Science.gov

Sample records for accelerometer wear time

  1. Validation of Accelerometer Wear and Nonwear Time Classification Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Leena; Liu, Zhouwen; Matthews, Charles E.; Buchowski, Maciej S.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The use of movement monitors (accelerometers) for measuring physical activity (PA) in intervention and population-based studies is becoming a standard methodology for the objective measurement of sedentary and active behaviors and for validation of subjective PA self-reports. A vital step in PA measurements is classification of daily time into accelerometer wear and nonwear intervals using its recordings (counts) and an accelerometer-specific algorithm. Purpose To validate and improve a commonly used algorithm for classifying accelerometer wear and nonwear time intervals using objective movement data obtained in the whole-room indirect calorimeter. Methods We conducted a validation study of a wear/nonwear automatic algorithm using data obtained from 49 adults and 76 youth wearing accelerometers during a strictly monitored 24-h stay in a room calorimeter. The accelerometer wear and nonwear time classified by the algorithm was compared with actual wearing time. Potential improvements to the algorithm were examined using the minimum classification error as an optimization target. Results The recommended elements in the new algorithm are: 1) zero-count threshold during a nonwear time interval, 2) 90-min time window for consecutive zero/nonzero counts, and 3) allowance of 2-min interval of nonzero counts with the up/downstream 30-min consecutive zero counts window for detection of artifactual movements. Compared to the true wearing status, improvements to the algorithm decreased nonwear time misclassification during the waking and the 24-h periods (all P < 0.001). Conclusions The accelerometer wear/nonwear time algorithm improvements may lead to more accurate estimation of time spent in sedentary and active behaviors. PMID:20581716

  2. Towards uniform accelerometry analysis: a standardization methodology to minimize measurement bias due to systematic accelerometer wear-time variation.

    PubMed

    Katapally, Tarun R; Muhajarine, Nazeem

    2014-05-01

    Accelerometers are predominantly used to objectively measure the entire range of activity intensities - sedentary behaviour (SED), light physical activity (LPA) and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA). However, studies consistently report results without accounting for systematic accelerometer wear-time variation (within and between participants), jeopardizing the validity of these results. This study describes the development of a standardization methodology to understand and minimize measurement bias due to wear-time variation. Accelerometry is generally conducted over seven consecutive days, with participants' data being commonly considered 'valid' only if wear-time is at least 10 hours/day. However, even within 'valid' data, there could be systematic wear-time variation. To explore this variation, accelerometer data of Smart Cities, Healthy Kids study (www.smartcitieshealthykids.com) were analyzed descriptively and with repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). Subsequently, a standardization method was developed, where case-specific observed wear-time is controlled to an analyst specified time period. Next, case-specific accelerometer data are interpolated to this controlled wear-time to produce standardized variables. To understand discrepancies owing to wear-time variation, all analyses were conducted pre- and post-standardization. Descriptive analyses revealed systematic wear-time variation, both between and within participants. Pre- and post-standardized descriptive analyses of SED, LPA and MVPA revealed a persistent and often significant trend of wear-time's influence on activity. SED was consistently higher on weekdays before standardization; however, this trend was reversed post-standardization. Even though MVPA was significantly higher on weekdays both pre- and post-standardization, the magnitude of this difference decreased post-standardization. Multivariable analyses with standardized SED, LPA and MVPA as outcome

  3. Characteristics associated with requested and required accelerometer wear in children

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Sian L; Kipping, Ruth R; Jago, Russell; Brown, Judith; Hucker, Daniel; Blackett, Ali; Lawlor, Debbie A

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate characteristics associated with wearing an accelerometer for the required and requested time among 8-year-old to 10-year-old children. Design Cross-sectional. Setting 60 Bristol and North Somerset primary schools taking part in the ‘Active for Life Year 5’ randomised controlled trial (RCT) in 2011. Participants 2048 children, aged 8–10 years, invited to wear an accelerometer for 5 days of recording. Primary outcome measure Numbers meeting required wear-time for inclusion in main RCT analysis (≥8 h/day ≥3 days) and numbers meeting requested wear-time (≥8 h/day for all 5 days). Results 817 (40%) of the children wore the accelerometer for the requested time and 1629 (80%) for the required time. In adjusted multivariable analyses the odds of wearing the accelerometer for the required time were greater in females as compared with males (OR 1.76 (1.42–2.18)), those with higher scores for reporting their mother restricted time on sedentary behaviours (1.26 (1.04–1.52) per increase of 1 on a 1–4 scale) and in children from schools with larger year group sizes (1.01 (1.00–1.02) per additional child). Living in a neighbourhood with higher levels of deprivation (0.49 (0.33–0.72) comparing highest to lowest third of the deprivation score) or reporting higher levels of weekday outdoor play (0.97 (0.94, 1.00) per 30 min more) were associated with reduced odds of meeting required time. Results were essentially the same for requested wear-time. Other characteristics, including child body mass index, were not associated with required or requested wear-time. Conclusions Only 40% of children wore the accelerometer for the requested time but 80% fulfilled the required criteria to be included in the main study analyses. Knowing which characteristics are associated with accelerometer wear could help target interventions to increase wear-time. PMID:23975106

  4. Validity of an automated algorithm to identify waking and in-bed wear time in hip-worn accelerometer data collected with a 24 h wear protocol in young adults.

    PubMed

    McVeigh, Joanne A; Winkler, Elisabeth A H; Healy, Genevieve N; Slater, James; Eastwood, Peter R; Straker, Leon M

    2016-09-21

    Researchers are increasingly using 24 h accelerometer wear protocols. No automated method has been published that accurately distinguishes 'waking' wear time from other data ('in-bed', non-wear, invalid days) in young adults. This study examined the validity of an automated algorithm developed to achieve this for hip-worn Actigraph GT3X  +  60 s epoch data. We compared the algorithm against a referent method ('into-bed' and 'out-of-bed' times visually identified by two independent raters) and benchmarked against two published algorithms. All methods used the same non-wear rules. The development sample (n  =  11) and validation sample (n  =  95) were Australian young adults from the Raine pregnancy cohort (54% female), all aged approximately 22 years. The agreement with Rater 1 in each minute's classification (yes/no) of waking wear time was examined as kappa (κ), limited to valid days (⩾10 h waking wear time per day) according to the algorithm and Rater 1. Bland-Altman methods assessed agreement in daily totals of waking wear and in-bed wear time. Excellent agreement (κ  >  0.75) was obtained between the raters for 80% of participants (median κ  =  0.94). The algorithm showed excellent agreement with Rater 1 (κ  >  0.75) for 89% of participants and poor agreement (κ  <  0.40) for 1%. In this sample, the algorithm (median κ  =  0.86) performed better than algorithms validated in children (median κ  =  0.77) and adolescents (median κ  =  0.66). The mean difference (95% limits of agreement) between Rater 1 and the algorithm was 7 (-220, 234) min d(-1) for waking wear time on valid days and  -41 (-309, 228) min d(-1) for in-bed wear time. In this population, the automated algorithm's validity for identifying waking wear time was mostly good, not worse than inter-rater agreement, and better than the evaluated published alternatives. However, the algorithm requires

  5. Time Domain Switched Accelerometer Design and Fabrication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT 2052 September 2014 Time -Domain Switched Accelerometer Design and Fabrication Paul Swanson Andrew Wang...Approved for public release. SSC Pacific San Diego, CA 92152-5001 TECHNICAL REPORT 2052 September 2014 Time ...objective of this report is to record the decision-making process for developing the device design and fabrication workflow for the time -domain switched

  6. Assessment of Differing Definitions of Accelerometer Nonwear Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evenson, Kelly R.; Terry, James W., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Measuring physical activity with objective tools, such as accelerometers, is becoming more common. Accelerometers measure acceleration multiple times within a given frequency and summarize this as a count over a pre-specified time period or epoch. The resultant count represents acceleration over the epoch length. Accelerometers eliminate biases…

  7. Identification of Accelerometer Nonwear Time and Sedentary Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Melody; Badland, Hannah M.; Schofield, Grant M.; Shepherd, Janine

    2011-01-01

    The primary aim of the current study was to investigate the accuracy of various automated rules for determining accelerometer nonwear time in a sample of predominantly desk-based office workers (using their self-reported nonwear times as a criterion). Second, the authors examined the effect of applying these rules to accelerometer data retention…

  8. ACCELEROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-11-25

    A device, commonly known as an accelerometer, is described which may be utllized for measuring acceleratlon with high sensitivity and accuracy tbroughout a relatively wlde range of values. In general, the accelerometer consists of an assembly, including an electric motor stator and a mass element located away from the axis of rotation of the stator, rotatably mounted on a support, and an electric motor rotor positioned within the stator and rotatable thereln. An electrlcal switching circuit controlled by the movement of the stator lntermittently energizes the rotor winding and retards move ment of the stator, and a centrifugal switch is rotatable with the rotor to operate upon attainment of a predetermined rotor rotational velocity.

  9. Extracting Time-Accurate Acceleration Vectors From Nontrivial Accelerometer Arrangements.

    PubMed

    Franck, Jennifer A; Blume, Janet; Crisco, Joseph J; Franck, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Sports-related concussions are of significant concern in many impact sports, and their detection relies on accurate measurements of the head kinematics during impact. Among the most prevalent recording technologies are videography, and more recently, the use of single-axis accelerometers mounted in a helmet, such as the HIT system. Successful extraction of the linear and angular impact accelerations depends on an accurate analysis methodology governed by the equations of motion. Current algorithms are able to estimate the magnitude of acceleration and hit location, but make assumptions about the hit orientation and are often limited in the position and/or orientation of the accelerometers. The newly formulated algorithm presented in this manuscript accurately extracts the full linear and rotational acceleration vectors from a broad arrangement of six single-axis accelerometers directly from the governing set of kinematic equations. The new formulation linearizes the nonlinear centripetal acceleration term with a finite-difference approximation and provides a fast and accurate solution for all six components of acceleration over long time periods (>250 ms). The approximation of the nonlinear centripetal acceleration term provides an accurate computation of the rotational velocity as a function of time and allows for reconstruction of a multiple-impact signal. Furthermore, the algorithm determines the impact location and orientation and can distinguish between glancing, high rotational velocity impacts, or direct impacts through the center of mass. Results are shown for ten simulated impact locations on a headform geometry computed with three different accelerometer configurations in varying degrees of signal noise. Since the algorithm does not require simplifications of the actual impacted geometry, the impact vector, or a specific arrangement of accelerometer orientations, it can be easily applied to many impact investigations in which accurate kinematics need to

  10. Ngram time series model to predict activity type and energy cost from wrist, hip and ankle accelerometers: implications of age.

    PubMed

    Strath, Scott J; Kate, Rohit J; Keenan, Kevin G; Welch, Whitney A; Swartz, Ann M

    2015-11-01

    To develop and test time series single site and multi-site placement models, we used wrist, hip and ankle processed accelerometer data to estimate energy cost and type of physical activity in adults. Ninety-nine subjects in three age groups (18-39, 40-64, 65 +  years) performed 11 activities while wearing three triaxial accelereometers: one each on the non-dominant wrist, hip, and ankle. During each activity net oxygen cost (METs) was assessed. The time series of accelerometer signals were represented in terms of uniformly discretized values called bins. Support Vector Machine was used for activity classification with bins and every pair of bins used as features. Bagged decision tree regression was used for net metabolic cost prediction. To evaluate model performance we employed the jackknife leave-one-out cross validation method. Single accelerometer and multi-accelerometer site model estimates across and within age group revealed similar accuracy, with a bias range of -0.03 to 0.01 METs, bias percent of -0.8 to 0.3%, and a rMSE range of 0.81-1.04 METs. Multi-site accelerometer location models improved activity type classification over single site location models from a low of 69.3% to a maximum of 92.8% accuracy. For each accelerometer site location model, or combined site location model, percent accuracy classification decreased as a function of age group, or when young age groups models were generalized to older age groups. Specific age group models on average performed better than when all age groups were combined. A time series computation show promising results for predicting energy cost and activity type. Differences in prediction across age group, a lack of generalizability across age groups, and that age group specific models perform better than when all ages are combined needs to be considered as analytic calibration procedures to detect energy cost and type are further developed.

  11. Ngram time series model to predict activity type and energy cost from wrist, hip and ankle accelerometers: implications of age

    PubMed Central

    Strath, Scott J; Kate, Rohit J; Keenan, Kevin G; Welch, Whitney A; Swartz, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    To develop and test time series single site and multi-site placement models, we used wrist, hip and ankle processed accelerometer data to estimate energy cost and type of physical activity in adults. Ninety-nine subjects in three age groups (18–39, 40–64, 65 + years) performed 11 activities while wearing three triaxial accelereometers: one each on the non-dominant wrist, hip, and ankle. During each activity net oxygen cost (METs) was assessed. The time series of accelerometer signals were represented in terms of uniformly discretized values called bins. Support Vector Machine was used for activity classification with bins and every pair of bins used as features. Bagged decision tree regression was used for net metabolic cost prediction. To evaluate model performance we employed the jackknife leave-one-out cross validation method. Single accelerometer and multi-accelerometer site model estimates across and within age group revealed similar accuracy, with a bias range of −0.03 to 0.01 METs, bias percent of −0.8 to 0.3%, and a rMSE range of 0.81–1.04 METs. Multi-site accelerometer location models improved activity type classification over single site location models from a low of 69.3% to a maximum of 92.8% accuracy. For each accelerometer site location model, or combined site location model, percent accuracy classification decreased as a function of age group, or when young age groups models were generalized to older age groups. Specific age group models on average performed better than when all age groups were combined. A time series computation show promising results for predicting energy cost and activity type. Differences in prediction across age group, a lack of generalizability across age groups, and that age group specific models perform better than when all ages are combined needs to be considered as analytic calibration procedures to detect energy cost and type are further developed. PMID:26449155

  12. SenseWearMini and Actigraph GT3X Accelerometer Classification of Observed Sedentary and Light-Intensity Physical Activities in a Laboratory Setting.

    PubMed

    Feehan, Lynne M; Goldsmith, Charles H; Leung, April Y F; Li, Linda C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the ability of SenseWear Mini (SWm) and Actigraph GT3X (AG3) accelerometers to differentiate between healthy adults' observed sedentary and light activities in a laboratory setting. Methods: The 22 participants (15 women, 7 men), ages 19 to 72 years, wore SWm and AG3 monitors and performed five sedentary and four light activities for 5 minutes each while observed in a laboratory setting. Performance was examined through comparisons of accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and positive and negative likelihood ratios. Correct identification of both types of activities was examined using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results: Both monitors demonstrated excellent ability to identify sedentary activities (sensitivity>0.89). The SWm monitor was better at identifying light activities (specificity 0.61-0.71) than the AG3 monitor (specificity 0.27-0.47) and thus also showed a greater ability to correctly identify both sedentary and light activities (SWm AUC 0.84; AG3 AUC 0.62-0.73). Conclusions: SWm may be a more suitable monitor for detecting time spent in sedentary and light-intensity activities. This finding has clinical and research relevance for evaluation of time spent in lower intensity physical activities by sedentary adults.

  13. Comparing the 7-Day PAR with a Triaxial Accelerometer for Measuring Time in Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Sloane, Richard; Snyder, Denise Clutter; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Lobach, David; Kraus, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The primary study aim was to evaluate associations of estimated weekly minutes of moderate-to-vigorous intensity exercise from self-reports of the telephone-administered 7-Day Physical Activity Recall (PAR) with data captured by the RT3 triaxial accelerometer. Methods This investigation was undertaken as part of the FRESH START study, a randomized clinical trial that tested an iteratively-tailored diet and exercise mailed print intervention among newly diagnosed breast and prostate cancer survivors. A convenience sample of 139 medically-eligible subjects living within a 60-mile radius of the study center provided both 7-Day PAR and accelerometer data at enrollment. Ultimately n=115 substudy subjects were found eligible for the FRESH START study and randomized to one of two study treatment arms. Follow-up assessments at Year 1 (n=103) and Year 2 (n=99) provided both the 7-Day PAR and accelerometer data. Results There was moderate agreement between the 7-Day PAR and the accelerometer with longitudinal serial correlation coefficients of .54 (baseline), .24 (Year 1) and .53 (Year 2), all P-values < .01, though the accelerometer estimates for weekly time in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity were much higher than those of the 7-Day PAR at all time points. The two methods were poorly correlated in assessing sensitivity to change from baseline to Year 1 (rho=.11, P=.30). Using mixed models repeated measures analysis, both methods exhibited similar non-significant treatment arm X time interaction P-values (7-Day PAR=.22, accelerometer=.23). Conclusions The correlations for three serial time points were in agreement with findings of other studies that compared self-reported time in exercise with physical activity captured by accelerometry. However, these methods capture somewhat different dimensions of physical activity and provide differing estimates of change over time. PMID:19461530

  14. The timing of scour and fill in a gravel-bedded river measured with buried accelerometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Czuba, Christiana R.; Konrad, Christopher P.

    2013-01-01

    A device that measures the timing of streambed scour and the duration of sediment mobilization at specific depths of a streambed was developed using data-logging accelerometers placed within the gravel substrate of the Cedar River, Washington, USA. Each accelerometer recorded its orientation every 20 min and remained stable until the surrounding gravel matrix mobilized as sediment was transported downstream and scour reached the level of the accelerometer. The accelerometer scour monitors were deployed at 26 locations in salmon-spawning habitat during the 2010–2011 flood season to record when the streambed was scoured to the depth of typical egg-pocket deposition. Scour was recorded at one location during a moderate high-flow event (65 m3/s; 1.25–1.5-year recurrence interval) and at 17 locations during a larger high-flow event (159 m3/s; 7-year recurrence interval). Accelerometer scour monitors recorded periods of intermittent sediment mobilization and stability within a high-flow event providing insight into the duration of scour. Most scour was recorded during the rising limb and at the peak of a flood hydrograph, though some scour occurred during sustained high flows following the peak of the flood hydrograph.

  15. Impact of Advertising on Tampon Wear-time Practices

    PubMed Central

    Woeller, Kara E.; Miller, Kenneth W.; Robertson-Smith, Amy L.; Bohman, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES (1) To determine whether advertising nighttime tampon use for up to eight hours was understood to be consistent with label recommendations and (2) to determine whether television and print advertising with this message affected tampon wear times in adults and teens. METHODS (1) A comprehension study (online advertising and follow-up questionnaire) among women aged 14–49 years (300 per group) who viewed either the test or a control advertising message; (2) Diary-based surveys of tampon wear times performed prior to (n = 292 adults, 18–49 years, 74 teens, 12–17 years) and after (n = 287 adults, 104 teens) the launch of national advertising. RESULTS Significantly more test message viewers than controls stated tampons should be worn less than or equal to eight hours (93.6% vs. 88.6%, respectively, P = 0.049). A directionally higher percentage of test message viewers said they would use a pad if sleeping longer than eight hours (52% vs. 42% of controls). Among the women who used tampons longer than eight hours when sleeping, 52% reported they would wake up and change compared with 45% of controls. No significant difference between baseline and follow-up diary surveys was found among teens or adults in various measures of tampon wear time (mean wear times; usage intervals from less than two hours to more than 10 hours; percentage of tampons used for more than or equal to eight hours; frequency of wearing at least one tampon more than eight hours). CONCLUSIONS Advertising nighttime tampon wear for up to eight hours effectively communicated label recommendations but did not alter tampon wear times. The informational intervention had limited impact on established habits. PMID:26688668

  16. Time- and computation-efficient calibration of MEMS 3D accelerometers and gyroscopes.

    PubMed

    Stančin, Sara; Tomažič, Sašo

    2014-08-13

    We propose calibration methods for microelectromechanical system (MEMS) 3D accelerometers and gyroscopes that are efficient in terms of time and computational complexity. The calibration process for both sensors is simple, does not require additional expensive equipment, and can be performed in the field before or between motion measurements. The methods rely on a small number of defined calibration measurements that are used to obtain the values of 12 calibration parameters. This process enables the static compensation of sensor inaccuracies. The values detected by the 3D sensor are interpreted using a generalized 3D sensor model. The model assumes that the values detected by the sensor are equal to the projections of the measured value on the sensor sensitivity axes. Although this finding is trivial for 3D accelerometers, its validity for 3D gyroscopes is not immediately apparent; thus, this paper elaborates on this latter topic. For an example sensor device, calibration parameters were established using calibration measurements of approximately 1.5 min in duration for the 3D accelerometer and 2.5 min in duration for the 3D gyroscope. Correction of each detected 3D value using the established calibration parameters in further measurements requires only nine addition and nine multiplication operations.

  17. Factors associated with participant compliance in studies using accelerometers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul H; Macfarlane, Duncan J; Lam, T H

    2013-09-01

    Participant compliance is an important issue in studies using accelerometers. Some participants wear the accelerometer for the duration specified by the researchers but many do not. We investigated a range of demographic factors associated with participant compliance in obtaining analyzable accelerometer data. A total of 3601 participants (aged 47.6±13.1 years, 44.6% male) were included. They were asked to wear an accelerometer (ActiGraph) for four consecutive days after completing a household survey during March 2009-January 2011 in Hong Kong. Participants wore the accelerometer on average for 13.9h in a 24-h day. No significant difference was found between males and females (p=0.38). Using log-linear regression, it was found that older participants (0.5% more wearing hours for each year of age, p<0.001), those with full-time job (p<0.01), with tertiary education (p<0.01), non-smokers (p<0.01) and with high self-reported health (p<0.05) wore the accelerometer for more hours. These results provide details for estimating compliance rates for samples with different characteristics and thus sample size calculation to account for participant compliance.

  18. Accelerometer-Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Time Differ According to Education Level in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kantomaa, Marko T.; Tikanmäki, Marjaana; Kankaanpää, Anna; Vääräsmäki, Marja; Sipola-Leppänen, Marika; Ekelund, Ulf; Hakonen, Harto; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kajantie, Eero; Tammelin, Tuija H.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the association of education level with objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time in young adults. Data from the Finnish ESTER study (2009–2011) (n = 538) was used to examine the association between educational attainment and different subcomponents of physical activity and sedentary time measured using hip-worn accelerometers (ActiGraph GT1M) for seven consecutive days. Overall physical activity, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), light-intensity physical activity and sedentary time were calculated separately for weekdays and weekend days. A latent profile analysis was conducted to identify the different profiles of sedentary time and the subcomponents of physical activity. The educational differences in accelerometer-measured physical activity and sedentary time varied according to the subcomponents of physical activity, and between weekdays and weekend days. A high education level was associated with high MVPA during weekdays and weekend days in both sexes, high sedentary time during weekdays in both sexes, and a low amount of light-intensity physical activity during weekdays in males and during weekdays and weekend days in females. The results indicate different challenges related to unhealthy behaviours in young adults with low and high education: low education is associated with a lack of MVPA, whereas high education is associated with a lack of light-intensity physical activity and high sedentary time especially during weekdays. PMID:27403958

  19. Associations of Accelerometer-Measured and Self-Reported Sedentary Time With Leukocyte Telomere Length in Older Women.

    PubMed

    Shadyab, Aladdin H; Macera, Caroline A; Shaffer, Richard A; Jain, Sonia; Gallo, Linda C; LaMonte, Michael J; Reiner, Alexander P; Kooperberg, Charles; Carty, Cara L; Di, Chongzhi; Manini, Todd M; Hou, Lifang; LaCroix, Andrea Z

    2017-01-18

    Few studies have assessed the association of sedentary time with leukocyte telomere length (LTL). In a cross-sectional study conducted in 2012-2013, we examined associations of accelerometer-measured and self-reported sedentary time with LTL in a sample of 1,481 older white and African-American women from the Women's Health Initiative and determined whether associations varied by level of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA). The association between sedentary time and LTL was evaluated using multiple linear regression models. Women were aged 79.2 (standard deviation, 6.7) years, on average. Self-reported sedentary time was not associated with LTL. In a model adjusting for demographic characteristics, lifestyle behaviors, and health-related factors, among women at or below the median level of accelerometer-measured MVPA, those in the highest quartile of accelerometer-measured sedentary time had significantly shorter LTL than those in the lowest quartile, with an average difference of 170 base pairs (95% confidence interval: 4, 340). Accelerometer-measured sedentary time was not associated with LTL in women above the median level of MVPA. Findings suggest that, on the basis of accelerometer measurements, higher sedentary time may be associated with shorter LTL among less physically active women.

  20. An energy dissipation and cross shear time dependent computational wear model for the analysis of polyethylene wear in total knee replacements.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Sean T; Bohm, Eric R; Petrak, Martin J; Wyss, Urs P; Brandt, Jan-M

    2014-03-21

    The cost and time efficiency of computational polyethylene wear simulations may enable the optimization of total knee replacements for the reduction of polyethylene wear. The present study proposes an energy dissipation wear model for polyethylene which considers the time dependent molecular behavior of polyethylene, aspects of tractive rolling and contact pressure. This time dependent - energy dissipation wear model was evaluated, along with several other wear models, by comparison to pin-on-disk results, knee simulator wear test results under various kinematic conditions and knee simulator wear test results that were performed following the ISO 14243-3 standard. The proposed time dependent - energy dissipation wear model resulted in improved accuracy for the prediction of pin-on-disk and knee simulator wear test results compared with several previously published wear models.

  1. Is questionnaire-based sitting time inaccurate and can it be improved? A cross-sectional investigation using accelerometer-based sitting time

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nidhi; Christiansen, Caroline Stordal; Hanisch, Christiana; Bay, Hans; Burr, Hermann; Holtermann, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the differences between a questionnaire-based and accelerometer-based sitting time, and develop a model for improving the accuracy of questionnaire-based sitting time for predicting accelerometer-based sitting time. Methods 183 workers in a cross-sectional study reported sitting time per day using a single question during the measurement period, and wore 2 Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometers on the thigh and trunk for 1–4 working days to determine their actual sitting time per day using the validated Acti4 software. Least squares regression models were fitted with questionnaire-based siting time and other self-reported predictors to predict accelerometer-based sitting time. Results Questionnaire-based and accelerometer-based average sitting times were ≈272 and ≈476 min/day, respectively. A low Pearson correlation (r=0.32), high mean bias (204.1 min) and wide limits of agreement (549.8 to −139.7 min) between questionnaire-based and accelerometer-based sitting time were found. The prediction model based on questionnaire-based sitting explained 10% of the variance in accelerometer-based sitting time. Inclusion of 9 self-reported predictors in the model increased the explained variance to 41%, with 10% optimism using a resampling bootstrap validation. Based on a split validation analysis, the developed prediction model on ≈75% of the workers (n=132) reduced the mean and the SD of the difference between questionnaire-based and accelerometer-based sitting time by 64% and 42%, respectively, in the remaining 25% of the workers. Conclusions This study indicates that questionnaire-based sitting time has low validity and that a prediction model can be one solution to materially improve the precision of questionnaire-based sitting time. PMID:28093433

  2. Real-time estimation of daily physical activity intensity by a triaxial accelerometer and a gravity-removal classification algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ohkawara, Kazunori; Oshima, Yoshitake; Hikihara, Yuki; Ishikawa-Takata, Kazuko; Tabata, Izumi; Tanaka, Shigeho

    2011-06-01

    We have recently developed a simple algorithm for the classification of household and locomotive activities using the ratio of unfiltered to filtered synthetic acceleration (gravity-removal physical activity classification algorithm, GRPACA) measured by a triaxial accelerometer. The purpose of the present study was to develop a new model for the immediate estimation of daily physical activity intensities using a triaxial accelerometer. A total of sixty-six subjects were randomly assigned into validation (n 44) and cross-validation (n 22) groups. All subjects performed fourteen activities while wearing a triaxial accelerometer in a controlled laboratory setting. During each activity, energy expenditure was measured by indirect calorimetry, and physical activity intensities were expressed as metabolic equivalents (MET). The validation group displayed strong relationships between measured MET and filtered synthetic accelerations for household (r 0·907, P < 0·001) and locomotive (r 0·961, P < 0·001) activities. In the cross-validation group, two GRPACA-based linear regression models provided highly accurate MET estimation for household and locomotive activities. Results were similar when equations were developed by non-linear regression or sex-specific linear or non-linear regressions. Sedentary activities were also accurately estimated by the specific linear regression classified from other activity counts. Therefore, the use of a triaxial accelerometer in combination with a GRPACA permits more accurate and immediate estimation of daily physical activity intensities, compared with previously reported cut-off classification models. This method may be useful for field investigations as well as for self-monitoring by general users.

  3. Accelerometer-measured sedentary time among Hispanic adults: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).

    PubMed

    Merchant, Gina; Buelna, Christina; Castañeda, Sheila F; Arredondo, Elva M; Marshall, Simon J; Strizich, Garrett; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Chambers, Earle C; McMurray, Robert G; Evenson, Kelly R; Stoutenberg, Mark; Hankinson, Arlene L; Talavera, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    Excessive sedentary behavior is associated with negative health outcomes independent of physical activity. Objective estimates of time spent in sedentary behaviors are lacking among adults from diverse Hispanic/Latino backgrounds. The objective of this study was to describe accelerometer-assessed sedentary time in a large, representative sample of Hispanic/Latino adults living in the United States, and compare sedentary estimates by Hispanic/Latino background, sociodemographic characteristics and weight categories. This study utilized baseline data from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) that included adults aged 18-74 years from four metropolitan areas (N = 16,415). Measured with the Actical accelerometer over 6 days, 76.9% (n = 12,631) of participants had > 10 h/day and > 3 days of data. Participants spent 11.9 h/day (SD 3.0), or 74% of their monitored time in sedentary behaviors. Adjusting for differences in wear time, adults of Mexican background were the least (11.6 h/day), whereas adults of Dominican background were the most (12.3 h/day), sedentary. Women were more sedentary than men, and older adults were more sedentary than younger adults. Household income was positively associated, whereas employment was negatively associated, with sedentary time. There were no differences in sedentary time by weight categories, marital status, or proxies of acculturation. To reduce sedentariness among these populations, future research should examine how the accumulation of various sedentary behaviors differs by background and region, and which sedentary behaviors are amenable to intervention.

  4. [Research on monitoring mechanical wear state based on oil spectrum multi-dimensional time series model].

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Zhang, Pei-lin; Ren, Guo-quan; Li, Bing; Yang, Ning

    2010-11-01

    A new method using oil atomic spectrometric analysis technology to monitor the mechanical wear state was proposed. Multi-dimensional time series model of oil atomic spectrometric data of running-in period was treated as the standard model. Residues remained after new data were processed by the standard model. The residues variance matrix was selected as the features of the corresponding wear state. Then, high dimensional feature vectors were reduced through the principal component analysis and the first three principal components were extracted to represent the wear state. Euclidean distance was computed for feature vectors to classify the testing samples. Thus, the mechanical wear state was identified correctly. The wear state of a specified track vehicle engine was effectively identified, which verified the validity of the proposed method. Experimental results showed that introducing the multi-dimensional time series model to oil spectrometric analysis can fuse the spectrum data and improve the accuracy of monitoring mechanical wear state.

  5. Quasi-Real Time Estimation of Angular Kinematics Using Single-Axis Accelerometers

    PubMed Central

    Caroselli, Alessio; Bagalà, Fabio; Cappello, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    In human movement modeling, the problem of multi-link kinematics estimation by means of inertial measurement units has been investigated by several authors through efficient sensor fusion algorithms. In this perspective a single inertial measurement unit per link is required. This set-up is not cost-effective compared with a solution in which a single-axis accelerometer per link is used. In this paper, a novel fast technique is presented for the estimation of the sway angle in a multi-link chain by using a single-axis accelerometer per segment and by setting the boundary conditions through an ad hoc algorithm. The technique, based on the windowing of the accelerometer output, was firstly tested on a mechanical arm equipped with a single-axis accelerometer and a reference encoder. The technique is then tested on a subject performing a squat task for the knee flexion-extension angle evaluation by using two single-axis accelerometers placed on the thigh and shank segments, respectively. A stereo-photogrammetric system was used for validation. RMSEs (mean ± std) are 0.40 ± 0.02° (mean peak-to-peak range of 147.2 ± 4.9°) for the mechanical inverted pendulum and 1.01 ± 0.11° (mean peak-to-peak range of 59.29 ± 2.02°) for the knee flexion-extension angle. Results obtained in terms of RMSE were successfully compared with an Extended Kalman Filter applied to an inertial measurement unit. These results suggest the usability of the proposed algorithm in several fields, from automatic control to biomechanics, and open new opportunities to increase the accuracy of the existing tools for orientation evaluation. PMID:23322097

  6. Permethrin exposure from fabric-treated military uniforms under different wear-time scenarios.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Susan P; Maule, Alexis L; Heaton, Kristin J; Adam, Gina E

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the project was to ascertain whether urinary biomarkers of permethrin exposure are detected after wearing post-tailored, fabric-treated military uniforms under two different wear-time exposure scenarios. Study A occurred over 3.5 days and involved six participants wearing treated uniforms continuously for 30-32 h. Urine collection occurred at scheduled time points before, during, and after wearing the uniform. Study B, conducted over 19 days, included 11 participants wearing treated uniforms for 3 consecutive days, 8 h each day (with urine collection before, during, and after wear). Urinary biomarkers of permethrin (3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3PBA), cis- 2,2-(dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (cDCCA), trans- 2,2-(dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (tDCCA)) were detected during and after wear. Biomarker detection generally occurred over the 10- to 12-h period after putting on the uniform and subsided 24 h following uniform removal (in both Study A and B scenarios). Those wearing permethrin-treated uniforms under the longer wear-time scenario (Study A) excreted significantly higher cumulative mean levels compared with those in Study B (3.29 times higher for 3PBA and 2.23 times higher for the sum of c/tDCCA (P≤0.001)). Findings suggest that wearing permethrin-treated clothing does increase absorbed, internal dose levels of permethrin above population levels and is significantly related to wear-time duration.

  7. Dressing Wear Time after Breast Reconstruction: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Luiz Francisley; Fonseca, Fernando Elias Martins; Cabral, Isaías Vieira; Pinto, Natália Lana Larcher; Juliano, Yara

    2016-01-01

    Background The evidence to support dressing standards for breast surgery wounds is empiric and scarce. Objective This two-arm randomized clinical trial was designed to assess the effect of dressing wear time on surgical site infection (SSI) rates, skin colonization and patient perceptions. Methods A total of 200 breast cancer patients undergoing breast reconstruction were prospectively enrolled. Patients were randomly allocated to group I (dressing removed on the first postoperative day, n = 100) or group II (dressing removed on the sixth postoperative day, n = 100). SSIs were defined and classified according to criteria from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Samples collected before placing the dressing and after 1 day (group I) and 6 days (both groups) were cultured for skin colonization assessments. Patients preferences and perceptions with regard to safety, comfort and convenience were recorded and analyzed. Results A total of 186 patients completed the follow-up. The global SSI rate was 4.5%. Six patients in group I and three in group II had SSI (p = 0.497). Before dressing, the groups were similar with regard to skin colonization. At the sixth day, there was a higher colonization by coagulase-negative staphylococci in group I (p<0.0001). Patients preferred to keep dressing for six days (p<0.0001), and considered this a safer choice (p<0.05). Conclusions Despite group I had a higher skin colonization by coagulase-negative staphylococci on the sixth postoperative day, there was no difference in SSI rates. Patients preferred keeping dressing for six days and considered it a safer choice. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01148823 PMID:27911904

  8. Time Dependent Wear and Its Mechanisms in Engine Cylinders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    Month, toy) October,1997 1S. PAliE COUNT 106 16. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION 17. COSATI COOES FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP 19. SUBJECT TCftMS (Continue on...The increase of HSC shows more asperity peaks, both original and newly created by wear, are crossed by the new centre line. The increase of A, and...at a high cooling rate, was present on cross -sections of the solid sphere panicles. Another evidence of solidification of molten state was that some

  9. Accelerometer design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, F H; Warner, Edward P

    1921-01-01

    In connection with the development of an accelerometer for measuring the loads on airplanes in free flight a study of the theory of such instruments has been made, and the results of this study are summarized in this report. A portion of the analysis deals particularly with the sources of error and with the limitations placed on the location of the instrument in the airplane. The discussion of the dynamics of the accelerometer includes a study of its theoretical motions and of the way in which they are affected by the natural period of vibration and by the damping, together with a report of some experiments on the effect of forced vibrations on the record.

  10. Quantification of Trunk Postural Stability Using Convex Polyhedron of the Time-Series Accelerometer Data

    PubMed Central

    Melecky, Roman; Socha, Vladimir; Kutilek, Patrik; Hanakova, Lenka; Takac, Peter; Schlenker, Jakub; Svoboda, Zdenek

    2016-01-01

    Techniques to quantify postural stability usually rely on the evaluation of only two variables, that is, two coordinates of COP. However, by using three variables, that is, three components of acceleration vector, it is possible to describe human movement more precisely. For this purpose, a single three-axis accelerometer was used, making it possible to evaluate 3D movement by use of a novel method, convex polyhedron (CP), together with a traditional method, based on area of the confidence ellipse (ACE). Ten patients (Pts) with cerebellar ataxia and eleven healthy individuals of control group (CG) participated in the study. The results show a significant increase of volume of the CP (CPV) in Pts or CG standing on foam surface with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) after the EC phase. Significant difference between Pts and CG was found in all cases as well. Correlation coefficient indicates strong correlation between the CPV and ACE in most cases of patient examinations, thus confirming the possibility of quantification of postural instability by the introduced method of CPV. PMID:27195465

  11. Effect of QPQ nitriding time on microstructure and wear resistance of SAF2906 duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Wu, G. X.; Shen, L. X.

    2017-01-01

    QPQ salt bath treatment of SAF2906 duplex stainless steel was conducted at 570 °C for 60 min, 90 min,120 min,150 min and 180 min, followed by post-oxidation process with heating temperature of 400°C and holding duration of 30 min. The effect of QPQ nitriding time on microstructure and wear resistance of SAF2906 duplex stainless steel was investigated by means of OM, SEM, XRD, microhardness test, adhesion strength test and wear resistance test. Microstructure observation showed outer layer was composed of Fe3O4. The main phase of the intermediate layer was CrN, αN and Fe2-3N. The main phase of the inner layer was CrN and S. The adhesion strength test of the surface layer-substrate showed the QPQ treated samples have favorable adhesion strength of HF-1 level. With the increase of nitriding time, the growth rate of the compound layer gradually slowed down and the surface hardness first increased and then decreased, and the maximum hardness was 1283 HV0.2 at 150 min. The dry siliding results showed that the wear resistance of the QPQ treated samples was at least 20 times than that of the substrate, and the optimum nitriding time to obtain the best wear resistance is 150 min. The worn surface morphology observation showed the main wear mechanism of the substrate was plough wear, while micro-cutting is the main wear mechanism that causes the damage of the QPQ treated samples.

  12. Investigation of the time-dependent wear behavior of veneering ceramic in porcelain fused to metal crowns during chewing simulations.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiawen; Tian, Beimin; Wei, Ran; Wang, Weiguo; Zhang, Hongyun; Wu, Xiaohong; He, Lin; Zhang, Shaofeng

    2014-12-01

    The excessive abrasion of occlusal surfaces in ceramic crowns limits the service life of restorations and their clinical results. However, little is known about the time-dependent wear behavior of ceramic restorations during the chewing process. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the dynamic evolution of the wear behavior of veneering porcelain in PFM crowns as wear progressed, as tested in a chewing simulator. Twenty anatomical metal-ceramic crowns were prepared using Ceramco III as the veneering porcelain. Stainless steel balls served as antagonists. The specimens were dynamically loaded in a chewing simulator with 350N up to 2.4×10(6) loading cycles, with additional thermal cycling between 5 and 55°C. During the testing, several checkpoints were applied to measure the substance loss of the crowns' occlusal surfaces and to evaluate the microstructure of the worn areas. After 2.4×10(6) cycles, the entire wear process of the veneering porcelain in the PFM crowns revealed three wear stages (running-in, steady and severe wear stages). The occlusal surfaces showed traces of intensive wear on the worn areas during the running-in wear stage, and they exhibited the propagation of cracks in the subsurface during steady wear stage. When the severe wear stage was reached, the cracks penetrated the ceramic layer, causing the separation of porcelain pieces. It also exhibited a good correlation among the microstructure, the wear loss and the wear rate of worn ceramic restorations. The results suggest that under the conditions of simulated masticatory movement, the wear performance of the veneering porcelain in PFM crowns indicates the apparent similarity of the tribological characteristics of the traditional mechanical system. Additionally, the evaluation of the wear behavior of ceramic restorations should be based on these three wear stages.

  13. Wear rate quantifying in real-time using the charged particle surface activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandreanu, B.; Popa-Simil, L.; Voiculescu, D.; Racolta, P. M.

    1997-02-01

    Surface activation, commonly known as Thin Layer Activation (TLA), is currently employed in over 30 accelerator laboratories around the world for wear and/or corrosion monitoring in industrial plants [1-6]. TLA was primarily designed and developed to meet requirements of potential industrial partners, in order to transfer this technique from research to industry. The method consists of accelerated ion bombardment of a surface of interest, e.g., a machine part subjected to wear. Loss of material owing to wear, erosive corrosion or abrasion is characterized by monitoring the resultant changes in radioactivity. In principle, depending upon the case at hand, one may choose to measure either the remnant activity of the component of interest or to monitor the activity of the debris. For applications of the second type, especially when a lubricating agent is involved, dedicated installations have been constructed and adapted to an engine or a tribological testing stand in order to assure oil circulation around an externally placed detection gauge. This way, the wear particles suspended in the lubricant can be detected and the material loss rates quantified in real time. Moreover, in specific cases, such as the one presented in this paper, remnant activity measurements prove to be useful tools for complementary results. This paper provides a detailed presentation of such a case: in situ resistance-to-wear testing of two types of piston rings.

  14. Varying the Wear Time of the Methylphenidate Transdermal System in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilens, Timothy E.; Boellner, Samuel W.; Lopez, Frank A.; Turnbow, John M.; Wigal, Sharon B.; Childress, Ann C.; Abikoff, Howard B.; Manos, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    A study investigated the impact of variable wear times of the methylphenidate transdermal system in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It was concluded that duration of medication effect was directly related to the wear time of the methylphenidate transdermal system patch.

  15. Towards Real-Time Detection of Freezing of Gait Using Wavelet Transform on Wireless Accelerometer Data

    PubMed Central

    Rezvanian, Saba; Lockhart, Thurmon E.

    2016-01-01

    Injuries associated with fall incidences continue to pose a significant burden to persons with Parkinson’s disease (PD) both in terms of human suffering and economic loss. Freezing of gait (FOG), which is one of the symptoms of PD, is a common cause of falls in this population. Although a significant amount of work has been performed to characterize/detect FOG using both qualitative and quantitative methods, there remains paucity of data regarding real-time detection of FOG, such as the requirements for minimum sensor nodes, sensor placement locations, and appropriate sampling period and update time. Here, the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) is employed to define an index for correctly identifying FOG. Since the CWT method uses both time and frequency components of a waveform in comparison to other methods utilizing only the frequency component, we hypothesized that using this method could lead to a significant improvement in the accuracy of FOG detection. We tested the proposed index on the data of 10 PD patients who experience FOG. Two hundred and thirty seven (237) FOG events were identified by the physiotherapists. The results show that the index could discriminate FOG in the anterior–posterior axis better than other two axes, and is robust to the update time variability. These results suggest that real time detection of FOG may be realized by using CWT of a single shank sensor with window size of 2 s and update time of 1 s (82.1% and 77.1% for the sensitivity and specificity, respectively). Although implicated, future studies should examine the utility of this method in real-time detection of FOG. PMID:27049389

  16. Towards Real-Time Detection of Freezing of Gait Using Wavelet Transform on Wireless Accelerometer Data.

    PubMed

    Rezvanian, Saba; Lockhart, Thurmon E

    2016-04-02

    Injuries associated with fall incidences continue to pose a significant burden to persons with Parkinson's disease (PD) both in terms of human suffering and economic loss. Freezing of gait (FOG), which is one of the symptoms of PD, is a common cause of falls in this population. Although a significant amount of work has been performed to characterize/detect FOG using both qualitative and quantitative methods, there remains paucity of data regarding real-time detection of FOG, such as the requirements for minimum sensor nodes, sensor placement locations, and appropriate sampling period and update time. Here, the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) is employed to define an index for correctly identifying FOG. Since the CWT method uses both time and frequency components of a waveform in comparison to other methods utilizing only the frequency component, we hypothesized that using this method could lead to a significant improvement in the accuracy of FOG detection. We tested the proposed index on the data of 10 PD patients who experience FOG. Two hundred and thirty seven (237) FOG events were identified by the physiotherapists. The results show that the index could discriminate FOG in the anterior-posterior axis better than other two axes, and is robust to the update time variability. These results suggest that real time detection of FOG may be realized by using CWT of a single shank sensor with window size of 2 s and update time of 1 s (82.1% and 77.1% for the sensitivity and specificity, respectively). Although implicated, future studies should examine the utility of this method in real-time detection of FOG.

  17. Dressing wear time after breast reconstruction: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background One of the major risk variables for surgical site infection is wound management. Understanding infection risk factors for breast operations is essential in order to develop infection-prevention strategies and improve surgical outcomes. The aim of this trial is to assess the influence of dressing wear time on surgical site infection rates and skin colonization. Patients’ perception at self-assessment will also be analyzed. Methods/Design This is a two-arm randomized controlled trial. Two hundred breast cancer patients undergoing immediate or delayed breast reconstruction will be prospectively enrolled. Patients will be randomly allocated to group I (dressing removed on postoperative day one) or group II (dressing removed on postoperative day six). Surgical site infections will be defined by standard criteria from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Skin colonization will be assessed by culture of samples collected at predefined time points. Patients will score dressing wear time with regard to safety, comfort and convenience. Discussion The evidence to support dressing standards for breast surgery wounds is empiric and scarce. CDC recommends protecting, with a sterile dressing for 24 to 48 hours postoperatively, a primarily closed incision, but there is no recommendation to cover this kind of incision beyond 48 hours, or on the appropriate time to shower or bathe with an uncovered incision. The results of the ongoing trial may support standard recommendations regarding dressing wear time after breast reconstruction. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: http://NCT01148823. PMID:23432779

  18. Space vehicle accelerometer applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The physics of accelerometer applications are reviewed, and details are given on accelerometer instruments and the principles of their operations. The functions to which accelerometers are applied are listed, and terms commonly used in accelerometer reports are defined. Criteria guides state what rule, limitation, or standard must be imposed on each essential design element to insure successful design. Elaboration of these criteria in the form of recommended practices show how to satisfy each of these criteria, with the best procedure described when possible.

  19. Effect of QPQ nitriding time on wear and corrosion behavior of 45 carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wei; Meng, Fanna; Gao, Xinyan; Hu, Jing

    2012-11-01

    QPQ salt bath treatment of 45 steel was conducted by nitriding at 565 °C for various time (60 min, 90 min, 120 min, 150 min and 180 min), followed by the same post-oxidation process with heating temperature of 430 °C and holding duration of 40 min. Characterization of modified surface layers was made by means of optical microscopy, microhardness test, X-ray diffraction analysis, corrosion and wear resistance test. The results showed the formation of a very thin Fe3O4 oxide layer during post-oxidation on the top of the bright nitrides compound layer formed during nitriding. The maximum microhardness value of 630 HV0.01 was obtained after nitriding at 565 °C for 120 min, which was two times higher than that of the untreated sample. The corrosion and wear resistance of 45 steel could be significantly improved by QPQ complex salt bath treatment, and the optimum nitriding duration for improving the wear and corrosion resistance was 120 min and 90 min, respectively.

  20. In Situ, Time-Resolved Accelerator Grid Erosion Measurements in the NSTAR 8000 Hour Ion Engine Wear Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J.

    1997-01-01

    Time-resolved, in situ measurements of the charge exchange ion erosion pattern on the downstream face of the accelerator grid have been made during an ongoin wear test of the NSTAR 30 cm ion thruster.

  1. Wearable accelerometer in clinical use.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Toshiyo

    2005-01-01

    To improve the equality of life, we must prevent the falls in both healthy elderly and patients with the cerebrovascular diseases. Wearable accelerometer was applied to monitor. In this paper, we introduced two different clinical applications. On is fall detector and the other is monitoring device for screening test. 1) We have developed body-worn accelerometer with data loggers and monitored the daily of life in patient with Parkinson disease. The patients wore the device and monitored falls while walking and standing. As a result, we could obtain fall times for a long period. 2) The ability of walking and standing have been evaluated by Timed up & go test. We used telemetry with accelerometer. The stability of walking could be evaluated by the acceleration signals. The simple body-won device can be useful for fall study.

  2. Physiological tolerance times while wearing explosive ordnance disposal protective clothing in simulated environmental extremes.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Ian B; Stewart, Kelly L; Worringham, Charles J; Costello, Joseph T

    2014-01-01

    Explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) technicians are required to wear protective clothing to protect themselves from the threat of overpressure, fragmentation, impact and heat. The engineering requirements to minimise these threats results in an extremely heavy and cumbersome clothing ensemble that increases the internal heat generation of the wearer, while the clothing's thermal properties reduce heat dissipation. This study aimed to evaluate the heat strain encountered wearing EOD protective clothing in simulated environmental extremes across a range of differing work intensities. Eight healthy males [age 25 ± 6 years (mean ± sd), height 180 ± 7 cm, body mass 79 ± 9 kg, VO2max 57 ± 6 ml(.) kg(-1.)min(-1)] undertook nine trials while wearing an EOD9 suit (weighing 33.4 kg). The trials involved walking on a treadmill at 2.5, 4 and 5.5 km ⋅ h(-1) at each of the following environmental conditions, 21, 30 and 37 °C wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) in a randomised controlled crossover design. The trials were ceased if the participants' core temperature reached 39 °C, if heart rate exceeded 90% of maximum, if walking time reached 60 minutes or due to fatigue/nausea. Tolerance times ranged from 10-60 minutes and were significantly reduced in the higher walking speeds and environmental conditions. In a total of 15 trials (21%) participants completed 60 minutes of walking; however, this was predominantly at the slower walking speeds in the 21 °C WBGT environment. Of the remaining 57 trials, 50 were ceased, due to attainment of 90% maximal heart rate. These near maximal heart rates resulted in moderate-high levels of physiological strain in all trials, despite core temperature only reaching 39 °C in one of the 72 trials.

  3. Assessing Stride Variables and Vertical Stiffness with GPS-Embedded Accelerometers: Preliminary Insights for the Monitoring of Neuromuscular Fatigue on the Field.

    PubMed

    Buchheit, Martin; Gray, Andrew; Morin, Jean-Benoit

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the ability of a GPS-imbedded accelerometer to assess stride variables and vertical stiffness (K), which are directly related to neuromuscular fatigue during field-based high-intensity runs. The ability to detect stride imbalances was also examined. A team sport player performed a series of 30-s runs on an instrumented treadmill (6 runs at 10, 17 and 24 km·h(-1)) with or without his right ankle taped (aimed at creating a stride imbalance), while wearing on his back a commercially-available GPS unit with an embedded 100-Hz tri-axial accelerometer. Contact (CT) and flying (FT) time, and K were computed from both treadmill and accelerometers (Athletic Data Innovations) data. The agreement between treadmill (criterion measure) and accelerometer-derived data was examined. We also compared the ability of the different systems to detect the stride imbalance. Biases were small (CT and K) and moderate (FT). The typical error of the estimate was trivial (CT), small (K) and moderate (FT), with nearly perfect (CT and K) and large (FT) correlations for treadmill vs. accelerometer. The tape induced very large increase in the right - left foot ∆ in CT, FT and K measured by the treadmill. The tape effect on CT and K ∆ measured with the accelerometers were also very large, but of lower magnitude than with the treadmill. The tape effect on accelerometer-derived ∆ FT was unclear. Present data highlight the potential of a GPS-embedded accelerometer to assess CT and K during ground running. Key pointsGPS-embedded tri-axial accelerometers may be used to assess contact time and vertical stiffness during ground running.These preliminary results open new perspective for the field monitoring of neuromuscular fatigue and performance in run-based sports.

  4. Assessing Stride Variables and Vertical Stiffness with GPS-Embedded Accelerometers: Preliminary Insights for the Monitoring of Neuromuscular Fatigue on the Field

    PubMed Central

    Buchheit, Martin; Gray, Andrew; Morin, Jean-Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the ability of a GPS-imbedded accelerometer to assess stride variables and vertical stiffness (K), which are directly related to neuromuscular fatigue during field-based high-intensity runs. The ability to detect stride imbalances was also examined. A team sport player performed a series of 30-s runs on an instrumented treadmill (6 runs at 10, 17 and 24 km·h-1) with or without his right ankle taped (aimed at creating a stride imbalance), while wearing on his back a commercially-available GPS unit with an embedded 100-Hz tri-axial accelerometer. Contact (CT) and flying (FT) time, and K were computed from both treadmill and accelerometers (Athletic Data Innovations) data. The agreement between treadmill (criterion measure) and accelerometer-derived data was examined. We also compared the ability of the different systems to detect the stride imbalance. Biases were small (CT and K) and moderate (FT). The typical error of the estimate was trivial (CT), small (K) and moderate (FT), with nearly perfect (CT and K) and large (FT) correlations for treadmill vs. accelerometer. The tape induced very large increase in the right - left foot ∆ in CT, FT and K measured by the treadmill. The tape effect on CT and K ∆ measured with the accelerometers were also very large, but of lower magnitude than with the treadmill. The tape effect on accelerometer-derived ∆ FT was unclear. Present data highlight the potential of a GPS-embedded accelerometer to assess CT and K during ground running. Key points GPS-embedded tri-axial accelerometers may be used to assess contact time and vertical stiffness during ground running. These preliminary results open new perspective for the field monitoring of neuromuscular fatigue and performance in run-based sports PMID:26664264

  5. Hybridizing matter-wave and classical accelerometers

    SciTech Connect

    Lautier, J.; Volodimer, L.; Hardin, T.; Merlet, S.; Lours, M.; Pereira Dos Santos, F.; Landragin, A.

    2014-10-06

    We demonstrate a hybrid accelerometer that benefits from the advantages of both conventional and atomic sensors in terms of bandwidth (DC to 430 Hz) and long term stability. First, the use of a real time correction of the atom interferometer phase by the signal from the classical accelerometer enables to run it at best performance without any isolation platform. Second, a servo-lock of the DC component of the conventional sensor output signal by the atomic one realizes a hybrid sensor. This method paves the way for applications in geophysics and in inertial navigation as it overcomes the main limitation of atomic accelerometers, namely, the dead times between consecutive measurements.

  6. Validation of a wireless accelerometer network for energy expenditure measurement.

    PubMed

    Montoye, Alexander H K; Dong, Bo; Biswas, Subir; Pfeiffer, Karin A

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate a wireless network of accelerometers and compare it to a hip-mounted accelerometer for predicting energy expenditure in a semi-structured environment. Adults (n = 25) aged 18-30 engaged in 14 sedentary, ambulatory, exercise, and lifestyle activities over a 60-min protocol while wearing a portable metabolic analyser, hip-mounted accelerometer, and wireless network of three accelerometers worn on the right wrist, thigh, and ankle. Participants chose the order and duration of activities. Artificial neural networks were created separately for the wireless network and hip accelerometer for energy expenditure prediction. The wireless network had higher correlations (r = 0.79 vs. r = 0.72, P < 0.01) but similar root mean square error (2.16 vs. 2.09 METs, P > 0.05) to the hip accelerometer. Measured (from metabolic analyser) and predicted energy expenditure from the hip accelerometer were significantly different for the 3 of the 14 activities (lying down, sweeping, and cycle fast); conversely, measured and predicted energy expenditure from the wireless network were not significantly different for any activity. In conclusion, the wireless network yielded a small improvement over the hip accelerometer, providing evidence that the wireless network can produce accurate estimates of energy expenditure in adults participating in a range of activities.

  7. Real-time measurement of camshaft wear in an automotive engine-a radiometric method

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, E.W.; Blossfeld, D.H.

    1990-01-01

    A radiometric method has been developed for the determination of camshaft wear during engine operation. After a radioactive tracer is induced at the tips of one or more cam lobes by the technique of surface layer activation, calibration procedures are performed to determine the amount of radioactive material remaining versus the depth worn. The decrease in {gamma}-ray intensity measured external to the engine is then directly related to cam lobe wear. By incorporating a high-resolution detector and an internal radioactive standard, measurement accuracy better than {plus}{equals}0.2 {mu}m at 95% confidence has been achieved. Without the requirement of engine disassembly, this method has provided unique measurements of break-in wear and wear as a function of operating conditions. Because this approach requires only low levels of radiation, it has significant potential applications in wear control.

  8. Obtaining Accelerometer Data in a National Cohort of Black and White Adults

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Virginia J.; Rhodes, J. David; Mosher, Aleena; Hutto, Brent; Stewart, Margaret S.; Colabianchi, Natalie; Vena, John E.; Blair, Steven N.; Hooker, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report methodological details and feasibility of conducting an accelerometer ancillary study in a large U.S. cohort being followed for stroke and cognitive decline. Methods REGARDS is a national, population-based study of 30,239 blacks and whites, aged ≥ 45 years, enrolled January 2003–October 2007. Baseline evaluations were conducted through computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI) and an in-home visit. Participants are followed by CATI every 6 months. Starting with May 2009 follow-up, contingent on accelerometer availability, participants were invited to wear an accelerometer for 7 days. Device inventory was 1,150. Accelerometer, instructions, log sheet and stamped addressed return envelope were mailed to consenting participants. Postcard acknowledgement and reminders, and ≤ two calls were made to encourage compliance. Results Between May 2009 and January 2013, 20,076 were invited to participate; 12,146 (60.5%) consented. Participation rates by race-sex groups were similar: black women 58.6%, black men 59.6%, white women 62.3% and white men 60.5%. Mean age of the 12,146 participants to whom devices were shipped was 63.5 ± 8.7 years. Return rate was 92%. Of 11,174 returned, 1,187 were not worn, 14 had device malfunction, and of 9,973 with data, 8,096 (81.2%) provided usable data, defined as ≥ 4 days of 10+ hours of wear time, ranging from 74.4% among black women to 85.2% among white men. Conclusions Using mail and telephone methods, it is feasible to obtain objective measures of physical activity from a sizeable proportion of a national cohort of adults, with similar participation rates among blacks and whites. Linked with the clinical health information collected through follow-up, these data will allow future analyses on the association between objectively-measured sedentary time, physical activity and health outcomes. PMID:25333247

  9. Accelerometer measured daily physical activity and sedentary pursuits–comparison between two models of the Actigraph and the importance of data reduction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Very few validation studies have been performed between different generations of the commonly used Actigraph accelerometers. We compared daily physical activity data generated from the old generation Actigraph model 7164 with the new generation Actigraph GT1M accelerometer in 15 young females for eight consecutive days. We also investigated if different wear time thresholds had any impact on the findings. Minutes per day of moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA), vigorous physical activity (VPA) and very vigorous physical activity (VVPA) were calculated. Moreover, minutes of sedentary pursuits per day were calculated. Findings There were significant (P < 0.05) differences between the Actigraph 7164 and the GT1M concerning MVPA (61 ± 21vs. 56 ± 23 min/day), VPA (12 ± 8 vs. 9 ± 3 min/day) and VVPA (3.2 ± 3.0 vs. 0.3 ± 1.1 min/day). The different wear time thresholds had little impact on minutes per day in different intensities. Median minutes of sedentary pursuits per day ranged from 159 to 438 minutes depending on which wear time threshold was used (i.e. 10, 30 or 60 minutes), whereas very small differences were observed between the two different models. Conclusions Data from the old generation Actigraph 7164 and the new generation Actigraph GT1M accelerometers differ, where the Actigraph GT1M generates lower minutes spent in free living physical activity. Median minutes of sedentary pursuits per day are highly dependent on which wear time threshold that is used, and not by accelerometer model. PMID:24176143

  10. The Impact of Gait Disability on the Calibration of Accelerometer Output in Adults with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Weikert, Madeline; Dlugonski, Deirdre; Suh, Yoojin; Fernhall, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Accelerometer activity counts have been correlated with energy expenditure during treadmill walking among ambulatory adults with multiple sclerosis (MS). This study examined the effects of gait disability on 1) the association between rates of energy expenditure and accelerometer output in overground walking and 2) the calibration of accelerometer output for quantifying time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in people with MS. The sample consisted of 24 individuals with MS, of whom 10 reported gait disability based on Patient-Determined Disease Steps (PDDS) scores. The participants undertook three 6-minute periods of overground walking while wearing an accelerometer and a portable metabolic unit (K4b2, Cosmed, Rome, Italy). In the first period of walking, the participants walked at a self-selected, comfortable speed. In the two subsequent walking periods, participants walked at speeds above and below (±0.5 mph) the comfortable walking speed, respectively. Strong linear relationships were observed between rates of accelerometer activity counts and energy expenditure during walking in the overall sample (R2 = 0.90) and subsamples with (R2 = 0.88) and without gait disability (R2 = 0.91). The slope of the relationship was significantly steeper in the subsample with gait disability (β= 0.0049) than in the subsample without gait disability (β= 0.0026). The difference in slopes resulted in a significantly lower cut-point for MVPA (1886 vs. 2717 counts/min) in those with gait disability. These findings provide a metabolic cut-point for quantifying time spent in MVPA in people with MS, both with and without gait disability. PMID:24453722

  11. A Comparison of Accelerometer Accuracy in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Lorraine J; Petroski, Gregory F; Markis, Natalie E

    2015-01-01

    Older adults' gait disorders present challenges for accurate activity monitoring. The current study compared the accuracy of accelerometer-detected to hand-tallied steps in 50 residential care/assisted living residents. Participants completed two walking trials wearing a Fitbit® Tracker and waist-, wrist-, and ankle-mounted Actigraph GT1M. Agreement between accelerometer and observed counts was calculated using concordance correlation coefficients (CCC), accelerometer to observed count ratios, accelerometer and observed count differences, and Bland-Altman plots. Classification and Regression Tree analysis identified minimum gait speed thresholds to achieve accelerometer accuracy ≥0.80. Participants' mean age was 84.2 and gait speed was 0.64 m/s. All accelerometers underestimated true steps. Only the ankle-mounted GT1M demonstrated positive agreement with observed counts (CCC = 0.205). Thresholds for 0.80 accuracy were gait speeds ≥0.56 m/s for the Fitbit and gait speeds ≥0.71 m/s for the ankle-mounted GT1M. Gait speed and accelerometer placement affected activity monitor accuracy in older adults.

  12. Large Scale Population Assessment of Physical Activity Using Wrist Worn Accelerometers: The UK Biobank Study

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Dan; Hammerla, Nils; Granat, Malcolm H.; van Hees, Vincent T.; Trenell, Michael I.; Owen, Christoper G.; Preece, Stephen J.; Peakman, Tim; Brage, Soren

    2017-01-01

    Background Physical activity has not been objectively measured in prospective cohorts with sufficiently large numbers to reliably detect associations with multiple health outcomes. Technological advances now make this possible. We describe the methods used to collect and analyse accelerometer measured physical activity in over 100,000 participants of the UK Biobank study, and report variation by age, sex, day, time of day, and season. Methods Participants were approached by email to wear a wrist-worn accelerometer for seven days that was posted to them. Physical activity information was extracted from 100Hz raw triaxial acceleration data after calibration, removal of gravity and sensor noise, and identification of wear / non-wear episodes. We report age- and sex-specific wear-time compliance and accelerometer measured physical activity, overall and by hour-of-day, week-weekend day and season. Results 103,712 datasets were received (44.8% response), with a median wear-time of 6.9 days (IQR:6.5–7.0). 96,600 participants (93.3%) provided valid data for physical activity analyses. Vector magnitude, a proxy for overall physical activity, was 7.5% (2.35mg) lower per decade of age (Cohen’s d = 0.9). Women had a higher vector magnitude than men, apart from those aged 45-54yrs. There were major differences in vector magnitude by time of day (d = 0.66). Vector magnitude differences between week and weekend days (d = 0.12 for men, d = 0.09 for women) and between seasons (d = 0.27 for men, d = 0.15 for women) were small. Conclusions It is feasible to collect and analyse objective physical activity data in large studies. The summary measure of overall physical activity is lower in older participants and age-related differences in activity are most prominent in the afternoon and evening. This work lays the foundation for studies of physical activity and its health consequences. Our summary variables are part of the UK Biobank dataset and can be used by researchers as

  13. A 3×3 wear debris sensor array for real time lubricant oil conditioning monitoring using synchronized sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoliang; Du, Li; Zhe, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    A high throughput wear debris sensor consisting of 3×3 sensing channels is presented for real time online lubricant oil conditioning monitoring. Time division multiplexing was applied to the sensing channels for measuring responses of multiple channels using one set of measurement electronics. Crosstalk among the 3×3 sensing channels was eliminated by diodes that are connected in series with each channel. Parallel L-C-R resonance was also applied to each sensing coil to increase the sensitivity. Furthermore, a unique synchronized sampling method was used to reduce the date size 50 times. Finally, we demonstrated that the sensor is capable of real time detection of wear debris as small as 50 μm in SAE 0W-5 at a flow rate of 460 ml/min; the measured debris concentration is in good agreement with the estimated actual concentration. The design can be extended to a N×N sensor array for an extremely high throughput without sacrificing the sensitivity, and can potentially be used for real time wear debris monitoring for health condition of rotating or reciprocating machineries.

  14. Predicting Human Movement with Multiple Accelerometers Using Movelets

    PubMed Central

    He, Bing; Bai, Jiawei; Zipunnikov, Vadim V.; Koster, Annemarie; Caserotti, Paolo; Lange-Maia, Brittney; Glynn, Nancy W.; Harris, Tamara B.; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The study aims were: 1) to develop transparent algorithms that use short segments of training data for predicting activity types; and 2) to compare prediction performance of proposed algorithms using single accelerometers and multiple accelerometers. Methods Sixteen participants (age, 80.6 yr (4.8 yr); BMI, 26.1 kg·m−2 (2.5 kg·m−2)) performed fifteen life-style activities in the laboratory, each wearing three accelerometers at the right hip, left and right wrists. Triaxial accelerometry data were collected at 80 Hz using Actigraph GT3X+. Prediction algorithms were developed, which, instead of extracting features, build activity specific dictionaries composed of short signal segments called movelets. Three alternative approaches were proposed to integrate the information from the multiple accelerometers. Results With at most several seconds of training data per activity, the prediction accuracy at the second-level temporal resolution was very high for lying, standing, normal/fast walking, and standing up from a chair (the median prediction accuracy ranged from 88.2% to 99.9% based on the single-accelerometer movelet approach). For these activities wrist-worn accelerometers performed almost as well as hip-worn accelerometers (the median difference in accuracy between wrist and hip ranged from −2.7% to 5.8%). Modest improvements in prediction accuracy were achieved by integrating information from multiple accelerometers. Discussion and conclusions It is possible to achieve high prediction accuracy at the secondlevel temporal resolution with very limited training data. To increase prediction accuracy from the simultaneous use of multiple accelerometers, a careful selection of integrative approaches is required. PMID:25134005

  15. The influence of wearing schemes and supportive telephone calls on adherence in accelerometry measurement: results of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Neeltje; Ulbricht, Sabina; Schwaneberg, Thea; Weitmann, Kerstin; Weymar, Franziska; Groß, Stefan; Dörr, Marcus; Hoffmann, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Background Physical activity (PA) can be assessed by accelerometer monitors. However, a high adherence to wearing this device is essential to obtain valid data. In this study, the influence of different wearing schemes and additional supportive phone calls (SPCs) on adherence was examined. Methods A randomized study with four groups was conducted in the context of a health examination program among participants aged 40–75 years without a history of cardiovascular diseases. Participants were recruited in different settings (general medical practices, job center, and health insurance). The participants were asked to wear an accelerometer for 7 consecutive days according to the wearing scheme “day and night” or “day only” and received or did not receive SPCs. Full adherence was defined as a total wearing time of 98 hours (between 8 am and 10 pm during 7 days). A generalized linear model was used to calculate the difference between the maximum possible and the observed adherence. Results Adherence could be assessed for 249 participants (mean age: 56.40 years; standard deviation [SD] 9.83, 40% males). The mean wearing time was 84.04 hours (SD 20.75). Participants with the wearing scheme day and night were significantly more adherent than participants with the wearing scheme day only (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 0.63; P=0.005). SPCs had no additional effect on adherence (IRR 0.80; P=0.168). Conclusion To assess PA, the wearing scheme day and night provides the best possible adherence in this group of participants. Further studies are necessary to examine adherence and the effects of additional SPCs in other samples or settings. PMID:28356721

  16. Double resonator cantilever accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, D.R.

    1982-09-23

    A digital quartz accelerometer includes a pair of spaced double-ended tuning forks fastened at one end to a base and at the other end through a spacer mass. Transverse movement of the resonator members stresses one and compresses the other, providing a differential frequency output which is indicative of acceleration.

  17. Double resonator cantilever accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, Dale R.

    1984-01-01

    A digital quartz accelerometer includes a pair of spaced double-ended tuning forks fastened at one end to a base and at the other end through a spacer mass. Transverse movement of the resonator members stresses one and compresses the other, providing a differential frequency output which is indicative of acceleration.

  18. Superconducting Rebalance Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torti, R. P.; Gerver, M.; Leary, K. J.; Jagannathan, S.; Dozer, D. M.

    1996-01-01

    A multi-axis accelerometer which utilizes a magnetically-suspended, high-TC proof mass is under development. The design and performance of a single axis device which is stabilized actively in the axial direction but which utilizes ring magnets for passive radial stabilization is discussed. The design of a full six degree-of-freedom device version is also described.

  19. Epidemiology of Shoe Wearing Patterns Over Time in Older Women: Associations With Foot Pain and Hallux Valgus

    PubMed Central

    Roddy, Edward; Marshall, Michelle; Thomas, Martin J.; Rathod, Trishna; Peat, George M.; Croft, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Foot problems are prevalent in older women and are thought to be associated with footwear. This study examined women’s shoe wearing patterns over time and evaluated associations between footwear characteristics and foot pain and hallux valgus. Methods: Women aged 50–89 years (n = 2,627) completed a survey that included drawings of four toe-box shapes and four heel heights. For each life decade, participants indicated which footwear style they wore most of the time. Foot pain in the past 12 months and hallux valgus were documented by self-report. Logistic regression examined associations between heel height, toe-box shape, foot pain and hallux valgus. Results: Wearing shoes with a high heel and very narrow toe box between the ages of 20 and 29 was common, but decreased to less than 10% by the age of 40. Compared with women who had worn shoes with a very wide toe box, the likelihood of hallux valgus increased in those who had worn shoes with a wide (odds ratio [OR] 1.96, 95% CI 1.03–3.71), narrow (2.39, 1.29–4.42) and very narrow (2.70, 1.46–5.00) toe box between the ages of 20 and 29 and those who wore shoes with a very narrow toe box (1.93, 1.10–3.39) between the ages of 30 and 39. Conclusions: Women wear shoes with a lower heel and broader toe box as they age. Wearing constrictive footwear between the ages of 20 and 39 may be critical for developing hallux valgus in later life. PMID:26834078

  20. CHAMP Tracking and Accelerometer Data Analysis Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank G.; Luthcke, S. B.; Rowlands, D. D.; Pavlis, D. E.; Colombo, O. L.; Ray, Richard D.; Thompson, B.; Nerem, R. S.; Williams, Teresa A.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The CHAMP (Challenging Minisatellite Payload) mission's unique combination of sensors and orbit configuration will enable unprecedented improvements in modeling and understanding the Earth's static gravity field and its temporal variations. CHAMP is the first of two missions (GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) to be launched in the later part of '01) that combine a new generation of GPS (Global Positioning System) receivers, a high precision three axis accelerometer, and star cameras for the precision attitude determination. In order to isolate the gravity signal for science investigations, it is necessary to perform a detailed reduction and analysis of the GPS and SLR tracking data in conjunction with the accelerometer and attitude data. Precision orbit determination based on the GPS and SLR (Satellite Laser Ranging) tracking data will isolate the orbit perturbations, while the accelerometer data will be used to distinguish the surface forces from those due to the geopotential (static, and time varying). In preparation for the CHAMP and GRACE missions, extensive modifications have been made to NASA/GSFC's GEODYN orbit determination software to enable the simultaneous reduction of spacecraft tracking (e.g. GPS and SLR), three axis accelerometer and precise attitude data. Several weeks of CHAMP tracking and accelerometer data have been analyzed and the results will be presented. Precision orbit determination analysis based on tracking data alone in addition to results based on the simultaneous reduction of tracking and accelerometer data will be discussed. Results from a calibration of the accelerometer will be presented along with the results from various orbit determination strategies. Gravity field modeling status and plans will be discussed.

  1. Precision of computer vision systems for real-time inspection of contact wire wear in railways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borromeo, Susana; Aparicio, Jose L.

    2005-02-01

    This paper is oriented to study techniques to improve the precision of the systems for wear measurement of contact wire in the railways. The problematic of wear measurement characterized by some important determining factors like rate of sampling and auscultation conditions is studied in detail. The different solutions to resolve the problematic successfully are examined. Issues related to image acquisition and image processing are discussed. Type of illumination and sensors employed, image processing hardware and image processing algorithms are some topics studied. Once analyzed each one factor which have influence on the precision of the measurement system, there are proposed an assembly of solutions that allow to optimize the conditions under which the inspection can be carried out.

  2. Validity of wrist worn accelerometers and comparability between hip and wrist placement sites in estimating physical activity behaviour in preschool children.

    PubMed

    Hislop, Jane; Palmer, Nicole; Anand, Priya; Aldin, Tara

    2016-09-21

    Wrist-worn accelerometers can increase compliance with wearing accelerometers, however, several large scale studies continue to use hip-worn accelerometers and it is unclear how comparable data is from the two sites. The study aims were: to investigate agreement between wrist- and hip- worn accelerometers and to determine the validity of Johansson et al cut-points for wrist worn accelerometers in preschool children. A sample of 32 preschool children (21 boys, 4.2 (0.5) years, BMI 16.6 (1.1)) were videoed wearing GT3X+  accelerometers on their wrist and hip while they engaged in 1 h of free-play in their nursery. Children's activity were coded using, the children's activity rating scale (CARS): with CARS, level 1 'sedentary' and levels 2-5 were classified as time spent in total physical activity (TPA). Accelerometry data were processed using Johansson et al cut-points for the wrist data and Evenson et al cut-points for the hip data, into time spent in different intensities of physical activity (PA). The mean counts per minute (cpm) from the hip and wrist were compared. There was a strong correlation between the hip and wrist cpm (r  =  0.81, p  <  0.01) and total count data (r  =  0.83 p  <  0.01), however there was a large systematic bias with wide limits of agreement. Good agreement (mean difference (LOA) 1.1 (-9.9, 12.1) was found between the CARS estimate of TPA (29.5 (10.4) mins) and the wrist estimate, using the Johansson et al cut points (28.4 (9.8) mins). There was also a reasonable agreement between the hip estimates with the Evenson et al cut-points and Johansson et al estimate (mean difference (LOA):6.3 (-8.8, 21.4) mins. In conclusion, the findings suggest that the Johansson et al (2013 Pediatr. Obes. 10 1-6) cut-points applied to wrist worn accelerometers provides a valid estimate of TPA in preschool children and have reasonable agreement with Evenson et al cut-points applied to hip accelerometers.

  3. Context-Specific Outdoor Time and Physical Activity among School-Children Across Gender and Age: Using Accelerometers and GPS to Advance Methods

    PubMed Central

    Klinker, Charlotte Demant; Schipperijn, Jasper; Kerr, Jacqueline; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Troelsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Being outdoors has a positive influence on health among children. Evidence in this area is limited and many studies have used self-reported measures. Objective context-specific assessment of physical activity patterns and correlates, such as outdoor time, may progress this field. Aims: To employ novel objective measures to assess age and gender differences in context-specific outdoor weekday behavior patterns among school-children [outdoor time and outdoor moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA)] and to investigate associations between context-specific outdoor time and MVPA. Methods: A total of 170 children had at least one weekday of 9 h combined accelerometer and global positioning system data and were included in the analyses. The data were processed using the personal activity and location measurement system (PALMS) and a purpose-built PostgreSQL database resulting in context-specific measures for outdoor time, outdoor MVPA, and overall daily MVPA. In addition, 4 domains (leisure, school, transport, and home) and 11 subdomains (e.g., urban green space and sports facilities) were created and assessed. Multilevel analyses provided results on age and gender differences and the association between outdoor time and MVPA. Results: Girls compared to boys had fewer outdoor minutes (p < 0.05), spent a smaller proportion of their overall daily time outdoors (p < 0.05), had fewer outdoor MVPA minutes during the day (p < 0.001) and in 11 contexts. Children compared to adolescents had more outdoor minutes (p < 0.05). During school and within recess, children compared to adolescents had more outdoor MVPA (p < 0.001) and outdoor time (p < 0.001). A 1-h increase in outdoor time was associated with 9.9 more minutes of MVPA (p < 0.001). Conclusion: A new methodology to assess the context-specific outdoor time and physical activity patterns has been developed and can be expanded to other populations. Different context

  4. Low G accelerometer testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, M. S.

    1972-01-01

    Eight different types of low-g accelerometer tests are covered on the Bell miniature electrostatically suspended accelerometer (MESA) which is known to be sensitive to less than 10 to the minus 7th power earth's gravity. These tests include a mass attracting scheme, Leitz dividing head, Wild theodolite, precision gage blocks, precision tiltmeters, Hilger Watts autocollimator, Razdow Mark 2 autocollimator, and laser interferometer measuring system. Each test is described and a comparison of the results is presented. The output of the MESA was as linear and consistent as any of the available devices were capable of measuring. Although the extent of agreement varied with the test equipment used, it can only be concluded that the indicated errors were attributable to the test equipment coupled with the environmental conditions.

  5. Fiber optic micro accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, Steve P.

    2005-07-26

    An accelerometer includes a wafer, a proof mass integrated into the wafer, at least one spring member connected to the proof mass, and an optical fiber. A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially reflective surface on the proof mass and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. The two partially reflective surfaces are used to detect movement of the proof mass through the optical fiber, using an optical detection system.

  6. Levitated micro-accelerometer.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Schmidt, Carrie Frances; Peterson, Kenneth Allen; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Renn, Rosemarie A.; Peter, Frank J.; Kinney, Ragon D.; Gilkey, Jeffrey C.

    2004-06-01

    The objective is a significant advancement in the state-of-the-art of accelerometer design for tactical grade (or better) applications. The design goals are <1 milli-G bias stability across environments and $200 cost. This quantum leap in performance improvement and cost reduction can only be achieved by a radical new approach, not incremental improvements to existing concepts. This novel levitated closed-loop accelerometer is implemented as a hybrid micromachine. The hybrid approach frees the designer from the limitations of any given monolithic process and dramatically expands the available design space. The design can be tailored to the dynamic range, resolution, bandwidth, and environmental requirements of the application while still preserving all of the benefits of monolithic MEMS fabrication - extreme precision, small size, low cost, and low power. An accelerometer was designed and prototype hardware was built, driving the successful development and refinement of several 'never been done before' fabrication processes. Many of these process developments are commercially valuable and are key enablers for the realization of a wide variety of useful micro-devices. While controlled levitation of a proof mass has yet to be realized, the overall design concept remains sound. This was clearly demonstrated by the stable and reliable closed-loop control of a proof mass at the test structure level. Furthermore, the hybrid MEMS implementation is the most promising approach for achieving the ambitious cost and performance targets. It is strongly recommended that Sandia remain committed to the original goal.

  7. A Simple Accelerometer Calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, R. A.; Islamy, M. R. F.; Munir, M. M.; Latief, H.; Irsyam, M.; Khairurrijal

    2016-08-01

    High possibility of earthquake could lead to the high number of victims caused by it. It also can cause other hazards such as tsunami, landslide, etc. In that case it requires a system that can examine the earthquake occurrence. Some possible system to detect earthquake is by creating a vibration sensor system using accelerometer. However, the output of the system is usually put in the form of acceleration data. Therefore, a calibrator system for accelerometer to sense the vibration is needed. In this study, a simple accelerometer calibrator has been developed using 12 V DC motor, optocoupler, Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) and AVR 328 microcontroller as controller system. The system uses the Pulse Wave Modulation (PWM) form microcontroller to control the motor rotational speed as response to vibration frequency. The frequency of vibration was read by optocoupler and then those data was used as feedback to the system. The results show that the systems could control the rotational speed and the vibration frequencies in accordance with the defined PWM.

  8. Passive Accelerometer System Measurements on MIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1997-01-01

    The Passive Accelerometer System (PAS) is a simple moving ball accelerometer capable of measuring the small magnitude steady relative acceleration that occurs in a low earth orbit spacecraft due to atmospheric drag and the earth's gravity gradient. The acceleration is measured by recording the average velocity of the spherical ball over a suitable time increment. A modified form of Stokes law is used to convert the average velocity into an acceleration. PAS was used to measure acceleration on the MIR space station and on the first United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-1). The PAS measurement on MIR revealed remarkably low acceleration levels in the SPEKTR module.

  9. An Attachable Electromagnetic Energy Harvester Driven Wireless Sensing System Demonstrating Milling-Processes and Cutter-Wear/Breakage-Condition Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tien-Kan; Yeh, Po-Chen; Lee, Hao; Lin, Cheng-Mao; Tseng, Chia-Yung; Lo, Wen-Tuan; Wang, Chieh-Min; Wang, Wen-Chin; Tu, Chi-Jen; Tasi, Pei-Yuan; Chang, Jui-Wen

    2016-02-23

    An attachable electromagnetic-energy-harvester driven wireless vibration-sensing system for monitoring milling-processes and cutter-wear/breakage-conditions is demonstrated. The system includes an electromagnetic energy harvester, three single-axis Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometers, a wireless chip module, and corresponding circuits. The harvester consisting of magnets with a coil uses electromagnetic induction to harness mechanical energy produced by the rotating spindle in milling processes and consequently convert the harnessed energy to electrical output. The electrical output is rectified by the rectification circuit to power the accelerometers and wireless chip module. The harvester, circuits, accelerometer, and wireless chip are integrated as an energy-harvester driven wireless vibration-sensing system. Therefore, this completes a self-powered wireless vibration sensing system. For system testing, a numerical-controlled machining tool with various milling processes is used. According to the test results, the system is fully self-powered and able to successfully sense vibration in the milling processes. Furthermore, by analyzing the vibration signals (i.e., through analyzing the electrical outputs of the accelerometers), criteria are successfully established for the system for real-time accurate simulations of the milling-processes and cutter-conditions (such as cutter-wear conditions and cutter-breaking occurrence). Due to these results, our approach can be applied to most milling and other machining machines in factories to realize more smart machining technologies.

  10. An Attachable Electromagnetic Energy Harvester Driven Wireless Sensing System Demonstrating Milling-Processes and Cutter-Wear/Breakage-Condition Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Tien-Kan; Yeh, Po-Chen; Lee, Hao; Lin, Cheng-Mao; Tseng, Chia-Yung; Lo, Wen-Tuan; Wang, Chieh-Min; Wang, Wen-Chin; Tu, Chi-Jen; Tasi, Pei-Yuan; Chang, Jui-Wen

    2016-01-01

    An attachable electromagnetic-energy-harvester driven wireless vibration-sensing system for monitoring milling-processes and cutter-wear/breakage-conditions is demonstrated. The system includes an electromagnetic energy harvester, three single-axis Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometers, a wireless chip module, and corresponding circuits. The harvester consisting of magnets with a coil uses electromagnetic induction to harness mechanical energy produced by the rotating spindle in milling processes and consequently convert the harnessed energy to electrical output. The electrical output is rectified by the rectification circuit to power the accelerometers and wireless chip module. The harvester, circuits, accelerometer, and wireless chip are integrated as an energy-harvester driven wireless vibration-sensing system. Therefore, this completes a self-powered wireless vibration sensing system. For system testing, a numerical-controlled machining tool with various milling processes is used. According to the test results, the system is fully self-powered and able to successfully sense vibration in the milling processes. Furthermore, by analyzing the vibration signals (i.e., through analyzing the electrical outputs of the accelerometers), criteria are successfully established for the system for real-time accurate simulations of the milling-processes and cutter-conditions (such as cutter-wear conditions and cutter-breaking occurrence). Due to these results, our approach can be applied to most milling and other machining machines in factories to realize more smart machining technologies. PMID:26907297

  11. Designing Electrostatic Accelerometers for Next Gravity Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Phuong-Anh; Foulon, Bernard; Christophe, Bruno; Liorzou, Françoise; Boulanger, Damien; Lebat, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Square cuboid electrostatic accelerometers sensor core have been used in various combinations in recent and still flying missions (CHAMP, GRACE, GOCE). ONERA is now in the process of delivering such accelerometers for the GRACE Follow-On mission. The goal is to demonstrate the performance benefits of an interferometry laser ranging method for future low-low satellite to satellite missions. The electrostatic accelerometer becoming thus the system main performance limiter, we propose for future missions a new symmetry which will allow for three ultrasensitive axes instead of two. This implies no performance ground testing, as the now cubic proof-mass will be too heavy, but only free fall tests in catapult mode, taking advantage of the additional microgravity testing time offered by the updated ZARM tower. The updated mission will be in better adequacy with the requirements of a next generation of smaller and drag compensated micro-satellites. In addition to the measurement of the surface forces exerted on the spacecraft by the atmospheric drag and by radiation pressures, the accelerometer will become a major part of the attitude and orbit control system by acting as drag free sensor and by accurately measuring the angular accelerations. ONERA also works on a hybridization of the electrostatic accelerometer with an atomic interferometer to take advantage of the absolute nature of the atomic interferometer acceleration measurement and its great accuracy in the [5-100] mHz bandwidth. After a description of the improvement of the GRACE-FO accelerometer with respect to the still in-orbit previous models and a status of its development, the presentation will describe the new cubic configuration and how its operations and performances can be verified in the Bremen drop tower.

  12. Improved Signal Processing Technique Leads to More Robust Self Diagnostic Accelerometer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokars, Roger; Lekki, John; Jaros, Dave; Riggs, Terrence; Evans, Kenneth P.

    2010-01-01

    The self diagnostic accelerometer (SDA) is a sensor system designed to actively monitor the health of an accelerometer. In this case an accelerometer is considered healthy if it can be determined that it is operating correctly and its measurements may be relied upon. The SDA system accomplishes this by actively monitoring the accelerometer for a variety of failure conditions including accelerometer structural damage, an electrical open circuit, and most importantly accelerometer detachment. In recent testing of the SDA system in emulated engine operating conditions it has been found that a more robust signal processing technique was necessary. An improved accelerometer diagnostic technique and test results of the SDA system utilizing this technique are presented here. Furthermore, the real time, autonomous capability of the SDA system to concurrently compensate for effects from real operating conditions such as temperature changes and mechanical noise, while monitoring the condition of the accelerometer health and attachment, will be demonstrated.

  13. Comparative evaluation of features and techniques for identifying activity type and estimating energy cost from accelerometer data.

    PubMed

    Kate, Rohit J; Swartz, Ann M; Welch, Whitney A; Strath, Scott J

    2016-03-01

    Wearable accelerometers can be used to objectively assess physical activity. However, the accuracy of this assessment depends on the underlying method used to process the time series data obtained from accelerometers. Several methods have been proposed that use this data to identify the type of physical activity and estimate its energy cost. Most of the newer methods employ some machine learning technique along with suitable features to represent the time series data. This paper experimentally compares several of these techniques and features on a large dataset of 146 subjects doing eight different physical activities wearing an accelerometer on the hip. Besides features based on statistics, distance based features and simple discrete features straight from the time series were also evaluated. On the physical activity type identification task, the results show that using more features significantly improve results. Choice of machine learning technique was also found to be important. However, on the energy cost estimation task, choice of features and machine learning technique were found to be less influential. On that task, separate energy cost estimation models trained specifically for each type of physical activity were found to be more accurate than a single model trained for all types of physical activities.

  14. Wearing gloves in the hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Infection control - wearing gloves; Patient safety - wearing gloves; Personal protective equipment - wearing gloves; PPE - wearing gloves; Nosocomial infection - wearing gloves; Hospital acquired infection - wearing gloves

  15. Slip resistance of non-slip socks--an accelerometer-based approach.

    PubMed

    Hübscher, Markus; Thiel, Christian; Schmidt, Jens; Bach, Matthias; Banzer, Winfried; Vogt, Lutz

    2011-04-01

    The present study investigated the relative slip resistance of commercially available non-slip socks during gait. Twenty-four healthy subjects (29.3±10.4 years) participated in the study. Each subject completed 4 different test conditions (barefoot, non-slip socks, conventional socks, backless slippers) in a randomized, balanced order. The slip resistance was estimated by measuring the heel deceleration time using a heel-mounted accelerometer. Repeated measures ANOVA and post hoc paired-sample t-test with Bonferroni correction were used for statistical analysis. Compared to barefoot walking absolute deceleration times [ms] were significantly increased when wearing conventional socks or slippers. No significant differences were observed between the barefoot and non-slip socks conditions. The present study shows that non-slip socks improved slip-resistance during gait when compared to conventional socks and slippers. Future investigations should verify the present findings in hospital populations prone to slip-related falls.

  16. MGRA: Motion Gesture Recognition via Accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Hong, Feng; You, Shujuan; Wei, Meiyu; Zhang, Yongtuo; Guo, Zhongwen

    2016-04-13

    Accelerometers have been widely embedded in most current mobile devices, enabling easy and intuitive operations. This paper proposes a Motion Gesture Recognition system (MGRA) based on accelerometer data only, which is entirely implemented on mobile devices and can provide users with real-time interactions. A robust and unique feature set is enumerated through the time domain, the frequency domain and singular value decomposition analysis using our motion gesture set containing 11,110 traces. The best feature vector for classification is selected, taking both static and mobile scenarios into consideration. MGRA exploits support vector machine as the classifier with the best feature vector. Evaluations confirm that MGRA can accommodate a broad set of gesture variations within each class, including execution time, amplitude and non-gestural movement. Extensive evaluations confirm that MGRA achieves higher accuracy under both static and mobile scenarios and costs less computation time and energy on an LG Nexus 5 than previous methods.

  17. MGRA: Motion Gesture Recognition via Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Feng; You, Shujuan; Wei, Meiyu; Zhang, Yongtuo; Guo, Zhongwen

    2016-01-01

    Accelerometers have been widely embedded in most current mobile devices, enabling easy and intuitive operations. This paper proposes a Motion Gesture Recognition system (MGRA) based on accelerometer data only, which is entirely implemented on mobile devices and can provide users with real-time interactions. A robust and unique feature set is enumerated through the time domain, the frequency domain and singular value decomposition analysis using our motion gesture set containing 11,110 traces. The best feature vector for classification is selected, taking both static and mobile scenarios into consideration. MGRA exploits support vector machine as the classifier with the best feature vector. Evaluations confirm that MGRA can accommodate a broad set of gesture variations within each class, including execution time, amplitude and non-gestural movement. Extensive evaluations confirm that MGRA achieves higher accuracy under both static and mobile scenarios and costs less computation time and energy on an LG Nexus 5 than previous methods. PMID:27089336

  18. Single-Axis Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis Stephen (Inventor); Capo-Lugo, Pedro A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A single-axis accelerometer includes a housing defining a sleeve. An object/mass is disposed in the sleeve for sliding movement therein in a direction aligned with the sleeve's longitudinal axis. A first piezoelectric strip, attached to a first side of the object and to the housing, is longitudinally aligned with the sleeve's longitudinal axis. The first piezoelectric strip includes a first strip of a piezoelectric material with carbon nanotubes substantially aligned along a length thereof. A second piezoelectric strip, attached to a second side of the object and to the housing, is longitudinally aligned with the sleeve's longitudinal axis. The second piezoelectric strip includes a second strip of the piezoelectric material with carbon nanotubes substantially aligned along a length thereof. A voltage sensor is electrically coupled to at least one of the first and second piezoelectric strips.

  19. Self Diagnostic Accelerometer Testing on the C-17 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokars, Roger P.; Lekki, John D.

    2013-01-01

    The self diagnostic accelerometer (SDA) developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center was tested for the first time in an aircraft engine environment as part of the Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research (VIPR) program. The VIPR program includes testing multiple critical flight sensor technologies. One such sensor, the accelerometer, measures vibrations to detect faults in the engine. In order to rely upon the accelerometer, the health of the accelerometer must be ensured. The SDA is a sensor system designed to actively determine the accelerometer structural health and attachment condition, in addition to vibration measurements. The SDA uses a signal conditioning unit that sends an electrical chirp to the accelerometer and recognizes changes in the response due to changes in the accelerometer health and attachment condition. To demonstrate the SDAs flight worthiness and robustness, multiple SDAs were mounted and tested on a C-17 aircraft engine. The engine test conditions varied from engine off, to idle, to maximum power. The SDA attachment conditions were varied from fully tight to loose. The newly developed SDA health algorithm described herein uses cross correlation pattern recognition to discriminate a healthy from a faulty SDA. The VIPR test results demonstrate for the first.

  20. Recent Results from CHAMP Tracking and Accelerometer Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthcke, S. B.; Rowlands, D. D.; Lemoine, F. G.; Nerem, R. S.; Thompson, B.; Pavlis, E.; Williams, T. A.; Colombo, O. L.; Chao, Benjamin F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The CHAMP mission's unique combination of sensors and orbit configuration will enable unprecedented improvements in modeling and understanding the Earth's static gravity field and its temporal variations. CHAMP is the first of two missions (GRACE to be launched in the early part of 02') that combine a new generation of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, a high precision three-axis accelerometer, and star cameras for the precision attitude determination. In order to isolate the gravity signal for science investigations, it is necessary to perform a detailed reduction and analysis of the GPS and Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) tracking data in conjunction with the accelerometer and attitude data. Precision orbit determination based on the GPS and SLR tracking data will isolate the orbit perturbations, while the accelerometer data will be used to distinguish the non-gravitational forces from those due to the geopotential (static, and time varying). In preparation for the CHAMP and GRACE missions, extensive modifications have been made to NASA/GSFC's GEODYN orbit determination software to enable the simultaneous reduction of spacecraft tracking (e.g. GPS and SLR), three-axis accelerometer and precise attitude data. Several weeks of CHAMP tracking and accelerometer data have been analyzed and the results will be presented. Precision orbit determination analysis based on tracking data alone in addition to results based on the simultaneous reduction of tracking and accelerometer data will be discussed. Results from a calibration of the accelerometer will be presented along with the results from various orbit determination strategies.

  1. Accelerometer Data Analysis and Presentation Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Hrovat, Kenneth; McPherson, Kevin; Moskowitz, Milton E.; Reckart, Timothy

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center's Principal Investigator Microgravity Services project analyzes Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment and Space Acceleration Measurement System data for principal investigators of microgravity experiments. Principal investigators need a thorough understanding of data analysis techniques so that they can request appropriate analyses to best interpret accelerometer data. Accelerometer data sampling and filtering is introduced along with the related topics of resolution and aliasing. Specific information about the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment and Space Acceleration Measurement System data sampling and filtering is given. Time domain data analysis techniques are discussed and example environment interpretations are made using plots of acceleration versus time, interval average acceleration versus time, interval root-mean-square acceleration versus time, trimmean acceleration versus time, quasi-steady three dimensional histograms, and prediction of quasi-steady levels at different locations. An introduction to Fourier transform theory and windowing is provided along with specific analysis techniques and data interpretations. The frequency domain analyses discussed are power spectral density versus frequency, cumulative root-mean-square acceleration versus frequency, root-mean-square acceleration versus frequency, one-third octave band root-mean-square acceleration versus frequency, and power spectral density versus frequency versus time (spectrogram). Instructions for accessing NASA Lewis Research Center accelerometer data and related information using the internet are provided.

  2. Validity of a Wearable Accelerometer Device to Measure Average Acceleration Values During High-Speed Running.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jeremy P; Hopkinson, Trent L; Wundersitz, Daniel W T; Serpell, Benjamin G; Mara, Jocelyn K; Ball, Nick B

    2016-11-01

    Alexander, JP, Hopkinson, TL, Wundersitz, DWT, Serpell, BG, Mara, JK, and Ball, NB. Validity of a wearable accelerometer device to measure average acceleration values during high-speed running. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3007-3013, 2016-The aim of this study was to determine the validity of an accelerometer to measure average acceleration values during high-speed running. Thirteen subjects performed three sprint efforts over a 40-m distance (n = 39). Acceleration was measured using a 100-Hz triaxial accelerometer integrated within a wearable tracking device (SPI-HPU; GPSports). To provide a concurrent measure of acceleration, timing gates were positioned at 10-m intervals (0-40 m). Accelerometer data collected during 0-10 m and 10-20 m provided a measure of average acceleration values. Accelerometer data was recorded as the raw output and filtered by applying a 3-point moving average and a 10-point moving average. The accelerometer could not measure average acceleration values during high-speed running. The accelerometer significantly overestimated average acceleration values during both 0-10 m and 10-20 m, regardless of the data filtering technique (p < 0.001). Body mass significantly affected all accelerometer variables (p < 0.10, partial η = 0.091-0.219). Body mass and the absence of a gravity compensation formula affect the accuracy and practicality of accelerometers. Until GPSports-integrated accelerometers incorporate a gravity compensation formula, the usefulness of any accelerometer-derived algorithms is questionable.

  3. Multi-Axis Accelerometer Calibration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, Tom; Parker, Peter

    2010-01-01

    A low-cost, portable, and simplified system has been developed that is suitable for in-situ calibration and/or evaluation of multi-axis inertial measurement instruments. This system overcomes facility restrictions and maintains or improves the calibration quality for users of accelerometer-based instruments with applications in avionics, experimental wind tunnel research, and force balance calibration applications. The apparatus quickly and easily positions a multi-axis accelerometer system into a precisely known orientation suitable for in-situ quality checks and calibration. In addition, the system incorporates powerful and sophisticated statistical methods, known as response surface methodology and statistical quality control. These methods improve calibration quality, reduce calibration time, and allow for increased calibration frequency, which enables the monitoring of instrument stability over time.

  4. Dark matter direct detection with accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Peter W.; Kaplan, David E.; Mardon, Jeremy; Rajendran, Surjeet; Terrano, William A.

    2016-04-01

    The mass of the dark matter particle is unknown, and may be as low as ˜1 0-22 eV . The lighter part of this range, below ˜eV , is relatively unexplored both theoretically and experimentally but contains an array of natural dark matter candidates. An example is the relaxion, a light boson predicted by cosmological solutions to the hierarchy problem. One of the few generic signals such light dark matter can produce is a time-oscillating, equivalence-principle-violating force. We propose searches for this using accelerometers, and consider in detail the examples of torsion balances, atom interferometry, and pulsar timing. These approaches have the potential to probe large parts of unexplored parameter space in the next several years. Thus such accelerometers provide radically new avenues for the direct detection of dark matter.

  5. The GRADIO accelerometer - Design and development status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, A.; Touboul, P.

    The concept of Satellite Gravity Gradiometry based on differential microaccelerometry has been proposed by ONERA in the early eighties. Since 1986, an important effort is devoted to the development of the GRADIO accelerometers. Their configuration has been optimized for the ARISTOTELES mission with the objective of 0.01 Eotvos resolution for an integrating time of 4 s. The achieved resolution, better than 10 exp -9 G, is limited by the actual stability of alignments on the testing equipment.

  6. Wear resistance properties of austempered ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Y. S.; Kingsbury, G. R.

    1998-02-01

    A detailed review of wear resistance properties of austempered ductile iron (ADI) was undertaken to examine the potential applications of this material for wear parts, as an alternative to steels, alloyed and white irons, bronzes, and other competitive materials. Two modes of wear were studied: adhesive (frictional) dry sliding and abrasive wear. In the rotating dry sliding tests, wear behavior of the base material (a stationary block) was considered in relationship to countersurface (steel shaft) wear. In this wear mode, the wear rate of ADI was only one-fourth that of pearlitic ductile iron (DI) grade 100-70-03; the wear rates of aluminum bronze and leaded-tin bronze, respectively, were 3.7 and 3.3 times greater than that of ADI. Only quenched DI with a fully martensitic matrix slightly outperformed ADI. No significant difference was observed in the wear of steel shafts running against ADI and quenched DI. The excellent wear performance of ADI and its countersurface, combined with their relatively low friction coefficient, indicate potential for dry sliding wear applications. In the abrasive wear mode, the wear rate of ADI was comparable to that of alloyed hardened AISI 4340 steel, and approximately one-half that of hardened medium-carbon AISI 1050 steel and of white and alloyed cast irons. The excellent wear resistance of ADI may be attributed to the strain-affected transformation of high-carbon austenite to martensite that takes place in the surface layer during the wear tests.

  7. A novel differential optical fiber accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Shaohua; Zhao, Jiang; Hong, Guangwei; Jia, Bo

    2013-08-01

    The development of sensitive fiber-optic accelerometers is a subject of continuing interest. To acquire high resolution, Michelson phase interferometric techniques are widely adopted. Among the variety structures, the compliant cylinder approach is particularly attractive due to its high sensitivity that is defined as the induced phase shift per applied acceleration. While the two arms of Michelson interferometer should be at the same optical path, it is inconvenient to adjust the two arms' length to equal, also the polarization instability and phase random drift will cause a signal decline. To overcome these limitations, a novel optical fiber accelerometer based on differential interferometric techniques is proposed and investigated. The interferometer is a Sagnac-like white light interferometer, which means the bandwidth of laser spectrum can be as wide as tens nanometers. This interferometer was firstly reported by Levin in 1990s. Lights are divided to two paths before entering the coupler. To induce time difference, one passes through a delay arm and another goes a direct arm. After modulated by the sensing component, they reflect to opposite arm. The sensing part is formed by a seismic mass that is held to only one compliant cylinder, where the single-mode optical fiber is wrapped tightly. When sticking to vibrations, the cylinder compresses or stretches as a spring. The corresponding changes in cylinder circumference lead to strain in the sensing fibers, which is detected as an optical phase shift by the interferometer. The lights from two arms reach the vibration source at different time, sensing a different accelerate speed; produce a different optic path difference. Integrating the dissimilarity of the accelerated speed by time can obtain the total acceleration graph. A shaker's vibration has been tested by the proposed accelerometer referring to a standard piezoelectric accelerometer. A 99.8% linearity of the optical phase shift to the ground acceleration

  8. Validity of method to quantify transtibial amputees' free-living prosthetic wearing times and physical activity levels when using suction suspension sockets.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kit Tzu; Spence, William D; Maxwell, Douglas; Stansfield, Benedict William

    2012-01-01

    Prostheses are prescribed to restore the mobility of people with amputated lower limbs. Monitoring the prosthesis wearing times and physical activity of prosthesis users would provide invaluable information regarding rehabilitation progress and suitability of the prosthesis. The validation of a method to determine wearing times and physical activity state, as well as strides taken, of amputees wearing suction suspension sockets is reported. Eight participants with transtibial amputation were fitted with custom-made suction sockets. Analysis algorithms were used to automatically characterize physical activity based on the pressure at the socket's relief valve. The algorithms were validated in a laboratory-based protocol that included walking, stair climbing, standing, sitting, donning, and doffing. Intraclass correlation coefficient (2,1) values of >0.98 were achieved with mean differences of - 2.0%, 0.3%, 1.3%, and 0.7% for agreement between "off," "static," and "dynamic" times and stride count, respectively, as determined by the analysis algorithms and a concurrent video analysis. This study demonstrates that an interpretation of the pressure at the pressure-relief valve of suction suspension sockets can be used to determine wearing times and activity state.

  9. Influence of Power Delivery Timing on the Energetics and Biomechanics of Humans Wearing a Hip Exoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Young, Aaron J.; Foss, Jessica; Gannon, Hannah; Ferris, Daniel P.

    2017-01-01

    A broad goal in the field of powered lower limb exoskeletons is to reduce the metabolic cost of walking. Ankle exoskeletons have successfully achieved this goal by correctly timing a plantarflexor torque during late stance phase. Hip exoskeletons have the potential to assist with both flexion and extension during walking gait, but the optimal timing for maximally reducing metabolic cost is unknown. The focus of our study was to determine the best assistance timing for applying hip assistance through a pneumatic exoskeleton on human subjects. Ten non-impaired subjects walked with a powered hip exoskeleton, and both hip flexion and extension assistance were separately provided at different actuation timings using a simple burst controller. The largest average across-subject reduction in metabolic cost for hip extension was at 90% of the gait cycle (just prior to heel contact) and for hip flexion was at 50% of the gait cycle; this resulted in an 8.4 and 6.1% metabolic reduction, respectively, compared to walking with the unpowered exoskeleton. However, the ideal timing for both flexion and extension assistance varied across subjects. When selecting the assistance timing that maximally reduced metabolic cost for each subject, average metabolic cost for hip extension was 10.3% lower and hip flexion was 9.7% lower than the unpowered condition. When taking into account user preference, we found that subject preference did not correlate with metabolic cost. This indicated that user feedback was a poor method of determining the most metabolically efficient assistance power timing. The findings of this study are relevant to developers of exoskeletons that have a powered hip component to assist during human walking gait. PMID:28337434

  10. Influence of Power Delivery Timing on the Energetics and Biomechanics of Humans Wearing a Hip Exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Young, Aaron J; Foss, Jessica; Gannon, Hannah; Ferris, Daniel P

    2017-01-01

    A broad goal in the field of powered lower limb exoskeletons is to reduce the metabolic cost of walking. Ankle exoskeletons have successfully achieved this goal by correctly timing a plantarflexor torque during late stance phase. Hip exoskeletons have the potential to assist with both flexion and extension during walking gait, but the optimal timing for maximally reducing metabolic cost is unknown. The focus of our study was to determine the best assistance timing for applying hip assistance through a pneumatic exoskeleton on human subjects. Ten non-impaired subjects walked with a powered hip exoskeleton, and both hip flexion and extension assistance were separately provided at different actuation timings using a simple burst controller. The largest average across-subject reduction in metabolic cost for hip extension was at 90% of the gait cycle (just prior to heel contact) and for hip flexion was at 50% of the gait cycle; this resulted in an 8.4 and 6.1% metabolic reduction, respectively, compared to walking with the unpowered exoskeleton. However, the ideal timing for both flexion and extension assistance varied across subjects. When selecting the assistance timing that maximally reduced metabolic cost for each subject, average metabolic cost for hip extension was 10.3% lower and hip flexion was 9.7% lower than the unpowered condition. When taking into account user preference, we found that subject preference did not correlate with metabolic cost. This indicated that user feedback was a poor method of determining the most metabolically efficient assistance power timing. The findings of this study are relevant to developers of exoskeletons that have a powered hip component to assist during human walking gait.

  11. Processing of multi-satellite accelerometer data for thermospheric modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doornbos, Eelco; Visser, Pieter N. A. M.; van Helleputte, Tom; van den Ijssel, Jose; Foerster, Matthias; Luehr, Hermann; Rees, David; Koppenwallner, Georg; Fritsche, Bent; Kern, Michael; Haagmans, Roger

    Satellite accelerometers, such as those carried on the CHAMP and GRACE satellites, provide valuable data for improving our knowledge of thermosphere density and winds. These data are now available over a full range of solar activity conditions and over a wide range of heights and local times. The fact that the CHAMP and GRACE accelerometer data sets are largely overlapping in time offers the opportunity to study their synergy. Continuity of this multisatellite accelerometer data set will be provided by ESA's Swarm mission, a constellation of three satellites for studying the Earth's magnetic field. This overview will cover both the processing steps required for converting accelerometer data into density and wind data, and the scientific investigations resulting from this data. Scientific investigations that make use of the accelerometer data sets include comparisons with and adjustment of empirical and physical thermosphere models, studies of the response of the thermosphere on geomagnetic storm conditions and characterization of thermospheric structures by analysis of long-term averages. Accelerometer calibration errors and attitude errors in the satellite aerodynamic model can be largely reduced by making use of data from the satellite's GPS receivers and star cameras. However, considerable uncertainties remain due to insufficient knowledge of the in-track wind speed, the gas-surface interaction and cross-track calibration. These uncertainties can be characterized by using error analysis, by comparing different processing approaches and by comparisons with force models.

  12. The LISA accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, M.; Touboul, P.

    2003-10-01

    In the frame of investigating the fundamental nature of gravity, the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission could open the way to a new kind of observations unreachable from ground. The experiment, based on a V-formation of six drag-free spacecraft, uses the cubic proof masses of inertial sensors to reflect the laser light, acting as reference mirrors of a 5 × 10 9 m arm length interferometer. The proof masses are also used as inertial references for the drag-free control of the spacecraft which constitute in return a shield against external forces. Derived from space electrostatic accelerometers developed at ONERA, such as GRADIO for the ESA ARISTOTELES and now GOCE mission (Bernard and Touboul, 1991), the proposed LISA sensor should shield its proof mass from any accelerometric disturbance at a level of 10 -15ms-2Hz- 1/2. The accurate capacitive sensing of the mass provides its position relative to the satellite with a resolution better than 10 -9m Hz- 1/2 in order to control the satellite orbit and to minimise the disturbances induced by the satellite self gravity or by the proof mass charge. The sensor configuration and accomodation has to be specifically optimised for the mission requirements. Fortunately, the sensor will benefit from the thermal stability of the LISA optical bench environment, i.e. 10 -6K Hz- 1/2, and of the selected materials that exhibit a very low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), ensuring a high geometrical stability. Apart from the modeling and the evaluation of the flight characteristics, the necessary indirect ground demonstration of the performance and the interfaces with the drag-free control will have to be considered in detail in the future.

  13. Does a waist-worn accelerometer capture intra- and inter-person variation in walking behavior among persons with multiple sclerosis?

    PubMed Central

    Motl, Robert W.; Sosnoff, Jacob J.; Dlugonski, Deirdre; Suh, Yoojin; Goldman, Myla

    2011-01-01

    The valid application of accelerometry and interpretation of its output (i.e., counts per unit time) for the measurement of walking behavior in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) rests upon multiple untested assumptions. This study tested the assumption that a waist-worn accelerometer should capture the intra- and inter-person variation in walking behavior. Twenty-four participants with a neurologist-confirmed diagnosis of MS and who were ambulatory with minimal assistance undertook three 6-min periods of over-ground walking that involved comfortable (CWS) and then slower (SWS) and faster (FWS) walking speeds while wearing ActiGraph, model 7164, accelerometers around the waist and ankle. The experimental manipulation of walking was successful such that the CWS was 76.7 ± 13.0 m/min (range = 55.6–105.14), whereas the SWS and FWS were 64.3 ± 12.3 m/min (range = 44.5–90.1) and 89.1 ± 13.8 m/min (range = 60.9–116.4), respectively. Movement counts from the waist and ankle-worn accelerometer were strongly associated with the manipulation of speed, but the association was stronger for the waist than ankle based on both eta-squared estimates (η2 values = .78 and .46) and the average squared multiple correlations from individual regression analyses (R2 values = .97 ± .04 and .88 ± .21). The bivariate correlation between movement counts from the waist-worn accelerometer and speed of walking (r = .823, p = .001) was large in magnitude and significantly different (z = 3.22, p = .001) from that between movement counts from the ankle-worn unit and walking speed (r = .549, p = .001). This study provides novel evidence that an accelerometer worn around the waist captures intra- and inter-person variation in over-ground walking behavior in those with MS. PMID:20875952

  14. Does a waist-worn accelerometer capture intra- and inter-person variation in walking behavior among persons with multiple sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Motl, Robert W; Sosnoff, Jacob J; Dlugonski, Deirdre; Suh, Yoojin; Goldman, Myla

    2010-12-01

    The valid application of accelerometry and interpretation of its output (i.e., counts per unit time) for the measurement of walking behavior in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) rests upon multiple untested assumptions. This study tested the assumption that a waist-worn accelerometer should capture the intra- and inter-person variation in walking behavior. Twenty-four participants with a neurologist-confirmed diagnosis of MS and who were ambulatory with minimal assistance undertook three 6-min periods of over-ground walking that involved comfortable (CWS) and then slower (SWS) and faster (FWS) walking speeds while wearing ActiGraph, model 7164, accelerometers around the waist and ankle. The experimental manipulation of walking was successful such that the CWS was 76.7±13.0m/min (range=55.6-105.14), whereas the SWS and FWS were 64.3±12.3m/min (range=44.5-90.1) and 89.1±13.8m/min (range=60.9-116.4), respectively. Movement counts from the waist and ankle-worn accelerometer were strongly associated with the manipulation of speed, but the association was stronger for the waist than ankle based on both eta-squared estimates (η(2) values=.78 and .46) and the average squared multiple correlations from individual regression analyses (R(2) values=.97±.04 and .88±.21). The bivariate correlation between movement counts from the waist-worn accelerometer and speed of walking (r=.823, p=.001) was large in magnitude and significantly different (z=3.22, p=.001) from that between movement counts from the ankle-worn unit and walking speed (r=.549, p=.001). This study provides novel evidence that an accelerometer worn around the waist captures intra- and inter-person variation in over-ground walking behavior in those with MS.

  15. Research on the effect of wear-ring clearances to the performance of centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W. G.; Li, Y. B.; Wang, X. Y.; Sun, J. P.; Wu, G. X.

    2012-11-01

    In order to study the effect of wear-ring clearance on the performance of centrifugal pump, based on the Reynolds Time-Averaged N-S equations and RNG k-ε turbulence model, a centrifugal pump was simulated with three variable styles of the wear-rings: Only the clearance of the front wear-ring was changed, only the clearance of the back wear-ring was changed and both were changed. Numerical results agree well with the experimental results. In the three changing styles of the clearance, the variable of the clearance of front wear-ring has the most influence on the performance of centrifugal pump. The existence of wear-ring not only has an effect on the volumetric loss of the centrifugal pump, but also on the performance of the centrifugal pump. Relative to the experimental studies, numerical simulation methods have some advantages, such as low cost, fast and efficient, and easy to get the detailed structure of the internal flow characteristics, so it has been widely used in the fluid machinery study. In order to study the effect of wear-ring clearance on the performance of centrifugal pump, based on the Reynolds Time-Averaged N-S equations and RNG k-ε turbulence model, a centrifugal pump was simulated with three variable styles of the wear-rings: Only the clearance of the front wear-ring was changed, only the clearance of the back wear-ring was changed and both were changed. Numerical results agree well with the experimental results. In the three changing styles of the clearance, the variable of the clearance of front wear-ring has the most influence on the performance of centrifugal pump.

  16. Intelligent clutch control with incremental encoder to improve wear issues of an intercept pendulum in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalba, C. K.; Diekmann, R.; Epple, S.

    2017-01-01

    A pendulum impact tester is a technical device which is used to perform plasticity characterizations of metallic materials. Results are calculated based on fracture behavior under pendulum impact loadings according to DIN 50115, DIN 51222/EN 10045. The material is held at the two ends and gets struck in the middle. A mechanical Problem occurs when testing materials with a very high impact toughness. These specimen often do not break when hit by the pendulum. To return the pendulum to its initial position, the operator presses a service button. After a delay of approximately 2 seconds a clutch is activated which connects the arm of the pendulum with an electric motor to return it back upright in start position. At the moment of clutch activation, the pendulum can still swing or bounce with any speed in any direction at any different position. Due to the lack of synchronization between pendulum speed and constant engine speed, the clutch suffers heavy wear of friction. This disadvantage results in considerable service and repair costs for the customer. As a solution to this problem this article presents a customized technical device to significantly increase the lifetime of the clutch. It was accomplished by a precisely controlled activation of the clutch at a point of time when pendulum and motor are at synchronized speed and direction using incremental encoders.

  17. Isolation of a piezoresistive accelerometer used in high acceleration tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, V. I.; Brown, F. A.; Davie, N. T.

    Both uniaxial and triaxial shock isolation techniques for a piezoresistive accelerometer have been developed for pyroshock and impact tests. The uniaxial shock isolation technique has demonstrated acceptable characteristics for a temperature range of -50 to +186 F and a frequency bandwidth of DC to 10 kHz. The triaxial shock isolation technique has demonstrated acceptable results for a temperature range of -50 to 70 F and a frequency bandwidth of DC to 10 kHz. These temperature ranges, that are beyond the accelerometer manufacturer's operational limits of -30 and +150 F, required the calibration of accelerometers at high shock levels and at the temperature extremes of -50 and +160 F. The purposes of these calibrations were to insure that the accelerometers operated at the field test temperatures and to provide an accelerometer sensitivity at each test temperature. Since there is no NIST-traceable (National Institute of Standards and Technology traceable) calibration capability at shock levels of 5,000 - 15,000 g for the temperature extremes of -50 and +160 F, a method for calibrating and certifying the Hopkinson bar with a transfer standard was developed. Time domain and frequency domain results are given that characterize the Hopkinson bar. The NIST-traceable accuracy for the standard accelerometer in shock is +\\-5%. The Hopkinson bar has been certified by the Sandia Secondary Standards Division with an uncertainty of 6%.

  18. Measurement of Impact Acceleration: Mouthpiece Accelerometer Versus Helmet Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Michael; Halstead, P. David; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Barlow, David

    2007-01-01

    Context: Instrumented helmets have been used to estimate impact acceleration imparted to the head during helmet impacts. These instrumented helmets may not accurately measure the actual amount of acceleration experienced by the head due to factors such as helmet-to-head fit. Objective: To determine if an accelerometer attached to a mouthpiece (MP) provides a more accurate representation of headform center of gravity (HFCOG) acceleration during impact than does an accelerometer attached to a helmet fitted on the headform. Design: Single-factor research design in which the independent variable was accelerometer position (HFCOG, helmet, MP) and the dependent variables were g and Severity Index (SI). Setting: Independent impact research laboratory. Intervention(s): The helmeted headform was dropped (n = 168) using a National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE) drop system from the standard heights and impact sites according to NOCSAE test standards. Peak g and SI were measured for each accelerometer position during impact. Main Outcome Measures: Upon impact, the peak g and SI were recorded for each accelerometer location. Results: Strong relationships were noted for HFCOG and MP measures, and significant differences were seen between HFCOG and helmet g measures and HFCOG and helmet SI measures. No statistically significant differences were noted between HFCOG and MP g and SI measures. Regression analyses showed a significant relationship between HFCOG and MP measures but not between HFCOG and helmet measures. Conclusions: Upon impact, MP acceleration (g) and SI measurements were closely related to and more accurate in measuring HFCOG g and SI than helmet measurements. The MP accelerometer is a valid method for measuring head acceleration. PMID:17597937

  19. Changes to the ocular biota with time in extended- and daily-wear disposable contact lens use.

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, F; Willcox, M D; Fleming, C M; Hickson, S; Sweeney, D F; Holden, B A

    1995-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria may play a role in the etiology of certain soft contact lens (SCL)-related diseases. Contact lens (CL) wear may modify the normal ocular biota, providing a more favorable environment for potential pathogens. This study reports temporal changes in ocular biota in daily-wear (DW) and extended-wear (EW) disposable SCL use in experienced and neophyte wearers. Lid margin and bulbar conjunctival biota were sampled prior to CL fitting in 26 previous DW SCL users, 18 previous EW SCL users, and 26 neophytes. Wearers were fitted with an etafilcon A CL in one eye and a polymacon CL in the fellow eye. Lenses were worn on a daily basis by the 26 previous DW SCL wearers and on an EW basis by the remaining 44 subjects. The ocular biota was further sampled after 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of wear. The ocular biota consisted of coagulase-negative staphylococci, Corynebacterium spp., Micrococcus spp., and Propionibacterium spp. Potential pathogens were rarely isolated at baseline. No significant trend of increasing ocular colonization was shown for extended CL wear. Lid and conjunctival colonization increased with DW SCL use (P < 0.001), although this increase occurred for nonpathogenic species only. Fewer potential pathogens were isolated from DW SCL than from EW SCL users (P < 0.05). The lid margin consistently showed greater colonization than the conjunctiva and may be a source of potential pathogens during CL wear. Hydrogel CL wear appears to modify the ocular biota. An increased number of commensal organisms were present in DW SCL use. EW SCL use altered the spectrum of organisms isolated. These alterations may suppress the normal ocular defense mechanisms and may be relevant in the pathogenesis of CL-related disease. PMID:7591092

  20. Effects of liquid cooling garments on recovery and performance time in individuals performing strenuous work wearing a firefighter ensemble.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Coca, Aitor; Williams, W Jon; Roberge, Raymond J

    2011-07-01

    This study investigated the effects of body cooling using liquid cooling garments (LCG) on performance time (PT) and recovery in individuals wearing a fully equipped prototype firefighter ensemble (PFE) incorporating a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA). Six healthy male participants (three firefighters and three non-firefighters) completed six experimental sessions in an environmental chamber (35°C, 50% relative humidity), consisting of three stages of 15 min exercise at 75% VO2max, and 10 min rest following each exercise stage. During each session, one of the following six conditions was administered in a randomized order: control (no cooling, CON); air ventilation of exhaust SCBA gases rerouted into the PFE (AV); top cooling garment (TCG); TCG combined with AV (TCG+AV); a shortened whole body cooling garment (SCG), and SCG combined with AV (SCG+AV). Results showed that total PT completed was longer under SCG and SCG+AV compared with CON, AV, TCG, and TCG+AV (p<0.01). Magnitude of core temperature (Tc) elevation was significantly decreased when SCG was utilized (p<0.01), and heart rate recovery rate (10 min) was enhanced under SCG, SCG+AV, TCG, and TCG+AV compared with CON (p<0.05). Estimated Esw rate (kg·h(-1)) was the greatest in CON, 1.62 (0.37), and the least in SCG+AV 0.98 (0.44): (descending order: CON>AV>TCG=TCG+AV>SCG>SCG+AV) without a statistical difference between the conditions (p<0.05). Results of the present study suggest that the application of LCG underneath the PFE significantly improves the recovery during a short period of rest and prolongs performance time in subsequent bouts of exercise. LCG also appears to be an effective method for body cooling that promotes heat dissipation during uncompensable heat stress.

  1. In-fiber integrated accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Peng, Feng; Yang, Jun; Li, Xingliang; Yuan, Yonggui; Wu, Bing; Zhou, Ai; Yuan, Libo

    2011-06-01

    A compact in-fiber integrated fiber-optic Michelson interferometer based accelerometer is proposed and investigated. In the system, the sensing element consists of a twin-core fiber acting as a bending simple supported beam. By demodulating the optical phase shift, we obtain that the acceleration is proportional to the force applied on the central position of the twin-core fiber. A simple model has been established to calculate the sensitivity and resonant frequency. The experimental results show that such an accelerometer has a sensitivity of 0.09 rad/g at the resonant frequency of 680 Hz.

  2. System Wide Joint Position Sensor Fault Tolerance in Robot Systems Using Cartesian Accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldridge, Hal A.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1997-01-01

    Joint position sensors are necessary for most robot control systems. A single position sensor failure in a normal robot system can greatly degrade performance. This paper presents a method to obtain position information from Cartesian accelerometers without integration. Depending on the number and location of the accelerometers. the proposed system can tolerate the loss of multiple position sensors. A solution technique suitable for real-time implementation is presented. Simulations were conducted using 5 triaxial accelerometers to recover from the loss of up to 4 joint position sensors on a 7 degree of freedom robot moving in general three dimensional space. The simulations show good estimation performance using non-ideal accelerometer measurements.

  3. Accelerometer having integral fault null

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An improved accelerometer is introduced. It comprises a transducer responsive to vibration in machinery which produces an electrical signal related to the magnitude and frequency of the vibration; and a decoding circuit responsive to the transducer signal which produces a first fault signal to produce a second fault signal in which ground shift effects are nullified.

  4. Variometric Tests for Accelerometer Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Urso, M. G.; Barbati, N.

    2012-07-01

    This paper has been re-published as: VARIOMETRIC TESTS FOR ACCELEROMETER SENSORS M. G. D'Urso and N. Barbati ISPRS Annals of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences, I-4, 2012 Page(s) 315-320

  5. Physical activity using wrist-worn accelerometers: comparison of dominant and non-dominant wrist.

    PubMed

    Dieu, Olivier; Mikulovic, Jacques; Fardy, Paul S; Bui-Xuan, Gilles; Béghin, Laurent; Vanhelst, Jérémy

    2016-01-07

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a difference in physical activity assessment between a wrist-worn accelerometer at the dominant or non-dominant arm. The secondary purpose was to assess the concurrent validity of measures of physical activity from the wrist-worn accelerometer and the waist-worn accelerometer. Forty adults wore three accelerometers simultaneously, one on the waist and one each on the non-dominant wrist and dominant wrist, respectively, for 24 consecutive hours of free-living conditions. Data were uploaded from the monitor to a computer following a 1-day test period. There were no significant differences in physical activity when comparing the dominant versus the non-dominant wrist, regardless of axis (P>0·05). Mean daily accelerometer output data from both wrists were strongly correlated with average counts per minute from the ActiGraph worn around the waist (r = 0·88, P<0·001). Findings suggest that the choice to wear the accelerometer on the non-dominant or dominant wrist has no impact on results. Data from this study contribute to the knowledge of how to best assess physical activity habits.

  6. Use of a Wireless Network of Accelerometers for Improved Measurement of Human Energy Expenditure.

    PubMed

    Montoye, Alexander H; Dong, Bo; Biswas, Subir; Pfeiffer, Karin A

    2014-01-01

    Single, hip-mounted accelerometers can provide accurate measurements of energy expenditure (EE) in some settings, but are unable to accurately estimate the energy cost of many non-ambulatory activities. A multi-sensor network may be able to overcome the limitations of a single accelerometer. Thus, the purpose of our study was to compare the abilities of a wireless network of accelerometers and a hip-mounted accelerometer for the prediction of EE. Thirty adult participants engaged in 14 different sedentary, ambulatory, lifestyle and exercise activities for five minutes each while wearing a portable metabolic analyzer, a hip-mounted accelerometer (AG) and a wireless network of three accelerometers (WN) worn on the right wrist, thigh and ankle. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) were created separately for the AG and WN for the EE prediction. Pearson correlations (r) and the root mean square error (RMSE) were calculated to compare criterion-measured EE to predicted EE from the ANNs. Overall, correlations were higher (r = 0.95 vs. r = 0.88, p < 0.0001) and RMSE was lower (1.34 vs. 1.97 metabolic equivalents (METs), p < 0.0001) for the WN than the AG. In conclusion, the WN outperformed the AG for measuring EE, providing evidence that the WN can provide highly accurate estimates of EE in adults participating in a wide range of activities.

  7. Use of a Wireless Network of Accelerometers for Improved Measurement of Human Energy Expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Montoye, Alexander H.; Dong, Bo; Biswas, Subir; Pfeiffer, Karin A.

    2014-01-01

    Single, hip-mounted accelerometers can provide accurate measurements of energy expenditure (EE) in some settings, but are unable to accurately estimate the energy cost of many non-ambulatory activities. A multi-sensor network may be able to overcome the limitations of a single accelerometer. Thus, the purpose of our study was to compare the abilities of a wireless network of accelerometers and a hip-mounted accelerometer for the prediction of EE. Thirty adult participants engaged in 14 different sedentary, ambulatory, lifestyle and exercise activities for five minutes each while wearing a portable metabolic analyzer, a hip-mounted accelerometer (AG) and a wireless network of three accelerometers (WN) worn on the right wrist, thigh and ankle. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) were created separately for the AG and WN for the EE prediction. Pearson correlations (r) and the root mean square error (RMSE) were calculated to compare criterion-measured EE to predicted EE from the ANNs. Overall, correlations were higher (r = 0.95 vs. r = 0.88, p < 0.0001) and RMSE was lower (1.34 vs. 1.97 metabolic equivalents (METs), p < 0.0001) for the WN than the AG. In conclusion, the WN outperformed the AG for measuring EE, providing evidence that the WN can provide highly accurate estimates of EE in adults participating in a wide range of activities. PMID:25530874

  8. FPGA-Based Fused Smart-Sensor for Tool-Wear Area Quantitative Estimation in CNC Machine Inserts

    PubMed Central

    Trejo-Hernandez, Miguel; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; de Jesus Romero-Troncoso, Rene; Rodriguez-Donate, Carlos; Dominguez-Gonzalez, Aurelio; Herrera-Ruiz, Gilberto

    2010-01-01

    Manufacturing processes are of great relevance nowadays, when there is a constant claim for better productivity with high quality at low cost. The contribution of this work is the development of a fused smart-sensor, based on FPGA to improve the online quantitative estimation of flank-wear area in CNC machine inserts from the information provided by two primary sensors: the monitoring current output of a servoamplifier, and a 3-axis accelerometer. Results from experimentation show that the fusion of both parameters makes it possible to obtain three times better accuracy when compared with the accuracy obtained from current and vibration signals, individually used. PMID:22319304

  9. FPGA-based fused smart-sensor for tool-wear area quantitative estimation in CNC machine inserts.

    PubMed

    Trejo-Hernandez, Miguel; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; de Jesus Romero-Troncoso, Rene; Rodriguez-Donate, Carlos; Dominguez-Gonzalez, Aurelio; Herrera-Ruiz, Gilberto

    2010-01-01

    Manufacturing processes are of great relevance nowadays, when there is a constant claim for better productivity with high quality at low cost. The contribution of this work is the development of a fused smart-sensor, based on FPGA to improve the online quantitative estimation of flank-wear area in CNC machine inserts from the information provided by two primary sensors: the monitoring current output of a servoamplifier, and a 3-axis accelerometer. Results from experimentation show that the fusion of both parameters makes it possible to obtain three times better accuracy when compared with the accuracy obtained from current and vibration signals, individually used.

  10. Wear resistant valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Gerald S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A valve which is resistant to wear caused by particles trapped between the valve seat and the valve member or poppet when the valve closes, including an outlet for directing washing fluid at the valve seat and/or sealing face of the poppet and means for supplying pressured fluid to the outlet at the time when the valve is closing.

  11. Predicting Adult Pulmonary Ventilation Volume and Wearing Compliance by On-Board Accelerometry During Personal Level Exposure Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Rodes, C.E.; Chillrud, S. N.; Haskell, W. L.; Intille, S. S.; Albinali, F.; Rosenberger, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Metabolic functions typically increase with human activity, but optimal methods to characterize activity levels for real-time predictions of ventilation volume (l/min) during exposure assessments have not been available. Could tiny, triaxial accelerometers be incorporated into personal level monitors to define periods of acceptable wearing compliance, and allow the exposures (μg/m3) to be extended to potential doses in μg/min/kg of body weight? Objectives In a pilot effort, we tested: 1) whether appropriately-processed accelerometer data could be utilized to predict compliance and in linear regressions to predict ventilation volumes in real time as an on-board component of personal level exposure sensor systems, and 2) whether locating the exposure monitors on the chest in the breathing zone, provided comparable accelerometric data to other locations more typically utilized (waist, thigh, wrist, etc.). Methods Prototype exposure monitors from RTI International and Columbia University were worn on the chest by a pilot cohort of adults while conducting an array of scripted activities (all <10 METS), spanning common recumbent, sedentary, and ambulatory activity categories. Referee Wocket accelerometers that were placed at various body locations allowed comparison with the chest-located exposure sensor accelerometers. An Oxycon Mobile mask was used to measure oral-nasal ventilation volumes in-situ. For the subset of participants with complete data (n= 22), linear regressions were constructed (processed accelerometric variable versus ventilation rate) for each participant and exposure monitor type, and Pearson correlations computed to compare across scenarios. Results Triaxial accelerometer data were demonstrated to be adequately sensitive indicators for predicting exposure monitor wearing compliance. Strong linear correlations (R values from 0.77 to 0.99) were observed for all participants for both exposure sensor accelerometer variables against

  12. Predicting adult pulmonary ventilation volume and wearing complianceby on-board accelerometry during personal level exposure assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodes, C. E.; Chillrud, S. N.; Haskell, W. L.; Intille, S. S.; Albinali, F.; Rosenberger, M. E.

    2012-09-01

    BackgroundMetabolic functions typically increase with human activity, but optimal methods to characterize activity levels for real-time predictions of ventilation volume (l min-1) during exposure assessments have not been available. Could tiny, triaxial accelerometers be incorporated into personal level monitors to define periods of acceptable wearing compliance, and allow the exposures (μg m-3) to be extended to potential doses in μg min-1 kg-1 of body weight? ObjectivesIn a pilot effort, we tested: 1) whether appropriately-processed accelerometer data could be utilized to predict compliance and in linear regressions to predict ventilation volumes in real-time as an on-board component of personal level exposure sensor systems, and 2) whether locating the exposure monitors on the chest in the breathing zone, provided comparable accelerometric data to other locations more typically utilized (waist, thigh, wrist, etc.). MethodsPrototype exposure monitors from RTI International and Columbia University were worn on the chest by a pilot cohort of adults while conducting an array of scripted activities (all <10 METS), spanning common recumbent, sedentary, and ambulatory activity categories. Referee Wocket accelerometers that were placed at various body locations allowed comparison with the chest-located exposure sensor accelerometers. An Oxycon Mobile mask was used to measure oral-nasal ventilation volumes in-situ. For the subset of participants with complete data (n = 22), linear regressions were constructed (processed accelerometric variable versus ventilation rate) for each participant and exposure monitor type, and Pearson correlations computed to compare across scenarios. ResultsTriaxial accelerometer data were demonstrated to be adequately sensitive indicators for predicting exposure monitor wearing compliance. Strong linear correlations (R values from 0.77 to 0.99) were observed for all participants for both exposure sensor accelerometer variables against

  13. The GRADIO accelerometer: Design and development status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Alain; Touboul, M. P.

    1991-12-01

    The concept of Satellite Gravity Gradiometry (SGG) based on differential microaccelerometry as proposed in the early eighties is summarized. Work devoted to the development of the GRADIO accelerometers is described. The configuration was optimized for the Aristoteles mission with the objective of increasing resolution for an integrating time of 4 s. Thanks to the selected three axis configuration, very sensitive differential tests were carried out between two very representative laboratory models, in directions perpendicular to gravity. The resolution of these tests, limited by the actual stability of alignments of the testing equipment is described.

  14. Evaluation of infrared thermography body temperature and collar-mounted accelerometer and acoustic technology for predicting time of ovulation of cows in a pasture-based system.

    PubMed

    Talukder, S; Thomson, P C; Kerrisk, K L; Clark, C E F; Celi, P

    2015-03-01

    This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that the specificity of infrared thermography (IRT) in detecting cows about to ovulate could be improved using different body parts that are less likely to be contaminated by fecal matter. In addition, the combined activity and rumination data captured by accelerometers were evaluated to provide a more accurate indication of ovulation than the activity and rumination data alone. Thermal images of 30 cows were captured for different body areas (eye, ear, muzzle, and vulva) twice daily after AM and PM milking sessions during the entire experimental period. Milk progesterone data and insemination records were used to determine the date of ovulation. Cows were fitted with SCR heat and rumination long-distance tags (SCR HR LD) for 1 month. Activity- and rumination-based estrus alerts were initially identified using default threshold values set by the manufacturer; however, a range of thresholds was also created and tested for both activity and rumination to determine the potential for higher levels of accuracy of ovulation detection. Visual assessment of mounting indicators resulted in 75% sensitivity (Se), 100% specificity (Sp), and 100% positive predictive value (PPV). Overall, IRT showed poor performance for detecting cows about to ovulate. Vulval temperature resulted in the greatest (80%) Sp but the poorest (21%) Se compared with the IRT temperatures of other body areas. The SCR HR LD tags default threshold value resulted in 78% Se, 57% Sp, and 70% PPV. Lowering the activity threshold from the default value improved the sensitivity but created a large number of false positives, which resulted in a decrease in specificity. Lowering the activity threshold to 20 resulted in a detection performance of 80% Se, 94% Sp, and 67% PPV, whereas the rumination levels achieved 35% Se, 69% Sp, and 14% PPV. The area under the curve for the activity level, rumination level, and the combined measures of activity and rumination levels

  15. The location of the tibial accelerometer does influence impact acceleration parameters during running.

    PubMed

    Lucas-Cuevas, Angel Gabriel; Encarnación-Martínez, Alberto; Camacho-García, Andrés; Llana-Belloch, Salvador; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro

    2016-10-03

    Tibial accelerations have been associated with a number of running injuries. However, studies attaching the tibial accelerometer on the proximal section are as numerous as those attaching the accelerometer on the distal section. This study aimed to investigate whether accelerometer location influences acceleration parameters commonly reported in running literature. To fulfil this purpose, 30 athletes ran at 2.22, 2.78 and 3.33 m · s(-1) with three accelerometers attached with double-sided tape and tightened to the participants' tolerance on the forehead, the proximal section of the tibia and the distal section of the tibia. Time-domain (peak acceleration, shock attenuation) and frequency-domain parameters (peak frequency, peak power, signal magnitude and shock attenuation in both the low and high frequency ranges) were calculated for each of the tibial locations. The distal accelerometer registered greater tibial acceleration peak and shock attenuation compared to the proximal accelerometer. With respect to the frequency-domain analysis, the distal accelerometer provided greater values of all the low-frequency parameters, whereas no difference was observed for the high-frequency parameters. These findings suggest that the location of the tibial accelerometer does influence the acceleration signal parameters, and thus, researchers should carefully consider the location they choose to place the accelerometer so that equivalent comparisons across studies can be made.

  16. Wear testing of crosslinked polyethylene: wear rate variability and microbial contamination.

    PubMed

    Brandt, J-M; Vecherya, A; Guenther, L E; Koval, S F; Petrak, M J; Bohm, E R; Wyss, U P

    2014-06-01

    The wear performance of two types of crosslinked polyethylene (Marathon™ and XLK™, DePuy Synthes Inc., Warsaw, IN) was evaluated in a pin-on-disc wear tester, a hip wear simulator, and a knee wear simulator. Sodium azide was used as the microbial inhibitor in the calf serum-based lubricant. In the pin-on-disc wear tester, the Marathon wear rate of 5.33±0.54mm(3)/Mc was significantly lower (p=0.002) than the wear rate of 6.43±0.60mm(3)/Mc for XLK. Inversely, the Marathon wear rate of 15.07±1.03mm(3)/Mc from the hip wear simulator was 2.2-times greater than the XLK wear rate of 6.71±1.03mm(3)/Mc from the knee wear simulator. Differences in implant design, conformity, GUR type, and kinematic test conditions were suggested to account for the difference between the wear rates generated in the different types of wear testing apparati. In all wear tests, sodium azide was ineffective at inhibiting microbial growth in the lubricant. Eight different organisms were identified in the lubricant samples from the wear tests, which suggested the necessity of using an alternative, more effective microbial inhibitor. Careful sample preparation and thorough cleaning has shown to improve the consistency of the wear results. The wear rates generated in the hip and knee wear simulators closely reflected the wear behaviour of Marathon and XLK reported in published data that were tested under similar conditions.

  17. Multiple-stage integrating accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Devaney, H.F.

    1984-06-27

    An accelerometer assembly is provided for use in activating a switch in response to multiple acceleration pulses in series. The accelerometer includes a housing forming a chamber. An inertial mass or piston is slidably disposed in the chamber and spring biased toward a first or reset position. A damping system is also provided to damp piston movement in response to first and subsequent acceleration pulses. Additionally, a cam, including a Z-shaped slot, and cooperating follower pin slidably received therein are mounted to the piston and the housing. The middle or cross-over leg of the Z-shaped slot cooperates with the follower pin to block or limit piston movement and prevent switch activation in response to a lone acceleration pulse. The switch of the assembly is only activated after two or more separate acceleration pulses are sensed and the piston reaches the end of the chamber opposite the reset position.

  18. Multiple-stage integrating accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Devaney, Howard F.

    1986-01-01

    An accelerometer assembly is provided for use in activating a switch in response to multiple acceleration pulses in series. The accelerometer includes a housing forming a chamber. An inertial mass or piston is slidably disposed in the chamber and spring biased toward a first or reset position. A damping system is also provided to damp piston movement in response to first and subsequent acceleration pulses. Additionally, a cam, including a Z-shaped slot, and cooperating follower pin slidably received therein are mounted to the piston and the housing. The middle or cross-over leg of the Z-shaped slot cooperates with the follower pin to block or limit piston movement and prevent switch activation in response to a lone acceleration pulse. The switch of the assembly is only activated after two or more separate acceleration pulses are sensed and the piston reaches the end of the chamber opposite the reset position.

  19. Helmsman’s Recording Accelerometer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Silage , Principal Electrical Engineer Mitchell B. Oslon, Research Engineer Conrad Technologies, Inc. Station Square One, Suite 102 Paoli, PA 19301...SUBTITLE Helmsman’s Recording Accelerometer 6. AUTHOR(S) Donald F. DeCleene Mitchell B. Oslon Dennis A. Silage 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...58,1995. McCreight, K. K., "Assessing the Seaworthiness of SWATH Ships," SNAME Transactions, vol. 95, pp. 189-214,1987. Silage , D., Hartmann, B

  20. Accelerometer Method and Apparatus for Integral Display and Control Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting mechanical vibrations and outputting a signal in response thereto is discussed. An accelerometer package having integral display and control functions is suitable for mounting upon the machinery to be monitored. Display circuitry provides signals to a bar graph display which may be used to monitor machine conditions over a period of time. Control switches may be set which correspond to elements in the bar graph to provide an alert if vibration signals increase in amplitude over a selected trip point. The circuitry is shock mounted within the accelerometer housing. The method provides for outputting a broadband analog accelerometer signal, integrating this signal to produce a velocity signal, integrating and calibrating the velocity signal before application to a display driver, and selecting a trip point at which a digitally compatible output signal is generated.

  1. The Effect of Long-Time Austenization on the Wear Resistance and Thermal Fatigue Properties of a High-Speed Steel Roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaodan; Liu, Wei; Godfrey, Andrew; Liu, Qing

    2009-09-01

    The effects of a long-time austenization treatment on a high-speed steel (HSS) roll have been investigated. Several interesting phenomena were observed, including the decomposition of the primary bulky M3C carbides on grain boundaries and the precipitation of a large number of MC carbides of size comparable to the primary MC carbides in the grains. As a consequence of these changes, the overall carbide size decreased and the homogeneity of the carbide distribution increased. The wear resistance and thermal fatigue properties of the HSS roll were also investigated, and it was found that the long-time austenization treatment resulted in improvements to both properties.

  2. Isolation of a piezoresistive accelerometer used in high acceleration tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Davie, N.T.

    1992-12-31

    Both uniaxial and triaxial shock isolation techniques for a piezoresistive accelerometer have been developed for pyroshock and impact tests. The uniaxial shock isolation technique has demonstrated acceptable characteristics for a temperature range of {minus}50{degree}F to +186{degree}F and a frequency bandwidth of DC to 10 kHz. The triaxial shock isolation technique has demonstrated acceptable results for a temperature range of {minus}50{degree}F to 70{degree}F and a frequency bandwidth of DC to 10 kHz. These temperature ranges, that are beyond the accelerometer manufacturer`s operational limits of {minus}30{degree}F and +150{degree}F, required the calibration of accelerometers at high shock levels and at the temperature extremes of {minus}50{degree}F and +160{degree}F. The purposes of these calibrations were to insure that the accelerometers operated at the field test temperatures and to provide an accelerometer sensitivity at each test temperature. Since there is no NIST-traceable (National Institute of Standards and Technology traceable) calibration capability at shock levels of 5,000 g - 15,000 g for the temperature extremes of {minus}50{degree}F and +160{degree}F, a method for calibrating and certifying the Hopkinson bar with a transfer standard was developed. Time domain and frequency domain results are given that characterize the Hopkinson bar. The NIST-traceable accuracy for the standard accelerometer in shock is {plus_minus}5%. The Hopkinson bar has been certified by the Sandia Secondary Standards Division with an uncertainty of 6%.

  3. The Effects of Metabolic Work Rate and Ambient Environment on Physiological Tolerance Times While Wearing Explosive and Chemical Personal Protective Equipment

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Joseph T.; Stewart, Kelly L.; Stewart, Ian B.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the physiological tolerance times when wearing explosive and chemical (>35 kg) personal protective equipment (PPE) in simulated environmental extremes across a range of differing work intensities. Twelve healthy males undertook nine trials which involved walking on a treadmill at 2.5, 4, and 5.5 km·h−1 in the following environmental conditions, 21, 30, and 37°C wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT). Participants exercised for 60 min or until volitional fatigue, core temperature reached 39°C, or heart rate exceeded 90% of maximum. Tolerance time, core temperature, skin temperature, mean body temperature, heart rate, and body mass loss were measured. Exercise time was reduced in the higher WBGT environments (WBGT37 < WBGT30 < WBGT21; P < 0.05) and work intensities (5.5 < 4 < 2.5 km·h−1; P < 0.001). The majority of trials (85/108; 78.7%) were terminated due to participant's heart rate exceeding 90% of their maximum. A total of eight trials (7.4%) lasted the full duration. Only nine (8.3%) trials were terminated due to volitional fatigue and six (5.6%) due to core temperatures in excess of 39°C. These results demonstrate that physiological tolerance times are influenced by the external environment and workload and that cardiovascular strain is the limiting factor to work tolerance when wearing this heavy multilayered PPE. PMID:25866818

  4. Friction and Wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pomey, Jacques

    1952-01-01

    From the practical point of view, this analysis shows that each problem of friction or wear requires its particular solution. There is no universal solution; one or other of the factors predominates and defines the choice of the solution. In certain cases, copper alloys of great thermal conductivity are preferred; in others, plastics abundantly supplied with water. Sometimes, soft antifriction metals are desirable to distribute the load; at other times, hard metals with high resistance to abrasion or heat.

  5. Polymer Wear Modes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-10-01

    first was the rubbing of Nylon 6—6, Nylon 11, Delrin 500, Delrin AF, and ultra—high molecular weight polyethylene ( UHMWPE ) against 440C stainless steel...strength at* T T Measured Time to Temperature ofPolymer . room temp. _~~ _i ~2!~ U severe wear counterface substrate UHMWP E 24.1 MPa 140°C 400°C -1.47 rn/s

  6. Calibration and validation of individual GOCE accelerometers by precise orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, P. N. A. M.; IJssel, J. A. A. van den

    2016-01-01

    The European Space Agency Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circular Explorer (GOCE) carries a gradiometer consisting of three pairs of accelerometers in an orthogonal triad. Precise GOCE science orbit solutions (PSO), which are based on satellite-to-satellite tracking observations by the Global Positioning System and which are claimed to be at the few cm precision level, can be used to calibrate and validate the observations taken by the accelerometers. This has been done for each individual accelerometer by a dynamic orbit fit of the time series of position co-ordinates from the PSOs, where the accelerometer observations represent the non-gravitational accelerations. Since the accelerometers do not coincide with the center of mass of the GOCE satellite, the observations have to be corrected for rotational and gravity gradient terms. This is not required when using the so-called common-mode accelerometer observations, provided the center of the gradiometer coincides with the GOCE center of mass. Dynamic orbit fits based on these common-mode accelerations therefore served as reference. It is shown that for all individual accelerometers, similar dynamic orbit fits can be obtained provided the above-mentioned corrections are made. In addition, accelerometer bias estimates are obtained that are consistent with offsets in the gravity gradients that are derived from the GOCE gradiometer observations.

  7. High shock, high frequency characteristics of a mechanical isolator for a piezoresistive accelerometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Davie, N.T.

    1995-07-01

    A mechanical isolator has been developed for a piezoresistive accelerometer. The purpose of the isolator is to mitigate high frequency shocks before they reach the accelerometer because the high frequency shocks may cause the accelerometer to resonate. Since the accelerometer is undamped, it often breaks when it resonates. The mechanical isolator was developed in response to impact test requirements for a variety of structures at Sandia National Laboratories. An Extended Technical Assistance Program with the accelerometer manufacturer has resulted in a commercial isolator that will be available to the general public. This mechanical isolator has ten times the bandwidth of any other commercial isolator and has acceptable frequency domain performance from DC to 10 kHz ({plus_minus} 10%) over a temperature range of -65{degrees}F to +185{degrees}F as demonstrated in this paper.

  8. Statistical analysis of accelerometer data in the online monitoring of a power slip ring in a wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soua, S.; Bridge, B.; Cebulski, L.; Gan, T.-H.

    2012-03-01

    The use of a shock accelerometer for the continuous in-service monitoring of wear of the slip ring on a wind turbine generator is proposed and supporting results are presented. Five wear defects in the form of out-of-round circumference acceleration data with average radial dimensions in the range 5.9-25 µm were studied. A theoretical model of the acceleration at a point on the circumference of a ring as a function of the defect profile is presented. Acceleration data as a continuous function of time have been obtained for ring rotation frequencies that span the range of frequencies arising with the variation of wind speeds experienced under all in-service conditions. As a result, the measured RMS acceleration is proven to follow an overall increasing trend with frequency for all defects at all brush pressures. A statistical analysis of the root mean square of the time acceleration data as a function of the defect profiles, rotation speeds and brush contact pressure has been performed. The detection performance is considered in terms of the achievement of a signal to noise ratio exceeding 3 (99.997% defect detection probability). Under all conditions of rotation speed and pressure, this performance was achieved for average defect sizes as small as 10 µm, which is only 0.004% of the ring diameter. These results form the basis of a very sensitive defect alarm system.

  9. Accelerometer and strain gage evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammerman, D. J.; Madsen, M. M.; Uncapher, W. L.; Stenberg, D. R.; Bronowski, D. R.

    1991-06-01

    This document describes the method developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to evaluate transducer used in the design certification testing of nuclear material shipping packages. This testing project was performed by SNL for the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). This evaluation is based on the results of tests conducted to measure ruggedness, failure frequency, repeatability, and manufacturers' calibration data under both field and laboratory conditions. The results of these tests are provided and discussed. The transducer were selected for testing by surveying cask contractors and testing facilities. Important insights relating to operational characteristics of accelerometer types were gained during field testing.

  10. Validation study of Polar V800 accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Vicente, Adrián; De Cocker, Katrien; Garatachea, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Background The correct quantification of physical activity (PA) and energy expenditure (EE) in daily life is an important target for researchers and professionals. The objective of this paper is to study the validity of the Polar V800 for the quantification of PA and the estimation of EE against the ActiGraph (ActiTrainer) in healthy young adults. Methods Eighteen Caucasian active people (50% women) aged between 19–23 years wore an ActiTrainer on the right hip and a Polar V800 on the preferred wrist during 7 days. Paired samples t-tests were used to analyze differences in outcomes between devices, and Pearson’s correlation coefficients to examine the correlation between outcomes. The agreement was studied using the Bland-Altman method. Also, the association between the difference and the magnitude of the measurement (heteroscedasticity) was examined. Sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC value) were calculated to evaluate the ability of the devices to accurately define a person who fulfills the recommendation of 10,000 daily steps. Results The devices significantly differed from each other on all outcomes (P<0.05), except for Polar V800’s alerts vs. ActiTrainer’s 1 hour sedentary bouts (P=0.595) and Polar V800’s walking time vs. ActiTrainer’s lifestyle time (P=0.484). Heteroscedasticity analyses were significant for all outcomes, except for Kcal and sitting time. The ROC-AUC value was fair (0.781±0.048) and the sensitivity and specificity was 98% and 58%, respectively. Conclusions The Polar V800 accelerometer has a comparable validity to the accelerometer in free-living conditions, regarding “1 hour sedentary bouts” and “V800’s walking time vs. ActiTrainer’s lifestyle time” in young adults. PMID:27570772

  11. Micromachined low frequency rocking accelerometer with capacitive pickoff

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Simon, Jonathon N.; McConaghy, Charles F.

    2001-01-01

    A micro electro mechanical sensor that uses capacitive readout electronics. The sensor involves a micromachined low frequency rocking accelerometer with capacitive pickoff fabricated by deep reactive ion etching. The accelerometer includes a central silicon proof mass, is suspended by a thin polysilicon tether, and has a moving electrode (capacitor plate or interdigitated fingers) located at each end the proof mass. During movement (acceleration), the tethered mass moves relative to the surrounding packaging, for example, and this defection is measured capacitively by a plate capacitor or interdigitated finger capacitor, having the cooperating fixed electrode (capacitor plate or interdigitated fingers) positioned on the packaging, for example. The micromachined rocking accelerometer has a low frequency (<500 Hz), high sensitivity (.mu.G), with minimal power usage. The capacitors are connected to a power supply (battery) and to sensor interface electronics, which may include an analog to digital (A/D) converter, logic, RF communication link, antenna, etc. The sensor (accelerometer) may be, for example, packaged along with the interface electronics and a communication system in a 2".times.2".times.2" cube. The proof mass may be asymmetric or symmetric. Additional actuating capacitive plates may be used for feedback control which gives a greater dynamic range.

  12. A random forest classifier for the prediction of energy expenditure and type of physical activity from wrist and hip accelerometers.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Katherine; Kerr, Jacqueline; Godbole, Suneeta; Lanckriet, Gert; Wing, David; Marshall, Simon

    2014-11-01

    Wrist accelerometers are being used in population level surveillance of physical activity (PA) but more research is needed to evaluate their validity for correctly classifying types of PA behavior and predicting energy expenditure (EE). In this study we compare accelerometers worn on the wrist and hip, and the added value of heart rate (HR) data, for predicting PA type and EE using machine learning. Forty adults performed locomotion and household activities in a lab setting while wearing three ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers (left hip, right hip, non-dominant wrist) and a HR monitor (Polar RS400). Participants also wore a portable indirect calorimeter (COSMED K4b2), from which EE and metabolic equivalents (METs) were computed for each minute. We developed two predictive models: a random forest classifier to predict activity type and a random forest of regression trees to estimate METs. Predictions were evaluated using leave-one-user-out cross-validation. The hip accelerometer obtained an average accuracy of 92.3% in predicting four activity types (household, stairs, walking, running), while the wrist accelerometer obtained an average accuracy of 87.5%. Across all 8 activities combined (laundry, window washing, dusting, dishes, sweeping, stairs, walking, running), the hip and wrist accelerometers obtained average accuracies of 70.2% and 80.2% respectively. Predicting METs using the hip or wrist devices alone obtained root mean square errors (rMSE) of 1.09 and 1.00 METs per 6 min bout, respectively. Including HR data improved MET estimation, but did not significantly improve activity type classification. These results demonstrate the validity of random forest classification and regression forests for PA type and MET prediction using accelerometers. The wrist accelerometer proved more useful in predicting activities with significant arm movement, while the hip accelerometer was superior for predicting locomotion and estimating EE.

  13. A random forest classifier for the prediction of energy expenditure and type of physical activity from wrist and hip accelerometers

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Katherine; Kerr, Jacqueline; Godbole, Suneeta; Lanckriet, Gert; Wing, David; Marshall, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Wrist accelerometers are being used in population level surveillance of physical activity (PA) but more research is needed to evaluate their validity for correctly classifying types of PA behavior and predicting energy expenditure (EE). In this study we compare accelerometers worn on the wrist and hip, and the added value of heart rate (HR) data, for predicting PA type and EE using machine learning. Forty adults performed locomotion and household activities in a lab setting while wearing three ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers (left hip, right hip, non-dominant wrist) and a HR monitor (Polar RS400). Participants also wore a portable indirect calorimeter (COSMED K4b2), from which EE and metabolic equivalents (METs) were computed for each minute. We developed two predictive models: a random forest classifier to predict activity type and a random forest of regression trees to estimate METs. Predictions were evaluated using leave-one-user-out cross-validation. The hip accelerometer obtained an average accuracy of 92.3% in predicting four activity types (household, stairs, walking, running), while the wrist accelerometer obtained an average accuracy of 87.5%. Across all 8 activities combined (laundry, window washing, dusting, dishes, sweeping, stairs, walking, running), the hip and wrist accelerometers obtained average accuracies of 70.2% and 80.2% respectively. Predicting METs using the hip or wrist devices alone obtained root mean square errors (rMSE) of 1.09 and 1.00 METs per 6-minute bout, respectively. Including HR data improved MET estimation, but did not significantly improve activity type classification. These results demonstrate the validity of random forest classification and regression forests for PA type and MET prediction using accelerometers. The wrist accelerometer proved more useful in predicting activities with significant arm movement, while the hip accelerometer was superior for predicting locomotion and estimating EE. PMID:25340969

  14. SeismoGeodesy: Combination of High Rate, Real-time GNSS and Accelerometer Observations and Rapid Seismic Event Notification for Earth Quake Early Warning and Volcano Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Michael; Zimakov, Leonid; Moessmer, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Scientific GNSS networks are moving towards a model of real-time data acquisition, epoch-by-epoch storage integrity, and on-board real-time position and displacement calculations. This new paradigm allows the integration of real-time, high-rate GNSS displacement information with acceleration and velocity data to create very high-rate displacement records. The mating of these two instruments allows the creation of a new, very high-rate (200 Hz) displacement observable that has the full-scale displacement characteristics of GNSS and high-precision dynamic motions of seismic technologies. It is envisioned that these new observables can be used for earthquake early warning studies, volcano monitoring, and critical infrastructure monitoring applications. Our presentation will focus on the characteristics of GNSS, seismic, and strong motion sensors in high dynamic environments, including historic earthquakes replicated on a shake table over a range of displacements and frequencies. We will explore the optimum integration of these sensors from a filtering perspective including simple harmonic impulses over varying frequencies and amplitudes and under the dynamic conditions of various earthquake scenarios. We will also explore the tradeoffs between various GNSS processing schemes including real-time precise point positioning (PPP) and real-time kinematic (RTK) as applied to seismogeodesy. In addition we will discuss implementation of a Rapid Seismic Event Notification System that provides quick delivery of digital data from seismic stations to the acquisition and processing center and a full data integrity model for real-time earthquake notification that provides warning prior to significant ground shaking.

  15. Wear of engineering materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, J.A.

    1998-12-31

    Nearly 60 papers discuss fundamental and applied research in the areas of wear, erosion and wear-corrosion of materials. Focus is on ceramics, ceramic and polymer-matrix composites, and coatings; the effect of sliding wear and wear-corrosion of materials in manufacturing processes, automobiles and bearings; and wear and erosion of materials used in fossil-fuel power plants, minerals processing and heavy manufacturing.

  16. Integrated SeismoGeodetic Systsem with High-Resolution, Real-Time GNSS and Accelerometer Observation For Earthquake Early Warning Application.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passmore, P. R.; Jackson, M.; Zimakov, L. G.; Raczka, J.; Davidson, P.

    2014-12-01

    The key requirements for Earthquake Early Warning and other Rapid Event Notification Systems are: Quick delivery of digital data from a field station to the acquisition and processing center; Data integrity for real-time earthquake notification in order to provide warning prior to significant ground shaking in the given target area. These two requirements are met in the recently developed Trimble SG160-09 SeismoGeodetic System, which integrates both GNSS and acceleration measurements using the Kalman filter algorithm to create a new high-rate (200 sps), real-time displacement with sufficient accuracy and very low latency for rapid delivery of the acquired data to a processing center. The data acquisition algorithm in the SG160-09 System provides output of both acceleration and displacement digital data with 0.2 sec delay. This is a significant reduction in the time interval required for real-time transmission compared to data delivery algorithms available in digitizers currently used in other Earthquake Early Warning networks. Both acceleration and displacement data are recorded and transmitted to the processing site in a specially developed Multiplexed Recording Format (MRF) that minimizes the bandwidth required for real-time data transmission. In addition, a built in algorithm calculates the τc and Pd once the event is declared. The SG160-09 System keeps track of what data has not been acknowledged and re-transmits the data giving priority to current data. Modified REF TEK Protocol Daemon (RTPD) receives the digital data and acknowledges data received without error. It forwards this "good" data to processing clients of various real-time data processing software including Earthworm and SeisComP3. The processing clients cache packets when a data gap occurs due to a dropped packet or network outage. The cache packet time is settable, but should not exceed 0.5 sec in the Earthquake Early Warning network configuration. The rapid data transmission algorithm was tested

  17. Superconducting six-axis accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, H. J.

    1990-01-01

    A new superconducting accelerometer, capable of measuring both linear and angular accelerations, is under development at the University of Maryland. A single superconducting proof mass is magnetically levitated against gravity or any other proof force. Its relative positions and orientations with respect to the platform are monitored by six superconducting inductance bridges sharing a single amplifier, called the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). The six degrees of freedom, the three linear acceleration components and the three angular acceleration components, of the platform are measured simultaneously. In order to improve the linearity and the dynamic range of the instrument, the demodulated outputs of the SQUID are fed back to appropriate levitation coils so that the proof mass remains at the null position for all six inductance bridges. The expected intrinsic noise of the instrument is 4 x 10(exp -12)m s(exp -2) Hz(exp -1/2) for linear acceleration and 3 x 10(exp -11) rad s(exp -2) Hz(exp -1/2) for angular acceleration in 1-g environment. In 0-g, the linear acceleration sensitivity of the superconducting accelerometer could be improved by two orders of magnitude. The design and the operating principle of a laboratory prototype of the new instrument is discussed.

  18. Display-And-Alarm Circuit For Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Compact accelerometer assembly consists of commercial accelerometer retrofit with display-and-alarm circuit. Provides simple means for technician attending machine to monitor vibrations. Also simpifies automatic safety shutdown by providing local alarm or shutdown signal when vibration exceeds preset level.

  19. Micromachined high-g accelerometers: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, V.; Li, H.; Jianmin, M.

    2015-03-01

    This Topical Review reviews research and commercial development of high-g micromachined accelerometers. Emphasis is placed on different high-g sensing schemes and popular design templates used to achieve high-g sensing. Additionally, trends in high-g micromachined accelerometer development both in research and in the market are discussed.

  20. Wear and Tear - Mechanical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Theodore

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this chapter is on the long term wear and tear, or aging, of the mechanical subsystem of a spacecraft. The mechanical subsystem is herein considered to be the primary support structure (as in a skeleton or exoskeleton) upon which all other spacecraft systems rest, and the associated mechanisms. Mechanisms are devices which have some component that moves at least once, in response to some type of passive or active control system. For the structure, aging may proceed as a gradual degradation of mechanical properties and/or function, possibly leading to complete structural failure over an extended period of time. However, over the 50 years of the Space Age such failures appear to be unusual. In contrast, failures for mechanisms are much more frequent and may have a very serious effect on mission performance. Just as on Earth, all moving devices are subject to normal (and possibly accelerated) degradation from mechanical wear due to loss or breakdown of lubricant, misalignment, temperature cycling effects, improper design/selection of materials, fatigue, and a variety of other effects. In space, such environmental factors as severe temperature swings (possibly 100's of degrees C while going in and out of direct solar exposure), hard vacuum, micrometeoroids, wear from operation in a dusty or contaminated environment, and materials degradation from radiation can be much worse. In addition, there are some ground handling issues such as humidity, long term storage, and ground transport which may be of concern. This chapter addresses the elements of the mechanical subsystem subject to wear, and identifies possible causes. The potential impact of such degradation is addressed, albeit with the recognition that the impact of such wear often depends on when it occurs and on what specific components. Most structural elements of the mechanical system typically are conservatively designed (often to a safety factor of greater than approximately 1.25 on yield for

  1. A triaxial accelerometer monkey algorithm for optimal sensor placement in structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jingqing; Feng, Shuo; Liu, Wei

    2015-06-01

    Optimal sensor placement (OSP) technique is a vital part of the field of structural health monitoring (SHM). Triaxial accelerometers have been widely used in the SHM of large-scale structures in recent years. Triaxial accelerometers must be placed in such a way that all of the important dynamic information is obtained. At the same time, the sensor configuration must be optimal, so that the test resources are conserved. The recommended practice is to select proper degrees of freedom (DOF) based upon several criteria and the triaxial accelerometers are placed at the nodes corresponding to these DOFs. This results in non-optimal placement of many accelerometers. A ‘triaxial accelerometer monkey algorithm’ (TAMA) is presented in this paper to solve OSP problems of triaxial accelerometers. The EFI3 measurement theory is modified and involved in the objective function to make it more adaptable in the OSP technique of triaxial accelerometers. A method of calculating the threshold value based on probability theory is proposed to improve the healthy rate of monkeys in a troop generation process. Meanwhile, the processes of harmony ladder climb and scanning watch jump are proposed and given in detail. Finally, Xinghai NO.1 Bridge in Dalian is implemented to demonstrate the effectiveness of TAMA. The final results obtained by TAMA are compared with those of the original monkey algorithm and EFI3 measurement, which show that TAMA can improve computational efficiency and get a better sensor configuration.

  2. Agreement rates for sleep/wake judgments obtained via accelerometer and sleep diary: a comparison.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Tomoyuki

    2008-11-01

    Agreement rates for waking and sleeping obtained via sleep diary and accelerometer were evaluated, to compare the two methods. Sleep/wake data for consecutive days and nights were surveyed in 119 healthy university students. Accelerometer sleep/wake judgments obeyed the standard algorithm. Agreement rates for waking and sleeping according to accelerometer versus sleep diary, respectively, were calculated. Sleep diary data were set as a baseline. Seventy-six subjects (63.9%), 22 to 32 years of age, presented perfect data for the analysis. The mean sleep times, in minutes, judged by sleep diary and by accelerometer, were 482.3 and 629.6, respectively. The mean percentages and standard deviations of agreement on wake and sleep were 77.5% (SD = 10.2) and 86.1% (SD = 6.2), respectively. There was a significant negative relationship between the agreement rates for wake and sleep (r = -.482, p < .01). The accelerometer showed some measurement failure during waking, presumably because of the decrease in body movement. Sleep diary data during daytime appear to be more valid for detecting a sleep/wake cycle than are accelerometer data. In contrast, nocturnal sleep diary data might be supplemented by the use of an accelerometer as long as participants do not have insomnia.

  3. Validity of gait asymmetry estimation by using an accelerometer in individuals with hemiparetic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Oyake, Kazuaki; Yamaguchi, Tomofumi; Sugasawa, Masafumi; Oda, Chihiro; Tanabe, Shigeo; Kondo, Kunitsugu; Otaka, Yohei; Momose, Kimito

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity of estimating step time and length asymmetries, using an accelerometer against force plate measurements in individuals with hemiparetic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four individuals who previously had experienced a stroke were asked to walk without using a cane or manual assistance on a 16-m walkway. Step time and length were measured using force plates, which is the gold standard for assessing gait asymmetry. In addition to ground reaction forces, trunk acceleration was simultaneously measured using an accelerometer. To estimate step time asymmetry using accelerometer data, the time intervals between forward acceleration peaks for each leg were calculated. To estimate step length asymmetry using accelerometer data, the integration of the positive vertical accelerations following initial contact of each leg was calculated. Asymmetry was considered the affected side value divided by the unaffected side value. [Results] Significant correlations were found between the accelerometer and the force plates for step time and length asymmetries (rho=0.83 and rho=0.64, respectively). [Conclusion] An accelerometer might be useful for assessing step time and length asymmetries in individuals with hemiparetic stroke, although improvements are needed for estimating the accuracy of step length asymmetry. PMID:28265163

  4. Validity of gait asymmetry estimation by using an accelerometer in individuals with hemiparetic stroke.

    PubMed

    Oyake, Kazuaki; Yamaguchi, Tomofumi; Sugasawa, Masafumi; Oda, Chihiro; Tanabe, Shigeo; Kondo, Kunitsugu; Otaka, Yohei; Momose, Kimito

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity of estimating step time and length asymmetries, using an accelerometer against force plate measurements in individuals with hemiparetic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four individuals who previously had experienced a stroke were asked to walk without using a cane or manual assistance on a 16-m walkway. Step time and length were measured using force plates, which is the gold standard for assessing gait asymmetry. In addition to ground reaction forces, trunk acceleration was simultaneously measured using an accelerometer. To estimate step time asymmetry using accelerometer data, the time intervals between forward acceleration peaks for each leg were calculated. To estimate step length asymmetry using accelerometer data, the integration of the positive vertical accelerations following initial contact of each leg was calculated. Asymmetry was considered the affected side value divided by the unaffected side value. [Results] Significant correlations were found between the accelerometer and the force plates for step time and length asymmetries (rho=0.83 and rho=0.64, respectively). [Conclusion] An accelerometer might be useful for assessing step time and length asymmetries in individuals with hemiparetic stroke, although improvements are needed for estimating the accuracy of step length asymmetry.

  5. GRADIO three-axis electrostatic accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, A.

    1987-01-01

    Dedicated accelerometers for satellite gravity gradiometry (GRADIO project) are described. The design profits from experience acquired with the CACTUS accelerometer payload of the satellite CASTOR-D5B and studies of highly accurate accelerometers for inertial navigation. The principle of operation, based on a three-axis electrostatic suspension of a cubic proof mass, is well suited for the measurements of accelerations less than 0.0001 m/sec/sec. A resolution better than 10 to the minus 11th power m/sec/sec/sq root Hz is expected.

  6. What Is the Effect on Obesity Indicators from Replacing Prolonged Sedentary Time with Brief Sedentary Bouts, Standing and Different Types of Physical Activity during Working Days? A Cross-Sectional Accelerometer-Based Study among Blue-Collar Workers

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nidhi; Heiden, Marina; Aadahl, Mette; Korshøj, Mette; Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Holtermann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to investigate if (a) substituting total sedentary time or long sedentary bouts with standing or various types of physical activity and (b) substituting long sedentary bouts with brief sedentary bouts; is associated with obesity indicators using a cross sectional isotemporal substitution approach among blue-collar workers. Methods A total of 692 workers from transportation, manufacturing and cleaning sectors wore an Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometer on the thigh for 1–4 working days. The sedentary (sit and lie), standing, walking, and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) time on working days was computed using validated Acti4 software. The total sedentary time and uninterrupted sedentary time spent in brief (≤5 mins), moderate (>5 and ≤30 mins), and long (>30mins) bouts, were determined for the whole day and during work and non-work time separately. The obesity indicators, BMI (kg/m2), waist circumference (cm) and fat percentage were objectively measured. Isotemporal substitution modelling was utilized to determine the linear association with obesity indicators of replacing 30 min of total sedentary time or long sedentary bouts with standing, walking or MVPA and separately replacing 30 min of long sedentary bouts with brief sedentary bouts. Results Workers [mean (standard deviation, SD); age = 45.1 (9.9) years, BMI = 27.5 (4.9) kg/m2, %BF = 29.6 (9.5), waist circumference = 94.4 (13.0) cm] sat for 2.4 hours (~32% of the measured time, SD = 1.8 hours) across the day during work period and 5.5 hours (~62% of the measured time, SD = 1.5 hours) during non-work period. Most of the sedentary time was accrued in moderate bouts [work = 1.40 (SD = 1.09) hours] during work and in long bouts during non-work [2.7 (SD = 1.4) hours], while least in long sedentary bouts during work [work = 0.5 (SD = 0.9)] and in brief sedentary bouts [0.5 hours (SD = 0.3)] during non-work. Significant associations with all obesity indicators were

  7. Wear of materials 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Ludema, K.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on wear resistance. Topics considered at the conference included erosion in aluminium oxides, abrasive wear tests, x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, wear tests of low-cobalt alloys for hardfacing nuclear components, microstructure, the elevated temperature erosion of steels, and steels under cyclic operation in corrosive liquids.

  8. Wear of materials - 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Ludema, K.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on materials testing to determine wear resistance. Topics considered at the conference included the wear of metals in a magnetic field, ceramics in advanced heat engine applications, wear tests of silicon carbides, microstructure, hardfacing alloys, sliding friction, coated systems, abrasion, erosion, test methods, tribology, stacking fault energy, and adhesion.

  9. Wear-mechanism modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, M.F. . Dept. of Engineering)

    1993-03-01

    Goals of the program are to calculate the surface temperatures in dry sliding, develop a soft wear tester for ceramics, survey the wear mechanisms in brittle solids, and couple the temperature calculations with models to give wear maps for brittle solids. (DLC)

  10. Accelerometer Measurements in the Amusement Park.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reno, Charles; Speers, Robert R.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the use of the Texas Instruments' calculator-based laboratory (CBL) and Vernier accelerometer for measuring the vector sum of the gravitational field and the acceleration of amusement park rides. (JRH)

  11. Early recognition of regional cardiac ischemia using a 3-axis accelerometer sensor.

    PubMed

    Elle, Ole Jakob; Halvorsen, Steinar; Gulbrandsen, Martin Gunnar; Aurdal, Lars; Bakken, Andre; Samset, Eigil; Dugstad, Harald; Fosse, Erik

    2005-08-01

    Perioperative mortality in coronary artery bypass grafting is usually caused by reduced left ventricular function due to regional myocardial ischemia or infarction. Post-operative graft occlusion is a well-known problem in coronary surgery. A sensitive tool to detect graft occlusion and monitor myocardial function may give the opportunity to revise malfunctioning grafts before departure from the hospital. This paper describes how a new method can detect cardiac ischemia using a 3-axis piezoelectric accelerometer. In three anesthetized pigs, a 3-axis piezoelectric accelerometer was sutured on the lateral free wall of the left ventricle. The left anterior descending (LAD) was occluded for different time periods and the accelerometer data were sampled with a PC. Short-time Fourier transform was calculated based on the accelerometer time series. The results were visualized using a 2D color-coded time-frequency plot. In the area of occlusion, a change to stronger power of higher harmonics was observed. Consequently, a difference value between the instant frequency pattern and a reference frequency pattern showed a rise in absolute value during the occlusion period. The preliminary results indicate that early recognition of regional cardiac ischemia is possible by analyzing accelerometer data acquired from the three animal trials using the prototype 3-axis accelerometer sensor.

  12. Effectiveness of ice-vest cooling in prolonging work tolerance time during heavy exercise in the heat for personnel wearing Canadian forces chemical defense ensembles

    SciTech Connect

    Bain, B.

    1991-01-01

    Effectiveness of a portable, ice-pack cooling vest (Steelevest) in prolonging work tolerance time in chemical defense clothing in the heat (33 C dry bulb, 33% relative humidity or 25 C WBGT) was evaluated while subjects exercised at a metabolic rate of approx. 700 watts. Subjects were six male volunteers. The protocol consisted of a 20 minute treadmill walk at 1.33 m/s. and 7.5% grade, followed by 15 minutes of a lifting task, 5 minutes rest, then another 20 minutes of lifting task for a total of one hour. The lifting task consisted of lifting of 20 kg box, carrying it 3 meters and setting it down. This was followed by a 6 m walk (3m back to the start point and 3 m back to the box) 15 sec after which the lifting cycle began again. The work was classified as heavy as previously defined. This protocol was repeated until the subjects were unable to continue or they reached a physiological endpoint. Time to voluntary cessation or physiological endpoint was called the work tolerance time. Physiological endpoints were rectal temperature of 39 C, heart rate exceeding 95% of maximum for two consecutive minutes or visible loss of motor control or nausea. The cooling vest had no effect on work tolerance time, rate of rise of rectal temperature or sweat loss. It was concluded that the Steelvest ice-vest is ineffective in prolonging work tolerance time and preventing increases in rectal temperature while wearing chemical protective clothing.

  13. Optomechanical accelerometers and gravity gradiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman Cervantes, F.; Pratt, J. R.; Taylor, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Compact optical cavities can be combined with highly stable mechanical oscillators to yield accelerometers and gravity gradiometers of exquisite sensitivity, which are also traceable to the SI.We have incorporated Fabry-Pérot fiber-optic micro-cavities onto low-loss monolithic fused-silica mechanical oscillators for gradiometry, acceleration, and force sensing. These devices consist solely of a glass oscillator and fiber optics to inject and read out the coherent optical signal, making them very simple and compatible with space applications.We have demonstrated displacement sensitivities better than 200 am/√Hz with these fiber-optic micro-sensors. This translates into broadband acceleration noise floors below 100 nano-g/√Hz over a 10kHz, when combined with compact high frequency mechanical oscillators. Similarly, we have developed monolithic oscillators with resonance frequencies near and below 10 Hz, yielding measurement sensitivities better than 10-9 m/s2.We will introduce our sensor concepts and present results on our fiber-optic displacement sensors and novel optomechanical devices.

  14. Optomechanical accelerometers and gravity gradiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Felipe

    2016-04-01

    Compact optical cavities can be combined with highly stable mechanical oscillators to yield accelerometers and gravity gradiometers of exquisite sensitivity, which are also traceable to the SI. We have incorporated Fabry-Pérot fiber-optic micro-cavities onto low-loss monolithic fused-silica mechanical oscillators for gradiometry, acceleration, and force sensing. These devices consist solely of a glass oscillator and fiber optics to inject and read out the coherent optical signal, making them very simple and compatible with space applications. We have demonstrated displacement sensitivities better than 200 am/√Hz with these fiber-optic micro-sensors. This translates into broadband acceleration noise floors below 100 nano-g/√Hz over a 10kHz, when combined with compact high frequency mechanical oscillators. Similarly, we have developed monolithic oscillators with resonance frequencies near and below 10 Hz, yielding measurement sensitivities better than 10-9 m/s2. We will introduce our sensor concepts and present results on our fiber-optic displacement sensors and novel optomechanical devices.

  15. High G MEMS integrated accelerometer

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, B.R.; Barron, C.C.; Montague, S.; Smith, J.H.; Murray, J.R.; Christenson, T.R.; Bateman, V.I.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a surface micromachined accelerometer for measuring very high levels of acceleration (up to 50,000 G). Both the mechanical and electronic portions of the sensor were integrated on a single substrate using a process developed at Sandia National Laboratories. In this process, the mechanical components of the sensor were first fabricated at the bottom of a trench etched into the water substrate. The trench was then filled with oxide and sealed to protect the mechanical components during subsequent microelectronics processing. The wafer surface was then planarized in preparation for CMOS processing using Chemical Mechanical Polishing (CMP). Next, the CMOS electronics were fabricated on areas of the wafer adjacent to the embedded structures. Finally, the mechanical structures were released and the sensor tested. The mechanical structure of the sensor consisted of two polysilicon plate masses suspended by multiple springs (cantilevered beam structures) over corresponding polysilicon plates fixed to the substrate to form two parallel plate capacitors. The first polysilicon plate mass was suspended using compliant springs (cantilever beams) and acted as a variable capacitor during sensor acceleration. The second polysilicon plate mass was suspended using very stiff springs and acted as a fixed capacitor during acceleration. Acceleration was measured by comparing the capacitance of the variable capacitor (compliant suspension) with the fixed capacitance (stiff suspension).

  16. Analysis of wear-debris from full-scale bearing fatigue tests using the ferrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    The ferrograph was used to determine the types and quantities of wear particles generated during full-scale bearing fatigue tests. Deep-groove ball bearings made from AISI 52100 steel were used. A MIL-L-23699 tetraester lubricant was used in a recirculating lubrication system containing a 49 mm absolute filter. Test conditions included a maximum Hertz stress of 2.4 GPa, a shaft speed of 15,000 rpm, and a lubricant supply temperature of 74 C (165 F). Four fatigue failures were detected by accelerometers in this test set. In general, the ferrograph was more sensitive (up to 23 hr) in detecting spall initiation than either accelerometers or the normal spectrographic oil analysis. Four particle types were observed: normal rubbing wear particles, spheres, nonferrous particles, and severe wear (spall) fragments.

  17. Analysis of wear debris from full-scale bearing fatigue tests using the Ferrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    The Ferrograph was used to determine the types of quantities of wear particles generated during full-scale bearing fatigue tests. Deep-groove ball bearings made from AISI 52100 steel were used. A MIL-L-23699 tetraester lubricant was used in a recirculating lubrication system containing a 49-micron absolute filter. Test conditions included a maximum Hertz stress of 2.4 GPa, a shaft speed of 15,000 rpm and a lubricant supply temperature of 74 C (165 F). Four fatigue failures were detected by accelerometers in this test set. In general, the Ferrograph was more sensitive (up to 23 h) in detecting spall initiation than either accelerometers or the normal spectrographic oil analysis (SOAP). Four particle types were observed: normal rubbing wear particles, spheres, nonferrous particles, and severe wear (spall) fragments.

  18. Portable, real-time alloy identification of metallic wear debris from machinery lubrication systems: laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy versus x-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, Pooja

    2014-05-01

    Alloy identification of oil-borne wear debris captured on chip detectors, filters and magnetic plugs allows the machinery maintainer to assess the health of the engine or gearbox and identify specific component damage. Today, such identification can be achieved in real time using portable, at-line laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and Xray fluorescence (XRF) instruments. Both techniques can be utilized in various industries including aviation, marine, railways, heavy diesel and other industrial machinery with, however, some substantial differences in application and instrument performance. In this work, the performances of a LIBS and an XRF instrument are compared based on measurements of a wide range of typical aerospace alloys including steels, titanium, aluminum and nickel alloys. Measurement results were analyzed with a staged correlation technique specifically developed for the purposes of this study - identifying the particle alloy composition using a pre-recorded library of spectral signatures. The analysis is performed in two stages: first, the base element of the alloy is determined by correlation with the stored elemental spectra and then, the alloy is identified by matching the particle's spectral signature using parametric correlation against the stored spectra of all alloys that have the same base element. The correlation analysis has achieved highly repeatable discrimination between alloys of similar composition. Portable LIBS demonstrates higher detection accuracy and better identification of alloys comprising lighter elements as compared to that of the portable XRF system, and reveals a significant reduction in the analysis time over XRF.

  19. A panorama of tooth wear during the medieval period.

    PubMed

    Esclassan, Rémi; Hadjouis, Djillali; Donat, Richard; Passarrius, Olivier; Maret, Delphine; Vaysse, Frédéric; Crubézy, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Tooth wear is a natural phenomenon and a universal occurrence that has existed from the origin of humankind and depends on the way of life, especially diet. Tooth wear was very serious in ancient populations up to the medieval period. The aim of this paper is to present a global view of tooth wear in medieval times in Europe through different parameters: scoring systems, quantity and direction of wear, gender, differences between maxilla and mandible, relations with diet, caries, tooth malpositions and age.

  20. High resolution interface circuit for closed-loop accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yin; Xiaowei, Liu; Weiping, Chen; Zhiping, Zhou

    2011-04-01

    This paper reports a low noise switched-capacitor CMOS interface circuit for the closed-loop operation of a capacitive accelerometer. The time division multiplexing of the same electrode is adopted to avoid the strong feedthrough between capacitance sensing and electrostatic force feedback. A PID controller is designed to ensure the stability and dynamic response of a high Q closed-loop accelerometer with a vacuum package. The architecture only requires single ended operational amplifiers, transmission gates and capacitors. Test results show that a full scale acceleration of ±3 g, non-linearity of 0.05% and signal bandwidth of 1000 Hz are achieved. The complete module operates from a ±5 V supply and has a measured sensitivity of 1.2 V/g with a noise of floor of in closed-loop. The chip is fabricated in the 2 μm two-metal and two-poly n-well CMOS process with an area of 15.2 mm2. These results prove that this circuit is suitable for high performance micro-accelerometer applications like seismic detection and oil exploration.

  1. Measuring gravitation near Mercury: the contribution of ISA accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, Valerio; Peron, Roberto; Lucchesi, David; Santoli, Francesco; Lefevre, Carlo; Fiorenza, Emiliano; Nozzoli, Sergio; Lucente, Marco; Magnafico, Carmelo

    2012-07-01

    The forthcoming BepiColombo mission for the exploration of the planet Mercury will include a comprehensive set of experiments --- the so--called Radio Science Experiments (RSE) --- in order to measure the gravitational field of the planet, its rotation, and to perform precise tests of Einstein's general theory of relativity. Fundamental piece of RSE is the high--sensitivity ISA (Italian Spring Accelerometer) accelerometer. It will directly measure the strong non--gravitational perturbations acting on Mercury Planetary Orbiter spacecraft, which are an important source of error in the RSE meaurements. Being the first time for an high--sensitivity accelerometer onboard an interplanetary mission, a number of choices had to be made and several issues had to be faced in the design phases. Following a general description of the instrument scientific objectives, its working and operations will be described. Emphasis will be given on the complex calibration procedures required in the various mission phases and on the integration of the measurements with the overall RSE operations and data analysis.

  2. Citizen Sensors for SHM: Use of Accelerometer Data from Smartphones

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Maria; Fukuda, Yoshio; Mizuta, Masato; Ozer, Ekin

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitous smartphones have created a significant opportunity to form a low-cost wireless Citizen Sensor network and produce big data for monitoring structural integrity and safety under operational and extreme loads. Such data are particularly useful for rapid assessment of structural damage in a large urban setting after a major event such as an earthquake. This study explores the utilization of smartphone accelerometers for measuring structural vibration, from which structural health and post-event damage can be diagnosed. Widely available smartphones are tested under sinusoidal wave excitations with frequencies in the range relevant to civil engineering structures. Large-scale seismic shaking table tests, observing input ground motion and response of a structural model, are carried out to evaluate the accuracy of smartphone accelerometers under operational, white-noise and earthquake excitations of different intensity. Finally, the smartphone accelerometers are tested on a dynamically loaded bridge. The extensive experiments show satisfactory agreements between the reference and smartphone sensor measurements in both time and frequency domains, demonstrating the capability of the smartphone sensors to measure structural responses ranging from low-amplitude ambient vibration to high-amplitude seismic response. Encouraged by the results of this study, the authors are developing a citizen-engaging and data-analytics crowdsourcing platform towards a smartphone-based Citizen Sensor network for structural health monitoring and post-event damage assessment applications. PMID:25643056

  3. Fault Wear and Friction Evolution: Experimental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boneh, Y.; Chang, J. C.; Lockner, D. A.; Reches, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Wear is an inevitable product of frictional sliding of brittle rocks as evidenced by the ubiquitous occurrence of fault gouge and slickenside striations. We present here experimental observations designed to demonstrate the relationship between wear and friction and their governing mechanisms. The experiments were conducted with a rotary shear apparatus on solid, ring-shaped rock samples that slipped for displacements up to tens of meters. Stresses, wear and temperature were continuously monitored. We analyzed 86 experiments of Kasota dolomite, Sierra White granite, Pennsylvania quartzite, Karoo gabbro, and Tennessee sandstone at slip velocities ranging from 0.002 to 0.97 m/s, and normal stress from 0.25 to 6.9 MPa. We conducted two types of runs: short slip experiments (slip distance < 25 mm) primarily on fresh, surface-ground samples, designed to analyze initial wear mechanisms; and long slip experiments (slip distance > 3 m) designed to achieve mature wear conditions and to observe the evolution of wear and friction as the fault surfaces evolved. The experiments reveal three wear stages: initial, running-in, and steady-state. The initial stage is characterized by (1) discrete damage striations, the length of which is comparable to total slip , and local pits or plow features; (2) timing and magnitude of fault-normal dilation corresponds to transient changes of normal and shear stresses; and (3) surface roughness increasing with the applied normal stress. We interpret these observations as wear mechanisms of (a) plowing into the fresh rock surfaces; (b) asperity breakage; and (c) asperity climb. The running-in stage is characterized by (1) intense wear-rate over a critical wear distance of Rd = 0.3-2 m; (2) drop of friction coefficient over a weakening distance of Dc = 0.2-4 m; (3) Rd and Dc display positive, quasi-linear relation with each other. We interpret these observations as indicating the organizing of newly-created wear particles into a 'three

  4. Free Fall tests for the qualification of Ultra sensitive accelerometers for space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Françoise, Liorzou; Pierre, Marque Jean; Santos Rodrigues, Manuel

    ONERA is developing since a long time accelerometers for space applications in the field of Earth Observations and Fundamental Physics. The more recent examples are the accelerom-eters embarked on the ESA GOCE mission launched in March 2009, dedicated to the Earth precise gravity field mapping, and the accelerometers of the CNES MICROSCOPE mission dedicated to the in orbit test of the Equivalence Principle. Those Ultra sensitive accelerome-ters are optimised for the space environment and operate over an acceleration range less than 10-6 ms-2 with an outstanding accuracy around 10-12 ms-2Hz1/2. Their testability on ground requires creating a low gravity environment in order to verify their functionalities and partially their performances before their delivery before launch. Free fall tests are the only way to ob-tain such a microgravity environment in representating space conditions. The presentation will show in a first part the results of the free fall test campaigns performed in the 120-meter high ZARM drop tower that have led to the qualification of the GOCE accelerometers. In a second part, it will describe the test plan being conducted to assess the best free-fall environment for the MICROSCOPE accelerometers. In particular, some efforts have been paid by ZARM and ONERA to develop a dedicated "free-flyer"capsule, in order to reduce the residual drag acceleration along the fall. Some results from the preliminary tests performed in preparation to the MICROSCOPE qualification campaign will be also presented.

  5. Characterizing performance of ultra-sensitive accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebesta, Henry

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of methodology and test results pertaining to the characterization of ultra sensitive accelerometers. Two issues are of primary concern. The terminology ultra sensitive accelerometer is used to imply instruments whose noise floors and resolution are at the state of the art. Hence, the typical approach of verifying an instrument's performance by measuring it with a yet higher quality instrument (or standard) is not practical. Secondly, it is difficult to find or create an environment with sufficiently low background acceleration. The typical laboratory acceleration levels will be at several orders of magnitude above the noise floor of the most sensitive accelerometers. Furthermore, this background must be treated as unknown since the best instrument available is the one to be tested. A test methodology was developed in which two or more like instruments are subjected to the same but unknown background acceleration. Appropriately selected spectral analysis techniques were used to separate the sensors' output spectra into coherent components and incoherent components. The coherent part corresponds to the background acceleration being measured by the sensors being tested. The incoherent part is attributed to sensor noise and data acquisition and processing noise. The method works well for estimating noise floors that are 40 to 50 dB below the motion applied to the test accelerometers. The accelerometers being tested are intended for use as feedback sensors in a system to actively stabilize an inertial guidance component test platform.

  6. Electret accelerometers: physics and dynamic characterization.

    PubMed

    Hillenbrand, J; Haberzettl, S; Motz, T; Sessler, G M

    2011-06-01

    Electret microphones are produced in numbers that significantly exceed those for all other microphone types. This is due to the fact that air-borne electret sensors are of simple and low-cost design but have very good acoustical properties. In contrast, most of the discrete structure-borne sound sensors (or accelerometers) are based on the piezoelectric effect. In the present work, capacitive accelerometers utilizing the electret principle were constructed, built, and characterized. These electret accelerometers comprise a metallic seismic mass, covered by an electret film, a ring of a soft cellular polymer supplying the restoring force, and a metallic backplate. These components replace membrane, spacer, and back electrode, respectively, of the electret microphone. An adjustable static pressure to the seismic mass is generated by two metal springs. The dynamic characterization of the accelerometers was carried out by using an electrodynamic shaker and an external charge or voltage amplifier. Sensors with various seismic masses, air gap distances, and electret voltages were investigated. Charge sensitivities from 10 to 40 pC/g, voltage sensitivities from 600 to 2000 mV/g, and resonance frequencies from 3 to 1.5 kHz were measured. A model describing both the charge and the voltage sensitivity is presented. Good agreement of experimental and calculated values is found. The experimental results show that sensitive, lightweight, and inexpensive electret accelerometers can be built.

  7. Interactions between nonlinear spur gear dynamics and surface wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Huali; Kahraman, Ahmet

    2007-11-01

    In this study, two different dynamic models, a finite elements-based deformable-body model and a simplified discrete model, and a surface wear model are combined to study the interaction between gear surface wear and gear dynamic response. The proposed dynamic gear wear model includes the influence of worn surface profiles on dynamic tooth forces and transmission error as well as the influence of dynamic tooth forces on wear profiles. This paper first introduces the nonlinear dynamic models that include gear backlash and time-varying gear mesh stiffness, and a wear model separately. It presents a comparison to experiments for validation of the dynamic models. The dynamic models are combined with the wear model to study the interaction of surface wear and dynamic behavior in both linear and nonlinear response regimes. At the end, several sets of simulation results are used to demonstrate the two-way relationship between nonlinear gear dynamics and surface wear.

  8. Combining global positioning system and accelerometer data to determine the locations of physical activity in children.

    PubMed

    Oreskovic, Nicolas M; Blossom, Jeff; Field, Alison E; Chiang, Sylvia R; Winickoff, Jonathan P; Kleinman, Ronald E

    2012-05-01

    National trends indicate that children and adolescents are not achieving sufficient levels of physical activity. Combining global positioning system (GPS) technology with accelerometers has the potential to provide an objective determination in locations where youth engage in physical activity. The aim of this study was to identify the optimal methods for collecting combined accelerometer and GPS data in youth, to best locate where children spend time and are physically active. A convenience sample of 24 mid-school children in Massachusetts was included. Accelerometers and GPS units were used to quantify and locate childhood physical activity over 5 weekdays and 2 weekend days. Accelerometer and GPS data were joined by time and mapped with a geographical information system (GIS) using ArcGIS software. Data were collected in winter, spring, summer in 2009-2010, collecting a total of 26,406 matched datapoints overall. Matched data yield was low (19.1% total), regardless of season (winter, 12.8%; spring, 30.1%; summer, 14.3%). Teacher-provided, pre-charged equipment yielded the most matched (30.1%; range: 10.1-52.3%) and greatest average days (6.1 days) of data. Across all seasons, children spent most of their time at home. Outdoor use patterns appeared to vary by season, with street use increasing in spring, and park and playground use increasing in summer. Children spent equal amounts of physical activity time at home and walking in the streets. Overall, the various methods for combining GPS and accelerometer data provided similarly low amounts of combined data. No combined GPS and accelerometer data collection method proved superior in every data return category, but use of GIS to map joined accelerometer and GPS data can demarcate childhood physical activity locations.

  9. An accelerometer-based system for elite athlete swimming performance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davey, Neil P.; Anderson, Megan E.; James, Daniel A.

    2005-02-01

    The measurement of sport specific performance characteristics is an important part of an athletes training and preparation for competition. Thus automated measurement, extraction and analysis of performance measures is desired and addressed in this paper. A tri-axial accelerometer based system was located on the lower back or swimmers to record acceleration profiles. The accelerometer system contained two ADXL202 bi-axial accelerometers positioned perpendicular to one another, and can store over 6 hours of data at 150Hz per channel using internal flash memory. The simultaneous collection of video and electronics touch pad timing was used to validate the algorithm results. Using the tri-axial accelerometer data, algorithms have been developed to derive lap times and stroke count. Comparison against electronic touch pad timing against accelerometer lap times has produced results with a typical error of better than +/-0.5 seconds. Video comparison of the stroke count algorithm for freestyle also produced results with an average error of +/-1 stroke. The developed algorithms have a higher level of reliability compared to hand timed and counted date that is commonly used during training.

  10. Accelerometer-Based Step Regularity Is Lower in Older Adults with Bilateral Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Barden, John M.; Clermont, Christian A.; Kobsar, Dylan; Beauchet, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the regularity and symmetry of gait between a cohort of older adults with bilateral knee osteoarthritis (OA) and an age and sex-matched control group of older adults with healthy knees. Methods: Fifteen (8 females) older adults with knee OA (64.7 ± 6.7 years) and fifteen (8 females) pain-free controls (66.1 ± 10.0 years) completed a 9-min. walk at a self-selected, comfortable speed while wearing a single waist-mounted tri-axial accelerometer. The following gait parameters were compared between the two groups according to sex: mean step time, mean stride time, stride and step regularity (defined as the consistency of the stride-to-stride or step-to-step pattern) and the symmetry of gait (defined as the difference between step and stride regularity) as determined by an unbiased autocorrelation procedure that analyzed the pattern of acceleration in the vertical, mediolateral and anteroposterior directions. Results: Older adults with knee OA displayed significantly less step regularity in the vertical (p < 0.05) and anteroposterior (p < 0.05) directions than controls. Females with knee OA were also found to have significantly less mediolateral step regularity than female controls (p < 0.05), whereas no difference was found between males. Conclusion: The results showed that the regularity of the step pattern in individuals with bilateral knee OA was less consistent compared to similarly-aged older adults with healthy knees. The findings suggest that future studies should investigate the relationship between step regularity, sex and movement direction as well as the application of these methods to the clinical assessment of knee OA. PMID:28008312

  11. Wear Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Lewis Research Center developed a tribometer for in-house wear tests. Implant Sciences Corporation (ISC), working on a NASA contract to develop coatings to enhance the wear capabilities of materials, adapted the tribometer for its own use and developed a commercial line of user-friendly systems. The ISC-200 is a pin-on-disk type of tribometer, functioning like a record player and creating a wear groove on the disk, with variables of speed and load. The system can measure the coefficient of friction, the wear behavior between materials, and the integrity of thin films or coatings. Applications include measuring wear on contact lenses and engine parts and testing disk drives.

  12. Self diagnostic accelerometer ground testing on a C-17 aircraft engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokars, Roger P.; Lekki, John D.

    The self diagnostic accelerometer (SDA) developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center was tested for the first time in an aircraft engine environment as part of the Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research (VIPR) program. The VIPR program includes testing multiple critical flight sensor technologies. One such sensor, the accelerometer, measures vibrations to detect faults in the engine. In order to rely upon the accelerometer, the health of the accelerometer must be ensured. Sensor system malfunction is a significant contributor to propulsion in flight shutdowns (IFSD) which can lead to aircraft accidents when the issue is compounded with an inappropriate crew response. The development of the SDA is important for both reducing the IFSD rate, and hence reducing the rate at which this component failure type can put an aircraft in jeopardy, and also as a critical enabling technology for future automated malfunction diagnostic systems. The SDA is a sensor system designed to actively determine the accelerometer structural health and attachment condition, in addition to making vibration measurements. The SDA uses a signal conditioning unit that sends an electrical chirp to the accelerometer and recognizes changes in the response due to changes in the accelerometer health and attachment condition. In an effort toward demonstrating the SDA's flight worthiness and robustness, multiple SDAs were mounted and tested on a C-17 aircraft engine. The engine test conditions varied from engine off, to idle, to maximum power. The two SDA attachment conditions used were fully tight and loose. The newly developed SDA health algorithm described herein uses cross correlation pattern recognition to discriminate a healthy from a faulty SDA. The VIPR test results demonstrate for the first time the robustness of the SDA in an engine environment characterized by high vibration levels.

  13. Self Diagnostic Accelerometer Ground Testing on a C-17 Aircraft Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokars, Roger P.; Lekki, John D.

    2013-01-01

    The self diagnostic accelerometer (SDA) developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center was tested for the first time in an aircraft engine environment as part of the Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research (VIPR) program. The VIPR program includes testing multiple critical flight sensor technologies. One such sensor, the accelerometer, measures vibrations to detect faults in the engine. In order to rely upon the accelerometer, the health of the accelerometer must be ensured. Sensor system malfunction is a significant contributor to propulsion in flight shutdowns (IFSD) which can lead to aircraft accidents when the issue is compounded with an inappropriate crew response. The development of the SDA is important for both reducing the IFSD rate, and hence reducing the rate at which this component failure type can put an aircraft in jeopardy, and also as a critical enabling technology for future automated malfunction diagnostic systems. The SDA is a sensor system designed to actively determine the accelerometer structural health and attachment condition, in addition to making vibration measurements. The SDA uses a signal conditioning unit that sends an electrical chirp to the accelerometer and recognizes changes in the response due to changes in the accelerometer health and attachment condition. In an effort toward demonstrating the SDAs flight worthiness and robustness, multiple SDAs were mounted and tested on a C-17 aircraft engine. The engine test conditions varied from engine off, to idle, to maximum power. The two SDA attachment conditions used were fully tight and loose. The newly developed SDA health algorithm described herein uses cross correlation pattern recognition to discriminate a healthy from a faulty SDA. The VIPR test results demonstrate for the first time the robustness of the SDA in an engine environment characterized by high vibration levels.

  14. Dual Accelerometer Usage Strategy for Onboard Space Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanetti, Renato; D'Souza, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This work introduces a dual accelerometer usage strategy for onboard space navigation. In the proposed algorithm the accelerometer is used to propagate the state when its value exceeds a threshold and it is used to estimate its errors otherwise. Numerical examples and comparison to other accelerometer usage schemes are presented to validate the proposed approach.

  15. Three-axis MEMS Accelerometer for Structural Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbin, E.; Koleda, A.; Nesterenko, T.; Vtorushin, S.

    2016-01-01

    Microelectromechanical system accelerometers are widely used for metrological measurements of acceleration, tilt, vibration, and shock in moving objects. The paper presents the analysis of MEMS accelerometer that can be used for the structural inspection. ANSYS Multiphysics platform is used to simulate the behavior of MEMS accelerometer by employing a finite element model and MATLAB/Simulink tools for modeling nonlinear dynamic systems.

  16. A novel piezoresistive polymer nanocomposite MEMS accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seena, V.; Hari, K.; Prajakta, S.; Pratap, Rudra; Ramgopal Rao, V.

    2017-01-01

    A novel polymer MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems) accelerometer with photo-patternable polymer nanocomposite as a piezoresistor is presented in this work. Polymer MEMS Accelerometer with beam thicknesses of 3.3 µm and embedded nanocomposite piezoresistive layer having a gauge factor of 90 were fabricated. The photosensitive nanocomposite samples were prepared and characterized for analyzing the mechanical and electrical properties and thereby ensuring proper process parameters for incorporating the piezoresistive layer into the polymer MEMS accelerometer. The microfabrication process flow and unit processes followed are extremely low cost with process temperatures below 100 °C. This also opens up a new possibility for easy integration of such polymer MEMS with CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) devices and circuits. The fabricated devices were characterized using laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) and the devices exhibited a resonant frequency of 10.8 kHz and a response sensitivity of 280 nm g-1 at resonance. The main focus of this paper is on the SU-8/CB nanocomposite piezoresistive MEMS accelerometer technology development which covers the material and the fabrication aspects of these devices. CoventorWare FEA analysis performed using the extracted material properties from the experimental characterization which are in close agreement to performance parameters of the fabricated devices is also discussed. The simulated piezoresistive polymer MEMS devices showed an acceleration sensitivity of 126 nm g-1 and 82 ppm of ΔR/R per 1 g of acceleration.

  17. Micro-Accelerometers Monitor Equipment Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    Glenn Research Center awarded SBIR funding to Ann Arbor, Michigan-based Evigia Systems to develop a miniaturized accelerometer to account for gravitational effects in space experiments. The company has gone on to implement the technology in its suite of prognostic sensors, which are used to monitor the integrity of industrial machinery. As a result, five employees have been hired.

  18. Smartphone MEMS accelerometers and earthquake early warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Q.; Allen, R. M.; Schreier, L.; Kwon, Y. W.

    2015-12-01

    The low cost MEMS accelerometers in the smartphones are attracting more and more attentions from the science community due to the vast number and potential applications in various areas. We are using the accelerometers inside the smartphones to detect the earthquakes. We did shake table tests to show these accelerometers are also suitable to record large shakings caused by earthquakes. We developed an android app - MyShake, which can even distinguish earthquake movements from daily human activities from the recordings recorded by the accelerometers in personal smartphones and upload trigger information/waveform to our server for further analysis. The data from these smartphones forms a unique datasets for seismological applications, such as earthquake early warning. In this talk I will layout the method we used to recognize earthquake-like movement from single smartphone, and the overview of the whole system that harness the information from a network of smartphones for rapid earthquake detection. This type of system can be easily deployed and scaled up around the global and provides additional insights of the earthquake hazards.

  19. Low-Cost Accelerometers for Physics Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannoni, Maurizio; Straulino, Samuele

    2007-01-01

    The implementation of a modern game-console controller as a data acquisition interface for physics experiments is discussed. The investigated controller is equipped with three perpendicular accelerometers and a built-in infrared camera to evaluate its own relative position. A pendulum experiment is realized as a demonstration of the proposed…

  20. Accelerometer-controlled automatic braking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreher, R. C.; Sleeper, R. K.; Nayadley, J. R., Sr.

    1973-01-01

    Braking system, which employs angular accelerometer to control wheel braking and results in low level of tire slip, has been developed and tested. Tests indicate that system is feasible for operations on surfaces of different slipperinesses. System restricts tire slip and is capable of adapting to rapidly-changing surface conditions.

  1. Strong Motion Seismograph Based On MEMS Accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Y.; Hu, X.

    2013-12-01

    The MEMS strong motion seismograph we developed used the modularization method to design its software and hardware.It can fit various needs in different application situation.The hardware of the instrument is composed of a MEMS accelerometer,a control processor system,a data-storage system,a wired real-time data transmission system by IP network,a wireless data transmission module by 3G broadband,a GPS calibration module and power supply system with a large-volumn lithium battery in it. Among it,the seismograph's sensor adopted a three-axis with 14-bit high resolution and digital output MEMS accelerometer.Its noise level just reach about 99μg/√Hz and ×2g to ×8g dynamically selectable full-scale.Its output data rates from 1.56Hz to 800Hz. Its maximum current consumption is merely 165μA,and the device is so small that it is available in a 3mm×3mm×1mm QFN package. Furthermore,there is access to both low pass filtered data as well as high pass filtered data,which minimizes the data analysis required for earthquake signal detection. So,the data post-processing can be simplified. Controlling process system adopts a 32-bit low power consumption embedded ARM9 processor-S3C2440 and is based on the Linux operation system.The processor's operating clock at 400MHz.The controlling system's main memory is a 64MB SDRAM with a 256MB flash-memory.Besides,an external high-capacity SD card data memory can be easily added.So the system can meet the requirements for data acquisition,data processing,data transmission,data storage,and so on. Both wired and wireless network can satisfy remote real-time monitoring, data transmission,system maintenance,status monitoring or updating software.Linux was embedded and multi-layer designed conception was used.The code, including sensor hardware driver,the data acquisition,earthquake setting out and so on,was written on medium layer.The hardware driver consist of IIC-Bus interface driver, IO driver and asynchronous notification driver. The

  2. Research on the effect of wear-ring clearances to the axial and radial force of a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W. G.; Y He, M.; Qi, C. X.; Li, Y. B.

    2013-12-01

    Varying of the wear-ring clearance not only has a distinct effect on the volumetric loss of the centrifugal pump, but also on the performance of the centrifugal pump including the axial and radial forces. Comparing with the experimental studies, numerical simulation methods have some special advantages, such as the low cost, fast and high efficiency, and convenient to get the detailed structure of the internal flow characteristics, so it has been widely used in the fluid machinery study in recent years. In order to study the effect of wear-ring clearance on the force performance of the centrifugal pump, based on the Reynolds Time-Averaged N-S equations and RNG k-ε turbulence model, a centrifugal pump with three variable styles of the wear-rings was simulated: Only the clearance of the front wear-ring was changed, only the clearance of the back wear-ring was changed and both were changed. Comparing with the experiment, numerical results show a good agreement. In the three changing styles of the clearance, the variable of the clearance of front wear-ring has the most influence on the axial force of the centrifugal pump, while has tiny effect on the radial force for all the conditions.

  3. Polymer wear and its control

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Recent advances in polymer (P) tribology are discussed in reviews and reports based on contributions to a symposium held by the Division of Polymeric Materials Science and Engineering of the Americal Chemical Society in St. Louis in spring 1984. Topics examined are mechanisms of P wear, controls of P wear, the tribological behavior of Ps, wear of biomaterials and P composites, characterization and measurements of P wear, and degradation and wear of polymeric films and filaments. Consideration is given to the fracture and surface energetics of P wear, fatigue-abrasive mechanisms of P wear, plasma modification of P surfaces, the wear characteristics of articular cartilage, the role of fillers in the wear of high-density polyethylene, the tribology of fiber-reinforced polyimides sliding against steel and Si3N4, laboratory and in-service wear tests of Ps, and the effect of degree of crystallinity on wear of poly(ethylene terephthalate).

  4. Evaluation of MEMS-Based Wireless Accelerometer Sensors in Detecting Gear Tooth Faults in Helicopter Transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David George; Lambert, Nicholas A.; Wagoner, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The diagnostics capability of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) based rotating accelerometer sensors in detecting gear tooth crack failures in helicopter main-rotor transmissions was evaluated. MEMS sensors were installed on a pre-notched OH-58C spiral-bevel pinion gear. Endurance tests were performed and the gear was run to tooth fracture failure. Results from the MEMS sensor were compared to conventional accelerometers mounted on the transmission housing. Most of the four stationary accelerometers mounted on the gear box housing and most of the CI's used gave indications of failure at the end of the test. The MEMS system performed well and lasted the entire test. All MEMS accelerometers gave an indication of failure at the end of the test. The MEMS systems performed as well, if not better, than the stationary accelerometers mounted on the gear box housing with regards to gear tooth fault detection. For both the MEMS sensors and stationary sensors, the fault detection time was not much sooner than the actual tooth fracture time. The MEMS sensor spectrum data showed large first order shaft frequency sidebands due to the measurement rotating frame of reference. The method of constructing a pseudo tach signal from periodic characteristics of the vibration data was successful in deriving a TSA signal without an actual tach and proved as an effective way to improve fault detection for the MEMS.

  5. Application of Accelerometer Data to Mars Odyssey Aerobraking and Atmospheric Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolson, R. H.; Keating, G. M.; George, B. E.; Escalera, P. E.; Werner, M. R.; Dwyer, A. M.; Hanna, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    Aerobraking was an enabling technology for the Mars Odyssey mission even though it involved risk due primarily to the variability of the Mars upper atmosphere. Consequently, numerous analyses based on various data types were performed during operations to reduce these risk and among these data were measurements from spacecraft accelerometers. This paper reports on the use of accelerometer data for determining atmospheric density during Odyssey aerobraking operations. Acceleration was measured along three orthogonal axes, although only data from the component along the axis nominally into the flow was used during operations. For a one second count time, the RMS noise level varied from 0.07 to 0.5 mm/s2 permitting density recovery to between 0.15 and 1.1 kg per cu km or about 2% of the mean density at periapsis during aerobraking. Accelerometer data were analyzed in near real time to provide estimates of density at periapsis, maximum density, density scale height, latitudinal gradient, longitudinal wave variations and location of the polar vortex. Summaries are given of the aerobraking phase of the mission, the accelerometer data analysis methods and operational procedures, some applications to determining thermospheric properties, and some remaining issues on interpretation of the data. Pre-flight estimates of natural variability based on Mars Global Surveyor accelerometer measurements proved reliable in the mid-latitudes, but overestimated the variability inside the polar vortex.

  6. Comparison of IPAQ-SF and Two Other Physical Activity Questionnaires with Accelerometer in Adolescent Boys

    PubMed Central

    Mäestu, Jarek; Lätt, Evelin; Jürimäe, Jaak; Vainik, Uku

    2017-01-01

    Self-report measures of physical activity (PA) are easy to use and popular but their reliability is often questioned. Therefore, the general aim of the present study was to investigate the association of PA questionnaires with accelerometer derived PA, in a sample of adolescent boys. In total, 191 pubertal boys (mean age 14.0 years) completed three self-report questionnaires and wore an accelerometer (ActiGraph GT1M) for 7 consecutive days. The PA questionnaires were: International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form (IPAQ-SF), Tartu Physical Activity Questionnaire (TPAQ), and the Inactivity subscale from Domain-Specific Impulsivity (DSI) scale. All three questionnaires were significantly correlated with accelerometer derived MVPA: the correlations were 0.31 for the IPAQ-SF MVPA, 0.34 for the TPAQ MVPA and -0.29 for the DSI Inactivity scale. Nevertheless, none of the questionnaires can be used as a reliable individual-level estimate of MVPA in male adolescents. The boys underreported their MVPA in IPAQ-SF as compared to accelerometer-derived MVPA (respective averages 43 and 56 minutes); underreporting was more marked in active boys with average daily MVPA at least 60 minutes, and was not significant in less active boys. Conversely, MVPA index from TPAQ overestimated the MVPA in less active boys but underestimated it in more active boys. The sedentary time reported in IPAQ-SF was an underestimate as compared to accelerometer-derived sedentary time (averages 519 and 545 minutes, respectively). PMID:28056080

  7. High Shock, High Frequency Characteristics of a Mechanical Isolator for a Piezoresistive Accelerometer, the ENDEVCO 7270AM6*

    SciTech Connect

    BATEMAN,VESTA I.; BROWN,FREDERICK A.; NUSSER,MICHAEL A.

    2000-07-01

    A mechanical isolator has been developed for a piezoresistive accelerometer. The purpose of the isolator is to mitigate high frequency shocks before they reach the accelerometer because the high frequency shocks may cause the accelerometer to resonate. Since the accelerometer is undamped, it often breaks when it resonates. The mechanical isolator was developed in response to impact test requirements for a variety of structures at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). An Extended Technical Assistance Program (ETAP) with the accelerometer manufacturer has resulted in a commercial mechanically isolated accelerometer that is available to the general public, the ENDEVCO 7270AM6*, for three shock acceleration ranges of 6,000 g, 20,000 g, and 60,000 g. The in-axis response shown in this report has acceptable frequency domain performance from DC to 10 kHz and 10(XO)over a temperature range of {minus}65 F to +185 F. Comparisons with other isolated accelerometers show that the ENDEVCO 7270AM6 has ten times the bandwidth of any other commercial isolator. ENDEVCO 7270AM6 cross-axis response is shown in this report.

  8. Robust Optimization of a MEMS Accelerometer Considering Temperature Variations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guangjun; Yang, Feng; Bao, Xiaofan; Jiang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    A robust optimization approach for a MEMS accelerometer to minimize the effects of temperature variations is presented. The mathematical model of the accelerometer is built. The effects of temperature variations on the output performance of the accelerometer are determined, and thermal deformation of the accelerometer is analyzed. The deviations of the output capacitance and resonance frequency due to temperature fluctuations are calculated and discussed. The sensitivity analysis method is employed to determine the design variables for robust optimization and find out the key structural parameters that have most significant influence on the output capacitance and resonance frequency of the accelerometer. The mathematical model and procedure for the robust optimization of the accelerometer are proposed. The robust optimization problem is solved and discussed. The robust optimization results show that an optimized accelerometer with high sensitivity, high temperature robustness and decoupling structure is finally obtained. PMID:25785308

  9. Feasibility study of ZnO nanowire made accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Chan; Ko, Hyun-U.; Song, Sangho; Yun, Youngmin; Kim, Jaehwan

    2016-04-01

    Vertically aligned arrays of ZnO nanowire can be used for many applications such as energy harvesters, UV sensors and mechanical sensors. Here we report the feasibility of a miniaturized accelerometer made with ZnO nanowire. For improving the sensitivity of miniaturized piezoelectric accelerometer, size of piezoelectric ceramic should be large which results in heavy accelerometer and low resonance frequency. To resolve the problem for the miniaturized accelerometer fabrication, ZnO nanowire is chosen. ZnO nanowire, which has piezoelectric property with Wurtzite structure. Since it has high aspect ratio, the use of ZnO nanowire leads to increase deformation and piezoelectric response output. The vertically ZnO nanowire array is grown on a copper substrate by hydrothermal synthesis process. Detail Fabrication process of the miniaturized accelerometer is illustrated. To prove the feasibility of the fabricated accelerometer, dynamic response test is performed in comparison with a commercial accelerometer.

  10. Validation of the Actical Accelerometer in Multiethnic Preschoolers: The Children's Healthy Living (CHL) Program

    PubMed Central

    Ettienne, Reynolette; Li, Fenfang; Su, Yuhua; McGlone, Katalina; Luick, Bret; Tachibana, Alvin; Carran, Christina; Mercado, Jobel; Novotny, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the validity and reliability of the Actical accelerometer for measuring physical activity (PA) in preschool children of mixed ethnicity, compared with direct observation via a modified System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time (SOFIT) protocol and proxy parental reports (PA Logs). Fifty children in Hawai‘i wore wrist-mounted accelerometers for two 7-day periods with a washout period between each week. Thirty children were concurrently observed using SOFIT. Parents completed PA Logs for three days. Reliability and validity were measured by intra-class correlation coefficient and proportions of agreement concurrently. There was slight agreement (proportion of agreement: 82%; weighted Kappa=.17, P <.001) between the accelerometer and SOFIT as well as between the accelerometer and the PA Logs (proportions of agreement: 40%; weighted Kappa=0.15, P <.001). PA logs underestimated the PA levels of the children, while the Actical was found to be valid and reliable for estimating PA levels of multiethnic, mixed ethnicity preschoolers. These findings suggest that accelerometers can be objective, valid, and accurate physical activity assessment tools compared to conventional PA logs and subjective reports of activity for preschool children of mixed ethnicity. PMID:27099804

  11. NASA interdisciplinary collaboration in tribology. A review of oxidational wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, T. F. J.

    1983-01-01

    An in-depth review of oxidational wear of metals is presented. Special emphasis is given to a description of the concept of oxidational wear and the formulation of an Oxidational Wear Theory. The parallelism between the formation of an oxide film for dry contact conditions and the formation of other surface films for a lubricated contact is discussed. The description of oxidational wear is prefaced with a unification of wear modes into two major classes of mild and severe wear including both lubricated and dry contacts. Oxidational wear of metals is a class of mild wear where protective oxide films are formed at real areas of contact and during the time of contact at temperataure T sub c. When the oxide reaches a critical thickness, frequently in the range of 1 to 3 microns, the oxide breaks up and eventually appears as a wear particle. These oxides are preferentially formed on plateaux which alternately carry the load as they reach their critical thickness and are removed. If the system is operated at elevated temperatures, thick oxides can form both out of contact and between the plateaux. Temperature is important in determining the structure of the oxide film present. Spinel oxide (Fe3O4) which forms above 300 C is more protective than the lower temperature rhomobohedral (alpha-Fe2O3) oxide which is abrasive. An Oxidational Wear Theory is derived using a modified Archard wear law expressed in terms of activation energy (Qp) and Arrhenius constant (Ap).

  12. A mechanical filter for FBG accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocciolone, Marco; Bucca, Giuseppe; Collina, Andrea; Comolli, Lorenzo

    2014-05-01

    Many applications are characterized by very severe environment from the sensors point of view. An example is the railway field, where often the measurement setup is subjected to high voltage and electromagnetic emission. In these work conditions, optical sensors are more suitable than electrical ones due to their characteristics. In this paper, the acceleration measurements are taken into account. Nowadays many optical accelerometers are present on the market. In particular, in this work FBG accelerometers are considered. This kind of sensors is characterized by an undamped resonance that can produce the break of the sensor. One possibility to avoid this problem is to add a damping effect in order to reduce the resonance amplification. In the following section, the method to reproduce a mechanical filter able to increase the damping coefficient of the sensor is presented. Experimental results in laboratory will be discussed, showing the effectiveness of the solution.

  13. Ferrographic analysis of wear debris from full-scale bearing fatigue tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1979-01-01

    The Ferrograph was used to determine the types and quantities of wear particles generated during full scale bearing fatigue tests. Deep-groove ball bearings made from steel were used. A tetraester lubricant was used in a recirculating lubricant system containing a 49 micrometers absolute filter. Test conditions include a maximum Hertz stress of 2.4 GPa, a shaft speed of 15,000 rpm, and a lubricant supply temperature of 74 C (165 F). Four fatigue failures were detected by accelerometers in this test set. In general, the Ferrograph was more sensitive (up to 23 hr) in detecting spall initiation than either accelerometers or the normal spectrographic oil analysis. Four particle types were observed: normal rubbing weather particles, spheres, nonferrous particles, and severe wear (spall) fragments.

  14. A very low noise monolithic Horizontal accelerometer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolini, Alessandro; Takamori, Akiteru; Cella, Giancarlo; Fidecaro, Francesco; Francesconi, Mario; Desalvo, Riccardo; Sannibale, Virginio

    2000-04-01

    We present a new low noise, low frequency, horizontal accelerometer. The mechanical design and the machining process aim to improve the sensitivity in the frequency region between 0.01 and 1 Hz, where metal internal friction and thermal elastic effects become critical. The accelerometer mechanics is shaped as a small folded pendulum in order to obtain a very low resonant frequency and low mechanical losses. A folded pendulum is essentially a mass suspended on one side by a simple pendulum and on the other by an inverted pendulum working antagonistically. The straight pendulum positive gravitational spring constant is balanced by the inverted pendulum’s negative one; by changing the center of mass position one can lower arbitrarily the resonant frequency. The only dissipation is in the anelasticity of the mechanical flex joint and in the readout/actuation system. If the spring constant is minimised, the mechanical losses are minimal. The monolithic design of the accelerometer eliminates the stick-and-slip friction localised in the flexure clamps. Low stiffness, 10 micron thick flex joints are achieved by EDM and electropolishing. The instrument is equipped with a low capacitance position sensor; the signal from the sensor is filtered by a PID controller and fed back to the mass through capacitive force actuator for feedback closed-loop operation. The sensor noise matches the expected thermal noise performances, 10-12 m/√Hz , with measuring range of a few microns. The expected sensitivity, less than 10-11 m/ s^2 / √Hz around 150 mHz, is a factor 30 below the state of the art limit. This accelerometer was designed to be integrated in the active control of the LIGO II mirror seismic isolators.

  15. Reliability of accelerometer-determined physical activity and sedentary behavior in school-aged children: a 12-country study

    PubMed Central

    Barreira, T V; Schuna, J M; Tudor-Locke, C; Chaput, J-P; Church, T S; Fogelholm, M; Hu, G; Kuriyan, R; Kurpad, A; Lambert, E V; Maher, C; Maia, J; Matsudo, V; Olds, T; Onywera, V; Sarmiento, O L; Standage, M; Tremblay, M S; Zhao, P; Katzmarzyk, P T

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Focused on the accelerometer-determined physical activity and sedentary time metrics in 9–11-year-old children, we sought to determine the following: (i) number of days that are necessary to achieve reliable estimates (G⩾0.8); (ii) proportion of variance attributed to different facets (participants and days) of reliability estimates; and (iii) actual reliability of data as collected in The International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and Environment (ISCOLE). Methods: The analytical sample consisted of 6025 children (55% girls) from sites in 12 countries. Physical activity and sedentary time metrics measures were assessed for up to 7 consecutive days for 24 h per day with a waist-worn ActiGraph GT3X+. Generalizability theory using R software was used to investigate the objectives i and ii. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) were computed using SAS PROC GLM to inform objective iii. Results: The estimated minimum number of days required to achieve a reliability estimate of G⩾0.8 ranged from 5 to 9 for boys and 3 to 11 for girls for light physical activity (LPA); 5 to 9 and 3 to 10, for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA); 5 to 10 and 4 to 10 for total activity counts; and 7 to 11 and 6 to 11 for sedentary time, respectively. For all variables investigated, the ‘participant' facet accounted for 30–50% of the variability, whereas the ‘days' facet accounted for ⩽5%, and the interaction (P × D) accounted for 50–70% of the variability. The actual reliability for boys in ISCOLE ranged from ICCs of 0.78 to 0.86, 0.73 to 0.85 and 0.72 to 0.86 for LPA, MVPA and total activity counts, respectively, and 0.67 to 0.79 for sedentary time. The corresponding values for girls were 0.80–0.88, 0.70–0.89, 0.74–0.86 and 0.64–0.80. Conclusions: It was rare that only 4 days from all participants would be enough to achieve desirable reliability estimates. However, asking participants to wear the device for 7 days and requiring

  16. High performance MEMS accelerometers for concrete SHM applications and comparison with COTS accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavitha, S.; Joseph Daniel, R.; Sumangala, K.

    2016-01-01

    Accelerometers used for civil and huge mechanical structural health monitoring intend to measure the shift in the natural frequency of the monitored structures (<100 Hz) and such sensors should have large sensitivity and extremely low noise floor. Sensitivity of accelerometers is inversely proportional to the frequency squared. Commercial MEMS (Micro Electro-Mechanical System) accelerometers that are generally designed for large bandwidth (e.g 25 kHz in ADXL150) have poor sensor level sensitivity and therefore uses complex signal conditioning electronics to achieve large sensitivity and low noise floor which in turn results in higher cost. In this work, an attempt has been made to design MEMS capacitive and piezoresistive accelerometers for smaller bandwidth using IntelliSuite and CoventorWare MEMS tools respectively. The various performance metrics have been obtained using simulation experiments and the results show that these sensors have excellent voltage sensitivity, noise performance and high resolution at sensor level and are even superior to commercial MEMS accelerometers.

  17. Correlating tool wear, tool life, surface roughness and tool vibration in finish turning with coated carbide tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, M. E. R.; Diniz, A. E.

    1994-04-01

    Experiments have been carried out in an attempt to monitor the change of workpiece surface roughness caused by the increase of tool wear, through the variation of the vibration in finish turning, under different cutting conditions. The vibration was measured by two accelerometers attached to the tool and the parameter used to make the correlation with surface roughness was the r.m.s. of the signal. The tool of one experiment was photographed at different stages of the cut in order to explain the wear formation and the behaviour of surface roughness as the cutting time elapsed. The material machined was AISI 4340 steel and the tool was coated carbide inserts. The results show that vibration of the tool can be a good way to monitor on-line the growth of surface roughness in finish turning and, therefore, it can be useful for establishing the end of tool life in these operations. Another conclusion is that, when coated tools are used, the behaviour of surface roughness as cutting time elapses is very different from that when uncoated tools are used.

  18. Machine Learning Methods for Classifying Human Physical Activity from On-Body Accelerometers

    PubMed Central

    Mannini, Andrea; Sabatini, Angelo Maria

    2010-01-01

    The use of on-body wearable sensors is widespread in several academic and industrial domains. Of great interest are their applications in ambulatory monitoring and pervasive computing systems; here, some quantitative analysis of human motion and its automatic classification are the main computational tasks to be pursued. In this paper, we discuss how human physical activity can be classified using on-body accelerometers, with a major emphasis devoted to the computational algorithms employed for this purpose. In particular, we motivate our current interest for classifiers based on Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). An example is illustrated and discussed by analysing a dataset of accelerometer time series. PMID:22205862

  19. Physical Activity and Adiposity Markers at Older Ages: Accelerometer Vs Questionnaire Data

    PubMed Central

    Sabia, Séverine; Cogranne, Pol; van Hees, Vincent T.; Bell, Joshua A.; Elbaz, Alexis; Kivimaki, Mika; Singh-Manoux, Archana

    2015-01-01

    Objective Physical activity is critically important for successful aging, but its effect on adiposity markers at older ages is unclear as much of the evidence comes from self-reported data on physical activity. We assessed the associations of questionnaire-assessed and accelerometer-assessed physical activity with adiposity markers in older adults. Design/Setting/Participants This was a cross-sectional study on 3940 participants (age range 60-83 years) of the Whitehall II study who completed a 20-item physical activity questionnaire and wore a wrist-mounted accelerometer for 9 days in 2012 and 2013. Measurements Total physical activity was estimated using metabolic equivalent hours/week for the questionnaire and mean acceleration for the accelerometer. Time spent in moderate-and-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was also assessed by questionnaire and accelerometer. Adiposity assessment included body mass index, waist circumference, and fat mass index. Fat mass index was calculated as fat mass/height² (kg/m²), with fat mass estimated using bioimpedance. Results Greater total physical activity was associated with lower adiposity for all adiposity markers in a dose-response manner. In men, the strength of this association was 2.4 to 2.8 times stronger with the accelerometer than with questionnaire data. In women, it was 1.9 to 2.3 times stronger. For MVPA, questionnaire data in men suggested no further benefit for adiposity markers past 1 hour/week of activity. This was not the case for accelerometer-assessed MVPA where, for example, compared with men undertaking <1 hour/week of accelerometer-assessed MVPA, waist circumference was 3.06 (95% confidence interval 2.06–4.06) cm lower in those performing MVPA 1–2.5 hours/week, 4.69 (3.47–5.91) cm lower in those undertaking 2.5–4 hours/week, and 7.11 (5.93–8.29) cm lower in those performing ≥4 hours/week. Conclusions The association of physical activity with adiposity markers in older adults was

  20. Intelligent identification of wear mechanism via on-line ferrograph images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tonghai; Peng, Yeping; Sheng, Chenxing; Wu, Jiaoyi

    2014-03-01

    Condition based maintenance(CBM) issues a new challenge of real-time monitoring for machine health maintenance. Wear state monitoring becomes the bottle-neck of CBM due to the lack of on-line information acquiring means. The wear mechanism judgment with characteristic wear debris has been widely adopted in off-line wear analysis; however, on-line wear mechanism characterization remains a big problem. In this paper, the wear mechanism identification via on-line ferrograph images is studied. To obtain isolated wear debris in an on-line ferrograph image, the deposition mechanism of wear debris in on-line ferrograph sensor is studied. The study result shows wear debris chain is the main morphology due to local magnetic field around the deposited wear debris. Accordingly, an improved sampling route for on-line wear debris deposition is designed with focus on the self-adjustment deposition time. As a result, isolated wear debris can be obtained in an on-line image, which facilitates the feature extraction of characteristic wear debris. By referring to the knowledge of analytical ferrograph, four dimensionless morphological features, including equivalent dimension, length-width ratio, shape factor, and contour fractal dimension of characteristic wear debris are extracted for distinguishing four typical wear mechanisms including normal, cutting, fatigue, and severe sliding wear. Furthermore, a feed-forward neural network is adopted to construct an automatic wear mechanism identification model. By training with the samples from analytical ferrograph, the model might identify some typical characteristic wear debris in an on-line ferrograph image. This paper performs a meaningful exploratory for on-line wear mechanism analysis, and the obtained results will provide a feasible way for on-line wear state monitoring.

  1. Dynamic Fluid in a Porous Transducer-Based Angular Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Siyuan; Fu, Mengyin; Wang, Meiling; Ming, Li; Fu, Huijin; Wang, Tonglei

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical model of the dynamics of liquid flow in an angular accelerometer comprising a porous transducer in a circular tube of liquid. Wave speed and dynamic permeability of the transducer are considered to describe the relation between angular acceleration and the differential pressure on the transducer. The permeability and streaming potential coupling coefficient of the transducer are determined in the experiments, and special prototypes are utilized to validate the theoretical model in both the frequency and time domains. The model is applied to analyze the influence of structural parameters on the frequency response and the transient response of the fluidic system. It is shown that the radius of the circular tube and the wave speed affect the low frequency gain, as well as the bandwidth of the sensor. The hydrodynamic resistance of the transducer and the cross-section radius of the circular tube can be used to control the transient performance. The proposed model provides the basic techniques to achieve the optimization of the angular accelerometer together with the methodology to control the wave speed and the hydrodynamic resistance of the transducer. PMID:28230793

  2. ISA accelerometer: fundamental support for the exploration of planet Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, Valerio; Fiorenza, Emiliano; Lefevre, Carlo; Nozzoli, Sergio; Peron, Roberto; Reale, Andrea; Santoli, Francesco

    2010-05-01

    The development of BepiColombo mission is proceeding, in view of the launch, foreseen for 2014. This mission will perform a thorough study of the planet Mercury and its environment. An important set of scientific objectives is constituted by the so-called Radio Science Experiments (RSE), which will study the gravitational field and rotation of the planet, and will perform very precise tests of general relativity theory. In order to reach the required level of accuracy in recovering the relevant parameters, the data coming from the high-sensitivity ISA (Italian Spring Accelerometer) instrument onboard the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) will be used: this will be the first time for a deep-space probe. Following a brief description of the mission and RSE, the instrument and its wide capabilities will be reviewed. The focus will be in particular on the updated error budget, operational procedures and extended use of the instrument in the various parts of the RSE. It will be also described the procedure for on-ground calibration of the accelerometer.

  3. A biomimetic accelerometer inspired by the cricket's clavate hair.

    PubMed

    Droogendijk, H; de Boer, M J; Sanders, R G P; Krijnen, G J M

    2014-08-06

    Crickets use so-called clavate hairs to sense (gravitational) acceleration to obtain information on their orientation. Inspired by this clavate hair system, a one-axis biomimetic accelerometer has been developed and fabricated using surface micromachining and SU-8 lithography. An analytical model is presented for the design of the accelerometer, and guidelines are derived to reduce responsivity due to flow-induced contributions to the accelerometer's output. Measurements show that this microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) hair-based accelerometer has a resonance frequency of 320 Hz, a detection threshold of 0.10 ms(-2) and a dynamic range of more than 35 dB. The accelerometer exhibits a clear directional response to external accelerations and a low responsivity to airflow. Further, the accelerometer's physical limits with respect to noise levels are addressed and the possibility for short-term adaptation of the sensor to the environment is discussed.

  4. Comparison and validation of capacitive accelerometers for health care applications.

    PubMed

    Büsching, Felix; Kulau, Ulf; Gietzelt, Matthias; Wolf, Lars

    2012-05-01

    Fall detection, gait analysis and context recognition are examples of applications where capacitive accelerometers are widely used in health care. In most of the existing work, algorithms were developed for a specific platform and accelerometers were used without explicitly choosing a specific type. With this work we present an inexpensive and practical test setup for replicable and repeatable testing of accelerometers. In addition we use this setup to evaluate six of the most commonly available accelerometers today and list their outcomes for linearity, power consumption and correlation of the tested sensors. We also attempt to an answer to the question of whether applications and algorithms developed for one platform and one type of accelerometer can be easily transferred to another accelerometer.

  5. Optical wear monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Kidane, Getnet S; Desilva, Upul P.; He, Chengli; Ulerich, Nancy H.

    2016-07-26

    A gas turbine includes first and second parts having outer surfaces located adjacent to each other to create an interface where wear occurs. A wear probe is provided for monitoring wear of the outer surface of the first part, and includes an optical guide having first and second ends, wherein the first end is configured to be located flush with the outer surface of the first part. A fiber bundle includes first and second ends, the first end being located proximate to the second end of the optical guide. The fiber bundle includes a transmit fiber bundle comprising a first plurality of optical fibers coupled to a light source, and a receive fiber bundle coupled to a light detector and configured to detect reflected light. A processor is configured to determine a length of the optical guide based on the detected reflected light.

  6. A new accelerometer recording system for shuttle use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenberg, Byron

    1990-01-01

    Microgravity investigators are interested in enhancing the capabilities and improving the information return from accelerometers used in microgravity research. In addition to improving the accelerometer sensor, efforts should be directed towards using recent advances in microprocessor technology and system design techniques to improve sensor calibration and temperature compensation, online data display and analysis, and data reduction and information storage. Results from the above areas of investigation should be combined in an integrated design for a spaceflight microgravity accelerometer package.

  7. Wear analysis of disc cutters of full face rock tunnel boring machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaohuang; Meng, Liang; Sun, Fei

    2014-11-01

    Wear is a major factor of disc cutters' failure. No current theory offers a standard for the prediction of disc cutter wear yet. In the field the wear prediction method commonly used is based on the excavation length of tunnel boring machine(TBM) to predict the disc cutter wear and its wear law, considering the location number of each disc cutter on the cutterhead(radius for installation); in theory, there is a prediction method of using arc wear coefficient. However, the preceding two methods have their own errors, with their accuracy being 40% or so and largely relying on the technicians' experience. Therefore, radial wear coefficient, axial wear coefficient and trajectory wear coefficient are defined on the basis of the operating characteristics of TBM. With reference to the installation and characteristics of disc cutters, those coefficients are modified according to penetration, which gives rise to the presentation of comprehensive axial wear coefficient, comprehensive radial wear coefficient and comprehensive trajectory wear coefficient. Calculation and determination of wear coefficients are made with consideration of data from a segment of TBM project(excavation length 173 m). The resulting wear coefficient values, after modification, are adopted to predict the disc cutter wear in the follow-up segment of the TBM project(excavation length of 5621 m). The prediction results show that the disc cutter wear predicted with comprehensive radial wear coefficient and comprehensive trajectory wear coefficient are not only accurate(accuracy 16.12%) but also highly congruous, whereas there is a larger deviation in the prediction with comprehensive axial wear coefficient(accuracy 41%, which is in agreement with the prediction of disc cutters' life in the field). This paper puts forth a new method concerning prediction of life span and wear of TBM disc cutters as well as timing for replacing disc cutters.

  8. Design and Implementation of a Micromechanical Silicon Resonant Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Libin; Yang, Hui; Gao, Yang; Zhao, Liye; Liang, Jinxing

    2013-01-01

    The micromechanical silicon resonant accelerometer has attracted considerable attention in the research and development of high-precision MEMS accelerometers because of its output of quasi-digital signals, high sensitivity, high resolution, wide dynamic range, anti-interference capacity and good stability. Because of the mismatching thermal expansion coefficients of silicon and glass, the micromechanical silicon resonant accelerometer based on the Silicon on Glass (SOG) technique is deeply affected by the temperature during the fabrication, packaging and use processes. The thermal stress caused by temperature changes directly affects the frequency output of the accelerometer. Based on the working principle of the micromechanical resonant accelerometer, a special accelerometer structure that reduces the temperature influence on the accelerometer is designed. The accelerometer can greatly reduce the thermal stress caused by high temperatures in the process of fabrication and packaging. Currently, the closed-loop drive circuit is devised based on a phase-locked loop. The unloaded resonant frequencies of the prototype of the micromechanical silicon resonant accelerometer are approximately 31.4 kHz and 31.5 kHz. The scale factor is 66.24003 Hz/g. The scale factor stability is 14.886 ppm, the scale factor repeatability is 23 ppm, the bias stability is 23 μg, the bias repeatability is 170 μg, and the bias temperature coefficient is 0.0734 Hz/°C. PMID:24256978

  9. Suitability of MEMS Accelerometers for Condition Monitoring: An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Albarbar, Alhussein; Mekid, Samir; Starr, Andrew; Pietruszkiewicz, Robert

    2008-01-01

    With increasing demands for wireless sensing nodes for assets control and condition monitoring; needs for alternatives to expensive conventional accelerometers in vibration measurements have been arisen. Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometer is one of the available options. The performances of three of the MEMS accelerometers from different manufacturers are investigated in this paper and compared to a well calibrated commercial accelerometer used as a reference for MEMS sensors performance evaluation. Tests were performed on a real CNC machine in a typical industrial environmental workshop and the achieved results are presented. PMID:27879734

  10. Suitability of MEMS Accelerometers for Condition Monitoring: An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Albarbar, Alhussein; Mekid, Samir; Starr, Andrew; Pietruszkiewicz, Robert

    2008-02-06

    With increasing demands for wireless sensing nodes for assets control and condition monitoring; needs for alternatives to expensive conventional accelerometers in vibration measurements have been arisen. Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometer is one of the available options. The performances of three of the MEMS accelerometers from different manufacturers are investigated in this paper and compared to a well calibrated commercial accelerometer used as a reference for MEMS sensors performance evaluation. Tests were performed on a real CNC machine in a typical industrial environmental workshop and the achieved results are presented.

  11. A three-axis ultrasensitive accelerometer for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, A.

    A three-axis ultrasensitive accelerometer ASTRE (Accelerometre Spatial Triaxial Electrostatique) is a simplified version of the GRADIO accelerometer designed for the ARISTOTELES mission, which operates by measuring the force provided by a three-axis electrostatic suspension of the proof-mass. It covers the g-spectrum from 10 exp -8 to 10 exp -4 in the frequency range dc to 5 Hz. A dedicated test bench was developed in order to preserve the accelerometer from the seismic noise. The paper presents the performance parameters of the ASTRE accelerometer and some of the design schemes.

  12. Research on grinding block wear in grinding of SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feihu; Lu, Guodong; Liu, Minhui; Luan, Dianrong

    2014-09-01

    Silicon carbide is being the main ceramics material to make aspherical optical reflectors because of its good physical and chemical performance. But, because of the particularity of wheel structure, wheel wear form and wear loss is changing with time going, which limits the wheel wear researchment. In order to make a better research to wheel grinding, the author experimented many researches on diamond grinding blocks in grinding of SiC in the surface grinding machine, finding the relationship between diamond grinding block wear form and wear loss and grinding force, surface quality and surface precision of workpiece, including the principle of diamond grinding block wear form and wear loss changing with time going, the influencing law of surface quality and surface accuracy because of wheel wear. By changing some grinding parameters in the grinding experiments, the author gets the order of the influencing factors of grinding parameters to wheel wear by orthogonal test.

  13. A novel class of MEMS accelerometers for guidance and control of gun-fired munitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastegar, Jahangir; Feng, Dake; Pereira, Carlos M.

    2015-05-01

    The state of art in shock resistant MEMS accelerometer design is to reduce the size of the proof-mass, thereby reducing the generated forces and moments due to shock loading. Physical stops are also provided to limit proof-mass motion to prevent damage to various moving components. The reduction of the proof-mass size reduces the sensor sensitivity. In addition, to increase the sensor dynamic response, proof-mass motion needs to be minimally damped, resulting in a significant sensor settling time after experiencing a high shock loading such as those experienced by gun-fired munitions during firing. The settling time is particularly important for accelerometers that are used in gun-fired munitions and mortars for navigation and guidance. This paper describes the development of a novel class of accelerometers that are provided with the means of locking the sensor proof-mass in its "null" position when subjected to acceleration levels above prescribed thresholds, thereby protecting the moving parts of the accelerometer. In munitions applications, the proof-mass is thereby locked in its null position during the firing and released during the flight to begin to measure flight acceleration with minimal settling time. Details of the design and operation of the developed sensors and results of their prototyping and testing are presented. The application of the developed technology to other types of inertial sensors and devices is discussed.

  14. Validity and reliability of intra-stroke kayak velocity and acceleration using a GPS-based accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Ina; Sachlikidis, Alexi

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the validity and reliability of the velocity and acceleration measured by a kayak-mounted GPS-based accelerometer units compared to the video-derived measurements and the effect of satellite configuration on velocity. Four GPS-based accelerometers units of varied accelerometer ranges (2 g or 6 g) were mounted on a kayak as the paddler performed 12 trials at three different stroke rates for each of three different testing sessions (two in the morning vs. one in the afternoon). The velocity and acceleration derived by the accelerometers was compared with the velocity and acceleration derived from high-speed video footage (100Hz). Validity was measured using Bland and Altman plots, R2, and the root of the mean of the squared difference (RMSe), while reliability was calculated using the coefficient of variation, R2, and repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests. The GPS-based accelerometers under-reported kayak velocity by 0.14-0.19 m/s and acceleration by 1.67 m/s2 when compared to the video-derived measurements. The afternoon session reported the least difference, indicating a time of day effect on the velocity measured. This study highlights the need for sports utilising GPS-based accelerometers, such as minimaxX, for intra-stroke measurements to conduct sport-specific validity and reliability studies to ensure the accuracy of their data.

  15. Employees Wearing Religious Attire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry

    2004-01-01

    While adherents to many religions can be identified by distinctive clothing or accessories, the wearing of such garb by teachers is not necessarily related to evangelism in the classroom. The following case and the accompanying question-and-answer discussion illustrate the problem of the principal caught between the rock of First Amendment…

  16. Wear of Spur Gears Having a Dithering Motion and Lubricated with a Perfluorinated Polyether Grease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, Timothy; Oswald, Fred; Handschuh, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Gear contact surface wear is one of the important failure modes for gear systems. Dedicated experiments are required to enable precise evaluations of gear wear for a particular application. The application of interest for this study required evaluation of wear of gears lubricated with a grade 2 perfluorinated polyether grease and having a dithering (rotation reversal) motion. Experiments were conducted using spur gears made from AISI 9310 steel. Wear was measured using a profilometer at test intervals encompassing 10,000 to 80,000 cycles of dithering motion. The test load level was 1.1 GPa maximum Hertz contact stress at the pitch-line. The trend of total wear as a function of test cycles was linear, and the wear depth rate was approximately 1.2 nm maximum wear depth per gear dithering cycle. The observed wear rate was about 600 times greater than the wear rate for the same gears operated at high speed and lubricated with oil.

  17. Calibrating Accelerometers Using an Electromagnetic Launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Erik Timpson

    2012-05-13

    A Pulse Forming Network (PFN), Helical Electromagnetic Launcher (HEML), Command Module (CM), and Calibration Table (CT) were built and evaluated for the combined ability to calibrate an accelerometer. The PFN has a maximum stored energy of 19.25 kJ bank and is fired by a silicon controlled rectifier (SCR), with appropriate safety precautions. The HEML is constructed out of G-10 fiberglass and is designed to accelerate 600 grams to 10 meters per second. The CM is microcontroller based running Arduino Software. The CM has a keypad input and 7 segment outputs of the bank voltage and desired voltage. After entering a desired bank voltage, the CM controls the charge of the PFN. When the two voltages are equal it allows the fire button to send a pulse to the SCR to fire the PFN and in turn, the HEML. The HEML projectile's tip hits a target that is held by the CT. The CT consists of a table to hold the PFN and HEML, a vacuum chuck, air bearing, velocity meter and catch pot. The Target is held with the vacuum chuck awaiting impact. After impact, the air bearing allows the target to fall freely for the velocity meter to get an accurate reading. A known acceleration is determined from the known change in velocity of the target. Thus, if an accelerometer was attached to the target, the measured value can be compared to the known value.

  18. Classification of Sporting Activities Using Smartphone Accelerometers

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Edmond; Monaghan, David; O'Connor, Noel E.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a framework that allows for the automatic identification of sporting activities using commonly available smartphones. We extract discriminative informational features from smartphone accelerometers using the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). Despite the poor quality of their accelerometers, smartphones were used as capture devices due to their prevalence in today's society. Successful classification on this basis potentially makes the technology accessible to both elite and non-elite athletes. Extracted features are used to train different categories of classifiers. No one classifier family has a reportable direct advantage in activity classification problems to date; thus we examine classifiers from each of the most widely used classifier families. We investigate three classification approaches; a commonly used SVM-based approach, an optimized classification model and a fusion of classifiers. We also investigate the effect of changing several of the DWT input parameters, including mother wavelets, window lengths and DWT decomposition levels. During the course of this work we created a challenging sports activity analysis dataset, comprised of soccer and field-hockey activities. The average maximum F-measure accuracy of 87% was achieved using a fusion of classifiers, which was 6% better than a single classifier model and 23% better than a standard SVM approach. PMID:23604031

  19. Validation of cardiac accelerometer sensor measurements.

    PubMed

    Remme, Espen W; Hoff, Lars; Halvorsen, Per Steinar; Naerum, Edvard; Skulstad, Helge; Fleischer, Lars A; Elle, Ole Jakob; Fosse, Erik

    2009-12-01

    In this study we have investigated the accuracy of an accelerometer sensor designed for the measurement of cardiac motion and automatic detection of motion abnormalities caused by myocardial ischaemia. The accelerometer, attached to the left ventricular wall, changed its orientation relative to the direction of gravity during the cardiac cycle. This caused a varying gravity component in the measured acceleration signal that introduced an error in the calculation of myocardial motion. Circumferential displacement, velocity and rotation of the left ventricular apical region were calculated from the measured acceleration signal. We developed a mathematical method to separate translational and gravitational acceleration components based on a priori assumptions of myocardial motion. The accuracy of the measured motion was investigated by comparison with known motion of a robot arm programmed to move like the heart wall. The accuracy was also investigated in an animal study. The sensor measurements were compared with simultaneously recorded motion from a robot arm attached next to the sensor on the heart and with measured motion by echocardiography and a video camera. The developed compensation method for the varying gravity component improved the accuracy of the calculated velocity and displacement traces, giving very good agreement with the reference methods.

  20. Six Degree Freedom Optical Fiber Accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazo, Rogerio Moreira; dos Reis Ribeiro, Erik; Nunes, Marcelo Buonocore; Barbosa, Carmem Lucia; de Siqueira Ferreira, Jorge Luis; de Barros Caldas, Tales; dos Santos, Josemir Coelho; de Arruda, Josiel Urbaninho

    2008-10-01

    Linear accelerations measurements are needed in many applications, as industry, military, aircrafts, space navigation, robotics and others. Actually, the most usual solutions to measure linear accelerations are three piezoelectric sensors used in orthogonal mounting, or MEM's sensors chips. Angular accelerations also are interesting to control and stabilize structures, like satellites and servo motors. It is possible to measure angular accelerations in two ways: direct measurement (using special sensors), or indirect measurements (obtaining acceleration of the angular velocity information) [1]. This work intends to present the structural and optical requirements of a six degree freedom opto-mechanical accelerometer based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG). With this sensor, it will be possible the direct measurement of three axial accelerations, and of three angular accelerations, with unlimited rotation angle, using one single proof mass. The FBG's are used as strain sensors and sustaining elements of the proof mass in the structure. Simulations have demonstrated that cross influences of 10 parts per million at worst case are possible. This kind of accelerometer may be used in navigation control, structural monitoring, satellite stabilization, guidance control and harsh environments, for example. The project requirements include the wavelength of FBG's, pre-strain and length of active segment of optical fibers, dimensions, material and structure of inertial proof mass and position of the fibers in the sustaining structure

  1. Analysis of walking improvement with dynamic shoe insoles, using two accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruoka, Yuriko; Tamura, Yoshiyasu; Shibasaki, Ryosuke; Tsuruoka, Masako

    2005-07-01

    The orthopedics at the rehabilitation hospital found that disorders caused by sports injuries to the feet or caused by lower-back are improved by wearing dynamic shoe insoles, these improve walking balance and stability. However, the relationship of the lower-back and knees and the rate of increase in stability were not quantitatively analyzed. In this study, using two accelerometers, we quantitatively analyzed the reciprocal spatiotemporal contributions between the lower-back and knee of patients with left lower-back pain by means of Relative Power Contribution Analysis. When the insoles were worn, the contribution of the left and right knee relative to the left lower-back pain was up to 26% ( p<0.05) greater than without the insoles. Comparing patients with and without insoles, we found that the variance in the step response analysis of the left and right knee decreased by up to 67% ( p<0.05). This shows an increase in stability.

  2. Accelerometer Use in a Physical Activity Intervention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Borradaile, Kelley E.; Lewis, Beth A.; Whiteley, Jessica A.; Longval, Jaime L.; Parisi, Alfred F.; Albrecht, Anna E.; Sciamanna, Christopher N.; Jakicic, John M.; Papandonatos, George D.; Marcus, Bess H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the application of best practice recommendations for using accelerometers in a physical activity (PA) intervention trial, and the concordance of different methods for measuring PA. A subsample (n=63; 26%) of the 239 healthy, sedentary adults participating in a PA trial (mean age=47.5; 82% women) wore the ActiGraph monitor at all 3 assessment time points. ActiGraph data were compared with self-report (i.e., PA weekly recall and monthly log) and fitness variables. Correlations between the PA recall and ActiGraph for moderate intensity activity ranged from 0.16–0.48 and from 0.28–0.42 for vigorous intensity activity. ActiGraph and fitness [estimated VO2(ml/kg/min)] had correlations of 0.15–0.45. The ActiGraph and weekly self-report were significantly correlated at all time points (correlations ranged from 0.23–0.44). In terms of detecting intervention effects, intervention groups recorded more minutes of at least moderate-intensity PA on the ActiGraph than the control group at 6 months (min=46.47, 95% CI=14.36–78.58), but not at 12 months. Limitations of the study include a small sample size and only 3 days of ActiGraph monitoring. To obtain optimal results with accelerometers in clinical trials, the authors recommend following best practice recommendations: detailed protocols for monitor use, calibration of monitors and validation of data quality, and use of validated equations for analysis. The ActiGraph has modest concordance with other assessment tools and is sensitive to change over time. However, until more information validating the use of accelerometry in clinical trials becomes available, properly administered self-report measures of PA should remain part of the assessment battery. PMID:20723619

  3. Accelerometer use in a physical activity intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Melissa A; Borradaile, Kelley E; Lewis, Beth A; Whiteley, Jessica A; Longval, Jaime L; Parisi, Alfred F; Albrecht, Anna E; Sciamanna, Christopher N; Jakicic, John M; Papandonatos, George D; Marcus, Bess H

    2010-11-01

    This paper describes the application of best practice recommendations for using accelerometers in a physical activity (PA) intervention trial, and the concordance of different methods for measuring PA. A subsample (n = 63; 26%) of the 239 healthy, sedentary adults participating in a PA trial (mean age = 47.5; 82% women) wore the ActiGraph monitor at all 3 assessment time points. ActiGraph data were compared with self-report (i.e., PA weekly recall and monthly log) and fitness variables. Correlations between the PA recall and ActiGraph for moderate intensity activity ranged from 0.16-0.48 and from 0.28-0.42 for vigorous intensity activity. ActiGraph and fitness [estimated VO(2)(ml/kg/min)] had correlations of 0.15-0.45. The ActiGraph and weekly self-report were significantly correlated at all time points (correlations ranged from 0.23 to 0.44). In terms of detecting intervention effects, intervention groups recorded more minutes of at least moderate-intensity PA on the ActiGraph than the control group at 6 months (min = 46.47, 95% CI = 14.36-78.58), but not at 12 months. Limitations of the study include a small sample size and only 3 days of ActiGraph monitoring. To obtain optimal results with accelerometers in clinical trials, the authors recommend following best practice recommendations: detailed protocols for monitor use, calibration of monitors and validation of data quality, and use of validated equations for analysis. The ActiGraph has modest concordance with other assessment tools and is sensitive to change over time. However, until more information validating the use of accelerometry in clinical trials becomes available, properly administered self-report measures of PA should remain part of the assessment battery.

  4. Using wearable cameras to categorise type and context of accelerometer-identified episodes of physical activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Accelerometers can identify certain physical activity behaviours, but not the context in which they take place. This study investigates the feasibility of wearable cameras to objectively categorise the behaviour type and context of participants’ accelerometer-identified episodes of activity. Methods Adults were given an Actical hip-mounted accelerometer and a SenseCam wearable camera (worn via lanyard). The onboard clocks on both devices were time-synchronised. Participants engaged in free-living activities for 3 days. Actical data were cleaned and episodes of sedentary, lifestyle-light, lifestyle-moderate, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were identified. Actical episodes were categorised according to their social and environmental context and Physical Activity (PA) compendium category as identified from time-matched SenseCam images. Results There were 212 days considered from 49 participants from whom SenseCam images and associated Actical data were captured. Using SenseCam images, behaviour type and context attributes were annotated for 386 (out of 3017) randomly selected episodes (such as walking/transportation, social/not-social, domestic/leisure). Across the episodes, 12 categories that aligned with the PA Compendium were identified, and 114 subcategory types were identified. Nineteen percent of episodes could not have their behaviour type and context categorized; 59% were outdoors versus 39% indoors; 33% of episodes were recorded as leisure time activities, with 33% transport, 18% domestic, and 15% occupational. 33% of the randomly selected episodes contained direct social interaction and 22% were in social situations where the participant wasn’t involved in direct engagement. Conclusion Wearable camera images offer an objective method to capture a spectrum of activity behaviour types and context across 81% of accelerometer-identified episodes of activity. Wearable cameras represent the best objective method currently

  5. Wear Resistance and Wear Mechanism of a Hot Dip Aluminized Steel in Sliding Wear Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhiyong; Hao, Xiaoyang; Huang, Yao; Gu, Lingyun; Ren, Yu; Zheng, Ruipeng

    2016-12-01

    Sliding wear experiments were conducted on a hot dip aluminized steel to investigate its wear resistance and wear mechanism. The wear tests were also carried out on a hot dip galvanized steel and the base material (steel Q345) as a comparison. Results show that the wear resistance and hardness of the hot dip aluminized steel are significantly higher than that of the hot dip galvanized steel and the steel Q345 at room temperature. The better wear resistance of the hot dip aluminized steel attributes mainly to the formation of a transition layer containing abundant Fe-Al intermetallic compounds and the transformation of wear-resisting oxides during the friction process. The main phase in the transition layer is Fe2Al5. The thickness of the transition layer is about 90-120 μm. When the wear load increases from 3 N to 19 N, the wear type of the aluminized layer transform from adhesive wear (3 N) into abrasive wear (7 N) and finally into slight wear mixed with oxidation (higher than 11 N).

  6. A System for Monitoring Posture and Physical Activity Using Accelerometers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Abstract- Accelerometers can be used to monitor physical activity in the home over prolonged periods. We describe a novel system for...processing schema in which these parameters are extracted is described. Keywords - physical activity , accelerometers, congestive heart failure, chronic...When monitoring the condition of patients with neurodegenerative or chronic diseases, a knowledge of their body movement and physical activity

  7. Technical Reliability Assessment of the Actigraph GT1M Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Pedro; Mota, Jorge; Esliger, Dale; Welk, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the Actigraph GT1M (Pensacola, FL, USA) accelerometer activity count and step functions. Fifty GT1M accelerometers were initialized to collect simultaneous acceleration counts and steps data using 15-sec epochs. All reliability testing was completed using a mechanical shaker plate to…

  8. Hierarchical classifier approach to physical activity recognition via wearable smartphone tri-axial accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Feridun; Maeder, Anthony; Basilakis, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity recognition has emerged as an active area of research which has drawn increasing interest from researchers in a variety of fields. It can support many different applications such as safety surveillance, fraud detection, and clinical management. Accelerometers have emerged as the most useful and extensive tool to capture and assess human physical activities in a continuous, unobtrusive and reliable manner. The need for objective physical activity data arises strongly in health related research. With the shift to a sedentary lifestyle, where work and leisure tend to be less physically demanding, research on the health effects of low physical activity has become a necessity. The increased availability of small, inexpensive components has led to the development of mobile devices such as smartphones, providing platforms for new opportunities in healthcare applications. In this study 3 subjects performed directed activity routines wearing a smartphone with a built in tri-axial accelerometer, attached on a belt around the waist. The data was collected to classify 11 basic physical activities such as sitting, lying, standing, walking, and the transitions in between them. A hierarchical classifier approach was utilised with Artificial Neural Networks integrated in a rule-based system, to classify the activities. Based on our evaluation, recognition accuracy of over 89.6% between subjects and over 91.5% within subject was achieved. These results show that activities such as these can be recognised with a high accuracy rate; hence the approach is promising for use in future work.

  9. Accelerometer tags: detecting and identifying activities in fish and the effect of sampling frequency.

    PubMed

    Broell, Franziska; Noda, Takuji; Wright, Serena; Domenici, Paolo; Steffensen, John Fleng; Auclair, Jean-Pierre; Taggart, Christopher T

    2013-04-01

    Monitoring and measuring the behaviour and movement of aquatic animals in the wild is typically challenging, though micro-accelerometer (archival or telemetry) tags now provide the means to remotely identify and quantify behavioural states and rates such as resting, swimming and migrating, and to estimate activity and energy budgets. Most studies use low-frequency (≤32 Hz) accelerometer sampling because of battery and data-archiving constraints. In this study we assessed the effect of sampling frequency (aliasing) on activity detection probability using the great sculpin (Myoxocephalus polyacanthoceaphalus) as a model species. Feeding strikes and escape responses (fast-start activities) and spontaneous movements among seven different great sculpin were triggered, observed and recorded using video records and a tri-axial accelerometer sampling at 100 Hz. We demonstrate that multiple parameters in the time and probability domains can statistically differentiate between activities with high detection (90%) and identification (80%) probabilities. Detection probability for feeding and escape activities decreased by 50% when sampling at <10 Hz. Our analyses illustrate additional problems associated with aliasing and how activity and energy-budget estimates can be compromised and misinterpreted. We recommend that high-frequency (>30 Hz) accelerometer sampling be used in similar laboratory and field studies. If battery and/or data storage is limited, we also recommend archiving the events via an on-board algorithm that determines the highest likelihood and subsequent archiving of the various event classes of interest.

  10. Application of a tri-axial accelerometer to estimate jump frequency in volleyball.

    PubMed

    Jarning, Jon M; Mok, Kam-Ming; Hansen, Bjørge H; Bahr, Roald

    2015-03-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is prevalent among athletes, and most likely associated with a high jumping load. If methods for estimating jump frequency were available, this could potentially assist in understanding and preventing this condition. The objective of this study was to explore the possibility of using peak vertical acceleration (PVA) or peak resultant acceleration (PRA) measured by an accelerometer to estimate jump frequency. Twelve male elite volleyball players (22.5 ± 1.6 yrs) performed a training protocol consisting of seven typical motion patterns, including jumping and non-jumping movements. Accelerometer data from the trial were obtained using a tri-axial accelerometer. In addition, we collected video data from the trial. Jump-float serving and spike jumping could not be distinguished from non-jumping movements using differences in PVA or PRA. Furthermore, there were substantial inter-participant differences in both the PVA and the PRA within and across movement types (p < 0.05). These findings suggest that neither PVA nor PRA measured by a tri-axial accelerometer is an applicable method for estimating jump frequency in volleyball. A method for acquiring real-time estimates of jump frequency remains to be verified. However, there are several alternative approaches, and further investigations are needed.

  11. Incisor wear and age in Yellowstone bison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christianson, D.A.; Gogan, P.J.P.; Podruzny, K.M.; Olexa, E.M.

    2005-01-01

    Biologists commonly use tooth eruption and wear patterns or cementum annuli techniques to estimate age of ungulates. However, in some situations the accuracy or sampling procedures of either approach are undesirable. We investigated the progression of several quantitative measures of wear with age, using permanent first incisors from Yellowstone bison (Bison bison), and tested for differences between sexes and herds. We further investigated the relationship of wear and age to explore an age-estimation method. Labial-lingual width (LLW) correlated best with assigned age (r2=0.66, males; r2=0.76 females). Labial-lingual width differed between sexes, with females showing ∼0.2 mm more wear than males. Additionally, differences in rate of wear existed between bison of the northern and central Yellowstone herds (1.2 and 0.9 mm/year, respectively). We developed a regression formula to test the power of LLW as an estimator of Yellowstone bison age. Our method provided estimated ages within 1 year of the assigned age 73% and 82% of the time for female and male bison, respectively.

  12. High sensitivity optical waveguide accelerometer based on Fano resonance.

    PubMed

    Wan, Fenghua; Qian, Guang; Li, Ruozhou; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Tong

    2016-08-20

    An optical waveguide accelerometer based on tunable asymmetrical Fano resonance in a ring-resonator-coupled Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) is proposed and analyzed. A Fano resonance accelerometer has a relatively large workspace of coupling coefficients with high sensitivity, which has potential application in inertial navigation, missile guidance, and attitude control of satellites. Due to the interference between a high-Q resonance pathway and a coherent background pathway, a steep asymmetric line shape is generated, which greatly improves the sensitivity of this accelerometer. The sensitivity of the accelerometer is about 111.75 mW/g. A 393-fold increase in sensitivity is achieved compared with a conventional MZI accelerometer and is approximately equal to the single ring structure.

  13. In Situ Wear Test on Thermal Spray Coatings in a Large Chamber Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Weifeng; Tillmann, Wolfgang; Selvadurai, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the determination of the mass loss is usually used for a quantitative evaluation of wear tests, while the analysis of wear tracks is utilized for a qualitative evaluation of wear. Both evaluation methods can only be used after the wear testing process and their results only present the final outcome of the wear test. However, the changes during the wear test and the time-dependent wear mechanisms are of great interest as well. A running wear test in a large chamber scanning electron microscope (SEM) offers the first opportunity to observe the wear process in situ. Different wear mechanisms, such as the adhesive, abrasive wear, surface fatigue and tribochemical reaction, can be recorded with high magnification. Within this research, a special pin-on-disk testing device is designed for a vacuum environment. Using this device, arc-sprayed NiCrBSi coatings and high-velocity-oxygen-fuel-sprayed WC-12Co coatings were tested in a large chamber SEM with Al2O3 ceramic balls as wear counterparts. During the wear testing, different wear mechanisms were determined and the processes were recorded in short video streams.

  14. Wear Testing of Moderate Activities of Daily Living Using In Vivo Measured Knee Joint Loading

    PubMed Central

    Reinders, Jörn; Sonntag, Robert; Vot, Leo; Gibney, Christian; Nowack, Moritz; Kretzer, Jan Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Resumption of daily living activities is a basic expectation for patients provided with total knee replacements. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the impact of different activities on the wear performance. In this study the wear performance under application of different daily activities has been analyzed. In vivo load data for walking, walking downstairs/upstairs, sitting down/standing up, and cycling (50 W & 120 W) has been standardized for wear testing. Wear testing of each activity was carried out on a knee wear simulator. Additionally, ISO walking was tested for reasons of comparison. Wear was assessed gravimetrically and wear particles were analyzed. In vivo walking produced the highest overall wear rates, which were determined to be three times higher than ISO walking. Moderate wear rates were determined for walking upstairs and downstairs. Low wear rates were determined for standing up/sitting down and cycling at power levels of 50 W and 120 W. The largest wear particles were observed for cycling. Walking based on in vivo data has been shown to be the most wear-relevant activity. Highly demanding activities (stair climbing) produced considerably less wear. Taking into account the expected number of loads, low-impact activities like cycling may have a greater impact on articular wear than highly demanding activities. PMID:25811996

  15. Hardfacing and wear plates battle abrasion

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.F.

    1983-06-01

    This article examines abrasion-resistant steels and hardfacing as two effective weapons at the disposal of material handlers. It points out that abrasion is probably the single most destructive form of wear in the mixing and processing of coal. Particulate matter such as quartz sand and other minerals including coal curtail in-service life of dragline buckets, chute, crusher rolls, gates and valves, exhauster fan blades, target plates, truck beds, hoppers, vibrating pans, grinding mills, piping elbows, etc. The advantages of abrasion-resistant steels and hardfacing can be obtained in the form of a composite wear plate-hardfacing on a carbon steel backup plate. It concludes that the composite wear plate represents a major innovation since its advantages include ease of handling, low cost and easy installation, minimum on-site welding time and versatility. Its use is limited only to the consumer's creativity in application.

  16. Some wear studies on aircraft brake systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    An initial investigation of worn surfaces in friction pads and steel rotors used in current aircraft brakes was carried out using electron microprobe and X-ray diffraction analysis. It consists of the topographical study and the analysis of chemical element distribution. Based upon this initial examination, two approaches, microscopic and macroscopic have been conducted to interpret and formulate the wear mechanism of the aircraft brake materials. Microscopically, the wear particles were examined. The initiation and growth of surface cracks and the oxidation were emphasized in this investigation. Macroscopically, it has been found that, for the current copper based brake material sliding against 17-22 AS steel in a caliper brake, the surface temperature raised due to frictional heat is nonlinearly proportional to the load applied and slide time with speed at 1750 rpm. The wear of brake materials is then proportional to this temperature and is also a function of the melting temperature for copper.

  17. The role of accelerometer data calibration within GRACE gravity field recovery: Results from ITSG-Grace2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, Beate; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten

    2016-11-01

    For more than 14 years, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission has provided information about Earth's gravity field with unprecedented accuracy. The twin satellites GRACE-A and GRACE-B are both equipped with a three-axis electrostatic accelerometer, measuring the non-gravitational forces acting on the spacecraft. In order to make use of the uncalibrated Level-1B accelerometer (ACC1B) data during gravity field recovery, bias and scale parameters have to be estimated. The proposed calibration method is a two-step approach and makes use of modeled non-conservative accelerations. The simulated non-conservative accelerations serve as reference for the a priori accelerometer calibration, i.e. for the ACC1B data. During gravity field recovery the calibration parameters are re-estimated. Several calibration parameters for the GRACE accelerometers using different methods have already been published. The aim of our study was primarily to analyze the temperature-dependent behavior of the accelerometer scale factors and biases, and the impact of the parametrization of scale factors and biases on the recovered gravity field solutions; but not to obtain calibrated accelerometer data. Within the ITSG-Grace2016 release, the accelerometer biases are estimated daily using uniform cubic basis splines (UCBS), the scale factors are also estimated daily using a fully-populated scale factor matrix. Therefore, not only the scale factors in along-track, cross-track, and radial direction are estimated, but also the non-orthogonality of the accelerometer axes (cross-talk) and the misalignment between the Accelerometer Frame (AF) and Science Reference Frame (SRF) are taken into account. The time evolution of the estimated calibration parameters over the whole GRACE period (2002-04 to 2016-01) shows a clear temperature-dependency for both scale factors and biases. Using this new approach, the estimates of the C20 coefficient significantly improve, with results now

  18. Saliva parameters and erosive wear in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zwier, N; Huysmans, M C D N J M; Jager, D H J; Ruben, J; Bronkhorst, E M; Truin, G J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between several parameters of saliva and erosive wear in adolescents. (Un-)stimulated saliva was collected from 88 adolescents with erosion and 49 controls (age 16 ± 1 years). Flow rate, pH and buffer capacity were determined immediately. Total protein content, carbonic anhydrase VI, amylase, albumin, calcium, phosphate, urea, sodium, chloride and potassium were measured at a later time. Unstimulated flow rate was found to be significantly lower in subjects with erosive wear (p = 0.016). The chloride concentration in unstimulated saliva was found to be significantly higher in the erosion group (p = 0.019).

  19. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Accelerometer Experiment Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, G. M.; Bougher, S. W.; Theriot, M. E.; Zurek, R. W.; Blanchard, R. C.; Tolson, R. H.; Murphy, J. R.

    2007-05-01

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) launched on August 12, 2005, designed for aerobraking, achieved Mars Orbital Insertion (MOI), March 10, 2006. Atmospheric density decreases exponentially with increasing height. By small propulsive adjustments of the apoapsis orbital velocity, periapsis altitude is fine tuned to the density surface that safely used the atmosphere of Mars to aerobrake over 400 orbits. MRO periapsis precessed from the South Pole at 6pm LST to near the equator at 3am LST. Meanwhile, apoapsis was brought dramatically from 40,000km at MOI to 460 km at aerobraking completion (ABX) August 30, 2006. After ABX, a few small propulsive maneuvers established the Primary Science Orbit (PSO), which without aerobraking would have required an additional 400 kg of fuel. Each of the 400 plus aerobraking orbits provided a vertical structure and distribution of density, scale heights, and temperatures, along the orbital path, providing key in situ insight into various upper atmosphere (greater than 100 km) processes. One of the major questions for scientists studying Mars is: "Where did the water go?" Honeywell's substantially improved electronics package for its IMU (QA-2000 accelerometer, gyro, electronics) maximized accelerometer sensitivities at the requests of The George Washington University, JPL, and Lockheed Martin. The improved accelerometer sensitivities allowed density measurements to exceed 200km, at least 40 km higher than with Mars Odyssey (MO). This extended vertical structures from MRO into the neutral lower exosphere, a region where various processes may allow atmospheric gasses to escape. Over the eons, water may have been lost in both near the surface and in the upper atmosphere. Thus the water balance throughout the entire atmosphere from subsurface to exosphere may both be critical. Comparisons of data from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), MO and MRO help characterize key temporal and spatial cycles including: winter polar warming, planetary scale

  20. Corrosive wear principles

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, W.J.

    1993-12-31

    The dual effects of corrosion and wear operate together in such industries as paper and pulp, coal handling, mining, and sugar beet extraction. There is a synergistic effect that causes far greater wastage to carbon steels, alloy steels, and even much more abrasion resistant cast irons. Several laboratory and in situ studies have been conducted to better understand the contributions of corrosion and wear to the wastage process. The environmental conditions are usually set by the process. However, there are a few instances where inhibitors as sodium nitrite, sodium chromate, and sodium metasilicate have been successfully used to reduce metal wastage of carbon steels. Hardness has been found to be an unreliable guide to performance under wet sliding conditions. Heat treated alloy steels and cast irons are inferior to stainless steels. Even distilled water is too severe a corrodent for steels. While the austenitic stainlesses perform the best, cold rolling to increase hardness does not further improve their performance. The surface roughness of stainless steels gets smoother during corrosive wear testing while it gets rougher for the alloy steels. This observation substantiated the reputation of improved slideability for stainless alloys over alloy steels.

  1. How to qualify and validate wear simulation devices and methods.

    PubMed

    Heintze, S D

    2006-08-01

    The clinical significance of increased wear can mainly be attributed to impaired aesthetic appearance and/or functional restrictions. Little is known about the systemic effects of swallowed or inhaled worn particles that derive from restorations. As wear measurements in vivo are complicated and time-consuming, wear simulation devices and methods had been developed without, however, systematically looking at the factors that influence important wear parameters. Wear simulation devices shall simulate processes that occur in the oral cavity during mastication, namely force, force profile, contact time, sliding movement, clearance of worn material, etc. Different devices that use different force actuator principles are available. Those with the highest citation frequency in the literature are - in descending order - the Alabama, ACTA, OHSU, Zurich and MTS wear simulators. When following the FDA guidelines on good laboratory practice (GLP) only the expensive MTS wear simulator is a qualified machine to test wear in vitro; the force exerted by the hydraulic actuator is controlled and regulated during all movements of the stylus. All the other simulators lack control and regulation of force development during dynamic loading of the flat specimens. This may be an explanation for the high coefficient of variation of the results in some wear simulators (28-40%) and the poor reproducibility of wear results if dental databases are searched for wear results of specific dental materials (difference of 22-72% for the same material). As most of the machines are not qualifiable, wear methods applying the machine may have a sound concept but cannot be validated. Only with the MTS method have wear parameters and influencing factors been documented and verified. A good compromise with regard to costs, practicability and robustness is the Willytec chewing simulator, which uses weights as force actuator and step motors for vertical and lateral movements. The Ivoclar wear method run on

  2. Modeling of the vibrating beam accelerometer nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowski, P. A.; Knop, R. C.

    Successful modeling and processing of the output of a quartz Vibrating Beam Accelerometer (VBA), whose errors are inherently nonlinear with respect to input acceleration, are reported. The VBA output, with two signals that are frequencies of vibrating quartz beams, has inherent higher-order terms. In order to avoid vibration rectification errors, the signal output must be sampled at a rapid rate and the output must be reduced using a nonlinear model. The present model, with acceleration as a function of frequency, is derived by a least-squares process where the covariance matrix is obtained from simulated data. The system performance is found to be acceptable to strategic levels, and it is shown that a vibration rectification error of 400 micrograms/sq g can be reduced to 4 micrograms/sq g by using the processor electronics and a nonlinear model.

  3. Ultralow wear of gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Guosong; Tan, Chee-Keong; Tansu, Nelson; Krick, Brandon A.

    2016-08-01

    Here, we reveal a remarkable (and surprising) physical property of GaN: it is extremely wear resistant. In fact, we measured the wear rate of GaN is approaching wear rates reported for diamond. Not only does GaN have an ultralow wear rate but also there are quite a few experimental factors that control the magnitude of its wear rate, further contributing to the rich and complex physics of wear of GaN. Here, we discovered several primary controlling factors that will affect the wear rate of III-Nitride materials: crystallographic orientation, sliding environment, and coating composition (GaN, InN and InGaN). Sliding in the ⟨ 1 2 ¯ 10 ⟩ is significantly lower wear than ⟨ 1 1 ¯ 00 ⟩ . Wear increases by 2 orders of magnitude with increasing humidity (from ˜0% to 50% RH). III-Nitride coatings are promising as multifunctional material systems for device design and sliding wear applications.

  4. The validity of gait variability and fractal dynamics obtained from a single, body-fixed triaxial accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Kobsar, Dylan; Olson, Chad; Paranjape, Raman; Barden, John M

    2014-04-01

    A single triaxial accelerometer has the ability to collect a large amount of continuous gait data to quantitatively assess the control of gait. Unfortunately, there is limited information on the validity of gait variability and fractal dynamics obtained from this device. The purpose of this study was to test the concurrent validity of the variability and fractal dynamic measures of gait provided by a triaxial accelerometer during a continuous 10 minute walk in older adults. Forty-one healthy older adults were fitted with a single triaxial accelerometer at the waist, as well as a criterion footswitch device before completing a ten minute overground walk. The concurrent validity of six outcome measures was examined using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and 95% limits of agreement. All six dependent variables measured by the accelerometer displayed excellent agreement with the footswitch device. Mean parameters displayed the highest validity, followed by measures of variability and fractal dynamics in stride times and measures of variability and fractal dynamics in step times. These findings suggest that an accelerometer is a valid and unique device that has the potential to provide clinicians with valid quantitative data for assessing their clients' gait.

  5. Does a waist-worn ActiGraph accelerometer quantify community ambulation in persons with multiple sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Sosnoff, Jacob J; Socie, Michael J; Boes, Morgan K; Sandroff, Brian M; Motl, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    Accelerometry has been recognized as a method of objectively measuring community ambulation in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the assumption that walking itself serves as a major contributor to the accelerometer signal has yet to be tested. This study examined the assumption that community-based walking is a primary contributor to accelerometer output in MS. Ambulatory persons (5 males/17 females; 13 without aid/9 with aid) with MS wore a triaxial accelerometer (ActiGraph GT3X, Health One Technologies; Fort Walton Beach, Florida) as well as an IDEEA system (MiniSun, Inc; Fresno, Florida) over the course of a single day. Outcome measures for the accelerometer included movement counts/hour for the vertical, anterior-posterior, and mediolateral axes. Outcomes for the IDEEA system included percent time walking, sitting, and standing, as well as walking speed. Pearson product correlations (r) were used to examine the associations between outcomes from the accelerometer and IDEEA system. Significant correlations were observed between percent walking time and movement counts/hour along the vertical (r = 0.84) and anterior-posterior (r = 0.69) axes. Significant correlations were further noted between movement counts/hour along the vertical axis and walking speed (r = 0.45) and self-report walking impairment (r = -0.50) and disability (r = -0.46). Such observations further support accelerometry as an objective marker of community ambulation in persons with MS.

  6. Placement of Accelerometers for High Sensing Resolution in Micromanipulation

    PubMed Central

    Latt, W. T.; Tan, U-X.; Riviere, C. N.; Ang, W. T.

    2012-01-01

    High sensing resolution is required in sensing of surgical instrument motion in micromanipulation tasks. Accelerometers can be employed to sense physiological motion of the instrument during micromanipulation. Various configurations of accelerometer placement had been introduced in the past to sense motion of a rigid-body such as a surgical instrument. Placement (location and orientation) of accelerometers fixed in the instrument plays a significant role in achieving high sensing resolution. However, there is no literature or work on the effect of placement of accelerometers on sensing resolution. In this paper, an approach of placement of accelerometers within an available space to obtain highest possible sensing resolution in sensing of rigid-body motion in micromanipulation tasks is proposed. Superiority of the proposed placement approach is shown in sensing of a microsurgical instrument angular motion by comparing sensing resolutions achieved as a result of employing the configuration following the proposed approach and the existing configurations. Apart from achieving high sensing resolution, and design simplicity, the proposed placement approach also provides flexibility in placing accelerometers; hence it is especially useful in applications with limited available space to mount accelerometers. PMID:22423176

  7. Vibration sensing in smart machine rotors using internal MEMS accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Samuel; Cole, Matthew O. T.; Keogh, Patrick S.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a novel topology for enhanced vibration sensing in which wireless MEMS accelerometers embedded within a hollow rotor measure vibration in a synchronously rotating frame of reference. Theoretical relations between rotor-embedded accelerometer signals and the vibration of the rotor in an inertial reference frame are derived. It is thereby shown that functionality as a virtual stator-mounted displacement transducer can be achieved through appropriate signal processing. Experimental tests on a prototype rotor confirm that both magnitude and phase information of synchronous vibration can be measured directly without additional stator-mounted key-phasor sensors. Displacement amplitudes calculated from accelerometer signals will become erroneous at low rotational speeds due to accelerometer zero-g offsets, hence a corrective procedure is introduced. Impact tests are also undertaken to examine the ability of the internal accelerometers to measure transient vibration. A further capability is demonstrated, whereby the accelerometer signals are used to measure rotational speed of the rotor by analysing the signal component due to gravity. The study highlights the extended functionality afforded by internal accelerometers and demonstrates the feasibility of internal sensor topologies, which can provide improved observability of rotor vibration at externally inaccessible rotor locations.

  8. Consideration of wear rates at high velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Chad S.

    The development of the research presented here is one in which high velocity relative sliding motion between two bodies in contact has been considered. Overall, the wear environment is truly three-dimensional. The attempt to characterize three-dimensional wear was not economically feasible because it must be analyzed at the micro-mechanical level to get results. Thus, an engineering approximation was carried out. This approximation was based on a metallographic study identifying the need to include viscoplasticity constitutive material models, coefficient of friction, relationships between the normal load and velocity, and the need to understand wave propagation. A sled test run at the Holloman High Speed Test Track (HHSTT) was considered for the determination of high velocity wear rates. In order to adequately characterize high velocity wear, it was necessary to formulate a numerical model that contained all of the physical events present. The experimental results of a VascoMax 300 maraging steel slipper sliding on an AISI 1080 steel rail during a January 2008 sled test mission were analyzed. During this rocket sled test, the slipper traveled 5,816 meters in 8.14 seconds and reached a maximum velocity of 1,530 m/s. This type of environment was never considered previously in terms of wear evaluation. Each of the features of the metallography were obtained through micro-mechanical experimental techniques. The byproduct of this analysis is that it is now possible to formulate a model that contains viscoplasticity, asperity collisions, temperature and frictional features. Based on the observations of the metallographic analysis, these necessary features have been included in the numerical model, which makes use of a time-dynamic program which follows the movement of a slipper during its experimental test run. The resulting velocity and pressure functions of time have been implemented in the explicit finite element code, ABAQUS. Two-dimensional, plane strain models

  9. Wearing someone else's shoes.

    PubMed

    Rae, Kym

    2010-06-01

    This paper recounts a journey of discovery by a scientist who inadvertently takes on coordination of an ArtsHealth programme. The dynamics of role change are explored showcasing the vulnerabilities and fears that often accompany these career adjustments. The associated ArtsHealth programme (Gomeroi gaaynggal) works with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in Australia throughout their pregnancy to improve understanding of issues that impact the health of themselves and their developing baby. By wearing someone else shoes, the scientist is immersed in the project and must confront issues including skill mix, learning and cultural diversity.

  10. Wear Behavior of Newly Developed Bainitic Wheel Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S.; Sangal, S.; Mondal, K.

    2015-02-01

    The present work concentrates on the analysis of wear behavior of bainitic steels made by austempering from a microalloyed steel MAS2, meant for making railway wheel, and comparison with that of a conventional railway wheel steel, wheel-R19. Austempering of the MAS2 steel samples has been performed at different times and temperatures to obtain different morphologies of bainite. Linearly reciprocating dry sliding wear tests of these samples have been carried out at laboratory scale using five different loads. The wear behavior of the bainitic steels has been compared with that of the ferritic-pearlitic steel, wheel-R19. Mechanical properties of the bainitic MAS2 steels are found to be more than that of the wheel-R19 steel. Considerable enhancement in wear resistance of the bainitic steels is attributed to high hardness and strength of the steels. The wear mechanism has been critically analyzed by examining wear track morphology. The wear data gathered have been graphically presented in the form of wear mechanism map to understand the material behavior under different sliding conditions and subsequent morphological variations.

  11. Wear-Out Sensitivity Analysis Project Abstract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Adam

    2015-01-01

    During the course of the Summer 2015 internship session, I worked in the Reliability and Maintainability group of the ISS Safety and Mission Assurance department. My project was a statistical analysis of how sensitive ORU's (Orbital Replacement Units) are to a reliability parameter called the wear-out characteristic. The intended goal of this was to determine a worst case scenario of how many spares would be needed if multiple systems started exhibiting wear-out characteristics simultaneously. The goal was also to determine which parts would be most likely to do so. In order to do this, my duties were to take historical data of operational times and failure times of these ORU's and use them to build predictive models of failure using probability distribution functions, mainly the Weibull distribution. Then, I ran Monte Carlo Simulations to see how an entire population of these components would perform. From here, my final duty was to vary the wear-out characteristic from the intrinsic value, to extremely high wear-out values and determine how much the probability of sufficiency of the population would shift. This was done for around 30 different ORU populations on board the ISS.

  12. Sensitivity of Dielectric Properties to Wear Process on Carbon Nanofiber/High-Density Polyethylene Composites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian; Wood, Weston; Zhong, Wei-Hong

    2011-12-01

    We examined the correlation of wear effects with dielectric properties of carbon nanofibers (CNFs; untreated and organosilane-treated)-reinforced high-density polyethylene (HDPE) composites. Wear testing for the nanocomposites over up to 120 h was carried out, and then, dielectric permittivity and dielectric loss factor of the polymer composites with the increased wear time were studied. Scanning electron microscope and optical microscope observations were made to analyze the microstructure features of the nanocomposites. The results reveal that there exist approximate linear relationships of permittivity with wear coefficient for the nanocomposites. Composites containing silanized CNFs with the sufficiently thick coating exhibited high wear resistance. The change in permittivity was more sensitive to the increased wear coefficient for the nanocomposites with lower wear resistance. This work provides potential for further research on the application of dielectric signals to detect the effects of wear process on lifetime of polymeric materials.

  13. Sensitivity of Dielectric Properties to Wear Process on Carbon Nanofiber/High-Density Polyethylene Composites

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We examined the correlation of wear effects with dielectric properties of carbon nanofibers (CNFs; untreated and organosilane-treated)-reinforced high-density polyethylene (HDPE) composites. Wear testing for the nanocomposites over up to 120 h was carried out, and then, dielectric permittivity and dielectric loss factor of the polymer composites with the increased wear time were studied. Scanning electron microscope and optical microscope observations were made to analyze the microstructure features of the nanocomposites. The results reveal that there exist approximate linear relationships of permittivity with wear coefficient for the nanocomposites. Composites containing silanized CNFs with the sufficiently thick coating exhibited high wear resistance. The change in permittivity was more sensitive to the increased wear coefficient for the nanocomposites with lower wear resistance. This work provides potential for further research on the application of dielectric signals to detect the effects of wear process on lifetime of polymeric materials. PMID:27502631

  14. The biochemical characteristics of wear testing lubricants affect polyethylene wear in orthopaedic pin-on-disc testing.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Leah E; Turgeon, Thomas R; Bohm, Eric R; Brandt, Jan-M

    2015-01-01

    Lubricant protein concentration is known to affect crosslinked polyethylene wear in in vitro testing; however, the biochemical nature of these lubricants may also have a significant effect on wear and dictate its clinical relevance. A modified approach to pin-on-disc testing was implemented to explore the effect of four biochemically different lubricants on the wear of two types of crosslinked polyethylene materials (XLK™ and Marathon™; DePuy Synthes, Warsaw, IN, USA). XLK was associated with higher wear rates than Marathon. In comparison to lubricants containing deionized water, lubricants containing phosphate buffered saline solution and hyaluronic acid increased osmolality by up to 1.2 times and thermal stability by up to 1.4 times. This biochemical change reduced wear by up to 12.5 times. Wear rates for XLK and Marathon differed by a factor of 3.2 using lubricants with phosphate buffered saline solution as the dilutive media, but only 2.0 for lubricants with deionized water. Interestingly, varying the concentration of hyaluronic acid did not have a significant effect on wear, and differences between XLK and Marathon wear rates were not found to be statistically significant when hyaluronic acid was added to the lubricant. The findings of this study showed that increasing the osmolality and thermal stability of lubricants to more clinical levels decreased wear; however, the effect of hyaluronic acid on wear may not be apparent in simplistic pin-on-disc testing. It was suggested that phosphate buffered saline solution be used as the dilutive media of choice in order to better differentiate the ranking of materials while maintaining some clinical relevance.

  15. Elucidation of wear mechanisms by ferrographic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The use of ferrographic analysis in conjunction with light and scanning electron microscopy is described for the elucidation of wear mechanisms taking place in operating equipment. Example of adhesive wear, abrasive wear, corrosive wear, rolling element fatigue, lubricant breakdown, and other wear modes are illustrated. In addition, the use of magnetic solutions to precipitate nonmagnetic debris from aqueous and nonaqueous fluids is described.

  16. WearSense: Detecting Autism Stereotypic Behaviors through Smartwatches

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Amir Mohammad; Peltier, Nicholas; Goldberg, Cody; Sun, Yan; Nathan, Anoo; Hiremath, Shivayogi V.; Mankodiya, Kunal

    2017-01-01

    Autism is a complex developmental disorder that affects approximately 1 in 68 children (according to the recent survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention—CDC) in the U.S., and has become the fastest growing category of special education. Each student with autism comes with her or his own unique needs and an array of behaviors and habits that can be severe and which interfere with everyday tasks. Autism is associated with intellectual disability, impairments in social skills, and physical health issues such as sleep and abdominal disturbances. We have designed an Internet-of-Things (IoT) framework named WearSense that leverages the sensing capabilities of modern smartwatches to detect stereotypic behaviors in children with autism. In this work, we present a study that used the inbuilt accelerometer of a smartwatch to detect three behaviors, including hand flapping, painting, and sibbing that are commonly observed in children with autism. In this feasibility study, we recruited 14 subjects to record the accelerometer data from the smartwatch worn on the wrist. The processing part extracts 34 different features in each dimension of the three-axis accelerometer, resulting in 102 features. Using and comparing various classification techniques revealed that an ensemble of 40 decision trees has the best accuracy of around 94.6%. This accuracy shows the quality of the data collected from the smartwatch and feature extraction methods used in this study. The recognition of these behaviors by using a smartwatch would be helpful in monitoring individuals with autistic behaviors, since the smartwatch can send the data to the cloud for comprehensive analysis and also to help parents, caregivers, and clinicians make informed decisions. PMID:28264474

  17. WearSense: Detecting Autism Stereotypic Behaviors through Smartwatches.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Amir Mohammad; Peltier, Nicholas; Goldberg, Cody; Sun, Yan; Nathan, Anoo; Hiremath, Shivayogi V; Mankodiya, Kunal

    2017-02-28

    Autism is a complex developmental disorder that affects approximately 1 in 68 children (according to the recent survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-CDC) in the U.S., and has become the fastest growing category of special education. Each student with autism comes with her or his own unique needs and an array of behaviors and habits that can be severe and which interfere with everyday tasks. Autism is associated with intellectual disability, impairments in social skills, and physical health issues such as sleep and abdominal disturbances. We have designed an Internet-of-Things (IoT) framework named WearSense that leverages the sensing capabilities of modern smartwatches to detect stereotypic behaviors in children with autism. In this work, we present a study that used the inbuilt accelerometer of a smartwatch to detect three behaviors, including hand flapping, painting, and sibbing that are commonly observed in children with autism. In this feasibility study, we recruited 14 subjects to record the accelerometer data from the smartwatch worn on the wrist. The processing part extracts 34 different features in each dimension of the three-axis accelerometer, resulting in 102 features. Using and comparing various classification techniques revealed that an ensemble of 40 decision trees has the best accuracy of around 94.6%. This accuracy shows the quality of the data collected from the smartwatch and feature extraction methods used in this study. The recognition of these behaviors by using a smartwatch would be helpful in monitoring individuals with autistic behaviors, since the smartwatch can send the data to the cloud for comprehensive analysis and also to help parents, caregivers, and clinicians make informed decisions.

  18. The vertical accelerometer, a new instrument for air navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laboccetta, Letterio

    1923-01-01

    This report endeavors to show the possibility of determining the rate of acceleration and the advantage of having such an accelerometer in addition to other aviation instruments. Most of the discussions concern balloons.

  19. Design and fabrication of wireless remotely readable MEMS accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Subramanian, Hareesh; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    1997-11-01

    The integration of MEMS, SAW devices and required microelectronics and conformal antenna to realize a programmable wireless accelerometer is presented in this paper. This unique combination of technologies results in a novel accelerometer that can be remotely sensed by a microwave system with the advantage of no power requirements at the sensor site. The microaccelerometer presented is simple in construction and easy to manufacture with existing silicon micromachining techniques. The relatively small size of the sensor makes it an ideal conformal sensor. The accelerometer finds application as air bag deployment sensors, vibration sensors for noise control, deflection and strain sensors, inertial and dimensional positioning systems, ABS/traction control, smart suspension, active roll stabilization and four wheel steering. The wireless accelerometer is very attractive to study the response of a 'dummy' in automobile crash test.

  20. Wireless accelerometer iPod application for quantifying gait characteristics.

    PubMed

    LeMoyne, Robert; Mastroianni, Timothy; Grundfest, Warren

    2011-01-01

    The capability to quantify gait characteristics through a wireless accelerometer iPod application in an effectively autonomous environment may alleviate the progressive strain on highly specific medical resources. The iPod consists of the inherent attributes imperative for robust gait quantification, such as a three dimensional accelerometer, data storage, flexible software, and the capacity for wireless transmission of the gait data through email. Based on the synthesis of the integral components of the iPod, a wireless accelerometer iPod application for quantifying gait characteristics has been tested and evaluated in an essentially autonomous environment. The quantified gait acceleration waveforms were wirelessly transmitted using email for postprocessing. The site for the gait experiment occurred in a remote location relative to the location where the postprocessing was conducted. The wireless accelerometer iPod application for quantifying gait characteristics demonstrated sufficient accuracy and consistency.

  1. Fabrication and assembly of MEMS accelerometer-based heart monitoring device with simplified, one step placement.

    PubMed

    Tjulkins, Fjodors; Nguyen, Anh-Tuan Thai; Andreassen, Erik; Aasmundtveit, Knut; Hoivik, Nils; Hoff, Lars; Halvorsen, Per Steinar; Grymyr, Ole-Johannes; Imenes, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    An accelerometer-based heart monitoring system has been developed for real-time evaluation of heart wall movement. In this paper, assembly and fabrication of an improved device is presented along with system characterization and test data from an animal experiment. The new device is smaller and has simplified the implantation procedure compared to earlier prototypes. Leakage current recordings were well below those set by the corresponding standards.

  2. LANCE Q-flex accelerometer qualification test program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, J. S.; Mitchell, J. N.; Hester, T.; Searcy, D.

    1982-03-01

    This report covers the performance obtained on six Sundstrand Q-Flex accelerometers during the qualification test program for the LANCE missile. The Qualification Test Program was divided into three parts: (1) Flight Assurance Tests (FAT), (2) Storage and Transportation Tests (SATT), and (3) Reliability Overstress Tests (ROT). All testing was performed in accordance with Vought accelerometer procurement specification 704-166C dated 8 June 1978.

  3. Optical fiber accelerometer based on a silicon micromachined cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malki, Abdelrafik; Lecoy, Pierre; Marty, Jeanine; Renouf, Christine; Ferdinand, Pierre

    1995-12-01

    An intensity-modulated fiber-optic accelerometer based on backreflection effects has been manufactured and tested. It uses a multimode fiber placed at a spherical mirror center, and the beam intensity is modulated by a micromachined silicon cantilever. This device has applications as an accelerometer and vibrometer for rotating machines. It exhibits an amplitude linearity of +/-1.2% in the range of 0.1-22 m s-2, a frequency linearity of +/-1% in the

  4. A PFV2 accelerometer for high shock applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tise, Bert; Smith, Talbot

    1989-08-01

    The development, fabrication, and testing of a high-g piezoelectric accelerometer that uses polyvinlylidene fluoride as the piezoelectric transducer is described. The accelerometer is designed to continuously measure accelerations up to 1000,000 g. The device is packages in a 3/8 inch hex head bolt and can include a built-in hybrid buffer to provide a low output impedance analog signal. Included are fabrication procedures, mechanical drawings, and software listings for test data analysis programs.

  5. Performance of several low-cost accelerometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, J.R.; Allen, R.M.; Chung, A. I.; Cochran, E.S.; Guy, R.; Hellweg, M.; Lawrence, J. F.

    2014-01-01

    Several groups are implementing low‐cost host‐operated systems of strong‐motion accelerographs to support the somewhat divergent needs of seismologists and earthquake engineers. The Advanced National Seismic System Technical Implementation Committee (ANSS TIC, 2002), managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with other network operators, is exploring the efficacy of such systems if used in ANSS networks. To this end, ANSS convened a working group to explore available Class C strong‐motion accelerometers (defined later), and to consider operational and quality control issues, and the means of annotating, storing, and using such data in ANSS networks. The working group members are largely coincident with our author list, and this report informs instrument‐performance matters in the working group’s report to ANSS. Present examples of operational networks of such devices are the Community Seismic Network (CSN; csn.caltech.edu), operated by the California Institute of Technology, and Quake‐Catcher Network (QCN; Cochran et al., 2009; qcn.stanford.edu; November 2013), jointly operated by Stanford University and the USGS. Several similar efforts are in development at other institutions. The overarching goals of such efforts are to add spatial density to existing Class‐A and Class‐B (see next paragraph) networks at low cost, and to include many additional people so they become invested in the issues of earthquakes, their measurement, and the damage they cause.

  6. Combination of High Rate, Real-Time GNSS and Accelerometer Observations and Rapid Seismic Event Notification for Earthquake Early Warning and Volcano Monitoring with a Focus on the Pacific Rim.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimakov, L. G.; Passmore, P.; Raczka, J.; Alvarez, M.; Jackson, M.

    2014-12-01

    Scientific GNSS networks are moving towards a model of real-time data acquisition, epoch-by-epoch storage integrity, and on-board real-time position and displacement calculations. This new paradigm allows the integration of real-time, high-rate GNSS displacement information with acceleration and velocity data to create very high-rate displacement records. The mating of these two instruments allows the creation of a new, very high-rate (200 sps) displacement observable that has the full-scale displacement characteristics of GNSS and high-precision dynamic motions of seismic technologies. It is envisioned that these new observables can be used for earthquake early warning studies, volcano monitoring, and critical infrastructure monitoring applications. Our presentation will focus on the characteristics of GNSS, seismic, and strong motion sensors in high dynamic environments, including historic earthquakes in Southern California and the Pacific Rim, replicated on a shake table, over a range of displacements and frequencies. We will explore the optimum integration of these sensors from a filtering perspective including simple harmonic impulses over varying frequencies and amplitudes and under the dynamic conditions of various earthquake scenarios. In addition we will discuss implementation of a Rapid Seismic Event Notification System that provides quick delivery of digital data from seismic stations to the acquisition and processing center and a full data integrity model for real-time earthquake notification that provides warning prior to significant ground shaking.

  7. Risk Assessment for Tooth Wear.

    PubMed

    Kontaxopoulou, Isavella; Alam, Sonia

    2015-08-01

    Tooth wear has an increasing prevalence in the UK population. The aetiology is commonly multifactorial, and the aetiopathology is through a combination of erosion, attrition, abrasion and abfraction. Erosion is associated with intrinsic or extrinsic acids, and therefore subjects with reflux disease and eating disorders are at increased risk. Fruit juice, fruits and carbonated drink consumption, frequency of consumption and specific habits are also risk factors. Attrition is more prevalent in bruxists. Other habits need to be considered when defining the risk of tooth wear. Abrasion is usually associated with toothbrushing and toothpastes, especially in an already acidic environment. Patients with extensive lesions that affect dentin may be at higher risk, as well as those presenting with unstained lesions. Monitoring of the progress of tooth wear is recommended to identify those with active tooth wear. Indices for tooth wear are a helpful aid.

  8. Development of a six station knee wear simulator and preliminary wear results.

    PubMed

    Burgess, I C; Kolar, M; Cunningham, J L; Unsworth, A

    1997-01-01

    In order to assess the wear performance of different designs of total knee replacements (TKR), a six station multi-axis knee simulator has been designed, built and commissioned. The most important features of a knee simulator are representative angles of flexion-extension synchronized with a dynamically applied load, and a combination of rolling and sliding motion. The simulator typically applies flexion-extension of 0-65, anterior-posterior translation of up to 15 mm, a dynamic load of up to 5.0 kN, and operates at 1.0 Hz. The loads and motions are applied using computer controlled servohydraulic actuators and hence their profiles are easily modified. A preliminary wear test has been conducted using a Kinemax (Howmedica, United Kingdom) TKR. The test was conducted in 30 per cent bovine serum which was changed every 150,000 cycles, at which time the bearing surfaces were examined and the UHMWPE tibial component was weighed. Over eight million cycles, a tibial wear rate of 2.62 mg/10(6) cycles was measured. The mild wear observed was characterized by burnishing and slight scratching in the anterior posterior direction. These observations are broadly in line with both in vitro and ex vivo studies reported in the literature for this type of prosthesis. Delamination wear sometimes observed in vivo was not seen.

  9. Ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene/graphene oxide nanocomposites: wear characterization and biological response to wear particles.

    PubMed

    Suñer, S; Gowland, N; Craven, R; Joffe, R; Emami, N; Tipper, J L

    2016-12-09

    In the field of total joint replacements, polymer nanocomposites are being investigated as alternatives to ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) for acetabular cup bearings. The objective of this study was to investigate the wear performance and biocompatibility of UHMWPE/graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposites. This study revealed that low concentrations of GO nanoparticles (0.5 wt %) do not significantly alter the wear performance of UHMWPE. In contrast, the addition of higher concentrations (2 wt %) led to a significant reduction in wear. In terms of biocompatibility, UHMWPE/GO wear particles did not show any adverse effects on L929 fibroblast and PBMNC viability at any of the concentrations tested over time. Moreover, the addition of GO to a UHMWPE matrix did not significantly affect the inflammatory response to wear particles. Further work is required to optimize the manufacturing processes to improve the mechanical properties of the nanocomposites and additional biocompatibility testing should be performed to understand the potential clinical application of these materials. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  10. Low friction wear resistant graphene films

    DOEpatents

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Berman, Diana; Erdemir, Ali

    2017-02-07

    A low friction wear surface with a coefficient of friction in the superlubric regime including graphene and nanoparticles on the wear surface is provided, and methods of producing the low friction wear surface are also provided. A long lifetime wear resistant surface including graphene exposed to hydrogen is provided, including methods of increasing the lifetime of graphene containing wear surfaces by providing hydrogen to the wear surface.

  11. Steady-state wear and friction in boundary lubrication studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, W. R.; Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A friction and wear study was made at 20 C to obtain improved reproducibility and reliability in boundary lubrication testing. Ester-base and C-ether-base fluids were used to lubricate a pure iron rider in sliding contact with a rotating M-50 steel disk in a friction and wear apparatus. Conditions included loads of 1/2 and 1 kg and sliding velocities of 3.6 to 18.2 m/min in a dry air atmosphere and stepwise time intervals from 1 to 250 min for wear measurements. The wear rate results were compared with those from previous studies where a single 25 min test period was used. Satisfactory test conditions for studying friction and wear in boundary lubrication for this apparatus were found to be 1 kg load; sliding velocities of 7.1 to 9.1 m/min (50 rpm disk speed); and use of a time stepwise test procedure. Highly reproducible steady-state wear rates and steady-state friction coefficients were determined under boundary conditions. Wear rates and coefficients of friction were constant following initially high values during run-in periods.

  12. Shuttle high resolution accelerometer package experiment results - Atmospheric density measurements between 60-160 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, R. C.; Hinson, E. W.; Nicholson, J. Y.

    1988-01-01

    Indirect or inferred values of atmospheric density encountered by the Shuttle Orbiter during reentry have been calculated from acceleration measurements made by the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP) and the Orbiter Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) liner accelerometers. The atmospheric density data developed from this study represent a significant gain with respect to the body of data collected to date by various techniques in the altitude range of 60 to 160 km. The data are unique in that they cover a very wide horizontal range during each flight and provide insight into the actual density variations encountered along the reentry flight path. The data, which were collected over about 3 years, are also characterized by variations in solar activity, geomagnetic index, and local solar time. Comparison of the flight-derived densities with various atmospheric models have been made, and analyses have attempted to characterize the data and to show correlation with selected physical variables.

  13. Switch wear leveling

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Hunter; Sealy, Kylee; Gilchrist, Aaron

    2015-09-01

    An apparatus for switch wear leveling includes a switching module that controls switching for two or more pairs of switches in a switching power converter. The switching module controls switches based on a duty cycle control technique and closes and opens each switch in a switching sequence. The pairs of switches connect to a positive and negative terminal of a DC voltage source. For a first switching sequence a first switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than a second switch of the pair of switches. The apparatus includes a switch rotation module that changes the switching sequence of the two or more pairs of switches from the first switching sequence to a second switching sequence. The second switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than the first switch of the pair of switches during the second switching sequence.

  14. Tooth wear: prevalence and associated factors in general practice patients

    PubMed Central

    Cunha-Cruz, Joana; Pashova, Hristina; Packard, J.D.; Zhou, Lingmei; Hilton, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence of tooth wear and to investigate factors associated with tooth wear in patients from general practices in the Northwest United States. Methods Data on the diagnosis and treatment of oral diseases during the previous year were collected in a survey with a systematic random sample of patients (n = 1530) visiting general dentists from the Northwest Practice-based REsearch Collaborative in Evidence-based DENTistry (PRECEDENT) (n = 80). Prevalence ratios (PRs) of moderate to severe occlusal and incisal tooth wear by patient characteristics were estimated using cluster-adjusted multiple binomial regression for adults (18+ years) and children/adolescents (3–17 years). Results For adults, the mean number of teeth with wear facets was 5.4 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 4.6–6.2] and 51% of the adults had four or more teeth with wear. Participants 45–64 and 65+ years old were 1.3 (95% CI = 1.1–1.6) and 1.4 (95% CI = 1.1–1.8) times as likely to have 4+ teeth with moderate to severe wear facets as participants 18–44 years old. Adult males had a 20% (PR = 1.2; 95% CI = 1.1–1.4) higher prevalence of wear than adult females. Adults who were using, or had ever used occlusal splints had higher prevalence of tooth wear compared to those who never used such appliances (PR = 1.3; 95% CI = 1.0–1.5). Adults with any periodontal bone loss also had a 20% higher prevalence of wear than adults without periodontal disease (PR = 1.2; 95% CI = 1.0–1.4). For children/adolescents, the mean number of teeth with moderate to severe wear facets was 1.6 (95% CI = 0.9–2.6) and 31% of the children had one or more teeth with wear facets. The adjusted prevalence ratio of tooth wear (1+ teeth with wear facets) for boys was 1.6 times as high (95% CI = 1.1–2.4) as compared with girls. The prevalence of wear for children 12+ years old was 50% (PR = 0.5; 95% CI = 0.3–0.8) lower than that of children <12 years old. Angle’s class II was associated

  15. Italian spring accelerometer (ISA) a high sensitive accelerometer for ``BepiColombo'' ESA CORNERSTONE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, V.; Nozzoli, S.

    2001-12-01

    The targets of the ESA CORNERSTONE mission to Mercury "BepiColombo" are concerned with both planetary and magnetospheric physics and to test some aspects of the general relativity. A payload devoted to a set of experiments named radio science is located within one of the three proposed modules, the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO). In particular, a high sensitivity accelerometer ( a min<10 -9√g/ Hz in the range 10 -4- 10 -1 Hz) will measure the inertial acceleration acting on the MPO. Such data, together with tracking data are used to evaluate the purely gravitational trajectory of the MPO, transforming it to a virtual drag-free satellite system. The ISA accelerometer, considered for this mission, is a well-studied instrument developed at the Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (IFSI), with the financial support of the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI). A prototype of such an instrument was constructed, matching the requirements of the radio science experiment. Results of the study concerning the use of ISA in the BepiColombo mission are reported here, particular care being devoted to the description of the instrument and to its sensitivity and thermal stabilisation.

  16. A modified Hopkinson pressure bar experiment to evaluate a damped piezoresistive MEMS accelerometer.

    SciTech Connect

    Frew, Danny Joe; Duong, Henry

    2009-03-01

    We conducted a series of modified Hopkinson pressure bar (HPB) experiments to evaluate a new, damped, high-shock accelerometer that has recently been developed by PCB Piezotronics Inc. Pulse shapers were used to create a long duration, non-dispersive stress pulse in an aluminum bar that interacted with a tungsten disk at the end of the incident bar. We measured stress at the aluminum bar-disk interface with a quartz gage and measured acceleration at the free-end of the disk with an Endevco brand 7270A and the new PCB 3991 accelerometers. The rise-time of the incident stress pulse in the aluminum bar was long enough and the disk length short enough so that the response of the disk can be approximated closely as rigid-body motion; an experimentally verified analytical model has been shown previously to support this assumption. Since the cross-sectional area and mass of the disk were known, we calculated acceleration of the rigid-disk from the quartz-gage force measurement and Newton's Second Law of Motion. Comparisons of accelerations calculated from the quartz-gage data and measured acceleration data show excellent agreement for acceleration pulses with the PCB accelerometer for peak amplitudes between 4,000 and 40,000 Gs , rise times as short as 40 microsec, and pulse durations between 150 and 320 microsec.

  17. Test-Retest Reliability and Concurrent Validity of a Single Tri-Axial Accelerometer-Based Gait Analysis in Older Adults with Normal Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Seonjeong; Han, Ji Won; Kim, Tae Hui; Kim, Ki Woong

    2016-01-01

    Objective We investigated the concurrent validity and test-retest reliability of spatio-temporal gait parameters measured with a single tri-axial accelerometer (TAA), determined the optimal number of steps required for obtaining acceptable levels of reliability, and compared the validity and reliability of the estimated gait parameters across the three reference axes of the TAA. Methods A total of 82 cognitively normal elderly participants walked around a 40-m long round walkway twice wearing a TAA at their center of body mass. Gait parameters such as cadence, gait velocity, step time, step length, step time variability, and step time asymmetry were estimated from the low pass-filtered signal of the TAA. The test-retest reliability and concurrent validity with the GAITRite® system were evaluated for the estimated gait parameters. Results Gait parameters using signals from the vertical axis showed excellent reliability for all gait parameters; the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.79–0.90. A minimum of 26 steps and 14 steps were needed to achieve excellent reliability in step time variability and step time asymmetry, respectively. A strong level of agreement was seen for the basic gait parameters between the TAA and GAITRiteⓇ (ICC = 0.91–0.96). Conclusions The measurement of gait parameters of elderly individuals with normal cognition using a TAA placed on the body’s center of mass was reliable and showed superiority over the GAITRiteⓇ with regard to gait variability and asymmetry. The TAA system was a valid tool for measuring basic gait parameters. Considering its wearability and low price, the TAA system may be a promising alternative to the pressure sensor walkway system for measuring gait parameters. PMID:27427965

  18. Application of MAVEN Accelerometer and Attitude Control Data to Mars Atmospheric Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Richard W.; Tolson, Robert H.; Baird, Darren; Johnson, Mark Z.; Bougher, Stephen W.

    2015-12-01

    The structure of the upper atmosphere of Mars (above ˜100 km) has been probed in situ mainly using spacecraft accelerometers during the aerobraking phases of 3 Mars orbiters. In a similar manner, the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) Accelerometer Experiment (ACC) will also use atmospheric drag accelerations sensed by inertial measurement units (IMU) onboard the spacecraft to recover atmospheric density along the orbiter path. These densities are used to estimate hydrostatic `vertical' density and temperature profiles, along track and altitudinal density waves, and latitudinal and longitudinal density variations. The IMU accelerometer signal-to-noise should permit profile reconstructions from spacecraft periapsis, nominally at 150 km altitude, to ˜170 km, an altitude range nominally spanning densities of 0.05-0.15 kg/km3. However, in situ measurements over a much greater altitude range, down to ˜125 km (reaching densities of ˜2-3.5 kg/km3), can be made during each of five week-long "Deep Dip" (DD) campaigns, and these are the prime focus of the Accelerometer Experiment. Judicious choice of the timing of these Deep-Dip campaigns during the MAVEN periapsis progression through local time, latitude and longitude in both hemispheres and in different seasons will add significantly to the existing data base of lower thermospheric densities. Other IMU and attitude control data may be used to estimate torques in order to improve the atmospheric density analysis, especially in the higher altitudes of the nominal science orbit, and, more challengingly, to estimate cross-track winds during the Deep-Dips.

  19. Wear resistance and wear mechanisms in polymer + metal composites.

    PubMed

    Olea-Mejia, Oscar; Brostow, Witold; Buchman, Eli

    2010-12-01

    We have investigated composites containing metallic micro-size and nano-sized particles as the 10 wt% dispersed phase. Branched low density polyethylene (LDPE) was the matrix. Microsized metals were Al, Ag and Ni; nanosized metals were Al and Ag. Several mechanisms of wear are observed in function of the kind and size of metal used: deformation, delamination, abrasion, adhesion and rolls formation. The presence of Ag particles increases the wear rate as compared to neat LDPE. The presence of Al particles lowers the wear of LDPE significantly; nanoparticles are more effective than microparticles.

  20. Modelling of the MEA float zone using accelerometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1993-01-01

    During a floating zone experiment involving the growth of indium on a recent orbiter mission, (STS 32) oscillation of the zone shapes were observed to occur in response to the background acceleration. An understanding of the nature of the response of the zone shape to forced (g-jitter) oscillations and predictions of its impact on future experiments is of great interest not only to the PI's but to other commercial and academic investigators who plan to fly similar experiments in the orbiter and on space station. Motivated by this, a 15 month study was undertaken to analyze the nature of the g-sensitivity of the STS 32 floating zone crystal growth experiment. Numerical models were used to describe the time-dependent free surface motion of the zone as it responds to the spacecraft residual acceleration. Relevant experimental data concerning the acceleration environment was obtained from the Honeywell in Space Accelerometer (HISA) investigators through MSFC's ACAP program and processed and analyzed. For the indium floating zone experiment, a series of calculations were made using time-dependent axial accelerations g(t). The form of g(t) included simple sinusoidal disturbances as well as actual data (subject to appropriate filtering) measured on the STS 32 mission. Focus was on the calculation of the response of the free surface of the zone as well as the internal flows and internal heat transfer. The influence of solidification on the response of the zone shape was also examined but found to be negligible.

  1. BepiColombo ISA accelerometer: ready for launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francesco, Santoli; Valerio, Iafolla; Emiliano, Fiorenza; Carlo, Lefevre; Lucchesi David, M.; Marco, Lucente; Carmelo, Magnafico; Sergio, Nozzoli; Roberto, Peron

    2016-04-01

    To be launched in 2017, ESA mission BepiColombo will perform a thorough study of the planet Mercury and its environment. Among the wide range of its scientific objectives, an important set is constituted by the so-called Radio Science Experiments (RSE), which will study the gravitational field and rotation of the planet, and will perform very precise tests of general relativity theory. The fulfilment of these scientific objectives will be made possible by a precise orbit determination of the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO), at the same time estimating a number of relevant parameters. In order to reach the required level of accuracy in recovering these parameters, the data coming from the high-sensitivity ISA (Italian Spring Accelerometer) instrument onboard the MPO probe will be used: the first time for a deep-space probe. After a long path of design and development, the instrument is now ready for integration into MPO. Following a brief description of the RSE in the context of the mission, the instrument and its capabilities will be reviewed. Emphasis will be given to the foreseen strategies for its operation in the various phases of the mission, along with the manifold calibration possibilities.

  2. RPP-WTP Slurry Wear Evaluation: Slurry Abrasivity

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.R.

    2002-06-03

    This report deals with the task of evaluating wear in the cross-flow ultrafiltration system and specifically the need to define a representative slurry in order to obtain prototypic wear rates. The filtration system will treat many different wastes, but it is not practical to run a test for each one. This is especially true when considering that the planned period for testing is 2000 hours long and procurement of appropriate simulants is costly. Considering time and cost, one waste stream needs to be chosen to perform the wear test.

  3. Relative performance of several inexpensive accelerometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, John R.; Rogers, John A.

    1995-01-01

    We examined the performance of several low-cost accelerometers for highly cost-driven applications in recording earthquake strong motion. We anticipate applications for such sensors in providing the lifeline and emergency-response communities with an immediate, comprehensive picture of the extent and characteristics of likely damage. We also foresee their use as 'filler' instruments sited between research-grade instruments to provide spatially detailed and near-field records of large earthquakes (on the order of 1000 stations at 600-m intervals in San Fernando Valley, population 1.2 million, for example). The latter applications would provide greatly improved attenuation relationships for building codes and design, the first examples of mainshock information (that is, potentially nonlinear regime) for microzonation, and a suite of records for structural engineers. We also foresee possible applications in monitoring structural inter-story drift during earthquakes, possibly leading to local and remote alarm functions as well as design criteria. This effort appears to be the first of its type at the USGS. It is spurred by rapid advances in sensor technology and the recognition of potential non-classical applications. In this report, we estimate sensor noise spectra, relative transfer functions and cross-axis sensitivity of six inexpensive sensors. We tested three micromachined ('silicon-chip') sensors in addition to classical force-balance and piezoelectric examples. This sample of devices is meant to be representative, not comprehensive. Sensor noise spectra were estimated by recording system output with the sensor mounted on a pneumatically supported 545-kg optical-bench isolation table. This isolation table appears to limit ground motion to below our system noise level. These noise estimates include noise introduced by signal-conditioning circuitry, the analog-to-digital converter (ADC), and noise induced in connecting wiring by ambient electromagnetic fields in

  4. Development and evaluation of an adult use-of-time instrument with an energy expenditure focus.

    PubMed

    Gomersall, Sjaan R; Olds, Tim S; Ridley, Kate

    2011-03-01

    Measurement in behavioural epidemiology depends on high resolution and precise and accurate measures of the behaviour of interest. Few questionnaires in the adult population are able to simultaneously collect the multidimensional information that is emerging as being important in the relationship between behaviour and health. This project had two objectives: (1) to develop an adult version of the computer-delivered Multimedia Activity Recall for Children and Adolescents (MARCA), a 24-h activity recall instrument that can measure use-of-time and estimate energy expenditure and (2) to determine the test-retest reliability and convergent validity of the developed adult MARCA. Thirty-eight healthy subjects (mean±SD, 31.7±12.1 yr) completed two recalls of the adult MARCA within 24-h and accelerometer counts were measured on 30 of the subjects. Bland-Altman analysis and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were used to quantify the test-retest reliability of the adult MARCA. Spearman rank correlation coefficients (rho) were used to quantify convergent validity of the adult MARCA compared to accelerometer counts. The test-retest reliability coefficients of the adult MARCA were high with intra-class coefficients ranging from 0.99 to 1.00. Moderate to strong validity was observed for physical activity level (PAL) (MET.min score of accelerometer wear time) and accelerometer counts per minute (rho=0.72). The adult MARCA is a valid and reliable self-report measure of use-of-time and energy expenditure, capable of a wide variety of flexible use-of-time analyses related to a wide range of behaviours.

  5. Metal wear in Lillehei-Kaster heart valve prostheses.

    PubMed

    Silver, M D; Koppenhoefer, H; Heggtveit, H A; Reif, T H

    1985-08-01

    Ten Lillehei-Kaster heart valve prostheses, in situ for up to 10 years and recovered at surgery or necropsy, were examined by light and scanning electron microscopy. All showed metal wear on the luminal aspect of their struts. The volume of wear related to the duration a prosthesis had been in situ. The worn metal showed distinct, transverse surface corrugations, which became more obvious with time. Aortic prostheses wore more and faster than mitral ones. One strut usually showed more wear than the other, a change likely due to specific manufacturing methods. It is believed that the pattern of wear is caused by a velocity-controlled stick-slip abrasive wear process, resulting from an interaction between the edge of the moving pyrolytic carbon disc, the struts' titanium surface, and the protein coat covering that surface. None of the patients had prosthesis dysfunction attributable to metal wear. Disc escape seems unlikely considering the degree of wear observed after 10 years. Furthermore, the surface corrugations did not appear to cause disc sticking or other problems. However, clinicians might consider monitoring patients who have borne these prostheses for greater than 10 years.

  6. Friction and wear of nickel in sulfuric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengstorff, G. W. P.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were conducted with elemental nickel sliding on aluminum oxide in aerated sulfuric acid in concentrations ranging from very dilute (10 -4 N, i.e., 5 ppm) to very concentrated (96 percent) acid. Load and reciprocating sliding speeds were kept constant. With the most dilute concentration (10 -4 N) no observable corrosion occurred in or outside the wear area. This was used as the base condition to determine the high contribution of corrosion to total wear loss at acid concentrations between 0.5 percent (0.1 N) and 75 percent. Corrosion reached a maximum rate of 100 millimeters per year at 30 percent acid. At the same time, general corrosion outside the wear area was very low, in agreement with published information. It is clear that friction and wear greatly accelerated corrosion in the wear area. At dilute concentrations of 0.001 and 0.01 N, corrosion in the wear area was low, and general corrosion outside was also low, but local outside regions in the direction of the wear motion experienced some enhanced corrosion, apparently due to fluid motion of the acid.

  7. Assessment of the MyWellness Key accelerometer in people with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    McGinley, Samantha Kate; Armstrong, Marni J; Khandwala, Farah; Zanuso, Silvano; Sigal, Ronald J

    2015-11-01

    Accelerometers are designed to measure physical activity (PA) objectively. The MyWellness Key (MWK) accelerometer has been validated primarily in younger, normal-weight populations. The aims of this study were to examine the accuracy of the MWK against directly measured lab-based exercise and free-living PA in people with type 2 diabetes, many of whom are older and overweight or obese. Thirty-five participants with type 2 diabetes completed the protocol, which included a laboratory-based session and a free-living phase. In the laboratory visit, participants completed a structured treadmill protocol wearing MWKs on each hip (all subjects) and bra cup (women only). The speed where each MWK switched from recording light- to moderate-intensity activity was determined for each MWK worn. In the free-living phase, participants wore the MWK for all waking hours for 2 weeks, and recorded exercise in PA diaries immediately after each exercise session. The mean cut-points between low ("Free") and moderate ("Play") intensity for the right and left waist-worn MWKs were 4.1 ± 0.5 km/h and 5.0 ± 0.9 km/h for the bra-mounted MWK; ideal cut-point would be 4.0 km/h. In the free-living phase, the Spearman correlation between PA according to PA diary and the waist-worn MWK was 0.81 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.76, 0.85; P < 0.001), but only 0.66 (95% CI: 0.53, 0.77; P < 0.001) when on the bra. In conclusion, the waist-worn MWK measured PA volume accurately, and was acceptably accurate at discriminating between low- and moderate-intensity PA in people with type 2 diabetes. The MWK underestimated PA volume and intensity when worn on a bra.

  8. Validity of a wearable accelerometer to quantify gait in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Aodhán; Gunn, Eleanor; Alcock, Lisa; Del Din, Silvia; Godfrey, Alan; Rochester, Lynn; Galna, Brook

    2016-11-01

    Biomarkers are required to track disease progression and measure the effectiveness of interventions for people with spinocerebellar ataxia type-6 (SCA6). Gait is a potential biomarker that is sensitive to SCA6 which can be measured using wearable technology, reducing the need for expensive specialist facilities. However, algorithms used to calculate gait using data from wearables have not been validated in SCA6. This study sought to examine the validity of a single wearable for deriving 14 spatio-temporal gait characteristics in SCA6 and control cohorts. Participants performed eight intermittent walks along a 7 m instrumented walkway at their preferred walking pace while also wearing a single accelerometer-based wearable on L5. Gait algorithms previously validated in neurological populations and controls were used to derive gait characteristics. We assessed the bias, agreement and sensitivity of gait characteristics derived using the instrumented walkway and the wearable. Mean gait characteristics showed good to excellent agreement for both groups, although gait variability and asymmetry showed poor agreement between the two systems. Agreement improved considerably in the SCA6 group when people who used walking sticks were excluded from the analysis, suggesting poorer agreement in people with more severe gait impairment. Despite poor agreement for some characteristics, gait measured using the wearable was generally more sensitive to group differences than the instrumented walkway. Our findings indicate mean gait characteristics can be accurately measured using an accelerometer-based wearable in people SCA6 with mild-to-moderately severe gait impairment yet further development of algorithms are required for people with more severe symptoms.

  9. Wear Behavior of Thermal Spray Coatings on Rotavator Blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Amardeep Singh; Grewal, Jasmaninder Singh; Jain, Deepak; Kang, Shivani

    2012-03-01

    A rotavator is a motorized cultivator, popularly used to decrease the total time and human efforts in soil preparation. However, under dynamic loading, rotavator blades are subjected to extreme abrasive wear. The objective of this study was to enhance the working life of the rotavator blade in order to decrease the idle time required to reinstate the blade periodically during cultivation. The objective was carried out by means of thermal spray coatings, where the effect of the coatings on the extent of wear and the wear characteristics of the rotavator blades were examined. Three different detonation gun sprayed coatings, namely WC-Co-Cr, Cr3C2NiCr and Stellite-21 were compared in this study on high tensile steel rotavator blades. The wear rates of Cr3C2NiCr and Stellite-21 coated blades showed significant superiority over the uncoated blade, but not as much as shown by WC-Co-Cr coated blade.

  10. Graphitic polymer nanocomposites: Wear performance and wear debris analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tian

    With the addition of appropriate nanofillers, nanocomposites have been shown to be an effective avenue to achieve a multitude of enhanced properties, even extending to multi-functionalities not normally considered possible for conventional polymer materials. However, the structure and properties of polymeric nanocomposites can be influenced by some environmental factors in practical use, such as wear and temperature, due to the nature of viscoelasticity of polymer matrix. The large interfacial areas exist between matrix and nanofillers are also susceptible to the wear/temperature-related changes. In this work, I was devoted to developing high wear and/or thermal performance graphitic nanofiller reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites. Two critical issues, including appropriate filler-matrix interactions and proper dispersion of the nano-reinforcement, were addressed through the effective nanofiller surface modification. Wear, thermal and mechanical properties of the resultant nanocomposites were systematically investigated. Meanwhile, the wear debris generated on the sliding surface of composite materials was analyzed morphologically and quantitatively. In particular, the research regarding the possibility of determining the effects of wear and thermal processes on the nanocomposites by detecting dielectric signals over the lifetime of polymeric materials was conducted. Correlations that exist between effects of wear or thermal processes and dielectric properties of the nanocomposites were then explored. Based on the studies of HDPE nanocomposites, high quality ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) nanocomposite reinforced by graphitic nanofillers was finally extended in this thesis. UHMWPE is an extremely viscous polymer and thus cannot be processed conventionally, typically resulting in dispersion issues far worse than that of other composite systems. The research presented aims at solving the issue by using ultrasonication-assisted melt

  11. Quality of GOCE accelerometer data and analysis with ionospheric dynamics during geomagnetically active days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinem Ince, Elmas; Fomichev, Victor; Floberghagen, Rune; Schlicht, Anja; Martynenko, Oleg; Pagiatakis, Spiros

    2016-07-01

    The Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) was launched in March, 2009 and completed its mission with great success in November, 2011. GOCE data processing is challenging and not all the disturbances are removed from the gravitational field observations. The disturbances observed in GOCE Vyy gradients around magnetic poles are investigated by using external datasets. It is found that the amplitude of these disturbances increase during geomagnetically active days and can reach up to 5 times the expected noise level of the gradiometer. ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer) and Wind satellites measured electric field and interplanetary magnetic field components have shown that the disturbances observed in the polar regions agree with the increased solar activity. Moreover, equivalent ionospheric currents computed along ascending satellite tracks over North America and Greenland have shown a noticeable correlation with the cross-track and vertical currents and the pointing flux (ExB) components in the satellite cross track direction. Lastly, Canadian Ionosphere and Atmosphere Model (C-IAM) electric field and neutral wind simulations have shown a strong correlation of the enhancement in the ionospheric dynamics during geomagnetically active days and disturbances measured by the GOCE accelerometers over high latitudes. This may be a result of imperfect instrumentation and in-flight calibration of the GOCE accelerometers for an increased geomagnetic activity or a real disturbance on the accelerometers. We use above listed external datasets to understand the causes of the disturbances observed in gravity gradients and reduce/ eliminate them by using response analyses in frequency domain. Based on our test transfer functions, improvement is possible in the quality of the gradients. Moreover, this research also confirms that the accelerometer measurements can be useful to understand the ionospheric dynamics and space weather forecasting.

  12. Should We Believe Atmospheric Temperatures Measured by Entry Accelerometers Traveling at "Slow" Near-Sonic Speeds?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withers, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder's Accelerometer instrument measured an unexpected and large temperature inversion between 10 and 20 kilometer altitude. Other instruments have failed to detect similar temperature inversions. I test whether this inversion is real or not by examining what changes have to be made to the assumptions in the accelerometer data processing to obtain a more "expected" temperature profile. Changes in derived temperature of up to 30K, or 15%, are necessary, which correspond to changes in derived density of up to 25% and changes in derived pressure of up to 10%. If the drag coefficient is changed to satisfy this, then instead of decreasing from 1.6 to 1.4 from 20 kilometers to 10 kilometers, the drag coefficient must increase from 1.6 to 1.8 instead. If winds are invoked, then speeds of 60 meters per second are necessary, four times greater than those predicted. Refinements to the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium modify the temperature profile by an order of magnitude less than the desired amount. Unrealistically large instrument drifts of 0.5-1.0 meters per square second are needed to adjust the temperature profile as desired. However, rotational contributions to the accelerations may have the necessary magnitude and direction to make this correction. Determining whether this hypothesis is true will require further study of the rigid body equations of motion, with detailed knowledge of the positions of all six accelerometers. The paradox concerning this inversion is not yet resolved. It is important to resolve it because the paradox has some startling implications. At one extreme, are temperature profiles derived from accelerometers inherently inaccurate by 20K or more? At the other extreme, are RS temperature profiles inaccurate by this same amount?

  13. Accelerometer and gyroscope based gait analysis using spectral analysis of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Staab, Wieland; Hottowitz, Ralf; Sohns, Christian; Sohns, Jan Martin; Gilbert, Fabian; Menke, Jan; Niklas, Andree; Lotz, Joachim

    2014-07-01

    [Purpose] A wide variety of accelerometer tools are used to estimate human movement, but there are no adequate data relating to gait symmetry parameters in the context of knee osteoarthritis. This study's purpose was to evaluate a 3D-kinematic system using body-mounted sensors (gyroscopes and accelerometers) on the trunk and limbs. This is the first study to use spectral analysis for data post processing. [Subjects] Twelve patients with unilateral knee osteoarthritis (OA) (10 male) and seven age-matched controls (6 male) were studied. [Methods] Measurements with 3-D accelerometers and gyroscopes were compared to video analysis with marker positions tracked by a six-camera optoelectronic system (VICON 460, Oxford Metrics). Data were recorded using the 3D-kinematic system. [Results] The results of both gait analysis systems were significantly correlated. Five parameters were significantly different between the knee OA and control groups. To overcome time spent in expensive post-processing routines, spectral analysis was performed for fast differentiation between normal gait and pathological gait signals using the 3D-kinematic system. [Conclusions] The 3D-kinematic system is objective, inexpensive, accurate and portable, and allows long-term recordings in clinical, sport as well as ergonomic or functional capacity evaluation (FCE) settings. For fast post-processing, spectral analysis of the recorded data is recommended.

  14. Automatic compensation for the errors of a gyroscopic linear integrating accelerometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bezvesil`naya, E.N.

    1995-10-01

    The method of least squares and the Kalman filter are the basis for developing algorithms and studying the errors of estimation of the state of a gyroscopic linear integrating accelerometer with digital processing of the data. The article considers the development of algorithms for self-compensation of the errors of a gyroscopic linear integrating accelerometer (GLIA). One of the promising applications of a gyroscopic linear integrating accelerometer is its use as a sensing element for an aviration gravimetric system. At the same time, a GLIA has errors due to nonlinear distortions of the path of the sensing element or gyroscope, the nonzero damping factor of precessional oscillations due to viscous friction moments acting frequency of the precessional oscillations used in the estimation algorithms and the frequency of the precessional oscillations of the gyroscope, and the disturbances that affect the law of motion of the gyroscope. These errors may have an unacceptably large effect (roughly 0.5 g) if not taken into account. The goal here, therefore, is to obtain an algorithm of automatic compensation for the indicated errors. Such a problem has not hitherto been formulated and solved in the theory and practice of gravimetric measurements.

  15. Application of MEMS Accelerometers and Gyroscopes in Fast Steering Mirror Control Systems.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jing; Yang, Wenshu; Peng, Zhenming; Tang, Tao; Li, Zhijun

    2016-03-25

    In a charge-coupled device (CCD)-based fast steering mirror (FSM) tracking control system, high control bandwidth is the most effective way to enhance the closed-loop performance. However, the control system usually suffers a great deal from mechanical resonances and time delays induced by the low sampling rate of CCDs. To meet the requirements of high precision and load restriction, fiber-optic gyroscopes (FOGs) are usually used in traditional FSM tracking control systems. In recent years, the MEMS accelerometer and gyroscope are becoming smaller and lighter and their performance have improved gradually, so that they can be used in a fast steering mirror (FSM) to realize the stabilization of the line-of-sight (LOS) of the control system. Therefore, a tentative approach to implement a CCD-based FSM tracking control system, which uses MEMS accelerometers and gyroscopes as feedback components and contains an acceleration loop, a velocity loop and a position loop, is proposed. The disturbance suppression of the proposed method is the product of the error attenuation of the acceleration loop, the velocity loop and the position loop. Extensive experimental results show that the MEMS accelerometers and gyroscopes can act the similar role as the FOG with lower cost for stabilizing the LOS of the FSM tracking control system.

  16. Identifying Active Travel Behaviors in Challenging Environments Using GPS, Accelerometers, and Machine Learning Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Katherine; Godbole, Suneeta; Marshall, Simon; Lanckriet, Gert; Staudenmayer, John; Kerr, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Background: Active travel is an important area in physical activity research, but objective measurement of active travel is still difficult. Automated methods to measure travel behaviors will improve research in this area. In this paper, we present a supervised machine learning method for transportation mode prediction from global positioning system (GPS) and accelerometer data. Methods: We collected a dataset of about 150 h of GPS and accelerometer data from two research assistants following a protocol of prescribed trips consisting of five activities: bicycling, riding in a vehicle, walking, sitting, and standing. We extracted 49 features from 1-min windows of this data. We compared the performance of several machine learning algorithms and chose a random forest algorithm to classify the transportation mode. We used a moving average output filter to smooth the output predictions over time. Results: The random forest algorithm achieved 89.8% cross-validated accuracy on this dataset. Adding the moving average filter to smooth output predictions increased the cross-validated accuracy to 91.9%. Conclusion: Machine learning methods are a viable approach for automating measurement of active travel, particularly for measuring travel activities that traditional accelerometer data processing methods misclassify, such as bicycling and vehicle travel. PMID:24795875

  17. Automatic Stress Detection in Working Environments From Smartphones' Accelerometer Data: A First Step.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ceja, Enrique; Osmani, Venet; Mayora, Oscar

    2016-07-01

    Increase in workload across many organizations and consequent increase in occupational stress are negatively affecting the health of the workforce. Measuring stress and other human psychological dynamics is difficult due to subjective nature of selfreporting and variability between and within individuals. With the advent of smartphones, it is now possible to monitor diverse aspects of human behavior, including objectively measured behavior related to psychological state and consequently stress. We have used data from the smartphone's built-in accelerometer to detect behavior that correlates with subjects stress levels. Accelerometer sensor was chosen because it raises fewer privacy concerns (e.g., in comparison to location, video, or audio recording), and because its low-power consumption makes it suitable to be embedded in smaller wearable devices, such as fitness trackers. About 30 subjects from two different organizations were provided with smartphones. The study lasted for eight weeks and was conducted in real working environments, with no constraints whatsoever placed upon smartphone usage. The subjects reported their perceived stress levels three times during their working hours. Using combination of statistical models to classify selfreported stress levels, we achieved a maximum overall accuracy of 71% for user-specific models and an accuracy of 60% for the use of similar-users models, relying solely on data from a single accelerometer.

  18. Application of MEMS Accelerometers and Gyroscopes in Fast Steering Mirror Control Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jing; Yang, Wenshu; Peng, Zhenming; Tang, Tao; Li, Zhijun

    2016-01-01

    In a charge-coupled device (CCD)-based fast steering mirror (FSM) tracking control system, high control bandwidth is the most effective way to enhance the closed-loop performance. However, the control system usually suffers a great deal from mechanical resonances and time delays induced by the low sampling rate of CCDs. To meet the requirements of high precision and load restriction, fiber-optic gyroscopes (FOGs) are usually used in traditional FSM tracking control systems. In recent years, the MEMS accelerometer and gyroscope are becoming smaller and lighter and their performance have improved gradually, so that they can be used in a fast steering mirror (FSM) to realize the stabilization of the line-of-sight (LOS) of the control system. Therefore, a tentative approach to implement a CCD-based FSM tracking control system, which uses MEMS accelerometers and gyroscopes as feedback components and contains an acceleration loop, a velocity loop and a position loop, is proposed. The disturbance suppression of the proposed method is the product of the error attenuation of the acceleration loop, the velocity loop and the position loop. Extensive experimental results show that the MEMS accelerometers and gyroscopes can act the similar role as the FOG with lower cost for stabilizing the LOS of the FSM tracking control system. PMID:27023557

  19. Can accelerometers detect mass variations in Amazonian trees?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Emmerik, Tim; Steele-Dunne, Susan; Gentine, Pierre; Guerin, Marceau; Hut, Rolf; Oliveira, Rafael; van de Giesen, Nick

    2016-04-01

    The mass of trees is influenced by physiological processes within the tree (e.g. transpiration and root water uptake), as well as external loads (e.g. intercepted precipitation). Recent studies have found diurnal variations in radar backscatter over vegetated areas, which might be attributed to mass changes of the vegetation layer. Field measurements are required to study the driving processes. This study aims to use measured three-dimensional displacement and acceleration of trees, to detect and quantify their diurnal (bio)mass variations. Accelerometers and dendrometers were installed on seven different tree species in the Amazon rainforest. Trees were selected to cover a broad range of wood density. Using spectral analysis, the governing frequencies in the acceleration time series were found. The governing frequencies showed a diurnal pattern, as well as a change during precipitation events. Our results suggest that we can separate and potentially quantify tree mass changes due to (1) internal water redistribution and (2) intercepted precipitation. This will allow further investigation of the effect of precipitation and water stress on tree dynamics in forest canopies.

  20. Characterization of a MEMS Accelerometer for Inertial Navigating Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, R.D.

    1999-02-12

    Inertial MEMS sensors such as accelerometers and angular rotation sensing devices continue to improve in performance as advances in design and processing are made. Present state-of-the-art accelerometers have achieved performance levels in the laboratory that are consistent with requirements for successful application in tactical weapon navigation systems. However, sensor performance parameters that are of interest to the designer of inertial navigation systems are frequently not adequately addressed by the MEMS manufacturer. This paper addresses the testing and characterization of a MEMS accelerometer from an inertial navigation perspective. The paper discusses test objectives, data reduction techniques and presents results from the test of a three-axis MEMS accelerometer conducted at Sandia National Laboratories during 1997. The test was structured to achieve visibility and characterization of the accelerometer bias and scale factor stability overtime and temperature. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the US Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. Optimal Placement of Accelerometers for the Detection of Everyday Activities

    PubMed Central

    Cleland, Ian; Kikhia, Basel; Nugent, Chris; Boytsov, Andrey; Hallberg, Josef; Synnes, Kåre; McClean, Sally; Finlay, Dewar

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an investigation to determine the optimal placement of accelerometers for the purpose of detecting a range of everyday activities. The paper investigates the effect of combining data from accelerometers placed at various bodily locations on the accuracy of activity detection. Eight healthy males participated within the study. Data were collected from six wireless tri-axial accelerometers placed at the chest, wrist, lower back, hip, thigh and foot. Activities included walking, running on a motorized treadmill, sitting, lying, standing and walking up and down stairs. The Support Vector Machine provided the most accurate detection of activities of all the machine learning algorithms investigated. Although data from all locations provided similar levels of accuracy, the hip was the best single location to record data for activity detection using a Support Vector Machine, providing small but significantly better accuracy than the other investigated locations. Increasing the number of sensing locations from one to two or more statistically increased the accuracy of classification. There was no significant difference in accuracy when using two or more sensors. It was noted, however, that the difference in activity detection using single or multiple accelerometers may be more pronounced when trying to detect finer grain activities. Future work shall therefore investigate the effects of accelerometer placement on a larger range of these activities. PMID:23867744

  2. They shall wear fringes.

    PubMed

    Sugar, M

    1999-01-01

    The multiple functions of clothes include utility, protection, rivalry, disguise, camouflage, display for seduction purposes, aggression, totemism, and status. Here the focus is on a decorative and distinctive hierarchical aspect of ancient dress, the tsitsit or fringes, whose original function is long absent, but that has endured for 3,500 years in Judaism. The beginning of their use beyond the totemic appears related to issues of changing identity from slavery to liberty, endowing noble status, exhibitionism, a symbol of identity, identification with the aggressor, a talisman, and potency. It is conceptualized that they became a symbol, or a specifier, that helped promote group cohesion in ex-slaves who were frightened, dependent, anxious, and not hopeful about their future. The tsitsit aided the development of a new identity and made all Israelites equal and noble to the observer. The durability of this symbol to the present is evident in its daily wear, as an accompaniment to daily prayers, as well as in its use as a burial shroud for males. It appears that the tsitsit have additional multiple functions. These are the promise of oral and genital satisfaction, and the pleasure of the after-life, superego warnings and control of sexual impulses, protection, survival value, and affirmation. Since they offer sublimation with acceptable gratification of instincts, the tsitsit have become ritualized and endure.

  3. Intelligent Detection of Drill Wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T. I.; Chen, W. Y.; Anatharaman, K. S.

    1998-11-01

    Backpropagation neural networks (BPNs) were used for on-line detection of drill wear. The neural network consisted of three layers: input, hidden, and output. The input vector comprised drill size, feed rate, spindle speed, and eight features obtained by processing the thrust and torque signals. The output was the drill wear state which either usable or failure. Drilling experiments with various drill sizes, feed rates and spindle speeds were carried out. The learning process was performed effectively by utilising backpropagation with smoothing and an activation function slope. The on-line detection of drill wear states using BPNs achieved 100% reliability even when the drill size, feed rate and spindle speed were changed. In other words, the developed on-line drill wear detection systems have very high robustness and hence can be used in very complex production environments, such as flexible manufacturing systems.

  4. Computational analysis of polyethylene wear in anatomical and reverse shoulder prostheses.

    PubMed

    Quental, C; Folgado, J; Fernandes, P R; Monteiro, J

    2015-02-01

    The wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene, UHMWPE, components has been associated with the failure of joint prostheses in the hip, knee, and shoulder. Considering that in vitro experiments are generally too expensive and time-consuming, computational models are an attractive alternative to study the wear behavior of UHMWPE components. The objective of the present study was to develop a computational wear model to evaluate the wear resistance of anatomical and reverse shoulder prostheses. The effects of the wear law and the updating of the UHMWPE surface on the prediction of wear were also considered. Apart from Archard's law, a new wear law, so-called second generation law, which includes the concept of cross-shear and a pressure-independent wear factor, was considered. The wear analyses were performed considering three shoulder joint motions. The muscle and joint reaction forces applied were estimated by an inverse biomechanical model of the upper limb. The results show that abrasive wear is as important for the reverse components as it is for the anatomical. Nevertheless, the volumetric wears estimated over 1 year are within the range considered clinically desirable to reduce the risk of osteolysis. For the anatomical components, the predictions from Archard's law compare better, than those of the second generation law, to the experimental and clinical data available in the literature. Yet, the opposite result is obtained for the reverse components. From the numerical point of view, an updating procedure for the UHMWPE surface is mandatory to improve the numerical predictions.

  5. Fractal characterization of wear-erosion surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, J.; Tylczak, J.

    1999-12-01

    Wear erosion is a complex phenomenon resulting in highly distorted and deformed surface morphologies. Most wear surface features have been described only qualitatively. In this study wear surfaces features were quantified using fractal analysis. The ability to assign numerical values to wear-erosion surfaces makes possible mathematical expressions that will enable wear mechanisms to be predicted and understood. Surface characterization came from wear-erosion experiments that included varying the erosive materials, the impact velocity, and the impact angle. Seven fractal analytical techniques were applied to micrograph images of wear-erosion surfaces. Fourier analysis was the most promising. Fractal values obtained were consistent with visual observations and provided a unique wear-erosion parameter unrelated to wear rate. In this study stainless steel was evaluated as a function of wear erosion conditions.

  6. The ISA accelerometer for BepiColombo mission .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, V.; Fiorenza, E.; Lefevre, C.; Nozzoli, S.; Peron, R.; Reale, A.; Santoli, F.

    The Italian Spring Accelerometer (ISA) will give a fundamental contribution to the Radio Science Experiments of BepiColombo mission, enabling substantial improvement of the knowledge of Mercury's orbit and rotation, and of the relativistic dynamics in the solar system. ISA is a three-axis accelerometer devoted to the measurement of the non-gravitational acceleration of Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO), whose knowledge is important in order to fully exploit the quality of the tracking data. ISA shall have an intrinsic noise level of (10^{-9} m/s^2/&sqrt;{Hz}) in the (3 \\cdot 10^{-5}) Hz to (10^{-1}) Hz frequency range, to guarantee the fulfilment of the RSE scientific goals. A comprehensive presentation of ISA accelerometer is given, including details about its scientific and technological features, the updated measurement error budget, the ongoing experimental activities and foreseen calibration and science operations strategies.

  7. Terrestrial Applications of a Nano-g Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    1996-01-01

    The ultra-sensitive accelerometer, developed for NASA to monitor the microgravity environments of Space Shuttle, five orbiters and Space Station, needed to measure accelerations up to 10 mg with an absolute accuracy of 10 nano-g (10(exp -8)g) for at least two orbits (10(exp 4) seconds) to resolve accelerations associated with orbital drag. Also, the accelerometers needed to have less than 10(exp -9) F.S. off-axis sensitivity; to be thermally and magnetically inert; to be immune to quiescent shock, and to have an in-situ calibration capability. Multi-axis compact seismometers, designs that have twelve decades of dynamic range will be described. Density profilometers, precision gradiometers, gyros and vibration isolation designs and applications will be discussed. Finally, examples of transformations of the accelerometer into sensitive anemometers and imaging spectrometers will be presented.

  8. Thermospheric density and winds from GRACE accelerometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Minkang; Tapley, Byron D.; Bettadpur, Srinivas; Ries, John C.

    The high-accuracy accelerometer data carried by the GRACE satellites represents the best measurements of the total surface forces acting on the spacecraft, including atmospheric drag, solar and earth radiation pressure. The GRACE accelerometer data are particularly well suited for exploring the variation in the thermospheric density and winds in response to changes in the solar and magnetic activity. In this study, the total atmospheric neutral density and winds are derived from analysis of the accelerometer data over a six-year period starting August 2002, which spans the complete range of solar activity. This paper will present the comparison of the six-year GRACE density with several density models, including DTM-78, NRLMSIS-00, JB2006 and HASDM. The GRACE-derived thermospheric winds will be compared with the HWM-93 model.

  9. Micromachined force-balance feedback accelerometer with optical displacement detection

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Langlois, Eric; Baker, Michael; Okandan, Murat; Anderson, Robert

    2014-07-22

    An accelerometer includes a proof mass and a frame that are formed in a handle layer of a silicon-on-an-insulator (SOI). The proof mass is separated from the frame by a back-side trench that defines a boundary of the proof mass. The accelerometer also includes a reflector coupled to a top surface of the proof mass. An optical detector is located above the reflector at the device side. The accelerometer further includes at least one suspension spring. The suspension spring has a handle anchor that extends downwards from the device side to the handle layer to mechanically support upward and downward movement of the proof mass relative to a top surface of the proof mass.

  10. Physiological effects of back belt wearing during asymmetric lifting.

    PubMed

    Bobick, T G; Belard, J L; Hsiao, H; Wassell, J T

    2001-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of wearing a back belt on subjects' heart rate, oxygen consumption, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and respiratory frequency during asymmetric repetitive lifting. Thirty subjects with materials-handling experience utilized three different belts (ten subjects per belt). Subjects completed six 30-min lifting sessions--three while wearing a belt and three without. Data analyses were conducted on the second, third, and fourth lifting periods. A 9.4 kg box, without handles, was lifted 3 times/min, starting at 10 cm above the floor, ending at 79 cm, with a 60 degree twist to the right. Data analysis indicates that belt-wearing did not have a significant effect on the overall mean values for heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and respiratory frequency. Belt-wearing had a significant effect on the overall mean oxygen consumption of the subjects.

  11. Improved single- and multi-contact life-time testing of dental restorative materials using key characteristics of the human masticatory system and a force/position-controlled robotic dental wear simulator.

    PubMed

    Raabe, D; Harrison, A; Ireland, A; Alemzadeh, K; Sandy, J; Dogramadzi, S; Melhuish, C; Burgess, S

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents a new in vitro wear simulator based on spatial parallel kinematics and a biologically inspired implicit force/position hybrid controller to replicate chewing movements and dental wear formations on dental components, such as crowns, bridges or a full set of teeth. The human mandible, guided by passive structures such as posterior teeth and the two temporomandibular joints, moves with up to 6 degrees of freedom (DOF) in Cartesian space. The currently available wear simulators lack the ability to perform these chewing movements. In many cases, their lack of sufficient DOF enables them only to replicate the sliding motion of a single occlusal contact point by neglecting rotational movements and the motion along one Cartesian axis. The motion and forces of more than one occlusal contact points cannot accurately be replicated by these instruments. Furthermore, the majority of wear simulators are unable to control simultaneously the main wear-affecting parameters, considering abrasive mechanical wear, which are the occlusal sliding motion and bite forces in the constraint contact phase of the human chewing cycle. It has been shown that such discrepancies between the true in vivo and the simulated in vitro condition influence the outcome and the quality of wear studies. This can be improved by implementing biological features of the human masticatory system such as tooth compliance realized through the passive action of the periodontal ligament and active bite force control realized though the central nervous system using feedback from periodontal preceptors. The simulator described in this paper can be used for single- and multi-occlusal contact testing due to its kinematics and ability to exactly replicate human translational and rotational mandibular movements with up to 6 DOF without neglecting movements along or around the three Cartesian axes. Recorded human mandibular motion and occlusal force data are the reference inputs of the simulator

  12. Effectiveness of Ice-Vest Cooling in Prolonging Work Tolerance Time during Heavy Exercise in the Heat for Personnel Wearing Canadian Forces Chemical Defence Ensembles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    this institute ( McLellan et al (5)), we found that work tolerance times decreased dramatically when CD equipment was worn during work in the heat when...order in which the trials would be performed. The subjects performed "heavy" work as defired in a previous study ( McLellan et al (5)). The work consisted...and sweat rate in the no cooling condition found in this study are similar to those we have reported in another experiment ( McLellan et al (5)). In

  13. Wear Assessment of Conical Pick used in Coal Cutting Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, Saurabh; Chattopadhyaya, Somnath; Hloch, Sergej

    2015-09-01

    Conical pick is a widely used tool for cutting coal in mines. It has a cemented carbide tip inserted in a steel body. Cemented carbide has been in use for many years for coal/rock cutting because it has the optimum combination of hardness, toughness and resistance against abrasive wear. As coal/rock is a heterogeneous substance, the cutting tool has to undergo various obstructions at the time of excavation that cause the tool to wear out. The cracks and fractures developing in the cemented carbide limit the life of the tool. For a long time, different wear mechanisms have been studied to develop improved grades of cemented carbide with high wear resistance properties. The research is still continuing. Moreover, due to the highly unpredictable nature of coal/rock, it is not easy to understand the wear mechanisms. In the present work, an attempt has been made to understand the wear mechanisms in four conical picks, which were used in a continuous miner machine for underground mining of coal. The wearing pattern of the conical pick indicates damage in its cemented carbide tip as well as the steel body. The worn out parts of the tools have been critically examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) point analysis. Mainly four types of wear mechanisms, namely, coal/rock intermixing, plastic deformation, rock channel formation and crushing and cracking, have been detected. The presence of coal/rock material and their respective concentrations in the selected area of worn out surface were observed using the spectra generated by EDX analysis.

  14. Effect of slide track shape on the wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene in a pin-on-disk wear simulation of total hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Saikko, Vesa; Calonius, Olof; Keränen, Jaakko

    2004-05-15

    Prosthetic joints appear to show a strong relationship between the type of relative motion and wear, requiring careful consideration in the design of wear simulators. This relationship was studied with a 12-station pin-on-disk device, specifically adapted for the wear simulation of prosthetic hip joints. Each station had a unique motion, characterized by the so-called slide track, the track of the pin on the disk. The slide track shapes included 10 ellipses, their aspect ratio (AR) varying from 1.1 to 11.0, and a circle and a straight line as extreme cases. Hence for the first time in hip wear simulation, the motion was systematically varied over a wide range. Conventional UHMWPE pins were tested against polished CoCr disks in diluted calf serum three times for 3 million cycles. Below the AR value of 5.5, the polyethylene wear factor and wear mechanisms agreed with clinical observations. Above this value, the wear factor decreased to unrealistically low values, and the wear surface topography differed from that of retrieved acetabular cups. The wear particles, however, were similar to those isolated from periprosthetic tissues, irrespective of the AR value. In conclusion, it is recommended that the AR value be kept well below the critical point of 5.5.

  15. Fabrication of a Miniaturized ZnO Nanowire Accelerometer and Its Performance Tests

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Chan; Song, Sangho; Kim, Jaehwan

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a miniaturized piezoelectric accelerometer suitable for a small haptic actuator array. The accelerometer is made with zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowire (NW) grown on a copper wafer by a hydrothermal process. The size of the accelerometer is 1.5 × 1.5 mm2, thus fitting the 1.8 × 1.8 mm2 haptic actuator array cell. The detailed fabrication process of the miniaturized accelerometer is illustrated. Performance evaluation of the fabricated accelerometer is conducted by comparing it with a commercial piezoelectric accelerometer. The output current of the fabricated accelerometer increases linearly with the acceleration. The miniaturized ZnO NW accelerometer is feasible for acceleration measurement of small and lightweight devices. PMID:27649184

  16. Cannon Wear and Erosion Science and Technology Objective Program (STO) 155-mm Projectile Rotating Band/Obturation for Extended Range

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    use of alternate rotating band materials with high melting temperatures and improved wear characteristics. One dimensional finite element wear...past for nickel and stainless steel, ArrowTech Associates interpolated a wear function by comparing the melt temperatures of iron, stainless steel...dimensional (1-D) model that estimates temperature distributions and wear in rotating bands taking into account parameters such as axial acceleration-time

  17. Analysis of Accelerometer Data from a Woven Inflatable Creep Burst Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, George H.; Grygier, Michael; Selig, Molly M.

    2015-01-01

    Accelerometers were used to montor an inflatable test article during a creep test to failure. The test article experienced impulse events that were classified based on the response of the sensors and their time-dependent manifestation. These impulse events required specialized techniques to process the structural dynamics data. However, certain phenomena were defined as worthy of additional study. An assessment of one phenomena (a frequency near 1000Hz) showed a time dependent frequency and an amplitude that increased significantly near the end of the test. Hence, these observations are expected to drive future understanding of and utility in inflatable space structures.

  18. Design and Fabrication of a Differential Electrostatic Accelerometer for Space-Station Testing of the Equivalence Principle.

    PubMed

    Han, Fengtian; Liu, Tianyi; Li, Linlin; Wu, Qiuping

    2016-08-10

    The differential electrostatic space accelerometer is an equivalence principle (EP) experiment instrument proposed to operate onboard China's space station in the 2020s. It is designed to compare the spin-spin interaction between two rotating extended bodies and the Earth to a precision of 10(-12), which is five orders of magnitude better than terrestrial experiment results to date. To achieve the targeted test accuracy, the sensitive space accelerometer will use the very soft space environment provided by a quasi-drag-free floating capsule and long-time observation of the free-fall mass motion for integration of the measurements over 20 orbits. In this work, we describe the design and capability of the differential accelerometer to test weak space acceleration. Modeling and simulation results of the electrostatic suspension and electrostatic motor are presented based on attainable space microgravity condition. Noise evaluation shows that the electrostatic actuation and residual non-gravitational acceleration are two major noise sources. The evaluated differential acceleration noise is 1.01 × 10(-9) m/s²/Hz(1/2) at the NEP signal frequency of 0.182 mHz, by neglecting small acceleration disturbances. The preliminary work on development of the first instrument prototype is introduced for on-ground technological assessments. This development has already confirmed several crucial fabrication processes and measurement techniques and it will open the way to the construction of the final differential space accelerometer.

  19. Design and Fabrication of a Differential Electrostatic Accelerometer for Space-Station Testing of the Equivalence Principle

    PubMed Central

    Han, Fengtian; Liu, Tianyi; Li, Linlin; Wu, Qiuping

    2016-01-01

    The differential electrostatic space accelerometer is an equivalence principle (EP) experiment instrument proposed to operate onboard China’s space station in the 2020s. It is designed to compare the spin-spin interaction between two rotating extended bodies and the Earth to a precision of 10−12, which is five orders of magnitude better than terrestrial experiment results to date. To achieve the targeted test accuracy, the sensitive space accelerometer will use the very soft space environment provided by a quasi-drag-free floating capsule and long-time observation of the free-fall mass motion for integration of the measurements over 20 orbits. In this work, we describe the design and capability of the differential accelerometer to test weak space acceleration. Modeling and simulation results of the electrostatic suspension and electrostatic motor are presented based on attainable space microgravity condition. Noise evaluation shows that the electrostatic actuation and residual non-gravitational acceleration are two major noise sources. The evaluated differential acceleration noise is 1.01 × 10−9 m/s2/Hz1/2 at the NEP signal frequency of 0.182 mHz, by neglecting small acceleration disturbances. The preliminary work on development of the first instrument prototype is introduced for on-ground technological assessments. This development has already confirmed several crucial fabrication processes and measurement techniques and it will open the way to the construction of the final differential space accelerometer. PMID:27517927

  20. Fretting Wear Mechanisms in A216 Plain Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maich, Alyssa Anne

    The subsurface and surface microstructures during pin-on-disk fretting wear of A216 steel disks under various loading conditions and times are investigated. The corresponding pins are fabricated from 410 stainless steel to simulate in-service conditions found in such engineering components as the Siemens W501FD engine row-2 diaphragm of a Siemens turbine engine, which is known to be prone to failure by fretting wear. Loading conditions range from 2N to 15N and times from 1 hour to a maximum of 69 hours, when steady state is confirmed. Wear track depth is quantitatively determined by optical profilometry, and found to range from 3 to 11 microns dependent upon load. Wear depth increases from 2N to 10N load, but decreases when increased to 15N load, due to heavier transfer of pin material to disk, as can be seen by EDS images of chromium transfer on A216 disk. Microstructures are evaluated by transmission electron microscopy of samples prepared by focused ion beam machining to pinpoint wear tracks and expose them in cross-section. EDS is used, in conjunction with TEM, to elucidate primary wear mechanisms at each stage of fretting wear. Microstructures in the subsurface of wear tracks are found to be heavily dislocated and layered, features that vary with both applied load and time. The microstructure eventually evolves into stable dislocation cells with cell walls aligned parallel to the surface. Penetration depth of the damaged layers increases with applied load, associated with a non-uniform maximum shear stress distribution that varies with depth. Primary oxide appears to evolve from Fe2O3 to Fe3O4, with increasing fretting time, leading to a uniform oxide on the surface of the A216 disk. Oxidation rate may be increased with the evolution of this subsurface dislocation cell structure. It is concluded that fretting wear failure is likely associated with a synergy between oxidative wear and crack initiation and propagation along dislocation cell walls under high

  1. Gaze Tracking System for User Wearing Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Gwon, Su Yeong; Cho, Chul Woo; Lee, Hyeon Chang; Lee, Won Oh; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2014-01-01

    Conventional gaze tracking systems are limited in cases where the user is wearing glasses because the glasses usually produce noise due to reflections caused by the gaze tracker's lights. This makes it difficult to locate the pupil and the specular reflections (SRs) from the cornea of the user's eye. These difficulties increase the likelihood of gaze detection errors because the gaze position is estimated based on the location of the pupil center and the positions of the corneal SRs. In order to overcome these problems, we propose a new gaze tracking method that can be used by subjects who are wearing glasses. Our research is novel in the following four ways: first, we construct a new control device for the illuminator, which includes four illuminators that are positioned at the four corners of a monitor. Second, our system automatically determines whether a user is wearing glasses or not in the initial stage by counting the number of white pixels in an image that is captured using the low exposure setting on the camera. Third, if it is determined that the user is wearing glasses, the four illuminators are turned on and off sequentially in order to obtain an image that has a minimal amount of noise due to reflections from the glasses. As a result, it is possible to avoid the reflections and accurately locate the pupil center and the positions of the four corneal SRs. Fourth, by turning off one of the four illuminators, only three corneal SRs exist in the captured image. Since the proposed gaze detection method requires four corneal SRs for calculating the gaze position, the unseen SR position is estimated based on the parallelogram shape that is defined by the three SR positions and the gaze position is calculated. Experimental results showed that the average gaze detection error with 20 persons was about 0.70° and the processing time is 63.72 ms per each frame. PMID:24473283

  2. Industrial Noise and Tooth Wear - Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Cavacas, Maria Alzira; Tavares, Vitor; Borrecho, Gonçalo; Oliveira, Maria João; Oliveira, Pedro; Brito, José; Águas, Artur; dos Santos, José Martins

    2015-01-01

    Tooth wear is a complex multifactorial process that involves the loss of hard dental tissue. Parafunctional habits have been mentioned as a self-destructive process caused by stress, which results in hyperactivity of masticatory muscles. Stress manifests itself through teeth grinding, leading to progressive teeth wear. The effects of continuous exposure to industrial noise, a “stressor” agent, cannot be ignored and its effects on the teeth must be evaluated. Aims: The aim of this study was to ascertain the effects of industrial noise on dental wear over time, by identifying and quantifying crown area loss. Material and Methods: 39 Wistar rats were used. Thirty rats were divided in 3 experimental groups of 10 animals each. Animals were exposed to industrial noise, rich in LFN components, for 1, 4 and 7 months, with an average weekly exposure of 40 hours (8h/day, 5 days/week with the weekends in silence). The remaining 9 animals were kept in silence. The areas of the three main cusps of the molars were measured under light microscopy. Statistical analysis used: A two-way ANOVA model was applied at significance level of 5%. Results: The average area of the molar cusps was significantly different between exposed and non-exposed animals. The most remarkable differences occurred between month 1 and 4. The total crown loss from month 1 to month 7 was 17.3% in the control group, and 46.5% in the exposed group, and the differences between these variations were significant (p<0.001). Conclusions: Our data suggest that industrial noise is an important factor in the pathogenesis of tooth wear. PMID:25798052

  3. A Basic Research for the Development and Evaluation of Novel MEMS Digital Accelerometers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    A, to the characteristic physical scale of the flow . In the case of accelerometer beam motion, the characteristic scale for the gas damping problem...and dynamic conditions encountered in the MEMS accelerometer. Typical ESBGK simulation results for the gas flow around the moving accelerometer beam... gas damping response have been compared with measurements of MEMS accelerometer beam closing and opening response done at various acceleration pulse

  4. Fractal characterization of wear-erosion surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, James C.; Tylczak, Joseph H.

    1999-12-01

    Wear erosion is a complex phenomenon resulting in highly distorted and deformed surface morphologies. Most wear surface features have been described only qualitatively. In this study wear surfaces features were quantified using fractal analysis. The ability to assign numerical values to wear-erosion surfaces makes possible mathematical expressions that will enable wear mechanisms to be predicted and understood. Surface characterization came from wear-erosion experiments that included varying the erosive materials, the impact velocity, and the impact angle. Seven fractal analytical techniques were applied to micrograph images of wear-erosion surfaces. Fourier analysis was the most promising. Fractal values obtained were consistent with visual observations and provided a unique wear-erosion parameter unrelated to wear rate.

  5. Wear resistance of ductile irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Y. S.

    1994-06-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the wear resistance of different grades of ductile iron as alterna-tives to high- tensile- strength alloyed and inoculated gray irons and bronzes for machine- tool and high-pressure hydraulic components. Special test methods were employed to simulate typical conditions of reciprocating sliding wear with and without abrasive- contaminated lubricant for machine and press guideways. Quantitative relationships were established among wear rate, microstructure and micro-hardness of structural constituents, and nodule size of ductile iron. The frictional wear resistance of duc-tile iron as a bearing material was tested with hardened steel shafts using standard test techniques under continuous rotating movement with lubricant. Lubricated sliding wear tests on specimens and compo-nents for hydraulic equipment and apparatus were carried out on a special rig with reciprocating motion, simulating the working conditions in a piston/cylinder unit in a pressure range from 5 to 32 MPa. Rig and field tests on machine- tool components and units and on hydraulic parts have confirmed the test data.

  6. Self-noise models of five commercial strong-motion accelerometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ringler, Adam; Evans, John R.; Hutt, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    To better characterize the noise of a number of commonly deployed accelerometers in a standardized way, we conducted noise measurements on five different models of strong‐motion accelerometers. Our study was limited to traditional accelerometers (Fig. 1) and is in no way exhaustive.

  7. The development of a bearing spectral analyzer and algorithms to detect turbopump bearing wear from deflectometer and strain gage data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Carol L.

    1992-07-01

    Over the last several years, Rocketdyne has actively developed condition and health monitoring techniques and their elements for rocket engine components, specifically high pressure turbopumps. Of key interest is the development of bearing signature analysis systems for real-time monitoring of the cryogen-cooled turbopump shaft bearings, which spin at speeds up to 36,000 RPM. These system elements include advanced bearing vibration sensors, signal processing techniques, wear mode algorithms, and integrated control software. Results of development efforts in the areas of signal processing and wear mode identification and quantification algorithms based on strain gage and deflectometer data are presented. Wear modes investigated include: inner race wear, cage pocket wear, outer race wear, differential ball wear, cracked inner race, and nominal wear.

  8. Evaluation Of Saltstone Mixer Paddle Configuration For Improved Wear Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M. M.; Fowley, M. D.; Pickenheim, B. R.

    2012-09-27

    A soft metal with low wear resistance (6000 series aluminum), was used to minimize run time while maximizing wear rate. Two paddle configurations were tested, with the first four paddles after the augers replaced by the wear paddles. The first configuration was all flat paddles, with the first paddle not aligned with the augers and is consistent with present SPF mixer. The second configuration had helical paddles for the first three stages after the augers and a flat paddle at the fourth stage. The first helical paddle was aligned with the auger flight for the second configuration. The all flat paddle configuration wear rate was approximately double the wear rate of the helical paddles for the first two sets of paddles after the augers. For both configurations, there was little or no wear on the third and fourth paddle sets based on mass change, indicating that the fully wetted premix materials are much less abrasive than the un-wetted or partially wetted premix. Additionally, inspection of the wear surface of the paddles at higher magnification showed the flat paddles were worn much more than the helical and is consistent with the wear rates. Aligning the auger discharge flight with the first set of helical paddles was effective in reducing the wear rate as compared to the flat paddle configuration. Changing the paddle configuration from flat to helical resulted in a slight increase in rheological properties. Although, both tests produced grout-like material that is within the processing rage of the SPF, it should be noted that cement is not included in the premix and water was used rather than salt solution, which does affect the rheology of the fresh grout. The higher rheological properties from the helical wear test are most likely due to the reduced number of shearing paddles in the mixer. In addition, there is variation in the rheological data for each wear test. This is most likely due to the way that the dry feeds enter the mixer from the dry feeder. The

  9. Single point optical calibration of accelerometers at NIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Bev

    2006-06-01

    Typical accelerometer calibrations by laser interferometer are performed by measuring displacement at three places on the shaker table. Each of these measurements, made along the perimeter of the accelerometer, requires repositioning and realigning of the interferometer. This is done to approximate the actual displacement of the accelerometer. Using a dual-coil shaker with a small moving element and two coaxially-located and rigidly-attached mounting tables allows placing the accelerometer on one table and measuring displacement directly on the center axis of the second table. This was found to work effectively at lower frequencies, up to about 5 kHz, with mounting tables of conventional materials such as stainless steel. However, for higher frequencies the use of steel results in unwanted relative motion between the two mounting tables. Mounting tables of beryllium with nickel coating have been used at NIST to overcome this difficulty. This paper shows the calibration results of single point, on-axis measurements, using fringe counting and sine-approximation methods. The results compare favorably with three point measurements made by fringe disappearance using a conventional piezo-electric shaker at frequencies up to 15 kHz.

  10. High Sensitivity Optomechanical Reference Accelerometer over 10 kHz

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-05

    measurements and observations in seismology and gravimetry. 2 High sensitivity optomechanical reference accele Approved for public release; distribution is...and this category of accelerometers, outlining a path for high sensitivity reference acceleration measurements and observations in seismology and...Traditional applications require either high acceleration resolution, such as in gravimetry or seismology well below 100 Hz, or large bandwidths, as for

  11. Estimating Energy Expenditure with the RT3 Triaxial Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddison, Ralph; Jiang, Yannan; Vander Hoorn, Stephen; Mhurchu, Cliona Ni; Lawes, Carlene M. M.; Rodgers, Anthony; Rush, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    The RT3 is a relatively new triaxial accelerometer that has replaced the TriTrac. The aim of this study was to validate the RT3 against doubly labeled water (DLW) in a free-living, mixed weight sample of adults. Total energy expenditure (TEE) was measured over a 15-day period using DLW. Activity-related energy expenditure (AEE) was estimated by…

  12. An overview of the evolution of vibrating beam accelerometer technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norling, B. L.

    The history of vibrating beam accelerometers (VBA) is briefly outlined, and the current status of VBA technology is reviewed. In particular, attention is given to the VBA design fundamentals and the performance characteristics of several state-of-the-art VBA models. Finally, prospects for the future development of VBAs and the effect of VBA technology on the inertial navigation industry are discussed.

  13. Students Wearing Police Uniforms Exhibit Biased Attention toward Individuals Wearing Hoodies

    PubMed Central

    Civile, Ciro; Obhi, Sukhvinder S.

    2017-01-01

    Police provide an essential public service and they often operate in difficult circumstances, requiring high-speed cognition. Recent incidents involving apparent profiling and aggressive behavior have led to accusations that the police are sometimes biased. Given that previous research has shown a link between clothing and cognition, we investigated the question of whether the police uniform itself might induce a bias in social attention. To address this question, and using a Canadian university student sample, we assessed whether wearing a police uniform biases attention toward black faces compared to white faces, and low-status individuals compared to high-status individuals. In Experiment 1 (n = 28), participants wore either a police-style uniform or mechanic overalls, and performed a shape categorization task in the presence of a distractor that could be either: a black face, a white face, a person wearing a hoodie (whom we propose will be associated with low SES), or a person wearing a suit (whom we propose will be associated with high SES). Participants wearing the police-style uniform exhibited biased attention, indexed by slower reaction times (RTs), in the presence of low-SES images. In Experiment 2 (n = 28), we confirmed this bias using a modified Dot-Probe task – an alternate measure of attentional bias in which we observed faster RTs to a dot probe that was spatially aligned with a low SES image. Experiment 3 (n = 56) demonstrated that attentional bias toward low-SES targets appears only when participants wear the police-style uniform, and not when they are simply exposed to it – by having it placed on the desk in front of them. Our results demonstrate that wearing a police-style uniform biases attention toward low-SES targets. Thus, wearing a police-style uniform may induce a kind of “status-profiling” in which individuals from low-status groups become salient and capture attention. We note that our results are limited to university students

  14. GPS-Based Reduced Dynamic Orbit Determination Using Accelerometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanHelleputte, Tom; Visser, Pieter

    2007-01-01

    Currently two gravity field satellite missions, CHAMP and GRACE, are equipped with high sensitivity electrostatic accelerometers, measuring the non-conservative forces acting on the spacecraft in three orthogonal directions. During the gravity field recovery these measurements help to separate gravitational and non-gravitational contributions in the observed orbit perturbations. For precise orbit determination purposes all these missions have a dual-frequency GPS receiver on board. The reduced dynamic technique combines the dense and accurate GPS observations with physical models of the forces acting on the spacecraft, complemented by empirical accelerations, which are stochastic parameters adjusted in the orbit determination process. When the spacecraft carries an accelerometer, these measured accelerations can be used to replace the models of the non-conservative forces, such as air drag and solar radiation pressure. This approach is implemented in a batch least-squares estimator of the GPS High Precision Orbit Determination Software Tools (GHOST), developed at DLR/GSOC and DEOS. It is extensively tested with data of the CHAMP and GRACE satellites. As accelerometer observations typically can be affected by an unknown scale factor and bias in each measurement direction, they require calibration during processing. Therefore the estimated state vector is augmented with six parameters: a scale and bias factor for the three axes. In order to converge efficiently to a good solution, reasonable a priori values for the bias factor are necessary. These are calculated by combining the mean value of the accelerometer observations with the mean value of the non-conservative force models and empirical accelerations, estimated when using these models. When replacing the non-conservative force models with accelerometer observations and still estimating empirical accelerations, a good orbit precision is achieved. 100 days of GRACE B data processing results in a mean orbit fit of

  15. In vitro wear simulation on the RandomPOD wear testing system as a screening method for bearing materials intended for total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Saikko, Vesa

    2014-08-22

    The 16-station RandomPOD wear test system, previously validated for prosthetic hip wear, was used in the simulation of knee wear mechanisms with a ball-on-flat test configuration. This consisted of a CoCr pin with a ground and polished spherical bearing surface (radius 28 mm) against a conventional, gamma-sterilized UHMWPE disk in serum lubrication. The biaxial motion, consisting of x and y translations, and the load was non-cyclic. Relative to the disk, the center of contact wandered within a circle of 10mm diameter, and the average sliding velocity was 15.5mm/s (ranging from 0 to 31 mm/s). The load varied non-cyclically between 0 and 142 N (average 73 N). In the 60-day test with 16 similar wear couples, moderate adhesive wear, the principal wear mechanism of a well-functioning prosthetic knee, dominated. This showed as a burnished, circular wear mark (diameter 13.2mm, area 137 mm(2)). The wear factor was 2.04 ± 0.03 × 10(-6)mm(3)/Nm (mean ± 95 percent confidence limit). For the first time a truly multidirectional, realistic and uniform, large capacity pin-on-disk simulation of knee wear mechanisms was implemented.

  16. High Sensitive Precise 3D Accelerometer for Solar System Exploration with Unmanned Spacecrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenko, Y. V.; Demyanenko, P. O.; Zinkovskiy, Y. F.

    serve as recipients of the information. It allows to save up all advantages of FOS (carrier of information, as earlier, remains an optical flow), but problem of accuracy of measurements now will not be more connected with problem of measurement of low power intensity of optical flow - it is transferred from area of optical measurements in other, non-optical area, where there is no this problem, or it had been solved duly. It had been developed a new class of FOS with pulse modulation of radiation flow intensity at the Department of Design and Production of Redioelectronic Systems of National Technical University of Ukraine ``Kiev Polytechnic Institute''. PFOS have benefit differ from usual analogue FOS on high threshold sensitivity and wide dynamic range of measured values. As example there are described design and performances of proposed 3D accelerometer. High precision of accelerometer measurements on PFOS is provided by following: possibility of high precision measurements of time intervals, which serve as informative parameters in output pulse signal of PFOS; possibility of creating a high quality quartz oscillating system, which serves as sensitive element of PFOS; insensitiveness of metrological performances of the accelerometer to any parameter instabilities (time, temperature, etc.) of optical and electrical elements in measuring path of PFOS; digital processing of PFOS signal practically excludes processing errors; principle insensitiveness of PFOS to electromagnetic noises of any nature and any intensity; possibility of direct correction of measuring results, during their processing, for taking into account and excluding undesirable influences of any destabilizing factors are acting on PFOS. Quasi stationary approach The developed 3D accelerometer on PFOS of extra low accelerations has unique technical performances, that confirms our conclusions about potentially high metrological abilities of pulse FOS. It has the following performances (calculated

  17. Classification accuracy of the wrist-worn GENEA accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Whitney A.; Bassett, David R.; Thompson, Dixie L.; Freedson, Patty S.; Staudenmayer, John W.; John, Dinesh; Steeves, Jeremy A.; Conger, Scott A.; Ceaser, Tyrone; Howe, Cheryl A.; Sasaki, Jeffer E.; Fitzhugh, Eugene C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether the published left-wrist cut-points for the triaxial GENEA accelerometer, are accurate for predicting intensity categories during structured activity bouts. Methods A convenience sample of 130 adults wore a GENEA accelerometer on their left wrist while performing 14 different lifestyle activities. During each activity, oxygen consumption was continuously measured using the Oxycon mobile. Statistical analysis used Spearman's rank correlations to determine the relationship between measured and estimated intensity classifications. Cross tabulation tables were constructed to show under- or over-estimation of misclassified intensities. One-way chi-square tests were used to determine whether the intensity classification accuracy for each activity differed from 80%. Results For all activities the GENEA accelerometer-based physical activity monitor explained 41.1% of the variance in energy expenditure. The intensity classification accuracy was 69.8% for sedentary activities, 44.9% for light activities, 46.2% for moderate activities, and 77.7% for vigorous activities. The GENEA correctly classified intensity for 52.9% of observations when all activities were examined; this increased to 61.5% with stationary cycling removed. Conclusion A wrist-worn triaxial accelerometer has modest intensity classification accuracy across a broad range of activities, when using the cut-points of Esliger et al. Although the sensitivity and specificity are less than those reported by Esliger et al., they are generally in the same range as those reported for waist-worn, uniaxial accelerometer cut-points. PMID:23584403

  18. Ultra-Low Power Event-Driven Wireless Sensor Node Using Piezoelectric Accelerometer for Health Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Hironao; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Masuda, Takashi; Itoh, Toshihiro

    2009-07-01

    We describe a low power consumption wireless sensor node designed for monitoring the conditions of animals, especially of chickens. The node detects variations in 24-h behavior patterns by acquiring the number of the movement of an animal whose acceleration exceeds a threshold measured in per unit time. Wireless sensor nodes when operated intermittently are likely to miss necessary data during their sleep mode state and waste the power in the case of acquiring useless data. We design the node worked only when required acceleration is detected using a piezoelectric accelerometer and a comparator for wake-up source of micro controller unit.

  19. Dynamic monitoring of a mobile telecommunications tower with a bi-axial optical FBG accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, Paulo; Travanca, Rui; Varum, Humberto; André, Paulo

    2011-05-01

    In this work, the structural health monitoring of a self-supported steel tower with 50 meters high used for mobile communications are presented. For this test, a fiber Bragg grating based biaxial horizontal accelerometer was used to obtain the structure frequencies. The frequencies for the first resonant modes were obtained from the acceleration data recorded over time, resulting from the application of mechanical horizontal impulses on the tower. The results shown that the frequencies measured in both directions are within the values expected for this type of structure and can be used to calibrate numerical models that represent their structural behavior.

  20. Clinical measurement of tooth wear: Tooth wear indices

    PubMed Central

    López-Frías, Francisco J.; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Martín-González, Jenifer; Llamas-Carreras, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Attrition, erosion, and abrasion result in alterations to the tooth and manifest as tooth wear. Each classification corresponds to a different process with specific clinical features. Classifications made so far have no accurate prevalence data because the indexes do not necessarily measure a specific etiology, or because the study populations can be diverse in age and characteristics. Tooth wears (attrition, erosion and abrasion) is perceived internationally as a growing problem. However, the interpretation and comparison of clinical and epidemiological studies, it is increasingly difficult because of differences in terminology and the large number of indicators/indices that have been developed for the diagnosis, classification and monitoring of the loss of dental hard tissue. These indices have been designed to identify increasing severity and are usually numerical, none have universal acceptance, complicating the evaluation of the true increase in prevalence reported. This article considers the ideal requirements for an erosion index. A literature review is conducted with the aim of analyzing the evolution of the indices used today and discuss whether they meet the clinical needs and research in dentistry. Key words:Tooth wear, tooth wear indices, attrition, erosion, abrasion, abfraction. PMID:24558525

  1. Clinical measurement of tooth wear: Tooth wear indices.

    PubMed

    López-Frías, Francisco J; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Martín-González, Jenifer; Llamas-Carreras, José M; Segura-Egea, Juan J

    2012-02-01

    Attrition, erosion, and abrasion result in alterations to the tooth and manifest as tooth wear. Each classification corresponds to a different process with specific clinical features. Classifications made so far have no accurate prevalence data because the indexes do not necessarily measure a specific etiology, or because the study populations can be diverse in age and characteristics. Tooth wears (attrition, erosion and abrasion) is perceived internationally as a growing problem. However, the interpretation and comparison of clinical and epidemiological studies, it is increasingly difficult because of differences in terminology and the large number of indicators/indices that have been developed for the diagnosis, classification and monitoring of the loss of dental hard tissue. These indices have been designed to identify increasing severity and are usually numerical, none have universal acceptance, complicating the evaluation of the true increase in prevalence reported. This article considers the ideal requirements for an erosion index. A literature review is conducted with the aim of analyzing the evolution of the indices used today and discuss whether they meet the clinical needs and research in dentistry. Key words:Tooth wear, tooth wear indices, attrition, erosion, abrasion, abfraction.

  2. Assessing head and trunk symmetry during sleep using tri-axial accelerometers.

    PubMed

    Sato, Haruhiko; Ikura, Daiki; Tsunoda, Masahiro

    2015-03-01

    Using two types of small, lightweight tri-axial accelerometers, we obtained evidence for the effectiveness of an approach for assessing head-trunk symmetrical or asymmetrical positions during sleep. First, we assessed the accuracy of our monitoring system in five healthy young adults (age range, 22-24 years). The participants wore acceleration monitors on the sternum and forehead; then spent 5 min in six different positions. Once accuracy was confirmed, we assessed head-trunk symmetry during night-time sleep in 10 healthy children (age range, 3-13 years) and 10 young adults (age range, 21-26 years) in their home environments. All participants wore the monitors during one night's sleep in their homes. After computing head-trunk positions using the orientation data obtained by the accelerometers, head and trunk symmetry were evaluated. The head and trunk positions were correctly detected: the positional data from the trunk had 99% agreement, and the data from the head had 96% agreement. Both the young adults and children were observed to spend time with the head-trunk in asymmetric positions; however, the subjects changed position frequently so the asymmetrical postures were mobile. We concluded that the proposed monitoring system is a reliable and valid approach for assessing head-trunk symmetry during sleep at home. Implications for Rehabilitation We propose a head and trunk symmetry monitoring system using accelerometers. The proposed system could accurately identify head and trunk position. Asymmetrical positioning was seen in healthy participants but it was not immobile.

  3. Numerical modelling of tool wear in turning with cemented carbide cutting tools

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, P.; Estrems, M.; Faura, F.

    2007-04-07

    A numerical model is proposed for analysing the flank and crater wear resulting from the loss of material on cutting tool surface in turning processes due to wear mechanisms of adhesion, abrasion and fracture. By means of this model, the material loss along cutting tool surface can be analysed, and the worn surface shape during the workpiece machining can be determined. The proposed model analyses the gradual degradation of cutting tool during turning operation, and tool wear can be estimated as a function of cutting time. Wear-land width (VB) and crater depth (KT) can be obtained for description of material loss on cutting tool surface, and the effects of the distinct wear mechanisms on surface shape can be studied. The parameters required for the tool wear model are obtained from bibliography and experimental observation for AISI 4340 steel turning with WC-Co cutting tools.

  4. Critical length scale controls adhesive wear mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Aghababaei, Ramin; Warner, Derek H.; Molinari, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    The adhesive wear process remains one of the least understood areas of mechanics. While it has long been established that adhesive wear is a direct result of contacting surface asperities, an agreed upon understanding of how contacting asperities lead to wear debris particle has remained elusive. This has restricted adhesive wear prediction to empirical models with limited transferability. Here we show that discrepant observations and predictions of two distinct adhesive wear mechanisms can be reconciled into a unified framework. Using atomistic simulations with model interatomic potentials, we reveal a transition in the asperity wear mechanism when contact junctions fall below a critical length scale. A simple analytic model is formulated to predict the transition in both the simulation results and experiments. This new understanding may help expand use of computer modelling to explore adhesive wear processes and to advance physics-based wear laws without empirical coefficients. PMID:27264270

  5. Elastomer Compound Developed for High Wear Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, D.; Feuer, H.; Flanagan, D.; Rodriguez, G.; Teets, A.; Touchet, P.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Army is currently spending 300 million dollars per year replacing rubber track pads. An experimental rubber compound has been developed which exhibits 2 to 3 times greater service life than standard production pad compounds. To improve the service life of the tank track pads various aspects of rubber chemistry were explored including polymer, curing and reinforcing systems. Compounds that exhibited superior physical properties based on laboratory data were then fabricated into tank pads and field tested. This paper will discuss the compounding studies, laboratory data and field testing that led to the high wear elastomer compound.

  6. Should School Nurses Wear Uniforms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of School Health, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This 1958 paper questions whether school nurses should wear uniforms (specifically, white uniforms). It concludes that white uniforms are often associated with the treatment of ill people, and since many people have a fear reaction to them, they are not necessary and are even undesirable. Since school nurses are school staff members, they should…

  7. Rigid gas permeable extended wear.

    PubMed

    Maehara, J R; Kastl, P R

    1994-04-01

    We have reviewed the pertinent literature on rigid gas permeable (RGP) extended wear contact lenses, and we discuss the benefits and adverse reactions of this contact lens modality, drawing conclusions from reviewed studies. We suggest parameters for success with these lenses and guidelines for the prevention of adverse reactions.

  8. Structurally Integrated Coatings for Wear and Corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Beardsley, M. Brad; Sebright, Jason L.

    2008-11-18

    Wear and corrosion of structures cuts across industries and continues to challenge materials scientists and engineers to develop cost effective solutions. Industries typically seek mature technologies that can be implemented for production with rapid or minimal development and have little appetite for the longer-term materials research and development required to solve complex problems. The collaborative work performed in this project addressed the complexity of this problem in a multi-year program that industries would be reluctant to undertake without government partnership. This effort built upon the prior development of Advanced Abrasion Resistant Materials conduct by Caterpillar Inc. under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41054. In this referenced work, coatings were developed that exhibited significant wear life improvements over standard carburized heat treated steel in abrasive wear applications. The technology used in this referenced work, arc lamp fusing of thermal spray coatings, was one of the primary technical paths in this work effort. In addition to extending the capability of the coating technology to address corrosion issues, additional competitive coating technologies were evaluated to insure that the best technology was developed to meet the goals of the program. From this, plasma transferred arc (PTA) welding was selected as the second primary technology that was investigated. Specifically, this project developed improved, cost effective surfacing materials and processes for wear and corrosion resistance in both sliding and abrasive wear applications. Materials with wear and corrosion performance improvements that are 4 to 5 times greater than heat treated steels were developed. The materials developed were based on low cost material systems utilizing ferrous substrates and stainless steel type matrix with hard particulates formed from borides and carbides. Affordability was assessed against other competing hard surfacing or coating

  9. Using Accelerometer and Gyroscopic Measures to Quantify Postural Stability

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, Jay L.; Hirsch, Joshua R.; Koop, Mandy Miller; Schindler, David D.; Kana, Daniel E.; Linder, Susan M.; Campbell, Scott; Thota, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    Context Force platforms and 3-dimensional motion-capture systems provide an accurate method of quantifying postural stability. Substantial cost, space, time to administer, and need for trained personnel limit widespread use of biomechanical techniques in the assessment of postural stability in clinical or field environments. Objective To determine whether accelerometer and gyroscope data sampled from a consumer electronics device (iPad2) provide sufficient resolution of center-of-gravity (COG) movements to accurately quantify postural stability in healthy young people. Design Controlled laboratory study. Setting Research laboratory in an academic medical center. Patients or Other Participants A total of 49 healthy individuals (age = 19.5 ± 3.1 years, height = 167.7 ± 13.2 cm, mass = 68.5 ± 17.5 kg). Intervention(s) Participants completed the NeuroCom Sensory Organization Test (SOT) with an iPad2 affixed at the sacral level. Main Outcome Measure(s) Primary outcomes were equilibrium scores from both systems and the time series of the angular displacement of the anteroposterior COG sway during each trial. A Bland-Altman assessment for agreement was used to compare equilibrium scores produced by the NeuroCom and iPad2 devices. Limits of agreement was defined as the mean bias (NeuroCom − iPad) ± 2 standard deviations. Mean absolute percentage error and median difference between the NeuroCom and iPad2 measurements were used to evaluate how closely the real-time COG sway measured by the 2 systems tracked each other. Results The limits between the 2 devices ranged from −0.5° to 0.5° in SOT condition 1 to −2.9° to 1.3° in SOT condition 5. The largest absolute value of the measurement error within the 95% confidence intervals for all conditions was 2.9°. The mean absolute percentage error analysis indicated that the iPad2 tracked NeuroCom COG with an average error ranging from 5.87% to 10.42% of the NeuroCom measurement across SOT conditions. Conclusions The i

  10. Microstructure and elevated temperature wear behavior of induction melted Fe-based composite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ge; Meng, Huimin; Liu, Junyou

    2014-10-01

    Fe-based composite coating prepared onto the component of guide wheel using ultrasonic frequency inductive cladding (UFIC) technique has been investigated in terms of microstructure, phase constitutions, microhardness and elevated temperature wear behavior by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Vickers microhardness tester and ball-on-disc wear tester. The results indicated that the primary phase in the coating contained austenite γ-Fe, eutectic γ-Fe/(Cr,Fe)2B, boride (Cr,Fe)2B and precipitation enriched in Mo. The average microhardness of the coating was 760 ± 10 HV0.2, which was three times higher than that of the substrate. With increasing temperature, the friction coefficients of the coating and high-chromium cast iron decreased gradually while the wear rates increased during dry sliding wear condition. The relative wear resistance of the coating was 1.63 times higher than that of the high-chromium cast iron at 500 °C, which was ascribed to the hard borides with high thermal stability uniformly embedded in the coating and the formation of dense transfer layer formed onto the worn surface. The high temperature wear mechanism of the coating was dominated by mild abrasive wear. The study revealed that Fe-based composite coating had excellent high temperature wear resistance under dry sliding wear condition.

  11. Wear particle analysis using the ferrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The use of the Ferrograph in analyzing wear particles from a variety of different sources is reported. Examples of wear particles from gas turbine engines, bearing tests, friction and wear tests, hydraulic systems, and human joints are illustrated. In addition, the separation of bacteria and human cells is described.

  12. Needs and challenges in precision wear measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.

    1996-01-10

    Accurate, precise wear measurements are a key element in solving both current wear problems and in basic wear research. Applications range from assessing durability of micro-scale components to accurate screening of surface treatments and thin solid films. Need to distinguish small differences in wear tate presents formidable problems to those who are developing new materials and surface treatments. Methods for measuring wear in ASTM standard test methods are discussed. Errors in using alterate methods of wear measurement on the same test specimen are also described. Human judgemental factors are a concern in common methods for wear measurement, and an experiment involving measurement of a wear scar by ten different people is described. Precision in wear measurement is limited both by the capabilities of the measuring instruments and by the nonuniformity of the wear process. A method of measuring wear using nano-scale indentations is discussed. Current and future prospects for incorporating advanced, higher-precision wear measurement methods into standards are considered.

  13. Testing of a Fiber Optic Wear, Erosion and Regression Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korman, Valentin; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2011-01-01

    The nature of the physical processes and harsh environments associated with erosion and wear in propulsion environments makes their measurement and real-time rate quantification difficult. A fiber optic sensor capable of determining the wear (regression, erosion, ablation) associated with these environments has been developed and tested in a number of different applications to validate the technique. The sensor consists of two fiber optics that have differing attenuation coefficients and transmit light to detectors. The ratio of the two measured intensities can be correlated to the lengths of the fiber optic lines, and if the fibers and the host parent material in which they are embedded wear at the same rate the remaining length of fiber provides a real-time measure of the wear process. Testing in several disparate situations has been performed, with the data exhibiting excellent qualitative agreement with the theoretical description of the process and when a separate calibrated regression measurement is available good quantitative agreement is obtained as well. The light collected by the fibers can also be used to optically obtain the spectra and measure the internal temperature of the wear layer.

  14. Rig for testing the relative wear resistance of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Berdikov, V.F.; Diulin, A.I.; Efimchuk, V.P.; Pushkarev, O.I.; Finogenov, G.P.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have developed a simple and compact rig for studying the relative wear resistance of materials subjected to mechanical abrasion and friction. The rig has an electronic control system. It was used to test the relative wear resistance of a wide range of superhard and brittle materials under mechanical abrasion against a counterbody. The counterbody was made of modified iron and the test medium was a diamond suspension in oil. The results showed that specimen wear exhibits a linear relationship with abrasion time (in the range of 0.5-20 min.) at unit pressure from 0.01 to 0.10 MPa. That a standard wear pattern exists within a wide range of parameters indicates that abrasive conditions are highly stable and makes it possible to control conditions. The rig was used to establish the relative wear resistance of several abrasives, minerals, and refractory compounds. The very large difference (15.2 times) between the most and least-resistant materials (tungsten carbide and fluoride) illustrates the sensitivity of the methodology.

  15. Measuring and validating physical activity and sedentary behavior comparing a parental questionnaire to accelerometer data and diaries.

    PubMed

    Bringolf-Isler, Bettina; Mäder, Urs; Ruch, Nicole; Kriemler, Susi; Grize, Leticia; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte

    2012-05-01

    Accurately measuring children's physical activity and their sedentary behavior is challenging. The present study compared 189 parental responses to a questionnaire surveying physical activity and sedentary behavior of children aged 6-14 years, to accelerometer outputs and time activity diaries for the same group. Responses were analyzed taking age, sex and maternal education into account. Correlation coefficients between questionnaire reports and accelerometer-based physical activity across all age groups were acceptable (up to r = .55). Yet, adjustment for age markedly attenuated these associations, suggesting concomitant influences of biological and behavioral processes linked to age. The comparisons of general time indications in the questionnaire with 24h-diary records suggested that parents tended to under- and over-report single activities, possibly due to social desirability. We conclude that physical activity questionnaires need to be designed for specific age groups and be administered in combination with objective measurements.

  16. Characterizing coarse bedload transport during floods with RFID and accelerometer tracers, in-stream RFID antennas and HEC-RAS modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olinde, L.; Johnson, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    By monitoring the transport timing and distances of tracer grains in a steep mountains stream, we collected data that can constrain numerical bedload transport models considered for these systems. We captured bedload activity during a weeks-spanning snowmelt period in Reynolds Creek, Idaho by deploying Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) and accelerometer embedded tracers with in-stream stationary RFID antennas. During transport events, RFID dataloggers recorded the times when tracers passed over stationary antennas. The accelerometer tracers also logged x, y, z-axis accelerations every 10 minutes to identify times of motion and rest. After snowmelt flows receded, we found tracers with mobile antennas and surveyed their positions. We know the timing and tracer locations when accelerometer tracers were initially entrained, passed stationary antennas, and were finally deposited at the surveyed locations. The fraction of moving accelerometers over time correlates well with discharge. Comparisons of the transported tracer fraction between rising and falling limbs over multiple flood peaks suggest that some degree of clockwise hysteresis persisted during the snowmelt period. Additionally, we apply accelerometer transport durations and displacement distances to calculate virtual velocities over full tracer path lengths and over lengths between initial locations to stationary antennas as well as between stationary antennas to final positions. The accelerometer-based virtual velocities are significantly faster than those estimated from traditional tracer methods that estimate bedload transport durations by assuming threshold flow conditions. We also subsample the motion data to calculate how virtual velocities change over the measurement intervals. Regressions of these relations are in turn used to extrapolate virtual velocities at smaller sampling timescales. Minimum hop lengths are also evaluated for each accelerometer tracer. Finally, flow conditions during the

  17. The impact of accelerometer use in exercise-associated hypoglycemia prevention in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Stenerson, Matthew; Cameron, Fraser; Payne, Shelby R; Payne, Sydney L; Ly, Trang T; Wilson, Darrell M; Buckingham, Bruce A

    2015-01-01

    Exercise-associated hypoglycemia is a common adverse event in people with type 1 diabetes. Previous in silico testing by our group demonstrated superior exercise-associated hypoglycemia mitigation when a predictive low glucose suspend (PLGS) algorithm was augmented to incorporate activity data. The current study investigates the effectiveness of an accelerometer-augmented PLGS algorithm in an outpatient exercise protocol. Subjects with type 1 diabetes on insulin pump therapy participated in two structured soccer sessions, one utilizing the algorithm and the other using the subject's regular basal insulin rate. Each subject wore their own insulin pump and a Dexcom G4™ Platinum continuous glucose monitor (CGM); subjects on-algorithm also wore a Zephyr BioHarness™ 3 accelerometer. The algorithm utilized a Kalman filter with a 30-minute prediction horizon. Activity and CGM readings were manually entered into a spreadsheet and at five-minute intervals, the algorithm indicated whether the basal insulin infusion should be on or suspended; any changes were then implemented by study staff. The rate of hypoglycemia during and after exercise (until the following morning) was compared between groups. Eighteen subjects (mean age 13.4 ± 3.7 years) participated in two separate sessions 7-22 days apart. The difference in meter blood glucose levels between groups at each rest period did not achieve statistical significance at any time point. Hypoglycemia during the session was recorded in three on-algorithm subjects, compared to six off-algorithm subjects. In the postexercise monitoring period, hypoglycemia occurred in two subjects who were on-algorithm during the session and four subjects who were off-algorithm. The accelerometer-augmented algorithm failed to prevent exercise-associated hypoglycemia compared to subjects on their usual basal rates. A larger sample size may have achieved statistical significance. Further research involving an automated system, a larger sample

  18. Validation of triaxial accelerometers to measure the lying behaviour of adult domestic horses.

    PubMed

    DuBois, C; Zakrajsek, E; Haley, D B; Merkies, K

    2015-01-01

    Examining the characteristics of an animal's lying behaviour, such as frequency and duration of lying bouts, has become increasingly relevant for animal welfare research. Triaxial accelerometers have the advantage of being able to continuously monitor an animal's standing and lying behaviour without relying on live observations or video recordings. Multiple models of accelerometers have been validated for use in monitoring dairy cattle; however, no units have been validated for use in equines. This study tested Onset Pendant G data loggers attached to the hind limb of each of two mature Standardbred horses for a period of 5 days. Data loggers were set to record their position every 20 s. Horses were monitored via live observations during the day and by video recordings during the night to compare activity against accelerometer data. All lying events occurred overnight (three to five lying bouts per horse per night). Data collected from the loggers was converted and edited using a macro program to calculate the number of bouts and the length of time each animal spent lying down by hour and by day. A paired t-test showed no significant difference between the video observations and the output from the data loggers (P=0.301). The data loggers did not distinguish standing hipshot from standing square. Predictability, sensitivity, and specificity were all >99%. This study has validated the use of Onset Pendant G data loggers to determine the frequency and duration of standing and lying bouts in adult horses when set to sample and register readings at 20 s intervals.

  19. Corrosive wear behavior of 2014 and 6061 aluminum alloy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, S. K.; Andrews, S.; Vasquez, G.

    1999-02-01

    Alloys of 2014 and 6061 aluminum reinforced with 0.1 volume fraction of alumina particles (VFAP) were subjected to impact scratching during a corrosive wear process. The transient currents generated due to the impact were measured in the two composites as well as in their respective monoliths. The effect of solutionizing time on the transient currents was correlated to the near surface microstructures, scratch morphology, concentration of quenched-in vacancies, and changes in grain sizes. It was observed that the transient current values increase with an increase in solutionizing time, indicating that the corrosive wear behavior is not strongly affected by the grain boundaries. However, a combination of pitting and the galvanic corrosion may account for the typical corrosive wear behavior exhibited by the alloys and the composites of this study.

  20. Pioneer Anomaly and Space Accelerometer for Gravity Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Agnès; Christophe, Bruno; Reynaud, Serge

    2006-06-01

    The Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft are subject to an unexplained acceleration which has a constant value of (8.74 1.33) \\cdot 10-10 m\\cdot s-2 and seems to be directed toward the sun. The hypotheses to explain this anomaly are either technical artifacts or new physics. This presentation deals with the unfolding of two aspects of my thesis: Doppler and telemetry data analysis with the objective to investigate the nature of the anomaly, and adapation of an ONERA accelerometer for a future mission in which the anomaly will be confirmed and more precisely measured. The presence of an accelerometer is mandatory for the identification of the anomaly's origin.

  1. A Low Frequency FBG Accelerometer with Symmetrical Bended Spring Plates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fufei; Dai, Yutang; Karanja, Joseph Muna; Yang, Minghong

    2017-01-22

    To meet the requirements for low-frequency vibration monitoring, a new type of FBG (fiber Bragg grating) accelerometer with a bended spring plate is proposed. Two symmetrical bended spring plates are used as elastic elements, which drive the FBG to produce axial strains equal in magnitude but opposite in direction when exciting vibrations exist, leading to doubling the wavelength shift of the FBG. The mechanics model and a numerical method are presented in this paper, with which the influence of the structural parameters on the sensitivity and the eigenfrequency are discussed. The test results show that the sensitivity of the accelerometer is more than 1000 pm/g when the frequency is within the 0.7-20 Hz range.

  2. A Low Frequency FBG Accelerometer with Symmetrical Bended Spring Plates

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fufei; Dai, Yutang; Karanja, Joseph Muna; Yang, Minghong

    2017-01-01

    To meet the requirements for low-frequency vibration monitoring, a new type of FBG (fiber Bragg grating) accelerometer with a bended spring plate is proposed. Two symmetrical bended spring plates are used as elastic elements, which drive the FBG to produce axial strains equal in magnitude but opposite in direction when exciting vibrations exist, leading to doubling the wavelength shift of the FBG. The mechanics model and a numerical method are presented in this paper, with which the influence of the structural parameters on the sensitivity and the eigenfrequency are discussed. The test results show that the sensitivity of the accelerometer is more than 1000 pm/g when the frequency is within the 0.7–20 Hz range. PMID:28117740

  3. Guidelines for Standardized Testing of Broadband Seismometers and Accelerometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutt, Charles R.; Evans, John R.; Followill, Fred; Nigbor, Robert L.; Wielandt, Erhard

    2010-01-01

    Testing and specification of seismic and earthquake-engineering sensors and recorders has been marked by significant variations in procedures and selected parameters. These variations cause difficulty in comparing such specifications and test results. In July 1989, and again in May 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey hosted international pub-lic/private workshops with the goal of defining widely accepted guidelines for the testing of seismological inertial sensors, seismometers, and accelerometers. The Proceedings of the 2005 workshop have been published and include as appendix 6 the report of the 1989 workshop. This document represents a collation and rationalization of a single set of formal guidelines for testing and specifying broadband seismometers and accelerometers.

  4. Champ Accelerometer: Evaluation and Contribution To The Gravity Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perosanz, F.; Loyer, S.; Bruinsma, S.; Tamagnan, D.; Lemoine, J. M.; Biancale, R.; Fayard, T.; Vales, N.; Touboul, P.

    The STAR accelerometer on-board the German CHAMP satellite delivers non- gravitational accelerations with an unprecedented resolution. This study presents the global evaluation of the instrument in terms of continuous measurement and "House Keeping" parameters surveying, a posteriori calibration strategy and results and mis- function analysis and correction. In addition the contribution of the STAR accelerom- eter to dynamic orbit computation and gravity modelling is evaluated. Different orbit fit solutions and geoid models resulting from gravity field test models are compared.

  5. The influence of nominal stress on wear factors of carbon fibre-reinforced polyetheretherketone (PEEK-OPTIMA® Wear Performance) against zirconia toughened alumina (Biolox® delta ceramic).

    PubMed

    Evans, Andrew; Horton, Henrietta; Unsworth, Anthony; Briscoe, Adam

    2014-06-01

    Carbon fibre-reinforced polyetheretherketone is an attractive alternative to ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene in artificial joints, but little has been published on the influence of stress on the wear factor. We know that in ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene, the wear factor reduces as the normal stress increases, which is counter-intuitive but very helpful in the case of non-conforming contacts. In this study, carbon fibre-reinforced polyetheretherketone (PEEK-OPTIMA(®) Wear Performance) has been investigated in a pin-on-plate machine under steady loads and under stresses typical of hip and knee joints. At stresses below about 6 MPa, wear factors are between 10 and a 100 times lower than for ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene but at higher stresses the wear factors increase substantially.

  6. Corrosive Wear in Wet Ore Grinding Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Denny A.

    1985-06-01

    Wear processes in ball and rod mills have recently received increased attention in order to increase efficiency and conserve grinding media. Direct removal of metal from the grinding media surface by abrasive wear occurs in both dry and wet grinding. Additional corrosive wear is apparent during wet grinding, in which less resistant corrosion product films are abraded away. Inhibitors and higher pH solutions, in which corrosion product films are more tenacious, improve wear resistance during wet grinding. Softer surfaces are less resistant to corrosive wear, suggesting that film formation and subsequent film abrasion on newly furrowed surfaces must be a factor.

  7. Backside Wear Analysis of Retrieved Acetabular Liners with a Press-Fit Locking Mechanism in Comparison to Wear Simulation In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Puente Reyna, Ana Laura; Jäger, Marcus; Floerkemeier, Thilo; Frecher, Sven; Delank, Karl-Stefan; Schilling, Christoph; Grupp, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Backside wear due to micromotion and poor conformity between the liner and its titanium alloy shell may contribute to the high rates of retroacetabular osteolysis and consequent aseptic loosening. The purpose of our study was to understand the wear process on the backside of polyethylene liners from two acetabular cup systems, whose locking mechanism is based on a press-fit cone in combination with a rough titanium conical inner surface on the fixation area. A direct comparison between in vitro wear simulator tests (equivalent to 3 years of use) and retrieved liners (average 13.1 months in situ) was done in order to evaluate the backside wear characteristics and behavior of these systems. Similar wear scores between in vitro tested and retrieved liners were observed. The results showed that this locking mechanism did not significantly produce wear marks at the backside of the polyethylene liners due to micromotion. In all the analyzed liners, the most common wear modes observed were small scratches at the cranial fixation zone directly below the rough titanium inner surface of the shell. It was concluded that most of the wear marks were produced during the insertion and removal of the liner, rather than during its time in situ.

  8. Backside Wear Analysis of Retrieved Acetabular Liners with a Press-Fit Locking Mechanism in Comparison to Wear Simulation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Marcus; Floerkemeier, Thilo; Frecher, Sven; Delank, Karl-Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Backside wear due to micromotion and poor conformity between the liner and its titanium alloy shell may contribute to the high rates of retroacetabular osteolysis and consequent aseptic loosening. The purpose of our study was to understand the wear process on the backside of polyethylene liners from two acetabular cup systems, whose locking mechanism is based on a press-fit cone in combination with a rough titanium conical inner surface on the fixation area. A direct comparison between in vitro wear simulator tests (equivalent to 3 years of use) and retrieved liners (average 13.1 months in situ) was done in order to evaluate the backside wear characteristics and behavior of these systems. Similar wear scores between in vitro tested and retrieved liners were observed. The results showed that this locking mechanism did not significantly produce wear marks at the backside of the polyethylene liners due to micromotion. In all the analyzed liners, the most common wear modes observed were small scratches at the cranial fixation zone directly below the rough titanium inner surface of the shell. It was concluded that most of the wear marks were produced during the insertion and removal of the liner, rather than during its time in situ. PMID:27722174

  9. Spectral Regression Based Fault Feature Extraction for Bearing Accelerometer Sensor Signals

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zhanguo; Xia, Shixiong; Wan, Ling; Cai, Shiyu

    2012-01-01

    Bearings are not only the most important element but also a common source of failures in rotary machinery. Bearing fault prognosis technology has been receiving more and more attention recently, in particular because it plays an increasingly important role in avoiding the occurrence of accidents. Therein, fault feature extraction (FFE) of bearing accelerometer sensor signals is essential to highlight representative features of bearing conditions for machinery fault diagnosis and prognosis. This paper proposes a spectral regression (SR)-based approach for fault feature extraction from original features including time, frequency and time-frequency domain features of bearing accelerometer sensor signals. SR is a novel regression framework for efficient regularized subspace learning and feature extraction technology, and it uses the least squares method to obtain the best projection direction, rather than computing the density matrix of features, so it also has the advantage in dimensionality reduction. The effectiveness of the SR-based method is validated experimentally by applying the acquired vibration signals data to bearings. The experimental results indicate that SR can reduce the computation cost and preserve more structure information about different bearing faults and severities, and it is demonstrated that the proposed feature extraction scheme has an advantage over other similar approaches. PMID:23202017

  10. Mechanical fault detection of electric motors by laser vibrometer and accelerometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristalli, C.; Paone, N.; Rodríguez, R. M.

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents a comparative study between accelerometer and laser vibrometer measurements aimed at on-line quality control carried out on the universal motors used in washing machines, which exhibit defects localised mainly in the bearings, including faults in the cage, in the rolling element and in the outer and inner ring. A set of no defective and defective motors were analysed by means of the acceleration signal provided by the accelerometer, and the displacement and velocity signals given by a single-point laser vibrometer. Advantages and disadvantages of both absolute and relative sensors and of contact and non-contact instrumentation are discussed taking into account the applicability to real on-line quality control measurements and bringing to light the related measurement problems due to the specific environmental conditions of assembly lines and sensor installation constraints. The performance of different signal-processing algorithms is discussed: RMS computation at steady-state proves effective for pass or fail diagnosis, while the amplitude of selected frequencies in the averaged spectra allows also for classification of a variety of special faults in bearings. Joint time-frequency analysis output data can be successfully used for pass or fail diagnosis during transients, thus achieving a remarkable reduction in testing time, which is important for on-line diagnostics.

  11. Sedentary Behavior in Preschoolers: How Many Days of Accelerometer Monitoring Is Needed?

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Wonwoo; Beets, Michael W.; Pate, Russell R.

    2015-01-01

    The reliability of accelerometry for measuring sedentary behavior in preschoolers has not been determined, thus we determined how many days of accelerometry monitoring are necessary to reliably estimate daily time spent in sedentary behavior in preschoolers. In total, 191 and 150 preschoolers (three to five years) wore ActiGraph accelerometers (15-s epoch) during the in-school (≥4 days) and the total-day (≥6 days) period respectively. Accelerometry data were summarized as time spent in sedentary behavior (min/h) using three different cutpoints developed for preschool-age children (<37.5, <200, and <373 counts/15 s). The intraclass correlations (ICCs) and Spearman-Brown prophecy formula were used to estimate the reliability of accelerometer for measuring sedentary behavior. Across different cutpoints, the ICCs ranged from 0.81 to 0.92 for in-school sedentary behavior, and from 0.75 to 0.81 for total-day sedentary behavior, respectively. To achieve an ICC of ≥0.8, two to four days or six to nine days of monitoring were needed for in-school sedentary behavior and total-day sedentary behavior, respectively. These findings provide important guidance for future research on sedentary behavior in preschool children using accelerometry. Understanding the reliability of accelerometry will facilitate the conduct of research designed to inform policies and practices aimed at reducing sedentary behavior in preschool children. PMID:26492261

  12. Changes in food processing and occlusal dental wear during the early agricultural period in northwest Mexico.

    PubMed

    Watson, James T

    2008-01-01

    Crown dimensions and occlusal surface wear rate and wear plane were evaluated using paired first and second mandibular molars from a sample of 84 Early Agricultural period (1600 B.C.-A.D. 200) skeletons from northwest Mexico. Although this period represents a major shift in subsistence strategies in the Sonoran Desert, from food-foraging to agriculture, archaeological and dental pathology studies have identified this period as one of relative dietary stability. It was therefore predicted that very little variation in occlusal wear would have occurred between the early phase (San Pedro: 1600-800 B.C.) and late phase (Cienega: 800 B.C.-A.D. 200). Comparison of crown diameters identified some phenotypic differences between sexes but not between archaeological phases. Molar occlusal surfaces were then divided into four quadrants, and wear scores recorded for each quadrant. Principle axis analysis was performed between total wear scores of paired, adjacent first and second mandibular molars to assess rate and occlusal wear plane over time. The analysis demonstrated that both wear rate and wear plane increased from the early to the late phase of the Early Agricultural period. These results indicate that although diet may have indeed remained stable during this period in the Sonoran Desert increases in the rate of wear and wear plane may reflect changes in food-processing techniques. It is suggested that more intensive processing of agricultural products during the Cienega phase simultaneously softened the diet to create more tooth-contact wear and introduced more grit to cause faster and more angled wear on the molar occlusal surfaces.

  13. Validation of mercury tip-switch and accelerometer activity sensors for identifying resting and active behavior in bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jasmine Ware,; Rode, Karyn D.; Pagano, Anthony M.; Bromaghin, Jeffrey; Charles T Robbins,; Joy Erlenbach,; Shannon Jensen,; Amy Cutting,; Nicole Nicassio-Hiskey,; Amy Hash,; Owen, Megan A.; Heiko Jansen,

    2015-01-01

    Activity sensors are often included in wildlife transmitters and can provide information on the behavior and activity patterns of animals remotely. However, interpreting activity-sensor data relative to animal behavior can be difficult if animals cannot be continuously observed. In this study, we examined the performance of a mercury tip-switch and a tri-axial accelerometer housed in collars to determine whether sensor data can be accurately classified as resting and active behaviors and whether data are comparable for the 2 sensor types. Five captive bears (3 polar [Ursus maritimus] and 2 brown [U. arctos horribilis]) were fitted with a collar specially designed to internally house the sensors. The bears’ behaviors were recorded, classified, and then compared with sensor readings. A separate tri-axial accelerometer that sampled continuously at a higher frequency and provided raw acceleration values from 3 axes was also mounted on the collar to compare with the lower resolution sensors. Both accelerometers more accurately identified resting and active behaviors at time intervals ranging from 1 minute to 1 hour (≥91.1% accuracy) compared with the mercury tip-switch (range = 75.5–86.3%). However, mercury tip-switch accuracy improved when sampled at longer intervals (e.g., 30–60 min). Data from the lower resolution accelerometer, but not the mercury tip-switch, accurately predicted the percentage of time spent resting during an hour. Although the number of bears available for this study was small, our results suggest that these activity sensors can remotely identify resting versus active behaviors across most time intervals. We recommend that investigators consider both study objectives and the variation in accuracy of classifying resting and active behaviors reported here when determining sampling interval.

  14. 3D Simulation Modeling of the Tooth Wear Process.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ning; Hu, Jian; Liu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Severe tooth wear is the most common non-caries dental disease, and it can seriously affect oral health. Studying the tooth wear process is time-consuming and difficult, and technological tools are frequently lacking. This paper presents a novel method of digital simulation modeling that represents a new way to study tooth wear. First, a feature extraction algorithm is used to obtain anatomical feature points of the tooth without attrition. Second, after the alignment of non-attrition areas, the initial homogeneous surface is generated by means of the RBF (Radial Basic Function) implicit surface and then deformed to the final homogeneous by the contraction and bounding algorithm. Finally, the method of bilinear interpolation based on Laplacian coordinates between tooth with attrition and without attrition is used to inversely reconstruct the sequence of changes of the 3D tooth morphology during gradual tooth wear process. This method can also be used to generate a process simulation of nonlinear tooth wear by means of fitting an attrition curve to the statistical data of attrition index in a certain region. The effectiveness and efficiency of the attrition simulation algorithm are verified through experimental simulation.

  15. 3D Simulation Modeling of the Tooth Wear Process

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ning; Hu, Jian; Liu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Severe tooth wear is the most common non-caries dental disease, and it can seriously affect oral health. Studying the tooth wear process is time-consuming and difficult, and technological tools are frequently lacking. This paper presents a novel method of digital simulation modeling that represents a new way to study tooth wear. First, a feature extraction algorithm is used to obtain anatomical feature points of the tooth without attrition. Second, after the alignment of non-attrition areas, the initial homogeneous surface is generated by means of the RBF (Radial Basic Function) implicit surface and then deformed to the final homogeneous by the contraction and bounding algorithm. Finally, the method of bilinear interpolation based on Laplacian coordinates between tooth with attrition and without attrition is used to inversely reconstruct the sequence of changes of the 3D tooth morphology during gradual tooth wear process. This method can also be used to generate a process simulation of nonlinear tooth wear by means of fitting an attrition curve to the statistical data of attrition index in a certain region. The effectiveness and efficiency of the attrition simulation algorithm are verified through experimental simulation. PMID:26241942

  16. Wear mechanisms in a nonrotating wire rope

    SciTech Connect

    Schrems, K.K.; Dogan, C.P.; Hawk, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    A nonrotating wire rope used in main hoist operations is being examined by the US Bureau of Mines to determine operative wear mechanisms. Typically, bending and loading the ropes during service cause small, localized movements at interwire contacts, leading to material loss through wear.The cumulative effect of both material loss by wear and wire breakage by fatigue failure accelerates rope retirement. If the macroscopic mechanics of wire rope failure are to be understood, microscopic deformation and degradation processes must be identified and quantified. As a first step in this study, interwire wear and deformation were studied using a combination of scanning electron microscopy and hardness measurements. Both fretting and abrasive wear were identified as wear mechanisms. Preferential sites for fretting and abrasive wear were identified and are discussed regarding rope construction and geometry and the tribo-system.

  17. Low wear partially fluorinated polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.; Hady, W. F.

    1984-01-01

    Tribological studies were conducted on five different polyimide solid bodies formulated from the diamine 2,2-bis 4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl hexafluoropropane (4-BDAF) and the dianhydrides pyromellitic acid (PMDS) and benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid (BTDA). The following polyimides were evaluated 4-BDAF/PMDA, 4-BDAF/BTDA, 4-BDAF/80 mole percent PMDA, 20 mole percent BTDA, 4-BDAF/60 mole percent BTDA. Friction coefficients, polyimide wear rates, polyimide surface morphology and transfer films were evaluated at sliding speeds of 0.31 to 11.6 m/s and at temperatures of 25 C to 300 C. The results indicate that the tribological properties are highly dependent on the composition of the polyimide and on the experimental conditions. Two polyimides were found which produced very low wear rates but very high friction coefficients (greater than 0.85) under ambient conditions. They offer considerable potential for high traction types of application such as brakes.

  18. Nuclear fuel assembly wear sleeve

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwell, D.J.; Kmonk, S.

    1983-03-08

    An improved control rod guide tube for use in a fuel assembly in a nuclear reactor. The guide tube extends the complete length of the fuel assembly and has its upper end fastened in a cylindrical housing by swaging the guide tube material into grooves formed in the housing walls. To eliminate wear on the guide tube inner walls caused by hydraulic induced vibratory forces on a control rod adapted to move therein, a thin-walled chrome plated sleeve is threaded into the top end of the guide thimble and extends downwardly a distance sufficient to be engaged by the control rod during reactor operation. The sleeve serves as a highly resistant wear surface between the control rod and walls on the guide tube in the fuel assembly.

  19. Coatings for wear and lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1978-01-01

    Recent advances in the tribological uses of rf-sputtered and ion plated films of solid film lubricants (laminar solids, soft metals, organic polymers) and wear resistant refractory compounds (carbides, nitrides, silicides) are reviewed. The sputtering and ion plating potentials and the corresponding coatings formed were evaluated relative to the friction coefficient, wear endurance life and mechanical properties. The tribological and mechanical properties for each kind of film are discussed in terms of film adherence, coherence, density, grain size, morphology, internal stresses, thickness, and substrate conditions such as temperature, topography, chemistry and dc-biasing. The ion plated metallic films in addition to improved tribological properties also have better mechanical properties such as tensile strength and fatigue life.

  20. Coatings for wear and lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper we review the recent advances in the tribological uses of R.F.-sputtered and ion-plated films of solid film lubricants (laminar solids, soft metals, organic polymers) and wear-resistant refractory compounds (carbides, nitrides, silicides). The sputtering and ion-plating potentials and the corresponding coatings formed are evaluated relative to the friction coefficient, wear endurance life and mechanical properties. The tribological and mechanical properties of each kind of film are discussed in terms of film adherence, coherence, density, grain size, morphology, internal stresses and thickness and substrate conditions such as temperature, topography, chemistry and d.c. biasing. The ion-plated metallic films in addition to improved tribological properties also have better mechanical properties such as tensile strength and fatigue life.

  1. Vehicle Unpaved Road Response Spectrum Acquisition Based on Accelerometer and GPS Data

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Nan; Shang, Jianzhong; Ren, Yanxi; Guo, Yao

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a response acquisition system composed of some spindle accelerometers and a time synchronized on-board GPS receiver developed in order to collect the dynamic response of vehicle riding on an unpaved road. A method of time-space conversion for calculating the response spectrum is proposed to eliminate the adverse effect of time-varying speed, based on the transform from the equitime sampled spindle acceleration responses to equidistance sampling. By using two groups of independent distance histories acquired from GPS, a method called long-range error correction is proposed to improve the accuracy of the vehicle's distance information, which is critical for the time-space conversion. The accuracy and limitations of the system have been analyzed, and its validity has been verified by implementing the system on a wheel loader for road response spectrum measuring. This paper offers a practical approach to obtaining unpaved road response spectra for durability road simulation. PMID:23112581

  2. Effects of message framing on self-report and accelerometer-assessed physical activity across age and gender groups.

    PubMed

    Li, Kin-Kit; Cheng, Sheung-Tak; Fung, Helene H

    2014-02-01

    This study compared message-framing effects on physical activity (PA) across age and gender groups. Participants included 111 younger and 100 older adults (68% were women), randomly assigned to read gain-framed or loss-framed PA messages in promotion pamphlets, and who wore accelerometers for the following 14 days. Using regression analyses controlling for demographic and health factors, we found significant age-by-gender-by-framing interactions predicting self-report (B = -4.39, p = .01) and accelerometer-assessed PA (B = -2.44, p = .02) during the follow-up period. Gain-framed messages were more effective than loss-framed messages in promoting PA behaviors only among older men. We speculated that the age-related positivity effect, as well as the age and gender differences in issue involvement, explained the group differences in framing. In addition, more time availability and higher self-efficacy among older men might have contributed to the results.

  3. Multiple Hollow Cathode Wear Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    1994-01-01

    A hollow cathode-based plasma contactor has been baselined for use on the Space Station to reduce station charging. The plasma contactor provides a low impedance connection to space plasma via a plasma produced by an arc discharge. The hollow cathode of the plasma contactor is a refractory metal tube, through which xenon gas flows, which has a disk-shaped plate with a centered orifice at the downstream end of the tube. Within the cathode, arc attachment occurs primarily on a Type S low work function insert that is next to the orifice plate. This low work function insert is used to reduce cathode operating temperatures and energy requirements and, therefore, achieve increased efficiency and longevity. The operating characteristics and lifetime capabilities of this hollow cathode, however, are greatly reduced by oxygen bearing contaminants in the xenon gas. Furthermore, an optimized activation process, where the cathode is heated prior to ignition by an external heater to drive contaminants such as oxygen and moisture from the insert absorbed during exposure to ambient air, is necessary both for cathode longevity and a simplified power processor. In order to achieve the two year (approximately 17,500 hours) continuous operating lifetime requirement for the plasma contactor, a test program was initiated at NASA Lewis Research Center to demonstrate the extended lifetime capabilities of the hollow cathode. To date, xenon hollow cathodes have demonstrated extended lifetimes with one test having operated in excess of 8000 hours in an ongoing test utilizing contamination control protocols developed by Sarver-Verhey. The objectives of this study were to verify the transportability of the contamination control protocols developed by Sarver-Verhey and to evaluate cathode contamination control procedures, activation processes, and cathode-to-cathode dispersions in operating characteristics with time. These were accomplished by conducting a 2000 hour wear test of four hollow

  4. Hydraulic System Wear Debris Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-03

    drawn. Each one-=L sample was drawn with a clean plastic pipette of one-mL capacity. The samples were placed in clean Ferrogram preparation bottles ...and from cavities in a block which held linear seals into sampling bottles . Several photographs of this debris , which was deposited on Ferro- grams...silicon in the glass overshadowed the elements of the wear debris . To overcome this difficulty, the Ferrogram should be pre- pared on a carbon-filled

  5. Wear of steel by rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gent, A. N.; Pulford, C. T. R.

    1978-01-01

    Wear of a steel blade used as a scraper to abrade rubber surfaces has been found to take place much more rapidly on a cis-polyisoprene (natural rubber) surface than on a cis-polybutadiene surface, and much more rapidly in an inert atmosphere than in air. These observations are attributed to the direct attack upon steel of free-radical species generated by mechanical rupture of elastomer molecules during abrasion.

  6. Friction and wear behavior of aluminum and composite airplane skins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, K. E.

    1984-01-01

    Friction and wear behavior was determined for small skin specimens under abrasive loading conditions typical of those occurring on the underside of a transport airplane during emergency belly landing. A test apparatus consisting of a standard belt sander provided the sliding surface. Small test specimens constructed of aluminum, standard graphite-epoxy composite, aramid-epoxy composite, and toughened-resin composites were tested undar a range of pressures, belt velocities, and belt-surface textures. The effects of these test variables on the wear rate and the coefficient of friction are discussed and comparisons are made between the composite materials and aluminum. The effect of fiber orientation in the composite materials on wear rate was also investigated. In addition, tests were performed in which thermocouples were imbedded into the various test specimens to obtain temperature-time histories during abrasion.

  7. [Observation on sleep improvement under noise environment by wearing earplugs].

    PubMed

    Li, D; Zheng, S; He, Y; Gao, H

    1998-04-01

    Sleep experiments were done in 6 subjects under 3 conditions. (1) Quiet, background noise level lower than 45dB (A); (2) Noisy with earplugs, ambient noise level 90dB (A); (3) Noisy, ambient noise level 90dB (A), and subjects wearing earplugs. EEG, REM and EMG during sleep were recorded. Sleep latency, times and duration of waking up, sleep rate of each stage and total sleep rate were analyzed. It shows that sleep under noise condition can be improved by wearing earplugs.

  8. Clinical manifestations secondary to soft contact lens wear.

    PubMed Central

    Ruben, M.; Brown, N.; Lobascher, D.; Chaston, J.; Morris, J.

    1976-01-01

    The study of 151 patients wearing soft hydrophilic lenses for one year revealed no gross irreversible lesions with loss of vision. But of significance was the presence of superficial lesions of the corneal epithelium, and chronic stromal oedema. While no significant loss of wearing time was noted for women taking the pill, the decrease in tear secretion in those patients with a latent dry eye problem could just alter the balance to produce intolerance. From this report it is the long-term changes to the tissues that remain to be fully investigated for soft hydrophilic lenses. PMID:952829

  9. Nonidentical and outlier duty cycles as factors accelerating UHMWPE wear in THA: a finite element exploration.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Hannah J; Stewart, Kristofer J; Pedersen, Douglas R; Callaghan, John J; Brown, Thomas D

    2007-01-01

    Wear rate and wear direction vary considerably within total hip arthroplasty (THA) patient cohorts. Third body effects and wide-ranging differences in patient activity levels are two factors suspected of contributing to wear variability. A sliding-distance-coupled contact finite element formulation was used to test the hypothesis that nonidentical duty cycles (differing activities, or change of third body challenge) produce accelerations in polyethylene wear. Effects of nonidentical duty cycles, time-variant femoral head roughening, and outlier gait inputs were investigated. Without femoral head roughening, combination walk/stair-climb wear simulations did not result in appreciably higher volumetric wear than a walk-only simulation, but when a roughened zone was included, walk/stair-climb volumetric wear increased by approximately 57% above that of a similarly roughened walk-only simulation. To investigate time-variant femoral head roughening, wear simulations were begun with femoral head roughening at one location on the femoral head, switching to another location halfway through the simulation. Results varied depending on roughening sites, but cases of substantial increase in wear involved a transient jump in wear rate shortly after the change of head roughening location. Outlier duty cycles were simulated by increasing or decreasing the joint contact force and range of motion inputs, to levels at the 97.5th and 2.5th percentiles of a population of normal subjects. The resulting wear showed an increase or decrease closely proportional to the percentage by which each input (force or range of motion) was changed.

  10. New modes and mechanisms of thermospheric mass density variations from GRACE accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabia, Andres; Jin, Shuanggen

    2016-11-01

    Monitoring and understanding the upper atmosphere processes is important for orbital decay and space physics. Nowadays, Low Earth Orbit (LEO) accelerometers provide a unique opportunity to study thermospheric density variations with unprecedented details. In this paper, thermospheric mass densities variations from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) accelerometers are investigated for the period 2003-2016 using the principal component analysis (PCA). The resulting modes are analyzed and parameterized in terms of solar and magnetospheric forcing, local solar time (LST), and annual variations. A better understanding of global thermospheric air density variations is presented, which validates the suitability of our technique and model. The parameterization of the subsolar-point annual variation shows two maxima around June and only one in December. The LST parameterization shows a new fluctuation controlling a middle latitude four-wave pattern, with two maxima at 12 h and 21 h LST and two minima at 1 h and 17 h LST. Our parameterizations are suitable to represent small-scale variations including, e.g., the equatorial mass density anomaly (EMA) and the midnight density maximum (MDM). Finally, the residuals are analyzed in the spectral domain, and additional contributions are found at the frequencies of the radiational tides and at the periods of 83, 93, 152, and 431 days.

  11. Using commodity accelerometers and gyroscopes to improve speed and accuracy of JanusVF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutson, Malcolm; Reiners, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Several critical limitations exist in the currently available commercial tracking technologies for fully-enclosed virtual reality (VR) systems. While several 6DOF solutions can be adapted to work in fully-enclosed spaces, they still include elements of hardware that can interfere with the user's visual experience. JanusVF introduced a tracking solution for fully-enclosed VR displays that achieves comparable performance to available commercial solutions but without artifacts that can obscure the user's view. JanusVF employs a small, high-resolution camera that is worn on the user's head, but faces backwards. The VR rendering software draws specific fiducial markers with known size and absolute position inside the VR scene behind the user but in view of the camera. These fiducials are tracked by ARToolkitPlus and integrated by a single-constraint-at-a-time (SCAAT) filter to update the head pose. In this paper we investigate the addition of low-cost accelerometers and gyroscopes such as those in Nintendo Wii remotes, the Wii Motion Plus, and the Sony Sixaxis controller to improve the precision and accuracy of JanusVF. Several enthusiast projects have implemented these units as basic trackers or for gesture recognition, but none so far have created true 6DOF trackers using only the accelerometers and gyroscopes. Our original experiments were repeated after adding the low-cost inertial sensors, showing considerable improvements and noise reduction.

  12. Design and implementation of a novel sliding mode sensing architecture for capacitive MEMS accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarraf, E. H.; Cousins, B.; Cretu, E.; Mirabbasi, S.

    2011-11-01

    We propose novel feedback control and sensing schemes based on sliding mode control (SMC) for closed-loop micro-accelerometers as alternative digital control architectures to sigma-delta (ΣΔ) approaches. The under-damped micro-device has been designed in Coventorware, fabricated in SOIMUMPs (25 µm thick structural layer) technology and experimentally characterized using a Polytec MSA-500 (micro-system analyzer) equipment. To verify the system architecture robustness, the application of SMC is extended to an over-damped accelerometer model. In either case, the SMC demonstrates the repositioning of the proof mass to null position; however, the over-damped model exhibits shorter transition time (15 ms for 1g acceleration) due to the increased damping. In addition to that, we extend the usage of SMC beyond the classical actuation problem to a novel sensing problem where we demonstrate the extraction of the external acceleration measurement from the switching behavior along the sliding surface. An optimized fixed-point implementation is targeted on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) using rapid prototyping methodology, where the new proposed method has been compared for reference with a control scheme that employs a ΣΔ modulator. The SMC-based architecture is advantageous in terms of hardware complexity, and the control of the number of degrees of freedom required by an inertial measurement unit can be accommodated on a low-cost FPGA device. SMC offers a sound theoretical framework for the nonlinear control of inertial sensors.

  13. Characterization of a 21-Story Reinforced Building in the Valley of Mexico Using MEMS Accelerometers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husker, A. L.; Dominguez, L. A.; Becerril, A.; Espejo, L.; Cochran, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    Low cost MEMS accelerometers are becoming increasingly higher resolution making them useful in strong motion studies. Here we present a building response analysis in the lakebed zone of the Valley of Mexico. The Valley of Mexico represents one of the highest seismic risk locations in the world and incorporates Mexico City and part of Mexico State. More than 20 million people live there and it is the political and economic center of Mexico. In addition the valley has very high site effects with amplifications 100 - 500 times that of sites outside of the basin (Singh et al., 1988; Singh et al., 1995). We instrumented a 21-story building with MEMS accelerometers as part of the Quake Catcher Network or Red Atrapa Sismos as it is called in Mexico. The building known as the Centro Cultural de Tlateloco is located in an important historical and political area as well as a zone with some of the highest amplifications in the Valley of Mexico that had some of the worst destruction after the 1985 M8.1 Michoacan earthquake. During the earthquake most of the buildings that failed were between 7 - 18 stories tall. The peak accelerations near Tlateloco were at periods of 2 seconds. Since the earthquake the building has been retrofitted with N-S crossing supports to help withstand another earthquake. We present the measurements of frequencies and amplifications between floors for the length of the building.

  14. Development of a quartz digital accelerometer for environmental sensing and navigation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, W.J.; Vianco, P.T.

    1993-03-01

    A quartz digital accelerometer has been developed which uses double ended tuning forks as the active sensing elements. The authors have demonstrated the ability of this accelerometer to be capable of acceleration measurements between {+-}150G with {+-}0.5G accuracy. They have further refined the original design and assembly processes to produce accelerometers with < 1mG stability in inertial measurement applications. This report covers the development, design, processing, assembly, and testing of these devices.

  15. Development of a gear vibration indicator and its application in gear wear monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chongqing; Smith, Wade A.; Randall, Robert B.; Peng, Zhongxiao

    2016-08-01

    Gear tooth wear is an inevitable phenomenon and has a significant influence on gear dynamic features. Although vibration analysis has been widely used to diagnose localised gear tooth faults, its techniques for gear wear monitoring have not been well-established. This paper aims at developing a vibration indicator to evaluate the effects of wear on gear performance. For this purpose, a gear state vector is extracted from time synchronous averaged gear signals to describe the gear state. This gear state vector consists of the sideband ratios obtained from a number of tooth meshing harmonics and their sidebands. Then, two averaged logarithmic ratios, ALR and mALR, are defined with fixed and moving references, respectively, to provide complementary information for gear wear monitoring. Since a fixed reference is utilised in the definition of ALR, it reflects the cumulated wear effects on the gear state. An increase in the ALR value indicates that the gear state deviates further from its reference condition. With the use of a moving reference, the indicator mALR shows changes in the gear state within short time intervals, making it suitable for wear process monitoring. The efficiency of these vibration indicators is demonstrated using experimental results from two sets of tests, in which the gears experienced different wear processes. In addition to gear wear monitoring, the proposed indicators can be used as general parameters to detect the occurrence of other faults, such as a tooth crack or shaft misalignment, because these faults would also change the gear vibrations.

  16. Assessment of wear coefficients of nuclear zirconium claddings without and with pre-oxidation

    DOE PAGES

    Qu, Jun; Cooley, Kevin M.; Shaw, Austin H.; ...

    2016-03-16

    In the cores of pressurized water nuclear reactors, water-flow induced vibration is known to cause claddings on the fuel rods to rub against their supporting grids. Such grid-to-rod-fretting (GTRF) may lead to fretting wear-through and the leakage of radioactive species. The surfaces of actual zirconium alloy claddings in a reactor are inevitably oxidized in the high-temperature pressurized water, and some claddings are even pre-oxidized. As a result, the wear process of the surface oxide film is expected to be quite different from the zirconium alloy substrate. In this paper, we attempt to measure the wear coefficients of zirconium claddings withoutmore » and with pre-oxidation rubbing against grid samples using a bench-scale fretting tribometer. Results suggest that the volumetric wear coefficient of the pre-oxidized cladding is 50 to 200 times lower than that of the untreated cladding. In terms of the linear rate of wear depth, the pre-oxidized alloy wears about 15 times more slowly than the untreated cladding. Finally, fitted with the experimentally-determined wear rates, a stage-wise GTRF engineering wear model demonstrates good agreement with in-reactor experience in predicting the trend of cladding lives.« less

  17. Assessment of wear coefficients of nuclear zirconium claddings without and with pre-oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun; Cooley, Kevin M.; Shaw, Austin H.; Lu, Roger Y.; Blau, Peter J.

    2016-03-16

    In the cores of pressurized water nuclear reactors, water-flow induced vibration is known to cause claddings on the fuel rods to rub against their supporting grids. Such grid-to-rod-fretting (GTRF) may lead to fretting wear-through and the leakage of radioactive species. The surfaces of actual zirconium alloy claddings in a reactor are inevitably oxidized in the high-temperature pressurized water, and some claddings are even pre-oxidized. As a result, the wear process of the surface oxide film is expected to be quite different from the zirconium alloy substrate. In this paper, we attempt to measure the wear coefficients of zirconium claddings without and with pre-oxidation rubbing against grid samples using a bench-scale fretting tribometer. Results suggest that the volumetric wear coefficient of the pre-oxidized cladding is 50 to 200 times lower than that of the untreated cladding. In terms of the linear rate of wear depth, the pre-oxidized alloy wears about 15 times more slowly than the untreated cladding. Finally, fitted with the experimentally-determined wear rates, a stage-wise GTRF engineering wear model demonstrates good agreement with in-reactor experience in predicting the trend of cladding lives.

  18. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines. Task 3, Traditional approaches to wear prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.

    1991-06-01

    Contamination of the lube-oil with hard abrasive particles leads to a three-body abrasive wear mechanism that highly accelerates piston ring/cylinder liner wear in coal-fueled diesel engines. One approach to reducing that wear is to modify the size and orientation of surface asperities on the cylinder to enhance the formation of a hydrodynamic film, and to provide avenues of escape for particles that would otherwise be trapped in the wear zone. Another approach is to introduce additives into the contaminated lube-oil that further enhance hydrodynamic film formation, form chemical films on the wearing surfaces, or form films on the contaminant particles. This work focuses on defining the effects of cylinder liner surface finish, various configurations of slots in the cylinder liner surface, and various additives in the contaminated lube-oil on the wear process. Wear tests were initiated in a bench apparatus using coal-ash contaminated lube-oil to test the various wear configurations. The results of these tests indicate that the formation of a hydrodynamic film between the ring and cylinder specimens is enhanced by increasing surface roughness, and by orienting the surface asperities normal to the direction of ring travel but modifications to the cylinder liner surface did not greatly reduce the wear rate. Additives to the lubricant seemed to have a much more significant effect on wear, with a dispersant additive highly accelerating the wear, while a detergent additive was able to reduce the wear almost to the rate achieved where there was no contaminant.

  19. Alternate paddle configuration for improved wear resistance in the saltstone mixer

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.; Fowley, M.

    2013-09-23

    The Saltstone Production Facility has a 10-inch Readco-Kurimoto continuous mixer that mixes the premix dry feeds and low-level waste salt solution to make fresh (uncured) saltstone. Inspection of the mixer in January 2013 showed significant wear on the third, fourth and fifth paddle pairs after the conveying augers. A 2-inch Readco-Kurimoto continuous mixer was used to test alternate paddle configurations for use in the 10-inch mixer to decrease the wear rate on the paddles. Two wear tests were conducted to investigate a method of reducing wear on the mixer paddles. The first test (wear test 2a) had a paddle configuration similar to the currently installed 10-inch mixer in the SPF. This test established baseline wear. The second test (wear test 2b) had a reconfigured paddle arrangement that replaced the flat paddles with helical paddles for paddle pairs 2 - 6 and aligned paddle pair 1 with the augers. The intent of the reconfiguration was to more effectively convey the partially wetted dry feeds through the transition region and into the liquid feed where paddle wear is reduced due to dry feeds and salt solution being mixed at the intended water to premix ratio. The design of the helical paddles provides conveyance through the transition region to the liquid feed inlet. The alignment with the auger is aimed to provide a smoother transition (minimizing the discontinuity between the auger and paddle pair 1) into the downstream paddles. A soft metal with low wear resistance (6000 series aluminum) was used for the wear testing paddles to determine wear patterns while minimizing run time and maximizing wear rate. For the two paddle configurations tested using the scaled 2-inch Readco-Kurimoto continuous mixer, with the first six paddles after the augers replaced by the wear paddles and the remaining paddles were stainless steel. Since the 10-inch SPF mixer is designed with the liquid inlet centered over paddle pairs 5 and 6, the scaled 2-inch mixer was configured the

  20. Self-calibration method of the bias of a space electrostatic accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Qu, Shao-Bo; Xia, Xiao-Mei; Bai, Yan-Zheng; Wu, Shu-Chao; Zhou, Ze-Bing

    2016-11-01

    The high precision space electrostatic accelerometer is an instrument to measure the non-gravitational forces acting on a spacecraft. It is one of the key payloads for satellite gravity measurements and space fundamental physics experiments. The measurement error of the accelerometer directly affects the precision of gravity field recovery for the earth. This paper analyzes the sources of the bias according to the operating principle and structural constitution of the space electrostatic accelerometer. Models of bias due to the asymmetry of the displacement sensing system, including the mechanical sensor head and the capacitance sensing circuit, and the asymmetry of the feedback control actuator circuit are described separately. According to the two models, a method of bias self-calibration by using only the accelerometer data is proposed, based on the feedback voltage data of the accelerometer before and after modulating the DC biasing voltage (Vb) applied on its test mass. Two types of accelerometer biases are evaluated separately using in-orbit measurement data of a space electrostatic accelerometer. Based on the preliminary analysis, the bias of the accelerometer onboard of an experiment satellite is evaluated to be around 10(-4) m/s(2), about 4 orders of magnitude greater than the noise limit. Finally, considering the two asymmetries, a comprehensive bias model is analyzed. A modified method to directly calibrate the accelerometer comprehensive bias is proposed.

  1. Self-calibration method of the bias of a space electrostatic accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Shao-Bo; Xia, Xiao-Mei; Bai, Yan-Zheng; Wu, Shu-Chao; Zhou, Ze-Bing

    2016-11-01

    The high precision space electrostatic accelerometer is an instrument to measure the non-gravitational forces acting on a spacecraft. It is one of the key payloads for satellite gravity measurements and space fundamental physics experiments. The measurement error of the accelerometer directly affects the precision of gravity field recovery for the earth. This paper analyzes the sources of the bias according to the operating principle and structural constitution of the space electrostatic accelerometer. Models of bias due to the asymmetry of the displacement sensing system, including the mechanical sensor head and the capacitance sensing circuit, and the asymmetry of the feedback control actuator circuit are described separately. According to the two models, a method of bias self-calibration by using only the accelerometer data is proposed, based on the feedback voltage data of the accelerometer before and after modulating the DC biasing voltage (Vb) applied on its test mass. Two types of accelerometer biases are evaluated separately using in-orbit measurement data of a space electrostatic accelerometer. Based on the preliminary analysis, the bias of the accelerometer onboard of an experiment satellite is evaluated to be around 10-4 m/s2, about 4 orders of magnitude greater than the noise limit. Finally, considering the two asymmetries, a comprehensive bias model is analyzed. A modified method to directly calibrate the accelerometer comprehensive bias is proposed.

  2. Conjoint corrosion and wear in titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Khan, M A; Williams, R L; Williams, D F

    1999-04-01

    When considering titanium alloys for orthopaedic applications it is important to examine the conjoint action of corrosion and wear. In this study we investigate the corrosion and wear behaviour of Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-7Nb and Ti-13Nb-13Zr in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), bovine albumin solutions in PBS and 10% foetal calf serum solutions in PBS. The tests were performed under four different conditions to evaluate the influence of wear on the corrosion and corrosion on the wear behaviour as follows: corrosion without wear, wear-accelerated corrosion, wear in a non-corrosive environment and wear in a corrosive environment. The corrosion behaviour was investigated using cyclic polarisation studies to measure the ability of the surface to repassivate following breakdown of the passive layer. The properties of the repassivated layer were evaluated by measuring changes in the surface hardness of the alloys. The amount of wear that had occurred was assessed from weight changes and measurement of the depth of the wear scar. It was found that in the presence of wear without corrosion the wear behaviour of Ti-13Nb-13Zr was greater than that of Ti-6Al-7Nb or Ti-6Al-4V and that in the presence of proteins the wear of all three alloys is reduced. In the presence of corrosion without wear Ti-13Nb-13Zr was more corrosion resistant than Ti-6Al-7Nb which was more corrosion resistant than Ti-6Al-4V without proteins whereas in the presence of protein the corrosion resistance of Ti-13Nb-13Zr and Ti-6Al-7Nb was reduced and that of Ti-6Al-4V increased. In the presence of corrosion and wear the corrosion resistance of Ti-13Nb-13Zr is higher than that of Ti-6Al-7Nb or Ti-6Al-4V in PBS but in the presence of proteins the corrosion resistance of Ti-13Nb-13Zr and Ti-6Al-7Nb are very similar but higher than that of Ti-6Al-4V. The wear of Ti-13Nb-13Zr is lower than that of Ti-6Al-7Nb and Ti-6Al-4V with or without the presence of proteins in a corrosive environment. Therefore the overall

  3. Accelerometer assessed moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and successful ageing: results from the Whitehall II study

    PubMed Central

    Menai, Mehdi; van Hees, Vincent T.; Elbaz, Alexis; Kivimaki, Mika; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Sabia, Séverine

    2017-01-01

    Physical activity is key for successful ageing, but questions remain regarding the optimal physical activity pattern. We examined the cross-sectional association between physical activity and successful ageing using data on 3,749 participants (age range = 60–83years) of the Whitehall II study. The participants underwent a clinical assessment, completed a 20-item physical activity questionnaire, and wore a wrist-mounted accelerometer for 9 days. Successful ageing was defined as good cognitive, motor, and respiratory functioning, along with absence of disability, mental health problems, and major chronic diseases. Time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) episodes assessed by accelerometer was classified as “short” (1–9.59 minutes) and “long” (≥10 minutes) bouts. Linear multivariate regression showed that successful agers (N = 789) reported 3.79 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.39–6.19) minutes more daily MVPA than other participants. Accelerometer data showed this difference to be 3.40 (95% CI:2.44–4.35) minutes for MVPA undertaken in short bouts, 4.16 (95% CI:3.11–5.20) minutes for long bouts, and 7.55 (95% CI:5.86–9.24) minutes for all MVPA bouts lasting 1 minute or more. Multivariate logistic regressions showed that participants undertaking ≥150 minutes of MVPA per week were more likely to be successful agers with both self-reported (Odd Ratio (OR) = 1.29,95% (CI):1.09–1.53) and accelerometer data (length bout ≥1 minute:OR = 1.92, 95%CI:1.60–2.30). Successful agers practice more MVPA, having both more short and long bouts, than non-successful agers. PMID:28367987

  4. Calibration and Validation of a Wrist- and Hip-Worn Actigraph Accelerometer in 4-Year-Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Elin; Larisch, Lisa-Marie; Marcus, Claude; Hagströmer, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To determine time spent at different physical activity intensities, accelerometers need calibration. The aim of this study was to develop and cross-validate intensity thresholds for the Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometer for wrist and hip placement in four-year-old children. Methods In total 30 children (49 months, SD 3.7) were recruited from five preschools in Stockholm. Equipped with an accelerometer on the wrist and another on the hip, children performed three indoor activities and one free-play session while being video recorded. Subsequently, physical activity intensity levels were coded every 5th second according to the Children’s Activity Rating Scale. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves was used to develop wrist and hip intensity thresholds, the upper threshold for sedentary, and lower threshold for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), for the vertical axis (VA) and for the vector magnitude (VM). A leave-one-out method was used to cross-validate the thresholds. Results Intensity thresholds for wrist placement were ≤ 178 (VA) and ≤ 328 (VM) for sedentary and ≥ 871 (VA) and ≥ 1393 (VM) counts/5 seconds for MVPA. The corresponding thresholds for hip placement were ≤ 43 (VA) and ≤ 105 (VM) for sedentary and ≥ 290 (VA) and ≥ 512 (VM) for MVPA. The quadratic weighted Kappa was 0.92 (95% CI 0.91–0.93) (VA) and 0.95 (95% CI 0.94–0.96) (VM) for the wrist-worn accelerometer and 0.76 (98% CI 0.74–0.77) and 0.86 (95% CI 0.85–0.87) for the hip-worn. Conclusion Using wrist placement and the VM when measuring physical activity with accelerometry in 4-year-old children is recommended. PMID:27617962

  5. Relationships between vocal function measures derived from an acoustic microphone and a subglottal neck-surface accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Daryush D.; Van Stan, Jarrad H.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring subglottal neck-surface acceleration has received renewed attention due to the ability of low-profile accelerometers to confidentially and noninvasively track properties related to normal and disordered voice characteristics and behavior. This study investigated the ability of subglottal neck-surface acceleration to yield vocal function measures traditionally derived from the acoustic voice signal and help guide the development of clinically functional accelerometer-based measures from a physiological perspective. Results are reported for 82 adult speakers with voice disorders and 52 adult speakers with normal voices who produced the sustained vowels /a/, /i/, and /u/ at a comfortable pitch and loudness during the simultaneous recording of radiated acoustic pressure and subglottal neck-surface acceleration. As expected, timing-related measures of jitter exhibited the strongest correlation between acoustic and neck-surface acceleration waveforms (r ≤ 0.99), whereas amplitude-based measures of shimmer correlated less strongly (r ≤ 0.74). Additionally, weaker correlations were exhibited by spectral measures of harmonics-to-noise ratio (r ≤ 0.69) and tilt (r ≤ 0.57), whereas the cepstral peak prominence correlated more strongly (r ≤ 0.90). These empirical relationships provide evidence to support the use of accelerometers as effective complements to acoustic recordings in the assessment and monitoring of vocal function in the laboratory, clinic, and during an individual’s daily activities. PMID:27066520

  6. The validity of an accelerometer-based method for estimating fluidity in the sit-to-walk task in a community setting

    PubMed Central

    Asakura, Tomoyuki; Miyazawa, Yoshiyuki; Usuda, Shigeru

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Fluidity in the sit-to-walk task has been quantitatively measured with three-dimensional motion analysis system. The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of an accelerometer-based method for estimating fluidity in community-dwelling elderly individuals. [Subjects and Methods] Seventeen community-dwelling elderly females performed a sit-to-walk task. The motion was recorded by an accelerometer, a three-dimensional motion analysis system and a foot pressure sensor simultaneously. The timings of events determined from the acceleration waveform were compared to the timings determined from the three-dimensional motion analysis data (task onset, maximum trunk inclination) or foot pressure sensor data (first heel strike). Regression analysis was used to estimate the fluidity index from the duration between events. [Results] The characteristics of the acceleration waveform were similar to those previously reported in younger adults. Comparisons of event timings from accelerometer and motion analysis system data indicated no systematic bias. Regression analysis showed that the duration from maximum trunk inclination to the first heel strike was the best predictor of fluidity index. [Conclusion] An accelerometer-based method using the duration between characteristic events may be used to precisely and conveniently assess fluidity in a sit-to-walk task in a community setting. PMID:28210059

  7. Equating accelerometer estimates among youth: the Rosetta Stone 2

    PubMed Central

    Brazendale, Keith; Beets, Michael W.; Bornstein, Daniel B.; Moore, Justin B.; Pate, Russell R.; Weaver, Robert G.; Falck, Ryan S.; Chandler, Jessica L.; Andersen, Lars B.; Anderssen, Sigmund A.; Cardon, Greet; Cooper, Ashley; Davey, Rachel; Froberg, Karsten; Hallal, Pedro C.; Janz, Kathleen F.; Kordas, Katarzyna; Kriemler, Susi; Puder, Jardena J.; Reilly, John J.; Salmon, Jo; Sardinha, Luis B.; Timperio, Anna; van Sluijs, Esther MF

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Different accelerometer cutpoints used by different researchers often yields vastly different estimates of moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA). This is recognized as cutpoint non-equivalence (CNE), which reduces the ability to accurately compare youth MVPA across studies. The objective of this research is to develop a cutpoint conversion system that standardizes minutes of MVPA for six different sets of published cutpoints. Design Secondary data analysis Methods Data from the International Children’s Accelerometer Database (ICAD; Spring 2014) consisting of 43,112 Actigraph accelerometer data files from 21 worldwide studies (children 3-18 years, 61.5% female) were used to develop prediction equations for six sets of published cutpoints. Linear and non-linear modeling, using a leave one out cross-validation technique, was employed to develop equations to convert MVPA from one set of cutpoints into another. Bland Altman plots illustrate the agreement between actual MVPA and predicted MVPA values. Results Across the total sample, mean MVPA ranged from 29.7 MVPA min.d-1 (Puyau) to 126.1 MVPA min.d-1 (Freedson 3 METs). Across conversion equations, median absolute percent error was 12.6% (range: 1.3 to 30.1) and the proportion of variance explained ranged from 66.7% to 99.8%. Mean difference for the best performing prediction equation (VC from EV) was -0.110 min.d-1 (limits of agreement (LOA), -2.623 to 2.402). The mean difference for the worst performing prediction equation (FR3 from PY) was 34.76 min.d-1 (LOA, -60.392 to 129.910). Conclusions For six different sets of published cutpoints, the use of this equating system can assist individuals attempting to synthesize the growing body of literature on Actigraph, accelerometry-derived MVPA. PMID:25747468

  8. Interest of the MICROSTAR Accelerometer to improve the GRASP Mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, E.; Lebat, V.; Foulon, B.; Christophe, B.; Liorzou, F.; Huynh, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Geodetic Reference Antenna in Space (GRASP) is a micro satellite mission concept proposed by JPL to improve the definition of the Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF). GRASP collocates GPS, SLR, VLBI, and DORIS sensors on a dedicated spacecraft in order to establish precise and stable ties between the key geodetic techniques used to define and disseminate the TRF. GRASP also offers a space-based reference antenna for the present and future Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). By taking advantage of the new testing possibilities offer by the catapult facility at the ZARM drop tower, the ONERA's space accelerometer team proposes an up-dated version, called MICROSTAR, of its ultra sensitive electrostatic accelerometers which have contributed to the success of the last Earth's gravity missions GRACE and GOCE. Built around a cubic proof-mass, it provides the 3 linear accelerations with a resolution better than 10-11 ms-2/Hz1/2 into a measurement bandwidth between 10-3 Hz and 0.1 Hz and the 3 angular accelerations about its 3 orthogonal axes with 5´10-10 rad.s-2/Hz1/2 resolution. Integrated at the centre of mass of the satellite, MICROSTAR improves the Precise Orbit Determination (POD) by accurate measurement of the non-gravitational force acting on the satellite. It offers also the possibility to calibrate the change in the position of the satellite center of mass with an accuracy better than 100 μm as demonstrated in the GRACE mission. Assuming a sufficiently rigid structure between the antennas and the accelerometer, its data can participate to reach the mission objective of 1 mm precision for the TRF position.

  9. Piezoelectric Shaker Development for High Frequency Calibration of Accelerometers

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Bev; Harper, Kari K.; Vogl, Gregory W.

    2010-05-28

    Calibration of vibration transducers requires sinusoidal motion over a wide frequency range with low distortion and low cross-axial motion. Piezoelectric shakers are well suited to generate such motion and are suitable for use with laser interferometric methods at frequencies of 3 kHz and above. An advantage of piezoelectric shakers is the higher achievable accelerations and displacement amplitudes as compared to electro-dynamic (ED) shakers. Typical commercial ED calibration shakers produce maximum accelerations from 100 m/s{sup 2} to 500 m/s{sup 2}. Very large ED shakers may produce somewhat higher accelerations but require large amplifiers and expensive cooling systems to dissipate heat. Due to the limitations in maximum accelerations by ED shakers at frequencies above 5 kHz, the amplitudes of the generated sinusoidal displacement are frequently below the resolution of laser interferometers used in primary calibration methods. This limits the usefulness of ED shakers in interferometric based calibrations at higher frequencies.Small piezoelectric shakers provide much higher acceleration and displacement amplitudes for frequencies above 5 kHz, making these shakers very useful for accelerometer calibrations employing laser interferometric measurements, as will be shown in this paper. These piezoelectric shakers have been developed and used at NIST for many years for high frequency calibration of accelerometers. This paper documents the construction and performance of a new version of these shakers developed at NIST for the calibration of accelerometers over the range of 3 kHz to 30 kHz and possibly higher. Examples of typical calibration results are also given.

  10. ISA accelerometer onboard the Mercury Planetary Orbiter: error budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, Valerio; Lucchesi, David M.; Nozzoli, Sergio; Santoli, Francesco

    2007-03-01

    We have estimated a preliminary error budget for the Italian Spring Accelerometer (ISA) that will be allocated onboard the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) of the European Space Agency (ESA) space mission to Mercury named BepiColombo. The role of the accelerometer is to remove from the list of unknowns the non-gravitational accelerations that perturb the gravitational trajectory followed by the MPO in the strong radiation environment that characterises the orbit of Mercury around the Sun. Such a role is of fundamental importance in the context of the very ambitious goals of the Radio Science Experiments (RSE) of the BepiColombo mission. We have subdivided the errors on the accelerometer measurements into two main families: (i) the pseudo-sinusoidal errors and (ii) the random errors. The former are characterised by a periodic behaviour with the frequency of the satellite mean anomaly and its higher order harmonic components, i.e., they are deterministic errors. The latter are characterised by an unknown frequency distribution and we assumed for them a noise-like spectrum, i.e., they are stochastic errors. Among the pseudo-sinusoidal errors, the main contribution is due to the effects of the gravity gradients and the inertial forces, while among the random-like errors the main disturbing effect is due to the MPO centre-of-mass displacements produced by the onboard High Gain Antenna (HGA) movements and by the fuel consumption and sloshing. Very subtle to be considered are also the random errors produced by the MPO attitude corrections necessary to guarantee the nadir pointing of the spacecraft. We have therefore formulated the ISA error budget and the requirements for the satellite in order to guarantee an orbit reconstruction for the MPO spacecraft with an along-track accuracy of about 1 m over the orbital period of the satellite around Mercury in such a way to satisfy the RSE requirements.

  11. MEMS capacitive accelerometer-based middle ear microphone.

    PubMed

    Young, Darrin J; Zurcher, Mark A; Semaan, Maroun; Megerian, Cliff A; Ko, Wen H

    2012-12-01

    The design, implementation, and characterization of a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) capacitive accelerometer-based middle ear microphone are presented in this paper. The microphone is intended for middle ear hearing aids as well as future fully implantable cochlear prosthesis. Human temporal bones acoustic response characterization results are used to derive the accelerometer design requirements. The prototype accelerometer is fabricated in a commercial silicon-on-insulator (SOI) MEMS process. The sensor occupies a sensing area of 1 mm × 1 mm with a chip area of 2 mm × 2.4 mm and is interfaced with a custom-designed low-noise electronic IC chip over a flexible substrate. The packaged sensor unit occupies an area of 2.5 mm × 6.2 mm with a weight of 25 mg. The sensor unit attached to umbo can detect a sound pressure level (SPL) of 60 dB at 500 Hz, 35 dB at 2 kHz, and 57 dB at 8 kHz. An improved sound detection limit of 34-dB SPL at 150 Hz and 24-dB SPL at 500 Hz can be expected by employing start-of-the-art MEMS fabrication technology, which results in an articulation index of approximately 0.76. Further micro/nanofabrication technology advancement is needed to enhance the microphone sensitivity for improved understanding of normal conversational speech.

  12. A Multi-Stage Wear Model for Grid-to-Rod Fretting of Nuclear Fuel Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian

    2014-01-01

    The wear of fuel rod cladding against the supporting structures in the cores of pressurized water nuclear reactors (PWRs) is an important and potentially costly tribological issue. Grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF), as it is known, involves not only time-varying contact conditions, but also elevated temperatures, flowing hot water, aqueous tribo-corrosion, and the embrittling effects of neutron fluences. The multi-stage, closed-form analytical model described in this paper relies on published out-of-reactor wear and corrosion data and a set of simplifying assumptions to portray the conversion of frictional work into wear depth. The cladding material of interest is a zirconium-based alloy called Zircaloy-4, and the grid support is made of a harder and more wear-resistant material. Focus is on the wear of the cladding. The model involves an incubation stage, a surface oxide wear stage, and a base alloy wear stage. The wear coefficient, which is a measure of the efficiency of conversion of frictional work into wear damage, can change to reflect the evolving metallurgical condition of the alloy. Wear coefficients for Zircaloy-4 and for a polyphase zirconia layer were back-calculated for a range of times required to wear to a critical depth. Inputs for the model, like the friction coefficient, are taken from the tribology literature in lieu of in-reactor tribological data. Concepts of classical fretting were used as a basis, but are modified to enable the model to accommodate the complexities of the PWR environment. Factors like grid spring relaxation, pre-oxidation of the cladding, multiple oxide phases, gap formation, impact, and hydrogen embrittlement are part of the problem definition but uncertainties in their relative roles limits the ability to validate the model. Sample calculations of wear depth versus time in the cladding illustrate how GTRF wear might occur in a discontinuous fashion during months-long reactor operating cycles. A means to account for grid/rod gaps

  13. Surface Wear Measurement Using Optical Correlation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acinger, Kresimir

    1983-12-01

    The coherent optical correlation technique was applied for measuring the surface wear of a tappet (part of car engine), worn by friction with the camshaft. It was found that maximum correlation intensity decays exponentially with the number of wear cycles (i.e. camshaft revolutions). Tappets of the same make have an identical rate of correlation decay. Tappets of different makes have different rates of correlation decay which are in agreement with observed long term wear.

  14. Investigation of wear phenomena by microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The various wear mechanisms involved in the loss of material from metallic and nonmetallic surfaces are discussed. The results presented indicate how various microscopy techniques used in conjunction with other analytical tools can assist in the elucidation of a wear mechanism. Without question, microscopy is the single most important tool for the study of the wear of surfaces, to assess and address inherent mechanisms of the material removal process.

  15. Accelerometer Placement for the International Space Station Node Modal Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, Michael L.

    1998-01-01

    Accelerometer location analysis for the modal survey test of the International Space Station Node is described. Three different approaches were utilized: (1) Guyan reduction; (2) Iterative Guyan reduction; and (3) The average driving point residue (ADPR) method. Both Guyan approaches worked well, but poor results were observed for the ADPR method. Although the iterative Guyan approach appears to provide the best set of sensor locations, it is intensive computationally, becoming impractical for large initial location sets. While this is computer dependent, it appears that initial sets larger than about 1500 degrees of freedom are impractical for the iterative technique.

  16. Self-powered In-plane Accelerometer Using Triboelectric Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Rahul Kumar; Dhakar, Lokesh; Lee, Chengkuo

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a self-powered triboelectric based accelerometer to detect wide range of in-plane acceleration utilizing the triboelectric mechanism. The freestanding sliding mode was utilized to realize the in-plane sensing. The fabricated device consists of soft polymer spring which displays wide detection range from ±1g to ±6g (g = 9.8m/s2) in x and y directions with sensitivity of 21mV/(g). The proposed device can be utilized for self-powered shock sensing in various future applications.

  17. Effects of dielectric charging on the output voltage of a capacitive accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Hao; Yu, Huijun; Zhou, Wu; Peng, Bei; Peng, Peng; He, Xiaoping

    2016-11-01

    Output voltage drifting observed in one typical capacitive microelectromechanical system (MEMS) accelerometer is discussed in this paper. Dielectric charging effect is located as one of the major determinants of this phenomenon through a combination of experimental and theoretical studies. A theoretical model for the electromechanical effects of the dielectric surface charges within the electrode gap is established to analyze the dielectric charge effect on the output voltage. Observations of output voltage drift against time are fitted to this model in order to estimate the possible dielectric layer thickness. Meanwhile, Auger electron spectroscopy is carried out to analyze the electrode surface material composition and confirms a mixture layer of dielectric SiO2 and Si with a thickness about 5 nm, which is very close to the model estimation. In addition, observation of time-varing output drift in the variable bias voltage experiment indicates the movement of dielectric charge can be controlled by the applied electric field.

  18. Monitoring mobility in older adults using global positioning system (GPS) watches and accelerometers: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Webber, Sandra C; Porter, Michelle M

    2009-10-01

    This exploratory study examined the feasibility of using Garmin global positioning system (GPS) watches and ActiGraph accelerometers to monitor walking and other aspects of community mobility in older adults. After accuracy at slow walking speeds was initially determined, 20 older adults (74.4 +/- 4.2 yr) wore the devices for 1 day. Steps, distances, and speeds (on foot and in vehicle) were determined. GPS data acquisition varied from 43 min to over 12 hr, with 55% of participants having more than 8 hr between initial and final data-collection points. When GPS data were acquired without interruptions, detailed mobility information was obtained regarding the timing, distances covered, and speeds reached during trips away from home. Although GPS and accelerometry technology offer promise for monitoring community mobility patterns, new GPS solutions are required that allow for data collection over an extended period of time between indoor and outdoor environments.

  19. Wear Performance of Laser Processed Tantalum Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Dittrick, Stanley; Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2011-01-01

    This first generation investigation evaluates the in vitro tribological performance of laser-processed Ta coatings on Ti for load-bearing implant applications. Linear reciprocating wear tests in simulated body fluid showed one order of magnitude less wear rate, of the order of 10−4mm3(N.m)−1, for Ta coatings compared to Ti. Our results demonstrate that Ta coatings can potentially minimize the early-stage bone-implant interface micro-motion induced wear debris generation due to their excellent bioactivity comparable to that of hydroxyapatite (HA), high wear resistance and toughness compared to popular HA coatings. PMID:22058608

  20. Wear Characteristics of Polymer -Based Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, Y.; Mirzayev, H.

    2015-11-01

    The dry wear of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-based composites, including bronze-filled composites (B60), glass-filled composites (G15), and carbon-filled composites (C25), produced by the mold casting method were investigated under different sliding conditions. The Taguchi L27 method and the analysis of variance were used to identify the effect of process parameters on the wear of tested materials. Experimental results showed that the wear resistance of G15 polymer composites was better than those of C25 and B60 ones. The specific wear rate decreased with increasing sliding distance and load, but partly decreased with increasing tensile strength.

  1. Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of Fly Ash Cenosphere/AZ91D Mg Alloy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, S. R.; Huang, Z. Q.

    2014-10-01

    Fly ash cenosphere/AZ91D Mg alloy (FAC/AZ91D) composites were prepared using stir casting method. The effects of the applied load, the wearing time, and the diameter and the content of fly ash cenosphere on the wear behavior of the composites were investigated under dry sliding condition. The results showed the wear resistance of FAC/AZ91D composites is generally better than that of AZ91D Mg alloy. The mass fraction and diameter of FAC have important effects on the wear resistance of the composites, and the wear resistance of the composites is excellent when the mass fraction and diameter of FAC are moderate. When the mass fraction and diameter of FAC are more than the critical values, the wear resistance of the composites lowers again. The wear resistance of the composites decreases with the increase in the applied load. The relationship between the worn mass loss and the applied load is nonlinear. When the applied load is smaller, the worn mass loss of the composites increases rapidly with the increase of the applied load. These research results show that the composites have broad application prospects under dry sliding wear condition, and they can provide guidance for the selection of the raw materials, the structure design, and the application conditions of the composites.

  2. Characteristics of satellite accelerometer measurements of thermospheric neutral winds at high latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doornbos, E.; Ridley, A. J.; Cnossen, I.; Aruliah, A. L.; Foerster, M.

    2015-12-01

    Thermospheric neutral winds play an important part in the coupled thermosphere-ionosphere system at high latitudes. Neutral wind speeds have been derived from the CHAMP and GOCE satellites, which carried precise accelerometers in low Earth orbits. Due to the need to simultaneously determine thermosphere neutral density from the accelerometer in-track measurements, only information on the wind component in the cross-track direction, perpendicular to the flight direction can be derived. However, contrary to ground-based Fabry-Perot interferometer and scanning Doppler imager observations of the thermosphere wind, these satellite-based measurements provide equally distributed coverage over both hemispheres. The sampling of seasonal and local time variations depend on the precession rate of the satellite's orbital plane, with CHAMP covering about 28 cycles of 24-hour local solar time coverage, during its 10 year mission (2000-2010), while the near sun-synchronous orbit of GOCE resulted in a much more limited local time coverage ranging from 6:20 to 8:00 (am and pm), during a science mission duration of 4 years (2009-2013). For this study, the wind data from both CHAMP and GOCE have been analysed in terms of seasonal variations and geographic and geomagnetic local solar time and latitude coordinates, in order to make statistical comparisons for both the Northern and Southern polar areas. The wind data from both satellites were studied independently and in combination, in order to investigate how the strengths and weaknesses of the instruments and orbit parameters of these missions affect investigations of interhemispheric differences. Finally, the data have been compared with results from coupled ionosphere-thermosphere models and from ground-based FPI and SDI measurements.

  3. Objectively-Measured Sedentary Time and Cardiometabolic Biomarkers in U.S. Hispanic/Latino Adults: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL)

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Qibin; Strizich, Garrett; Merchant, Gina; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Buelna, Christina; Castañeda, Sheila F.; Gallo, Linda C.; Cai, Jianwen; Gellman, Marc D.; Isasi, Carmen R.; Moncrieft, Ashley E.; Sanchez-Johnsen, Lisa; Schneiderman, Neil; Kaplan, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sedentary behavior is recognized as a distinct construct from lack of moderate-vigorous physical activity and is associated with deleterious health outcomes. Previous studies have primarily relied on self-reported data, while data on the relationship between objectively-measured sedentary time and cardiometabolic biomarkers are sparse, especially among U.S. Hispanics/Latinos. Methods and Results We examined associations of objectively-measured sedentary time (via Actical accelerometers for 7 days) and multiple cardiometabolic biomarkers among 12,083 participants, aged 18–74 years, from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Hispanics/Latinos of diverse backgrounds (Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, and South American) were recruited from 4 U.S. cities between 2008 and 2011. Sedentary time (<100 counts/minute) was standardized to 16-hour/day of wear time. The mean sedentary time was 11.9 hours/day (74% of accelerometer wear time). After adjustment for moderate-vigorous physical activity and confounding variables, prolonged sedentary time was associated with decreased high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol (P=0.04), and increased triglycerides, 2-hour glucose, fasting insulin and HOMA-IR (all P<0.0001). These associations were generally consistent across age, sex, Hispanic/Latino backgrounds, and physical activity levels. Even among individuals meeting physical activity guidelines, sedentary time was detrimentally associated with several cardiometabolic biomarkers (diastolic blood pressure, HDL-cholesterol, fasting and 2-hour glucose, fasting insulin and HOMA-IR; all P<0.05). Conclusions Our large population-based, objectively-derived data showed deleterious associations between sedentary time and cardiometabolic biomarkers, independent of physical activity, in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos. Our findings emphasize the importance of reducing sedentary behavior for the prevention of cardiometabolic diseases, even in

  4. Field and flume applications of RFID and accelerometer-embedded gravel and cobble tracers to constrain transport during floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. P.; Olinde, L.; Goodwin, K.

    2014-12-01

    Individually identifiable tracer particles and instrumented clasts provide a wealth of information about coarse bedload transport during floods. The dispersive nature of sediment transport means that tracer methods may constrain effects of spatial variability in the underlying topography of the channel, and effects of temporal variability in discharge (e.g., hydrographs). We highlight results from recent field and flume work that employed both radio frequency identification (RFID) and accelerometer tracers. The overall goal is to demonstrate that a broad range of quantitative constraints on sediment transport can be pulled from these unique datasets. In the field, tracer transport was monitored along ~11 km of Reynolds Creek, Idaho, a snowmelt-dominated gravel-bedded stream with local reach slopes of roughly 0.5% to 7%. Three antennas were installed on the channel bed near a gauging station to measure the exact times that RFID tracers passed the antennas during high flows. The combination of transport data, discharge and flow modeling allows us to calculate a hiding function that quantifies size-dependent thresholds of motion in this particular reach. During transport, RFID and accelerometer tracers became distributed along ~11 and ~2 km of the channel, respectively. The timing of individual particle movements was measured in 10 minute intervals by the accelerometers. These data constrained transport probabilities and bedload hysteresis as a function of changing discharge. Additionally, cumulative travel distances of the accelerometers allow us to put bounds on particle velocities and average individual step lengths. We find that average tracer transport distances are well correlated with cumulative discharge. Using flood magnitude-frequency relations based on the >50 year discharge record of Reynolds creek, the seasonal flow with an ~10 year recurrence interval likely transports coarse gravel the farthest average distance. Finally, in flume experiments on gravel

  5. Wear Analysis of Second-generation Highly Cross-Linked Polyethylene in Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Samujh, Christopher; Bhimani, Samrath; Smith, Langan; Malkani, Arthur L

    2016-11-01

    A major limiting factor in the longevity of total hip replacement is the wear rate of the hip bearing. As manufacturing technology has improved during the past several decades, much attention has been focused on developing newer generations of polyethylene that have lower rates of wear while minimizing free radical formation and subsequent osteolysis. The turning point for the manufacture of polyethylene was moving from gamma irradiation in air to irradiation in a low oxygen environment, which reduced free radical formation while increasing the wear resistance. New polyethylene manufacturing methods, including multiple cycles of irradiation and annealing, have resulted in greater wear resistance. Wear analysis studies are essential to determine if these new liners actually show a benefit from prior generations of polyethylene and, more importantly, if they are safe to use. This study involved a single center retrospective review of 60 patients with a mean follow-up of 5.5 years who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty with a second-generation highly cross-linked polyethylene manufactured by 3 cycles of sequential irradiation and annealing. Linear and volumetric wear rates were determined from digitized radiographs using contemporary wear analysis software. The mean linear wear rate for the entire group was 0.025 millimeters per year (mm/y). This value represents a linear wear rate 2.7 times less than that of a first-generation highly cross-linked polyethylene and 4.2 times less than that of a conventional polyethylene. At an average of 5 years, compared with a first-generation highly cross-linked polyethylene, a second-generation highly cross-linked polyethylene appears to show significant improvement regarding wear. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1178-e1182.].

  6. Monitoring tool wear using classifier fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannatey-Asibu, Elijah; Yum, Juil; Kim, T. H.

    2017-02-01

    Real time monitoring of manufacturing processes using a single sensor often poses significant challenge. Sensor fusion has thus been extensively investigated in recent years for process monitoring with significant improvement in performance. This paper presents the results for a monitoring system based on the concept of classifier fusion, and class-weighted voting is investigated to further enhance the system performance. Classifier weights are based on the overall performances of individual classifiers, and majority voting is used in decision making. Acoustic emission monitoring of tool wear during the coroning process is used to illustrate the concept. A classification rate of 87.7% was obtained for classifier fusion with unity weighting. When weighting was based on overall performance of the respective classifiers, the classification rate improved to 95.6%. Further using state performance weighting resulted in a 98.5% classification. Finally, the classifier fusion performance further increased to 99.7% when a penalty vote was applied on the weighting factor.

  7. Microelectromechanical Resonant Accelerometer Designed with a High Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Su, Yan; Shi, Qin; Qiu, An-Ping

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the design and experimental evaluation of a silicon micro-machined resonant accelerometer (SMRA). This type of accelerometer works on the principle that a proof mass under acceleration applies force to two double-ended tuning fork (DETF) resonators, and the frequency output of two DETFs exhibits a differential shift. The dies of an SMRA are fabricated using silicon-on-insulator (SOI) processing and wafer-level vacuum packaging. This research aims to design a high-sensitivity SMRA because a high sensitivity allows for the acceleration signal to be easily demodulated by frequency counting techniques and decreases the noise level. This study applies the energy-consumed concept and the Nelder-Mead algorithm in the SMRA to address the design issues and further increase its sensitivity. Using this novel method, the sensitivity of the SMRA has been increased by 66.1%, which attributes to both the re-designed DETF and the reduced energy loss on the micro-lever. The results of both the closed-form and finite-element analyses are described and are in agreement with one another. A resonant frequency of approximately 22 kHz, a frequency sensitivity of over 250 Hz per g, a one-hour bias stability of 55 μg, a bias repeatability (1σ) of 48 μg and the bias-instability of 4.8 μg have been achieved. PMID:26633425

  8. Free fall tests of the accelerometers of the MICROSCOPE mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liorzou, F.; Boulanger, D.; Rodrigues, M.; Touboul, P.; Selig, H.

    2014-09-01

    The MICROSCOPE mission is fully dedicated to the in-orbit test of the Universality of free fall, the so-called Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP), with an expected accuracy better than 10-15. The test principle consists in comparing the accelerations of two proof masses of different composition in the Earth gravitational field. The payload embarks two pairs of test-masses made of Platinum Rhodium and Titanium alloys at the core of two dedicated coaxial electrostatic accelerometers. These instruments are under qualification for a launch in 2016. Their operations are only possible in microgravity environment which makes its validation on ground a real issue. In Europe, only the drop tower of the ZARM Institute provides a facility for experiments under conditions of weightlessness and offers the experimental conditions to verify the correct functioning of the MICROSCOPE payload. The height of the tower limits the “free fall” experiment period to 4.72 s. Under this strong constraint, the demonstration of the capability to control the test masses of the two coaxial electrostatic accelerometers is challenging. This paper describes the complete experimental set up and in which condition the test has been performed, then an analysis of a drop result is given with its interpretations.

  9. Technique for Determining Bridge Displacement Response Using MEMS Accelerometers

    PubMed Central

    Sekiya, Hidehiko; Kimura, Kentaro; Miki, Chitoshi

    2016-01-01

    In bridge maintenance, particularly with regard to fatigue damage in steel bridges, it is important to determine the displacement response of the entire bridge under a live load as well as that of each member. Knowing the displacement response enables the identification of dynamic deformations that can cause stresses and ultimately lead to damage and thus also allows the undertaking of appropriate countermeasures. In theory, the displacement response can be calculated from the double integration of the measured acceleration. However, data measured by an accelerometer include measurement errors caused by the limitations of the analog-to-digital conversion process and sensor noise. These errors distort the double integration results. Furthermore, as bridges in service are constantly vibrating because of passing vehicles, estimating the boundary conditions for the numerical integration is difficult. To address these problems, this paper proposes a method for determining the displacement of a bridge in service from its acceleration based on its free vibration. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, field measurements were conducted using nine different accelerometers. Based on the results of these measurements, the proposed method was found to be highly accurate in comparison with the reference displacement obtained using a contact displacement gauge. PMID:26907287

  10. Surface Micromachined Silicon Carbide Accelerometers for Gas Turbine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeAnna, Russell G.

    1998-01-01

    A finite-element analysis of possible silicon carbide (SIC) folded-beam, lateral-resonating accelerometers is presented. Results include stiffness coefficients, acceleration sensitivities, resonant frequency versus temperature, and proof-mass displacements due to centripetal acceleration of a blade-mounted sensor. The surface micromachined devices, which are similar to the Analog Devices Inc., (Norwood, MA) air-bag crash detector, are etched from 2-pm thick, 3C-SiC films grown at 1600 K using atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD). The substrate is a 500 gm-thick, (100) silicon wafer. Polysilicon or silicon dioxide is used as a sacrificial layer. The finite element analysis includes temperature-dependent properties, shape change due to volume expansion, and thermal stress caused by differential thermal expansion of the materials. The finite-element results are compared to experimental results for a SiC device of similar, but not identical, geometry. Along with changes in mechanical design, blade-mounted sensors would require on-chip circuitry to cancel displacements due to centripetal acceleration and improve sensitivity and bandwidth. These findings may result in better accelerometer designs for this application.

  11. Shock margin testing of a one-axis MEMS accelerometer.

    SciTech Connect

    Parson, Ted Blair; Tanner, Danelle Mary; Buchheit, Thomas Edward

    2008-07-01

    Shock testing was performed on a selected commercial-off-the-shelf - MicroElectroMechanical System (COTS-MEMS) accelerometer to determine the margin between the published absolute maximum rating for shock and the 'measured' level where failures are observed. The purpose of this testing is to provide baseline data for isolating failure mechanisms under shock and environmental loading in a representative device used or under consideration for use within systems and assemblies of the DOD/DOE weapons complex. The specific device chosen for this study was the AD22280 model of the ADXL78 MEMS Accelerometer manufactured by Analog Devices Inc. This study focuses only on the shock loading response of the device and provides the necessary data for adding influence of environmental exposure to the reliability of this class of devices. The published absolute maximum rating for acceleration in any axis was 4000 G for this device powered or unpowered. Results from this study showed first failures at 8000 G indicating a margin of error of two. Higher shock level testing indicated that an in-plane, but off-axis acceleration was more damaging than one in the sense direction.

  12. Airbag accelerometer with a simple switched-capacitor readout ASIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsugai, Masahiro; Hirata, Yoshiaki; Tanimoto, Koji; Usami, Teruo; Araki, Toru; Otani, Hiroshi

    1997-09-01

    A bulk micromachined capacitive accelerometer for airbag applications based on (110) silicon anisotropic KOH etching is presented. The sensor is a two-chip accelerometer that consists of a glass-silicon-glass stacked sense element and an interface ASIC containing an impedance converter for capacitance detection, an EPROM and DACs for digital trimming, and a self-test feature for diagnosis. A simple switched-capacitor readout circuit with DC offset error cancellation scheme is proposed as the impedance converter. The dependence of narrow gap etching, surface roughness, and uniformity of the groove depth on the KOH concentration are also investigated for the fabrication of the device, and it is shown that the etch rate of the plane intrinsically controls the depth of the narrow gap with a KOH concentration of over 30 wt. percent, and smooth surface and uniformity of groove depth are obtained at 40 wt. percent KOH. The nonlinearity of the output is about 1.5 percent FS. The temperature coefficient of sensitivity and the off-axis sensitivity are 150 ppm/degree C and 2 percent respectively. The dimensions of the sensor are 10.3 X 10.3 X 3 mm.

  13. Engineering Implications of Rotational Sensitivity of Translational Accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroschek, R. L.

    2006-12-01

    Several studies have indicated that nominal linear translational accelerometers are strongly sensitive to rotation motions, especially around their horizontal axis. It has been theoretically and experimentally demonstrated that this situation affects the acceleration record and severely limits appropriate velocity and displacement determination. More importantly the common believe that filtering long periods signals could "clean" the acceleration record from this unwanted effect has been shown inadequate by the author this abstract and collaborators using experimental testing. Rotational effects are still present on filtered records unless the complete frequency bandwidth that composes the rotation motion is filtered out. In civil engineering structures rotations are nearly always present. Typical examples are foundation rocking, beam bending, floor slab deformation and overall rotation of structures due to relative large loads or damage. Two real cases were rotation of a relative flexible structure strongly influence the linear accelerometer responses are presented and later experimentally reproduce in a shake table controlled situation. The first one corresponds to a bridge with a contiguous 383 meter simple supported beam rested on rubber bearing that suffered the rotational related distortions due to the passing of a heavy truck at the end of a seismic event. The second event corresponds to the vibration recording of vertical motions on an industrial bridge that is exposed to forced vibration of a large motor. Both examples indicate that in certain conditions motion records from structural instruments are subjected to distortions effects that could make acceleration, velocity and displacement (temporarily or permanent) measurements not reliable.

  14. Applying macro design tools to the design of MEMS accelerometers

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, B.R.; Rodgers, M.S.; Montague, S.

    1998-02-01

    This paper describes the design of two different surface micromachined (MEMS) accelerometers and the use of design and analysis tools intended for macro sized devices. This work leverages a process for integrating both the micromechanical structures and microelectronics circuitry of a MEMS accelerometer on the same chip. In this process, the mechanical components of the sensor are first fabricated at the bottom of a trench etched into the wafer substrate. The trench is then filled with oxide and sealed to protect the mechanical components during subsequent microelectronics processing. The wafer surface is then planarized in preparation for CMOS processing. Next, the CMOS electronics are fabricated and the mechanical structures are released. The mechanical structure of each sensor consists of two polysilicon plate masses suspended by multiple springs (cantilevered beam structures) over corresponding polysilicon plates fixed to the substrate to form two parallel plate capacitors. One polysilicon plate mass is suspended using compliant springs forming a variable capacitor. The other polysilicon plate mass is suspended using very stiff springs acting as a fixed capacitor. Acceleration is measured by comparing the variable capacitance with the fixed capacitance during acceleration.

  15. Effects of a canine Elizabethan collar on ambulatory electrocardiogram recorded by a Holter recording system and spontaneous activities measured continuously by an accelerometer in Beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Yamada, M; Tokuriki, M

    2000-05-01

    Ambulatory electrocardiogram (ECG) has been recorded in dogs wearing a jacket to protect a Holter recording system, but the jacket was often damaged by dogs. We compared ECG recorded by a Holter recording system and spontaneous activity measured by an accelerometer in Beagle dogs with or without an Elizabethan collar. There were few significant differences in mean values (per hr) of the heart rate and the amount of spontaneous activity between dogs with or without the Elizabethan collar. Mean values (per 23 hr) of them had no significant difference between them. We concluded that the Elizabethan collar did not have any effect on ambulatory ECG and canine movements and was effective to protect the recording apparatus.

  16. Wear of highly crosslinked polyethylene acetabular components

    PubMed Central

    Callary, Stuart A; Solomon, Lucian B; Holubowycz, Oksana T; Campbell, David G; Munn, Zachary; Howie, Donald W

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Wear rates of highly crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE) acetabular components have varied considerably between different published studies. This variation is in part due to the different techniques used to measure wear and to the errors inherent in measuring the relatively low amounts of wear in XLPE bearings. We undertook a scoping review of studies that have examined the in vivo wear of XLPE acetabular components using the most sensitive method available, radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Methods A systematic search of the PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane databases was performed to identify published studies in which RSA was used to measure wear of XLPE components in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Results 18 publications examined 12 primary THA cohorts, comprising only 260 THAs at 2–10 years of follow-up. The mean or median proximal wear rate reported ranged from 0.00 to 0.06 mm/year. However, differences in the manner in which wear was determined made it difficult to compare some studies. Furthermore, differences in RSA methodology between studies, such as the use of supine or standing radiographs and the use of beaded or unbeaded reference segments, may limit future meta-analyses examining the effect of patient and implant variables on wear rates. Interpretation This scoping review confirmed the low wear rates of XLPE in THA, as measured by RSA. We make recommendations to enhance the standardization of reporting of RSA wear results, which will facilitate early identification of poorly performing implants and enable a better understanding of the effects of surgical and patient factors on wear. PMID:25301435

  17. Assessing Physical Activity in Children with Asthma: Convergent Validity between Accelerometer and Electronic Diary Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floro, Josh N.; Dunton, Genevieve F.; Delfino, Ralph J.

    2009-01-01

    Convergent validity of accelerometer and electronic diary physical activity data was assessed in children with asthma. Sixty-two participants, ages 9-18 years, wore an accelerometer and reported their physical activity level in quarter-hour segments every 2 hr using the Ambulatory Diary Assessment (ADA). Moderate validity was found between…

  18. A New Z-axis Resonant Micro-Accelerometer Based on Electrostatic Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Xingjun; Dai, Bo; Liu, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Presented in the paper is the design, the simulation, the fabrication and the experiment of a new z-axis resonant accelerometer based on the electrostatic stiffness. The new z-axis resonant micro-accelerometer, which consists of a torsional accelerometer and two plane resonators, decouples the sensing movement of the accelerometer from the oscillation of the plane resonators by electrostatic stiffness, which will improve the performance. The new structure and the sensitive theory of the acceleration are illuminated, and the equation of the scale factor is deduced under ideal conditions firstly. The Ansys simulation is implemented to verify the basic principle of the torsional accelerometer and the plane resonator individually. The structure simulation results prove that the effective frequency of the torsional accelerometer and the plane resonator are 0.66 kHz and 13.3 kHz, respectively. Then, the new structure is fabricated by the standard three-mask deep dry silicon on glass (DDSOG) process and encapsulated by parallel seam welding. Finally, the detecting and control circuits are designed to achieve the closed-loop self-oscillation, to trace the natural frequency of resonator and to measure the system frequency. Experimental results show that the new z-axis resonant accelerometer has a scale factor of 31.65 Hz/g, a bias stability of 727 μg and a dynamic range of over 10 g, which proves that the new z-axis resonant micro-accelerometer is practicable. PMID:25569748

  19. Alumina-alumina artificial hip joints. Part II: characterisation of the wear debris from in vitro hip joint simulations.

    PubMed

    Tipper, J L; Hatton, A; Nevelos, J E; Ingham, E; Doyle, C; Streicher, R; Nevelos, A B; Fisher, J

    2002-08-01

    Until recently it was not possible to reproduce clinically relevant wear rates and wear patterns in in vitro hip joint simulators for alumina ceramic-on-ceramic hip prostheses. The introduction of microseparation of the prosthesis components into in vitro wear simulations produced clinically relevant wear rates and wear patterns for the first time. The aim of this study was to characterise the wear particles generated from standard simulator testing and microseparation simulator testing of hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) and non-HIPed alumina ceramic-on-ceramic hip prostheses, and compare these particles to those generated in vivo. Standard simulation conditions produced wear rates of approximately 0.1 mm3 per million cycles for both material types. No change in surface roughness was detected and very few wear features were observed. In contrast, when microseparation was introduced into the wear simulation, wear rates of between 1.24 (HIPed) and 1.74 mm3 per million cycles (non-HIPed) were produced. Surface roughness increased and a wear stripe often observed clinically on retrieved femoral heads was also reproduced. Under standard simulation conditions only nanometre-sized wear particles (2-27.5 nm) were observed by TEM, and it was thought likely that these particles resulted from relief polishing of the alumina ceramic. However, when microseparation of the prosthesis components was introduced into the simulation, a bi-modal distribution of particle sizes was observed. The nanometre-sized particles produced by relief polishing were present (1-35nm). however, larger micrometre-sized particles were also observed by both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) (0.021 microm) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) (0.05-->10 microm). These larger particles were thought to originate from the wear stripe and were produced by trans-granular fracture of the alumina ceramic. In Part I of this study, alumina ceramic wear particles were isolated from the periprosthetic

  20. Commissioning of a displacement-controlled knee wear simulator and exploration of some issues related to the lubricant.

    PubMed

    Brandt, J-M; Charron, K D J; Zhao, L; MacDonald, S J; Medley, J B

    2011-08-01

    A six-station displacement-controlled knee simulator with separately controlled left (L) and right (R) banks (three wear implants per bank) was commissioned for a total of three million cycles (Mc) following ISO 14243-3. A commissioning protocol was applied to compare the polyethylene wear among the six wear stations by exchanging the implants between wear stations. Changes in lubricant characteristics during wear testing, such as polypeptide degradation, low-molecular-weight polypeptide concentration, and possible microbial contamination were also assessed. The total mean wear rate for the implants was 23.60 +/- 1.96 mm3/Mc and this was of a similar magnitude to the mean wear rate for the same implant tested under similar conditions by DePuy Orthopaedics Inc. (Warsaw, IN). Repeated run-in wear was observed when the implants were exchanged between wear stations, suggesting that implants should be subjected to the same wear station throughout the duration of a wear test. The total polypeptide degradation for the implants measured 30.53 +/- 3.96 percent; the low-molecular-weight polypeptide concentration of the "used" lubricant for implants (0.131 +/- 0.012 g/L) was 3.3 times greater than the mean polypeptide concentration of the fresh, "unused" lubricant (0.039 +/- 0.004 g/L). This increase in low-molecular weight polypeptide concentration was suggested to be attributable to protein shear in the articulation of the implant, the circulation of the lubricant, and some proteolytic activity. Sodium azide was ineffective in maintaining a sterile environment for wear testing as a single, highly motile Gram-negative micro-organism was identified in the lubricant from wear tests.

  1. Sign language recognition using intrinsic-mode sample entropy on sEMG and accelerometer data.

    PubMed

    Kosmidou, Vasiliki E; Hadjileontiadis, Leontios J

    2009-12-01

    Sign language forms a communication channel among the deaf; however, automated gesture recognition could further expand their communication with the hearers. In this work, data from five-channel surface electromyogram and 3-D accelerometer from the signer's dominant hand were analyzed using intrinsic-mode entropy (IMEn) for the automated recognition of Greek sign language (GSL) isolated signs. Discriminant analysis was used to identify the effective scales of the intrinsic-mode functions and the window length for the calculation of the IMEn that contributes to the efficient classification of the GSL signs. Experimental results from the IMEn analysis applied to GSL signs corresponding to 60-word lexicon repeated ten times by three native signers have shown more than 93% mean classification accuracy using IMEn as the only source of the classification feature set. This provides a promising bed-set toward the automated GSL gesture recognition.

  2. Using sample entropy for automated sign language recognition on sEMG and accelerometer data.

    PubMed

    Kosmidou, Vasiliki E; Hadjileontiadis, Leontios I

    2010-03-01

    Communication using sign language (SL) provides alternative means for information transmission among the deaf. Automated gesture recognition involved in SL, however, could further expand this communication channel to the world of hearers. In this study, data from five-channel surface electromyogram and three-dimensional accelerometer from signers' dominant hand were subjected to a feature extraction process. The latter consisted of sample entropy (SampEn)-based analysis, whereas time-frequency feature (TFF) analysis was also performed as a baseline method for the automated recognition of 60-word lexicon Greek SL (GSL) isolated signs. Experimental results have shown a 66 and 92% mean classification accuracy threshold using TFF and SampEn, respectively. These results justify the superiority of SampEn against conventional methods, such as TFF, to provide with high recognition hit-ratios, combined with feature vector dimension reduction, toward a fast and reliable automated GSL gesture recognition.

  3. Wear rate control of peek surfaces modified by femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammouti, S.; Pascale-Hamri, A.; Faure, N.; Beaugiraud, B.; Guibert, M.; Mauclair, C.; Benayoun, S.; Valette, S.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the effect of laser texturing on the tribological properties of PEEK surfaces under a ball-on-flat contact configuration. Thus, surfaces with circular dimples of various diameters and depth were created. Tests were conducted with a normal load of 5 N and a sliding velocity of 0.01 m s-1, using bovine calf serum at 37.5 °C as a lubricant. The tribological conditions including the sliding frequency and the lubricant viscosity indicate that tests were performed under boundary lubrication regime. Results showed that discs with higher dimple depth exhibited higher friction coefficient and caused more abrasive wear on the ball specimen. Nevertheless, tribosystems (ball and disc) with dimpled disc surfaces showed a higher wear resistance. In the frame of our experiments, wear rates obtained for tribosystems including dimpled surfaces were 10 times lower than tribosystems including limited patterned or untextured surfaces. Applications such as design of spinal implants may be concerned by such a surface treatment to increase wear resistance of components.

  4. Development of wear resistant ceramic coatings for diesel engine components

    SciTech Connect

    Haselkorn, M.H. )

    1992-04-01

    Improved fuel economy and a reduction of emissions can be achieved by insulation of the combustion chamber components to reduce heat rejection. However, insulating the combustion chamber components will also increase the operating temperature of the piston ring/cylinder liner interface from approximately 150{degree}C to over 300{degree}C. Existing ring/liner materials can not withstand these higher operating temperatures and for this reason, new materials need to be developed for this critical tribological interface. The overall goal of this program is the development of piston ring/cylinder liner material pairs which would be able to provide the required friction and wear properties at these more severe operating conditions. More specifically, this program first selected, and then evaluated, potential d/wear resistant coatings which could be applied to either piston rings an or cylinder liners and provide, at 350{degree}C under lubricated conditions, coefficients of friction below 0.1 and wear rates of less than 25 {times} lO{sup {minus}6} mm/hour. The processes selected for applying the candidate wear resistant coatings to piston rings and/or cylinder liners were plasma spraying, chemical vapor, physical vapor and low temperature arc vapor deposition techniques as well as enameling techniques.

  5. Enamel wear opposing polished and aged zirconia.

    PubMed

    Burgess, J O; Janyavula, S; Lawson, N C; Lucas, T J; Cakir, D

    2014-01-01

    Aging of dental zirconia roughens its surface through low temperature degradation. We hypothesized that age-related roughening of zirconia crowns may cause detrimental wear to the enamel of an opposing tooth. To test our hypothesis, we subjected artificially aged zirconia and reference specimens to simulated mastication in a wear device and measured the wear of an opposing enamel cusp. Additionally, the roughness of the pretest surfaces was measured. The zirconia specimens, artificially aged by autoclave, showed no significant increase in roughness compared to the nonaged specimens. Furthermore, no significant difference in material or opposing enamel wear between the aged and nonaged zirconia was seen. All zirconia specimens showed less material and opposing enamel wear than the enamel to enamel control or veneering porcelain specimens. Scanning electron micrographs showed relatively smooth surfaces of aged and nonaged zirconia following wear testing. The micrographs of the veneering ceramic showed sharp fractured edges and fragments of wear debris. Zirconia may be considered a wear-friendly material for restorations opposing enamel, even after simulated aging.

  6. Studies of the Nature of Wear

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-28

    hemispherical particles. Investigations using Ferrography have shown that most sliding wear is caused by the exfoliation or flaking off of the Beilby...parts as gear teeth and ball bearing balls and races. Such particles are not always generated as a result of the wear of hard steels and the

  7. The effect of insert conformity and material on total knee replacement wear

    PubMed Central

    Abdelgaied, Abdellatif; Brockett, Claire L; Liu, Feng; Jennings, Louise M; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John

    2013-01-01

    The mean average life is increasing; therefore, there is a need to increase the lifetime of the prostheses. To fulfil this requirement, new prosthetic designs and materials are being introduced. Two of the design parameters that may affect wear of total knee replacements, and hence the expected lifetime, are the insert conformity and material. Computational models have been used extensively for wear prediction and optimisation of artificial knee designs. The objective of the present study was to use a previously validated non-dimensional wear coefficient-based computational wear model to investigate the effect of insert conformity and material on the predicted wear in total knee replacements. Four different inserts (curved, lipped, partial flat and custom flat), with different conformity levels, were tested against the same femoral and under two different kinematic inputs (intermediate and high), with different levels of cross-shear. The insert bearing materials were either conventional or moderately cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Wear predictions were validated against the experimental data from Leeds knee simulation tests. The predicted wear rates for the curved insert (most conformed) were more than three times those for the flat insert (least conformed). In addition, the computationally predicted average volumetric wear rates for moderately cross-linked UHMWPE bearings were less than half of their corresponding conventional UHMWPE bearings. Moreover, the wear of the moderately cross-linked UHMWPE was shown to be less dependent on the degree of cross-shear, compared to conventional UHMWPE. These results along with supporting experimental studies provide insight into the design variables, which may reduce wear in knee replacements. PMID:24297773

  8. The effect of insert conformity and material on total knee replacement wear.

    PubMed

    Abdelgaied, Abdellatif; Brockett, Claire L; Liu, Feng; Jennings, Louise M; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John

    2014-01-01

    The mean average life is increasing; therefore, there is a need to increase the lifetime of the prostheses. To fulfil this requirement, new prosthetic designs and materials are being introduced. Two of the design parameters that may affect wear of total knee replacements, and hence the expected lifetime, are the insert conformity and material. Computational models have been used extensively for wear prediction and optimisation of artificial knee designs. The objective of the present study was to use a previously validated non-dimensional wear coefficient-based computational wear model to investigate the effect of insert conformity and material on the predicted wear in total knee replacements. Four different inserts (curved, lipped, partial flat and custom flat), with different conformity levels, were tested against the same femoral and under two different kinematic inputs (intermediate and high), with different levels of cross-shear. The insert bearing materials were either conventional or moderately cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Wear predictions were validated against the experimental data from Leeds knee simulation tests. The predicted wear rates for the curved insert (most conformed) were more than three times those for the flat insert (least conformed). In addition, the computationally predicted average volumetric wear rates for moderately cross-linked UHMWPE bearings were less than half of their corresponding conventional UHMWPE bearings. Moreover, the wear of the moderately cross-linked UHMWPE was shown to be less dependent on the degree of cross-shear, compared to conventional UHMWPE. These results along with supporting experimental studies provide insight into the design variables, which may reduce wear in knee replacements.

  9. Wear behaviour of cross-linked polyethylene assessed in vitro under severe conditions.

    PubMed

    Affatato, Saverio; Bersaglia, Gianluca; Rocchi, Mirko; Taddei, Paola; Fagnano, Concezio; Toni, Aldo

    2005-06-01

    The polyethylene (PE) for hip implants presents serious clinical problems; the production of debris may induce adverse tissue reactions that may lead to extensive bone loss around the implant and consequently osteolysis and implant loosening. Several attempts have been made to improve the wear properties of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). More recently the attention of various researchers has been focused on cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE), due to its improved wear resistance with respect to conventional UHMWPE. This study was aimed at comparing the wear performances of clinically available acetabular liners (Zimmer Inc.) made of electron beam XLPE and conventional UHMWPE. To evaluate the influence of the material properties on wear, conventional UHMWPE and XLPE acetabular cups were tested against deliberately scratched CoCrMo femoral heads (Ra = 0.12-0.14 microm) in a hip joint wear simulator run for 3 million cycles with bovine calf serum as lubricant. Gravimetric measurements revealed significant differences between the wear behaviours of the two sets of acetabular cups: XLPE exhibited a wear rate about 40 times lower than conventional UHMWPE. Raman spectroscopy coupled to partial least-squares analysis was used to evaluate the possible crystallinity changes induced by mechanical stress (and thus the material wear resistance): only the UHMWPE cup which showed the highest weight loss displayed significant crystallinity changes. These results were correlated to the thickness of the plasticity-induced damage layer. The wear debris produced during the tests were isolated according to a validated protocol and imaged by scanning electron microscopy . The wear particles produced by XLPE were smaller than those produced by UHMWPE; the latter were observed as fibrillar and agglomerated particles. The mean equivalent circle diameter was 0.71 and 0.26 microm for UHMWPE and XLPE, respectively.

  10. Use of three-dimensional accelerometers to evaluate behavioral changes in cattle experimentally infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Bayne, Jenna E; Walz, Paul H; Passler, Thomas; White, Brad J; Theurer, Miles E; van Santen, Edzard

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the use of 3-D accelerometers to evaluate behavioral changes in cattle experimentally infected with a low-virulent strain of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). ANIMALS 20 beef steers (mean weight, 238 kg). PROCEDURES Calves were allocated to a BVDV (n = 10) or control (10) group. On day 0, calves in the BVDV group were inoculated with a low-virulent strain of BVDV (4 × 10(6) TCID50, intranasally), and calves in the control group were sham inoculated with BVDV-free medium (4 mL; intranasally). An accelerometer was affixed to the right hind limb of each calf on day -7 to record activity (lying, walking, and standing) continuously until 35 days after inoculation. Baseline was defined as days -7 to -1. Blood samples were collected at predetermined times for CBC, serum biochemical analysis, virus isolation, and determination of anti-BVDV antibody titers. RESULTS All calves in the BVDV group developed viremia and anti-BVDV antibodies but developed only subclinical or mild disease. Calves in the control group did not develop viremia or anti-BVDV antibodies. Mean time allocated to each activity did not differ significantly between the BVDV and control groups on any day except day 8, when calves in the BVDV group spent less time standing than the calves in the control group. Following inoculation, calves in both groups tended to spend more time lying and less time walking and standing than they did during baseline. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that behavioral data obtained by accelerometers could not distinguish calves subclinically infected with BVDV from healthy control calves. However, subtle changes in the behavior of the BVDV-infected calves were detected and warrant further investigation.

  11. Swarm accelerometer data processing from raw accelerations to thermospheric neutral densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemes, Christian; de Teixeira da Encarnação, João; Doornbos, Eelco; van den IJssel, Jose; Kraus, Jiří; Pereštý, Radek; Grunwaldt, Ludwig; Apelbaum, Guy; Flury, Jakob; Holmdahl Olsen, Poul Erik

    2016-05-01

    The Swarm satellites were launched on November 22, 2013, and carry accelerometers and GPS receivers as part of their scientific payload. The GPS receivers do not only provide the position and time for the magnetic field measurements, but are also used for determining non-gravitational forces like drag and radiation pressure acting on the spacecraft. The accelerometers measure these forces directly, at much finer resolution than the GPS receivers, from which thermospheric neutral densities can be derived. Unfortunately, the acceleration measurements suffer from a variety of disturbances, the most prominent being slow temperature-induced bias variations and sudden bias changes. In this paper, we describe the new, improved four-stage processing that is applied for transforming the disturbed acceleration measurements into scientifically valuable thermospheric neutral densities. In the first stage, the sudden bias changes in the acceleration measurements are manually removed using a dedicated software tool. The second stage is the calibration of the accelerometer measurements against the non-gravitational accelerations derived from the GPS receiver, which includes the correction for the slow temperature-induced bias variations. The identification of validity periods for calibration and correction parameters is part of the second stage. In the third stage, the calibrated and corrected accelerations are merged with the non-gravitational accelerations derived from the observations of the GPS receiver by a weighted average in the spectral domain, where the weights depend on the frequency. The fourth stage consists of transforming the corrected and calibrated accelerations into thermospheric neutral densities. We present the first results of the processing of Swarm C acceleration measurements from June 2014 to May 2015. We started with Swarm C because its acceleration measurements contain much less disturbances than those of Swarm A and have a higher signal-to-noise ratio

  12. First Analysis of Densities Inferred from Accelerometer Data on ESA's Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruinsma, S.; Mueller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Marty, J. C.; Svedhem, H.

    2015-12-01

    After completing its primary science mission, ESA decided to do a risky aerobraking campaign with Venus Express (VEx) in order to gain operational experience as well as to measure high-resolution density profiles at high northern latitude. VEx was in a polar and highly eccentric orbit (e=0.84). In the aerobraking period from 24 June to 11 July 2014, the pericenter was at 75°N at an altitude of 130-134 km, and the local solar time drifted from 6.2 to 4.5 hr. One density profile extending about 3° in latitude on both sides of the pericenter has been obtained for each of the 18 consecutive days at 1 Hz sampling, after ingestion of the 8 Hz accelerometer data in the GINS software. The uncertainty in the derived density is the sum of a systematic part due to the uncertainty in Cd, estimated to be 10%, and a noise and bias part due to the accelerometers. Using the accelerometer errors according to specifications, a signal-to-noise ratio of one is reached on average at 139 km altitude. The validity range of the VEx densities can also be evaluated by means of comparison with a model. The VEx-to-VTS3 density ratios were computed for each profile, and these results are consistent with the specified instrument resolution. VEx densities are on average nearly a factor of 2 smaller than VTS3, which is in agreement with Precise Orbit Determination results obtained for higher altitudes (160-170 km). However, variability of up to tens of percent is visible in the form of wavelike activity as well as an altitude-dependent variation that is revealed by ratios that become smaller towards the start and end of the profile. The latter model error hints at an inaccurate the temperature profile, errors in constituent concentrations, or both. The waves can be interpreted as a superposition of two wave trains with wavelengths of around 100 km and 250 km. Average scale heights over the range of observations (130-140 km) are found to be 2.9+/-0.6 km.

  13. Modeling wear of cast Ti alloys.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kwai S; Koike, Marie; Okabe, Toru

    2007-05-01

    The wear behavior of Ti-based alloys was analyzed by considering the elastic-plastic fracture of individual alloys in response to the relevant contact stress field. Using the contact stresses as the process driving force, wear was computed as the wear rate or volume loss as a function of hardness and tensile ductility for Ti-based cast alloys containing an alpha, alpha+beta or beta microstructure with or without the intermetallic precipitates. Model predictions indicated that wear of Ti alloys increases with increasing hardness but with decreasing fracture toughness or tensile ductility. The theoretical results are compared with experimental data to elucidate the roles of microstructure in wear and contrasted against those in grindability.

  14. Biologically Based Restorative Management of Tooth Wear

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, Martin G. D.; Bomfim, Deborah I.; Austin, Rupert S.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence and severity of tooth wear is increasing in industrialised nations. Yet, there is no high-level evidence to support or refute any therapeutic intervention. In the absence of such evidence, many currently prevailing management strategies for tooth wear may be failing in their duty of care to first and foremost improve the oral health of patients with this disease. This paper promotes biologically sound approaches to the management of tooth wear on the basis of current best evidence of the aetiology and clinical features of this disease. The relative risks and benefits of the varying approaches to managing tooth wear are discussed with reference to long-term follow-up studies. Using reference to ethical standards such as “The Daughter Test”, this paper presents case reports of patients with moderate-to-severe levels of tooth wear managed in line with these biologically sound principles. PMID:22315608

  15. Modeling wear of cast Ti alloys

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kwai S.; Koike, Marie; Okabe, Toru

    2007-01-01

    The wear behavior of Ti-based alloys was analyzed by considering the elastic–plastic fracture of individual alloys in response to the relevant contact stress field. Using the contact stresses as the process driving force, wear was computed as the wear rate or volume loss as a function of hardness and tensile ductility for Ti-based cast alloys containing an α, α+β or β microstructure with or without the intermetallic precipitates. Model predictions indicated that wear of Ti alloys increases with increasing hardness but with decreasing fracture toughness or tensile ductility. The theoretical results are compared with experimental data to elucidate the roles of microstructure in wear and contrasted against those in grindability. PMID:17224314

  16. Friction, wear, transfer, and wear surface morphology of ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Tribological studies at 25 C in a 50-percent-relative-humidity air atmosphere were conducted using hemispherically tipped 440 C HT (high temperature) stainless steel pins sliding against ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) disks. The results indicate that sliding speed, sliding distance, contact stress and specimen geometry can markedly affect friction, UHMWPE wear, UHMWPE transfer and the type of wear mechanisms that occur. Adhesion appears to be the predominant wear mechanism; but after long sliding distances at slow speeds, heavy ridges of transfer result which can induce fatigue-like wear on the UHMWPE disk wear track. In one instance, abrasive wear to the metallic pin was observed. This was caused by a hard particle embedded in the UHMWPE disk wear track.

  17. Friction, wear, transfer and wear surface morphology of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Tribological studies at 25 C in a 50-percent-relative-humidity air atmosphere were conducted using hemispherically tipped 440 C HT (high temperature) stainless steel pins sliding against ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) disks. The results indicate that sliding speed, sliding distance, contact stress and specimen geometry can markedly affect friction, UHMWPE wear, UHMWPE transfer and the type of wear mechanisms that occur. Adhesion appears to be the predominant wear mechanism; but after long sliding distances at slow speeds, heavy ridges of transfer result which can induce fatigue-like wear on the UHMWPE disk wear track. In one instance, abrasive wear to the metallic pin was observed. This was caused by a hard particle embedded in the UHMWPE disk wear track.

  18. Dynamic SEM wear studies of tungsten carbide cermets. [friction and wear experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Dynamic friction and wear experiments were conducted in a scanning electron microscope. The wear behavior of pure tungsten carbide and composite with 6 and 15 weight percent cobalt binder was examined, and etching of the binder was done to selectively determine the role of the binder in the wear process. Dynamic experiments were conducted as the tungsten carbide (WC) and bonded WC cermet surfaces were transversed by a 50 micron radiused diamond stylus. These studies show that the predominant wear process in WC is fracture initiated by plastic deformation, and the wear of the etched cermets is similar to pure WC. The presence of the cobalt binder reduces both friction and wear. The cementing action of the cobalt reduces granular separation, and promotes a dense polished layer because of its low shear strength film-forming properties. The wear debris generated from unetched surface is approximately the same composition as the bulk.

  19. Adhesive Wear of Rollers in Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaeef, Iqbal; Krantz, Timothy L.

    2012-01-01

    This work was done to support NASA's James Webb Space Telescope that is equipped with a Near Infrared Camera and Spectrograph and Micro Shutter Assembly (MSA). A MSA mechanism's qualification test in cryogenic vacuum at 30deg K for 96K cycles resulted in roller wear and formation of some debris. Lab tests in vacuum were conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to understand the wear of Ti6Al4V mated with 440F steel rollers. Misalignment angle was found to have the most significant effect on debris formation. At misalignment angle of 1.4deg, significant amount of wear debris were formed within 50,000 cycles. Very few wear particles were found for a zero misalignment angle, and the total wear was small even after 367,000 cycles. The mode of wear in all the tests was attributed to adhesion, which was clearly evident from video records as well as the plate-like amalgamated debris material from both rollers. The adhesive wear rate was found to be approximately proportional to the misalignment angle. The wear is a two-way phenomenon, and the mixing of both roller materials in wear debris was confirmed by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and EDX spectra. While there was a net loss of mass from the steel rollers, XRF and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectra showed peaks of Ti on steel rollers, and peaks of Fe on Ti rollers. These results are useful for designers in terms of maintaining appropriate tolerances to avoid misalignment of rolling elements and the resulting severe wear

  20. Atmospheric structure from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter accelerometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, G.; Bougher, S.; Theriot, M.; Zurek, R.; Blanchard, R.; Tolson, R.; Murphy, J.

    Designed for aerobraking, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) launched on August 12, 2005, achieved Mars Orbital Insertion (MOI), March 10, 2006. Atmospheric density decreases exponentially with increasing height. By small propulsive adjustments of the apoapsis orbital velocity, periapsis altitude is fine tuned to the density surface that will safely use the atmosphere of Mars to aerobrake over 500 orbits. MRO periapsis precesses from the South Pole at 6pm LST to near the equator at 3am LST. Meanwhile, apoapsis is brought dramatically from ˜40,000km at MOI to 460 km at aerobraking completion (ABX) mid September 2006. After ABX, a few small propulsive maneuvers will establish the Primary Science Orbit (PSO), which without aerobraking would have required an additional 400 kg of fuel. Each of the 500 plus aerobraking orbits provides a vertical structure and distribution of density, scale heights, and temperatures, along the orbital path, providing key in situ insight into various upper atmosphere (> 100 km) processes. One of the major questions for scientists studying Mars is: "Where did the water go?" Honeywell's substantially improved electronics package for its IMU (QA-2000 accelerometer, gyro, electronics) maximized accelerometer sensitivities at the requests of The George Washington University, JPL, and Lockheed Martin. The improved accelerometer sensitivities allowed density measurements to exceed 200km, at least 40 km higher than with Mars Odyssey (MO). This extends vertical structures from MRO into the neutral lower exosphere, a region where various processes may allow atmospheric gasses to escape. Over the eons, water may have been lost in both the lower atmosphere and the upper atmosphere, thus the water balance throughout the entire atmosphere from subsurface to exosphere may be equally critical. Comparisons of data from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), MO and MRO will help characterize key temporal and spatial cycles including: polar vortices, winter polar

  1. The application of counter immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) in ocular protein studies Part II: Kinin activity in the lens wearing eye.

    PubMed

    Mann, Aisling M; Tighe, Brian J

    2002-06-01

    The kinin family are a group of bioactive peptides that are closely involved in the modulation of vascular inflammation and local injury. We have demonstrated here, for the first time, a link between kinin activity and contact lens wear. Protein extracts from daily and extended wear etafilcon A, Group IV, Acuvue lenses (Vistakon), were analysed by counter immunoelectrophoresis. In this way, kinin activity associated with contact lens wear was detected. High molecular weight kininogen was used as the marker protein. In contrast, no kinin activity was detected in the non-lens wearing normal eye.

  2. Mechanisms for fatigue and wear of polysilicon structural thinfilms

    SciTech Connect

    Alsem, Daniel Henricus

    2006-01-01

    extreme temperature increases are found, ruling out plasticity and temperature-assisted mechanisms. The COF reaches a steady-state value of ~0.20±0.05 after a short time at an initial value of ~0.11±0.01. Plowing tracks are found before the steady-state value of the COF is reached, suggesting only a short adhesive wear regime. This suggests a predominantly abrasive wear mechanism, controlled by fracture, which commences by the first particles created by adhesive wear.

  3. Mechanisms for fatigue and wear of polysilicon structural thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsem, Daniel Henricus

    dislocations or extreme temperature increases are found, ruling out plasticity and temperature-assisted mechanisms. The COF reaches a steady-state value of ˜0.20+/-0.05 after a short time at an initial value of ˜0.11+/-0.01. Plowing tracks are found before the steady-state value of the COF is reached, suggesting only a short adhesive wear regime. This suggests a predominantly abrasive wear mechanism, controlled by fracture, which commences by the first particles created by adhesive wear.

  4. Determining the functional and material properties needed for abrasive wear prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petre, I.

    2016-08-01

    Abrassive wear is a complex mechanical process with specific characteristics, dependent on the bodies velocities and load, the quality of contact surfaces, the mechanical properties of the superficial layers, lubrication etc. During the friction of the bodies in contact, the mechanical properties and the micro-topography of superficial layers change, most of the time irrecoverable, leading to the shut-down of the technical system they are part of. The present paper proposes a theoretical and experimental analysis of the abrassive wear behaviour of a coupling made of steel/cast iron as well as the detection of the wear trace dependent on the inclination angle of the harder material asperities (penetrator).

  5. Ferrographic analysis of wear debris generated in accelerated rolling element fatigue tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Parker, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    The types and quantities of wear particles generated during accelerated ball rolling contact fatigue tests were determined. Ball specimens were made of AMS 5749, a corrosion resistant, high-temperature bearing steel. The lubricant was a super-refined naphthenic mineral oil. Conditions included a maximum Hertz stress of 5.215 times 10 to the 9th power Pa and a shaft speed of 10,000 rpm. Four types of wear particles were observed; normal rubbing wear particles, fatigue spall particles, spheres, and friction polymer.

  6. Wear behavior of AISI 1090 steel modified by pulse plasma technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ayday, Aysun; Durman, Mehmet

    2012-09-06

    AISI 1090 steel was pulse plasma treated (PPT) using a Molybdenum electrode. Two different pulse numbers were chosen to obtain modified layers of 20{+-}5 {mu}m thickness. The dry sliding wear studies performed on this steel with and without PPT against an alumina ball counterpart showed that the PPT improved the wear resistance. The pulse number of the PPT modified layer was found to be highly influential in imparting the wear resistance to this steel, due to enhancement of surface hardness depending on treatment time.

  7. Single-asperity contributions to multi-asperity wear simulated with molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, S. J.; Cihak-Bayr, U.; Bianchi, D.

    2016-03-01

    We use a molecular dynamics approach to simulate the wear of a rough ferrite surface due to multiple hard, abrasive particles under variation of normal pressure, grinding direction, and particle geometry. By employing a clustering algorithm that incorporates some knowledge about the grinding process such as the main grinding direction, we can break down the total wear volume into contributions from the individual abrasive particles in a time-resolved fashion. The resulting analysis of the simulated grinding process allows statements on wear particle generation, distribution, and stability depending on the initial topography, the grinding angle, the normal pressure, as well as the abrasive shape and orientation with respect to the surface.

  8. Friction and wear of selected metals and of carbons in liquid natural gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisander, D. W.

    1971-01-01

    Friction and wear experiments were conducted with hemispherically tipped (4.76-mm radius) rider specimens in sliding contact with a rotating disk submerged in liquid natural gas (LNG). The program included metal combinations and carbon-metal combinations. These experiments revealed that the metal combinations were not lubricated by the LNG. Carbons had much lower wear in LNG than in liquid hydrogen or in liquid nitrogen. (Wear of carbon in liquid hydrogen was 100 times that in LNG.) The friction coefficients obtained in LNG (0.6 for metal-metal and 0.2 for carbon-metal) are similar to those obtained in liquid hydrogen.

  9. Slice&Dice: Recognizing Food Preparation Activities Using Embedded Accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Cuong; Olivier, Patrick

    Within the context of an endeavor to provide situated support for people with cognitive impairments in the kitchen, we developed and evaluated classifiers for recognizing 11 actions involved in food preparation. Data was collected from 20 lay subjects using four specially designed kitchen utensils incorporating embedded 3-axis accelerometers. Subjects were asked to prepare a mixed salad in our laboratory-based instrumented kitchen environment. Video of each subject's food preparation activities were independently annotated by three different coders. Several classifiers were trained and tested using these features. With an overall accuracy of 82.9% our investigation demonstrated that a broad set of food preparation actions can be reliably recognized using sensors embedded in kitchen utensils.

  10. Accelerometer-Based Event Detector for Low-Power Applications

    PubMed Central

    Smidla, József; Simon, Gyula

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, an adaptive, autocovariance-based event detection algorithm is proposed, which can be used with micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) accelerometer sensors to build inexpensive and power efficient event detectors. The algorithm works well with low signal-to-noise ratio input signals, and its computational complexity is very low, allowing its utilization on inexpensive low-end embedded sensor devices. The proposed algorithm decreases its energy consumption by lowering its duty cycle, as much as the event to be detected allows it. The performance of the algorithm is tested and compared to the conventional filter-based approach. The comparison was performed in an application where illegal entering of vehicles into restricted areas was detected. PMID:24135991

  11. A silicon micromachined piezoresistive accelerometer for health and condition monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Kevin M.; Henderson, H. Thurman

    1990-01-01

    Silicon micromachining etching techniques were utilized to batch-fabricate hundreds of general purpose microaccelerometers on a single silicon substrate. Piezoresistive sensing elements were aligned to the back-side patterns using an IR mask aligner and then diffused into the areas of maximum stress. Capping of the two-arm cantilever beam structure was achieved using a combination of electrostatic bonding and low temperature glass films. Overrange protection, critical damping, and overall protection from the outside environment are achieved by controlling the cavity depths of the top and bottom covers. Temperature compensation, amplification, and filtering are performed by a companion LSI chip that is interfaced to the accelerometer by conventional wire-bonding techniques.

  12. Vehicle Maneuver Detection with Accelerometer-Based Classification

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes-Villanueva, Javier; Carrillo-Zapata, Daniel; Terroso-Saenz, Fernando; Valdes-Vela, Mercedes; Skarmeta, Antonio F.

    2016-01-01

    In the mobile computing era, smartphones have become instrumental tools to develop innovative mobile context-aware systems. In that sense, their usage in the vehicular domain eases the development of novel and personal transportation solutions. In this frame, the present work introduces an innovative mechanism to perceive the current kinematic state of a vehicle on the basis of the accelerometer data from a smartphone mounted in the vehicle. Unlike previous proposals, the introduced architecture targets the computational limitations of such devices to carry out the detection process following an incremental approach. For its realization, we have evaluated different classification algorithms to act as agents within the architecture. Finally, our approach has been tested with a real-world dataset collected by means of the ad hoc mobile application developed. PMID:27690058

  13. GOCE Accelerometers Data Revisited: Stability And Detector Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, J.; Christophe, B.; Foulon, B.

    2013-12-01

    We report on our analyses of Gravity field and steady- state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) data aiming to characterize the stability and the noise of GOCE's ac- celerometers. We first measure science and detector co- herence signals, which allow us to infer the role of the accelerometers Digital Voltage Amplifiers and measure- ment chanel in the overall quadratic factor and scale fac- tor; we show that their temporal stability is as low as ex- pected. We then investigate the effect of the aliasing of high frequency detector's noise on the measured noise, in an attempt to explain why the measured noise is higher than originally expected. We find that although this alias- ing explains part of the higher noise, it does not account for the total of the difference seen between the expected and the measured noise.

  14. Concept of an Opto-electronic Accelerometer System (OAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunkel, B.; Keller, K.; Lutz, R.

    1987-01-01

    An accelerometer based on a spring-suspended reference mass and its precise relative motion measurement by means of 3 two-dimensional position sensitive detectors (PSD) is described. A breadboard model achieves a resolution (longterm linearity) of 25 nm in one direction. Due to the physical principle of the PSD, the second layer is slightly less sensitive than the top layer; accordingly for gravity gradient detection the more sensitive layer is selected for the Z/X component detection. At 10 Hz sampling rate an acceleration gradient of under 10 to the minus 12th power g (i.e., 0.01 E or 0.001 Gal/km) is considered to be detectable.

  15. Concept of an Opto-electronic Accelerometer System (OAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunkel, B.; Keller, K.; Lutz, R.

    1987-10-01

    An accelerometer based on a spring-suspended reference mass and its precise relative motion measurement by means of 3 two-dimensional position sensitive detectors (PSD) is described. A breadboard model achieves a resolution (longterm linearity) of 25 nm in one direction. Due to the physical principle of the PSD, the second layer is slightly less sensitive than the top layer; accordingly for gravity gradient detection the more sensitive layer is selected for the Z/X component detection. At 10 Hz sampling rate an acceleration gradient of under 10 to the minus 12th power g (i.e., 0.01 E or 0.001 Gal/km) is considered to be detectable.

  16. Monolithic CMOS-MEMS integration for high-g accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, Vinayak; Li, Holden; Tan, Chuan Seng

    2014-10-01

    This paper highlights work-in-progress towards the conceptualization, simulation, fabrication and initial testing of a silicon-germanium (SiGe) integrated CMOS-MEMS high-g accelerometer for military, munition, fuze and shock measurement applications. Developed on IMEC's SiGe MEMS platform, the MEMS offers a dynamic range of 5,000 g and a bandwidth of 12 kHz. The low noise readout circuit adopts a chopper-stabilization technique implementing the CMOS through the TSMC 0.18 µm process. The device structure employs a fully differential split comb-drive set up with two sets of stators and a rotor all driven separately. Dummy structures acting as protective over-range stops were designed to protect the active components when under impacts well above the designed dynamic range.

  17. ISLES: Probing Extra Dimensions Using a Superconducting Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Ho Jung; Moody, M. Vol; Prieto-Gortcheva, Violeta A.

    2003-01-01

    In string theories, extra dimensions must be compactified. The possibility that gravity can have large radii of compactification leads to a violation of the inverse square law at submillimeter distances. The objective of ISLES is to perform a null test of Newton s law in space with a resolution of one part in 10(exp 5) or better at 100 microns. The experiment will be cooled to less than or equal to 2 K, which permits superconducting magnetic levitation of the test masses. To minimize Newtonian errors, ISLES employs a near null source, a circular disk of large diameter-to-thickness ratio. Two test masses, also disk-shaped, are suspended on the two sides of the source mass at a nominal distance of 100 microns. The signal is detected by a superconducting differential accelerometer. A ground test apparatus is under construction.

  18. Accelerometer Load Profiles for Basketball-Specific Drills in Elite Players

    PubMed Central

    Schelling, Xavi; Torres, Lorena

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the workload during basketball-specific drills measured through microtechnology. Twelve professional male basketball players from the Spanish 1st Division were monitored over a 4-week period. Data were collected from 16 sessions, for a total of 95 ± 33 drills per player. Workload data (Acceleration load; AL) were obtained from a tri-axial accelerometer at 100Hz sampling frequency, and were expressed over time (AL.min-1). Comparisons among training drills (i.e., 2v2, 3v3, 4v4, and 5v5) were assessed via standardized mean differences. Full-court 3v3 and 5v5 showed the highest physical demand (AL.min-1: 18.7 ± 4.1 and 17.9 ± 4.6, respectively) compared with other traditional balanced basketball drills such as 2v2 and 4v4 (14.6 ± 2.8 and 13.8±2.5, respectively). The AL.min-1 on half-court showed trivial-to-moderate differences with a likely increase of ~10-20% in 2v2 drill compared with any other formats. This study provides insight into the specific requirements of a range of exercises typically performed in basketball sessions. The use of accelerometer data is presented as a useful tool in assessing the workload. Key points Full-court 3v3 and 5v5 showed the highest external workload. The smaller the player, the higher the raw acceleration load. Systematic monitoring during training and competition would likely improve training prescription and periodization. PMID:27928203

  19. On the influence of strain rate sensitivity on wear in the Archard regime

    SciTech Connect

    Brechet, Y. . Lab. de Thermodynamique et Physico-Chimie Metallurgique); Estrin, Y. . Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    Relating wear characteristics of a metallic material to its mechanical properties (yield strength, strain hardening coefficient) and its microstructural features (size and volume fraction of inclusions) is a long-standing problem. The diversity of mechanisms which are involved during wear processes makes it practically impossible to have a general theory which would encompass all thinkable situations corresponding to various loads and various regimes of sliding. Different regimes and the conditions for their occurrence have been systematized in wear mechanism maps. In this communication the authors are going to restrict their consideration to plasticity dominated wear which is expected to occur in the low velocity range where surface heating is negligible. In this regime, the prevalent wear mechanism is the removal of slivers of metal by plastic failure due to shearing of contact asperities. The classic works by Rabinowicz have demonstrated clearly that solid friction is a rate dependent problem and that the velocity dependence of dynamic solid friction is nothing else than a consequence of the increase of static solid friction with time during which normal load was applied prior to the commencement of sliding. Creep under normal compression stress leads to flattening of the junctions causing their strength to increase with time. Like solid friction, wear appears to be a rate dependent phenomenon, and the strain rate sensitivity of the flow stress can be expected to be relevant for wear resistance. The strain rate sensitivity is known to play an important role in other damage related properties, such as ductility and fracture toughness. The authors felt that it would be of interest to evaluate the effect of strain rate sensitivity on the wear rate as part of an attempt to relate the wear properties to a bulk constitutive equation, and as a guideline for assessing the influence of alloying elements known to affect the strain rate sensitivity.

  20. Quantifying slope and grain size dependent transport thresholds using RFID and accelerometer tracers with on-bed RFID antennas in an upland channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olinde, L.; Johnson, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Integrating accelerometer and radio frequency identification (RFID) embedded tracers with in-stream RFID antennas can provide unique field-based relations for grain size and slope dependent thresholds of motion. We recorded bedload activity at a reach and across individual particles paths during a weeks-spanning snowmelt period in Reynolds Creek, Idaho. Deployed accelerometer tracers logged unique clast mobility, while stationary antennas captured the times when RFID and accelerometer tracers passed through a given reach. We analyze the temporal motion dataset from the stationary antennas along with the reach's shear stress conditions over the season. The antenna records quantify a grain-size dependent lower envelope for the threshold of motion that is fit with a hiding function. The accelerometer tracers were transported downstream as little as 10 m to more than 2 km, and were deposited in reaches with slopes ranging from 0.5 to 7 percent. The integration of the antenna-based hiding function along with flow modeling, grain size distributions and the accelerometer tracers' mobility data constrain the dependence of critical shear stress on reach slope. Both the grain-size and slope dependent threshold results gleaned from these novel field methods are then utilized to evaluate how transport capacities fluctuate along the channel during a snowmelt flood. The hiding function results from the stationary antennas also demonstrate promising potential for bedload monitoring programs to include continuous threshold data by deploying multiple antenna stations across watershed scales. This multi-antenna watershed application could provide spatiotemporal comparisons of transport thresholds between reaches of interest. Such an effort could also be used to quantify changes in transport thresholds due to natural perturbations or restoration/management modifications within a watershed.

  1. Wear characteristics of UHMW polyethylene: a method for accurately measuring extremely low wear rates.

    PubMed

    McKellop, H; Clarke, I C; Markolf, K L; Amstutz, H C

    1978-11-01

    The wear of UHMW polyethylene bearing against 316 stainless steel or cobalt chrome alloy was measured using a 12-channel wear tester especially developed for the evaluation of candidate materials for prosthetic joints. The coefficient of friction and wear rate was determined as a function of lubricant, contact stress, and metallic surface roughness in tests lasting two to three million cycles, the equivalent of several years' use of a prosthesis. Wear was determined from the weight loss of the polyethylene specimens corrected for the effect of fluid absorption. The friction and wear processes in blood serum differed markedly from those in saline solution or distilled water. Only serum lubrication produced wear surfaces resembling those observed on removed prostheses. The experimental method provided a very accurate reproducible measurement of polyethylene wear. The long-term wear rates were proportional to load and sliding distance and were much lower than expected from previously published data. Although the polyethylene wear rate increased with increasing surface roughness, wear was not severe except with very coarse metal surfaces. The data obtained in these studies forms a basis for the subsequent comparative evaluation of potentially superior materials for prosthetic joints.

  2. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

    1991-10-01

    Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

  3. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

    1991-10-01

    Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

  4. Wear of PEEK-OPTIMA® and PEEK-OPTIMA®-Wear Performance articulating against highly cross-linked polyethylene.

    PubMed

    East, Rebecca H; Briscoe, Adam; Unsworth, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    The idea of all polymer artificial joints, particularly for the knee and finger, has been raised several times in the past 20 years. This is partly because of weight but also to reduce stress shielding in the bone when stiffer materials such as metals or ceramics are used. With this in mind, pin-on-plate studies of various polyetheretherketone preparations against highly cross-linked polyethylene were conducted to investigate the possibility of using such a combination in the design of a new generation of artificial joints. PEEK-OPTIMA(®) (no fibre) against highly cross-linked polyethylene gave very low wear factors of 0.0384 × 10(-6) mm(3)/N m for the polyetheretherketone pins and -0.025 × 10(-6) mm(3)/N m for the highly cross-linked polyethylene plates. The carbon-fibre-reinforced polyetheretherketone (PEEK-OPTIMA(®)-Wear Performance) also produced very low wear rates in the polyetheretherketone pins but produced very high wear in the highly cross-linked polyethylene, as might have been predicted since the carbon fibres are quite abrasive. When the fibres were predominantly tangential to the sliding plane, the mean wear factor was 0.052 × 10(-6) mm(3)/N m for the pins and 49.3 × 10(-6) mm(3)/N m for the highly cross-linked polyethylene plates; a half of that when the fibres ran axially in the pins (0.138 × 10(-6) mm(3)/N m for the pins and 97.5 × 10(-6) mm/ N m for the cross-linked polyethylene plates). PEEK-OPTIMA(®) against highly cross-linked polyethylene merits further investigation.

  5. Effect of mouthrinses on microhardness and wear of composite and compomer restoratives.

    PubMed

    Yap, Adrian U J; Tan, Bernard W Y; Tay, L C; Chang, K M; Loy, T K; Mok, Betty Y Y

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of commercially available mouthrinses on the microhardness and wear of composite (Esthet-X, Dentsply) and compomer (Dyract Posterior, Dentsply) restoratives. Fifty-four hardness and 36 wear specimens of each material were fabricated and stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for two weeks. The specimens were then randomly divided into six equal groups and exposed to the following solutions for 24 hours at 37 degrees C: distilled water [WC] (control); Listerine Original [AP] (alcohol-containing essential oil/phenolic compound mouthrinse); Colgate Chloropharm [AC] (alcohol-containing chlorhexidine mouthrinse); Oral B Tooth & Gum Care [AF] (alcohol-containing fluoride mouthrinse); Oral B Tooth & Gum Care Alcohol Free [OF] (alcohol free fluoride mouthrinse) and Oral B Sensitive [PF] (phosphoric acid containing fluoride mouthrinse). After conditioning, the specimens were subjected to hardness testing using a digital microhardness tester (load = 500 gf; dwell time = 15 seconds) and wear testing with a reciprocal compression-sliding system (contact stress = 20 MPa). Wear depth was measured every 1,000 cycles up to 10,000 cycles using profilometry. Data was analyzed using ANOVA/Scheffe's test at significance level 0.05. Dyract was significantly softened by AP, while Esthet-X was significantly softened by AC and AP. The wear resistance of Dyract was significantly reduced after exposure to PF, while the wear resistance of Esthet-X was significantly reduced by AC. The effect of mouthrinses on hardness and wear was material dependent.

  6. Finite element analysis of stress and wear characterization in total ankle replacements.

    PubMed

    Jay Elliot, Bradley; Gundapaneni, Dinesh; Goswami, Tarun

    2014-06-01

    Total Ankle Arthroplasty is performed in order to reduce the pain and loss of ambulation in patients with various forms of arthritis and trauma. Although replacement devices fail by a number of mechanisms, wear in the polyethylene liner constitutes one of the dominating failure modes. This leads to instability and loosening of the implant. Mechanisms that contribute to wear in the liners are high contact and subsurface stresses that break down the material over time. Therefore, it is important to understand the gait that generates these stresses. Methods to characterize and decrease wear in Ohio Total Ankle Replacements (TARs) have been performed in this research. This research utilizes finite element analysis of Wright State University (WSU) patented TAR models. From the Finite element analysis (FEA) results, mathematical models of contact conditions and wear mechanics were developed. The maximum wear rate values obtained in the study (at 25.598MPa, 3.74mm(3)/year) and maximum surface Mises stress obtained with new optimization model (11.52MPa) seem to be comparable with the maximum wear values obtained in other similar studies. These models were used to determine the best methods for wear characterization and reduction. Furthermore, optimization models were developed based on geometry of the implants. These equations optimize geometry, thus congruency and anatomical simulations for total ankle implants.

  7. Accelerometer-Determined Physical Activity and Its Comparison with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire in a Sample of Nigerian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Oyeyemi, Adewale L.; Umar, Maimuna; Oguche, Friday; Aliyu, Salamatu U.; Oyeyemi, Adetoyeje Y.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Accurate assessment of physical activity to identify current levels and changes within the population is dependent on the precision of the measurement tools. The aim of this study was to compare components of physical activity measured with an adapted version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (Hausa IPAQ-SF) and the accelerometer in a sample of Nigeria adults. Methods One hundred and forty-four participants (Mean age = 32.6±9.9 years, 40.3% women) in a cross-sectional study wore an accelerometer for seven consecutive days and completed the Hausa IPAQ-SF questionnaire on the eighth day. Total physical activity, time spent in moderate-to-vigorous activity (MVPA) and sedentary time assessed by Hausa IPAQ-SF and accelerometer were compared. The absolute and criterion- related validity of the Hausa IPAQ-SF was assessed by Bland-Altman analysis and Spearman Correlation Coefficients, respectively. Specificity and sensitivity were calculated to classify individuals according to the global standard guideline for sufficient physical activity. Results Compared with the accelerometer, higher time in MVPA and total physical activity were reported on the Hausa IPAQ-SF (p<0.001), while low to moderate correlations (Rs = 0.03–0.38) were found between the two methods. The 95% limits of agreement were wide between methods for total physical activity (−23019 to 20375 METmin.d−1) and sedentary time (−510 to 150 min.d−1). The sensitivity (76.2%) of Hausa IPAQ-SF to identify insufficiently active people was good, but its specificity (33.3%) to correctly classify sufficiently active people was low. Conclusions The Hausa IPAQ-SF overestimated components of physical activity among Nigerian adults, and demonstrated poor to moderate evidence of absolute and criterion validity. Further evaluation of IPAQ and other self-report physical activity instruments in other Africa populations could enhance accurate evaluation of physical activity data

  8. Quasi-Static Calibration Method of a High-g Accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Fan, Jinbiao; Zu, Jing; Xu, Peng

    2017-02-20

    To solve the problem of resonance during quasi-static calibration of high-g accelerometers, we deduce the relationship between the minimum excitation pulse width and the resonant frequency of the calibrated accelerometer according to the second-order mathematical model of the accelerometer, and improve the quasi-static calibration theory. We establish a quasi-static calibration testing system, which uses a gas gun to generate high-g acceleration signals, and apply a laser interferometer to reproduce the impact acceleration. These signals are used to drive the calibrated accelerometer. By comparing the excitation acceleration signal and the output responses of the calibrated accelerometer to the excitation signals, the impact sensitivity of the calibrated accelerometer is obtained. As indicated by the calibration test results, this calibration system produces excitation acceleration signals with a pulse width of less than 1000 μs, and realize the quasi-static calibration of high-g accelerometers with a resonant frequency above 20 kHz when the calibration error was 3%.

  9. A brief test of the Hewlett-Packard MEMS seismic accelerometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Homeijer, Brian D.; Milligan, Donald J.; Hutt, Charles R.

    2014-01-01

    Testing was performed on a prototype of Hewlett-Packard (HP) Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) seismic accelerometer at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory. This prototype was built using discrete electronic components. The self-noise level was measured during low seismic background conditions and found to be 9.8 ng/√Hz at periods below 0.2 s (frequencies above 5 Hz). The six-second microseism noise was also discernible. The HP MEMS accelerometer was compared to a Geotech Model GS-13 reference seismometer during seismic noise and signal levels well above the self-noise of the accelerometer. Matching power spectral densities (corrected for accelerometer and seismometer responses to represent true ground motion) indicated that the HP MEMS accelerometer has a flat (constant) response to acceleration from 0.0125 Hz to at least 62.5 Hz. Tilt calibrations of the HP MEMS accelerometer verified that the flat response to acceleration extends to 0 Hz. Future development of the HP MEMS accelerometer includes replacing the discreet electronic boards with a low power application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and increasing the dynamic range of the sensor to detect strong motion signals above one gravitational acceleration, while maintaining the self-noise observed during these tests.

  10. Quasi-Static Calibration Method of a High-g Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Fan, Jinbiao; Zu, Jing; Xu, Peng

    2017-01-01

    To solve the problem of resonance during quasi-static calibration of high-g accelerometers, we deduce the relationship between the minimum excitation pulse width and the resonant frequency of the calibrated accelerometer according to the second-order mathematical model of the accelerometer, and improve the quasi-static calibration theory. We establish a quasi-static calibration testing system, which uses a gas gun to generate high-g acceleration signals, and apply a laser interferometer to reproduce the impact acceleration. These signals are used to drive the calibrated accelerometer. By comparing the excitation acceleration signal and the output responses of the calibrated accelerometer to the excitation signals, the impact sensitivity of the calibrated accelerometer is obtained. As indicated by the calibration test results, this calibration system produces excitation acceleration signals with a pulse width of less than 1000 μs, and realize the quasi-static calibration of high-g accelerometers with a resonant frequency above 20 kHz when the calibration error was 3%. PMID:28230743

  11. Evaluation of artificial neural network algorithms for predicting METs and activity type from accelerometer data: validation on an independent sample

    PubMed Central

    Lyden, Kate; Kozey-Keadle, Sarah; Staudenmayer, John

    2011-01-01

    Previous work from our laboratory provided a “proof of concept” for use of artificial neural networks (nnets) to estimate metabolic equivalents (METs) and identify activity type from accelerometer data (Staudenmayer J, Pober D, Crouter S, Bassett D, Freedson P, J Appl Physiol 107: 1330–1307, 2009). The purpose of this study was to develop new nnets based on a larger, more diverse, training data set and apply these nnet prediction models to an independent sample to evaluate the robustness and flexibility of this machine-learning modeling technique. The nnet training data set (University of Massachusetts) included 277 participants who each completed 11 activities. The independent validation sample (n = 65) (University of Tennessee) completed one of three activity routines. Criterion measures were 1) measured METs assessed using open-circuit indirect calorimetry; and 2) observed activity to identify activity type. The nnet input variables included five accelerometer count distribution features and the lag-1 autocorrelation. The bias and root mean square errors for the nnet MET trained on University of Massachusetts and applied to University of Tennessee were +0.32 and 1.90 METs, respectively. Seventy-seven percent of the activities were correctly classified as sedentary/light, moderate, or vigorous intensity. For activity type, household and locomotion activities were correctly classified by the nnet activity type 98.1 and 89.5% of the time, respectively, and sport was correctly classified 23.7% of the time. Use of this machine-learning technique operates reasonably well when applied to an independent sample. We propose the creation of an open-access activity dictionary, including accelerometer data from a broad array of activities, leading to further improvements in prediction accuracy for METs, activity intensity, and activity type. PMID:21885802

  12. Self Diagnostic Accelerometer for Mission Critical Health Monitoring of Aircraft and Spacecraft Engines