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Sample records for accelerometers sense vibration

  1. Vibration sensing in smart machine rotors using internal MEMS accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Samuel; Cole, Matthew O. T.; Keogh, Patrick S.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a novel topology for enhanced vibration sensing in which wireless MEMS accelerometers embedded within a hollow rotor measure vibration in a synchronously rotating frame of reference. Theoretical relations between rotor-embedded accelerometer signals and the vibration of the rotor in an inertial reference frame are derived. It is thereby shown that functionality as a virtual stator-mounted displacement transducer can be achieved through appropriate signal processing. Experimental tests on a prototype rotor confirm that both magnitude and phase information of synchronous vibration can be measured directly without additional stator-mounted key-phasor sensors. Displacement amplitudes calculated from accelerometer signals will become erroneous at low rotational speeds due to accelerometer zero-g offsets, hence a corrective procedure is introduced. Impact tests are also undertaken to examine the ability of the internal accelerometers to measure transient vibration. A further capability is demonstrated, whereby the accelerometer signals are used to measure rotational speed of the rotor by analysing the signal component due to gravity. The study highlights the extended functionality afforded by internal accelerometers and demonstrates the feasibility of internal sensor topologies, which can provide improved observability of rotor vibration at externally inaccessible rotor locations.

  2. Vibration Analysis and the Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Have you ever put your hand on an electric motor or motor-driven electric appliance and felt it vibrate? Ever wonder why it vibrates? What is there about the operation of the motor, or the object to which it is attached, that causes the vibrations? Is there anything "regular" about the vibrations, or are they the result of random causes? In this…

  3. Smart accelerometer. [vibration damage detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention discloses methods and apparatus for detecting vibrations from machines which indicate an impending malfunction for the purpose of preventing additional damage and allowing for an orderly shutdown or a change in mode of operation. The method and apparatus is especially suited for reliable operation in providing thruster control data concerning unstable vibration in an electrical environment which is typically noisy and in which unrecognized ground loops may exist.

  4. Modeling of the vibrating beam accelerometer nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowski, P. A.; Knop, R. C.

    Successful modeling and processing of the output of a quartz Vibrating Beam Accelerometer (VBA), whose errors are inherently nonlinear with respect to input acceleration, are reported. The VBA output, with two signals that are frequencies of vibrating quartz beams, has inherent higher-order terms. In order to avoid vibration rectification errors, the signal output must be sampled at a rapid rate and the output must be reduced using a nonlinear model. The present model, with acceleration as a function of frequency, is derived by a least-squares process where the covariance matrix is obtained from simulated data. The system performance is found to be acceptable to strategic levels, and it is shown that a vibration rectification error of 400 micrograms/sq g can be reduced to 4 micrograms/sq g by using the processor electronics and a nonlinear model.

  5. Placement of Accelerometers for High Sensing Resolution in Micromanipulation

    PubMed Central

    Latt, W. T.; Tan, U-X.; Riviere, C. N.; Ang, W. T.

    2012-01-01

    High sensing resolution is required in sensing of surgical instrument motion in micromanipulation tasks. Accelerometers can be employed to sense physiological motion of the instrument during micromanipulation. Various configurations of accelerometer placement had been introduced in the past to sense motion of a rigid-body such as a surgical instrument. Placement (location and orientation) of accelerometers fixed in the instrument plays a significant role in achieving high sensing resolution. However, there is no literature or work on the effect of placement of accelerometers on sensing resolution. In this paper, an approach of placement of accelerometers within an available space to obtain highest possible sensing resolution in sensing of rigid-body motion in micromanipulation tasks is proposed. Superiority of the proposed placement approach is shown in sensing of a microsurgical instrument angular motion by comparing sensing resolutions achieved as a result of employing the configuration following the proposed approach and the existing configurations. Apart from achieving high sensing resolution, and design simplicity, the proposed placement approach also provides flexibility in placing accelerometers; hence it is especially useful in applications with limited available space to mount accelerometers. PMID:22423176

  6. An overview of the evolution of vibrating beam accelerometer technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norling, B. L.

    The history of vibrating beam accelerometers (VBA) is briefly outlined, and the current status of VBA technology is reviewed. In particular, attention is given to the VBA design fundamentals and the performance characteristics of several state-of-the-art VBA models. Finally, prospects for the future development of VBAs and the effect of VBA technology on the inertial navigation industry are discussed.

  7. ACCELEROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-11-25

    A device, commonly known as an accelerometer, is described which may be utllized for measuring acceleratlon with high sensitivity and accuracy tbroughout a relatively wlde range of values. In general, the accelerometer consists of an assembly, including an electric motor stator and a mass element located away from the axis of rotation of the stator, rotatably mounted on a support, and an electric motor rotor positioned within the stator and rotatable thereln. An electrlcal switching circuit controlled by the movement of the stator lntermittently energizes the rotor winding and retards move ment of the stator, and a centrifugal switch is rotatable with the rotor to operate upon attainment of a predetermined rotor rotational velocity.

  8. Development of a quartz digital accelerometer for environmental sensing and navigation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, W.J.; Vianco, P.T.

    1993-03-01

    A quartz digital accelerometer has been developed which uses double ended tuning forks as the active sensing elements. The authors have demonstrated the ability of this accelerometer to be capable of acceleration measurements between {+-}150G with {+-}0.5G accuracy. They have further refined the original design and assembly processes to produce accelerometers with < 1mG stability in inertial measurement applications. This report covers the development, design, processing, assembly, and testing of these devices.

  9. Comparison between accelerometer and laser vibrometer to measure traffic-excited vibrations on bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioffre, M.; Gusella, V.; Marsili, Roberto; Rossi, Gianluca L.

    2000-05-01

    The use of accelerometer based measurement techniques for evaluating bridge forced vibrations or to perform bridge modal analysis is well established. Some of the goals of this experimental approach and typical results are here reviewed. It is well known to all researchers who have experience in vibration measurements that values of acceleration amplitude can be very low at low frequencies and that a limitation to the use of accelerometer can be due to the threshold parameter of this kind of transducer. Under this condition the measurement of displacement seems more appropriate. On the other hand laser vibrometer systems detect relative displacements as opposed to the absolute measures of accelerometers. In this paper the results of some in field measurements on a highway little bridge, excited by traffic, under normal operating conditions, are analyzed. Vibrations have been measured simultaneously by a typical accelerometer for civil structures and by a laser vibrometer equipped with a fringe counter board in terms of velocity and displacements. The accelerations calculated from the laser vibrometer signals and the one directly measured by the accelerometer has been compared. The advantages of the use of a laser vibrometer at low frequency are relevant and it appears possible to open up new possibility to analyze bridge loads in operating conditions, monitoring bridge health state, predict fatigue life and improve the bridge design.

  10. The potential of micro-electro-mechanical accelerometers in human vibration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarabini, Marco; Saggin, Bortolino; Scaccabarozzi, Diego; Moschioni, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the advantages and the drawbacks deriving from the use of MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems) accelerometers for hand-arm and whole-body vibration measurements. Metrological performances of different transducers were assessed through the identification of their frequency response function, linearity, floor noise and sensitivity to thermal and electromagnetic disturbances. Experimental results highlighted a standard instrumental uncertainty (including the nonlinearity) lower than 5% with the single frequency calibration procedure, such a value was reduced to 2%. The temperature effect was negligible and the electromagnetic disturbances sensitivity was comparable to that of the piezoelectric accelerometers. The compatibility of measurements obtained with MEMS accelerometers with those of piezoelectric-based measurement chains was verified for two specific applications. An example of direct transducer fixation on the skin for vibration transmissibility measurements is also presented. Thanks to the MEMS peculiarities - mainly small sizes and low cost - since novel approaches in the vibration monitoring could be pursued. For instance, it is possible to include by design MEMS accelerometers in any hand-held tool at the operator interface, or inside the seats structures of cars, tractors and trucks. This could be a viable solution to easily obtain repeatable exposure measurements and could also provide diagnostic signals for the tools or seats of functional monitoring.

  11. Sensing and Control Electronics for Low-Mass Low-Capacitance MEMS Accelerometers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-05-01

    applications generally require sub µg/rtHz noise floor and less than 0.1% overall scale factor error in acceleration measurement. Micro accelerometers...Figure 1-2 shows a generic block diagram of the system under study. The first goal of this research is to design a low noise capacitive sensing...µg/ Transducer Sensing Circuit Control System Acceleration Digital Output Figure 1-2: Generic block diagram of accelerometer system studied in this

  12. Vibration transmissibility on rifle shooter: A comparison between accelerometer and laser Doppler vibrometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalise, L.; Casacanditella, L.; Santolini, C.; Martarelli, M.; Tomasini, E. P.

    2014-05-01

    The transmission of mechanical vibrations from tools to human subjects is known to be potentially dangerous for the circulatory and neurological systems. It is also known that such damages are strictly depending on the intensity and the frequency range of the vibrational signals transferred to the different anatomical districts. In this paper, very high impulsive signals, generated during a shooting by a rifle, will be studied, being such signals characterised by a very high acceleration amplitude as well as high frequency range. In this paper, it will be presented an experimental setup aimed to collect experimental data relative to the transmission of the vibration signals from the rifle to the shoulder of subject during the shooting action. In particular the transmissibility of acceleration signals, as well as of the velocity signals, between the rifle stock and the subject's back shoulder will be measured using two piezoelectric accelerometers and a single point laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). Tests have been carried out in a shooting lab where a professional shooter has conducted the experiments, using different experimental configurations: two different types of stocks and two kinds of bullets with different weights were considered. Two uniaxial accelerometers were fixed on the stock of the weapon and on the back of the shoulder of the shooter respectively. Vibration from the back shoulder was also measured by means of a LDV simultaneously. A comparison of the measured results will be presented and the pros and cons of the use of contact and non-contact transducers will be discussed taking into account the possible sources of the measurement uncertainty as unwanted sensor vibrations for the accelerometer.

  13. An integrated digital silicon micro-accelerometer with MOSFET-type sensing elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Youngjoo; Bu, Jong Uk; Chun, Kukjin; Lee, Joong-Won

    2000-09-01

    A fully digital integrated accelerometer having a new sensing element is designed and fabricated based on CMOS processes and micromachining. The sensing elements of this accelerometer are constructed on the bulk silicon proof mass with metal air-gap MOSFETs (MAMOS) whose drain current is dependent on the applied acceleration. A current-controlled oscillator converts the change of this drain current to a digital pulse train. A 20-bit synchronous binary counter is monolithically integrated to digitize the output pulse of the oscillator. A bulk micromachined silicon proof mass provides perfect electrical isolation of the MOSFET sensing elements from a peripheral CMOS readout circuit. The suspension springs of this accelerometer are formed from thick MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) polysilicon. A CMOS compatible doping and annealing process for the MEMS polysilicon is developed to optimize the trade-off between the mechanical properties and the electrical requirements. The shift in the overall device characteristics of CMOS circuitry integrated with MEMS polysilicon is well below 5% of those fabricated by a standard CMOS process. Using the slightly modified 1.5 µm CMOS circuit process followed by an anisotropic silicon etch, an integrated digital silicon accelerometer is fabricated. The measured sensitivity of the fabricated MAMOS accelerometer is 63 kHz G-1.

  14. Measurement Model and Precision Analysis of Accelerometers for Maglev Vibration Isolation Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qianqian; Yue, Honghao; Liu, Rongqiang; Zhang, Xiaoyou; Ding, Liang; Liang, Tian; Deng, Zongquan

    2015-01-01

    High precision measurement of acceleration levels is required to allow active control for vibration isolation platforms. It is necessary to propose an accelerometer configuration measurement model that yields such a high measuring precision. In this paper, an accelerometer configuration to improve measurement accuracy is proposed. The corresponding calculation formulas of the angular acceleration were derived through theoretical analysis. A method is presented to minimize angular acceleration noise based on analysis of the root mean square noise of the angular acceleration. Moreover, the influence of installation position errors and accelerometer orientation errors on the calculation precision of the angular acceleration is studied. Comparisons of the output differences between the proposed configuration and the previous planar triangle configuration under the same installation errors are conducted by simulation. The simulation results show that installation errors have a relatively small impact on the calculation accuracy of the proposed configuration. To further verify the high calculation precision of the proposed configuration, experiments are carried out for both the proposed configuration and the planar triangle configuration. On the basis of the results of simulations and experiments, it can be concluded that the proposed configuration has higher angular acceleration calculation precision and can be applied to different platforms. PMID:26287203

  15. Measurement Model and Precision Analysis of Accelerometers for Maglev Vibration Isolation Platforms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qianqian; Yue, Honghao; Liu, Rongqiang; Zhang, Xiaoyou; Ding, Liang; Liang, Tian; Deng, Zongquan

    2015-08-14

    High precision measurement of acceleration levels is required to allow active control for vibration isolation platforms. It is necessary to propose an accelerometer configuration measurement model that yields such a high measuring precision. In this paper, an accelerometer configuration to improve measurement accuracy is proposed. The corresponding calculation formulas of the angular acceleration were derived through theoretical analysis. A method is presented to minimize angular acceleration noise based on analysis of the root mean square noise of the angular acceleration. Moreover, the influence of installation position errors and accelerometer orientation errors on the calculation precision of the angular acceleration is studied. Comparisons of the output differences between the proposed configuration and the previous planar triangle configuration under the same installation errors are conducted by simulation. The simulation results show that installation errors have a relatively small impact on the calculation accuracy of the proposed configuration. To further verify the high calculation precision of the proposed configuration, experiments are carried out for both the proposed configuration and the planar triangle configuration. On the basis of the results of simulations and experiments, it can be concluded that the proposed configuration has higher angular acceleration calculation precision and can be applied to different platforms.

  16. Vibration sensing method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Barna, B.A.

    1989-04-25

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive evaluation of a structure are disclosed. Resonant audio frequency vibrations are excited in the structure to be evaluated and the vibrations are measured and characterized to obtain information about the structure. The vibrations are measured and characterized by reflecting a laser beam from the vibrating structure and directing a substantial portion of the reflected beam back into the laser device used to produce the beam which device is capable of producing an electric signal containing information about the vibration. 4 figs.

  17. Vibration sensing method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Barna, B.A.

    1987-07-07

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive evaluation of a structure is disclosed. Resonant audio frequency vibrations are excited in the structure to be evaluated and the vibrations are measured and characterized to obtain information about the structure. The vibrations are measured and characterized by reflecting a laser beam from the vibrating structure and directing a substantial portion of the reflected beam back into the laser device used to produce the beam which device is capable of producing an electric signal containing information about the vibration. 4 figs.

  18. Vibration sensing method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Barna, Basil A.

    1989-04-25

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive evaluation of a structure is disclosed. Resonant audio frequency vibrations are excited in the structure to be evaluated and the vibrations are measured and characterized to obtain information about the structure. The vibrations are measured and characterized by reflecting a laser beam from the vibrating structure and directing a substantial portion of the reflected beam back into the laser device used to produce the beam which device is capable of producing an electric signal containing information about the vibration.

  19. A Simple Accelerometer Calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, R. A.; Islamy, M. R. F.; Munir, M. M.; Latief, H.; Irsyam, M.; Khairurrijal

    2016-08-01

    High possibility of earthquake could lead to the high number of victims caused by it. It also can cause other hazards such as tsunami, landslide, etc. In that case it requires a system that can examine the earthquake occurrence. Some possible system to detect earthquake is by creating a vibration sensor system using accelerometer. However, the output of the system is usually put in the form of acceleration data. Therefore, a calibrator system for accelerometer to sense the vibration is needed. In this study, a simple accelerometer calibrator has been developed using 12 V DC motor, optocoupler, Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) and AVR 328 microcontroller as controller system. The system uses the Pulse Wave Modulation (PWM) form microcontroller to control the motor rotational speed as response to vibration frequency. The frequency of vibration was read by optocoupler and then those data was used as feedback to the system. The results show that the systems could control the rotational speed and the vibration frequencies in accordance with the defined PWM.

  20. High resolution space quartz-flexure accelerometer based on capacitive sensing and electrostatic control technology.

    PubMed

    Tian, W; Wu, S C; Zhou, Z B; Qu, S B; Bai, Y Z; Luo, J

    2012-09-01

    High precision accelerometer plays an important role in space scientific and technical applications. A quartz-flexure accelerometer operating in low frequency range, having a resolution of better than 1 ng/Hz(1/2), has been designed based on advanced capacitive sensing and electrostatic control technologies. A high precision capacitance displacement transducer with a resolution of better than 2 × 10(-6) pF/Hz(1/2) above 0.1 Hz, is used to measure the motion of the proof mass, and the mechanical stiffness of the spring oscillator is compensated by adjusting the voltage between the proof mass and the electrodes to induce a proper negative electrostatic stiffness, which increases the mechanical sensitivity and also suppresses the position measurement noise down to 3 × 10(-10) g/Hz(1/2) at 0.1 Hz. A high resolution analog-to-digital converter is used to directly readout the feedback voltage applied on the electrodes in order to suppress the action noise to 4 × 10(-10) g/Hz(1/2) at 0.1 Hz. A prototype of the quartz-flexure accelerometer has been developed and tested, and the preliminary experimental result shows that its resolution comes to about 8 ng/Hz(1/2) at 0.1 Hz, which is mainly limited by its mechanical thermal noise due to low quality factor.

  1. A Fiber Bragg Grating Sensing-Based Micro-Vibration Sensor and Its Application

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tianliang; Tan, Yuegang; Zhou, Zude

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a fiber Bragg grating sensing-based micro-vibration sensor. The optical fiber has been directly treated as an elastomer to design the micro-vibration sensor, which possesses two FBGs. The mass is fixed on the middle of the fiber, and the vertical vibration of the mass has been converted into the axial tension/compression of the fiber. The principle of the sensor has been introduced, and the experiment conclusions show that the sensor sensitivity is 2362 pm/g within the range of 200–1200 mm/s2, which is consistent with theoretical analysis sensitivity of 2532.6 pm/g, and it shows an excellent linearity of 1.376%, while the resonant frequency of the sensor is 34 Hz, and the flat frequency range resides in the 0–22 Hz range. When used to measure micro-vibrations, its measured frequency relative error is less than 1.69% compared with the values acquired with a MEMS accelerometer, and the amplitude values of its measured vibration signal are consistent with the MEMS accelerometer under different excitation conditions too, so it can effectively realize the micro-vibration measurements. PMID:27092507

  2. A Fiber Bragg Grating Sensing-Based Micro-Vibration Sensor and Its Application.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianliang; Tan, Yuegang; Zhou, Zude

    2016-04-15

    This paper proposes a fiber Bragg grating sensing-based micro-vibration sensor. The optical fiber has been directly treated as an elastomer to design the micro-vibration sensor, which possesses two FBGs. The mass is fixed on the middle of the fiber, and the vertical vibration of the mass has been converted into the axial tension/compression of the fiber. The principle of the sensor has been introduced, and the experiment conclusions show that the sensor sensitivity is 2362 pm/g within the range of 200-1200 mm/s², which is consistent with theoretical analysis sensitivity of 2532.6 pm/g, and it shows an excellent linearity of 1.376%, while the resonant frequency of the sensor is 34 Hz, and the flat frequency range resides in the 0-22 Hz range. When used to measure micro-vibrations, its measured frequency relative error is less than 1.69% compared with the values acquired with a MEMS accelerometer, and the amplitude values of its measured vibration signal are consistent with the MEMS accelerometer under different excitation conditions too, so it can effectively realize the micro-vibration measurements.

  3. Design and implementation of a novel sliding mode sensing architecture for capacitive MEMS accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarraf, E. H.; Cousins, B.; Cretu, E.; Mirabbasi, S.

    2011-11-01

    We propose novel feedback control and sensing schemes based on sliding mode control (SMC) for closed-loop micro-accelerometers as alternative digital control architectures to sigma-delta (ΣΔ) approaches. The under-damped micro-device has been designed in Coventorware, fabricated in SOIMUMPs (25 µm thick structural layer) technology and experimentally characterized using a Polytec MSA-500 (micro-system analyzer) equipment. To verify the system architecture robustness, the application of SMC is extended to an over-damped accelerometer model. In either case, the SMC demonstrates the repositioning of the proof mass to null position; however, the over-damped model exhibits shorter transition time (15 ms for 1g acceleration) due to the increased damping. In addition to that, we extend the usage of SMC beyond the classical actuation problem to a novel sensing problem where we demonstrate the extraction of the external acceleration measurement from the switching behavior along the sliding surface. An optimized fixed-point implementation is targeted on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) using rapid prototyping methodology, where the new proposed method has been compared for reference with a control scheme that employs a ΣΔ modulator. The SMC-based architecture is advantageous in terms of hardware complexity, and the control of the number of degrees of freedom required by an inertial measurement unit can be accommodated on a low-cost FPGA device. SMC offers a sound theoretical framework for the nonlinear control of inertial sensors.

  4. Occupant traffic estimation through structural vibration sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Shijia; Mirshekari, Mostafa; Zhang, Pei; Noh, Hae Young

    2016-04-01

    The number of people passing through different indoor areas is useful in various smart structure applications, including occupancy-based building energy/space management, marketing research, security, etc. Existing approaches to estimate occupant traffic include vision-, sound-, and radio-based (mobile) sensing methods, which have placement limitations (e.g., requirement of line-of-sight, quiet environment, carrying a device all the time). Such limitations make these direct sensing approaches difficult to deploy and maintain. An indirect approach using geophones to measure floor vibration induced by footsteps can be utilized. However, the main challenge lies in distinguishing multiple simultaneous walkers by developing features that can effectively represent the number of mixed signals and characterize the selected features under different traffic conditions. This paper presents a method to monitor multiple persons. Once the vibration signals are obtained, features are extracted to describe the overlapping vibration signals induced by multiple footsteps, which are used for occupancy traffic estimation. In particular, we focus on analysis of the efficiency and limitations of the four selected key features when used for estimating various traffic conditions. We characterize these features with signals collected from controlled impulse load tests as well as from multiple people walking through a real-world sensing area. In our experiments, the system achieves the mean estimation error of +/-0.2 people for different occupant traffic conditions (from one to four) using k-nearest neighbor classifier.

  5. Suitability of MEMS Accelerometers for Condition Monitoring: An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Albarbar, Alhussein; Mekid, Samir; Starr, Andrew; Pietruszkiewicz, Robert

    2008-01-01

    With increasing demands for wireless sensing nodes for assets control and condition monitoring; needs for alternatives to expensive conventional accelerometers in vibration measurements have been arisen. Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometer is one of the available options. The performances of three of the MEMS accelerometers from different manufacturers are investigated in this paper and compared to a well calibrated commercial accelerometer used as a reference for MEMS sensors performance evaluation. Tests were performed on a real CNC machine in a typical industrial environmental workshop and the achieved results are presented. PMID:27879734

  6. Suitability of MEMS Accelerometers for Condition Monitoring: An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Albarbar, Alhussein; Mekid, Samir; Starr, Andrew; Pietruszkiewicz, Robert

    2008-02-06

    With increasing demands for wireless sensing nodes for assets control and condition monitoring; needs for alternatives to expensive conventional accelerometers in vibration measurements have been arisen. Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometer is one of the available options. The performances of three of the MEMS accelerometers from different manufacturers are investigated in this paper and compared to a well calibrated commercial accelerometer used as a reference for MEMS sensors performance evaluation. Tests were performed on a real CNC machine in a typical industrial environmental workshop and the achieved results are presented.

  7. Self-sensing tunable vibration absorber incorporating piezoelectric ceramic-magnetostrictive composite sensoriactuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Yuan-Feng; Wing Or, Siu

    2011-08-01

    A novel self-sensing tunable vibration absorber (SSTVA) is developed for active absorption of vibrations in vibrating structures. The SSTVA consists of a piezoelectric ceramic-magnetostrictive composite sensoriactuator suspended in a mounting frame by two flexible beams connected to the axial ends of the sensoriactuator. The sensoriactuator serves to produce an axial force for tuning of the natural frequency of the SSTVA, to gather the signals associated with structural vibrations and to provide a lumped damped mass for the SSTVA. By monitoring the sensoriactuator output voltage while adjusting its input magnetic field (or electric current), the natural frequency of the SSTVA is tuned to the targeted resonance frequency of a structure. In this paper, the working principle, design prototype and operating performance of a 62.5 Hz SSTVA are reported. A high tunability of the natural frequency of 20% and a good sensing capability of vibrations comparable to a commercial accelerometer are obtained, together with a high absorbability of vibrations of ~ 4 dB in a steel-plate-neoprene resilient mount structure.

  8. Accelerometer design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, F H; Warner, Edward P

    1921-01-01

    In connection with the development of an accelerometer for measuring the loads on airplanes in free flight a study of the theory of such instruments has been made, and the results of this study are summarized in this report. A portion of the analysis deals particularly with the sources of error and with the limitations placed on the location of the instrument in the airplane. The discussion of the dynamics of the accelerometer includes a study of its theoretical motions and of the way in which they are affected by the natural period of vibration and by the damping, together with a report of some experiments on the effect of forced vibrations on the record.

  9. Accelerometer-based estimation and modal velocity feedback vibration control of a stress-ribbon bridge with pneumatic muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaohan; Schauer, Thomas; Goldack, Arndt; Bleicher, Achim; Schlaich, Mike

    2016-09-01

    Lightweight footbridges are very elegant but also prone to vibration. By employing active vibration control, smart footbridges could accomplish not only the architectural concept but also the required serviceability and comfort. Inertial sensors such as accelerometers allow the estimation of nodal velocities and displacements. A Kalman filter together with a band-limited multiple Fourier linear combiner (BMFLC) is applied to enable a drift-free estimation of these signals for the quasi-periodic motion under pedestrian excitation without extra information from other kinds of auxiliary sensors. The modal velocities of the structure are determined by using a second Kalman filter with the known applied actuator forces as inputs and the estimated nodal displacement and velocities as measurements. The obtained multi-modal velocities are then used for feedback control. An ultra-lightweight stress-ribbon footbridge built in the Peter-Behrens- Halle at the Technische Universitat Berlin served as the research object. Using two inertial sensors in optimal points we can estimate the dominant modal characteristics of this bridge. Real-time implementation and evaluation results of the proposed estimator will be presented in comparison to signals derived from classical displacement encoders. The real-time estimated modal velocities were applied in a multi-modal velocity feedback vibration control scheme with lightweight pneumatic muscle actuators. Experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of using inertial sensors for active vibration control of lightweight footbridges.

  10. Topographic analysis of the skull vibration-induced nystagmus test with piezoelectric accelerometers and force sensors.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Georges; Lion, Alexis; Perrin, Philippe; Ouedraogo, Evariste; Schmerber, Sébastien

    2016-03-23

    Vibration-induced nystagmus is elicited by skull or posterior cervical muscle stimulations in patients with vestibular diseases. Skull vibrations delivered by the skull vibration-induced nystagmus test are known to stimulate the inner ear structures directly. This study aimed to measure the vibration transfer at different cranium locations and posterior cervical regions to contribute toward stimulus topographic optimization (experiment 1) and to determine the force applied on the skull with a hand-held vibrator to study the test reproducibility and provide recommendations for good clinical practices (experiment 2). In experiment 1, a 100 Hz hand-held vibrator was applied on the skull (vertex, mastoids) and posterior cervical muscles in 11 healthy participants. Vibration transfer was measured by piezoelectric sensors. In experiment 2, the vibrator was applied 30 times by two experimenters with dominant and nondominant hands on a mannequin equipped to measure the force. Experiment 1 showed that after unilateral mastoid vibratory stimulation, the signal transfer was higher when recorded on the contralateral mastoid than on the vertex or posterior cervical muscles (P<0.001). No difference was observed between the different vibratory locations when vibration transfer was measured on vertex and posterior cervical muscles. Experiment 2 showed that the force applied to the mannequin varied according to the experimenters and the handedness, higher forces being observed with the most experienced experimenter and with the dominant hand (10.3 ± 1.0 and 7.8 ± 2.9 N, respectively). The variation ranged from 9.8 to 29.4% within the same experimenter. Bone transcranial vibration transfer is more efficient from one mastoid to the other mastoid than other anatomical sites. The mastoid is therefore the optimal site for skull vibration-induced nystagmus test in patients with unilateral vestibular lesions and enables a stronger stimulation of the healthy side. In clinical practice

  11. Noncontact vibration measurements using magnetoresistive sensing elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomassini, R.; Rossi, G.

    2016-06-01

    Contactless instrumentations is more and more used in turbomachinery testing thanks to the non-intrusive character and the possibility to monitor all the components of the machine at the same time. Performances of blade tip timing (BTT) measurement systems, used for noncontact turbine blade vibration measurements, in terms of uncertainty and resolution are strongly affected by sensor characteristics and processing methods. The sensors used for BTT generate pulses, used for precise measurements of turbine blades time of arrival. Nowadays proximity sensors used in this application are based on optical, capacitive, eddy current and microwave measuring principle. Pressure sensors has been also tried. This paper summarizes the results achieved using a novel instrumentation based on the magnetoresistive sensing elements. The characterization of the novel probe has been already published. The measurement system was validated in test benches and in a real jet-engine comparing different sensor technologies. The whole instrumentation was improved. The work presented in this paper focuses on the current developments. In particular, attention is given to the data processing software and new sensor configurations.

  12. Factors influencing vibration sense thresholds used to assess occupational exposures to hand transmitted vibration.

    PubMed Central

    Harada, N; Griffin, M J

    1991-01-01

    The effects of various conditions, including temporary threshold shifts (TTS) induced by exposure to vibration on vibration sense thresholds, have been investigated. The vibration sense thresholds of five subjects were measured on the middle fingertip of the left hand. A contactor with a diameter of 7 mm was surrounded by three alternative plates with holes of different sizes. The contact force was controlled at either 1 N, 2 N, or 3 N. For the TTS test, the left hand was exposed to vibration at 20 ms-2 rms for five minutes. The frequencies of both the exposure to vibration and the vibration threshold test were in the range 16 Hz to 500 Hz. Using a surround around the contactor greatly reduced the vibration sense threshold at 16 Hz and 31.5 Hz but increased the threshold at 125 Hz, 250 Hz, and 500 Hz. An effect of contact force was seen only at the higher frequencies; larger contact forces led to lower thresholds at 125 Hz, 250 Hz, and 500 Hz. As temperature of the finger skin decreased, the vibration thresholds increased, with the changes at higher frequencies greater than those at lower frequencies. The TTS at 16 Hz and 31.5 Hz measured 0.5 minutes after exposure to vibration (TTS0.5) were highest after exposures to vibration at lower frequencies. The TTS0.5 at 63 Hz was similar after exposure to all frequencies. The TTS0.5 values at 125 Hz, 250 Hz, and 500 Hz were highest after exposures to vibration at 125 Hz and 250 Hz. It was apparent that the physiological characteristics of vibration sensation at low and high frequencies differed significantly. These findings suggest that two representative frequencies can be used when evaluation the neurological effects of occupational exposures to vibration by means of vibration sense thresholds. PMID:2015210

  13. A novel differential optical fiber accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Shaohua; Zhao, Jiang; Hong, Guangwei; Jia, Bo

    2013-08-01

    The development of sensitive fiber-optic accelerometers is a subject of continuing interest. To acquire high resolution, Michelson phase interferometric techniques are widely adopted. Among the variety structures, the compliant cylinder approach is particularly attractive due to its high sensitivity that is defined as the induced phase shift per applied acceleration. While the two arms of Michelson interferometer should be at the same optical path, it is inconvenient to adjust the two arms' length to equal, also the polarization instability and phase random drift will cause a signal decline. To overcome these limitations, a novel optical fiber accelerometer based on differential interferometric techniques is proposed and investigated. The interferometer is a Sagnac-like white light interferometer, which means the bandwidth of laser spectrum can be as wide as tens nanometers. This interferometer was firstly reported by Levin in 1990s. Lights are divided to two paths before entering the coupler. To induce time difference, one passes through a delay arm and another goes a direct arm. After modulated by the sensing component, they reflect to opposite arm. The sensing part is formed by a seismic mass that is held to only one compliant cylinder, where the single-mode optical fiber is wrapped tightly. When sticking to vibrations, the cylinder compresses or stretches as a spring. The corresponding changes in cylinder circumference lead to strain in the sensing fibers, which is detected as an optical phase shift by the interferometer. The lights from two arms reach the vibration source at different time, sensing a different accelerate speed; produce a different optic path difference. Integrating the dissimilarity of the accelerated speed by time can obtain the total acceleration graph. A shaker's vibration has been tested by the proposed accelerometer referring to a standard piezoelectric accelerometer. A 99.8% linearity of the optical phase shift to the ground acceleration

  14. Statistical-mode sensor for fiber optic vibration sensing uses.

    PubMed

    Spillman, W B; Kline, B R; Maurice, L B; Fuhr, P L

    1989-08-01

    A method of sensing vibration using the detection of changes in the spatial distribution of energy in the output of a multimode optical fiber has been demonstrated. Two implementations of the sensor have been built and tested. The first implementation involved simple optical processing of the output fiber speckle pattern using spatial filtering. The second implementation involved projecting the pattern on a CCD array and digitally processing observed changes in the intensity distribution. A mathematical model has been developed which has shown good agreement with observed sensor behavior. The sensor technique has been used to detect induced structural vibration in laboratory test specimens. Simple field testing has also demonstrated the ability of the technique to detect personnel and vehicles passing over a buried and electrically undetectable sensing cable. The sensing technique is compatible with off-the-shelf components and fiber cable and even allows for simultaneous telecommunication and sensing using the same optical fiber cable. Near term application of this technology could provide significant benefits for vibration sensing, intrusion detection, and acoustic sensing.

  15. Design and fabrication of wireless remotely readable MEMS accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Subramanian, Hareesh; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    1997-11-01

    The integration of MEMS, SAW devices and required microelectronics and conformal antenna to realize a programmable wireless accelerometer is presented in this paper. This unique combination of technologies results in a novel accelerometer that can be remotely sensed by a microwave system with the advantage of no power requirements at the sensor site. The microaccelerometer presented is simple in construction and easy to manufacture with existing silicon micromachining techniques. The relatively small size of the sensor makes it an ideal conformal sensor. The accelerometer finds application as air bag deployment sensors, vibration sensors for noise control, deflection and strain sensors, inertial and dimensional positioning systems, ABS/traction control, smart suspension, active roll stabilization and four wheel steering. The wireless accelerometer is very attractive to study the response of a 'dummy' in automobile crash test.

  16. A Biological Model for Directional Sensing of Seismic Vibration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    provides an approach to directional vibration sensing over very small spatial scales . The treehopper Umbonia crassicornis communicates using...smaller scales . Mechanisms of vibration localization in small species, which experience microsecond time delays and minuscule amplitude differences...2500 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Frequency in Hertz Pr op ag at io n Ve lo ci ty (m /s ) 0.0 0.5 1.0 0.5 1.0 -1 0 1 1.0 0.5 0.0 B. Measured motion of

  17. Directional vibration sensing in the termite Macrotermes natalensis.

    PubMed

    Hager, Felix A; Kirchner, Wolfgang H

    2014-07-15

    Although several behavioural studies demonstrate the ability of insects to localise the source of vibrations, it is still unclear how insects are able to perceive directional information from vibratory signals on solid substrates, because time-of-arrival and amplitude difference between receptory structures are thought to be too small to be processed by insect nervous systems. The termite Macrotermes natalensis communicates using vibrational drumming signals transmitted along subterranean galleries. When soldiers are attacked by predators, they tend to drum with their heads against the substrate and create a pulsed vibration. Workers respond by a fast retreat into the nest. Soldiers in the vicinity start to drum themselves, leading to an amplification and propagation of the signal. Here we show that M. natalensis makes use of a directional vibration sensing in the context of colony defence. In the field, soldiers are recruited towards the source of the signal. In arena experiments on natural nest material, soldiers are able to localise the source of vibration. Using two movable platforms allowing us to vibrate the legs of the left and right sides of the body with a time delay, we show that the difference in time-of-arrival is the directional cue used for orientation. Delays as short as 0.2 ms are sufficient to be detected. Soldiers show a significant positive tropotaxis to the platform stimulated earlier, demonstrating for the first time perception of time-of-arrival delays and vibrotropotaxis on solid substrates in insects.

  18. Non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device

    DOEpatents

    Kalibjian, R.

    1994-08-09

    A non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device including a photorefractive crystal and a laser is disclosed. The laser produces a coherent light beam which is split by a beam splitter into a first laser beam and a second laser beam. After passing through the crystal the first laser beam is counter-propagated back upon itself by a retro-mirror, creating a third laser beam. The laser beams are modulated, due to the mixing effect within the crystal by vibration of the crystal. In the third laser beam, modulation is stable and such modulation is converted by a photodetector into a usable electrical output, intensity modulated in accordance with vibration applied to the crystal. 3 figs.

  19. Non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device

    DOEpatents

    Kalibjian, Ralph

    1994-01-11

    A non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device (10) including a photorefractive crystal (26) and a laser (12). The laser (12 ) produces a coherent light beam (14) which is split by a beam splitter (18) into a first laser beam (20) and a second laser beam (22). After passing through the crystal (26) the first laser beam (20) is counter-propagated back upon itself by a retro-mirror (32), creating a third laser beam (30). The laser beams (20, 22, 30) are modulated, due to the mixing effect within the crystal (26) by vibration of the crystal (30). In the third laser beam (30), modulation is stable and such modulation is converted by a photodetector (34) into a usable electrical output, intensity modulated in accordance with vibration applied to the crystal (26).

  20. Vibration-based monitoring and diagnostics using compressive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Vaahini; Das, Tuhin; Rahnavard, Nazanin; Kauffman, Jeffrey L.

    2017-04-01

    Vibration data from mechanical systems carry important information that is useful for characterization and diagnosis. Standard approaches rely on continually streaming data at a fixed sampling frequency. For applications involving continuous monitoring, such as Structural Health Monitoring (SHM), such approaches result in high volume data and rely on sensors being powered for prolonged durations. Furthermore, for spatial resolution, structures are instrumented with a large array of sensors. This paper shows that both volume of data and number of sensors can be reduced significantly by applying Compressive Sensing (CS) in vibration monitoring applications. The reduction is achieved by using random sampling and capitalizing on the sparsity of vibration signals in the frequency domain. Preliminary experimental results validating CS-based frequency recovery are also provided. By exploiting the sparsity of mode shapes, CS can also enable efficient spatial reconstruction using fewer spatially distributed sensors. CS can thereby reduce the cost and power requirement of sensing as well as streamline data storage and processing in monitoring applications. In well-instrumented structures, CS can enable continued monitoring in case of sensor or computational failures.

  1. Display-And-Alarm Circuit For Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Compact accelerometer assembly consists of commercial accelerometer retrofit with display-and-alarm circuit. Provides simple means for technician attending machine to monitor vibrations. Also simpifies automatic safety shutdown by providing local alarm or shutdown signal when vibration exceeds preset level.

  2. Molecular vibration-sensing component in Drosophila melanogaster olfaction

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Maria Isabel; Turin, Luca; Mershin, Andreas; Skoulakis, Efthimios M. C.

    2011-01-01

    A common explanation of molecular recognition by the olfactory system posits that receptors recognize the structure or shape of the odorant molecule. We performed a rigorous test of shape recognition by replacing hydrogen with deuterium in odorants and asking whether Drosophila melanogaster can distinguish these identically shaped isotopes. We report that flies not only differentiate between isotopic odorants, but can be conditioned to selectively avoid the common or the deuterated isotope. Furthermore, flies trained to discriminate against the normal or deuterated isotopes of a compound, selectively avoid the corresponding isotope of a different odorant. Finally, flies trained to avoid a deuterated compound exhibit selective aversion to an unrelated molecule with a vibrational mode in the energy range of the carbon–deuterium stretch. These findings are inconsistent with a shape-only model for smell, and instead support the existence of a molecular vibration-sensing component to olfactory reception. PMID:21321219

  3. Accelerometer having integral fault null

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An improved accelerometer is introduced. It comprises a transducer responsive to vibration in machinery which produces an electrical signal related to the magnitude and frequency of the vibration; and a decoding circuit responsive to the transducer signal which produces a first fault signal to produce a second fault signal in which ground shift effects are nullified.

  4. On the sensing and tuning of progressive structural vibration waves.

    PubMed

    Minikes, Adi; Gabay, Ran; Bucher, Izhak; Feldman, Michael

    2005-09-01

    Progressive flexural waves can be generated only in finite structures by fine tuning the excitation and the boundary conditions. The tuning process eliminates the reflected waves arising from discontinuities and edge effects. This work presents and expands two new methods for the identification and tuning of traveling waves. One is a parametric method based on fitting an ellipse to the complex spatial amplitude distribution. The other is a nonparametric method based on the Hilbert transform providing a space-localized estimate. With these methods, an optimization-based tuning of transverse flexural waves in a one-dimensional structure, a vibrating beam, is developed. Existing methods are designed for a single frequency and are based on either combining two vibration modes or mechanical impedance matching. Such methods are limited to a designated excitation frequency determined by a specific configuration of the system. With the proposed methods, structural progressive waves can be generated for a wide range of frequencies under the same given system configuration and can be tuned in real time to accommodate changes in boundary conditions. An analytical study on the nature of the optimal excitation conditions has been carried out, revealing singular configurations. The experimental verification of the sensing and tuning methods is demonstrated on a dedicated laboratory prototype. The proposed methods are not confined to mechanical waves and present a comprehensive approach applicable for other physical wave phenomena.

  5. Micromachined high-g accelerometers: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, V.; Li, H.; Jianmin, M.

    2015-03-01

    This Topical Review reviews research and commercial development of high-g micromachined accelerometers. Emphasis is placed on different high-g sensing schemes and popular design templates used to achieve high-g sensing. Additionally, trends in high-g micromachined accelerometer development both in research and in the market are discussed.

  6. A piezoresistive micro-accelerometer with high frequency response and low transverse effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Zhao, Yulong; Tian, Bian; Liu, Yan; Wang, Zixi; Li, Cun; Zhao, You

    2017-01-01

    With the purpose of measuring vibration signals in high-speed machinery, this paper developed a piezoresistive micro-accelerometer with multi-beam structure by combining four tiny sensing beams with four suspension beams. The eight-beam (EB) structure was designed to improve the trade-off between the sensitivity and the natural frequency of piezoresistive accelerometer. Besides, the piezoresistor configuration in the sensing beams reduces the cross interference from the undesirable direction significantly. The natural frequency of the structure and the stress on the sensing beams are theoretically calculated, and then verified through finite element method (FEM). The proposed sensor is fabricated on the n-type single crystal silicon wafer and packaged for experiment. The results demonstrate that the developed device possesses a suitable characteristic in sensitivity, natural frequency and transverse effect, which allows its usage in the measuring high frequency vibration signals.

  7. Transducer senses displacements of panels subjected to vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pea, R. O.

    1965-01-01

    Inductive vibration sensor measures the surface displacement of nonferrous metal panels subjected to vibration or flutter. This transducer does not make any physical contact with the test panel when measuring.

  8. Three-axis MEMS Accelerometer for Structural Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbin, E.; Koleda, A.; Nesterenko, T.; Vtorushin, S.

    2016-01-01

    Microelectromechanical system accelerometers are widely used for metrological measurements of acceleration, tilt, vibration, and shock in moving objects. The paper presents the analysis of MEMS accelerometer that can be used for the structural inspection. ANSYS Multiphysics platform is used to simulate the behavior of MEMS accelerometer by employing a finite element model and MATLAB/Simulink tools for modeling nonlinear dynamic systems.

  9. Effects of vibration measurement error on remote sensing image restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xuan; Wei, Zhang; Zhi, Xiyang

    2016-10-01

    Satellite vibrations would lead to image motion blur. Since the vibration isolators cannot fully suppress the influence of vibrations, image restoration methods are usually adopted, and the vibration characteristics of imaging system are usually required as algorithm inputs for better restoration results, making the vibration measurement error strongly connected to the final outcome. If the measurement error surpass a certain range, the restoration may not be implemented successfully. Therefore it is important to test the applicable scope of restoration algorithms and control the vibrations within the range, on the other hand, if the algorithm is robust, then the requirements for both vibration isolator and vibration detector can be lowered and thus less financial cost is needed. In this paper, vibration-induced degradation is first analyzed, based on which the effects of measurement error on image restoration are further analyzed. The vibration-induced degradation is simulated using high resolution satellite images and then the applicable working condition of typical restoration algorithms are tested with simulation experiments accordingly. The research carried out in this paper provides a valuable reference for future satellite design which plan to implement restoration algorithms.

  10. Self-powered semi-passive vibration damping system based on self-sensing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hui; Zhang, Fengsheng; Ji, Hongli; Qiu, Jinhao; Bian, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, semi-passive vibration damping using Synchronized Switching Damping on Inductor (SSDI) technique has been intensively investigated. In this paper, a self-powered semi-passive vibration damping system based on self sensing approach is proposed and investigated. With the self-sensing technique, the same piezoelectric element can be used as a sensor and an actuator. Compared with the other self-powered SSDI approaches, this technique can not only detect switching time without lag, but also reduce the number of piezoelectric elements. Furthermore, a low-power circuit for semi-passive piezoelectric vibration control based on self-sensing technique is designed. Experimental results demonstrate that the self-sensing SSDI system has good damping performance. The performance of the self-sensing SSDI system is also compared with the externally powered system.

  11. Variometric Tests for Accelerometer Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Urso, M. G.; Barbati, N.

    2012-07-01

    This paper has been re-published as: VARIOMETRIC TESTS FOR ACCELEROMETER SENSORS M. G. D'Urso and N. Barbati ISPRS Annals of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences, I-4, 2012 Page(s) 315-320

  12. Fiber-optic Raman sensing of cell proliferation probes and molecular vibrations: Brain-imaging perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronina-Amitonova, Lyubov V.; Fedotov, Il'ya V.; Ivashkina, Olga I.; Zots, Marina A.; Fedotov, Andrei B.; Anokhin, Konstantin V.; Zheltikov, Aleksei M.

    2012-09-01

    Optical fibers are employed to sense fingerprint molecular vibrations in ex vivo experiments on the whole brain and detect cell proliferation probes in a model study on a quantitatively controlled solution. A specifically adapted spectral filtering procedure is shown to allow the Raman signal from molecular vibrations of interest to be discriminated against the background from the fiber, allowing a highly sensitive Raman detection of the recently demonstrated EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine) labels of DNA synthesis in cells.

  13. Dissipation enhanced vibrational sensing in an olfactory molecular switch.

    PubMed

    Chęcińska, Agata; Pollock, Felix A; Heaney, Libby; Nazir, Ahsan

    2015-01-14

    Motivated by a proposed olfactory mechanism based on a vibrationally activated molecular switch, we study electron transport within a donor-acceptor pair that is coupled to a vibrational mode and embedded in a surrounding environment. We derive a polaron master equation with which we study the dynamics of both the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom beyond previously employed semiclassical (Marcus-Jortner) rate analyses. We show (i) that in the absence of explicit dissipation of the vibrational mode, the semiclassical approach is generally unable to capture the dynamics predicted by our master equation due to both its assumption of one-way (exponential) electron transfer from donor to acceptor and its neglect of the spectral details of the environment; (ii) that by additionally allowing strong dissipation to act on the odorant vibrational mode, we can recover exponential electron transfer, though typically at a rate that differs from that given by the Marcus-Jortner expression; (iii) that the ability of the molecular switch to discriminate between the presence and absence of the odorant, and its sensitivity to the odorant vibrational frequency, is enhanced significantly in this strong dissipation regime, when compared to the case without mode dissipation; and (iv) that details of the environment absent from previous Marcus-Jortner analyses can also dramatically alter the sensitivity of the molecular switch, in particular, allowing its frequency resolution to be improved. Our results thus demonstrate the constructive role dissipation can play in facilitating sensitive and selective operation in molecular switch devices, as well as the inadequacy of semiclassical rate equations in analysing such behaviour over a wide range of parameters.

  14. Dissipation enhanced vibrational sensing in an olfactory molecular switch

    SciTech Connect

    Chęcińska, Agata; Heaney, Libby; Pollock, Felix A.; Nazir, Ahsan

    2015-01-14

    Motivated by a proposed olfactory mechanism based on a vibrationally activated molecular switch, we study electron transport within a donor-acceptor pair that is coupled to a vibrational mode and embedded in a surrounding environment. We derive a polaron master equation with which we study the dynamics of both the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom beyond previously employed semiclassical (Marcus-Jortner) rate analyses. We show (i) that in the absence of explicit dissipation of the vibrational mode, the semiclassical approach is generally unable to capture the dynamics predicted by our master equation due to both its assumption of one-way (exponential) electron transfer from donor to acceptor and its neglect of the spectral details of the environment; (ii) that by additionally allowing strong dissipation to act on the odorant vibrational mode, we can recover exponential electron transfer, though typically at a rate that differs from that given by the Marcus-Jortner expression; (iii) that the ability of the molecular switch to discriminate between the presence and absence of the odorant, and its sensitivity to the odorant vibrational frequency, is enhanced significantly in this strong dissipation regime, when compared to the case without mode dissipation; and (iv) that details of the environment absent from previous Marcus-Jortner analyses can also dramatically alter the sensitivity of the molecular switch, in particular, allowing its frequency resolution to be improved. Our results thus demonstrate the constructive role dissipation can play in facilitating sensitive and selective operation in molecular switch devices, as well as the inadequacy of semiclassical rate equations in analysing such behaviour over a wide range of parameters.

  15. In-fiber integrated accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Peng, Feng; Yang, Jun; Li, Xingliang; Yuan, Yonggui; Wu, Bing; Zhou, Ai; Yuan, Libo

    2011-06-01

    A compact in-fiber integrated fiber-optic Michelson interferometer based accelerometer is proposed and investigated. In the system, the sensing element consists of a twin-core fiber acting as a bending simple supported beam. By demodulating the optical phase shift, we obtain that the acceleration is proportional to the force applied on the central position of the twin-core fiber. A simple model has been established to calculate the sensitivity and resonant frequency. The experimental results show that such an accelerometer has a sensitivity of 0.09 rad/g at the resonant frequency of 680 Hz.

  16. Molecular Vibration-Sensing Component in Human Olfaction

    PubMed Central

    Vamvakias, Manolis; Ragoussis, Nikitas; Skoulakis, Efthimios M. C.; Turin, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Whether olfaction recognizes odorants by their shape, their molecular vibrations, or both remains an open and controversial question. A convenient way to address it is to test for odor character differences between deuterated and undeuterated odorant isotopomers, since these have identical ground-state conformations but different vibrational modes. In a previous paper (Franco et al. (2011) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108:9, 3797-802) we showed that fruit flies can recognize the presence of deuterium in odorants by a vibrational mechanism. Here we address the question of whether humans too can distinguish deuterated and undeuterated odorants. A previous report (Keller and Vosshall (2004) Nat Neurosci 7:4, 337-8) indicated that naive subjects are incapable of distinguishing acetophenone and d-8 acetophenone. Here we confirm and extend those results to trained subjects and gas-chromatography [GC]-pure odorants. However, we also show that subjects easily distinguish deuterated and undeuterated musk odorants purified to GC-pure standard. These results are consistent with a vibrational component in human olfaction. PMID:23372854

  17. SenseWearMini and Actigraph GT3X Accelerometer Classification of Observed Sedentary and Light-Intensity Physical Activities in a Laboratory Setting.

    PubMed

    Feehan, Lynne M; Goldsmith, Charles H; Leung, April Y F; Li, Linda C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the ability of SenseWear Mini (SWm) and Actigraph GT3X (AG3) accelerometers to differentiate between healthy adults' observed sedentary and light activities in a laboratory setting. Methods: The 22 participants (15 women, 7 men), ages 19 to 72 years, wore SWm and AG3 monitors and performed five sedentary and four light activities for 5 minutes each while observed in a laboratory setting. Performance was examined through comparisons of accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and positive and negative likelihood ratios. Correct identification of both types of activities was examined using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results: Both monitors demonstrated excellent ability to identify sedentary activities (sensitivity>0.89). The SWm monitor was better at identifying light activities (specificity 0.61-0.71) than the AG3 monitor (specificity 0.27-0.47) and thus also showed a greater ability to correctly identify both sedentary and light activities (SWm AUC 0.84; AG3 AUC 0.62-0.73). Conclusions: SWm may be a more suitable monitor for detecting time spent in sedentary and light-intensity activities. This finding has clinical and research relevance for evaluation of time spent in lower intensity physical activities by sedentary adults.

  18. Acoustic and vibration performance evaluations of a velocity sensing hull array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cray, Benjamin A.; Christman, Russell A.

    1996-04-01

    Acoustic and vibration measurements were conducted at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center's Seneca Lake Facility to investigate the in situ signal response of a linear array of velocity sensors (sensors that measure either acoustic particle acceleration, velocity, or displacement have generically been denoted as velocity sensors) on a coating. The coating used at Seneca Lake consisted of air-voided elastomeric tiles with an overall coating thickness of approximately 3 inches. The accelerometer array and coating were mounted on the Seneca Lake Hull Fixture, which measures 33 feet lengthwise with an arc length of 20 feet. The fixture weighs approximately 30 tons. Specifically, measurements of in situ sensitivity, velocity reduction, reflection gain, array beam response, and equivalent planewave self-noise levels are presented.

  19. Suppressing the image smear of the vibration modulation transfer function for remote-sensing optical cameras.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Liu, Zilong; Liu, Si

    2017-02-20

    In on-board photographing processes of satellite cameras, the platform vibration can generate image motion, distortion, and smear, which seriously affect the image quality and image positioning. In this paper, we create a mathematical model of a vibrating modulate transfer function (VMTF) for a remote-sensing camera. The total MTF of a camera is reduced by the VMTF, which means the image quality is degraded. In order to avoid the degeneration of the total MTF caused by vibrations, we use an Mn-20Cu-5Ni-2Fe (M2052) manganese copper alloy material to fabricate a vibration-isolation mechanism (VIM). The VIM can transform platform vibration energy into irreversible thermal energy with its internal twin crystals structure. Our experiment shows the M2052 manganese copper alloy material is good enough to suppress image motion below 125 Hz, which is the vibration frequency of satellite platforms. The camera optical system has a higher MTF after suppressing the vibration of the M2052 material than before.

  20. Space vehicle accelerometer applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The physics of accelerometer applications are reviewed, and details are given on accelerometer instruments and the principles of their operations. The functions to which accelerometers are applied are listed, and terms commonly used in accelerometer reports are defined. Criteria guides state what rule, limitation, or standard must be imposed on each essential design element to insure successful design. Elaboration of these criteria in the form of recommended practices show how to satisfy each of these criteria, with the best procedure described when possible.

  1. Application of the ARMA model in distributed fiber vibration sensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hongyan; Xu, Haiyan; Peng, HeKuo

    2015-06-01

    Distributed fiber vibration sensing system is widely used in the field of wide area security, communication cable of long distances and pipeline security. The principle of the system is that for a vibration signal applied at a particular position along the fiber, the response, in the frequency domain, presents a series of periodic maxima and minima (or nulls). These minima depend on the position of the vibration along a fiber. Power spectral estimation method is considered to denoise the power spectrum of the system and determine these minima precisely in the paper. The parametric modelling methods such as autoregressive-moving average (ARMA) model is used to improve the positional accuracy of the system. The experimental results show the high accuracy of the position using ARMA model.

  2. The Design of Vibration Sensing System Used for the Internet of Things

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Ma, Xuejie

    2016-06-01

    A vibration sensing system used for the Internet of Things is presented in this paper. Using the distributed feedback fiber lasers (DFB-FL) collects external sound signals and digital phase generated carrier (PGC) method realizes wavelength demodulation. The platform is designed based on an open architecture and B/S (Browser/Server) technology which makes it an ideal platform to be operated under a network environment. The sensing system is no power supply and could be monitored anytime and anywhere which is the requirement of Internet of things.

  3. Dynamic tire pressure sensor for measuring ground vibration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; McDaniel, James Gregory; Wang, Ming L

    2012-11-07

    This work presents a convenient and non-contact acoustic sensing approach for measuring ground vibration. This approach, which uses an instantaneous dynamic tire pressure sensor (DTPS), possesses the capability to replace the accelerometer or directional microphone currently being used for inspecting pavement conditions. By measuring dynamic pressure changes inside the tire, ground vibration can be amplified and isolated from environmental noise. In this work, verifications of the DTPS concept of sensing inside the tire have been carried out. In addition, comparisons between a DTPS, ground-mounted accelerometer, and directional microphone are made. A data analysis algorithm has been developed and optimized to reconstruct ground acceleration from DTPS data. Numerical and experimental studies of this DTPS reveal a strong potential for measuring ground vibration caused by a moving vehicle. A calibration of transfer function between dynamic tire pressure change and ground acceleration may be needed for different tire system or for more accurate application.

  4. Dynamic Tire Pressure Sensor for Measuring Ground Vibration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; McDaniel, James Gregory; Wang, Ming L.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a convenient and non-contact acoustic sensing approach for measuring ground vibration. This approach, which uses an instantaneous dynamic tire pressure sensor (DTPS), possesses the capability to replace the accelerometer or directional microphone currently being used for inspecting pavement conditions. By measuring dynamic pressure changes inside the tire, ground vibration can be amplified and isolated from environmental noise. In this work, verifications of the DTPS concept of sensing inside the tire have been carried out. In addition, comparisons between a DTPS, ground-mounted accelerometer, and directional microphone are made. A data analysis algorithm has been developed and optimized to reconstruct ground acceleration from DTPS data. Numerical and experimental studies of this DTPS reveal a strong potential for measuring ground vibration caused by a moving vehicle. A calibration of transfer function between dynamic tire pressure change and ground acceleration may be needed for different tire system or for more accurate application. PMID:23202206

  5. Compressive Sensing of Roller Bearing Faults via Harmonic Detection from Under-Sampled Vibration Signals.

    PubMed

    Tang, Gang; Hou, Wei; Wang, Huaqing; Luo, Ganggang; Ma, Jianwei

    2015-10-09

    The Shannon sampling principle requires substantial amounts of data to ensure the accuracy of on-line monitoring of roller bearing fault signals. Challenges are often encountered as a result of the cumbersome data monitoring, thus a novel method focused on compressed vibration signals for detecting roller bearing faults is developed in this study. Considering that harmonics often represent the fault characteristic frequencies in vibration signals, a compressive sensing frame of characteristic harmonics is proposed to detect bearing faults. A compressed vibration signal is first acquired from a sensing matrix with information preserved through a well-designed sampling strategy. A reconstruction process of the under-sampled vibration signal is then pursued as attempts are conducted to detect the characteristic harmonics from sparse measurements through a compressive matching pursuit strategy. In the proposed method bearing fault features depend on the existence of characteristic harmonics, as typically detected directly from compressed data far before reconstruction completion. The process of sampling and detection may then be performed simultaneously without complete recovery of the under-sampled signals. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated by simulations and experiments.

  6. An investigation into the performance of macro-fiber composites for sensing and structural vibration applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodano, Henry A.; Park, Gyuhae; Inman, Daniel J.

    2004-05-01

    This paper presents the use of macro-fiber composites (MFC) for vibration suppression and structural health monitoring. The major advantages of the piezoelectric fiber composite actuators are their high performance, flexibility, and durability when compared with the traditional piezoceramic (PZT) actuators. The recently developed MFC actuator provides these advantages and can be used in structural vibration applications. In addition, the ability of MFC devices to couple the electrical and mechanical fields is larger than in monolithic PZT. In this study, we showed that an MFC could be used as a sensor and actuator to find modal parameters of an inflatable structure. This sensor and actuator combination has also been used to reduce vibration in an inflated object. Once the sensing capability was identified, we developed a self-sensing circuit for an MFC. Our experimental results clearly indicate that this strategy can suppress structural vibration, while reducing the number of system components. Finally, the MFC has been implemented as impedance sensor for structural health monitoring (e.g. a of bolted joint connection). The experimental results presented in this paper show the potential of MFC for use in the dynamics and control of flexible structures.

  7. Tapered Polymer Fiber Sensors for Reinforced Concrete Beam Vibration Detection.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dong; Ibrahim, Zainah; Ma, Jianxun; Ismail, Zubaidah; Iseley, David Thomas

    2016-12-16

    In this study, tapered polymer fiber sensors (TPFSs) have been employed to detect the vibration of a reinforced concrete beam (RC beam). The sensing principle was based on transmission modes theory. The natural frequency of an RC beam was theoretically analyzed. Experiments were carried out with sensors mounted on the surface or embedded in the RC beam. Vibration detection results agreed well with Kistler accelerometers. The experimental results found that both the accelerometer and TPFS detected the natural frequency function of a vibrated RC beam well. The mode shapes of the RC beam were also found by using the TPFSs. The proposed vibration detection method provides a cost-comparable solution for a structural health monitoring (SHM) system in civil engineering.

  8. Tapered Polymer Fiber Sensors for Reinforced Concrete Beam Vibration Detection

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Dong; Ibrahim, Zainah; Ma, Jianxun; Ismail, Zubaidah; Iseley, David Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In this study, tapered polymer fiber sensors (TPFSs) have been employed to detect the vibration of a reinforced concrete beam (RC beam). The sensing principle was based on transmission modes theory. The natural frequency of an RC beam was theoretically analyzed. Experiments were carried out with sensors mounted on the surface or embedded in the RC beam. Vibration detection results agreed well with Kistler accelerometers. The experimental results found that both the accelerometer and TPFS detected the natural frequency function of a vibrated RC beam well. The mode shapes of the RC beam were also found by using the TPFSs. The proposed vibration detection method provides a cost-comparable solution for a structural health monitoring (SHM) system in civil engineering. PMID:27999245

  9. Multiple-stage integrating accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Devaney, H.F.

    1984-06-27

    An accelerometer assembly is provided for use in activating a switch in response to multiple acceleration pulses in series. The accelerometer includes a housing forming a chamber. An inertial mass or piston is slidably disposed in the chamber and spring biased toward a first or reset position. A damping system is also provided to damp piston movement in response to first and subsequent acceleration pulses. Additionally, a cam, including a Z-shaped slot, and cooperating follower pin slidably received therein are mounted to the piston and the housing. The middle or cross-over leg of the Z-shaped slot cooperates with the follower pin to block or limit piston movement and prevent switch activation in response to a lone acceleration pulse. The switch of the assembly is only activated after two or more separate acceleration pulses are sensed and the piston reaches the end of the chamber opposite the reset position.

  10. Multiple-stage integrating accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Devaney, Howard F.

    1986-01-01

    An accelerometer assembly is provided for use in activating a switch in response to multiple acceleration pulses in series. The accelerometer includes a housing forming a chamber. An inertial mass or piston is slidably disposed in the chamber and spring biased toward a first or reset position. A damping system is also provided to damp piston movement in response to first and subsequent acceleration pulses. Additionally, a cam, including a Z-shaped slot, and cooperating follower pin slidably received therein are mounted to the piston and the housing. The middle or cross-over leg of the Z-shaped slot cooperates with the follower pin to block or limit piston movement and prevent switch activation in response to a lone acceleration pulse. The switch of the assembly is only activated after two or more separate acceleration pulses are sensed and the piston reaches the end of the chamber opposite the reset position.

  11. Optical multi-frequency swept sensing for wide-field vibration measurement of interior surfaces in biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.; Nin, F.; Hibino, H.; Suzuki, T.

    2015-12-01

    Multifrequency sensing technique adopting the wide field heterodyne detection technique is demonstrated for interior surface vibration measurements in thick biological tissue. These arrangements allow obtaining not only 3D tomographic images but also various vibration parameters such as spatial amplitude, phase, and frequency, with high temporal and transverse resolutions over a wide field. The axial resolution and the accuracy of vibration amplitude measurement were estimated to be 2.5 μm and 3 nm, respectively. This wide-field tomographic sensing method can be applied for measuring microdynamics of a variety of biological samples, thus contributing to the progress in life sciences research.

  12. Identification of capacitive MEMS accelerometer structure parameters for human body dynamics measurements.

    PubMed

    Benevicius, Vincas; Ostasevicius, Vytautas; Gaidys, Rimvydas

    2013-08-22

    Due to their small size, low weight, low cost and low energy consumption, MEMS accelerometers have achieved great commercial success in recent decades. The aim of this research work is to identify a MEMS accelerometer structure for human body dynamics measurements. Photogrammetry was used in order to measure possible maximum accelerations of human body parts and the bandwidth of the digital acceleration signal. As the primary structure the capacitive accelerometer configuration is chosen in such a way that sensing part measures on all three axes as it is 3D accelerometer and sensitivity on each axis is equal. Hill climbing optimization was used to find the structure parameters. Proof-mass displacements were simulated for all the acceleration range that was given by the optimization problem constraints. The final model was constructed in Comsol Multiphysics. Eigenfrequencies were calculated and model's response was found, when vibration stand displacement data was fed into the model as the base excitation law. Model output comparison with experimental data was conducted for all excitation frequencies used during the experiments.

  13. Vibration Powered RF-Transponder for Sensing Low Frequency Motion Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S. K.; Pinrod, V.; Nadig, S.; Davaji, B.; Lal, A.

    2016-11-01

    Vibration energy harvesting offers a pathway to developing battery-less sensing solutions to be deployed in wireless sensor network nodes. The integration of the energy harvesters require regulation by power conditioning and control circuitry that consume some of the energy generated, reducing the effective energy available for node function. By designing a unique 3D-printed plastic structure for low frequency sensitivity and mechanical switching, and a lateral PZT bimorph for capturing energy from environmental vibrations, we report a zero-power consumption RF-transponder capable of detecting and reporting motion events without a battery. We have successfully picked up wireless transmissions on an external receiver placed ∼25cm away from the transponder, shaken at 0.75 g and 20 Hz. We have additionally demonstrated the ability to harvest energy from 5 Hz vibrations up to just under 150 Hz. When placed on an oil-based electric generator, which vibrates when operating, the RF-transponder has successfully picked up the differing harmonics to identify the mode of operation as the economy or regular power setting.

  14. A biomimetic accelerometer inspired by the cricket's clavate hair.

    PubMed

    Droogendijk, H; de Boer, M J; Sanders, R G P; Krijnen, G J M

    2014-08-06

    Crickets use so-called clavate hairs to sense (gravitational) acceleration to obtain information on their orientation. Inspired by this clavate hair system, a one-axis biomimetic accelerometer has been developed and fabricated using surface micromachining and SU-8 lithography. An analytical model is presented for the design of the accelerometer, and guidelines are derived to reduce responsivity due to flow-induced contributions to the accelerometer's output. Measurements show that this microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) hair-based accelerometer has a resonance frequency of 320 Hz, a detection threshold of 0.10 ms(-2) and a dynamic range of more than 35 dB. The accelerometer exhibits a clear directional response to external accelerations and a low responsivity to airflow. Further, the accelerometer's physical limits with respect to noise levels are addressed and the possibility for short-term adaptation of the sensor to the environment is discussed.

  15. An Attachable Electromagnetic Energy Harvester Driven Wireless Sensing System Demonstrating Milling-Processes and Cutter-Wear/Breakage-Condition Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tien-Kan; Yeh, Po-Chen; Lee, Hao; Lin, Cheng-Mao; Tseng, Chia-Yung; Lo, Wen-Tuan; Wang, Chieh-Min; Wang, Wen-Chin; Tu, Chi-Jen; Tasi, Pei-Yuan; Chang, Jui-Wen

    2016-02-23

    An attachable electromagnetic-energy-harvester driven wireless vibration-sensing system for monitoring milling-processes and cutter-wear/breakage-conditions is demonstrated. The system includes an electromagnetic energy harvester, three single-axis Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometers, a wireless chip module, and corresponding circuits. The harvester consisting of magnets with a coil uses electromagnetic induction to harness mechanical energy produced by the rotating spindle in milling processes and consequently convert the harnessed energy to electrical output. The electrical output is rectified by the rectification circuit to power the accelerometers and wireless chip module. The harvester, circuits, accelerometer, and wireless chip are integrated as an energy-harvester driven wireless vibration-sensing system. Therefore, this completes a self-powered wireless vibration sensing system. For system testing, a numerical-controlled machining tool with various milling processes is used. According to the test results, the system is fully self-powered and able to successfully sense vibration in the milling processes. Furthermore, by analyzing the vibration signals (i.e., through analyzing the electrical outputs of the accelerometers), criteria are successfully established for the system for real-time accurate simulations of the milling-processes and cutter-conditions (such as cutter-wear conditions and cutter-breaking occurrence). Due to these results, our approach can be applied to most milling and other machining machines in factories to realize more smart machining technologies.

  16. An Attachable Electromagnetic Energy Harvester Driven Wireless Sensing System Demonstrating Milling-Processes and Cutter-Wear/Breakage-Condition Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Tien-Kan; Yeh, Po-Chen; Lee, Hao; Lin, Cheng-Mao; Tseng, Chia-Yung; Lo, Wen-Tuan; Wang, Chieh-Min; Wang, Wen-Chin; Tu, Chi-Jen; Tasi, Pei-Yuan; Chang, Jui-Wen

    2016-01-01

    An attachable electromagnetic-energy-harvester driven wireless vibration-sensing system for monitoring milling-processes and cutter-wear/breakage-conditions is demonstrated. The system includes an electromagnetic energy harvester, three single-axis Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometers, a wireless chip module, and corresponding circuits. The harvester consisting of magnets with a coil uses electromagnetic induction to harness mechanical energy produced by the rotating spindle in milling processes and consequently convert the harnessed energy to electrical output. The electrical output is rectified by the rectification circuit to power the accelerometers and wireless chip module. The harvester, circuits, accelerometer, and wireless chip are integrated as an energy-harvester driven wireless vibration-sensing system. Therefore, this completes a self-powered wireless vibration sensing system. For system testing, a numerical-controlled machining tool with various milling processes is used. According to the test results, the system is fully self-powered and able to successfully sense vibration in the milling processes. Furthermore, by analyzing the vibration signals (i.e., through analyzing the electrical outputs of the accelerometers), criteria are successfully established for the system for real-time accurate simulations of the milling-processes and cutter-conditions (such as cutter-wear conditions and cutter-breaking occurrence). Due to these results, our approach can be applied to most milling and other machining machines in factories to realize more smart machining technologies. PMID:26907297

  17. Estimation of Subjective Difficulty and Psychological Stress by Ambient Sensing of Desk Panel Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Nana; Yamamoto, Keiko; Iwai, Daisuke; Sato, Kosuke

    We investigate ambient sensing techniques that recognize writer's psychological states by measuring vibrations of handwriting on a desk panel using a piezoelectric contact sensor attached to its underside. In particular, we describe a technique for estimating the subjective difficulty of a question for a student as the ratio of the time duration of thinking to the total amount of time spent on the question. Through experiments, we confirm that our technique correctly recognizes whether or not a person writes something down on paper by measured vibration data at the accuracy of over 80 %, and that the order of computed subjective difficulties of three questions is coincident with that reported by the subject in 60 % of experiments. We also propose a technique to estimate a writer's psychological stress by using the standard deviation of the spectrum of the measured vibration. Results of a proof-of-concept experiment show that the proposed technique correctly estimates whether or not the subject feels stress at least 90 % of the time.

  18. Robust vibration control at critical resonant modes using indirect-driven self-sensing actuation in mechatronic systems.

    PubMed

    Hong, Fan; Pang, Chee Khiang

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents an improved indirect-driven self-sensing actuation circuit for robust vibration control of piezoelectrically-actuated flexible structures in mechatronic systems. The circuit acts as a high-pass filter and provides better self-sensing strain signals with wider sensing bandwidth and higher signal-to-noise ratio. An adaptive non-model-based control is used to compensate for the structural vibrations using the strain signals from the circuit. The proposed scheme is implemented in a PZT-actuated suspension of a commercial dual-stage hard disk drive. Experimental results show improvements of 50% and 75% in the vibration suppression at 5.4kHz and 21kHz respectively, compared to the conventional PI control.

  19. The effects of whole body vibration on balance, joint position sense and cutaneous sensation.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Ross D; Provan, Sally; Martin, Finbarr C; Newham, Di J

    2011-12-01

    Whole body vibration (WBV) may enhance muscular strength and power but little is known about its influence on sensory-motor function. Vibration of a single muscle or tendon affects the afferent system in a manner that depends on amplitude and frequency. WBV stimulates many muscle groups simultaneously and the frequencies and amplitudes used are different from many of the studies on single musculotendinous units. We investigated the effects of WBV at two amplitudes on balance, joint position sense (JPS) and cutaneous sensation in young healthy subjects. Eighteen adults (24.3 ± 1.5 years, 15 females) were assessed before WBV (five 1 min bouts, 30 Hz) then immediately, 15 and 30 min afterwards. Two amplitudes (4 and 8 mm peak to peak) were investigated on different occasions. Standing balance was assessed with feet together and eyes closed, and standing on one leg with eyes open and closed. JPS at the knee and ankle was assessed by repositioning tasks while cutaneous sensation was recorded from six sites in the lower limb using pressure aesthesiometry. Neither amplitude affected JPS (P > 0.05). There were minimal effects on balance only in the vertical plane and only 30 min after WBV (P < 0.05). Low amplitude vibration only reduced sensation at the foot and ankle immediately after WBV (P < 0.008). High amplitude vibration impaired sensation at the foot, ankle and posterior shank for the entire test period (P < 0.008). In young healthy individuals WBV did not affect JPS or static balance, but reduced cutaneous sensation. These data may have implications for older and clinical populations with compromised postural control.

  20. Strain-induced vibration and temperature sensing BOTDA system combined frequency sweeping and slope-assisted techniques.

    PubMed

    Hu, Junhui; Xia, Lan; Yang, Li; Quan, Wenwen; Zhang, Xuping

    2016-06-13

    A BOTDA sensing scheme combined frequency sweeping and slope-assisted techniques is proposed and experimentally demonstrated for simultaneously temperature and strain-induced vibration sensing. In this scheme, during sweeping Brillouin gain spectrum (BGS) for temperature measurement, we simultaneously perform FFT to the time-domain traces whose probe-pump frequency difference (PPFD) is within the FWHM of the BGS at each position of fiber, and the location and the frequency of the strain-induced vibration event can be acquired based on SA-BOTDA technique. In this way, the vibration can be continuously measured at each selected working frequency point during the BGS scanning process and multiple measurements of vibration event can be completed in one whole BGS scanning process. Meanwhile, double sidebands probe method is employed to reduce the nonlocal effects. In our experiment, a temperature event and two vibration events with the frequency of 7.00Hz or 10.00Hz are simultaneously measured near the end of 10.6km long sensing fiber in a traditional BOTDA system. The system shows 1.2°C temperature accuracy and 0.67Hz frequency resolution, as well as a 3m spatial resolution. The proposed method may find some potential applications where both the strain-induced vibration frequency and temperature are the diagnostic objects.

  1. Self Diagnostic Accelerometer Testing on the C-17 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokars, Roger P.; Lekki, John D.

    2013-01-01

    The self diagnostic accelerometer (SDA) developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center was tested for the first time in an aircraft engine environment as part of the Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research (VIPR) program. The VIPR program includes testing multiple critical flight sensor technologies. One such sensor, the accelerometer, measures vibrations to detect faults in the engine. In order to rely upon the accelerometer, the health of the accelerometer must be ensured. The SDA is a sensor system designed to actively determine the accelerometer structural health and attachment condition, in addition to vibration measurements. The SDA uses a signal conditioning unit that sends an electrical chirp to the accelerometer and recognizes changes in the response due to changes in the accelerometer health and attachment condition. To demonstrate the SDAs flight worthiness and robustness, multiple SDAs were mounted and tested on a C-17 aircraft engine. The engine test conditions varied from engine off, to idle, to maximum power. The SDA attachment conditions were varied from fully tight to loose. The newly developed SDA health algorithm described herein uses cross correlation pattern recognition to discriminate a healthy from a faulty SDA. The VIPR test results demonstrate for the first.

  2. The LISA accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, M.; Touboul, P.

    2003-10-01

    In the frame of investigating the fundamental nature of gravity, the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission could open the way to a new kind of observations unreachable from ground. The experiment, based on a V-formation of six drag-free spacecraft, uses the cubic proof masses of inertial sensors to reflect the laser light, acting as reference mirrors of a 5 × 10 9 m arm length interferometer. The proof masses are also used as inertial references for the drag-free control of the spacecraft which constitute in return a shield against external forces. Derived from space electrostatic accelerometers developed at ONERA, such as GRADIO for the ESA ARISTOTELES and now GOCE mission (Bernard and Touboul, 1991), the proposed LISA sensor should shield its proof mass from any accelerometric disturbance at a level of 10 -15ms-2Hz- 1/2. The accurate capacitive sensing of the mass provides its position relative to the satellite with a resolution better than 10 -9m Hz- 1/2 in order to control the satellite orbit and to minimise the disturbances induced by the satellite self gravity or by the proof mass charge. The sensor configuration and accomodation has to be specifically optimised for the mission requirements. Fortunately, the sensor will benefit from the thermal stability of the LISA optical bench environment, i.e. 10 -6K Hz- 1/2, and of the selected materials that exhibit a very low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), ensuring a high geometrical stability. Apart from the modeling and the evaluation of the flight characteristics, the necessary indirect ground demonstration of the performance and the interfaces with the drag-free control will have to be considered in detail in the future.

  3. Analysis of In-Situ Vibration Monitoring for End-Point Detection of CMP Planarization Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hetherington, Dale L.; Lauffer, James P.; Shingledecker, David M.; Stein, David J.; Wyckoff, Edward E.

    1999-05-14

    This paper details the analysis of vibration monitoring for end-point control in oxide CMP processes. Two piezoelectric accelerometers were integrated onto the backside of a stainless steel polishing head of an IPEC 472 polisher. One sensor was placed perpendicular to the carrier plate (vertical) and the other parallel to the plate (horizontal). Wafers patterned with metal and coated with oxide material were polished at different speeds and pressures. Our results show that it is possible to sense a change in the vibration signal over time during planarization of oxide material on patterned wafers. The horizontal accelerometer showed more sensitivity to change in vibration amplitude compared to the vertical accelerometer for a given polish condition. At low carrier and platen rotation rates, the change in vibration signal over time at fixed frequencies decreased approximately ½ - 1 order of magnitude (over the 2 to 10 psi polish pressure ranges). At high rotation speeds, the vibration signal remained essentially constant indicating that other factors dominated the vibration signaL These results show that while it is possible to sense changes in acceleration during polishing, more robust hardware and signal processing algorithms are required to ensure its use over a wide range of process conditions.

  4. Novel approach for non-invasive glucose sensing using vibrational contrast CD absorption measurements (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Tovar, Carlos; Hokr, Brett; Petrov, Georgi I.

    2016-03-01

    Noninvasive glucose sensing is a Holy Grail of diabetes mellitus management. Unfortunately, despite a number of innovative concepts and a long history of continuous instrumental improvements, the problem remains largely unsolved. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate the first successful implementation of a novel strategy based on vibrational overtone circular dichroism absorption measurements. Such an approach uses a short-wavelength infrared excitation (1000-2000 nm), which takes the advantage of lower light scattering and intrinsic chemical contrast provided by the chemical structure of D-glucose molecule. We model the propagation of circular polarized light in scattering medium using Monte Carlo simulations to show the feasibility of such approach in turbid medium and demonstrate the proof of principle using optical detection. We also investigate the possibility of using ultrasound detection through circular dichroism absorption measurements to achieve simple and sensitive glucose monitoring.

  5. Design and experimental research on cantilever accelerometer based on fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Longhai; Jiang, Qi; Li, Yibin; Song, Rui

    2016-06-01

    Currently, an acceleration sensor based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) has been widely used. A cantilever FBG accelerometer is designed. The simulation of this structure was implemented by finite element software (ANSYS) to analyze its sensing performance parameters. And then the optimized structure was produced and calibration experiments were conducted. On the basis of simulation, optical fiber is embedded in the inner tank of the vibrating mass, and Bragg grating is suspended above the cantilever structure, which can effectively avoid the phenomenon of center wavelength chirp or broadening, and greatly improve the sensitivity of the sensor. The experimental results show that the FBG accelerometer exhibits a sensitivity of 75 pm/(m/s2) (100 Hz) and dynamic range of 60 dB. Its linearity error is <2.31% and repeatability error is <2.76%. And the resonant frequency is ˜125 Hz. The simulation results match the experimental results to demonstrate the good performance of FBG accelerometer, which is expected to be used in the actual project.

  6. Double resonator cantilever accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, D.R.

    1982-09-23

    A digital quartz accelerometer includes a pair of spaced double-ended tuning forks fastened at one end to a base and at the other end through a spacer mass. Transverse movement of the resonator members stresses one and compresses the other, providing a differential frequency output which is indicative of acceleration.

  7. Double resonator cantilever accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, Dale R.

    1984-01-01

    A digital quartz accelerometer includes a pair of spaced double-ended tuning forks fastened at one end to a base and at the other end through a spacer mass. Transverse movement of the resonator members stresses one and compresses the other, providing a differential frequency output which is indicative of acceleration.

  8. Superconducting Rebalance Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torti, R. P.; Gerver, M.; Leary, K. J.; Jagannathan, S.; Dozer, D. M.

    1996-01-01

    A multi-axis accelerometer which utilizes a magnetically-suspended, high-TC proof mass is under development. The design and performance of a single axis device which is stabilized actively in the axial direction but which utilizes ring magnets for passive radial stabilization is discussed. The design of a full six degree-of-freedom device version is also described.

  9. Short-Term Adaptation of Joint Position Sense Occurs during and after Sustained Vibration of Antagonistic Muscle Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Tomas I.; Goble, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Proprioception is critical for the control of many goal-directed activities of daily living. While contributions from skin and joint receptors exist, the muscle spindle is thought to play an important role in allowing accurate judgments of limb position and movement to occur. The discharges elicited from muscle spindles can be degraded by simultaneous agonist-antagonist tendon vibration, causing proprioception to be distorted. Despite this, changes in limb perception that may result from sensory adaptation to this stimulus remain misunderstood. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to investigate short-term proprioceptive adaptation resulting from vibration of antagonistic muscle pairs. We measured elbow joint position sense in 21 healthy young adults while 80 Hz vibration was applied simultaneously to the distal tendons of the elbow flexor and extensor muscles. Matching errors were then analyzed during early and late adaptation phases to assess short-term adaptation to the vibration stimuli. Participants committed significant undershoot errors during the early adaptation phase, but were comparable to baseline measurements during the late adaptation phase. When we removed the vibration stimuli and conducted a second joint position matching task, matching variability increased significantly, and participants committed overshoot errors. These results bring into question the efficacy of simultaneous agonist-antagonist tendon vibration to degrade proprioceptive acuity. PMID:25414661

  10. Accelerometer Method and Apparatus for Integral Display and Control Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting mechanical vibrations and outputting a signal in response thereto is discussed. An accelerometer package having integral display and control functions is suitable for mounting upon the machinery to be monitored. Display circuitry provides signals to a bar graph display which may be used to monitor machine conditions over a period of time. Control switches may be set which correspond to elements in the bar graph to provide an alert if vibration signals increase in amplitude over a selected trip point. The circuitry is shock mounted within the accelerometer housing. The method provides for outputting a broadband analog accelerometer signal, integrating this signal to produce a velocity signal, integrating and calibrating the velocity signal before application to a display driver, and selecting a trip point at which a digitally compatible output signal is generated.

  11. Low G accelerometer testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, M. S.

    1972-01-01

    Eight different types of low-g accelerometer tests are covered on the Bell miniature electrostatically suspended accelerometer (MESA) which is known to be sensitive to less than 10 to the minus 7th power earth's gravity. These tests include a mass attracting scheme, Leitz dividing head, Wild theodolite, precision gage blocks, precision tiltmeters, Hilger Watts autocollimator, Razdow Mark 2 autocollimator, and laser interferometer measuring system. Each test is described and a comparison of the results is presented. The output of the MESA was as linear and consistent as any of the available devices were capable of measuring. Although the extent of agreement varied with the test equipment used, it can only be concluded that the indicated errors were attributable to the test equipment coupled with the environmental conditions.

  12. Fiber optic micro accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, Steve P.

    2005-07-26

    An accelerometer includes a wafer, a proof mass integrated into the wafer, at least one spring member connected to the proof mass, and an optical fiber. A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially reflective surface on the proof mass and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. The two partially reflective surfaces are used to detect movement of the proof mass through the optical fiber, using an optical detection system.

  13. Levitated micro-accelerometer.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Schmidt, Carrie Frances; Peterson, Kenneth Allen; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Renn, Rosemarie A.; Peter, Frank J.; Kinney, Ragon D.; Gilkey, Jeffrey C.

    2004-06-01

    The objective is a significant advancement in the state-of-the-art of accelerometer design for tactical grade (or better) applications. The design goals are <1 milli-G bias stability across environments and $200 cost. This quantum leap in performance improvement and cost reduction can only be achieved by a radical new approach, not incremental improvements to existing concepts. This novel levitated closed-loop accelerometer is implemented as a hybrid micromachine. The hybrid approach frees the designer from the limitations of any given monolithic process and dramatically expands the available design space. The design can be tailored to the dynamic range, resolution, bandwidth, and environmental requirements of the application while still preserving all of the benefits of monolithic MEMS fabrication - extreme precision, small size, low cost, and low power. An accelerometer was designed and prototype hardware was built, driving the successful development and refinement of several 'never been done before' fabrication processes. Many of these process developments are commercially valuable and are key enablers for the realization of a wide variety of useful micro-devices. While controlled levitation of a proof mass has yet to be realized, the overall design concept remains sound. This was clearly demonstrated by the stable and reliable closed-loop control of a proof mass at the test structure level. Furthermore, the hybrid MEMS implementation is the most promising approach for achieving the ambitious cost and performance targets. It is strongly recommended that Sandia remain committed to the original goal.

  14. The assessment of vibration sense in the musculoskeletal examination: Moving towards a valid and reliable quantitative approach to vibration testing in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    O' Conaire, Eoin; Rushton, Alison; Wright, Chris

    2011-06-01

    Impairment of vibration sense is an early sign of nerve pathology. A range of devices can evaluate vibration sense, with moderate to excellent reliability demonstrated for the Somedic Vibrameter. However, devices are expensive and time-consuming for use in practice, and tuning forks are used but not supported by rigorous research. The aims of this study were to evaluate the inter-rater reliability and precision of a novel device to improve use of a tuning fork, and to evaluate its concurrent validity with the Vibrameter. Following a power calculation, a double-blinded, prospective, reliability and validity study recruited 19 healthy subjects who were tested by two physiotherapists using both instruments testing over the median nerve distribution. Inter-rater reliability was determined using Intraclass Correlation Coefficients, 2.1 (0.798 for the Vibrameter and 0.520 for the tuning fork), and precision using Bland Altman plots and Standard Error of Measurement (Vibrameter 0.289 μm, tuning fork 2.55 s). Concurrent validity using Pearson's Product Moment Correlation was 0.515-0.634. The Vibrameter results support previous reliability studies. The tuning fork and novel device demonstrated a strong correlation with the Vibrameter supporting concurrent validity; although it possesses moderate inter-rater reliability. Further research exploring reliability in pathological populations is now indicated.

  15. A hybrid single-end-access MZI and Φ-OTDR vibration sensing system with high frequency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yixin; Xia, Lan; Cao, Chunqi; Sun, Zhenhong; Li, Yanting; Zhang, Xuping

    2017-01-01

    A hybrid single-end-access Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) and phase sensitive OTDR (Φ-OTDR) vibration sensing system is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. In our system, the narrow optical pulses and the continuous wave are injected into the fiber through the front end of the fiber at the same time. And at the rear end of the fiber, a frequency-shift-mirror (FSM) is designed to back propagate the continuous wave modulated by the external vibration. Thus the Rayleigh backscattering signals (RBS) and the back propagated continuous wave interfere with the reference light at the same end of the sensing fiber and a single-end-access configuration is achieved. The RBS can be successfully separated from the interference signal (IS) through digital signal process due to their different intermediate frequency based on frequency division multiplexing technique. There is no influence between these two schemes. The experimental results show 10 m spatial resolution and up to 1.2 MHz frequency response along a 6.35 km long fiber. This newly designed single-end-access setup can achieve vibration events locating and high frequency events response, which can be widely used in health monitoring for civil infrastructures and transportation.

  16. Discrimination Threshold of Tactile Sense to Point Stimulation and Vector Stimulation in Modulated Vibration by ERP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Tota; Nozawa, Akio; Uchida, Masafumi; Ide, Hideto

    In this paper, we research what kind of influence with the discrimination threshold in frequency area Ts-1 vs. Tl-1 by using segment which had an aim as simple line drawing figure in other words, vector stimulation. As a result, it has been suggested that the modulated vibration discrimination doesn't depend variation of vibration frequency.

  17. Development of a long-gauge vibration sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Peter; Comanici, Maria I.; Li, Qian; Zhang, Yiwei

    2015-03-01

    We have recently found that a long length of fiber of up to 1 km terminated with an in-fiber cavity structure can detect vibrations over a frequency range from 5 Hz to 2 kHz. We want to determine whether the sensor (including packaging) can be optimized to detect vibrations at even higher frequencies. The structure can be used as a distributed vibration sensor mounted on large motors and other rotating machines to capture the entire frequency spectrum of the associated vibration signals, and therefore, replace the many accelerometers, which add to maintenance cost. The sensor may also help detect in-slot vibrations which cause intermittent contact leading to sparking under high voltages inside air-cooled generators. However, that requires the sensor to detect frequencies associated with vibration sparking, ranging from 6 kHz to 15 kHz. Acoustic vibration monitoring may need sensing at even higher frequencies (30 kHz to 150 kHz) associated with partial discharge (PD) in generators and transformers. Detecting lower frequencies in the range 2 Hz to 200 Hz makes the sensor suitable for seismic studies and falls well into the vibrations associated with rotating machines. Another application of interest is corrosion detection in large re-enforced concrete structures by inserting the sensor along a long hole drilled around structures showing signs of corrosion. The frequency response for the proposed longgauge vibration sensor depends on packaging.

  18. Optomechanical accelerometers and gravity gradiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman Cervantes, F.; Pratt, J. R.; Taylor, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Compact optical cavities can be combined with highly stable mechanical oscillators to yield accelerometers and gravity gradiometers of exquisite sensitivity, which are also traceable to the SI.We have incorporated Fabry-Pérot fiber-optic micro-cavities onto low-loss monolithic fused-silica mechanical oscillators for gradiometry, acceleration, and force sensing. These devices consist solely of a glass oscillator and fiber optics to inject and read out the coherent optical signal, making them very simple and compatible with space applications.We have demonstrated displacement sensitivities better than 200 am/√Hz with these fiber-optic micro-sensors. This translates into broadband acceleration noise floors below 100 nano-g/√Hz over a 10kHz, when combined with compact high frequency mechanical oscillators. Similarly, we have developed monolithic oscillators with resonance frequencies near and below 10 Hz, yielding measurement sensitivities better than 10-9 m/s2.We will introduce our sensor concepts and present results on our fiber-optic displacement sensors and novel optomechanical devices.

  19. Optomechanical accelerometers and gravity gradiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Felipe

    2016-04-01

    Compact optical cavities can be combined with highly stable mechanical oscillators to yield accelerometers and gravity gradiometers of exquisite sensitivity, which are also traceable to the SI. We have incorporated Fabry-Pérot fiber-optic micro-cavities onto low-loss monolithic fused-silica mechanical oscillators for gradiometry, acceleration, and force sensing. These devices consist solely of a glass oscillator and fiber optics to inject and read out the coherent optical signal, making them very simple and compatible with space applications. We have demonstrated displacement sensitivities better than 200 am/√Hz with these fiber-optic micro-sensors. This translates into broadband acceleration noise floors below 100 nano-g/√Hz over a 10kHz, when combined with compact high frequency mechanical oscillators. Similarly, we have developed monolithic oscillators with resonance frequencies near and below 10 Hz, yielding measurement sensitivities better than 10-9 m/s2. We will introduce our sensor concepts and present results on our fiber-optic displacement sensors and novel optomechanical devices.

  20. Terrestrial Applications of a Nano-g Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    1996-01-01

    The ultra-sensitive accelerometer, developed for NASA to monitor the microgravity environments of Space Shuttle, five orbiters and Space Station, needed to measure accelerations up to 10 mg with an absolute accuracy of 10 nano-g (10(exp -8)g) for at least two orbits (10(exp 4) seconds) to resolve accelerations associated with orbital drag. Also, the accelerometers needed to have less than 10(exp -9) F.S. off-axis sensitivity; to be thermally and magnetically inert; to be immune to quiescent shock, and to have an in-situ calibration capability. Multi-axis compact seismometers, designs that have twelve decades of dynamic range will be described. Density profilometers, precision gradiometers, gyros and vibration isolation designs and applications will be discussed. Finally, examples of transformations of the accelerometer into sensitive anemometers and imaging spectrometers will be presented.

  1. A distributed optical fiber sensing system for synchronous vibration and loss measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu-ping; Qiao, Wei-yan; Sun, Zhen-hong; Shan, Yuan-yuan; Zeng, Jie; Zhang, Yi-xin

    2016-09-01

    We propose a fully distributed fusion system combining phase-sensitive optical time-domain reflectometry (Φ-OTDR) and OTDR for synchronous vibration and loss measurement by setting an ingenious frequency sweep rate ( FSR) of the optical source. The relationships between FSR, probe pulse width and repeat period are given to balance the amplitude fluctuation of OTDR traces, the dead zone probability and the measurable frequency range of vibration events. In the experiment, we achieve synchronous vibration and loss measurement with FSR of 40 MHz/s, the proble pulse width of 100 ns and repeat rate of 0.4 ms. The fluctuation of OTDR trace is less than 0.45 dB when the signal-to-noise ratio ( SNR) is over 12 dB for a captured vibration event located at 9.1 km. The proposed method can be used for not only detection but also early warning of damage events in optical communication networks.

  2. Self-calibration method of the bias of a space electrostatic accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Qu, Shao-Bo; Xia, Xiao-Mei; Bai, Yan-Zheng; Wu, Shu-Chao; Zhou, Ze-Bing

    2016-11-01

    The high precision space electrostatic accelerometer is an instrument to measure the non-gravitational forces acting on a spacecraft. It is one of the key payloads for satellite gravity measurements and space fundamental physics experiments. The measurement error of the accelerometer directly affects the precision of gravity field recovery for the earth. This paper analyzes the sources of the bias according to the operating principle and structural constitution of the space electrostatic accelerometer. Models of bias due to the asymmetry of the displacement sensing system, including the mechanical sensor head and the capacitance sensing circuit, and the asymmetry of the feedback control actuator circuit are described separately. According to the two models, a method of bias self-calibration by using only the accelerometer data is proposed, based on the feedback voltage data of the accelerometer before and after modulating the DC biasing voltage (Vb) applied on its test mass. Two types of accelerometer biases are evaluated separately using in-orbit measurement data of a space electrostatic accelerometer. Based on the preliminary analysis, the bias of the accelerometer onboard of an experiment satellite is evaluated to be around 10(-4) m/s(2), about 4 orders of magnitude greater than the noise limit. Finally, considering the two asymmetries, a comprehensive bias model is analyzed. A modified method to directly calibrate the accelerometer comprehensive bias is proposed.

  3. Self-calibration method of the bias of a space electrostatic accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Shao-Bo; Xia, Xiao-Mei; Bai, Yan-Zheng; Wu, Shu-Chao; Zhou, Ze-Bing

    2016-11-01

    The high precision space electrostatic accelerometer is an instrument to measure the non-gravitational forces acting on a spacecraft. It is one of the key payloads for satellite gravity measurements and space fundamental physics experiments. The measurement error of the accelerometer directly affects the precision of gravity field recovery for the earth. This paper analyzes the sources of the bias according to the operating principle and structural constitution of the space electrostatic accelerometer. Models of bias due to the asymmetry of the displacement sensing system, including the mechanical sensor head and the capacitance sensing circuit, and the asymmetry of the feedback control actuator circuit are described separately. According to the two models, a method of bias self-calibration by using only the accelerometer data is proposed, based on the feedback voltage data of the accelerometer before and after modulating the DC biasing voltage (Vb) applied on its test mass. Two types of accelerometer biases are evaluated separately using in-orbit measurement data of a space electrostatic accelerometer. Based on the preliminary analysis, the bias of the accelerometer onboard of an experiment satellite is evaluated to be around 10-4 m/s2, about 4 orders of magnitude greater than the noise limit. Finally, considering the two asymmetries, a comprehensive bias model is analyzed. A modified method to directly calibrate the accelerometer comprehensive bias is proposed.

  4. Single-Axis Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis Stephen (Inventor); Capo-Lugo, Pedro A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A single-axis accelerometer includes a housing defining a sleeve. An object/mass is disposed in the sleeve for sliding movement therein in a direction aligned with the sleeve's longitudinal axis. A first piezoelectric strip, attached to a first side of the object and to the housing, is longitudinally aligned with the sleeve's longitudinal axis. The first piezoelectric strip includes a first strip of a piezoelectric material with carbon nanotubes substantially aligned along a length thereof. A second piezoelectric strip, attached to a second side of the object and to the housing, is longitudinally aligned with the sleeve's longitudinal axis. The second piezoelectric strip includes a second strip of the piezoelectric material with carbon nanotubes substantially aligned along a length thereof. A voltage sensor is electrically coupled to at least one of the first and second piezoelectric strips.

  5. Peri-prosthetic fracture vibration testing

    SciTech Connect

    Cruce, Jesse R; Erwin, Jenny R; Remick, Kevin R; Cornwell, Phillip J; Menegini, R. Michael; Racanelli, Joe

    2011-01-28

    The purpose of this study is to establish a test setup and vibration analysis method to predict femoral stem seating and prevent bone fracture using accelerometer or force response data from an instrument stem and impactor. This study builds upon earlier studies to identify a means to supplement a surgeon's tactile and auditory senses by using damage identification techniques normally used for civil and mechanical structures. Testing will be conducted using foam cortical shell sawbones prepared for stems of different geometries. Each stem will be instrumented with an accelerometer. Two impactor designs will be compared: a monolithic impactor with an integrated load cell and accelerometer and a two piece impactor. Acceleration and force measurements will be taken in the direction of impaction. Signal processing techniques will be applied to the acceleration time histories to determine features that can be used to assess device seating and potential fracture. A consistent energy input will be applied using a drop tower. The effect of introducing compliance under the bone support vise will also be investigated. The ultimate goal of this study is to design an integrated portable data acquisition system capable of being used in future cadaveric testing. This paper will discuss the experimental set-up, the signal processing techniques used and the subsequent results.

  6. Peri-prosthetic fracture vibration testing

    SciTech Connect

    Cruce, Jesse R; Erwin, Jenny R; Remick, Kevin R; Cornwell, Phillip J; Menegini, R. Michael; Racanelli, Joe

    2010-11-08

    The purpose of this study was to establish a test setup and vibration analysis method to predict femoral stem seating and prevent bone fracture using accelerometer and force response data from an instrumented stem and impactor. This study builds upon earlier studies to identify a means to supplement a surgeon's tactile and auditory senses by using damage identification techniques normally used for civil and mechanical structures. Testing was conducted using foam cortical shell sawbones prepared for stems of different geometries. Each stem was instrumented with an accelerometer. Two impactor designs were compared: a monolithic impactor and a two-piece impactor, each with an integrated load cell and accelerometer. Acceleration and force measurements were taken in the direction of impaction. Comparisons between different methods of applying an impacting force were made, including a drop tower and a surgical hammer. The effect of varying compliance on the data was also investigated. The ultimate goal of this study was to assist in the design of an integrated portable data acquisition system capable of being used in future cadaveric testing. This paper will discuss the experimental setup and the subsequent results of the comparisons made between impactors, prosthetic geometries, compliances, and impact methods. The results of this study can be used for both future replicate testing as well as in a cadaveric environment.

  7. Experimental verification of a novel MEMS multi-modal vibration energy harvester for ultra-low power remote sensing nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannacci, J.; Sordo, G.; Serra, E.; Kucera, M.; Schmid, U.

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we discuss the verification and preliminary experimental characterization of a MEMS-based vibration Energy Harvester (EH) design. The device, named Four-Leaf Clover (FLC), is based on a circular-shaped mechanical resonator with four petal-like mass-spring cascaded systems. This solution introduces several mechanical Degrees of Freedom (DOFs), and therefore enables multiple resonant modes and deformation shapes in the vibrations frequency range of interest. The target is to realize a wideband multi-modal EH-MEMS device, that overcomes the typical narrowband working characteristics of standard cantilevered EHs, by ensuring flexible and adaptable power source to ultra-low power electronics for integrated remote sensing nodes (e.g. Wireless Sensor Networks - WSNs) in the Internet of Things (IoT) scenario, aiming to self-powered and energy autonomous smart systems. Finite Element Method simulations of the FLC EH-MEMS show the presence of several resonant modes for vibrations up to 4-5 kHz, and level of converted power up to a few μW at resonance and in closed-loop conditions (i.e. with resistive load). On the other hand, the first experimental tests of FLC fabricated samples, conducted with a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV), proved the presence of several resonant modes, and allowed to validate the accuracy of the FEM modeling method. Such a good accordance holds validity for what concerns the coupled field behavior of the FLC EH-MEMS, as well. Both measurements and simulations performed at 190 Hz (i.e. out of resonance) showed the generation of power in the range of nW (Root Mean Square - RMS values). Further steps of this work will include the experimental characterization in a full range of vibrations, aiming to prove the whole functionality of the FLC EH-MEMS proposed design concept.

  8. A Low Frequency FBG Accelerometer with Symmetrical Bended Spring Plates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fufei; Dai, Yutang; Karanja, Joseph Muna; Yang, Minghong

    2017-01-22

    To meet the requirements for low-frequency vibration monitoring, a new type of FBG (fiber Bragg grating) accelerometer with a bended spring plate is proposed. Two symmetrical bended spring plates are used as elastic elements, which drive the FBG to produce axial strains equal in magnitude but opposite in direction when exciting vibrations exist, leading to doubling the wavelength shift of the FBG. The mechanics model and a numerical method are presented in this paper, with which the influence of the structural parameters on the sensitivity and the eigenfrequency are discussed. The test results show that the sensitivity of the accelerometer is more than 1000 pm/g when the frequency is within the 0.7-20 Hz range.

  9. A Low Frequency FBG Accelerometer with Symmetrical Bended Spring Plates

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fufei; Dai, Yutang; Karanja, Joseph Muna; Yang, Minghong

    2017-01-01

    To meet the requirements for low-frequency vibration monitoring, a new type of FBG (fiber Bragg grating) accelerometer with a bended spring plate is proposed. Two symmetrical bended spring plates are used as elastic elements, which drive the FBG to produce axial strains equal in magnitude but opposite in direction when exciting vibrations exist, leading to doubling the wavelength shift of the FBG. The mechanics model and a numerical method are presented in this paper, with which the influence of the structural parameters on the sensitivity and the eigenfrequency are discussed. The test results show that the sensitivity of the accelerometer is more than 1000 pm/g when the frequency is within the 0.7–20 Hz range. PMID:28117740

  10. Pixel-Level and Robust Vibration Source Sensing in High-Frame-Rate Video Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Mingjun; Aoyama, Tadayoshi; Takaki, Takeshi; Ishii, Idaku

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effect of appearance variations on the detectability of vibration feature extraction with pixel-level digital filters for high-frame-rate videos. In particular, we consider robust vibrating object tracking, which is clearly different from conventional appearance-based object tracking with spatial pattern recognition in a high-quality image region of a certain size. For 512 × 512 videos of a rotating fan located at different positions and orientations and captured at 2000 frames per second with different lens settings, we verify how many pixels are extracted as vibrating regions with pixel-level digital filters. The effectiveness of dynamics-based vibration features is demonstrated by examining the robustness against changes in aperture size and the focal condition of the camera lens, the apparent size and orientation of the object being tracked, and its rotational frequency, as well as complexities and movements of background scenes. Tracking experiments for a flying multicopter with rotating propellers are also described to verify the robustness of localization under complex imaging conditions in outside scenarios. PMID:27827860

  11. Experimental study of a self-powered and sensing MR-damper-based vibration control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapiński, Bogdan

    2011-10-01

    The paper deals with a semi-active vibration control system based on a magnetorheological (MR) damper. The study outlines the model and the structure of the system, and describes its experimental investigation. The conceptual design of this system involves harvesting energy from structural vibrations using an energy extractor based on an electromagnetic transduction mechanism (Faraday's law). The system consists of an electromagnetic induction device (EMI) prototype and an MR damper of RD-1005 series manufactured by Lord Corporation. The energy extracted is applied to control the damping characteristics of the MR damper. The model of the system was used to prove that the proposed vibration control system is feasible. The system was realized in the semi-active control strategy with energy recovery and examined through experiments in the cases where the control coil of the MR damper was voltage-supplied directly from the EMI or voltage-supplied via the rectifier, or supplied with a current control system with two feedback loops. The external loop used the sky-hook algorithm whilst the internal loop used the algorithm switching the photorelay, at the output from the rectifier. Experimental results of the proposed vibration control system were compared with those obtained for the passive system (MR damper is off-state) and for the system with an external power source (conventional system) when the control coil of the MR damper was supplied by a DC power supply and analogue voltage amplifier or a DC power supply and a photorelay. It was demonstrated that the system is able to power-supply the MR damper and can adjust itself to structural vibrations. It was also found that, since the signal of induced voltage from the EMI agrees well with that of the relative velocity signal across the damper, the device can act as a 'velocity-sign' sensor.

  12. Feather Vibration as a Stimulus for Sensing Incipient Separation in Falcon Diving Flight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-07

    V-shape some feathers tips may elevate in certain regions of the body. These regions were identi- fied in wind tunnel tests for typical diving...was studied in a wind tunnel to focus on the fluid-structure interaction of feathers located in this sec- tor. The distal ends of the feathers show...feather vibration during flight and the local flow situation. A possible way is to study the bird flight under controlled situation in a wind

  13. Research and implementation of simulation for TDICCD remote sensing in vibration of optical axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi-hong; Kang, Xiao-jun; Lin, Zhe; Song, Li

    2013-12-01

    During the exposure time, the charge transfer speed in the push-broom direction and the line-by-lines canning speed of the sensor are required to match each other strictly for a space-borne TDICCD push-broom camera. However, as attitude disturbance of satellite and vibration of camera are inevitable, it is impossible to eliminate the speed mismatch, which will make the signal of different targets overlay each other and result in a decline of image resolution. The effects of velocity mismatch will be visually observed and analyzed by simulating the degradation of image quality caused by the vibration of the optical axis, and it is significant for the evaluation of image quality and design of the image restoration algorithm. How to give a model in time domain and space domain during the imaging time is the problem needed to be solved firstly. As vibration information for simulation is usually given by a continuous curve, the pixels of original image matrix and sensor matrix are discrete, as a result, they cannot always match each other well. The effect of simulation will also be influenced by the discrete sampling in integration time. In conclusion, it is quite significant for improving simulation accuracy and efficiency to give an appropriate discrete modeling and simulation method. The paper analyses discretization schemes in time domain and space domain and presents a method to simulate the quality of image of the optical system in the vibration of the line of sight, which is based on the principle of TDICCD sensor. The gray value of pixels in sensor matrix is obtained by a weighted arithmetic, which solves the problem of pixels dismatch. The result which compared with the experiment of hardware test indicate that this simulation system performances well in accuracy and reliability.

  14. Characterization of a MEMS Accelerometer for Inertial Navigating Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, R.D.

    1999-02-12

    Inertial MEMS sensors such as accelerometers and angular rotation sensing devices continue to improve in performance as advances in design and processing are made. Present state-of-the-art accelerometers have achieved performance levels in the laboratory that are consistent with requirements for successful application in tactical weapon navigation systems. However, sensor performance parameters that are of interest to the designer of inertial navigation systems are frequently not adequately addressed by the MEMS manufacturer. This paper addresses the testing and characterization of a MEMS accelerometer from an inertial navigation perspective. The paper discusses test objectives, data reduction techniques and presents results from the test of a three-axis MEMS accelerometer conducted at Sandia National Laboratories during 1997. The test was structured to achieve visibility and characterization of the accelerometer bias and scale factor stability overtime and temperature. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the US Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. Optimal Placement of Accelerometers for the Detection of Everyday Activities

    PubMed Central

    Cleland, Ian; Kikhia, Basel; Nugent, Chris; Boytsov, Andrey; Hallberg, Josef; Synnes, Kåre; McClean, Sally; Finlay, Dewar

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an investigation to determine the optimal placement of accelerometers for the purpose of detecting a range of everyday activities. The paper investigates the effect of combining data from accelerometers placed at various bodily locations on the accuracy of activity detection. Eight healthy males participated within the study. Data were collected from six wireless tri-axial accelerometers placed at the chest, wrist, lower back, hip, thigh and foot. Activities included walking, running on a motorized treadmill, sitting, lying, standing and walking up and down stairs. The Support Vector Machine provided the most accurate detection of activities of all the machine learning algorithms investigated. Although data from all locations provided similar levels of accuracy, the hip was the best single location to record data for activity detection using a Support Vector Machine, providing small but significantly better accuracy than the other investigated locations. Increasing the number of sensing locations from one to two or more statistically increased the accuracy of classification. There was no significant difference in accuracy when using two or more sensors. It was noted, however, that the difference in activity detection using single or multiple accelerometers may be more pronounced when trying to detect finer grain activities. Future work shall therefore investigate the effects of accelerometer placement on a larger range of these activities. PMID:23867744

  16. Wireless sensing and vibration control with increased redundancy and robustness design.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Li, Luyu; Song, Gangbing; Yu, Yan

    2014-11-01

    Control systems with long distance sensor and actuator wiring have the problem of high system cost and increased sensor noise. Wireless sensor network (WSN)-based control systems are an alternative solution involving lower setup and maintenance costs and reduced sensor noise. However, WSN-based control systems also encounter problems such as possible data loss, irregular sampling periods (due to the uncertainty of the wireless channel), and the possibility of sensor breakdown (due to the increased complexity of the overall control system). In this paper, a wireless microcontroller-based control system is designed and implemented to wirelessly perform vibration control. The wireless microcontroller-based system is quite different from regular control systems due to its limited speed and computational power. Hardware, software, and control algorithm design are described in detail to demonstrate this prototype. Model and system state compensation is used in the wireless control system to solve the problems of data loss and sensor breakdown. A positive position feedback controller is used as the control law for the task of active vibration suppression. Both wired and wireless controllers are implemented. The results show that the WSN-based control system can be successfully used to suppress the vibration and produces resilient results in the presence of sensor failure.

  17. Motorized Force-Sensing Micro-Forceps with Tremor Cancelling and Controlled Micro-Vibrations for Easier Membrane Peeling*

    PubMed Central

    Gonenc, Berk; Gehlbach, Peter; Handa, James; Taylor, Russell H.; Iordachita, Iulian

    2014-01-01

    Retinal microsurgery requires the manipulation of extremely delicate tissues by various micron scale maneuvers and the application of very small forces. Among vitreoretinal procedures, membrane peeling is a standard procedure requiring the delamination of a very thin fibrous membrane on the retina surface. This study presents the development and evaluation of an integrated assistive system for membrane peeling. This system combines a force-sensing motorized micro-forceps with an active tremor-canceling handheld micromanipulator, Micron. The proposed system (1) attenuates hand-tremor when accurate positioning is needed, (2) provides auditory force feedback to keep the exerted forces at a safe level, and (3) pulsates the tool tip at high frequency to provide ease in delaminating membranes. Experiments on bandages and raw chicken eggs have revealed that controlled micro-vibrations provide significant ease in delaminating membranes. Applying similar amount of forces, much faster delamination was observed when the frequency of these vibrations were increased (up to 50 Hz). PMID:25544965

  18. High precision particle mass sensing using microchannel resonators in the second vibration mode

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jungchul; Bryan, Andrea K.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2011-02-15

    An intrinsic uncertainty in particle mass sensing with the suspended microchannel resonator results from variation in a particle's position near the free end of the resonator. To circumvent this error we employ the second flexural bending mode. This mode exhibits additional frequency peaks while particles pass over the antinode, a point where the frequency shift is insensitive to the lateral position of the particle. We measure polystyrene beads with the first and second modes and confirm that the second mode sensing provides a narrower mass histogram. For 3 {mu}m diameter beads, second mode sensing at the antinode improves the coefficient of variation in buoyant mass from 1.76% to 1.05% for population measurements and from 1.40% to 0.53% for a single trapped particle.

  19. Measurement of Impact Acceleration: Mouthpiece Accelerometer Versus Helmet Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Michael; Halstead, P. David; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Barlow, David

    2007-01-01

    Context: Instrumented helmets have been used to estimate impact acceleration imparted to the head during helmet impacts. These instrumented helmets may not accurately measure the actual amount of acceleration experienced by the head due to factors such as helmet-to-head fit. Objective: To determine if an accelerometer attached to a mouthpiece (MP) provides a more accurate representation of headform center of gravity (HFCOG) acceleration during impact than does an accelerometer attached to a helmet fitted on the headform. Design: Single-factor research design in which the independent variable was accelerometer position (HFCOG, helmet, MP) and the dependent variables were g and Severity Index (SI). Setting: Independent impact research laboratory. Intervention(s): The helmeted headform was dropped (n = 168) using a National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE) drop system from the standard heights and impact sites according to NOCSAE test standards. Peak g and SI were measured for each accelerometer position during impact. Main Outcome Measures: Upon impact, the peak g and SI were recorded for each accelerometer location. Results: Strong relationships were noted for HFCOG and MP measures, and significant differences were seen between HFCOG and helmet g measures and HFCOG and helmet SI measures. No statistically significant differences were noted between HFCOG and MP g and SI measures. Regression analyses showed a significant relationship between HFCOG and MP measures but not between HFCOG and helmet measures. Conclusions: Upon impact, MP acceleration (g) and SI measurements were closely related to and more accurate in measuring HFCOG g and SI than helmet measurements. The MP accelerometer is a valid method for measuring head acceleration. PMID:17597937

  20. Sensing of fluid viscoelasticity from piezoelectric actuation of cantilever flexural vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeongwon; Jeong, Seongbin; Kim, Seung Joon; Park, Junhong

    2015-01-15

    An experimental method is proposed to measure the rheological properties of fluids. The effects of fluids on the vibration actuated by piezoelectric patches were analyzed and used in measuring viscoelastic properties. Fluid-structure interactions induced changes in the beam vibration properties and frequency-dependent variations of the complex wavenumber of the beam structure were used in monitoring these changes. To account for the effects of fluid-structure interaction, fluids were modelled as a simple viscoelastic support at one end of the beam. The measured properties were the fluid’s dynamic shear modulus and loss tangent. Using the proposed method, the rheological properties of various non-Newtonian fluids were measured. The frequency range for which reliable viscoelasticity results could be obtained was 10–400 Hz. Viscosity standard fluids were tested to verify the accuracy of the proposed method, and the results agreed well with the manufacturer’s reported values. The simple proposed laboratory setup for measurements was flexible so that the frequency ranges of data acquisition were adjustable by changing the beam’s mechanical properties.

  1. Wearable accelerometer in clinical use.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Toshiyo

    2005-01-01

    To improve the equality of life, we must prevent the falls in both healthy elderly and patients with the cerebrovascular diseases. Wearable accelerometer was applied to monitor. In this paper, we introduced two different clinical applications. On is fall detector and the other is monitoring device for screening test. 1) We have developed body-worn accelerometer with data loggers and monitored the daily of life in patient with Parkinson disease. The patients wore the device and monitored falls while walking and standing. As a result, we could obtain fall times for a long period. 2) The ability of walking and standing have been evaluated by Timed up & go test. We used telemetry with accelerometer. The stability of walking could be evaluated by the acceleration signals. The simple body-won device can be useful for fall study.

  2. Bragg grating-based fiber laser vibration sensing system with novel phase detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiufeng; Chen, Zhihao; Teo, Ju Teng; Ng, Soon Huat

    2014-01-01

    We characterized the dynamic response of a Bragg grating-based fiber laser sensing system. The sensing system comprises of a narrow line width fiber laser based on π-phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating formed in an active fiber, an unbalanced fiber Michelson interferometer (FMI), which performs wavelength-to-phase mapping, and a phase detection algorithm, which acquires the phase change from the interferometric output signal. The novel phase detection algorithm is developed based on the combination of the two traditional phase generated carrier algorithms: differential-cross-multiplying and arctangent algorithms, and possesses the advantages of the two algorithms. The modulation depth fluctuation of the carrier does not affect the performance of the sensing system. A relatively high side mode suppression ratio of above 50 dB has been achieved within a wide range of carrier amplitude from 1.6 to 5.0 V which correspond to the modulation depth from 1.314 to 4.106 rad. The linearity is 99.082% for the relationship between the power spectral density (dBm/Hz) of the detected signal and the amplitude (mv) of the test signal. The unbalanced FMI is used to eliminate the polarization effect.

  3. A New Z-axis Resonant Micro-Accelerometer Based on Electrostatic Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Xingjun; Dai, Bo; Liu, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Presented in the paper is the design, the simulation, the fabrication and the experiment of a new z-axis resonant accelerometer based on the electrostatic stiffness. The new z-axis resonant micro-accelerometer, which consists of a torsional accelerometer and two plane resonators, decouples the sensing movement of the accelerometer from the oscillation of the plane resonators by electrostatic stiffness, which will improve the performance. The new structure and the sensitive theory of the acceleration are illuminated, and the equation of the scale factor is deduced under ideal conditions firstly. The Ansys simulation is implemented to verify the basic principle of the torsional accelerometer and the plane resonator individually. The structure simulation results prove that the effective frequency of the torsional accelerometer and the plane resonator are 0.66 kHz and 13.3 kHz, respectively. Then, the new structure is fabricated by the standard three-mask deep dry silicon on glass (DDSOG) process and encapsulated by parallel seam welding. Finally, the detecting and control circuits are designed to achieve the closed-loop self-oscillation, to trace the natural frequency of resonator and to measure the system frequency. Experimental results show that the new z-axis resonant accelerometer has a scale factor of 31.65 Hz/g, a bias stability of 727 μg and a dynamic range of over 10 g, which proves that the new z-axis resonant micro-accelerometer is practicable. PMID:25569748

  4. Citizen Sensors for SHM: Use of Accelerometer Data from Smartphones

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Maria; Fukuda, Yoshio; Mizuta, Masato; Ozer, Ekin

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitous smartphones have created a significant opportunity to form a low-cost wireless Citizen Sensor network and produce big data for monitoring structural integrity and safety under operational and extreme loads. Such data are particularly useful for rapid assessment of structural damage in a large urban setting after a major event such as an earthquake. This study explores the utilization of smartphone accelerometers for measuring structural vibration, from which structural health and post-event damage can be diagnosed. Widely available smartphones are tested under sinusoidal wave excitations with frequencies in the range relevant to civil engineering structures. Large-scale seismic shaking table tests, observing input ground motion and response of a structural model, are carried out to evaluate the accuracy of smartphone accelerometers under operational, white-noise and earthquake excitations of different intensity. Finally, the smartphone accelerometers are tested on a dynamically loaded bridge. The extensive experiments show satisfactory agreements between the reference and smartphone sensor measurements in both time and frequency domains, demonstrating the capability of the smartphone sensors to measure structural responses ranging from low-amplitude ambient vibration to high-amplitude seismic response. Encouraged by the results of this study, the authors are developing a citizen-engaging and data-analytics crowdsourcing platform towards a smartphone-based Citizen Sensor network for structural health monitoring and post-event damage assessment applications. PMID:25643056

  5. Vibration monitoring of a helicopter blade model using the optical fiber distributed strain sensing technique.

    PubMed

    Wada, Daichi; Igawa, Hirotaka; Kasai, Tokio

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate a dynamic distributed monitoring technique using a long-length fiber Bragg grating (FBG) interrogated by optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) that measures strain at a speed of 150 Hz, spatial resolution of 1 mm, and measurement range of 20 m. A 5 m FBG is bonded to a 5.5 m helicopter blade model, and vibration is applied by the step relaxation method. The time domain responses of the strain distributions are measured, and the blade deflections are calculated based on the strain distributions. Frequency response functions are obtained using the time domain responses of the calculated deflection induced by the preload release, and the modal parameters are retrieved. Experimental results demonstrated the dynamic monitoring performances and the applicability to the modal analysis of the OFDR-FBG technique.

  6. Ambient vibration monitoring of slender structures by microwave interferometer remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gikas, Vassilis

    2012-11-01

    This paper examines the potential of microwave radar interferometry for monitoring the dynamic behaviour of large civil engineering works. It provides an overview of the method, its principles of operation with particular emphasis given on the IBIS-S system. Two areas of application are considered and the results of the analyses are presented and discussed. The first experimental study involves the monitoring of the dynamic response of a tall power plant chimney due to wind load. The second example examines the dynamic behaviour of a long cable-stayed bridge. In this case, the focus is placed on the effects that individual traffic events impose on the vibration response of the main span of the bridge deck and the bridge pylons. Analysis of the results provides detailed displacement time-histories and the dominant frequencies observed at the top of the chimney and along the bridge deck and the top of the towers. Also, cross-comparisons and discussions with the results obtained at the same structures using different sensor configurations are provided.

  7. Self diagnostic accelerometer ground testing on a C-17 aircraft engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokars, Roger P.; Lekki, John D.

    The self diagnostic accelerometer (SDA) developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center was tested for the first time in an aircraft engine environment as part of the Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research (VIPR) program. The VIPR program includes testing multiple critical flight sensor technologies. One such sensor, the accelerometer, measures vibrations to detect faults in the engine. In order to rely upon the accelerometer, the health of the accelerometer must be ensured. Sensor system malfunction is a significant contributor to propulsion in flight shutdowns (IFSD) which can lead to aircraft accidents when the issue is compounded with an inappropriate crew response. The development of the SDA is important for both reducing the IFSD rate, and hence reducing the rate at which this component failure type can put an aircraft in jeopardy, and also as a critical enabling technology for future automated malfunction diagnostic systems. The SDA is a sensor system designed to actively determine the accelerometer structural health and attachment condition, in addition to making vibration measurements. The SDA uses a signal conditioning unit that sends an electrical chirp to the accelerometer and recognizes changes in the response due to changes in the accelerometer health and attachment condition. In an effort toward demonstrating the SDA's flight worthiness and robustness, multiple SDAs were mounted and tested on a C-17 aircraft engine. The engine test conditions varied from engine off, to idle, to maximum power. The two SDA attachment conditions used were fully tight and loose. The newly developed SDA health algorithm described herein uses cross correlation pattern recognition to discriminate a healthy from a faulty SDA. The VIPR test results demonstrate for the first time the robustness of the SDA in an engine environment characterized by high vibration levels.

  8. Self Diagnostic Accelerometer Ground Testing on a C-17 Aircraft Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokars, Roger P.; Lekki, John D.

    2013-01-01

    The self diagnostic accelerometer (SDA) developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center was tested for the first time in an aircraft engine environment as part of the Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research (VIPR) program. The VIPR program includes testing multiple critical flight sensor technologies. One such sensor, the accelerometer, measures vibrations to detect faults in the engine. In order to rely upon the accelerometer, the health of the accelerometer must be ensured. Sensor system malfunction is a significant contributor to propulsion in flight shutdowns (IFSD) which can lead to aircraft accidents when the issue is compounded with an inappropriate crew response. The development of the SDA is important for both reducing the IFSD rate, and hence reducing the rate at which this component failure type can put an aircraft in jeopardy, and also as a critical enabling technology for future automated malfunction diagnostic systems. The SDA is a sensor system designed to actively determine the accelerometer structural health and attachment condition, in addition to making vibration measurements. The SDA uses a signal conditioning unit that sends an electrical chirp to the accelerometer and recognizes changes in the response due to changes in the accelerometer health and attachment condition. In an effort toward demonstrating the SDAs flight worthiness and robustness, multiple SDAs were mounted and tested on a C-17 aircraft engine. The engine test conditions varied from engine off, to idle, to maximum power. The two SDA attachment conditions used were fully tight and loose. The newly developed SDA health algorithm described herein uses cross correlation pattern recognition to discriminate a healthy from a faulty SDA. The VIPR test results demonstrate for the first time the robustness of the SDA in an engine environment characterized by high vibration levels.

  9. Vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes for pressure, tactile and vibration sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmazoglu, O.; Popp, A.; Pavlidis, D.; Schneider, J. J.; Garth, D.; Schüttler, F.; Battenberg, G.

    2012-03-01

    We report a simple method for the micro-nano integration of flexible, vertically aligned multiwalled CNT arrays sandwiched between a top and bottom carbon layer via a porous alumina (Al2O3) template approach. The electromechanical properties of the flexible CNT arrays have been investigated under mechanical stress conditions. First experiments show highly sensitive piezoresistive sensors with a resistance decrease of up to ˜35% and a spatial resolution of <1 mm. The results indicate that these CNT structures can be utilized for tactile sensing components. They also confirm the feasibility of accessing and utilizing nanoscopic CNT bundles via lithographic processing. The method involves room-temperature processing steps and standard microfabrication techniques.

  10. Design of a Piezoelectric Accelerometer with High Sensitivity and Low Transverse Effect.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bian; Liu, Hanyue; Yang, Ning; Zhao, Yulong; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2016-09-26

    In order to meet the requirements of cable fault detection, a new structure of piezoelectric accelerometer was designed and analyzed in detail. The structure was composed of a seismic mass, two sensitive beams, and two added beams. Then, simulations including the maximum stress, natural frequency, and output voltage were carried out. Moreover, comparisons with traditional structures of piezoelectric accelerometer were made. To verify which vibration mode is the dominant one on the acceleration and the space between the mass and glass, mode analysis and deflection analysis were carried out. Fabricated on an n-type single crystal silicon wafer, the sensor chips were wire-bonged to printed circuit boards (PCBs) and simply packaged for experiments. Finally, a vibration test was conducted. The results show that the proposed piezoelectric accelerometer has high sensitivity, low resonance frequency, and low transverse effect.

  11. Design of a Piezoelectric Accelerometer with High Sensitivity and Low Transverse Effect

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Bian; Liu, Hanyue; Yang, Ning; Zhao, Yulong; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2016-01-01

    In order to meet the requirements of cable fault detection, a new structure of piezoelectric accelerometer was designed and analyzed in detail. The structure was composed of a seismic mass, two sensitive beams, and two added beams. Then, simulations including the maximum stress, natural frequency, and output voltage were carried out. Moreover, comparisons with traditional structures of piezoelectric accelerometer were made. To verify which vibration mode is the dominant one on the acceleration and the space between the mass and glass, mode analysis and deflection analysis were carried out. Fabricated on an n-type single crystal silicon wafer, the sensor chips were wire-bonged to printed circuit boards (PCBs) and simply packaged for experiments. Finally, a vibration test was conducted. The results show that the proposed piezoelectric accelerometer has high sensitivity, low resonance frequency, and low transverse effect. PMID:27681734

  12. Cable force monitoring system of cable stayed bridges using accelerometers inside mobile smart phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Yu, Yan; Hu, Weitong; Jiao, Dong; Han, Ruicong; Mao, Xingquan; Li, Mingchu; Ou, Jinping

    2015-03-01

    Cable force is one of the most important parameters in structural health monitoring system integrated on cable stayed bridges for safety evaluation. In this paper, one kind of cable force monitoring system scheme was proposed. Accelerometers inside mobile smart phones were utilized for the acceleration monitoring of cable vibration. Firstly, comparative tests were conducted in the lab. The test results showed that the accelerometers inside smartphones can detect the cable vibration, and then the cable force can be obtained. Furthermore, there is good agreement between the monitoring results of different kinds of accelerometers. Finally, the proposed cable force monitoring system was applied on one cable strayed bridge structure, the monitoring result verified the feasibility of the monitoring system.

  13. Testing accelerometer rectification error caused by multidimensional composite inputs with double turntable centrifuge.

    PubMed

    Guan, W; Meng, X F; Dong, X M

    2014-12-01

    Rectification error is a critical characteristic of inertial accelerometers. Accelerometers working in operational situations are stimulated by composite inputs, including constant acceleration and vibration, from multiple directions. However, traditional methods for evaluating rectification error only use one-dimensional vibration. In this paper, a double turntable centrifuge (DTC) was utilized to produce the constant acceleration and vibration simultaneously and we tested the rectification error due to the composite accelerations. At first, we deduced the expression of the rectification error with the output of the DTC and a static model of the single-axis pendulous accelerometer under test. Theoretical investigation and analysis were carried out in accordance with the rectification error model. Then a detailed experimental procedure and testing results were described. We measured the rectification error with various constant accelerations at different frequencies and amplitudes of the vibration. The experimental results showed the distinguished characteristics of the rectification error caused by the composite accelerations. The linear relation between the constant acceleration and the rectification error was proved. The experimental procedure and results presented in this context can be referenced for the investigation of the characteristics of accelerometer with multiple inputs.

  14. Evaluation of transverse piezoelectric coefficient of ZnO thin films deposited on different flexible substrates: a comparative study on the vibration sensing performance.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Sudeep; Nayak, Manjunatha M; Rajanna, K

    2014-05-28

    We report on the systematic comparative study of highly c-axis oriented and crystalline piezoelectric ZnO thin films deposited on four different flexible substrates for vibration sensing application. The flexible substrates employed for present experimental study were namely a metal alloy (Phynox), metal (aluminum), polyimide (Kapton), and polyester (Mylar). ZnO thin films were deposited by an RF reactive magnetron sputtering technique. ZnO thin films of similar thicknesses of 700 ± 30 nm were deposited on four different flexible substrates to have proper comparative studies. The crystallinity, surface morphology, chemical composition, and roughness of ZnO thin films were evaluated by respective material characterization techniques. The transverse piezoelectric coefficient (d31) value for assessing the piezoelectric property of ZnO thin films on different flexible substrates was measured by a four-point bending method. ZnO thin films deposited on Phynox alloy substrate showed relatively better material characterization results and a higher piezoelectric d31 coefficient value as compared to ZnO films on metal and polymer substrates. In order to experimentally verify the above observations, vibration sensing studies were performed. As expected, the ZnO thin film deposited on Phynox alloy substrate showed better vibration sensing performance. It has generated the highest peak to peak output voltage amplitude of 256 mV as compared to that of aluminum (224 mV), Kapton (144 mV), and Mylar (46 mV). Therefore, metal alloy flexible substrate proves to be a more suitable, advantageous, and versatile choice for integrating ZnO thin films as compared to metal and polymer flexible substrates for vibration sensing applications. The present experimental study is extremely important and helpful for the selection of a suitable flexible substrate for various applications in the field of sensor and actuator technology.

  15. Self-powered In-plane Accelerometer Using Triboelectric Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Rahul Kumar; Dhakar, Lokesh; Lee, Chengkuo

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a self-powered triboelectric based accelerometer to detect wide range of in-plane acceleration utilizing the triboelectric mechanism. The freestanding sliding mode was utilized to realize the in-plane sensing. The fabricated device consists of soft polymer spring which displays wide detection range from ±1g to ±6g (g = 9.8m/s2) in x and y directions with sensitivity of 21mV/(g). The proposed device can be utilized for self-powered shock sensing in various future applications.

  16. Helmsman’s Recording Accelerometer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Silage , Principal Electrical Engineer Mitchell B. Oslon, Research Engineer Conrad Technologies, Inc. Station Square One, Suite 102 Paoli, PA 19301...SUBTITLE Helmsman’s Recording Accelerometer 6. AUTHOR(S) Donald F. DeCleene Mitchell B. Oslon Dennis A. Silage 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...58,1995. McCreight, K. K., "Assessing the Seaworthiness of SWATH Ships," SNAME Transactions, vol. 95, pp. 189-214,1987. Silage , D., Hartmann, B

  17. Vibration in textile mills.

    PubMed

    Sorainen, E

    1988-12-01

    The vibration in nine halls of the six weaving mills was measured in 1978-80. The measurements were taken at regular intervals in the working area of the weavers, which was the wooden support attached to the machine or the floor of the textile mill. The accelerometer was mounted with screws onto the working area, and all vibration samples were analyzed immediately, in situ. The vibration of the floor was tangent to or exceeded slightly the "reduced comfort boundary" specified in International Standard ISO 2631/1 (1985) only in the areas where the floor was not against the ground. The greatest amount of vibration occurred on the supports which had been attached to the machines. On these supports the vibration in places exceeded the "fatigue-decreased proficiency boundary."

  18. Calibration and deployment of a fiber-optic sensing system for monitoring debris flows.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ching-Jer; Chu, Chung-Ray; Tien, Tsung-Mo; Yin, Hsiao-Yuen; Chen, Ping-Sen

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel fiber-optic sensing system, capable of monitoring debris flows or other natural hazards that produce ground vibrations. The proposed sensing system comprises a demodulator (BraggSCOPE, FS5500), which includes a broadband light source and a data logger, a four-port coupler and four Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) accelerometers. Based on field tests, the performance of the proposed fiber-optic sensing system is compared with that of a conventional sensing system that includes a geophone or a microphone. Following confirmation of the reliability of the proposed sensing system, the fiber-optic sensing systems are deployed along the Ai-Yu-Zi and Chu-Shui Creeks in Nautou County of central Taiwan for monitoring debris flows. Sensitivity test of the deployed fiber-optic sensing system along the creek banks is also performed. Analysis results of the seismic data recorded by the systems reveal in detail the frequency characteristics of the artificially generated ground vibrations. Results of this study demonstrate that the proposed fiber-optic sensing system is highly promising for use in monitoring natural disasters that generate ground vibrations.

  19. Calibration and Deployment of a Fiber-Optic Sensing System for Monitoring Debris Flows

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ching-Jer; Chu, Chung-Ray; Tien, Tsung-Mo; Yin, Hsiao-Yuen; Chen, Ping-Sen

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel fiber-optic sensing system, capable of monitoring debris flows or other natural hazards that produce ground vibrations. The proposed sensing system comprises a demodulator (BraggSCOPE, FS5500), which includes a broadband light source and a data logger, a four-port coupler and four Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) accelerometers. Based on field tests, the performance of the proposed fiber-optic sensing system is compared with that of a conventional sensing system that includes a geophone or a microphone. Following confirmation of the reliability of the proposed sensing system, the fiber-optic sensing systems are deployed along the Ai-Yu-Zi and Chu-Shui Creeks in Nautou County of central Taiwan for monitoring debris flows. Sensitivity test of the deployed fiber-optic sensing system along the creek banks is also performed. Analysis results of the seismic data recorded by the systems reveal in detail the frequency characteristics of the artificially generated ground vibrations. Results of this study demonstrate that the proposed fiber-optic sensing system is highly promising for use in monitoring natural disasters that generate ground vibrations. PMID:22778616

  20. Accelerometer and strain gage evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammerman, D. J.; Madsen, M. M.; Uncapher, W. L.; Stenberg, D. R.; Bronowski, D. R.

    1991-06-01

    This document describes the method developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to evaluate transducer used in the design certification testing of nuclear material shipping packages. This testing project was performed by SNL for the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). This evaluation is based on the results of tests conducted to measure ruggedness, failure frequency, repeatability, and manufacturers' calibration data under both field and laboratory conditions. The results of these tests are provided and discussed. The transducer were selected for testing by surveying cask contractors and testing facilities. Important insights relating to operational characteristics of accelerometer types were gained during field testing.

  1. Technique for Determining Bridge Displacement Response Using MEMS Accelerometers

    PubMed Central

    Sekiya, Hidehiko; Kimura, Kentaro; Miki, Chitoshi

    2016-01-01

    In bridge maintenance, particularly with regard to fatigue damage in steel bridges, it is important to determine the displacement response of the entire bridge under a live load as well as that of each member. Knowing the displacement response enables the identification of dynamic deformations that can cause stresses and ultimately lead to damage and thus also allows the undertaking of appropriate countermeasures. In theory, the displacement response can be calculated from the double integration of the measured acceleration. However, data measured by an accelerometer include measurement errors caused by the limitations of the analog-to-digital conversion process and sensor noise. These errors distort the double integration results. Furthermore, as bridges in service are constantly vibrating because of passing vehicles, estimating the boundary conditions for the numerical integration is difficult. To address these problems, this paper proposes a method for determining the displacement of a bridge in service from its acceleration based on its free vibration. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, field measurements were conducted using nine different accelerometers. Based on the results of these measurements, the proposed method was found to be highly accurate in comparison with the reference displacement obtained using a contact displacement gauge. PMID:26907287

  2. Engineering Implications of Rotational Sensitivity of Translational Accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroschek, R. L.

    2006-12-01

    Several studies have indicated that nominal linear translational accelerometers are strongly sensitive to rotation motions, especially around their horizontal axis. It has been theoretically and experimentally demonstrated that this situation affects the acceleration record and severely limits appropriate velocity and displacement determination. More importantly the common believe that filtering long periods signals could "clean" the acceleration record from this unwanted effect has been shown inadequate by the author this abstract and collaborators using experimental testing. Rotational effects are still present on filtered records unless the complete frequency bandwidth that composes the rotation motion is filtered out. In civil engineering structures rotations are nearly always present. Typical examples are foundation rocking, beam bending, floor slab deformation and overall rotation of structures due to relative large loads or damage. Two real cases were rotation of a relative flexible structure strongly influence the linear accelerometer responses are presented and later experimentally reproduce in a shake table controlled situation. The first one corresponds to a bridge with a contiguous 383 meter simple supported beam rested on rubber bearing that suffered the rotational related distortions due to the passing of a heavy truck at the end of a seismic event. The second event corresponds to the vibration recording of vertical motions on an industrial bridge that is exposed to forced vibration of a large motor. Both examples indicate that in certain conditions motion records from structural instruments are subjected to distortions effects that could make acceleration, velocity and displacement (temporarily or permanent) measurements not reliable.

  3. Superconducting six-axis accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, H. J.

    1990-01-01

    A new superconducting accelerometer, capable of measuring both linear and angular accelerations, is under development at the University of Maryland. A single superconducting proof mass is magnetically levitated against gravity or any other proof force. Its relative positions and orientations with respect to the platform are monitored by six superconducting inductance bridges sharing a single amplifier, called the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). The six degrees of freedom, the three linear acceleration components and the three angular acceleration components, of the platform are measured simultaneously. In order to improve the linearity and the dynamic range of the instrument, the demodulated outputs of the SQUID are fed back to appropriate levitation coils so that the proof mass remains at the null position for all six inductance bridges. The expected intrinsic noise of the instrument is 4 x 10(exp -12)m s(exp -2) Hz(exp -1/2) for linear acceleration and 3 x 10(exp -11) rad s(exp -2) Hz(exp -1/2) for angular acceleration in 1-g environment. In 0-g, the linear acceleration sensitivity of the superconducting accelerometer could be improved by two orders of magnitude. The design and the operating principle of a laboratory prototype of the new instrument is discussed.

  4. The co-design of interface sensing and tailoring of ultra-thin film with ultrasonic vibration-assisted AFM system.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jialin; Liu, Lianqing; Li, Guangyong

    2016-06-10

    Ultra-thin films (e.g., graphene, MoS2, and black phosphorus) have shown amazing performance in a variety of applications. The tailoring or machining of these ultra-thin films is often the preliminary step to manufacturing them into functional devices. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a flexible, high-efficiency and low-cost tailoring or machining tool with the advantages of high resolution and precision. However, the current AFM-based tailoring methods are often set up as an open loop regarding the machined depth and state. Thus, because of a lack of real-time feedback, an inappropriate applied force leads to over-cutting or under-cutting, which limits the performance of the manufactured devices. In this study, we propose a real-time tailoring and sensing method based on an ultrasonic vibration-assisted (USV-assisted) AFM system to solve the above problems. With the proposed method, the machined depth and state can be sensed in real time by detecting the phase value of the vibrating cantilever. To characterize and gain insight into the phase responses of the cantilever to the machined depth and sample material, a theoretical dynamic model of a cantilever-film vibrating system is introduced to model the machining process, and a sensing theory of machined depth and state is developed based on a USV-assisted AFM system. The experimental results verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method, which in turn lay the foundation for a closed-loop tailoring control strategy for ultra-thin films.

  5. High resolution interface circuit for closed-loop accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yin; Xiaowei, Liu; Weiping, Chen; Zhiping, Zhou

    2011-04-01

    This paper reports a low noise switched-capacitor CMOS interface circuit for the closed-loop operation of a capacitive accelerometer. The time division multiplexing of the same electrode is adopted to avoid the strong feedthrough between capacitance sensing and electrostatic force feedback. A PID controller is designed to ensure the stability and dynamic response of a high Q closed-loop accelerometer with a vacuum package. The architecture only requires single ended operational amplifiers, transmission gates and capacitors. Test results show that a full scale acceleration of ±3 g, non-linearity of 0.05% and signal bandwidth of 1000 Hz are achieved. The complete module operates from a ±5 V supply and has a measured sensitivity of 1.2 V/g with a noise of floor of in closed-loop. The chip is fabricated in the 2 μm two-metal and two-poly n-well CMOS process with an area of 15.2 mm2. These results prove that this circuit is suitable for high performance micro-accelerometer applications like seismic detection and oil exploration.

  6. Monitoring femoral component installation using vibration testing.

    PubMed

    Giardini, Seana; Cornwell, Phillip; Meneghini, R Michael

    2005-01-01

    With emerging minimally invasive surgical techniques in total hip arthroplasty, there has been anecdotal evidence of an increase in fractures associated with the insertion of the prosthesis into the femur. The diminished visibility associated with minimally invasive surgical techniques necessitates a greater emphasis on the surgeon's tactile and auditory senses. These senses are used to ascertain the femoral component position of maximum stability and interference fit, as well as to prevent further component impaction and subsequent fracture of the femur. The work described herein attempts to identify a means to supplement the surgeon's tactile and auditory senses by using damage identification techniques normally used in civil and mechanical structures to monitor the insertion process of the prosthesis. It is hypothesized that vibration characteristics of the impact process may be used intraoperatively to determine at what position the femoral component has reached appropriate interference fit and stability in the femur. Such information may be used to prevent further impaction of the femoral component past a threshold that could result in a periprosthetic fracture. A piezoelectric accelerometer and impact hammer will be used to monitor the impact process. The acceleration time history data were analyzed by using low and high pass filters to allow frequency analysis of the time history signals. This paper will summarize features derived from the measured data that will be used to develop an insertion process termination indicator.

  7. Evaluation of Thermo-Mechanical Stability of COTS Dual-Axis MEMS Accelerometers for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Ashok K.; Teverovksy, Alexander; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems in MEMS is one of the fastest growing technologies in microelectronics, and is of great interest for military and aerospace applications. Accelerometers are the earliest and most developed representatives of MEMS. First demonstrated in 1979, micromachined accelerometers were used in automobile industry for air bag crash- sensing applications since 1990. In 1999, N4EMS accelerometers were used in NASA-JPL Mars Microprobe. The most developed accelerometers for airbag crash- sensing are rated for a full range of +/- 50 G. The range of sensitivity for accelerometers required for military or aerospace applications is much larger, varying from 20,000 G (to measure acceleration during gun and ballistic munition launches), and to 10(exp -6) G, when used as guidance sensors (to measure attitude and position of a spacecraft). The presence of moving parts on the surface of chip is specific to MEMS, and particularly, to accelerometers. This characteristic brings new reliability issues to micromachined accelerometers, including cyclic fatigue cracking of polysilicon cantilevers and springs, mechanical stresses that are caused by packaging and contamination in the internal cavity of the package. Studies of fatigue cracks initiation and growth in polysilicon showed that the fatigue damage may influence MEMS device performance, and the presence of water vapor significantly enhances crack initiation and growth. Environmentally induced failures, particularly, failures due to thermal cycling and mechanical shock are considered as one of major reliability concerns in MEMS. These environmental conditions are also critical for space applications of the parts. For example, the Mars pathfinder mission had experienced 80 mechanical shock events during the pyrotechnic separation processes.

  8. Temperature insensitive all-fiber accelerometer using a photonic crystal fiber long-period grating interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Shijie; Zhu, Yinian; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2012-04-01

    Fiber-optic accelerometers have attracted great attention in recent years due to the fact that they have many advantages over electrical counterparts because all-fiber accelerometers have the capabilities for multiplexing to reduce cabling and to transmit signals over a long distance. They are also immune to electromagnetic interference. We propose and develop a compact and robust photonic crystal fiber (PCF) Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) that can be implemented as an accelerometer for measurements of vibration and displacement. To excite core mode to couple out with cladding modes, two long-period gratings (LPGs) with identical transmission spectra are needed to be written in an endless single-mode PCF using a CO2 laser. The first LPG can couple a part of core mode to several cladding modes. After the light beams travel at different speeds over a certain length of the core and cladding, the cladding modes will be recoupled back to the core when they meet the second LPG, resulting in interference between the core mode and cladding modes. Dynamic strain is introduced to the PCF-MZI fiber segment that is bonded onto a spring-mass system. The shift of interference fringe can be measured by a photodetector, and the transformed analog voltage signal is proportional to the acceleration of the sensor head. Based on simulations of the PCF-MZI accelerometer, we can get a sensitivity of ~ 0.08 nm/g which is comparable with fiber Bragg grating (FBG) accelerometers. The proposed accelerometer has a capability of temperature insensitivity; therefore, no thermal-compensation scheme is required. Experimental results indicate that the PCF-MZI accelerometer may be a good candidate sensor for applications in civil engineering infrastructure and aeronautical platforms.

  9. Evaluation of MEMS-Based Wireless Accelerometer Sensors in Detecting Gear Tooth Faults in Helicopter Transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David George; Lambert, Nicholas A.; Wagoner, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The diagnostics capability of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) based rotating accelerometer sensors in detecting gear tooth crack failures in helicopter main-rotor transmissions was evaluated. MEMS sensors were installed on a pre-notched OH-58C spiral-bevel pinion gear. Endurance tests were performed and the gear was run to tooth fracture failure. Results from the MEMS sensor were compared to conventional accelerometers mounted on the transmission housing. Most of the four stationary accelerometers mounted on the gear box housing and most of the CI's used gave indications of failure at the end of the test. The MEMS system performed well and lasted the entire test. All MEMS accelerometers gave an indication of failure at the end of the test. The MEMS systems performed as well, if not better, than the stationary accelerometers mounted on the gear box housing with regards to gear tooth fault detection. For both the MEMS sensors and stationary sensors, the fault detection time was not much sooner than the actual tooth fracture time. The MEMS sensor spectrum data showed large first order shaft frequency sidebands due to the measurement rotating frame of reference. The method of constructing a pseudo tach signal from periodic characteristics of the vibration data was successful in deriving a TSA signal without an actual tach and proved as an effective way to improve fault detection for the MEMS.

  10. Spatial patterns of cutaneous vibration during whole-hand haptic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Vincent; Visell, Yon

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the propagation patterns of cutaneous vibration in the hand during interactions with touched objects. Prior research has highlighted the importance of vibrotactile signals during haptic interactions, but little is known of how vibrations propagate throughout the hand. Furthermore, the extent to which the patterns of vibrations reflect the nature of the objects that are touched, and how they are touched, is unknown. Using an apparatus comprised of an array of accelerometers, we mapped and analyzed spatial distributions of vibrations propagating in the skin of the dorsal region of the hand during active touch, grasping, and manipulation tasks. We found these spatial patterns of vibration to vary systematically with touch interactions and determined that it is possible to use these data to decode the modes of interaction with touched objects. The observed vibration patterns evolved rapidly in time, peaking in intensity within a few milliseconds, fading within 20–30 ms, and yielding interaction-dependent distributions of energy in frequency bands that span the range of vibrotactile sensitivity. These results are consistent with findings in perception research that indicate that vibrotactile information distributed throughout the hand can transmit information regarding explored and manipulated objects. The results may further clarify the role of distributed sensory resources in the perceptual recovery of object attributes during active touch, may guide the development of approaches to robotic sensing, and could have implications for the rehabilitation of the upper extremity. PMID:27035957

  11. Spatial patterns of cutaneous vibration during whole-hand haptic interactions.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yitian; Hayward, Vincent; Visell, Yon

    2016-04-12

    We investigated the propagation patterns of cutaneous vibration in the hand during interactions with touched objects. Prior research has highlighted the importance of vibrotactile signals during haptic interactions, but little is known of how vibrations propagate throughout the hand. Furthermore, the extent to which the patterns of vibrations reflect the nature of the objects that are touched, and how they are touched, is unknown. Using an apparatus comprised of an array of accelerometers, we mapped and analyzed spatial distributions of vibrations propagating in the skin of the dorsal region of the hand during active touch, grasping, and manipulation tasks. We found these spatial patterns of vibration to vary systematically with touch interactions and determined that it is possible to use these data to decode the modes of interaction with touched objects. The observed vibration patterns evolved rapidly in time, peaking in intensity within a few milliseconds, fading within 20-30 ms, and yielding interaction-dependent distributions of energy in frequency bands that span the range of vibrotactile sensitivity. These results are consistent with findings in perception research that indicate that vibrotactile information distributed throughout the hand can transmit information regarding explored and manipulated objects. The results may further clarify the role of distributed sensory resources in the perceptual recovery of object attributes during active touch, may guide the development of approaches to robotic sensing, and could have implications for the rehabilitation of the upper extremity.

  12. GRADIO three-axis electrostatic accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, A.

    1987-01-01

    Dedicated accelerometers for satellite gravity gradiometry (GRADIO project) are described. The design profits from experience acquired with the CACTUS accelerometer payload of the satellite CASTOR-D5B and studies of highly accurate accelerometers for inertial navigation. The principle of operation, based on a three-axis electrostatic suspension of a cubic proof mass, is well suited for the measurements of accelerations less than 0.0001 m/sec/sec. A resolution better than 10 to the minus 11th power m/sec/sec/sq root Hz is expected.

  13. Hybridizing matter-wave and classical accelerometers

    SciTech Connect

    Lautier, J.; Volodimer, L.; Hardin, T.; Merlet, S.; Lours, M.; Pereira Dos Santos, F.; Landragin, A.

    2014-10-06

    We demonstrate a hybrid accelerometer that benefits from the advantages of both conventional and atomic sensors in terms of bandwidth (DC to 430 Hz) and long term stability. First, the use of a real time correction of the atom interferometer phase by the signal from the classical accelerometer enables to run it at best performance without any isolation platform. Second, a servo-lock of the DC component of the conventional sensor output signal by the atomic one realizes a hybrid sensor. This method paves the way for applications in geophysics and in inertial navigation as it overcomes the main limitation of atomic accelerometers, namely, the dead times between consecutive measurements.

  14. Piezoelectric Shaker Development for High Frequency Calibration of Accelerometers

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Bev; Harper, Kari K.; Vogl, Gregory W.

    2010-05-28

    Calibration of vibration transducers requires sinusoidal motion over a wide frequency range with low distortion and low cross-axial motion. Piezoelectric shakers are well suited to generate such motion and are suitable for use with laser interferometric methods at frequencies of 3 kHz and above. An advantage of piezoelectric shakers is the higher achievable accelerations and displacement amplitudes as compared to electro-dynamic (ED) shakers. Typical commercial ED calibration shakers produce maximum accelerations from 100 m/s{sup 2} to 500 m/s{sup 2}. Very large ED shakers may produce somewhat higher accelerations but require large amplifiers and expensive cooling systems to dissipate heat. Due to the limitations in maximum accelerations by ED shakers at frequencies above 5 kHz, the amplitudes of the generated sinusoidal displacement are frequently below the resolution of laser interferometers used in primary calibration methods. This limits the usefulness of ED shakers in interferometric based calibrations at higher frequencies.Small piezoelectric shakers provide much higher acceleration and displacement amplitudes for frequencies above 5 kHz, making these shakers very useful for accelerometer calibrations employing laser interferometric measurements, as will be shown in this paper. These piezoelectric shakers have been developed and used at NIST for many years for high frequency calibration of accelerometers. This paper documents the construction and performance of a new version of these shakers developed at NIST for the calibration of accelerometers over the range of 3 kHz to 30 kHz and possibly higher. Examples of typical calibration results are also given.

  15. Accelerometer Measurements in the Amusement Park.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reno, Charles; Speers, Robert R.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the use of the Texas Instruments' calculator-based laboratory (CBL) and Vernier accelerometer for measuring the vector sum of the gravitational field and the acceleration of amusement park rides. (JRH)

  16. Compact dual-frequency fiber laser accelerometer with sub-μg resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qian; Jin, Long; Liang, Yizhi; Cheng, Linghao; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a compact and high-resolution dual-polarization fiber laser accelerometer. A spring-mass like scheme is constructed by fixing a 10-gram proof mass on the laser cavity to transduce applied vibration into beat-frequency change. The loading is located at the intensity maximum of intracavity light to maximize the optical response. The detection limit reaches 107 ng/Hz1/2 at 200 Hz. The working bandwidth ranges from 60 Hz to 600 Hz.

  17. High G MEMS integrated accelerometer

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, B.R.; Barron, C.C.; Montague, S.; Smith, J.H.; Murray, J.R.; Christenson, T.R.; Bateman, V.I.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a surface micromachined accelerometer for measuring very high levels of acceleration (up to 50,000 G). Both the mechanical and electronic portions of the sensor were integrated on a single substrate using a process developed at Sandia National Laboratories. In this process, the mechanical components of the sensor were first fabricated at the bottom of a trench etched into the water substrate. The trench was then filled with oxide and sealed to protect the mechanical components during subsequent microelectronics processing. The wafer surface was then planarized in preparation for CMOS processing using Chemical Mechanical Polishing (CMP). Next, the CMOS electronics were fabricated on areas of the wafer adjacent to the embedded structures. Finally, the mechanical structures were released and the sensor tested. The mechanical structure of the sensor consisted of two polysilicon plate masses suspended by multiple springs (cantilevered beam structures) over corresponding polysilicon plates fixed to the substrate to form two parallel plate capacitors. The first polysilicon plate mass was suspended using compliant springs (cantilever beams) and acted as a variable capacitor during sensor acceleration. The second polysilicon plate mass was suspended using very stiff springs and acted as a fixed capacitor during acceleration. Acceleration was measured by comparing the capacitance of the variable capacitor (compliant suspension) with the fixed capacitance (stiff suspension).

  18. Electrostatic Accelerometer for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On Mission (GRACE FO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, Eddy; Christophe, Bruno; Foulon, Bernard; Boulanger, Damien; Liorzou, Françoise; Lebat, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    excitation especially due to launching vibrations. As the measure must be accurate, no displacements or sliding must appear during excitations. The electrode cage is made of glass material (ULE), which is very critical, in particular due to the free motion of the proof-mass during the launch. Specific analysis on this part is realized to ensure mechanical behavior. The design of electrostatic accelerometer of the GRACE Follow-On mission benefits of the GRACE heritage, GOCE launched in 2009 and MICROSCOPE which will be launched in 2016, including some improvement to win in performance, in particular the thermal sensitivity of the measurements.

  19. Using wearable cameras to categorise type and context of accelerometer-identified episodes of physical activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Accelerometers can identify certain physical activity behaviours, but not the context in which they take place. This study investigates the feasibility of wearable cameras to objectively categorise the behaviour type and context of participants’ accelerometer-identified episodes of activity. Methods Adults were given an Actical hip-mounted accelerometer and a SenseCam wearable camera (worn via lanyard). The onboard clocks on both devices were time-synchronised. Participants engaged in free-living activities for 3 days. Actical data were cleaned and episodes of sedentary, lifestyle-light, lifestyle-moderate, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were identified. Actical episodes were categorised according to their social and environmental context and Physical Activity (PA) compendium category as identified from time-matched SenseCam images. Results There were 212 days considered from 49 participants from whom SenseCam images and associated Actical data were captured. Using SenseCam images, behaviour type and context attributes were annotated for 386 (out of 3017) randomly selected episodes (such as walking/transportation, social/not-social, domestic/leisure). Across the episodes, 12 categories that aligned with the PA Compendium were identified, and 114 subcategory types were identified. Nineteen percent of episodes could not have their behaviour type and context categorized; 59% were outdoors versus 39% indoors; 33% of episodes were recorded as leisure time activities, with 33% transport, 18% domestic, and 15% occupational. 33% of the randomly selected episodes contained direct social interaction and 22% were in social situations where the participant wasn’t involved in direct engagement. Conclusion Wearable camera images offer an objective method to capture a spectrum of activity behaviour types and context across 81% of accelerometer-identified episodes of activity. Wearable cameras represent the best objective method currently

  20. Enhancement of Optical Adaptive Sensing by Using a Dual-Stage Seesaw-Swivel Actuator with a Tunable Vibration Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Po-Chien; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Cheng, Stone

    2011-01-01

    Technological obstacles to the use of rotary-type swing arm actuators to actuate optical pickup modules in small-form-factor (SFF) disk drives stem from a hinge’s skewed actuation, subsequently inducing off-axis aberrations and deteriorating optical quality. This work describes a dual-stage seesaw-swivel actuator for optical pickup actuation. A triple-layered bimorph bender made of piezoelectric materials (PZTs) is connected to the suspension of the pickup head, while the tunable vibration absorber (TVA) unit is mounted on the seesaw swing arm to offer a balanced force to reduce vibrations in a focusing direction. Both PZT and TVA are designed to satisfy stable focusing operation operational requirements and compensate for the tilt angle or deformation of a disc. Finally, simulation results verify the performance of the dual-stage seesaw-swivel actuator, along with experimental procedures and parametric design optimization confirming the effectiveness of the proposed system. PMID:22163877

  1. Active damping of spacecraft structural appendage vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, Joseph V. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An active vibration damper system, for bending in two orthogonal directions and torsion, in each of three mutually perpendicular axes is located at the extremities of the flexible appendages of a space platform. The system components for each axis includes: an accelerometer, filtering and signal processing apparatus, and a DC motor-inertia wheel torquer. The motor torquer, when driven by a voltage proportional to the relative vibration tip velocity, produces a reaction torque for opposing and therefore damping a specific modal velocity of vibration. The relative tip velocity is obtained by integrating the difference between the signal output from the accelerometer located at the end of the appendage with the output of a usually carried accelerometer located on a relatively rigid body portion of the space platform. A selector switch, with sequential stepping logic or highest modal vibration energy logic, steps to another modal tip velocity channel and receives a signal voltage to damp another vibration mode. In this manner, several vibration modes can be damped with a single sensor/actuator pair. When a three axis damper is located on each of the major appendages of the platform, then all of the system vibration modes can be effectively damped.

  2. CHAMP Tracking and Accelerometer Data Analysis Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank G.; Luthcke, S. B.; Rowlands, D. D.; Pavlis, D. E.; Colombo, O. L.; Ray, Richard D.; Thompson, B.; Nerem, R. S.; Williams, Teresa A.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The CHAMP (Challenging Minisatellite Payload) mission's unique combination of sensors and orbit configuration will enable unprecedented improvements in modeling and understanding the Earth's static gravity field and its temporal variations. CHAMP is the first of two missions (GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) to be launched in the later part of '01) that combine a new generation of GPS (Global Positioning System) receivers, a high precision three axis accelerometer, and star cameras for the precision attitude determination. In order to isolate the gravity signal for science investigations, it is necessary to perform a detailed reduction and analysis of the GPS and SLR tracking data in conjunction with the accelerometer and attitude data. Precision orbit determination based on the GPS and SLR (Satellite Laser Ranging) tracking data will isolate the orbit perturbations, while the accelerometer data will be used to distinguish the surface forces from those due to the geopotential (static, and time varying). In preparation for the CHAMP and GRACE missions, extensive modifications have been made to NASA/GSFC's GEODYN orbit determination software to enable the simultaneous reduction of spacecraft tracking (e.g. GPS and SLR), three axis accelerometer and precise attitude data. Several weeks of CHAMP tracking and accelerometer data have been analyzed and the results will be presented. Precision orbit determination analysis based on tracking data alone in addition to results based on the simultaneous reduction of tracking and accelerometer data will be discussed. Results from a calibration of the accelerometer will be presented along with the results from various orbit determination strategies. Gravity field modeling status and plans will be discussed.

  3. Evaluation Of Vibration-Monitoring Gear-Diagnostic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.; Zakrajsek, James J.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes experimental evaluation of commercial electronic system designed to monitor vibration signal from accelerometer on gear-box to detect vibrations indicative of damage to gears. System includes signal-conditioning subsystem and personal computer in which analog-to-digital converter installed. Results show system fairly effective in detecting surface fatigue pits on spur-gear teeth.

  4. Inertia-Wheel Vibration-Damping System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, Joseph V.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed electromechanical system would damp vibrations in large, flexible structure. In active vibration-damping system motors and reaction wheels at tips of appendages apply reaction torques in response to signals from accelerometers. Velocity signal for vibrations about one axis processes into control signal to oppose each of n vibrational modes. Various modes suppressed one at a time. Intended primarily for use in spacecraft that has large, flexible solar panels and science-instrument truss assembly, embodies principle of control interesting in its own right and adaptable to terrestrial structures, vehicles, and instrument platforms.

  5. MEMS capacitive accelerometer-based middle ear microphone.

    PubMed

    Young, Darrin J; Zurcher, Mark A; Semaan, Maroun; Megerian, Cliff A; Ko, Wen H

    2012-12-01

    The design, implementation, and characterization of a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) capacitive accelerometer-based middle ear microphone are presented in this paper. The microphone is intended for middle ear hearing aids as well as future fully implantable cochlear prosthesis. Human temporal bones acoustic response characterization results are used to derive the accelerometer design requirements. The prototype accelerometer is fabricated in a commercial silicon-on-insulator (SOI) MEMS process. The sensor occupies a sensing area of 1 mm × 1 mm with a chip area of 2 mm × 2.4 mm and is interfaced with a custom-designed low-noise electronic IC chip over a flexible substrate. The packaged sensor unit occupies an area of 2.5 mm × 6.2 mm with a weight of 25 mg. The sensor unit attached to umbo can detect a sound pressure level (SPL) of 60 dB at 500 Hz, 35 dB at 2 kHz, and 57 dB at 8 kHz. An improved sound detection limit of 34-dB SPL at 150 Hz and 24-dB SPL at 500 Hz can be expected by employing start-of-the-art MEMS fabrication technology, which results in an articulation index of approximately 0.76. Further micro/nanofabrication technology advancement is needed to enhance the microphone sensitivity for improved understanding of normal conversational speech.

  6. Characterizing performance of ultra-sensitive accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebesta, Henry

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of methodology and test results pertaining to the characterization of ultra sensitive accelerometers. Two issues are of primary concern. The terminology ultra sensitive accelerometer is used to imply instruments whose noise floors and resolution are at the state of the art. Hence, the typical approach of verifying an instrument's performance by measuring it with a yet higher quality instrument (or standard) is not practical. Secondly, it is difficult to find or create an environment with sufficiently low background acceleration. The typical laboratory acceleration levels will be at several orders of magnitude above the noise floor of the most sensitive accelerometers. Furthermore, this background must be treated as unknown since the best instrument available is the one to be tested. A test methodology was developed in which two or more like instruments are subjected to the same but unknown background acceleration. Appropriately selected spectral analysis techniques were used to separate the sensors' output spectra into coherent components and incoherent components. The coherent part corresponds to the background acceleration being measured by the sensors being tested. The incoherent part is attributed to sensor noise and data acquisition and processing noise. The method works well for estimating noise floors that are 40 to 50 dB below the motion applied to the test accelerometers. The accelerometers being tested are intended for use as feedback sensors in a system to actively stabilize an inertial guidance component test platform.

  7. Electret accelerometers: physics and dynamic characterization.

    PubMed

    Hillenbrand, J; Haberzettl, S; Motz, T; Sessler, G M

    2011-06-01

    Electret microphones are produced in numbers that significantly exceed those for all other microphone types. This is due to the fact that air-borne electret sensors are of simple and low-cost design but have very good acoustical properties. In contrast, most of the discrete structure-borne sound sensors (or accelerometers) are based on the piezoelectric effect. In the present work, capacitive accelerometers utilizing the electret principle were constructed, built, and characterized. These electret accelerometers comprise a metallic seismic mass, covered by an electret film, a ring of a soft cellular polymer supplying the restoring force, and a metallic backplate. These components replace membrane, spacer, and back electrode, respectively, of the electret microphone. An adjustable static pressure to the seismic mass is generated by two metal springs. The dynamic characterization of the accelerometers was carried out by using an electrodynamic shaker and an external charge or voltage amplifier. Sensors with various seismic masses, air gap distances, and electret voltages were investigated. Charge sensitivities from 10 to 40 pC/g, voltage sensitivities from 600 to 2000 mV/g, and resonance frequencies from 3 to 1.5 kHz were measured. A model describing both the charge and the voltage sensitivity is presented. Good agreement of experimental and calculated values is found. The experimental results show that sensitive, lightweight, and inexpensive electret accelerometers can be built.

  8. Wearable Goniometer and Accelerometer Sensory Fusion for Knee Joint Angle Measurement in Daily Life

    PubMed Central

    Tognetti, Alessandro; Lorussi, Federico; Carbonaro, Nicola; de Rossi, Danilo

    2015-01-01

    Human motion analysis is crucial for a wide range of applications and disciplines. The development and validation of low cost and unobtrusive sensing systems for ambulatory motion detection is still an open issue. Inertial measurement systems and e-textile sensors are emerging as potential technologies for daily life situations. We developed and conducted a preliminary evaluation of an innovative sensing concept that combines e-textiles and tri-axial accelerometers for ambulatory human motion analysis. Our sensory fusion method is based on a Kalman filter technique and combines the outputs of textile electrogoniometers and accelerometers without making any assumptions regarding the initial accelerometer position and orientation. We used our technique to measure the flexion-extension angle of the knee in different motion tasks (monopodalic flexions and walking at different velocities). The estimation technique was benchmarked against a commercial measurement system based on inertial measurement units and performed reliably for all of the various tasks (mean and standard deviation of the root mean square error of 1.96 and 0.96∘, respectively). In addition, the method showed a notable improvement in angular estimation compared to the estimation derived by the textile goniometer and accelerometer considered separately. In future work, we will extend this method to more complex and multi-degree of freedom joints. PMID:26569249

  9. Wearable Goniometer and Accelerometer Sensory Fusion for Knee Joint Angle Measurement in Daily Life.

    PubMed

    Tognetti, Alessandro; Lorussi, Federico; Carbonaro, Nicola; de Rossi, Danilo

    2015-11-11

    Human motion analysis is crucial for a wide range of applications and disciplines. The development and validation of low cost and unobtrusive sensing systems for ambulatory motion detection is still an open issue. Inertial measurement systems and e-textile sensors are emerging as potential technologies for daily life situations. We developed and conducted a preliminary evaluation of an innovative sensing concept that combines e-textiles and tri-axial accelerometers for ambulatory human motion analysis. Our sensory fusion method is based on a Kalman filter technique and combines the outputs of textile electrogoniometers and accelerometers without making any assumptions regarding the initial accelerometer position and orientation. We used our technique to measure the flexion-extension angle of the knee in different motion tasks (monopodalic flexions and walking at different velocities). The estimation technique was benchmarked against a commercial measurement system based on inertial measurement units and performed reliably for all of the various tasks (mean and standard deviation of the root mean square error of 1:96 and 0:96, respectively). In addition, the method showed a notable improvement in angular estimation compared to the estimation derived by the textile goniometer and accelerometer considered separately. In future work, we will extend this method to more complex and multi-degree of freedom joints.

  10. Microelectromechanical accelerometer with resonance-cancelling control circuit including an idle state

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Dahlon D.; Thelen, Jr., Donald C.; Campbell, David V.

    2001-01-01

    A digital feedback control circuit is disclosed for use in an accelerometer (e.g. a microelectromechanical accelerometer). The digital feedback control circuit, which periodically re-centers a proof mass in response to a sensed acceleration, is based on a sigma-delta (.SIGMA..DELTA.) configuration that includes a notch filter (e.g. a digital switched-capacitor filter) for rejecting signals due to mechanical resonances of the proof mass and further includes a comparator (e.g. a three-level comparator). The comparator generates one of three possible feedback states, with two of the feedback states acting to re-center the proof mass when that is needed, and with a third feedback state being an "idle" state which does not act to move the proof mass when no re-centering is needed. Additionally, the digital feedback control system includes an auto-zero trim capability for calibration of the accelerometer for accurate sensing of acceleration. The digital feedback control circuit can be fabricated using complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology, bi-CMOS technology or bipolar technology and used in single- and dual-proof-mass accelerometers.

  11. Active Inertial Vibration Isolators And Dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Darren; Blackburn, John; Smith, Dennis

    1994-01-01

    Report describes development of active inertial vibration isolators and dampers in which actuators electromagnet coils moving linearly within permanent magnetic fields in housings, somewhat as though massive, low-frequency voice coils in loudspeakers. Discusses principle of operation, electrical and mechanical considerations in design of actuators, characteristics of accelerometers, and frequency responses of control systems. Describes design and performance of one- and three-degree-of-freedom vibration-suppressing system based on concept.

  12. Shock margin testing of a one-axis MEMS accelerometer.

    SciTech Connect

    Parson, Ted Blair; Tanner, Danelle Mary; Buchheit, Thomas Edward

    2008-07-01

    Shock testing was performed on a selected commercial-off-the-shelf - MicroElectroMechanical System (COTS-MEMS) accelerometer to determine the margin between the published absolute maximum rating for shock and the 'measured' level where failures are observed. The purpose of this testing is to provide baseline data for isolating failure mechanisms under shock and environmental loading in a representative device used or under consideration for use within systems and assemblies of the DOD/DOE weapons complex. The specific device chosen for this study was the AD22280 model of the ADXL78 MEMS Accelerometer manufactured by Analog Devices Inc. This study focuses only on the shock loading response of the device and provides the necessary data for adding influence of environmental exposure to the reliability of this class of devices. The published absolute maximum rating for acceleration in any axis was 4000 G for this device powered or unpowered. Results from this study showed first failures at 8000 G indicating a margin of error of two. Higher shock level testing indicated that an in-plane, but off-axis acceleration was more damaging than one in the sense direction.

  13. Airbag accelerometer with a simple switched-capacitor readout ASIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsugai, Masahiro; Hirata, Yoshiaki; Tanimoto, Koji; Usami, Teruo; Araki, Toru; Otani, Hiroshi

    1997-09-01

    A bulk micromachined capacitive accelerometer for airbag applications based on (110) silicon anisotropic KOH etching is presented. The sensor is a two-chip accelerometer that consists of a glass-silicon-glass stacked sense element and an interface ASIC containing an impedance converter for capacitance detection, an EPROM and DACs for digital trimming, and a self-test feature for diagnosis. A simple switched-capacitor readout circuit with DC offset error cancellation scheme is proposed as the impedance converter. The dependence of narrow gap etching, surface roughness, and uniformity of the groove depth on the KOH concentration are also investigated for the fabrication of the device, and it is shown that the etch rate of the plane intrinsically controls the depth of the narrow gap with a KOH concentration of over 30 wt. percent, and smooth surface and uniformity of groove depth are obtained at 40 wt. percent KOH. The nonlinearity of the output is about 1.5 percent FS. The temperature coefficient of sensitivity and the off-axis sensitivity are 150 ppm/degree C and 2 percent respectively. The dimensions of the sensor are 10.3 X 10.3 X 3 mm.

  14. Designing Electrostatic Accelerometers for Next Gravity Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Phuong-Anh; Foulon, Bernard; Christophe, Bruno; Liorzou, Françoise; Boulanger, Damien; Lebat, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Square cuboid electrostatic accelerometers sensor core have been used in various combinations in recent and still flying missions (CHAMP, GRACE, GOCE). ONERA is now in the process of delivering such accelerometers for the GRACE Follow-On mission. The goal is to demonstrate the performance benefits of an interferometry laser ranging method for future low-low satellite to satellite missions. The electrostatic accelerometer becoming thus the system main performance limiter, we propose for future missions a new symmetry which will allow for three ultrasensitive axes instead of two. This implies no performance ground testing, as the now cubic proof-mass will be too heavy, but only free fall tests in catapult mode, taking advantage of the additional microgravity testing time offered by the updated ZARM tower. The updated mission will be in better adequacy with the requirements of a next generation of smaller and drag compensated micro-satellites. In addition to the measurement of the surface forces exerted on the spacecraft by the atmospheric drag and by radiation pressures, the accelerometer will become a major part of the attitude and orbit control system by acting as drag free sensor and by accurately measuring the angular accelerations. ONERA also works on a hybridization of the electrostatic accelerometer with an atomic interferometer to take advantage of the absolute nature of the atomic interferometer acceleration measurement and its great accuracy in the [5-100] mHz bandwidth. After a description of the improvement of the GRACE-FO accelerometer with respect to the still in-orbit previous models and a status of its development, the presentation will describe the new cubic configuration and how its operations and performances can be verified in the Bremen drop tower.

  15. Passive Accelerometer System Measurements on MIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1997-01-01

    The Passive Accelerometer System (PAS) is a simple moving ball accelerometer capable of measuring the small magnitude steady relative acceleration that occurs in a low earth orbit spacecraft due to atmospheric drag and the earth's gravity gradient. The acceleration is measured by recording the average velocity of the spherical ball over a suitable time increment. A modified form of Stokes law is used to convert the average velocity into an acceleration. PAS was used to measure acceleration on the MIR space station and on the first United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-1). The PAS measurement on MIR revealed remarkably low acceleration levels in the SPEKTR module.

  16. A study of the use of vibration and stress wave sensing for the detection of bearing failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ensor, L. C.; Feng, C. C.

    1975-01-01

    Results from an experimental study of vibrations and stress waves emitted from ball bearings are presented. Fatique tests were run with both high quality bearings and man faulted bearings, all of one size. Tests were instrumented with different sensors to detect the noises from 10 Hz to 1 MHz. Frequency spectrum plots are presented. The modulation characteristics of the ultrasonic noises were analyzed, and acoustic emission type measurements were conducted. Results are presented which show that there are usable acoustic signal levels even beyond 500 KHz. These signal levels are modulated by a low frequency carrier which is a function of the stress loading and acoustic transmissibility. The results were correlated to fault size in the bearings. The correlation shows that the sensor used for signals from 100 KHz to 1 MHz gave the best sensitivity and detected the generation of very small spalls or pits.

  17. A silicon micromachined piezoresistive accelerometer for health and condition monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Kevin M.; Henderson, H. Thurman

    1990-01-01

    Silicon micromachining etching techniques were utilized to batch-fabricate hundreds of general purpose microaccelerometers on a single silicon substrate. Piezoresistive sensing elements were aligned to the back-side patterns using an IR mask aligner and then diffused into the areas of maximum stress. Capping of the two-arm cantilever beam structure was achieved using a combination of electrostatic bonding and low temperature glass films. Overrange protection, critical damping, and overall protection from the outside environment are achieved by controlling the cavity depths of the top and bottom covers. Temperature compensation, amplification, and filtering are performed by a companion LSI chip that is interfaced to the accelerometer by conventional wire-bonding techniques.

  18. Vehicle Maneuver Detection with Accelerometer-Based Classification

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes-Villanueva, Javier; Carrillo-Zapata, Daniel; Terroso-Saenz, Fernando; Valdes-Vela, Mercedes; Skarmeta, Antonio F.

    2016-01-01

    In the mobile computing era, smartphones have become instrumental tools to develop innovative mobile context-aware systems. In that sense, their usage in the vehicular domain eases the development of novel and personal transportation solutions. In this frame, the present work introduces an innovative mechanism to perceive the current kinematic state of a vehicle on the basis of the accelerometer data from a smartphone mounted in the vehicle. Unlike previous proposals, the introduced architecture targets the computational limitations of such devices to carry out the detection process following an incremental approach. For its realization, we have evaluated different classification algorithms to act as agents within the architecture. Finally, our approach has been tested with a real-world dataset collected by means of the ad hoc mobile application developed. PMID:27690058

  19. Dual Accelerometer Usage Strategy for Onboard Space Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanetti, Renato; D'Souza, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This work introduces a dual accelerometer usage strategy for onboard space navigation. In the proposed algorithm the accelerometer is used to propagate the state when its value exceeds a threshold and it is used to estimate its errors otherwise. Numerical examples and comparison to other accelerometer usage schemes are presented to validate the proposed approach.

  20. Assessment of Differing Definitions of Accelerometer Nonwear Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evenson, Kelly R.; Terry, James W., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Measuring physical activity with objective tools, such as accelerometers, is becoming more common. Accelerometers measure acceleration multiple times within a given frequency and summarize this as a count over a pre-specified time period or epoch. The resultant count represents acceleration over the epoch length. Accelerometers eliminate biases…

  1. A novel piezoresistive polymer nanocomposite MEMS accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seena, V.; Hari, K.; Prajakta, S.; Pratap, Rudra; Ramgopal Rao, V.

    2017-01-01

    A novel polymer MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems) accelerometer with photo-patternable polymer nanocomposite as a piezoresistor is presented in this work. Polymer MEMS Accelerometer with beam thicknesses of 3.3 µm and embedded nanocomposite piezoresistive layer having a gauge factor of 90 were fabricated. The photosensitive nanocomposite samples were prepared and characterized for analyzing the mechanical and electrical properties and thereby ensuring proper process parameters for incorporating the piezoresistive layer into the polymer MEMS accelerometer. The microfabrication process flow and unit processes followed are extremely low cost with process temperatures below 100 °C. This also opens up a new possibility for easy integration of such polymer MEMS with CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) devices and circuits. The fabricated devices were characterized using laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) and the devices exhibited a resonant frequency of 10.8 kHz and a response sensitivity of 280 nm g-1 at resonance. The main focus of this paper is on the SU-8/CB nanocomposite piezoresistive MEMS accelerometer technology development which covers the material and the fabrication aspects of these devices. CoventorWare FEA analysis performed using the extracted material properties from the experimental characterization which are in close agreement to performance parameters of the fabricated devices is also discussed. The simulated piezoresistive polymer MEMS devices showed an acceleration sensitivity of 126 nm g-1 and 82 ppm of ΔR/R per 1 g of acceleration.

  2. Micro-Accelerometers Monitor Equipment Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    Glenn Research Center awarded SBIR funding to Ann Arbor, Michigan-based Evigia Systems to develop a miniaturized accelerometer to account for gravitational effects in space experiments. The company has gone on to implement the technology in its suite of prognostic sensors, which are used to monitor the integrity of industrial machinery. As a result, five employees have been hired.

  3. Smartphone MEMS accelerometers and earthquake early warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Q.; Allen, R. M.; Schreier, L.; Kwon, Y. W.

    2015-12-01

    The low cost MEMS accelerometers in the smartphones are attracting more and more attentions from the science community due to the vast number and potential applications in various areas. We are using the accelerometers inside the smartphones to detect the earthquakes. We did shake table tests to show these accelerometers are also suitable to record large shakings caused by earthquakes. We developed an android app - MyShake, which can even distinguish earthquake movements from daily human activities from the recordings recorded by the accelerometers in personal smartphones and upload trigger information/waveform to our server for further analysis. The data from these smartphones forms a unique datasets for seismological applications, such as earthquake early warning. In this talk I will layout the method we used to recognize earthquake-like movement from single smartphone, and the overview of the whole system that harness the information from a network of smartphones for rapid earthquake detection. This type of system can be easily deployed and scaled up around the global and provides additional insights of the earthquake hazards.

  4. Low-Cost Accelerometers for Physics Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannoni, Maurizio; Straulino, Samuele

    2007-01-01

    The implementation of a modern game-console controller as a data acquisition interface for physics experiments is discussed. The investigated controller is equipped with three perpendicular accelerometers and a built-in infrared camera to evaluate its own relative position. A pendulum experiment is realized as a demonstration of the proposed…

  5. Time Domain Switched Accelerometer Design and Fabrication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT 2052 September 2014 Time -Domain Switched Accelerometer Design and Fabrication Paul Swanson Andrew Wang...Approved for public release. SSC Pacific San Diego, CA 92152-5001 TECHNICAL REPORT 2052 September 2014 Time ...objective of this report is to record the decision-making process for developing the device design and fabrication workflow for the time -domain switched

  6. Accelerometer-controlled automatic braking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreher, R. C.; Sleeper, R. K.; Nayadley, J. R., Sr.

    1973-01-01

    Braking system, which employs angular accelerometer to control wheel braking and results in low level of tire slip, has been developed and tested. Tests indicate that system is feasible for operations on surfaces of different slipperinesses. System restricts tire slip and is capable of adapting to rapidly-changing surface conditions.

  7. Transmissive grating-reflective mirror-based fiber optic accelerometer for stable signal acquisition in industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yeon-Gwan; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Kim, Chun-Gon

    2012-05-01

    This paper discusses an applicable fiber-optic accelerometer composed of a transmissive grating panel, a reflection mirror, and two optical fibers with a separation of quarter grating pitch as transceivers that monitor the low-frequency accelerations of civil engineering structures. This sensor structure brings together the advantages of both a simple sensor structure, which leads to simplified cable design by 50% in comparison with the conventional transmission-type fiber optic accelerometer, and a stable reflected signals acquisition with repeatability in comparison to the researched grating-reflection type fiber optic accelerometer. The vibrating displacement and sinusoidal acceleration measured from the proposed fiber optic sensor demonstrated good agreement with those of a commercial laser displacement sensor and a MEMS accelerometer without electromagnetic interference. The developed fiber optic accelerometer can be used in frequency ranges below 4.0 Hz with a margin of error that is less than 5% and a high sensitivity of 5.06 rad/(m/s)2.

  8. Electrostatic Accelerometer for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On Mission (GRACE FO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebat, V.; Foulon, B.; Christophe, B.

    2013-12-01

    The GRACE FO mission, led by the JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), is an Earth-orbiting gravity mission, continuation of the GRACE mission, that will produce an accurate model of the Earth's gravity field variation providing global climatic data during five year at least. The mission involves two satellites in a loosely controlled tandem formation, with a micro-wave link measuring the inter-satellites distance variation. Non-uniformities in the distribution of the Earth's mass cause the distance between the two satellites to vary. This variation is measured to recover gravity, after subtracting the non-gravitational contributors, as the residual drag. ONERA (the French Aerospace Lab) is developing, manufacturing and testing electrostatic accelerometers measuring this residual drag applied on the satellites. The accelerometer is composed of two main parts: the Sensor Unit (including the Sensor Unit Mechanics and the Front-End Electronic Unit) and the Interface Control Unit. In the Accelerometer Core, located in the Sensor Unit Mechanics, the proof mass is levitated and maintained in a center of an electrode cage by electrostatic forces. Thus, any drag acceleration applied on the satellite involves a variation on the servo-controlled electrostatic suspension of the mass. The voltage on the electrodes providing this electrostatic force is the measurement output of the accelerometer. The impact of the accelerometer defaults (geometry, electronic and parasitic forces) leads to bias, misalignment and scale factor error, non-linearity and noise. Some of these accelerometer defaults are characterized by tests with micro-gravity pendulum bench and with drops in ZARM catapult. Besides, a thermal stability is needed for the accelerometer core and front-end electronics to avoid bias and scale factor variation, and reached by a thermal box designed by Astrium, spacecraft manufacturer. The accelerometers are designed to endure the launch vibrations and the thermal environment at

  9. Compressive power spectrum sensing for vibration-based output-only system identification of structural systems in the presence of noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tau Siesakul, Bamrung; Gkoktsi, Kyriaki; Giaralis, Agathoklis

    2015-05-01

    Motivated by the need to reduce monetary and energy consumption costs of wireless sensor networks in undertaking output-only/operational modal analysis of engineering structures, this paper considers a multi-coset analog-toinformation converter for structural system identification from acceleration response signals of white noise excited linear damped structures sampled at sub-Nyquist rates. The underlying natural frequencies, peak gains in the frequency domain, and critical damping ratios of the vibrating structures are estimated directly from the sub-Nyquist measurements and, therefore, the computationally demanding signal reconstruction step is by-passed. This is accomplished by first employing a power spectrum blind sampling (PSBS) technique for multi-band wide sense stationary stochastic processes in conjunction with deterministic non-uniform multi-coset sampling patterns derived from solving a weighted least square optimization problem. Next, modal properties are derived by the standard frequency domain peak picking algorithm. Special attention is focused on assessing the potential of the adopted PSBS technique, which poses no sparsity requirements to the sensed signals, to derive accurate estimates of modal structural system properties from noisy sub- Nyquist measurements. To this aim, sub-Nyquist sampled acceleration response signals corrupted by various levels of additive white noise pertaining to a benchmark space truss structure with closely spaced natural frequencies are obtained within an efficient Monte Carlo simulation-based framework. Accurate estimates of natural frequencies and reasonable estimates of local peak spectral ordinates and critical damping ratios are derived from measurements sampled at about 70% below the Nyquist rate and for SNR as low as 0db demonstrating that the adopted approach enjoys noise immunity.

  10. Optimization of sensing and feedback control for vibration/flutter of rotating disk by PZT actuators via air coupled pressure.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tianhong; Xu, Xinsheng; Han, Jianqiang; Lin, Rongming; Ju, Bingfeng; Li, Qing

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a feedback control mechanism and its optimization for rotating disk vibration/flutter via changes of air-coupled pressure generated using piezoelectric patch actuators are studied. A thin disk rotates in an enclosure, which is equipped with a feedback control loop consisting of a micro-sensor, a signal processor, a power amplifier, and several piezoelectric (PZT) actuator patches distributed on the cover of the enclosure. The actuator patches are mounted on the inner or the outer surfaces of the enclosure to produce necessary control force required through the airflow around the disk. The control mechanism for rotating disk flutter using enclosure surfaces bonded with sensors and piezoelectric actuators is thoroughly studied through analytical simulations. The sensor output is used to determine the amount of input to the actuator for controlling the response of the disk in a closed loop configuration. The dynamic stability of the disk-enclosure system, together with the feedback control loop, is analyzed as a complex eigenvalue problem, which is solved using Galerkin's discretization procedure. The results show that the disk flutter can be reduced effectively with proper configurations of the control gain and the phase shift through the actuations of PZT patches. The effectiveness of different feedback control methods in altering system characteristics and system response has been investigated. The control capability, in terms of control gain, phase shift, and especially the physical configuration of actuator patches, are also evaluated by calculating the complex eigenvalues and the maximum displacement produced by the actuators. To achieve a optimal control performance, sizes, positions and shapes of PZT patches used need to be optimized and such optimization has been achieved through numerical simulations.

  11. Robust Optimization of a MEMS Accelerometer Considering Temperature Variations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guangjun; Yang, Feng; Bao, Xiaofan; Jiang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    A robust optimization approach for a MEMS accelerometer to minimize the effects of temperature variations is presented. The mathematical model of the accelerometer is built. The effects of temperature variations on the output performance of the accelerometer are determined, and thermal deformation of the accelerometer is analyzed. The deviations of the output capacitance and resonance frequency due to temperature fluctuations are calculated and discussed. The sensitivity analysis method is employed to determine the design variables for robust optimization and find out the key structural parameters that have most significant influence on the output capacitance and resonance frequency of the accelerometer. The mathematical model and procedure for the robust optimization of the accelerometer are proposed. The robust optimization problem is solved and discussed. The robust optimization results show that an optimized accelerometer with high sensitivity, high temperature robustness and decoupling structure is finally obtained. PMID:25785308

  12. Feasibility study of ZnO nanowire made accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Chan; Ko, Hyun-U.; Song, Sangho; Yun, Youngmin; Kim, Jaehwan

    2016-04-01

    Vertically aligned arrays of ZnO nanowire can be used for many applications such as energy harvesters, UV sensors and mechanical sensors. Here we report the feasibility of a miniaturized accelerometer made with ZnO nanowire. For improving the sensitivity of miniaturized piezoelectric accelerometer, size of piezoelectric ceramic should be large which results in heavy accelerometer and low resonance frequency. To resolve the problem for the miniaturized accelerometer fabrication, ZnO nanowire is chosen. ZnO nanowire, which has piezoelectric property with Wurtzite structure. Since it has high aspect ratio, the use of ZnO nanowire leads to increase deformation and piezoelectric response output. The vertically ZnO nanowire array is grown on a copper substrate by hydrothermal synthesis process. Detail Fabrication process of the miniaturized accelerometer is illustrated. To prove the feasibility of the fabricated accelerometer, dynamic response test is performed in comparison with a commercial accelerometer.

  13. Low cost subpixel method for vibration measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrer, Belen; Espinosa, Julian; Perez, Jorge; Acevedo, Pablo; Mas, David; Roig, Ana B.

    2014-05-27

    Traditional vibration measurement methods are based on devices that acquire local data by direct contact (accelerometers, GPS) or by laser beams (Doppler vibrometers). Our proposal uses video processing to obtain the vibration frequency directly from the scene, without the need of auxiliary targets or devices. Our video-vibrometer can obtain the vibration frequency at any point in the scene and can be implemented with low-cost devices, such as commercial cameras. Here we present the underlying theory and some experiments that support our technique.

  14. Recent Triplet Vibration Studies in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Thieberger, P.; Bonati, R.; Corbin, G.; Jain, A.; Minty, M.; McIntyre, G.; Montag, C.; Muratore, J.; Schultheiss, C.; Seberg, S.; Tuozzolo, J.

    2010-05-23

    We report on recent developments for mitigating vibrations of the quadrupole magnets near the interaction regions of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). High precision accelerometers, geophones, and a laser vibrometer were installed around one of the two interaction points to characterize the frequencies of the mechanical motion. In addition actuators were mounted directly on the quadrupole cryostats. Using as input the locally measured motion, dynamic damping of the mechanical vibrations has been demonstrated. In this report we present these measurements and measurements of the beam response. Future options for compensating the vibrations are discussed.

  15. Low cost subpixel method for vibration measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Belen; Espinosa, Julian; Roig, Ana B.; Perez, Jorge; Acevedo, Pablo; Mas, David

    2014-05-01

    Traditional vibration measurement methods are based on devices that acquire local data by direct contact (accelerometers, GPS) or by laser beams (Doppler vibrometers). Our proposal uses video processing to obtain the vibration frequency directly from the scene, without the need of auxiliary targets or devices. Our video-vibrometer can obtain the vibration frequency at any point in the scene and can be implemented with low-cost devices, such as commercial cameras. Here we present the underlying theory and some experiments that support our technique.

  16. Characterisation of multi roof tile-shaped out-of-plane vibrational modes in aluminium-nitride-actuated self-sensing micro-resonators in liquid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucera, Martin; Wistrela, Elisabeth; Pfusterschmied, Georg; Ruiz-Díez, Víctor; Sánchez-Rojas, José Luis; Schalko, Johannes; Bittner, Achim; Schmid, Ulrich

    2015-08-01

    This letter reports on higher orders of an advanced out-of-plane bending mode in aluminium-nitride (AlN)-actuated cantilever plates achieving the highest quality factors (Q-factor) of cantilever-based MEMS (micro electromechanical system) resonators in liquids up to now. Devices based on a 20 μm thick silicon cantilever were fabricated and characterised by optical and electrical measurements in air and in different liquids. Furthermore, finite element method eigenmode analyses were performed, showing an excellent agreement with the measured mode shape and the electrical characteristics. The highest Q-factor was achieved in deionised water with Q = 366, operated at the 10th order mode at a resonance frequency less than 4 MHz. This is the highest value ever measured in liquid media with a cantilever-based MEMS resonator up to now and exceeds the Q-factors of state of the art resonators in liquids in the given resonance frequency range by a factor of about 4. Furthermore, the strain related conductance peak of the multi roof tile-shaped modes is superior, showing great potential for further electrode design optimisation. Compared to common out-of-plane bending modes, this combination of most beneficial properties is unique, making this type of vibration mode the first choice for a large variety of resonator-based liquid-phase sensing applications.

  17. Temporal features of human tendon vibration illusions.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Christina T; Gomi, Hiroaki; Haggard, Patrick

    2012-12-01

    Muscle spindles provide information about the position and movement of our bodies. One method for investigating spindle signals is tendon vibration. Vibration of flexor tendons can produce illusions of extension, and vibration of extensor tendons can produce illusions of flexion. Here we estimate the temporal resolution and persistence of these illusions. In Experiments 1 and 2, sequences of alternating vibration of wrist flexor and extensor tendons produced position illusions that varied with alternation period. When vibrations alternated at 1 Hz or slower, perceived position at the end of the sequence depended on the last vibration. When vibrations alternated every 0.3 s, perceived position was independent of the last vibration. Experiment 2 verified and extended these results using more trials and concurrent electromyographic recording. Although tendon vibrations sometimes induce reflexive muscle activity, we found no evidence that such activity contributed to these effects. Experiment 3 investigated how long position sense is retained when not updated by current information from spindles. Our first experiments suggested that vibrating antagonistic tendons simultaneously could produce conflicting inputs, leaving position sense reliant on memory of position prior to vibration onset. We compared variability in position sense after different durations of such double vibration. After 12 s of double vibration, variability across trials exceeded levels predicted from vibrations of flexor or extensor tendons alone. This suggests that position sense memory had decayed too much to substitute for the current conflicting sensory information. Together, our results provide novel, quantitative insight into the temporal properties of tendon vibration illusions.

  18. High performance, accelerometer-based control of the Mini-MAST structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Emmanuel G., Jr.; King, James A.; Phillips, Douglas J.; Hyland, David C.

    1992-08-01

    Many large space system concepts will require active vibration control to satisfy critical performance requirements such as line of sight pointing accuracy and constraints on rms surface roughness. In order for these concepts to become operational, it is imperative that the benefits of active vibration control be shown to be practical in ground based experiments. The results of an experiment shows the successful application of the Maximum Entropy/Optical Projection control design methodology to active vibration control for a flexible structure. The testbed is the Mini-Mast structure at NASA-Langley and has features dynamically traceable to future space systems. To maximize traceability to real flight systems, the controllers were designed and implemented using sensors (four accelerometers and one rate gyro) that are actually mounted to the structure. Ground mounted displacement sensors that could greatly ease the control design task were available but were used only for performance evaluation. The use of the accelerometers increased the potential of destabilizing the system due to spillover effects and motivated the use of precompensation strategy to achieve sufficient compensator roll-off.

  19. A mechanical filter for FBG accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocciolone, Marco; Bucca, Giuseppe; Collina, Andrea; Comolli, Lorenzo

    2014-05-01

    Many applications are characterized by very severe environment from the sensors point of view. An example is the railway field, where often the measurement setup is subjected to high voltage and electromagnetic emission. In these work conditions, optical sensors are more suitable than electrical ones due to their characteristics. In this paper, the acceleration measurements are taken into account. Nowadays many optical accelerometers are present on the market. In particular, in this work FBG accelerometers are considered. This kind of sensors is characterized by an undamped resonance that can produce the break of the sensor. One possibility to avoid this problem is to add a damping effect in order to reduce the resonance amplification. In the following section, the method to reproduce a mechanical filter able to increase the damping coefficient of the sensor is presented. Experimental results in laboratory will be discussed, showing the effectiveness of the solution.

  20. MGRA: Motion Gesture Recognition via Accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Hong, Feng; You, Shujuan; Wei, Meiyu; Zhang, Yongtuo; Guo, Zhongwen

    2016-04-13

    Accelerometers have been widely embedded in most current mobile devices, enabling easy and intuitive operations. This paper proposes a Motion Gesture Recognition system (MGRA) based on accelerometer data only, which is entirely implemented on mobile devices and can provide users with real-time interactions. A robust and unique feature set is enumerated through the time domain, the frequency domain and singular value decomposition analysis using our motion gesture set containing 11,110 traces. The best feature vector for classification is selected, taking both static and mobile scenarios into consideration. MGRA exploits support vector machine as the classifier with the best feature vector. Evaluations confirm that MGRA can accommodate a broad set of gesture variations within each class, including execution time, amplitude and non-gestural movement. Extensive evaluations confirm that MGRA achieves higher accuracy under both static and mobile scenarios and costs less computation time and energy on an LG Nexus 5 than previous methods.

  1. Multi-Axis Accelerometer Calibration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, Tom; Parker, Peter

    2010-01-01

    A low-cost, portable, and simplified system has been developed that is suitable for in-situ calibration and/or evaluation of multi-axis inertial measurement instruments. This system overcomes facility restrictions and maintains or improves the calibration quality for users of accelerometer-based instruments with applications in avionics, experimental wind tunnel research, and force balance calibration applications. The apparatus quickly and easily positions a multi-axis accelerometer system into a precisely known orientation suitable for in-situ quality checks and calibration. In addition, the system incorporates powerful and sophisticated statistical methods, known as response surface methodology and statistical quality control. These methods improve calibration quality, reduce calibration time, and allow for increased calibration frequency, which enables the monitoring of instrument stability over time.

  2. Dark matter direct detection with accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Peter W.; Kaplan, David E.; Mardon, Jeremy; Rajendran, Surjeet; Terrano, William A.

    2016-04-01

    The mass of the dark matter particle is unknown, and may be as low as ˜1 0-22 eV . The lighter part of this range, below ˜eV , is relatively unexplored both theoretically and experimentally but contains an array of natural dark matter candidates. An example is the relaxion, a light boson predicted by cosmological solutions to the hierarchy problem. One of the few generic signals such light dark matter can produce is a time-oscillating, equivalence-principle-violating force. We propose searches for this using accelerometers, and consider in detail the examples of torsion balances, atom interferometry, and pulsar timing. These approaches have the potential to probe large parts of unexplored parameter space in the next several years. Thus such accelerometers provide radically new avenues for the direct detection of dark matter.

  3. MGRA: Motion Gesture Recognition via Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Feng; You, Shujuan; Wei, Meiyu; Zhang, Yongtuo; Guo, Zhongwen

    2016-01-01

    Accelerometers have been widely embedded in most current mobile devices, enabling easy and intuitive operations. This paper proposes a Motion Gesture Recognition system (MGRA) based on accelerometer data only, which is entirely implemented on mobile devices and can provide users with real-time interactions. A robust and unique feature set is enumerated through the time domain, the frequency domain and singular value decomposition analysis using our motion gesture set containing 11,110 traces. The best feature vector for classification is selected, taking both static and mobile scenarios into consideration. MGRA exploits support vector machine as the classifier with the best feature vector. Evaluations confirm that MGRA can accommodate a broad set of gesture variations within each class, including execution time, amplitude and non-gestural movement. Extensive evaluations confirm that MGRA achieves higher accuracy under both static and mobile scenarios and costs less computation time and energy on an LG Nexus 5 than previous methods. PMID:27089336

  4. A very low noise monolithic Horizontal accelerometer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolini, Alessandro; Takamori, Akiteru; Cella, Giancarlo; Fidecaro, Francesco; Francesconi, Mario; Desalvo, Riccardo; Sannibale, Virginio

    2000-04-01

    We present a new low noise, low frequency, horizontal accelerometer. The mechanical design and the machining process aim to improve the sensitivity in the frequency region between 0.01 and 1 Hz, where metal internal friction and thermal elastic effects become critical. The accelerometer mechanics is shaped as a small folded pendulum in order to obtain a very low resonant frequency and low mechanical losses. A folded pendulum is essentially a mass suspended on one side by a simple pendulum and on the other by an inverted pendulum working antagonistically. The straight pendulum positive gravitational spring constant is balanced by the inverted pendulum’s negative one; by changing the center of mass position one can lower arbitrarily the resonant frequency. The only dissipation is in the anelasticity of the mechanical flex joint and in the readout/actuation system. If the spring constant is minimised, the mechanical losses are minimal. The monolithic design of the accelerometer eliminates the stick-and-slip friction localised in the flexure clamps. Low stiffness, 10 micron thick flex joints are achieved by EDM and electropolishing. The instrument is equipped with a low capacitance position sensor; the signal from the sensor is filtered by a PID controller and fed back to the mass through capacitive force actuator for feedback closed-loop operation. The sensor noise matches the expected thermal noise performances, 10-12 m/√Hz , with measuring range of a few microns. The expected sensitivity, less than 10-11 m/ s^2 / √Hz around 150 mHz, is a factor 30 below the state of the art limit. This accelerometer was designed to be integrated in the active control of the LIGO II mirror seismic isolators.

  5. The GRADIO accelerometer - Design and development status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, A.; Touboul, P.

    The concept of Satellite Gravity Gradiometry based on differential microaccelerometry has been proposed by ONERA in the early eighties. Since 1986, an important effort is devoted to the development of the GRADIO accelerometers. Their configuration has been optimized for the ARISTOTELES mission with the objective of 0.01 Eotvos resolution for an integrating time of 4 s. The achieved resolution, better than 10 exp -9 G, is limited by the actual stability of alignments on the testing equipment.

  6. High performance MEMS accelerometers for concrete SHM applications and comparison with COTS accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavitha, S.; Joseph Daniel, R.; Sumangala, K.

    2016-01-01

    Accelerometers used for civil and huge mechanical structural health monitoring intend to measure the shift in the natural frequency of the monitored structures (<100 Hz) and such sensors should have large sensitivity and extremely low noise floor. Sensitivity of accelerometers is inversely proportional to the frequency squared. Commercial MEMS (Micro Electro-Mechanical System) accelerometers that are generally designed for large bandwidth (e.g 25 kHz in ADXL150) have poor sensor level sensitivity and therefore uses complex signal conditioning electronics to achieve large sensitivity and low noise floor which in turn results in higher cost. In this work, an attempt has been made to design MEMS capacitive and piezoresistive accelerometers for smaller bandwidth using IntelliSuite and CoventorWare MEMS tools respectively. The various performance metrics have been obtained using simulation experiments and the results show that these sensors have excellent voltage sensitivity, noise performance and high resolution at sensor level and are even superior to commercial MEMS accelerometers.

  7. Accelerometer Data Analysis and Presentation Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Hrovat, Kenneth; McPherson, Kevin; Moskowitz, Milton E.; Reckart, Timothy

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center's Principal Investigator Microgravity Services project analyzes Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment and Space Acceleration Measurement System data for principal investigators of microgravity experiments. Principal investigators need a thorough understanding of data analysis techniques so that they can request appropriate analyses to best interpret accelerometer data. Accelerometer data sampling and filtering is introduced along with the related topics of resolution and aliasing. Specific information about the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment and Space Acceleration Measurement System data sampling and filtering is given. Time domain data analysis techniques are discussed and example environment interpretations are made using plots of acceleration versus time, interval average acceleration versus time, interval root-mean-square acceleration versus time, trimmean acceleration versus time, quasi-steady three dimensional histograms, and prediction of quasi-steady levels at different locations. An introduction to Fourier transform theory and windowing is provided along with specific analysis techniques and data interpretations. The frequency domain analyses discussed are power spectral density versus frequency, cumulative root-mean-square acceleration versus frequency, root-mean-square acceleration versus frequency, one-third octave band root-mean-square acceleration versus frequency, and power spectral density versus frequency versus time (spectrogram). Instructions for accessing NASA Lewis Research Center accelerometer data and related information using the internet are provided.

  8. Aging changes in the senses

    MedlinePlus

    ... safety products, such as a gas detector that sounds an alarm you can hear. TOUCH, VIBRATION, AND PAIN The sense of touch makes you aware of pain, temperature, pressure, vibration, and body position. Skin, muscles, tendons, ...

  9. Force Limited Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry; Chang, Kurng Y.

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concept and applications of Force Limited Vibration Testing. The goal of vibration testing of aerospace hardware is to identify problems that would result in flight failures. The commonly used aerospace vibration tests uses artificially high shaker forces and responses at the resonance frequencies of the test item. It has become common to limit the acceleration responses in the test to those predicted for the flight. This requires an analysis of the acceleration response, and requires placing accelerometers on the test item. With the advent of piezoelectric gages it has become possible to improve vibration testing. The basic equations have are reviewed. Force limits are analogous and complementary to the acceleration specifications used in conventional vibration testing. Just as the acceleration specification is the frequency spectrum envelope of the in-flight acceleration at the interface between the test item and flight mounting structure, the force limit is the envelope of the in-flight force at the interface . In force limited vibration tests, both the acceleration and force specifications are needed, and the force specification is generally based on and proportional to the acceleration specification. Therefore, force limiting does not compensate for errors in the development of the acceleration specification, e.g., too much conservatism or the lack thereof. These errors will carry over into the force specification. Since in-flight vibratory force data are scarce, force limits are often derived from coupled system analyses and impedance information obtained from measurements or finite element models (FEM). Fortunately, data on the interface forces between systems and components are now available from system acoustic and vibration tests of development test models and from a few flight experiments. Semi-empirical methods of predicting force limits are currently being developed on the basis of the limited flight and system test

  10. Automatic compensation for the errors of a gyroscopic linear integrating accelerometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bezvesil`naya, E.N.

    1995-10-01

    The method of least squares and the Kalman filter are the basis for developing algorithms and studying the errors of estimation of the state of a gyroscopic linear integrating accelerometer with digital processing of the data. The article considers the development of algorithms for self-compensation of the errors of a gyroscopic linear integrating accelerometer (GLIA). One of the promising applications of a gyroscopic linear integrating accelerometer is its use as a sensing element for an aviration gravimetric system. At the same time, a GLIA has errors due to nonlinear distortions of the path of the sensing element or gyroscope, the nonzero damping factor of precessional oscillations due to viscous friction moments acting frequency of the precessional oscillations used in the estimation algorithms and the frequency of the precessional oscillations of the gyroscope, and the disturbances that affect the law of motion of the gyroscope. These errors may have an unacceptably large effect (roughly 0.5 g) if not taken into account. The goal here, therefore, is to obtain an algorithm of automatic compensation for the indicated errors. Such a problem has not hitherto been formulated and solved in the theory and practice of gravimetric measurements.

  11. Estimation of seismic response of buildings with a few accelerometers without input data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yu; Mita, Akira

    2016-04-01

    To assess the health of buildings, maximum inter-story drift angle is recognized as an important indicator. If we have to estimate maximum inter-story drift angle very precisely, we need to install accelerometers on all floors. However, it is not realistic due to the cost. In many methods to estimate the response using small number of accelerometers, the excitation (input) is assumed to be available. However, in some cases, some sensors including the input sensor may not be available. Thus, in this paper, we propose a method for the estimating inter-story drift angle using small number of accelerometers without knowing input information. The proposed method is based on two assumptions. One is that the response is represented by the superposition of the response of only lower modes. The other is that mode vectors and participation factors are available from the structural design model. Based on the assumption, first, we estimate modal frequencies and damping ratios using the subspace method from obtained acceleration data. Second, we decompose observed acceleration data to each mode by solving simultaneous equations using pseudo-inverse matrix. Third, we calculate mode response by focusing on the vibration equation of each mode. It was verified that this method could successfully estimate the modal response as well as the inter-story drift angles.

  12. Gyro and accelerometer failure detection and identification in redundant sensor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. E.; Deckert, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Algorithms for failure detection and identification for redundant noncolinear arrays of single degree of freedom gyros and accelerometers are described. These algorithms are optimum in the sense that detection occurs as soon as it is no longer possible to account for the instrument outputs as the outputs of good instruments operating within their noise tolerances, and identification occurs as soon as it is true that only a particular instrument failure could account for the actual instrument outputs within the noise tolerance of good instruments. An estimation algorithm is described which minimizes the maximum possible estimation error magnitude for the given set of instrument outputs. Monte Carlo simulation results are presented for the application of the algorithms to an inertial reference unit consisting of six gyros and six accelerometers in two alternate configurations.

  13. Comparison and validation of capacitive accelerometers for health care applications.

    PubMed

    Büsching, Felix; Kulau, Ulf; Gietzelt, Matthias; Wolf, Lars

    2012-05-01

    Fall detection, gait analysis and context recognition are examples of applications where capacitive accelerometers are widely used in health care. In most of the existing work, algorithms were developed for a specific platform and accelerometers were used without explicitly choosing a specific type. With this work we present an inexpensive and practical test setup for replicable and repeatable testing of accelerometers. In addition we use this setup to evaluate six of the most commonly available accelerometers today and list their outcomes for linearity, power consumption and correlation of the tested sensors. We also attempt to an answer to the question of whether applications and algorithms developed for one platform and one type of accelerometer can be easily transferred to another accelerometer.

  14. A new accelerometer recording system for shuttle use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenberg, Byron

    1990-01-01

    Microgravity investigators are interested in enhancing the capabilities and improving the information return from accelerometers used in microgravity research. In addition to improving the accelerometer sensor, efforts should be directed towards using recent advances in microprocessor technology and system design techniques to improve sensor calibration and temperature compensation, online data display and analysis, and data reduction and information storage. Results from the above areas of investigation should be combined in an integrated design for a spaceflight microgravity accelerometer package.

  15. Design and Implementation of a Micromechanical Silicon Resonant Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Libin; Yang, Hui; Gao, Yang; Zhao, Liye; Liang, Jinxing

    2013-01-01

    The micromechanical silicon resonant accelerometer has attracted considerable attention in the research and development of high-precision MEMS accelerometers because of its output of quasi-digital signals, high sensitivity, high resolution, wide dynamic range, anti-interference capacity and good stability. Because of the mismatching thermal expansion coefficients of silicon and glass, the micromechanical silicon resonant accelerometer based on the Silicon on Glass (SOG) technique is deeply affected by the temperature during the fabrication, packaging and use processes. The thermal stress caused by temperature changes directly affects the frequency output of the accelerometer. Based on the working principle of the micromechanical resonant accelerometer, a special accelerometer structure that reduces the temperature influence on the accelerometer is designed. The accelerometer can greatly reduce the thermal stress caused by high temperatures in the process of fabrication and packaging. Currently, the closed-loop drive circuit is devised based on a phase-locked loop. The unloaded resonant frequencies of the prototype of the micromechanical silicon resonant accelerometer are approximately 31.4 kHz and 31.5 kHz. The scale factor is 66.24003 Hz/g. The scale factor stability is 14.886 ppm, the scale factor repeatability is 23 ppm, the bias stability is 23 μg, the bias repeatability is 170 μg, and the bias temperature coefficient is 0.0734 Hz/°C. PMID:24256978

  16. A three-axis ultrasensitive accelerometer for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, A.

    A three-axis ultrasensitive accelerometer ASTRE (Accelerometre Spatial Triaxial Electrostatique) is a simplified version of the GRADIO accelerometer designed for the ARISTOTELES mission, which operates by measuring the force provided by a three-axis electrostatic suspension of the proof-mass. It covers the g-spectrum from 10 exp -8 to 10 exp -4 in the frequency range dc to 5 Hz. A dedicated test bench was developed in order to preserve the accelerometer from the seismic noise. The paper presents the performance parameters of the ASTRE accelerometer and some of the design schemes.

  17. A Small Range Six-Axis Accelerometer Designed with High Sensitivity DCB Elastic Element.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhibo; Liu, Jinhao; Yu, Chunzhan; Zheng, Yili

    2016-09-21

    This paper describes a small range six-axis accelerometer (the measurement range of the sensor is ±g) with high sensitivity DCB (Double Cantilever Beam) elastic element. This sensor is developed based on a parallel mechanism because of the reliability. The accuracy of sensors is affected by its sensitivity characteristics. To improve the sensitivity, a DCB structure is applied as the elastic element. Through dynamic analysis, the dynamic model of the accelerometer is established using the Lagrange equation, and the mass matrix and stiffness matrix are obtained by a partial derivative calculation and a conservative congruence transformation, respectively. By simplifying the structure of the accelerometer, a model of the free vibration is achieved, and the parameters of the sensor are designed based on the model. Through stiffness analysis of the DCB structure, the deflection curve of the beam is calculated. Compared with the result obtained using a finite element analysis simulation in ANSYS Workbench, the coincidence rate of the maximum deflection is 89.0% along the x-axis, 88.3% along the y-axis and 87.5% along the z-axis. Through strain analysis of the DCB elastic element, the sensitivity of the beam is obtained. According to the experimental result, the accuracy of the theoretical analysis is found to be 90.4% along the x-axis, 74.9% along the y-axis and 78.9% along the z-axis. The measurement errors of linear accelerations ax, ay and az in the experiments are 2.6%, 0.6% and 1.31%, respectively. The experiments prove that accelerometer with DCB elastic element performs great sensitive and precision characteristics.

  18. A Small Range Six-Axis Accelerometer Designed with High Sensitivity DCB Elastic Element

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhibo; Liu, Jinhao; Yu, Chunzhan; Zheng, Yili

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a small range six-axis accelerometer (the measurement range of the sensor is ±g) with high sensitivity DCB (Double Cantilever Beam) elastic element. This sensor is developed based on a parallel mechanism because of the reliability. The accuracy of sensors is affected by its sensitivity characteristics. To improve the sensitivity, a DCB structure is applied as the elastic element. Through dynamic analysis, the dynamic model of the accelerometer is established using the Lagrange equation, and the mass matrix and stiffness matrix are obtained by a partial derivative calculation and a conservative congruence transformation, respectively. By simplifying the structure of the accelerometer, a model of the free vibration is achieved, and the parameters of the sensor are designed based on the model. Through stiffness analysis of the DCB structure, the deflection curve of the beam is calculated. Compared with the result obtained using a finite element analysis simulation in ANSYS Workbench, the coincidence rate of the maximum deflection is 89.0% along the x-axis, 88.3% along the y-axis and 87.5% along the z-axis. Through strain analysis of the DCB elastic element, the sensitivity of the beam is obtained. According to the experimental result, the accuracy of the theoretical analysis is found to be 90.4% along the x-axis, 74.9% along the y-axis and 78.9% along the z-axis. The measurement errors of linear accelerations ax, ay and az in the experiments are 2.6%, 0.6% and 1.31%, respectively. The experiments prove that accelerometer with DCB elastic element performs great sensitive and precision characteristics. PMID:27657089

  19. Vibration manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, C.

    1971-01-01

    Guidelines of the methods and applications used in vibration technology at the MSFC are presented. The purpose of the guidelines is to provide a practical tool for coordination and understanding between industry and government groups concerned with vibration of systems and equipments. Topics covered include measuring, reducing, analyzing, and methods for obtaining simulated environments and formulating vibration specifications. Methods for vibration and shock testing, theoretical aspects of data processing, vibration response analysis, and techniques of designing for vibration are also presented.

  20. Instrumentation by accelerometers and distributed optical fiber sensors of a real ballastless track structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapeleau, Xavier; Cottineau, Louis-Marie; Sedran, Thierry; Cailliau, Joël; Gueguen, Ivan; Dumoulin, Jean

    2015-04-01

    While relatively expensive to build, ballastless track structures are presently seen as an attractive alternative to conventional ballast. Firstly, they are built quickly since the slabs can be cast in place in an automated fashion by a slipform paver. Secondly, with its service life of at least 60 years, they requires little maintenance and hence they offers great availability. Other reasons for using ballastless tracks instead of ballasted tracks are the lack of suitable ballast material and the need of less noise and vibration for high-speed, in particularly. In the framework of a FUI project (n° 072906053), a new ballastless track structure based on concrete slabs was designed and its thermal-mechanical behavior in fatigue under selected mechanical and thermal conditions was tested on a real scale mockup in our laboratory [1,2]. By applying to the slabs both together mechanical stresses and thermal gradients, finite elements simulation and experimental results show that the weather conditions influence significantly the concrete slabs curvatures and by the way, the contact conditions with the underlaying layers. So it is absolutely necessary to take into account this effect in the design of the ballastless track structures in order to guarantee a long target life of at least of 50 years. After design and experimental tests in laboratory, a real ballastless track structure of 1km was built in France at the beginning of year 2013. This structure has 2 tracks on which several trains circulate every day since the beginning of year 2014. Before the construction, it was decided to monitor this structure to verify that the mechanical behavior is conform to the simulations. One part of the instrumentation is dedicated to monitor quasi-continuously the evolution of the curvature of a concrete slab. For this, 2 accelerometers were fixed on the slab under the track. One was placed on the edge and the other in the middle of the slab. The acquisition of the signals by a

  1. The GRADIO accelerometer: Design and development status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Alain; Touboul, M. P.

    1991-12-01

    The concept of Satellite Gravity Gradiometry (SGG) based on differential microaccelerometry as proposed in the early eighties is summarized. Work devoted to the development of the GRADIO accelerometers is described. The configuration was optimized for the Aristoteles mission with the objective of increasing resolution for an integrating time of 4 s. Thanks to the selected three axis configuration, very sensitive differential tests were carried out between two very representative laboratory models, in directions perpendicular to gravity. The resolution of these tests, limited by the actual stability of alignments of the testing equipment is described.

  2. Vibration characteristics of OH-58A helicopter main rotor transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Coy, John J.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental vibration tests covering a range of torque and speed conditions were performed on the OH-58A helicopter main rotor transmission at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Signals from accelerometers located on the transmission housing were analyzed by using Fourier spectra, power spectral density functions, and averaging techniques. Most peaks of the Fourier spectra occurred at the spiral bevel and planetary gear mesh harmonics. The highest level of vibration occurred at the spiral bevel meshing frequency. Transmission speed and vibration measurement location had a significant effect on measured vibration; transmission torque and measurement direction had a small effect.

  3. Experiment Study on Fuzzy Vibration Control of Solar Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongxu X.; Xu, Rui; Jiang, Jiangjian P.

    Some flexible appendages of spacecraft are cantilever plate structures, such as solar panels. These structures usually have very low damping ratios, high dimensional order, low modal frequencies and parameter uncertainties in dynamics. Their unwanted vibrations will be caused unavoidably, and harmful to the spacecraft. To solve this problem, the dynamic equations of the solar panel with piezoelectric patches are derived, and an accelerometer based fuzzy controller is designed. In order to verify the effectiveness of the vibration control algorithms, experiment research was conducted on a piezoelectric adaptive composite honeycomb cantilever panel. The experiment results demonstrate that the accelerometer-based fuzzy vibration control method can suppress the vibration of the solar panel effectively, the first bending mode damping ratio of the controlled system increase to 1.64%, and that is 3.56 times of the uncontrolled system.

  4. Accuracy improvement in a calibration test bench for accelerometers by a vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Emilia, Giulio; Di Gasbarro, David; Gaspari, Antonella; Natale, Emanuela

    2016-06-01

    A procedure is described in this paper for the accuracy improvement of calibration of low-cost accelerometers in a prototype rotary test bench, driven by a brushless servo-motor and operating in a low frequency range of vibrations (0 to 5 Hz). Vibration measurements by a vision system based on a low frequency camera have been carried out, in order to reduce the uncertainty of the real acceleration evaluation at the installation point of the sensor to be calibrated. A preliminary test device has been realized and operated in order to evaluate the metrological performances of the vision system, showing a satisfactory behavior if the uncertainty measurement is taken into account. A combination of suitable settings of the control parameters of the motion control system and of the information gained by the vision system allowed to fit the information about the reference acceleration at the installation point to the needs of the procedure for static and dynamic calibration of three-axis accelerometers.

  5. Calibrating Accelerometers Using an Electromagnetic Launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Erik Timpson

    2012-05-13

    A Pulse Forming Network (PFN), Helical Electromagnetic Launcher (HEML), Command Module (CM), and Calibration Table (CT) were built and evaluated for the combined ability to calibrate an accelerometer. The PFN has a maximum stored energy of 19.25 kJ bank and is fired by a silicon controlled rectifier (SCR), with appropriate safety precautions. The HEML is constructed out of G-10 fiberglass and is designed to accelerate 600 grams to 10 meters per second. The CM is microcontroller based running Arduino Software. The CM has a keypad input and 7 segment outputs of the bank voltage and desired voltage. After entering a desired bank voltage, the CM controls the charge of the PFN. When the two voltages are equal it allows the fire button to send a pulse to the SCR to fire the PFN and in turn, the HEML. The HEML projectile's tip hits a target that is held by the CT. The CT consists of a table to hold the PFN and HEML, a vacuum chuck, air bearing, velocity meter and catch pot. The Target is held with the vacuum chuck awaiting impact. After impact, the air bearing allows the target to fall freely for the velocity meter to get an accurate reading. A known acceleration is determined from the known change in velocity of the target. Thus, if an accelerometer was attached to the target, the measured value can be compared to the known value.

  6. Classification of Sporting Activities Using Smartphone Accelerometers

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Edmond; Monaghan, David; O'Connor, Noel E.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a framework that allows for the automatic identification of sporting activities using commonly available smartphones. We extract discriminative informational features from smartphone accelerometers using the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). Despite the poor quality of their accelerometers, smartphones were used as capture devices due to their prevalence in today's society. Successful classification on this basis potentially makes the technology accessible to both elite and non-elite athletes. Extracted features are used to train different categories of classifiers. No one classifier family has a reportable direct advantage in activity classification problems to date; thus we examine classifiers from each of the most widely used classifier families. We investigate three classification approaches; a commonly used SVM-based approach, an optimized classification model and a fusion of classifiers. We also investigate the effect of changing several of the DWT input parameters, including mother wavelets, window lengths and DWT decomposition levels. During the course of this work we created a challenging sports activity analysis dataset, comprised of soccer and field-hockey activities. The average maximum F-measure accuracy of 87% was achieved using a fusion of classifiers, which was 6% better than a single classifier model and 23% better than a standard SVM approach. PMID:23604031

  7. Validation of cardiac accelerometer sensor measurements.

    PubMed

    Remme, Espen W; Hoff, Lars; Halvorsen, Per Steinar; Naerum, Edvard; Skulstad, Helge; Fleischer, Lars A; Elle, Ole Jakob; Fosse, Erik

    2009-12-01

    In this study we have investigated the accuracy of an accelerometer sensor designed for the measurement of cardiac motion and automatic detection of motion abnormalities caused by myocardial ischaemia. The accelerometer, attached to the left ventricular wall, changed its orientation relative to the direction of gravity during the cardiac cycle. This caused a varying gravity component in the measured acceleration signal that introduced an error in the calculation of myocardial motion. Circumferential displacement, velocity and rotation of the left ventricular apical region were calculated from the measured acceleration signal. We developed a mathematical method to separate translational and gravitational acceleration components based on a priori assumptions of myocardial motion. The accuracy of the measured motion was investigated by comparison with known motion of a robot arm programmed to move like the heart wall. The accuracy was also investigated in an animal study. The sensor measurements were compared with simultaneously recorded motion from a robot arm attached next to the sensor on the heart and with measured motion by echocardiography and a video camera. The developed compensation method for the varying gravity component improved the accuracy of the calculated velocity and displacement traces, giving very good agreement with the reference methods.

  8. Six Degree Freedom Optical Fiber Accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazo, Rogerio Moreira; dos Reis Ribeiro, Erik; Nunes, Marcelo Buonocore; Barbosa, Carmem Lucia; de Siqueira Ferreira, Jorge Luis; de Barros Caldas, Tales; dos Santos, Josemir Coelho; de Arruda, Josiel Urbaninho

    2008-10-01

    Linear accelerations measurements are needed in many applications, as industry, military, aircrafts, space navigation, robotics and others. Actually, the most usual solutions to measure linear accelerations are three piezoelectric sensors used in orthogonal mounting, or MEM's sensors chips. Angular accelerations also are interesting to control and stabilize structures, like satellites and servo motors. It is possible to measure angular accelerations in two ways: direct measurement (using special sensors), or indirect measurements (obtaining acceleration of the angular velocity information) [1]. This work intends to present the structural and optical requirements of a six degree freedom opto-mechanical accelerometer based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG). With this sensor, it will be possible the direct measurement of three axial accelerations, and of three angular accelerations, with unlimited rotation angle, using one single proof mass. The FBG's are used as strain sensors and sustaining elements of the proof mass in the structure. Simulations have demonstrated that cross influences of 10 parts per million at worst case are possible. This kind of accelerometer may be used in navigation control, structural monitoring, satellite stabilization, guidance control and harsh environments, for example. The project requirements include the wavelength of FBG's, pre-strain and length of active segment of optical fibers, dimensions, material and structure of inertial proof mass and position of the fibers in the sustaining structure

  9. Automated Recognition of Advanced Vibration Features for Machinery Fault Classification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-05

    fault " using transitional failure data for commercial grade gearboxes . Features will be extracted from accelerometer data obtained on the Mechanical...Machinery Fault Classification DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release, distribution unlimited This paper is part of the following report: TITLE: New...thru ADP013516 UNCLASSIFIED AUTOMATED RECOGNITION OF ADVANCED VIBRATION FEATURES FOR MACHINERY FAULT CLASSIFICATION Katherine McClintic, Robert Campbell

  10. A System for Monitoring Posture and Physical Activity Using Accelerometers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Abstract- Accelerometers can be used to monitor physical activity in the home over prolonged periods. We describe a novel system for...processing schema in which these parameters are extracted is described. Keywords - physical activity , accelerometers, congestive heart failure, chronic...When monitoring the condition of patients with neurodegenerative or chronic diseases, a knowledge of their body movement and physical activity

  11. Identification of Accelerometer Nonwear Time and Sedentary Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Melody; Badland, Hannah M.; Schofield, Grant M.; Shepherd, Janine

    2011-01-01

    The primary aim of the current study was to investigate the accuracy of various automated rules for determining accelerometer nonwear time in a sample of predominantly desk-based office workers (using their self-reported nonwear times as a criterion). Second, the authors examined the effect of applying these rules to accelerometer data retention…

  12. Validation of a wireless accelerometer network for energy expenditure measurement.

    PubMed

    Montoye, Alexander H K; Dong, Bo; Biswas, Subir; Pfeiffer, Karin A

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate a wireless network of accelerometers and compare it to a hip-mounted accelerometer for predicting energy expenditure in a semi-structured environment. Adults (n = 25) aged 18-30 engaged in 14 sedentary, ambulatory, exercise, and lifestyle activities over a 60-min protocol while wearing a portable metabolic analyser, hip-mounted accelerometer, and wireless network of three accelerometers worn on the right wrist, thigh, and ankle. Participants chose the order and duration of activities. Artificial neural networks were created separately for the wireless network and hip accelerometer for energy expenditure prediction. The wireless network had higher correlations (r = 0.79 vs. r = 0.72, P < 0.01) but similar root mean square error (2.16 vs. 2.09 METs, P > 0.05) to the hip accelerometer. Measured (from metabolic analyser) and predicted energy expenditure from the hip accelerometer were significantly different for the 3 of the 14 activities (lying down, sweeping, and cycle fast); conversely, measured and predicted energy expenditure from the wireless network were not significantly different for any activity. In conclusion, the wireless network yielded a small improvement over the hip accelerometer, providing evidence that the wireless network can produce accurate estimates of energy expenditure in adults participating in a range of activities.

  13. Technical Reliability Assessment of the Actigraph GT1M Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Pedro; Mota, Jorge; Esliger, Dale; Welk, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the Actigraph GT1M (Pensacola, FL, USA) accelerometer activity count and step functions. Fifty GT1M accelerometers were initialized to collect simultaneous acceleration counts and steps data using 15-sec epochs. All reliability testing was completed using a mechanical shaker plate to…

  14. A low-cost CMOS-MEMS piezoresistive accelerometer with large proof mass.

    PubMed

    Khir, Mohd Haris Md; Qu, Peng; Qu, Hongwei

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports a low-cost, high-sensitivity CMOS-MEMS piezoresistive accelerometer with large proof mass. In the device fabricated using ON Semiconductor 0.5 μm CMOS technology, an inherent CMOS polysilicon thin film is utilized as the piezoresistive sensing material. A full Wheatstone bridge was constructed through easy wiring allowed by the three metal layers in the 0.5 μm CMOS technology. The device fabrication process consisted of a standard CMOS process for sensor configuration, and a deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) based post-CMOS microfabrication for MEMS structure release. A bulk single-crystal silicon (SCS) substrate is included in the proof mass to increase sensor sensitivity. In device design and analysis, the self heating of the polysilicon piezoresistors and its effect to the sensor performance is also discussed. With a low operating power of 1.5 mW, the accelerometer demonstrates a sensitivity of 0.077 mV/g prior to any amplification. Dynamic tests have been conducted with a high-end commercial calibrating accelerometer as reference.

  15. High sensitivity optical waveguide accelerometer based on Fano resonance.

    PubMed

    Wan, Fenghua; Qian, Guang; Li, Ruozhou; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Tong

    2016-08-20

    An optical waveguide accelerometer based on tunable asymmetrical Fano resonance in a ring-resonator-coupled Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) is proposed and analyzed. A Fano resonance accelerometer has a relatively large workspace of coupling coefficients with high sensitivity, which has potential application in inertial navigation, missile guidance, and attitude control of satellites. Due to the interference between a high-Q resonance pathway and a coherent background pathway, a steep asymmetric line shape is generated, which greatly improves the sensitivity of this accelerometer. The sensitivity of the accelerometer is about 111.75 mW/g. A 393-fold increase in sensitivity is achieved compared with a conventional MZI accelerometer and is approximately equal to the single ring structure.

  16. Optical fiber accelerometer based on MEMS torsional micromirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Fanlin; Zhong, Shaolong; Xu, Jing; Wu, Yaming

    2008-03-01

    A novel structure of optical fiber accelerometer based on MEMS torsional micro-mirror is introduced, including MEMS torsional micro-mirror and optical signal detection. The micro-mirror is a non-symmetric one, which means that the torsional bar supporting the micro-mirror is not located in the axis where the center of the micro-mirror locates. The optical signal detection is composed of PIN diode and dual fiber collimator, which is very sensitive to the coupling angle between the input fiber and output fiber. The detection principle is that acceleration is first transformed into torsional angle of the micro-mirror, then, optical insertion loss of the dual fiber collimator caused by the angle can be received by PIN. So under the flow of acceleration to torsional angle to optical signal attenuation to optical power detection, the acceleration is detected. The theory about sensing and optical signal detect of the device are discussed in this paper. The sensitive structure parameters and performance parameters are calculated by MATLAB. To simulate the static and modal analysis, the finite element analysis, ANSYS, is employed. Based on the above calculation, several optimization methods and the final structure parameters are given. The micro-mirror is completed by using silicon-glass bonding and deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). In the experiment, the acceleration is simulated by electrostatic force and the test results show that the static acceleration detection agrees with the theory analysis very well.

  17. NIF Ambient Vibration Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, C.R.; Hoehler, M.S., S.C. Sommer

    1999-11-29

    LLNL has an ongoing research and development project that includes developing data acquisition systems with remote wireless communication for monitoring the vibrations of large civil engineering structures. In order to establish the capability of performing remote sensing over an extended period of time, the researchers needed to apply this technology to a real structure. The construction of the National Ignition Facility provided an opportunity to test the data acquisition system on a large structure to monitor whether the facility is remaining within the strict ambient vibration guidelines. This document will briefly discuss the NIF ambient vibration requirements and summarize the vibration measurements performed during the Spring and Summer of 1999. In addition, a brief description of the sensors and the data acquisition systems will be provided in Appendix B.

  18. Micromechanical structures and microelectronics for acceleration sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Brady R.; Montague, Stephen; Smith, James H.; Lemkin, Mark

    1997-09-01

    MEMS is an enabling technology that may provide low-cost devices capable of sensing motion in a reliable and accurate manner. This paper describes work in MEMS accelerometer development at Sandia National Laboratories. This work leverages a process for integrating both the micromechanical structures and microelectronics circuitry of a MEMS accelerometer on the same chip. The design and test results of an integrated MEMS high-g accelerometer will be detailed. Additionally a design for a high-g fuse component (low-G or approximately equals 25 G accelerometer) will be discussed in the paper (where 1 G approximately equals 9.81 m/s). In particular, a design team at Sandia was assembled to develop a new micromachined silicon accelerometer which would be capable of surviving and measuring high-g shocks. Such a sensor is designed to be cheaper and more reliable than currently available sensors. A promising design for a suspended plate mass sensor was developed and the details of that design along with test data will be documented in the paper. Future development in this area at Sandia will focus on implementing accelerometers capable of measuring 200 kilo-g accelerations. Accelerometer development at Sandia will also focus on multi-axis acceleration measurement with integrated microelectronics.

  19. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Accelerometer Experiment Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, G. M.; Bougher, S. W.; Theriot, M. E.; Zurek, R. W.; Blanchard, R. C.; Tolson, R. H.; Murphy, J. R.

    2007-05-01

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) launched on August 12, 2005, designed for aerobraking, achieved Mars Orbital Insertion (MOI), March 10, 2006. Atmospheric density decreases exponentially with increasing height. By small propulsive adjustments of the apoapsis orbital velocity, periapsis altitude is fine tuned to the density surface that safely used the atmosphere of Mars to aerobrake over 400 orbits. MRO periapsis precessed from the South Pole at 6pm LST to near the equator at 3am LST. Meanwhile, apoapsis was brought dramatically from 40,000km at MOI to 460 km at aerobraking completion (ABX) August 30, 2006. After ABX, a few small propulsive maneuvers established the Primary Science Orbit (PSO), which without aerobraking would have required an additional 400 kg of fuel. Each of the 400 plus aerobraking orbits provided a vertical structure and distribution of density, scale heights, and temperatures, along the orbital path, providing key in situ insight into various upper atmosphere (greater than 100 km) processes. One of the major questions for scientists studying Mars is: "Where did the water go?" Honeywell's substantially improved electronics package for its IMU (QA-2000 accelerometer, gyro, electronics) maximized accelerometer sensitivities at the requests of The George Washington University, JPL, and Lockheed Martin. The improved accelerometer sensitivities allowed density measurements to exceed 200km, at least 40 km higher than with Mars Odyssey (MO). This extended vertical structures from MRO into the neutral lower exosphere, a region where various processes may allow atmospheric gasses to escape. Over the eons, water may have been lost in both near the surface and in the upper atmosphere. Thus the water balance throughout the entire atmosphere from subsurface to exosphere may both be critical. Comparisons of data from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), MO and MRO help characterize key temporal and spatial cycles including: winter polar warming, planetary scale

  20. Rejecting harmonic vibrations at Gemini with real-time vibration tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rippa, Mathew J.; Bonnet, Henri; Hayward, Thomas L.; Trujillo, Chadwick; Cavedoni, Chas P.; Cumming, Tom; Yamasaki, Chris; Masuda, Neal; Bagano, Cy; Hardash, Steve

    2016-08-01

    Fighting vibrations on large telescopes is an arduous task. At Gemini, vibrations originating from cryogenic coolers have been shown to degrade the optical wavefront, in certain cases by as much as 40%. This paper discusses a general solution to vibration compensation by tracking the real time vibration state of the telescope and using M2 to apply corrections. Two approaches are then presented: an open loop compensation at M2 based on the signal of accelerometers at the M1 glass, and a closed loop compensation at M2 based on optical measurements from the wave front sensor. The paper elaborates on the pros and cons of each approach and the challenges faced during commissioning. A conclusion is presented with the final results of vibration tracking integrated with operations.

  1. Application of MAVEN Accelerometer and Attitude Control Data to Mars Atmospheric Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Richard W.; Tolson, Robert H.; Baird, Darren; Johnson, Mark Z.; Bougher, Stephen W.

    2015-12-01

    The structure of the upper atmosphere of Mars (above ˜100 km) has been probed in situ mainly using spacecraft accelerometers during the aerobraking phases of 3 Mars orbiters. In a similar manner, the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) Accelerometer Experiment (ACC) will also use atmospheric drag accelerations sensed by inertial measurement units (IMU) onboard the spacecraft to recover atmospheric density along the orbiter path. These densities are used to estimate hydrostatic `vertical' density and temperature profiles, along track and altitudinal density waves, and latitudinal and longitudinal density variations. The IMU accelerometer signal-to-noise should permit profile reconstructions from spacecraft periapsis, nominally at 150 km altitude, to ˜170 km, an altitude range nominally spanning densities of 0.05-0.15 kg/km3. However, in situ measurements over a much greater altitude range, down to ˜125 km (reaching densities of ˜2-3.5 kg/km3), can be made during each of five week-long "Deep Dip" (DD) campaigns, and these are the prime focus of the Accelerometer Experiment. Judicious choice of the timing of these Deep-Dip campaigns during the MAVEN periapsis progression through local time, latitude and longitude in both hemispheres and in different seasons will add significantly to the existing data base of lower thermospheric densities. Other IMU and attitude control data may be used to estimate torques in order to improve the atmospheric density analysis, especially in the higher altitudes of the nominal science orbit, and, more challengingly, to estimate cross-track winds during the Deep-Dips.

  2. Design and development of PVDF-based MEMS hydrophone and accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bei

    It is always desirable to fabricate low-cost, highly sensitive and miniaturized sensors for various applications. In this thesis, the design and processing of PVDF-based MEMS hydrophones and accelerometers have been investigated. The basic structure of the hydrophone was fabricated on a silicon wafer using standard NMOS process technology. A MOSFET with extended gate electrode was designed as the interface circuit to a sensing material, which is a piezoelectric polymer, polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF). Acoustic impedance possessed by this piezoelectric material provides a reasonable match to that of water, which makes it very attractive for underwater applications. The electrical signal generated by the PVDF film was directly coupled to the gate of the MOSFET. In order to minimize the parasitic capacitance underneath the PVDF film and hence improve the device sensitivity, a thick photoresist, SU-8, was first employed as the dielectric layer under the extended gate electrode. For underwater operation, the hydrophone was encapsulated by a waterproof Rho-C rubber. However, it was found that the rubber induced the degradation of the MOSFET. To improve the reliability of the hydrophone, the active device was passivated by a silicon nitride layer, which is a good barrier material to most mobile ions and solvents. The device after passivation also shows a lower noise level. A theoretical model was developed to predict the sensitivity of the hydrophone. A reasonable agreement between the theoretical and experimental results was obtained. MEMS accelerometers based on the PVDF-MOSFET structure by attaching a seismic mass on top of the PVDF film were also fabricated. The accelerometer was calibrated using a comparison method and an average sensitivity of 0.28 mV/g was achieved. A dynamic model of the accelerometer was derived and the calculated results are in good agreement with the measured results.

  3. Traceable vibration measurements--who needs them?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Norman H.

    1998-06-01

    Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) is rapidly displacing accelerometer methods in many vibration measurement applications. Although the technique may be considered by some to give an 'absolute' measure of vibration amplitude, there are certain instances in which it may be necessary to show a rigorous traceability, to primary physical standards, of measured amplitudes. In particular, where vibration measurements are made in order to show compliance or non- compliance with a clause in a contract, the measurer must be able to state uncertainties at a specified level of confidence. In such cases the calibration component of uncertainty must be known, and traceability must be shown to primary standards of length, time and voltage. In other cases, eg mode studies, only amplitude linearity may be of interest. This paper discusses the various methods currently used in national measurement institutes for primary calibration of vibration-measuring transducers, and the uncertainties in these methods. The usefulness of portable calibrators is discussed, and the practicality of using reference accelerometers to calibrate LDV measuring systems. Finally, the paper discusses the possibility of an alternative path of traceability of vibration measurements, using a LDV reference instrument.

  4. Validation study of Polar V800 accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Vicente, Adrián; De Cocker, Katrien; Garatachea, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Background The correct quantification of physical activity (PA) and energy expenditure (EE) in daily life is an important target for researchers and professionals. The objective of this paper is to study the validity of the Polar V800 for the quantification of PA and the estimation of EE against the ActiGraph (ActiTrainer) in healthy young adults. Methods Eighteen Caucasian active people (50% women) aged between 19–23 years wore an ActiTrainer on the right hip and a Polar V800 on the preferred wrist during 7 days. Paired samples t-tests were used to analyze differences in outcomes between devices, and Pearson’s correlation coefficients to examine the correlation between outcomes. The agreement was studied using the Bland-Altman method. Also, the association between the difference and the magnitude of the measurement (heteroscedasticity) was examined. Sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC value) were calculated to evaluate the ability of the devices to accurately define a person who fulfills the recommendation of 10,000 daily steps. Results The devices significantly differed from each other on all outcomes (P<0.05), except for Polar V800’s alerts vs. ActiTrainer’s 1 hour sedentary bouts (P=0.595) and Polar V800’s walking time vs. ActiTrainer’s lifestyle time (P=0.484). Heteroscedasticity analyses were significant for all outcomes, except for Kcal and sitting time. The ROC-AUC value was fair (0.781±0.048) and the sensitivity and specificity was 98% and 58%, respectively. Conclusions The Polar V800 accelerometer has a comparable validity to the accelerometer in free-living conditions, regarding “1 hour sedentary bouts” and “V800’s walking time vs. ActiTrainer’s lifestyle time” in young adults. PMID:27570772

  5. Optomechanics for Inertial Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, David Neil

    Inertial MEMS (accelerometers and gyroscopes) is a rapidly-growing billion dollar industry. At the heart of these devices is a displacement sensor. Since its commercialization in the 1980s, the core technology has not changed (viz., capacitive displacement readout of mass-on-springs), for almost all commercially-available inertial MEMS. However, recent developments in integrated optomechanics when combined with recent low-cost on-chip lasers and detectors may enable high-SNR on-chip displacement sensing. Such devices represent a new paradigm in on-chip inertial MEMS sensors, but have yet to be considered in detail in the literature. In this dissertation we quantitatively investigate several optomechanical displacement sensing schemes, both theoretically and experimentally, and discuss the merits of each approach. These schemes include: cavity deformation sensing, cavity evanescent field displacement sensing (both waveguide or nearby absorber moving), and two-cavity gap sensing. Beyond simply investigating different sensing schemes, we find that reinventing the traditional displacement-sensing element has the effect of reinventing the entire system. For example the driving circuitry may be simpler and/or lower-power than traditional inertial MEMS driving circuitry, the noise sources are fundamentally different and are limited by different mechanisms, the footprint and cost drivers may be completely reimagined, etc. Although we have not yet integrated the devices reported here with on-chip lasers and detectors, we show experimental results and modeling for our non-integrated devices, discuss the noise sources to be expected in an integrated device, and survey some on-chip laser/detector noise figures from the literature. Using such noise figures and the measured optomechanical sensitivities, we show that our measured devices when operated as accelerometers could easily achieve sub-microg[square root of] Hz total noise, and thus potentially exceed typical

  6. A Comparison of Accelerometer Accuracy in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Lorraine J; Petroski, Gregory F; Markis, Natalie E

    2015-01-01

    Older adults' gait disorders present challenges for accurate activity monitoring. The current study compared the accuracy of accelerometer-detected to hand-tallied steps in 50 residential care/assisted living residents. Participants completed two walking trials wearing a Fitbit® Tracker and waist-, wrist-, and ankle-mounted Actigraph GT1M. Agreement between accelerometer and observed counts was calculated using concordance correlation coefficients (CCC), accelerometer to observed count ratios, accelerometer and observed count differences, and Bland-Altman plots. Classification and Regression Tree analysis identified minimum gait speed thresholds to achieve accelerometer accuracy ≥0.80. Participants' mean age was 84.2 and gait speed was 0.64 m/s. All accelerometers underestimated true steps. Only the ankle-mounted GT1M demonstrated positive agreement with observed counts (CCC = 0.205). Thresholds for 0.80 accuracy were gait speeds ≥0.56 m/s for the Fitbit and gait speeds ≥0.71 m/s for the ankle-mounted GT1M. Gait speed and accelerometer placement affected activity monitor accuracy in older adults.

  7. Recent Results from CHAMP Tracking and Accelerometer Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthcke, S. B.; Rowlands, D. D.; Lemoine, F. G.; Nerem, R. S.; Thompson, B.; Pavlis, E.; Williams, T. A.; Colombo, O. L.; Chao, Benjamin F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The CHAMP mission's unique combination of sensors and orbit configuration will enable unprecedented improvements in modeling and understanding the Earth's static gravity field and its temporal variations. CHAMP is the first of two missions (GRACE to be launched in the early part of 02') that combine a new generation of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, a high precision three-axis accelerometer, and star cameras for the precision attitude determination. In order to isolate the gravity signal for science investigations, it is necessary to perform a detailed reduction and analysis of the GPS and Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) tracking data in conjunction with the accelerometer and attitude data. Precision orbit determination based on the GPS and SLR tracking data will isolate the orbit perturbations, while the accelerometer data will be used to distinguish the non-gravitational forces from those due to the geopotential (static, and time varying). In preparation for the CHAMP and GRACE missions, extensive modifications have been made to NASA/GSFC's GEODYN orbit determination software to enable the simultaneous reduction of spacecraft tracking (e.g. GPS and SLR), three-axis accelerometer and precise attitude data. Several weeks of CHAMP tracking and accelerometer data have been analyzed and the results will be presented. Precision orbit determination analysis based on tracking data alone in addition to results based on the simultaneous reduction of tracking and accelerometer data will be discussed. Results from a calibration of the accelerometer will be presented along with the results from various orbit determination strategies.

  8. Predicting Human Movement with Multiple Accelerometers Using Movelets

    PubMed Central

    He, Bing; Bai, Jiawei; Zipunnikov, Vadim V.; Koster, Annemarie; Caserotti, Paolo; Lange-Maia, Brittney; Glynn, Nancy W.; Harris, Tamara B.; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The study aims were: 1) to develop transparent algorithms that use short segments of training data for predicting activity types; and 2) to compare prediction performance of proposed algorithms using single accelerometers and multiple accelerometers. Methods Sixteen participants (age, 80.6 yr (4.8 yr); BMI, 26.1 kg·m−2 (2.5 kg·m−2)) performed fifteen life-style activities in the laboratory, each wearing three accelerometers at the right hip, left and right wrists. Triaxial accelerometry data were collected at 80 Hz using Actigraph GT3X+. Prediction algorithms were developed, which, instead of extracting features, build activity specific dictionaries composed of short signal segments called movelets. Three alternative approaches were proposed to integrate the information from the multiple accelerometers. Results With at most several seconds of training data per activity, the prediction accuracy at the second-level temporal resolution was very high for lying, standing, normal/fast walking, and standing up from a chair (the median prediction accuracy ranged from 88.2% to 99.9% based on the single-accelerometer movelet approach). For these activities wrist-worn accelerometers performed almost as well as hip-worn accelerometers (the median difference in accuracy between wrist and hip ranged from −2.7% to 5.8%). Modest improvements in prediction accuracy were achieved by integrating information from multiple accelerometers. Discussion and conclusions It is possible to achieve high prediction accuracy at the secondlevel temporal resolution with very limited training data. To increase prediction accuracy from the simultaneous use of multiple accelerometers, a careful selection of integrative approaches is required. PMID:25134005

  9. Real-time optimal sensing strategies for active control of optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Suk-Min; Fowler, Leslie P.; Clark, Robert L.; Anderson, Eric H.

    2007-04-01

    The pointing and imaging performance of precision optical systems is degraded by disturbances on the system that create optical jitter. These disturbances can be caused by structural motion of optical components due to vibration sources that (1) originate within the optical system, (2) originate external to the system and are transmitted through the structural path in the environment, and (3) are air-induced vibrations from acoustic noise. Beam control systems can suppress optical jitter, and active control techniques can be used to extend performance by incorporating information from accelerometers, microphones, and other auxiliary sensors. In some applications, offline fixed gain controllers can be used to minimize jitter. However there are many applications in which a real-time adaptive control approach would yield improved optical performance. Often we would like the capability to adapt in real-time to a system which is time-varying or whose disturbances are non-stationary and hard to predict. In the presence of these harsh, ever-changing environments we would like to use every available tool to optimize performance. Improvements in control algorithms are important, but another potentially useful tool is a real-time adaptive control method employing optimal sensing strategies. In this approach, real-time updating of reference sensors is provided to minimize optical jitter. The technique selects an optimal subset of sensors to use as references from an array of possible sensor locations. The optimal, weighted reference sensor set is well correlated with the disturbance and when used with an adaptive control algorithm, results in improved line-of-sight jitter performance with less computational burden compared to a controller which uses multiple reference sensors. The proposed technique is applied to an experimental test bed in which multiple proof-mass actuators generate structural vibrations on a flexible plate. These vibrations are transmitted to an optical

  10. Hand-arm vibration exposure monitoring with wearable sensor module.

    PubMed

    Austad, Hanne O; Røed, Morten H; Liverud, Anders E; Dalgard, Steffen; Seeberg, Trine M

    2013-01-01

    Vibration exposure is a serious risk within work physiology for several work groups. Combined with cold artic climate, the risk for permanent harm is even higher. Equipment that can monitor the vibration exposure and warn the user when at risk will provide a safer work environment for these work groups. This study evaluates whether data from a wearable wireless multi-parameter sensor module can be used to estimate vibration exposure and exposure time. This work has been focused on the characterization of the response from the accelerometer in the sensor module and the optimal location of the module in the hand-arm configuration.

  11. The vertical accelerometer, a new instrument for air navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laboccetta, Letterio

    1923-01-01

    This report endeavors to show the possibility of determining the rate of acceleration and the advantage of having such an accelerometer in addition to other aviation instruments. Most of the discussions concern balloons.

  12. Wireless accelerometer iPod application for quantifying gait characteristics.

    PubMed

    LeMoyne, Robert; Mastroianni, Timothy; Grundfest, Warren

    2011-01-01

    The capability to quantify gait characteristics through a wireless accelerometer iPod application in an effectively autonomous environment may alleviate the progressive strain on highly specific medical resources. The iPod consists of the inherent attributes imperative for robust gait quantification, such as a three dimensional accelerometer, data storage, flexible software, and the capacity for wireless transmission of the gait data through email. Based on the synthesis of the integral components of the iPod, a wireless accelerometer iPod application for quantifying gait characteristics has been tested and evaluated in an essentially autonomous environment. The quantified gait acceleration waveforms were wirelessly transmitted using email for postprocessing. The site for the gait experiment occurred in a remote location relative to the location where the postprocessing was conducted. The wireless accelerometer iPod application for quantifying gait characteristics demonstrated sufficient accuracy and consistency.

  13. LANCE Q-flex accelerometer qualification test program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, J. S.; Mitchell, J. N.; Hester, T.; Searcy, D.

    1982-03-01

    This report covers the performance obtained on six Sundstrand Q-Flex accelerometers during the qualification test program for the LANCE missile. The Qualification Test Program was divided into three parts: (1) Flight Assurance Tests (FAT), (2) Storage and Transportation Tests (SATT), and (3) Reliability Overstress Tests (ROT). All testing was performed in accordance with Vought accelerometer procurement specification 704-166C dated 8 June 1978.

  14. Optical fiber accelerometer based on a silicon micromachined cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malki, Abdelrafik; Lecoy, Pierre; Marty, Jeanine; Renouf, Christine; Ferdinand, Pierre

    1995-12-01

    An intensity-modulated fiber-optic accelerometer based on backreflection effects has been manufactured and tested. It uses a multimode fiber placed at a spherical mirror center, and the beam intensity is modulated by a micromachined silicon cantilever. This device has applications as an accelerometer and vibrometer for rotating machines. It exhibits an amplitude linearity of +/-1.2% in the range of 0.1-22 m s-2, a frequency linearity of +/-1% in the

  15. A PFV2 accelerometer for high shock applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tise, Bert; Smith, Talbot

    1989-08-01

    The development, fabrication, and testing of a high-g piezoelectric accelerometer that uses polyvinlylidene fluoride as the piezoelectric transducer is described. The accelerometer is designed to continuously measure accelerations up to 1000,000 g. The device is packages in a 3/8 inch hex head bolt and can include a built-in hybrid buffer to provide a low output impedance analog signal. Included are fabrication procedures, mechanical drawings, and software listings for test data analysis programs.

  16. Vibration training for upper body: transmission of platform vibrations through cables.

    PubMed

    Tankisheva, Ekaterina; Boonen, Steven; Delecluse, Christophe; Druyts, Hans Lj; Verschueren, Sabine M P

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the vibration transmission from a vibration platform through Vectran cables to the upper body and its relationship to induced muscular activation. Fifteen clinically healthy participants performed 3 different arm exercises-biceps curl, triceps curl, and lateral raise. Vibration transmission to the upper body was assessed over a wide range of accelerations (from 1.90 to 5.98 g) and frequencies (from 25 to 40 Hz). To assess the vibration transmission, 7 triaxial accelerometers were attached from the hand up to the head, and the root-mean-square of acceleration signal of each site-specific body point was calculated. Muscular activity of biceps brachii, triceps brachii, deltoid, and upper trapezius was recorded. The results showed a significant attenuation of the platform accelerations transmitted through the Vectran cables to the upper body. Handle vibration ranged between 27 and 44% of the acceleration delivered by the platform depending on platform vibration parameters (acceleration/frequency). Vibration increased the muscle activity of biceps brachii, triceps brachii, deltoid, and upper trapezius muscles significantly only during biceps curl exercises. No frequency or acceleration effect was found on the size of the muscle response. The results of the present study suggest that a cable-pulley resistance system on a vibration platform channels the vibration safely from the platform to the arms and induces additional muscle activation in some arm muscles when biceps curl exercises are performed.

  17. Spectral Regression Based Fault Feature Extraction for Bearing Accelerometer Sensor Signals

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zhanguo; Xia, Shixiong; Wan, Ling; Cai, Shiyu

    2012-01-01

    Bearings are not only the most important element but also a common source of failures in rotary machinery. Bearing fault prognosis technology has been receiving more and more attention recently, in particular because it plays an increasingly important role in avoiding the occurrence of accidents. Therein, fault feature extraction (FFE) of bearing accelerometer sensor signals is essential to highlight representative features of bearing conditions for machinery fault diagnosis and prognosis. This paper proposes a spectral regression (SR)-based approach for fault feature extraction from original features including time, frequency and time-frequency domain features of bearing accelerometer sensor signals. SR is a novel regression framework for efficient regularized subspace learning and feature extraction technology, and it uses the least squares method to obtain the best projection direction, rather than computing the density matrix of features, so it also has the advantage in dimensionality reduction. The effectiveness of the SR-based method is validated experimentally by applying the acquired vibration signals data to bearings. The experimental results indicate that SR can reduce the computation cost and preserve more structure information about different bearing faults and severities, and it is demonstrated that the proposed feature extraction scheme has an advantage over other similar approaches. PMID:23202017

  18. A Differential Resonant Accelerometer with Low Cross-Interference and Temperature Drift

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Zhao, Yulong; Li, Cun; Cheng, Rongjun; Sun, Dengqiang; Wang, Songli

    2017-01-01

    Presented in this paper is a high-performance resonant accelerometer with low cross-interference, low temperature drift and digital output. The sensor consists of two quartz double-ended tuning forks (DETFs) and a silicon substrate. A new differential silicon substrate is proposed to reduce the temperature drift and cross-interference from the undesirable direction significantly. The natural frequency of the quartz DETF is theoretically calculated, and then the axial stress on the vibration beams is verified through finite element method (FEM) under a 100 g acceleration which is loaded on x-axis, y-axis and z-axis, respectively. Moreover, sensor chip is wire-bonded to a printed circuit board (PCB) which contains two identical oscillating circuits. In addition, a steel shell is selected to package the sensor for experiments. Benefiting from the distinctive configuration of the differential structure, the accelerometer characteristics such as temperature drift and cross-interface are improved. The experimental results demonstrate that the cross-interference is lower than 0.03% and the temperature drift is about 18.16 ppm/°C. PMID:28106798

  19. Performance of several low-cost accelerometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, J.R.; Allen, R.M.; Chung, A. I.; Cochran, E.S.; Guy, R.; Hellweg, M.; Lawrence, J. F.

    2014-01-01

    Several groups are implementing low‐cost host‐operated systems of strong‐motion accelerographs to support the somewhat divergent needs of seismologists and earthquake engineers. The Advanced National Seismic System Technical Implementation Committee (ANSS TIC, 2002), managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with other network operators, is exploring the efficacy of such systems if used in ANSS networks. To this end, ANSS convened a working group to explore available Class C strong‐motion accelerometers (defined later), and to consider operational and quality control issues, and the means of annotating, storing, and using such data in ANSS networks. The working group members are largely coincident with our author list, and this report informs instrument‐performance matters in the working group’s report to ANSS. Present examples of operational networks of such devices are the Community Seismic Network (CSN; csn.caltech.edu), operated by the California Institute of Technology, and Quake‐Catcher Network (QCN; Cochran et al., 2009; qcn.stanford.edu; November 2013), jointly operated by Stanford University and the USGS. Several similar efforts are in development at other institutions. The overarching goals of such efforts are to add spatial density to existing Class‐A and Class‐B (see next paragraph) networks at low cost, and to include many additional people so they become invested in the issues of earthquakes, their measurement, and the damage they cause.

  20. Factors associated with participant compliance in studies using accelerometers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul H; Macfarlane, Duncan J; Lam, T H

    2013-09-01

    Participant compliance is an important issue in studies using accelerometers. Some participants wear the accelerometer for the duration specified by the researchers but many do not. We investigated a range of demographic factors associated with participant compliance in obtaining analyzable accelerometer data. A total of 3601 participants (aged 47.6±13.1 years, 44.6% male) were included. They were asked to wear an accelerometer (ActiGraph) for four consecutive days after completing a household survey during March 2009-January 2011 in Hong Kong. Participants wore the accelerometer on average for 13.9h in a 24-h day. No significant difference was found between males and females (p=0.38). Using log-linear regression, it was found that older participants (0.5% more wearing hours for each year of age, p<0.001), those with full-time job (p<0.01), with tertiary education (p<0.01), non-smokers (p<0.01) and with high self-reported health (p<0.05) wore the accelerometer for more hours. These results provide details for estimating compliance rates for samples with different characteristics and thus sample size calculation to account for participant compliance.

  1. Isolation of a piezoresistive accelerometer used in high acceleration tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, V. I.; Brown, F. A.; Davie, N. T.

    Both uniaxial and triaxial shock isolation techniques for a piezoresistive accelerometer have been developed for pyroshock and impact tests. The uniaxial shock isolation technique has demonstrated acceptable characteristics for a temperature range of -50 to +186 F and a frequency bandwidth of DC to 10 kHz. The triaxial shock isolation technique has demonstrated acceptable results for a temperature range of -50 to 70 F and a frequency bandwidth of DC to 10 kHz. These temperature ranges, that are beyond the accelerometer manufacturer's operational limits of -30 and +150 F, required the calibration of accelerometers at high shock levels and at the temperature extremes of -50 and +160 F. The purposes of these calibrations were to insure that the accelerometers operated at the field test temperatures and to provide an accelerometer sensitivity at each test temperature. Since there is no NIST-traceable (National Institute of Standards and Technology traceable) calibration capability at shock levels of 5,000 - 15,000 g for the temperature extremes of -50 and +160 F, a method for calibrating and certifying the Hopkinson bar with a transfer standard was developed. Time domain and frequency domain results are given that characterize the Hopkinson bar. The NIST-traceable accuracy for the standard accelerometer in shock is +\\-5%. The Hopkinson bar has been certified by the Sandia Secondary Standards Division with an uncertainty of 6%.

  2. Processing of multi-satellite accelerometer data for thermospheric modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doornbos, Eelco; Visser, Pieter N. A. M.; van Helleputte, Tom; van den Ijssel, Jose; Foerster, Matthias; Luehr, Hermann; Rees, David; Koppenwallner, Georg; Fritsche, Bent; Kern, Michael; Haagmans, Roger

    Satellite accelerometers, such as those carried on the CHAMP and GRACE satellites, provide valuable data for improving our knowledge of thermosphere density and winds. These data are now available over a full range of solar activity conditions and over a wide range of heights and local times. The fact that the CHAMP and GRACE accelerometer data sets are largely overlapping in time offers the opportunity to study their synergy. Continuity of this multisatellite accelerometer data set will be provided by ESA's Swarm mission, a constellation of three satellites for studying the Earth's magnetic field. This overview will cover both the processing steps required for converting accelerometer data into density and wind data, and the scientific investigations resulting from this data. Scientific investigations that make use of the accelerometer data sets include comparisons with and adjustment of empirical and physical thermosphere models, studies of the response of the thermosphere on geomagnetic storm conditions and characterization of thermospheric structures by analysis of long-term averages. Accelerometer calibration errors and attitude errors in the satellite aerodynamic model can be largely reduced by making use of data from the satellite's GPS receivers and star cameras. However, considerable uncertainties remain due to insufficient knowledge of the in-track wind speed, the gas-surface interaction and cross-track calibration. These uncertainties can be characterized by using error analysis, by comparing different processing approaches and by comparisons with force models.

  3. An all-silicon single-wafer micro-g accelerometer with a combined surface and bulk micromachining process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yazdi, N.; Najafi, K.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports an all-silicon fully symmetrical z-axis micro-g accelerometer that is fabricated on a single-silicon wafer using a combined surface and bulk fabrication process. The microaccelerometer has high device sensitivity, low noise, and low/controllable damping that are the key factors for attaining micro g and sub-micro g resolution in capacitive accelerometers. The microfabrication process produces a large proof mass by using the whole wafer thickness and a large sense capacitance by utilizing a thin sacrificial layer. The sense/feedback electrodes are formed by a deposited 2-3 microns polysilicon film with embedded 25-35 microns-thick vertical stiffeners. These electrodes, while thin, are made very stiff by the thick embedded stiffeners so that force rebalancing of the proof mass becomes possible. The polysilicon electrodes are patterned to create damping holes. The microaccelerometers are batch-fabricated, packaged, and tested successfully. A device with a 2-mm x 1-mm proof mass and a full bridge support has a measured sensitivity of 2 pF/g. The measured sensitivity of a 4-mm x 1-mm accelerometer with a cantilever support is 19.4 pF/g. The calculated noise floor of these devices at atmosphere are 0.23 micro g/sqrt(Hz) and 0.16 micro g/sqrt(Hz), respectively.

  4. A BASIC STUDY FOR GRAVITY SURVEY USING A FORCE-BALANCED-TYPE ACCELEROMETER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Hiroko; Morikawa, Hitoshi; Matsuda, Shigeo; Tokue, Satoshi; Komazawa, Masao; Kusumoto, Shigekazu

    The gravity survey is applied to model a ground structure. For this purpose, a spring-type relative gravimeter is usually used. Though this type of gravimeter can provide very accurate data, it is very expensive and difficult to handle. This means that a simple and inexpensive sensor to measure the gravity is required. For this, we began to develop a new gravimeter using a force-balanced-type accelerometer. In this study, we develop a preliminary system and calibrate it. Then, a simple measurements is carried out on an observation wheel, on a car, and on a ship. The gravity data is contaminated by vibration of carriers, though we found a technique of blind source separation can be hopeful to pick up gravity data from the observed data. However, we also recognized some problems that needs to be solved.

  5. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  6. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, Joseph B.; Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Tobin, Kenneth W.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  7. Italian spring accelerometer (ISA) a high sensitive accelerometer for ``BepiColombo'' ESA CORNERSTONE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, V.; Nozzoli, S.

    2001-12-01

    The targets of the ESA CORNERSTONE mission to Mercury "BepiColombo" are concerned with both planetary and magnetospheric physics and to test some aspects of the general relativity. A payload devoted to a set of experiments named radio science is located within one of the three proposed modules, the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO). In particular, a high sensitivity accelerometer ( a min<10 -9√g/ Hz in the range 10 -4- 10 -1 Hz) will measure the inertial acceleration acting on the MPO. Such data, together with tracking data are used to evaluate the purely gravitational trajectory of the MPO, transforming it to a virtual drag-free satellite system. The ISA accelerometer, considered for this mission, is a well-studied instrument developed at the Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (IFSI), with the financial support of the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI). A prototype of such an instrument was constructed, matching the requirements of the radio science experiment. Results of the study concerning the use of ISA in the BepiColombo mission are reported here, particular care being devoted to the description of the instrument and to its sensitivity and thermal stabilisation.

  8. Study on the DFB fiber laser accelerometer with a metal-shell-packaged single-cylinder mandrel structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haitao; Ma, Lina; Yang, Huayong; Luo, Hong

    2014-12-01

    To realize the miniature of fiber laser accelerometers, a metal-shell-packaged single-cylinder mandrel-structured distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser accelerometer was proposed, whose key sensing component is the DFB fiber laser with a cavity length of 16mm. Simulation results show that when the weight of the mass is 400g, the radius of the thin shell cylinder is 0.5cm, we will find that the resonance frequency of the sensor is 900Hz and its sensitivity reaches 18.1pm/g. It is also shown that its sensitivity achieved 42.8dB.re.rad/g while demodulated by an unbalanced Michelson optical fiber interferometer with 1m path difference. In addition, the effects of its structure and material parameters on the acceleration sensitivity are also studied.

  9. Relative performance of several inexpensive accelerometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, John R.; Rogers, John A.

    1995-01-01

    We examined the performance of several low-cost accelerometers for highly cost-driven applications in recording earthquake strong motion. We anticipate applications for such sensors in providing the lifeline and emergency-response communities with an immediate, comprehensive picture of the extent and characteristics of likely damage. We also foresee their use as 'filler' instruments sited between research-grade instruments to provide spatially detailed and near-field records of large earthquakes (on the order of 1000 stations at 600-m intervals in San Fernando Valley, population 1.2 million, for example). The latter applications would provide greatly improved attenuation relationships for building codes and design, the first examples of mainshock information (that is, potentially nonlinear regime) for microzonation, and a suite of records for structural engineers. We also foresee possible applications in monitoring structural inter-story drift during earthquakes, possibly leading to local and remote alarm functions as well as design criteria. This effort appears to be the first of its type at the USGS. It is spurred by rapid advances in sensor technology and the recognition of potential non-classical applications. In this report, we estimate sensor noise spectra, relative transfer functions and cross-axis sensitivity of six inexpensive sensors. We tested three micromachined ('silicon-chip') sensors in addition to classical force-balance and piezoelectric examples. This sample of devices is meant to be representative, not comprehensive. Sensor noise spectra were estimated by recording system output with the sensor mounted on a pneumatically supported 545-kg optical-bench isolation table. This isolation table appears to limit ground motion to below our system noise level. These noise estimates include noise introduced by signal-conditioning circuitry, the analog-to-digital converter (ADC), and noise induced in connecting wiring by ambient electromagnetic fields in

  10. Strong Motion Seismograph Based On MEMS Accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Y.; Hu, X.

    2013-12-01

    The MEMS strong motion seismograph we developed used the modularization method to design its software and hardware.It can fit various needs in different application situation.The hardware of the instrument is composed of a MEMS accelerometer,a control processor system,a data-storage system,a wired real-time data transmission system by IP network,a wireless data transmission module by 3G broadband,a GPS calibration module and power supply system with a large-volumn lithium battery in it. Among it,the seismograph's sensor adopted a three-axis with 14-bit high resolution and digital output MEMS accelerometer.Its noise level just reach about 99μg/√Hz and ×2g to ×8g dynamically selectable full-scale.Its output data rates from 1.56Hz to 800Hz. Its maximum current consumption is merely 165μA,and the device is so small that it is available in a 3mm×3mm×1mm QFN package. Furthermore,there is access to both low pass filtered data as well as high pass filtered data,which minimizes the data analysis required for earthquake signal detection. So,the data post-processing can be simplified. Controlling process system adopts a 32-bit low power consumption embedded ARM9 processor-S3C2440 and is based on the Linux operation system.The processor's operating clock at 400MHz.The controlling system's main memory is a 64MB SDRAM with a 256MB flash-memory.Besides,an external high-capacity SD card data memory can be easily added.So the system can meet the requirements for data acquisition,data processing,data transmission,data storage,and so on. Both wired and wireless network can satisfy remote real-time monitoring, data transmission,system maintenance,status monitoring or updating software.Linux was embedded and multi-layer designed conception was used.The code, including sensor hardware driver,the data acquisition,earthquake setting out and so on,was written on medium layer.The hardware driver consist of IIC-Bus interface driver, IO driver and asynchronous notification driver. The

  11. Investigation of Gearbox Vibration Transmission Paths on Gear Condition Indicator Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Islam, AKM Anwarul; Feldman, Jason; Larsen, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Helicopter health monitoring systems use vibration signatures generated from damaged components to identify transmission faults. For damaged gears, these signatures relate to changes in dynamics due to the meshing of the damaged tooth. These signatures, referred to as condition indicators (CI), can perform differently when measured on different systems, such as a component test rig, or a full-scale transmission test stand, or an aircraft. These differences can result from dissimilarities in systems design and environment under dynamic operating conditions. The static structure can also filter the response between the vibration source and the accelerometer, when the accelerometer is installed on the housing. To assess the utility of static vibration transfer paths for predicting gear CI performance, measurements were taken on the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Test Rig. The vibration measurements were taken to determine the effect of torque, accelerometer location and gearbox design on accelerometer response. Measurements were taken at the housing and compared while impacting the gear set near mesh. These impacts were made at gear mesh to simulate gear meshing dynamics. Data measured on a helicopter gearbox installed in a static fixture were also compared to the test rig. The behavior of the structure under static conditions was also compared to CI values calculated under dynamic conditions. Results indicate that static vibration transfer path measurements can provide some insight into spiral bevel gear CI performance by identifying structural characteristics unique to each system that can affect specific CI response.

  12. Validation of Accelerometer Wear and Nonwear Time Classification Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Leena; Liu, Zhouwen; Matthews, Charles E.; Buchowski, Maciej S.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The use of movement monitors (accelerometers) for measuring physical activity (PA) in intervention and population-based studies is becoming a standard methodology for the objective measurement of sedentary and active behaviors and for validation of subjective PA self-reports. A vital step in PA measurements is classification of daily time into accelerometer wear and nonwear intervals using its recordings (counts) and an accelerometer-specific algorithm. Purpose To validate and improve a commonly used algorithm for classifying accelerometer wear and nonwear time intervals using objective movement data obtained in the whole-room indirect calorimeter. Methods We conducted a validation study of a wear/nonwear automatic algorithm using data obtained from 49 adults and 76 youth wearing accelerometers during a strictly monitored 24-h stay in a room calorimeter. The accelerometer wear and nonwear time classified by the algorithm was compared with actual wearing time. Potential improvements to the algorithm were examined using the minimum classification error as an optimization target. Results The recommended elements in the new algorithm are: 1) zero-count threshold during a nonwear time interval, 2) 90-min time window for consecutive zero/nonzero counts, and 3) allowance of 2-min interval of nonzero counts with the up/downstream 30-min consecutive zero counts window for detection of artifactual movements. Compared to the true wearing status, improvements to the algorithm decreased nonwear time misclassification during the waking and the 24-h periods (all P < 0.001). Conclusions The accelerometer wear/nonwear time algorithm improvements may lead to more accurate estimation of time spent in sedentary and active behaviors. PMID:20581716

  13. Active Suppression Of Vibrations On Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    1995-01-01

    Method of active suppression of nonlinear and nonstationary vibrations developed to reduce sonic fatigue and interior noise in high-speed aircraft. Structure of aircraft exhibits periodic, chaotic, and random vibrations when forced by high-intensity sound from jet engines, shock waves, turbulence, and separated flows. Method of suppressing vibrations involves feedback control: Strain gauges or other sensors mounted in paths of propagation of vibrations on structure sense vibrations; outputs of sensors processed into control signal applied to actuator mounted on structure, inducing compensatory forces.

  14. An implantable intracardiac accelerometer for monitoring myocardial contractility. The Multicenter PEA Study Group.

    PubMed

    Rickards, A F; Bombardini, T; Corbucci, G; Plicchi, G

    1996-12-01

    As the myocardium contracts isometrically, it generates vibrations that are transmitted throughout the heart. These vibrations can be measured with an implantable microaccelerometer located inside the tip of an otherwise conventional unipolar pacing lead. These vibrations are, in their audible component, responsible for the first heart sound. The aim of this study was to evaluate, in man, the clinical feasibility and reliability of intracavity sampling of Peak Endocardial Acceleration (PEA) of the first heart sound vibrations using an implantable tip mounted accelerometer. We used a unidirectional accelerometer located inside the stimulating tip of a standard unipolar pacing lead: the sensor has a frequency response of DC to 1 kHz and a sensitivity of 5 mV/G (G = 9.81 m/s-2). The lead was connected to an external signal amplifier with a frequency range of 0.05-1,000 Hz and to a peak-to-peak detector synchronized with the endocardial R wave scanning the isovolumetric contraction phase. Following standard electrophysiological studies, sensor equipped leads were temporarily inserted in the RV of 15 patients (68 +/- 15 years), with normal regional and global ventricular function, to record PEA at rest, during AAI pacing, during VVI pacing, and during dobutamine infusion (up to 20 micrograms/kg per min). PEA at baseline was 1.1 G +/- 0.5 (heart rate = 75 +/- 14 beats/min) and increased to 1.3 G +/- 0.9 (P = NS vs baseline) during AAI pacing (heart rate = 140 beats/min) and to 1.4 G +/- 0.5 (P = NS vs baseline) during VVI pacing (heart rate = 140 beats/min). Dobutamine infusion increased PEA to 3.7 G +/- 1.1 (P < 0.001 vs baseline), with a heart rate of 121 +/- 13 beats/min. In a subset of three patients, simultaneous hemodynamic RV monitoring was performed to obtain RV dP/dtmax, whose changes during dobutamine and pacing were linearly related to changes in PEA (r = 0.9; P < 0.001). In conclusion, the PEA recording can be consistently and safely obtained with an

  15. Vibrating Frequency Thresholds in Mice and Rats: Implications for the Effects of Vibrations on Animal Health.

    PubMed

    Rabey, Karyne N; Li, Yao; Norton, John N; Reynolds, Randall P; Schmitt, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Vibrations in research facilities can cause complex animal behavioral and physiological responses that can affect animal health and research outcomes. The goal of this study was to determine the range of frequency values, where animals are unable to attenuate vibrations, and therefore may be most susceptible to their effects. Anesthetized and euthanized adult rats and mice were exposed to vibration frequencies over a wide range (0-600 Hz) and at a constant magnitude of 0.3 m/s(2). Euthanized animals were additionally exposed to vibrations at an acceleration of 1 m/s(2). The data showed that at most frequencies rodents were able to attenuate vibration magnitudes, with values for the back-mounted accelerometer being substantially less than that of the table. At frequencies of 41-60 Hz mice did not attenuate vibration magnitude, but instead the magnitude of the table and animal were equal or amplified. Rats experienced the same pattern of non-attenuation between 31 and 50 Hz. Once euthanized, the mice vibrated at a slightly more elevated frequency (up to 100 Hz). Based on these results, it may be prudent that in laboratory settings, vibrations in the ranges reported here should be accounted for as possible contributors to animal stress and/or biomechanical changes.

  16. Blind identification of full-field vibration modes of output-only structures from uniformly-sampled, possibly temporally-aliased (sub-Nyquist), video measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongchao; Dorn, Charles; Mancini, Tyler; Talken, Zachary; Nagarajaiah, Satish; Kenyon, Garrett; Farrar, Charles; Mascareñas, David

    2017-03-01

    Enhancing the spatial and temporal resolution of vibration measurements and modal analysis could significantly benefit dynamic modelling, analysis, and health monitoring of structures. For example, spatially high-density mode shapes are critical for accurate vibration-based damage localization. In experimental or operational modal analysis, higher (frequency) modes, which may be outside the frequency range of the measurement, contain local structural features that can improve damage localization as well as the construction and updating of the modal-based dynamic model of the structure. In general, the resolution of vibration measurements can be increased by enhanced hardware. Traditional vibration measurement sensors such as accelerometers have high-frequency sampling capacity; however, they are discrete point-wise sensors only providing sparse, low spatial sensing resolution measurements, while dense deployment to achieve high spatial resolution is expensive and results in the mass-loading effect and modification of structure's surface. Non-contact measurement methods such as scanning laser vibrometers provide high spatial and temporal resolution sensing capacity; however, they make measurements sequentially that requires considerable acquisition time. As an alternative non-contact method, digital video cameras are relatively low-cost, agile, and provide high spatial resolution, simultaneous, measurements. Combined with vision based algorithms (e.g., image correlation or template matching, optical flow, etc.), video camera based measurements have been successfully used for experimental and operational vibration measurement and subsequent modal analysis. However, the sampling frequency of most affordable digital cameras is limited to 30-60 Hz, while high-speed cameras for higher frequency vibration measurements are extremely costly. This work develops a computational algorithm capable of performing vibration measurement at a uniform sampling frequency lower than

  17. Blind identification of full-field vibration modes of output-only structures from uniformly-sampled, possibly temporally-aliased (sub-Nyquist), video measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Yongchao; Dorn, Charles; Mancini, Tyler; ...

    2016-12-05

    Enhancing the spatial and temporal resolution of vibration measurements and modal analysis could significantly benefit dynamic modelling, analysis, and health monitoring of structures. For example, spatially high-density mode shapes are critical for accurate vibration-based damage localization. In experimental or operational modal analysis, higher (frequency) modes, which may be outside the frequency range of the measurement, contain local structural features that can improve damage localization as well as the construction and updating of the modal-based dynamic model of the structure. In general, the resolution of vibration measurements can be increased by enhanced hardware. Traditional vibration measurement sensors such as accelerometers havemore » high-frequency sampling capacity; however, they are discrete point-wise sensors only providing sparse, low spatial sensing resolution measurements, while dense deployment to achieve high spatial resolution is expensive and results in the mass-loading effect and modification of structure's surface. Non-contact measurement methods such as scanning laser vibrometers provide high spatial and temporal resolution sensing capacity; however, they make measurements sequentially that requires considerable acquisition time. As an alternative non-contact method, digital video cameras are relatively low-cost, agile, and provide high spatial resolution, simultaneous, measurements. Combined with vision based algorithms (e.g., image correlation or template matching, optical flow, etc.), video camera based measurements have been successfully used for experimental and operational vibration measurement and subsequent modal analysis. However, the sampling frequency of most affordable digital cameras is limited to 30–60 Hz, while high-speed cameras for higher frequency vibration measurements are extremely costly. This work develops a computational algorithm capable of performing vibration measurement at a uniform sampling frequency

  18. Blind identification of full-field vibration modes of output-only structures from uniformly-sampled, possibly temporally-aliased (sub-Nyquist), video measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yongchao; Dorn, Charles; Mancini, Tyler; Talken, Zachary; Nagarajaiah, Satish; Kenyon, Garrett; Farrar, Charles Reed; Mascarenas, David Dennis Lee

    2016-12-05

    Enhancing the spatial and temporal resolution of vibration measurements and modal analysis could significantly benefit dynamic modelling, analysis, and health monitoring of structures. For example, spatially high-density mode shapes are critical for accurate vibration-based damage localization. In experimental or operational modal analysis, higher (frequency) modes, which may be outside the frequency range of the measurement, contain local structural features that can improve damage localization as well as the construction and updating of the modal-based dynamic model of the structure. In general, the resolution of vibration measurements can be increased by enhanced hardware. Traditional vibration measurement sensors such as accelerometers have high-frequency sampling capacity; however, they are discrete point-wise sensors only providing sparse, low spatial sensing resolution measurements, while dense deployment to achieve high spatial resolution is expensive and results in the mass-loading effect and modification of structure's surface. Non-contact measurement methods such as scanning laser vibrometers provide high spatial and temporal resolution sensing capacity; however, they make measurements sequentially that requires considerable acquisition time. As an alternative non-contact method, digital video cameras are relatively low-cost, agile, and provide high spatial resolution, simultaneous, measurements. Combined with vision based algorithms (e.g., image correlation or template matching, optical flow, etc.), video camera based measurements have been successfully used for experimental and operational vibration measurement and subsequent modal analysis. However, the sampling frequency of most affordable digital cameras is limited to 30–60 Hz, while high-speed cameras for higher frequency vibration measurements are extremely costly. This work develops a computational algorithm capable of performing vibration measurement at a uniform sampling frequency lower than

  19. Quantification of mouse in vivo whole-body vibration amplitude from motion-blur using x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhengyi; Welch, Ian; Yuan, Xunhua; Pollmann, Steven I.; Nikolov, Hristo N.; Holdsworth, David W.

    2015-08-01

    Musculoskeletal effects of whole-body vibration on animals and humans have become an intensely studied topic recently, due to the potential of applying this method as a non-pharmacological therapy for strengthening bones. It is relatively easy to quantify the transmission of whole-body mechanical vibration through the human skeletal system using accelerometers. However, this is not the case for small-animal pre-clinical studies because currently available accelerometers have a large mass, relative to the mass of the animals, which causes the accelerometers themselves to affect the way vibration is transmitted. Additionally, live animals do not typically remain motionless for long periods, unless they are anesthetized, and they are required to maintain a static standing posture during these studies. These challenges provide the motivation for the development of a method to quantify vibrational transmission in small animals. We present a novel imaging technique to quantify whole-body vibration transmission in small animals using 280 μm diameter tungsten carbide beads implanted into the hind limbs of mice. Employing time-exposure digital x-ray imaging, vibrational amplitude is quantified based on the blurring of the implanted beads caused by the vibrational motion. Our in vivo results have shown this technique is capable of measuring vibration amplitudes as small as 0.1 mm, with precision as small as  ±10 μm, allowing us to distinguish differences in the transmitted vibration at different locations on the hindlimbs of mice.

  20. VIBRATION COMPACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hauth, J.J.

    1962-07-01

    A method of compacting a powder in a metal container is described including the steps of vibrating the container at above and below the resonant frequency and also sweeping the frequency of vibration across the resonant frequency several times thereby following the change in resonant frequency caused by compaction of the powder. (AEC)

  1. Operational Data Reduction Procedure for Determining Density and Vertical Structure of the Martian Upper Atmosphere from Mars Global Surveyor Accelerometer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cancro, George J.; Tolson, Robert H.; Keating, Gerald M.

    1998-01-01

    The success of aerobraking by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft was partly due to the analysis of MGS accelerometer data. Accelerometer data was used to determine the effect of the atmosphere on each orbit, to characterize the nature of the atmosphere, and to predict the atmosphere for future orbits. To interpret the accelerometer data, a data reduction procedure was developed to produce density estimations utilizing inputs from the spacecraft, the Navigation Team, and pre-mission aerothermodynamic studies. This data reduction procedure was based on the calculation of aerodynamic forces from the accelerometer data by considering acceleration due to gravity gradient, solar pressure, angular motion of the MGS, instrument bias, thruster activity, and a vibration component due to the motion of the damaged solar array. Methods were developed to calculate all of the acceleration components including a 4 degree of freedom dynamics model used to gain a greater understanding of the damaged solar array. The total error inherent to the data reduction procedure was calculated as a function of altitude and density considering contributions from ephemeris errors, errors in force coefficient, and instrument errors due to bias and digitization. Comparing the results from this procedure to the data of other MGS Teams has demonstrated that this procedure can quickly and accurately describe the density and vertical structure of the Martian upper atmosphere.

  2. Principal Components Analysis of Triaxial Vibration Data From Helicopter Transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Irem Y.; Huff, Edward M.

    2001-01-01

    Research on the nature of the vibration data collected from helicopter transmissions during flight experiments has led to several crucial observations believed to be responsible for the high rates of false alarms and missed detections in aircraft vibration monitoring systems. This work focuses on one such finding, namely, the need to consider additional sources of information about system vibrations. In this light, helicopter transmission vibration data, collected using triaxial accelerometers, were explored in three different directions, analyzed for content, and then combined using Principal Components Analysis (PCA) to analyze changes in directionality. In this paper, the PCA transformation is applied to 176 test conditions/data sets collected from an OH58C helicopter to derive the overall experiment-wide covariance matrix and its principal eigenvectors. The experiment-wide eigenvectors. are then projected onto the individual test conditions to evaluate changes and similarities in their directionality based on the various experimental factors. The paper will present the foundations of the proposed approach, addressing the question of whether experiment-wide eigenvectors accurately model the vibration modes in individual test conditions. The results will further determine the value of using directionality and triaxial accelerometers for vibration monitoring and anomaly detection.

  3. Micro-optoelectromechanical systems accelerometer based on intensity modulation using a one-dimensional photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Sheikhaleh, Arash; Abedi, Kambiz; Jafari, Kian; Gholamzadeh, Reza

    2016-11-10

    In this paper, we propose what we believe is a novel sensitive micro-optoelectromechanical systems (MOEMS) accelerometer based on intensity modulation by using a one-dimensional photonic crystal. The optical sensing system of the proposed structure includes an air-dielectric multilayer photonic bandgap material, a laser diode (LD) light source, a typical photodiode (1550 nm) and a set of integrated optical waveguides. The proposed sensor provides several advantages, such as a relatively wide measurement range, good linearity in the whole measurement range, integration capability, negligible cross-axis sensitivity, high reliability, and low air-damping coefficient, which results in a wider frequency bandwidth for a fixed resonance frequency. Simulation results show that the functional characteristics of the sensor are as follows: a mechanical sensitivity of 119.21 nm/g, a linear measurement range of ±38g and a resonance frequency of 1444 Hz. Thanks to the above-mentioned characteristics, the proposed MOEMS accelerometer is suitable for a wide spectrum of applications, ranging from consumer electronics to aerospace and inertial navigation.

  4. The expected performance of Gravity Probe B electrically suspended gyroscopes as differential accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiser, G. M.; Buchman, Saps; Bencze, William; Debra, Daniel B.

    1998-12-01

    Four cryogenic gyroscopes on the Gravity Probe B satellite will be used to measure the precession of the local inertial reference frame with respect to a distant inertial reference frame. One of these four gyroscopes will serve as the drag-free sensor for the satellite. The other three gyroscopes, which are separated from each other by 8.25 cm, will be electrostatically supported by a digital control system. Although the gyroscopes and the electrostatic suspension system are designed to measure a precession as small as 0.1 mas/yr, any pair of these gyroscopes may also be used as a differential accelerometer. This paper analyzes the expected performance of these gyroscopes as differential accelerometers for accelerations in the frequency band from 2×10-3 to 2×10-2 Hz. The three contributions to the specific force on any one of the gyroscopes are the residual acceleration of the spacecraft, the specific forces acting between the gyroscope and the satellite, and the noise in the capacitance bridge which senses the position of the gyroscope relative to its housing. The dominant source of noise in this frequency band is found to be the quantization noise in the D/A converter used in digitally controlled electrostatic suspension system for the supported gyroscopes.

  5. The ISA accelerometer for BepiColombo mission .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, V.; Fiorenza, E.; Lefevre, C.; Nozzoli, S.; Peron, R.; Reale, A.; Santoli, F.

    The Italian Spring Accelerometer (ISA) will give a fundamental contribution to the Radio Science Experiments of BepiColombo mission, enabling substantial improvement of the knowledge of Mercury's orbit and rotation, and of the relativistic dynamics in the solar system. ISA is a three-axis accelerometer devoted to the measurement of the non-gravitational acceleration of Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO), whose knowledge is important in order to fully exploit the quality of the tracking data. ISA shall have an intrinsic noise level of (10^{-9} m/s^2/&sqrt;{Hz}) in the (3 \\cdot 10^{-5}) Hz to (10^{-1}) Hz frequency range, to guarantee the fulfilment of the RSE scientific goals. A comprehensive presentation of ISA accelerometer is given, including details about its scientific and technological features, the updated measurement error budget, the ongoing experimental activities and foreseen calibration and science operations strategies.

  6. Thermospheric density and winds from GRACE accelerometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Minkang; Tapley, Byron D.; Bettadpur, Srinivas; Ries, John C.

    The high-accuracy accelerometer data carried by the GRACE satellites represents the best measurements of the total surface forces acting on the spacecraft, including atmospheric drag, solar and earth radiation pressure. The GRACE accelerometer data are particularly well suited for exploring the variation in the thermospheric density and winds in response to changes in the solar and magnetic activity. In this study, the total atmospheric neutral density and winds are derived from analysis of the accelerometer data over a six-year period starting August 2002, which spans the complete range of solar activity. This paper will present the comparison of the six-year GRACE density with several density models, including DTM-78, NRLMSIS-00, JB2006 and HASDM. The GRACE-derived thermospheric winds will be compared with the HWM-93 model.

  7. Micromachined force-balance feedback accelerometer with optical displacement detection

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Langlois, Eric; Baker, Michael; Okandan, Murat; Anderson, Robert

    2014-07-22

    An accelerometer includes a proof mass and a frame that are formed in a handle layer of a silicon-on-an-insulator (SOI). The proof mass is separated from the frame by a back-side trench that defines a boundary of the proof mass. The accelerometer also includes a reflector coupled to a top surface of the proof mass. An optical detector is located above the reflector at the device side. The accelerometer further includes at least one suspension spring. The suspension spring has a handle anchor that extends downwards from the device side to the handle layer to mechanically support upward and downward movement of the proof mass relative to a top surface of the proof mass.

  8. Isolation of a piezoresistive accelerometer used in high acceleration tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Davie, N.T.

    1992-12-31

    Both uniaxial and triaxial shock isolation techniques for a piezoresistive accelerometer have been developed for pyroshock and impact tests. The uniaxial shock isolation technique has demonstrated acceptable characteristics for a temperature range of {minus}50{degree}F to +186{degree}F and a frequency bandwidth of DC to 10 kHz. The triaxial shock isolation technique has demonstrated acceptable results for a temperature range of {minus}50{degree}F to 70{degree}F and a frequency bandwidth of DC to 10 kHz. These temperature ranges, that are beyond the accelerometer manufacturer`s operational limits of {minus}30{degree}F and +150{degree}F, required the calibration of accelerometers at high shock levels and at the temperature extremes of {minus}50{degree}F and +160{degree}F. The purposes of these calibrations were to insure that the accelerometers operated at the field test temperatures and to provide an accelerometer sensitivity at each test temperature. Since there is no NIST-traceable (National Institute of Standards and Technology traceable) calibration capability at shock levels of 5,000 g - 15,000 g for the temperature extremes of {minus}50{degree}F and +160{degree}F, a method for calibrating and certifying the Hopkinson bar with a transfer standard was developed. Time domain and frequency domain results are given that characterize the Hopkinson bar. The NIST-traceable accuracy for the standard accelerometer in shock is {plus_minus}5%. The Hopkinson bar has been certified by the Sandia Secondary Standards Division with an uncertainty of 6%.

  9. Extracting Time-Accurate Acceleration Vectors From Nontrivial Accelerometer Arrangements.

    PubMed

    Franck, Jennifer A; Blume, Janet; Crisco, Joseph J; Franck, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Sports-related concussions are of significant concern in many impact sports, and their detection relies on accurate measurements of the head kinematics during impact. Among the most prevalent recording technologies are videography, and more recently, the use of single-axis accelerometers mounted in a helmet, such as the HIT system. Successful extraction of the linear and angular impact accelerations depends on an accurate analysis methodology governed by the equations of motion. Current algorithms are able to estimate the magnitude of acceleration and hit location, but make assumptions about the hit orientation and are often limited in the position and/or orientation of the accelerometers. The newly formulated algorithm presented in this manuscript accurately extracts the full linear and rotational acceleration vectors from a broad arrangement of six single-axis accelerometers directly from the governing set of kinematic equations. The new formulation linearizes the nonlinear centripetal acceleration term with a finite-difference approximation and provides a fast and accurate solution for all six components of acceleration over long time periods (>250 ms). The approximation of the nonlinear centripetal acceleration term provides an accurate computation of the rotational velocity as a function of time and allows for reconstruction of a multiple-impact signal. Furthermore, the algorithm determines the impact location and orientation and can distinguish between glancing, high rotational velocity impacts, or direct impacts through the center of mass. Results are shown for ten simulated impact locations on a headform geometry computed with three different accelerometer configurations in varying degrees of signal noise. Since the algorithm does not require simplifications of the actual impacted geometry, the impact vector, or a specific arrangement of accelerometer orientations, it can be easily applied to many impact investigations in which accurate kinematics need to

  10. The vibration compensation system for ARGOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, D.; Gaessler, W.; Borelli, J.; Kulas, M.

    2011-09-01

    For every adaptive optics system telescope vibrations can strongly reduce the performance. This is true for the receiver part of the system i.e. the telescope and wave front sensor part as well as for the transmitter part in the case of a laser guide star system. Especially observations in deep fields observed with a laser guide star system without any tip-tilt star will be greatly spoiled by telescope vibrations. The ARGOS GLAO system actually being built for the LBT aims to implement this kind of mode where wave front correction will rely purely on signals from the laser beacons. To remove the vibrations from the uplink path a vibration compensation system will be installed. This system uses accelerometers to measure the vibrations and corrects their effect with a small fast tip-tilt mirror. The controller of the system is built based on the assumption that the vibrations take place at a few distinct frequencies. Here I present a lab set-up of this system and show first results of the performance.

  11. A Comparison of PSD Enveloping Methods for Nonstationary Vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, Tom

    2015-01-01

    There is a need to derive a power spectral density (PSD) envelope for nonstationary acceleration time histories, including launch vehicle data, so that components can be designed and tested accordingly. This paper presents the results of the three methods for an actual flight accelerometer record. Guidelines are given for the application of each method to nonstationary data. The method can be extended to other scenarios, including transportation vibration.

  12. Fabrication of a Miniaturized ZnO Nanowire Accelerometer and Its Performance Tests

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Chan; Song, Sangho; Kim, Jaehwan

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a miniaturized piezoelectric accelerometer suitable for a small haptic actuator array. The accelerometer is made with zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowire (NW) grown on a copper wafer by a hydrothermal process. The size of the accelerometer is 1.5 × 1.5 mm2, thus fitting the 1.8 × 1.8 mm2 haptic actuator array cell. The detailed fabrication process of the miniaturized accelerometer is illustrated. Performance evaluation of the fabricated accelerometer is conducted by comparing it with a commercial piezoelectric accelerometer. The output current of the fabricated accelerometer increases linearly with the acceleration. The miniaturized ZnO NW accelerometer is feasible for acceleration measurement of small and lightweight devices. PMID:27649184

  13. Improved Signal Processing Technique Leads to More Robust Self Diagnostic Accelerometer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokars, Roger; Lekki, John; Jaros, Dave; Riggs, Terrence; Evans, Kenneth P.

    2010-01-01

    The self diagnostic accelerometer (SDA) is a sensor system designed to actively monitor the health of an accelerometer. In this case an accelerometer is considered healthy if it can be determined that it is operating correctly and its measurements may be relied upon. The SDA system accomplishes this by actively monitoring the accelerometer for a variety of failure conditions including accelerometer structural damage, an electrical open circuit, and most importantly accelerometer detachment. In recent testing of the SDA system in emulated engine operating conditions it has been found that a more robust signal processing technique was necessary. An improved accelerometer diagnostic technique and test results of the SDA system utilizing this technique are presented here. Furthermore, the real time, autonomous capability of the SDA system to concurrently compensate for effects from real operating conditions such as temperature changes and mechanical noise, while monitoring the condition of the accelerometer health and attachment, will be demonstrated.

  14. Separating in shell pistachio nuts from kernels using impact vibration analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A sorting system has been developed for the separation of small in-shell pistachio nuts from kernels without shells on the basis of vibrations generated when moving samples strike a steel plate. Impacts between the steel plate and the hard shells, as measured using an accelerometer attached to the...

  15. A Basic Research for the Development and Evaluation of Novel MEMS Digital Accelerometers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    A, to the characteristic physical scale of the flow . In the case of accelerometer beam motion, the characteristic scale for the gas damping problem...and dynamic conditions encountered in the MEMS accelerometer. Typical ESBGK simulation results for the gas flow around the moving accelerometer beam... gas damping response have been compared with measurements of MEMS accelerometer beam closing and opening response done at various acceleration pulse

  16. Self-noise models of five commercial strong-motion accelerometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ringler, Adam; Evans, John R.; Hutt, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    To better characterize the noise of a number of commonly deployed accelerometers in a standardized way, we conducted noise measurements on five different models of strong‐motion accelerometers. Our study was limited to traditional accelerometers (Fig. 1) and is in no way exhaustive.

  17. Single point optical calibration of accelerometers at NIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Bev

    2006-06-01

    Typical accelerometer calibrations by laser interferometer are performed by measuring displacement at three places on the shaker table. Each of these measurements, made along the perimeter of the accelerometer, requires repositioning and realigning of the interferometer. This is done to approximate the actual displacement of the accelerometer. Using a dual-coil shaker with a small moving element and two coaxially-located and rigidly-attached mounting tables allows placing the accelerometer on one table and measuring displacement directly on the center axis of the second table. This was found to work effectively at lower frequencies, up to about 5 kHz, with mounting tables of conventional materials such as stainless steel. However, for higher frequencies the use of steel results in unwanted relative motion between the two mounting tables. Mounting tables of beryllium with nickel coating have been used at NIST to overcome this difficulty. This paper shows the calibration results of single point, on-axis measurements, using fringe counting and sine-approximation methods. The results compare favorably with three point measurements made by fringe disappearance using a conventional piezo-electric shaker at frequencies up to 15 kHz.

  18. High Sensitivity Optomechanical Reference Accelerometer over 10 kHz

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-05

    measurements and observations in seismology and gravimetry. 2 High sensitivity optomechanical reference accele Approved for public release; distribution is...and this category of accelerometers, outlining a path for high sensitivity reference acceleration measurements and observations in seismology and...Traditional applications require either high acceleration resolution, such as in gravimetry or seismology well below 100 Hz, or large bandwidths, as for

  19. Estimating Energy Expenditure with the RT3 Triaxial Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddison, Ralph; Jiang, Yannan; Vander Hoorn, Stephen; Mhurchu, Cliona Ni; Lawes, Carlene M. M.; Rodgers, Anthony; Rush, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    The RT3 is a relatively new triaxial accelerometer that has replaced the TriTrac. The aim of this study was to validate the RT3 against doubly labeled water (DLW) in a free-living, mixed weight sample of adults. Total energy expenditure (TEE) was measured over a 15-day period using DLW. Activity-related energy expenditure (AEE) was estimated by…

  20. Micromachined low frequency rocking accelerometer with capacitive pickoff

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Simon, Jonathon N.; McConaghy, Charles F.

    2001-01-01

    A micro electro mechanical sensor that uses capacitive readout electronics. The sensor involves a micromachined low frequency rocking accelerometer with capacitive pickoff fabricated by deep reactive ion etching. The accelerometer includes a central silicon proof mass, is suspended by a thin polysilicon tether, and has a moving electrode (capacitor plate or interdigitated fingers) located at each end the proof mass. During movement (acceleration), the tethered mass moves relative to the surrounding packaging, for example, and this defection is measured capacitively by a plate capacitor or interdigitated finger capacitor, having the cooperating fixed electrode (capacitor plate or interdigitated fingers) positioned on the packaging, for example. The micromachined rocking accelerometer has a low frequency (<500 Hz), high sensitivity (.mu.G), with minimal power usage. The capacitors are connected to a power supply (battery) and to sensor interface electronics, which may include an analog to digital (A/D) converter, logic, RF communication link, antenna, etc. The sensor (accelerometer) may be, for example, packaged along with the interface electronics and a communication system in a 2".times.2".times.2" cube. The proof mass may be asymmetric or symmetric. Additional actuating capacitive plates may be used for feedback control which gives a greater dynamic range.

  1. Tomographic elastography of contracting skeletal muscles from their natural vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabra, Karim G.; Archer, Akibi

    2009-11-01

    Conventional elastography techniques require an external mechanical or radiation excitation to measure noninvasively the viscoelastic properties of skeletal muscles and thus monitor human motor functions. We developed instead a passive elastography technique using only an array of skin-mounted accelerometers to record the low-frequency vibrations of the biceps brachii muscle naturally generated during voluntary contractions and to determine their two-dimensional directionality. Cross-correlating these recordings provided travel-times measurements of these muscle vibrations between multiple sensor pairs. Travel-time tomographic inversions yielded spatial variations of their propagation velocity during isometric elbow flexions which indicated a nonuniform longitudinal stiffening of the biceps.

  2. Holographic study of a vibrating bell: An undergraduate laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menou, Kristen; Audit, Benjamin; Boutillon, Xavier; Vach, Holger

    1998-05-01

    An experiment combining holography and musical acoustics is described. Structures of vibration modes of a bell are visualized by time-average holography under either acoustical or mechanical excitation. The vibration amplitude as measured by an accelerometer shows very good quantitative agreement with that determined from our holograms by fringe counting. An effect of degenerate level separation is shown in the mechanical case. It is argued that this experiment is not only very inexpensive for a physics laboratory already equipped for holography, but that it also strongly stimulates students to deepen their insight into a variety of different topics in applied physics.

  3. Vibration generators

    SciTech Connect

    Lerwill, W.E.

    1980-09-16

    Apparatus for generating vibrations in a medium, such as the ground, comprises a first member which contacts the medium, means , preferably electromagnetic, which includes two relatively movable members for generating vibrations in the apparatus and means operatively connecting the said two members to said first member such that the relatively amplitudes of the movements of said three members can be adjusted to match the impedances of the apparatus and the medium.

  4. Michelson interferometric fiber sensor for beam vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chan-Shin

    1994-05-01

    A fiber-optic Michelson interferometer is employed for sensing the vibration of a cantilevered beam. A small section of the sensing fiber arm is attached to the beam to sense the vibration of the beam. The active homodyne technique is used to obtain an electrical output which is proportional to the vibrational signal of the beam. A closed-loop control system comprises a pair of sensors and actuators, which are mounted nearly at the same point of the vibrating body, and an inverting power amplifier. The fiber sensor and a piezoelectric actuator are co- located on the root of the cantilevered beam. The fiber sensed signal is amplified and inverted, then fed into a piezoelectric actuator for exerting a dynamic control force on the body. Experimental results show that vibration of the beam is substantially reduced by applying a single control system with the fiber-optic Michelson interferometric vibration sensor.

  5. Pilot Study EURAMET.AUV.V-P1: Bilateral comparison on magnitude of the complex charge sensitivity of accelerometers from 10 Hz to 10 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoli, Claire; Hermawanto, Denny

    2017-01-01

    The results of a Pilot Study EURAMET.AUV.V-P1 between LNE (France) and RCM-LIPI (Indonesia) are reported. This bilateral comparison of sinusoidal vibration was organized after the implementation of various improvements at RCM-LIPI following a previous (unpublished) comparison that had revealed discrepancies in their results at frequencies above 5 kHz. The results of this Pilot Study, using the same accelerometers as the earlier comparison, demonstrate that the discrepancies at high frequencies have been resolved. For both the back-to-back and the single-ended accelerometers tested, the sensitivities of the RCM-LIPI and the LNE over the frequency range from 10 Hz to 10 kHz now agree within their declared uncertainties. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV.

  6. GPS-Based Reduced Dynamic Orbit Determination Using Accelerometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanHelleputte, Tom; Visser, Pieter

    2007-01-01

    Currently two gravity field satellite missions, CHAMP and GRACE, are equipped with high sensitivity electrostatic accelerometers, measuring the non-conservative forces acting on the spacecraft in three orthogonal directions. During the gravity field recovery these measurements help to separate gravitational and non-gravitational contributions in the observed orbit perturbations. For precise orbit determination purposes all these missions have a dual-frequency GPS receiver on board. The reduced dynamic technique combines the dense and accurate GPS observations with physical models of the forces acting on the spacecraft, complemented by empirical accelerations, which are stochastic parameters adjusted in the orbit determination process. When the spacecraft carries an accelerometer, these measured accelerations can be used to replace the models of the non-conservative forces, such as air drag and solar radiation pressure. This approach is implemented in a batch least-squares estimator of the GPS High Precision Orbit Determination Software Tools (GHOST), developed at DLR/GSOC and DEOS. It is extensively tested with data of the CHAMP and GRACE satellites. As accelerometer observations typically can be affected by an unknown scale factor and bias in each measurement direction, they require calibration during processing. Therefore the estimated state vector is augmented with six parameters: a scale and bias factor for the three axes. In order to converge efficiently to a good solution, reasonable a priori values for the bias factor are necessary. These are calculated by combining the mean value of the accelerometer observations with the mean value of the non-conservative force models and empirical accelerations, estimated when using these models. When replacing the non-conservative force models with accelerometer observations and still estimating empirical accelerations, a good orbit precision is achieved. 100 days of GRACE B data processing results in a mean orbit fit of

  7. Classification accuracy of the wrist-worn GENEA accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Whitney A.; Bassett, David R.; Thompson, Dixie L.; Freedson, Patty S.; Staudenmayer, John W.; John, Dinesh; Steeves, Jeremy A.; Conger, Scott A.; Ceaser, Tyrone; Howe, Cheryl A.; Sasaki, Jeffer E.; Fitzhugh, Eugene C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether the published left-wrist cut-points for the triaxial GENEA accelerometer, are accurate for predicting intensity categories during structured activity bouts. Methods A convenience sample of 130 adults wore a GENEA accelerometer on their left wrist while performing 14 different lifestyle activities. During each activity, oxygen consumption was continuously measured using the Oxycon mobile. Statistical analysis used Spearman's rank correlations to determine the relationship between measured and estimated intensity classifications. Cross tabulation tables were constructed to show under- or over-estimation of misclassified intensities. One-way chi-square tests were used to determine whether the intensity classification accuracy for each activity differed from 80%. Results For all activities the GENEA accelerometer-based physical activity monitor explained 41.1% of the variance in energy expenditure. The intensity classification accuracy was 69.8% for sedentary activities, 44.9% for light activities, 46.2% for moderate activities, and 77.7% for vigorous activities. The GENEA correctly classified intensity for 52.9% of observations when all activities were examined; this increased to 61.5% with stationary cycling removed. Conclusion A wrist-worn triaxial accelerometer has modest intensity classification accuracy across a broad range of activities, when using the cut-points of Esliger et al. Although the sensitivity and specificity are less than those reported by Esliger et al., they are generally in the same range as those reported for waist-worn, uniaxial accelerometer cut-points. PMID:23584403

  8. Dynamic Loads Generation for Multi-Point Vibration Excitation Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    A random-force method has been developed to predict dynamic loads produced by rocket-engine random vibrations for new rocket-engine designs. The method develops random forces at multiple excitation points based on random vibration environments scaled from accelerometer data obtained during hot-fire tests of existing rocket engines. This random-force method applies random forces to the model and creates expected dynamic response in a manner that simulates the way the operating engine applies self-generated random vibration forces (random pressure acting on an area) with the resulting responses that we measure with accelerometers. This innovation includes the methodology (implementation sequence), the computer code, two methods to generate the random-force vibration spectra, and two methods to reduce some of the inherent conservatism in the dynamic loads. This methodology would be implemented to generate the random-force spectra at excitation nodes without requiring the use of artificial boundary conditions in a finite element model. More accurate random dynamic loads than those predicted by current industry methods can then be generated using the random force spectra. The scaling method used to develop the initial power spectral density (PSD) environments for deriving the random forces for the rocket engine case is based on the Barrett Criteria developed at Marshall Space Flight Center in 1963. This invention approach can be applied in the aerospace, automotive, and other industries to obtain reliable dynamic loads and responses from a finite element model for any structure subject to multipoint random vibration excitations.

  9. Development of a long-gauge vibration sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Peter; Comanici, Maria I.; Li, Qian; Zhang, Yiwei

    2014-11-01

    Recently, we found that by terminating a long length of fiber of up to 1 km with an in-fiber cavity structure, the entire structure can detect vibrations over a frequency range from 5 Hz to 100 Hz. We want to determine whether the structure (including packaging) can be optimized to detect vibrations at even higher frequencies. The structure can be used as a distributed vibration sensor mounted on large motors and other rotating machines to capture the entire frequency spectrum of the associated vibration signals, and therefore, replace the many accelerometers, which add to the maintenance cost. Similarly, it will help detect in-slot vibrations which cause intermittent contact leading to sparking under high voltages inside air-cooled generators. However, that will require the sensor to detect frequencies associated with vibration sparking, ranging from 6 kHz to 15 kHz. Then, at even higher frequencies, the structure can be useful to detect acoustic vibrations (30 kHz to 150 kHz) associated with partial discharge (PD) in generators and transformers. Detecting lower frequencies in the range 2 Hz to 200 Hz makes the sensor suitable for seismic studies and falls well into the vibrations associated with rotating machines. Another application of interest is corrosion detection in large reenforced concrete structures by inserting the sensor along a long hole drilled around structures showing signs of corrosion. The frequency response for the proposed long-gauge vibration sensor depends on packaging.

  10. Development of a long-gauge vibration sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Peter; Comanici, Maria I.

    2014-06-01

    Recently, we found that by terminating a long length of fiber of up to 2 km with an in-fiber cavity structure, the entire structure can detect vibrations over a frequency range from 5 Hz to 100 Hz. We want to determine whether the structure (including packaging) can be optimized to detect vibrations at even higher frequencies. The structure can be used as a distributed vibration sensor mounted on large motors and other rotating machines to capture the entire frequency spectrum of the associated vibration signals, and therefore, replace the many accelerometers, which add to the maintenance cost. Similarly, it will help detect in-slot vibrations which cause intermittent contact leading to sparking under high voltages inside air-cooled generators. However, that will require the sensor to detect frequencies associated with vibration sparking, ranging from 6 kHz to 15 kHz. Then, at even higher frequencies, the structure can be useful to detect acoustic vibrations (30 kHz to 150 kHz) associated with partial discharge (PD) in generators and transformers. Detecting lower frequencies in the range 2 Hz to 200 Hz makes the sensor suitable for seismic studies and falls well into the vibrations associated with rotating machines. Another application of interest is corrosion detection in large re-enforced concrete structures by inserting the sensor along a long hole drilled around structures showing signs of corrosion. The frequency response for the proposed long-gauge vibration sensor depends on packaging.

  11. E/M launcher vibration and acceleration data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Grzesik, R.G.; Mitchell, D.E.; Sebastian, J.H. ); Chin, I.W. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on acquired acceleration curves for projectiles electromagnetically launched out of the non-stiff, (epoxy fiber wrapped copper rails) 50 mm Benet barrel which were very noisy and difficult to interpret. The cause for the noise was assumed to be the induced vibration from the barrel and projectile. Standard numerical smoothing techniques were not deemed plausible candidates for mathematical analysis because using them alone would have resulted in curves which would have been superficially smoothed over, concealing possibly interesting transient responses and/or distorting valuable acceleration data. The barrel low frequency vibrations were too interwoven with the acceleration signal and could not be extracted non-intrusively, and the high frequency barrel vibrations were not apparent. The projectile vibrations turned out to be negligible being on the order of magnitude of the accelerometer's background noise.

  12. Random Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messaro. Semma; Harrison, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Ares I Zonal Random vibration environments due to acoustic impingement and combustion processes are develop for liftoff, ascent and reentry. Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components are developed by enveloping the applicable zonal environments where each component is located. Random vibration tests will be conducted to assure that these components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments. Methodology: Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components were desired that would envelope all the applicable environments where each component was located. Applicable Ares I Vehicle drawings and design information needed to be assessed to determine the location(s) for each component on the Ares I Upper Stage. Design and test criteria needed to be developed by plotting and enveloping the applicable environments using Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet Software and documenting them in a report Using Microsoft Word Processing Software. Conclusion: Random vibration liftoff, ascent, and green run design & test criteria for the Upper Stage Pyrotechnic Components were developed by using Microsoft Excel to envelope zonal environments applicable to each component. Results were transferred from Excel into a report using Microsoft Word. After the report is reviewed and edited by my mentor it will be submitted for publication as an attachment to a memorandum. Pyrotechnic component designers will extract criteria from my report for incorporation into the design and test specifications for components. Eventually the hardware will be tested to the environments I developed to assure that the components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments.

  13. Ultraviolet-LIGA-based fabrication and characterization of a nonresonant drive-mode vibratory gyro/accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Payal; Zaman Khan, Khamar; Khonina, Svetlana Nikolaevna; Kazanskiy, Nikolay Lvovich; Gopal, Ram

    2016-07-01

    A dual-purpose nonresonant 2-degrees of freedom (DOF) drive-mode and 1-DOF sense-mode vibratory gyro/accelerometer fabricated using the economical ultraviolet-lithographie-galvanoformung-abformung (UV-LIGA) fabrication process using SU-8 photoresist is reported. The dual-purpose device presented is capable of detecting acceleration at the lower-frequency band and angular rate at the operating frequency band thereby functioning as both accelerometer and gyroscope. This is achieved by designing the structure such that the frequency response of the drive oscillator has two drive resonances with a flat zone between them, while the sense oscillator has one resonance, which is deliberately placed in the flat region between the two drive resonances. For angular rate detection, the device is operated in the flat zone at the sense resonance frequency at which the device is less susceptible to frequency variations due to both environmental variation and fabrication imperfections and hence is said to be operating in robust mode. The steady-state response and discrimination for angular rate and acceleration sensing have been devised using analytical modeling. The fabrication process is optimized to realize a gyro/accelerometer that has a 9-μm-thick nickel structural layer and 4-μm capacitive gaps. The overall miniature device size is 2.0 mm×1.9 mm. The experimental frequency response of the fabricated devices shows drive-mode resonances at 2.85 and 4.96 kHz and sense resonance at 3.85 kHz compared to the respective design values of drive-mode resonance frequencies 2.97 and 4.81 kHz and sense resonance frequency of 4 kHz. To demonstrate the dual-purpose capability of the device, acceleration characterization has been carried out and presented. The fabricated sensor is packaged in a ceramic package and interfaced with a MS3110 differential capacitive read out IC to characterize the acceleration response of the sensor, using an out-of-plane shaker. The bandwidth for

  14. Validity of a Wearable Accelerometer Device to Measure Average Acceleration Values During High-Speed Running.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jeremy P; Hopkinson, Trent L; Wundersitz, Daniel W T; Serpell, Benjamin G; Mara, Jocelyn K; Ball, Nick B

    2016-11-01

    Alexander, JP, Hopkinson, TL, Wundersitz, DWT, Serpell, BG, Mara, JK, and Ball, NB. Validity of a wearable accelerometer device to measure average acceleration values during high-speed running. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3007-3013, 2016-The aim of this study was to determine the validity of an accelerometer to measure average acceleration values during high-speed running. Thirteen subjects performed three sprint efforts over a 40-m distance (n = 39). Acceleration was measured using a 100-Hz triaxial accelerometer integrated within a wearable tracking device (SPI-HPU; GPSports). To provide a concurrent measure of acceleration, timing gates were positioned at 10-m intervals (0-40 m). Accelerometer data collected during 0-10 m and 10-20 m provided a measure of average acceleration values. Accelerometer data was recorded as the raw output and filtered by applying a 3-point moving average and a 10-point moving average. The accelerometer could not measure average acceleration values during high-speed running. The accelerometer significantly overestimated average acceleration values during both 0-10 m and 10-20 m, regardless of the data filtering technique (p < 0.001). Body mass significantly affected all accelerometer variables (p < 0.10, partial η = 0.091-0.219). Body mass and the absence of a gravity compensation formula affect the accuracy and practicality of accelerometers. Until GPSports-integrated accelerometers incorporate a gravity compensation formula, the usefulness of any accelerometer-derived algorithms is questionable.

  15. Customized DSP-based vibration measurement for wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    LaWhite, N.E.; Cohn, K.E.

    1996-12-31

    As part of its Advanced Distributed Monitoring System (ADMS) project funded by NREL, Second Wind Inc. is developing a new vibration measurement system for use with wind turbines. The system uses low-cost accelerometers originally designed for automobile airbag crash-detection coupled with new software executed on a Digital Signal Processor (DSP) device. The system is envisioned as a means to monitor the mechanical {open_quotes}health{close_quotes} of the wind turbine over its lifetime. In addition the system holds promise as a customized emergency vibration detector. The two goals are very different and it is expected that different software programs will be executed for each function. While a fast Fourier transform (FFT) signature under given operating conditions can yield much information regarding turbine condition, the sampling period and processing requirements make it inappropriate for emergency condition monitoring. This paper briefly reviews the development of prototype DSP and accelerometer hardware. More importantly, it reviews our work to design prototype vibration alarm filters. Two-axis accelerometer test data from the experimental FloWind vertical axis wind turbine is analyzed and used as a development guide. Two levels of signal processing are considered. The first uses narrow band pre-processing filters at key fundamental frequencies such as the 1P, 2P and 3P. The total vibration energy in each frequency band is calculated and evaluated as a possible alarm trigger. In the second level of signal processing, the total vibration energy in each frequency band is further decomposed using the two-axis directional information. Directional statistics are calculated to differentiate between linear translations and circular translations. After analyzing the acceleration statistics for normal and unusual operating conditions, the acceleration processing system described could be used in automatic early detection of fault conditions. 9 figs.

  16. Characteristics associated with requested and required accelerometer wear in children

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Sian L; Kipping, Ruth R; Jago, Russell; Brown, Judith; Hucker, Daniel; Blackett, Ali; Lawlor, Debbie A

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate characteristics associated with wearing an accelerometer for the required and requested time among 8-year-old to 10-year-old children. Design Cross-sectional. Setting 60 Bristol and North Somerset primary schools taking part in the ‘Active for Life Year 5’ randomised controlled trial (RCT) in 2011. Participants 2048 children, aged 8–10 years, invited to wear an accelerometer for 5 days of recording. Primary outcome measure Numbers meeting required wear-time for inclusion in main RCT analysis (≥8 h/day ≥3 days) and numbers meeting requested wear-time (≥8 h/day for all 5 days). Results 817 (40%) of the children wore the accelerometer for the requested time and 1629 (80%) for the required time. In adjusted multivariable analyses the odds of wearing the accelerometer for the required time were greater in females as compared with males (OR 1.76 (1.42–2.18)), those with higher scores for reporting their mother restricted time on sedentary behaviours (1.26 (1.04–1.52) per increase of 1 on a 1–4 scale) and in children from schools with larger year group sizes (1.01 (1.00–1.02) per additional child). Living in a neighbourhood with higher levels of deprivation (0.49 (0.33–0.72) comparing highest to lowest third of the deprivation score) or reporting higher levels of weekday outdoor play (0.97 (0.94, 1.00) per 30 min more) were associated with reduced odds of meeting required time. Results were essentially the same for requested wear-time. Other characteristics, including child body mass index, were not associated with required or requested wear-time. Conclusions Only 40% of children wore the accelerometer for the requested time but 80% fulfilled the required criteria to be included in the main study analyses. Knowing which characteristics are associated with accelerometer wear could help target interventions to increase wear-time. PMID:23975106

  17. Characterization of a roof tile-shaped out-of-plane vibrational mode in aluminum-nitride-actuated self-sensing micro-resonators for liquid monitoring purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucera, Martin; Wistrela, Elisabeth; Pfusterschmied, Georg; Ruiz-Díez, Víctor; Manzaneque, Tomás; Luis Sánchez-Rojas, José; Schalko, Johannes; Bittner, Achim; Schmid, Ulrich

    2014-06-01

    This Letter reports on an advanced out-of-plane bending mode for aluminum-nitride (AlN)-actuated cantilevers. Devices of different thickness were fabricated and characterized by optical and electrical measurements in air and liquid media having viscosities up to 615 cP and compared to the classical out-of-plane bending and torsional modes. Finite element method eigenmode analyses were performed showing excellent agreement with the measured mode shapes and resonance frequencies. Quality factors (Q-factor) and the electrical behavior were evaluated as a function of the cantilever thickness. A very high Q-factor of about 197 was achieved in deionized water at a low resonance frequency of 336 kHz, being up to now, the highest quality factor reported for cantilever sensors in liquid media. Compared to the quality factor of the common fundamental out-of-plane bending mode, a 5 times higher Q-factor was achieved. Furthermore, the strain related conductance peak of the roof tile-shaped mode is superior. Compared to any out-of-plane bending mode, this combination of most beneficial properties is unique and make this mode superior for a large variety of resonator-based sensing applications.

  18. High-temperature piezoelectric sensing.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Kim, Kyungrim; Zhang, Shujun; Johnson, Joseph; Salazar, Giovanni

    2013-12-20

    Piezoelectric sensing is of increasing interest for high-temperature applications in aerospace, automotive, power plants and material processing due to its low cost, compact sensor size and simple signal conditioning, in comparison with other high-temperature sensing techniques. This paper presented an overview of high-temperature piezoelectric sensing techniques. Firstly, different types of high-temperature piezoelectric single crystals, electrode materials, and their pros and cons are discussed. Secondly, recent work on high-temperature piezoelectric sensors including accelerometer, surface acoustic wave sensor, ultrasound transducer, acoustic emission sensor, gas sensor, and pressure sensor for temperatures up to 1,250 °C were reviewed. Finally, discussions of existing challenges and future work for high-temperature piezoelectric sensing are presented.

  19. High-Temperature Piezoelectric Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Kim, Kyungrim; Zhang, Shujun; Johnson, Joseph; Salazar, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric sensing is of increasing interest for high-temperature applications in aerospace, automotive, power plants and material processing due to its low cost, compact sensor size and simple signal conditioning, in comparison with other high-temperature sensing techniques. This paper presented an overview of high-temperature piezoelectric sensing techniques. Firstly, different types of high-temperature piezoelectric single crystals, electrode materials, and their pros and cons are discussed. Secondly, recent work on high-temperature piezoelectric sensors including accelerometer, surface acoustic wave sensor, ultrasound transducer, acoustic emission sensor, gas sensor, and pressure sensor for temperatures up to 1,250 °C were reviewed. Finally, discussions of existing challenges and future work for high-temperature piezoelectric sensing are presented. PMID:24361928

  20. VibeComm: Radio-Free Wireless Communication for Smart Devices Using Vibration

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Inhwan; Cho, Jungchan; Oh, Songhwai

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes VibeComm, a novel communication method for smart devices using a built-in vibrator and accelerometer. The proposed approach is ideal for low-rate off-line communication, and its communication medium is an object on which smart devices are placed, such as tables and desks. When more than two smart devices are placed on an object and one device wants to transmit a message to the other devices, the transmitting device generates a sequence of vibrations. The vibrations are propagated through the object on which the devices are placed. The receiving devices analyze their accelerometer readings to decode incoming messages. The proposed method can be the alternative communication method when general types of radio communication methods are not available. VibeComm is implemented on Android smartphones, and a comprehensive set of experiments is conducted to show its feasibility. PMID:25390406

  1. VibeComm: radio-free wireless communication for smart devices using vibration.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Inhwan; Cho, Jungchan; Oh, Songhwai

    2014-11-10

    This paper proposes VibeComm, a novel communication method for smart devices using a built-in vibrator and accelerometer. The proposed approach is ideal for low-rate off-line communication, and its communication medium is an object on which smart devices are placed, such as tables and desks. When more than two smart devices are placed on an object and one device wants to transmit a message to the other devices, the transmitting device generates a sequence of vibrations. The vibrations are propagated through the object on which the devices are placed. The receiving devices analyze their accelerometer readings to decode incoming messages. The proposed method can be the alternative communication method when general types of radio communication methods are not available. VibeComm is implemented on Android smartphones, and a comprehensive set of experiments is conducted to show its feasibility.

  2. Pioneer Anomaly and Space Accelerometer for Gravity Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Agnès; Christophe, Bruno; Reynaud, Serge

    2006-06-01

    The Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft are subject to an unexplained acceleration which has a constant value of (8.74 1.33) \\cdot 10-10 m\\cdot s-2 and seems to be directed toward the sun. The hypotheses to explain this anomaly are either technical artifacts or new physics. This presentation deals with the unfolding of two aspects of my thesis: Doppler and telemetry data analysis with the objective to investigate the nature of the anomaly, and adapation of an ONERA accelerometer for a future mission in which the anomaly will be confirmed and more precisely measured. The presence of an accelerometer is mandatory for the identification of the anomaly's origin.

  3. Guidelines for Standardized Testing of Broadband Seismometers and Accelerometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutt, Charles R.; Evans, John R.; Followill, Fred; Nigbor, Robert L.; Wielandt, Erhard

    2010-01-01

    Testing and specification of seismic and earthquake-engineering sensors and recorders has been marked by significant variations in procedures and selected parameters. These variations cause difficulty in comparing such specifications and test results. In July 1989, and again in May 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey hosted international pub-lic/private workshops with the goal of defining widely accepted guidelines for the testing of seismological inertial sensors, seismometers, and accelerometers. The Proceedings of the 2005 workshop have been published and include as appendix 6 the report of the 1989 workshop. This document represents a collation and rationalization of a single set of formal guidelines for testing and specifying broadband seismometers and accelerometers.

  4. Vibration Analysis of the Space Shuttle External Tank Cable Tray Flight Data With and Without PAL Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Bruce E.; Panda, Jayanta; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2008-01-01

    External Tank Cable Tray vibration data for three successive Space Shuttle flights were analyzed to assess response to buffet and the effect of removal of the Protuberance Air Loads (PAL) ramp. Waveform integration, spectral analysis, cross-correlation analysis and wavelet analysis were employed to estimate vibration modes and temporal development of vibration motion from a sparse array of accelerometers and an on-board system that acquired 16 channels of data for approximately the first 2 min of each flight. The flight data indicated that PAL ramp removal had minimal effect on the fluctuating loads on the cable tray. The measured vibration frequencies and modes agreed well with predicted structural response.

  5. Vibration Analysis of the Space Shuttle External Tank Cable Tray Flight Data with and without PAL Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, B. E.; Panda, B. E.; Sutliff, D. L.

    2008-01-01

    External Tank Cable Tray vibration data for three successive Space Shuttle flights were analyzed to assess response to buffet and the effect of removal of the Protuberance Air Loads (PAL) ramp. Waveform integration, spectral analysis, cross-correlation analysis and wavelet analysis were employed to estimate vibration modes and temporal development of vibration motion from a sparse array of accelerometers and an on-board system that acquired 16 channels of data for approximately the first two minutes of each flight. The flight data indicated that PAL ramp removal had minimal effect on the fluctuating loads on the cable tray. The measured vibration frequencies and modes agreed well with predicted structural response.

  6. Champ Accelerometer: Evaluation and Contribution To The Gravity Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perosanz, F.; Loyer, S.; Bruinsma, S.; Tamagnan, D.; Lemoine, J. M.; Biancale, R.; Fayard, T.; Vales, N.; Touboul, P.

    The STAR accelerometer on-board the German CHAMP satellite delivers non- gravitational accelerations with an unprecedented resolution. This study presents the global evaluation of the instrument in terms of continuous measurement and "House Keeping" parameters surveying, a posteriori calibration strategy and results and mis- function analysis and correction. In addition the contribution of the STAR accelerom- eter to dynamic orbit computation and gravity modelling is evaluated. Different orbit fit solutions and geoid models resulting from gravity field test models are compared.

  7. VLTI-UT vibrations effort and performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poupar, Sébastien; Haguenauer, Pierre; Alonso, Jaime; Schuhler, Nicolas; Henriquez, Juan-Pablo; Berger, Jean-Philippe; Bourget, Pierre; Brillant, Stephane; Castillo, Roberto; Gitton, Philippe; Gonte, Frederic; Di Lieto, Nicola; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Merand, Antoine; Woillez, Julien

    2014-07-01

    The ESO Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) using the Unit Telescope (UT) was strongly affected by vibrations since the first observations. Investigation by ESO on that subject had started in 2007, with a considerable effort since mid 2008. An important number of investigations on various sub-systems (On telescope: Guiding, Passive supports, Train Coude, insulation of electronics cabinets; On Instruments: dedicated campaign on each instruments with a special attention on the ones equipped with Close Cycle Cooler) were realized. Vibrations were not only recorded and analyzed using the usual accelerometers but also using on use sub-systems as InfRared Image Sensor (IRIS) and Multiple Applications Curvature Adaptive Optics (MACAO) and using a specific tool developed for vibrations measurements Mirror vibrAtion Metrology systeM for the Unit Telescope (MAMMUT). Those tools and systems have been used in order to improve the knowledge on telescope by finding sources. The sources whenever it was possible were damped. As known for years, instruments are still the principal sources of vibrations, for the majority of the UT. A special test in which 2 UTs instruments were completely shut down was realized to determine the minimum Optical Path Length (OPL) achievable. Vibrations is now a part of the instruments interface document and during the installation of any new instrument (KMOS) or system (AOF) a test campaign is realized. As a result some modifications (damping of CCC) can be asked in case of non-compliance. To ensure good operational conditions, levels of vibrations are regularly recorded to control any environmental change.

  8. A Novel Approach to Determine Strides, Ice Contact, and Swing Phases During Ice Hockey Skating Using a Single Accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Stetter, Bernd J; Buckeridge, Erica; von Tscharner, Vinzenz; Nigg, Sandro R; Nigg, Benno M

    2016-02-01

    This study presents a new approach for automated identification of ice hockey skating strides and a method to detect ice contact and swing phases of individual strides by quantifying vibrations in 3D acceleration data during the blade-ice interaction. The strides of a 30-m forward sprinting task, performed by 6 ice hockey players, were evaluated using a 3D accelerometer fixed to a hockey skate. Synchronized plantar pressure data were recorded as reference data. To determine the accuracy of the new method on a range of forward stride patterns for temporal skating events, estimated contact times and stride times for a sequence of 5 consecutive strides was validated. Bland-Altman limits of agreement (95%) between accelerometer and plantar pressure derived data were less than 0.019 s. Mean differences between the 2 capture methods were shown to be less than 1 ms for contact and stride time. These results demonstrate the validity of the novel approach to determine strides, ice contact, and swing phases during ice hockey skating. This technology is accurate, simple, effective, and allows for in-field ice hockey testing.

  9. Measuring gravitation near Mercury: the contribution of ISA accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, Valerio; Peron, Roberto; Lucchesi, David; Santoli, Francesco; Lefevre, Carlo; Fiorenza, Emiliano; Nozzoli, Sergio; Lucente, Marco; Magnafico, Carmelo

    2012-07-01

    The forthcoming BepiColombo mission for the exploration of the planet Mercury will include a comprehensive set of experiments --- the so--called Radio Science Experiments (RSE) --- in order to measure the gravitational field of the planet, its rotation, and to perform precise tests of Einstein's general theory of relativity. Fundamental piece of RSE is the high--sensitivity ISA (Italian Spring Accelerometer) accelerometer. It will directly measure the strong non--gravitational perturbations acting on Mercury Planetary Orbiter spacecraft, which are an important source of error in the RSE meaurements. Being the first time for an high--sensitivity accelerometer onboard an interplanetary mission, a number of choices had to be made and several issues had to be faced in the design phases. Following a general description of the instrument scientific objectives, its working and operations will be described. Emphasis will be given on the complex calibration procedures required in the various mission phases and on the integration of the measurements with the overall RSE operations and data analysis.

  10. Variable-Tension-Cord Suspension/Vibration-Isolation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villemarette, Mark L.; Boston, Joshua; RInks, Judith; Felice, Pat; Stein, Tim; Payne, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    A system for mechanical suspension and vibration isolation of a machine or instrument is based on the use of Kevlar (or equivalent aromatic polyamide) cord held in variable tension between the machine or instrument and a surrounding frame. The basic concept of such a tensioned-cord suspension system (including one in which the cords are made of aromatic polyamide fibers) is not new by itself; what is new here is the additional provision for adjusting the tension during operation to optimize vibration- isolation properties. In the original application for which this system was conceived, the objective is to suspend a reciprocating cryocooler aboard a space shuttle and to prevent both (1) transmission of launch vibrations to the cryocooler and (2) transmission of vibrations from the cryocooler to samples in a chamber cooled by the cryocooler. The basic mechanical principle of this system can also be expected to be applicable to a variety of other systems in which there are requirements for cord suspension and vibration isolation. The reciprocating cryocooler of the original application is a generally axisymmetric object, and the surrounding frame is a generally axisymmetric object with windows (see figure). Two cords are threaded into a spoke-like pattern between attachment rings on the cryocooler, holes in the cage, and cord-tension- adjusting assemblies. Initially, the cord tensions are adjusted to at least the level necessary to suspend the cryocooler against gravitation. Accelerometers for measuring vibrations are mounted (1) on the cold tip of the cryocooler and (2) adjacent to the cage, on a structure that supports the cage. During operation, a technician observes the accelerometer outputs on an oscilloscope while manually adjusting the cord tensions in an effort to minimize the amount of vibration transmitted to and/or from the cryocooler. A contemplated future version of the system would include a microprocessor-based control subsystem that would include cord

  11. Low-cost vibration sensor based on dual fiber Bragg gratings and light intensity measurement.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xueqing; Wang, Yongjiao; Yuan, Bo; Yuan, Yinquan; Dai, Yawen; Xu, Gang

    2013-09-20

    A vibration monitoring system based on light intensity measurement has been constructed, and the designed accelerometer is based on steel cantilever frame and dual fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). By using numerical simulations for the dual FBGs, the dependence relationship of the area of main lobes on the difference of initial central wavelengths is obtained and the most optimal choice for the initial value and the vibration amplitude of the difference of central wavelengths of two FBGs is suggested. The vibration monitoring experiments are finished, and the measured data are identical to the simulated results.

  12. Vibration control for the ARGOS laser launch path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Diethard; Gässler, Wolfgang; Borelli, Jose; Barl, Lothar; Rabien, S.

    2012-07-01

    Present and future adaptive optics systems aim for the correction of the atmospheric turbulence over a large field of view combined with large sky coverage. To achieve this goal the telescope is equipped with multiple laser beacons. Still, to measure tip-tilt aberrations a natural guide star is used. For some fields such a tilt-star is not available and a correction on the laser beacons alone is applied. For this method to work well the laser beacons must not be affected by telescope vibrations on their up-link path. For the ARGOS system the jitter of the beacons is specified to be below 0.05. To achieve this goal a vibration compensation system is necessary to mitigate the mechanical disturbances. The ARGOS vibration compensation system is an accelerometer based feed forward system. The accelerometer measurements are fed into a real time controller. To achieve high performance the controller of the system is model based. The output is applied to a fast steering mirror. This paper presents the concept of the ARGOS vibration compensation, the hardware, and laboratory results.

  13. Development of a Novel Translational Model of Vibration Injury to the Spine to Study Acute Injury in Vivo

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    accelerometer and were tracked by a high speed CCD camera (VRI-MIROEX1-1024MM; Phantom ; 640X480) during vibration. Behavioral sensitivity was assessed... DICOM images were acquired at a slice thickness of 0.38 µm and a 1024x1024 axial field of view, with 32-bit-gray levels to enable segmentation of the

  14. A novel sandwich differential capacitive accelerometer with symmetrical double-sided serpentine beam-mass structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, D. B.; Li, Q. S.; Hou, Z. Q.; Wang, X. H.; Chen, Z. H.; Xia, D. W.; Wu, X. Z.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a novel differential capacitive silicon micro-accelerometer with symmetrical double-sided serpentine beam-mass sensing structure and glass-silicon-glass sandwich structure. The symmetrical double-sided serpentine beam-mass sensing structure is fabricated with a novel pre-buried mask fabrication technology, which is convenient for manufacturing multi-layer sensors. The glass-silicon-glass sandwich structure is realized by a double anodic bonding process. To solve the problem of the difficulty of leading out signals from the top and bottom layer simultaneously in the sandwich sensors, a silicon pillar structure is designed that is inherently simple and low-cost. The prototype is fabricated and tested. It has low noise performance (the peak to peak value is 40 μg) and μg-level Allan deviation of bias (2.2 μg in 1 h), experimentally demonstrating the effectiveness of the design and the novel fabrication technology.

  15. Three Three-Axis IEPE Accelerometers on the Inner Liner of a Tire for Finding the Tire-Road Friction Potential Indicators †

    PubMed Central

    Niskanen, Arto; Tuononen, Ari J.

    2015-01-01

    Direct tire-road contact friction estimation is essential for future autonomous cars and active safety systems. Friction estimation methods have been proposed earlier for driving conditions in the presence of a slip angle or slip ratio. However, the estimation of the friction from a freely-rolling tire is still an unsolved topic. Knowing the existing friction potential would be beneficial since vehicle control systems could be adjusted before any remarkable tire force has been produced. Since accelerometers are well-known and robust, and thus a promising sensor type for intelligent tires, this study uses three three-axis IEPE accelerometers on the inner liner of a tire to detect friction potential indicators on two equally smooth surfaces with different friction levels. The equal roughness was chosen for both surfaces in order to study the friction phenomena by neglecting the effect of surface texture on vibrations. The acceleration data before the contact is used to differentiate the two friction levels between the tire and the road. In addition, the contact lengths from the three accelerometers are used to validate the acceleration data. A method to differentiate the friction levels on the basis of the acceleration signal is also introduced. PMID:26251914

  16. Driving an Active Vibration Balancer to Minimize Vibrations at the Fundamental and Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holliday, Ezekiel S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Vibrations of a principal machine are reduced at the fundamental and harmonic frequencies by driving the drive motor of an active balancer with balancing signals at the fundamental and selected harmonics. Vibrations are sensed to provide a signal representing the mechanical vibrations. A balancing signal generator for the fundamental and for each selected harmonic processes the sensed vibration signal with adaptive filter algorithms of adaptive filters for each frequency to generate a balancing signal for each frequency. Reference inputs for each frequency are applied to the adaptive filter algorithms of each balancing signal generator at the frequency assigned to the generator. The harmonic balancing signals for all of the frequencies are summed and applied to drive the drive motor. The harmonic balancing signals drive the drive motor with a drive voltage component in opposition to the vibration at each frequency.

  17. Calibrating accelerometer sensor on android phone with Accelerograph TDL 303 QS for earthquake online recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riantana, R.; Darsono, D.; Triyono, A.; Azimut, H. B.

    2016-11-01

    Calibration of the android censor was done by placing the device in a mounting at side of accelerograph TDL 303 QS that will be a means of comparison. Leveling of both devices was set same, so that the state of the device can be assumed same anyway. Then applied vibrations in order to have the maximum amplitude value of both censor, so it can be found equality of the coefficient of proportionality both of them. The results on both devices obtain the Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) as follows, on the x axis (EW) android censor is obtained PGA -2.4478145 gal than at TDL 303 QS obtained PGA -2.5504 gal, the y-axis (NS) on the censor android obtained PGA 3.0066964 gal than at TDL 303 QS obtained PGA 3.2073 gal, the z-axis (UD) on the android censor obtained PGA -14.0702377 gal than at TDL 303 QS obtained PGA -13.2927 gal, A correction value for android accelerometer censor is ± 0.1 gal for the x-axis (EW), ± 0.2 gal for the y-axis (NS), and ± 0.7 gal for the z-axis (UD).

  18. Orientation-dependent fiber-optic accelerometer based on grating inscription over fiber cladding.

    PubMed

    Rong, Qiangzhou; Qiao, Xueguang; Guo, Tuan; Bao, Weijia; Su, Dan; Yang, Hangzhou

    2014-12-01

    An orientation-sensitive fiber-optic accelerometer based on grating inscription over fiber cladding has been demonstrated. The sensor probe comprises a compact structure in which a short section of thin-core fiber (TCF) stub containing a "cladding" fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is spliced to another single-mode fiber (SMF) without any lateral offset. A femtosecond laser side-illumination technique was utilized to ensure that the grating inscription remains close to the core-cladding interface of the TCF. The core mode and the cladding mode of the TCF are coupled at the core-mismatch junction, and two well-defined resonances in reflection appear from the downstream FBG, in which the cladding resonance exhibits a strong polarization and bending dependence due to the asymmetrical distribution of the cladding FBG along the fiber cross section. Strong orientation dependence of the vibration (acceleration) measurement has been achieved by power detection of the cladding resonance. Meanwhile, the unwanted power fluctuations and temperature perturbations can be referenced out by monitoring the fundamental core resonance.

  19. High-speed system for FBG-based measurements of vibration and sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, Devrez M.; Ibrahim, Selwan K.; Koumans, Yorick; Meulblok, Bastiaan; Knoppers, Rik

    2016-05-01

    Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) allow for optical detection of localized physical effects without the need to couple the light out and back into a fiber, enabling robust and multiplexed sensor systems. The need of combining wide bandwidth and high resolution for dynamic sensing applications, like acoustics and vibrations, has presented significant challenges for FBG-based solutions. Here, we present a novel FBG-based measurement system enabled by using high-speed and highprecision tunable laser-based optical interrogation scheme. Multiple levels of integrated wavelength referencing coupled with low-noise high-speed electronics allow for spectral feature tracking at a resolution of <20 fm at kHz-frequencies. In combination with fiber accelerometers that employ unique force transmission mechanisms, amplifying strain on the Bragg grating and increasing the resonance frequency of the transducer, resolutions <10 μg (150 Hz bandwidth) to submg resolution in kHz-frequencies is achieved. Similarly, compact wavelength-multiplexed hydrophones with wide range linearity and dynamic range, sub-Pa resolution and flat-sensitivity down to static pressures are demonstrated. The sensors are demonstrated to be customizable to application-specific requirements, and designed to be scalable to large quantity reproducible manufacturing. In contrast to interferometry-based solutions, the tunable swept-laser detection scheme in combination with strain-based FBG sensors provides a cost-effective system that allows for easy scaling of sensor counts per fiber with multiple fibers being simultaneously recorded. Finally, the integrated high accuracy triggering and hybrid measurement capabilities present the potential to monitor sounds and vibrations in a wide range of applications from seismic surveys to machine and structural monitoring applications in harsh environments.

  20. Understanding Vibration Spectra of Planetary Gear Systems for Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosher, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    An understanding of the vibration spectra is very useful for any gear fault detection scheme based upon vibration measurements. The vibration measured from planetary gears is complicated. Sternfeld noted the presence of sidebands about the gear mesh harmonics spaced at the planet passage frequency in spectra measured near the ring gear of a CH-47 helicopter. McFadden proposes a simple model of the vibration transmission that predicts high spectral amplitudes at multiples of the planet passage frequency, for planetary gears with evenly spaced planets. This model correctly predicts no strong signal at the meshing frequency when the number of teeth on the ring gear is not an integer multiple of the number of planets. This paper will describe a model for planetary gear vibration spectra developed from the ideas started in reference. This model predicts vibration to occur only at frequencies that are multiples of the planet repetition passage frequency and clustered around gear mesh harmonics. Vibration measurements will be shown from tri-axial accelerometers mounted on three different planetary gear systems and compared with the model. The model correctly predicts the frequencies with large components around the first several gear mesh harmonics in measurements for systems with uniformly and nonuniformly spaced planet gears. Measurements do not confirm some of the more detailed features predicted by the model. Discrepancies of the ideal model to the measurements are believed due to simplifications in the model and will be discussed. Fault detection will be discussed applying the understanding will be discussed.

  1. Primary mirror dynamic disturbance models for TMT: vibration and wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMynowski, Douglas G.; Colavita, M. Mark; Skidmore, Warren; Vogiatzis, Konstantinos

    2010-07-01

    The principal dynamic disturbances acting on a telescope segmented primary mirror are unsteady wind pressure (turbulence) and narrowband vibration from rotating equipment. Understanding these disturbances is essential for the design of the segment support assembly (SSA), segment actuators, and primary mirror control system (M1CS). The wind disturbance is relatively low frequency, and is partially compensated by M1CS; the response depends on the control bandwidth and the quasi-static stiffness of the actuator and SSA. Equipment vibration is at frequencies higher than the M1CS bandwidth; the response depends on segment damping, and the proximity of segment support resonances to dominant vibration tones. We present here both disturbance models and parametric response. Wind modeling is informed by CFD and based on propagation of a von Karman pressure screen. The vibration model is informed by analysis of accelerometer and adaptive optics data from Keck. This information is extrapolated to TMT and applied to the telescope structural model to understand the response dependence on actuator design parameters in particular. Whether the vibration response or the wind response is larger depends on these design choices; "soft" (e.g. voice-coil) actuators provide better vibration reduction but require high servo bandwidth for wind rejection, while "hard" (e.g. piezo-electric) actuators provide good wind rejection but require damping to avoid excessive vibration transmission to the primary mirror segments. The results for both nominal and worst-case disturbances and design parameters are incorporated into the TMT actuator performance assessment.

  2. System Wide Joint Position Sensor Fault Tolerance in Robot Systems Using Cartesian Accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldridge, Hal A.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1997-01-01

    Joint position sensors are necessary for most robot control systems. A single position sensor failure in a normal robot system can greatly degrade performance. This paper presents a method to obtain position information from Cartesian accelerometers without integration. Depending on the number and location of the accelerometers. the proposed system can tolerate the loss of multiple position sensors. A solution technique suitable for real-time implementation is presented. Simulations were conducted using 5 triaxial accelerometers to recover from the loss of up to 4 joint position sensors on a 7 degree of freedom robot moving in general three dimensional space. The simulations show good estimation performance using non-ideal accelerometer measurements.

  3. The location of the tibial accelerometer does influence impact acceleration parameters during running.

    PubMed

    Lucas-Cuevas, Angel Gabriel; Encarnación-Martínez, Alberto; Camacho-García, Andrés; Llana-Belloch, Salvador; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro

    2016-10-03

    Tibial accelerations have been associated with a number of running injuries. However, studies attaching the tibial accelerometer on the proximal section are as numerous as those attaching the accelerometer on the distal section. This study aimed to investigate whether accelerometer location influences acceleration parameters commonly reported in running literature. To fulfil this purpose, 30 athletes ran at 2.22, 2.78 and 3.33 m · s(-1) with three accelerometers attached with double-sided tape and tightened to the participants' tolerance on the forehead, the proximal section of the tibia and the distal section of the tibia. Time-domain (peak acceleration, shock attenuation) and frequency-domain parameters (peak frequency, peak power, signal magnitude and shock attenuation in both the low and high frequency ranges) were calculated for each of the tibial locations. The distal accelerometer registered greater tibial acceleration peak and shock attenuation compared to the proximal accelerometer. With respect to the frequency-domain analysis, the distal accelerometer provided greater values of all the low-frequency parameters, whereas no difference was observed for the high-frequency parameters. These findings suggest that the location of the tibial accelerometer does influence the acceleration signal parameters, and thus, researchers should carefully consider the location they choose to place the accelerometer so that equivalent comparisons across studies can be made.

  4. Planetary Gearbox Fault Detection Using Vibration Separation Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; LaBerge, Kelsen E.; Ehinger, Ryan T.; Fetty, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Studies were performed to demonstrate the capability to detect planetary gear and bearing faults in helicopter main-rotor transmissions. The work supported the Operations Support and Sustainment (OSST) program with the U.S. Army Aviation Applied Technology Directorate (AATD) and Bell Helicopter Textron. Vibration data from the OH-58C planetary system were collected on a healthy transmission as well as with various seeded-fault components. Planetary fault detection algorithms were used with the collected data to evaluate fault detection effectiveness. Planet gear tooth cracks and spalls were detectable using the vibration separation techniques. Sun gear tooth cracks were not discernibly detectable from the vibration separation process. Sun gear tooth spall defects were detectable. Ring gear tooth cracks were only clearly detectable by accelerometers located near the crack location or directly across from the crack. Enveloping provided an effective method for planet bearing inner- and outer-race spalling fault detection.

  5. Analysis and Modelling of Muscles Motion during Whole Body Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesarelli, M.; Fratini, A.; Bifulco, P.; La Gatta, A.; Romano, M.; Pasquariello, G.

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the study is to characterize the local muscles motion in individuals undergoing whole body mechanical stimulation. In this study we aim also to evaluate how subject positioning modifies vibration dumping, altering local mechanical stimulus. Vibrations were delivered to subjects by the use of a vibrating platform, while stimulation frequency was increased linearly from 15 to 60 Hz. Two different subject postures were here analysed. Platform and muscles motion were monitored using tiny MEMS accelerometers; a contra lateral analysis was also presented. Muscle motion analysis revealed typical displacement trajectories: motion components were found not to be purely sinusoidal neither in phase to each other. Results also revealed a mechanical resonant-like behaviour at some muscles, similar to a second-order system response. Resonance frequencies and dumping factors depended on subject and his positioning. Proper mechanical stimulation can maximize muscle spindle solicitation, which may produce a more effective muscle activation.

  6. Surface Acoustic Wave Vibration Sensors for Measuring Aircraft Flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Moore, Jason P.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Under NASA's Advanced Air Vehicles Program the Advanced Air Transport Technology (AATT) Project is investigating flutter effects on aeroelastic wings. To support that work a new method for measuring vibrations due to flutter has been developed. The method employs low power Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors. To demonstrate the ability of the SAW sensor to detect flutter vibrations the sensors were attached to a Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite panel which was vibrated at six frequencies from 1Hz to 50Hz. The SAW data was compared to accelerometer data and was found to resemble sine waves and match each other closely. The SAW module design and results from the tests are presented here.

  7. High-vibration detection using motor current signature analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Castleberry, K.N.

    1996-08-01

    Motor current signature analysis (CSA) has been used for several years as a diagnostic tool for electrical problems in ac, induction motors. Personnel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have found that CSA can also provide information about system vibrations and imbalances similar to the information provided by an accelerometer. As a result, CSA techniques for monitoring the status of the equipment, such as pumps and compressors, driven by induction motors have been developed and used in dedicated monitoring systems. In this work, researchers have found that CSA responds proportionately to imbalances in rotating equipment and can be used to detect the In high-vibration conditions that can result. This report describes how vibration monitoring with CSA can be implemented and presents test data to support that use.

  8. Equating accelerometer estimates among youth: the Rosetta Stone 2

    PubMed Central

    Brazendale, Keith; Beets, Michael W.; Bornstein, Daniel B.; Moore, Justin B.; Pate, Russell R.; Weaver, Robert G.; Falck, Ryan S.; Chandler, Jessica L.; Andersen, Lars B.; Anderssen, Sigmund A.; Cardon, Greet; Cooper, Ashley; Davey, Rachel; Froberg, Karsten; Hallal, Pedro C.; Janz, Kathleen F.; Kordas, Katarzyna; Kriemler, Susi; Puder, Jardena J.; Reilly, John J.; Salmon, Jo; Sardinha, Luis B.; Timperio, Anna; van Sluijs, Esther MF

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Different accelerometer cutpoints used by different researchers often yields vastly different estimates of moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA). This is recognized as cutpoint non-equivalence (CNE), which reduces the ability to accurately compare youth MVPA across studies. The objective of this research is to develop a cutpoint conversion system that standardizes minutes of MVPA for six different sets of published cutpoints. Design Secondary data analysis Methods Data from the International Children’s Accelerometer Database (ICAD; Spring 2014) consisting of 43,112 Actigraph accelerometer data files from 21 worldwide studies (children 3-18 years, 61.5% female) were used to develop prediction equations for six sets of published cutpoints. Linear and non-linear modeling, using a leave one out cross-validation technique, was employed to develop equations to convert MVPA from one set of cutpoints into another. Bland Altman plots illustrate the agreement between actual MVPA and predicted MVPA values. Results Across the total sample, mean MVPA ranged from 29.7 MVPA min.d-1 (Puyau) to 126.1 MVPA min.d-1 (Freedson 3 METs). Across conversion equations, median absolute percent error was 12.6% (range: 1.3 to 30.1) and the proportion of variance explained ranged from 66.7% to 99.8%. Mean difference for the best performing prediction equation (VC from EV) was -0.110 min.d-1 (limits of agreement (LOA), -2.623 to 2.402). The mean difference for the worst performing prediction equation (FR3 from PY) was 34.76 min.d-1 (LOA, -60.392 to 129.910). Conclusions For six different sets of published cutpoints, the use of this equating system can assist individuals attempting to synthesize the growing body of literature on Actigraph, accelerometry-derived MVPA. PMID:25747468

  9. Interest of the MICROSTAR Accelerometer to improve the GRASP Mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, E.; Lebat, V.; Foulon, B.; Christophe, B.; Liorzou, F.; Huynh, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Geodetic Reference Antenna in Space (GRASP) is a micro satellite mission concept proposed by JPL to improve the definition of the Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF). GRASP collocates GPS, SLR, VLBI, and DORIS sensors on a dedicated spacecraft in order to establish precise and stable ties between the key geodetic techniques used to define and disseminate the TRF. GRASP also offers a space-based reference antenna for the present and future Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). By taking advantage of the new testing possibilities offer by the catapult facility at the ZARM drop tower, the ONERA's space accelerometer team proposes an up-dated version, called MICROSTAR, of its ultra sensitive electrostatic accelerometers which have contributed to the success of the last Earth's gravity missions GRACE and GOCE. Built around a cubic proof-mass, it provides the 3 linear accelerations with a resolution better than 10-11 ms-2/Hz1/2 into a measurement bandwidth between 10-3 Hz and 0.1 Hz and the 3 angular accelerations about its 3 orthogonal axes with 5´10-10 rad.s-2/Hz1/2 resolution. Integrated at the centre of mass of the satellite, MICROSTAR improves the Precise Orbit Determination (POD) by accurate measurement of the non-gravitational force acting on the satellite. It offers also the possibility to calibrate the change in the position of the satellite center of mass with an accuracy better than 100 μm as demonstrated in the GRACE mission. Assuming a sufficiently rigid structure between the antennas and the accelerometer, its data can participate to reach the mission objective of 1 mm precision for the TRF position.

  10. ISA accelerometer onboard the Mercury Planetary Orbiter: error budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, Valerio; Lucchesi, David M.; Nozzoli, Sergio; Santoli, Francesco

    2007-03-01

    We have estimated a preliminary error budget for the Italian Spring Accelerometer (ISA) that will be allocated onboard the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) of the European Space Agency (ESA) space mission to Mercury named BepiColombo. The role of the accelerometer is to remove from the list of unknowns the non-gravitational accelerations that perturb the gravitational trajectory followed by the MPO in the strong radiation environment that characterises the orbit of Mercury around the Sun. Such a role is of fundamental importance in the context of the very ambitious goals of the Radio Science Experiments (RSE) of the BepiColombo mission. We have subdivided the errors on the accelerometer measurements into two main families: (i) the pseudo-sinusoidal errors and (ii) the random errors. The former are characterised by a periodic behaviour with the frequency of the satellite mean anomaly and its higher order harmonic components, i.e., they are deterministic errors. The latter are characterised by an unknown frequency distribution and we assumed for them a noise-like spectrum, i.e., they are stochastic errors. Among the pseudo-sinusoidal errors, the main contribution is due to the effects of the gravity gradients and the inertial forces, while among the random-like errors the main disturbing effect is due to the MPO centre-of-mass displacements produced by the onboard High Gain Antenna (HGA) movements and by the fuel consumption and sloshing. Very subtle to be considered are also the random errors produced by the MPO attitude corrections necessary to guarantee the nadir pointing of the spacecraft. We have therefore formulated the ISA error budget and the requirements for the satellite in order to guarantee an orbit reconstruction for the MPO spacecraft with an along-track accuracy of about 1 m over the orbital period of the satellite around Mercury in such a way to satisfy the RSE requirements.

  11. Accelerometer Placement for the International Space Station Node Modal Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, Michael L.

    1998-01-01

    Accelerometer location analysis for the modal survey test of the International Space Station Node is described. Three different approaches were utilized: (1) Guyan reduction; (2) Iterative Guyan reduction; and (3) The average driving point residue (ADPR) method. Both Guyan approaches worked well, but poor results were observed for the ADPR method. Although the iterative Guyan approach appears to provide the best set of sensor locations, it is intensive computationally, becoming impractical for large initial location sets. While this is computer dependent, it appears that initial sets larger than about 1500 degrees of freedom are impractical for the iterative technique.

  12. Characterization of Train-Induced Vibration and its Effect on Fecal Corticosterone Metabolites in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Atanasov, Nicholas A; Sargent, Jennifer L; Parmigiani, John P; Palme, Rupert; Diggs, Helen E

    2015-01-01

    Excessive environmental vibrations can have deleterious effects on animal health and experimental results, but they remain poorly understood in the animal laboratory setting. The aims of this study were to characterize train-associated vibration in a rodent vivarium and to assess the effects of this vibration on the reproductive success and fecal corticosterone metabolite levels of mice. An instrumented cage, featuring a high-sensitivity microphone and accelerometer, was used to characterize the vibrations and sound in a vivarium that is near an active railroad. The vibrations caused by the passing trains are 3 times larger in amplitude than are the ambient facility vibrations, whereas most of the associated sound was below the audible range for mice. Mice housed in the room closest to the railroad tracks had pregnancy rates that were 50% to 60% lower than those of mice of the same strains but bred in other parts of the facility. To verify the effect of the train vibrations, we used a custom-built electromagnetic shaker to simulate the train-induced vibrations in a controlled environment. Fecal pellets were collected from male and female mice that were exposed to the simulated vibrations and from unexposed control animals. Analysis of the fecal samples revealed that vibrations similar to those produced by a passing train can increase the levels of fecal corticosterone metabolites in female mice. These increases warrant attention to the effects of vibration on mice and, consequently, on reproduction and experimental outcomes. PMID:26632783

  13. Characterization of Train-Induced Vibration and its Effect on Fecal Corticosterone Metabolites in Mice.

    PubMed

    Atanasov, Nicholas A; Sargent, Jennifer L; Parmigiani, John P; Palme, Rupert; Diggs, Helen E

    2015-11-01

    Excessive environmental vibrations can have deleterious effects on animal health and experimental results, but they remain poorly understood in the animal laboratory setting. The aims of this study were to characterize train-associated vibration in a rodent vivarium and to assess the effects of this vibration on the reproductive success and fecal corticosterone metabolite levels of mice. An instrumented cage, featuring a high-sensitivity microphone and accelerometer, was used to characterize the vibrations and sound in a vivarium that is near an active railroad. The vibrations caused by the passing trains are 3 times larger in amplitude than are the ambient facility vibrations, whereas most of the associated sound was below the audible range for mice. Mice housed in the room closest to the railroad tracks had pregnancy rates that were 50% to 60% lower than those of mice of the same strains but bred in other parts of the facility. To verify the effect of the train vibrations, we used a custom-built electromagnetic shaker to simulate the train-induced vibrations in a controlled environment. Fecal pellets were collected from male and female mice that were exposed to the simulated vibrations and from unexposed control animals. Analysis of the fecal samples revealed that vibrations similar to those produced by a passing train can increase the levels of fecal corticosterone metabolites in female mice. These increases warrant attention to the effects of vibration on mice and, consequently, on reproduction and experimental outcomes.

  14. Microelectromechanical power generator and vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2006-11-28

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus is disclosed which can be used to generate electrical power in response to an external source of vibrations, or to sense the vibrations and generate an electrical output voltage in response thereto. The MEM apparatus utilizes a meandering electrical pickup located near a shuttle which holds a plurality of permanent magnets. Upon movement of the shuttle in response to vibrations coupled thereto, the permanent magnets move in a direction substantially parallel to the meandering electrical pickup, and this generates a voltage across the meandering electrical pickup. The MEM apparatus can be fabricated by LIGA or micromachining.

  15. Possible Mechanisms of Low Back Pain due to Whole-Body Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, M. H.; Wilder, D. G.; Magnusson, M.

    1998-08-01

    The investigators describe their multifaceted approach to the study of the relationship between whole-body vibration and low back pain.In vitroexperiments, using percutaneous pin-mounted accelerometers have shown that the natural frequency is at 4·5 Hz. The frequency response was affected by posture, seating, and seat-back inclination. The response appears to be largely determined by the rocking of the pelvis. Electromyographic studies have shown that muscle fatigue occurs under whole body vibration. After whole body vibration exposure the muscle response to a sudden load has greater latency. Vehicle driving may be a reason for low back pain or herniated nucleus pulposus. Prolonged seating exposure, coupled with the whole body vibration should be reduced for those recovering from these problems. Vibration attenuating seats, and correct ergonomic layout of the cabs may reduce the risks of recurrence.

  16. Dynamic Fluid in a Porous Transducer-Based Angular Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Siyuan; Fu, Mengyin; Wang, Meiling; Ming, Li; Fu, Huijin; Wang, Tonglei

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical model of the dynamics of liquid flow in an angular accelerometer comprising a porous transducer in a circular tube of liquid. Wave speed and dynamic permeability of the transducer are considered to describe the relation between angular acceleration and the differential pressure on the transducer. The permeability and streaming potential coupling coefficient of the transducer are determined in the experiments, and special prototypes are utilized to validate the theoretical model in both the frequency and time domains. The model is applied to analyze the influence of structural parameters on the frequency response and the transient response of the fluidic system. It is shown that the radius of the circular tube and the wave speed affect the low frequency gain, as well as the bandwidth of the sensor. The hydrodynamic resistance of the transducer and the cross-section radius of the circular tube can be used to control the transient performance. The proposed model provides the basic techniques to achieve the optimization of the angular accelerometer together with the methodology to control the wave speed and the hydrodynamic resistance of the transducer. PMID:28230793

  17. Microelectromechanical Resonant Accelerometer Designed with a High Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Su, Yan; Shi, Qin; Qiu, An-Ping

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the design and experimental evaluation of a silicon micro-machined resonant accelerometer (SMRA). This type of accelerometer works on the principle that a proof mass under acceleration applies force to two double-ended tuning fork (DETF) resonators, and the frequency output of two DETFs exhibits a differential shift. The dies of an SMRA are fabricated using silicon-on-insulator (SOI) processing and wafer-level vacuum packaging. This research aims to design a high-sensitivity SMRA because a high sensitivity allows for the acceleration signal to be easily demodulated by frequency counting techniques and decreases the noise level. This study applies the energy-consumed concept and the Nelder-Mead algorithm in the SMRA to address the design issues and further increase its sensitivity. Using this novel method, the sensitivity of the SMRA has been increased by 66.1%, which attributes to both the re-designed DETF and the reduced energy loss on the micro-lever. The results of both the closed-form and finite-element analyses are described and are in agreement with one another. A resonant frequency of approximately 22 kHz, a frequency sensitivity of over 250 Hz per g, a one-hour bias stability of 55 μg, a bias repeatability (1σ) of 48 μg and the bias-instability of 4.8 μg have been achieved. PMID:26633425

  18. ISA accelerometer: fundamental support for the exploration of planet Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, Valerio; Fiorenza, Emiliano; Lefevre, Carlo; Nozzoli, Sergio; Peron, Roberto; Reale, Andrea; Santoli, Francesco

    2010-05-01

    The development of BepiColombo mission is proceeding, in view of the launch, foreseen for 2014. This mission will perform a thorough study of the planet Mercury and its environment. An important set of scientific objectives is constituted by the so-called Radio Science Experiments (RSE), which will study the gravitational field and rotation of the planet, and will perform very precise tests of general relativity theory. In order to reach the required level of accuracy in recovering the relevant parameters, the data coming from the high-sensitivity ISA (Italian Spring Accelerometer) instrument onboard the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) will be used: this will be the first time for a deep-space probe. Following a brief description of the mission and RSE, the instrument and its wide capabilities will be reviewed. The focus will be in particular on the updated error budget, operational procedures and extended use of the instrument in the various parts of the RSE. It will be also described the procedure for on-ground calibration of the accelerometer.

  19. Free fall tests of the accelerometers of the MICROSCOPE mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liorzou, F.; Boulanger, D.; Rodrigues, M.; Touboul, P.; Selig, H.

    2014-09-01

    The MICROSCOPE mission is fully dedicated to the in-orbit test of the Universality of free fall, the so-called Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP), with an expected accuracy better than 10-15. The test principle consists in comparing the accelerations of two proof masses of different composition in the Earth gravitational field. The payload embarks two pairs of test-masses made of Platinum Rhodium and Titanium alloys at the core of two dedicated coaxial electrostatic accelerometers. These instruments are under qualification for a launch in 2016. Their operations are only possible in microgravity environment which makes its validation on ground a real issue. In Europe, only the drop tower of the ZARM Institute provides a facility for experiments under conditions of weightlessness and offers the experimental conditions to verify the correct functioning of the MICROSCOPE payload. The height of the tower limits the “free fall” experiment period to 4.72 s. Under this strong constraint, the demonstration of the capability to control the test masses of the two coaxial electrostatic accelerometers is challenging. This paper describes the complete experimental set up and in which condition the test has been performed, then an analysis of a drop result is given with its interpretations.

  20. Surface Micromachined Silicon Carbide Accelerometers for Gas Turbine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeAnna, Russell G.

    1998-01-01

    A finite-element analysis of possible silicon carbide (SIC) folded-beam, lateral-resonating accelerometers is presented. Results include stiffness coefficients, acceleration sensitivities, resonant frequency versus temperature, and proof-mass displacements due to centripetal acceleration of a blade-mounted sensor. The surface micromachined devices, which are similar to the Analog Devices Inc., (Norwood, MA) air-bag crash detector, are etched from 2-pm thick, 3C-SiC films grown at 1600 K using atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD). The substrate is a 500 gm-thick, (100) silicon wafer. Polysilicon or silicon dioxide is used as a sacrificial layer. The finite element analysis includes temperature-dependent properties, shape change due to volume expansion, and thermal stress caused by differential thermal expansion of the materials. The finite-element results are compared to experimental results for a SiC device of similar, but not identical, geometry. Along with changes in mechanical design, blade-mounted sensors would require on-chip circuitry to cancel displacements due to centripetal acceleration and improve sensitivity and bandwidth. These findings may result in better accelerometer designs for this application.

  1. Applying macro design tools to the design of MEMS accelerometers

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, B.R.; Rodgers, M.S.; Montague, S.

    1998-02-01

    This paper describes the design of two different surface micromachined (MEMS) accelerometers and the use of design and analysis tools intended for macro sized devices. This work leverages a process for integrating both the micromechanical structures and microelectronics circuitry of a MEMS accelerometer on the same chip. In this process, the mechanical components of the sensor are first fabricated at the bottom of a trench etched into the wafer substrate. The trench is then filled with oxide and sealed to protect the mechanical components during subsequent microelectronics processing. The wafer surface is then planarized in preparation for CMOS processing. Next, the CMOS electronics are fabricated and the mechanical structures are released. The mechanical structure of each sensor consists of two polysilicon plate masses suspended by multiple springs (cantilevered beam structures) over corresponding polysilicon plates fixed to the substrate to form two parallel plate capacitors. One polysilicon plate mass is suspended using compliant springs forming a variable capacitor. The other polysilicon plate mass is suspended using very stiff springs acting as a fixed capacitor. Acceleration is measured by comparing the variable capacitance with the fixed capacitance during acceleration.

  2. Proprioceptive illusions created by vibration of one arm are altered by vibrating the other arm.

    PubMed

    Hakuta, Naoyuki; Izumizaki, Masahiko; Kigawa, Kazuyoshi; Murai, Norimitsu; Atsumi, Takashi; Homma, Ikuo

    2014-07-01

    There is some evidence that signals coming from both arms are used to determine the perceived position and movement of one arm. We examined whether the sense of position and movement of one (reference) arm is altered by increases in muscle spindle signals in the other (indicator) arm in blindfolded participants (n = 26). To increase muscle spindle discharge, we applied 70-80 Hz muscle vibration to the elbow flexors of the indicator arm. In a first experiment, proprioceptive illusions in the vibrated reference arm in a forearm position-matching task were compared between conditions in which the indicator arm elbow flexors were vibrated or not vibrated. We found that the vibration illusion of arm extension induced by vibration of reference arm elbow flexors was reduced in the presence of vibration of the indicator elbow flexors. In a second experiment, participants were asked to describe their perception of the illusion of forearm extension movements of the reference arm evoked by vibration of reference arm elbow flexors in response to on/off and off/on transitions of vibration of non-reference arm elbow flexors. When vibration of non-reference arm elbow flexors was turned on, they reported a sensation of slowing down of the illusion of the reference arm. When it was turned off, they reported a sensation of speeding up. To conclude, the present study shows that both the sense of limb position and the sense of limb movement of one arm are dependent to some extent on spindle signals coming from the other arm.

  3. Honeybee Colony Vibrational Measurements to Highlight the Brood Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Bencsik, Martin; Le Conte, Yves; Reyes, Maritza; Pioz, Maryline; Whittaker, David; Crauser, Didier; Simon Delso, Noa; Newton, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    Insect pollination is of great importance to crop production worldwide and honey bees are amongst its chief facilitators. Because of the decline of managed colonies, the use of sensor technology is growing in popularity and it is of interest to develop new methods which can more accurately and less invasively assess honey bee colony status. Our approach is to use accelerometers to measure vibrations in order to provide information on colony activity and development. The accelerometers provide amplitude and frequency information which is recorded every three minutes and analysed for night time only. Vibrational data were validated by comparison to visual inspection data, particularly the brood development. We show a strong correlation between vibrational amplitude data and the brood cycle in the vicinity of the sensor. We have further explored the minimum data that is required, when frequency information is also included, to accurately predict the current point in the brood cycle. Such a technique should enable beekeepers to reduce the frequency with which visual inspections are required, reducing the stress this places on the colony and saving the beekeeper time. PMID:26580393

  4. Chemical and biological sensing using tuning forks

    DOEpatents

    Tao, Nongjian; Boussaad, Salah

    2012-07-10

    A device for sensing a chemical analyte is disclosed. The device is comprised of a vibrating structure having first and second surfaces and having an associated resonant frequency and a wire coupled between the first and second surfaces of the vibrating structure, wherein the analyte interacts with the wire and causes a change in the resonant frequency of the vibrating structure. The vibrating structure can include a tuning fork. The vibrating structure can be comprised of quartz. The wire can be comprised of polymer. A plurality of vibrating structures are arranged in an array to increase confidence by promoting a redundancy of measurement or to detect a plurality of chemical analytes. A method of making a device for sensing a chemical analyte is also disclosed.

  5. Using consumer electronic devices to estimate whole-body vibration exposure.

    PubMed

    Wolfgang, Rebecca; Burgess-Limerick, Robin

    2014-01-01

    The cost and complexity of commercially available devices for measuring whole-body vibration is a barrier to the systematic collection of the information required to manage this hazard at workplaces. The potential for a consumer electronic device to be used to estimate whole-body vibration was assessed by use of an accelerometer calibrator, and by collecting 42 simultaneous pairs of measurements from a fifth-generation iPod Touch and one of two gold standard vibration measurement devices (Svantech SV111 [Svantech, Warsaw, Poland] or Brüel & Kjær 4447 [Brüel & Kjær Sound & Vibration Measurement A/S, Nærum, Denmark]) while driving light vehicles on a variety of different roadway surfaces. While sampling rate limitations make the accelerometer data collected from the iPod Touch unsuitable for frequency analysis, the vibration amplitudes recorded are sufficiently accurate (errors less than 0.1 m/s(2)) to assist workplaces manage whole-body vibration exposures.

  6. Calibration and validation of individual GOCE accelerometers by precise orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, P. N. A. M.; IJssel, J. A. A. van den

    2016-01-01

    The European Space Agency Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circular Explorer (GOCE) carries a gradiometer consisting of three pairs of accelerometers in an orthogonal triad. Precise GOCE science orbit solutions (PSO), which are based on satellite-to-satellite tracking observations by the Global Positioning System and which are claimed to be at the few cm precision level, can be used to calibrate and validate the observations taken by the accelerometers. This has been done for each individual accelerometer by a dynamic orbit fit of the time series of position co-ordinates from the PSOs, where the accelerometer observations represent the non-gravitational accelerations. Since the accelerometers do not coincide with the center of mass of the GOCE satellite, the observations have to be corrected for rotational and gravity gradient terms. This is not required when using the so-called common-mode accelerometer observations, provided the center of the gradiometer coincides with the GOCE center of mass. Dynamic orbit fits based on these common-mode accelerations therefore served as reference. It is shown that for all individual accelerometers, similar dynamic orbit fits can be obtained provided the above-mentioned corrections are made. In addition, accelerometer bias estimates are obtained that are consistent with offsets in the gravity gradients that are derived from the GOCE gradiometer observations.

  7. Assessing Physical Activity in Children with Asthma: Convergent Validity between Accelerometer and Electronic Diary Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floro, Josh N.; Dunton, Genevieve F.; Delfino, Ralph J.

    2009-01-01

    Convergent validity of accelerometer and electronic diary physical activity data was assessed in children with asthma. Sixty-two participants, ages 9-18 years, wore an accelerometer and reported their physical activity level in quarter-hour segments every 2 hr using the Ambulatory Diary Assessment (ADA). Moderate validity was found between…

  8. Simulation of Satellite Vibration Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettacchioli, Alain

    2014-06-01

    During every mechanical qualification test of satellites on vibrator, we systematically notice beating phenomena that appear every time we cross a mode's frequency. There could lead to an over-qualification of the tested specimen when the beating reaches a maximum and a under-qualification when the beating passes by a minimum. On a satellite, three lateral modes raise such a problem in a recurring way: the first structure mode (between 10 and 15 hertz) and the two tanks modes (between 35 and 50 hertz).To step forward in the resolution of this problem, we are developing a simulator which is based on the identification of the responses of the accelerometers that are fixed on the satellite and on the shaker slip table. The estimated transfer functions then allow to reconstruct at once the sensors response and the drive which generated them.For the simulation, we do not select all the sensors but only those on the slip table and those used to limit the input level (notching). We may also add those which were close to generate a notching.To perform its calculations, the simulator reproduces on one hand the unity amplitude signal (cola) which serves as frequency reference for the sweep achievement (generally 3 octaves per minute from 5 to 100 and even 150 Hertz), and on the other hand, the vibrator control loop. The drive amplitude is calculated at each cola's period by taking into account a compression factor. The control applied through the amplifier to the shaker coil is the product of this amplitude by the cola. The simulated measurements are updated at each sampling period thanks to the propagation of the identified model. The superposition of these curves on those supplied by real sensors during the tests allows to validate the simulation.Thereby, it seems possible to actively control the beatings thanks to a real-time corrector which uses these identifications.

  9. Characterizing and mitigating vibrations for SCExAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozi, Julien; Guyon, Olivier; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Singh, Garima; Goebel, Sean; Norris, Barnaby; Okita, Hirofumi

    2016-07-01

    The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) instrument, under development for the Subaru Telescope, has currently the fastest on-sky wavefront control loop, with a pyramid wavefront sensor running at 3.5 kHz. But even at that speed, we are still limited by low-frequency vibrations. The current main limitation was found to be vibrations attributed mainly to the rotation of the telescope. Using the fast wavefront sensors, cameras and accelerometers, we managed to identify the origin of most of the vibrations degrading our performance. Low-frequency vibrations are coming from the telescope drive in azimuth and elevation, as well as the elevation encoders when the target is at transit. Other vibrations were found at higher frequency coming from the image rotator inside Subaru's adaptive optics facility AO188. Different approaches are being implemented to take care of these issues. The PID control of the image rotator has been tuned to reduce their high-frequency contribution. We are working with the telescope team to tune the motor drives and reduce the impact of the elevation encoder. A Linear Quadratic Gaussian controller (LQG, or Kalman filter) is also being implemented inside SCExAO to control these vibrations. These solutions will not only improve significantly SCExAOs performance, but will also help all the other instruments on the Subaru Telescope, especially the ones behind AO188. Ultimately, this study will also help the development of the TMT, as these two telescopes share very similar drives.

  10. High shock, high frequency characteristics of a mechanical isolator for a piezoresistive accelerometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Davie, N.T.

    1995-07-01

    A mechanical isolator has been developed for a piezoresistive accelerometer. The purpose of the isolator is to mitigate high frequency shocks before they reach the accelerometer because the high frequency shocks may cause the accelerometer to resonate. Since the accelerometer is undamped, it often breaks when it resonates. The mechanical isolator was developed in response to impact test requirements for a variety of structures at Sandia National Laboratories. An Extended Technical Assistance Program with the accelerometer manufacturer has resulted in a commercial isolator that will be available to the general public. This mechanical isolator has ten times the bandwidth of any other commercial isolator and has acceptable frequency domain performance from DC to 10 kHz ({plus_minus} 10%) over a temperature range of -65{degrees}F to +185{degrees}F as demonstrated in this paper.

  11. Lunar Tide Variability in Thermosphere Density as Derived from GOCE, CHAMP and GRACE Accelerometer Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Jeffrey; Zhang, Jesse; Doornbos, Eelco; Bruinsma, Sean; Zhang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Casey

    2014-05-01

    Study of the lunar tide in the ionosphere has a long history, and new discoveries are still being made, e.g., in connection with sudden stratosphere warmings and the equatorial electrojet, for instance. However, only recently have sufficient observations been available to delineate the neutral-atmosphere lunar tide and its variability on a global scale. In this paper we discuss extraction of the lunar tide from accelerometer measurements on the GOCE, CHAMP and GRACE satellites at nominal altitudes of 260, 350 and 450 km, respectively, from both climatological and space weather perspectives. Despite near-constant forcing, the weather aspects of the lunar tide arise from its sensitivity to background atmosphere conditions, which change in response to meteorological conditions and variable solar and magnetospheric inputs. There are significant challenges in separating the lunar tide from density variability due to changing geomagnetic conditions, especially recurrent geomagnetic activity with a period of 13.5 days, which are briefly described. We find that thermosphere density variations attributable to the lunar tide (~5-7%) at 260 km during 2009-2011 are about half those due to the the background "weather" due to geomagnetic activity; amplitudes at CHAMP and GRACE altitudes can be twice as large. Although of sufficient magnitude to be relevant to prediction of satellite ephemerides and inherently predictable in a climatological sense, the lunar tide has not been included in any empirical models to date.

  12. Imaging photorefractive optical vibration measurement method and device

    DOEpatents

    Telschow, Kenneth L.; Deason, Vance A.; Hale, Thomas C.

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for characterizing a vibrating image of an object of interest. The method includes providing a sensing media having a detection resolution within a limited bandwidth and providing an object of interest having a vibrating medium. Two or more wavefronts are provided, with at least one of the wavefronts being modulated by interacting the one wavefront with the vibrating medium of the object of interest. The another wavefront is modulated such that the difference frequency between the one wavefront and the another wavefront is within a response range of the sensing media. The modulated one wavefront and another wavefront are combined in association with the sensing media to interfere and produce simultaneous vibration measurements that are distributed over the object so as to provide an image of the vibrating medium. The image has an output intensity that is substantially linear with small physical variations within the vibrating medium. Furthermore, the method includes detecting the image. In one implementation, the apparatus comprises a vibration spectrum analyzer having an emitter, a modulator, sensing media and a detector configured so as to realize such method. According to another implementation, the apparatus comprises a vibration imaging device.

  13. Surface-Enhanced Impulsive Coherent Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Juan; Harra, Juha; Virkki, Matti; Mäkelä, Jyrki M.; Leng, Yuxin; Kauranen, Martti; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2016-11-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has attracted a lot of attention in molecular sensing because of the remarkable ability of plasmonic metal nanostructures to enhance the weak Raman scattering process. On the other hand, coherent vibrational spectroscopy triggered by impulsive excitation using ultrafast laser pulses provides complete information about the temporal evolution of molecular vibrations, allowing dynamical processes in molecular systems to be followed in “real time”. Here, we combine these two concepts and demonstrate surface-enhanced impulsive vibrational spectroscopy. The vibrational modes of the ground and excited states of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)‑1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV), spin-coated on a substrate covered with monodisperse silver nanoparticles, are impulsively excited with a sub-10 fs pump pulse and characterized with a delayed broad-band probe pulse. The maximum enhancement in the spectrally and temporally resolved vibrational signatures averaged over the whole sample is about 4.6, while the real-time information about the instantaneous vibrational amplitude together with the initial vibrational phase is preserved. The phase is essential to determine the vibrational contributions from the ground and excited states.

  14. Surface-Enhanced Impulsive Coherent Vibrational Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Harra, Juha; Virkki, Matti; Mäkelä, Jyrki M.; Leng, Yuxin; Kauranen, Martti; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has attracted a lot of attention in molecular sensing because of the remarkable ability of plasmonic metal nanostructures to enhance the weak Raman scattering process. On the other hand, coherent vibrational spectroscopy triggered by impulsive excitation using ultrafast laser pulses provides complete information about the temporal evolution of molecular vibrations, allowing dynamical processes in molecular systems to be followed in “real time”. Here, we combine these two concepts and demonstrate surface-enhanced impulsive vibrational spectroscopy. The vibrational modes of the ground and excited states of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)−1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV), spin-coated on a substrate covered with monodisperse silver nanoparticles, are impulsively excited with a sub-10 fs pump pulse and characterized with a delayed broad-band probe pulse. The maximum enhancement in the spectrally and temporally resolved vibrational signatures averaged over the whole sample is about 4.6, while the real-time information about the instantaneous vibrational amplitude together with the initial vibrational phase is preserved. The phase is essential to determine the vibrational contributions from the ground and excited states. PMID:27812020

  15. Tennis Racket Vibrations and Shock Transmission to the Wrist during Forehand Drive

    PubMed Central

    Rogowski, Isabelle; Creveaux, Thomas; Triquigneaux, Sylvain; Macé, Pierre; Gauthier, Fabien; Sevrez, Violaine

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of two different racket models and two different forehand drive velocities on the three-dimensional vibration behavior of the racket and shock transmission to the player’s wrist under real playing conditions. Nine tennis players performed a series of crosscourt flat forehand drives at two velocities, using a lightly and a highly vibrant racket. Two accelerometers were fixed on the racket frame and the player’s wrist. The analysis of vibration signals in both time and frequency domains showed no interaction effect of velocity and racket conditions either on the racket vibration behavior or on shock transmission. An increase in playing velocity enlarged the amount of vibrations at the racket and wrist, but weakly altered their frequency content. As compared to a racket perceived as highly vibrating, a racket perceived as lightly vibrating damped longer in the out-of-plane axis of the racket and shorter on the other axis of the racket and on the wrist, and displayed a lower amount of energy in the high frequency of the vibration signal at the racket and wrist. These findings indicated that the playing velocity must be controlled when investigating the vibration loads due to the racket under real playing conditions. Similarly, a reduced perception of vibration by the tennis player would be linked to decreased amplitude of the racket vibration signal, which may concentrate the signal energy in the low frequencies. PMID:26177373

  16. Tennis Racket Vibrations and Shock Transmission to the Wrist during Forehand Drive.

    PubMed

    Rogowski, Isabelle; Creveaux, Thomas; Triquigneaux, Sylvain; Macé, Pierre; Gauthier, Fabien; Sevrez, Violaine

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of two different racket models and two different forehand drive velocities on the three-dimensional vibration behavior of the racket and shock transmission to the player's wrist under real playing conditions. Nine tennis players performed a series of crosscourt flat forehand drives at two velocities, using a lightly and a highly vibrant racket. Two accelerometers were fixed on the racket frame and the player's wrist. The analysis of vibration signals in both time and frequency domains showed no interaction effect of velocity and racket conditions either on the racket vibration behavior or on shock transmission. An increase in playing velocity enlarged the amount of vibrations at the racket and wrist, but weakly altered their frequency content. As compared to a racket perceived as highly vibrating, a racket perceived as lightly vibrating damped longer in the out-of-plane axis of the racket and shorter on the other axis of the racket and on the wrist, and displayed a lower amount of energy in the high frequency of the vibration signal at the racket and wrist. These findings indicated that the playing velocity must be controlled when investigating the vibration loads due to the racket under real playing conditions. Similarly, a reduced perception of vibration by the tennis player would be linked to decreased amplitude of the racket vibration signal, which may concentrate the signal energy in the low frequencies.

  17. A thin rod is all that is needed to transmit vibrations from a shaker device (at bottom) and the win

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A thin rod is all that is needed to transmit vibrations from a shaker device (at bottom) and the wingtip of the Active Aeroelastic Wing F/A-18 research aircraft during ground vibration testing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. Wiring hanging down from the wingtip launcher rail transfer signals from accelerometers and other sensors mounted on the wing's upper surface to monitoring equipment. The tests help engineers determine if aerodynamically induced vibrations are controlled or suppressed during flight, and were the last major ground tests prior to the initiation of research flights.

  18. [Research of working condition monitoring and analyzing system for rotating anode X-ray tube based on the vibration measurement].

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Wang, Weidong; Yan, Yong; Zhang, Shuai; Zu, Hefei; Chen, Weibin

    2011-01-01

    A non-invasive detecting and analyzing method which used to monitor the working condition of rotating anode X-ray was proposed. Based on the NI development environment, accelerometer, 24-bit high resolution data acquisition card and personal computer were connected to construct the system for collecting the vibration signal of X-ray tube. Results demonstrate that the system could acquire and store the vibration data of X-ray tube quickly and efficiently. The characteristics of vibration, were extracted and processed, which proposed a new approach to detect the malfunction of rotating anode X-ray early and effectively.

  19. Vibration Stabilization of a Mechanical Model of a X-Band Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, Josef; Chang, Allison; Decker, Valentin; Doyle, Eric; Eriksson, Leif; Hendrickson, Linda; Himel, Thomas; Markiewicz, Thomas; Partridge, Richard; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2006-09-28

    The small beam sizes at the interaction point of a X-band linear collider require mechanical stabilization of the final focus magnets at the nanometer level. While passive systems provide adequate performance at many potential sites, active mechanical stabilization is useful if the natural or cultural ground vibration is higher than expected. A mechanical model of a room temperature linear collider final focus magnet has been constructed and actively stabilized with an accelerometer based system.

  20. Atmospheric structure from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter accelerometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, G.; Bougher, S.; Theriot, M.; Zurek, R.; Blanchard, R.; Tolson, R.; Murphy, J.

    Designed for aerobraking, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) launched on August 12, 2005, achieved Mars Orbital Insertion (MOI), March 10, 2006. Atmospheric density decreases exponentially with increasing height. By small propulsive adjustments of the apoapsis orbital velocity, periapsis altitude is fine tuned to the density surface that will safely use the atmosphere of Mars to aerobrake over 500 orbits. MRO periapsis precesses from the South Pole at 6pm LST to near the equator at 3am LST. Meanwhile, apoapsis is brought dramatically from ˜40,000km at MOI to 460 km at aerobraking completion (ABX) mid September 2006. After ABX, a few small propulsive maneuvers will establish the Primary Science Orbit (PSO), which without aerobraking would have required an additional 400 kg of fuel. Each of the 500 plus aerobraking orbits provides a vertical structure and distribution of density, scale heights, and temperatures, along the orbital path, providing key in situ insight into various upper atmosphere (> 100 km) processes. One of the major questions for scientists studying Mars is: "Where did the water go?" Honeywell's substantially improved electronics package for its IMU (QA-2000 accelerometer, gyro, electronics) maximized accelerometer sensitivities at the requests of The George Washington University, JPL, and Lockheed Martin. The improved accelerometer sensitivities allowed density measurements to exceed 200km, at least 40 km higher than with Mars Odyssey (MO). This extends vertical structures from MRO into the neutral lower exosphere, a region where various processes may allow atmospheric gasses to escape. Over the eons, water may have been lost in both the lower atmosphere and the upper atmosphere, thus the water balance throughout the entire atmosphere from subsurface to exosphere may be equally critical. Comparisons of data from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), MO and MRO will help characterize key temporal and spatial cycles including: polar vortices, winter polar

  1. Transmission of vertical whole body vibration to the human body.

    PubMed

    Kiiski, Juha; Heinonen, Ari; Järvinen, Teppo L; Kannus, Pekka; Sievänen, Harri

    2008-08-01

    According to experimental studies, low-amplitude high-frequency vibration is anabolic to bone tissue, whereas in clinical trials, the bone effects have varied. Given the potential of whole body vibration in bone training, this study aimed at exploring the transmission of vertical sinusoidal vibration to the human body over a wide range of applicable amplitudes (from 0.05 to 3 mm) and frequencies (from 10 to 90 Hz). Vibration-induced accelerations were assessed with skin-mounted triaxial accelerometers at the ankle, knee, hip, and lumbar spine in four males standing on a high-performance vibration platform. Peak vertical accelerations of the platform covered a range from 0.04 to 19 in units of G (Earth's gravitational constant). Substantial amplification of peak acceleration could occur between 10 and 40 Hz for the ankle, 10 and 25 Hz for the knee, 10 and 20 Hz for the hip, and at 10 Hz for the spine. Beyond these frequencies, the transmitted vibration power declined to 1/10th-1/1000 th of the power delivered by the platform. Transmission of vibration to the body is a complicated phenomenon because of nonlinearities in the human musculoskeletal system. These results may assist in estimating how the transmission of vibration-induced accelerations to body segments is modified by amplitude and frequency and how well the sinusoidal waveform is maintained. Although the attenuation of vertical vibration at higher frequencies is fortunate from the aspect of safety, amplitudes >0.5 mm may result in greater peak accelerations than imposed at the platform and thus pose a potential hazard for the fragile musculoskeletal system.

  2. Feasibility of vibration monitoring of small rotating machines for the environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) of the NASA advanced space craft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milner, G. Martin; Black, Mike; Hovenga, Mike; Mcclure, Paul; Miller, Patrice

    1988-01-01

    The application of vibration monitoring to the rotating machinery typical of ECLSS components in advanced NASA spacecraft was studied. It is found that the weighted summation of the accelerometer power spectrum is the most successful detection scheme for a majority of problem types. Other detection schemes studied included high-frequency demodulation, cepstrum, clustering, and amplitude processing.

  3. Slice&Dice: Recognizing Food Preparation Activities Using Embedded Accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Cuong; Olivier, Patrick

    Within the context of an endeavor to provide situated support for people with cognitive impairments in the kitchen, we developed and evaluated classifiers for recognizing 11 actions involved in food preparation. Data was collected from 20 lay subjects using four specially designed kitchen utensils incorporating embedded 3-axis accelerometers. Subjects were asked to prepare a mixed salad in our laboratory-based instrumented kitchen environment. Video of each subject's food preparation activities were independently annotated by three different coders. Several classifiers were trained and tested using these features. With an overall accuracy of 82.9% our investigation demonstrated that a broad set of food preparation actions can be reliably recognized using sensors embedded in kitchen utensils.

  4. Accelerometer-Based Event Detector for Low-Power Applications

    PubMed Central

    Smidla, József; Simon, Gyula

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, an adaptive, autocovariance-based event detection algorithm is proposed, which can be used with micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) accelerometer sensors to build inexpensive and power efficient event detectors. The algorithm works well with low signal-to-noise ratio input signals, and its computational complexity is very low, allowing its utilization on inexpensive low-end embedded sensor devices. The proposed algorithm decreases its energy consumption by lowering its duty cycle, as much as the event to be detected allows it. The performance of the algorithm is tested and compared to the conventional filter-based approach. The comparison was performed in an application where illegal entering of vehicles into restricted areas was detected. PMID:24135991

  5. GOCE Accelerometers Data Revisited: Stability And Detector Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, J.; Christophe, B.; Foulon, B.

    2013-12-01

    We report on our analyses of Gravity field and steady- state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) data aiming to characterize the stability and the noise of GOCE's ac- celerometers. We first measure science and detector co- herence signals, which allow us to infer the role of the accelerometers Digital Voltage Amplifiers and measure- ment chanel in the overall quadratic factor and scale fac- tor; we show that their temporal stability is as low as ex- pected. We then investigate the effect of the aliasing of high frequency detector's noise on the measured noise, in an attempt to explain why the measured noise is higher than originally expected. We find that although this alias- ing explains part of the higher noise, it does not account for the total of the difference seen between the expected and the measured noise.

  6. Concept of an Opto-electronic Accelerometer System (OAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunkel, B.; Keller, K.; Lutz, R.

    1987-01-01

    An accelerometer based on a spring-suspended reference mass and its precise relative motion measurement by means of 3 two-dimensional position sensitive detectors (PSD) is described. A breadboard model achieves a resolution (longterm linearity) of 25 nm in one direction. Due to the physical principle of the PSD, the second layer is slightly less sensitive than the top layer; accordingly for gravity gradient detection the more sensitive layer is selected for the Z/X component detection. At 10 Hz sampling rate an acceleration gradient of under 10 to the minus 12th power g (i.e., 0.01 E or 0.001 Gal/km) is considered to be detectable.

  7. Concept of an Opto-electronic Accelerometer System (OAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunkel, B.; Keller, K.; Lutz, R.

    1987-10-01

    An accelerometer based on a spring-suspended reference mass and its precise relative motion measurement by means of 3 two-dimensional position sensitive detectors (PSD) is described. A breadboard model achieves a resolution (longterm linearity) of 25 nm in one direction. Due to the physical principle of the PSD, the second layer is slightly less sensitive than the top layer; accordingly for gravity gradient detection the more sensitive layer is selected for the Z/X component detection. At 10 Hz sampling rate an acceleration gradient of under 10 to the minus 12th power g (i.e., 0.01 E or 0.001 Gal/km) is considered to be detectable.

  8. Monolithic CMOS-MEMS integration for high-g accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, Vinayak; Li, Holden; Tan, Chuan Seng

    2014-10-01

    This paper highlights work-in-progress towards the conceptualization, simulation, fabrication and initial testing of a silicon-germanium (SiGe) integrated CMOS-MEMS high-g accelerometer for military, munition, fuze and shock measurement applications. Developed on IMEC's SiGe MEMS platform, the MEMS offers a dynamic range of 5,000 g and a bandwidth of 12 kHz. The low noise readout circuit adopts a chopper-stabilization technique implementing the CMOS through the TSMC 0.18 µm process. The device structure employs a fully differential split comb-drive set up with two sets of stators and a rotor all driven separately. Dummy structures acting as protective over-range stops were designed to protect the active components when under impacts well above the designed dynamic range.

  9. ISLES: Probing Extra Dimensions Using a Superconducting Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Ho Jung; Moody, M. Vol; Prieto-Gortcheva, Violeta A.

    2003-01-01

    In string theories, extra dimensions must be compactified. The possibility that gravity can have large radii of compactification leads to a violation of the inverse square law at submillimeter distances. The objective of ISLES is to perform a null test of Newton s law in space with a resolution of one part in 10(exp 5) or better at 100 microns. The experiment will be cooled to less than or equal to 2 K, which permits superconducting magnetic levitation of the test masses. To minimize Newtonian errors, ISLES employs a near null source, a circular disk of large diameter-to-thickness ratio. Two test masses, also disk-shaped, are suspended on the two sides of the source mass at a nominal distance of 100 microns. The signal is detected by a superconducting differential accelerometer. A ground test apparatus is under construction.

  10. Accelerometer Use in a Physical Activity Intervention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Borradaile, Kelley E.; Lewis, Beth A.; Whiteley, Jessica A.; Longval, Jaime L.; Parisi, Alfred F.; Albrecht, Anna E.; Sciamanna, Christopher N.; Jakicic, John M.; Papandonatos, George D.; Marcus, Bess H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the application of best practice recommendations for using accelerometers in a physical activity (PA) intervention trial, and the concordance of different methods for measuring PA. A subsample (n=63; 26%) of the 239 healthy, sedentary adults participating in a PA trial (mean age=47.5; 82% women) wore the ActiGraph monitor at all 3 assessment time points. ActiGraph data were compared with self-report (i.e., PA weekly recall and monthly log) and fitness variables. Correlations between the PA recall and ActiGraph for moderate intensity activity ranged from 0.16–0.48 and from 0.28–0.42 for vigorous intensity activity. ActiGraph and fitness [estimated VO2(ml/kg/min)] had correlations of 0.15–0.45. The ActiGraph and weekly self-report were significantly correlated at all time points (correlations ranged from 0.23–0.44). In terms of detecting intervention effects, intervention groups recorded more minutes of at least moderate-intensity PA on the ActiGraph than the control group at 6 months (min=46.47, 95% CI=14.36–78.58), but not at 12 months. Limitations of the study include a small sample size and only 3 days of ActiGraph monitoring. To obtain optimal results with accelerometers in clinical trials, the authors recommend following best practice recommendations: detailed protocols for monitor use, calibration of monitors and validation of data quality, and use of validated equations for analysis. The ActiGraph has modest concordance with other assessment tools and is sensitive to change over time. However, until more information validating the use of accelerometry in clinical trials becomes available, properly administered self-report measures of PA should remain part of the assessment battery. PMID:20723619

  11. Accelerometer use in a physical activity intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Melissa A; Borradaile, Kelley E; Lewis, Beth A; Whiteley, Jessica A; Longval, Jaime L; Parisi, Alfred F; Albrecht, Anna E; Sciamanna, Christopher N; Jakicic, John M; Papandonatos, George D; Marcus, Bess H

    2010-11-01

    This paper describes the application of best practice recommendations for using accelerometers in a physical activity (PA) intervention trial, and the concordance of different methods for measuring PA. A subsample (n = 63; 26%) of the 239 healthy, sedentary adults participating in a PA trial (mean age = 47.5; 82% women) wore the ActiGraph monitor at all 3 assessment time points. ActiGraph data were compared with self-report (i.e., PA weekly recall and monthly log) and fitness variables. Correlations between the PA recall and ActiGraph for moderate intensity activity ranged from 0.16-0.48 and from 0.28-0.42 for vigorous intensity activity. ActiGraph and fitness [estimated VO(2)(ml/kg/min)] had correlations of 0.15-0.45. The ActiGraph and weekly self-report were significantly correlated at all time points (correlations ranged from 0.23 to 0.44). In terms of detecting intervention effects, intervention groups recorded more minutes of at least moderate-intensity PA on the ActiGraph than the control group at 6 months (min = 46.47, 95% CI = 14.36-78.58), but not at 12 months. Limitations of the study include a small sample size and only 3 days of ActiGraph monitoring. To obtain optimal results with accelerometers in clinical trials, the authors recommend following best practice recommendations: detailed protocols for monitor use, calibration of monitors and validation of data quality, and use of validated equations for analysis. The ActiGraph has modest concordance with other assessment tools and is sensitive to change over time. However, until more information validating the use of accelerometry in clinical trials becomes available, properly administered self-report measures of PA should remain part of the assessment battery.

  12. Noncontact Electromagnetic Vibration Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Fulton, James P.; Wincheski, Buzz A.

    1994-01-01

    Metal aircraft skins scanned rapidly in vibration tests. Relatively simple combination of permanent magnets and electromagnet serves as noncontact vibration source for nondestructive testing of metal aircraft skins. In test, source excites vibrations, and vibration waveforms measured, then analyzed for changes in resonances signifying cracks and other flaws.

  13. Vibrational sensitivity of the subgenual organ complex in female Sipyloidea sipylus stick insects in different experimental paradigms of stimulus direction, leg attachment, and ablation of a connective tibial sense organ.

    PubMed

    Strauß, Johannes; Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    We document the sensitivity to sinusoidal vibrations for chordotonal organs in the stick insect tibia (Sipyloidea sipylus). In the tibia, the scolopidial subgenual organ (~40 scolopidial sensilla), distal organ (~20 scolopidial sensilla), and distal tibial chordotonal organ (~7 scolopidial sensilla) are present. We study the sensitivity of tibial sensory organs in all leg pairs to vibration stimuli as sensory thresholds by recording summed action potentials from Nervus cruris in the femur. The tibia was stimulated with a minishaker delivering vibrational stimuli. Because different experimental procedures may affect the vibration sensitivity, we here analysed possible effects of different experimental conditions: (1) the stimulus direction delivered in either horizontal or vertical direction to the leg; (2) recording responses only from the subgenual organ complex after ablation of the distal tibial chordotonal organ, and (3) the attachment of the leg to the minishaker by plastilin, beeswax-colophony, or freely standing legs. The tibial scolopidial organs give summed responses to vibration stimuli with highest sensitivity between 500 and 1000Hz for all leg pairs. In the different experimental series, we find that (1) thresholds were influenced by stimulation direction with lower thresholds in response to vertical vibrations, (2) ablating the distal tibial chordotonal organ by cutting the distal-most tibia did not change the summed sensory thresholds significantly, and (3) the attachment material between legs and the minishaker (plastilin or beeswax-colophony mixture) did not significant influence the sensory thresholds against free-standing tarsi. The distal tibial chordotonal organ is a connective chordotonal organ attached to a tendon and is likely a proprioceptive organ. These results emphasise that vibrational thresholds are mainly direction-sensitive. Thus, the direction of stimulus delivery during electrophysiological recordings is relevant for comparisons of

  14. Directivity and Sensitivity of Fiber-Optic Cable Measuring Ground Motion using a Distributed Acoustic Sensing Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancelle, C.; Lord, N. E.; Wang, H. F.; Fratta, D.; Nigbor, R. L.; Chalari, A.; Karaulanov, R.; Baldwin, J. A.; Castongia, E.

    2014-12-01

    Distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) is a relatively recent development for measurement of ground motion by using a fiber-optic cable itself as the sensor. In September 2013 a field test was conducted at the NEES@UCSB Garner Valley field site in Southern California incorporating DAS technology. A 762 meter long fiber-optic cable was trenched to a depth of about 0.3 m in a rectangular design with two interior diagonal segments. Existing instruments at the field site include the Garner Valley Downhole Array (GVDA) surface and borehole accelerometers and pore pressure transducers. A PASSCAL seismometer array and four NEES@UCLA tri-axial accelerometers were also deployed along the two interior diagonal segments. These sensors also recorded most of the source events. One goal of the field test was to study the response of the fiber-optic cable to various vibration sources, including a 45 kN shear shaker and a smaller 450 N portable mass shaker, both of which were available through NEES@UCLA. In addition to the shear sources, signals were recorded from a mini-Vibe source and hammer blows on a steel plate. The focus of this study is on the directivity and the sensitivity of the fiber-optic cable and the distributed acoustic sensor. Preliminary results indicate that the fiber-optic cable is most effective if oriented in the direction of maximum strain. Even with the directional response, signals were recorded throughout the array for different cable orientations at distances up to two-hundred meters. Move-out of different phases could be seen over several meters of traces recorded one-meter apart. Sensitivity of the fiber-optic cable relative to the other instruments is also presented.

  15. FPGA-based fused smart sensor for dynamic and vibration parameter extraction in industrial robot links.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Donate, Carlos; Morales-Velazquez, Luis; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; Herrera-Ruiz, Gilberto; de Jesus Romero-Troncoso, Rene

    2010-01-01

    Intelligent robotics demands the integration of smart sensors that allow the controller to efficiently measure physical quantities. Industrial manipulator robots require a constant monitoring of several parameters such as motion dynamics, inclination, and vibration. This work presents a novel smart sensor to estimate motion dynamics, inclination, and vibration parameters on industrial manipulator robot links based on two primary sensors: an encoder and a triaxial accelerometer. The proposed smart sensor implements a new methodology based on an oversampling technique, averaging decimation filters, FIR filters, finite differences and linear interpolation to estimate the interest parameters, which are computed online utilizing digital hardware signal processing based on field programmable gate arrays (FPGA).

  16. FPGA-Based Fused Smart Sensor for Dynamic and Vibration Parameter Extraction in Industrial Robot Links

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Donate, Carlos; Morales-Velazquez, Luis; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; Herrera-Ruiz, Gilberto; de Jesus Romero-Troncoso, Rene

    2010-01-01

    Intelligent robotics demands the integration of smart sensors that allow the controller to efficiently measure physical quantities. Industrial manipulator robots require a constant monitoring of several parameters such as motion dynamics, inclination, and vibration. This work presents a novel smart sensor to estimate motion dynamics, inclination, and vibration parameters on industrial manipulator robot links based on two primary sensors: an encoder and a triaxial accelerometer. The proposed smart sensor implements a new methodology based on an oversampling technique, averaging decimation filters, FIR filters, finite differences and linear interpolation to estimate the interest parameters, which are computed online utilizing digital hardware signal processing based on field programmable gate arrays (FPGA). PMID:22319345

  17. Quasi-Static Calibration Method of a High-g Accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Fan, Jinbiao; Zu, Jing; Xu, Peng

    2017-02-20

    To solve the problem of resonance during quasi-static calibration of high-g accelerometers, we deduce the relationship between the minimum excitation pulse width and the resonant frequency of the calibrated accelerometer according to the second-order mathematical model of the accelerometer, and improve the quasi-static calibration theory. We establish a quasi-static calibration testing system, which uses a gas gun to generate high-g acceleration signals, and apply a laser interferometer to reproduce the impact acceleration. These signals are used to drive the calibrated accelerometer. By comparing the excitation acceleration signal and the output responses of the calibrated accelerometer to the excitation signals, the impact sensitivity of the calibrated accelerometer is obtained. As indicated by the calibration test results, this calibration system produces excitation acceleration signals with a pulse width of less than 1000 μs, and realize the quasi-static calibration of high-g accelerometers with a resonant frequency above 20 kHz when the calibration error was 3%.

  18. A brief test of the Hewlett-Packard MEMS seismic accelerometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Homeijer, Brian D.; Milligan, Donald J.; Hutt, Charles R.

    2014-01-01

    Testing was performed on a prototype of Hewlett-Packard (HP) Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) seismic accelerometer at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory. This prototype was built using discrete electronic components. The self-noise level was measured during low seismic background conditions and found to be 9.8 ng/√Hz at periods below 0.2 s (frequencies above 5 Hz). The six-second microseism noise was also discernible. The HP MEMS accelerometer was compared to a Geotech Model GS-13 reference seismometer during seismic noise and signal levels well above the self-noise of the accelerometer. Matching power spectral densities (corrected for accelerometer and seismometer responses to represent true ground motion) indicated that the HP MEMS accelerometer has a flat (constant) response to acceleration from 0.0125 Hz to at least 62.5 Hz. Tilt calibrations of the HP MEMS accelerometer verified that the flat response to acceleration extends to 0 Hz. Future development of the HP MEMS accelerometer includes replacing the discreet electronic boards with a low power application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and increasing the dynamic range of the sensor to detect strong motion signals above one gravitational acceleration, while maintaining the self-noise observed during these tests.

  19. A triaxial accelerometer monkey algorithm for optimal sensor placement in structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jingqing; Feng, Shuo; Liu, Wei

    2015-06-01

    Optimal sensor placement (OSP) technique is a vital part of the field of structural health monitoring (SHM). Triaxial accelerometers have been widely used in the SHM of large-scale structures in recent years. Triaxial accelerometers must be placed in such a way that all of the important dynamic information is obtained. At the same time, the sensor configuration must be optimal, so that the test resources are conserved. The recommended practice is to select proper degrees of freedom (DOF) based upon several criteria and the triaxial accelerometers are placed at the nodes corresponding to these DOFs. This results in non-optimal placement of many accelerometers. A ‘triaxial accelerometer monkey algorithm’ (TAMA) is presented in this paper to solve OSP problems of triaxial accelerometers. The EFI3 measurement theory is modified and involved in the objective function to make it more adaptable in the OSP technique of triaxial accelerometers. A method of calculating the threshold value based on probability theory is proposed to improve the healthy rate of monkeys in a troop generation process. Meanwhile, the processes of harmony ladder climb and scanning watch jump are proposed and given in detail. Finally, Xinghai NO.1 Bridge in Dalian is implemented to demonstrate the effectiveness of TAMA. The final results obtained by TAMA are compared with those of the original monkey algorithm and EFI3 measurement, which show that TAMA can improve computational efficiency and get a better sensor configuration.

  20. Quasi-Static Calibration Method of a High-g Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Fan, Jinbiao; Zu, Jing; Xu, Peng

    2017-01-01

    To solve the problem of resonance during quasi-static calibration of high-g accelerometers, we deduce the relationship between the minimum excitation pulse width and the resonant frequency of the calibrated accelerometer according to the second-order mathematical model of the accelerometer, and improve the quasi-static calibration theory. We establish a quasi-static calibration testing system, which uses a gas gun to generate high-g acceleration signals, and apply a laser interferometer to reproduce the impact acceleration. These signals are used to drive the calibrated accelerometer. By comparing the excitation acceleration signal and the output responses of the calibrated accelerometer to the excitation signals, the impact sensitivity of the calibrated accelerometer is obtained. As indicated by the calibration test results, this calibration system produces excitation acceleration signals with a pulse width of less than 1000 μs, and realize the quasi-static calibration of high-g accelerometers with a resonant frequency above 20 kHz when the calibration error was 3%. PMID:28230743

  1. Agreement rates for sleep/wake judgments obtained via accelerometer and sleep diary: a comparison.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Tomoyuki

    2008-11-01

    Agreement rates for waking and sleeping obtained via sleep diary and accelerometer were evaluated, to compare the two methods. Sleep/wake data for consecutive days and nights were surveyed in 119 healthy university students. Accelerometer sleep/wake judgments obeyed the standard algorithm. Agreement rates for waking and sleeping according to accelerometer versus sleep diary, respectively, were calculated. Sleep diary data were set as a baseline. Seventy-six subjects (63.9%), 22 to 32 years of age, presented perfect data for the analysis. The mean sleep times, in minutes, judged by sleep diary and by accelerometer, were 482.3 and 629.6, respectively. The mean percentages and standard deviations of agreement on wake and sleep were 77.5% (SD = 10.2) and 86.1% (SD = 6.2), respectively. There was a significant negative relationship between the agreement rates for wake and sleep (r = -.482, p < .01). The accelerometer showed some measurement failure during waking, presumably because of the decrease in body movement. Sleep diary data during daytime appear to be more valid for detecting a sleep/wake cycle than are accelerometer data. In contrast, nocturnal sleep diary data might be supplemented by the use of an accelerometer as long as participants do not have insomnia.

  2. Whole-Body Human Inverse Dynamics with Distributed Micro-Accelerometers, Gyros and Force Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Latella, Claudia; Kuppuswamy, Naveen; Romano, Francesco; Traversaro, Silvio; Nori, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Human motion tracking is a powerful tool used in a large range of applications that require human movement analysis. Although it is a well-established technique, its main limitation is the lack of estimation of real-time kinetics information such as forces and torques during the motion capture. In this paper, we present a novel approach for a human soft wearable force tracking for the simultaneous estimation of whole-body forces along with the motion. The early stage of our framework encompasses traditional passive marker based methods, inertial and contact force sensor modalities and harnesses a probabilistic computational technique for estimating dynamic quantities, originally proposed in the domain of humanoid robot control. We present experimental analysis on subjects performing a two degrees-of-freedom bowing task, and we estimate the motion and kinetics quantities. The results demonstrate the validity of the proposed method. We discuss the possible use of this technique in the design of a novel soft wearable force tracking device and its potential applications. PMID:27213394

  3. The Development of a Robust Accelerometer-Based Start of Combustion Sensing System

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn Davis

    2010-03-31

    Polymer nanofibers are nanoscale materials whose properties can be adjusted to provide desirable light management performance for high efficiency solid-state lighting luminaires. The polymeric nanofibers at the core of this project have diameters on the order of 100 to 1000 nm and a length of more than 1 cm. By controlling fiber diameter, fiber packing, and fiber morphology, a low cost, high performance optical material can be fabricated. This report describes the fabrication of these nanofiber structures and their uses and benefits in solid-state lighting application. When used in solid state lighting devices, nanofibers can take the form of either diffuse reflectors or photoluminescent materials. Nanofiber reflectors (NFR) were developed which displayed high diffuse reflectance with reflectance values in excess of 0.90. In contrast, traditional reflector materials such as aluminum and paint typically possess reflectance values below 0.80 and absorb a larger fraction of light, reducing luminaire output efficiency. The incorporation of the NFR technology into reflectors, troffers, and beam formers present in SSL luminaires provides better reflectance and lower light loss than is possible with conventional materials. Photoluminescent nanofibers (PLN) can be formed by combining nanofibers with photoluminescent materials such as phosphors and quantum dots (QD). Forming the PLN with the proper combination of green and red luminescent materials and exciting the nanocomposite with a blue light emitting diode (LED) has been demonstrated to produce high efficiency (> 55 lumens per watt) white light with excellent color rendering properties. The incorporation of QDs in the PLN is particularly advantageous in that this approach enables the correction of any color deficiencies in the light source without creating unnecessary radiation in the near infrared. Cost models developed during this project have demonstrated that both the NFR and PLN materials can be mass produced at a manufacturing cost of less than $5 per square foot, making it commercially attractive. To capitalize on the benefits of nanofiber technologies in solid-state lighting, several new remote phosphor reflector configurations were developed in the project. When combined with these unique lighting designs, nanofibers have a number of demonstrated benefits in lighting devices including: (1) Providing high quantum efficiency down-conversion of LED wavelengths to produce full spectrum white light; (2) Enabling tunable device structures that achieve colors ranging from warm white to cool white with high CRIs; (3) Supplying mass producible, cost-effective solutions for diffuse, high reflectance light management across the visible spectrum; (4) Facilitating remote phosphor luminaire designs that increase the lifetime and performance of luminescent materials; and (5) Providing conformability to geometries imposed by the light fixture enabling new lighting designs. This report provides a review of the activities conducted during this project and the major advances that have been made during this work in the field of nanoscale materials for solid-state lighting. Section 1 provides background on the nanofiber technologies and patent-pending luminaire structures developed during this project. Section 2 provides a detailed discussion of the benefits of the technologies developed during this work. Section 3 compares the execution of this project with the original proposal. A high level summary of the findings from each Task is also provided in the section. Section 4 lists the products (i.e., patent applications, presentations, publications, collaborations) that have been developed during this project. More details on work conducted during Budget Periods 1-3 can be found in Appendices A-C. The technologies developed during this program have significant commercial potential, and there has already been strong interest in these breakthroughs from the lighting community. It is anticipated that these technologies will begin appearing in commercial products in roughly 5 years to provide significant energy savings for the United States.

  4. Whole-Body Human Inverse Dynamics with Distributed Micro-Accelerometers, Gyros and Force Sensing.

    PubMed

    Latella, Claudia; Kuppuswamy, Naveen; Romano, Francesco; Traversaro, Silvio; Nori, Francesco

    2016-05-20

    Human motion tracking is a powerful tool used in a large range of applications that require human movement analysis. Although it is a well-established technique, its main limitation is the lack of estimation of real-time kinetics information such as forces and torques during the motion capture. In this paper, we present a novel approach for a human soft wearable force tracking for the simultaneous estimation of whole-body forces along with the motion. The early stage of our framework encompasses traditional passive marker based methods, inertial and contact force sensor modalities and harnesses a probabilistic computational technique for estimating dynamic quantities, originally proposed in the domain of humanoid robot control. We present experimental analysis on subjects performing a two degrees-of-freedom bowing task, and we estimate the motion and kinetics quantities. The results demonstrate the validity of the proposed method. We discuss the possible use of this technique in the design of a novel soft wearable force tracking device and its potential applications.

  5. The Development of a Rebust Accelerometer-Based Start of Combustion Sensing System

    SciTech Connect

    Jim Huang; David Mumford

    2009-01-31

    The development of modern combustion systems increasingly relies on detailed knowledge of the combustion event. As the limits of combustion are approached, tight control of combustion leads to improved emissions and higher efficiencies, while retaining and even improving engine reliability and durability. While developing a novel HCCI (Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition) technology for large natural gas engines, Westport found that there was no reliable cost-effective technology to monitor the combustion event. As a result, Westport began working on developing a solution based on commercially available knock sensors. While initially developed around HCCI, Westport has identified that numerous other forms of combustion (high EGR systems, Homogeneous Charge Direct Injection, etc) will require combustion sensors. This requirement is also reflected in the development of other technologies in this field. However, the potential low system cost and the lack of intrusion into the cylinder head area are significant benefits for the Westport approach. Previous work by Westport has proven the method on two different large compression ignition gas engines. The objective of the current work is to improve the robustness of this technology; particularly, to identify and reduce the sensor-to-sensor and engine-to-engine variations.

  6. Characterization and Comparison of Vibration Transfer Paths in a Helicopter Gearbox and a Fixture Mounted Gearbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Islam, Akm Anwarul; Dempsey, Paula J.; Feldman, Jason; Larsen, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Health monitoring of rotorcraft components, currently being performed by Health and Usage Monitoring Systems through analyses of vibration signatures of dynamic mechanical components, is very important for their safe and economic operation. HUMS analyze vibration signatures associated with faults and quantify them as condition indicators to predict component behavior. Vibration transfer paths are characterized by frequency response functions derived from the input/output relationship between applied force and dynamic response through a structure as a function of frequency. With an objective to investigate the differences in transfer paths, transfer path measurements were recorded under similar conditions in the left and right nose gearboxes of an AH-64 helicopter and in an isolated left nose gearbox in a test fixture at NASA Glenn Research Center. The test fixture enabled the application of measured torques-common during an actual operation. An impact hammer as well as commercial and lab piezo shakers, were used in conjunction with two types of commercially available accelerometers to collect the vibration response under various test conditions. The frequency response functions measured under comparable conditions of both systems were found to be consistent. Measurements made on the fixture indicated certain real-world installation and maintenance issues, such as sensor alignments, accelerometer locations and installation torques, had minimal effect. However, gear vibration transfer path dynamics appeared to be somewhat dependent on the presence of oil, and the transfer path dynamics were notably different if the force input was on the internal ring gear rather than on the external gearbox case.

  7. Fault diagnosis of the rolling bearing with optical fiber Bragg grating vibration sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Peng; Dai, Zejing; Zheng, Leilei; Li, Ming

    2016-10-01

    Fault diagnosis of the rolling bearing means a lot for property and life safety. In this paper the Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) vibration sensor and resonance demodulation technology are used in the fault diagnosis of the rolling bearing. Traditionally, the vibration signals are measured by the resistance strain gauge, accelerometer, etc. But those traditional electronic sensors are usually influenced by the industry electromagnetic noise. But the FBG vibration sensor is totally different. It has a lot of advantages such as small volume, light weight, easy connection and so on. And the high industry electromagnetic noise means nothing to the FBG sensors. In this paper, we use the FBG vibration and temperature sensors to measure the fast strain and temperature signal of the rolling bearing. In order to extract the fault signals from strong background noise, the resonant demodulation technology is used to analyze and process the vibration signals collected by the FBG sensors. In order to verify the reliability of the FBG vibration sensor and resonance demodulation technology applied in the fault diagnosis of the rolling bearing, several experiments are done. Five FBG vibration sensors are attached on the different parts of the rolling bearing to verify its function and its influence on the fault diagnosis of the rolling bearing. The results of the experiments show that the FBG vibration sensor method could be used in fault diagnosis of the rolling bearing. The repetitive experiments show the reliability of the FBG vibration sensors method.

  8. Self Diagnostic Accelerometer for Mission Critical Health Monitoring of Aircraft and Spacecraft Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lekki, John; Tokars, Roger; Jaros, Dave; Riggs, M. Terrence; Evans, Kenneth P.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    A self diagnostic accelerometer system has been shown to be sensitive to multiple failure modes of charge mode accelerometers. These failures include sensor structural damage, an electrical open circuit and most importantly sensor detachment. In this paper, experimental work that was performed to determine the capabilities of a self diagnostic accelerometer system while operating in the presence of various levels of mechanical noise, emulating real world conditions, is presented. The results show that the system can successfully conduct a self diagnostic routine under these conditions.

  9. Use of a laser doppler vibrometer for high frequency accelerometer characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Hansche, B.D.; Solomon, O.M.

    1995-12-31

    A laser doppler vibrometer (LDV) is being used for high frequency characterizations of accelerometers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). A LDV with high frequency (up to 1.5 MHz) and high velocity (10 M/s) capability was purchased from a commercial source and has been certified by the Primary Electrical Standards Department at SNL. The method used for this certification and the certification results are presented. Use of the LDV for characterization of accelerometers at high frequencies and of accelerometer sensitivity to cross-axis shocks on a Hopkinson bar apparatus is discussed.

  10. Use of a laser displacement sensor with a non-contact electromagnetic vibration device for assessment of simulated periodontal tissue conditions.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Yamaoka, Masaru; Hayashi, Makoto; Ogiso, Bunnai

    2016-01-01

    A non-contact electromagnetic vibration device (NEVD) was previously developed to monitor the condition of periodontal tissues by assessing mechanical parameters. This system requires placement of an accelerometer on the target tooth, to detect vibration. Using experimental tooth models, we evaluated the performance of an NEVD system with a laser displacement sensor (LDS), which does not need an accelerometer. Simulated teeth (polyacetal rods) were submerged at various depths in simulated bone (polyurethane or polyurethane foam) containing simulated periodontal ligament (tissue conditioner). Then, mechanical parameters (resonant frequency, elastic modulus, and viscosity coefficient) were assessed using the NEVD with the following detection methods: Group 1, measurement with an accelerometer; Group 2, measurement with an LDS in the presence of the accelerometer; and Group 3, measurement with an LDS in the absence of the accelerometer. Statistical analyses were performed using nonparametric methods (n = 5) (P < 0.05). The three mechanical parameters significantly increased with increasing depth. In addition, the mechanical parameters significantly differed between the polyurethane and polyurethane foam models. Although Groups 1 and 2 did not significantly differ, most all mechanical parameters in Group 3 were significantly larger and more distinguishable than those in Groups 1 and 2. The LDS was more accurate in measuring mechanical parameters and better able to differentiate periodontal tissue conditions. (J Oral Sci 58, 93-99, 2016).

  11. Effect of body shape on vibration of electric guitars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Daniel A.; Haveman, Wesley S.; Broden, Willis; Weibull, N. Pontus

    2003-04-01

    The body vibrations of an electric guitar are typically ignored since the string vibrations are converted to sound through the use of a magnetic pickup. However, vibrations in the neck have been shown to cause dead spots at certain fret positions [H. Fleischer, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 105, 1330 (1999)]. In this paper we compare the vibrational mode shapes and frequencies of three electric guitars with different body shapes. Two guitars are solid-body electrics: one with a body shape which is symmetric about the neck axis (Epiphone Coronet) and the other which is not (Gibson Explorer). Mode shapes and frequencies are considerably different for the body, though neck vibrations are more closely related. The third guitar is an arched top hollow-body electric (Gibson ES-335). For this guitar, the top and back plates and the air cavities may also contribute to the guitar sound quality. Mode shapes and frequencies are determined from experimental modal analysis using an impact hammer and accelerometer.

  12. Study on antilock brake system with elastic membrane vibration generated by controlled solenoid excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibowo, Zakaria, Lambang, Lullus; Triyono, Muhayat, Nurul

    2016-03-01

    The most effective chassis control system for improving vehicle safety during severe braking is anti-lock braking system (ABS). Antilock effect can be gained by vibrate the pad brake at 7 to 20 cycle per second. The aim of this study is to design a new method of antilock braking system with membrane elastic vibrated by solenoid. The influence of the pressure fluctuations of brake fluid is investigated. Vibration data is collected using a small portable accelerometer-slam stick. The experiment results that the vibration of brake pad caused by controlled solenoid excitation at 10 Hz is obtained by our new method. The result of measurements can be altered by varying brake fluid pressure.

  13. Monitoring high-shear granulation using sound and vibration measurements.

    PubMed

    Briens, L; Daniher, D; Tallevi, A

    2007-02-22

    Sound and vibration measurements were investigated as monitoring methods for high-shear granulation. Five microphones and one accelerometer were placed at different locations on a 10 and a 25 l granulator and compared to find the optimum location and the effect of scale. The granulation process could be monitored using the mean frequency and root mean square sound pressure levels from acoustic emissions measured using a microphone in the filtered air exhaust of the granulators. These acoustic monitoring methods were successful for both the 10 and the 25 l granulation scales. The granulation phases, however, were more clearly defined for the larger scale granulation. The root mean square acceleration level from vibration measurements was also able to monitor the granulation, but only for the larger 25 l granulator.

  14. Vibration transmission to lower extremity soft tissues during whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Friesenbichler, Bernd; Lienhard, Karin; Vienneau, Jordyn; Nigg, Benno M

    2014-09-22

    In order to evaluate potential risks of whole-body vibration (WBV) training, it is important to understand the transfer of vibrations from the WBV platform to the muscles. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify the transmissibility of vibrations from the WBV platform to the triceps surae and quadriceps soft tissue compartments. Sixteen healthy, male participants were exposed to side-altering WBV at 2.5mm amplitude and frequencies of 10, 17 and 28 Hz. Acceleration signals were measured at the platform and at the soft tissue compartments using tri-axial accelerometers. Transmissibility of peak acceleration and peak amplitude for both tested soft tissue compartments was high at 10 Hz (2.1-2.3), moderate at 17 Hz (1.1-1.9) and low at 28 Hz (0.5-1.2). The average peak acceleration was 125.4 ms(-2) and 46.5 ms(-2) for the triceps surae and quadriceps at 28 Hz, respectively. The muscles' vibration frequency was equal to the input frequency of the WBV platform (p<0.05). The transfer of vibrations to the muscles is strongly dependent on the platform frequency and the particular muscle of interest. The acceleration measured at the triceps surae was higher than the corresponding accelerations related to soft tissue injury in animal studies but neither existing regulations nor the comparison to available animal studies seem appropriate to make inferences on injury risk. More realistic animal or computational muscle models may use the current data to evaluate potentially unwanted side effects of WBV training.

  15. Composite Bending Box Section Modal Vibration Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werlink, Rudy

    2002-01-01

    One of the primary concerns with Composite construction in critical structures such as wings and stabilizers is that hidden faults and cracks can develop operationally. In the real world, catastrophic sudden failure can result from these undetected faults in composite structures. Vibration data incorporating a broad frequency modal approach, could detect significant changes prior to failure. The purpose of this report is to investigate the usefulness of frequency mode testing before and after bending and torsion loading on a composite bending Box Test section. This test article is representative of construction techniques being developed for the recent NASA Blended Wing Body Low Speed Vehicle Project. The Box section represents the construction technique on the proposed blended wing aircraft. Modal testing using an impact hammer provides an frequency fingerprint before and after bending and torsional loading. If a significant structural discontinuity develops, the vibration response is expected to change. The limitations of the data will be evaluated for future use as a non-destructive in-situ method of assessing hidden damage in similarly constructed composite wing assemblies. Modal vibration fault detection sensitivity to band-width, location and axis will be investigated. Do the sensor accelerometers need to be near the fault and or in the same axis? The response data used in this report was recorded at 17 locations using tri-axial accelerometers. The modal tests were conducted following 5 independent loading conditions before load to failure and 2 following load to failure over a period of 6 weeks. Redundant data was used to minimize effects from uncontrolled variables which could lead to incorrect interpretations. It will be shown that vibrational modes detected failure at many locations when skin de-bonding failures occurred near the center section. Important considerations are the axis selected and frequency range.

  16. Characteristics of a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments up to 150,000 G

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Davie, N.T.; Brown, F.A.

    1995-03-01

    The characteristics of a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments are being studied at Sandia National Laboratories in the Mechanical Shock Testing Laboratory. A Hopkinson bar capability has been developed to extend our undemanding of the piezoresistive accelerometer, in two mechanical configurations, in the high frequency, high shock environments where measurements are being made. Two different Hopkinson bar materials are being used: Titanium and beryllium The in-axis performance of the piezoresistive accelerometer for frequencies of dc-10 kHz and shock magnitudes of up to 150,000 g as determined from measurements with a titanium Hopkinson bar are presented. The beryllium Hopkinson bar configuration is described. Preliminary in-axis characteristics of the piezoresistive accelerometer at a nominal shock level of 50,000 g for a frequency range of DC-30 kHz determined from the beryllium bar are presented.

  17. The use of a beryllium Hopkinson bar to characterize a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Davie, N.T.

    1996-03-01

    The characteristics of a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments are being studied at Sandia National Laboratories in the Mechanical Shock Testing Laboratory. A Hopkinson bar capability has been developed to extend our understanding of the piezoresistive accelerometer, in two mechanical configurations, in the high frequency, high shock environments where measurements are being made. In this paper, the beryllium Hopkinson bar configuration with a laser doppler vibrometer as the reference measurement is described. The in-axis performance of the piezoresistive accelerometer for frequencies of dc-50 kHz and shock magnitudes of up to 70,000 g as determined from measurements with a beryllium Hopkinson bar are presented. Preliminary results of characterizations of the accelerometers subjected to cross-axis shocks in a split beryllium Hopkinson bar configuration are presented.

  18. Bulk Micromachined 6H-SiC High-g Piezoresistive Accelerometer Fabricated and Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.

    2002-01-01

    High-g accelerometers are needed in certain applications, such as in the study and analysis of high-g impact landings and projectiles. Also, these accelerometers must survive the high electromagnetic fields associated with the all-electric vehicle technology needed for aerospace applications. The choice of SiC is largely due to its excellent thermomechanical properties over conventional silicon-based accelerometers, whose material properties inhibit applicability in high electromagnetic radiation and high temperatures (>150 C) unless more complex and sometimes costly packaging schemes are adopted. This work was the outcome of a NASA Glenn Research Center summer internship program, in collaboration with Cornell University and the Munitions Directorate of the U.S. Air Force in Eglin, Florida. It aimed to provide the enabling technology infrastructure (modeling, fabrication, and validation) for the implementation of SiC accelerometers designed specifically for harsh environments.

  19. Validation of uniaxial and triaxial accelerometers for the assessment of physical activity in preschool children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Given the unique physical activity patterns of preschoolers, wearable electronic devices for quantitative assessment of physical activity require validation in this population. Study objective was to validate uniaxial and triaxial accelerometers in preschoolers. Room calorimetry was performed over 3...

  20. Quantified reflex strategy using an iPod as a wireless accelerometer application.

    PubMed

    LeMoyne, Robert; Mastroianni, Timothy; Grundfest, Warren

    2012-01-01

    A primary aspect of a neurological evaluation is the deep tendon reflex, frequently observed through the patellar tendon reflex. The reflex response provides preliminary insight as to the status of the nervous system. A quantified reflex strategy has been developed, tested, and evaluated though the use of an iPod as a wireless accelerometer application integrated with a potential energy device to evoke the patellar tendon reflex. The iPod functions as a wireless accelerometer equipped with robust software, data storage, and the capacity to transmit the recorded accelerometer waveform of the reflex response wirelessly through email for post-processing. The primary feature of the reflex response acceleration waveform is the maximum acceleration achieved subsequent to evoking the patellar tendon reflex. The quantified reflex strategy using an iPod as a wireless accelerometer application yields accurate and consistent quantification of the reflex response.

  1. Comparison of linear and non-linear models for predicting energy expenditure from raw accelerometer data.

    PubMed

    Montoye, Alexander H K; Begum, Munni; Henning, Zachary; Pfeiffer, Karin A

    2017-02-01

    This study had three purposes, all related to evaluating energy expenditure (EE) prediction accuracy from body-worn accelerometers: (1) compare linear regression to linear mixed models, (2) compare linear models to artificial neural network models, and (3) compare accuracy of accelerometers placed on the hip, thigh, and wrists. Forty individuals performed 13 activities in a 90 min semi-structured, laboratory-based protocol. Participants wore accelerometers on the right hip, right thigh, and both wrists and a portable metabolic analyzer (EE criterion). Four EE prediction models were developed for each accelerometer: linear regression, linear mixed, and two ANN models. EE prediction accuracy was assessed using correlations, root mean square error (RMSE), and bias and was compared across models and accelerometers using repeated-measures analysis of variance. For all accelerometer placements, there were no significant differences for correlations or RMSE between linear regression and linear mixed models (correlations: r  =  0.71-0.88, RMSE: 1.11-1.61 METs; p  >  0.05). For the thigh-worn accelerometer, there were no differences in correlations or RMSE between linear and ANN models (ANN-correlations: r  =  0.89, RMSE: 1.07-1.08 METs. Linear models-correlations: r  =  0.88, RMSE: 1.10-1.11 METs; p  >  0.05). Conversely, one ANN had higher correlations and lower RMSE than both linear models for the hip (ANN-correlation: r  =  0.88, RMSE: 1.12 METs. Linear models-correlations: r  =  0.86, RMSE: 1.18-1.19 METs; p  <  0.05), and both ANNs had higher correlations and lower RMSE than both linear models for the wrist-worn accelerometers (ANN-correlations: r  =  0.82-0.84, RMSE: 1.26-1.32 METs. Linear models-correlations: r  =  0.71-0.73, RMSE: 1.55-1.61 METs; p  <  0.01). For studies using wrist-worn accelerometers, machine learning models offer a significant improvement in EE prediction

  2. Gyro and Accelerometer Based Navigation System for a Mobile Autonomous Robot.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-02

    8217[ C) ~OF ~ FEB 13 1986 J GYRO AND ACCELEROMETER BASED NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR A MOBILE AUTONOMOUS ROBOT Roland J. Bloom William J. Ramey, Jr. Captain...ACCELEROMETER BASED NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR A MOBILE AUTONOMOUS ROBOT THESIS Roland J. Bloom William J. Ramey, Jr. Captain, USAF Captain, USAF AF IT/GA/GE/ENG/85D...MOBILE AUTONOMOUS ROBOT THE SI S Presented to the Faculty of the School of Engineering of the Air Force Institute of Technology Air University In

  3. Application of the Satellite Triaxial Accelerometer Experiment to Atmospheric Density and Wind Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-04

    EVERETT R. SWIFT U DTIC " 4 MARCH 1982 -J_ OCT 2 9 1 3 Approed for publis rebo.; dlributon unlimited. AERONOMY DIVISION PROJECT 6690 , AIR FORCE...Accelerometers Thermospheric density; . * Aerodynic drag Atmospheric density -- A new satellite triaxial accelerometer system has been developed. This...understanding of dynamic processes in the atmosphere and for the improvement of atmospheric models. i’ :. 4 Unclassified SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS

  4. Modelling of the MEA float zone using accelerometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1993-01-01

    During a floating zone experiment involving the growth of indium on a recent orbiter mission, (STS 32) oscillation of the zone shapes were observed to occur in response to the background acceleration. An understanding of the nature of the response of the zone shape to forced (g-jitter) oscillations and predictions of its impact on future experiments is of great interest not only to the PI's but to other commercial and academic investigators who plan to fly similar experiments in the orbiter and on space station. Motivated by this, a 15 month study was undertaken to analyze the nature of the g-sensitivity of the STS 32 floating zone crystal growth experiment. Numerical models were used to describe the time-dependent free surface motion of the zone as it responds to the spacecraft residual acceleration. Relevant experimental data concerning the acceleration environment was obtained from the Honeywell in Space Accelerometer (HISA) investigators through MSFC's ACAP program and processed and analyzed. For the indium floating zone experiment, a series of calculations were made using time-dependent axial accelerations g(t). The form of g(t) included simple sinusoidal disturbances as well as actual data (subject to appropriate filtering) measured on the STS 32 mission. Focus was on the calculation of the response of the free surface of the zone as well as the internal flows and internal heat transfer. The influence of solidification on the response of the zone shape was also examined but found to be negligible.

  5. Ambulatory respiratory rate detection using ECG and a triaxial accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Chan, Alexander M; Ferdosi, Nima; Narasimhan, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of respiratory rate in ambulatory conditions has widespread applications for screening of respiratory diseases and remote patient monitoring. Unfortunately, minimally obtrusive techniques often suffer from low accuracy. In this paper, we describe an algorithm with low computational complexity for combining multiple respiratory measurements to estimate breathing rate from an unobtrusive chest patch sensor. Respiratory rates derived from the respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and modulation of the QRS amplitude of electrocardiography (ECG) are combined with a respiratory rate derived from tri-axial accelerometer data. The three respiration rates are combined by a weighted average using weights based on quality metrics for each signal. The algorithm was evaluated on 15 elderly subjects who performed spontaneous and metronome breathing as well as a variety of activities of daily living (ADLs). When compared to a reference device, the mean absolute error was 1.02 breaths per minute (BrPM) during metronome breathing, 1.67 BrPM during spontaneous breathing, and 2.03 BrPM during ADLs.

  6. Can accelerometers detect mass variations in Amazonian trees?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Emmerik, Tim; Steele-Dunne, Susan; Gentine, Pierre; Guerin, Marceau; Hut, Rolf; Oliveira, Rafael; van de Giesen, Nick

    2016-04-01

    The mass of trees is influenced by physiological processes within the tree (e.g. transpiration and root water uptake), as well as external loads (e.g. intercepted precipitation). Recent studies have found diurnal variations in radar backscatter over vegetated areas, which might be attributed to mass changes of the vegetation layer. Field measurements are required to study the driving processes. This study aims to use measured three-dimensional displacement and acceleration of trees, to detect and quantify their diurnal (bio)mass variations. Accelerometers and dendrometers were installed on seven different tree species in the Amazon rainforest. Trees were selected to cover a broad range of wood density. Using spectral analysis, the governing frequencies in the acceleration time series were found. The governing frequencies showed a diurnal pattern, as well as a change during precipitation events. Our results suggest that we can separate and potentially quantify tree mass changes due to (1) internal water redistribution and (2) intercepted precipitation. This will allow further investigation of the effect of precipitation and water stress on tree dynamics in forest canopies.

  7. Modeling perceived stress via HRV and accelerometer sensor streams.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Cao, Hong; Nguyen, Hai-Long; Surmacz, Karl; Hargrove, Caroline

    2015-08-01

    Discovering and modeling of stress patterns of human beings is a key step towards achieving automatic stress monitoring, stress management and healthy lifestyle. As various wearable sensors become popular, it becomes possible for individuals to acquire their own relevant sensory data and to automatically assess their stress level on the go. Previous studies for stress analysis were conducted in the controlled laboratory and clinic settings. These studies are not suitable for stress monitoring in one's daily life as various physical activities may affect the physiological signals. In this paper, we address such issue by integrating two modalities of sensors, i.e., HRV sensors and accelerometers, to monitor the perceived stress levels in daily life. We gathered both the heart and the motion data from 8 participants continuously for about 2 weeks. We then extracted features from both sensory data and compared the existing machine learning methods for learning personalized models to interpret the perceived stress levels. Experimental results showed that Bagging classifier with feature selection is able to achieve a prediction accuracy 85.7%, indicating our stress monitoring on daily basis is fairly practical.

  8. BepiColombo ISA accelerometer: ready for launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francesco, Santoli; Valerio, Iafolla; Emiliano, Fiorenza; Carlo, Lefevre; Lucchesi David, M.; Marco, Lucente; Carmelo, Magnafico; Sergio, Nozzoli; Roberto, Peron

    2016-04-01

    To be launched in 2017, ESA mission BepiColombo will perform a thorough study of the planet Mercury and its environment. Among the wide range of its scientific objectives, an important set is constituted by the so-called Radio Science Experiments (RSE), which will study the gravitational field and rotation of the planet, and will perform very precise tests of general relativity theory. The fulfilment of these scientific objectives will be made possible by a precise orbit determination of the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO), at the same time estimating a number of relevant parameters. In order to reach the required level of accuracy in recovering these parameters, the data coming from the high-sensitivity ISA (Italian Spring Accelerometer) instrument onboard the MPO probe will be used: the first time for a deep-space probe. After a long path of design and development, the instrument is now ready for integration into MPO. Following a brief description of the RSE in the context of the mission, the instrument and its capabilities will be reviewed. Emphasis will be given to the foreseen strategies for its operation in the various phases of the mission, along with the manifold calibration possibilities.

  9. Valid detection of self-propelled wheelchair driving with two accelerometers.

    PubMed

    Kooijmans, H; Horemans, H L D; Stam, H J; Bussmann, J B J

    2014-11-01

    This study assessed whether self-propelled wheelchair driving can be validly detected by a new method using a set of two commonly used accelerometers.In a rehabilitation centre, 10 wheelchair-bound persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) (aged 29-63 years) performed a series of representative daily activities according to a protocol including self-propelled wheelchair driving and other activities. Two ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers were used; one was attached at the wrist, the other to the spokes of the wheelchair wheel. Based on the movement intensity of the two accelerometers, a custom-made algorithm in MatLab differentiated between self-propelled wheelchair driving and other activities (e.g. being pushed or arm movements not related to wheelchair driving). Video recordings were used for reference. Validity scores between the accelerometer output and the video analyses were expressed in terms of agreement, sensitivity and specificity scores.Overall agreement for the detection of self-propelled wheelchair driving was 85%; sensitivity was 88% and specificity 83%. Disagreement between accelerometer output and video analysis was largest for wheelchair driving at very low speed on a treadmill, wheelchair driving on a slope on a treadmill, and being pushed in the wheelchair whilst making excessive arm movements.Valid detection of self-propelled wheelchair driving is provided by two accelerometers and a simple algorithm. Disagreement with the video analysis was largest during three atypical daily activities.

  10. Validity of gait asymmetry estimation by using an accelerometer in individuals with hemiparetic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Oyake, Kazuaki; Yamaguchi, Tomofumi; Sugasawa, Masafumi; Oda, Chihiro; Tanabe, Shigeo; Kondo, Kunitsugu; Otaka, Yohei; Momose, Kimito

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity of estimating step time and length asymmetries, using an accelerometer against force plate measurements in individuals with hemiparetic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four individuals who previously had experienced a stroke were asked to walk without using a cane or manual assistance on a 16-m walkway. Step time and length were measured using force plates, which is the gold standard for assessing gait asymmetry. In addition to ground reaction forces, trunk acceleration was simultaneously measured using an accelerometer. To estimate step time asymmetry using accelerometer data, the time intervals between forward acceleration peaks for each leg were calculated. To estimate step length asymmetry using accelerometer data, the integration of the positive vertical accelerations following initial contact of each leg was calculated. Asymmetry was considered the affected side value divided by the unaffected side value. [Results] Significant correlations were found between the accelerometer and the force plates for step time and length asymmetries (rho=0.83 and rho=0.64, respectively). [Conclusion] An accelerometer might be useful for assessing step time and length asymmetries in individuals with hemiparetic stroke, although improvements are needed for estimating the accuracy of step length asymmetry. PMID:28265163

  11. Estimating daily walking distance of captive African elephants using an accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Rothwell, Emily S; Bercovitch, Fred B; Andrews, Jeff R M; Anderson, Matthew J

    2011-01-01

    Two central concerns for elephant husbandry and management are whether zoological enclosures are appropriately sized and the degree to which naturalistic exercise and activity are observed in such enclosures. In order to address these issues, accurate data on the daily walking distance of elephants both in situ and ex situ are necessary. We used an accelerometer, a pedometer that measures step count and activity level, to estimate walking distance in African elephants (Loxodonta africana) at the San Diego Zoo's Wild Animal Park. The accelerometer was worn simultaneously with a GPS unit that recorded actual walking distance. Estimates of walking distance were extrapolated from the accelerometer and compared with actual distances determined by GPS data. The accelerometer was found to overestimate step count, and subsequently walking distance, by including false counts of steps. Extrapolating walking distance based upon stride length measurements did not match actual GPS walking distance. However, activity level output from the accelerometer significantly correlated with actual GPS walking distance. In addition, we report that the rate of movement is comparable to that reported in other zoological settings. We provide a linear regression equation that can be utilized by other institutions to estimate daily walking distance of elephants in their collection who are outfitted with accelerometers.

  12. Physical activity using wrist-worn accelerometers: comparison of dominant and non-dominant wrist.

    PubMed

    Dieu, Olivier; Mikulovic, Jacques; Fardy, Paul S; Bui-Xuan, Gilles; Béghin, Laurent; Vanhelst, Jérémy

    2016-01-07

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a difference in physical activity assessment between a wrist-worn accelerometer at the dominant or non-dominant arm. The secondary purpose was to assess the concurrent validity of measures of physical activity from the wrist-worn accelerometer and the waist-worn accelerometer. Forty adults wore three accelerometers simultaneously, one on the waist and one each on the non-dominant wrist and dominant wrist, respectively, for 24 consecutive hours of free-living conditions. Data were uploaded from the monitor to a computer following a 1-day test period. There were no significant differences in physical activity when comparing the dominant versus the non-dominant wrist, regardless of axis (P>0·05). Mean daily accelerometer output data from both wrists were strongly correlated with average counts per minute from the ActiGraph worn around the waist (r = 0·88, P<0·001). Findings suggest that the choice to wear the accelerometer on the non-dominant or dominant wrist has no impact on results. Data from this study contribute to the knowledge of how to best assess physical activity habits.

  13. Validity of gait asymmetry estimation by using an accelerometer in individuals with hemiparetic stroke.

    PubMed

    Oyake, Kazuaki; Yamaguchi, Tomofumi; Sugasawa, Masafumi; Oda, Chihiro; Tanabe, Shigeo; Kondo, Kunitsugu; Otaka, Yohei; Momose, Kimito

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity of estimating step time and length asymmetries, using an accelerometer against force plate measurements in individuals with hemiparetic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four individuals who previously had experienced a stroke were asked to walk without using a cane or manual assistance on a 16-m walkway. Step time and length were measured using force plates, which is the gold standard for assessing gait asymmetry. In addition to ground reaction forces, trunk acceleration was simultaneously measured using an accelerometer. To estimate step time asymmetry using accelerometer data, the time intervals between forward acceleration peaks for each leg were calculated. To estimate step length asymmetry using accelerometer data, the integration of the positive vertical accelerations following initial contact of each leg was calculated. Asymmetry was considered the affected side value divided by the unaffected side value. [Results] Significant correlations were found between the accelerometer and the force plates for step time and length asymmetries (rho=0.83 and rho=0.64, respectively). [Conclusion] An accelerometer might be useful for assessing step time and length asymmetries in individuals with hemiparetic stroke, although improvements are needed for estimating the accuracy of step length asymmetry.

  14. Free Fall tests for the qualification of Ultra sensitive accelerometers for space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Françoise, Liorzou; Pierre, Marque Jean; Santos Rodrigues, Manuel

    ONERA is developing since a long time accelerometers for space applications in the field of Earth Observations and Fundamental Physics. The more recent examples are the accelerom-eters embarked on the ESA GOCE mission launched in March 2009, dedicated to the Earth precise gravity field mapping, and the accelerometers of the CNES MICROSCOPE mission dedicated to the in orbit test of the Equivalence Principle. Those Ultra sensitive accelerome-ters are optimised for the space environment and operate over an acceleration range less than 10-6 ms-2 with an outstanding accuracy around 10-12 ms-2Hz1/2. Their testability on ground requires creating a low gravity environment in order to verify their functionalities and partially their performances before their delivery before launch. Free fall tests are the only way to ob-tain such a microgravity environment in representating space conditions. The presentation will show in a first part the results of the free fall test campaigns performed in the 120-meter high ZARM drop tower that have led to the qualification of the GOCE accelerometers. In a second part, it will describe the test plan being conducted to assess the best free-fall environment for the MICROSCOPE accelerometers. In particular, some efforts have been paid by ZARM and ONERA to develop a dedicated "free-flyer"capsule, in order to reduce the residual drag acceleration along the fall. Some results from the preliminary tests performed in preparation to the MICROSCOPE qualification campaign will be also presented.

  15. Early recognition of regional cardiac ischemia using a 3-axis accelerometer sensor.

    PubMed

    Elle, Ole Jakob; Halvorsen, Steinar; Gulbrandsen, Martin Gunnar; Aurdal, Lars; Bakken, Andre; Samset, Eigil; Dugstad, Harald; Fosse, Erik

    2005-08-01

    Perioperative mortality in coronary artery bypass grafting is usually caused by reduced left ventricular function due to regional myocardial ischemia or infarction. Post-operative graft occlusion is a well-known problem in coronary surgery. A sensitive tool to detect graft occlusion and monitor myocardial function may give the opportunity to revise malfunctioning grafts before departure from the hospital. This paper describes how a new method can detect cardiac ischemia using a 3-axis piezoelectric accelerometer. In three anesthetized pigs, a 3-axis piezoelectric accelerometer was sutured on the lateral free wall of the left ventricle. The left anterior descending (LAD) was occluded for different time periods and the accelerometer data were sampled with a PC. Short-time Fourier transform was calculated based on the accelerometer time series. The results were visualized using a 2D color-coded time-frequency plot. In the area of occlusion, a change to stronger power of higher harmonics was observed. Consequently, a difference value between the instant frequency pattern and a reference frequency pattern showed a rise in absolute value during the occlusion period. The preliminary results indicate that early recognition of regional cardiac ischemia is possible by analyzing accelerometer data acquired from the three animal trials using the prototype 3-axis accelerometer sensor.

  16. Use of a Wireless Network of Accelerometers for Improved Measurement of Human Energy Expenditure.

    PubMed

    Montoye, Alexander H; Dong, Bo; Biswas, Subir; Pfeiffer, Karin A

    2014-01-01

    Single, hip-mounted accelerometers can provide accurate measurements of energy expenditure (EE) in some settings, but are unable to accurately estimate the energy cost of many non-ambulatory activities. A multi-sensor network may be able to overcome the limitations of a single accelerometer. Thus, the purpose of our study was to compare the abilities of a wireless network of accelerometers and a hip-mounted accelerometer for the prediction of EE. Thirty adult participants engaged in 14 different sedentary, ambulatory, lifestyle and exercise activities for five minutes each while wearing a portable metabolic analyzer, a hip-mounted accelerometer (AG) and a wireless network of three accelerometers (WN) worn on the right wrist, thigh and ankle. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) were created separately for the AG and WN for the EE prediction. Pearson correlations (r) and the root mean square error (RMSE) were calculated to compare criterion-measured EE to predicted EE from the ANNs. Overall, correlations were higher (r = 0.95 vs. r = 0.88, p < 0.0001) and RMSE was lower (1.34 vs. 1.97 metabolic equivalents (METs), p < 0.0001) for the WN than the AG. In conclusion, the WN outperformed the AG for measuring EE, providing evidence that the WN can provide highly accurate estimates of EE in adults participating in a wide range of activities.

  17. Improved mapping of planetary gravitational field with an electrostatic accelerometer/gradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulon, Bernard; Huynh, Phuong-Anh; Liorzou, Francoise; Christophe, Bruno; Hardy, Emilie; Boulanger, Damien; Lebat, Vincent; Perrot, Eddy

    2015-04-01

    ONERA has a proven record spanning several years in developing the most accurate accelerometers for geodesy missions. They are still operational in the GRACE mission and their successors for the GRACE-FO mission will fly in 2017. Finally, the GOCE mission has shown the benefit of using a gradiometer for the direct measurement of the gravity field. Now, ONERA proposes a new accelerometer design, MicroSTAR, for interplanetary missions. This design based on the same technology as for the GRACE and GOCE space missions, with the notable addition of a bias rejection system, has a reduced mass and consumption. The accelerometer is embarked on Uranus Pathfinder (mission proposal for Cosmic M4) as up-scope instrument to achieve two scientific objectives: 1) to determine the gravity fields of Uranus and the satellites, allowing for a better understanding of the planet interior composition, 2) to test gravity at the largest possible length scales to search for deviations from General Relativity. The success of using accelerometer for geodesy mission could be imported in the planetary science field. The poster details the accuracy which can be achieved on the gravity potential field according to different accelerometer configurations. It describes the instrument and its integration inside an interplanetary probe. Finally, it explains the benefit of using this electrostatic accelerometer complementary to radio science technology for improved planetary gravitational field measurements.

  18. Improvement of the Planetary Gravitational Potentiel Field Knwoledge with Accurate Electrostatic Accelerometer / Gradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christophe, B.; Lebat, V.; Foulon, B.; Liorzou, F.; Perrot, E.; Boulanger, D.; Hardy, E.

    2014-12-01

    ONERA has developed since several years the most accurate accelerometers for the geodesy mission. The accelerometers are still operational in the GRACE mission. Their successors for the GRACE-FO mission are under manufacturing and will fly in 2017. Finally, the GOCE mission has proved the interest of gradiometer for a direct measurement of the gravity field.Now, ONERA proposes a new design of accelerometer, MicroSTAR, for interplanetary mission. It inherits of the same technology but with reduced mass and consumption. It has been proposed in several missions towards outer planets in order to test the deviation to the relativity general over large distance to the sun (with the addition of a bias rejection system). But the same instrument could be interesting to improve our knowledge of the planetary gravitational potential field, allowing a better understanding of the planet interior composition. The success of using accelerometer for geodesy mission could be imported in the planetary science.The paper will present the accuracy achievable on the gravity potential field according to different accelerometer configurations (one accelerometer, one gradiometer arm or a complete 3-axis gradiometer). Then, the instrument will be described and the integration of the instrument inside an interplanetary probe will be evoked.

  19. Linearity enhancement of scale factor in an optical interrogated micromechanical accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Feng, Lishuang; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Yang

    2016-08-01

    A method to reduce the residual stress of support arms in an optical interrogated micromechanical accelerometer is proposed in order to enhance the linearity of the scale factor of the accelerometer. First, the behavior of residual stress in support arms is analyzed in detail, and the simulation of shape curvature caused by residual stress in aluminum-made support arms is completed using finite element analysis. Then, by comparing two different materials of support arms (aluminum-made and silicon-made support arms), a modified fabrication is introduced in order to reduce the unexpected residual stress in support arms. Finally, based on contrast experiments, the linearity of the scale factor of accelerometers with aluminum-made and silicon-made support arms is measured using the force feedback test system, respectively. Results show that the linearity of the scale factor of the accelerometer with silicon-made support arms is 0.85%, which is reduced about an order of magnitude compared to that of the accelerometer with aluminum-made support arms with the linearity of scale factor of 7.48%; linearity enhancement of the scale factor is validated. This allows accuracy improvement of the optical interrogated micromechanical accelerometer in the application of inertial navigation and positioning.

  20. Use of a Wireless Network of Accelerometers for Improved Measurement of Human Energy Expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Montoye, Alexander H.; Dong, Bo; Biswas, Subir; Pfeiffer, Karin A.

    2014-01-01

    Single, hip-mounted accelerometers can provide accurate measurements of energy expenditure (EE) in some settings, but are unable to accurately estimate the energy cost of many non-ambulatory activities. A multi-sensor network may be able to overcome the limitations of a single accelerometer. Thus, the purpose of our study was to compare the abilities of a wireless network of accelerometers and a hip-mounted accelerometer for the prediction of EE. Thirty adult participants engaged in 14 different sedentary, ambulatory, lifestyle and exercise activities for five minutes each while wearing a portable metabolic analyzer, a hip-mounted accelerometer (AG) and a wireless network of three accelerometers (WN) worn on the right wrist, thigh and ankle. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) were created separately for the AG and WN for the EE prediction. Pearson correlations (r) and the root mean square error (RMSE) were calculated to compare criterion-measured EE to predicted EE from the ANNs. Overall, correlations were higher (r = 0.95 vs. r = 0.88, p < 0.0001) and RMSE was lower (1.34 vs. 1.97 metabolic equivalents (METs), p < 0.0001) for the WN than the AG. In conclusion, the WN outperformed the AG for measuring EE, providing evidence that the WN can provide highly accurate estimates of EE in adults participating in a wide range of activities. PMID:25530874

  1. Dynamic Response Assessment for the MEMS Accelerometer Under Severe Shock Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Mark S.; Shaw, Harry C.

    2001-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has evaluated the dynamic response of a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) device made by Analog Device, Inc. The device is designated as ADXL250 and is designed mainly for sensing dynamic acceleration. It is also used to measure the tilting angle of any system or component from its original level position. The device has been in commercial use (e.g., in automobile airbag deployment system as a dual-axial accelerometer and in the electronic game play-station as a tilting sensor) with success, but NASA needs an in-depth assessment of its performance under severe dynamic shock environments. It was realized while planning this evaluation task that two assessments would be beneficial to NASA's missions: (1) severe dynamic shock response under nominal thermal environments; and (2) general dynamic performance under cryogenic environments. The first evaluation aims at obtaining a good understanding of its micromachined structure within a framework of brittle fracture dynamics, while the second evaluation focuses on the structure integrity under cryogenic temperature conditions. The information we gathered from the manufacturer indicated that the environmental stresses under NASA's evaluation program have been far beyond what the device has experienced with commercial applications, for which the device was designed. Thus NASA needs the outcome of this evaluation in order to make the selection for possible use for its missions. This paper provides details of the first evaluation the dynamic response under severe multi-axial single-pulse shock load. It was performed using finite element tools with nonlinear dynamics procedures.

  2. Portable vibration exciter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beecher, L. C.; Williams, F. T.

    1970-01-01

    Gas-driven vibration exciter produces a sinusoidal excitation function controllable in frequency and in amplitude. It allows direct vibration testing of components under normal loads, removing the possibility of component damage due to high static pressure.

  3. Cabin attendants’ exposure to vibration and shocks during landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burström, Lage; Lindberg, Lennart; Lindgren, Torsten

    2006-12-01

    The Scandinavian Airlines System (SAS) has noted that cabin attendants have reported an increase in health problems associated with landing. The European Union reports cover health problems related to neck, shoulder, and lower-back injuries. Moreover, analysis of these reports shows that the problems are often associated with specific airplanes that have a longer tail behind the rear wheels and appear more often in attendants who sit in the back of planes rather then the front. Against this background, this study measures and describes the vibration during landing in specific airplanes to evaluate the health risk for the cabin attendants. Measurements were conducted on regular flights with passengers in the type of airplane, Boeing 737-800, which was related to the highest per cent of reported health problems. All measurements were performed the same day during three landings in one airplane with the same pilots and cabin attendants. The measurements were carried out simultaneously on the cabin crew seats in the back and front of the passenger cabin. Under the cabin crew's seat cushions, a triaxiell seat-accelerometer was placed to measure the vibration in three axes. The signals from the accelerometers were amplified by charge amplifiers and stored on tape. The stored data were analysed with a computer-based analyse system. For the cabin attendants, the dominant direction for the vibration load during landing is the up-and-down direction although some vibration also occurs in the other horizontal directions. The exposure to vibration is higher on the rear crew seat compared to the front seat. For instance, both the vibration dose value (VDV) and the frequency-weighted acceleration in the dominant direction are more then 50% higher on the rear seat. The frequency-weighted acceleration and the VDV measured at the crew seats are below the exposure limits as described by the European vibration directive. The evaluation of the cabin attendants' exposure to multiple

  4. Tunable Passive Vibration Suppressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boechler, Nicholas (Inventor); Dillon, Robert Peter (Inventor); Daraio, Chiara (Inventor); Davis, Gregory L. (Inventor); Shapiro, Andrew A. (Inventor); Borgonia, John Paul C. (Inventor); Kahn, Daniel Louis (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An apparatus and method for vibration suppression using a granular particle chain. The granular particle chain is statically compressed and the end particles of the chain are attached to a payload and vibration source. The properties of the granular particles along with the amount of static compression are chosen to provide desired filtering of vibrations.

  5. Hermetically sealed vibration damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheatley, D. G.

    1969-01-01

    Simple fluidic vibration damper for installation at each pivotal mounting between gimbals isolates inertial measuring units from external vibration and other disruptive forces. Installation between each of the three gimbal axes can dampen vibration and shock in any direction while permitting free rotation of the gimbals.

  6. DIY Astrophysics: Examining diurnal and seasonal fluctuations in the effects of solar gravity using a three-axis accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romich, Kristine; Kruger, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    On the surface of the Earth, the acceleration due to the influence of the Sun's gravity is approximately 0.06% of that due to the Earth's own gravity (0.0006g). Nevertheless, it may be detected using a sensitive three-axis accelerometer such as the InvenSense MPU-6050, which is compatible with low-cost microcontrollers such as the Arduino and Raspberry Pi and hence provides an affordable means of investigation. Unlike the gravitational force between the Earth and an object on its surface, the x-, y-, and z-components of the gravitational force between the Sun and an earthbound observer are not constant: the vector direction of the gravitational acceleration caused by the Sun — denoted g⊙ — fluctuates as a function of the Earth's rotation (i.e., the time of day) and position in orbit (i.e., the time of year). The present investigation derives mathematical expressions for the instantaneous value of each component of g⊙ in terms of both quantities. It also outlines a method of using the InvenSense MPU-6050 to detect the corresponding fluctuations in total gravity (and, thus, the influence of the Sun's gravity) experimentally.

  7. Application of MEMS gyroscopes and accelerometers in FSM stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jing; Yang, Wenshu; Peng, Zhenming; Deng, Chao

    2015-10-01

    Gimbals and Fast steering mirrors (FSMs) are commonly used to stabilize the line-of-sight (LOS) of the electro-optical tracking system mounted on moving platforms .The gimbal is used to restrain the vibration of low frequencies, and the FSM is used to restrain the vibration of high frequencies. The restraining performance of the Electro-Optical tracking system is equal to the multiplication of the restraining performance of the gimbal and the FSM. The vibration of high frequencies is mainly restrained by the FSM, and so the performance of the FSM is very important to the Electro-Optical tracking system. There are two ways to improve the stabilization accuracy and bandwidth of the FSM, one way is to improve the accuracy and bandwidth of inertial sensors, and the other way is to use low weight inertial sensors to reduce the load of FSM and increase the mechanical resonance frequency. And so the inertial sensors of high accuracy, high bandwidth and low weight are the key to improve the stabilization accuracy and bandwidth of the FSM.

  8. Reduction of friction using piezoelectrically excited ultrasonic vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littmann, Walter; Storck, Heiner; Wallaschek, Joerg

    2001-07-01

    Piezoelectric materials are an important class of smart materials for the generation of mechanical ultrasonic vibrations. In industrial applications (for example ultrasonic cutting) the frictional contact of the vibrating tool with the workpiece is of special importance. A common observation at the contact zone is that frictional forces can be significantly reduced by superposition of ultrasonic vibrations. In this report we present a theoretical explanation for the reduction of friction. A basic system, consisting of a longitudinal ultrasonic vibrator sliding on a plane, is investigated. It is shown that a modification of Coulomb's friction law can be applied to this kind of vibrating friction contact. The macroscopically observed friction-force with ultrasonic vibration depends on the sliding velocity and the velocity of vibration: For sliding velocities higher than the vibration-amplitude the frictional force is not changed by vibration. But for small sliding velocities the friction-coefficient is significantly reduced and almost approaches zero for very slow sliding-velocity. The theoretical results were confirmed systematically by experimental investigations done on a specially designed test-rig. Energy considerations are used to calculate the ultrasonic energy which is required to achieve a prescribed reduction of the frictional forces. The model is also used for sensing the vibration-amplitude as well as the sliding-velocity without an additional sensor.

  9. The application of accelerometers to the measurement of compliant baffle characteristics: Effects of sensor size and mass

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, N.C.; Dees, R.N.; Sachs, D.A.

    1996-04-01

    Compliant layers find use in sonar applications for the purpose of reducing either the surface motion or fluid pressure transmitted to sonar elements due to structural vibration of the underlying ship structure. Although the characterization of candidate compliant materials has traditionally been accomplished using hydrophones, recent test capabilities have employed accelerometers at the compliant surface. For excitation of the compliant layer at acoustic wavenumbers the interaction of the mass of the sensor with the surface compliance leads to a resonant response which reduces the accuracy of the measurement. This effect is mitigated by adding syntactic foam to produce a composite sensor which is neutrally buoyant. For excitations at wavenumbers greater than the acoustic wavenumber (e.g.: plate flexural wavenumbers) neutrally buoyant sensors continue to interact with the compliant surface to reduce the sensor response. Increases in sensor height lead to reductions in sensor response. Finite element calculations combined with simple analytic models have been used to evaluate the requirements on sensor mass and size in order to make accurate measurements of compliant layer characteristics. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. An isotropic suspension system for a biaxial accelerometer using electroplated thick metal with a HAR SU-8 mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin Seung; Lee, Seung S.

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, a novel approach is developed to design an isotropic suspension system using thick metal freestanding micro-structures combining bulk micro-machining with electroplating based on a HAR SU-8 mold. An omega-shape isotropic suspension system composed of circular curved beams that have free switching of imaginary boundary conditions is proposed. This novel isotropic suspension design is not affected by geometric dimensional parameters and always achieves matching stiffness along the principle axes of elasticity. Using the finite element method, the isotropic suspension system was compared with an S-shaped meandering suspension system. In order to realize the suggested isotropic suspension system, a cost-effective fabrication process using electroplating with the SU-8 mold was developed to avoid expensive equipment and materials such as deep reactive-ion etching (DRIE) or a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer. The fabricated isotropic suspension system was verified by electromagnetic actuation experiments. Finally, a biaxial accelerometer with isotropic suspension system was realized and tested using a vibration generator system. The proposed isotropic suspension system and the modified surface micro-machining technique based on electroplating with an SU-8 mold can contribute towards minimizing the system size, simplifying the system configuration, reducing the system price of and facilitating mass production of various types of low-cost sensors and actuators.

  11. Development of a superconducting six-axis accelerometer. Final report, 1 April 1985-31 March 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Paik, H.J.; Parke, J.W.; Canavan, E.R.

    1989-07-01

    This report describes research on the superconducting six-axis accelerometer performed at the University of Maryland from April, 1985, to March,1988, under Air Force Contract F19628-85-K-0042. This report consists of four chapters. After an introduction and summary is given in Chapter 1, Chapter 2 discusses the theory of a superconducting six-axis accelerometer. The construction and test of the conducting six-axis accelerometer are given in Chapters 3 and 4, respectively. The superconducting six-axis accelerometer described in this report was invented to monitor the platform motions of a superconducting gravity gradiometer which is under development at the University of Maryland for space application. The signals from the accelerometer will be used to control the position and the attitude of the gradiometer platform. The superconducting six-axis accelerometer represents by itself a complete inertial navigation system. Integrated with the superconducting gravity gradiometer, it becomes a gradiometer-aided inertial navigation system.

  12. Validation of a novel smartphone accelerometer-based knee goniometer.

    PubMed

    Ockendon, Matthew; Gilbert, Robin E

    2012-09-01

    Loss of full knee extension following anterior cruciate ligament surgery has been shown to impair knee function. However, there can be significant difficulties in accurately and reproducibly measuring a fixed flexion of the knee. We studied the interobserver and the intraobserver reliabilities of a novel, smartphone accelerometer-based, knee goniometer and compared it with a long-armed conventional goniometer for the assessment of fixed flexion knee deformity. Five healthy male volunteers (age range 30 to 40 years) were studied. Measurements of knee flexion angle were made with a telescopic-armed goniometer (Lafayette Instrument, Lafayette, IN) and compared with measurements using the smartphone (iPhone 3GS, Apple Inc., Cupertino, CA) knee goniometer using a novel trigonometric technique based on tibial inclination. Bland-Altman analysis of validity and reliability including statistical analysis of correlation by Pearson's method was undertaken. The iPhone goniometer had an interobserver correlation (r) of 0.994 compared with 0.952 for the Lafayette. The intraobserver correlation was r = 0.982 for the iPhone (compared with 0.927). The datasets from the two instruments correlate closely (r = 0.947) are proportional and have mean difference of only -0.4 degrees (SD 3.86 degrees). The Lafayette goniometer had an intraobserver reliability +/- 9.6 degrees. The interobserver reliability was +/- 8.4 degrees. By comparison the iPhone had an interobserver reliability +/- 2.7 degrees and an intraobserver reliability +/- 4.6 degrees. We found the iPhone goniometer to be a reliable tool for the measurement of subtle knee flexion in the clinic setting.

  13. Combining global positioning system and accelerometer data to determine the locations of physical activity in children.

    PubMed

    Oreskovic, Nicolas M; Blossom, Jeff; Field, Alison E; Chiang, Sylvia R; Winickoff, Jonathan P; Kleinman, Ronald E

    2012-05-01

    National trends indicate that children and adolescents are not achieving sufficient levels of physical activity. Combining global positioning system (GPS) technology with accelerometers has the potential to provide an objective determination in locations where youth engage in physical activity. The aim of this study was to identify the optimal methods for collecting combined accelerometer and GPS data in youth, to best locate where children spend time and are physically active. A convenience sample of 24 mid-school children in Massachusetts was included. Accelerometers and GPS units were used to quantify and locate childhood physical activity over 5 weekdays and 2 weekend days. Accelerometer and GPS data were joined by time and mapped with a geographical information system (GIS) using ArcGIS software. Data were collected in winter, spring, summer in 2009-2010, collecting a total of 26,406 matched datapoints overall. Matched data yield was low (19.1% total), regardless of season (winter, 12.8%; spring, 30.1%; summer, 14.3%). Teacher-provided, pre-charged equipment yielded the most matched (30.1%; range: 10.1-52.3%) and greatest average days (6.1 days) of data. Across all seasons, children spent most of their time at home. Outdoor use patterns appeared to vary by season, with street use increasing in spring, and park and playground use increasing in summer. Children spent equal amounts of physical activity time at home and walking in the streets. Overall, the various methods for combining GPS and accelerometer data provided similarly low amounts of combined data. No combined GPS and accelerometer data collection method proved superior in every data return category, but use of GIS to map joined accelerometer and GPS data can demarcate childhood physical activity locations.

  14. Muscle motion and EMG activity in vibration treatment.

    PubMed

    Fratini, Antonio; La Gatta, Antonio; Bifulco, Paolo; Romano, Maria; Cesarelli, Mario

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study is to highlight the relationship between muscle motion, generated by whole body vibration, and the correspondent electromyographic (EMG) activity and to suggest a new method to customize the stimulation frequency. Simultaneous recordings of EMG and tri-axial accelerations of quadriceps rectus femoris from fifteen subjects undergoing vibration treatments were collected. Vibrations were delivered via a sinusoidal oscillating platform at different frequencies (10-45 Hz). Muscle motion was estimated by processing the accelerometer data. Large EMG motion artifacts were removed using sharp notch filters centred at the vibration frequency and its superior harmonics. EMG-RMS values were computed and analyzed before and after artifact suppression to assess muscular activity. Muscles acceleration amplitude increased with frequency. Muscle displacements revealed a mechanical resonant-like behaviour of the muscle. Resonance frequencies and dumping factors depended on subject. Moreover, RMS of artifact-free EMG was found well correlated (R(2)=0.82) to the actual muscle displacement, while the maximum of the EMG response was found related to the mechanical resonance frequency of muscle. Results showed that maximum muscular activity was found in correspondence to the mechanical resonance of the muscle itself. Assuming the hypothesis that muscle activation is proportional to muscle displacement, treatment optimization (i.e. to choose the best stimulation frequency) could be obtained by simply monitoring local acceleration (resonance), leading to a more effective muscle stimulation. Motion artifact produced an overestimation of muscle activity, therefore its removal was essential.

  15. Anti-vibration gloves?

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Sue; Dong, Ren G; Welcome, Daniel E; McDowell, Thomas W

    2015-03-01

    For exposure to hand-transmitted vibration (HTV), personal protective equipment is sold in the form of anti-vibration (AV) gloves, but it remains unclear how much these gloves actually reduce vibration exposure or prevent the development of hand-arm vibration syndrome in the workplace. This commentary describes some of the issues that surround the classification of AV gloves, the assessment of their effectiveness and their applicability in the workplace. The available information shows that AV gloves are unreliable as devices for controlling HTV exposures. Other means of vibration control, such as using alternative production techniques, low-vibration machinery, routine preventative maintenance regimes, and controlling exposure durations are far more likely to deliver effective vibration reductions and should be implemented. Furthermore, AV gloves may introduce some adverse effects such as increasing grip force and reducing manual dexterity. Therefore, one should balance the benefits of AV gloves and their potential adverse effects if their use is considered.

  16. Low-Frequency Foam Insulator (LOFFI) Accelerometer Mount Characterization Results and Analysis for Phase I (FY2013)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    Low-Frequency Foam Insulator (LOFFI) Accelerometer Mount Characterization Results and Analysis for Phase I (FY2013) by Andrew Drysdale...Proving Ground, MD 21005-5068 ARL-TR-6977 June 2014 Low-Frequency Foam Insulator (LOFFI) Accelerometer Mount Characterization Results...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Low-Frequency Foam Insulator (LOFFI) Accelerometer Mount Characterization Results and Analysis for Phase I (FY2013) 5a

  17. What is the most effective posture to conduct vibration from the lower to the upper extremities during whole-body vibration exercise?

    PubMed Central

    Tsukahara, Yuka; Iwamoto, Jun; Iwashita, Kosui; Shinjo, Takuma; Azuma, Koichiro; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Background Whole-body vibration (WBV) exercise is widely used for training and rehabilitation. However, the optimal posture for training both the upper and lower extremities simultaneously remains to be established. Objectives The objective of this study was to search for an effective posture to conduct vibration from the lower to the upper extremities while performing WBV exercises without any adverse effects. Methods Twelve healthy volunteers (age: 22–34 years) were enrolled in the study. To measure the magnitude of vibration, four accelerometers were attached to the upper arm, back, thigh, and calf of each subject. Vibrations were produced using a WBV platform (Galileo 900) with an amplitude of 4 mm at two frequencies, 15 and 30 Hz. The following three postures were examined: posture A, standing posture with the knees flexed at 30°; posture B, crouching position with no direct contact between the knees and elbows; and posture C, crouching position with direct contact between the knees and elbows. The ratio of the magnitude of vibration at the thigh, back, and upper arm relative to that at the calf was used as an index of vibration conduction. Results Posture B was associated with a greater magnitude of vibration to the calf than posture A at 15 Hz, and postures B and C were associated with greater magnitudes of vibration than posture A at 30 Hz. Posture C was associated with a vibration conduction to the upper arm that was 4.62 times and 8.26 times greater than that for posture A at 15 and 30 Hz, respectively. Conclusion This study revealed that a crouching position on a WBV platform with direct contact between the knees and elbows was effective for conducting vibration from the lower to the upper extremities. PMID:26793008

  18. Pyroshock data acquisition-recent developments using P/R and P/E accelerometers and isolators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, Vesta I.

    2002-05-01

    Mechanical isolators have been developed for piezoresistive and piezoelectric accelerometers to mitigate high frequency shocks before they reach the accelerometer because the high frequency pyroshocks may cause the accelerometer to resonate and/or break. Several commercial mechanically isolated accelerometers are available to the general public and their characteristics have been studied using Hopkinson bar test techniques. The in-axis response of these devices will be compared. Cross-axis response will be presented for one device. Additionally, pyroshock and ballistic shock measurements, performed by international organizations, will be presented for several isolators.

  19. Desert ants learn vibration and magnetic landmarks.

    PubMed

    Buehlmann, Cornelia; Hansson, Bill S; Knaden, Markus

    2012-01-01

    The desert ants Cataglyphis navigate not only by path integration but also by using visual and olfactory landmarks to pinpoint the nest entrance. Here we show that Cataglyphis noda can additionally use magnetic and vibrational landmarks as nest-defining cues. The magnetic field may typically provide directional rather than positional information, and vibrational signals so far have been shown to be involved in social behavior. Thus it remains questionable if magnetic and vibration landmarks are usually provided by the ants' habitat as nest-defining cues. However, our results point to the flexibility of the ants' navigational system, which even makes use of cues that are probably most often sensed in a different context.

  20. A distributed fiber vibration sensor utilizing dispersion induced walk-off effect in a unidirectional Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingming; Jin, Chao; Bao, Yuan; Li, Zhaohui; Li, Jianping; Lu, Chao; Yang, Liang; Li, Guifang

    2014-02-10

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel ultra-long range and sensitive distributed fiber vibration sensor. Only one unidirectional Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) is employed in this scheme as the sensing element. In this sensor structure, we utilize chromatic dispersion-induced walk-off effect between the vibration signals sensed by two distributed feedback (DFB) lasers at different wavelengths to locate the vibration position. Vibration signals with frequencies up to 9 MHz can be detected and the spatial resolution of 31 m is achieved over 320 km of the standard single mode fiber. Monitoring multiple vibration sources can also be realized using this scheme.

  1. Terahertz Sensing of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, G.; Ghosh, S.; Kim, S.; Lv, P.-C.; Buma, T.; Weng, B.; Barner, K.; Kolodzey, J.

    2007-06-01

    Biomolecules such as DNA and proteins exhibit a wealth of modes in the Terahertz (THz) range from the rotational, vibrational and stretching modes of biomolecules. Many materials such as drywall that are opaque to human eyes are transparent to THz. Therefore, it can be used as a powerful tool for biomolecular sensing, biomedical analysis and through-the-wall imaging. Experiments were carried out to study the absorption of various materials including DNA and see-through imaging of drywall using FTIR spectrometer and Time Domain Spectroscopy (TDS) system.

  2. Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) Component Responses to Payload Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    Vibration testing of SUMI was performed at both the experiment and payload levels. No accelerometers were installed inside the experiment during testing, but it is certain that component responses were very high. The environments experienced by optical and electronic components in these tests is an area of ongoing concern. The analysis supporting this presentation included a detailed finite element model of the SUMI experiment section, the dynamic response of which, correlated well with accelerometer measurements from the testing of the experimental section at Marshall Space Flight Center. The relatively short timeframe available to complete the task and the limited design information available was a limitation on the level of detail possible for the non-experiment portion of the model. However, since the locations of interest are buried in the experimental section of the model, the calculated responses should be enlightening both for the development of test criteria and for guidance in design.

  3. Active control of sound transmission/radiation from elastic plates by vibration inputs. II - Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, V. L.; Fuller, C. R.; Silcox, R. J.; Brown, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Actively controlled harmonic force inputs were applied experimentally to reduce the sound transmitted through an elastic circular plate. The control implementation used a time domain least mean square adaptive algorithm with two error sensors. The control forces were applied directly to the plate by point force vibration inputs, while the error information and performance were measured in the radiated acoustic field by microphones. Test cases were also performed in which the error sensors were accelerometers mounted on the plate. When accelerometers were used as error sensors, the controller performance was degraded; leading to the conclusion that minimizing plate motion does not necessarily lead to an associated decrease in radiated sound levels. In contrast, the results show excellent attenuation of the transmitted sound field when microphone error sensors were used. This result was consistent over a range of frequencies. In addition, the experimental results are compared to previously derived analytical results and the effect of using a point or global minimization scheme is discussed.

  4. Application of Accelerometer Data to Mars Odyssey Aerobraking and Atmospheric Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolson, R. H.; Keating, G. M.; George, B. E.; Escalera, P. E.; Werner, M. R.; Dwyer, A. M.; Hanna, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    Aerobraking was an enabling technology for the Mars Odyssey mission even though it involved risk due primarily to the variability of the Mars upper atmosphere. Consequently, numerous analyses based on various data types were performed during operations to reduce these risk and among these data were measurements from spacecraft accelerometers. This paper reports on the use of accelerometer data for determining atmospheric density during Odyssey aerobraking operations. Acceleration was measured along three orthogonal axes, although only data from the component along the axis nominally into the flow was used during operations. For a one second count time, the RMS noise level varied from 0.07 to 0.5 mm/s2 permitting density recovery to between 0.15 and 1.1 kg per cu km or about 2% of the mean density at periapsis during aerobraking. Accelerometer data were analyzed in near real time to provide estimates of density at periapsis, maximum density, density scale height, latitudinal gradient, longitudinal wave variations and location of the polar vortex. Summaries are given of the aerobraking phase of the mission, the accelerometer data analysis methods and operational procedures, some applications to determining thermospheric properties, and some remaining issues on interpretation of the data. Pre-flight estimates of natural variability based on Mars Global Surveyor accelerometer measurements proved reliable in the mid-latitudes, but overestimated the variability inside the polar vortex.

  5. An accelerometer-based system for elite athlete swimming performance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davey, Neil P.; Anderson, Megan E.; James, Daniel A.

    2005-02-01

    The measurement of sport specific performance characteristics is an important part of an athletes training and preparation for competition. Thus automated measurement, extraction and analysis of performance measures is desired and addressed in this paper. A tri-axial accelerometer based system was located on the lower back or swimmers to record acceleration profiles. The accelerometer system contained two ADXL202 bi-axial accelerometers positioned perpendicular to one another, and can store over 6 hours of data at 150Hz per channel using internal flash memory. The simultaneous collection of video and electronics touch pad timing was used to validate the algorithm results. Using the tri-axial accelerometer data, algorithms have been developed to derive lap times and stroke count. Comparison against electronic touch pad timing against accelerometer lap times has produced results with a typical error of better than +/-0.5 seconds. Video comparison of the stroke count algorithm for freestyle also produced results with an average error of +/-1 stroke. The developed algorithms have a higher level of reliability compared to hand timed and counted date that is commonly used during training.

  6. Characteristics of a piezoresistive accelerometer in high frequency, high shock environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Davie, N.T.; Brown, F.A.

    1993-12-31

    The characteristics of a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments are being studied at Sandia National Laboratories in the Mechanical Shock Testing Laboratory. A Hopkinson bar capability has been developed to extend our understanding of the piezoresistive accelerometer with and without mechanical isolation in the high frequency, high shock environments where measurements are being made. Two different Hopkinson bar materials are being used: titanium and beryllium. The characteristics of the piezoresistive accelerometer for frequencies of DC-10 kHz and shock magnitudes of up to 4,000 g as determined from measurements with a titanium Hopkinson bar are presented. The SNL uniaxial shock isolation technique has demonstrated acceptable characteristics for a temperature range of {minus}50{degree}F to +186{degree}F and a frequency bandwidth of DC to 10 kHz. These characteristics have been verified by the calibration of the Hopkinson bar used for accelerometer testing. The beryllium Hopkinson bar configuration is described. Preliminary characteristics of the piezoresistive accelerometer at a nominal shock level of 17,000 g for a frequency range of DC-50 kHz are presented.

  7. Comparison of IPAQ-SF and Two Other Physical Activity Questionnaires with Accelerometer in Adolescent Boys

    PubMed Central

    Mäestu, Jarek; Lätt, Evelin; Jürimäe, Jaak; Vainik, Uku

    2017-01-01

    Self-report measures of physical activity (PA) are easy to use and popular but their reliability is often questioned. Therefore, the general aim of the present study was to investigate the association of PA questionnaires with accelerometer derived PA, in a sample of adolescent boys. In total, 191 pubertal boys (mean age 14.0 years) completed three self-report questionnaires and wore an accelerometer (ActiGraph GT1M) for 7 consecutive days. The PA questionnaires were: International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form (IPAQ-SF), Tartu Physical Activity Questionnaire (TPAQ), and the Inactivity subscale from Domain-Specific Impulsivity (DSI) scale. All three questionnaires were significantly correlated with accelerometer derived MVPA: the correlations were 0.31 for the IPAQ-SF MVPA, 0.34 for the TPAQ MVPA and -0.29 for the DSI Inactivity scale. Nevertheless, none of the questionnaires can be used as a reliable individual-level estimate of MVPA in male adolescents. The boys underreported their MVPA in IPAQ-SF as compared to accelerometer-derived MVPA (respective averages 43 and 56 minutes); underreporting was more marked in active boys with average daily MVPA at least 60 minutes, and was not significant in less active boys. Conversely, MVPA index from TPAQ overestimated the MVPA in less active boys but underestimated it in more active boys. The sedentary time reported in IPAQ-SF was an underestimate as compared to accelerometer-derived sedentary time (averages 519 and 545 minutes, respectively). PMID:28056080

  8. Measurement Method of Magnetic Field for the Wire Suspended Micro-Pendulum Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yongle; Li, Leilei; Hu, Ning; Pan, Yingjun; Ren, Chunhua

    2015-01-01

    Force producer is one of the core components of a Wire Suspended Micro-Pendulum Accelerometer; and the stability of permanent magnet in the force producer determines the consistency of the acceleration sensor’s scale factor. For an assembled accelerometer; direct measurement of magnetic field strength is not a feasible option; as the magnetometer probe cannot be laid inside the micro-space of the sensor. This paper proposed an indirect measurement method of the remnant magnetization of Micro-Pendulum Accelerometer. The measurement is based on the working principle of the accelerometer; using the current output at several different scenarios to resolve the remnant magnetization of the permanent magnet. Iterative Least Squares algorithm was used for the adjustment of the data due to nonlinearity of this problem. The calculated remnant magnetization was 1.035 T. Compared to the true value; the error was less than 0.001 T. The proposed method provides an effective theoretical guidance for measuring the magnetic field of the Wire Suspended Micro-Pendulum Accelerometer; correcting the scale factor and temperature influence coefficients; etc. PMID:25871721

  9. Measurement method of magnetic field for the wire suspended micro-pendulum accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongle; Li, Leilei; Hu, Ning; Pan, Yingjun; Ren, Chunhua

    2015-04-13

    Force producer is one of the core components of a Wire Suspended Micro-Pendulum Accelerometer; and the stability of permanent magnet in the force producer determines the consistency of the acceleration sensor's scale factor. For an assembled accelerometer; direct measurement of magnetic field strength is not a feasible option; as the magnetometer probe cannot be laid inside the micro-space of the sensor. This paper proposed an indirect measurement method of the remnant magnetization of Micro-Pendulum Accelerometer. The measurement is based on the working principle of the accelerometer; using the current output at several different scenarios to resolve the remnant magnetization of the permanent magnet. Iterative Least Squares algorithm was used for the adjustment of the data due to nonlinearity of this problem. The calculated remnant magnetization was 1.035 T. Compared to the true value; the error was less than 0.001 T. The proposed method provides an effective theoretical guidance for measuring the magnetic field of the Wire Suspended Micro-Pendulum Accelerometer; correcting the scale factor and temperature influence coefficients; etc.

  10. Feasibility of frequency-modulated wireless transmission for a multi-purpose MEMS-based accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Sabato, Alessandro; Feng, Maria Q

    2014-09-05

    Recent advances in the Micro Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) technology have made wireless MEMS accelerometers an attractive tool for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of civil engineering structures. To date, sensors' low sensitivity and accuracy--especially at very low frequencies--have imposed serious limitations for their application in monitoring large-sized structures. Conventionally, the MEMS sensor's analog signals are converted to digital signals before radio-frequency (RF) wireless transmission. The conversion can cause a low sensitivity to the important low-frequency and low-amplitude signals. To overcome this difficulty, the authors have developed a MEMS accelerometer system, which converts the sensor output voltage to a frequency-modulated signal before RF transmission. This is achieved by using a Voltage to Frequency Conversion (V/F) instead of the conventional Analog to Digital Conversion (ADC). In this paper, a prototype MEMS accelerometer system is presented, which consists of a transmitter and receiver circuit boards. The former is equipped with a MEMS accelerometer, a V/F converter and a wireless RF transmitter, while the latter contains an RF receiver and a F/V converter for demodulating the signal. The efficacy of the MEMS accelerometer system in measuring low-frequency and low-amplitude dynamic responses is demonstrated through extensive laboratory tests and experiments on a flow-loop pipeline.

  11. Feasibility of Frequency-Modulated Wireless Transmission for a Multi-Purpose MEMS-Based Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Sabato, Alessandro; Feng, Maria Q.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the Micro Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) technology have made wireless MEMS accelerometers an attractive tool for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of civil engineering structures. To date, sensors' low sensitivity and accuracy—especially at very low frequencies—have imposed serious limitations for their application in monitoring large-sized structures. Conventionally, the MEMS sensor's analog signals are converted to digital signals before radio-frequency (RF) wireless transmission. The conversion can cause a low sensitivity to the important low-frequency and low-amplitude signals. To overcome this difficulty, the authors have developed a MEMS accelerometer system, which converts the sensor output voltage to a frequency-modulated signal before RF transmission. This is achieved by using a Voltage to Frequency Conversion (V/F) instead of the conventional Analog to Digital Conversion (ADC). In this paper, a prototype MEMS accelerometer system is presented, which consists of a transmitter and receiver circuit boards. The former is equipped with a MEMS accelerometer, a V/F converter and a wireless RF transmitter, while the latter contains an RF receiver and a F/V converter for demodulating the signal. The efficacy of the MEMS accelerometer system in measuring low-frequency and low-amplitude dynamic responses is demonstrated through extensive laboratory tests and experiments on a flow-loop pipeline. PMID:25198003

  12. The timing of scour and fill in a gravel-bedded river measured with buried accelerometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Czuba, Christiana R.; Konrad, Christopher P.

    2013-01-01

    A device that measures the timing of streambed scour and the duration of sediment mobilization at specific depths of a streambed was developed using data-logging accelerometers placed within the gravel substrate of the Cedar River, Washington, USA. Each accelerometer recorded its orientation every 20 min and remained stable until the surrounding gravel matrix mobilized as sediment was transported downstream and scour reached the level of the accelerometer. The accelerometer scour monitors were deployed at 26 locations in salmon-spawning habitat during the 2010–2011 flood season to record when the streambed was scoured to the depth of typical egg-pocket deposition. Scour was recorded at one location during a moderate high-flow event (65 m3/s; 1.25–1.5-year recurrence interval) and at 17 locations during a larger high-flow event (159 m3/s; 7-year recurrence interval). Accelerometer scour monitors recorded periods of intermittent sediment mobilization and stability within a high-flow event providing insight into the duration of scour. Most scour was recorded during the rising limb and at the peak of a flood hydrograph, though some scour occurred during sustained high flows following the peak of the flood hydrograph.

  13. Validation of the Actical Accelerometer in Multiethnic Preschoolers: The Children's Healthy Living (CHL) Program

    PubMed Central

    Ettienne, Reynolette; Li, Fenfang; Su, Yuhua; McGlone, Katalina; Luick, Bret; Tachibana, Alvin; Carran, Christina; Mercado, Jobel; Novotny, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the validity and reliability of the Actical accelerometer for measuring physical activity (PA) in preschool children of mixed ethnicity, compared with direct observation via a modified System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time (SOFIT) protocol and proxy parental reports (PA Logs). Fifty children in Hawai‘i wore wrist-mounted accelerometers for two 7-day periods with a washout period between each week. Thirty children were concurrently observed using SOFIT. Parents completed PA Logs for three days. Reliability and validity were measured by intra-class correlation coefficient and proportions of agreement concurrently. There was slight agreement (proportion of agreement: 82%; weighted Kappa=.17, P <.001) between the accelerometer and SOFIT as well as between the accelerometer and the PA Logs (proportions of agreement: 40%; weighted Kappa=0.15, P <.001). PA logs underestimated the PA levels of the children, while the Actical was found to be valid and reliable for estimating PA levels of multiethnic, mixed ethnicity preschoolers. These findings suggest that accelerometers can be objective, valid, and accurate physical activity assessment tools compared to conventional PA logs and subjective reports of activity for preschool children of mixed ethnicity. PMID:27099804

  14. Thermal Vibrational Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershuni, G. Z.; Lyubimov, D. V.

    1998-08-01

    Recent increasing awareness of the ways in which vibrational effects can affect low-gravity experiments have renewed interest in the study of thermal vibrational convection across a wide range of fields. For example, in applications where vibrational effects are used to provide active control of heat and mass transfer, such as in heat exchangers, stirrers, mineral separators and crystal growth, a sound understanding of the fundamental theory is required. In Thermal Vibrational Convection, the authors present the theory of vibrational effects caused by a static gravity field, and of fluid flows which appear under vibration in fluid-filled cavities. The first part of the book discusses fluid-filled cavities where the fluid motion only appears in the presence of temperature non-uniformities, while the second considers those situations where the vibrational effects are caused by a non-uniform field. Throughout, the authors concentrate on consideration of high frequency vibrations, where averaging methods can be successfully applied in the study of the phenomena. Written by two of the pioneers in this field, Thermal Vibrational Convection will be of great interest to scientists and engineers working in the many areas that are concerned with vibration, and its effect on heat and mass transfer. These include hydrodynamics, hydro-mechanics, low gravity physics and mechanics, and geophysics. The rigorous approach adopted in presenting the theory of this fascinating and highly topical area will facilitate a greater understanding of the phenomena involved, and will lead to the development of more and better-designed experiments.

  15. Emitted vibration measurement device and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gisler, G. L. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention is directed to a method and apparatus for measuring emitted vibrational forces produced by a reaction wheel assembly due to imbalances, misalignment, bearing defects and the like. The apparatus includes a low mass carriage supported on a large mass base. The carriage is in the form of an octagonal frame having an opening which is adapted for receiving the reaction wheel assembly supported thereon by means of a mounting ring. The carriage is supported on the base by means of air bearings which support the carriage in a generally frictionless manner when supplied with compressed air from a source. A plurality of carriage brackets and a plurality of base blocks provided for physical coupling of the base and carriage. The sensing axes of the load cells are arranged generally parallel to the base and connected between the base and carriage such that all of the vibrational forces emitted by the reaction wheel assembly are effectively transmitted through the sensing axes of the load cells. In this manner, a highly reliable and accurate measurment of the vibrational forces of the reaction wheel assembly can be had. The output signals from the load cells are subjected to a dynamical analyzer which analyzes and identifies the rotor and spin bearing components which are causing the vibrational forces.

  16. Microgyroscope with Vibrating Post as Rotation Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Tony K.; Gutierrez, Roman

    2003-01-01

    The figure depicts a micromachined silicon vibratory gyroscope that senses rotation about its z axis. The rotation-sensitive vibratory element is a post oriented (when at equilibrium) along the z axis and suspended at its base by thin, flexible silicon bands oriented along the x and y axes, respectively. Unlike in the vibratory microgyroscopes described in the immediately preceding article ["Cloverleaf Vibratory Microgyroscope With Integrated Post" (NPO-20688)] and other previous articles in NASA Tech Briefs, the rotation-sensitive vibratory element does not include a cloverleaf-shaped structure that lies (when at equilibrium) in the x-y plane. As in the cases of the previously reported vibratory microgyroscopes, vibrations of the rotation-sensitive vibratory element are excited electrostatically, the vibrations are measured by use of capacitive proximity sensors, and the rate of rotation along the axis of sensitivity is deduced from the effect of the Coriolis force upon the vibrations. To create electrodes for electrostatic excitation and capacitive sensing of vibrations, portions of the facing surfaces of the post and of the four stationary members that surround the post are rendered electrically conductive; this can be accomplished by either depositing metal films or else doping the silicon in the affected areas.

  17. Missile captive carry monitoring using a capacitive MEMS accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatchell, Brian; Mauss, Fred; Santiago-Rojas, Emiliano; Amaya, Ivan; Skorpik, Jim; Silvers, Kurt; Marotta, Steve

    2010-03-01

    Military missiles are exposed to many sources of mechanical vibration that can affect system reliability, safety, and mission effectiveness. One of the most significant exposures to vibration occurs when the missile is being carried by an aviation platform, which is a condition known as captive carry. If the duration of captive carry exposure could be recorded during the missile's service life, several advantages could be realized. Missiles that have been exposed to durations outside the design envelop could be flagged or screened for maintenance or inspection; lightly exposed missiles could be selected for critical mission applications; and missile allocation to missions could be based on prior use to avoid overuse. The U. S. Army Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) has been developing health monitoring systems to assess and improve reliability of missiles during storage and field exposures. Under the direction of AMRDEC staff, engineers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a Captive Carry Health Monitor (CCHM) for the HELLFIRE II missile. The CCHM is an embedded usage monitoring device installed on the outer skin of the HELLFIRE II missile to record the cumulative hours the host missile has been in captive carry mode and thereby assess the overall health of the missile. This paper provides an overview of the CCHM electrical and package design, describes field testing and data analysis techniques used to identify captive carry, and discusses the potential application of missile health and usage data for real-time reliability analysis and fleet management.

  18. Missile Captive Carry Monitoring using a Capacitive MEMS Accelerometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hatchell, Brian K.; Mauss, Fredrick J.; Santiago-Rojas, Emiliano; Amaya, Ivan A.; Skorpik, James R.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Marotta, Steve

    2010-04-08

    Military missiles are exposed to many sources of mechanical vibration that can affect system reliability, safety, and mission effectiveness. One of the most significant exposures to vibration occurs when the missile is being carried by an aviation platform, which is a condition known as captive carry. If the duration of captive carry exposure could be recorded during the missile’s service life, several advantages could be realized. Missiles that have been exposed to durations outside the design envelop could be flagged or screened for maintenance or inspection; lightly exposed missiles could be selected for critical mission applications; and missile allocation to missions could be based on prior use to avoid overuse. The U. S. Army Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) has been developing health monitoring systems to assess and improve reliability of missiles during storage and field exposures. Under the direction of AMRDEC staff, engineers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a Captive Carry Health Monitor (CCHM) for the HELLFIRE II missile. The CCHM is an embedded usage monitoring device installed on the outer skin of the HELLFIRE II missile to record the cumulative hours the host missile has been in captive carry mode and thereby assess the overall health of the missile. This paper provides an overview of the CCHM electrical and package design, describes field testing and data analysis techniques used to identify captive carry, and discusses the potential application of missile health and usage data for real-time reliability analysis and fleet management.

  19. Ground Based Investigation of Electrostatic Accelerometer in HUST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Y.; Zhou, Z.

    2013-12-01

    High-precision electrostatic accelerometers with six degrees of freedom (DOF) acceleration measurement were successfully used in CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions which to measure the Earth's gravity field. In our group, space inertial sensor based on the capacitance transducer and electrostatic control technique has been investigated for test of equivalence principle (TEPO), searching non-Newtonian force in micrometer range, and satellite Earth's field recovery. The significant techniques of capacitive position sensor with the noise level at 2×10-7pF/Hz1/2 and the μV/Hz1/2 level electrostatic actuator are carried out and all the six servo loop controls by using a discrete PID algorithm are realized in a FPGA device. For testing on ground, in order to compensate one g earth's gravity, the fiber torsion pendulum facility is adopt to measure the parameters of the electrostatic controlled inertial sensor such as the resolution, and the electrostatic stiffness, the cross couple between different DOFs. A short distance and a simple double capsule equipment the valid duration about 0.5 second is set up in our lab for the free fall tests of the engineering model which can directly verify the function of six DOF control. Meanwhile, high voltage suspension method is also realized and preliminary results show that the horizontal axis of acceleration noise is about 10-8m/s2/Hz1/2 level which limited mainly by the seismic noise. Reference: [1] Fen Gao, Ze-Bing Zhou, Jun Luo, Feasibility for Testing the Equivalence Principle with Optical Readout in Space, Chin. Phys. Lett. 28(8) (2011) 080401. [2] Z. Zhu, Z. B. Zhou, L. Cai, Y. Z. Bai, J. Luo, Electrostatic gravity gradiometer design for the advanced GOCE mission, Adv. Sp. Res. 51 (2013) 2269-2276. [3] Z B Zhou, L Liu, H B Tu, Y Z Bai, J Luo, Seismic noise limit for ground-based performance measurements of an inertial sensor using a torsion balance, Class. Quantum Grav. 27 (2010) 175012. [4] H B Tu, Y Z Bai, Z B Zhou, L Liu, L

  20. Using Accelerometer and Gyroscopic Measures to Quantify Postural Stability

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, Jay L.; Hirsch, Joshua R.; Koop, Mandy Miller; Schindler, David D.; Kana, Daniel E.; Linder, Susan M.; Campbell, Scott; Thota, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    Context Force platforms and 3-dimensional motion-capture systems provide an accurate method of quantifying postural stability. Substantial cost, space, time to administer, and need for trained personnel limit widespread use of biomechanical techniques in the assessment of postural stability in clinical or field environments. Objective To determine whether accelerometer and gyroscope data sampled from a consumer electronics device (iPad2) provide sufficient resolution of center-of-gravity (COG) movements to accurately quantify postural stability in healthy young people. Design Controlled laboratory study. Setting Research laboratory in an academic medical center. Patients or Other Participants A total of 49 healthy individuals (age = 19.5 ± 3.1 years, height = 167.7 ± 13.2 cm, mass = 68.5 ± 17.5 kg). Intervention(s) Participants completed the NeuroCom Sensory Organization Test (SOT) with an iPad2 affixed at the sacral level. Main Outcome Measure(s) Primary outcomes were equilibrium scores from both systems and the time series of the angular displacement of the anteroposterior COG sway during each trial. A Bland-Altman assessment for agreement was used to compare equilibrium scores produced by the NeuroCom and iPad2 devices. Limits of agreement was defined as the mean bias (NeuroCom − iPad) ± 2 standard deviations. Mean absolute percentage error and median difference between the NeuroCom and iPad2 measurements were used to evaluate how closely the real-time COG sway measured by the 2 systems tracked each other. Results The limits between the 2 devices ranged from −0.5° to 0.5° in SOT condition 1 to −2.9° to 1.3° in SOT condition 5. The largest absolute value of the measurement error within the 95% confidence intervals for all conditions was 2.9°. The mean absolute percentage error analysis indicated that the iPad2 tracked NeuroCom COG with an average error ranging from 5.87% to 10.42% of the NeuroCom measurement across SOT conditions. Conclusions The i

  1. An experimental investigation of airflow-induced vibrations within the multiplicity and vertex detector

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardin, J.D.; Bosze, E.; Boissevain, J.; Simon-Gillo, J.

    1997-07-01

    This report summarizes an experimental investigation of vibrations within the multiplicity and vertex detector (MVD). In particular, the maximum displacements of several MVD components were determined from accelerometer measurements of vibrations induced by an electronics air-cooling system. For an MVD inlet air volumetric flow rate of 0.022 m{sup 3}/s, maximum displacements of several MVD components including a multi-chip module, the Rohacell inlet air plenum, and an aluminum structural cross support, were found to be on the order of 1.5 {mu}m. Consequently, it was concluded that air induced vibrations will not significantly interfere with the MVD`s long-term structural integrity or operating performance. 2 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Active Vibration Isolation of Microgravity Experiments with Spring Umbilicals Using an Electrodynamic Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, B. B.; Allaire, P. E.; Grodsinsky, C. M.

    1996-01-01

    Microgravity experiments will require active vibration isolation in the low to mid frequency range of 0.1 Hz to 10 Hz. Approximately two orders of acceleration reduction (40 dB) will be required. Previous works have reported results for accelerations transmitted through the umbilical. This paper describes experimental and theoretical results for vibration isolation in one dimension (horizontal) where the simulated experiment is connected to the spacecraft by a spring umbilical. The experiment consisted of a spacecraft (shaker), experiment (mass), umbilical, accelerometer, control electronics, and Lorentz actuator. The experiment mass was supported in magnetic bearings to avoid any stiction problems. Acceleration feedback control was employed to obtain the vibration isolation. Three different spring umbilicals were employed. Acceleration reductions on the order of 40 dB were obtained over the frequency range of 0.1 Hz to 10 Hz. Good agreement was obtained between theory and experiment.

  3. Experimental Comparison of two Active Vibration Control Approaches: Velocity Feedback and Negative Capacitance Shunt Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Benjamin; Schiller, Noah

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines a direct, experimental comparison between two established active vibration control techniques. Active vibration control methods, many of which rely upon piezoelectric patches as actuators and/or sensors, have been widely studied, showing many advantages over passive techniques. However, few direct comparisons between different active vibration control methods have been made to determine the performance benefit of one method over another. For the comparison here, the first control method, velocity feedback, is implemented using four accelerometers that act as sensors along with an analog control circuit which drives a piezoelectric actuator. The second method, negative capacitance shunt damping, consists of a basic analog circuit which utilizes a single piezoelectric patch as both a sensor and actuator. Both of these control methods are implemented individually using the same piezoelectric actuator attached to a clamped Plexiglas window. To assess the performance of each control method, the spatially averaged velocity of the window is compared to an uncontrolled response.

  4. Ground vibration test of the XV-15 Tiltrotor Research Aircraft and pretest predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studebaker, Karen; Abrego, Anita

    1994-01-01

    The first comprehensive ground vibration survey was performed on the XV-15 Tiltrotor Research Aircraft to measure the vibration modes of the airframe and to provide data critical for determining whirl flutter stability margins. The aircraft was suspended by the wings with bungee cords and cables. A NASTRAN finite element model was used in the design of the suspension system to minimize its interference with the wing modes. The primary objective of the test was to measure the dynamic characteristics of the wings and pylons for aeroelastic stability analysis. In addition, over 130 accelerometers were placed on the airframe to characterize the fuselage, wing, and tail vibration. Pretest predictions were made with the NASTRAN model as well as correlations with the test data. The results showed that the suspension system provided the isolation necessary for modal measurements.

  5. Development and testing of an advanced technology vibration transducer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, H.F.

    1996-07-08

    The goal is to develop and test high-temperature fiber optic sensors and show that they are suitable for monitoring vibration and other instabilities in gas turbine engines. Transducers with the fiber optic Fabry-Perot interferometer (FFPI) configuration have been adapted for use in the turbomachinery environment. To ensure the survival of the FFPI sensors at high temperatures, two techniques for coating the fibers with metal have been developed: electroplating and vacuum deposition. Coated sensors have subsequently been embedded in aluminum and brass alloys. Experiments on a small Sargent Welch turbine engine have shown the high sensitivity of embedded FFPI strain sensors to vibration in rolling bearings. Data have been collected in both the time and frequency domain. A new accelerometer design in which a metal-coated fiber containing the FFPI element is soldered directly to a diaphragm in a stainless steel housing shows response similar to a piezoelectric accelerometer in shaker table tests. The high sensitivity of the FFPI accelerometer has been demonstrated in field tests in a Solar Centaur turbine engine, and the design has survived temperatures > 500 C in a test oven. A magnetometer with a physical configuration similar to that of the accelerometer has been used to measure the distance from the sensor head to a rotating shaft made of ferromagnetic material. This device, which functions as a proximity probe, has been used to monitor shaft rotation rate (key phasor application) and as a shaft thrust position sensor. These results indicate the potential for performing critical measurements in turbine engines with FFPI sensors. They can measure acceleration, distance (proximity), strain (as it relates to bearing defect diagnosis), and gas pressure, and can operate at higher temperatures than conventional transducers.

  6. Vibration induced white-feet: Overview and field study of vibration exposure and reported symptoms in workers

    PubMed Central

    Eger, Tammy; Thompson, Aaron; Leduc, Mallorie; Krajnak, Kristine; Goggins, Katie; Godwin, Alison; House, Ron

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Workers who stand on platforms or equipment that vibrate are exposed to foot-transmitted vibration (FTV). Exposure to FTV can lead to vibration white feet/toes resulting in blanching of the toes, and tingling and numbness in the feet and toes. OBJECTIVES The objectives are 1) to review the current state of knowledge of the health risks associated with foot-transmitted vibration (FTV), and 2) to identify the characteristics of FTV and discuss the associated risk of vibration-induced injury. PARTICIPANTS Workers who operated locomotives (n = 3), bolting platforms (n = 10), jumbo drills (n = 7), raise drilling platforms (n = 4), and crushers (n = 3), participated. METHODS A tri-axial accelerometer was used to measure FTV in accordance with ISO 2631-1 guidelines. Frequency-weighted root-mean-square acceleration and the dominant frequency are reported. Participants were also asked to report pain/ache/discomfort in the hands and/or feet. RESULTS Reports of pain/discomfort/ache were highest in raise platform workers and jumbo drill operators who were exposed to FTV in the 40 Hz and 28 Hz range respectively. Reports of discomfort/ache/pain were lowest in the locomotive and crusher operators who were exposed to FTV below 10 Hz. These findings are consistent with animal studies that have shown vascular and neural damage in exposed appendages occurs at frequencies above 40 Hz. CONCLUSIONS Operators exposed to FTV at 40 Hz appear to be at greater risk of experiencing vibration induced injury. Future research is required to document the characteristics of FTV and epidemiological evidence is required to link exposure with injury. PMID:24004754

  7. Can an iPod Touch be used to assess whole-body vibration associated with mining equipment?

    PubMed

    Wolfgang, Rebecca; Di Corleto, Luke; Burgess-Limerick, Robin

    2014-11-01

    The cost and complexity of commercially available whole-body vibration measurement devices is a barrier to the systematic collection of the information required to manage this hazard. The potential for a consumer electronic device to be used to estimate whole-body vibration was assessed by collecting 58 simultaneous pairs of acceleration measurements in three dimensions from a fifth-generation iPod Touch and gold standard whole-body vibration measurement devices, while a range of heavy mining equipment was operated at three surface coal mines. The results suggest that accelerometer data gathered from a consumer electronic device are able to be used to measure whole-body vibration amplitude with 95% confidence of ±0.06 m s(-2) root mean square for the vertical direction (1.96 × standard deviation of the constant error).

  8. Note: A balloon-borne accelerometer technique for measuring atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlton, Graeme J.; Giles Harrison, R.; Nicoll, Keri A.; Williams, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    A weather balloon and its suspended instrument package behave like a pendulum with a moving pivot. This dynamical system is exploited here for the detection of atmospheric turbulence. By adding an accelerometer to the instrument package, the size of the swings induced by atmospheric turbulence can be measured. In test flights, strong turbulence has induced accelerations greater than 5g, where g = 9.81 m s-2. Calibration of the accelerometer data with a vertically orientated lidar has allowed eddy dissipation rate values of between 10-3 and 10-2 m2 s-3 to be derived from the accelerometer data. The novel use of a whole weather balloon and its adapted instrument package can be used as a new instrument to make standardized in situ measurements of turbulence.

  9. In-Flight Estimation of Center of Gravity Position Using All-Accelerometers

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rawashdeh, Yazan Mohammad; Elshafei, Moustafa; Al-Malki, Mohammad Fahad

    2014-01-01

    Changing the position of the Center of Gravity (CoG) for an aerial vehicle is a challenging part in navigation, and control of such vehicles. In this paper, an all-accelerometers-based inertial measurement unit is presented, with a proposed method for on-line estimation of the position of the CoG. The accelerometers' readings are used to find and correct the vehicle's angular velocity and acceleration using an Extended Kalman Filter. Next, the accelerometers' readings along with the estimated angular velocity and acceleration are used in an identification scheme to estimate the position of the CoG and the vehicle's linear acceleration. The estimated position of the CoG and motion measurements can then be used to update the control rules to achieve better trim conditions for the air vehicle. PMID:25244585

  10. Implementation of an iPhone as a wireless accelerometer for quantifying gait characteristics.

    PubMed

    Lemoyne, Robert; Mastroianni, Timothy; Cozza, Michael; Coroian, Cristian; Grundfest, Warren

    2010-01-01

    The capacity to quantify and evaluate gait beyond the general confines of a clinical environment under effectively autonomous conditions may alleviate rampant strain on limited and highly specialized medical resources. An iPhone consists of a three dimensional accelerometer subsystem with highly robust and scalable software applications. With the synthesis of the integral iPhone features, an iPhone application, which constitutes a wireless accelerometer system for gait quantification and analysis, has been tested and evaluated in an autonomous environment. The acquired gait cycle data was transmitted wireless and through email for subsequent post-processing in a location remote to the location where the experiment was conducted. The iPhone application functioning as a wireless accelerometer for the acquisition of gait characteristics has demonstrated sufficient accuracy and consistency.

  11. Activity recognition in planetary navigation field tests using classification algorithms applied to accelerometer data.

    PubMed

    Song, Wen; Ade, Carl; Broxterman, Ryan; Barstow, Thomas; Nelson, Thomas; Warren, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Accelerometer data provide useful information about subject activity in many different application scenarios. For this study, single-accelerometer data were acquired from subjects participating in field tests that mimic tasks that astronauts might encounter in reduced gravity environments. The primary goal of this effort was to apply classification algorithms that could identify these tasks based on features present in their corresponding accelerometer data, where the end goal is to establish methods to unobtrusively gauge subject well-being based on sensors that reside in their local environment. In this initial analysis, six different activities that involve leg movement are classified. The k-Nearest Neighbors (kNN) algorithm was found to be the most effective, with an overall classification success rate of 90.8%.

  12. A hydraulic absorber for wideband vibration reduction in ship hulls

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, W.J.; Lee, Y.J. . Dept. of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering)

    1994-02-01

    A vibration reduction of ship hulls by an active absorber system is proposed. In the scheme, a tuned mass is moved according to the hull vibration as measured by a multi-mode sensing system in order to generate a suitable active force for vibration reduction of hull girder. In order to supply the large amount of required power, a hydraulic servo system is implemented. Then the dynamic characteristic of the hydraulic system is considered for system design. Based on stochastic theory and optimal theory, the control law of the system is derived in order to approach the optimal level of vibration reduction. A 10-t absorber is applied to a 87,000-t oil tanker to demonstrate the feasibility of this scheme. The results show that the multi-peak values of resonance are suppressed in frequency response. Moreover, the vibration excited by propeller and engine is reduced to an extremely efficient level by this scheme.

  13. Vibrating fuel grapple. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Chertock, A.J.; Fox, J.N.; Weissinger, R.B.

    A reactor refueling method is described which utilizes a vibrating fuel grapple for removing spent fuel assemblies from a reactor core. It incorporates a pneumatic vibrator in the grapple head which allows additional withdrawal capability without exceeding the allowable axial force limit. The only moving part in the vibrator is a steel ball, pneumatically driven by a gas, such as argon, around a track, with centrifugal force created by the ball being transmitted through the grapple to the assembly handling socket.

  14. Vibrating fuel grapple

    DOEpatents

    Chertock, deceased, Alan J.; Fox, Jack N.; Weissinger, Robert B.

    1982-01-01

    A reactor refueling method utilizing a vibrating fuel grapple for removing spent fuel assemblies from a reactor core which incorporates a pneumatic vibrator in the grapple head, enabling additional withdrawal capability without exceeding the allowable axial force limit. The only moving part in the vibrator is a steel ball, pneumatically driven by a gas, such as argon, around a track, with centrifugal force created by the ball being transmitted through the grapple to the assembly handling socket.

  15. Distributed Fiber-Optic Sensors for Vibration Detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Jin, Baoquan; Bai, Qing; Wang, Yu; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-07-26

    Distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors receive extensive investigation and play a significant role in the sensor panorama. Optical parameters such as light intensity, phase, polarization state, or light frequency will change when external vibration is applied on the sensing fiber. In this paper, various technologies of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensing are reviewed, from interferometric sensing technology, such as Sagnac, Mach-Zehnder, and Michelson, to backscattering-based sensing technology, such as phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometer, polarization-optical time domain reflectometer, optical frequency domain reflectometer, as well as some combinations of interferometric and backscattering-based techniques. Their operation principles are presented and recent research efforts are also included. Finally, the applications of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors are summarized, which mainly include structural health monitoring and perimeter security, etc. Overall, distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors possess the advantages of large-scale monitoring, good concealment, excellent flexibility, and immunity to electromagnetic interference, and thus show considerable potential for a variety of practical applications.

  16. Distributed Fiber-Optic Sensors for Vibration Detection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Jin, Baoquan; Bai, Qing; Wang, Yu; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-01-01

    Distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors receive extensive investigation and play a significant role in the sensor panorama. Optical parameters such as light intensity, phase, polarization state, or light frequency will change when external vibration is applied on the sensing fiber. In this paper, various technologies of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensing are reviewed, from interferometric sensing technology, such as Sagnac, Mach–Zehnder, and Michelson, to backscattering-based sensing technology, such as phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometer, polarization-optical time domain reflectometer, optical frequency domain reflectometer, as well as some combinations of interferometric and backscattering-based techniques. Their operation principles are presented and recent research efforts are also included. Finally, the applications of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors are summarized, which mainly include structural health monitoring and perimeter security, etc. Overall, distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors possess the advantages of large-scale monitoring, good concealment, excellent flexibility, and immunity to electromagnetic interference, and thus show considerable potential for a variety of practical applications. PMID:27472334

  17. Comparing the 7-Day PAR with a Triaxial Accelerometer for Measuring Time in Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Sloane, Richard; Snyder, Denise Clutter; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Lobach, David; Kraus, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The primary study aim was to evaluate associations of estimated weekly minutes of moderate-to-vigorous intensity exercise from self-reports of the telephone-administered 7-Day Physical Activity Recall (PAR) with data captured by the RT3 triaxial accelerometer. Methods This investigation was undertaken as part of the FRESH START study, a randomized clinical trial that tested an iteratively-tailored diet and exercise mailed print intervention among newly diagnosed breast and prostate cancer survivors. A convenience sample of 139 medically-eligible subjects living within a 60-mile radius of the study center provided both 7-Day PAR and accelerometer data at enrollment. Ultimately n=115 substudy subjects were found eligible for the FRESH START study and randomized to one of two study treatment arms. Follow-up assessments at Year 1 (n=103) and Year 2 (n=99) provided both the 7-Day PAR and accelerometer data. Results There was moderate agreement between the 7-Day PAR and the accelerometer with longitudinal serial correlation coefficients of .54 (baseline), .24 (Year 1) and .53 (Year 2), all P-values < .01, though the accelerometer estimates for weekly time in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity were much higher than those of the 7-Day PAR at all time points. The two methods were poorly correlated in assessing sensitivity to change from baseline to Year 1 (rho=.11, P=.30). Using mixed models repeated measures analysis, both methods exhibited similar non-significant treatment arm X time interaction P-values (7-Day PAR=.22, accelerometer=.23). Conclusions The correlations for three serial time points were in agreement with findings of other studies that compared self-reported time in exercise with physical activity captured by accelerometry. However, these methods capture somewhat different dimensions of physical activity and provide differing estimates of change over time. PMID:19461530

  18. A novel wireless and temperature-compensated SAW vibration sensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Xue, Xufeng; Huang, Yangqing; Liu, Xinlu

    2014-11-03

    A novel wireless and passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) based temperature-compensated vibration sensor utilizing a flexible Y-cut quartz cantilever beam with a relatively substantial proof mass and two one-port resonators is developed. One resonator acts as the sensing device adjacent to the clamped end for maximum strain sensitivity, and the other one is used as the reference located on clamped end for temperature compensation for vibration sensor through the differential approach. Vibration directed to the proof mass flex the cantilever, inducing relative changes in the acoustic propagation characteristics of the SAW travelling along the sensing device, and generated output signal varies in frequency as a function of vibration.  A theoretical mode using the Rayleigh method was established to determine the optimal dimensions of the cantilever beam. Coupling of Modes (COM) model was used to extract the optimal design parameters of the SAW devices prior to fabrication. The performance of the developed SAW sensor attached to an antenna towards applied vibration was evaluated wirelessly by using the precise vibration table, programmable incubator chamber, and reader unit.  High vibration sensitivity of ~10.4 kHz/g, good temperature stability, and excellent linearity were observed in the wireless measurements.

  19. Evaluation of Qualitative Changes in Simulated Periodontal Ligament and Alveolar Bone Using a Noncontact Electromagnetic Vibration Device with a Laser Displacement Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Makoto; Yamaoka, Masaru; Yasukawa, Takuya; Ibi, Haruna; Ogiso, Bunnai

    2016-01-01

    Evaluating periodontal tissue condition is an important diagnostic parameter in periodontal disease. Noncontact electromagnetic vibration device (NEVD) was previously developed to monitor this condition using mechanical parameters. However, this system requires accelerometer on the target tooth. This study assessed application of laser displacement sensor (LDS) to NEVD without accelerometer using experimental tooth models. Tooth models consisted of cylindrical rod, a tissue conditioner, and polyurethane or polyurethane foam to simulate tooth, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone, respectively. Tissue conditioner was prepared by mixing various volumes of liquid with powder. Mechanical parameters (resonant frequency, elastic modulus, and coefficient of viscosity) were assessed using NEVD with the following methods: Group A, measurement with accelerometer; Group B, measurement with LDS in the presence of accelerometer; and Group C, measurement with LDS in the absence of accelerometer. Mechanical parameters significantly decreased with increasing liquid volume. Significant differences were also observed between the polyurethane and polyurethane foam models. Meanwhile, no statistically significant differences were observed between Groups A and B; however, most mechanical parameters in Group C were significantly larger and more distinguishable than those of Groups A and B. LDS could measure mechanical parameters more accurately and clearly distinguished the different periodontal ligament and alveolar bone conditions. PMID:27274995

  20. Machine Learning Methods for Classifying Human Physical Activity from On-Body Accelerometers

    PubMed Central

    Mannini, Andrea; Sabatini, Angelo Maria

    2010-01-01

    The use of on-body wearable sensors is widespread in several academic and industrial domains. Of great interest are their applications in ambulatory monitoring and pervasive computing systems; here, some quantitative analysis of human motion and its automatic classification are the main computational tasks to be pursued. In this paper, we discuss how human physical activity can be classified using on-body accelerometers, with a major emphasis devoted to the computational algorithms employed for this purpose. In particular, we motivate our current interest for classifiers based on Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). An example is illustrated and discussed by analysing a dataset of accelerometer time series. PMID:22205862