dataset.

  5. The accuracy of climate models' simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of grid scale correction factors

    SciTech Connect

    Winterhalter, Wade E.

    2011-09-01

    Global climate change is expected to impact biological populations through a variety of mechanisms including increases in the length of their growing season. Climate models are useful tools for predicting how season length might change in the future. However, the accuracy of these models tends to be rather low at regional geographic scales. Here, I determined the ability of several atmosphere and ocean general circulating models (AOGCMs) to accurately simulate historical season lengths for a temperate ectotherm across the continental United States. I also evaluated the effectiveness of regional-scale correction factors to improve the accuracy of these models. I found that both the accuracy of simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of the correction factors to improve the model's accuracy varied geographically and across models. These results suggest that regional specific correction factors do not always adequately remove potential discrepancies between simulated and historically observed environmental parameters. As such, an explicit evaluation of the correction factors' effectiveness should be included in future studies of global climate change's impact on biological populations.

  6. An all-silicon single-wafer micro-g accelerometer with a combined surface and bulk micromachining process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yazdi, N.; Najafi, K.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports an all-silicon fully symmetrical z-axis micro-g accelerometer that is fabricated on a single-silicon wafer using a combined surface and bulk fabrication process. The microaccelerometer has high device sensitivity, low noise, and low/controllable damping that are the key factors for attaining micro g and sub-micro g resolution in capacitive accelerometers. The microfabrication process produces a large proof mass by using the whole wafer thickness and a large sense capacitance by utilizing a thin sacrificial layer. The sense/feedback electrodes are formed by a deposited 2-3 microns polysilicon film with embedded 25-35 microns-thick vertical stiffeners. These electrodes, while thin, are made very stiff by the thick embedded stiffeners so that force rebalancing of the proof mass becomes possible. The polysilicon electrodes are patterned to create damping holes. The microaccelerometers are batch-fabricated, packaged, and tested successfully. A device with a 2-mm x 1-mm proof mass and a full bridge support has a measured sensitivity of 2 pF/g. The measured sensitivity of a 4-mm x 1-mm accelerometer with a cantilever support is 19.4 pF/g. The calculated noise floor of these devices at atmosphere are 0.23 micro g/sqrt(Hz) and 0.16 micro g/sqrt(Hz), respectively.

  7. Modelling of the subgrid scale wrinkling factor for large eddy simulation of turbulent premixed combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiesset, Fabien; Maurice, Guillaume; Halter, Fabien; Mazellier, Nicolas; Chauveau, Christian; Gökalp, Iskender

    2016-05-01

    We propose a model for assessing the unresolved wrinkling factor in the large eddy simulation of turbulent premixed combustion. It relies essentially on a power-law dependence of the wrinkling factor on the filter size and an original expression for the 'active' corrugating strain rate. The latter is written as the turbulent strain multiplied by an efficiency function that accounts for viscous effects and the kinematic constraint of Peters. This yields functional expressions for the fractal dimension and the inner cut-off length scale, the latter being (i) filter-size independent and (ii) consistent with the Damköhler asymptotic behaviours at both large and small Karlovitz numbers. A new expression for the wrinkling factor that incorporates finite Reynolds number effects is further proposed. Finally, the model is successfully assessed on an experimental filtered database.

  8. Bias-dependent enhancement of the Fano factor in atomic-scale Au junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Loah; Zolotavin, Pavlo; Chen, Ruoyu; Natelson, Douglas

    We report measurements of current noise in STM-style Au break junctions at 77K, focusing on the dependence of the Fano factor on applied bias. In room temperature investigations of similar systems, measured noise at low bias (<150 mV) was observed to agree well with Landauer-Büttiker theory for shot noise at a fixed electronic temperature. At higher biases, however, measured noise exhibited a superlinear dependence on scaled bias above the low bias expectations. In the present experiment at cryogenic temperatures, we also observe this nonlinear increase of noise. We will discuss this behavior in terms of an enhancement of the Fano factor above the predicted model for minimum open transmission channels, and how the data constrain possible explanations of this excess noise. Furthermore, we will examine channel mixing in transport through the junction from measured Fano factor and conductance.

  9. Factor structure and psychometric properties of the Body Appreciation Scale-2 in Iran.

    PubMed

    Atari, Mohammad

    2016-09-01

    Tylka and Wood-Barcalow (2015b) developed the Body Appreciation Scale-2 (BAS-2) as a psychometrically robust measure that is conceptually consistent with recent findings on positive body image. The present study aimed to examine the factor structure and psychometric properties of the BAS-2 in Iran. Participants were 568 men and 525 women from seven universities in Tehran, Iran. Two exploratory factor analyses were performed on data from women and men separately. Similar to the original English version, the Persian BAS-2 had a one-factor solution. Persian BAS-2 scores had satisfactory convergent validity (indexed by significantly correlations with self-esteem and life satisfaction) and internal consistency. Men had significantly higher scores on BAS-2 compared to women. The present study suggests that the Persian BAS-2 has adequate psychometric properties to assess body appreciation. PMID:27236470

  10. Shorebird roost-site selection at two temporal scales: Is human disturbance a factor?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, K.A.; Otis, D.L.

    2007-01-01

    1. Roost-site selection in shorebirds is governed by ambient factors, including environmental conditions and human disturbance. Determination of the extent to which these factors affect roost use and the associated implications for shorebird habitat protection is important for conservation strategies and informed management of human recreational use of these habitats. Shorebird conservation as a whole is a high priority world-wide because a large proportion of shorebird species is in decline. However, little is understood about the consistency of roost use by different species, what conditions affect species-specific roost-site selection, and at what spatial and temporal scales conditions influence selection. 2. We studied high-tide roost-site selection by eight species of non-breeding shorebirds on a critically important stopover and wintering refuge. We calculated spatial and temporal variability in roost use for each species based on counts and consistency of incidence. We then examined roost-site selection in relation to structural, environmental and human disturbance factors, and how this varied across spatial and temporal scales. 3. Most roosts were used less than 50% of the time, although larger roosts were used more consistently. This varied among species, with red knot Calidris canutus tending to concentrate at a few roosts and American oystercatcher Haematopus palliatus, dowitcher Limnodromus griseus and Limnodromus scolopaceus and ruddy turnstone Arenaria interpres more diffusely distributed among roosts. 4. At an annual scale, the principal factors affecting shorebird presence at roosts were roost length (size), local region, substrate and aspect. The extent and direction of these effects varied among species. Among years, red knots avoided roosts that had high average boat activity within 1000 m, but disturbance did not appear to be a factor for other species. 5. Daily roost use was influenced primarily by wind speed and the ability of roosts to

  11. An Exploratory Factor Analysis of the Acquired Capability for Suicide Scale in Male Prison Inmates

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Phillip N.; Wolford, Caitlin; Mandracchia, Jon T.; Jahn, Danielle R.

    2014-01-01

    Prison inmates are exposed to a number of adverse conditions prior to and during incarceration that place them at risk for suicide. The interpersonal theory of suicide may prove useful in better understanding suicide in prisons, allowing for more effective prevention and treatment programs. However, no studies of the interpersonal theory have been conducted in prison populations. Further, there have been no studies examining the factor structure of the assessment of one of the theory’s main constructs: the acquired capability for suicide. The current study examined the factor structure of the Acquired Capability for Suicide Scale in a sample of male prison inmates. We found that a four-factor model provided the best statistical and conceptual fit; though, only three of these factors were meaningful with an additional method-factor. The three resulting factors were each associated with previous exposure to painful and provocative events, but none differentiated suicide attempter status. Results suggest that the interpersonal theory has promise in application to suicide in prison populations, but more work is needed to develop a self-report measure of acquired capability, particularly as it relates to prisoners. PMID:23230965

  12. Factor structure and construct validity of the temporal experience of pleasure scales.

    PubMed

    Ho, Paul M; Cooper, Andrew J; Hall, Phillip J; Smillie, Luke D

    2015-01-01

    Feelings of pleasure felt in the moment of goal attainment (consummatory pleasure) are thought to be dissociable from feelings of desire connected with the motivated approach of goals (anticipatory pleasure). The Temporal Experience of Pleasure Scales (TEPS; Gard, Gard, Kring, & John, 2006) was developed to assess individual differences in these distinct processes. Recently, an independent evaluation of the psychometric characteristics of a Chinese-translated TEPS suggested a more complex factor structure (Chan et al., 2012). This study aimed to reexamine the factor structure and convergent and divergent validity of the TEPS in two previously unexamined multiethnic samples. University students in the United Kingdom (N = 294) completed the TEPS and university students in Australia (N = 295) completed the TEPS as well as a battery of conceptually related questionnaires. A confirmatory factor analysis of Gard et al.'s (2006) 2-factor model produced inadequate fit, which model-modification indexes suggested might be due to item cross-loadings. This issue was examined further using an exploratory factor analysis, which revealed a clear 2-factor solution despite cross-loadings among some items. Finally, mixed evidence for convergent-divergent validity was obtained, in terms of relationships between the TEPS and measures of anhedonia, approach-motivation, and positive emotion. PMID:25101907

  13. Examining the factor structures of the five facet mindfulness questionnaire and the self-compassion scale.

    PubMed

    Williams, Matthew J; Dalgleish, Tim; Karl, Anke; Kuyken, Willem

    2014-06-01

    The five facet mindfulness questionnaire (FFMQ; Baer, Smith, Hopkins, Krietemeyer, & Toney, 2006) and the self-compassion scale (SCS; Neff, 2003) are widely used measures of mindfulness and self-compassion in mindfulness-based intervention research. The psychometric properties of the FFMQ and the SCS need to be independently replicated in community samples and relevant clinical samples to support their use. Our primary aim was to establish the factor structures of the FFMQ and SCS in individuals with recurrent depression in remission, since mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) was developed as a treatment for preventing depressive relapse. In order to determine the consistency across populations, we examined the factor structures of the FFMQ and SCS in 3 samples: (1) a convenience sample of adults, (2) a sample of adults who practice meditation, and (3) a sample of adults who suffer from recurrent depression and were recruited to take part in a trial of MBCT. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) showed that a 4-factor hierarchical model of the FFMQ best fits the community sample and the clinical sample but that a 5-factor hierarchical model of the FFMQ best fits the meditator sample. CFA did not endorse the SCS 6-factor hierarchical structure in any of the 3 samples. Clinicians and researchers should be aware of the psychometric properties of the FFMQ to measure mindfulness when comparing meditators and nonmeditators. Further research is needed to develop a more psychometrically robust measure of self-compassion.

  14. In-Axis and Cross-Axid Accelerometer Response in Shock Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.

    1999-03-10

    The characteristics of a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments have been studied at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in the Mechanical Shock Testing Laboratory for ten years The SNL Shock Laboratory has developed a capability to characterize accelerometers and other transducers with shocks aligned with the transducer's sensing axis and perpendicular to the transducer's sensing axis. This unique capability includes Hopkinson bars made of aluminum, steel, titanium, and beryllium. The bars are configured as both single and split Hopkinson bars. Four different areas that conclude this study are summarized in this paper: characterization of the cross-axis response of the accelerometer in the four environments of static compression, static strain on a beam, dynamic strain, and mechanical shock, the accelerometer's response on a titanium Hopkinson bar with two 45{degree} flats on the end of the bar; failure analysis of the accelerometer; and measurement of the accelerometer's self-generating cable response in a shock environment.

  15. [Factors influencing soil moisture at different scales of the Lhasa River basin, China].

    PubMed

    Fu, Guo-zhen; Bai, Wan-qi; Yao, Li-nao

    2015-07-01

    The scale difference and role of factors influencing soil moisture regime are the basis of scale dependency study. This study, which selected farmland soils in the Lhasa River basin of the Tibetan Plateau as the research object, identified the main factors affecting the soil moisture using ecological redundancy analysis (RDA) and statistic analysis methods, based on data obtained by remote sensing technology and field surveys. The soil layers of 0-20, 20-40 and 40-60 cm were collected with the soil-drilling method at each of 115 sampling sites distributed in the whole basin of the Lhasa River and 49 sampling sites in one of its sub-watersheds. The results showed that soil moisture content in the Lhasa River basin, under the influence of climate and altitude, increased from southwest to northeast, and was higher in the lower soil layer than the upper layer due to water supplement by lateral seepage of the river. At sub-watershed scale, farmland soil water content decreased with increasing the altitude and slope, and soil water storage capacity decreased with increasing the gravel content. The results were a significant support for the farmland expansion to higher altitude, adjustment of cropping structure, land consolidation, and construction of irrigation facilities in the region. PMID:26710640

  16. Development of scaling factors for the activated concrete of the KRR-2.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sang-Bum; Kang, Mun-Ja; Lee, Ki-Won; Chung, Un-Soo

    2009-01-01

    The biological shielding concrete of KRR-2 was activated by a thermal neutron reaction during the operation of the reactor, thus a variety of radionuclides were generated in the concrete. In order to verify the radioactivity for the final disposal of waste and to achieve a more efficient cutting of the concrete, the radioactivity inventories and distributions of the activated concrete were evaluated. The activity of gamma-emitting radionuclides was measured by using an HPGe detector. The beta-emitting radionuclides were measured by an oxidation/combustion method for (3)H and (14)C and a combined method of an extraction chromatography and a liquid scintillation for (55)Fe and (63)Ni. The dominant radioactive nuclides in the activated concrete were (3)H, (14)C, (55)Fe and (60)Co, and the maximum gamma activity was 105Bq/g at the surface around the thermal column. The specific activities of all the nuclides were found to decrease almost linearly on a logarithmic scale along the depth from the inner surface of the concrete. Equations for scaling factors were obtained by a linear regression of logarithms from the radioactivity data of (3)H/(60)Co, (14)C/(60)Co and (55)Fe/(60)Co nuclide pairs of the activated concrete. The scaling factors can be utilized for the estimation of beta radioactivity without the time consuming separation processes of the nuclides. PMID:19303787

  17. An item factor analysis and item response theory-based revision of the Everyday Discrimination Scale.

    PubMed

    Stucky, Brian D; Gottfredson, Nisha C; Panter, A T; Daye, Charles E; Allen, Walter R; Wightman, Linda F

    2011-04-01

    The Everyday Discrimination Scale (EDS), a widely used measure of daily perceived discrimination, is purported to be unidimensional, to function well among African Americans, and to have adequate construct validity. Two separate studies and data sources were used to examine and cross-validate the psychometric properties of the EDS. In Study 1, an exploratory factor analysis was conducted on a sample of African American law students (N = 589), providing strong evidence of local dependence, or nuisance multidimensionality within the EDS. In Study 2, a separate nationally representative community sample (N = 3,527) was used to model the identified local dependence in an item factor analysis (i.e., bifactor model). Next, item response theory (IRT) calibrations were conducted to obtain item parameters. A five-item, revised-EDS was then tested for gender differential item functioning (in an IRT framework). Based on these analyses, a summed score to IRT-scaled score translation table is provided for the revised-EDS. Our results indicate that the revised-EDS is unidimensional, with minimal differential item functioning, and retains predictive validity consistent with the original scale.

  18. Accelerometer Adherence and Performance in a Cohort Study of US Hispanic Adults

    PubMed Central

    Evenson, Kelly R.; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Deng, Yu; Marshall, Simon J.; Isasi, Carmen R.; Esliger, Dale W.; Davis, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study described participant adherence to wearing the accelerometer and accelerometer performance in a cohort study of adults. Methods From 2008-2011, 16,415 United States (US) Hispanic/Latino adults age 18-74 years enrolled in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Immediately following the baseline visit, participants wore an Actical accelerometer for one week. This study explored correlates of accelerometer participation and adherence, defined as wearing it for at least 3 of a possible days for >=10 hours/day. Accelerometer performance was assessed by exploring the number of different values of accelerometer counts/minute for each participant. Results Overall, 92.3% (n=15,153) had at least one day with accelerometer data and 77.7% (n=12,750) were adherent. Both accelerometer participation and adherence were higher among participants who were married or partnered, reported a higher household income, were first generation immigrants, or reported lower sitting time. Participation was also higher among those with no stair limitations. Adherence was higher among participants who were male, older, employed or retired, not US born, preferred Spanish over English, reported higher work activity or lower recreational activity, and those with a lower body mass index. Among the sample that met the adherence definition, the maximum recorded count/minute was 12,000, and there were a total of 5,846 different counts/minute. On average, participants had 112.5 different counts/minute over 6 days (median 106, interquartile range 91-122). The number of different counts/minute were higher among men, younger ages, normal weight, and those with higher accelerometer assessed physical activity. Conclusion Several correlates differed between accelerometer participation and adherence. These characteristics could be targeted in future studies to improve accelerometer wear. The performance of the accelerometer provided insight into creating a more accurate non

  19. Development of a quartz digital accelerometer for environmental sensing and navigation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, W.J.; Vianco, P.T.

    1993-03-01

    A quartz digital accelerometer has been developed which uses double ended tuning forks as the active sensing elements. The authors have demonstrated the ability of this accelerometer to be capable of acceleration measurements between {+-}150G with {+-}0.5G accuracy. They have further refined the original design and assembly processes to produce accelerometers with < 1mG stability in inertial measurement applications. This report covers the development, design, processing, assembly, and testing of these devices.

  20. An Abbreviated Impulsiveness Scale (ABIS) Constructed through Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the BIS-11

    PubMed Central

    Coutlee, Christopher G.; Politzer, Cary S.; Hoyle, Rick H.; Huettel, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Impulsiveness is a personality trait that reflects an urge to act spontaneously, without thinking or planning ahead for the consequences of your actions. High impulsiveness is characteristic of a variety of problematic behaviors including attention deficit disorder, hyperactivity, excessive gambling, risk-taking, drug use, and alcoholism. Researchers studying attention and self-control often assess impulsiveness using personality questionnaires, notably the common Barratt Impulsiveness Scale version 11 (BIS-11; last revised in 1995). Advances in techniques for producing personality questionnaires over the last 20 years prompted us to revise and improve the BIS-11. We sought to make the revised scale shorter – so that it would be quicker to administer – and better matched to current behaviors. We analyzed responses from 1549 adults who took the BIS-11 questionnaire. Using a statistical technique called factor analysis, we eliminated 17 questions that did a poor job of measuring the three major types of impulsiveness identified by the scale: inattention, spontaneous action, and lack of planning. We constructed our ABbreviated Impulsiveness Scale (ABIS) using the remaining 13 questions. We showed that the ABIS performed well when administered to additional groups of 657 and 285 adults. Finally, we showed expected relationships between the ABIS and other personality measurements related to impulsiveness, and showed that the ABIS can help predict alcohol consumption. We present the ABIS as a useful and efficient tool for researchers interested in measuring impulsive personality. PMID:26258000

  1. Rasch modeling and confirmatory factor analysis of the systemizing quotient-revised (SQ-R) scale.

    PubMed

    Allison, Carrie; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Stone, Mark H; Muncer, Steven J

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the dimensionality of the Systemizing Quotient-Revised (SQ-R), a measure of how strong a person's interest is in systems, using two statistical approaches: Rasch modeling and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA). Participants included N = 675 with an autism spectrum condition (ASC), N = 1369 family members of people with ASC, and N = 2014 typical controls. Data were applied to the Rasch model (Rating Scale) using WINSTEPS. The data fit the Rasch model quite well lending support to the idea that systemizing could be seen as unidimensional. Reliability estimates were .99 for items and .92 for persons. A CFA parceling approach confirmed that a unidimensional model fit the data. There was, however, differential functioning by sex in some of these items. An abbreviated 44-item version of the scale, consisting of items without differential item functioning by sex was developed. This shorter scale also was tested from a Rasch perspective and confirmed through CFA. All measures showed differences on total scale scores between those participants with and without ASC (d = 0.71, p < .005), and between sexes (d = 0.53, p < .005). We conclude that the SQ-R is an appropriate measure of systemizing which can be measured along a single dimension.

  2. Psychometric properties and confirmatory factor analysis of the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Empathy towards patients is considered to be associated with improved health outcomes. Many scales have been developed to measure empathy in health care professionals and students. The Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy (JSPE) has been widely used. This study was designed to examine the psychometric properties and the theoretical structure of the JSPE. Methods A total of 853 medical students responded to the JSPE questionnaire. A hypothetical model was evaluated by structural equation modelling to determine the adequacy of goodness-of-fit to sample data. Results The model showed excellent goodness-of-fit. Further analysis showed that the hypothesised three-factor model of the JSPE structure fits well across the gender differences of medical students. Conclusions The results supported scale multi-dimensionality. The 20 item JSPE provides a valid and reliable scale to measure empathy among not only undergraduate and graduate medical education programmes, but also practising doctors. The limitations of the study are discussed and some recommendations are made for future practice. PMID:21810268

  3. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale: a bifactor answer to a two-factor question?

    PubMed

    McKay, Michael T; Boduszek, Daniel; Harvey, Séamus A

    2014-01-01

    Despite its long-standing and widespread use, disagreement remains regarding the structure of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES). In particular, concern remains regarding the degree to which the scale assesses self-esteem as a unidimensional or multidimensional (positive and negative self-esteem) construct. Using a sample of 3,862 high school students in the United Kingdom, 4 models were tested: (a) a unidimensional model, (b) a correlated 2-factor model in which the 2 latent variables are represented by positive and negative self-esteem, (c) a hierarchical model, and (d) a bifactor model. The totality of results including item loadings, goodness-of-fit indexes, reliability estimates, and correlations with self-efficacy measures all supported the bifactor model, suggesting that the 2 hypothesized factors are better understood as "grouping" factors rather than as representative of latent constructs. Accordingly, this study supports the unidimensionality of the RSES and the scoring of all 10 items to produce a global self-esteem score.

  4. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale: a bifactor answer to a two-factor question?

    PubMed

    McKay, Michael T; Boduszek, Daniel; Harvey, Séamus A

    2014-01-01

    Despite its long-standing and widespread use, disagreement remains regarding the structure of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES). In particular, concern remains regarding the degree to which the scale assesses self-esteem as a unidimensional or multidimensional (positive and negative self-esteem) construct. Using a sample of 3,862 high school students in the United Kingdom, 4 models were tested: (a) a unidimensional model, (b) a correlated 2-factor model in which the 2 latent variables are represented by positive and negative self-esteem, (c) a hierarchical model, and (d) a bifactor model. The totality of results including item loadings, goodness-of-fit indexes, reliability estimates, and correlations with self-efficacy measures all supported the bifactor model, suggesting that the 2 hypothesized factors are better understood as "grouping" factors rather than as representative of latent constructs. Accordingly, this study supports the unidimensionality of the RSES and the scoring of all 10 items to produce a global self-esteem score. PMID:24940657

  5. Measuring the intrapersonal component of psychological empowerment: confirmatory factor analysis of the sociopolitical control scale.

    PubMed

    Peterson, N Andrew; Lowe, John B; Hughey, Joseph; Reid, Robert J; Zimmerman, Marc A; Speer, Paul W

    2006-12-01

    The Sociopolitical Control Scale (SPCS) is a widely used measure of the intrapersonal component of psychological empowerment. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) were conducted with data from two samples to test the hypothesized structure of the SPCS, the potential effects of method bias on the measure's psychometric properties, and whether a revised version of the scale (SPCS-R) yielded improved model fit. Sample 1 included 316 randomly selected community residents of the Midwestern United States. Sample 2 included 750 community residents of the Northeastern U.S. Results indicated that method bias from the use of negatively worded items had a significant effect on the factor structure of the SPCS. CFA of the SPCS-R, in which negatively worded items were rephrased so that all statements were positively worded, supported the measure's hypothesized two-factor structure (i.e., leadership competence and policy control). Subscales of the SPCS-R were found reliable and related in expected ways with measures of community involvement. Implications of the study for empowerment-based research and practice are described, and strategies to further develop the SPCS are discussed.

  6. Influence of landscape-scale factors in limiting brook trout populations in Pennsylvania streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocovsky, P.M.; Carline, R.F.

    2006-01-01

    Landscapes influence the capacity of streams to produce trout through their effect on water chemistry and other factors at the reach scale. Trout abundance also fluctuates over time; thus, to thoroughly understand how spatial factors at landscape scales affect trout populations, one must assess the changes in populations over time to provide a context for interpreting the importance of spatial factors. We used data from the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission's fisheries management database to investigate spatial factors that affect the capacity of streams to support brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and to provide models useful for their management. We assessed the relative importance of spatial and temporal variation by calculating variance components and comparing relative standard errors for spatial and temporal variation. We used binary logistic regression to predict the presence of harvestable-length brook trout and multiple linear regression to assess the mechanistic links between landscapes and trout populations and to predict population density. The variance in trout density among streams was equal to or greater than the temporal variation for several streams, indicating that differences among sites affect population density. Logistic regression models correctly predicted the absence of harvestable-length brook trout in 60% of validation samples. The r 2-value for the linear regression model predicting density was 0.3, indicating low predictive ability. Both logistic and linear regression models supported buffering capacity against acid episodes as an important mechanistic link between landscapes and trout populations. Although our models fail to predict trout densities precisely, their success at elucidating the mechanistic links between landscapes and trout populations, in concert with the importance of spatial variation, increases our understanding of factors affecting brook trout abundance and will help managers and private groups to protect and

  7. Examination of the Factor Structure of the Adolescent Sleep-Wake Scale (ASWS).

    PubMed

    Essner, Bonnie; Noel, Melanie; Myrvik, Matthew; Palermo, Tonya

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the factor structure of the Adolescent Sleep-Wake Scale (ASWS) among 491 adolescents (12-18 years) with and without pediatric health conditions. Exploratory factor analyses were conducted using iterated principal axis factoring with varimax rotation. Highly cross-loading items were systematically removed and analyses were rerun until a clean solution was attained. The final solution explained 57.1% of the total model variance, including 10 items and three factors: Falling Asleep and Reinitiating Sleep-Revised, returning to Wakefulness-Revised, and Going to Bed-Revised. Internal consistency reliability scores were acceptable to good, with the exception of the Going to Bed-Revised subscale for the healthy sample. Adolescents with chronic pain reported significantly poorer overall sleep quality and more problems in falling asleep, reinitiating sleep, and returning to wakefulness as compared to healthy adolescents, providing preliminary evidence for construct validity of the new factors. The resulting ASWS version is a concise assessment tool with empirically derived, distinct behavioral sleep dimensions that can be used for clinical and research purposes.

  8. Scaling study of the pion electroproduction cross sections and the pion form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Tanja Horn; Xin Qian; John Arrington; Razmik Asaturyan; Fatiha Benmokthar; Werner Boeglin; Peter Bosted; Antje Bruell; Eric Christy; Eugene Chudakov; Ben Clasie; Mark Dalton; AJI Daniel; Donal Day; Dipangkar Dutta; Lamiaa El Fassi; Rolf Ent; Howard Fenker; J. Ferrer; Nadia Fomin; H. Gao; K Garrow; Dave Gaskell; C Gray; G. Huber; M. Jones; N Kalantarians; C. Keppel; K Kramer; Y Li; Y Liang; A. Lung; S Malace; P. Markowitz; A. Matsumura; D. Meekins; T Mertens; T Miyoshi; H. Mykrtchyan; R. Monson; T. Navasardyan; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; Y. Okayasu; A. Opper; C Perdrisat; V. Punjabi; A. Rauf; V. Rodriguez; D. Rohe; J Seely; E Segbefia; G. Smith; M. Sumihama; V. Tadevoyan; L Tang; V. Tvaskis; A. Villano; W. Vulcan; F. Wesselmann; S. Wood; L. Yuan; X. Zheng

    2007-07-12

    The $^{1}$H($e,e^\\prime \\pi^+$)n cross section was measured for a range of four-momentum transfer up to $Q^2$=3.91 GeV$^2$ at values of the invariant mass, $W$, above the resonance region. The $Q^2$-dependence of the longitudinal component is consistent with the $Q^2$-scaling prediction for hard exclusive processes. This suggests that perturbative QCD concepts are applicable at rather low values of $Q^2$. Pion form factor results, while consistent with the $Q^2$-scaling prediction, are inconsistent in magnitude with perturbative QCD calculations. The extraction of Generalized Parton Distributions from hard exclusive processes assumes the dominance of the longitudinal term. However, transverse contributions to the cross section are still significant at $Q^2$=3.91 GeV$^2$.

  9. System Wide Joint Position Sensor Fault Tolerance in Robot Systems Using Cartesian Accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldridge, Hal A.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1997-01-01

    Joint position sensors are necessary for most robot control systems. A single position sensor failure in a normal robot system can greatly degrade performance. This paper presents a method to obtain position information from Cartesian accelerometers without integration. Depending on the number and location of the accelerometers. the proposed system can tolerate the loss of multiple position sensors. A solution technique suitable for real-time implementation is presented. Simulations were conducted using 5 triaxial accelerometers to recover from the loss of up to 4 joint position sensors on a 7 degree of freedom robot moving in general three dimensional space. The simulations show good estimation performance using non-ideal accelerometer measurements.

  10. Physics of failure modes in accelerometers utilizing single crystal piezoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlodkowski, Paul Alexander

    1999-11-01

    For over forty years, the lead zirconate -- lead titanate system (PZT) has been the industrial standard of sensing materials for piezoelectric accelerometers. This ceramic has established a reliability benchmark given the uniformity of its electromechanical properties, the negligible dependence of these properties on temperature and pre-stress, and the ability to manufacture the sensing element cost-effectively into a myriad of geometries. Today, revolutionary advances in the growth of single crystal piezoelectric materials have spawned the evolution of novel sensor designs. With piezoelectric coefficients exceeding 2000 pC/N, and electromechanical coupling factors above 90%, single crystals of Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 [PMNT] and Pb(Zn1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 [PZNT] have the potential of superseding PZT ceramics in certain critical applications. This dissertation reports the first results of the design, development and performance characterization for an accelerometer utilizing bulk, single crystal piezoelectric materials. Numerous prototypes, developed in the compression and flexural-mode design configurations, exhibit charge sensitivities that exceed that of their PZT-counterparts by a factor of greater than three times. The introduction of accelerometer prototypes employing single crystal piezoelectric material is an important advancement for the sensor industry. Root-cause failure processes were identified and subsequently used as a reliability enhancement tool to prevent device failures through robust design and manufacturing practices. Crystal machining techniques were analyzed in which a scanning electron microscope was used to inspect the crystal surface for defects. Inhomogeneity in the piezoelectric properties over the surface of the crystal was quantified and recognized as a major obstacle to commercialization. Measurements were made on the material's fracture toughness and electromechanical properties over a wide temperature range. Effects of aging and

  11. A review of modifying factors affecting usage of diagnostic rating scales in concussion management.

    PubMed

    Dessy, Alexa; Rasouli, Jonathan; Gometz, Alex; Choudhri, Tanvir

    2014-07-01

    Sport-related concussion has gained increasing recognition as a result of recent legislation, public health initiatives and media coverage. Moreover, there have been substantial paradigm shifts in the management of concussion. This article will discuss the variables that affect the use of diagnostic rating scales such as ImPACT and SCAT in the current management of concussed individuals. Specifically, patient-specific modifying factors affecting test interpretation, including age, gender, fitness level, psychiatric conditions, learning disorders and other components of medical history will be addressed, as well as methodological concerns with baseline testing. PMID:24908218

  12. Factor Structure of the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale: Comment on Park (2014).

    PubMed

    Horwitz, Elaine K

    2016-08-01

    By employing both exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, Park has provided an important contribution to understanding the underlying constructs of the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale. To Park's concerns about previous research on the components of the measure, this article adds the necessity of considering the specific learner populations and learning contexts where foreign language anxiety (FLA) is being examined since the components of FLA likely vary in different learner populations, especially with respect to cultural and proficiency differences. It is particularly important to consider that FLA has different triggers and manifestations in different cultures. PMID:27287268

  13. Chip scale mechanical spectrum analyzers based on high quality factor overmoded bulk acouslic wave resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, R. H., III

    2012-03-01

    The goal of this project was to develop high frequency quality factor (fQ) product acoustic resonators matched to a standard RF impedance of 50 {Omega} using overmoded bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonators. These resonators are intended to serve as filters in a chip scale mechanical RF spectrum analyzer. Under this program different BAW resonator designs and materials were studied theoretically and experimentally. The effort resulted in a 3 GHz, 50 {Omega}, sapphire overmoded BAW with a fQ product of 8 x 10{sup 13}, among the highest values ever reported for an acoustic resonator.

  14. Model-independent plotting of the cosmological scale factor as a function of lookback time

    SciTech Connect

    Ringermacher, H. I.; Mead, L. R. E-mail: Lawrence.mead@usm.edu

    2014-11-01

    In this work we describe a model-independent method of developing a plot of scale factor a(t) versus lookback time t{sub L} from the usual Hubble diagram of modulus data against redshift. This is the first plot of this type. We follow the model-independent methodology of Daly and Djorgovski used for their radio-galaxy data. Once the a(t)data plot is completed, any model can be applied and will display as described in the standard literature. We then compile an extensive data set to z = 1.8 by combining Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) data from SNLS3 of Conley et al., high-z SNe data of Riess et al., and radio-galaxy data of Daly and Djorgovski to validate the new plot. We first display these data on a standard Hubble diagram to confirm the best fit for ΛCDM cosmology, and thus validate the joined data set. The scale factor plot is then developed from the data and the ΛCDM model is again displayed from a least-squares fit. The fit parameters are in agreement with the Hubble diagram fit confirming the validity of the new plot. Of special interest is the transition time of the universe, which in the scale factor plot will appear as an inflection point in the data set. Noise is more visible in this presentation, which is particularly sensitive to inflection points of any model displayed in the plot, unlike on a modulus-z diagram, where there are no inflection points and the transition-z is not at all obvious by inspection. We obtain a lower limit of z ≥ 0.6. It is evident from this presentation that there is a dearth of SNe data in the range z = 1-2, exactly the range necessary to confirm a ΛCDM transition-z around z = 0.76. We then compare a 'toy model' wherein dark matter is represented as a perfect fluid with an equation of state p = –(1/3) ρ to demonstrate the plot sensitivity to model choice. Its density varies as 1/t {sup 2} and it enters the Friedmann equations as Ω{sub dark}/t {sup 2}, replacing only the Ω{sub dark}/a {sup 3} term. The toy model is a

  15. Assessing Stress in Cancer Patients: A Second-Order Factor Analysis Model for the Perceived Stress Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden-Kreutz, Deanna M.; Browne, Michael W.; Frierson, Georita M.; Andersen, Barbara L.

    2004-01-01

    Using the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), perceptions of global stress were assessed in 111women following breast cancer surgery and at 12 and 24 months later. This is the first study to factor analyze the PSS. The PSS data were factor analyzed each time using exploratory factor analysis with oblique direct quartimin rotation. Goodness-of-fit…

  16. Orthogonal Higher Order Structure and Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the French Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golay, Philippe; Lecerf, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    According to the most widely accepted Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) model of intelligence measurement, each subtest score of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Adults (3rd ed.; WAIS-III) should reflect both 1st- and 2nd-order factors (i.e., 4 or 5 broad abilities and 1 general factor). To disentangle the contribution of each factor, we applied a…

  17. Interest of the MICROSTAR Accelerometer to improve the GRASP Mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, E.; Lebat, V.; Foulon, B.; Christophe, B.; Liorzou, F.; Huynh, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Geodetic Reference Antenna in Space (GRASP) is a micro satellite mission concept proposed by JPL to improve the definition of the Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF). GRASP collocates GPS, SLR, VLBI, and DORIS sensors on a dedicated spacecraft in order to establish precise and stable ties between the key geodetic techniques used to define and disseminate the TRF. GRASP also offers a space-based reference antenna for the present and future Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). By taking advantage of the new testing possibilities offer by the catapult facility at the ZARM drop tower, the ONERA's space accelerometer team proposes an up-dated version, called MICROSTAR, of its ultra sensitive electrostatic accelerometers which have contributed to the success of the last Earth's gravity missions GRACE and GOCE. Built around a cubic proof-mass, it provides the 3 linear accelerations with a resolution better than 10-11 ms-2/Hz1/2 into a measurement bandwidth between 10-3 Hz and 0.1 Hz and the 3 angular accelerations about its 3 orthogonal axes with 5´10-10 rad.s-2/Hz1/2 resolution. Integrated at the centre of mass of the satellite, MICROSTAR improves the Precise Orbit Determination (POD) by accurate measurement of the non-gravitational force acting on the satellite. It offers also the possibility to calibrate the change in the position of the satellite center of mass with an accuracy better than 100 μm as demonstrated in the GRACE mission. Assuming a sufficiently rigid structure between the antennas and the accelerometer, its data can participate to reach the mission objective of 1 mm precision for the TRF position.

  18. Microgravity accelerometer characterization on Columbia STS-32 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoess, Jeff; Thomas, Don; Dunbar, Bonnie

    1992-05-01

    The Honeywell In-Space Accelerometer (HISA) is a three-axis microgravity accelerometer instrument package recently developed by Honeywell Systems and Research Center (SRC) to monitor oscillatory and transient accelerations onboard spacecraft and spaceborne structures. The HISA was designed to be co-located with materials and life sciences experiments to record real-time accelerometer event data, sampling time, and temperature. The HISA was originally developed to monitor the microgravity disturbances associated with a polymer morphology experiment developed by 3M Company in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The HISA was first flight tested with the 3M experiment on the Space Shuttle Atlantis STS-34 in October 1989. The HISA was successfully flown on a second shuttle mission (Columbia STS-32 in January 1990) in support of the NASA JSC-sponsored Microgravity Disturbances Experiment (MDE), which focused on the effects of microgravity disturbances on the growth of high-quality Indium crystals. The primary objective of the STS-32 MDE experiment was to investigate the effects of crew-induced gravity disturbances on the microstructure (crystal defects and uniformity of impurity distribution) of float-zone-grown crystals. The float-zone technique involves establishing a suspended molten zone between two cylindrical samples a pure, single-crystal sample and an impure, polycrystalline sample. Microgravity disturbances due to crew treadmill activity and orbiter maneuvering system thruster firings were sensed and recorded by the HISA to understand their effects on the stability of the float zone. The principle of operation of the HISA, the flight configuration of the HISA supporting the MDE experiment, and the characterization of STS-32 treadmill disturbance data are summarized.

  19. MEMS capacitive accelerometer-based middle ear microphone.

    PubMed

    Young, Darrin J; Zurcher, Mark A; Semaan, Maroun; Megerian, Cliff A; Ko, Wen H

    2012-12-01

    The design, implementation, and characterization of a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) capacitive accelerometer-based middle ear microphone are presented in this paper. The microphone is intended for middle ear hearing aids as well as future fully implantable cochlear prosthesis. Human temporal bones acoustic response characterization results are used to derive the accelerometer design requirements. The prototype accelerometer is fabricated in a commercial silicon-on-insulator (SOI) MEMS process. The sensor occupies a sensing area of 1 mm × 1 mm with a chip area of 2 mm × 2.4 mm and is interfaced with a custom-designed low-noise electronic IC chip over a flexible substrate. The packaged sensor unit occupies an area of 2.5 mm × 6.2 mm with a weight of 25 mg. The sensor unit attached to umbo can detect a sound pressure level (SPL) of 60 dB at 500 Hz, 35 dB at 2 kHz, and 57 dB at 8 kHz. An improved sound detection limit of 34-dB SPL at 150 Hz and 24-dB SPL at 500 Hz can be expected by employing start-of-the-art MEMS fabrication technology, which results in an articulation index of approximately 0.76. Further micro/nanofabrication technology advancement is needed to enhance the microphone sensitivity for improved understanding of normal conversational speech.

  20. Piezoelectric Shaker Development for High Frequency Calibration of Accelerometers

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Bev; Harper, Kari K.; Vogl, Gregory W.

    2010-05-28

    Calibration of vibration transducers requires sinusoidal motion over a wide frequency range with low distortion and low cross-axial motion. Piezoelectric shakers are well suited to generate such motion and are suitable for use with laser interferometric methods at frequencies of 3 kHz and above. An advantage of piezoelectric shakers is the higher achievable accelerations and displacement amplitudes as compared to electro-dynamic (ED) shakers. Typical commercial ED calibration shakers produce maximum accelerations from 100 m/s{sup 2} to 500 m/s{sup 2}. Very large ED shakers may produce somewhat higher accelerations but require large amplifiers and expensive cooling systems to dissipate heat. Due to the limitations in maximum accelerations by ED shakers at frequencies above 5 kHz, the amplitudes of the generated sinusoidal displacement are frequently below the resolution of laser interferometers used in primary calibration methods. This limits the usefulness of ED shakers in interferometric based calibrations at higher frequencies.Small piezoelectric shakers provide much higher acceleration and displacement amplitudes for frequencies above 5 kHz, making these shakers very useful for accelerometer calibrations employing laser interferometric measurements, as will be shown in this paper. These piezoelectric shakers have been developed and used at NIST for many years for high frequency calibration of accelerometers. This paper documents the construction and performance of a new version of these shakers developed at NIST for the calibration of accelerometers over the range of 3 kHz to 30 kHz and possibly higher. Examples of typical calibration results are also given.

  1. Microgravity accelerometer characterization on Columbia STS-32 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoess, Jeff; Thomas, Don; Dunbar, Bonnie

    1992-01-01

    The Honeywell In-Space Accelerometer (HISA) is a three-axis microgravity accelerometer instrument package recently developed by Honeywell Systems and Research Center (SRC) to monitor oscillatory and transient accelerations onboard spacecraft and spaceborne structures. The HISA was designed to be co-located with materials and life sciences experiments to record real-time accelerometer event data, sampling time, and temperature. The HISA was originally developed to monitor the microgravity disturbances associated with a polymer morphology experiment developed by 3M Company in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The HISA was first flight tested with the 3M experiment on the Space Shuttle Atlantis STS-34 in October 1989. The HISA was successfully flown on a second shuttle mission (Columbia STS-32 in January 1990) in support of the NASA JSC-sponsored Microgravity Disturbances Experiment (MDE), which focused on the effects of microgravity disturbances on the growth of high-quality Indium crystals. The primary objective of the STS-32 MDE experiment was to investigate the effects of crew-induced gravity disturbances on the microstructure (crystal defects and uniformity of impurity distribution) of float-zone-grown crystals. The float-zone technique involves establishing a suspended molten zone between two cylindrical samples a pure, single-crystal sample and an impure, polycrystalline sample. Microgravity disturbances due to crew treadmill activity and orbiter maneuvering system thruster firings were sensed and recorded by the HISA to understand their effects on the stability of the float zone. The principle of operation of the HISA, the flight configuration of the HISA supporting the MDE experiment, and the characterization of STS-32 treadmill disturbance data are summarized.

  2. ISA accelerometer onboard the Mercury Planetary Orbiter: error budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, Valerio; Lucchesi, David M.; Nozzoli, Sergio; Santoli, Francesco

    2007-03-01

    We have estimated a preliminary error budget for the Italian Spring Accelerometer (ISA) that will be allocated onboard the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) of the European Space Agency (ESA) space mission to Mercury named BepiColombo. The role of the accelerometer is to remove from the list of unknowns the non-gravitational accelerations that perturb the gravitational trajectory followed by the MPO in the strong radiation environment that characterises the orbit of Mercury around the Sun. Such a role is of fundamental importance in the context of the very ambitious goals of the Radio Science Experiments (RSE) of the BepiColombo mission. We have subdivided the errors on the accelerometer measurements into two main families: (i) the pseudo-sinusoidal errors and (ii) the random errors. The former are characterised by a periodic behaviour with the frequency of the satellite mean anomaly and its higher order harmonic components, i.e., they are deterministic errors. The latter are characterised by an unknown frequency distribution and we assumed for them a noise-like spectrum, i.e., they are stochastic errors. Among the pseudo-sinusoidal errors, the main contribution is due to the effects of the gravity gradients and the inertial forces, while among the random-like errors the main disturbing effect is due to the MPO centre-of-mass displacements produced by the onboard High Gain Antenna (HGA) movements and by the fuel consumption and sloshing. Very subtle to be considered are also the random errors produced by the MPO attitude corrections necessary to guarantee the nadir pointing of the spacecraft. We have therefore formulated the ISA error budget and the requirements for the satellite in order to guarantee an orbit reconstruction for the MPO spacecraft with an along-track accuracy of about 1 m over the orbital period of the satellite around Mercury in such a way to satisfy the RSE requirements.

  3. Interpreting the Dispositional Flow Scale-2 scores: a pilot study of latent class factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Masato; Mallett, Clifford J

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the extent to which scores on the Dispositional Flow Scale-2 (DFS-2) could differentiate individuals who frequently experience flow characteristics in physical activity from those who do not. A total of 993 participants completed the Japanese version of the DFS-2. Latent class factor analysis (LCFA), which combines the strengths of both latent class analysis and factor analysis, was conducted on the DFS-2 responses. Six classes were identified through a series of LCFAs and the patterns of the item-average scores for the nine flow attributes were found to be parallel among these classes. The top two and bottom two classes (19.3% and 13.4% of the whole sample) were considered the groups who experience flow characteristics frequently and seldom, respectively. These results indicated that individuals who often experience flow attributes in physical activity could be differentiated from those who do not based on their DFS-2 scores. PMID:22709370

  4. A Reexamination of the Factor Structure of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale: Is a One-Factor Model Plausible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Michael C.; Cheavens, Jennifer S.; Heiy, Jane E.; Cukrowicz, Kelly C.

    2010-01-01

    The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) is one of the most widely used measures of depressive symptoms in research today. The original psychometric work in support of the CES-D (Radloff, 1977) described a 4-factor model underlying the 20 items on the scale. Despite a long history of evidence supporting this structure,…

  5. New tunable mechanical monolithic horizontal accelerometer for low frequency seismic noise measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acernese, F.; De Rosa, R.; Giordano, G.; Romano, R.; Vilasi, S.; Barone, F.

    2010-04-01

    This paper describes a version of the mechanical horizontal monolithic sensor for geophysical applications developed at the University of Salerno. The instrument is basically a monolithic tunable folded pendulum, shaped with precision machining and electric-discharge-machining, that can be used both as seismometer and, in a forcefeedback configuration, as accelerometer. It is a very compact instrument, very sensitive in the low-frequency seismic noise band, with a very good immunity to environmental noises, whose main characteristics are the tunability of the resonance frequency, a high mechanical quality factor and a very sensitive interferometric readout. In this paper we describe the results of the first tests performed on this new instrument, comparing the results with a previous version of the instrument.

  6. Rapid tremor frequency assessment with the iPhone accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Joundi, Raed A; Brittain, John-Stuart; Jenkinson, Ned; Green, Alexander L; Aziz, Tipu

    2011-05-01

    The physician is often seeking more efficient ways of performing patient assessments. Currently, measuring tremor frequency requires expensive and bulky equipment. We propose the use of the in-built accelerometer of the iPhone via the iSeismo application for rapid measurement of tremor frequency. We use this device in a series of 7 different tremor cases, and show that the frequency measurements on the iSeismo graph closely match the more sophisticated EMG analysis during tremor. This is a preliminary confirmation of the usefulness of this device in the clinical setting for quick assessment of the dominant frequency component in a variety of tremors. PMID:21300563

  7. Accelerometer Placement for the International Space Station Node Modal Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, Michael L.

    1998-01-01

    Accelerometer location analysis for the modal survey test of the International Space Station Node is described. Three different approaches were utilized: (1) Guyan reduction; (2) Iterative Guyan reduction; and (3) The average driving point residue (ADPR) method. Both Guyan approaches worked well, but poor results were observed for the ADPR method. Although the iterative Guyan approach appears to provide the best set of sensor locations, it is intensive computationally, becoming impractical for large initial location sets. While this is computer dependent, it appears that initial sets larger than about 1500 degrees of freedom are impractical for the iterative technique.

  8. Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of the Work-Family Balance Scale in an Urban Chinese Sample.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiping; Yip, Paul S F; Chi, Peilian; Chan, Kinsun; Cheung, Yee Tak; Zhang, Xiulan

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the factor structure of the Work-Family Balance Scale (WFBS) and examine its reliability and validity in use in the urban Chinese population. The scale was validated using a sample of 605 urban Chinese residents from 7 cities. Exploratory factor analysis identified two factors: work-family conflict and work-family enrichment. The WFBS showed adequate reliability and concurrent validity. The WFBS is a reliable and valid instrument to measure work-family balance for Chinese working parents. However, further examination of the scale is needed.

  9. Attitude Toward Ambiguity: Empirically Robust Factors in Self-Report Personality Scales.

    PubMed

    Lauriola, Marco; Foschi, Renato; Mosca, Oriana; Weller, Joshua

    2016-06-01

    Two studies were conducted to examine the factor structure of attitude toward ambiguity, a broad personality construct that refers to personal reactions to perceived ambiguous stimuli in a variety of context and situations. Using samples from two countries, Study 1 mapped the hierarchical structure of 133 items from seven tolerance-intolerance of ambiguity scales (N = 360, Italy; N = 306, United States). Three major factors-Discomfort with Ambiguity, Moral Absolutism/Splitting, and Need for Complexity and Novelty-were recovered in each country with high replicability coefficients across samples. In Study 2 (N = 405, Italian community sample; N =366, English native speakers sample), we carried out a confirmatory analysis on selected factor markers. A bifactor model had an acceptable fit for each sample and reached the construct-level invariance for general and group factors. Convergent validity with related traits was assessed in both studies. We conclude that attitude toward ambiguity can be best represented a multidimensional construct involving affective (Discomfort with Ambiguity), cognitive (Moral Absolutism/Splitting), and epistemic (Need for Complexity and Novelty) components.

  10. A Large-Scale Analysis of Impact Factor Biased Journal Self-Citations.

    PubMed

    Chorus, Caspar; Waltman, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    Based on three decades of citation data from across scientific fields of science, we study trends in impact factor biased self-citations of scholarly journals, using a purpose-built and easy to use citation based measure. Our measure is given by the ratio between i) the relative share of journal self-citations to papers published in the last two years, and ii) the relative share of journal self-citations to papers published in preceding years. A ratio higher than one suggests that a journal's impact factor is disproportionally affected (inflated) by self-citations. Using recently reported survey data, we show that there is a relation between high values of our proposed measure and coercive journal self-citation malpractices. We use our measure to perform a large-scale analysis of impact factor biased journal self-citations. Our main empirical result is, that the share of journals for which our measure has a (very) high value has remained stable between the 1980s and the early 2000s, but has since risen strongly in all fields of science. This time span corresponds well with the growing obsession with the impact factor as a journal evaluation measure over the last decade. Taken together, this suggests a trend of increasingly pervasive journal self-citation malpractices, with all due unwanted consequences such as inflated perceived importance of journals and biased journal rankings. PMID:27560807

  11. Determine the Galaxy Bias Factors on Large Scales Using the Bispectrum Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, H.; Jing, Y. P.

    2009-09-01

    We study whether the bias factors of galaxies can be unbiasedly recovered from their power spectra and bispectra. We use a set of numerical N-body simulations and construct large mock galaxy catalogs based upon the semi-analytical model of Croton et al. We measure the reduced bispectra for galaxies of different luminosity, and determine the linear and first nonlinear bias factors from their bispectra. We find that on large scales down to that of the wavenumber k = 0.1 h Mpc-1, the bias factors b 1 and b 2 are nearly constant, and b 1 obtained with the bispectrum method agrees very well with the expected value. The nonlinear bias factor b 2 is negative, except for the most luminous galaxies with Mr < -23 which have a positive b 2. The behavior of b 2 of galaxies is consistent with the b 2 mass dependence of their host halos. We show that it is essential to have an accurate estimation of the dark matter bispectrum in order to have an unbiased measurement of b 1 and b 2. We also test the analytical approach of incorporating halo occupation distribution to model the galaxy power spectrum and bispectrum. The halo model predictions do not fit the simulation results well on the precision requirement of current cosmological studies.

  12. Attitude Toward Ambiguity: Empirically Robust Factors in Self-Report Personality Scales.

    PubMed

    Lauriola, Marco; Foschi, Renato; Mosca, Oriana; Weller, Joshua

    2016-06-01

    Two studies were conducted to examine the factor structure of attitude toward ambiguity, a broad personality construct that refers to personal reactions to perceived ambiguous stimuli in a variety of context and situations. Using samples from two countries, Study 1 mapped the hierarchical structure of 133 items from seven tolerance-intolerance of ambiguity scales (N = 360, Italy; N = 306, United States). Three major factors-Discomfort with Ambiguity, Moral Absolutism/Splitting, and Need for Complexity and Novelty-were recovered in each country with high replicability coefficients across samples. In Study 2 (N = 405, Italian community sample; N =366, English native speakers sample), we carried out a confirmatory analysis on selected factor markers. A bifactor model had an acceptable fit for each sample and reached the construct-level invariance for general and group factors. Convergent validity with related traits was assessed in both studies. We conclude that attitude toward ambiguity can be best represented a multidimensional construct involving affective (Discomfort with Ambiguity), cognitive (Moral Absolutism/Splitting), and epistemic (Need for Complexity and Novelty) components. PMID:25818603

  13. A Large-Scale Analysis of Impact Factor Biased Journal Self-Citations

    PubMed Central

    Waltman, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    Based on three decades of citation data from across scientific fields of science, we study trends in impact factor biased self-citations of scholarly journals, using a purpose-built and easy to use citation based measure. Our measure is given by the ratio between i) the relative share of journal self-citations to papers published in the last two years, and ii) the relative share of journal self-citations to papers published in preceding years. A ratio higher than one suggests that a journal’s impact factor is disproportionally affected (inflated) by self-citations. Using recently reported survey data, we show that there is a relation between high values of our proposed measure and coercive journal self-citation malpractices. We use our measure to perform a large-scale analysis of impact factor biased journal self-citations. Our main empirical result is, that the share of journals for which our measure has a (very) high value has remained stable between the 1980s and the early 2000s, but has since risen strongly in all fields of science. This time span corresponds well with the growing obsession with the impact factor as a journal evaluation measure over the last decade. Taken together, this suggests a trend of increasingly pervasive journal self-citation malpractices, with all due unwanted consequences such as inflated perceived importance of journals and biased journal rankings. PMID:27560807

  14. Hurricane Katrina-induced forest damage in relation to ecological factors at landscape scale.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fugui; Xu, Y Jun

    2009-09-01

    Forest stand stability to strong winds such as hurricanes has been found to be associated with a number of forest, soil and topography factors. In this study, through applying geographic information system (GIS) and logit regression, we assessed effects of forest characteristics and site conditions on pattern, severity and probability of Hurricane Katrina disturbance to forests in the Lower Pearl River Valley, USA. The factors included forest type, forest coverage, stand density, soil great group, elevation, slope, aspect, and stream buffer zone. Results showed that Hurricane Katrina damaged 60% of the total forested land in the region. The distribution and intensity of the hurricane disturbance varied across the landscape, with the bottomland hardwood forests on river floodplains most severely affected. All these factors had a variety of effects on vulnerability of the forests to the hurricane disturbance and thereby spatial patterns of the disturbance. Soil groups and stand factors including forest types, forest coverage and stand density contributed to 85% of accuracy in modeling the probability of the hurricane disturbance to forests in this region. Besides assessment of Katrina's damage, this study elucidates the great usefulness of remote sensing and GIS techniques combined with statistics modeling in assessment of large-scale risks of hurricane damage to coastal forests.

  15. A genome-scale study of transcription factor expression in the branching mouse lung

    PubMed Central

    Herriges, John C.; Yi, Lan; Hines, Elizabeth A.; Harvey, Julie F.; Xu, Guoliang; Gray, Paul; Ma, Qiufu; Sun, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Background Mammalian lung development consists of a series of precisely choreographed events that drive the progression from simple lung buds to the elaborately branched organ that fulfills the vital function of gas exchange. Strict transcriptional control is essential for lung development. Among the large number of transcription factors encoded in the mouse genome, only a small portion of them are known to be expressed and function in the developing lung. Thus a systematic investigation of transcription factors expressed in the lung is warranted. Results To enrich for genes that may be responsible for regional growth and patterning, we performed a screen using RNA in situ hybridization to identify genes that show restricted expression patterns in the embryonic lung. We focused on the pseudoglandular stage during which the lung undergoes branching morphogenesis, a cardinal event of lung development. Using a genome-scale probe set that represents over 90% of the transcription factors encoded in the mouse genome, we identified sixty-two transcription factor genes with localized expression in the epithelium, mesenchyme or both. Many of these genes have not been previously implicated in lung development. Conclusions Our findings provide new starting points for the elucidation of the transcriptional circuitry that controls lung development. PMID:22711520

  16. Identification of Prey Captures in Australian Fur Seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus) Using Head-Mounted Accelerometers: Field Validation with Animal-Borne Video Cameras.

    PubMed

    Volpov, Beth L; Hoskins, Andrew J; Battaile, Brian C; Viviant, Morgane; Wheatley, Kathryn E; Marshall, Greg; Abernathy, Kyler; Arnould, John P Y

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated prey captures in free-ranging adult female Australian fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus) using head-mounted 3-axis accelerometers and animal-borne video cameras. Acceleration data was used to identify individual attempted prey captures (APC), and video data were used to independently verify APC and prey types. Results demonstrated that head-mounted accelerometers could detect individual APC but were unable to distinguish among prey types (fish, cephalopod, stingray) or between successful captures and unsuccessful capture attempts. Mean detection rate (true positive rate) on individual animals in the testing subset ranged from 67-100%, and mean detection on the testing subset averaged across 4 animals ranged from 82-97%. Mean False positive (FP) rate ranged from 15-67% individually in the testing subset, and 26-59% averaged across 4 animals. Surge and sway had significantly greater detection rates, but also conversely greater FP rates compared to heave. Video data also indicated that some head movements recorded by the accelerometers were unrelated to APC and that a peak in acceleration variance did not always equate to an individual prey item. The results of the present study indicate that head-mounted accelerometers provide a complementary tool for investigating foraging behaviour in pinnipeds, but that detection and FP correction factors need to be applied for reliable field application. PMID:26107647

  17. Identification of Prey Captures in Australian Fur Seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus) Using Head-Mounted Accelerometers: Field Validation with Animal-Borne Video Cameras

    PubMed Central

    Volpov, Beth L.; Hoskins, Andrew J.; Battaile, Brian C.; Viviant, Morgane; Wheatley, Kathryn E.; Marshall, Greg; Abernathy, Kyler; Arnould, John P. Y.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated prey captures in free-ranging adult female Australian fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus) using head-mounted 3-axis accelerometers and animal-borne video cameras. Acceleration data was used to identify individual attempted prey captures (APC), and video data were used to independently verify APC and prey types. Results demonstrated that head-mounted accelerometers could detect individual APC but were unable to distinguish among prey types (fish, cephalopod, stingray) or between successful captures and unsuccessful capture attempts. Mean detection rate (true positive rate) on individual animals in the testing subset ranged from 67-100%, and mean detection on the testing subset averaged across 4 animals ranged from 82-97%. Mean False positive (FP) rate ranged from 15-67% individually in the testing subset, and 26-59% averaged across 4 animals. Surge and sway had significantly greater detection rates, but also conversely greater FP rates compared to heave. Video data also indicated that some head movements recorded by the accelerometers were unrelated to APC and that a peak in acceleration variance did not always equate to an individual prey item. The results of the present study indicate that head-mounted accelerometers provide a complementary tool for investigating foraging behaviour in pinnipeds, but that detection and FP correction factors need to be applied for reliable field application. PMID:26107647

  18. Scale Factor Measurements for a Gyroscope Based on an Expanding Cloud of Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoth, Gregory; Pelle, Bruno; Riedl, Stefan; Kitching, John; Donley, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    We present an atom interferometer that can simultaneously measure two-axis rotations and one-axis accelerations with a single cloud of atoms in an active evacuated volume of about 1 cm3. This is accomplished by extending the point-source interferometry technique (Dickerson et al. PRL, 111, 083001, 2013) to a compact regime. In this technique, the cloud of atoms is imaged after the interferometer sequence. Rotations cause spatial fringes to appear across the cloud. To realize a gyroscope with this method, it is necessary to know how the wave-vector of the spatial fringes, k, is related to the rotation rate, Ω. If the cloud is initially infinitesimally small, it can be shown that k = FΩ with a scale factor F determined by the time between interferometer pulses, the total free expansion time, and the wavelength of the interrogating laser. However, the point-source approximation is not appropriate in our case because the final size of the cloud in our experiment is between 1.4 and 5 times its initial size. We show experimentally that in this finite expansion regime the phase gradient is still well described by k = FΩ , but the scale factor F depends on the initial distribution of the atoms. We also present modeling that explains this dependence.

  19. Linear Zeff scaling of the anomalous inward drift and enhanced proportionality factor during neon inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, G.

    1996-12-01

    The origin of density profile peaking due to impurity puffing and the anomalous particle pinch are explored by computer simulations with special versions of the 1.5-D BALDUR predictive transport code. Transport analysis of high density H mode plasmas with strong neon puffing and density profile peaking yields a new scaling law for the anomalous inward drift velocity, upsilon in(x)=Cupsilon 2xD(x)/( rho wxs2), with C upsilon =FZeff(x), where D is the diffusion coefficient. This scaling implies that upsilon in/D varies as Zeff and results in upsilon in varies as Zeff since D is found to be independent of this parameter. The strong density profile peaking is caused by the increase in Zeff and by an enhanced factor F discovered during neon puffing. The time evolution of F correlates with the neon influx rate, but not with the neon content and the power losses due to line radiation and ionization. The factor F rises with growing influx rate and depends non-locally on the region where inelastic collisions prevail. One plausible mechanism for the enhancement of F is that inelastic collisions between fluctuating electrons and impurity ions change the dissipative part of the fluctuating electron distribution

  20. Martian Atmospheric Modeling of Scale Factors for MarsGRAM 2005 and the MAVEN Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCullough, Chris

    2011-01-01

    For spacecraft missions to Mars, especially the navigation of Martian orbiters and landers, an extensive knowledge of the Martian atmosphere is extremely important. The generally-accepted NASA standard for modeling (MarsGRAM), which was developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. MarsGRAM is useful for task such as aerobraking, performance analysis and operations planning for aerobraking, entry descent and landing, and aerocapture. Unfortunately, the densities for the Martian atmosphere in MarsGRAM are based on table look-up and not on an analytical algorithm. Also, these values can vary drastically from the densities actually experienced by the spacecraft. This does not have much of an impact on simple integrations but drastically affects its usefulness in other applications, especially those in navigation. For example, the navigation team for the Mars Atmosphere Volatile Environment (MAVEN) Project uses MarsGRAM to target the desired atmospheric density for the orbiter's pariapse passage, its closet approach to the planet. After the satellite's passage through pariapsis the computed density is compared to the MarsGRAM model and a scale factor is assigned to the model to account for the difference. Therefore, large variations in the atmosphere from the model can cause unexpected deviations from the spacecraft's planned trajectory. In order to account for this, an analytic stochastic model of the scale factor's behavior is desired. The development of this model will allow for the MAVEN navigation team to determine the probability of various Martian atmospheric variations and their effects on the spacecraft.