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Sample records for acceptable electrostatic precipitator

  1. Electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, T.

    1982-08-03

    An electrostatic precipitator comprising a plurality of flat plate dust-collecting electrodes, arranged in substantially equally spaced and parallel relationship with one another and each having a discharge electrode, or electrodes, on and along the edge of one side thereof with the discharge electrodes of the adjacent dust-collecting electrodes alternately facing in opposite directions; the edges having the discharge electrodes are arranged in a setback relation by some distance in relation to the nearby edges of the adjacent dust-collecting plates, where no discharge electrodes are provided, so that uniform and nonuniform electric fields may be produced.

  2. Electrostatic precipitator manual

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.R.; Dean, A.H.

    1982-01-01

    Studies performed by various individuals and organizations on the application of electrostatic precipitators to the collection of fly ash produced in the combustion of pulverized fuel are summarized in this manual. The scope of the studies evaluated include full scale precipitators and laboratory investigations. It covers measurement of fly ash resistivity, rapping reentrainment, conditioning agents, fundamental operations of hot-side precipitators. The major chapter headings are: Terminology and General Design Features Associated with Electrostatic Precipitators Used to Collect Fly Ash Particles; Fundamental Principles of Electrostatic Precipitation; Limiting Factors Affecting Precipitator Performance; Use of Electrostatic Precipitators for the Collection of Fly Ash; Analysis of Factors influencing ESP Performance; Emissions from Electrostatic Precipitators; Choosig an Electrostatic Precipitator: Cold-side versus Hot-side; Safety Aspects of Working with Electrostatic Precipitators; Maintenance Procedures; Troubleshooting; An Electrostatic Precipitator Computer Model; Features of a Well-equipped Electrostatic Precipitator.

  3. Electrostatic precipitator efficiency enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Polizzotti, D.M.; Steelhammer, J.C.

    1983-05-24

    Method for enhancing the removal of particles from a particleladen gas stream utilizing an electrostatic precipitator, which comprises treating the gas with morpholine or derivatives thereof. Treated particles are found to also have desirable flow characteristics. Particularly effective compositions for the purpose comprise a combination of the morpholine, or derivative thereof, with an electrostatic precipitator efficiency enhancer, and in particular an alkanolamine.

  4. Electrostatic precipitator with precipitator electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Junkers, G.

    1980-12-16

    The invention relates to an electrostatic precipitator with collecting electrodes which are arranged in rows adjacent to each other and in respective pairs at equal distances from a respective discharge electrode with which they cooperate. Spring elements are provided between the collecting electrodes and influence the stiffness and oscillating properties of the array of the collecting electrodes.

  5. Electrostatic particle precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiya, T.; Hikizi, S.; Yabuta, H.

    1984-04-03

    An electrostatic particle precipitator for removing dust particles from a flue gas. The precipitator includes a plurality of collecting electrodes in the shape of plates mounted on endless chains and moving between a first region through which flue gas to be treated flows and a second region where the flow of gas is extremely scarce. A dust removal mechanism is positioned in the second region to remove dust which accumulates on the electrode plates. The moving speed of the collecting electrodes is controlled within a certain range to maintain a prescribed thickness of dust on the electrodes whereby the ocurrence of reverse ionization phenomenon is prevented.

  6. Resistivity Problems in Electrostatic Precipitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Harry J.

    1974-01-01

    The process of electrostatic precipitation has ever-increasing application in more efficient collection of fine particles from industrial air emissions. This article details a large number of new developments in the field. The emphasis is on high resistivity particles which are a common cause of poor precipitator performance. (LS)

  7. Electrostatic precipitator construction having spacers

    SciTech Connect

    Jonelis, J.A.

    1984-10-23

    The present invention relates to an improved construction for an electrostatic precipitator. The electrostatic precipitator collects solid particles carried by a flue gas from a source of combustion. The precipitator includes a plurality of spaced plates for collecting solid particles from the flue gas by electrostatic attraction of the solid particles to the plates. A plurality of elongated electrodes is positioned among the plates. Each of the electrodes is mounted between a pair of adjacent plates. Each of the electrodes is parallel to the other electrodes and is parallel to the plates. A plurality of identical spacers is positioned between adjacent plates to hold the plates in a flat attitude and to maintain adjacent surfaces of adjacent plates equidistantly spaced from one another. Each of the spacers is an elongated single unitary member and has one end fixed to a surface of one of a pair of adjacent surfaces of the plates and the other end abutting the other of the adjacent surfaces.

  8. Electrostatic Precipitator (ESP) TRAINING MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual assists engineers in using a computer program, the ESPVI 4.0W, that models all elements of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The program is a product of the Electric Power Research Institute and runs in the Windows environment. Once an ESP is accurately modeled, the...

  9. Portable liquid collection electrostatic precipitator

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Duane C.; DeGange, John J.; Halverson, Justin E.

    2005-10-18

    A portable liquid collection electrostatic collection precipitator for analyzing air is provided which is a relatively small, self-contained device. The device has a tubular collection electrode, a reservoir for a liquid, and a pump. The pump pumps the liquid into the collection electrode such that the liquid flows down the exterior of the collection electrode and is recirculated to the reservoir. An air intake is provided such that air to be analyzed flows through an ionization section to ionize analytes in the air, and then flows near the collection electrode where ionized analytes are collected. A portable power source is connected to the air intake and the collection electrode. Ionizable constituents in the air are ionized, attracted to the collection electrode, and precipitated in the liquid. The precipitator may also have an analyzer for the liquid and may have a transceiver allowing remote operation and data collection.

  10. SUPER ESP: Ultimate electrostatic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Plaks, N.

    1991-01-01

    The paper discusses SUPER ESP, a new electrostatic precipitator (ESP) concept, enabling high collection efficiencies with considerably smaller collection areas than has previously been possible. The new concept allows a major reduction in ESP size by using an alternating sequence of prechargers and short collector sections. The length of the collection section in each precharger/collector pair (module) dominates the optimization. The size reduction is greater for ESPs operating with high resistivity particulate matter than with low resistivity particulate matter. The relationship in number of modules, collector section size, and overall ESP collection is presented and discussed. Comparisons are given of ESP size for both conventional and SUPER ESP technology operating with either high or low resistivity particulate matter. Because of the size reduction, the cost of the SUPER ESP is projected to be lower than that of a conventional ESP of comparable efficiencY. The paper is based on an ESP model, ESPVI 4.0.

  11. Electrostatic precipitator control for high resistivity particulate

    SciTech Connect

    Bibbo, P.P.; Hankins, F.E.; Jakoplic, R.

    1982-01-19

    A method and apparatus are described for optimizing the operating efficiency of an electrostatic precipitator based on controlling the average input power of the precipitator electrodes in response to control signals derived by sensing changes in specific instantaneous peak voltages associated with the average electrode voltages. The method is particularly well suited for electrostatic precipitators processing high resistivity fly ash and exhibiting an inflection region in its kvmin electrode voltage characteristic. The apparatus is organized to serve as a stand alone control system, or as an adjunct to existing electrostatic precipitator control systems.

  12. Improved Electronic Control for Electrostatic Precipitators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    Electrostatic precipitators remove particulate matter from smoke created by burning refuse. Smoke exposed to electrostatic field, and particles become electrically charged and migrate to electrically charged collecting surfaces. New microprocessor-based electronic control maintains precipitator power at maximum particulate-collection level. Control automatically senses changes in smoke composition due to variations in fuel or combustion and adjusts precipitator voltage and current accordingly. Also, sensitive yet stable fault detection provided.

  13. Electrostatic precipitator having apparatus for sensing electrostatic field strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Perryman, J.W.

    1984-03-27

    An electrostatic precipitator (10) of the type having a casing (12) defining a precipitation chamber (6) wherein a plurality of discharge electrode frames (32) are disposed alternately between a plurality of collecting electrode plates (20). Paired probe devices (50) are mounted on the collecting electrode plates for sensing the strength of the electrostatic field generated by at least one discharge electrode wire (36) at at least one location on each of the collecting electrode plates (20) disposed adjacent thereto. The electrostatic field strength sensed by the paired probe devices are compared with each other to provide an indication of the degree of imbalance, if any, existing between the sensed electrostatic fields experienced by the bounding electrode plates. The existence of an imbalance and the strength of the electrostatic fields on the bounding collecting electrode plates and the degree of any such imbalance provide an indication of whether or not the discharge electrode frame is properly positioned within the assembly of collecting electrode plates.

  14. Art and the science of electrostatic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    White, H.J.

    1984-11-01

    An essay on the art and science of electrostatic precipitation was presented by Harry J. White in November 1982 at a symposium in Tokyo for the Institute of Electrostatics Japan. The paper is written in a philosophic rather than a scientific vein in order to express a personal viewpoint distilled over many years on the subject. In examining the roles of art and science in electrostatic precipitation it has been shown how both are operative and essential. The long-term trend is for less dependence on the art phase, and more on the science. But there is no indication that art and intuition will not continue to be very important. This is especially true in precipitator design which even today is almost as much an art as it is a science.

  15. Electrostatic Precipitation in Nearly Pure Gaseous Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhler, Charles; Calle, Carlos; Clements, Sid; Cox, Bobby; Ritz, Mindy

    2008-01-01

    Electrostatic precipitation was performed in a nearly pure gaseous nitrogen system as a possible remedy for black dust contaminant from high pressure 6000 psi lines at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. The results of a prototype electrostatic precipitator that was built and tested using nitrogen gas at standard atmospheric pressures is presented. High voltage pulsed waveforms are generated using a rotating spark gap system at 30 Hz. A unique dust delivery system utilizing the Venturi effect was devised that supplies a given amount of dust per unit time for testing purposes.

  16. Electrostatic precipitator and discharge electrode therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Bojsen, E.M.

    1981-07-07

    A discharge electrode is disclosed for producing ion emission in an electrostatic precipitator. The electrode includes a rigid cylindrical tubular member having a plurality of protrusions extending outwardly therefrom. The protrusions preferably have rounded free end portions and are formed either by individual rods integrally attached to the member or by one or more wires attached to the surface of the member and having folds which are selectively spaced apart to provide the desired dispersion of the ion emission. The wires may also be embedded in depressions defined in the surface of the member. The invention also pertains to an improved electrostatic precipitator incorporating the inventive discharge electrode.

  17. OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL FOR ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual focuses on the operation and maintenance (O/M) of typical electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). It summarizes available information on theory and design in sufficient detail to provide a basic background O/M portions of the manual. Although O/M-related air pollution prob...

  18. Dust particles precipitation in AC/DC electrostatic precipitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworek, A.; Marchewicz, A.; Krupa, A.; Sobczyk, A. T.; Czech, T.; Antes, T.; Śliwiński, Ł.; Kurz, M.; Szudyga, M.; Rożnowski, W.

    2015-10-01

    Submicron and nanoparticles removal from flue or exhaust gases remain still a challenge for engineers. The most effective device used for gas cleaning in power plants or industry is electrostatic precipitator, but its collection efficiency steeply decreases for particles smaller than 1 micron. In this paper, fractional collection efficiency of two-stage electrostatic precipitator comprising of alternating electric field charger and DC supplied parallel-plate collection stage has been investigated. The total number collection efficiency for PM2.5 particles was higher than 95% and mass collection efficiency >99%. Fractional collection efficiency for particles between 300 nm and 1 μm was >95%.

  19. Electrostatic precipitator upgrading -- Twelve years of progress

    SciTech Connect

    Grieco, G.J.

    1997-09-01

    In 1984 the author presented a paper entitled ``Electrostatic Precipitator Upgrading: A Technology Overview`` which reviewed various technologies for electrostatic precipitator performance enhancement in the utility industry. This evaluation was based on a set of criteria which included: commercial status; space requirements; required outage time for installation; installed cost; operating cost; range of applicability; and performance enhancement factor. The upgrade technologies discussed and evaluated included: gas/particulate flow upgrade; microprocessor controller retrofit; transformer-rectifier (T/R) set upgrade; pulse energization; electrode rapping modification; flue gas conditioning agents such as sulfur trioxide, ammonia and sodium; pulse energization; precipitator rebuild; and precipitator retrofit. The findings of this 1984 survey are summarized on Table 1. The installed costs listed on this table range from a low end cost associated with large precipitators with 250,000 ft{sup 2} of collecting electrode plate area and above, to a high end cost for small precipitators with only 25,000 ft{sup 2} of plate area. Twelve years later this subject is revisited and, surprisingly, significant progress has been made--this in spite of what some experts would characterize as a mature and somewhat stagnant technology field. Commercially proven techniques such as advanced flue gas conditioning, sonic horns, selective fuel blending using powder river basin coals, prudent selection of electrode geometry, and pulse energization are discussed and evaluated. Updated costs are presented for these technologies.

  20. Automatic control and management of electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Durga Prasad, N.V.P.R.; Lakshminarayana, T.; Narasimham, J.R.K.; Verman, T.M.; Krishnam Raju, C.S.R.

    1999-05-01

    The efficient operation of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in practice depends upon many variables, such as charging method, particle size, gas flow, temperature, dust resistivity, etc. With the air pollution control requirements becoming increasingly stringent, it is essential to closely monitor and accurately control the key parameters of an ESP control system. The efficient functioning of an ESP normally means minimizing power consumption and maximizing dust collection. Several control strategies can be adopted to meet this broad requirement. In this paper, a distributed control technique of an ESP, which uses the actual dust emission and boiler load as feedback inputs has been explained. The Electrostatic Precipitator Management System, which is a system designed by Bharat Heavy Electricals Ltd., Hyderabad, India, to meet the above control strategies using the distributed architecture to achieve efficient ESP operation is also described.

  1. Discharge electrode wire assembly for electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Ivester, F. D.; Troulias, J. R.

    1985-03-05

    An electrostatic precipitator having a casing defining a precipitation chamber wherein a plurality of discharge electrode frames are disposed alternately between a plurality of collecting electrode plates. Each discharge electrode frame is comprised of a plurality of individual discharge electrode wires tautly strung across a support frame. Individual discharge electrode wires are maintained in a taut condition during operation by tensioning coil springs which interconnect neighboring discharge electrode wires to take-up any lengthening of the discharge electrode wires in a horizontal direction.

  2. Plate electrode arrangement for an electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Wooldridge, J.E.

    1982-06-01

    An electrode plate arrangement for an electrostatic precipitator including a plurality of essentially identical plate assemblies secured in an opposing fashion to the opposite sides of a gridlike mounting frame extending across the interior of the precipitator. The plate assemblies on the upstream side of the frame include an ionizing zone for the dirty gas stream which feeds into serially aligned collecting zones in the opposing assemblies which in turn feed into a deionizing zone in the plate assemblies on the downstream side of the frame.

  3. Electrostatic precipitator performance: Improvement with frame stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Optimum electrostatic precipitator performance depends upon maintaining proper clearances between the high voltage components. Historically, the high voltage discharge electrode systems was either unstabilized and allowed to swing between the collection plate surfaces, or was stabilized with various mechanical methods. Free swinging electric fields will normally result in higher spark rates and reduced available power for collection of dust particles. Various mechanical stabilization methods have produced unsatisfactory results. The subject of this paper discusses an innovative mechanical stabilization method which will provide proper clearance for the high voltage components which will maintain maximum precipitator performance. The end of this report includes actual case studies where stabilization resulted in improved performance and reliability.

  4. Pulsed power supply for an electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Santamaria, G.T.

    1986-07-15

    An electrostatic precipitator power supply circuit is described for generating voltage pulses on the precipitator while allowing a residual collection voltage to be retained on the precipitator during intervals between pulses, where the voltage of the pulses is substantially in excess of the residual voltage, the power supply circuit comprising: means for generating the high voltage pulses at the secondary inductance of a step-up transformer by discharging a capacitor through the primary inductance of the step-up transformer; the electrostatic precipitator connected to the secondary inductance of the step-up transformer to receive the high voltage pulses; and means for returning a portion of the high voltage pulses to the capacitor, and for maintaining the residual voltage on the precipitator during interpulse periods including means with a variable impedance adapted for providing a maximum impedance during interpulse periods and a minimum impedance during high voltage pulses and means for causing the variable impedance means to exhibit a minimum impedance during the return of a portion of the high voltage pulses.

  5. Discharge electrode structure for electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, T.J.

    1980-10-28

    An electrostatic precipitator is described for extracting particles and other contaminants from a gaseous stream to be purified, the contaminants being ionized by means of a discharge electrode structure which includes a column of dielectric material whose central axis is coincident with the axis of a collector tube within which the column is disposed. The column has a crosssectional geometry that defines a circular series of longitudinally-extending niches. Supported between the ends of the column is a circular array of fine gauge wires each of which is suspended with a respective niche. A high voltage is impressed between the wires in the array and the inner surface of the collector tube to create an electrostatic field in the annular region between the discharge electrode structure and the tube to ionize contaminants in the gaseous stream passing therethrough. The surfaces of the niches acquire bound electrostatic charges whereby the voltage gradient established between the discharge electrode structure and the tube is substantially uniform, thereby attaining optimum collecting and ionization conditions.

  6. Electrostatic precipitator having high strength discharge electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Bakke, E.; Willett, H.P.

    1983-06-21

    There is disclosed an electrostatic precipitator with a discharge electrode having dimensional and configuration characteristics which provide high field strength and high current density particularly in a wet electrostatic precipitator. The round cylindrical collector tube of length (L) and with an inner diameter (D) has a coaxially positioned discharge electrode having an electrode supporting mast of a diameter from 0.25 to 40 D with an electrically conducting closed screw fli secured to the mast. The screw flight has an overall diameter (D) of from 0.33 to 0.67 D with a pitch of from d-d/2 to d-d and an overall length of from one screw revolution to l-(D-d), preferably one-half L or less and most preferably one to two revolutions. The short screw flight is economical and readily adjusted. The screw flight has a thickness of from about 0.05 to 15 inch and has a symmetrically curved outer edge. Collector tube is flared at its lower end to direct water away from the electrode mast as the water is discharged from the tube. The discharge electrode is supported from above and centered by means of adjustable tie rods at its lower end.

  7. Electrostatic precipitator having traversing collector washing mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Bricker, J.C.; Elsbernd, C.A.

    1980-12-23

    An electrostatic precipitator air cleaner is described that includes a number of precipitator cells having spaced parallel plates for collecting dirt particles, and a vertically disposed traversing pipe-like spray header containing a number of spray nozzles for directing a spray of wash or rinse fluid onto the collecting plates in order to remove collected particles. The header is traversed horizontally across the precipitator cells by means of a trolley supported by a rail-like guide member and reciprocated between a home position and an extended position by means of a rotating elongated helical drive screw cooperating with a gear-like follower attached to the trolley, such that the rotation of the screw produces linear motion of the header. The header is connected to a source of wash or rinse fluid by means of swivel connections and a flexible conduit. An elongated flat resilient fluid impervious strip containing a longitudinal slit in sliding sealable engagement with the header is positioned between the traversing mechanism and the spray nozzles to prevent infiltration of the precipitator airstream or wash fluid into the area occupied by the traversing mechanism. The threaded follower may also be disengaged from the helical drive screw and the header moved manually to any position along its length of travel.

  8. Use of membrane collectors in electrostatic precipitators.

    PubMed

    Bayless, D J; Pasic, H; Alam, M K; Shi, L; Haynes, B; Cochran, J; Khan, W

    2001-10-01

    Membrane collection surfaces, developed and patented by researchers at Ohio University, were used to replace steel plates in a dry electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Such replacement facilitates tension-based rapping, which shears the adhered particle layer from the collector surface more effectively than hammer-based rapping. Tests were performed to measure the collection efficiency of the membranes and to quantify the potential improvements of this novel cleaning technique with respect to re-entrainment. Results indicate that even semiconductor materials (e.g., carbon fibers) collect ash nearly as efficiently as steel plates, potentially indicating that collection surface resistivity is primarily dictated by the accumulated ash layer and not by the underlying plate conductivity. In addition, virtually all sheared particles separated from the collecting membranes fell within the boundary layer of the membrane, indicating extremely low potential for re-entrainment.

  9. Free base amino alcohols as electrostatic precipitator efficiency enhancers

    SciTech Connect

    Polizzotti, D.M.; Steelhammer, J.C.

    1980-12-16

    A method is disclosed for improving operation of an electrostatic precipitator. By adding free base amino alcohol to a particle-laden gas being treated by the precipitator, the efficiency of particle removal is significantly enhanced.

  10. Parametric testing of coal electrostatic precipitator performance

    SciTech Connect

    Canadas, L.; Navarrete, B.; Ollero, P.; Salvador, L.

    1997-12-31

    The effect of internal geometry, electrode type, and operating conditions on the performance of a coal electrostatic precipitator (ESP) has been analyzed by means of an extensive parametric testing program. Tests under different conditions of plate spacing, discharge electrodes, gas velocity, and energization wave form have been performed using two extreme coal types, with very high and low resistivity ashes, respectively. The study was made by means of a pilot installation operating with a flue gas slipstream drawn upstream of a power plant ESP. The experimental plant includes a specifically designed pilot ESP, able to admit an internal modification of plate spacing and electrode type. The ESP is equipped with a microprocessor controlled power supply which can generate both continuous and intermittent rectified current. The measured sensitivity of the precipitation process to the dust properties, filter configuration, electrode type, and energization method is presented, covering both the ESP efficiency evolution and the associated power consumption. The results of this work allow to extract practical conclusions about specification of ESP design and size for a given application, and assess the conditions in which use of wide plate spacing, new electrode geometries, or intermittent current are actually advantageous. 11 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Electrostatic precipitation of condensed acid mist

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This project addresses the acid mist that is formed by condensation of sulfuric acid vapor in flue gas from coal-fired utility boilers. An acid mist can be formed whenever the flue gas temperature approaches the prevailing acid dew point. This commonly occurs when the gas is subjected to rapid adiabatic cooling in a wet scrubber system for flue gas desulfurization. Acid mists can also sometimes result from unexpected temperature excursions caused by air inleakage, load cycling, and start-up operations. A wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) is the best control option for acid mist. The mist would blind a fabric filter and attach glass fiber fabrics. A wet ESP is required because the acid would quickly corrode the plates in a conventional dry ESP. The wet ESP also offers the advantages of no rapping reentrainment and no sensitivity to fly ash resistivity. Therefore, this program has been structured around the use of a compact, wet ESP to control acid mist emissions. Progress to date is discussed. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Electrostatic precipitation of condensed acid mist

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlin, R.S.

    1989-11-01

    Southern Research Institute is developing a compact, wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) to control acid mist missions from high-sulfur coal combustion. The WESP is being developed as a retrofit technology for existing coal-fired power plants, particularly those equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers. Acid mist emissions can be a significant problem at these facilities because the sulfuric acid vapor in the flue gas is converted to a very fine mist that is not collected in the scrubber system. Conventional mist eliminators are not adequate in this application due to the very fine size of the mist droplets. The potential for corrosion also makes it difficult to use a fabric filter or a conventional, dry ESP in this application. Therefore, this research project has been structured around the development of a compact WESP that could be retrofit on top of an existing scrubber or within an existing flue gas duct. This paper describes the development and testing of a prototype WESP for the utility acid mist application. Testing was conducted with combustion of sulfur-doped gas to simulate the acid mist alone, and with a combination of coal and sulfur-doped gas to simulate the mixture of acid mist and fly ash downstream from a scrubber. The performance of the WESP test unit was modeled using two different cylindrical-geometry computer models: a current-seeking'' model and a current-specific'' model. 8 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Electrostatic precipitation of condensed acid mist

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This project addresses the acid mist that is formed by condensation of sulfuric acid vapor in flue gas from coal-fired utility boilers. An acid mist can be formed whenever the flue gas temperature approaches the prevailing acid dew point. This commonly occurs when the gas is subjected to rapid adiabatic cooling in a wet scrubber system for flue gas desulfurization. Acid mists can also sometimes result from unexpected temperature excursions caused by air inleakage, load cycling, and start-up operations. A wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) is the best control option for acid mist. The mist would blind a fabric filter and attack glass fiber fabrics. A wet ESP is required because the acid would quickly corrode the plates in a conventional dry ESP. The wet ESP also offers the advantages of no rapping reentrainment and no sensitivity to fly ash resistivity. Therefore, this program has been structured around the use of a compact, wet ESP to control acid mist emissions. 7 refs.

  14. Achieving low particulate emissions with electrostatic precipitators

    SciTech Connect

    Mastropietro, R.A.

    1994-12-31

    A great deal of literature has been published in recent years maligning electrostatic precipitators (ESP) as not being effective in achieving low emissions, or as being less effective than fabric filters in collecting fine particulate. This observation is not valid, provided the ESP is properly sized. The misconception comes from comparing modern high efficiency fabric filters, with 1950-1970`s vintage ESP`s. ESP`s were sized much smaller in that era, basically just for {open_quotes}good-neighbor{close_quotes} policies. Figure 1 shows the historical sizing practices for coal-fired utility boilers. From this, it can be seen that ESP`s from the 50`s through the early 1970`s were only about one-fourth to one-half the size of modern ESP`s. These undersized ESP`s, often in the presence of a coal switch to low sulfur coal, sometimes perform poorly. When replaced with a fabric filter, the claim is made that the ESP did not work and that a fabric filter does work properly. Had the ESP been increased in size to modern standards, it too would work properly.

  15. Membrane-based wet electrostatic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    David J. Bayless; Liming Shi; Gregory Kremer; Ben J. Stuart; James Reynolds; John Caine

    2005-06-01

    Emissions of fine particulate matter, PM2.5, in both primary and secondary form, are difficult to capture in typical dry electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). Wet (or waterbased) ESPs are well suited for collection of acid aerosols and fine particulates because of greater corona power and virtually no re-entrainment. However, field disruptions because of spraying (misting) of water, formation of dry spots (channeling), and collector surface corrosion limit the applicability of current wet ESPs in the control of secondary PM2.5. Researchers at Ohio University have patented novel membrane collection surfaces to address these problems. Water-based cleaning in membrane collectors made of corrosion-resistant fibers is facilitated by capillary action between the fibers, maintaining an even distribution of water. This paper presents collection efficiency results of lab-scale and pilot-scale testing at First Energy's Bruce Mansfield Plant for the membrane-based wet ESP. The data indicate that a membrane wet ESP was more effective at collecting fine particulates, acid aerosols, and oxidized mercury than the metal-plate wet ESP, even with {approximately}15% less collecting area. 15 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Electrostatic precipitation of condensed acid mist

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlin, R.S.

    1991-04-01

    This report deals with the second part (Phase 2) of a two-phased study of the control of acid mist emissions using a compact, wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP). The goal of the study was to determine the degree of acid mist control that could be achieved when a compact WESP was used to replace or augment the mist eliminators in a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. Phase 1 of the study examined the electrical operation of a lab-scale WESP collecting an acid mist from a coal combustion pilot plant equipped with a spray chamber. The results of this study were used to develop and validate a computer model of the WESP. In Phase 2, measurements were made at two utility scrubber installations to determine the loadings of acid mist, fly ash, and scrubber carryover. These measurements were used as input to the computer model to project the performance of retrofitted WESPs at both of the utility test sites. Phase 1 results showed that excellent electrical operating conditions could be achieved, but very high loadings of acid mist or the fine fly ash tended to degrade electrical operation because of space charge suppression of the corona current. Measurements made at the utility sites under Phase 2 showed that acid mist accounted for 40 to 57% of the total particulate mass, while fly ash and scrubber solids accounted for 40 to 55% and 1.0 to 3.4%. Impactor samples from both test sites showed an increase in acid content with decreasing particle size. 9 refs., 14 figs., 13 tabs.

  17. 4. EXTERIOR VIEW OF ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATORS FOR OPEN HEARTH NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. EXTERIOR VIEW OF ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATORS FOR OPEN HEARTH NO. 5 (Martin Stupich) - U.S. Steel Homestead Works, Open Hearth Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Homestead, Allegheny County, PA

  18. 5. EXTERIOR VIEW OF ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATORS FOR OPEN HEARTH NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. EXTERIOR VIEW OF ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATORS FOR OPEN HEARTH NO. 5 (Martin Stupich) - U.S. Steel Homestead Works, Open Hearth Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Homestead, Allegheny County, PA

  19. Combined electrostatic precipitator and acidic gas removal system

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, L.E.; Plaks, N.

    1989-12-05

    This patent describes a method of retrofitting an apparatus for removing acidic gas and particulate matter from air. The device to be retrofit including an electrostatic precipitator, lacking a precharger, positioned within a housing, a flue gas generating means outside the housing, an entry port in the housing and upstream of the electrostatic precipitator; an exit port in the housing and downstream of the electrostatic precipitator; and ductwork, outside the housing, leading from the generating means to the entry port. The retrofitting comprising the steps of: substituting electrostatic filtration units, for dry electrostatic precipitation, each comprising a precharger and a downstream particle collector having wires of from 1/4 to 1/2 inch in diameter for the electrostatic precipitator. The substituted units being designed so as to occupy less space in the housing that the electrostatic filter lacking a precharger, thereby leaving free space within the housing between a one of the prechargers which is first downstream from the entry port and the exit port and inserting an acidic gas removal means, within the housing.

  20. Controlled trial of an electrostatic precipitator in childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, E A; Elliott, R B

    1980-09-13

    A cross-over trial was conducted on 10 children with moderate to severe asthma, who had positive skin tests to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and nocturnal wheeze. An electrostatic precipitator was used during the night to remove airborne particles from the bedroom. During use of the precipitator peak expiratory flow rates were no better than in a control period.

  1. Electrostatic precipitator with modular cabinet and cell washer

    SciTech Connect

    Kitsch, E.A.; Krause, J.A.

    1983-02-15

    A roof-mounted electrostatic air cleaner for connection to an exhaust duct has a sectionalized cabinet with detachably connected, directable inlet and outlet sections and an intermediate precipitator section, a traveling manifold with multiple spray nozzles is arranged to wash the outer surfaces of precipitator cell end plates as well as both surfaces of intermediate collector plates, and a construction and arrangement of large capacity precipitator cells provides for their convenient and safe assembly and removal from the cabinet.

  2. An Electrostatic Precipitator System for the Martian Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, C. I.; Mackey, P. J.; Hogue, M. D.; Johansen, M. R.; Phillips, J. R., III; Clements, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    Human exploration missions to Mars will require the development of technologies for the utilization of the planet's own resources for the production of commodities. However, the Martian atmosphere contains large amounts of dust. The extraction of commodities from this atmosphere requires prior removal of this dust. We report on our development of an electrostatic precipitator able to collect Martian simulated dust particles in atmospheric conditions approaching those of Mars. Extensive experiments with an initial prototype in a simulated Martian atmosphere showed efficiencies of 99%. The design of a second prototype with aerosolized Martian simulated dust in a flow-through is described. Keywords: Space applications, electrostatic precipitator, particle control, particle charging

  3. Electrostatic precipitator for metal and particulate emission control

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.L.; Beltran, M.

    2000-03-01

    Improving air pollution control systems is crucial for incinerators to be an option for sewage sludge disposal. Combinations of venturi and tray tower scrubbers are the most popular air pollution control system for sewage sludge incinerators. Recently wet electrostatic precipitators have been installed downstream of the scrubbing system to ensure the compliance of new regulations. Performance and stack tests were conducted on sludge incinerators at Somerset Raritan Valley Sewage Authority and New England Treatment Company. Efficiencies in terms of heavy metal and particulate removals are presented. This paper also describes sewage sludge incinerators, existing air pollution control systems, design considerations of the wet electrostatic precipitator, as well as sampling and analysis methods.

  4. On Deposition Efficiency of Point-To-Plate Electrostatic Precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Alexander; Cowin, James P.

    2002-03-11

    The deposition efficiency of a point-to-plate electrostatic precipitator onto a target substrate was studied in this work. The efficiency when measured in the traditional way, by the loss of particles from the exiting air, was like in many others such devices, typically high (80-90%). However the actual useful deposition onto the target substrate was never more than 50% and sometime as low as a few percent only. Therefore, special caution should be taken in design and testing of electrostatic precipitators for quantitative sampling of aerosols.

  5. Electrostatic precipitation of condensed acid mist

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and demonstrate a compact, wet electrostatic collector for condensed acid mist in power plant flue gas. The following are project objectives: (1) fabrication of laboratory-version of the WESP; (2) optimization of the WESP performance through laboratory tests with a non-volatile simulant aerosol having a size distribution similar to the acid mist; (3) demonstration of adequate collection of actual acid mist in a pilot coal combustion facility under conditions simulating full-scale power plant burning high-sulfur coal; (4) development of computer model of the WESP process must be developed to assist in the process optimization, interpretation of test results, and extrapolation to full scale; and (5) solicitation of utility participation in a follow-on demonstration of the WESP concept at a full-scale power plant. The WESP fabrication, laboratory and pilot combustor testing, and computer modeling is discussed. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Electric field directed control of dust in electrostatic precipitators

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfand, P.C.

    1981-01-13

    In an electrostatic precipitator, a downwardly directed corona discharge is produced at the entrance to dust collecting hoppers attached at the bottom of the precipitator chamber, the corona discharge being produced by an array of corona discharge points connected to a high voltage source and a grounded electrode grid positioned below the corona points near the hopper entrance either in the hopper or in the chamber.

  7. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M.D.

    1993-04-16

    Several tasks have been completed in a program to evaluate additives to improve fine particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Screening tests and laboratory evaluations of additives are summarized in this report. Over 20 additives were evaluated; four were found to improve flyash precipitation rates. The Insitec particle analyzer was also evaluated; test results show that the analyzer will provide accurate sizing and counting information for particles in the size range of [le] 10 [mu]m dia.

  8. Electrostatic precipitation of condensed acid mist

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This project addresses the problem of acid mist formed by condensation of sulfuric acid vapor in flue gas from coal-fired utility boilers. Acid mists can sometimes constitute a significant portion of the total particulate emissions from power plants burning high-sulfur coals. Complete condensation of 10 ppM of acid vapor produces a condensed acid mass loading of about 0.02 gr/dscf or 0.03 lb/MBtu, equivalent to the total allowable mass emissions under the revised (1979) New Source Performance Standards (2). The purpose of this project is to develop and demonstrated a compact, wet electrostatic collector for condensed acid mist in power plant flue gas. The project is organized in two phases. Phase I involved the WESP fabrication, laboratory and pilot combustor testing, and computer modeling. Phase II involves the solicitation of a utility demonstration site, preliminary site measurements, and planning for the demonstration test program. Only Phase II work will be addressed in this discussion which includes: site selection, site measurements, computer modeling and demonstration plan, and phase II reporting. 9 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. Martian Atmospheric Dust Mitigation for ISRU Intakes via Electrostatic Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, James R., III; Pollard, Jacob R. S.; Johansen, Michael R.; Mackey, Paul J.; Clements, Sid; Calle, Carlos I.

    2016-01-01

    This document is the presentation to be given at the 2016 American Society of Civil Engineers Earth and Space Conference to examine the concept of using electrostatic precipitation for Martian atmospheric dust mitigation of the intakes of in-situ resource utilization reactors.

  10. Optimization of the rapping process of an intermittent electrostatic precipitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloua, F.; Tilmatine, A.; Gouri, R.; Kadous, N.; Dascalescu, L.

    2008-01-01

    Intermittent operation mode is specific to electrostatic precipitators (ESP) used in workshops where the polluting product is produced in a discontinuous way. The rapping system is necessary in order to ensure a continuous and effective operation of a dry electrostatic precipitator, but causes at the same time, a problem of re-entrainment of dust and thus the degradation of filtration efficiency. The objective of this paper is to propose a procedure based on the methodology of experimental designs (Tagushi's Methodology) aiming at optimizing the rapping process; it consists to determine optimal values of rapping, i.e. the moment, the position and the force of rapping. Several “one-factor-at-a-time" experimental designs followed by a Full Factorial design, made it possible to model the process and to analyze interactions between the factors. The experiments were carried out on a laboratory experimental device which simulates an industrial precipitator with intermittent operation.

  11. Effective capture of respirable sized particulates using electrostatic precipitator technology

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, K.R.; Sanyal, A.

    1999-11-01

    The electrostatic precipitator widely used for the prevention of particulate pollution from industrial sources, can also be effective, when correctly sized and operated, for the collection of respirable fine particulates. That is, those below some 2 micron diameter, particularly of heavy metals which tend to be cumulative and hence injurious to health. Following a review of the basic principles of operation of electrostatic precipitators, specifically addressed to the capture of fine particulates, an outline of the various types of equipment used for collecting solid and liquid (mist) particulates will be discussed. Finally some typical precipitator applications will be illustrated, together with suggestions as to how efficiencies can be further increased to meet compliance with any potential future changes in legislation.

  12. Inward electrostatic precipitation of interplanetary particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rulison, Aaron J.; Flagan, Richard C.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1993-01-01

    An inward precipitator collects particles initially dispersed in a gas throughout either a cylindrical or spherical chamber onto a small central planchet. The instrument is effective for particle diameters greater than about 1 micron. One use is the collection of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) which are stopped in a noble gas (xenon) by drag and ablation after perforating the wall of a thin-walled spacecraft-mounted chamber. First, the particles are positively charged for several seconds by the corona production of positive xenon ions from inward facing needles placed on the chamber wall. Then an electric field causes the particles to migrate toward the center of the instrument and onto the planchet. The collection time (on the order of hours for a 1 m radius spherical chamber) is greatly reduced by the use of optimally located screens which reapportion the electric field. Some of the electric field lines terminate on the wires of the screens so a fraction of the total number of particles in the chamber is lost. The operation of the instrument is demonstrated by experiments which show the migration of carbon soot particles with radius of approximately 1 micron in a 5 cm diameter cylindrical chamber with a single field enhancing screen toward a 3.2 mm central collection rod.

  13. Lagrangian simulation of turbulent particle dispersion in electrostatic precipitators

    SciTech Connect

    Soldati, A.; Casal, M.; Andreussi, P.; Banerjee, S.

    1997-06-01

    Industrial design of electrostatic precipitators is based on the transport theory developed by Deutsch (1922), which assumes that transverse turbulent mixing is effective enough to maintain the concentration profile uniform throughout the cross section (i.e., turbulent diffusivity is assumed infinite). To improve understanding of turbulent particle dispersion under the influence of electrostatic forces, a database on particle trajectories was first generated, based on the flow field from a direct numerical simulation of a plate-plate precipitator. The effect of various parameters, such as particle size, charge and particle migration velocity, on dispersion and collection efficiency was investigated. Results show that particle concentration profiles are not uniform due to finite values of turbulent diffusion coefficient. The simulations indicate that the early stages of particle collection are controlled by particle migration velocity, while final stages are controlled by turbulence diffusion mechanisms.

  14. Electrostatic precipitator apparatus having an improved ion generating means

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, J.E.; Fitch, R.A.; Mondelli, A.A.

    1982-09-14

    A multi-stage system is disclosed for removing particles from a gaseous medium and comprises an upstream precipitating stage of spaced corona discharging wires between parallel collecting plates, followed by a downstream precipitating stage having one or more electrically charges shells with flat sides generally parallel to collecting side plates for providing a uniform electric field in the medium carrying space, the sides of the shell having openings through which ions generated in the interior pass into the gaseous medium. A corona discharge apparatus inside the shell produces the ions at predictable, generally uniformly spaced locations. Alternative embodiments of the system include another stage located ahead of the upstream stage for removing the larger particles in the gaseous medium which can comprise a gravitational precipitator, a cyclone separator, a low voltage electrostatic precipitator or a low voltage ion beam generator. A further embodiment of the system includes a downstream electrostatic precipitator stage for recharging and removing particles which may become reentrained in the gaseous medium after initial collection thereof.

  15. Wet electrostatic precipitator eliminates over 90% of previous emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    After ten years of searching for an effective air pollution control device, engineers at Teledyne Wah Chang Albany (TWCA) found that zirconium was the best metal in withstanding the gases generated in the manufacturing process of zirconium and hafnium. The best equipment was a two-stage, modular wet electrostatic precipitator to collect the submicron-size particulates in the form of metal oxides, ammonium sulfate, ammonium sulfite and ammonium bisulfite. All nonmetal components of the precipitator were fabricated entirely from industrial grade reinforced thermoset plastics. All metal components, including process water spray components, pipe fittings, and emitting electrodes - to be charged at 45,000 V - were fabricated from zirconium. Stack emission tests indicate the precipitator has eliminated over 90% of previous particulate emissions. Operation has been virtually maintenance free. The zirconium components show no signs of corrosion to date. (DP)

  16. An electrostatic precipitator for preparative gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Borka, L; Privett, O S

    1966-03-01

    The effect of the operating variables of electrostatic precipitators on the recovery and structure of methyl esters and related aerosol forming compounds collected in preparative gas-liquid chromatography was studied.Aerosol formation was prevented by AC or DC voltages of 5000 to 12000 volts. AC was more effective than DC but caused changes in structure which were detectable by both thin-layer and gas-liquid chromatographic methods of analysis.An apparatus of simple construction and operation was designed for the collection of methyl esters and its use demonstrated with several model compounds.

  17. An electrostatic precipitator for the study of airborne radioactivity.

    PubMed

    Andrews, L L; Schery, S D; Wilkening, M H

    1984-04-01

    An system has been developed to measure airborne radioactivity using electrostatic precipitation for collection and alpha-particle spectroscopy for detection. Features include good energy resolution (e.g. 170 and 300 KeV for full-width half maximum and full-width tenth maximum for 7.7-MeV alpha particles using a 7-cm2 area detector; and 52- and 122-KeV, respectively, using 1.2-cm2 area detector) and versatile computer control for collection, counting and data reduction. Aerosols bearing the radioactive atoms are deposited on a foil tape by electrostatic precipitation for a predetermined time after which the foil is moved under a solid-state detector to count the alpha-particle emissions. Activities are determined at the same frequency as samples are collected. Helium gas can be introduced at the detector to reduce energy loss and improve resolution. Although in principle certain aerosol sizes could be difficult to collect, in practice no difficulties were observed for typical environmental conditions, provided sufficiently low air-sampling rates were used. One important application is the measurement of 222Rn daughters. The sensitivity is such that detection of individual daughter concentrations less than 0.1 pCi/l. with only a 10% counting error is possible.

  18. EPRICON: Agentless flue gas conditioning for electrostatic precipitators

    SciTech Connect

    Bibbo, P.P.

    1995-09-01

    Achieving efficient particulate control in coal burning electric utility plants is becoming an increasingly difficult proposition, giver, the variety of regulatory, technical, operating and environmental pressures that exist in the US. For most powerplants, particulate control is achieved by an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Under optimal conditions, modern ESPs are capable of achieving particulate removal efficiencies of 99.7 %. Unfortunately, optimal conditions are not always present. ESP`s are sensitive to flue gas conditions, and those conditions may change dramatically after a fuel switch or the installation of some types of emissions control technology upstream of the ESP. Gas conditioning has been shown to be an effective means of returning flue gas to the ``optimal`` conditions required for efficient ESP operation following a fuel switch to a low, or at least, lower sulfur coal. Borrowing technology common in conventional soap-making plants around the turn of the century, sulfur-burning SO3 gas conditioning has been the solution to may difficult fuels in electrostatic precipitators. Although it has contributed most to improved ESP performance after a fuel switch, conventional gas conditioning has significant drawbacks. In an effort to develop an alternative to conventional SO{sub 3} gas conditioning, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) initiated a research and development project that has produced an alternative and modem technology for flue gas conditioning, now called EPRICON, and licensed it to Research-Cottrell. This article describes the EPRICON process and its performance in pilot and demonstration plants.

  19. Removal of Serratia marcescens aerosols using an electrostatic precipitator.

    PubMed

    Ko, Gwangpyo; Burge, Harriet

    2007-10-01

    We characterized the efficacy of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) air-cleaner in reducing the concentration of Serratia marcescens in an enclosed space. We used an experimental room (4.5 x 3 x 2.9 m) in which electrostatic aircleaners were located. Two air-cleaners enhanced the equivalent ventilation rates in the chamber by about 3.3 air changes per hour (ACH) over the 2 ACH provided by the mechanical ventilation system. Natural die-off of the organisms provided an additional equivalent of 3 ACH, so that the total ventilation rate with the ESP air-cleaners was 8.3 ACH. We also examined whether the ESP air-cleaners altered the deposition of Serratia marcescens aerosols on the experimental room surfaces. We did not find any significant differences in the number of colony forming units recovered from surfaces with and without the air-cleaners. We installed UV lights inside the ESPs and determined if UV light, in addition to electrical fields, increased the efficacy of the ESPs. The presence of UV light inside the ESP reduced S. marcescens aerosols by approximately 2 ACH. Finally, a box model indicates that the efficiency of the air-cleaner increases for both biological and nonbiological particles at ventilation rates of 0.2-1, which are typical for residential settings.

  20. Aerosol Analysis via Electrostatic Precipitation-Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    He, Siqin; Li, Lin; Duan, Hongxu; Naqwi, Amir; Hogan, Christopher J

    2015-07-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) is the preferred mode of ion generation for mass analysis of many organic species, as alternative ionization techniques can lead to appreciable analyte fragmentation. For this reason, ESI is an ideal method for the analysis of species within aerosol particles. However, because of their low concentrations (∼10 μg/m(3)) in most environments, ESI has been applied sparingly in aerosol particle analysis; aerosol mass spectrometers typically employ analyte volatilization followed by electron ionization or chemical ionization, which can lead to a considerable degree of analyte fragmentation. Here, we describe an approach to apply ESI to submicrometer and nanometer scale aerosol particles, which utilizes unipolar ionization to charge particles, electrostatic precipitation to collect particles on the tip of a Tungsten rod, and subsequently, by flowing liquid over the rod, ESI and mass analysis of the species composing collected particles. This technique, which we term electrostatic precipitation-ESI-MS (EP-ESI-MS), is shown to enable analysis of nanogram quantities of collected particles (from aerosol phase concentrations as low as 10(2) ng m(-3)) composed of cesium iodide, levoglucosan, and levoglucosan within a carbon nanoparticle matrix. With EP-ESI-MS, the integrated mass spectrometric signals are found to be a monotonic function of the mass concentration of analyte in the aerosol phase. We additionally show that EP-ESI-MS has a dynamic range of close to 5 orders of magnitude in mass, making it suitable for molecular analysis of aerosol particles in laboratory settings with upstream particle size classification, as well as analysis of PM 2.5 particles in ambient air. PMID:26024017

  1. Collection of low resistivity fly ash in an electrostatic precipitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jędrusik, M.; Świerczok, A.; Jaworek, A.

    2013-03-01

    Due to increasing restrictions on dust emission limits (IED directive), particularly in the fine particle size range, wider application of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) in cleaning the combustion gases from stoker boilers can be anticipated. The objective of the model studies in this paper was to select the optimal construction of the discharge electrode in ESP for obtaining high collection efficiency of fly ash leaving stoker boilers. In these studies a test bench was constructed, which comprised one-stage model ESPs with a set of discharge and collecting electrodes. The main dimensions of the precipitator chamber were as follows: length of electric field 2.0 m; active height 0.45 m and spacing between the collecting electrodes 0.4 m. Four constructions of discharge electrode were tested for fly ash of different fractional sizes and chemical compositions. The aim of the tests was to determine the current-voltage characteristics and the discharge current distribution on the collection electrode so as to find out the optimal construction and ensure the maximal collection efficiency of ESP. The results of the collection efficiency measurements in these tests were compared with those obtained from an ordinary industrial ESP. The comparison shows that it is necessary to optimise the discharge electrode construction for a specific physico-chemical property of fly ash so as to obtain the highest collection efficiency.

  2. Electrostatic precipitator electrode upgrade for low sulfur western coal at the OPPD Nebraska City station

    SciTech Connect

    Drdla, E. )

    1992-01-01

    The Omaha Public Power District (OPPD) Nebraska City Unit 1 coal fired boiler (585 MW) began operation in 1980. It was quickly recognized that the electrostatic precipitator would be a major detriment to the unit's availability. After nine years of boiler availability averaging approximately 70% due to electrostatic precipitator forced outages, a major upgrade was undertaken in 1989. The air preheater was relocated and the electrostatic precipitator ductwork was modified for cold side operation. Major component replacement and modifications were performed on the electrostatic precipitator internals during 4 months of the 6 months outage period. The insight to his dramatic upgrade success (boiler availability increased from 70% to 99.8%) is highlighted. It provides support to operating companies that are required to change coals (due to acid rain legislation) or have electrostatic precipitators that cannot meet current emissions standards.

  3. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M.D.

    1992-01-14

    Electrostatic precipitators (ESP) serve as the primary air pollution control device for the majority of coal-fired utility boilers in the Eastern and Midwestern regions of the United States. Since most of these ESPs are collecting flyash generated from medium- and high-sulfur coal, they are not experiencing operational limitations which are common when treating high-resistivity particles and are performing at an efficiency that is as high as could be expected. However, there are indications that the collection efficiency could be improved with flue gas conditioning. Conditioning is commonly used for solving operational problems associated with high-resistivity dusts. The purpose of conditioning for low- and moderate-resistivity applications is to increase the adhesive characteristics of the dust. Flue gas conditioning that increases particle adhesion has the potential to improve collection efficiency because a large percentage of particulate emissions from a well-performing ESP is due to reentrainment. Improved ESP performance should result if particle reentrainment could be reduced by making the particles more adhesive. This could produce a significant reduction in emissions from and ESP from the Following mechanisms: reduced erosion-type reentrainment; reduced rapping emissions; reduced hopper reentrainment; increased agglomeration of fine particles.

  4. Martian Atmospheric Dust Mitigation for ISRU Intakes via Electrostatic Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, James R., III; Pollard, Jacob R. S.; Johansen, Michael R.; Mackey, Paul J.; Clements, J. Sid; Calle, Carlos I.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars 2020 and Mars Sample Return missions expected to fly to Mars within the next ten years will each include an In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) system. They convert carbon dioxide in the Martian atmosphere into consumable oxygen at 1% and 20% of the rate required by a full scale human exploration Mars mission, respectively. The ISRU systems will need to draw in the surrounding atmosphere at a rate of 110L/min and 550L/min, respectively, in order to meet their oxygen production goals. Over the duration of each respective mission, a total atmospheric dust mass of 4.86g and 243g will be drawn into each system, respectively. Ingestion of large quantities of dust may interfere with ISRU operations, so a dust mitigation device will be required. The atmospheric volume and dust mass flow rates above will be utilized to simulate Martian environmental conditions in a laboratory electrostatic precipitator being developed to provide active dust mitigation support for atmospheric ISRU systems such as these.

  5. Ambient flow studies and particulate collection measurements: A laminar flow, reduced entrainment electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, G.P.; Furlong, D.A.; Bahner, M.A.

    1989-05-01

    This report describes ambient temperature testing of an electrostatic precipitator having a portion of the main precipitator flow drawn through porous (fabric) plates. The effects of flow through the plates (side flow) on precipitator turbulence and particulate removal efficiency are investigated. Ambient temperature particulate removal efficiency measurements are conducted on both indoor air dust, and on injected coal fly ash. 24 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Effects of plate spacing on the efficiency of an electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, E.

    1982-10-01

    The effect of plate spacing on the efficiency of an electrostatic precipitator was investigated. For that purpose, laboratory experiments were performed on a test precipitator with variable plate spacing of up to 715 mm. A proportionality was found between the migration velocity and the plate spacing. Apart from the current/voltage characteristics, also the rise in migration velocity with increasing gas velocity was determined. A laser device was used to measure dust concentration profiles which indicate an approximately linear increase from the centre of the duct towards the precipitation electrode. Optimization of electrostatic precipitators by enlarging the plate spacing appears to be possible.

  7. Nitrogen oxides removal by pulsed corona enhanced wet electrostatics precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, C.H.; Keener, T.C.; Khang, S.J.

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents the results of a bench-scale pulsed-corona enhanced wet electrostatic precipitator (wESP) application for removal of nitrogen oxides. This wESP is designed to operate wet/dry, positive/negative, and pulsed/non-pulsed conditions. The applied pulsed voltage is varied from 0 to 60 kV at 70 Hz. Gas flow rate is a nominal 7 m{sup 3}/hr and the collecting electrode area is 0.20 m{sup 2}. A simulated flue gas with NO concentration up to 1,200 ppm{sub v} has been used to determine the feasibility of NO{sub x} removal in the wESP. NO has to be oxidized to N{sub 2} before any removal takes place. NO{sub x} removal efficiency increased with gas residence time, inlet NO concentration and applied corona power. In the air stream with 10 seconds gas residence time, up to 20% of 1,000 ppm NO (or 22% NO{sub x}) was removed from an air stream of 1.9x10{sup {minus}3} m{sup 3}/s with a water flow of 6.3 x 10{sup {minus}5} m{sup 3}/sec and 20 W, 70 Hz pulsed corona. Both ammonia and ozone injections improve the NO{sub x} removal for both the corona and non-corona cases. With the inclusion of NH{sub 3} (NH{sub 3}/NO{sub x} ratio 1.3) and 25 watts corona power, NO removal efficiency was increased from 28% to 57%. The amount of in-situ ozone is not enough to be considered as a major NO{sub x} removal mechanism in this wESP. However, the additional injection of ozone improves the NO removal from 29% to 38% for both the corona and non-corona cases. When the oxygen concentration is dropped to 3% in a simulated flue gas with 12% CO{sub 2} and 800 ppm NO and 70% relative humidity at 11.5 s of gas residence time, the removal efficiency of NO is only 5%. Adding NH{sub 3} (NH{sub 3}/NO{sub x} ratio 1) at 76 watts corona power, NO removal is increased to 13%.

  8. Dust reentrainment, gas distribution and electrostatic precipitator performance

    SciTech Connect

    Hein, A.G.

    1989-05-01

    Field observations indicating that uniform gas flow at the precipiator outlet may not result in best performance led to a study of how reentrainment and changes in gas distributions within a precipitator affect performance. A computer model developed in the study predicts that an improvement over uniform flow performance is possible by using controlled non-uniform gas distributions at both the inlet and the outlet faces of the precipitator. The model was used to study how changes in precipitator side view geometry affect performance and offers explanations for the reduction in precipitation constants experienced with larger installations.

  9. Electrostatic precipitator guidelines: Volume 1, Design specifications: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Altin, C.A.; Grieco, G.J.

    1987-06-01

    The report includes three companion manuals for design specifications, operations and maintenance, and troubleshooting. Although the manuals primarily address users having some knowledge of precipitator design and operation, they provide enough background material and precipitator theory to make them useful as training aids. The loose-leaf format will allow updating.

  10. Influence of electrostatic precipitator collecting plate spacing and corona power upon performance

    SciTech Connect

    Brummer, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    Results from the extensive electrostatic precipitator field test program from two plant sites are presented. The effects of collecting plate spacing design and the control of corona power on performance and particulate emission are evaluated. The test program evaluation includes a precipitator performance comparison between a nine inch and a twelve inch collecing plate spacing design and corona power optimization for rigid frame precipitator design.

  11. Electrostatic precipitation of ultrafine particles enhanced by simultaneous diffusional deposition on wire screens.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Manuel; Alguacil, Francisco José

    2002-11-01

    A laboratory-scale electrostatic precipitator has been designed and constructed in which the grounded collector plate has been substituted by a set of wire screens placed perpendicularly to the gas flow. Particles are deposited onto the screens by two mechanisms--electrostatic deposition and diffusional deposition--which act simultaneously. On the one hand, electrostatic deposition is effective for relatively large particles, but it is quite ineffective for the smallest ones because their charging probability in the corona field is too low. On the other hand, the diffusional collection efficiency of particles on fibers is high for small particles but low for the larger ones. Therefore, the simultaneous diffusional-electrostatic precipitation may become a useful technique for efficient filtration of particles below 0.1 microm. A preliminary experimental evaluation of this filtering device has shown that submicrometer particles with diameters down to a few nanometers can be collected with number efficiencies greater than 99%.

  12. A new power regulator control system based on verilog for electrostatic precipitators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zisheng; Li, Guan; Liu, Taotao; Ge, Pengbo; Liu, Zhiqiang

    2013-03-01

    In order to improve the inefficient response of the power system in traditional electrostatic precipitators, such as long design cycles and low safety, a new power regulator control system is designed to tackle the deficiencies. The working voltage system of an electrostatic precipitator consists of an L-C component, a rectifier bridge group and a step-up transformer. The Verilog hardware description language is used to complete the design of the feedback systems. Continuous steady current can be obtained automatically through changing the number of steady voltage control units. The results show that control systems can accurately feed back the changes of the voltage signal of the electrostatic precipitator. Comparing with other control systems, it has the advantages of faster response, higher accuracy, better monitoring performance and superior anti-interference capacity.

  13. Testing and evaluation of electrostatic precipitator at New York University: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, K.S.; Marx, J.A.; Feldman, P.L.

    1988-08-01

    Cottrell Environmental Sciences designed and furnished a horizontal flow, plate type electrostatic precipitator for testing at the government furnished Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor (PFBC) located at New York University's (NYU) facility in Westbury, Long Island. The overall purpose was to gather applications data on a sub-pilot scale to evaluate factors such as capital and operating costs. A test program was developed with this purpose and the major parameters to be evaluated where (a) collecting surface area of precipitator, (b) precipitator operating power, and (c) the gas velocity through the precipitator. 9 refs., 28 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M.D.

    1993-01-15

    It is concluded that the laboratory tests should be conducted at high levels of SO[sub 3] such that the resulting resistivity is in the range of 10[sup 7]--10[sup 8] ohm-cm. There are several reasons leading to this conclusion. At SO[sub 3] concentrations of 30 ppM and greater, the curves for both dew point and resistivity are relatively flat so that changes in gas phase SO[sub 3] will have minimal impact on particle characteristics. In addition, the electrostatic forces are relatively flat in this range so that changes in flue gas conditions will that result in a change in resistivity by up to two orders of magnitude will have little effect on the magnitude of reentrainment. Finally, at the very low resistivity conditions, reentrainment will be the highest. Since the purpose of the laboratory resistivity tests is to determine the relative ability of the various additives to reduce resistivity, the greater the reentrainment, the easier it will be to measure an improvement. Tests were conducted by first operating at baseline conditions with no additives and then repeating the test with additives. The data collected during each test includes the resistivity of the material, thickness of the collected dust layer, and subjective indications of the dust characteristics. The candidate additives were from the polymer group, cellulose derivatives, starches and gums, and oils. No waxes or synthetic compounds have been tested to date in the laboratory apparatus. Of the seventeen additives tested, eight appeared to have a positive impact on either the ash layer thickness or the physical appearance of the dust layer. Excessive deposits on the discharge electrode resulted during injection of some of the additives. Three of the additives resulted in significant deposits in the injection chamber. The build up on the electrode was interpreted as a positive indicator of increase particle adhesion. The initial observations and comments for the eight additives are listed in Table 1.

  15. Laboratory measurements of oil mist concentrations using filters and an electrostatic precipitator.

    PubMed

    Leith, D; Leith, F A; Boundy, M G

    1996-12-01

    This study investigated the potential for mineral oil mist to evaporate, during sampling, from filters and electrostatic precipitator substrates used to assess personal exposure. If sample evaporation occurs, reported mist concentrations will underestimate true exposure. Mineral oil used as a machining fluid is not normally considered volatile; however, when dispersed as mist its aggregate surface area is so high that significant evaporation can occur. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Method 5026 specifies that oil mist concentrations should be determined by collecting mist on filters of mixed cellulose esters (MCE) or polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Collected mist droplets remain dispersed on the filter surface and in contact with passing air while sampling continues, conditions that can lead to sample evaporation. Less evaporation should occur for samples taken with an electrostatic precipitator, where mist droplets are separated from the airflow by electrostatic force and coalesce on the precipitator wall to form a film with relatively low surface area. Collection of mineral oil mist was investigated using a precipitator designed for personal sampling and using either an MCE or a PVC filter. The amounts of oil mist collected using the precipitator were significantly higher than the amounts collected using the filters, p < 0.001. Further tests in which clean air passed through mist-loaded precipitators and filters showed that the precipitator retained substantially more collected mist than both filters, p < 0.001, and further suggested that the MCE filter retained more mist than the PVC filter, p = 0.059. Differences in sample collection and retention between the precipitator and the filters were particularly pronounced at mist loadings below 1 mg.

  16. Influence of particle charging on TEOM measurements in the presence of an electrostatic precipitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, N. K.; Lauber, A.; Nussbaumer, T.; Burtscher, H.

    2009-03-01

    The efficiency of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) for reducing wood combustion emissions was investigated. Real-time measurements were conducted by directly reading the change in frequency of the tapered element in a Thermo Scientific 1400a TEOM. These measurements have been shown to be influenced by the charge on the aerosols reaching the tapered element such that the TEOM overestimates mass concentration. This electrostatic effect was crosschecked with particle mass concentration and particle number concentration measurements where no influence was observed. Placing a radioactive neutraliser prior to the TEOM leads to agreement between observed ESP efficiencies as measured by both the TEOM, mass filters and a CPC.

  17. MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL USING MEMBRANE-BASED UP-FLOW WET ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATION

    SciTech Connect

    James Reynolds

    2003-01-01

    This is the first quarterly report of the ''Multi-Pollutant Control Using Membrane--Based Upflow Wet Electrostatic Precipitation'' project funded by the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory under DOE Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41592 to Croll-Reynolds Clean Air Technologies (CRCAT). In this 18 month project, CRCAT and its team members will conduct detailed emission tests of metallic and new membrane collection material within a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) at First Energy's Penn Power's Bruce Mansfield (BMP) plant in Shippingport, Pa. Test results performed on the existing metallic WESP during November of 2002 showed consistent results with previous test results. Average collection efficiency of 89% on SO{sub 3} mist was achieved. Additionally, removal efficiencies of 62% were achieved at very high velocity, greater than 15 ft./sec.

  18. MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL USING MEMBRANE--BASED UP-FLOW WET ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATION

    SciTech Connect

    James Reynolds

    2003-04-30

    This is the second quarterly report of the ''Multi-Pollutant Control Using Membrane-Based Upflow Wet Electrostatic Precipitation'' project funded by the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory under DOE Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41592 to Croll-Reynolds Clean Air Technologies (CRCAT). In this 18 month project, CRCAT and its team members will conduct detailed emission tests of metallic and new membrane collection material within a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) at First Energy's Penn Power's Bruce Mansfield (BMP) plant in Shippingport, Pa. Test results performed on the existing metallic WESP during November of 2002 showed consistent results with previous test results. Average collection efficiency of 89% on SO{sub 3} mist was achieved. Additionally, removal efficiencies of 62% were achieved at very high velocity, greater than 15 ft./sec. During the first quarter of 2003 final design and start of fabrication of the membrane wet ESP was undertaken.

  19. The influence of an electrostatic precipitator and a mechanical filter on Rn decay products.

    PubMed

    Rajala, M; Janka, K; Lehtimäki, M; Kulmala, V; Graeffe, G

    1986-04-01

    In the present work the effect of an HEPA filter and an electrostatic precipitator on the behaviour of Rn decay products has been studied in laboratory conditions. Both filters were found to decrease the equilibrium factor of progeny and increase the unattached fraction of decay products. In a clean air they also decreased the activity of unattached progeny. An electrostatic precipitator was found to produce condensation nuclei which were observable when no other particle sources were present. The ozone produced by the corona discharge of the filter probably has a great effect on the production of these submicron particles. The impurities of the air were found to grow the particles and thus their influence on the behaviour of Rn decay products became in some cases significant.

  20. Wet electrostatic precipitator having removable nested hexagonal collector plates and magnetic aligning and rapping means

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.E.; Drzewiecki, G.

    1984-04-10

    A wet electrostatic precipitator including a plurality of removable nested collecting electrodes or plates forming a repeating pattern of hexagonal collecting zones throughout the precipitator. Each collecting plate is formed with a sixty degree bend along two opposing longitudinal edges so as to allow three plates to form a self-nesting Y-shaped intersection point. Six points form a hexagonal collecting zone. The plates are removable thereby expediting replacement. A plurality of strategically placed spray nozzles provide wash fluid to the plates. Magnet sets provide for discharge electrode alignment and rapping.

  1. Study of particle transport in the boundary layer of an electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Mozumdar, S.

    1986-01-01

    The design and construction of a new, nonintrusive optical instrument for the measurement of particle velocity in the boundary layer of a laboratory model electrostatic precipitator with transparent collector plates is presented. The instrument is a two-color-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV). It uses the blue (488.0 nm) and green (514.5 nm) beams from an argon ion laser source. It simultaneously measures two components of particle velocity, one parallel to the axis of the precipitator and the other perpendicular to the collector plate of the precipitator. These measurements are performed by detecting the Doppler frequency shift in the light scattered by the particle. The design is modular and the LDV system can be easily switched between a user selected 30/sup 0/ to 60/sup 0/ off-axis micro-LDV system and a regular LDV system. The micro-LDV instrument was used to study particle velocity in the boundary layer of a laboratory model, wireplate type electrostatic precipitator.

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH BRIEF: DEVELOPMENT OF GAS CLEANING TECHNOLOGY: DEMONSTRATION OF ADVANCED ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATOR TECHNOLOGY (INDIA ESP TRAINING)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Brief discusses a demonstration of advanced electrostatic precipitator (ESP) diagnostics and technologies in India. Six Indian ESP specialists were selected by Southern Research Institute and their consultants, with the concurrence of EPA's project officer, to attend a course...

  3. Calculation of ionized fields in DC electrostatic precipitators in the presence of dust and electric wind

    SciTech Connect

    Cristina, S.; Feliziani, M.

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes a new procedure for the numerical computation of the electric field and current density distributions in a dc electrostatic precipitator in the presence of dust, taking into account the particle-size distribution. Poisson`s and continuity equations are numerically solved by supposing that the coronating conductors satisfy Kaptzov`s assumption on the emitter surfaces. Two iterative numerical procedures, both based on the finite element method (FEM), are implemented for evaluating, respectively, the unknown ionic charge density and the particle charge density distributions. The V-I characteristic and the precipitation efficiencies for the individual particle-size classes, calculated with reference to the pilot precipitator installed by ENEL (Italian Electricity Board) at its Marghera (Venice) coal-fired power station, are found to be very close to those measured experimentally.

  4. Electrostatic precipitator upgrade strategies get the most from what you have

    SciTech Connect

    Sankey, M.; Mastropietro, R.

    1997-09-01

    Over the years, many power generation facilities have installed electrostatic precipitators to control particulate emissions. With the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, power plants must determine if their existing precipitator equipment is adequate. Many power companies have already completed this task and upgraded or replaced equipment, but the work is now in progress for many others. In every case the condition and capabilities of the existing equipment must be assessed and weighted against the applicable, new regulations. Assessment includes consideration of the mechanical and structural condition of a precipitator as well as particulate collection performance. A unit which is large enough to achieve the necessary performance may only need refurbishing. The paper discusses possible modifications which may be needed.

  5. Mathematical modeling of wire-duct single-stage electrostatic precipitators.

    PubMed

    Talaie, M R

    2005-09-30

    A two-dimensional mathematical model was developed to simulate the performance of wire-duct single-stage electrostatic precipitators (ESP). The model presented by Talaie et al. [M.R. Talaie, M. Taheri, J. Fathikaljahi, A new method to evaluate the voltage-current characteristics applicable for a single-stage electrostatic precipitator, J. Electrostat., 53 (3) (2001) 221-233] was used for prediction of electric field strength distribution and V-I characteristic for high-voltage wire-plate configuration. Simple Lagrangian approach was used to predict particle movement. Normal k-epsilon turbulent flow model with considering electrical body force due to ion and charged particle flow was used to evaluate gas velocity distribution. Ignoring the effect of particle movement and fluid flow, the results of electrical part of mathematical model are in good agreement with experimental data of Penny and Matick [G.W. Penny, R.E. Matrick, Potential in DC corona field, Trans. AIEE Part 1, 79 (1960) 91-99]. The prediction of corona sheath radius and its variation with particle loading and applied voltage is the main distinguishing feature of the present model. This fact was not included in the earlier models.

  6. An exemple of particle concentration reduction in Parisian subway stations by electrostatic precipitation.

    PubMed

    Tokarek, S; Bernis, A

    2006-11-01

    The air quality in Parisian subway stations is a great concern to users and the public authorities. Particle concentration is one of the major problems; indeed concentrations observed in stations are generally superior to those collected in the street. The subway generates its own particles from wheels / rail contact, braking, the ground... One of the ways explored to lower this level of particles is a removal treatment: the principle is to treat the ambient air using a suitable system placed in stations. Following literature, the process chosen by Paris Transport Authority is the electrostatic precipitator. An electrostatic precipitator prototype from the Recycl'Air company is installed in May 2001 in a closed station on the 5th line (Italy Place -Bobigny). Results show that, by the end of approximately one year, the efficiency has fallen by 15% and it is therefore necessary to clean the precipitation cartridges. A consideration has also been made on the possibility to equip an entire subway station. According to the results obtained, about twenty filters placed in the top of a non mechanically ventilated station would permit to half an initial concentration in particles of 230 microg m(-3).

  7. Characterization of sintering dust collected in the various fields of the electrostatic precipitator.

    PubMed

    Lanzerstorfer, Christof; Steiner, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Sinter plant off-gas is usually de-dusted by electrostatic precipitators. Compliance with the dust emission limits is often difficult because of the high specific resistivity of the emitted dust. Mechanical properties of the dust are also relevant for the electrostatic precipitator design. Dust samples from the four consecutive electrostatic precipitator fields were characterized in this study. Most measured parameters showed a considerable variation in the various dust samples. The particle size of the dust as well as its bulk density continuously decreased from the first field to the fourth field. The flowability of the dusts was generally bad and decreased from the first to the last field. In contrast, the wall friction angles with structural steel were quite constant at approximately 30°. The Fe content was lower in the dust from the last two fields while the concentration of K, Na, Cl(-) and [Formula: see text] was significantly higher. At the same time the particle density was lower. The maximum specific dust resistivity for the first field and second field dust was approximately 3 × 10(11) Ω cm and no signs for the occurrence of back corona were detected. For the dusts from the last two fields the maximum value was approximately 2 × 10(12) Ω cm. Back corona was observed in the temperature range from 120°C to 210°C. In this area the dust resistivity values were higher than 4 × 10(11) Ω cm.

  8. Research of vibration controlling based on programmable logic controller for electrostatic precipitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zisheng; Li, Yanhu; Li, Jiaojiao; Liu, Zhiqiang; Li, Qing

    2013-03-01

    In order to improve the reliability, stability and automation of electrostatic precipitator, circuits of vibration motor for ESP and vibration control ladder diagram program are investigated using Schneider PLC with high performance and programming software of Twidosoft. Operational results show that after adopting PLC, vibration motor can run automatically; compared with traditional control system of vibration based on single-chip microcomputer, it has higher reliability, better stability and higher dust removal rate, when dust emission concentrations <= 50 mg m-3, providing a new method for vibration controlling of ESP.

  9. Removal of particulate matter in a tubular wet electrostatic precipitator using a water collection electrode.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Ho; Yoo, Hee-Jung; Hwang, You-Seong; Kim, Hyeok-Gyu

    2012-01-01

    As one of the effective control devices of air pollutants, the wet electrostatic precipitator (ESP) is an effective technique to eliminate acid mist and fine particles that are re-entrained in a collection electrode. However, its collection efficiency can deteriorate, as its operation is subject to water-induced corrosion of the collection electrode. To overcome this drawback, we modified the wet ESP system with the installation of a PVC dust precipitator wherein water is supplied as a replacement of the collection electrode. With this modification, we were able to construct a compact wet ESP with a small specific collection area (SCA, 0.83 m(2)/(m(3)/min)) that can acquire a high collection efficiency of fine particles (99.7%).

  10. Removal of Particulate Matter in a Tubular Wet Electrostatic Precipitator Using a Water Collection Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Ho; Yoo, Hee-Jung; Hwang, You-Seong; Kim, Hyeok-Gyu

    2012-01-01

    As one of the effective control devices of air pollutants, the wet electrostatic precipitator (ESP) is an effective technique to eliminate acid mist and fine particles that are re-entrained in a collection electrode. However, its collection efficiency can deteriorate, as its operation is subject to water-induced corrosion of the collection electrode. To overcome this drawback, we modified the wet ESP system with the installation of a PVC dust precipitator wherein water is supplied as a replacement of the collection electrode. With this modification, we were able to construct a compact wet ESP with a small specific collection area (SCA, 0.83 m2/(m3/min)) that can acquire a high collection efficiency of fine particles (99.7%). PMID:22577353

  11. MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL USING MEMBRANE--BASED UP-FLOW WET ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATION

    SciTech Connect

    James Reynolds

    2004-10-29

    This is the Final Report of the ''Multi-Pollutant Control Using Membrane-Based Up-flow Wet Electrostatic Precipitation'' project funded by the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory under DOE Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41592 to Croll-Reynolds Clean Air Technologies (CRCAT). In this 18 month project, CRCAT and its team members conducted detailed emission tests of metallic and new membrane collection material within a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) at First Energy's Penn Power's Bruce Mansfield (BMP) plant in Shippingport, Pa. The Membrane WESP was designed to be as similar as the metallic WESP in terms of collection area, air-flow, and electrical characteristics. Both units are two-field units. The membrane unit was installed during the 2nd and 3rd quarters of 2003. Testing of the metallic unit was performed to create a baseline since the Mansfield plant had installed selective catalytic reduction equipment for NOx control and a sodium bisulfate injection system for SO3 control during the spring of 2003. Tests results on the metallic WESP were consistent with previous testing for PM2.5, SO3 mist and mercury. Testing on the membrane WESP demonstrated no adverse impact and equivalent removal efficiencies as that of the metallic WESP. Testing on both units was performed at 8,000 acfm and 15,000 acfm. Summary results are shown.

  12. Influence of the inlet velocity profiles on the prediction of velocity distribution inside an electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Shah M.E.; Deev, A.V.; Subaschandar, N.; Rasul, M.G.; Khan, M.M.K.

    2009-01-15

    The influence of the velocity profile at the inlet boundary on the simulation of air velocity distribution inside an electrostatic precipitator is presented in this study. Measurements and simulations were performed in a duct and an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). A four-hole cobra probe was used for the measurement of velocity distribution. The flow simulation was performed by using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT. Numerical calculations for the air flow were carried out by solving the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the realizable k-{epsilon} turbulence model equations. Simulations were performed with two different velocity profiles at the inlet boundary - one with a uniform (ideal) velocity profile and the other with a non-uniform (real) velocity profile to demonstrate the effect of velocity inlet boundary condition on the flow simulation results inside an ESP. The real velocity profile was obtained from the velocity measured at different points of the inlet boundary whereas the ideal velocity profile was obtained by calculating the mean value of the measured data. Simulation with the real velocity profile at the inlet boundary was found to predict better the velocity distribution inside the ESP suggesting that an experimentally measured velocity profile could be used as velocity inlet boundary condition for an accurate numerical simulation of the ESP. (author)

  13. Pilot scale-SO{sub 2} control by dry sodium bicarbonate injection and an electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Pliat, M.J.; Wilder, J.M.

    2007-10-15

    A 500 actual cubic feet gas per minute (acfm) pilot-scale SO{sub 2} control study was undertaken to investigate flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by dry sodium sorbents in 400{sup o}F (204.5{sup o}C) flue gases emitted from a coal fired boiler with flue gas concentrations between 350 and 2500 ppm SO{sub 2}. Powdered sodium alkaline reagents were injected into the hot flue gas downstream of the air preheater and the spent reagents were collected using an electrostatic precipitator. Three different sorbents were used: processed sodium bicarbonate of two particle sizes; solution mined sodium bicarbonate, and processed sodium sesquicarbonate. SO{sub 2} concentrations were measured upstream of the reagent injection, 25-ft (7.62 m) downstream of the injection point, and downstream of the electrostatic precipitator. SO{sub 2} collection efficiencies ranged from 40 to 80% using sodium bicarbonate stoichiometric ratios from 0.5 to 3.0. Much of the in-duct SO{sub 2} removal occurred during the first second of reagent reaction time, indicating that the sulfur dioxide-sodium reaction rates may be faster than have been measured for fixed bed measurements reported in the literature.

  14. Electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, John P.; Wallace, Michael J.

    2015-12-01

    Quantum mechanics should be able to generate the basic properties of a particle. One of the most basic properties are charge and the associated electrostatic electric field. Electrostatic force is a fundamental characteristics of a charged fermion and should have its nature described by the fermion's structure. To produce the particle properties require two spaces that define both their dynamics and their base structure. Relativity and the conservation of energy dictate how these two separate spaces are connected and the differential equations that describe behavior within these two spaces. The main static characteristic of an elementary fermion are mass and charge. Mass represents a scale measure of the fermion and it appears that charge results from the detailed structure of the fermion, which must merge into the electric field description of Maxwell. Coulomb's law is a good approximation for large distances, but it is a poor approximation at dimension on the order of a particle's Compton wavelength. The relativistic description of the fermion in its own frame of reference contains the information required for producing the electrostatic field over all space without a singularity as a source. With this description it is possible to understand the first order correction to the ionization energy of hydrogen. The role of nuclear effects on ionization energies can now be better defined for nuclei heavier than hydrogen.

  15. Electrostatics

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, John P.; Wallace, Michael J.

    2015-12-04

    Quantum mechanics should be able to generate the basic properties of a particle. One of the most basic properties are charge and the associated electrostatic electric field. Electrostatic force is a fundamental characteristics of a charged fermion and should have its nature described by the fermion’s structure. To produce the particle properties require two spaces that define both their dynamics and their base structure. Relativity and the conservation of energy dictate how these two separate spaces are connected and the differential equations that describe behavior within these two spaces. The main static characteristic of an elementary fermion are mass and charge. Mass represents a scale measure of the fermion and it appears that charge results from the detailed structure of the fermion, which must merge into the electric field description of Maxwell. Coulomb’s law is a good approximation for large distances, but it is a poor approximation at dimension on the order of a particle’s Compton wavelength. The relativistic description of the fermion in its own frame of reference contains the information required for producing the electrostatic field over all space without a singularity as a source. With this description it is possible to understand the first order correction to the ionization energy of hydrogen. The role of nuclear effects on ionization energies can now be better defined for nuclei heavier than hydrogen.

  16. The influence of unburned carbon particles on electrostatic precipitator collection efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jędrusik, M.; Świerczok, A.

    2011-06-01

    Laboratory tests have shown that the chemical composition of fly ash (in that unburned coal) as well as its size distribution has significant influence on the dust cleaning process. Likewise the design of discharge electrodes has shown a strong influence on the dust cleaning. Tests of precipitation efficiency were carried out on a laboratory electrostatic precipitator (ESP) model using fly ash samples of diverse size distribution and unburned coal content collected from several grate boilers. Test results show explicit dependency of the ESP precipitation efficiency on physical and chemical characteristics of the fly ash, design of discharge electrodes and amount of electrical energy delivered to the ESP. Mercury concentration measurements show higher levels in the fly ash than in the fired coal indicating high sorption capacity of the fly ash. Prior observation suggests good mercury adsorption on fine fly ash particles in the presence of elemental coal. Hence the improvement of ESP collection efficiency of fine particles containing unburned coal may help decrease the emission of mercury.

  17. Charge measurements of particles exiting electrostatic precipitators. Final report Oct 78-Oct 79

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.R.; Anderson, M.H.; Mosley, R.B.

    1980-04-01

    The report gives results of an investigation of particle charging in positive and negative corona discharge as a function of temperature from 38 to 343C in order to establish, especially at hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) temperatures, the relative effectiveness of the two possible methods of charging. Charge values on individual particles exiting two laboratory ESPs were measured in an experimental apparatus utilizing a Millikan cell. Measurements were directed at fine particles with radii between 0.3 and 1.5 micrometers. Measurements were obtained for redispersed fly ash particles carried in air at temperatures from 38 to 343C. The electrode geometries and electrical operating conditions utilized were typical of full-scale ESPs.

  18. Electrostatic precipitation of condensed acid mist: Third quarterly technical progress report, March 1--May 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Acid mists can sometimes constitute a significant portion of the total particulate emissions from power plants burning high-sulfur coals. A wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) is the best control option for acid mist. The mist would blind a fabric filter and attack glass fiber fabrics. A wet ESP is required because the acid would quickly corrode the plates in a conventional dry ESP. The wet ESP also offers the advantages of no rapping reentrainment and no sensitivity to fly ash resistivity. The project is organized in two phases. Phase I, which is scheduled for September 1988 to September 1989, involves the WESP fabrication, laboratory and pilot combustor testing, and computer modeling. Phase II, which is scheduled for September 1989 to September 1990, involves the solicitation of a utility demonstration site, preliminary site measurements, and planning for the demonstration test program. Progress on Phase I work is addressed in this discussion. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Toxic and teratogenic effects of chemical class fractions of a coal-gasification electrostatic precipitator tar.

    PubMed

    Schultz, T W; Dumont, J N; Buchanan, M V

    1983-12-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide slurries of a coal gasifier electrostatic precipitator tar and its chemical class fractions were assayed for their toxicity and teratogenicity using early embryos of the frog Xenopus laevis. Of the 5 tar fractions the ether-soluble base and polyaromatic were found to be the most teratogenic and the ether-soluble acid and ether-soluble base were the most toxic. The teratogenic effects of the raw tar suggest synergism. The toxic effects to newly metamorphosed froglets is 1-2 orders of magnitude less than those observed for embryos. Chemical analysis shows dihydroxybenzenes and organonitrogen compounds to be the major components of the acid and base fractions, respectively. The neutral fractions contain mainly alkyl-substituted two-ring hydrocarbons.

  20. Electrode configurations inside an electrostatic precipitator and their impact on collection efficiency and flow pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zhiyuan; Cheng, Lu; Shen, Xinjun; Li, Shuran; Yan, Keping

    2016-06-01

    Electrostatic precipitator (ESP) units have wide application in lots industries processes as gas filtration devices. Regarding their high efficiency, further improvement is still required. Wide ESP (plate-to-plate distance greater than 400 mm) is one of a promising way to improve existing ESP due to its ability to reduce equipment investment significantly. However, its large-scale application has been limited because it may potentially lead to collection efficiency reduction. This article focuses on the study of two major effects when several different electrode configurations are applied. The electrohydrodynamic (EHD) flow pattern inside ESP and particle collection efficiency were investigated by using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI) respectively. Results suggested that the collection efficiency of wide ESP is rather complicated and highly related to inner gas flow pattern.

  1. Development of a new portable air sampler based on electrostatic precipitation.

    PubMed

    Roux, J M; Sarda-Estève, R; Delapierre, G; Nadal, M H; Bossuet, C; Olmedo, L

    2016-05-01

    Airborne particles are known to cause illness and to influence meteorological phenomena. It is therefore important to monitor their concentrations and to identify them. A challenge is to collect micro and nanoparticles, microorganisms as well as toxic molecules with a device as simple and small as possible to be used easily and everywhere. Electrostatic precipitation is an efficient method to collect all kinds of airborne particles. Furthermore, this method can be miniaturized. A portable, silent, and autonomous air sampler based on this technology is therefore being developed with the final objective to collect very efficiently airborne pathogens such as supermicron bacteria but also submicron viruses. Particles are collected on a dry surface so they may be concentrated afterwards in a small amount of liquid medium to be analyzed. It is shown that nearly 98 % of airborne particles from 10 nm to 3 μm are collected. PMID:26452658

  2. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. First topical report, Results of laboratory screening of additives

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M.D.

    1993-04-16

    Several tasks have been completed in a program to evaluate additives to improve fine particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Screening tests and laboratory evaluations of additives are summarized in this report. Over 20 additives were evaluated; four were found to improve flyash precipitation rates. The Insitec particle analyzer was also evaluated; test results show that the analyzer will provide accurate sizing and counting information for particles in the size range of {le} 10 {mu}m dia.

  3. Economic comparison of pulsed electrostatic precipitators and fabric filters in coal fired utility plants

    SciTech Connect

    Caputo, A.C.; Pelagagge, P.M.

    1997-12-31

    Electrostatic precipitators (ESP) and fabric filters (FF) are the main air pollution control systems utilized to clean dust laden fumes from utility boilers. The choice among these systems depends from the specific site conditions such as dust characteristics, required efficiency, gas flowrate and temperature. ESP are generally characterized by higher capital investments and lower operating charges, while the opposite may be said for baghouses. As a consequence, ESP present higher total costs when high specific collection areas are required, as happens in the case of low-sulfur high-resistivity dust. However, significant reductions in both capital investment and operating charges may be obtained with pulsed energization of precipitators working in severe back corona conditions. This possibility greatly enlarges the field of applications in which SP are a lower cost option compared to fabric filters. In the paper an economic comparison of pulse energized ESP, with conventional ESP, reverse-air, shaker, and pulse-jet baghouses is performed. A mapping of the operating conditions in which the adoption of each examined control technology is economically convenient is also defined.

  4. Performance of a pilot-scale wet electrostatic precipitator for the control of sulfuric acid mist.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiayu; Wang, Hongmei; Shi, Yingjie; Zhang, Fan; Dang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Hui; Shu, Yun; Deng, Shuang; Liu, Yu

    2016-10-01

    The use of a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) is often regarded as a viable option to reduce sulfuric acid mist emitted from the wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) tower in coal-fired power plants. In this study, a pilot-scale wet electrostatic precipitator equipped with a wall-cooled collection electrode is investigated for the control of sulfuric acid mist from a simulated WFGD system. The results show that due to partial charging effect, the removal efficiency of sulfuric acid aerosol decreases when the aerosol size decreases to several tens of nanometers. Moreover, due to the plasma-induced effect, a large number of ultrafine sulfuric acid aerosols below 50 nm formed at a voltage higher than 24 kV inside the WESP. The percentages of submicron-sized aerosols significantly increase together with the voltage. To minimize the adverse plasma-induced effect, a WESP should be operated at a high gas velocity with an optimum high voltage. Even at a high flue gas velocity of 2.3 m s(-1), the mass concentration and the total number concentration of uncaptured sulfuric acid aerosols at the WESP outlet are as low as ca. 0.6 mg m(-3) and ca. 10(4) 1 cm(-3) at 28 kV, respectively. The corresponding removal efficiencies were respectively higher than 99.4 and 99.9 % and are very similar to that at 1.1 and 1.6 m s(-1). Moreover, the condensation-induced aerosol growth enhances the removal of sulfuric acid mist inside a WESP and enables a low emission concentration of ca. 0.65 mg m(-3) with a corresponding removal efficiency superior to 99.4 % even at a low voltage of 21 kV, and of ca. 0.35 mg m(-3) with a corresponding removal efficiency superior to 99.6 % at a higher voltage level of 26 kV. PMID:27357706

  5. Performance of a pilot-scale wet electrostatic precipitator for the control of sulfuric acid mist.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiayu; Wang, Hongmei; Shi, Yingjie; Zhang, Fan; Dang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Hui; Shu, Yun; Deng, Shuang; Liu, Yu

    2016-10-01

    The use of a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) is often regarded as a viable option to reduce sulfuric acid mist emitted from the wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) tower in coal-fired power plants. In this study, a pilot-scale wet electrostatic precipitator equipped with a wall-cooled collection electrode is investigated for the control of sulfuric acid mist from a simulated WFGD system. The results show that due to partial charging effect, the removal efficiency of sulfuric acid aerosol decreases when the aerosol size decreases to several tens of nanometers. Moreover, due to the plasma-induced effect, a large number of ultrafine sulfuric acid aerosols below 50 nm formed at a voltage higher than 24 kV inside the WESP. The percentages of submicron-sized aerosols significantly increase together with the voltage. To minimize the adverse plasma-induced effect, a WESP should be operated at a high gas velocity with an optimum high voltage. Even at a high flue gas velocity of 2.3 m s(-1), the mass concentration and the total number concentration of uncaptured sulfuric acid aerosols at the WESP outlet are as low as ca. 0.6 mg m(-3) and ca. 10(4) 1 cm(-3) at 28 kV, respectively. The corresponding removal efficiencies were respectively higher than 99.4 and 99.9 % and are very similar to that at 1.1 and 1.6 m s(-1). Moreover, the condensation-induced aerosol growth enhances the removal of sulfuric acid mist inside a WESP and enables a low emission concentration of ca. 0.65 mg m(-3) with a corresponding removal efficiency superior to 99.4 % even at a low voltage of 21 kV, and of ca. 0.35 mg m(-3) with a corresponding removal efficiency superior to 99.6 % at a higher voltage level of 26 kV.

  6. Electrostatic Precipitation of Dust in the Martian Atmosphere: Implications for the Utilization of Resources During Future Manned Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Carlos I.; Clements, Judson S.; Thompson, Samuel M.; Cox, Nathan D.; Hogue, Michael D.; Johansen, Michael R.; Williams, Blakeley S.

    2011-01-01

    Future human missions to Mars will require the utilization of local resources for oxygen, fuel. and water. The In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) project is an active research endeavor at NASA to develop technologies that can enable cost effective ways to live off the land. The extraction of oxygen from the Martian atmosphere. composed primarily of carbon dioxide, is one of the most important goals of the Mars ISRU project. The main obstacle is the relatively large amount of dust present in the Martian atmosphere. This dust must be efficiently removed from atmospheric gas intakes for ISRU processing chambers. A common technique to achieve this removal on earth is by electrostatic precipitation, where large electrostatic fields are established in a localized region to precipitate and collect previously charged dust particles. This technique is difficult to adapt to the Martian environment, with an atmospheric pressure of about one-hundredth of the terrestrial atmosphere. At these low pressures. the corona discharges required to implant an electrostatic charge to the particles to be collected is extremely difficult to sustain and the corona easily becomes biopolar. which is unsuitable for particle charging. In this paper, we report on our successful efforts to establish a stable corona under Martian simulated conditions. We also present results on dust collecting efficiencies with an electrostatic precipitator prototype that could be effectively used on a future mission to the red planet

  7. Subtask 2.11 - An Investigation into the EERC Staged Electrostatic Precipitator Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Zhuang; Jay Almlie; Stanley Miller

    2008-03-31

    A new concept of electrostatic precipitator (ESP), named a Staged ESP (an Energy & Environmental Research Center proprietary), was conceived in June 2004. The concept is based on a simple design that can be retrofitted on existing coal-fired power plants to provide high particulate matter (PM) collection efficiency without compromising reliability. A prototype of Staged ESP was designed, fabricated, and tested in two different combustion coal flue gases with different fly ash resistivities. Several design parameters of the Staged ESP were evaluated under various operating conditions to optimize PM collection performance. A set of particulate sampling data, including aerodynamic particle sizer, scanning mobility particle sizer, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Method 5 data, was collected to determine PM emissions of the Staged ESP configurations. These data were compared against data collected with a conventional ESP configuration. Compared to PM capture performance in conventional ESPs, an additional 30% to 70% reductions on total PM emissions were achieved for Staged ESPs in flue gas with medium- to high-resistivity fly ashes. Experimental data proved that the Staged ESP concept is capable of achieving higher PM collection efficiency, especially for particles in the submicrometer size range typically thought difficult to capture in an ESP.

  8. Submicron fly ash penetration through electrostatic precipitators at two coal power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, M.; Burtscher, H. |; Ylaetalo, S.; Kauppinen, E.I.; Klippel, N.; Riccius, O.

    1996-04-01

    Simultaneous measurements of the size distribution were performed for fine particulate matter (diameter d < 0.5 {mu}m) at the inlet and outlet of the electrostatic precipitators (ESP) of two full-scale pulverized coal power stations (615 MW, 510 MW). For a comparative study of the performance of the ESP the same high resistivity coal was burned at both sites. In addition, measurements were carried out for an easy to handle coal at the newer state-of-the-art power station. Effects on the size distribution caused by nonintermittent pulse energization of the ESP were also investigated. The results revealed a significantly stronger influence of the boiler than of the coal type on the size distribution at the inlet of the ESPs. In all cases the distribution was unimodal and a pronounced peak could be observed around 100 nm particle diameter. The ESP outlet distributions varied much more and showed also a dependence on the coal type. The maximum of the penetration through the ESP was determined in the range from 300 to 400 nm for all configurations. At the newer power station the number of ultrafine particles (< 30 nm) at the ESP outlet exceeded the inlet concentration under certain conditions. This effect was strongly influenced by the ESP energization and seemed to be related to the denitrification unit (DeNO{sub x}) installed upstream of the ESP where ammonia is injected as reducing agent. 14 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Mercury capture within coal-fired power plant electrostatic precipitators: model evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Clack, H.L.

    2009-03-01

    Efforts to reduce anthropogenic mercury emissions worldwide have recently focused on a variety of sources, including mercury emitted during coal combustion. Toward that end, much research has been ongoing seeking to develop new processes for reducing coal combustion mercury emissions. Among air pollution control processes that can be applied to coal-fired boilers, electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) are by far the most common, both on a global scale and among the principal countries of India, China, and the U.S. that burn coal for electric power generation. A previously reported theoretical model of in-flight mercury capture within ESPs is herein evaluated against data from a number of full-scale tests of activated carbon injection for mercury emissions control. By using the established particle size distribution of the activated carbon and actual or estimated values of its equilibrium mercury adsorption capacity, the incremental reduction in mercury concentration across each ESP can be predicted and compared to experimental results. Because the model does not incorporate kinetics associated with gas-phase mercury transformation or surface adsorption, the model predictions represent the mass-transfer-limited performance. Comparing field data to model results reveals many facilities performing at or near the predicted mass-transfer-limited maximum, particularly at low rates of sorbent injection. Where agreement is poor between field data and model predictions, additional chemical or physical phenomena may be responsible for reducing mercury removal efficiencies. 26 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Mass transfer within electrostatic precipitators: trace gas adsorption by sorbent-covered plate electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Herek L. Clack

    2006-06-15

    Varying degrees of mercury (Hg) capture have been reported within the electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) of coal-fired electric utility boilers. There has been some speculation that the adsorption takes place on the particulate-covered plate electrodes. This convective mass transfer analysis of laminar and turbulent channel flows provides the maximum potential for Hg adsorption by the plate electrodes within an ESP under those conditions. Mass transfer calculations, neglecting electro hydrodynamic (EHD) effects, reveal 65% removal of elemental Hg for a laminar flow within a 15-m-long channel of 0.2-m spacing and 42% removal for turbulent flow within a similar configuration. Both configurations represent specific collection areas (SCAs) that are significantly larger than conventional ESPs in use. Results reflecting more representative SCA values generally returned removal efficiencies of {lt}20%. EHD effects, although potentially substantial at low Reynolds numbers, diminish rapidly with increasing Reynolds number and become negligible at typical ESP operating conditions. The present results indicate maximum Hg removal efficiencies for ESPs that are much less than those observed in practice for comparable ESP operating conditions. Considering Hg adsorption kinetics and finite sorbent capacity in addition to the present mass transfer analyses would yield even lower adsorption efficiencies than the present results. In a subsequent paper, the author addresses the mass transfer potential presented by the charged, suspended particulates during their collection within an ESP and the role they potentially play in Hg capture within ESPs. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Ozone, Electrostatic Precipitators, and Particle Number Concentrations: Correlations Observed in a Real Office during Working Hours.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jianbang; Weschler, Charles J; Mo, Jinhan; Day, Drew; Zhang, Junfeng; Zhang, Yinping

    2016-09-20

    This study investigates the impacts of outdoor and indoor ozone concentrations, ESP operation and occupancy on particle number concentrations within a modern office in Changsha, China. The office's one-pass air handling system contains a mini-bag filter (MERV 12) followed by an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. Over a five-week period the system was operated either without the ESP (Stage 1, first-third week) or with the ESP (Stage 2, fourth and fifth week). Ozone and particle number concentrations were measured on working days. During both stages, indoor ozone and particle number concentrations tracked the outdoor ozone concentration. When operating, the ESP produced approximately 29 mg h(-1) of ozone, increasing supply air ozone by 15 ppb and steady-state indoor ozone by about 3 ppb. Occupancy tended to decrease indoor ozone and increase particle levels. During occupancy, indoor particle levels were low (∼2600 particle/cm(3)) when the supply air ozone level was less than 18 ppb. Above this threshold, the supply air ozone concentration and indoor particle number concentration were linearly related, and ESP operation increased the average indoor particle level by about 22 000 particles/cm(3). The implications for worker exposure to both ozone and particles are discussed. PMID:27571436

  12. The production and treatment of gaseous pollutants in an electrostatic precipitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamm, D. L.; Tangirala, U.

    1977-01-01

    The production of ozone and nitric oxides and the oxidation of two organic contaminants, methane and acetylene, were studied in the corona discharge of a model cylindrical electrostatic precipitator. Both air and oxygen streams were passed through the discharge while current, voltage, electrode/wall radius ratio, residence time and wall temperature were varied. Under all conditions using air, much more ozone was produced in the negative than in the positive corona, in agreement with qualitative data reported in the literature. However, using oxygen, as much as three to four times more ozone is produced by the positive corona. Over a wide range of conditions ozone production is proportional to current. Limited analyses of nitric oxides formation in air indicated that levels were higher in the negative than in the positive corona. In contrast to previous work using an RF discharge, methane contamination was not removed by the corona discharge. However, the oxidation of acetylene was affected by the discharge and could not be accounted for by homogeneous ozonation alone.

  13. Embryotoxic and teratogenic effects of aqueous extracts of tar from a coal gasification electrostatic precipitator.

    PubMed

    Schultz, T W; Dumont, J N; Clark, B R; Buchanan, M V

    1982-01-01

    Aqueous extracts of tar from a coal gasification electrostatic precipitator were tested for its toxic and teratogenic potential in vitro on embryos of the amphibian Xenopus laevis. The 96-h LC50 and EC50 were determined to be 0.83% and 0.48%, respectively. The developmental stage of normal-appearing exposed embryos is not affected by increasing concentrations of the extract. Embryo growth, however, is significantly reduced at concentrations as low as 0.25%. Motility and pigmentation were effectively reduced relative to controls by extract concentrations of 0.5% and greater. Exposed embryos are shorter and stockier than controls. Malformations of head, eyes, viscera, and spine are common, and cartilage formation is abnormal. The epidermis is often hyperplastic, and large blisters occur over the somatic surface. The severity of abnormal development is directly related to the concentration of the toxicant to which the embryos are exposed. Chemical analysis shows that the aqueous extracts contain phenols, furans, monoaromatic and diaromatic hydrocarbons, and mono- and diazaarenes and/or monoaromatic amines.

  14. Two-stage-type electrostatic precipitator re-entrainment phenomena under diesel flue gases

    SciTech Connect

    Zukeran, Akinori; Ehara, Yoshiyasu; Ito, Tairo; Matsuyama, M.; Ikeda, Yasushi; Kawakami, Hitomi; Takahashi, Takeo; Takamatsu, Takeshi

    1999-03-01

    One of the applications of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) is the cleaning of air to increase the visibility index in highway tunnels. Particles floating in air in highway tunnels are mainly carbon. Collection efficiency of a large particle diameter in an ESP often decreases when the ESP collects carbon particles which have low electric resistance. Collection efficiency often becomes negative in an experimental ESP. The negative collection efficiency means that the particle concentration flowing downstream is greater than that upstream in the ESP. The negative collection efficiency means that the particle concentration flowing downstream is greater than that upstream in the ESP. This phenomenon is explained as the re-entrainment of particles. In this paper, experiments were carried out to investigate the cause of the decrease in efficiency of particle collection of the ESP. The time characteristic of the collection efficiency and the distribution of particle size on the collection electrodes were studied. Experimental results showed that the decrease in the collection efficiency and the distribution of particle size on the collection electrodes were studied. Experimental results showed that the decrease in the collection efficiency was caused by re-entrainment of particles during the ESP operation. The effect of gas-flow velocity on the collection efficiency of the ESP was also investigated to study the cause of re-entrainment phenomena. The result showed that the re-entrainment phenomena depended on the gas-flow velocity.

  15. High temperature behavior of electrostatic precipitator ash from municipal solid waste combustors.

    PubMed

    Le Forestier, Lydie; Libourel, Guy

    2008-06-15

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) flue gas residues require further treatment prior to disposal or reuse, and vitrification is one of the main solidification-stabilization processes. This paper investigates the high temperature behavior of MSW flue gas residues, performed in laboratory experiments up to 1400 degrees C, and coupled with thermogravimetric analyses, X-ray diffraction, chemical and electron microprobe analyses. Melting temperatures of electrostatic precipitator (ESP) ash are in the range of 1202-1272 degrees C, whereas semi-dry scrubber residues melt between 1900 and 2300 degrees C. We show that the mean liquidus temperature of flue gas residues can be simply evaluated from their CaO content, by using the CaOSiO2Al2O3 ternary diagram. For ESP ash, the liquidus phase is a Zn-rich aluminous spinel, followed by anorthite at 1225 degrees C, and melilite at 1190 degrees C. The total mass loss reaches 18 wt.% at 1300 degrees C. Moreover, 90% of evaporation takes place below 1000 degrees C, linked to evaporation of C, Cl, S, Na, K, and of the toxic metals Hg, Cd, Pb, Cu. Due to the high partial pressure of chlorine during heating, chloride is the most probable form of evaporation for Cd, Pb, and Cu. However, most of Zn, Cr, Ni, Sb and Sn remain in the vitrified product.

  16. Electrostatic precipitator performance and trace element emissions from two Kraft recovery boilers.

    PubMed

    Lind, Terttaliisa; Hokkinen, Jouni; Jokiniemi, Jorma K; Hillamo, Risto; Makkonen, Ulla; Raukola, Antti; Rintanen, Jaakko; Saviharju, Kari

    2006-01-15

    Fine particle emissions from combustion sources have gained attention recently due to their adverse effects on human health. The emission depends on the combustion process, fuel, and particulate removal technology. Particle concentrations at Kraft recovery boiler exits are very high, and the boilers are typically equipped with electrostatic precipitators (ESP). However, little data are available on the ESP performance in recovery boilers. Particle concentrations and size distributions were determined at two modern, operating recovery boilers. In addition, we determined the fractional collection efficiency of the ESPs by simultaneous measurements at the ESP inlet and outlet and the particulate emissions of trace metals. The particle mass concentration atthe ESP inlet was 11-24 g/Nm3 at the two boilers. Particle emissions were 30-40 mg/ Nm3 at boiler A and 12-15 mg/Nm3 at boiler B. The particle size distributions had a major particle mode at around 1 microm. These fume particles contained most of the particle mass. The main components in the particles were sodium and sulfate with minor amounts of chloride, potassium, and presumably some carbonate. The ESP collection efficiency was 99.6-99.8% at boiler A and 99.9% at boiler B. The particle penetration through the ESP was below 0.6% in the entire fume particle size range of 0.3-3 microm. Trace element emissions from both boilers were well below the limit values set by EU directive for waste incineration.

  17. Collection efficiency of ultrafine particles by an electrostatic precipitator under DC and pulse operating modes

    SciTech Connect

    Zukeran, Akinori; Looy, P.C.; Chakrabarti, A.; Berezin, A.A.; Jayaram, S.; Cross, J.D.; Ito, Tairo; Chang, J.S.

    1999-10-01

    High particle collection efficiency in terms of particle weight/volume mg/m{sup 3} is well achieved by a conventional electrostatic precipitator (ESP). However, the collection efficiencies in terms of number density for the ultrafine (particle size between 0.01--0.1 {micro}m) or submicrometer particles by a conventional ESP are still relatively low. Therefore, it is necessary to improve the collection efficiency for ultrafine particles. In this paper, attempts have been made to improve the ultrafine particle collection efficiency by controlling dust loading, as well as using the short pulse energizations. The present version of the ESP consists of three sets of wire-plate-type electrodes. For the ESP under dc operation modes, experimental results show that the collection efficiency for dc applied voltage decreases with increasing dust loading when particle density is larger than 2.5 x 10{sup 10} particles/m{sup 3} due to inefficient collections of ultrafine particles. However, under pulse operating modes without dc bias, high particle collection efficiency for ultrafine particles was obtained, which is thought to be due to the enhancement of particle charging by electrons.

  18. Ultrafine particle removal and ozone generation by in-duct electrostatic precipitators.

    PubMed

    Poppendieck, Dustin G; Rim, Donghyun; Persily, Andrew K

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to airborne ultrafine particles (UFP, < 100 nm) has been shown to have adverse health effects and can be elevated in buildings. In-duct electrostatic precipitator filters (ESP) have been shown to be an effective particulate control device for reducing UFP concentrations (20-100 nm) in buildings, although they have the potential to increase indoor ozone concentrations. This study investigated residential ESP filters to reduce ultrafine particles between 4 to 15 nm and quantified the resulting ozone generation. In-duct ESPs were operated in the central air handling unit of a test house. Results for the two tested ESP brands indicate that removal efficiency of 8 to 14 nm particles was near zero and always less than 10% (± 15%), possibly due to particle generation or low charging efficiency. Adding a media filter downstream of the ESP increased the decay rate for particles in the same size range. Continuous operation of one brand of ESP raised indoor ozone concentrations to 77 ppbv and 20 ppbv for a second brand. Using commercial filters containing activated carbon downstream of the installed ESP reduced the indoor steady-state ozone concentrations between 6% and 39%.

  19. Ozone, Electrostatic Precipitators, and Particle Number Concentrations: Correlations Observed in a Real Office during Working Hours.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jianbang; Weschler, Charles J; Mo, Jinhan; Day, Drew; Zhang, Junfeng; Zhang, Yinping

    2016-09-20

    This study investigates the impacts of outdoor and indoor ozone concentrations, ESP operation and occupancy on particle number concentrations within a modern office in Changsha, China. The office's one-pass air handling system contains a mini-bag filter (MERV 12) followed by an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. Over a five-week period the system was operated either without the ESP (Stage 1, first-third week) or with the ESP (Stage 2, fourth and fifth week). Ozone and particle number concentrations were measured on working days. During both stages, indoor ozone and particle number concentrations tracked the outdoor ozone concentration. When operating, the ESP produced approximately 29 mg h(-1) of ozone, increasing supply air ozone by 15 ppb and steady-state indoor ozone by about 3 ppb. Occupancy tended to decrease indoor ozone and increase particle levels. During occupancy, indoor particle levels were low (∼2600 particle/cm(3)) when the supply air ozone level was less than 18 ppb. Above this threshold, the supply air ozone concentration and indoor particle number concentration were linearly related, and ESP operation increased the average indoor particle level by about 22 000 particles/cm(3). The implications for worker exposure to both ozone and particles are discussed.

  20. Ultrafine particle removal and ozone generation by in-duct electrostatic precipitators.

    PubMed

    Poppendieck, Dustin G; Rim, Donghyun; Persily, Andrew K

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to airborne ultrafine particles (UFP, < 100 nm) has been shown to have adverse health effects and can be elevated in buildings. In-duct electrostatic precipitator filters (ESP) have been shown to be an effective particulate control device for reducing UFP concentrations (20-100 nm) in buildings, although they have the potential to increase indoor ozone concentrations. This study investigated residential ESP filters to reduce ultrafine particles between 4 to 15 nm and quantified the resulting ozone generation. In-duct ESPs were operated in the central air handling unit of a test house. Results for the two tested ESP brands indicate that removal efficiency of 8 to 14 nm particles was near zero and always less than 10% (± 15%), possibly due to particle generation or low charging efficiency. Adding a media filter downstream of the ESP increased the decay rate for particles in the same size range. Continuous operation of one brand of ESP raised indoor ozone concentrations to 77 ppbv and 20 ppbv for a second brand. Using commercial filters containing activated carbon downstream of the installed ESP reduced the indoor steady-state ozone concentrations between 6% and 39%. PMID:24387032

  1. Novel catalytic process for flue gas conditioning in electrostatic precipitators of coal-fired power plants.

    PubMed

    Zagoruiko, Andrey; Balzhinimaev, Bair; Vanag, Sergey; Goncharov, Vladimir; Lopatin, Sergey; Zykov, Alexander; Anichkov, Sergey; Zhukov, Yurii; Yankilevich, Vassily; Proskokov, Nikolay; Hutson, Nick

    2010-08-01

    One of the most important environmental protection problems for coal-fired power plants is prevention of atmospheric pollution of flying ash. The ash particles are typically removed from flue gases by means of electrostatic precipitators, for which the efficiency may be significantly increased by lowering the resistance of fly ash, which may be achieved by controlled addition of microamounts of sulfur trioxide (SO3) into the flue gases. This paper describes the novel technology for production of SO3 by sulfur dioxide (SO2) oxidation using the combined catalytic system consisting of conventional vanadium catalyst and novel platinum catalyst on the base of silicazirconia glass-fiber supports. This combination provides highly efficient SO, oxidation in a wide temperature range with achievement of high SO, conversion. The performed pilot tests have demonstrated reliable and stable operation, excellent resistance of the novel catalytic system to deactivation, and high overall efficiency of the proposed process. The scale of the plant was equivalent to the commercial prototype; therefore, no further scale-up of the oxidation process is required. PMID:20842940

  2. Electrostatic precipitator efficiency improvement using state-of-the-art electrical controls at Suez Cement Plant in Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, B.

    1996-12-31

    A very common problem for many cement factories with regard to air pollution control can be described as follows: (1) the company plans to increase kiln capacity, (2) the company is at the same time faced by new Clean Air regulations from their authorities, requiring lower clean gas dust contents, (3) the company wants to achieve these goals with a minimum of investment costs and a minimum of additional running costs. An increased kiln capacity means for the electrostatic precipitator an increased gas flow rate and reduced specific collecting area, resulting in a reduced efficiency of the precipitator.

  3. Mass transfer within electrostatic precipitators: in-flight adsorption of mercury by charged suspended particulates

    SciTech Connect

    Herek L. Clack

    2006-06-01

    Electrostatic precipitation is the dominant method of particulate control used for coal combustion, and varying degrees of mercury capture and transformation have been reported across ESPs. Nevertheless, the fate of gas-phase mercury within an ESP remains poorly understood. The present analysis focuses on the gas-particle mass transfer that occurs within a charged aerosol in an ESP. As a necessary step in gas-phase mercury adsorption or transformation, gas-particle mass transfer - particularly in configurations other than fixed beds - has received far less attention than studies of adsorption kinetics. Our previous analysis showed that only a small fraction of gas-phase mercury entering an ESP is likely to be adsorbed by collected particulate matter on the plate electrodes. The present simplified analysis provides insight into gas-particle mass transfer within an ESP under two limiting conditions: laminar and turbulent fluid flows. The analysis reveals that during the process of particulate collection, gas-particle mass transfer can be quite high, easily exceeding the mass transfer to ESP plate electrodes in most cases. Decreasing particle size, increasing particle mass loading, and increasing temperature all result in increased gas-particle mass transfer. The analysis predicts significantly greater gas-particle mass transfer in the laminar limit than in the turbulent limit; however, the differences become negligible under conditions where other factors, such as total mass of suspended particulates, are the controlling mass transfer parameters. Results are compared to selected pilot- and full-scale sorbent injection data. 41 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Enhanced performance of electrostatic precipitators through chemical modification of particle resistivity and cohesion

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M.D.; Baldrey, K.E.; Bustard, C.J.

    1995-11-01

    Control of fine particles, including particulate air toxics, from utility boilers is required near-term by state and federal air regulations. Electrostatic precipitators (ESP) serve as the primary air pollution control device for the majority of coal-fired utility boilers in the Eastern and Midwestern united States. Cost-effective retrofit technologies for fine particle control, including flue gas conditioning, are needed for the large base of existing ESPs. Flue has conditioning is an attractive option because it requires minimal structural changes and lower capital costs. For flue gas conditioning to be effective for fine particle control, cohesive and particle agglomerating agents are needed to reduce reentrainment losses, since a large percentage of particulate emissions from well-performing ESPs are due to erosion, rapping, and non-rapping reentrainment. A related and somewhat ironic development is that emissions reductions of SO{sub 2} from utility boilers, as required by the Title IV acid rain program of the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments, has the potential to substantially increase particulate air toxics from existing ESPs. The switch to low-sulfur coals as an SO{sub 2} control strategy by many utilities has exacerbated ESP performance problems associated with high resistivity flyash. The use of flue gas conditioning has increased in the past several years to maintain adequate performance in ESPs which were not designed for high resistivity ash. However, commercially available flue gas conditioning systems, including NH{sub 3}/SO{sub 3} dual gas conditioning systems, have problems and inherent drawbacks which create a need for alternative conditioning agents. in particular, NH{sub 3}/SO{sub 3} systems can create odor and ash disposal problems due to ammonia outgassing. In addition, there are concerns over chemical handling safety and the potential for accidental releases.

  5. New trends in electrostatic precipitation: wide duct spacing, precharging, pulse energization

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, H.H.

    1981-09-01

    In a new design concept the precipitator duct spacing is increased from the traditional 200-300 mm up to 400-600 mm, and the precipitator voltage is raised correspondingly, with precipitator performance remaining almost unchanged for the same precipitator volume and the same gas flow. For suitable applications, this design results in reduced installation costs and easier maintenance. Devices for precharging of high resistivity dust now under development improve particle charging and enhance precipitator performance. Pulse energization improves the performance of precipitators collecting high resistivity dust by improving particle charging and current distribution and allowing regulation of the precipitator current independent of the precipitator voltage.

  6. Results of the CES high-temperature, high-pressure electrostatic precipitator testing program at Curtiss-Wright. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, K.S.; Feldman, P.L.; Jeselsohn, F.S.

    1985-09-01

    This final report to the Department of Energy discusses the results of electrostatic precipitator (ESP) testing and evaluation at the Government furnished pressurized fluidized bed combustor (PFBC) test facility located at the Curtiss-Wright plant in New Jersey. A practical hot gas cleanup (HGCU) design for a 660 MWe PFBC plant is proposed and costs are estimated for the proposed commercial design. Though the concept and engineering feasibility of precipitators for PFBC has been established through the present work, the need for reliable applications data in actual PFBC environment remains foremost in developing the HGCU technology towards commercialization. Long term integrated operation of the PFBC system, including the precipitator and gas turbine is another necessity before the perception of high temperature (1600 to 1650/sup 0/F) PFBC cycle as a high risk technology can be mollified. 20 refs., 33 figs., 15 tabs.

  7. Control of diesel gaseous and particulate emissions with a tube-type wet electrostatic precipitator.

    PubMed

    Saiyasitpanich, Phirun; Keener, Tim C; Lu, Mingming; Liang, Fuyan; Khang, Soon-Jai

    2008-10-01

    In this study, experiments were performed with a bench-scale tube-type wet electrostatic precipitator (wESPs) to investigate its effectiveness for the removal of mass- and number-based diesel particulate matter (DPM), hydrocarbons (HCs), carbon monoxide (CO), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from diesel exhaust emissions. The concentration of ozone (O3) present in the exhaust that underwent a nonthermal plasma treatment process inside the wESP was also measured. A nonroad diesel generator operating at varying load conditions was used as a stationary diesel emission source. The DPM mass analysis was conducted by means of isokinetic sampling and the DPM mass concentration was determined by a gravimetric method. An electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) was used to quantify the DPM number concentration. The HC compounds, n-alkanes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were collected on a moisture-free quartz filter together with a PUF/XAD/PUF cartridge and extracted in dichloromethane with sonication. Gas chromatography (GC)/mass spectroscopy (MS) was used to determine HC concentrations in the extracted solution. A calibrated gas combustion analyzer (Testo 350) and an O3 analyzer were used for quantifying the inlet and outlet concentrations of CO and NOx (nitric oxide [NO] + nitrogen dioxide [NO2]), and O3 in the diesel exhaust stream. The wESP was capable of removing approximately 67-86% of mass- and number-based DPM at a 100% exhaust volumetric flow rate generated from 0- to 75-kW engine loads. At 75-kW engine load, increasing gas residence time from approximately 0.1 to 0.4 sec led to a significant increase of DPM removal efficiency from approximately 67 to more than 90%. The removal of n-alkanes, 16 PAHs, and CO in the wESP ranged from 31 to 57% and 5 to 38%, respectively. The use of the wESP did not significantly affect NOx concentration in diesel exhaust. The O3 concentration in diesel exhaust was measured to be less than 1 ppm. The main mechanisms

  8. Collection of ultrafine diesel particulate matter (DPM) in cylindrical single-stage wet electrostatic precipitators.

    PubMed

    Saiyasitpanich, Phirun; Keener, Tim C; Lu, Mingming; Khang, Soon-Jai; Evans, Douglas E

    2006-12-15

    Long-term exposures to diesel particulate matter (DPM) emissions are linked to increasing adverse human health effects due to the potential association of DPM with carcinogenicity. Current diesel vehicular particulate emission regulations are based solely upon total mass concentration, albeit it is the submicrometer particles that are highly respirable and the most detrimental to human health. In this study, experiments were performed with a tubular single-stage wet electrostatic precipitator (wESP) to evaluate its performance for the removal of number-based DPM emissions. A nonroad diesel generator utilizing a low sulfur diesel fuel (500 ppmw) operating under varying load conditions was used as a stationary DPM emission source. An electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) was used to quantify the number concentration distributions of diesel particles in the diluted exhaust gas at each tested condition. The wESP was evaluated with respect to different operational control parameters such as applied voltage, gas residence time, etc., to determine their effect on overall collection efficiency, as well as particle size dependent collection efficiency. The results show that the total DPM number concentrations in the untreated diesel exhaust are in the magnitude of approximately108/cm(3) at all engine loads with the particle diameter modes between 20 and 40 nm. The measured collection efficiency of the wESP operating at 70 kV based on total particle numbers was 86% at 0 kW engine load and the efficiency decreased to 67% at 75 kW due to a decrease in gas residence time and an increase in particle concentrations. At a constant wESP voltage of 70 kV and at 75 kW engine load, the variation of gas residence time within the wESP from approximately 0.1 to approximately 0.4 s led to a substantial increase in the collection efficiency from 67% to 96%. In addition, collection efficiency was found to be directly related to the applied voltage, with increasing collection efficiency

  9. Semipilot plant pulse energized cold-precharger electrostatic precipitator tests for collection of moderately high resistivity flyash particles

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaram, S.; Castle, G.S.P.; Chang, J.S.; Berezin, A.A.; Looy, P.C.; Mangal, R.; Mozes, M.S.

    1996-07-01

    The performance of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) to collect moderately high resistivity flyash has been tested under pulse/precharger energization using the semipilot scale integrated electrostatics combustion flue gas (IECFG) cleaning system at Ontario Hydro`s 640 MJ/h Combustion Research Facility Center. The pulse energization enhanced the performance of the existing dc energized wire-plate electrostatic precipitator in collecting moderately high resistivity ({rho} {approximately} 10{sup 10} {Omega}{center_dot}cm) flyash. A 26% improvement in particle collection efficiency and 30% energy saving were obtained with pulse energization, with moderately high resistivity flyash generated by burning high-sulfur (3.7%) Nova Scotia coal with limestone conditioning. The cold precharger specially designed to suit the three-stage wire-plate ESP gas also been tested for its ability to improve the performance of ESP in reducing the back corona. With an additional 30% of energy supplied to the precharger it was possible to obtain up to 40% enhancement in collection efficiency. In general an enhancement factor of 1.8--2.8 was obtained with dust loading {approximately}2 g/m{sup 3}.

  10. Effect of face velocity and the nature of aerosol on the collection of submicrometer particles by electrostatic precipitator.

    PubMed

    Morawska, L; Agranovski, V; Ristovski, Z; Jamriska, M

    2002-06-01

    Despite the electrostatic collection of aerosol particles as one of the most widely used air cleaning methods, there has not been sufficient amount of effort devoted to investigate its performance in the full range of operating conditions. This paper reports results of the tests of a two-stage electrostatic precipitator (ESP) conducted in the particle size range of 0.018-1.2 microns over a range of flow rates using NaCl and Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) test aerosols. The total collection efficiency of the precipitator was found to increase with an increase in the count median diameter (CMD) of the particles, to have polynomial dependence on flow rate and no significant dependence on the type of test aerosol. The fractional efficiency of the precipitator was found to be dependent on flow rate. However, the 'critical' particle size of about 1.2 microns was found to exist when the fractional collection efficiency becomes independent of flow rate. For submicrometer particles, the collection efficiency was found to be independent of particle size at flow rates below 560 l/s. A minimum in the efficiency was observed in the 0.1-0.45 micron particle size range and for particles smaller than about 0.02 micron.

  11. Soft-X-Ray-Enhanced Electrostatic Precipitation for Protection against Inhalable Allergens, Ultrafine Particles, and Microbial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kettleson, Eric M.; Schriewer, Jill M.; Buller, R. Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    Protection of the human lung from infectious agents, allergens, and ultrafine particles is difficult with current technologies. High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters remove airborne particles of >0.3 μm with 99.97% efficiency, but they are expensive to maintain. Electrostatic precipitation has been used as an inexpensive approach to remove large particles from airflows, but it has a collection efficiency minimum in the submicrometer size range, allowing for a penetration window for some allergens and ultrafine particles. Incorporating soft X-ray irradiation as an in situ component of the electrostatic precipitation process greatly improves capture efficiency of ultrafine particles. Here we demonstrate the removal and inactivation capabilities of soft-X-ray-enhanced electrostatic precipitation technology targeting infectious agents (Bacillus anthracis, Mycobacterium bovis BCG, and poxviruses), allergens, and ultrafine particles. Incorporation of in situ soft X-ray irradiation at low-intensity corona conditions resulted in (i) 2-fold to 9-fold increase in capture efficiency of 200- to 600-nm particles and (ii) a considerable delay in the mean day of death as well as lower overall mortality rates in ectromelia virus (ECTV) cohorts. At the high-intensity corona conditions, nearly complete protection from viral and bacterial respiratory infection was afforded to the murine models for all biological agents tested. When optimized for combined efficient particle removal with limited ozone production, this technology could be incorporated into stand-alone indoor air cleaners or scaled for installation in aircraft cabin, office, and residential heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. PMID:23263945

  12. Soft-X-ray-enhanced electrostatic precipitation for protection against inhalable allergens, ultrafine particles, and microbial infections.

    PubMed

    Kettleson, Eric M; Schriewer, Jill M; Buller, R Mark L; Biswas, Pratim

    2013-02-01

    Protection of the human lung from infectious agents, allergens, and ultrafine particles is difficult with current technologies. High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters remove airborne particles of >0.3 μm with 99.97% efficiency, but they are expensive to maintain. Electrostatic precipitation has been used as an inexpensive approach to remove large particles from airflows, but it has a collection efficiency minimum in the submicrometer size range, allowing for a penetration window for some allergens and ultrafine particles. Incorporating soft X-ray irradiation as an in situ component of the electrostatic precipitation process greatly improves capture efficiency of ultrafine particles. Here we demonstrate the removal and inactivation capabilities of soft-X-ray-enhanced electrostatic precipitation technology targeting infectious agents (Bacillus anthracis, Mycobacterium bovis BCG, and poxviruses), allergens, and ultrafine particles. Incorporation of in situ soft X-ray irradiation at low-intensity corona conditions resulted in (i) 2-fold to 9-fold increase in capture efficiency of 200- to 600-nm particles and (ii) a considerable delay in the mean day of death as well as lower overall mortality rates in ectromelia virus (ECTV) cohorts. At the high-intensity corona conditions, nearly complete protection from viral and bacterial respiratory infection was afforded to the murine models for all biological agents tested. When optimized for combined efficient particle removal with limited ozone production, this technology could be incorporated into stand-alone indoor air cleaners or scaled for installation in aircraft cabin, office, and residential heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. PMID:23263945

  13. Economic comparison of fabric filters and electrostatic precipitators for particulate control on coal-fired utility boilers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cukor, P. M.; Chapman, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    The uncertainties and associated costs involved in selecting and designing a particulate control device to meet California's air emission regulations are considered. The basic operating principles of electrostatic precipitators and fabric filters are discussed, and design parameters are identified. The size and resulting cost of the control device as a function of design parameters is illustrated by a case study for an 800 MW coal-fired fired utility boiler burning a typical southwestern subbituminous coal. The cost of selecting an undersized particulate control device is compared with the cost of selecting an oversized device.

  14. Ambient Test Rig (ATR) flow studies: A laminar flow, reduced entrainment electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-10-01

    Results of flow testing on a Reduced Entrainment Precipitator Ambient Test Rig are presented. The Reduced Entrainment Precipitator concept involves drawing a portion of the main precipitator flow through hollow, porous collecting plates. The purposes of flow through porous collecting plates ( side flow'') are to provide a dust layer clamping force, and to reduce turbulence with the precipitator. Achievement of these goals should reduce re-entrainment, and result in increased precipitator efficiency. The increased efficiency should be especially evident at higher precipitator main flow velocities. Flow tests conducted included pilot tube velocity traverses, smoke (turbulence) visualization, and measurements of turbulence and velocity with a (fast-response) hot-wire anemometer. 12 refs., 13 figs.

  15. ESP VI 4. 0 Electrostatic Precipitator VI and performance-prediction model. Final report, Aug 89-Feb 92

    SciTech Connect

    Lawless, P.A.

    1992-06-01

    The manual is the companion document for the microcomputer program ESPVI 4.0, Electrostatic Precipitation V-I and Performance Model (PB92-502251). The program was developed to provide a user-friendly interface to an advanced model of electrostatic precipitation (ESP) performance. The program is capable of modeling standard ESP configurations as well as those that might be proposed for improved performance. It incorporates many of the latest developments in prediction of ESP performance, including electrical waveform effects, non-rapping reentrainment, and electrode misalignment. The manual provides the documentation needed to load the program from its disk, sets up the computer configuration for optimal operation, and introduces the operation of the program. The user is expected to be familiar with the operation of an ESP and know the important factors that affect it. An example ESP is provided with the program to help with the manual's exposition: it provides a direct comparison of the model's predictions. The program consists of a series of menu screens; the document is similarly organized, with increasing levels of detail provided as the menus become more specific. Finally, a section on the underlying algorithms discusses typical values that might be encountered with the model.

  16. Simultaneous measurements of wire electrode surface contamination and corona discharge characteristics in an air-cleaning electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Kanazawa, Seiji; Ohkubo, Toshikazu; Nomoto, Yukiharu; Adachi, Takayoshi; Chang, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    Contamination of the corona wire in a wire-to-plate type air-cleaning electrostatic precipitator is studied experimentally. In order to enhance the contamination of wire, air containing dusts is directly supplied to a part of the wire electrode. Spores of Lycopodium and cigarette smoke particles are used as test dusts. Simultaneous measurements of wire electrode optical images and corona discharge modes are carried out during contamination processes. Results show that corona discharge modes and optical emission from the wire electrode change with time due to the surface contamination. In the case of cigarette smoke, after a time elapsed, streamer coronas appear due to the buildup of smoke particles on the wire surface. After the first streamer generation, the corona current fluctuates with time because the formation and diminution of the projections occur alternately at the different parts on the wire electrode surface.

  17. Electrostatic precipitation of condensed acid mist: First quarterly technical progress report, September 1 to November 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlin, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    This report covers the project scope and structure for developing and demonstrating a compact, wet electrostatic collector for condensed acid mist in power plant flue gas. In order to accomplish this goal, the objectives to be met are: (1) a laboratory-version of the WESP (Wet Electrostatic Precipitator) must be fabricated. (2) the WESP performance must be optimized through laboratory tests with a nonvolatile simulant aerosol having a size distribution similar to the acid mist. (3) the WESP concept must be proven by demonstrating adequate collection of actual acid mist in a pilot coal combustion facility under conditions simulating a full-scale power plant burning high-sulfur coal. (4) a computer model of the WESP process must be developed to assist in the process optimization, interpretation of test results, and extrapolation to full scale. (5) Utility participation must be solicited in a follow-on demonstration of the WESP concept at a full-scale power plant. 5 refs., 2 figs. (JL)

  18. Electrostatic precipitation of condensed acid mist: Second quarterly technical progress report, December 1, 1988--February 28, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlin, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    This report covers the project scope and structure for developing and demonstrating a compact, wet electrostatic collector for condensed acid mist in power plant flue gas. In order to accomplish this goal, the objectives to be met are: (1) a laboratory-version of the WESP (Wet Electrostatic Precipitator) must be fabricated, (2) the WESP performance must be optimized through laboratory tests with a nonvolatile simulant aerosol having a size distribution similar to the acid mist, (3) the WESP concept must be proven by demonstrating adequate collection of actual acid mist in a pilot coal combustion facility under conditions simulating a full-scale power plant burning high-sulfur coal, (4) a computer model of the WESP process must be developed to assist in the process optimization, interpretation of test results, and extrapolation to full scale, and (5) utility participation must be solicited in a follow-on demonstration of the WESP concept at a full-scale power plant. Progress in laboratory testing and collection efficiency is described. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Development of an Electrostatic Precipitator to Remove Martian Atmospheric Dust from ISRU Gas Intakes During Planetary Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, J. Sidney; Thompson, Samuel M.; Cox, Nathan D.; Johansen, Michael R.; Williams, Blakeley S.; Hogue, Michael D.; Lowder, M. Loraine; Calle, Carlos I.

    2011-01-01

    Manned exploration missions to Mars will need dependable in situ resource utilization (ISRU) for the production of oxygen and other commodities. One of these resources is the Martian atmosphere itself, which is composed of carbon dioxide (95.3%), nitrogen (2.7%), argon (1.6%), oxygen (0.13%), carbon monoxide (0.07%), and water vapor (0.03%), as well as other trace gases. However, the Martian atmosphere also contains relatively large amounts of dust, uploaded by frequent dust devils and high Winds. To make this gas usable for oxygen extraction in specialized chambers requires the removal of most of the dust. An electrostatic precipitator (ESP) system is an obvious choice. But with an atmospheric pressure just one-hundredth of Earth's, electrical breakdown at low voltages makes the implementation of the electrostatic precipitator technology very challenging. Ion mobility, drag forces, dust particle charging, and migration velocity are also affected because the low gas pressure results in molecular mean free paths that are approximately one hundred times longer than those at Earth .atmospheric pressure. We report here on our efforts to develop this technology at the Kennedy Space Center, using gases with approximately the same composition as the Martian atmosphere in a vacuum chamber at 9 mbars, the atmospheric pressure on Mars. We also present I-V curves and large particle charging data for various versions of wire-cylinder and rod-cylinder geometry ESPs. Preliminary results suggest that use of an ESP for dust collection on Mars may be feasible, but further testing with Martian dust simulant is required.

  20. The Development of Electrostatic Precipitation-Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (EP-ESI-MS) for Atmospheric Aerosol Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, S.; Hogan, C. J., Jr.; Naqwi, A.; Gross, D. S.; Li, L.; Duan, H.; Jiang, L.; Flowers, J.; Grubb, E.; Au, L.

    2015-12-01

    Chemical composition analysis of atmospheric aerosols is of considerable interest and has been facilitated by mass spectrometry. Electrospray ionization (ESI) is a suitable mode of ion generation of many organic species comprising aerosol particles, as it leads to minimal analyte fragmentation. However, particles exist in the atmosphere at mass concentrations of the order 10 μg/m3 or less in many environments and are highly heterogeneous; low concentrations and chemical complexity have limited ESI application in aerosol analysis. In this presentation, the development of an approach to apply ESI to molecules within submicrometer and nanometer scale aerosol particles is discussed. The technique, which we term electrostatic precipitation-ESI-MS (EP-ESI-MS), utilizes unipolar ionization to charge particles, electrostatic precipitation to collect particles on the tip of a tungsten rod, and subsequently, by flowing liquid over the rod, ESI and mass analysis of dissolved species originating from the collected particles. EP-ESI-MS is shown to enable analysis of nanogram quantities of collected inorganic and organic components. Furthermore, it is coupled with a tandem mass spectrometry and challenged with oxidation products of α-pinene to investigate its capability of enabling structure analysis of complex organic compounds in aerosol particles. With EP-ESI-MS, the identification of chemical components in aerosol particles is realized and the integrated mass spectrometric signals are found to be a monotonic function of the analyte mass concentration in the aerosol phase. Additionally, it is shown to have a dynamic range of 5 orders of magnitude in mass, making it suitable for molecular analysis of aerosol particles in laboratory settings, as well as analysis of atmospheric aerosols in ambient air.

  1. Optimizing the operation of an electrostatic precipitator by developing a multipoint electrode supplied by a hybrid generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestre de Ferron, A.; Reess, T.; Pécastaing, L.; Pignolet, P.; Lemont, F.

    2009-05-01

    The authors investigated and improved the filtration efficiency of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). A laboratory-scale pilot unit was developed to allow experimentation under conditions approaching those of the industrial ESPs used by the CEA at Marcoule (France). After elucidating the electrical phenomena and optically analysing the physical processes occurring inside the precipitator, a specific electrode was developed for use with a hybrid power supply. The experiments were based on analysing the variation over time of the electric charge injected into the particle separator, the particle mass collected at the ground electrode and the charges quantity measured on a grid in the airstream after the electrode unit. Photos were also taken under different electrical discharge conditions. The results show that combining a multipoint electrode and a hybrid generator (30 kV dc and 30 kV, 1 kHz) improves the process efficiency and significantly extends the time frame (more than 10 h) during which the process operates at optimum efficiency.

  2. Direct and rapid analysis of ambient air and exhaled air via electrostatic precipitation of aerosols in an atomizer furnace and Zeeman spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ivanenko, A A; Ivanenko, N B; Kuzmenkov, M A; Jakovleva, E M; Skudra, A; Slyadnev, M N; Ganeev, A A

    2005-02-01

    Techniques that allow the elements present in the air to be determined in a simple and rapid manner are very attractive. Direct aerosol sampling techniques avoid the need to pretreat the filter via wet digestion in order to remove any sources of contamination, and they decrease the precipitation time significantly. Analyzers based on this technique can also determine the concentrations of elements in the air automatically in situ. This paper is concerned with the development of a novel analytical system that is based on electrostatically precipitating aerosols from the air into a graphite furnace. The equipment includes a Zeeman spectrometer with high frequency modulation polarization (MGA-915), and an electrostatic precipitation system incorporated into the analyzer. The high sensitivity of the system developed here means that it can be used to determine element concentrations in the air exhaled by humans, as well as those in ambient air.

  3. Novel Wire-on-Plate Electrostatic Precipitator (WOP-EP) for Controlling Fine Particle and Nanoparticle Pollution.

    PubMed

    Li, Ziyi; Liu, Yingshu; Xing, Yi; Tran, Thi-Minh-Phuong; Le, Thi-Cuc; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn

    2015-07-21

    A new wire-on-plate electrostatic precipitator (WOP-EP), where discharge wires are attached directly on the surface of a dielectric plate, was developed to ease the installation of the wires, minimize particle deposition on the wires, and lower ozone emission while maintaining a high particle collection efficiency. For a lab-scale WOP-EP (width, 50 mm; height, 20 mm; length, 180 mm) tested at the applied voltage of 18 kV, experimental total particle collection efficiencies were found as high as 90.9-99.7 and 98.8-99.9% in the particle size range of 30-1870 nm at the average air velocities of 0.50 m/s (flow rate, 30 L/min; residence time, 0.36 s) and 0.25 m/s (flow rate, 15 L/min; residence time, 0.72 s), respectively. Particle collection efficiencies calculated by numerical models agreed well with the experimental results. The comparison to the traditional wire-in-plate EP showed that, at the same applied voltage, the current WOP-EP emitted 1-2 orders of magnitude lower ozone concentration, had cleaner discharge wires after heavy particle loading in the EP, and recovered high particle collection efficiency after the grounded collection plate was cleaned. It is expected that the current WOP-EP can be scaled up as an efficient air-cleaning device to control fine particle and nanoparticle pollution.

  4. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Quarterly technical report, [October--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M.D.

    1992-01-14

    Electrostatic precipitators (ESP) serve as the primary air pollution control device for the majority of coal-fired utility boilers in the Eastern and Midwestern regions of the United States. Since most of these ESPs are collecting flyash generated from medium- and high-sulfur coal, they are not experiencing operational limitations which are common when treating high-resistivity particles and are performing at an efficiency that is as high as could be expected. However, there are indications that the collection efficiency could be improved with flue gas conditioning. Conditioning is commonly used for solving operational problems associated with high-resistivity dusts. The purpose of conditioning for low- and moderate-resistivity applications is to increase the adhesive characteristics of the dust. Flue gas conditioning that increases particle adhesion has the potential to improve collection efficiency because a large percentage of particulate emissions from a well-performing ESP is due to reentrainment. Improved ESP performance should result if particle reentrainment could be reduced by making the particles more adhesive. This could produce a significant reduction in emissions from and ESP from the Following mechanisms: reduced erosion-type reentrainment; reduced rapping emissions; reduced hopper reentrainment; increased agglomeration of fine particles.

  5. Electrostatic precipitator V-I (ESPVI 4.0) and performance prediction model (for microcomputers). Model-Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The microcomputer program ESPVI 4.0 was developed to provide a user-friendly interface to an advanced model of electrostatic precipitation (ESP) performance. The program is capable of modeling standard ESP configurations as well as those that might be proposed for improved performance. It incorporates many of the latest developments in prediction of ESP performance, including electrical waveform effects, non-rapping reentrainment, and electrode misalignment. The program is organized by a series of menu screens with increasing levels of detail provided as the menus become more specific. The user`s manual provides the documentation needed to load the program from its disk, set up the computer configuration for optimal operation, and introduces the operation of the program. The user is expected to be familiar with the operation of an ESP and know the important factors that affect it. An example ESP is provided with the program to help with the manual`s exposition. It is taken from a report describing measurement of the unit`s performance and so provides a direct comparison of the models predictions.

  6. Association of the sites of heavy metals with nanoscale carbon in a Kentucky electrostatic precipitator fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    James C. Hower; Uschi M. Graham; Alan Dozier; Michael T. Tseng; Rajesh A. Khatri

    2008-11-15

    A combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HRTEM-STEM-EELS) was used to study fly ashes produced from the combustion of an eastern Kentucky coal at a southeastern-Kentucky wall-fired pulverized coal utility boiler retrofitted for low-NOx combustion. Fly ash was collected from individual hoppers in each row of the electrostatic precipitators (ESP) pollution-control system, with multiple hoppers sampled within each of the three rows. Temperatures within the ESP array range from about 200 {degree}C at the entry to the first row to <150{degree}C at the exit of the third row. HRTEM-STEM-EELS study demonstrated the presence of nanoscale (10 s nm) C agglomerates with typical soot-like appearance and others with graphitic fullerene-like nanocarbon structures. The minute carbon agglomerates are typically juxtaposed and intergrown with slightly larger aluminosilicate spheres and often form an ultrathin halo or deposit on the fly ash particles. The STEM-EELS analyses revealed that the nanocarbon agglomerates host even finer (<3 nm) metal and metal oxide particles. Elemental analysis indicated an association of Hg with the nanocarbon. Arsenic, Se, Pb, Co, and traces of Ti and Ba are often associated with Fe-rich particles within the nanocarbon deposits. 57 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Association of the sites of heavy metals with nanoscale carbon in a Kentucky electrostatic precipitator fly ash.

    PubMed

    Hower, James C; Graham, Uschi M; Dozier, Alan; Tseng, Michael T; Khatri, Rajesh A

    2008-11-15

    A combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HRTEM-STEM-EELS) was used to study fly ashes produced from the combustion of an eastern Kentucky coal at a southeastern-Kentucky wall-fired pulverized coal utility boiler. Fly ash was collected from individual hoppers in each row of the electrostatic precipitators (ESP) pollution-control system, with multiple hoppers sampled within each of the three rows. Temperatures within the ESP array range from about 200 degrees C at the entry to the first row to < 150 degrees C at the exit of the third row. HRTEM-STEM-EELS study demonstrated the presence of nanoscale (10 s nm) C agglomerates with typical soot-like appearance and others with graphitic fullerene-like nanocarbon structures. The minute carbon agglomerates are typically juxtaposed and intergrown with slightly larger aluminosilicate spheres and often form an ultrathin halo or deposit on the fly ash particles. The STEM-EELS analyses revealed that the nanocarbon agglomerates host even finer (< 3 nm) metal and metal oxide particles. Elemental analysis indicated an association of Hg with the nanocarbon. Arsenic, Se, Pb, Co, and traces of Ti and Ba are often associated with Fe-rich particles within the nanocarbon deposits.

  8. Measurement and capture of fine and ultrafine particles from a pilot-scale pulverized coal combustor with an electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Ying Li; Achariya Suriyawong; Michael Daukoru; Ye Zhuang; Pratim Biswas

    2009-05-15

    Experiments were carried out in a pilot-scale pulverized coal combustor at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) burning a Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and an electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) were used to measure the particle size distributions (PSDs) in the range of 17 nm to 10 m at the inlet and outlet of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP). At the ESP inlet, a high number concentration of ultrafine particles was found, with the peak at approximately 75 nm. A trimodal PSD for mass concentration was observed with the modes at approximately 80-100 nm, 1-2 {mu}m, and 10 {mu}m. The penetration of ultrafine particles through the ESP increased dramatically as particle size decreased below 70 nm, attributable to insufficient or partial charging of the ultrafine particles. Injection of nanostructured fine-particle sorbents for capture of toxic metals in the flue gas caused high penetration of the ultrafine particles through the ESP. The conventional ESP was modified to enhance charging using soft X-ray irradiation. A slipstream of flue gas was introduced from the pilot-scale facility and passed through this modified ESP. Enhancement of particle capture was observed with the soft X-ray irradiation when moderate voltages were used in the ESP, indicating more efficient charging of fine particles. 32 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Fine particle collection of an electrostatic precipitator in CO2-rich gas conditions for oxy-fuel combustion.

    PubMed

    Han, Bangwoo; Kim, Hak Joon; Kim, Yong Jin

    2010-10-01

    The collection of particles in CO(2)-enriched environments has long been important for the capture of CO(2) in order to clean gases via oxy-fuel combustion. We here report on the collection characteristics of fine and ultrafine particles using an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in a CO(2)-enriched atmosphere. In order to understand the characteristics of particle collection in CO(2)-rich gas mixtures, the ionic properties of a CO(2)-enriched atmosphere was also investigated. The electrical mobility of the ions in a CO(2)-enriched atmosphere was found to be about 0.56 times that found in a conventional air atmosphere, due to the higher mass of CO(2) gas compared to that of air. The low electrical mobility of ions resulted in a low corona current under CO(2)-enriched conditions. The collection efficiency of particles in a CO(2)-rich atmosphere for a given power consumption was thus somewhat lower than that found in air, due to the low quantity of particle charging in CO(2)-enriched air. At the same time, higher temperatures led to the higher electrical mobility of ions, which resulted in a greater collection efficiency for a given power. The presence of a negative corona also led to a greater collection efficiency of particles in an ESP than that achieved for a positive corona.

  10. Measurement and capture of fine and ultrafine particles from a pilot-scale pulverized coal combustor with an electrostatic precipitator.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Suriyawong, Achariya; Daukoru, Michael; Zhuang, Ye; Biswas, Pratim

    2009-05-01

    Experiments were carried out in a pilot-scale pulverized coal combustor at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) burning a Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and an electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) were used to measure the particle size distributions (PSDs) in the range of 17 nm to 10 microm at the inlet and outlet of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP). At the ESP inlet, a high number concentration of ultrafine particles was found, with the peak at approximately 75 nm. A trimodal PSD for mass concentration was observed with the modes at approximately 80-100 nm, 1-2 microm, and 10 microm. The penetration of ultrafine particles through the ESP increased dramatically as particle size decreased below 70 nm, attributable to insufficient or partial charging of the ultrafine particles. Injection of nanostructured fine-particle sorbents for capture of toxic metals in the flue gas caused high penetration of the ultrafine particles through the ESP. The conventional ESP was modified to enhance charging using soft X-ray irradiation. A slipstream of flue gas was introduced from the pilot-scale facility and passed through this modified ESP. Enhancement of particle capture was observed with the soft X-ray irradiation when moderate voltages were used in the ESP, indicating more efficient charging of fine particles.

  11. Performance of electrostatic precipitators and fabric filter particulate controls on oil-fired electric utility boilers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McRanie, R.D.; Baker, S.S. Jr.

    1995-09-01

    Of the 189 hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) listed in Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, 11 are metals commonly found in particulate emissions from oil-fired boilers. In light of the potential future need for additional control of particulate emissions from oil-fired units, a white paper was prepared documenting the extent of particulate and HAPs emissions and the state-of-the-art in the use of electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and fabric filter (FF) technologies to control their emissions from oil-fired boilers. The white paper is based on EPRI research on particulate emissions from oil-fired boilers and a survey of ESP and FF manufacturers. The EPRI ESPM{trademark} performance model was used to estimate the particulate control effectiveness of oil-fired ESPs. The white paper describes the characteristics of oil ash, summarizes particulate and HAPs emission rates for oil-fired boilers, and projects the particulate and HAPs removal effectiveness for baghouses and different sized ESPs. Information on oil-fired ESP operation and maintenance requirements and overall costs is included.

  12. Fine particle removal performance of a two-stage wet electrostatic precipitator using a nonmetallic pre-charger.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak-Joon; Han, Bangwoo; Kim, Yong-Jin; Hwang, Kyu-Dong; Oh, Won-Seek; Yoo, Seong-Yeon; Oda, Tetsuji

    2011-12-01

    A novel two-stage wet electrostatic precipitator (ESP) has been developed using a carbon brush pre-charger and collection plates with a thin water film. The electrical and particle collection performance was evaluated for submicrometer particles smaller than 0.01- 0.5 micrometer in diameter by varying the voltages applied to the pre-charger and collection plates as well as the polarity of the voltage. The collection efficiency was compared with that calculated by the theoretical models. The long-term performances of the ESP with and without water films were also compared in tests using Japanese Industrial Standards dust. The experimental results show that the carbon brush pre-charger of the two-stage wet ESP had approximately 10% particle capture, while producing ozone concentrations of less than 30 ppb. The produced amounts of ozone are significantly lower than the current limits set by international agencies. The ESP also achieved a high collection rate performance, averaging 90% for ultrafine particles, as based on the particle number concentration at an average velocity of 1 m/sec corresponding to a residence time of 0.17 sec. Higher particle collection efficiency for the ESP can be achieved by increasing the voltages applied to the pre-charger and the collection plates. The decreased collection efficiency that occurred during dust loading without water films was completely avoided by forming a thin water film on the collection plates at a water flow rate of 6.5 L/min/m(2).

  13. Particle collection efficiency and particle re-entrainment of an electrostatic precipitator in a sewage sludge incineration plant.

    PubMed

    Ferge, Thomas; Maguhn, Jürgen; Felber, Hannes; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2004-03-01

    In several recent studies it was shown that high atmospheric loads of submicrometer particles in the size range below 500 nm have strong impact on human health. Therefore, extensive research concerning the reduction of fine particle emissions is needed to further improve air quality. Regarding health effects, especially the emission characteristics of fine and ultrafine particles emerging from anthropogenic sources such as combustion processes are of special interest. This study shows that the emission characteristic of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) due to re-entrainment of fine particles and their subsequent release into the atmosphere can be significantly lowered by application of different operating conditions. For this purpose the particle collection efficiency of an ESP was studied in a municipal sewage sludge incineration plant. Particles were sampled under different operating conditions upstream and downstream from the ESP, and the particle number concentrations were measured simultaneously with aerodynamic particle sizers. In addition, the size distribution of the particles downstream from the ESP was measured with high time resolution by an electrical low-pressure impactor to investigate the particle re-entrainment into the flue gas. To determine the influence of operating conditions, different rapping cycles were investigated regarding their impact on the collection efficiency and the subsequent particle re-entrainment.

  14. Mercury emissions from coal combustion: modeling and comparison of Hg capture in a fabric filter versus an electrostatic precipitator.

    PubMed

    Scala, Fabrizio; Clack, Herek L

    2008-04-01

    Mercury emissions from coal combustion must be reduced, in response to new air quality regulations in the U.S. Although the most mature control technology is adsorption across a dust cake of powdered sorbent in a fabric filter (FF), most particulate control in the U.S. associated with coal combustion takes the form of electrostatic precipitation (ESP). Using recently developed models of mercury adsorption within an ESP and within a growing sorbent bed in a FF, parallel analyses of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) uptake have been conducted. The results show little difference between an ESP and a FF in absolute mercury removal for a low-capacity sorbent, with a high-capacity sorbent achieving better performance in the FF. Comparisons of fractional mercury uptake per-unit-pressure-drop provide a means for incorporating and comparing the impact of the much greater pressure drop of a FF as compared to an ESP. On a per-unit-pressure-drop basis, mercury uptake within an ESP exhibited better performance, particularly for the low-capacity sorbent and high mass loadings of both sorbents.

  15. Estimates of increased black carbon emissions from electrostatic precipitators during powdered activated carbon injection for mercury emissions control.

    PubMed

    Clack, Herek L

    2012-07-01

    The behavior of mercury sorbents within electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) is not well-understood, despite a decade or more of full-scale testing. Recent laboratory results suggest that powdered activated carbon exhibits somewhat different collection behavior than fly ash in an ESP and particulate filters located at the outlet of ESPs have shown evidence of powdered activated carbon penetration during full-scale tests of sorbent injection for mercury emissions control. The present analysis considers a range of assumed differential ESP collection efficiencies for powdered activated carbon as compared to fly ash. Estimated emission rates of submicrometer powdered activated carbon are compared to estimated emission rates of particulate carbon on submicrometer fly ash, each corresponding to its respective collection efficiency. To the extent that any emitted powdered activated carbon exhibits size and optical characteristics similar to black carbon, such emissions could effectively constitute an increase in black carbon emissions from coal-based stationary power generation. The results reveal that even for the low injection rates associated with chemically impregnated carbons, submicrometer particulate carbon emissions can easily double if the submicrometer fraction of the native fly ash has a low carbon content. Increasing sorbent injection rates, larger collection efficiency differentials as compared to fly ash, and decreasing sorbent particle size all lead to increases in the estimated submicrometer particulate carbon emissions. PMID:22663136

  16. Filtering Chromatic Aberration for Wide Acceptance Angle Electrostatic Lenses II--Experimental Evaluation and Software-Based Imaging Energy Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Fazekas, Ádám; Daimon, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Tóth, László

    2016-03-01

    Here, the experimental results of the method of filtering the effect of chromatic aberration for wide acceptance angle electrostatic lens-based system are described. This method can eliminate the effect of chromatic aberration from the images of a measured spectral image sequence by determining and removing the effect of higher and lower kinetic energy electrons on each different energy image, which leads to significant improvement of image and spectral quality. The method is based on the numerical solution of a large system of linear equations and equivalent with a multivariate strongly nonlinear deconvolution method. A matrix whose elements describe the strongly nonlinear chromatic aberration-related transmission function of the lens system acts on the vector of the ordered pixels of the distortion free spectral image sequence, and produces the vector of the ordered pixels of the measured spectral image sequence. Since the method can be applied not only on 2D real- and $k$ -space diffraction images, but also along a third dimension of the image sequence that is along the optical or in the 3D parameter space, the energy axis, it functions as a software-based imaging energy analyzer (SBIEA). It can also be applied in cases of light or other type of optics for different optical aberrations and distortions. In case of electron optics, the SBIEA method makes possible the spectral imaging without the application of any other energy filter. It is notable that this method also eliminates the disturbing background significantly in the present investigated case of reflection electron energy loss spectra. It eliminates the instrumental effects and makes possible to measure the real physical processes better. PMID:26863662

  17. COOLING TIME, FREEFALL TIME, AND PRECIPITATION IN THE CORES OF ACCEPT GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Voit, G. Mark; Donahue, Megan

    2015-01-20

    Star formation in the universe's largest galaxies—the ones at the centers of galaxy clusters—depends critically on the thermodynamic state of their hot gaseous atmospheres. Central galaxies with low-entropy, high-density atmospheres frequently contain multiphase star-forming gas, while those with high-entropy, low-density atmospheres never do. The dividing line between these two populations in central entropy, and therefore central cooling time, is amazingly sharp. Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain the dichotomy. One points out that thermal conduction can prevent radiative cooling of cluster cores above the dividing line. The other holds that cores below the dividing line are subject to thermal instability that fuels the central active galactic nucleus (AGN) through a cold-feedback mechanism. Here we explore those hypotheses with an analysis of the Hα properties of ACCEPT galaxy clusters. We find that the two hypotheses are likely to be complementary. Our results support a picture in which cold clouds inevitably precipitate out of cluster cores in which cooling outcompetes thermal conduction and rain down on the central black hole, causing AGN feedback that stabilizes the cluster core. In particular, the observed distribution of the cooling-time to freefall-time ratio is nearly identical to that seen in simulations of this cold-feedback process, implying that cold-phase accretion, and not Bondi-like accretion of hot-phase gas, is responsible for the AGN feedback that regulates star formation in large galaxies.

  18. Simultaneous treatment of NO and SO2 with aqueous NaClO2 solution in a wet scrubber combined with a plasma electrostatic precipitator.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Woo; Choi, Sooseok; Park, Dong-Wha

    2015-03-21

    NO and SO2 gases that are generally produced in thermal power plants and incinerators were simultaneously removed by using a wet scrubber combined with a plasma electrostatic precipitator. The wet scrubber was used for the absorption and oxidation of NO and SO2, and non-thermal plasma was employed for the electrostatic precipitation of aerosol particles. NO and SO2 gases were absorbed and oxidized by aerosol particles of NaClO2 solution in the wet scrubber. NO and SO2 reacted with the generated NaClO2 aerosol particles, NO2 gas, and aqueous ions such as NO2(-), NO3(-), HSO3(-), and SO4(2-). The aerosol particles were negatively charged and collected on the surface of grounded anode in the plasma electrostatic precipitator. The NO and SO2 removal efficiencies of the proposed system were 94.4% and 100% for gas concentrations of 500 mg/m(3) and a total gas flow rate of 60 Nm(3)/h, when the molar flow rate of NaClO2 and the gas-liquid contact time were /min and 1.25 s, respectively. The total amount and number of aerosol particles in the exhaust gas were reduced to 7.553 μg/m(3) and 210/cm(3) at the maximum plasma input power of 68.8 W, which are similar to the values for clean air.

  19. Fine particle removal performance of a two-stage wet electrostatic precipitator using a nonmetallic pre-charger.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak-Joon; Han, Bangwoo; Kim, Yong-Jin; Hwang, Kyu-Dong; Oh, Won-Seek; Yoo, Seong-Yeon; Oda, Tetsuji

    2011-12-01

    A novel two-stage wet electrostatic precipitator (ESP) has been developed using a carbon brush pre-charger and collection plates with a thin water film. The electrical and particle collection performance was evaluated for submicrometer particles smaller than 0.01- 0.5 micrometer in diameter by varying the voltages applied to the pre-charger and collection plates as well as the polarity of the voltage. The collection efficiency was compared with that calculated by the theoretical models. The long-term performances of the ESP with and without water films were also compared in tests using Japanese Industrial Standards dust. The experimental results show that the carbon brush pre-charger of the two-stage wet ESP had approximately 10% particle capture, while producing ozone concentrations of less than 30 ppb. The produced amounts of ozone are significantly lower than the current limits set by international agencies. The ESP also achieved a high collection rate performance, averaging 90% for ultrafine particles, as based on the particle number concentration at an average velocity of 1 m/sec corresponding to a residence time of 0.17 sec. Higher particle collection efficiency for the ESP can be achieved by increasing the voltages applied to the pre-charger and the collection plates. The decreased collection efficiency that occurred during dust loading without water films was completely avoided by forming a thin water film on the collection plates at a water flow rate of 6.5 L/min/m(2). PMID:22263421

  20. Fly ash formation and penetration through the electrostatic precipitator at PC boilers firing South African and Colombian coals

    SciTech Connect

    Kauppinen, E.I.; Lind, T.M.; Ylatalo, V.

    1995-12-31

    We have studied in detail the properties of fly ash particles in the size range 0.01 to 100 um formed during the combustion of South African and Colombian coals as well as the fly ash penetration through the electrostatic precipitators (ESP). Both coals were fired at a modern, pulverized coal fired boiler. In addition, South African coal was fired at another boiler. Both boilers were equipped with ABB ESP`s. In addition to standard coal analyses methods, both coals were analyzed with computer controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSEM) to find more detailed information on the distribution of ash forming constituents in coal. Fly ash number and mass size distributions upstream and downstream the ESP were measured with the differential mobility analyzers and low pressure impactors, respectively. Fly ash upstream and downstream the ESPs was analyzed with CCSEM. Fly ash microstructure was determined with SEM and TEM. Fly ash particle number size distributions at conditions upstream the ESP showed a broad mode at 0.1 to 0.2 um. Electron micrographs showed that these ultrafine particles were chain-like agglomerates having few to several tens of 20 to 50 nm primary particles within each agglomerates Primary particles were mostly amorphous oxides of Al and Si coated with Ca. Particles larger than 0.1 um were spheres having ultrafine Primary particles and agglomerates deposited on the surface. Mass size distributions showed a major mode at 15 um. Only 1 to 2 percent of fly ash was smaller than 0.5 um on the mass basis, i.e. had vaporized during combustion. ESP penetration curves showed clear maxima at 0.1 to 1 um. CCSEM results indicated that supermicron fly ash penetration through the ESP was a function of both particle size and composition.

  1. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission profiles and removal efficiency by electrostatic precipitator and wetfine scrubber in an iron ore sintering plant.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Ettore; Lutri, Antonina; Mabilia, Rosanna; Scianò, Maria Concetta Tomasi; Rotatori, Mauro

    2008-11-01

    A monitoring campaign of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and polychlorinated biphenyl was carried out in an Italian iron ore sintering plant by sampling the combustion gases at the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) outlet, at the Wetfine scrubber (WS) outlet, and by collecting the ESP dust. Few data are available on these micropollutants produced in iron ore sintering plants, particularly from Italian plants. This study investigates the PAH emission profiles and the removal efficiency of ESPs and WS. PAHs were determined at the stack, ESP outlet flue gases, and in ESP dust to characterize the emission profiles and the performance of the ESP and the WS for reducing PAH emission. The 11 PAHs monitored are listed in the Italian legislative decree 152/2006. The mean total PAH sum concentration in the stack flue gases is 3.96 microg/N x m3, in ESP outlet flue gases is 9.73 microg/N x m3, and in ESP dust is 0.53 microg/g. Regarding the emission profiles, the most abundant compound is benzo(b)fluoranthene, which has a relative low BaP toxic equivalency factors (TEF) value, followed by dibenzo(a,l)pyrene, which has a very high BaP(TEF) value. The emission profiles in ESP dust and in the flue gases after the ESP show some changes, whereas the fingerprint in ESP and stack flue gases is very similar. The removal efficiency of the ESP and of WS on the total PAH concentration is 5.2 and 59.5%, respectively.

  2. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission profiles and removal efficiency by electrostatic precipitator and wetfine scrubber in an iron ore sintering plant

    SciTech Connect

    Ettore Guerriero; Antonina Lutri; Rosanna Mabilia; Maria Concetta Tomasi Sciano; Mauro Rotatori

    2008-11-15

    A monitoring campaign of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and polychlorinated biphenyl was carried out in an Italian iron ore sintering plant by sampling the combustion gases at the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) outlet, at the Wetfine scrubber (WS) outlet, and by collecting the ESP dust. Few data are available on these micropollutants produced in iron ore sintering plants, particularly from Italian plants. This study investigates the PAH emission profiles and the removal efficiency of ESPs and WS. PAHs were determined at the stack, ESP outlet flue gases, and in ESP dust to characterize the emission profiles and the performance of the ESP and the WS for reducing PAH emission. The 11 PAHs monitored are listed in the Italian legislative decree 152/2006. The mean total PAH sum concentration in the stack flue gases is 3.96 {mu}g/N m{sup 3}, in ESP outlet flue gases is 9.73 {mu}g/N m{sup 3}, and in ESP dust is 0.53 {mu}g/g. Regarding the emission profiles, the most abundant compound is benzo(b)fluoranthene, which has a relative low BaP toxic equivalency factors (TEF) value, followed by dibenzo(a,l)pyrene, which has a very high BaP(TEF) value. The emission profiles in ESP dust and in the flue gases after the ESP show some changes, whereas the fingerprint in ESP and stack flue gases is very similar. The removal efficiency of the ESP and of WS on the total PAH concentration is 5.2 and 59.5%, respectively. 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. PCDD/Fs removal efficiency by electrostatic precipitator and wetfine scrubber in an iron ore sintering plant.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Ettore; Guarnieri, Alessandra; Mosca, Silvia; Rossetti, Gianluca; Rotatori, Mauro

    2009-12-30

    This study investigates the removal efficiency of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) by the APCDs of an iron ore sintering plant, an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and a wetfine scrubbing system (WS). The removal efficiencies of the ESP on the total PCDD/Fs concentration and the total PCDD/Fs I-TEQ concentration are 44.3% and 41.4%, respectively, while those of the WS are 66.7% and 68.4%, respectively, but the vapor/solid phase distribution changes after APCDs abatement. At ESP inlet, the PCDD/Fs account for 31.2% in vapor phase and for 68.8% in particulate phase while, at ESP outlet, the PCDD/Fs account for 63.3% in vapor phase and for 36.7% in solid phase. The ESP removes effectively solid-phase PCDD/Fs for its effectiveness to capture the particulate while it is ineffective in removing vapor-phase PCDD/Fs. It, on the contrary, increase for the vaporization within the ESP, especially for these congeners with a lower chlorination degree, and for the PCDD/Fs "stripping" from particulate to gas-phase during the sampling. At WS inlet, the PCDD/Fs account for 63.3% in vapor phase and for 36.7% in solid phase while, at WS outlet, the PCDD/Fs account for 21.4% in vapor phase and for 78.6% in solid phase. Considering that WS outlet temperature is about 40 degrees C, the PCDD/Fs vapor-phase condense to particles: therefore, even if the particulate is removed by WS, the final result is that PCDD/Fs percentage decreases in vapor-phase and increases in solid-phase.

  4. Staged electrostatic precipitator

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Stanley J.; Almlie, Jay C.; Zhuang, Ye

    2016-03-01

    A device includes a chamber having an air inlet and an air outlet. The device includes a plurality of stages including at least a first stage adjacent a second stage. The plurality of stages are disposed in the chamber and each stage has a plurality of discharge electrodes disposed in an interior region and is bounded by an upstream baffle on an end proximate the air inlet and bounded by a downstream baffle on an end proximate the air outlet. Each stage has at least one sidewall between the upstream baffle and the downstream baffle. The sidewall is configured as a collection electrode and has a plurality of apertures disposed along a length between the upstream baffle and the downstream baffle. The upstream baffle of the first stage is positioned in staggered alignment relative to the upstream baffle of the second stage and the downstream baffle of the first stage are positioned in staggered alignment relative to the downstream baffle of the second stage.

  5. Martian Environment Electrostatic Precipitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDougall, Michael Owen

    2016-01-01

    As part of the planned manned mission to Mars, NASA has noticed that shipping oxygen as a part of life support to keep the astronauts alive continuously is overly expensive, and impractical. As such, noting that the Martian atmosphere is 95.37% CO2, NASA chemists noted that one could obtain oxygen from the Martian atmosphere. The plan, as part of a larger ISRU (in-situ resource utilization) initiative, would extract water from the regolith, or the Martian soil which can be electrolyzed by solar panel produced voltage into hydrogen and oxygen. The hydrogen can then be used in the Sabatier reaction with carbon dioxide to produce methane and water producing a net reaction that does not lose water and outputs methane and oxygen for use as rocket fuel and breathing.

  6. Field evaluation of a new particle concentrator- electrostatic precipitator system for measuring chemical and toxicological properties of particulate matter

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Zhi; Sillanpää, Markus; Pakbin, Payam; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2008-01-01

    Background A newly designed electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in tandem with Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System (VACES) was developed by the University of Southern California to collect ambient aerosols on substrates appropriate for chemical and toxicological analysis. The laboratory evaluation of this sampler is described in a previous paper. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of the new VACES-ESP system in the field by comparing the chemical characteristics of the PM collected in the ESP to those of reference samplers operating in parallel. Results The field campaign was carried out in the period from August, 2007 to March, 2008 in a typical urban environment near downtown Los Angeles. Each sampling set was restricted to 2–3 hours to minimize possible sampling artifacts in the ESP. The results showed that particle penetration increases and ozone concentration decreases with increasing sampling flow rate, with highest particle penetration observed between 100 nm and 300 nm. A reference filter sampler was deployed in parallel to the ESP to collect concentration-enriched aerosols, and a MOUDI sampler was used to collect ambient aerosols. Chemical analysis results showed very good agreement between the ESP and MOUDI samplers in the concentrations of trace elements and inorganic ions. The overall organic compound content of PM collected by the ESP, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), hopanes, steranes, and alkanes, was in good agreement with that of the reference sampler, with an average ESP -to -reference concentration ratio of 1.07 (± 0.38). While majority of organic compound ratios were close to 1, some of the semi-volatile organic species had slightly deviated ratios from 1, indicating the possibility of some sampling artifacts in the ESP due to reactions of PM with ozone and radicals generated from corona discharge, although positive and negative sampling artifacts in the reference filter sampler

  7. Electrostatic precipitator collection efficiency and trace element emissions from co-combustion of biomass and recovered fuel in fluidized-bed combustion.

    PubMed

    Lind, Terttaliisa; Hokkinen, Jouni; Jokiniemi, Jorma K; Saarikoski, Sanna; Hillamo, Risto

    2003-06-15

    Particle and trace element emissions from energy production have continuously been subject to tightening regulations. At the same time, not enough is known on the effect of different combustion processes and different fuels and fuel mixtures on the particle characteristics and particle removal device operation. In this investigation, electrostatic precipitator fractional collection efficiency and trace metal emissions were determined experimentally at a 66 MW biomass-fueled bubbling fluidized-bed combustion plant. The measurements were carried out at the inlet and outlet of the two-field electrostatic precipitator (ESP) at the flue gas temperature of 130-150 degrees C. Two fuel mixtures were investigated: biomass fuel containing 70% wood residue and 30% peat and biomass with recovered fuel containing 70% wood residue, 18% peat, and 12% recovered fuel. The particle mass concentration at the ESP inlet was 510-1400 mg/Nm3. Particle emission at the ESP outlet was 2.3-6.4 mg/Nm3. Total ESP collection efficiency was 99.2-99.8%. Collection efficiency had a minimum in particle size range of 0.1-2 microm. In this size range, collection efficiency was 96-97%. The emission of the trace metals As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Tl, and V was well below the regulation values set by EU directive for waste incineration and co-incineration.

  8. Quasi-static and dynamical computation of V-I characteristics of a dust-loaded pulse-energized electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Buccella, C.

    1999-03-01

    This paper describes an accurate model and a new procedure for the numerical computation of the electric field, current and charge density, in a pulse energized electrostatic duct-type precipitator, in presence of dust. The proposed model is compared to the classical steady-state model used in the past. The old model shows nonphysical bumps and discontinuity whereas the new approach predicts the natural transient behavior of electrical quantities. The partial differential equations governing the transient phenomena are solved by means of an implicit-explicit finite-difference time-domain method, which ensures a fast computation. The obtained results, compared with experimental values, show a good accuracy of the presented method.

  9. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M.D.

    1993-01-15

    It is concluded that the laboratory tests should be conducted at high levels of SO{sub 3} such that the resulting resistivity is in the range of 10{sup 7}--10{sup 8} ohm-cm. There are several reasons leading to this conclusion. At SO{sub 3} concentrations of 30 ppM and greater, the curves for both dew point and resistivity are relatively flat so that changes in gas phase SO{sub 3} will have minimal impact on particle characteristics. In addition, the electrostatic forces are relatively flat in this range so that changes in flue gas conditions will that result in a change in resistivity by up to two orders of magnitude will have little effect on the magnitude of reentrainment. Finally, at the very low resistivity conditions, reentrainment will be the highest. Since the purpose of the laboratory resistivity tests is to determine the relative ability of the various additives to reduce resistivity, the greater the reentrainment, the easier it will be to measure an improvement. Tests were conducted by first operating at baseline conditions with no additives and then repeating the test with additives. The data collected during each test includes the resistivity of the material, thickness of the collected dust layer, and subjective indications of the dust characteristics. The candidate additives were from the polymer group, cellulose derivatives, starches and gums, and oils. No waxes or synthetic compounds have been tested to date in the laboratory apparatus. Of the seventeen additives tested, eight appeared to have a positive impact on either the ash layer thickness or the physical appearance of the dust layer. Excessive deposits on the discharge electrode resulted during injection of some of the additives. Three of the additives resulted in significant deposits in the injection chamber. The build up on the electrode was interpreted as a positive indicator of increase particle adhesion. The initial observations and comments for the eight additives are listed in Table 1.

  10. VOCs elimination and health risk reduction in e-waste dismantling workshop using integrated techniques of electrostatic precipitation with advanced oxidation technologies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiangyao; Huang, Yong; Li, Guiying; An, Taicheng; Hu, Yunkun; Li, Yunlu

    2016-01-25

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted during the electronic waste dismantling process (EWDP) were treated at a pilot scale, using integrated electrostatic precipitation (EP)-advanced oxidation technologies (AOTs, subsequent photocatalysis (PC) and ozonation). Although no obvious alteration was seen in VOC concentration and composition, EP technology removed 47.2% of total suspended particles, greatly reducing the negative effect of particles on subsequent AOTs. After the AOT treatment, average removal efficiencies of 95.7%, 95.4%, 87.4%, and 97.5% were achieved for aromatic hydrocarbons, aliphatic hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons, as well as nitrogen- and oxygen-containing compounds, respectively, over 60-day treatment period. Furthermore, high elimination capacities were also seen using hybrid technique of PC with ozonation; this was due to the PC unit's high loading rates and excellent pre-treatment abilities, and the ozonation unit's high elimination capacity. In addition, the non-cancer and cancer risks, as well as the occupational exposure cancer risk, for workers exposed to emitted VOCs in workshop were reduced dramatically after the integrated technique treatment. Results demonstrated that the integrated technique led to highly efficient and stable VOC removal from EWDP emissions at a pilot scale. This study points to an efficient approach for atmospheric purification and improving human health in e-waste recycling regions.

  11. Apparatus and method for improving electrostatic precipitator performance by plasma reactor conversion of SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.S.; Gorski, A.J.

    1999-11-09

    An apparatus and process that utilize a low temperature nonequilibrium plasma reactor, for improving the particulate removal efficiency of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) are disclosed. A portion of the flue gas, that contains a low level of SO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and particulate matter, is passed through a low temperature plasma reactor, which defines a plasma volume, thereby oxidizing a portion of the SO{sub 2} present in the flue gas into SO{sub 3}. An SO{sub 2} rich flue gas is generated. The SO{sub 3} rich flue gas is then returned to the primary flow of the flue gas in the exhaust treatment system prior to the ESP. This allows the SO{sub 3} to react with water to form H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} that is in turn is absorbed by fly ash in the gas stream in order to improve the removal efficiency of the EPS.

  12. Apparatus and method for improving electrostatic precipitator performance by plasma reactor conversion of SO.sub.2 to SO.sub.3

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hann-Sheng; Gorski, Anthony J.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and process that utilize a low temperature nonequilibrium plasma reactor, for improving the particulate removal efficiency of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) are disclosed. A portion of the flue gas, that contains a low level of SO.sub.2 O.sub.2 H.sub.2 O, and particulate matter, is passed through a low temperature plasma reactor, which defines a plasma volume, thereby oxidizing a portion of the SO.sub.2 present in the flue gas into SO.sub.3. An SO.sub.2 rich flue gas is thereby generated. The SO.sub.3 rich flue gas is then returned to the primary flow of the flue gas in the exhaust treatment system prior to the ESP. This allows the SO.sub.3 to react with water to form H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 that is in turn is absorbed by fly ash in the gas stream in order to improve the removal efficiency of the EPS.

  13. Novel electrostatic precipitator using unipolar soft X-ray charger for removing fine particles: Application to a dry de-NOX process.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeongan; Kim, Hak Joon; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Sang Soo; Jung, Jae Hee

    2016-02-13

    The novel electrostatic precipitator (ESP), consisting of a soft X-ray charger and a collection part, was demonstrated and applied to a dry de-NOX process to evaluate its performance in by-product particle removal. NOX gas was oxidized by ozone (O3) and neutralized by ammonia (NH3) sequentially, and finally converted to an ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) aerosol with ∼ 100-nm peak particle diameter. The unipolar soft X-ray charger was introduced for charging the by-product particles in this dry de-NOX process. For the highest particle collection efficiency, the optimal operating conditions of the soft X-ray charger and collection part were investigated by adjusting the applied voltage of each device. The results showed that ∼ 99% of NOX was removed when the O3/NOX ratio was increased to 2 (i.e., the maximum production conditions of the NH4NO3 by-product particles by the gas-to-particle conversion process). The highest removal efficiency of particle (∼ 90%) was observed with operating conditions of positive polarity and an applied voltage of ∼ 2-3 kV in the charger chamber. The unipolar soft X-ray charger has potential for particle removal systems in industrial settings because of its compact size, ease of operation, and non-interruptive charging mechanism.

  14. Integration of a nonmetallic electrostatic precipitator and a wet scrubber for improved removal of particles and corrosive gas cleaning in semiconductor manufacturing industries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak-Joon; Han, Bangwoo; Kim, Yong-Jin; Yoa, Seok-Jun; Oda, Tetsuji

    2012-08-01

    To remove particles in corrosive gases generated by semiconductor industries, we have developed a novel non-metallic, two-stage electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Carbon brush electrodes and grounded carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) form the ionization stage, and polyvinyl chloride collection plates are used in the collection stage of the ESP The collection performance of the ESP downstream of a wet scrubber was evaluated with KC1, silica, and mist particles (0.01-10 pm), changing design and operation parameters such as the ESP length, voltage, and flow rate. A long-term and regeneration performance (12-hr) test was conducted at the maximum operation conditions of the scrubber and ESP and the performance was then demonstrated for 1 month with exhaust gases from wet scrubbers at the rooftop of a semiconductor manufacturing plant in Korea. The results showed that the electrical and collection performance of the ESP (16 channels, 400x400 mm2) was maintained with different grounded plate materials (stainless steel and CFRP) and different lengths of the ionization stage. The collection efficiency of the ESP at high air velocity was enhanced with increases in applied voltages and collection plate lengths. The ESP (16 channels with 100 mm length, 400x400 mm2x540 mm with a 10-mm gap) removed more than 90% of silica and mistparticles with 10 and 12 kV applied to the ESPat the air velocity of 2 m/s and liquid-to-gas ratio of 3.6 L/m3. Decreased performance after 13 hours ofcontinuous operation was recovered to the initial performance level by 5 min of water washing. Moreover during the 1-month operation at the demonstration site, the ESP showed average collection efficiencies of 97% based on particle number and 92% based on total particle mass, which were achieved with a much smaller specific corona power of 0.28 W/m3/hr compared with conventional ESPs. PMID:22916438

  15. Integration of a nonmetallic electrostatic precipitator and a wet scrubber for improved removal of particles and corrosive gas cleaning in semiconductor manufacturing industries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak-Joon; Han, Bangwoo; Kim, Yong-Jin; Yoa, Seok-Jun; Oda, Tetsuji

    2012-08-01

    To remove particles in corrosive gases generated by semiconductor industries, we have developed a novel non-metallic, two-stage electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Carbon brush electrodes and grounded carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) form the ionization stage, and polyvinyl chloride collection plates are used in the collection stage of the ESP The collection performance of the ESP downstream of a wet scrubber was evaluated with KC1, silica, and mist particles (0.01-10 pm), changing design and operation parameters such as the ESP length, voltage, and flow rate. A long-term and regeneration performance (12-hr) test was conducted at the maximum operation conditions of the scrubber and ESP and the performance was then demonstrated for 1 month with exhaust gases from wet scrubbers at the rooftop of a semiconductor manufacturing plant in Korea. The results showed that the electrical and collection performance of the ESP (16 channels, 400x400 mm2) was maintained with different grounded plate materials (stainless steel and CFRP) and different lengths of the ionization stage. The collection efficiency of the ESP at high air velocity was enhanced with increases in applied voltages and collection plate lengths. The ESP (16 channels with 100 mm length, 400x400 mm2x540 mm with a 10-mm gap) removed more than 90% of silica and mistparticles with 10 and 12 kV applied to the ESPat the air velocity of 2 m/s and liquid-to-gas ratio of 3.6 L/m3. Decreased performance after 13 hours ofcontinuous operation was recovered to the initial performance level by 5 min of water washing. Moreover during the 1-month operation at the demonstration site, the ESP showed average collection efficiencies of 97% based on particle number and 92% based on total particle mass, which were achieved with a much smaller specific corona power of 0.28 W/m3/hr compared with conventional ESPs.

  16. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Second topical report, Results of bench-scale screening of additives

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M.D.

    1993-08-13

    ADA Technologies, Inc. (ADA) has completed the bench-scale testing phase of a program to evaluate additives that will improve the collection of fine particles in electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). A bench-scale ESP was installed at the Consolidation Coal Company (CONSOL) combustion research and development facility in Library, PA in order to conduct the evaluation. During a two-week test, four candidate additives were injected into the flue gas ahead of a 100 acfm ESP to determine the effect on fly ash collectability. Two additives were found to reduce the emissions from the ESP. Additives ``C`` and ``D`` performed better than initially anticipated -- reducing emissions initially by 17%. Emissions were reduced by 27% after the ESP was modified by the installation of baffles to minimize sneakage. In addition to the measured improvements in performance, no detrimental effects (i.e., electrode fouling) were observed in the operation of the ESP during the testing. The measures of success identified for the bench-scale phase of the program have been surpassed. Since the additives will affect only non-rapping reentrainment particle losses, it is expected that an even greater improvement in particle collection will be observed in larger-scale ESPs. Therefore, positive results are anticipated during the pilot-scale phase of the program and during a future full-scale demonstration test. A preliminary economic analysis was performed to evaluate the cost of the additive process and to compare its costs against alternative means for reducing emissions from ESPs. The results show that conditioning with additive C at a rate of 0.05% (wt. additive to wt. fly ash) is much less expensive than adding new ESP capacity, and more cost competitive than existing chemical conditioning processes. Preliminary chemical analysis of conditioned fly ash shows that it passes the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure criteria.

  17. Submicrometer particle removal indoors by a novel electrostatic precipitator with high clean air delivery rate, low ozone emissions, and carbon fiber ionizer.

    PubMed

    Kim, H-J; Han, B; Kim, Y-J; Oda, T; Won, H

    2013-10-01

    A novel positive-polarity electrostatic precipitator (ESP) was developed using an ionization stage (0.4 × 0.4 × 0.14 m(3) ) with 16 carbon fiber ionizers in each channel and a collection stage (0.4 × 0.4 × 0.21 m(3) ) with parallel metallic plates. The single-pass collection efficiency and clean air delivery rate (CADR) were measured by standard tests using KCl particles in 0.25-0.35 μm. Performance was determined using the Deutsch equation and established diffusion and field charging theories and also compared with the commercialized HEPA filter-type air cleaner. Experimental results showed that the single-pass collection efficiency of the ESP ranged from 50 to 95% and decreased with the flow rate (10-20 m(3) /min), but increased with the voltage applied to the ionizers (6 to 8 kV) and collection plates (-5 to -7 kV). The ESP with 18 m(3) /min achieved a CADR of 12.1 m(3) /min with a voltage of 8 kV applied to the ionization stage and with a voltage of -6 kV applied to the collection stage. The concentration of ozone in the test chamber (30.4 m(3) ), a maximum value of 5.4 ppb over 12 h of continuous operation, was much lower than the current indoor regulation (50 ppb).

  18. Submicrometer particle removal indoors by a novel electrostatic precipitator with high clean air delivery rate, low ozone emissions, and carbon fiber ionizer.

    PubMed

    Kim, H-J; Han, B; Kim, Y-J; Oda, T; Won, H

    2013-10-01

    A novel positive-polarity electrostatic precipitator (ESP) was developed using an ionization stage (0.4 × 0.4 × 0.14 m(3) ) with 16 carbon fiber ionizers in each channel and a collection stage (0.4 × 0.4 × 0.21 m(3) ) with parallel metallic plates. The single-pass collection efficiency and clean air delivery rate (CADR) were measured by standard tests using KCl particles in 0.25-0.35 μm. Performance was determined using the Deutsch equation and established diffusion and field charging theories and also compared with the commercialized HEPA filter-type air cleaner. Experimental results showed that the single-pass collection efficiency of the ESP ranged from 50 to 95% and decreased with the flow rate (10-20 m(3) /min), but increased with the voltage applied to the ionizers (6 to 8 kV) and collection plates (-5 to -7 kV). The ESP with 18 m(3) /min achieved a CADR of 12.1 m(3) /min with a voltage of 8 kV applied to the ionization stage and with a voltage of -6 kV applied to the collection stage. The concentration of ozone in the test chamber (30.4 m(3) ), a maximum value of 5.4 ppb over 12 h of continuous operation, was much lower than the current indoor regulation (50 ppb). PMID:23418721

  19. Partitioning of mercury, arsenic, selenium, boron, and chloride in a full-scale coal combustion process equipped with selective catalytic reduction, electrostatic precipitation, and flue gas desulfurization systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chin-Min Cheng; Pauline Hack; Paul Chu; Yung-Nan Chang; Ting-Yu Lin; Chih-Sheng Ko; Po-Han Chiang; Cheng-Chun He; Yuan-Min Lai; Wei-Ping Pan

    2009-09-15

    A full-scale field study was carried out at a 795 MWe coal-fired power plant equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR), an electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems to investigate the distribution of selected trace elements (i.e., mercury, arsenic, selenium, boron, and chloride) from coal, FGD reagent slurry, makeup water to flue gas, solid byproduct, and wastewater streams. Flue gases were collected from the SCR outlet, ESP inlet, FGD inlet, and stack. Concurrent with flue gas sampling, coal, bottom ash, economizer ash, and samples from the FGD process were also collected for elemental analysis. By combining plant operation parameters, the overall material balances of selected elements were established. The removal efficiencies of As, Se, Hg, and B by the ESP unit were 88, 56, 17, and 8%, respectively. Only about 2.5% of Cl was condensed and removed from flue gas by fly ash. The FGD process removed over 90% of Cl, 77% of B, 76% of Hg, 30% of Se, and 5% of As. About 90% and 99% of the FGD-removed Hg and Se were associated with gypsum. For B and Cl, over 99% were discharged from the coal combustion process with the wastewater. Mineral trona (trisodium hydrogendicarbonate dehydrate, Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O) was injected before the ESP unit to control the emission of sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}). By comparing the trace elements compositions in the fly ash samples collected from the locations before and after the trona injection, the injection of trona did not show an observable effect on the partitioning behaviors of selenium and arsenic, but it significantly increased the adsorption of mercury onto fly ash. The stack emissions of mercury, boron, selenium, and chloride were for the most part in the gas phase. 47 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs.

  20. 40 CFR 60.5175 - How do I establish operating limits if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, activated carbon injection..., fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, activated carbon injection, or afterburner, or if I limit... device other than a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, activated carbon...

  1. 40 CFR 60.5175 - How do I establish operating limits if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, activated carbon injection..., fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, activated carbon injection, or afterburner, or if I limit... device other than a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, activated carbon...

  2. 40 CFR 60.5175 - How do I establish operating limits if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, activated carbon injection..., fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, activated carbon injection, or afterburner, or if I limit... device other than a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, activated carbon...

  3. Electrostatic Explorations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallai, Ditta; Stewart, Gay

    1998-01-01

    Presents a set of hands-on electrostatics experiments in the form of an activity guide and worksheet through which students discover the different types of electric charge, Coulomb's Law, induced charge separation, and grounding. (DDR)

  4. Electrostatic monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2001-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for more simply measuring alpha and/or beta emissions arising from items or locations. The technique uses indirect monitoring of the emissions by detecting ions generated by the emissions, the ions being attracted electrostatically to electrodes for discharge of collection. The apparatus and method employ a chamber which is sealed around the item or location during monitoring with no air being drawn into or expelled from the chamber during the monitoring process. A simplified structure and operations arises as a result, but without impairing the efficiency and accuracy of the detection technique.

  5. Electrostatic thrusters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Reader, P. D.

    1972-01-01

    The current status of research and development programs on electrostatic thrusters is reviewed. Current programs that utilize mercury electron-bombardment thrusters range from 5- to 30-cm in diameter. Recent progress on the 5-cm thruster has emphasized durability, with accelerator time exceeding 6300 hours and total time on the rest of the thruster exceeding 8300 hours. Recent progress on the 30-cm thruster has been outstanding in dished-grid accelerator systems. Ion beams up to 5 amperes have been obtained for short periods with 1000 volts net accelerating potential difference. The cesium electron-bombardment and cesium contact programs are also described.

  6. PREFACE: Electrostatics 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, James

    2015-10-01

    Electrostatics 2015, supported by the Institute of Physics, was held in the Sir James Matthews building at Southampton Solent University, UK between 12th and 16th April 2015. Southampton is a historic city on the South Coast of England with a strong military and maritime history. Southampton is home to two Universities: Solent University, which hosted the conference, and the University of Southampton, where much work is undertaken related to electrostatics. 37 oral and 44 poster presentations were accepted for the conference, and 60 papers were submitted and accepted for the proceedings. The Bill Bright Memorial Lecture was delivered this year by Professor Mark Horenstein from Boston University who was, until recently, Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Electrostatics. He spoke on The contribution of surface potential to diverse problems in electrostatics and his thorough knowledge of the subject of electrostatics was evident in the presentation. The first session was chaired by the Conference Chair, Dr Keith Davies, whose experience in the field showed through his frequent contributions to the discussions throughout the conference. Hazards and Electrostatic Discharge have formed a strong core to Electrostatics conferences for many years, and this conference contained sessions on both Hazards and on ESD, including an invited talk from Dr Jeremy Smallwood on ESD in Industry - Present and Future. Another strong theme to emerge from this year's programme was Non-Thermal Plasmas, which was covered in two sessions. There were two invited talks on this subject: Professor Masaaki Okubo gave a talk on Development of super-clean diesel engine and combustor using nonthermal plasma hybrid after treatment and Dr David Go presented a talk on Atmospheric-pressure ionization processes: New approaches and applications for plasmas in contact with liquids. A new innovation to the conference this year was the opportunity for conference sponsors to present to the delegates a technical

  7. Recovery of combustibles from electrostatic precipitator discharge.

    PubMed

    Jain, Pankaj Kumar; Bhattacharya, Sumantra; Kumar, Shravan

    2016-06-01

    Coal is the main fuel for the direct reduced iron (DRI) plants of India, which are one of the major sources of fly ash generation. The generation of fly ash and its disposal has raised concern because of the environmental impacts. In the present study, two different fly ash samples were investigated to explore the scope of recovery of combustibles. One did not show any recovery potential. The second sample indicated that about 40% of material could be recovered, with 35% fixed carbon and 10,841 kJ kg(-1) gross calorific value. This can be used as a fuel blend in standard fluidised bed combustion boilers efficiently burning inferior coal. A process flowsheet has been suggested for the recovery purpose. It was estimated that for a small 0.2 million tonnes per year (Mtpy) capacity DRI plant, approximately 3.4 ha of land could thus annually be saved from dumping of the generated fly ash, while recovering 1.83 MW of electrical energy. PMID:27053376

  8. Direct impact aerosol sampling by electrostatic precipitation

    DOEpatents

    Braden, Jason D.; Harter, Andrew G.; Stinson, Brad J.; Sullivan, Nicholas M.

    2016-02-02

    The present disclosure provides apparatuses for collecting aerosol samples by ionizing an air sample at different degrees. An air flow is generated through a cavity in which at least one corona wire is disposed and electrically charged to form a corona therearound. At least one grounded sample collection plate is provided downstream of the at least one corona wire so that aerosol ions generated within the corona are deposited on the at least one grounded sample collection plate. A plurality of aerosol samples ionized to different degrees can be generated. The at least one corona wire may be perpendicular to the direction of the flow, or may be parallel to the direction of the flow. The apparatus can include a serial connection of a plurality of stages such that each stage is capable of generating at least one aerosol sample, and the air flow passes through the plurality of stages serially.

  9. Recovery of combustibles from electrostatic precipitator discharge.

    PubMed

    Jain, Pankaj Kumar; Bhattacharya, Sumantra; Kumar, Shravan

    2016-06-01

    Coal is the main fuel for the direct reduced iron (DRI) plants of India, which are one of the major sources of fly ash generation. The generation of fly ash and its disposal has raised concern because of the environmental impacts. In the present study, two different fly ash samples were investigated to explore the scope of recovery of combustibles. One did not show any recovery potential. The second sample indicated that about 40% of material could be recovered, with 35% fixed carbon and 10,841 kJ kg(-1) gross calorific value. This can be used as a fuel blend in standard fluidised bed combustion boilers efficiently burning inferior coal. A process flowsheet has been suggested for the recovery purpose. It was estimated that for a small 0.2 million tonnes per year (Mtpy) capacity DRI plant, approximately 3.4 ha of land could thus annually be saved from dumping of the generated fly ash, while recovering 1.83 MW of electrical energy.

  10. Survey and evaluation of modern electrostatic concepts applied to high-resistivity fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    The ineffectiveness of conventional electrostatic precipitators on high resistivity fly ash has different, though interrelated, causes. Voltages high enough to generate corona at the discharge electrode also generate back corona on the deposited dust layer. Removal of the layer results in reentrainment losses. Reduction of voltage to suppress back corona reduces precipitation effectiveness. All of the surveyed concepts attempt to deal with one or more of these problems; most but none will address all of the deficiencies. A versatile multiple-concept pilot precipitator would allow GFETC to develop the optimum combination of novel concepts. Acurex is recommending a precipitator with component interchangeability in three sections: (1) the main precipitator section (one or more cells) should be designed to accept either conventional electrodes or a few tri-electrode configurations. Versatile pulse-charged power supplies will be needed to accommodate the various electrode configurations. The best method of suppressing back-corona in the precipitator itself can thus be developed; (2) a precharger section should be installed ahead of the main precipitator to optimize precharger design; and (3) a downstream collector section would test the effectiveness of concepts which lend themselves to effective collection of low-load, high-resistivity, small particles. These include wet precipitators, fabric filters, and bed filters. The separation of functions will allow more effective particle charging in the first section, collection of most of the particulate without reverse ionization in the main section, and polishing of the remaining fine and reentrained particulate in a suitable downstream collector.

  11. Electrostatically Guided Rydberg Positronium.

    PubMed

    Deller, A; Alonso, A M; Cooper, B S; Hogan, S D; Cassidy, D B

    2016-08-12

    We report experiments in which positronium (Ps) atoms were guided using inhomogeneous electric fields. Ps atoms in Rydberg-Stark states with principal quantum number n=10 and electric dipole moments up to 610 D were prepared via two-color two-photon optical excitation in the presence of a 670  V cm^{-1} electric field. The Ps atoms were created at the entrance of a 0.4 m long electrostatic quadrupole guide, and were detected at the end of the guide via annihilation gamma radiation. When the lasers were tuned to excite low-field-seeking Stark states, a fivefold increase in the number of atoms reaching the end of the guide was observed, whereas no signal was detected when high-field-seeking states were produced. The data are consistent with the calculated geometrical guide acceptance. PMID:27563960

  12. Electrostatically Guided Rydberg Positronium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deller, A.; Alonso, A. M.; Cooper, B. S.; Hogan, S. D.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2016-08-01

    We report experiments in which positronium (Ps) atoms were guided using inhomogeneous electric fields. Ps atoms in Rydberg-Stark states with principal quantum number n =10 and electric dipole moments up to 610 D were prepared via two-color two-photon optical excitation in the presence of a 670 V cm-1 electric field. The Ps atoms were created at the entrance of a 0.4 m long electrostatic quadrupole guide, and were detected at the end of the guide via annihilation gamma radiation. When the lasers were tuned to excite low-field-seeking Stark states, a fivefold increase in the number of atoms reaching the end of the guide was observed, whereas no signal was detected when high-field-seeking states were produced. The data are consistent with the calculated geometrical guide acceptance.

  13. Control of electrostatic damage to electronic circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, W.J. Jr.

    1980-03-01

    Static is caused by the flow of materials and people within an environment. The static voltages generated by these movements can degrade or destroy many solid state devices currently being used in sophisticated electronic equipment. Discharge of static voltages through these sensitive devices during assembly operations can lead to a nonfunctional assembly fabricated from parts which previously were acceptable or to later failure of an assembly which was functional after fabrication. Sources of electrostatic charges, equipment and methods for minimizing the generation of electrostatic voltages during the production, assembly and packaging of solid state electronic equipment, and the sensitivity of solid state devices to electrostatic damage are discussed. It is concluded that static awareness is the key to an effective electrostatic damage (ESD) control program, and that production facilities must incorporate electrostatic protection facilities, materials, and processes so that workers can concentrate on producing a high-quality product without having to be overly concerned about ESD procedures. (LCL)

  14. PREFACE: Electrostatics 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, James

    2015-10-01

    Electrostatics 2015, supported by the Institute of Physics, was held in the Sir James Matthews building at Southampton Solent University, UK between 12th and 16th April 2015. Southampton is a historic city on the South Coast of England with a strong military and maritime history. Southampton is home to two Universities: Solent University, which hosted the conference, and the University of Southampton, where much work is undertaken related to electrostatics. 37 oral and 44 poster presentations were accepted for the conference, and 60 papers were submitted and accepted for the proceedings. The Bill Bright Memorial Lecture was delivered this year by Professor Mark Horenstein from Boston University who was, until recently, Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Electrostatics. He spoke on The contribution of surface potential to diverse problems in electrostatics and his thorough knowledge of the subject of electrostatics was evident in the presentation. The first session was chaired by the Conference Chair, Dr Keith Davies, whose experience in the field showed through his frequent contributions to the discussions throughout the conference. Hazards and Electrostatic Discharge have formed a strong core to Electrostatics conferences for many years, and this conference contained sessions on both Hazards and on ESD, including an invited talk from Dr Jeremy Smallwood on ESD in Industry - Present and Future. Another strong theme to emerge from this year's programme was Non-Thermal Plasmas, which was covered in two sessions. There were two invited talks on this subject: Professor Masaaki Okubo gave a talk on Development of super-clean diesel engine and combustor using nonthermal plasma hybrid after treatment and Dr David Go presented a talk on Atmospheric-pressure ionization processes: New approaches and applications for plasmas in contact with liquids. A new innovation to the conference this year was the opportunity for conference sponsors to present to the delegates a technical

  15. Electrostatic correlations near charged planar surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Mingge; Em Karniadakis, George

    2014-01-01

    Electrostatic correlation effects near charged planar surfaces immersed in a symmetric electrolytes solution are systematically studied by numerically solving the nonlinear six-dimensional electrostatic self-consistent equations. We compare our numerical results with widely accepted mean-field (MF) theory results, and find that the MF theory remains quantitatively accurate only in weakly charged regimes, whereas in strongly charged regimes, the MF predictions deviate drastically due to the electrostatic correlation effects. We also observe a first-order like phase-transition corresponding to the counterion condensation phenomenon in strongly charged regimes, and compute the phase diagram numerically within a wide parameter range. Finally, we investigate the interactions between two likely-charged planar surfaces, which repulse each other as MF theory predicts in weakly charged regimes. However, our results show that they attract each other above a certain distance in strongly charged regimes due to significant electrostatic correlations. PMID:25194382

  16. Electrostatic Levitator Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Electrostatic levitation system inside Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  17. Electrostatically controlled micromechanical gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkey, Timothy (Inventor); Torti, Richard (Inventor); Johnson, Bruce (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An integrated electrostatically-controlled micromechanical gyroscope with a rotor encompassed within a rotor cavity and electrostatically spun within the cavity. The gyroscope includes a plurality of axial electrostatic rotor actuators above and below the rotor for controlling the axial and tilt position of the rotor within the cavity, and a plurality of radial electrostatic actuators spaced circumferentially around the rotor for controlling the radial and tilt position of the rotor within the cavity. The position of the rotor within the cavity is then resolved to determine the external forces acting on the rotor.

  18. Edutainment Science: Electrostatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahlers, Carl

    2009-01-01

    Electrostatics should find a special place in all primary school science curricula. It is a great learning area that reinforces the basics that underpin electricity and atomic structure. Furthermore, it has many well documented hands-on activities. Unfortunately, the "traditional" electrostatics equipment such as PVC rods, woollen cloths, rabbit…

  19. Electrostatic Field Invisibility Cloak

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Chuwen; Yang, Yuping; Geng, Zhaoxin; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji

    2015-01-01

    The invisibility cloak has been drawing much attention due to its new concept for manipulating many physical fields, from oscillating wave fields (electromagnetic, acoustic and elastic) to static magnetic fields, dc electric fields, and diffusive fields. Here, an electrostatic field invisibility cloak has been theoretically investigated and experimentally demonstrated to perfectly hide two dimensional objects without disturbing their external electrostatic fields. The desired cloaking effect has been achieved via both cancelling technology and transformation optics (TO). This study demonstrates a novel way for manipulating electrostatic fields, which shows promise for a wide range of potential applications. PMID:26552343

  20. Electrostatic Field Invisibility Cloak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chuwen; Yang, Yuping; Geng, Zhaoxin; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji

    2015-11-01

    The invisibility cloak has been drawing much attention due to its new concept for manipulating many physical fields, from oscillating wave fields (electromagnetic, acoustic and elastic) to static magnetic fields, dc electric fields, and diffusive fields. Here, an electrostatic field invisibility cloak has been theoretically investigated and experimentally demonstrated to perfectly hide two dimensional objects without disturbing their external electrostatic fields. The desired cloaking effect has been achieved via both cancelling technology and transformation optics (TO). This study demonstrates a novel way for manipulating electrostatic fields, which shows promise for a wide range of potential applications.

  1. Electrostatic precipatator construction having ladder bar spacers

    SciTech Connect

    Jonelis, J.A.

    1984-10-30

    The present invention relates to an improved construction for an electrostatic precipitator having ladder bar spacers. The electrostatic precipitator collects solid particles carried by a flue gas from a source of combustion. The precipitator includes a plurality of spaced plates for collecting solid particles from the flue gas by electrostatic attraction of the solid particles to the plates. A second plurality of elongated electrodes is positioned among the plates. Each of the electrodes is mounted between a pair of adjacent plates. Each of the electrodes is parallel to the other electrodes and is parallel to the plates. A third plurality of ladder bars is positioned between adjacent plates to hold the plates in a flat attitude and to maintain adjacent surfaces of adjacent plates substantially equidistantly spaced from one another. Each of the ladder bars has a connector bar secured to one of the pair of adjacent surfaces. Each of the ladder bars has a fourth plurality of holder bars. Each of the holder bars having one end connected to its respective connector bar and extending outwardly from the connector bar toward the other of the pair of adjacent surfaces. A contact on the other end of each holder bar engages the other of the pair of adjacent surfaces to hold the pair of adjacent surfaces apart.

  2. Studying Electrostatic Levitator Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Kevin Croat of Washington University in St. Louis, MO, examines samples processed in NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC)Electrostatic Levitator Facility. Croat is working with Prof. Kerneth Kelton in investigating undercooling of polytetrahedral phase-forming liquids.

  3. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Sommargren, Gary E.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  4. Graphene Electrostatic Microphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qin; Onishi, Seita; Zettl, A.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a wideband electrostatic graphene microphone displaying flat frequency response over the entire human audible region as well as into the ultrasonic regime. Using the microphone, low-level ultrasonic bat calls are successfully recorded. The microphone can be paired with a similarly constructed electrostatic graphene loudspeaker to create a wideband ultrasonic radio. Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute at the University of California - Berkeley.

  5. Electrostatic Linear Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.; Curry, Kenneth C.

    1990-01-01

    Electrically charged helices attract or repel each other. Proposed electrostatic linear actuator made with intertwined dual helices, which holds charge-bearing surfaces. Dual-helix configuration provides relatively large unbroken facing charged surfaces (relatively large electrostatic force) within small volume. Inner helix slides axially in outer helix in response to voltages applied to conductors. Spiral form also makes components more rigid. Actuator conceived to have few moving parts and to be operable after long intervals of inactivity.

  6. Electrostatic discharge test apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Electrostatic discharge properties of materials are quantitatively measured and ranked. Samples (20) are rotated on a turntable (15) beneath selectable, co-available electrostatic chargers (30/40), one being a corona charging element (30) and the other a sample-engaging triboelectric charging element (40). They then pass under a voltage meter (25) to measure the amount of residual charge on the samples (20). After charging is discontinued, measurements are continued to record the charge decay history over time.

  7. Electrostatic Levitator in Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Metal droplet levitated inside the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  8. Electrostatic Levitator Layout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) general layout with captions. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  9. Electrostatic Levitator Layout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    General oayout of Electrostatic Levitator (ESL). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  10. Electrostatic Levitator Electrode Layout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Schematic of Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) electrodes and controls system. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  11. Electrostatics in molecular phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Náray-Szabó, G.

    1995-04-01

    Molecular electrostatic potentials (MEP) and fields (MEF) became very popular in the last two decades since they offer a pictorial modeling of complicated molecular events. In this paper we give an overview on applications. We can discuss chemical reactivity in terms of MEP maps: negative and positive regions are preferred by electrophilic and nucleophilic reagents, respectively. We may define the concept of electrostatic enzyme catalysis. In cases when the ground-state polarity of the active site essentially increases in the transition state the catalytic rate enhancement is due to electrostatic stabilization by the polar protein and solvent environment. Crystal surfaces provide strong MEF, thus enhanced reactivity, in their vicinity. Hydration depends also on the electrostatic behaviour. It is possible to define the average MEF of a molecule that is an appropriate descriptor of hydration ability to be used in quantitative structure-activity relationships. Molecular recognition has also important electrostatic aspects. Complementarity and similarity are determined beside steric aspects by electrostatic and hydrophobic factors, as well. We may define hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions around a molecule in terms of the MEF and apply this representation to the study of host-guest complementarity, as well as crystal packing.

  12. Large electrostatic accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    The increasing importance of energetic heavy ion beams in the study of atomic physics, nuclear physics, and materials science has partially or wholly motivated the construction of a new generation of large electrostatic accelerators designed to operate at terminal potentials of 20 MV or above. In this paper, the author briefly discusses the status of these new accelerators and also discusses several recent technological advances which may be expected to further improve their performance. The paper is divided into four parts: (1) a discussion of the motivation for the construction of large electrostatic accelerators, (2) a description and discussion of several large electrostatic accelerators which have been recently completed or are under construction, (3) a description of several recent innovations which may be expected to improve the performance of large electrostatic accelerators in the future, and (4) a description of an innovative new large electrostatic accelerator whose construction is scheduled to begin next year. Due to time and space constraints, discussion is restricted to consideration of only tandem accelerators.

  13. Electrostatics at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Walker, David A; Kowalczyk, Bartlomiej; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2011-04-01

    Electrostatic forces are amongst the most versatile interactions to mediate the assembly of nanostructured materials. Depending on experimental conditions, these forces can be long- or short-ranged, can be either attractive or repulsive, and their directionality can be controlled by the shapes of the charged nano-objects. This Review is intended to serve as a primer for experimentalists curious about the fundamentals of nanoscale electrostatics and for theorists wishing to learn about recent experimental advances in the field. Accordingly, the first portion introduces the theoretical models of electrostatic double layers and derives electrostatic interaction potentials applicable to particles of different sizes and/or shapes and under different experimental conditions. This discussion is followed by the review of the key experimental systems in which electrostatic interactions are operative. Examples include electroactive and "switchable" nanoparticles, mixtures of charged nanoparticles, nanoparticle chains, sheets, coatings, crystals, and crystals-within-crystals. Applications of these and other structures in chemical sensing and amplification are also illustrated.

  14. Electrostatically shaped membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverberg, Larry M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and apparatus for electrostatically shaping a membrane suitable for use in antennas or the like, comprising an electrically conductive thin membrane where the periphery of said membrane is free to move in at least one direction, a first charge on the electrically conductive thin membrane to electrostatically stiffen the membrane, a second charge which shapes the electrostatically stiffened thin membrane and a restraint for limiting the movement of at least one point of the thin membrane relative to the second charge. Also disclosed is a method and apparatus for adaptively controlling the shape of the thin membrane by sensing the shape of the membrane and selectively controlling the first and second charge to achieve a desired performance characteristic of the membrane.

  15. Electrostatic graphene loudspeaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qin; Zettl, A.

    2013-06-01

    Graphene has extremely low mass density and high mechanical strength, and key qualities for efficient wide-frequency-response electrostatic audio speaker design. Low mass ensures good high frequency response, while high strength allows for relatively large free-standing diaphragms necessary for effective low frequency response. Here, we report on construction and testing of a miniaturized graphene-based electrostatic audio transducer. The speaker/earphone is straightforward in design and operation and has excellent frequency response across the entire audio frequency range (20 Hz-20 kHz), with performance matching or surpassing commercially available audio earphones.

  16. Electrostatic Levitator Inspected

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Larry Savage, Dr. Jan Rogers, Dr. Michael Robinson (All NASA) and Doug Huie (Mevatec) inspect the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  17. Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) Undercooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Graph depicting Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) heating and cooling cycle to achieve undercooling of liquid metals. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 3-4 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contracting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity matierials sciences program.

  18. Electrostatic Levitator at Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A 3 mm drop of nickel-zirconium, heated to incandescence, hovers between electrically charged plates inside the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  19. Electrostatic Levitator Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Jan Rogers and Dr. Michael Robinson operate the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  20. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical ports ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (beam passes through the window at left), positioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  1. Electrostatics of Rigid Polyelectrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, G.C.L.

    2009-06-04

    The organization of rigid biological polyelectrolytes by multivalent ions and macroions are important for many fundamental problems in biology and biomedicine, such as cytoskeletal regulation and antimicrobial sequestration in cystic fibrosis. These polyelectrolytes have been used as model systems for understanding electrostatics in complex fluids. Here, we review some recent results in theory, simulations, and experiments.

  2. Electrostatic space radiation shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, R.; Wilson, J. W.; Youngquist, R. C.

    For the success of NASA s new vision for space exploration to Moon Mars and beyond exposures from the hazards of severe space radiation in deep space long duration missions is a must solve problem The payload penalty demands a very stringent requirement on the design of the spacecrafts for human deep space missions The exploration beyond low Earth orbit LEO to enable routine access of space will require protection from the hazards of the accumulated exposures of space radiation Galactic Cosmic Rays GCR and Solar Particle Events SPE and minimizing the production of secondary radiation is a great advantage There is a need to look to new horizons for newer technologies The present investigation revisits electrostatic active radiation shielding and explores the feasibility of using the electrostatic shielding in concert with the state-of-the-art materials shielding and protection technologies The full space radiation environment has been used for the first time to explore the feasibility of electrostatic shielding The goal is to repel enough positive charge ions so that they miss the spacecraft without attracting thermal electrons Conclusions will be drawn should the electrostatic shielding be successful for the future directions of space radiation protection

  3. An asymmetry in electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2013-11-01

    This paper outlines a misuse of the electrostatic induction concept. A non-symmetrical behaviour was observed in a charge by the induction of an insulated hollow metallic conductor (the Faraday ice pail experiment). The major consequence of this experiment is a quick demonstration that the Earth must have a net negative charge.

  4. Studying Electrostatic Levitator Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Prof. Kerneth Kelton of Washington University in St. Lous, MO, (L) and Dr. Michael Robinson of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) examine a titanium-iron silicate (TiFeSiO)sample processed in MSFC's Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) Facility (background). Kelton is investigating undercooling of polytetrahedral phase-forming liquids.

  5. Nanoscale Electrostatics in Mitosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, L. John; West, Patrick Michael

    2001-04-01

    Primitive biological cells had to divide with very little biology. This work simulates a physicochemical mechanism, based upon nanoscale electrostatics, which explains the anaphase A poleward motion of chromosomes. In the cytoplasmic medium that exists in biological cells, electrostatic fields are subject to strong attenuation by Debye screening, and therefore decrease rapidly over a distance equal to several Debye lengths. However, the existence of microtubules within cells changes the situation completely. Microtubule dimer subunits are electric dipolar structures, and can act as intermediaries that extend the reach of the electrostatic interaction over cellular distances. Experimental studies have shown that intracellular pH rises to a peak at mitosis, and decreases through cytokinesis. This result, in conjunction with the electric dipole nature of microtubule subunits and the Debye screened electrostatic force is sufficient to explain and unify the basic events during mitosis and cytokinesis: (1) assembly of asters, (2) motion of the asters to poles, (3) poleward motion of chromosomes (anaphase A), (4) cell elongation, and (5) cytokinesis. This paper will focus on a simulation of the dynamics if anaphase A motion based on this comprehensive model. The physicochemical mechanisms utilized by primitive cells could provide important clues regarding our understanding of cell division in modern eukaryotic cells.

  6. Electrostatics in sandstorms and earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbrot, Troy; Thyagu, Nirmal; Paehtz, Thomas; Herrmann, Hans

    2010-11-01

    We present new data demonstrating (1) that electrostatic charging in sandstorms is a necessary outcome in a class of rapid collisional flows, and (2) that electrostatic precursors to slip events - long reported in earthquakes - can be reproduced in the laboratory.

  7. Sulfur dioxide removal by enhanced electrostatics

    SciTech Connect

    Larkin, K.; Tseng, C.; Keener, T.C.; Khang, S.J.

    1997-12-31

    The economic removal of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) still represents a significant technical challenge which could determine the use of certain types of fossil fuels for energy production. This paper will present the preliminary results of an innovative research project utilizing a low-cost wet electrostatic precipitator to remove sulfur dioxide. There are many aspects for gas removal in an electrostatic precipitator which are not currently being used. This project utilizes electron attachment of free electrons onto gas molecules and ozone generation to remove sulfur dioxide which is a typical flue gas pollutant. This research was conducted on a bench-scale, wet electrostatic precipitator. A direct-current negative discharge corona is used to generate the ozone in-situ. This ozone will be used to oxidize SO{sub 2} to form sulfuric acid, which is very soluble in water. However, it is believed that the primary removal mechanism is electron attachment of the free electrons from the corona which force the SO{sub 2} to go to equilibrium with the water and be removed from the gas stream. Forcing the equilibrium has been shown to achieve removal efficiencies of up to 70%. The bench scale unit has been designed to operate wet or dry, positive and negative for comparison purposes. The applied dc voltage is variable from 0 to 100 kV, the flow rate is a nominal 7 m{sup 3}/hr and the collecting electrode area is 0.20 m{sup 2}. Tests are conducted on a simulated flue gas stream with SO{sub 2} ranging from 0 to 4,000 ppmv. This paper presents the results of tests conducted to determine the effect of operating conditions on removal efficiency. The removal efficiency was found to vary with gas residence time, water flow rate, inlet concentration, applied power, and the use of corona pulsing.

  8. Biobriefcase electrostatic aerosol collector

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Perry M.; Christian, Allen T.; Bailey, Christopher G.; Willis, Ladona; Masquelier, Donald A.; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L.

    2009-03-17

    A system for sampling air and collecting particles entrained in the air comprising a receiving surface, a liquid input that directs liquid to the receiving surface and produces a liquid surface, an air input that directs the air so that the air with particles entrained in the air impact the liquid surface, and an electrostatic contact connected to the liquid that imparts an electric charge to the liquid. The particles potentially including bioagents become captured in the liquid by the air with particles entrained in the air impacting the liquid surface. Collection efficiency is improved by the electrostatic contact electrically charging the liquid. The effects of impaction and adhesion due to electrically charging the liquid allows a unique combination in a particle capture medium that has a low fluid consumption rate while maintaining high efficiency.

  9. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical prots ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (the beam passes through the window at left), poisitioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps (such as the deuterium arc lamp at right), and to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  10. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical prots ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (the beam passes through the window at left), poisitioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps (arc lamp at right), and to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  11. Electrostatic Levitator Vaccum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical ports ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (the beam passes through the window at left), positioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps (such as the deuterium arc lamp at right), and to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  12. Electrostatic curtain studies

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, L C

    1992-05-01

    This report presents the results of experiments using electrostatic curtains (ESCS) as a transuranic (TRU) contamination control technique. The TRU contaminants included small (micrometer to sub micrometer) particles of plutonium and americium compounds associated with defense-related waste. Three series of experiments were conducted. The first was with uncontaminated Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) soil, the second used contaminated soil containing plutonium-239 (from a mixture of Rocky Flats Plant contaminated soil and INEL uncontaminated soil), and the third was uncontaminated INEL soil spiked with plutonium-239. All experiments with contaminated soil were conducted inside a glove box containing a dust generator, low volume cascade impactor (LVCI), electrostatic separator, and electrostatic materials. The data for these experiments consisted of the mass of dust collected on the various material coupons, plates, and filters; radiochemical analysis of selected samples; and photographs, as well as computer printouts giving particle size distributions and dimensions from the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The following results were found: (a) plutonium content (pCi/g) was found to increase with smaller soil particle sizes and (b) the electrostatic field had a stronger influence on smaller particle sizes compared to larger particle sizes. The SEM analysis indicated that the particle size of the tracer Pu239 used in the spiked soil experiments was below the detectable size limit (0.5 {mu}m) of the SEM and, thus, may not be representative of plutonium particles found in defense-related waste. The use of radiochemical analysis indicated that plutonium could be found on separator plates of both polarities, as well as passing through the electric field and collecting on LVCI filters.

  13. Electrostatic space radiation shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Ram K.; Wilson, John W.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2008-09-01

    For the success of NASA’s new vision for space exploration to Moon, Mars and beyond, exposures from the hazards of severe space radiation in deep space long duration missions is ‘a must solve’ problem. The payload penalty demands a very stringent requirement on the design of the spacecrafts for human deep space missions. The exploration beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) to enable routine access of space will require protection from the hazards of the accumulated exposures of space radiation, Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE), and minimizing the production of secondary radiation is a great advantage. There is a need to look to new horizons for newer technologies. The present investigation revisits electrostatic active radiation shielding and explores the feasibility of using the electrostatic shielding in concert with the state-of-the-art materials shielding and protection technologies. The full space radiation environment has been used, for the first time, to explore the feasibility of electrostatic shielding. The goal is to repel enough positive charge ions so that they miss the spacecraft without attracting thermal electrons. Conclusions are drawn for the future directions of space radiation protection.

  14. Electrostatic containerless processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rulison, Aaron J.; Watkins, John L.; Zambrano, Brian

    1997-07-01

    We introduce a materials science tool for investigating refractory solids and melts: the electrostatic containerless processing system (ESCAPES). ESCAPES maintains refractory specimens of materials in a pristine state by levitating and heating them in a vacuum chamber, thereby avoiding the contaminating influences of container walls and ambient gases. ESCAPES is designed for the investigation of thermophysical properties, phase equilibria, metastable phase formation, undercooling and nucleation, time-temperature-transformation diagrams, and other aspects of materials processing. ESCAPES incorporates several design improvements over prior electrostatic levitation technology. It has an informative and responsive computer control system. It has separate light sources for heating and charging, which prevents runaway discharging. Both the heating and charging light sources are narrow band, which allows the use of optical pyrometry and other diagnostics at all times throughout processing. Heat is provided to the levitated specimens by a 50 W Nd:YAG laser operating at 1.064 μm. A deuterium arc lamp charges the specimen through photoelectric emission. ESCAPES can heat metals, ceramics, and semiconductors to temperatures exceeding 2300 K; specimens range in size from 1 to 3 mm diam. This article describes the design, capabilities, and applications of ESCAPES, focusing on improvements over prior electrostatic levitation technology.

  15. Electrostatic modeling for LISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaul, Diana N.; Sumner, Timothy J.

    2003-03-01

    LISA employs a capacitive sensing and positioning system to maintain the drag free environment of the test masses acting as interferometer mirror elements. The need for detailed electrostatic modelling of the test mass environment arises because any electric field gradient or variation associated with test mass motion can couple the test mass to its housing, and ultimately the spacecraft. Cross-couplings between components in the system can introduce direct couplings between sensing signals, sensing axes and the drive signal. A variation in cross-couplings or asymmetry in the system can introduce capacitance gradients and second derivatives, giving rise to unwanted forces and spring constant modifications. These effects will vary dependent on the precise geometry of the system and will also tend to increase the sensitivity to accumulated charge on the test-mass. Presented are the results of a systematic study of the effect of the principal geometry elements (e.g. machining imperfections, the caging mechanism) on the test mass electrostatic environment, using the finite element code ANSYS. This work is part of an ongoing ESA study into drag-free control for LISA and the LTP on SMART 2 and ultimately aims to eliminate geometries that introduce too large a disturbance and optimise the electrostatic design.

  16. Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Aston, Graeme

    1989-01-01

    The Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA) is a thruster concept which promises specific impulse levels between low power arcjets and those of the ion engine while retaining the relative simplicity of the arcjet. The EPA thruster produces thrust through the electrostatic acceleration of a moderately dense plasma. No accelerating electrodes are used and the specific impulse is a direct function of the applied discharge voltage and the propellant atomic mass. The goal of the present program is to demonstrate feasibility of the EPA thruster concept through experimental and theoretical investigations of the EPA acceleration mechanism and discharge chamber performance. Experimental investigations will include operating the test bed ion (TBI) engine as an EPA thruster and parametrically varying the thruster geometry and operating conditions to quantify the electrostatic plasma acceleration effect. The theoretical investigations will include the development of a discharge chamber model which describes the relationships between the engine size, plasma properties, and overall performance. For the EPA thruster to be a viable propulsion concept, overall thruster efficiencies approaching 30% with specific impulses approaching 1000 s must be achieved.

  17. Electrostatics of Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, John

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to continue developing an understanding of electrostatic phenomena in preparation for any future flight opportunities of the EGM experiment, originally slated for a 2004 Space Station deployment. Work would be based on theoretical assessments, ground-based lab experiments, and reduced-gravity experiments. The ability to examine dipoles in the lab proved to be elusive, and thus, effort was concentrated on monopoles -how materials become charged, the fate of the charge, the role of material type, and so forth. Several significant milestones were achieved in this regard. In regard of the dipoles, experiments were designed in collaboration with the University of Chicago school district who had access to reduced gravity on the KC-135 aircraft. Two experiments were slated to fly last year but were cancelled after the Columbia accident. One of the experiments has been given a second life and will fly sometime in 2005 if the Shuttle flights resume. There remains active interest in the question of electrostatic dipoles within the educational community, and experiments using magnetic dipoles as a substitute are to be examined. The KC-135 experiments will also examine dispersion methods for particles as a verification of possible future techniques in microgravity. Both laboratory and theoretical work established a number of breakthroughs in our understanding of electrostatic phenomena. These breakthroughs are listed in this paper.

  18. ESPVI 4.0 ELECTROSTATIS PRECIPITATOR V-1 AND PERFORMANCE MODEL: USER'S MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual is the companion document for the microcomputer program ESPVI 4.0, Electrostatic Precipitation VI and Performance Model. The program was developed to provide a user- friendly interface to an advanced model of electrostatic precipitation (ESP) performance. The program i...

  19. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, L.; Bryan, T.; Williams, S.; McCoy, B.; MacLeod, T.

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and development

  20. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Tom; Macleod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry; Williams, Scott; McCoy, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA gripper pad surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and

  1. ELECTROSTATICALLY ENHANCED BARRIER FILTER COLLECTION

    SciTech Connect

    John Erjavec; Michael D. Mann; Ryan Z. Knutson; Michael L. Swanson; Michael E. Collings

    2003-06-01

    barrier filter collection (EBFC). This concept combines electrostatic precipitation (ESP) with candle filters in a single unit. Similar technology has been recently proven on a commercial scale for atmospheric applications, but needed to be tested at high temperatures and pressures. The synergy obtained by combining the two control technologies into a single system should actually reduce filter system capital and operating costs and make the system more reliable. More specifically, the ESP is expected to significantly reduce candle filter load and also to limit ash reintrainment, allowing for full recovery of baseline pressure drop during backpulsing of the filters.

  2. Filter and electrostatic samplers for semivolatile aerosols: physical artifacts.

    PubMed

    Volckens, John; Leith, David

    2002-11-01

    Adsorptive and evaporative artifacts often bias measurements of semivolatile aerosols. Adsorption occurs when the sampling method disrupts the gas-particle partitioning equilibrium. Evaporation occurs because concentrations of semivolatiles are rarely constant over time. Filtration is subject to both adsorptive and evaporative artifacts. By comparison, electrostatic precipitation reduces these artifacts by minimizing the surface area of collected particles without substantially disrupting the gas-particle equilibrium. The extent of these artifacts was determined for filter samplers and electrostatic precipitator samplers for semivolatile alkane aerosols in the laboratory. Adsorption of gas-phase semivolatiles was lower in electrostatic precipitators by factors of 5-100 compared to the filter method. Particle evaporation from the electrostatic sampler was 2.3 times lower than that from TFE-coated glass-fiber filters. Use of a backup filter to correct for compound-specific adsorption artifacts can introduce positive or negative errors to the measured particle-phase concentration due to competition among the adsorbates for available adsorption sites. Adsorption of evaporated particles from the front filter onto the backup filter increased the measured evaporative artifact by a factor of 1.5-2.

  3. Electrostatic Return of Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rantanen, R.; Gordon, T.

    2003-01-01

    A Model has been developed capable of calculating the electrostatic return of spacecraft-emitted molecules that are ionized and attracted back to the spacecraft by the spacecraft electric potential on its surfaces. The return of ionized contaminant molecules to charged spacecraft surfaces is very important to all altitudes. It is especially important at geosynchronous and interplanetary environments, since it may be the only mechanism by which contaminants can degrade a surface. This model is applicable to all altitudes and spacecraft geometries. In addition to results of the model will be completed to cover a wide range of potential space systems.

  4. Physics of electrostatic lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-09-01

    The purpose of this program was to study the physics of the ion-energy boosting electrostatic lens for collective ion acceleration in the Luce diode. Extensive work was done in preparation for experiments on the PI Pulserad 1150. Analytic work was done on the orbit of protons in a mass spectrometer and a copper stack for nuclear activation analysis of proton energy spectrum has been designed. Unfortunately, a parallel program which would provide the Luce diode for the collective ion acceleration experiment never materialized. As a result no experiments were actually performed on the Pulserad 1150.

  5. TECHNICAL NOTE: PERFORMANCE OF A PERSONAL ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATOR PARTICLE SAMPLER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Filter-based methods used to measure aerosols with semi-volatile constituents are subject to biases from adsorption and volatilization that may occur during sampling (McDow et al., 1990, Turpin et al., 1994, Volckens et al., 1999; Tolocka et al. 2001). The development and eval...

  6. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M.D.

    1992-04-27

    The purpose of this research program is to identify and evaluate a variety of additives capable of increasing particle cohesion which could be used for improving collection efficiency in an ESP. A three-phase screening process will be used to provide the, evaluation of many additives in a logical and cost-effective manner. The three step approach involves the following experimental setups: 1. Provide a preliminary screening in the laboratory by measuring the effects of various conditioning agents on reentrainment of flyash particles in an electric field operating at simulated flue gas conditions. 2. Evaluate the successful additives using a 100 acfm bench-scale ESP operating on actual flue gas. 3. Obtain the data required for scaling up the technology by testing the two or three most promising conditioning agents at the pilot scale.

  7. Precipitation Recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.; Bras, Rafael L.

    1996-01-01

    The water cycle regulates and reflects natural variability in climate at the regional and global scales. Large-scale human activities that involve changes in land cover, such as tropical deforestation, are likely to modify climate through changes in the water cycle. In order to understand, and hopefully be able to predict, the extent of these potential global and regional changes, we need first to understand how the water cycle works. In the past, most of the research in hydrology focused on the land branch of the water cycle, with little attention given to the atmospheric branch. The study of precipitation recycling which is defined as the contribution of local evaporation to local precipitation, aims at understanding hydrologic processes in the atmospheric branch of the water cycle. Simply stated, any study on precipitation recycling is about how the atmospheric branch of the water cycle works, namely, what happens to water vapor molecules after they evaporate from the surface, and where will they precipitate?

  8. Electrostatic Suspension Using Variable Capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Takaaki; Tsukada, Shinya; Ishino, Yuji; Takasaki, Masaya; Mizuno, Takeshi

    A new control system for electrostatic actuators was applied to electrostatic suspension. This control system was designed to use a variable capacitor connected with an electrostatic actuator in series. A high voltage was applied to this connection. The voltage applied to the actuator was controlled by varying the capacitance of the variable capacitor. An experimental apparatus was fabricated in order to study the controllability of electrostatic force using this control system. The experimental results show that electrostatic force can be controlled both statically and dynamically. Another experimental apparatus was fabricated for demonstrating the feasibility of electrostatic suspension. This apparatus was able to control the 3-DOF vertical motions of the suspended object. Non-contact suspension was achieved with the developed control system using variable capacitors.

  9. 40 CFR 60.4855 - How do I establish operating limits if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, or activated carbon..., electrostatic precipitator, or activated carbon injection, or limit emissions in some other manner (e.g... I establish operating limits if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter,...

  10. 40 CFR 60.4855 - How do I establish operating limits if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, or activated carbon..., electrostatic precipitator, or activated carbon injection, or limit emissions in some other manner (e.g... I establish operating limits if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter,...

  11. 40 CFR 60.4855 - How do I establish operating limits if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, or activated carbon..., electrostatic precipitator, or activated carbon injection, or limit emissions in some other manner (e.g... I establish operating limits if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter,...

  12. STRONTIUM PRECIPITATION

    DOEpatents

    McKenzie, T.R.

    1960-09-13

    A process is given for improving the precipitation of strontium from an aqueous phosphoric-acid-containing solution with nickel or cobalt ferrocyanide by simultaneously precipitating strontium or calcium phosphate. This is accomplished by adding to the ferrocyanide-containing solution calcium or strontium nitrate in a quantity to yield a concentration of from 0.004 to 0.03 and adjusting the pH of the solution to a value of above 8.

  13. Precipitator rehabilitation ComEd Waukegan station

    SciTech Connect

    Sanda, L.; Hermanas, G.

    1996-12-31

    ComEd`s Waukegan Station successfully completed a total rehabilitation of its Unit 8 electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and recovered 66 MW that has been lost due to burning Western Coal. This practice began in the 1970`s for emission`s compliance. The unit now operates at it maximum continuous rating (MCR) with increased fuel flexibility.

  14. Undamped electrostatic plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, F.; Perrone, D.; Veltri, P.; Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F.; Morrison, P. J.; O'Neil, T. M.

    2012-09-15

    Electrostatic waves in a collision-free unmagnetized plasma of electrons with fixed ions are investigated for electron equilibrium velocity distribution functions that deviate slightly from Maxwellian. Of interest are undamped waves that are the small amplitude limit of nonlinear excitations, such as electron acoustic waves (EAWs). A deviation consisting of a small plateau, a region with zero velocity derivative over a width that is a very small fraction of the electron thermal speed, is shown to give rise to new undamped modes, which here are named corner modes. The presence of the plateau turns off Landau damping and allows oscillations with phase speeds within the plateau. These undamped waves are obtained in a wide region of the (k,{omega}{sub R}) plane ({omega}{sub R} being the real part of the wave frequency and k the wavenumber), away from the well-known 'thumb curve' for Langmuir waves and EAWs based on the Maxwellian. Results of nonlinear Vlasov-Poisson simulations that corroborate the existence of these modes are described. It is also shown that deviations caused by fattening the tail of the distribution shift roots off of the thumb curve toward lower k-values and chopping the tail shifts them toward higher k-values. In addition, a rule of thumb is obtained for assessing how the existence of a plateau shifts roots off of the thumb curve. Suggestions are made for interpreting experimental observations of electrostatic waves, such as recent ones in nonneutral plasmas.

  15. Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Aston, Graeme

    1995-01-01

    The application of electric propulsion to communications satellites, however, has been limited to the use of hydrazine thrusters with electric heaters for thrust and specific impulse augmentation. These electrothermal thrusters operate at specific impulse levels of approximately 300 s with heater powers of about 500 W. Low power arcjets (1-3 kW) are currently being investigated as a way to increase specific impulse levels to approximately 500 s. Ion propulsion systems can easily produce specific impulses of 3000 s or greater, but have yet to be applied to communications satellites. The reasons most often given for not using ion propulsion systems are their high level of overall complexity, low thrust with long burn times, and the difficulty of integrating the propulsion system into existing commercial spacecraft busses. The Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA) is a thruster concept which promises specific impulse levels between low power arcjets and those of the ion engine while retaining the relative simplicity of the arcjet. The EPA thruster produces thrust through the electrostatic acceleration of a moderately dense plasma. No accelerating electrodes are used and the specific impulse is a direct function of the applied discharge voltage and the propellant atomic mass.

  16. ELECTROSTATIC MEMORY SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Chu, J.C.

    1958-09-23

    An improved electrostatic memory system is de scribed fer a digital computer wherein a plarality of storage tubes are adapted to operate in either of two possible modes. According to the present irvention, duplicate storage tubes are provided fur each denominational order of the several binary digits. A single discriminator system is provided between corresponding duplicate tubes to determine the character of the infurmation stored in each. If either tube produces the selected type signal, corresponding to binazy "1" in the preferred embodiment, a "1" is regenerated in both tubes. In one mode of operation each bit of information is stored in two corresponding tubes, while in the other mode of operation each bit is stored in only one tube in the conventional manner.

  17. Versatile electrostatic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Veldhoven, Jacqueline van; Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard

    2006-06-15

    A four electrode electrostatic trap geometry is demonstrated that can be used to combine a dipole, quadrupole, and hexapole field. A cold packet of {sup 15}ND{sub 3} molecules is confined in both a purely quadrupolar and hexapolar trapping field and additionally, a dipole field is added to a hexapole field to create either a double-well or a donut-shaped trapping field. The profile of the {sup 15}ND{sub 3} packet in each of these four trapping potentials is measured, and the dependence of the well-separation and barrier height of the double-well and donut potential on the hexapole and dipole term are discussed.

  18. Teaching Electrostatics in University Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    Describes an optional course on applied electrostatics that was offered to electrical engineers in their final year. Topics included the determination of electric fields, nature of the charging process, static electricity in liquids, solid state processes, charged particle applications, and electrostatic ignition. (GS)

  19. Precipitation Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDuffie, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Although weather, including its role in the water cycle, is included in most elementary science programs, any further examination of raindrops and snowflakes is rare. Together rain and snow make up most of the precipitation that replenishes Earth's life-sustaining fresh water supply. When viewed individually, raindrops and snowflakes are quite…

  20. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.A.; Seager, C.H.

    1996-12-10

    An electrostatic chuck is faced with a patterned silicon plate, created by micromachining a silicon wafer, which is attached to a metallic base plate. Direct electrical contact between the chuck face (patterned silicon plate`s surface) and the silicon wafer it is intended to hold is prevented by a pattern of flat-topped silicon dioxide islands that protrude less than 5 micrometers from the otherwise flat surface of the chuck face. The islands may be formed in any shape. Islands may be about 10 micrometers in diameter or width and spaced about 100 micrometers apart. One or more concentric rings formed around the periphery of the area between the chuck face and wafer contain a low-pressure helium thermal-contact gas used to assist heat removal during plasma etching of a silicon wafer held by the chuck. The islands are tall enough and close enough together to prevent silicon-to-silicon electrical contact in the space between the islands, and the islands occupy only a small fraction of the total area of the chuck face, typically 0.5 to 5 percent. The pattern of the islands, together with at least one hole bored through the silicon veneer into the base plate, will provide sufficient gas-flow space to allow the distribution of the helium thermal-contact gas. 6 figs.

  1. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert A.; Seager, Carleton H.

    1996-01-01

    An electrostatic chuck is faced with a patterned silicon plate 11, created y micromachining a silicon wafer, which is attached to a metallic base plate 13. Direct electrical contact between the chuck face 15 (patterned silicon plate's surface) and the silicon wafer 17 it is intended to hold is prevented by a pattern of flat-topped silicon dioxide islands 19 that protrude less than 5 micrometers from the otherwise flat surface of the chuck face 15. The islands 19 may be formed in any shape. Islands may be about 10 micrometers in diameter or width and spaced about 100 micrometers apart. One or more concentric rings formed around the periphery of the area between the chuck face 15 and wafer 17 contain a low-pressure helium thermal-contact gas used to assist heat removal during plasma etching of a silicon wafer held by the chuck. The islands 19 are tall enough and close enough together to prevent silicon-to-silicon electrical contact in the space between the islands, and the islands occupy only a small fraction of the total area of the chuck face 15, typically 0.5 to 5 percent. The pattern of the islands 19, together with at least one hole 12 bored through the silicon veneer into the base plate, will provide sufficient gas-flow space to allow the distribution of the helium thermal-contact gas.

  2. Electrostatic Focusing Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Eric; Hopkins, Demitri

    2011-10-01

    We developed an electrostatic focusing lens capable of generating DD reactions, by focusing deuterium ions generated from a pointed emitter at a frozen heavy water target. Due to difficulty with the pointed emitter, we later switched to a hollow cathode design. To model the lenses, chamber, and calculate the dimensions for the design that would maximize ion energy and density, the program SIMION was used. During stable operation, vacuum was hand adjusted around 10-13 mTorr. To keep stable beam, DC voltage generator was varied between 15-25 kV. Hand adjusting was necessary, because at points in the operation the frozen heavy water would release vapor at an increased rate. This caused the pressure to rise and the beam current to spike, creating instabilities and an arc to the lens. Three methods were used to determine successful DD production. (1) Two differently shielded Geiger counters (unshielded and UHMW-PE insulated tube), (2) Spectrophotometer comparing control peaks with heavy water tests, and (3) a calibrated bubble dosimeter specific to neutrons. Analysis of the results suggest the neutrons flux varied from 532 to 1.4 × 106 neutrons/sec, and require further tests to plot and narrow results.

  3. Using visualizations to teach electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casperson, Janet M.; Linn, Marcia C.

    2006-04-01

    We investigate the effect of visualizations of electrostatics phenomena on students' ability to integrate microscopic and macroscopic views of electrostatics in the context of a technology-enhanced inquiry project that features particle interactions. We used knowledge integration instructional design patterns to determine activity sequences. A pretest/post-test design was used to assess the students' overall gains. The results from the implementation of the project in two classes demonstrate that it helped students form a more integrated understanding of electrostatics. An analysis of student responses to prompts embedded with the visualizations reveals that interactions with the visualizations played a significant role in increasing understanding.

  4. Electrostatic control of acid mist emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlin, R S; Brown, T D

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a two-phased study of the control of acid mist emissions using a compact, wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP). The goal of the study was to determine the degree of acid mist control that could be achieved when a compact WESP is used to replace or augment the mist eliminators in a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. Phase I of the study examined the electrical operation of a lab-scale WESP collecting an acid mist from a coal combustion pilot plant equipped with a spray chamber. The results of this study were used to develop and validate a computer model of the WESP. In Phase II, measurements were made at two utility scrubber installations to determine the loadings of acid mist, fly ash, and scrubber carryover. These measurements were used as input to the model to project the performance of a retrofitted WESP.

  5. Acidic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    At the International Symposium on Acidic Precipitation, over 400 papers were presented, and nearly 200 of them are included here. They provide an overview of the present state of the art of acid rain research. The Conference focused on atmospheric science (monitoring, source-receptor relationships), aquatic effects (marine eutrophication, lake acidification, impacts on plant and fish populations), and terrestrial effects (forest decline, soil acidification, etc.).

  6. PREFACE: 7th International Conference on Applied Electrostatics (ICAES-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie

    2013-03-01

    ICAES is an important conference organized every four years by the Committee on Electrostatics of the Chinese Physical Society, which serves as a forum for scientists, educators and engineers interested in the fundamentals, applications, disasters and safety of electrostatics, etc. In recent years, new techniques, applications and fundamental theories on electrostatics have developed considerably. ICAES-7, held in Dalian, China, from 17-19 September 2012, aimed to provide a forum for all scholars to report the newest developments in electrostatics, to probe the questions that scholars faced and to discuss fresh ideas related to electrostatics. ICAES-7 was co-organized and hosted by Dalian University of Technology, and was sponsored by the Ministry of Education of China, the National Natural Science Foundation of China, Dalian University of Technology, Nanjing Suman Electronics Co. Ltd (Suman, China), Shekonic (Yangzhou Shuanghong, China) Electric/Mechanical Co. Ltd, and Suzhou TA&A Ultra Clean Technology Co. Ltd. (China). On behalf of the organizing committee of ICAES-7, I express my great appreciation for their support of the conference. Over 160 scholars and engineers from many countries including Croatia, The Czech Republic, D.P.R. Korea, Germany, Japan, Malaysia, Poland, Russia, the United States of America, China attended ICAES-7, and the conference collected and selected 149 papers for publication. The subjects of those papers cover the fundamentals of electrostatics, electrostatic disaster and safety, and electrostatic application (e.g. precipitation, pollutant control, biological treatment, mixture separation and food processing, etc). I cordially thank all authors and attendees for their support, and my appreciation is also given to the conference honorary chair, the organizing committee and advisory committee, and the conference secretaries for their hard work. ICAES-7 is dedicated to the memory of Professor Jen-Shih Chang (professor emeritus in the

  7. Characterization of electrostatic glass actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, R.; Wüthrich, R.; Sache, L.; Higuchi, T.; Bleuler, H.

    2003-06-01

    Electrostatic glass actuators are a promising concept for various applications. The use of the interaction between glassy substances and electrostatic fields allows synchronous propulsion akin to the electret actuator. Even though some properties of electrostatic glass motors have been observed and described, a characterization is still missing. The authors would like to present the experimental work leading to the determination of the optimal glass blend and to the optimal electrode pattern in order to maximize the exploitable forces. An analytical model is also presented, satisfactorily close to the measured data. These measurements and models constitute a tool to design electrostatic glass actuators such as, for example, a miniature disk drive, which is presented as one of several promising applications.

  8. Computational Methods for Biomolecular Electrostatics

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Feng; Olsen, Brett; Baker, Nathan A.

    2008-01-01

    An understanding of intermolecular interactions is essential for insight into how cells develop, operate, communicate and control their activities. Such interactions include several components: contributions from linear, angular, and torsional forces in covalent bonds, van der Waals forces, as well as electrostatics. Among the various components of molecular interactions, electrostatics are of special importance because of their long range and their influence on polar or charged molecules, including water, aqueous ions, and amino or nucleic acids, which are some of the primary components of living systems. Electrostatics, therefore, play important roles in determining the structure, motion and function of a wide range of biological molecules. This chapter presents a brief overview of electrostatic interactions in cellular systems with a particular focus on how computational tools can be used to investigate these types of interactions. PMID:17964951

  9. Electrostatic prepregging of thermoplastic matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muzzy, John D.; Varughese, Babu; Thammongkol, Vivan; Tincher, Wayne

    1989-01-01

    Thermoplastic towpregs of PEEK/AS-4, PEEK/S-2 glass and LaRC-TPI/AS-4, produced by electrostatic deposition of charged and fluidized polymer powders on spread continuous fiber tows, are described. Processing parameters for combining PEEK 150 powder with unsized 3k AS-4 carbon fiber are presented. The experimental results for PEEK 150/AS-4 reveal that electrostatic fluidized bed coating may be an economically attractive process for producing towpreg.

  10. Electrostatic testing of thin plastic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, S. Ballou

    1988-01-01

    Ten thin plastic materials (Velostat, RCAS 1200, Llumalloy, Herculite 80, RCAS 2400, Wrightlon 7000, PVC, Aclar 22A, Mylar, and Polyethylene) were tested for electrostatic properties by four different devices: (1) The static decay meter, (2) the manual triboelectric testing device, (3) the robotic triboelectric testing device, and (4) the resistivity measurement adapter device. The static decay meter measured the electrostatic decay rates in accordance with the Federal Test Method Standard 101B, Method 4046. The manual and the robotic triboelectric devices measured the triboelectric generated peak voltages and the five-second decay voltages in accordance with the criteria for acceptance standards at Kennedy Space Center. The resistivity measurement adapter measured the surface resistivity of each material. An analysis was made to correlate the data among the four testing devices. For the material tested the pass/fail results were compared for the 4046 method and the triboelectric testing devices. For the limited number of materials tested, the relationship between decay rate and surface resistivity was investigated as well as the relationship between triboelectric peak voltage and surface resistivity.

  11. Engineering scale electrostatic enclosure demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, L.C.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents results from an engineering scale electrostatic enclosure demonstration test. The electrostatic enclosure is part of an overall in-depth contamination control strategy for transuranic (TRU) waste recovery operations. TRU contaminants include small particles of plutonium compounds associated with defense-related waste recovery operations. Demonstration test items consisted of an outer Perma-con enclosure, an inner tent enclosure, and a ventilation system test section for testing electrostatic curtain devices. Three interchangeable test fixtures that could remove plutonium from the contaminated dust were tested in the test section. These were an electret filter, a CRT as an electrostatic field source, and an electrically charged parallel plate separator. Enclosure materials tested included polyethylene, anti-static construction fabric, and stainless steel. The soil size distribution was determined using an eight stage cascade impactor. Photographs of particles containing plutonium were obtained with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The SEM also provided a second method of getting the size distribution. The amount of plutonium removed from the aerosol by the electrostatic devices was determined by radiochemistry from input and output aerosol samplers. The inner and outer enclosures performed adequately for plutonium handling operations and could be used for full scale operations.

  12. High volume, multiple use, portable precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Duane C.

    2011-10-25

    A portable high air volume electrostatic collection precipitator for analyzing air is provided which is a relatively small, self-contained device. The device has a collection electrode adapted to carry a variety of collecting media. An air intake is provided such that air to be analyzed flows through an ionization section with a transversely positioned ionization wire to ionize analytes in the air, and then flows over the collection electrode where ionized analytes are collected. Air flow is maintained at but below turbulent flow, Ionizable constituents in the air are ionized, attracted to the collection electrode, and precipitated in the selected medium which can be removed for analysis.

  13. Surface electrostatics: theory and computations

    PubMed Central

    Chatzigeorgiou, G.; Javili, A.; Steinmann, P.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work is to study the electrostatic response of materials accounting for boundary surfaces with their own (electrostatic) constitutive behaviour. The electric response of materials with (electrostatic) energetic boundary surfaces (surfaces that possess material properties and constitutive structures different from those of the bulk) is formulated in a consistent manner using a variational framework. The forces and moments that appear due to bulk and surface electric fields are also expressed in a consistent manner. The theory is accompanied by numerical examples on porous materials using the finite-element method, where the influence of the surface electric permittivity on the electric displacement, the polarization stress and the Maxwell stress is examined. PMID:24711720

  14. Electrostatic disturbances aboard LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferroni, Valerio

    Test mass charging and stray electrostatic fields are a potentially important source of force noise for the LISA Pathfinder mission. During the flight we plan to measure the relevant stray electrostatic fields on the surfaces of both the test mass and the electrode housing and compensate them with DC electrode bias voltages. In addition we monitor the charge and reduce it to near zero by UV illumination. We describe the analysis techniques used during the mission and explain the importance of periodic charging/discharging and of long-term charge measurements to limit the force noise at low frequency, which is particularly relevant for the eLISA mission.

  15. Electrostatically actuatable light modulating device

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, Dale R.

    1991-01-01

    The electrostatically actuatable light modulator utilizes an opaque substrate plate patterned with an array of aperture cells, the cells comprised of physically positionable dielectric shutters and electrostatic actuators. With incorporation of a light source and a viewing screen, a projection display system is effected. Inclusion of a color filter array aligned with the aperture cells accomplishes a color display. The system is realized in terms of a silicon based manufacturing technology allowing fabrication of a high resolution capability in a physically small device which with the utilization of included magnification optics allows both large and small projection displays.

  16. Polarizable multipolar electrostatics for cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Timothy L.; Popelier, Paul L. A.

    2016-08-01

    FFLUX is a novel force field under development for biomolecular modelling, and is based on topological atoms and the machine learning method kriging. Successful kriging models have been obtained for realistic electrostatics of amino acids, small peptides, and some carbohydrates but here, for the first time, we construct kriging models for a sizeable ligand of great importance, which is cholesterol. Cholesterol's mean total (internal) electrostatic energy prediction error amounts to 3.9 kJ mol-1, which pleasingly falls below the threshold of 1 kcal mol-1 often cited for accurate biomolecular modelling. We present a detailed analysis of the error distributions.

  17. Charge sniffer for electrostatics demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinca, Mihai P.

    2011-02-01

    An electronic electroscope with a special design for demonstrations and experiments on static electricity is described. It operates as an electric charge sniffer by detecting slightly charged objects when they are brought to the front of its sensing electrode. The sniffer has the advantage of combining high directional sensitivity with a logarithmic bar display. It allows for the identification of electric charge polarity during charge separation by friction, peeling, electrostatic induction, batteries, or secondary coils of power transformers. Other experiments in electrostatics, such as observing the electric field of an oscillating dipole and the distance dependence of the electric field generated by simple charge configurations, are also described.

  18. Observation of weak HF electrostatic turbulence in the auroral ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottelette, R.; Illiano, J. M.

    1982-07-01

    A numerical calculation of the cross spectrum of random signals received by two small antennas that were immersed in a two-component magnetoplasma has been conducted, for the case of a plasma model consisting of a cool and a warm component. The data were compiled by the HF electrostatic wave detection experiment of the Porcupine F3 rocket. A linear calculation of the natural electrostatic emissions detected around the electron gyrofrequency three-halves harmonic and around the upper hybrid frequency shows that their amplitudes are above the plasma thermal noise level. It is noted that the low energy precipitating suprathermal electrons present are highly anisotropic and enhance the three-halves electron gyrofrequency noise, although the electron distribution function remains stable and the most intense emissions are observed around the upper hybrid frequency.

  19. Defining protein electrostatic recognition processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getzoff, Elizabeth D.; Roberts, Victoria A.

    The objective is to elucidate the nature of electrostatic forces controlling protein recognition processes by using a tightly coupled computational and interactive computer graphics approach. The TURNIP program was developed to determine the most favorable precollision orientations for two molecules by systematic search of all orientations and evaluation of the resulting electrostatic interactions. TURNIP was applied to the transient interaction between two electron transfer metalloproteins, plastocyanin and cytochrome c. The results suggest that the productive electron-transfer complex involves interaction of the positive region of cytochrome c with the negative patch of plastocyanin, consistent with experimental data. Application of TURNIP to the formation of the stable complex between the HyHEL-5 antibody and its protein antigen lysozyme showed that long-distance electrostatic forces guide lysozyme toward the HyHEL-5 binding site, but do not fine tune its orientation. Determination of docked antigen/antibody complexes requires including steric as well as electrostatic interactions, as was done for the U10 mutant of the anti-phosphorylcholine antibody S107. The graphics program Flex, a convenient desktop workstation program for visualizing molecular dynamics and normal mode motions, was enhanced. Flex now has a user interface and was rewritten to use standard graphics libraries, so as to run on most desktop workstations.

  20. Vibrating diaphragm measures high electrostatic field strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Meter with flexible conductive diaphragm measures electrostatic charge density on a conducting surface in a vacuum. The diaphragm is supported from an insulated conductive support ring rigidly attached to the conductive surface whose electrostatic charge density is to be measured.

  1. A Simple Apparatus for Electrostatic Force Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the construction of an apparatus that demonstrates that electrostatic forces can be large and also gives some idea of dependence of electrostatic forces between charged parallel discs on potential differences and separation. (CS)

  2. Quantitative nanoscale electrostatics of viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernando-Pérez, M.; Cartagena-Rivera, A. X.; Lošdorfer Božič, A.; Carrillo, P. J. P.; San Martín, C.; Mateu, M. G.; Raman, A.; Podgornik, R.; de Pablo, P. J.

    2015-10-01

    Electrostatics is one of the fundamental driving forces of the interaction between biomolecules in solution. In particular, the recognition events between viruses and host cells are dominated by both specific and non-specific interactions and the electric charge of viral particles determines the electrostatic force component of the latter. Here we probe the charge of individual viruses in liquid milieu by measuring the electrostatic force between a viral particle and the Atomic Force Microscope tip. The force spectroscopy data of co-adsorbed φ29 bacteriophage proheads and mature virions, adenovirus and minute virus of mice capsids is utilized for obtaining the corresponding density of charge for each virus. The systematic differences of the density of charge between the viral particles are consistent with the theoretical predictions obtained from X-ray structural data. Our results show that the density of charge is a distinguishing characteristic of each virus, depending crucially on the nature of the viral capsid and the presence/absence of the genetic material.Electrostatics is one of the fundamental driving forces of the interaction between biomolecules in solution. In particular, the recognition events between viruses and host cells are dominated by both specific and non-specific interactions and the electric charge of viral particles determines the electrostatic force component of the latter. Here we probe the charge of individual viruses in liquid milieu by measuring the electrostatic force between a viral particle and the Atomic Force Microscope tip. The force spectroscopy data of co-adsorbed φ29 bacteriophage proheads and mature virions, adenovirus and minute virus of mice capsids is utilized for obtaining the corresponding density of charge for each virus. The systematic differences of the density of charge between the viral particles are consistent with the theoretical predictions obtained from X-ray structural data. Our results show that the density of

  3. Electrostatic Spraying With Conductive Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, Joseph J.; Dawn, Frederic S.; Erlandson, Robert E.; Atkins, Loren E.

    1989-01-01

    Thin, uniform polymer coatings applied in water base normally impossible to charge. Electrostatic sprayer modified so applies coatings suspended or dissolved in electrically conductive liquids. Nozzle and gun constructed of nonconductive molded plastic. Liquid passageway made long enough electrical leakage through it low. Coaxial hose for liquid built of polytetrafluoroethylene tube, insulating sleeve, and polyurethane jacket. Sprayer provided with insulated seal at gun-to-hose connection, nonconductive airhose, pressure tank electrically isolated from ground, and special nozzle electrode. Supply of atomizing air reduced so particle momentum controlled by electrostatic field more effectively. Developed to apply water-base polyurethane coating to woven, shaped polyester fabric. Coating provides pressure seal for fabric, which is part of spacesuit. Also useful for applying waterproof, decorative, or protective coatings to fabrics for use on Earth.

  4. Electrostatic Interactions Between Glycosaminoglycan Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Fan; Moyne, Christian; Bai, Yi-Long

    2005-02-01

    The electrostatic interactions between nearest-neighbouring chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan (CS-GAG) molecular chains are obtained on the bottle brush conformation of proteoglycan aggrecan based on an asymptotic solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation the CS-GAGs satisfy under the physiological conditions of articular cartilage. The present results show that the interactions are associated intimately with the minimum separation distance and mutual angle between the molecular chains themselves. Further analysis indicates that the electrostatic interactions are not only expressed to be purely exponential in separation distance and decrease with the increasing mutual angle but also dependent sensitively on the saline concentration in the electrolyte solution within the tissue, which is in agreement with the existed relevant conclusions.

  5. Electrostatic waves in the magnetosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarf, F. L.; Fredricks, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Electric dipole antennas on magnetospheric spacecraft measure E field components of many kinds of electromagnetic waves. In addition, lower hybrid resonance emissions are frequently observed well above the ionosphere. The Ogo 5 plasma wave experiment has also detected new forms of electrostatic emissions that appear to interact very strongly with the local plasma particles. Greatly enhanced wave amplitudes have been found during the expansion phases of substorms, and analysis indicates that these emissions produce strong pitch angle diffusion. Intense broadband electrostatic turbulence is also detected at current layers containing steep magnetic field gradients. This current-driven instability is operative at the bow shock and also at field null regions just within the magnetosheath, and at the magnetopause near the dayside polar cusp. The plasma turbulence appears to involve ion acoustic waves, and the wave particle scattering provides an important collisionless dissipation mechanism for field merging.

  6. Closed loop electrostatic levitation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W. K.; Saffren, M. M.; Elleman, D. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An electrostatic levitation system is described, which can closely control the position of objects of appreciable size. A plurality of electrodes surround the desired position of an electrostatically charged object, the position of the objects is monitored, and the voltages applied to the electrodes are varied to hold the object at a desired position. In one system, the object is suspended above a plate-like electrode which has a concave upper face to urge the object toward the vertical axis of the curved plate. An upper electrode that is also curved can be positioned above the object, to assure curvature of the field at any height above the lower plate. In another system, four spherical electrodes are positioned at the points of a tetrahedron, and the voltages applied to the electrodes are varied in accordance with the object position as detected by two sensors.

  7. Electrostatic interactions in molecular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painelli, Anna; Terenziani, Francesca

    2004-03-01

    Non-additive collective behavior appears in molecular materials as a result of intermolecular interactions. We present a model for interacting polar and polarizable molecules that applies to different supramolecular architectures of donor-π-acceptor molecules. We follow a bottom-up modeling strategy: the detailed analysis of spectroscopic data of solvated molecules leads to the definition of a simple two-state model for the molecular units. Classical electrostatic interactions are then introduced to model molecular clusters. The molecular properties are strickingly affected by supramolecular interactions, as demonstrated by spectroscopic studies. Brand new phenomena, like phase transitions and multielectron transfer, with no counterpart at the molecular level are observed as direct consequences of electrostatic intermolecular interactions.

  8. Sulfate removal from waste chemicals by precipitation.

    PubMed

    Benatti, Cláudia Telles; Tavares, Célia Regina Granhen; Lenzi, Ervim

    2009-01-01

    Chemical oxidation using Fenton's reagent has proven to be a viable alternative to the oxidative destruction of organic pollutants in mixed waste chemicals, but the sulfate concentration in the treated liquor was still above the acceptable limits for effluent discharge. In this paper, the feasibility of sulfate removal from complex laboratory wastewaters using barium and calcium precipitation was investigated. The process was applied to different wastewater cases (two composite samples generated in different periods) in order to study the effect of the wastewater composition on the sulfate precipitation. The experiments were performed with raw and oxidized wastewater samples, and carried out according to the following steps: (1) evaluate the pH effect upon sulfate precipitation on raw wastewaters at pH range of 2-8; (2) conduct sulfate precipitation experiments on raw and oxidized wastewaters; and (3) characterize the precipitate yielded. At a concentration of 80 g L(-1), barium precipitation achieved a sulfate removal up to 61.4% while calcium precipitation provided over 99% sulfate removal in raw and oxidized wastewaters and for both samples. Calcium precipitation was chosen to be performed after Fenton's oxidation; hence this process configuration favors the production of higher quality precipitates. The results showed that, when dried at 105 degrees C, the precipitate is composed of hemidrate and anhydrous calcium sulfate ( approximately 99.8%) and trace metals ( approximately 0.2%: Fe, Cr, Mn, Co, Ag, Mg, K, Na), what makes it suitable for reuse in innumerous processes.

  9. Electrostatic forces for personnel restraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, N.; Ciciora, J.; Gardner, R.; Porter, K.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing electrostatic forces for personnel retention devices on exterior spacecraft surfaces was analyzed. The investigation covered: (1) determination of the state of the art; (2) analysis of potential adhesion surfaces; (3) safety considerations for personnel; (4) electromagnetic force field determination and its effect on spacecraft instrumentation; and (5) proposed advances to current technology based on documentation review, analyses, and experimental test data.

  10. Electrostatic ion thruster optics calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whealton, John H.; Kirkman, David A.; Raridon, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations have been performed which encompass both a self-consistent ion source extraction plasma sheath and the primary ion optics including sheath and electrode-induced aberrations. Particular attention is given to the effects of beam space charge, accelerator geometry, and properties of the downstream plasma sheath on the position of the electrostatic potential saddle point near the extractor electrode. The electron blocking potential blocking is described as a function of electrode thickness and secondary plasma processes.

  11. Electrostatic generator/motor configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Richard F

    2014-02-04

    Electrostatic generators/motors designs are provided that generally may include a first cylindrical stator centered about a longitudinal axis; a second cylindrical stator centered about the axis, a first cylindrical rotor centered about the axis and located between the first cylindrical stator and the second cylindrical stator. The first cylindrical stator, the second cylindrical stator and the first cylindrical rotor may be concentrically aligned. A magnetic field having field lines about parallel with the longitudinal axis is provided.

  12. KSC Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhler, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Discussion of key electrostatic issues that have arisen during the past few years at KSC that the Electrostatics Laboratory has studied. The lab has studied in depth the Space Shuttle's Thermal Control System Blankets, the International Space Station Thermal Blanket, the Pan/Tilt Camera Blankets, the Kapton Purge Barrier Curtain, the Aclar Purge Barrier Curtain, the Thrust Vector Controller Blankets, the Tyvek Reaction Control System covers, the AID-PAK and FLU-9 pyro inflatable devices, the Velostat Solid Rocket Booster mats, and the SCAPE suits. In many cases these materials are insulating meaning that they might be a source of unsafe levels of electrostatic discharge (ESD). For each, the lab provided in-depth testing of each material within its current configuration to ensure that it does not cause an ESD concern that may violate the safety of the astronauts, the workers and equipment for NASA. For example the lab provides unique solutions and testing such as Spark Incendivity Testing that checks whether a material is capable of generating a spark strong enough to ignite a flammable gas. The lab makes recommendations to changes in specifications, procedures, and material if necessary. The lab also consults with a variety of non-safety related ESD issues for the agency.

  13. Quantitative nanoscale electrostatics of viruses.

    PubMed

    Hernando-Pérez, M; Cartagena-Rivera, A X; Lošdorfer Božič, A; Carrillo, P J P; San Martín, C; Mateu, M G; Raman, A; Podgornik, R; de Pablo, P J

    2015-11-01

    Electrostatics is one of the fundamental driving forces of the interaction between biomolecules in solution. In particular, the recognition events between viruses and host cells are dominated by both specific and non-specific interactions and the electric charge of viral particles determines the electrostatic force component of the latter. Here we probe the charge of individual viruses in liquid milieu by measuring the electrostatic force between a viral particle and the Atomic Force Microscope tip. The force spectroscopy data of co-adsorbed ϕ29 bacteriophage proheads and mature virions, adenovirus and minute virus of mice capsids is utilized for obtaining the corresponding density of charge for each virus. The systematic differences of the density of charge between the viral particles are consistent with the theoretical predictions obtained from X-ray structural data. Our results show that the density of charge is a distinguishing characteristic of each virus, depending crucially on the nature of the viral capsid and the presence/absence of the genetic material. PMID:26228582

  14. PRECIPITATION OF PLUTONOUS PEROXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Barrick, J.G.; Manion, J.P.

    1961-08-15

    A precipitation process for recovering plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution is described. In the process for precipitating plutonium as plutonous peroxide, hydroxylamine or hydrazine is added to the plutoniumcontaining solution prior to the addition of peroxide to precipitate plutonium. The addition of hydroxylamine or hydrazine increases the amount of plutonium precipitated as plutonous peroxide. (AEC)

  15. Electrostatic potential map modelling with COSY Infinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, J. A.; Baartman, R.; Planche, T.; Saminathan, S.

    2016-06-01

    COSY Infinity (Makino and Berz, 2005) is a differential-algebra based simulation code which allows accurate calculation of transfer maps to arbitrary order. COSY's existing internal procedures were modified to allow electrostatic elements to be specified using an array of field potential data from the midplane. Additionally, a new procedure was created allowing electrostatic elements and their fringe fields to be specified by an analytic function. This allows greater flexibility in accurately modelling electrostatic elements and their fringe fields. Applied examples of these new procedures are presented including the modelling of a shunted electrostatic multipole designed with OPERA, a spherical electrostatic bender, and the effects of different shaped apertures in an electrostatic beam line.

  16. Offer/Acceptance Ratio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Mimi

    1997-01-01

    Explores how human resource professionals, with above average offer/acceptance ratios, streamline their recruitment efforts. Profiles company strategies with internships, internal promotion, cooperative education programs, and how to get candidates to accept offers. Also discusses how to use the offer/acceptance ratio as a measure of program…

  17. Dual excitation multiphase electrostatic drive

    SciTech Connect

    Niino, Toshiki; Higuchi, Toshiro |; Egawa, Saku

    1995-12-31

    A novel electrostatic drive technology named Dual Excitation Multiphase Electrostatic Drive (DEMED) was presented. A basic DEMED consisted of two plastic films in which 3-phase parallel electrodes were embedded and was driven by a 3-phase ac excitation to the electrodes. Static characteristics of DEMED were calculated and tested and the results agreed very well. Three prototype motors of DEMED were fabricated using commercially available technique. The first prototype consisted of a single slider and stator and generated a linear motion with a slider`s motion range of about 5mm. It weighed 7g and generated a power of 1.6W and a thrust force of 4.4N. The second prototype consisted of 50 layer stack of linear motors, summing their outputs. It weighed 3.6kg and generated a propulsive force of 310N being powered with boosted commercial 3-phase electricity. The third prototype consisted of a rotor and a stator in which electrodes were arranged radially and generated rotational motion. The maximum power of 36mW was generated by the prototype weighing only 260mg for its rotor and stator. From the results of the numerical calculation, a practical design methodology for the motor was determined. An optimal design for a motor employing currently available material and fabrication techniques is provided as an example. Analyses predict that force generation over the interfacial area between the slider and stator of this motor would be 3,900N/m{sup 2}.

  18. Microencapsulation and Electrostatic Processing Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor); Cassanto, John M. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A microencapsulation and electrostatic processing (MEP) device is provided for forming microcapsules. In one embodiment, the device comprises a chamber having a filter which separates a first region in the chamber from a second region in the chamber. An aqueous solution is introduced into the first region through an inlet port, and a hydrocarbon/ polymer solution is introduced into the second region through another inlet port. The filter acts to stabilize the interface and suppress mixing between the two immiscible solutions as they are being introduced into their respective regions. After the solutions have been introduced and have become quiescent, the interface is gently separated from the filter. At this point, spontaneous formation of microcapsules at the interface may begin to occur, or some fluid motion may be provided to induce microcapsule formation. In any case, the fluid shear force at the interface is limited to less than 100 dynes/sq cm. This low-shear approach to microcapsule formation yields microcapsules with good sphericity and desirable size distribution. The MEP device is also capable of downstream processing of microcapsules, including rinsing, re-suspension in tertiary fluids, electrostatic deposition of ancillary coatings, and free-fluid electrophoretic separation of charged microcapsules.

  19. Electrostatic charging of lunar dust

    SciTech Connect

    Walch, Bob; Horanyi, Mihaly; Robertson, Scott

    1998-10-21

    Transient dust clouds suspended above the lunar surface were indicated by the horizon glow observed by the Surveyor spacecrafts and the Lunar Ejecta and Meteorite Experiment (Apollo 17), for example. The theoretical models cannot fully explain these observations, but they all suggest that electrostatic charging of the lunar surface due to exposure to the solar wind plasma and UV radiation could result in levitation, transport and ejection of small grains. We report on our experimental studies of the electrostatic charging properties of an Apollo-17 soil sample and two lunar simulants MLS-1 and JSC-1. We have measured their charge after exposing individual grains to a beam of fast electrons with energies in the range of 20{<=}E{<=}90 eV. Our measurements indicate that the secondary electron emission yield of the Apollo-17 sample is intermediate between MLS-1 and JSC-1, closer to that of MLS-1. We will also discuss our plans to develop a laboratory lunar surface model, where time dependent illumination and plasma bombardment will closely emulate the conditions on the surface of the Moon.

  20. Electrostatic doping in oxide heterostructures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demkov, Alexander A.; Lee, Jaekwang; Sai, Na

    2009-03-01

    Recent experiments on perovskite heterostructures grown by methods ranging from molecular beam epitaxy to pulsed laser deposition suggest the existence of two dimensional electron gas of high mobility at the oxide/oxide interface, and even a possibility of a superconducting state. Both p-type and n-type interfaces have been reported. However, the origin of charge in these insulating materials is still under debate. We report a first-principles study of several heterostructures where we employ the internal filed in a polar oxide LaAlO3 to demonstrate the possibility of the electrostatic doping, an effect similar to a well known polar catastrophe in e.g., III-V semiconductors. We use density functional theory at the LDA+U level. We mainly focus on the electronic structure of the oxide/oxide junctions. The results of our calculations suggest that once the critical thickness of the aluminate layer is reached the internal electric field is sufficient to produce the electrostatic doping. We will discuss simple estimates for the temperature of the superconducting transition and the role of oxygen-related defects such as vacancies in the electronic structure and thermodynamic stability of these fascinating oxide structures.

  1. Electrostatic discharge concepts and definitions

    SciTech Connect

    Borovina, Dan L

    2008-01-01

    Many objects -like a human body, plastic wrap, or a rolling cart -that are electrically neutral, overall, can gain a net electrostatic charge by means of one of three methods: induction, physical transfer, or triboelectric charging (separation of conductive surfaces). The result is a voltage difference between the charged object and other objects, creating a situation where current flow is likely if two objects come into contact or close proximity. This current flow is known as electrostatic discharge, or ESD. The energy and voltage of the discharge can be influenced by factors such as the temperature and humidity in the room, the types of materials or flooring involved, or the clothing and footwear a person uses. Given the possible ranges of the current and voltage characteristic of an ESD pulse, it is important to consider the safety risks associated with detonator handling, assembly and disassembly, transportation and maintenance. For main charge detonators, these safety risks include high explosive violent reactions (HEVR) as well as inadvertent nuclear detonations (lND).

  2. Electrostatics of deformable lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Vorobyov, Igor; Bekker, Borislava; Allen, Toby W

    2010-06-16

    It was recently demonstrated that significant local deformations of biological membranes take place due to the fields of charged peptides and ions, challenging the standard model of membrane electrostatics. The ability of ions to retain their immediate hydration environment, combined with the lack of sensitivity of permeability to ion type or even ion pairs, led us to question the extent to which hydration energetics and electrostatics control membrane ion permeation. Using the arginine analog methyl-guanidinium as a test case, we find that although hydrocarbon electronic polarizability causes dramatic changes in ion solvation free energy, as well as a significant change (approximately 0.4 V) in the membrane dipole potential, little change in membrane permeation energetics occurs. We attribute this to compensation of solvation terms from polar and polarizable nonpolar components within the membrane, and explain why the dipole potential is not fully sensed in terms of the locally deformed bilayer interface. Our descriptions provide a deeper understanding of the translocation process and allow predictions for poly-ions, ion pairs, charged lipids, and lipid flip-flop. We also report simulations of large hydrophobic-ion-like membrane defects and the ionophore valinomycin, which exhibit little membrane deformation, as well as hydrophilic defects and the ion channel gramicidin A, to provide parallels to membranes deformed by unassisted ion permeation.

  3. Preconceptual design for the electrostatic enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, L.C.

    1992-09-01

    This report presents a preconceptual design (design criteria and assumptions) for electrostatic enclosures to be used during buried transuranic waste recovery operations. These electrostatic enclosures (along with the application of dust control products) will provide an in-depth contamination control strategy. As part of this preconceptual design, options for electrostatic curtain design are given including both hardwall and fabric enclosures. Ventilation systems, doors, air locks, electrostatic curtains, and supporting systems also are discussed. In addition to the conceptual design, engineering scale tests are proposed to be run at the Test Reactor Area. The planned engineering scale tests will give final material specifications for full-scale retrieval demonstrations.

  4. Preventing Electrostatic-Discharge Damage to Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Read, W. S.; Dozois, P. C.; Lonborg, J. O.

    1986-01-01

    Booklet discusses damage to electronic components caused by electrostatic discharges during assembly. Describes procedure for setting up static-free workplace for handling and assembling electronic components.

  5. Electrostatic properties of cytochrome f: implications for docking with plastocyanin.

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, D C; Gross, E L; David, E S

    1996-01-01

    The electrostatic properties of cytochrome f (cyt f), a member of the cytochrome b6f complex and reaction partner with plastocyanin (PC) in photosynthetic electron transport, are qualitatively studied with the goal of determining the mechanism of electron transfer between cyt f and PC. A crystal structure for cyt f was analyzed with the software package GRASP, revealing a large region of positive potential generated by a patch of positively charged residues (including K58, K65, K66, K122, K185, K187, and R209) and reinforced by the iron center of the heme. This positive field attracts the negative charges of the two acidic patches on the mobile electron carrier PC. Three docked complexes are obtained for the two proteins, based on electrostatic or hydrophobic interactions or both and on steric fits by manual docking methods. The first of these three complexes shows strong electrostatic interactions between K187 on cyt f and D44 on PC and between E59 on PC and K58 on cyt f. Two other manually docked complexes are proposed, implicating H87 on PC as the electron-accepting site from the iron center of cyt f through Y1. The second complex maintains the D44/K187 cross-link (but not the E59/K58 link) while increasing hydrophobic interactions between PC and cyt f. Hydrophobic interactions are increased still further in the third complex, whereas the link between K187 on cyt f and D44 on PC is broken. The proposed reaction mechanism, therefore, involves an initial electrostatic docking complex that gives rise to a nonpolar attraction between the regions surrounding H87 on PC and Y1 on cyt f, providing for an electron-transfer active complex. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:8804589

  6. Electrostatic generator/motor configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Richard Freeman

    2012-09-11

    Electrostatic generators/motors designs are provided that include a stator fixedly connected to a first central support centered about a central axis. The stator elements are attached to the first central support. Similarly, a second stator is connected to a central support centered about the central axis, and the second stator has stator elements attached to the second central support. A rotor is located between the first stator and the second stator and includes an outer support, where the rotor is rotatably centered about the central axis, the rotor having elements in contact with the outer support, each rotor element having an extending rotor portion that extends radially from the outer support toward the axis of rotation.

  7. Galileo internal electrostatic discharge program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, P. L.; Plamp, G. H.; Robinson, P. A., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The Galileo spacecraft which will orbit Jupiter in 1988 will encounter a very harsh environment of energetic electrons. These electrons will have sufficient energy to penetrate the spacecraft shielding, consequently depositing charges in the dielectric insulating materials or ungrounded conductors. The resulting electric field could exceed the breakdown strength of the insulating materials, producing discharges. The transients produced from these Internal Electrostatic Discharges (IESD) could, depending on their relative location, be coupled to nearby cables and circuits. These transients could change the state of logic circuits or degrade or even damage spacecraft components, consequently disrupting the operation of subsystems and systems of the Galileo spacecraft during its expected mission life. An extensive testing program was initiated for the purpose of understanding the potential threats associated with these IESD events. Data obtained from these tests were used to define design guidelines.

  8. Microencapsulation and Electrostatic Processing Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Methods are provided for forming spherical multilamellar microcapsules having alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic liquid layers, surrounded by flexible, semi-permeable hydrophobic or hydrophilic outer membranes which can be tailored specifically to control the diffusion rate. The methods of the invention rely on low shear mixing and liquid-liquid diffusion process and are particularly well suited for forming microcapsules containing both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs. These methods can be carried out in the absence of gravity and do not rely on density-driven phase separation, mechanical mixing or solvent evaporation phases. The methods include the process of forming, washing and filtering microcapsules. In addition, the methods contemplate coating microcapsules with ancillary coatings using an electrostatic field and free fluid electrophoresis of the microcapsules. The microcapsules produced by such methods are particularly useful in the delivery of pharmaceutical compositions.

  9. An electrostatically rebalanced micromechanical accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxenhorn, Burton; Greiff, Paul

    The design and test performance of a low-cost micromechanical accelerometer (MA) with integral electrodes, developed for use with the vibratory micromechanical gyro described by Boxenhorn and Greiff (1988), are reported. The MA is a monolithic Si device of size 300 x 600 microns and comprises a torsional pendulum with capacitive readout and an electrostatic torquer. Data from 360-deg sweep tests performed in a g-field are presented in tables and graphs and discussed in detail. Results include bandwidth about 1 Hz, scale-factor error 480 ppm, stable bias of 260 microg over 203 min, and temperature effect 2100 microg/C on bias and -123 ppm/C on scale factor.

  10. Large Aperture Electrostatic Dust Detector

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner, R. Hensley, and A.L Roquemore

    2007-10-09

    Diagnosis and management of dust inventories generated in next-step magnetic fusion devices is necessary for their safe operation. A novel electrostatic dust detector, based on a fine grid of interlocking circuit traces biased to 30 or 50 ν has been developed for the detection of dust particles on remote surfaces in air and vacuum environments. Impinging dust particles create a temporary short circuit and the resulting current pulse is recorded by counting electronics. Up to 90% of the particles are ejected from the grid or vaporized suggesting the device may be useful for controlling dust inventories. We report measurements of the sensitivity of a large area (5x5 cm) detector to microgram quantities of dust particles and review its applications to contemporary tokamaks and ITER.

  11. Review on the modeling of electrostatic MEMS.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Wan-Chun; Lee, Hsin-Li; Chang, Pei-Zen; Hu, Yuh-Chung

    2010-01-01

    Electrostatic-driven microelectromechanical systems devices, in most cases, consist of couplings of such energy domains as electromechanics, optical electricity, thermoelectricity, and electromagnetism. Their nonlinear working state makes their analysis complex and complicated. This article introduces the physical model of pull-in voltage, dynamic characteristic analysis, air damping effect, reliability, numerical modeling method, and application of electrostatic-driven MEMS devices. PMID:22219707

  12. Review on the Modeling of Electrostatic MEMS

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Wan-Chun; Lee, Hsin-Li; Chang, Pei-Zen; Hu, Yuh-Chung

    2010-01-01

    Electrostatic-driven microelectromechanical systems devices, in most cases, consist of couplings of such energy domains as electromechanics, optical electricity, thermoelectricity, and electromagnetism. Their nonlinear working state makes their analysis complex and complicated. This article introduces the physical model of pull-in voltage, dynamic characteristic analysis, air damping effect, reliability, numerical modeling method, and application of electrostatic-driven MEMS devices. PMID:22219707

  13. Ionic electrostatic excitations along biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2011-02-01

    A theoretical analysis of ionic electrostatic excitations of a charged biological membrane is presented within the framework of the fluid theory for surface ions inside and outside the cell, in conjunction with the Poisson's equation. General expressions of dispersion relations are obtained for electrostatic oscillations of intrinsic cellular with different shapes and symmetries.

  14. Electrostatics experiments with sharp metal points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Dragia; Nikolov, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we examine the phenomena that arise around an electrically charged sharp metal spike and present numerous experiments that can be used in the teaching of electrostatics. The experiments are quite spectacular and attention-grabbing while being relatively simple and easy to perform in any decently supplied physics education laboratory that is equipped with an electrostatic machine (like a Wimshurst machine).

  15. Electrostatic Propulsion Using C60 Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leifer, Stephanie D.; Saunders, Winston A.

    1993-01-01

    Report proposes use of C60 as propellant material in electrostatic propulsion system of spacecraft. C60, C70, and similar molecules, have recently been found to have characteristics proving advantageous in electrostatic propulsion. Report discusses these characteristics and proposes experiments to determine feasibility of concept.

  16. Electrostatics with Computer-Interfaced Charge Sensors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    Computer interfaced electrostatic charge sensors allow both qualitative and quantitative measurements of electrostatic charge but are quite sensitive to charges accumulating on modern synthetic materials. They need to be used with care so that students can correctly interpret their measurements. This paper describes the operation of the sensors,…

  17. Preliminary tests of the electrostatic plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G.; Acker, T.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the results of a program to verify an electrostatic plasma acceleration concept and to identify those parameters most important in optimizing an Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA) thruster based upon this thrust mechanism. Preliminary performance measurements of thrust, specific impulse and efficiency were obtained using a unique plasma exhaust momentum probe. Reliable EPA thruster operation was achieved using one power supply.

  18. Origins of the Earth's Diffuse Auroral Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Binbin; Thorne, Richard M.; Zhang, Xiaojia; Bortnik, Jacob; Pu, Zuyin; Xie, Lun; Hu, Ze-jun; Han, Desheng; Shi, Run; Zhou, Chen; Gu, Xudong

    2016-04-01

    The Earth's diffuse auroral precipitation provides the major source of energy input into the nightside upper atmosphere and acts as an essential linkage of the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. Resonant wave-particle interactions play a dominant role in the scattering of injected plasma sheet electrons, leading to the diffuse auroral precipitation. We review the recent advances in understanding the origin of the diffuse aurora and in quantifying the exact roles of various magnetospheric waves in producing the global distribution of diffuse auroral precipitation and its variability with the geomagnetic activity. Combined scattering by upper-and lower-band chorus accounts for the most intense inner magnetospheric electron diffuse auroral precipitation on the nightside. Dayside chorus can be responsible for the weaker dayside electron diffuse auroral precipitation. Pulsating auroras, the dynamic auroral structures embedded in the diffuse aurora, can be mainly caused by modulation of the excitation of lower band chorus due to macroscopic density variations in the magnetosphere. Electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves are an important or even dominant cause for the nightside electron diffuse auroral precipitation beyond {˜}8Re and can also contribute to the occurrence of the pulsating aurora at high L-shells. Scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves could quite possibly be the leading candidate responsible for the ion precipitation (especially the reversed-type events of the energy-latitude dispersion) in the regions of the central plasma sheet and ring current. We conclude the review with a summary of current understanding, outstanding questions, and a number of suggestions for future research.

  19. Fine structures of organic photovoltaic thin films probed by frequency-shift electrostatic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Kento; Ie, Yutaka; Aso, Yoshio; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2016-07-01

    The localized charge and electrostatic properties of organic photovoltaic thin films are predominating factors for controlling energy conversion efficiency. The surface potential and electrostatic structures of organic photovoltaic thin films were investigated by frequency shift mode Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) and electrostatic force microscopy (EFM). The KFM images of a poly[2-methoxy-5-(3‧,7‧-dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene]/phenyl-C61-butyric-acid-methyl ester (PCBM) blend thin film reveals that the PCBM domains precipitate as the topmost layer on the thin films. We find fine structures that were not observed in the topography and KFM images. The bias dependence of the EFM images suggests that the EFM contrast reflects the field-induced polarization, indicating the presence of charge trapping sites.

  20. Measurement of the cross spectrum of HF electrostatic waves in an auroral plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottelette, R.; Illiano, J. M.

    1983-06-01

    A method for the metrology of space plasmas, based on the reception of electrostatic waves by a pair of small dipole antennas was tested in PORCUPINE project rocket experiments. Both dipoles received signals from the natural electrostatic microfield in the plasma; the cross spectrum of these random signals was measured. Data obtained during a weak auroral activity are presented. Natural electrostatic emissions were observed around the upper hybrid frequency and also around the three-halves harmonic of the electron gyrofrequency. A linear calculation shows that the amplitudes of these emissions are above the thermal noise level of the plasma. To explain the observations, it is necessary to take into account the presence of low-energy precipitating electrons (1 to 20 eV), which are highly anisotropic.

  1. Electrostatic thin film chemical and biological sensor

    DOEpatents

    Prelas, Mark A.; Ghosh, Tushar K.; Tompson, Jr., Robert V.; Viswanath, Dabir; Loyalka, Sudarshan K.

    2010-01-19

    A chemical and biological agent sensor includes an electrostatic thin film supported by a substrate. The film includes an electrostatic charged surface to attract predetermined biological and chemical agents of interest. A charge collector associated with said electrostatic thin film collects charge associated with surface defects in the electrostatic film induced by the predetermined biological and chemical agents of interest. A preferred sensing system includes a charge based deep level transient spectroscopy system to read out charges from the film and match responses to data sets regarding the agents of interest. A method for sensing biological and chemical agents includes providing a thin sensing film having a predetermined electrostatic charge. The film is exposed to an environment suspected of containing the biological and chemical agents. Quantum surface effects on the film are measured. Biological and/or chemical agents can be detected, identified and quantified based on the measured quantum surface effects.

  2. Conditional Generation of Monthly Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, U.; Kaluarachchi, J. J.

    2006-12-01

    Monthly precipitation models can be used in basin-wide modeling to develop long-term strategies for water resources planning and management and to estimate the change of water yield due to climate change. Such precipitation models are especially important for effective management of river basins in developing countries such as the upper Blue Nile River basin of Ethiopia where the water resource utilization is limited. Many studies have been previously performed to preserve historical temporal and spatial structures when generating precipitation series. The main focus of those studies was to preserve the historical statistics. Other important factors to be considered are transition and spatial correlations. A few recent studies attempted to preserve transition as well as the statistics of historical record. These studies provided satisfactory results while showing the difficulty and complexity of computations in their methods. The conditional generation method (CGM) that can preserve both historical temporal and spatial structures is presented in this study. Because the CGM is driven from the historical conditional probabilities occurring given amounts of precipitation between two successive months or two stations, it is computationally simple and reliable, i.e., parameterization, inverse matrix, or optimum band width is not required. The CGM was applied to reproducing the precipitation pattern of the upper Blue Nile River basin in Ethiopia using monthly precipitation data of 10 stations to demonstrate its applicability. Comparing to the method of inverse transformation of cumulative distribution functions of the gamma distribution and nonparametric kernel estimator with variable band width selected from the goodness-of-fit tests, the CGM showed improved performance, especially in representing the transition characteristics. The CGM also generated the historical spatial correlations between the stations with acceptable accuracy. The results suggested that the CGM

  3. Assessment and control of electrostatic charges. [hazards to space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, M.

    1974-01-01

    The experience is described of NASA and DOD with electrostatic problems, generation mechanisms, and type of electrostatic hazards. Guidelines for judging possible effects of electrostatic charges on space missions are presented along with mathematical formulas and definitions.

  4. Design and testing of electrostatic aerosol in vitro exposure system (EAVES): An alternative exposure system for particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conventional in vitro exposure methods for cultured human lung cells rely on prior suspension of particles in a liquid medium; these have limitations for exposure intensity and may modify the particle composition. Here electrostatic precipitation was used as an effective method f...

  5. Acceptability of BCG vaccination.

    PubMed

    Mande, R

    1977-01-01

    The acceptability of BCG vaccination varies a great deal according to the country and to the period when the vaccine is given. The incidence of complications has not always a direct influence on this acceptability, which depends, for a very large part, on the risk of tuberculosis in a given country at a given time.

  6. ATLAS ACCEPTANCE TEST

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, J. C. , Jr.; Parker, J. V.; Hinckley, W. B.; Hosack, K. W.; Mills, D.; Parsons, W. M.; Scudder, D. W.; Stokes, J. L.; Tabaka, L. J.; Thompson, M. C.; Wysocki, Frederick Joseph; Campbell, T. N.; Lancaster, D. L.; Tom, C. Y.

    2001-01-01

    The acceptance test program for Atlas, a 23 MJ pulsed power facility for use in the Los Alamos High Energy Density Hydrodynamics program, has been completed. Completion of this program officially releases Atlas from the construction phase and readies it for experiments. Details of the acceptance test program results and of machine capabilities for experiments will be presented.

  7. Properties of electrostatically-driven granular medium: Phase transitions and charge transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Aranson, I. S.; Kalatsky, V. A.; Crabtree, G. W.; Kwok, W.-K.; Vinokur, V. M.; Welp, U.

    1999-10-14

    The experimental and theoretical study of electrostatically driven granular material are reported. It is shown that the charged granular medium undergoes a hysteretic first order phase transition from the immobile condensed state (granular solid) to a fluidized dilated state (granular gas) with a changing applied electric field. In addition a spontaneous precipitation of dense clusters from the gas phase and subsequent coarsening--coagulation of these clusters is observed. Molecular dynamics simulations shows qualitative agreement with experimental results.

  8. Electrostatic Changes Observed with Narrow Bipolar Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunarathne, S.; Marshall, T. C.; Stolzenburg, M.; Karunarathna, N.

    2015-12-01

    Narrow bipolar pulses (NBPs) or compact intracloud discharges are impulsive discharges that are considered to be the strongest natural emitters in the HF radio band; they usually occur at high altitudes in some thunderstorms. In the summer of 2011, we collected E-change data with wideband flat-plate antennas (0.16 Hz - 2.5 MHz) at ten stations covering an area of nearly 70 km x 100 km in and around Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA. On one thunderstorm day, 14 August 2011, we detected 226 positive NBPs, and some observations of these pulses were published in Karunarathne et al. [2015, JGR-atmospheres]. Of these 226 NBPs, 50 (22.1 %) occurred within 10 km horizontally of at least one sensor. All of these closer sensors show electrostatic changes associated with corresponding NBPs, with a net electrostatic change in the main bipolar pulse and with a slower electrostatic change after the bipolar pulse that seems similar to short continuing current immediately after some cloud-to-ground return strokes. Although NBPs have been considered as short duration pulses (10 - 20 microseconds), the electrostatic changes after the main bipolar pulse ranged from 0.7 ms to 34 ms and associated charge moments were calculated. The total duration of the electrostatic E-change was strongly dependent on the distance to the sensors. In this presentation, we will present data for these electrostatic changes, some statistics, and physical background and reasoning for the electrostatic changes.

  9. Electrostatic Charged Two-Phase Flow Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhentao; Wen, Jianlong; Wang, Junfeng; Tang, Zhihua; Luo, Tiqian

    2007-06-01

    Electrostatic charged two-phase flows exit in electrostatic spray crop-dusting and fuel spray and so on. Electrostatic charged spray applying to FGD scrubber can improve desulfurization efficiency, decrease water usage. For the complexity of two-phase flow's structure in FGD scrubber, and there exit coupled action between non-uniform electric and flow field, also exit phase interaction between charged particles and continuous phase, which makes the flow more complex. So the complete theory has not formed at present. This paper adopts Lagrange and Euler method of combining together and takes the dispersed particle as fluid, and applies the Reynolds transport principle to set up a Reynolds transport equation, which suit electrostatic charged particle and liquid phase. Then based on Reynolds transport equation, equations for the volume average and instantaneous state of the electrostatic charged two-phase flow are obtained. Similar to equations for single phase turbulent flow, this paper applies Reynolds-average method, and develops equations for Reynolds-average equations for electrostatic charged two-phase flow. Finally, according to the model of single phase turbulent flow, equations for electrostatic charged two-phase flows has been closed. So the k - ɛ - kp model is obtained. Contrast of result by PIV and simulation has been finished.

  10. Intrinsic electrostatic effects in nanostructured ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Stanek, Chris R; Nerikar, Pankaj V

    2009-01-01

    Using empirical potentials, we have found that electrostatic dipoles can be created at grain boundaries formed from non-polar surfaces of fluorite-structured materials. In particular, the {Sigma}5(310)/[001] symmetric tilt grain boundary reconstructs to break the symmetry in the atomic structure at the boundary, forming the dipole. This dipole results in an abrupt change in electrostatic potential across the boundary. In multilayered ceramics composed of stacks of grain boundaries, the change in electrostatic potential at the boundary results in profound electrostatic effects within the crystalline layers, the nature of which depends on the electrostatic boundary conditions. For open-circuit boundary conditions, layers with either high or low electrostatic potential are formed. By contrast, for short-circuit boundary conditions, electric fields can be created within each layer, the strength of which then depends on the thickness of the layers. These electrostatic effects may have important consequences for the behavior of defects and dopants within these materials and offer the possibility of interesting technological applications.

  11. U.S. operating experience with wide plate spacing precipitators on high, medium, and low sulfur coals

    SciTech Connect

    Marker, B.L.; Dye, D.; Weaver, E.H.

    1995-12-31

    Wide plate spacing has become a widely used technology for electrostatic precipitators installed on coal fired boilers. As more operational time is gained with wide plate spacing precipitators, much has been learned concerning the operational and performance characteristics of these units. This information is extremely valuable to ensure their performance and operational integrity. This paper examines two installations of wide plate spacing precipitators through the project specifics, performance, and operating history of these facilities. The first facility examined is the precipitators at New York State Electric & Gas Milliken Station. This plant consists of two boilers, each rated at 160 MW. The boilers burn a medium to high sulfur Eastern U.S. coal. Each boiler has one wide plate spacing electrostatic precipitator with 16 inch plate spacing. The initially installed unit has been in service since July, 1993 and the second unit since December, 1994. The other plant examined is the precipitator installed on unit number five at City Utilities of Springfield James River Station. This boiler is rated at 105 MW. It has burned a medium sulfur Illinois coal and has recently switched to a low sulfur coal from the Western U.S. This unit has a 16 inch plate spacing electrostatic precipitator in series with 1970s vintage weighted wire electrostatic precipitators. This unit has been in service since April, 1994.

  12. Internal Electrostatic Discharge Monitor - IESDM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Wousik; Goebel, Dan M.; Jun, Insoo; Garrett, Henry B.

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses an innovation designed to effectively monitor dielectric charging in spacecraft components to measure the potential for discharge in order to prevent damage from internal electrostatic discharge (IESD). High-energy electrons penetrate the structural materials and shielding of a spacecraft and then stop inside dielectrics and keep accumulating. Those deposited charges generate an electric field. If the electric field becomes higher than the breakdown threshold (approx. =2 x 10(exp 5) V/cm), discharge occurs. This monitor measures potentials as a function of dielectric depth. Differentiation of potential with respect to the depth yields electric field. Direct measurement of the depth profile of the potential in a dielectric makes real-time electronic field evaluation possible without simulations. The IESDM has been designed to emulate a multi-layer circuit board, to insert very thin metallic layers between the dielectric layers. The conductors serve as diagnostic monitoring locations to measure the deposited electron-charge and the charge dynamics. Measurement of the time-dependent potential of the metal layers provides information on the amount of charge deposited in the dielectrics and the movement of that charge with time (dynamics).

  13. Feedback controlled electrostatic and electromagnetic sample positioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Elleman, D. D.

    1990-01-01

    Four different sample positioners are discussed. The four systems share a common operating principle in that the sample positioning is achieved by feedback controlled forces which can be electrostatic, dielectrophoretic, or electromagnetic. The first system is the electrostatic liquid drop positioner which operates at the near ambient position. The second system is the tetrahedral electrostatic positioner which is being developed for the high temperature materials processing in vacuum. The third system is essentially the the same tetrahedral system above except that the position control is achieved by dielectrophoretic forces in the pressurized gas environment. Finally, the feasibility of a feedback controlled electromagnetic positioner is discussed.

  14. Electrostatic Stabilization Of Growing Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed technique produces large crystals in compact, economical apparatus. Report presents concept for supporting protein crystals during growth in microgravity. Yields crystals larger and more-nearly perfect than those grown on Earth. Combines best features of sandwich-drop and electrostatic-levitation methods of support. Drop of protein solution inserted between pair of glass or plastic plates, as in sandwich-drop-support method. Electrostatically charged ring confines drop laterally and shapes it, as in electrostatic technique. Apparatus also made to accommodate several drops simultaneously between same pair of supporting plates. Drops can be inserted and crystals removed through ducts in plates.

  15. Electronic structure calculations in arbitrary electrostatic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Mark A.; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Lee, Elizabeth M. Y.; Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    Modeling of electronic structure of molecules in electrostatic environments is of considerable relevance for surface-enhanced spectroscopy and molecular electronics. We have developed and implemented a novel approach to the molecular electronic structure in arbitrary electrostatic environments that is compatible with standard quantum chemical methods and can be applied to medium-sized and large molecules. The scheme denoted CheESE (chemistry in electrostatic environments) is based on the description of molecular electronic structure subject to a boundary condition on the system/environment interface. Thus, it is particularly suited to study molecules on metallic surfaces. The proposed model is capable of describing both electrostatic effects near nanostructured metallic surfaces and image-charge effects. We present an implementation of the CheESE model as a library module and show example applications to neutral and negatively charged molecules.

  16. Electrostatic interactions in gas-solid chromatography.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, S. W.; King, J., Jr.

    1966-01-01

    Electrostatic theory of physical adsorption applied to gas-solid chromatography, discussing chromatographic inseparability of argon and oxygen at room temperature, prediction of elution order of many gases, etc

  17. The Electrocardiogram as an Example of Electrostatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbie, Russell K.

    1973-01-01

    Develops a simplified electrostatic model of the heart with conduction within the torso neglected to relate electrocardiogram patterns to the charge distribution within the myocardium. Suggests its application to explanation of Coulomb's law in general physics. (CC)

  18. Electrostatic discharge control for STDN stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckiernan, J.

    1983-01-01

    This manual defines the requirements and control methods necessary to control the effect of electrostatic discharges that damage or destroy electronic equipment components. Test procedures for measuring the effectiveness of the control are included.

  19. Electrostatic Liquid-Drop-Levitation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won Kyu; Chung, San Kun; Hyson, Michael T.; Elleman, Daniel D.

    1988-01-01

    Electrostatic levitator has levitated drops of liquid up to 4 mm in diameter while maintaining spherical drop shapes. Stable levitation of spherical drops valuable in experiments involving super-cooling, solidification, and crystal growth.

  20. Stochastic ion acceleration by beating electrostatic waves.

    PubMed

    Jorns, B; Choueiri, E Y

    2013-01-01

    A study is presented of the stochasticity in the orbit of a single, magnetized ion produced by the particle's interaction with two beating electrostatic waves whose frequencies differ by the ion cyclotron frequency. A second-order Lie transform perturbation theory is employed in conjunction with a numerical analysis of the maximum Lyapunov exponent to determine the velocity conditions under which stochasticity occurs in this dynamical system. Upper and lower bounds in ion velocity are found for stochastic orbits with the lower bound approximately equal to the phase velocity of the slower wave. A threshold condition for the onset of stochasticity that is linear with respect to the wave amplitudes is also derived. It is shown that the onset of stochasticity occurs for beating electrostatic waves at lower total wave energy densities than for the case of a single electrostatic wave or two nonbeating electrostatic waves. PMID:23410446

  1. Global Precipitation Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Kummerow, Christian D.; Shepherd, James Marshall

    2008-01-01

    This chapter begins with a brief history and background of microwave precipitation sensors, with a discussion of the sensitivity of both passive and active instruments, to trace the evolution of satellite-based rainfall techniques from an era of inference to an era of physical measurement. Next, the highly successful Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission will be described, followed by the goals and plans for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission and the status of precipitation retrieval algorithm development. The chapter concludes with a summary of the need for space-based precipitation measurement, current technological capabilities, near-term algorithm advancements and anticipated new sciences and societal benefits in the GPM era.

  2. Selective Precipitation of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Matulis, Daumantas

    2016-01-01

    Selective precipitation of proteins can be used as a bulk method to recover the majority of proteins from a crude lysate, as a selective method to fractionate a subset of proteins from a protein solution, or as a very specific method to recover a single protein of interest from a purification step. This unit describes a number of methods suitable for selective precipitation. In each of the protocols that are outlined, the physical or chemical basis of the precipitation process, the parameters that can be varied for optimization, and the basic steps for developing an optimized precipitation are described.

  3. Electrostatic Beneficiation of Lunar Simulant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trigwell, Steve; Captain, James; Captain, Janine; Arens, Ellen; Quinn, Jacqueline; Calle, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    Electrostatic beneficiation of lunar regolith is a method allowing refinement of specific minerals in the material for processing on the moon. The use of tribocharging the regolith prior to separation was investigated on the lunar simulant MLS-I by passing the dust through static mixers constructed from different materials; aluminum, copper, stainless steel, and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The amount of charge acquired by the simulant was dependent upon the difference in the work function of the dust and the charging material. XPS and SEM were used to characterize the simulant after it was sieved into five size fractions (> 100 pm, 75-100 pm, 50- 75 pm, 50-25 pm, and < 25 pm), where very little difference in surface composition was observed between the sizes. Samples of the smallest (< 25 pm) and largest (> 100 pm) size fractions were beneficiated through a charge separator using the aluminum (charged the simulant negatively) and PTFE (charged positively) mixers. The mass fractions of the separated simulant revealed that for the larger particle size, significant unipolar charging was observed for both mixers, whereas for the smaller particle sizes, more bipolar charging was observed, probably due to the finer simulant adhering to the inside of the mixers shielding the dust from the charging material. Subsequent XPS analysis of the beneficiated fractions showed the larger particle size fraction having some species differentiation, but very little difference for the smaller.size. Although MLS-1 was made to have similar chemistry to actual lunar dust, its mineralogy is quite different. On-going experiments are using NASA JSC-1 lunar simulant. A vacuum chamber has been constructed, and future experiments are planned in a simulated lunar environment.

  4. Miniature Bipolar Electrostatic Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2006-01-01

    The figure presents a concept of a bipolar miniature electrostatic ion thruster for maneuvering a small spacecraft. The ionization device in the proposed thruster would be a 0.1-micron-thick dielectric membrane with metal electrodes on both sides. Small conical holes would be micromachined through the membrane and electrodes. An electric potential of the order of a volt applied between the membrane electrodes would give rise to an electric field of the order of several mega-volts per meter in the submicron gap between the electrodes. An electric field of this magnitude would be sufficient to ionize all the molecules that enter the holes. In a thruster-based on this concept, one or more propellant gases would be introduced into such a membrane ionizer. Unlike in larger prior ion thrusters, all of the propellant molecules would be ionized. This thruster would be capable of bipolar operation. There would be two accelerator grids - one located forward and one located aft of the membrane ionizer. In one mode of operation, which one could denote the forward mode, positive ions leaving the ionizer on the backside would be accelerated to high momentum by an electric field between the ionizer and an accelerator grid. Electrons leaving the ionizer on the front side would be ejected into free space by a smaller accelerating field. The equality of the ion and electron currents would eliminate the need for an additional electron- or ion-emitting device to keep the spacecraft charge-neutral. In another mode of operation, which could denote the reverse mode, the polarities of the voltages applied to the accelerator grids and to the electrodes of the membrane ionizer would be the reverse of those of the forward mode. The reversal of electric fields would cause the ion and electrons to be ejected in the reverse of their forward mode directions, thereby giving rise to thrust in the direction opposite that of the forward mode.

  5. Electrostatic Levitation Furnace for the ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, Keiji; Koshikawa, Naokiyo; Shibasaki, Kohichi; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Okada, Junpei; Takada, Tetsuya; Arai, Tatsuya; Fujino, Naoki; Yamaura, Yukiko

    2012-01-01

    JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) has just started the development of Electrostatic Levitation Furnace to be launched in 2014 for the ISS. This furnace can control the sample position with electrostatic force and heat it above 2000 degree Celsius using semiconductor laser from four different directions. The announcement of Opportunity will be issued soon for this furnace. In this paper, we will show the specifications of this furnace and also the development schedule

  6. Electrostatic breakup in a misty plasma.

    PubMed

    Coppins, M

    2010-02-12

    A misty plasma is defined as a plasma containing small liquid droplets. In such a system, the droplets will undergo total electrostatic breakup if their charge exceeds the well-known Rayleigh limit. This imposes a minimum size on the droplets. Electrostatic breakup is a significant mechanism limiting droplet survival in a wide range of plasma applications, including plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and fusion tokamaks. PMID:20366826

  7. Electrostatic camera system functional design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botticelli, R. A.; Cook, F. J.; Moore, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    A functional design study for an electrostatic camera system for application to planetary missions is presented. The electrostatic camera can produce and store a large number of pictures and provide for transmission of the stored information at arbitrary times after exposure. Preliminary configuration drawings and circuit diagrams for the system are illustrated. The camera system's size, weight, power consumption, and performance are characterized. Tradeoffs between system weight, power, and storage capacity are identified.

  8. Miniature Electrostatic Ion Thruster With Magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2006-01-01

    A miniature electrostatic ion thruster is proposed that, with one exception, would be based on the same principles as those of the device described in the previous article, "Miniature Bipolar Electrostatic Ion Thruster". The exceptional feature of this thruster would be that, in addition to using electric fields for linear acceleration of ions and electrons, it would use a magnetic field to rotationally accelerate slow electrons into the ion stream to neutralize the ions.

  9. Electrostatic Breakup in a Misty Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Coppins, M.

    2010-02-12

    A misty plasma is defined as a plasma containing small liquid droplets. In such a system, the droplets will undergo total electrostatic breakup if their charge exceeds the well-known Rayleigh limit. This imposes a minimum size on the droplets. Electrostatic breakup is a significant mechanism limiting droplet survival in a wide range of plasma applications, including plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and fusion tokamaks.

  10. Acceptance procedures: Microfilm printer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    Acceptance tests were made for a special order automatic additive color microfilm printer. Tests include film capacity, film transport, resolution, illumination uniformity, exposure range checks, and color cuing considerations.

  11. An improved proximity force approximation for electrostatics

    SciTech Connect

    Fosco, Cesar D.; Lombardo, Fernando C.; Mazzitelli, Francisco D.

    2012-08-15

    A quite straightforward approximation for the electrostatic interaction between two perfectly conducting surfaces suggests itself when the distance between them is much smaller than the characteristic lengths associated with their shapes. Indeed, in the so called 'proximity force approximation' the electrostatic force is evaluated by first dividing each surface into a set of small flat patches, and then adding up the forces due two opposite pairs, the contributions of which are approximated as due to pairs of parallel planes. This approximation has been widely and successfully applied in different contexts, ranging from nuclear physics to Casimir effect calculations. We present here an improvement on this approximation, based on a derivative expansion for the electrostatic energy contained between the surfaces. The results obtained could be useful for discussing the geometric dependence of the electrostatic force, and also as a convenient benchmark for numerical analyses of the tip-sample electrostatic interaction in atomic force microscopes. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proximity force approximation (PFA) has been widely used in different areas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The PFA can be improved using a derivative expansion in the shape of the surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use the improved PFA to compute electrostatic forces between conductors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results can be used as an analytic benchmark for numerical calculations in AFM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insight is provided for people who use the PFA to compute nuclear and Casimir forces.

  12. On the electrostatic properties of homodimeric proteins

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Brandon; Petukh, Marharyta; Alexov, Emil

    2014-01-01

    A large fraction of proteins function as homodimers, but it is not always clear why the dimerization is important for functionality since frequently each monomer possesses a distinctive active site. Recent work (PLoS Computational Biology, 9(2), e1002924) indicates that homodimerization may be important for forming an electrostatic funnel in the spermine synthase homodimer which guides changed substrates toward the active centers. This prompted us to investigate the electrostatic properties of a large set of homodimeric proteins and resulted in an observation that in a vast majority of the cases the dimerization indeed results in specific electrostatic features, although not necessarily in an electrostatic funnel. It is demonstrated that the electrostatic dipole moment of the dimer is predominantly perpendicular to the axis connecting the centers of the mass of the monomers. In addition, the surface points with highest potential are located in the proximity of the interfacial plane of the homodimeric complexes. These findings indicate that frequently homodimerization provides specific electrostatic features needed for the function of proteins. PMID:25419028

  13. Low-frequency electrostatic waves in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeraj, T.; Singh, Satyavir; Singh Lakhina, Gurbax

    2016-07-01

    Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves are one of the ubiquitous features in space and laboratory plasmas. Here we present a linear study of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in the solar wind. We model the solar wind by three-component magnetised plasma consisting of hot electrons with kappa distribution and fluid cold protons and doubly charged Helium ions. A numerical analysis of the linear electrostatic dispersion relation has been carried out for slow solar wind parameters and for -oblique wave propagation. The system supports four different modes i.e., fast and slow acoustic modes, and proton and Helium cyclotron modes. It has to be emphasised that for parallel propagation, physically acceptable solution to the dispersion relation are those of fast and slow acoustic modes. For oblique propagation, the coupling between various modes can be seen. Moreover, when the angle of propagation is increased the separation between acoustic modes and cyclotron modes increases and at perpendicular propagation, only proton and Helium-cyclotron modes can exist. The effect of various parameters like number density and temperature of Helium ions and kappa index on the dispersive properties has also been investigated. As the number density of helium ions increases, frequency of proton cyclotron mode decreases and frequency of Helium cyclotron mode increases at a fixed wave number. When the value of kappa increases, the frequency of the proton cyclotron mode increases but it does not have significant effect on the frequency of the Helium cyclotron mode. Likewise, when the temperature of Helium ions increases, the frequency of Helium cyclotron mode increases, however, the frequency of proton cyclotron mode remains more or less unchanged.

  14. PRECIPITATION OF PROTACTINIUM

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.L.

    1958-07-15

    An lmprovement in the separation of protactinium from aqueous nitric acid solutions is described. 1t covers the use of lead dioxide and tin dioxide as carrier precipitates for the protactinium. In carrying out the process, divalent lead or divalent tin is addcd to the solution and oxidized, causing formation of a carrier precipitate of lead dioxide or stannic oxide, respectively.

  15. Electrostatic and electromagnetic instabilities associated with electrostatic shocks: Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Tsunehiko N.; Takabe, Hideaki

    2010-03-15

    A two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation with the realistic ion-to-electron mass ratio of 1836 is carried out to investigate the electrostatic collisionless shocks in relatively high-speed (approx3000 km s{sup -1}) plasma flows and also the influence of both electrostatic and electromagnetic instabilities, which can develop around the shocks, on the shock dynamics. It is shown that the electrostatic ion-ion instability can develop in front of the shocks, where the plasma is under counterstreaming condition, with highly oblique wave vectors as was shown previously. The electrostatic potential generated by the electrostatic ion-ion instability propagating obliquely to the shock surface becomes comparable with the shock potential and finally the shock structure is destroyed. It is also shown that in front of the shock the beam-Weibel instability gradually grows as well, consequently suggesting that the magnetic field generated by the beam-Weibel instability becomes important in long-term evolution of the shock and the Weibel-mediated shock forms long after the electrostatic shock vanished. It is also observed that the secondary electrostatic shock forms in the reflected ions in front of the primary electrostatic shock.

  16. Hemispheric Assymeries in Auroral Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mende, S. B.

    2014-12-01

    It is widely accepted that the space weather related electrodynamic forcing of the geospace environment acts through the high geomagnetic latitude regions. At high latitudes inter-hemispheric asymmetries are largely due to the differences in solar illumination, the direction of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field components and to a lesser extent, due to differences between the two hemispheric internal fields. So far most research regarding interhemispheric differences concentrated on learning about the basic magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling mechanisms. It has been well established that sunlit conditions affect the energy flux of auroral precipitation resulting from the reduction in the mean energy of the auroral electrons in the sunlit summer hemisphere. This can be explained by the partial shorting out of the particle accelerating fields by the sunlight induced conductivity. It has also been found that sunlit conditions reduce the particle fluxes and therefore the associated field aligned currents. Unless the precipitation-induced conductivities overwhelm the sunlit component of conductivity, this would imply that the magnetospheric current generator responds to the ionospheric load in a highly non-linear manner. Interhemispheric currents may also play an important role that has not been fully explored. Interhemispheric asymmetries in substorm morphology have been explored critically because conjugacy implies that substorms have a common source at equatorial latitudes. In some cases the lack of conjugacy of substorms could be explained by considering the magnitude and direction of the IMF.

  17. Dye-promoted precipitation of serum proteins. Mechanism and application.

    PubMed

    Birkenmeier, G; Kopperschläger, G

    1991-11-01

    Immobilized dyes have been used primarily for purification of nucleotide dependent enzymes and proteins from plasma and other sources. Due to their low costs, high protein binding capacity and resistance to degradation dyes bear the potential as ligand for affinity separation of proteins on a large scale. In this paper dyes have been used for precipitation of proteins. Using albumin, prealbumin, alpha 1-acid glycoprotein and immunoglobulin G as model proteins we could demonstrate that dye-promoted precipitation depends on several factors which include the structure of the dye, the pH of the solution, the dye/protein molar ratio and the intrinsic properties of the proteins. It revealed that most of the dyes tested were endowed with the precipitating potential. The efficacy of precipitation was found to increase with the complexity of the dye structure. However, the amount of a dye required for total precipitation was found to be different for a given protein. Electrostatic as well as hydrophobic forces are involved in the mechanism of precipitation. It was demonstrated that by optimizing the conditions, mixtures of proteins can be resolved by dye-promoted precipitation. The high sensitivity of the reaction offers the possibility of using this method for rapid concentration of very diluted protein solutions. PMID:1367693

  18. Screened Electrostatic Interactions in Molecular Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Truhlar, Donald G

    2014-10-14

    In a typical application of molecular mechanics (MM), the electrostatic interactions are calculated from parametrized partial atomic charges treated as point charges interacting by radial Coulomb potentials. This does not usually yield accurate electrostatic interactions at van der Waals distances, but this is compensated by additional parametrized terms, for example Lennard-Jones potentials. In the present work, we present a scheme involving radial screened Coulomb potentials that reproduces the accurate electrostatics much more accurately. The screening accounts for charge penetration of one subsystem's charge cloud into that of another subsystem, and it is incorporated into the interaction potential in a way similar to what we proposed in a previous article (J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2010, 6, 3330) for combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations, but the screening parameters are reoptimized for MM. The optimization is carried out with electrostatic-potential-fitted partial atomic charges, but the optimized parameters should be useful with any realistic charge model. In the model we employ, the charge density of an atom is approximated as the sum of a point charge representing the nucleus and inner electrons and a smeared charge representing the outermost electrons; in particular, for all atoms except hydrogens, the smeared charge represents the two outermost electrons in the present model. We find that the charge penetration effect can cause very significant deviations from the popular point-charge model, and by comparison to electrostatic interactions calculated by symmetry-adapted perturbation theory, we find that the present results are considerably more accurate than point-charge electrostatic interactions. The mean unsigned error in electrostatics for a large and diverse data set (192 interaction energies) decreases from 9.2 to 3.3 kcal/mol, and the error in the electrostatics for 10 water dimers decreases from 1.7 to 0.5 kcal

  19. Screened Electrostatic Interactions in Molecular Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Truhlar, Donald G

    2014-10-14

    In a typical application of molecular mechanics (MM), the electrostatic interactions are calculated from parametrized partial atomic charges treated as point charges interacting by radial Coulomb potentials. This does not usually yield accurate electrostatic interactions at van der Waals distances, but this is compensated by additional parametrized terms, for example Lennard-Jones potentials. In the present work, we present a scheme involving radial screened Coulomb potentials that reproduces the accurate electrostatics much more accurately. The screening accounts for charge penetration of one subsystem's charge cloud into that of another subsystem, and it is incorporated into the interaction potential in a way similar to what we proposed in a previous article (J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2010, 6, 3330) for combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations, but the screening parameters are reoptimized for MM. The optimization is carried out with electrostatic-potential-fitted partial atomic charges, but the optimized parameters should be useful with any realistic charge model. In the model we employ, the charge density of an atom is approximated as the sum of a point charge representing the nucleus and inner electrons and a smeared charge representing the outermost electrons; in particular, for all atoms except hydrogens, the smeared charge represents the two outermost electrons in the present model. We find that the charge penetration effect can cause very significant deviations from the popular point-charge model, and by comparison to electrostatic interactions calculated by symmetry-adapted perturbation theory, we find that the present results are considerably more accurate than point-charge electrostatic interactions. The mean unsigned error in electrostatics for a large and diverse data set (192 interaction energies) decreases from 9.2 to 3.3 kcal/mol, and the error in the electrostatics for 10 water dimers decreases from 1.7 to 0.5 kcal

  20. Electrostatic effects on hyaluronic acid configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezney, John; Saleh, Omar

    2015-03-01

    In systems of polyelectrolytes, such as solutions of charged biopolymers, the electrostatic repulsion between charged monomers plays a dominant role in determining the molecular conformation. Altering the ionic strength of the solvent thus affects the structure of such a polymer. Capturing this electrostatically-driven structural dependence is important for understanding many biological systems. Here, we use single molecule manipulation experiments to collect force-extension behavior on hyaluronic acid (HA), a polyanion which is a major component of the extracellular matrix in all vertebrates. By measuring HA elasticity in a variety of salt conditions, we are able to directly assess the contribution of electrostatics to the chain's self-avoidance and local stiffness. Similar to recent results from our group on single-stranded nucleic acids, our data indicate that HA behaves as a swollen chain of electrostatic blobs, with blob size proportional to the solution Debye length. Our data indicate that the chain structure within the blob is not worm-like, likely due to long-range electrostatic interactions. We discuss potential models of this effect.

  1. Electrostatics of DNA complexes with cationic lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherstvy, Andrey

    2007-03-01

    We present the exact solutions of the linear Poisson-Boltzmann theory for several problems relevant to electrostatics of DNA complexes with cationic lipids. We calculate the electrostatic potential and energy for lamellar and inverted hexagonal phases, concentrating on the effects of water-membrane dielectric boundaries. Our results for the complex energy agree qualitatively well with the known numerical solutions of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation. Using the solution for the lamellar phase, we calculate its compressibility modulus and compare our findings with experimental data available suggesting a new scaling dependence on DNA-DNA separations in the complex. Also, we treat analytically charge-charge electrostatic interactions across, along, and in between two low-dielectric membranes. We obtain an estimate for the strength of electrostatic interactions of 1D DNA smectic layers across a lipid membrane. We discuss also some aspects of 2D DNA condensation and DNA-DNA attraction in DNA-lipid lamellar phase in the presence of di- and tri-valent cations and analyze the equilibrium intermolecular separations using the recently developed theory of electrostatic interactions of DNA helical charge motifs.

  2. Cloud and Precipitation Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Martin; Höller, Hartmut; Schmidt, Kersten

    Precipitation or weather radar is an essential tool for research, diagnosis, and nowcasting of precipitation events like fronts or thunderstorms. Only with weather radar is it possible to gain insights into the three-dimensional structure of thunderstorms and to investigate processes like hail formation or tornado genesis. A number of different radar products are available to analyze the structure, dynamics and microphysics of precipitation systems. Cloud radars use short wavelengths to enable detection of small ice particles or cloud droplets. Their applications differ from weather radar as they are mostly orientated vertically, where different retrieval techniques can be applied.

  3. Smaller hospitals accept advertising.

    PubMed

    Mackesy, R

    1988-07-01

    Administrators at small- and medium-sized hospitals gradually have accepted the role of marketing in their organizations, albeit at a much slower rate than larger institutions. This update of a 1983 survey tracks the increasing competitiveness, complexity and specialization of providing health care and of advertising a small hospital's services. PMID:10288550

  4. Students Accepted on Probation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorberbaum, Caroline S.

    This report is a justification of the Dalton Junior College admissions policy designed to help students who had had academic and/or social difficulties at other schools. These students were accepted on probation, their problems carefully analyzed, and much effort devoted to those with low academic potential. They received extensive academic and…

  5. Approaches to acceptable risk

    SciTech Connect

    Whipple, C.

    1997-04-30

    Several alternative approaches to address the question {open_quotes}How safe is safe enough?{close_quotes} are reviewed and an attempt is made to apply the reasoning behind these approaches to the issue of acceptability of radiation exposures received in space. The approaches to the issue of the acceptability of technological risk described here are primarily analytical, and are drawn from examples in the management of environmental health risks. These include risk-based approaches, in which specific quantitative risk targets determine the acceptability of an activity, and cost-benefit and decision analysis, which generally focus on the estimation and evaluation of risks, benefits and costs, in a framework that balances these factors against each other. These analytical methods tend by their quantitative nature to emphasize the magnitude of risks, costs and alternatives, and to downplay other factors, especially those that are not easily expressed in quantitative terms, that affect acceptance or rejection of risk. Such other factors include the issues of risk perceptions and how and by whom risk decisions are made.

  6. Why was Relativity Accepted?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brush, S. G.

    Historians of science have published many studies of the reception of Einstein's special and general theories of relativity. Based on a review of these studies, and my own research on the role of the light-bending prediction in the reception of general relativity, I discuss the role of three kinds of reasons for accepting relativity (1) empirical predictions and explanations; (2) social-psychological factors; and (3) aesthetic-mathematical factors. According to the historical studies, acceptance was a three-stage process. First, a few leading scientists adopted the special theory for aesthetic-mathematical reasons. In the second stage, their enthusiastic advocacy persuaded other scientists to work on the theory and apply it to problems currently of interest in atomic physics. The special theory was accepted by many German physicists by 1910 and had begun to attract some interest in other countries. In the third stage, the confirmation of Einstein's light-bending prediction attracted much public attention and forced all physicists to take the general theory of relativity seriously. In addition to light-bending, the explanation of the advance of Mercury's perihelion was considered strong evidence by theoretical physicists. The American astronomers who conducted successful tests of general relativity became defenders of the theory. There is little evidence that relativity was `socially constructed' but its initial acceptance was facilitated by the prestige and resources of its advocates.

  7. Electrostatic coating technologies for food processing.

    PubMed

    Barringer, Sheryl A; Sumonsiri, Nutsuda

    2015-01-01

    The application of electrostatics in both powder and liquid coating can improve the quality of food, such as its appearance, aroma, taste, and shelf life. Coatings can be found most commonly in the snack food industry, as well as in confectionery, bakery, meat and cheese processing. In electrostatic powder coating, the most important factors influencing coating quality are powder particle size, density, flowability, charge, and resistivity, as well as the surface properties and characteristics of the target. The most important factors during electrostatic liquid coating, also known as electrohydrodynamic coating, include applied voltage and electrical resistivity and viscosity of the liquid. A good understanding of these factors is needed for the design of optimal coating systems for food processing. PMID:25648420

  8. Electrostatic micromotor based on ferroelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baginsky, I. L.; Kostsov, E. G.

    2004-11-01

    A new electrostatic micromotor is described that utilizes the electromechanical energy conversion principle earlier described by the authors. The electromechanical energy conversion is based on reversible electrostatic rolling of thin metallic films (petals) on a ferroelectric surface. The motor's active media are layers of ferroelectric ceramics (about 100 µm in thickness). The characteristics of the electrostatic rolling of the petals on different ceramic surfaces are studied, as well as the dynamic characteristics of the micromotors. It is shown that the use of antiferroelectric material allows one to reach a specific energy capacitance comparable to that of the micromotors based on ferroelectric films and to achieve a specific power of 30-300 µW mm-2.

  9. Analytical expressions for electrostatics of graphene structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgantzinos, S. K.; Giannopoulos, G. I.; Fatsis, A.; Vlachakis, N. V.

    2016-10-01

    This study focuses on electrostatics of various graphene structures as graphene monolayer, graphene nanoribbons, as well as multi-layer graphene or graphene flakes. An atomistic moment method based on classical electrostatics is utilized in order to evaluate the charge distribution in each nanostructure. Assuming a freestanding graphene structure in an infinite or in a semi-infinite space limited by a grounded infinite plane, the effect of the length, width, number of layers and position of the nanostructure on its electrostatic charge distributions and total charge and capacitance is examined through a parametric analysis. The results of the present show good agreement with corresponding available data in the literature, obtained from different theoretical approaches. Performing nonlinear regression analysis on the numerical results, where it is possible, simple analytical expressions are proposed for the total charge and charge distribution prediction based on structure geometry.

  10. IMERG Global Precipitation Rates

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission has produced its first global map of rainfall and snowfall. The GPM Core Observatory launched one year ago on Feb. 27, 2014 as a collaboration betwee...

  11. My NASA Data Precipitation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This lesson has two activities that help students develop a basic understanding of the relationship between cloud type and the form of precipitation and the relationship between the amount of water...

  12. Precipitation Estimates for Hydroelectricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapiador, Francisco J.; Hou, Arthur Y.; de Castro, Manuel; Checa, Ramiro; Cuartero, Fernando; Barros, Ana P.

    2011-01-01

    Hydroelectric plants require precise and timely estimates of rain, snow and other hydrometeors for operations. However, it is far from being a trivial task to measure and predict precipitation. This paper presents the linkages between precipitation science and hydroelectricity, and in doing so it provides insight into current research directions that are relevant for this renewable energy. Methods described include radars, disdrometers, satellites and numerical models. Two recent advances that have the potential of being highly beneficial for hydropower operations are featured: the Global Precipitation Measuring (GPM) mission, which represents an important leap forward in precipitation observations from space, and high performance computing (HPC) and grid technology, that allows building ensembles of numerical weather and climate models.

  13. Chemisorption And Precipitation Reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transport and bioavailability of chemical components within soils is, in part, controlled by partitioning between solids and solution. General terms used to describe these partitioning reactions include chemisorption and precipitation. Chemisorption is inclusive of the suit...

  14. Electrostatic contribution to the bending of DNA.

    PubMed

    Sivolob, A; Khrapunov, S N

    1997-09-01

    A model is derived that accounts for the short-range electrostatic contribution to the bending of DNA molecule in solution and in complexes with proteins in terms of the non-linear Poisson-Boltzmann equation. We defined that the short-range electrostatic interactions depend on the changes of the polyion surface charge density under deformation, while the long-range interactions depend on the bending-induced changes in distances between each two points along the polyion axis. After an appropriate simplification of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the short-range term is calculated separately giving the lower limit for the electrostatic contribution to the DNA persistence length. The result is compared with the theoretical approaches developed earlier [M. Fixman, J. Chem. Phys. 76 (1982) 6346; M. Le Bret, J. Chem. Phys. 76 (1982) 6243] and with the experimental data. The conclusion is made that the results of Fixman-Le Bret, which took into account both types of the electrostatic interactions for a uniformly bent polyion, give the upper limit for the electrostatic persistence length at low ionic strength, and the actual behavior of the DNA persistence length lies between two theoretical limits. Only the short-range term is significant at moderate-to-high ionic strength where our results coincide with the predictions of Fixman-Le Bret. The bending of DNA on the protein surface that is accompanied by an asymmetric neutralization of the DNA charge is also analyzed. In this case, the electrostatic bending energy gives a significant favorite contribution to the total bending energy of DNA. Important implications to the mechanisms of DNA-protein interactions, particularly in the nucleosome particle, are discussed.

  15. Marcasite precipitation from hydrothermal solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murowchick, James B.; Barnes, H. L.

    1986-12-01

    Pyrite and marcasite were precipitated by both slow addition of aqueous Fe2+ and SiO32- to an H2S solution and by mixing aqueous Fe2+ and Na2S4 solutions at 75°C. H2S2 or HS2- and H2S4 or HS4- were formed in the S2O32- and Na2S4 experiments, respectively. Marcasite formed at pH < pK1 of the polysulfide species present (for H2S2, pK1 = 5.0; for H2S4, pK1 = 3.8 at 25°C). Marcasite forms when the neutral sulfane is the dominant polysulfide, whereas pyrite forms when mono-or divalent polysulfides are dominant. In natural solutions where H2S2 and HS2 are likely to be the dominant polysulfides, marcasite will form only below pH 5 at all temperatures. The pH-dependent precipitation of pyrite and marcasite may be caused by electrostatic interactions between polysulfide species and pyrite or marcasite growth surfaces: the protonated ends of H2S2 and HS2 are repelled from pyrite growth sites but not from marcasite growth sites. The negative ions HS2 and S22- are strongly attracted to the positive pyrite growth sites. Masking of 1πg* electrons in the S2 group by the protons makes HS2 and H2S2 isoelectronic with AsS2- and As22-, respectively (TOSSELLet al., 1981). Thus, the loellingitederivative structure (marcasite) results when both ends of the polysulfide are protonated. Marcasite occurs abundantly only for conditions below pH 5 and where H2S2 was formed near the site of deposition by either partial oxidation of aqueous H2S by O2 or by the reaction of higher oxidation state sulfur species that are reactive with H2S at the conditions of formation e.g., S2O32- but not SO42-. The temperature of formation of natural marcasite may be as high as 240°C (HANNINGTON and SCOTT, 1985), but preservation on a multimillion-year scale seems to require post-depositional temperatures of below about 160°C (RISING, 1973; MCKIBBEN and ELDERS, 1985).

  16. A new spore precipitator with polarized dielectric insulators for physical control of tomato powdery mildew.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yoshinori; Ikeda, Hiroki; Moriura, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Norio; Shimizu, Kunihiko; Oichi, Wataru; Nonomura, Teruo; Kakutani, Koji; Kusakari, Shin-Ichi; Higashi, Katsuhide; Toyoda, Hideyoshi

    2006-09-01

    ABSTRACT In an attempt to physically protect greenhouse tomato plants from the powdery mildew fungus Oidium neolycopersici, we developed a new electrostatic spore precipitator in which a copper wire conductor is linked to an electrostatic generator and covered with a transparent acrylic cylinder (insulator). The conductor was negatively charged by the generator, and the electrostatic field created by the conductor was used to dielectrically polarize the insulator cylinder. The dielectrically polarized cylinder also produced an electrostatic force without a spark discharge. This force was directly proportional to the potential applied to the conductor and was used to attract conidia of the pathogen. The efficacy of this spore precipitator in protecting hydroponically cultured tomato plants from powdery mildew was evaluated in the greenhouse. The hydroponic culture troughs were covered with a cubic frame installed with the spore precipitator, and the disease progress on precipitator-guarded and unguarded seedlings was traced after the conidia were disseminated mechanically from inoculum on tomato plants. Seedlings in the guarded troughs remained uninfected during the entire experiment, in spite of rapid spread of the disease to all leaves of the unguarded seedlings.

  17. Electrostatic formation of liquid marbles and agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liyanaarachchi, K. R.; Ireland, P. M.; Webber, G. B.; Galvin, K. P.

    2013-07-01

    We report observations of a sudden, explosive release of electrostatically charged 100 μm glass beads from a particle bed. These cross an air gap of several millimeters, are engulfed by an approaching pendant water drop, and form a metastable spherical agglomerate on the bed surface. The stability transition of the particle bed is explained by promotion of internal friction by in-plane electrostatic stresses. The novel agglomerates formed this way resemble the "liquid marbles" formed by coating a drop with hydrophobic particles. Complex multi-layered agglomerates may also be produced by this method, with potential industrial, pharmaceutical, environmental, and biological applications.

  18. Fabrication of Electrostatically Actuated Microshutters Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, L.; Li, M.; Kelly, D.; Kutyrev, A.; Moseley, S.

    2016-01-01

    A new fabrication process has been developed to actuate microshutter arrays (MSA) electrostatically at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The microshutters, made with silicon nitride membranes with a pixel size of 100 x 200 sq microns, rotate on torsion bars. The microshutters are actuated, latched, and addressed electrostatically by applying voltages on the electrodes the front and back sides of the microshutters. The atomic layer deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide was used to insulate electrodes on the back side of walls; the insulation can withstand over 100 V. The ALD aluminum oxide is dry etched, and then the microshutters are released in vapor HF.

  19. The electrostatic surface term: (I) periodic systems.

    PubMed

    Herce, Henry David; Garcia, Angel Enrique; Darden, Thomas

    2007-03-28

    The authors propose a new approach to understand the electrostatic surface contributions to the interactions of large but finite periodic distributions of charges. They present a simple method to derive and interpret the surface contribution to any electrostatic field produced by a periodic distribution of charges. They discuss the physical and mathematical interpretations of this term. They present several examples and physical details associated with the calculation of the surface term. Finally, they provide a simple derivation of the surface contribution to the virial. This term does not disappear even if tinfoil boundary conditions are applied.

  20. Electrostatic Separation Of Layers In Thermal Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep

    1995-01-01

    Layers in multilayer insulation charged to keep them separated by electrostatic repulsion, eliminating need for spacer nets. Removal of spacer nets reduces conduction of heat between layers. Insulation in question type used to slow leakage of heat into Dewar flasks containing liquid helium. Proposal originally applied to insulation in cryogenic cooling subsystems of infrared-detector systems in outer space, also appears applicable to small panels of insulation for terrestrial cryogenic equipment, provided layers contained in evacuated spaces and weight of each layer small fraction of electrostatic force upon it.

  1. Electrostatic supersolitons in three-species plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Verheest, Frank; Hellberg, Manfred A.; Kourakis, Ioannis

    2013-01-15

    Superficially, electrostatic potential profiles of supersolitons look like those of traditional solitons. However, their electric field profiles are markedly different, having additional extrema on the wings of the standard bipolar structure. This new concept was recently pointed out in the literature for a plasma model with five species. Here, it is shown that electrostatic supersolitons are not an artefact of exotic, complicated plasma models, but can exist even in three-species plasmas and are likely to occur in space plasmas. Further, a methodology is given to delineate their existence domains in a systematic fashion by determining the specific limiting factors.

  2. Dr. Jan Rogers with Electrostatic Levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Jan Rogers, project scientist for the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center(MSFC). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an obejct (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials sciences program.

  3. Ultraviolet Lasers Realized via Electrostatic Doping Method

    PubMed Central

    Liu, X. Y.; Shan, C. X.; Zhu, H.; Li, B. H.; Jiang, M. M.; Yu, S. F.; Shen, D. Z.

    2015-01-01

    P-type doping of wide-bandgap semiconductors has long been a challenging issue for the relatively large activation energy and strong compensation of acceptor states in these materials, which hinders their applications in ultraviolet (UV) optoelectronic devices drastically. Here we show that by employing electrostatic doping method, hole-dominant region can be formed in wide bandgap semiconductors, and UV lasing has been achieved through the external injection of electrons into the hole-dominant region, confirming the applicability of the p-type wide bandgap semiconductors realized via the electrostatic doping method in optoelectronic devices. PMID:26324054

  4. A new constituent of electrostatic energy in semiconductors. An attempt to reformulate electrostatic energy in matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallese, Jean-Michel

    2016-06-01

    The concept of electric energy is revisited in detail for semiconductors. We come to the conclusion that the main relationship used to calculate the energy related to the penetration of the electric field in semiconductors is missing a fundamental term. For instance, spatial derivate of the electrostatic energy using the traditional formula fails at giving the correct electrostatic force between semiconductor based capacitor plates, and reveals unambiguously the existence of an extra contribution to the standard electrostatic free energy. The additional term is found to be related to the generation of space charge regions which are predicted when combining electrostatics with semiconductor physics laws, such as for accumulation and inversion layers. On the contrary, no such energy is needed when relying on electrostatics only, as for instance when adopting the so-called full depletion approximation. The same holds for neutral and charged insulators that are still consistent with the customary definition, but these two examples are in fact singular cases. In semiconductors for instance, this additional energy can largely exceed the energy gained by the dipoles, thus becoming the dominant term. This unexpected result clearly asks for a generalization of electrostatic energy in matter in order to reconcile basic concepts of electrostatic energy in the framework of classical physics.

  5. Acceptability of human risk.

    PubMed Central

    Kasperson, R E

    1983-01-01

    This paper has three objectives: to explore the nature of the problem implicit in the term "risk acceptability," to examine the possible contributions of scientific information to risk standard-setting, and to argue that societal response is best guided by considerations of process rather than formal methods of analysis. Most technological risks are not accepted but are imposed. There is also little reason to expect consensus among individuals on their tolerance of risk. Moreover, debates about risk levels are often at base debates over the adequacy of the institutions which manage the risks. Scientific information can contribute three broad types of analyses to risk-setting deliberations: contextual analysis, equity assessment, and public preference analysis. More effective risk-setting decisions will involve attention to the process used, particularly in regard to the requirements of procedural justice and democratic responsibility. PMID:6418541

  6. Electrostatic waves stimulated by coherent VLF signals propagating in and near the inner radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, T. F.; Ngo, H. D.

    1988-01-01

    The excitation of electrostatic waves by whistler-mode VLF signals propagating along magnetic-field lines in and near the earth's inner radiation belt is examined on the basis of ISEE-1 observations obtained during July-December 1983. The data are presented in extensive graphs and characterized in detail. The effect is seen in about 60 percent of the ISEE-1 orbits penetrating the belt and for signals originating in both hemispheres, with an electrostatic-wave effective bandwidth roughly proportional to the local magnetic-field strength. These results are interpreted in terms of a theoretical model in which scattering of the VLF waves off magnetic-field-aligned plasma density irregularities is followed by particle pitch-angle scattering and precipitation in the radiation belt; the latter effect could then produce new irregularities via a feedback mechanism.

  7. A rocket-borne electrostatic analyzer for measurement of energetic particle flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pozzi, M. A.; Smith, L. G.; Voss, H. D.

    1979-01-01

    A rocket-borne electrostatic analyzer experiment is described. It is used to measure energetic particle flux (0.9 to 14 keV) in the nighttime midlatitude E region. Energetic particle precipitation is believed to be a significant nighttime ionization source, particularly during times of high geomagnetic activity. The experiment was designed for use in the payload of a Nike Apache sounding rocket. The electrostatic analyzer employs two cylindrical parallel plates subtending a central angle of 90 deg. The voltage waveform supplied to the plates is a series of steps synchronized to the spin of the payload during flight. Both positive and negative voltages are provided, extending the detection capabilities of the instrument to both electrons and protons (and positive ions). The development, construction and operation of the instrument is described together with a preliminary evaluation of its performance in a rocket flight.

  8. On the structure of an electrostatic spray of monodisperse droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Keqi; Gomez, Alessandro

    1994-07-01

    An experimental study has been performed on the structure of an electrostatic spray of monodisperse droplets. Such a spray is established when a liquid with sufficient electric conductivity and moderate surface tension, in the present case heptane doped with an antistatic additive, is fed through a small metal tube maintained at several kilovolts relative to a ground electrode a few centimeters away. The liquid meniscus at the outlet of the capillary takes a conical shape under the action of the electric field, with a thin jet emerging from the cone tip. This jet breaks up into charged droplets that disperse into a fine spray. Flash shadowgraph of the breakup region showed that the jet initially breaks into droplets of bimodal size distribution by varicose wave instabilities. The spray monodispersity is established farther downstream by a segregation process of electrostatic and inertial nature that confines the bulk of the mass flow rate (97%) and 85% of the total current in a core of nearly monodisperse primary droplets, with the remainder in a shroud of satellites. Droplet size, axial velocity, and concentration were measured throughout the spray by phase Doppler anemometry (PDA). The complementary use of these measurements permitted the determination of the electric field via the spray momentum equation. It was found that droplets are ejected from the jet at a relatively high velocity in a region characterized by a very intense electric field. They maintain this velocity farther downstream because of inertia, even though the field is precipitously decreasing, and ultimately decelerate under the action of the drag force and a progressively weaker electrostatic force. Velocity and concentration fields were shown to be self-similar. Comparison between the external field, due to the potential difference applied between the electrodes, and the space charge field shows that the droplet axial motion is driven primarily by the external field, whereas the droplet radial

  9. Age and Acceptance of Euthanasia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Russell A.

    1980-01-01

    Study explores relationship between age (and sex and race) and acceptance of euthanasia. Women and non-Whites were less accepting because of religiosity. Among older people less acceptance was attributable to their lesser education and greater religiosity. Results suggest that quality of life in old age affects acceptability of euthanasia. (Author)

  10. Analysis of an Electrostatic Wobble Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonobe, Tadashi; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    Analysis of an electrostatic wobble motor is first strictly done by conformal mapping, especially by image method. Capacitances and torques calculated theoretically are in very good agreement with those calculated by FEM simulation, ANSYS, whose relative errors are within 1 %. Then, the effectiveness of detection of commutation timing is suggested by some numerical experiment based on this proposed analysis.

  11. Design of an asynchronous electrostatic motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayasi, Syoyu

    1990-02-01

    An asynchronous electrostatic motor that works under a high-voltage pulse controller using LED-phototransistor photosensors is described. The motor produced the torque 1030-dyn-cm at 1500 V and attained the power 0.8 mW at 80 rpm in n-hexane.

  12. Electrostatically biased binding of kinesin to microtubules.

    PubMed

    Grant, Barry J; Gheorghe, Dana M; Zheng, Wenjun; Alonso, Maria; Huber, Gary; Dlugosz, Maciej; McCammon, J Andrew; Cross, Robert A

    2011-11-01

    The minimum motor domain of kinesin-1 is a single head. Recent evidence suggests that such minimal motor domains generate force by a biased binding mechanism, in which they preferentially select binding sites on the microtubule that lie ahead in the progress direction of the motor. A specific molecular mechanism for biased binding has, however, so far been lacking. Here we use atomistic Brownian dynamics simulations combined with experimental mutagenesis to show that incoming kinesin heads undergo electrostatically guided diffusion-to-capture by microtubules, and that this produces directionally biased binding. Kinesin-1 heads are initially rotated by the electrostatic field so that their tubulin-binding sites face inwards, and then steered towards a plus-endwards binding site. In tethered kinesin dimers, this bias is amplified. A 3-residue sequence (RAK) in kinesin helix alpha-6 is predicted to be important for electrostatic guidance. Real-world mutagenesis of this sequence powerfully influences kinesin-driven microtubule sliding, with one mutant producing a 5-fold acceleration over wild type. We conclude that electrostatic interactions play an important role in the kinesin stepping mechanism, by biasing the diffusional association of kinesin with microtubules. PMID:22140358

  13. Efficient optimization of electrostatic interactions between biomolecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Bardhan, J. P.; Altman, M. D.; White, J. K.; Tidor, B.; Mathematics and Computer Science; MIT

    2007-01-01

    We present a PDE-constrained approach to optimizing the electrostatic interactions between two biomolecules. These interactions play important roles in the determination of binding affinity and specificity, and are therefore of significant interest when designing a ligand molecule to bind tightly to a receptor. Using a popular continuum model and physically reasonable assumptions, the electrostatic component of the binding free energy is a convex, quadratic function of the ligand charge distribution. Traditional optimization methods require exhaustive pre-computation, and the expense has precluded a full exploration of the promise of electrostatic optimization in biomolecule analysis and design. In this paper we describe an approach in which the electrostatic simulations and optimization problem are solved simultaneously; unlike many PDE- constrained optimization frameworks, the proposed method does not incorporate the PDE as a set of equality constraints. This co-optimization approach can be used by itself to solve unconstrained problems or those with linear equality constraints, or in conjunction with primal-dual interior point methods to solve problems with inequality constraints. Model problems demonstrate that the co-optimization method is computationally efficient and can be used to solve realistic problems.

  14. Electrostatic Enhancement of Coagulation in Protoplanetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J.; Cuzzi, J.

    2001-01-01

    Microgravity experiments suggest that electrostatic forces (overwhelmed by normal Earth gravity) could greatly enhance cohesive strength of preplanetary aggregates. Cohesive forces may be 103 times larger than those for van der Waals adhesion. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. Electrostatics of Pharmaceutical Aerosols for Pulmonary Delivery.

    PubMed

    Lip Kwok, Philip Chi

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a review on key research findings in the rapidly developing area of pharmaceutical aerosol electrostatics. Solids and liquids can become charged without electric fields, the former by contact or friction and the latter by flowing or spraying. Therefore, charged particles and droplets carrying net charges are produced from pharmaceutical inhalers (e.g. dry powder inhalers, metered dose inhalers, and nebulisers) due to the mechanical processes involved in aerosolisation. The charging depends on many physicochemical factors, such as formulation composition, solid state properties, inhaler material and design, and relative humidity. In silico, in vitro, and limited in vivo studies have shown that electrostatic charges may potentially influence particle deposition in the airways. However, the evidence is not yet conclusive. Furthermore, there are currently no regulatory requirements on the characterisation and control of the electrostatic properties of inhaled formulations. Besides the need for further investigations on the relationship between physicochemical factors and charging characteristics of the aerosols, controlled and detailed in vivo studies are also required to confirm whether charges can affect particle deposition in the airways. Since pharmaceutical aerosol electrostatics is a relatively new research area, much remains to be explored. Thus there is certainly potential for development. New findings in the future may contribute to the advancement of pharmaceutical aerosol formulations and respiratory drug delivery.

  16. Electrostatically Biased Binding of Kinesin to Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wenjun; Alonso, Maria; Huber, Gary; Dlugosz, Maciej; McCammon, J. Andrew; Cross, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    The minimum motor domain of kinesin-1 is a single head. Recent evidence suggests that such minimal motor domains generate force by a biased binding mechanism, in which they preferentially select binding sites on the microtubule that lie ahead in the progress direction of the motor. A specific molecular mechanism for biased binding has, however, so far been lacking. Here we use atomistic Brownian dynamics simulations combined with experimental mutagenesis to show that incoming kinesin heads undergo electrostatically guided diffusion-to-capture by microtubules, and that this produces directionally biased binding. Kinesin-1 heads are initially rotated by the electrostatic field so that their tubulin-binding sites face inwards, and then steered towards a plus-endwards binding site. In tethered kinesin dimers, this bias is amplified. A 3-residue sequence (RAK) in kinesin helix alpha-6 is predicted to be important for electrostatic guidance. Real-world mutagenesis of this sequence powerfully influences kinesin-driven microtubule sliding, with one mutant producing a 5-fold acceleration over wild type. We conclude that electrostatic interactions play an important role in the kinesin stepping mechanism, by biasing the diffusional association of kinesin with microtubules. PMID:22140358

  17. Electrostatics of Pharmaceutical Aerosols for Pulmonary Delivery.

    PubMed

    Lip Kwok, Philip Chi

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a review on key research findings in the rapidly developing area of pharmaceutical aerosol electrostatics. Solids and liquids can become charged without electric fields, the former by contact or friction and the latter by flowing or spraying. Therefore, charged particles and droplets carrying net charges are produced from pharmaceutical inhalers (e.g. dry powder inhalers, metered dose inhalers, and nebulisers) due to the mechanical processes involved in aerosolisation. The charging depends on many physicochemical factors, such as formulation composition, solid state properties, inhaler material and design, and relative humidity. In silico, in vitro, and limited in vivo studies have shown that electrostatic charges may potentially influence particle deposition in the airways. However, the evidence is not yet conclusive. Furthermore, there are currently no regulatory requirements on the characterisation and control of the electrostatic properties of inhaled formulations. Besides the need for further investigations on the relationship between physicochemical factors and charging characteristics of the aerosols, controlled and detailed in vivo studies are also required to confirm whether charges can affect particle deposition in the airways. Since pharmaceutical aerosol electrostatics is a relatively new research area, much remains to be explored. Thus there is certainly potential for development. New findings in the future may contribute to the advancement of pharmaceutical aerosol formulations and respiratory drug delivery. PMID:26290198

  18. Electrostatic MEMS devices with high reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Charles L; Auciello, Orlando H; Sumant, Anirudha V; Mancini, Derrick C; Gudeman, Chris; Sampath, Suresh; Carlilse, John A; Carpick, Robert W; Hwang, James

    2015-02-24

    The present invention provides for an electrostatic microelectromechanical (MEMS) device comprising a dielectric layer separating a first conductor and a second conductor. The first conductor is moveable towards the second conductor, when a voltage is applied to the MEMS device. The dielectric layer recovers from dielectric charging failure almost immediately upon removal of the voltage from the MEMS device.

  19. Collapsible antennae deployed by electrostatic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvamichava, A. S.; Kotik, A. N.; Koshelev, V. A.; Nefedov, S. S.; Patsaeva, V. A.; Rogachev, A. S.; Sokolov, A. G.

    1981-09-01

    Conventional space mirror antennas occupy a substantial volume when folded; the dimensions of antennas, automatically extendable at orbit, may be reduced to magnitudes of about 100-200 m. These large mirror antennas are designed by means of thin films or mesh structures forming a reflecting surface, which are deployed by electrostatic forces. The interaction of charges applied to reflecting and subsidiary surfaces creates the electrostatic forces sustaining the structural form of the antenna. By varying the distribution of charges at the subsidiary shell, it is possible to change the structural form. Electrostatic forces in the shell must exceed outer influences, and the antenna should have a paraboloidal or spherical form and be made of soft materials, which can be extended by the forces of electrostatic charge interaction. Mirrors of considerable dimensions may be formed by combining a shell with stiffness rings; these rings are important factors defining the efficiency of the antenna, since they contribute to both the mass and the dimension of the antenna when packed.

  20. Machined electrostatic sector for mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An electrostatic sector device for a mass spectrometer is formed from a single piece of machinable ceramic. The machined ceramic is coated with a nickel coating, and a notch is etched in the nickel coating to form two separated portions. The sector can be covered by a cover formed from a separate piece of machined ceramic.

  1. Electrostatic fuel conditioning of internal combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, P. I.

    1982-01-01

    Diesel engines were tested to determine if they are influenced by the presence of electrostatic and magnetic fields. Field forces were applied in a variety of configurations including pretreatment of the fuel and air, however, no affect on engine performance was observed.

  2. Electrostatic 'bounce' instability in a magnetotail configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Fruit, G.; Louarn, P.; Tur, A.

    2013-02-15

    To understand the possible destabilization of two-dimensional current sheets, a kinetic model is proposed to describe the resonant interaction between electrostatic modes and trapped particles that bounce within the sheet. This work follows the initial investigation by Tur et al.[Phys. Plasmas 17, 102905 (2010)] that is revised and extended. Using a quasi-parabolic equilibrium state, the linearized gyro-kinetic Vlasov equation is solved for electrostatic fluctuations with period of the order of the electron bounce period. Using an appropriated Fourier expansion of the particle motion along the magnetic field, the complete time integration of the non-local perturbed distribution functions is performed. The dispersion relation for electrostatic modes is then obtained through the quasineutrality condition. It is found that strongly unstable electrostatic modes may develop provided that the current sheet is moderately stretched and, more important, that the proportion of passing particle remains small (less than typically 10%). This strong but finely tuned instability may offer opportunities to explain features of magnetospheric substorms.

  3. as the Strengthening Precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qi; Xu, Wei; van der Zwaag, Sybrand

    2014-12-01

    Generally, Laves phase and M23C6 are regarded as undesirable phases in creep-resistant steels due to their very high-coarsening rates and the resulting depletion of beneficial alloying elements from the matrix. In this study, a computational alloy design approach is presented to develop martensitic steels strengthened by Laves phase and/or M23C6, for which the coarsening rates are tailored such that they are at least one order of magnitude lower than those in existing alloys. Their volume fractions are optimized by tuning the chemical composition in parallel. The composition domain covering 10 alloying elements at realistic levels is searched by a genetic algorithm to explore the full potential of simultaneous maximization of the volume fraction and minimization of the precipitates coarsening rate. The calculations show that Co and W can drastically reduce the coarsening rate of Laves and M23C6 and yield high-volume fractions of precipitates. Mo on the other hand was shown to have a minimal effect on coarsening. The strengthening effects of Laves phase and M23C6 in the newly designed alloys are compared to existing counterparts, showing substantially higher precipitation-strengthening contributions especially after a long service time. New alloys were designed in which both Laves phase and M23C6 precipitates act as strengthening precipitates. Successfully combining MX and M23C6 was found to be impossible.

  4. Toward high-torque electrostatic tubular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helin, Philippe; Bourbon, Gilles; Minotti, Patrice; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    1999-10-01

    A new generation of electrostatic micro-motors is investigated using cooperation of arrayed direct-drive actuators. Electrostatic scratch-drive actuators (SDA), which combine active frictional contact mechanisms with electrostatic actuation, are particularly analyzed. Active polysilicon sheets of 2*3 mm2 that integrate up to several thousands of electrostatic scratch drive actuators are fabricated by silicon surface micro-machining process. Each elementary actuator provides its contribution according to the driving force superposition principle, with internal forces as high as 105uN are available from this sheet. According to their natural flexibility, active polysilicon sheets can be coated onto large surfaces. A new generation of self-assembled tubular electrostatic micromotors is developed using this concept. A prototype of a cylindrical micromotor, whose external diameter and length are 1 mm and 2 mm, respectively, has been realized through the insertion of a flexible active polysilicon sheet at the rotor/motor- frame interface. After final assembling, the sheet has to be jammed onto the chassis, in order to allow the rotor to be moved with respect to the motor frame. Thus, the sheet must be in close contact with both the rotor and the motor frame, whatever the gap, which separates the two macroscopic parts. The problem related to the micro/macro world interfacing is solved during the design of sheet in allowing an out-of- plane motion of SDA in order to provide a self gap compensation, whatever both the thermal expansion effects and the macroscopic machining tolerances. The expected driving characteristics show the interest of both cooperative arrayed microactuators and direct drive frictional mechanisms.

  5. Electrostatic Interactions in Aminoglycoside-RNA Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kulik, Marta; Goral, Anna M.; Jasiński, Maciej; Dominiak, Paulina M.; Trylska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions often play key roles in the recognition of small molecules by nucleic acids. An example is aminoglycoside antibiotics, which by binding to ribosomal RNA (rRNA) affect bacterial protein synthesis. These antibiotics remain one of the few valid treatments against hospital-acquired infections by Gram-negative bacteria. It is necessary to understand the amplitude of electrostatic interactions between aminoglycosides and their rRNA targets to introduce aminoglycoside modifications that would enhance their binding or to design new scaffolds. Here, we calculated the electrostatic energy of interactions and its per-ring contributions between aminoglycosides and their primary rRNA binding site. We applied either the methodology based on the exact potential multipole moment (EPMM) or classical molecular mechanics force field single-point partial charges with Coulomb formula. For EPMM, we first reconstructed the aspherical electron density of 12 aminoglycoside-RNA complexes from the atomic parameters deposited in the University at Buffalo Databank. The University at Buffalo Databank concept assumes transferability of electron density between atoms in chemically equivalent vicinities and allows reconstruction of the electron densities from experimental structural data. From the electron density, we then calculated the electrostatic energy of interaction using EPMM. Finally, we compared the two approaches. The calculated electrostatic interaction energies between various aminoglycosides and their binding sites correlate with experimentally obtained binding free energies. Based on the calculated energetic contributions of water molecules mediating the interactions between the antibiotic and rRNA, we suggest possible modifications that could enhance aminoglycoside binding affinity. PMID:25650932

  6. Electrostatic interactions in aminoglycoside-RNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Kulik, Marta; Goral, Anna M; Jasiński, Maciej; Dominiak, Paulina M; Trylska, Joanna

    2015-02-01

    Electrostatic interactions often play key roles in the recognition of small molecules by nucleic acids. An example is aminoglycoside antibiotics, which by binding to ribosomal RNA (rRNA) affect bacterial protein synthesis. These antibiotics remain one of the few valid treatments against hospital-acquired infections by Gram-negative bacteria. It is necessary to understand the amplitude of electrostatic interactions between aminoglycosides and their rRNA targets to introduce aminoglycoside modifications that would enhance their binding or to design new scaffolds. Here, we calculated the electrostatic energy of interactions and its per-ring contributions between aminoglycosides and their primary rRNA binding site. We applied either the methodology based on the exact potential multipole moment (EPMM) or classical molecular mechanics force field single-point partial charges with Coulomb formula. For EPMM, we first reconstructed the aspherical electron density of 12 aminoglycoside-RNA complexes from the atomic parameters deposited in the University at Buffalo Databank. The University at Buffalo Databank concept assumes transferability of electron density between atoms in chemically equivalent vicinities and allows reconstruction of the electron densities from experimental structural data. From the electron density, we then calculated the electrostatic energy of interaction using EPMM. Finally, we compared the two approaches. The calculated electrostatic interaction energies between various aminoglycosides and their binding sites correlate with experimentally obtained binding free energies. Based on the calculated energetic contributions of water molecules mediating the interactions between the antibiotic and rRNA, we suggest possible modifications that could enhance aminoglycoside binding affinity. PMID:25650932

  7. Electrostatic interactions in aminoglycoside-RNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Kulik, Marta; Goral, Anna M; Jasiński, Maciej; Dominiak, Paulina M; Trylska, Joanna

    2015-02-01

    Electrostatic interactions often play key roles in the recognition of small molecules by nucleic acids. An example is aminoglycoside antibiotics, which by binding to ribosomal RNA (rRNA) affect bacterial protein synthesis. These antibiotics remain one of the few valid treatments against hospital-acquired infections by Gram-negative bacteria. It is necessary to understand the amplitude of electrostatic interactions between aminoglycosides and their rRNA targets to introduce aminoglycoside modifications that would enhance their binding or to design new scaffolds. Here, we calculated the electrostatic energy of interactions and its per-ring contributions between aminoglycosides and their primary rRNA binding site. We applied either the methodology based on the exact potential multipole moment (EPMM) or classical molecular mechanics force field single-point partial charges with Coulomb formula. For EPMM, we first reconstructed the aspherical electron density of 12 aminoglycoside-RNA complexes from the atomic parameters deposited in the University at Buffalo Databank. The University at Buffalo Databank concept assumes transferability of electron density between atoms in chemically equivalent vicinities and allows reconstruction of the electron densities from experimental structural data. From the electron density, we then calculated the electrostatic energy of interaction using EPMM. Finally, we compared the two approaches. The calculated electrostatic interaction energies between various aminoglycosides and their binding sites correlate with experimentally obtained binding free energies. Based on the calculated energetic contributions of water molecules mediating the interactions between the antibiotic and rRNA, we suggest possible modifications that could enhance aminoglycoside binding affinity.

  8. Air-fuel mixture ratio control using electrostatic force

    SciTech Connect

    Maruoka, H.

    1981-07-28

    Electrostatically charged liquid fuel is introduced into a venturi to be atomized therein and is then applied to the combustion chamber of an engine under the control of electrostatic force for properly controlling the air-fuel mixture ratio.

  9. Air-fuel mixture ratio control using electrostatic force

    SciTech Connect

    Maruoka, H.

    1980-01-15

    Electrostatically charged liquid fuel is introduced into a venturi to be atomized therein and is then applied to the combustion chambers of an engine under the control of electrostatic force for properly controlling the air-fuel mixture ratio.

  10. Precipitating factors of asthma.

    PubMed

    Lee, T H

    1992-01-01

    Asthma is characterised by bronchial hyperresponsiveness. This feature of the asthmatic diathesis predisposes patients to wheezing in response to a number of different factors. These precipitating factors include specific allergen acting via sensitised mediator cells through an IgE-dependent mechanism. There are irritants which may work through a non-specific manner, or stimuli such as exercise and hyperventilation, which probably also act through mediator release via a non-IgE-dependent manner. The mechanism whereby physical stimuli such as exercise induce bronchoconstriction is of interest, because it increases the context in which the mast cell may participate in acute asthmatic bronchoconstriction. Respiratory infections also commonly provoke asthma, especially in infants and may, indeed, precipitate the asthmatic state itself. Finally, drugs can often trigger asthma attacks and the mechanisms of asthma precipitated by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin have been the subject of recent research.

  11. URANIUM PRECIPITATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Thunaes, A.; Brown, E.A.; Smith, H.W.; Simard, R.

    1957-12-01

    A method for the recovery of uranium from sulfuric acid solutions is described. In the present process, sulfuric acid is added to the uranium bearing solution to bring the pH to between 1 and 1.8, preferably to about 1.4, and aluminum metal is then used as a reducing agent to convert hexavalent uranium to the tetravalent state. As the reaction proceeds, the pH rises amd a selective precipitation of uranium occurs resulting in a high grade precipitate. This process is an improvement over the process using metallic iron, in that metallic aluminum reacts less readily than metallic iron with sulfuric acid, thus avoiding consumption of the reducing agent and a raising of the pH without accomplishing the desired reduction of the hexavalent uranium in the solution. Another disadvantage to the use of iron is that positive ferric ions will precipitate with negative phosphate and arsenate ions at the pH range employed.

  12. FORMATION OF URANIUM PRECIPITATES

    DOEpatents

    Googin, J.M. Jr.

    1959-03-17

    A method is described for precipitation of uranium peroxide from uranium- containing solutions so as to obtain larger aggregates which facilitates washings decantations filtrations centrifugations and the like. The desired larger aggregate form is obtained by maintaining the pH of the solution in the approximate range of 1 to 3 and the temperature at about 25 deg C or below while carrytng out the precipitation. Then prior to removal of the precipitate a surface active sulfonated bicarboxyacids such as di-octyl sodium sulfo-succinates is incorporated in an anount of the order of 0.01 to 0.05 percent by weights and the slurry is allowed to ripen for about one-half hour at a temperatare below 10 deg C.

  13. Optimization design combined with coupled structural-electrostatic analysis for the electrostatically controlled deployable membrane reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Yang, Guigeng; Zhang, Yiqun

    2015-01-01

    The electrostatically controlled deployable membrane reflector (ECDMR) is a promising scheme to construct large size and high precision space deployable reflector antennas. This paper presents a novel design method for the large size and small F/D ECDMR considering the coupled structure-electrostatic problem. First, the fully coupled structural-electrostatic system is described by a three field formulation, in which the structure and passive electrical field is modeled by finite element method, and the deformation of the electrostatic domain is predicted by a finite element formulation of a fictitious elastic structure. A residual formulation of the structural-electrostatic field finite element model is established and solved by Newton-Raphson method. The coupled structural-electrostatic analysis procedure is summarized. Then, with the aid of this coupled analysis procedure, an integrated optimization method of membrane shape accuracy and stress uniformity is proposed, which is divided into inner and outer iterative loops. The initial state of relatively high shape accuracy and uniform stress distribution is achieved by applying the uniform prestress on the membrane design shape and optimizing the voltages, in which the optimal voltage is computed by a sensitivity analysis. The shape accuracy is further improved by the iterative prestress modification using the reposition balance method. Finally, the results of the uncoupled and coupled methods are compared and the proposed optimization method is applied to design an ECDMR. The results validate the effectiveness of this proposed methods.

  14. Precipitation-Regulated Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voit, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Star formation in the central galaxies of galaxy clusters appears to be fueled by precipitation of cold clouds out of hot circumgalactic gas via thermal instability. I will present both observational and theoretical support for the precipitation mode in large galaxies and discuss how it can be implemented in cosmological simulations of galaxy evolution. Galaxy cluster cores are unique laboratories for studying the astrophysics of thermal instability and may be teaching us valuable lessons about how feedback works in galaxies spanning the entire mass spectrum.

  15. Acid Precipitation; (USA)

    SciTech Connect

    Rushing, J.W.; Hicks, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    This publication, Acid Precipitation (APC) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information on acid precipitation and closely related subjects, including wet and dry deposition, long-range transport, environmental effects, modeling, and socioeconomic factors. Information on the following subjects is included within the scope of this publication, but all subjects may not appear in each issue: Pollution sources and pollution control technology; atmospheric transport and chemistry; terrestrial transport and chemistry; aquatic transport and chemistry; biological effects; corrosive effects; and socioeconomics, policy, and legislation.

  16. Final wash precipitate feed simulants for DWPF Cold Chemical Runs

    SciTech Connect

    Marek, J.C.

    1992-05-15

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is scheduled to start non-radioactive process operation in September, 1992. The Cold Chemical Runs will demonstrate acceptable process operation and provide data required to satisfy the Waste Compliance Plan. Five basic sludge simulants will be required for these tests. Two basic precipitate simulants will be needed to operate the Salt Processing Cell with and without mercury in the precipitate feed. Precipitate feed simulant specifications for DWPF Cold Chemical Runs are revised in this report. All previous specifications of precipitate feed simulants for DWPF Cold Chemical Runs (CCRs) are superceded by this document. The revision is needed to (1) eliminate use of hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) in the precipitate process operation, (2) simulate the projected composition of the precipitate feed to DWPF produced by final washing to reduce the nitrite concentration to {le} 0.01M without washing the simulated feed, (3) delete organic trim chemical additions to the precipitate feed and (4) specify an additive to prevent foaming of the precipitate. Two specifications are provided to operate the Salt Processing Cell with mercury (Tests 5&6) and without mercury (Tests 1--4) in the precipitate feed.

  17. Final wash precipitate feed simulants for DWPF Cold Chemical Runs

    SciTech Connect

    Marek, J.C.

    1992-05-15

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is scheduled to start non-radioactive process operation in September, 1992. The Cold Chemical Runs will demonstrate acceptable process operation and provide data required to satisfy the Waste Compliance Plan. Five basic sludge simulants will be required for these tests. Two basic precipitate simulants will be needed to operate the Salt Processing Cell with and without mercury in the precipitate feed. Precipitate feed simulant specifications for DWPF Cold Chemical Runs are revised in this report. All previous specifications of precipitate feed simulants for DWPF Cold Chemical Runs (CCRs) are superceded by this document. The revision is needed to (1) eliminate use of hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) in the precipitate process operation, (2) simulate the projected composition of the precipitate feed to DWPF produced by final washing to reduce the nitrite concentration to [le] 0.01M without washing the simulated feed, (3) delete organic trim chemical additions to the precipitate feed and (4) specify an additive to prevent foaming of the precipitate. Two specifications are provided to operate the Salt Processing Cell with mercury (Tests 5 6) and without mercury (Tests 1--4) in the precipitate feed.

  18. A robust and accurate formulation of molecular and colloidal electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiang; Klaseboer, Evert; Chan, Derek Y. C.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a re-formulation of the boundary integral method for the Debye-Hückel model of molecular and colloidal electrostatics that removes the mathematical singularities that have to date been accepted as an intrinsic part of the conventional boundary integral equation method. The essence of the present boundary regularized integral equation formulation consists of subtracting a known solution from the conventional boundary integral method in such a way as to cancel out the singularities associated with the Green's function. This approach better reflects the non-singular physical behavior of the systems on boundaries with the benefits of the following: (i) the surface integrals can be evaluated accurately using quadrature without any need to devise special numerical integration procedures, (ii) being able to use quadratic or spline function surface elements to represent the surface more accurately and the variation of the functions within each element is represented to a consistent level of precision by appropriate interpolation functions, (iii) being able to calculate electric fields, even at boundaries, accurately and directly from the potential without having to solve hypersingular integral equations and this imparts high precision in calculating the Maxwell stress tensor and consequently, intermolecular or colloidal forces, (iv) a reliable way to handle geometric configurations in which different parts of the boundary can be very close together without being affected by numerical instabilities, therefore potentials, fields, and forces between surfaces can be found accurately at surface separations down to near contact, and (v) having the simplicity of a formulation that does not require complex algorithms to handle singularities will result in significant savings in coding effort and in the reduction of opportunities for coding errors. These advantages are illustrated using examples drawn from molecular and colloidal electrostatics.

  19. A robust and accurate formulation of molecular and colloidal electrostatics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; Klaseboer, Evert; Chan, Derek Y C

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a re-formulation of the boundary integral method for the Debye-Hückel model of molecular and colloidal electrostatics that removes the mathematical singularities that have to date been accepted as an intrinsic part of the conventional boundary integral equation method. The essence of the present boundary regularized integral equation formulation consists of subtracting a known solution from the conventional boundary integral method in such a way as to cancel out the singularities associated with the Green's function. This approach better reflects the non-singular physical behavior of the systems on boundaries with the benefits of the following: (i) the surface integrals can be evaluated accurately using quadrature without any need to devise special numerical integration procedures, (ii) being able to use quadratic or spline function surface elements to represent the surface more accurately and the variation of the functions within each element is represented to a consistent level of precision by appropriate interpolation functions, (iii) being able to calculate electric fields, even at boundaries, accurately and directly from the potential without having to solve hypersingular integral equations and this imparts high precision in calculating the Maxwell stress tensor and consequently, intermolecular or colloidal forces, (iv) a reliable way to handle geometric configurations in which different parts of the boundary can be very close together without being affected by numerical instabilities, therefore potentials, fields, and forces between surfaces can be found accurately at surface separations down to near contact, and (v) having the simplicity of a formulation that does not require complex algorithms to handle singularities will result in significant savings in coding effort and in the reduction of opportunities for coding errors. These advantages are illustrated using examples drawn from molecular and colloidal electrostatics. PMID:27497538

  20. Ultrahigh impedance method to assess electrostatic accelerator performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, Nikolai R.; Linardakis, Peter; Tsifakis, Dimitrios

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes an investigation of problem-solving procedures to troubleshoot electrostatic accelerators. A novel technique to diagnose issues with high-voltage components is described. The main application of this technique is noninvasive testing of electrostatic accelerator high-voltage grading systems, measuring insulation resistance, or determining the volume and surface resistivity of insulation materials used in column posts and acceleration tubes. In addition, this technique allows verification of the continuity of the resistive divider assembly as a complete circuit, revealing if an electrical path exists between equipotential rings, resistors, tube electrodes, and column post-to-tube conductors. It is capable of identifying and locating a "microbreak" in a resistor and the experimental validation of the transfer function of the high impedance energy control element. A simple and practical fault-finding procedure has been developed based on fundamental principles. The experimental distributions of relative resistance deviations (Δ R /R ) for both accelerating tubes and posts were collected during five scheduled accelerator maintenance tank openings during 2013 and 2014. Components with measured Δ R /R >±2.5 % were considered faulty and put through a detailed examination, with faults categorized. In total, thirty four unique fault categories were identified and most would not be identifiable without the new technique described. The most common failure mode was permanent and irreversible insulator current leakage that developed after being exposed to the ambient environment. As a result of efficient in situ troubleshooting and fault-elimination techniques, the maximum values of |Δ R /R | are kept below 2.5% at the conclusion of maintenance procedures. The acceptance margin could be narrowed even further by a factor of 2.5 by increasing the test voltage from 40 V up to 100 V. Based on experience over the last two years, resistor and insulator

  1. Electrostatic Solitary Waves (ESWs) observed by Kaguya near the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, K.; Hashitani, M.; Omura, Y.; Kasahara, Y.; Kojima, H.; Ono, T.; Tsunakawa, H.

    2010-12-01

    In KAGUYA (SELENE) LRS[1], WFC-L [2] observes waveforms of plasma waves in 100Hz-100kHz and a lot of electrostatic solitary waves (ESWs) have been observed. Some results have been reported [3]. Although orthogonal dipole antennas are generally used in the observations, sometimes a pair of monopole antennas were used. We reports observations mainly by the latter antennas. The velocities and spatial scales of ESWs are evaluated from waveforms observed in the monopole mode. Generally their velocities are from several 100km/s to several 1000km/s. Their spatial scales are several 10m and the potential depths were less than 0.05 eV. Their velocities are very slow near the wake boundaries. The ESW waveforms have often components perpendicular to the background magnetic field and the potential structure has a component perpendicular to the background magnetic field. This means that these waves were observed close the source regions. Acknowledgments: The SELENE project has been organized by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The authors express their thanks to all members of the SELENE project team. References [1] Y. Kasahara, Y. Goto, K. Hashimoto, T. Imachi, A. Kumamoto, T. Ono, and H. Matsumoto, Plasma Wave Observation Using Waveform Capture in the Lunar Radar Sounder on board the SELENE Spacecraft, Earth, Planets and Space, 60, 341-351, 2008. [2] K. Hashimoto, M. Hashitani, Y. Kasahara, Y. Omura, M.N. Nishino, Y. Saito, S. Yokota, T. Ono, H. Tsunakawa, H. Shibuya, M. Matsushima, H. Shimizu, and F. Takahashi, Electrostatic solitary waves associated with magnetic anomalies and wake boundary of the Moon observed by KAGUYA, accepted for publication in Geophys. Res. Lett., 2010.

  2. 40 CFR 60.5175 - How do I establish operating limits if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How do I establish operating limits if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, activated carbon injection, or afterburner, or if I limit emissions in some other manner, to comply with the emission limits? 60.5175 Section 60.5175 Protection of...

  3. 40 CFR 60.4855 - How do I establish operating limits if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How do I establish operating limits if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, or activated carbon injection, or if I limit emissions in some other manner, to comply with the emission limits? 60.4855 Section 60.4855 Protection of Environment...

  4. Baby-Crying Acceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Tiago; de Magalhães, Sérgio Tenreiro

    The baby's crying is his most important mean of communication. The crying monitoring performed by devices that have been developed doesn't ensure the complete safety of the child. It is necessary to join, to these technological resources, means of communicating the results to the responsible, which would involve the digital processing of information available from crying. The survey carried out, enabled to understand the level of adoption, in the continental territory of Portugal, of a technology that will be able to do such a digital processing. It was used the TAM as the theoretical referential. The statistical analysis showed that there is a good probability of acceptance of such a system.

  5. High acceptance recoil polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    The HARP Collaboration

    1992-12-05

    In order to detect neutrons and protons in the 50 to 600 MeV energy range and measure their polarization, an efficient, low-noise, self-calibrating device is being designed. This detector, known as the High Acceptance Recoil Polarimeter (HARP), is based on the recoil principle of proton detection from np[r arrow]n[prime]p[prime] or pp[r arrow]p[prime]p[prime] scattering (detected particles are underlined) which intrinsically yields polarization information on the incoming particle. HARP will be commissioned to carry out experiments in 1994.

  6. PREFACE: 13th International Conference on Electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, D. Martin

    2011-06-01

    Electrostatics 2011 was held in the city of Bangor which is located in North West Wales in an area of outstanding natural beauty close to the Snowdonia mountain range and bordering the Irish Sea. The history of the area goes back into the mists of times, but a continuous technological thread can be traced from the stone- and bronze-age craftsmen, who inhabited the area several thousand years ago, via the civil engineering and fortifications of the Romans and Edward I of England, through Marconi's long-wave trans-Atlantic transmitter near Caernarfon to the conference host. The School of Electronic Engineering at Bangor University has contributed much to the discipline of Electrostatics not only in teaching and research but also in supporting industry. It was a great pleasure for me, therefore, to have the pleasure of welcoming the world's experts in Electrostatics to Bangor in April 2011. In my preface to the Proceedings of Electrostatics 1999, I reported that almost 90 papers were presented. Interestingly, a similar number were presented in 2011 testifying to the importance and endurance of the subject. The all-embracing nature of electrostatics is captured in the pictorial depiction used for the conference logo: a hand-held plasma ball with its close link to gaseous discharges and the superimposed Antarctic aurora highlighting the featured conference themes of atmospheric, planetary and environmental electrostatics. Leading these themes were three invited contributions, the first by Giles Harrison who delivered the Bill Bright Memorial Lecture 'Fair weather atmospheric electricity', Carlos Calle on 'The electrostatic environments of Mars and the Moon' and Istvan Berta on 'Lightning protection - challenges, solutions and questionable steps in the 21st century'. Leading other key sessions were invited papers by Atsushi Ohsawa on 'Statistical analysis of fires and explosions attributed to static electricity over the last 50 years in Japanese industry' and Antonio

  7. Electrostatic Tractor Analysis for GEO Debris Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Erik A.

    The high value of operating in the geostationary ring, coupled with increasing numbers of orbital debris, highlights the need for GEO debris remediation techniques. One recent proposed technique for GEO debris mitigation is the electrostatic tractor. Here, a tug vehicle approaches a target debris object and emits a focused electron beam onto it. This results in a negative charge on the debris, and a positive charge on the tug vehicle. Due to the near proximity of the highly charged objects (20 meters or less) an attractive electrostatic force on the order of milliNewtons results. This electrostatic force is used in conjunction with low thrusting by the tug vehicle to tow the debris object into a disposal orbit 200-300 kilometers above the GEO belt. During the tugging period, the charged relative motion between tug and deputy is stabilized through a feedback control law. This is accomplished using a novel relative motion description that isolates separation distance from the relative orientation. The equations of motion for the relative motion description are derived from the Clohessy-Wiltshire equations, assuming the debris object is in a nearly circular orbit. Lyapunov stability theory is used to derive an asymptotically stable control law for the tug thrusters during the towing period. The control law requires an estimate of the electrostatic force magnitude, and the impacts of improperly modeled charging on control response are determined. If the electrostatic force is under-predicted too severely, a collision may result. A bound on the control gains is determined to prevent such a collision. Expected reorbiting performance levels achievable with the electrostatic tractor are computed. An open-loop analytical performance study is performed where variational equations are used to predict how much general orbital elements may be changed using the electrostatic tractor over one orbital period for a towed object at geosynchronous altitude. In contrast to earlier

  8. EFFECTS OF TURBULENCE AND ELECTROHYDRODYAMICS ON THE PERFORMANCE OF ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerical simulations of the turbulent diffusion equation coupled with the electrohydrodynamics (EHD) are carried out for the plate-plate and wire-plate ESPs. The local particle concentration profiles and fractional collection efficiencies have been evaluated as a function of thr...

  9. ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATION AN AN ALTERNATIVE METHOD FOR /IN VITRO/ EXPOSURES TO MIXTURES OF GASES AND PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is an increasing interest in examining complex urban air pollution mixtures that include both particulate and gaseous components. Conventional methodologies are unable to expose lung cells in vitro simultaneously to both particulate and gaseous pollutants that are being for...

  10. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Quarterly technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M.D.

    1992-04-27

    The purpose of this research program is to identify and evaluate a variety of additives capable of increasing particle cohesion which could be used for improving collection efficiency in an ESP. A three-phase screening process will be used to provide the, evaluation of many additives in a logical and cost-effective manner. The three step approach involves the following experimental setups: 1. Provide a preliminary screening in the laboratory by measuring the effects of various conditioning agents on reentrainment of flyash particles in an electric field operating at simulated flue gas conditions. 2. Evaluate the successful additives using a 100 acfm bench-scale ESP operating on actual flue gas. 3. Obtain the data required for scaling up the technology by testing the two or three most promising conditioning agents at the pilot scale.

  11. Carbonation of municipal solid waste incineration electrostatic precipitator fly ashes in solution.

    PubMed

    De Boom, Aurore; Aubert, Jean-Emmanuel; Degrez, Marc

    2014-05-01

    Carbonation was applied to a Pb- and Zn-contaminated fraction of municipal solid waste incineration electrofilter fly ashes in order to reduce heavy metal leaching. Carbonation tests were performed in solution, by Na2CO3 addition or CO2 bubbling, and were compared with washing (with water only). The injection of CO2 during the washing did not modify the mineralogy, but the addition of Na2CO3 induced the reaction with anhydrite, forming calcite. Microprobe analyses showed that Pb and Zn contamination was rather diffuse and that the various treatments had no effect on Pb and Zn speciation in the residues. The leaching tests indicated that carbonation using Na2CO3 was successful because it gave a residue that could be considered as non-hazardous material. With CO2 bubbling, Pb and Zn leaching was strongly decreased compared with material washed with water alone, but the amount of chromium extracted became higher than the non-hazardous waste limits for landfilling.

  12. PROCEEDINGS: EIGHTH SYMPOSIUM ON THE TRANSFER AND UTILIZATION OF PARTICULATE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY - VOLUME 1. ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two-volume proceedings describe the latest research and development efforts to improve particulate control devices, while treating traditional concerns of operational cost and compliance. Overall, particulate control remains a key issue in the cost and applicability of furnac...

  13. The Global Precipitation Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Scott; Kummerow, Christian

    2000-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Mission (GPM), expected to begin around 2006, is a follow-up to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Unlike TRMM, which primarily samples the tropics, GPM will sample both the tropics and mid-latitudes. The primary, or core, satellite will be a single, enhanced TRMM satellite that can quantify the 3-D spatial distributions of precipitation and its associated latent heat release. The core satellite will be complemented by a constellation of very small and inexpensive drones with passive microwave instruments that will sample the rainfall with sufficient frequency to be not only of climate interest, but also have local, short-term impacts by providing global rainfall coverage at approx. 3 h intervals. The data is expected to have substantial impact upon quantitative precipitation estimation/forecasting and data assimilation into global and mesoscale numerical models. Based upon previous studies of rainfall data assimilation, GPM is expected to lead to significant improvements in forecasts of extratropical and tropical cyclones. For example, GPM rainfall data can provide improved initialization of frontal systems over the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. The purpose of this talk is to provide information about GPM to the USWRP (U.S. Weather Research Program) community and to discuss impacts on quantitative precipitation estimation/forecasting and data assimilation.

  14. Global precipitation measurement (GPM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeck, Steven P.; Flaming, Gilbert M.; Adams, W. James; Smith, Eric A.

    2001-12-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is studying options for future space-based missions for the EOS Follow-on Era (post 2003), building upon the measurements made by Pre-EOS and EOS First Series Missions. One mission under consideration is the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM), a cooperative venture of NASA, Japan, and other international partners. GPM will capitalize on the experience of the highly successful Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM). Its goal is to extend the measurement of rainfall to high latitudes with high temporal frequency, providing a global data set every three hours. A reference concept has been developed consisting of an improved TRMM-like primary satellite with precipitation radar and microwave radiometer to make detailed and accurate estimates of the precipitation structure and a constellation of small satellites flying compact microwave radiometers to provide the required temporal sampling of highly variable precipitation systems. Considering that DMSP spacecraft equipped with SSMIS microwave radiometers, successor NPOESS spacecraft equipped with CMIS microwave radiometers, and other relevant international systems are expected to be in operation during the timeframe of the reference concept, the total number of small satellites required to complete the constellation will be reduced. A nominal plan is to begin implementation in FY'03 with launches in 2007. NASA is presently engaged in advanced mission studies and advanced instrument technology development related to the mission.

  15. Total Precipitable Water

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    The simulation was performed on 64K cores of Intrepid, running at 0.25 simulated-years-per-day and taking 25 million core-hours. This is the first simulation using both the CAM5 physics and the highly scalable spectral element dynamical core. The animation of Total Precipitable Water clearly shows hurricanes developing in the Atlantic and Pacific.

  16. Ultrafast collisional ion heating by electrostatic shocks.

    PubMed

    Turrell, A E; Sherlock, M; Rose, S J

    2015-01-01

    High-intensity lasers can be used to generate shockwaves, which have found applications in nuclear fusion, proton imaging, cancer therapies and materials science. Collisionless electrostatic shocks are one type of shockwave widely studied for applications involving ion acceleration. Here we show a novel mechanism for collisionless electrostatic shocks to heat small amounts of solid density matter to temperatures of ∼keV in tens of femtoseconds. Unusually, electrons play no direct role in the heating and it is the ions that determine the heating rate. Ions are heated due to an interplay between the electric field of the shock, the local density increase during the passage of the shock and collisions between different species of ion. In simulations, these factors combine to produce rapid, localized heating of the lighter ion species. Although the heated volume is modest, this would be one of the fastest heating mechanisms discovered if demonstrated in the laboratory.

  17. Ultrafast collisional ion heating by electrostatic shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrell, A. E.; Sherlock, M.; Rose, S. J.

    2015-11-01

    High-intensity lasers can be used to generate shockwaves, which have found applications in nuclear fusion, proton imaging, cancer therapies and materials science. Collisionless electrostatic shocks are one type of shockwave widely studied for applications involving ion acceleration. Here we show a novel mechanism for collisionless electrostatic shocks to heat small amounts of solid density matter to temperatures of ~keV in tens of femtoseconds. Unusually, electrons play no direct role in the heating and it is the ions that determine the heating rate. Ions are heated due to an interplay between the electric field of the shock, the local density increase during the passage of the shock and collisions between different species of ion. In simulations, these factors combine to produce rapid, localized heating of the lighter ion species. Although the heated volume is modest, this would be one of the fastest heating mechanisms discovered if demonstrated in the laboratory.

  18. Teaching Electrostatics and Entropy in Introductory Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Mark

    Entropy changes underlie the physics that dominates biological interactions. Indeed, introductory biology courses often begin with an exploration of the qualities of water that are important to living systems. However, one idea that is not explicitly addressed in most introductory physics or biology courses is important contribution of the entropy in driving fundamental biological processes towards equilibrium. I will present material developed to teach electrostatic screening in solutions and the function of nerve cells where entropic effects act to counterbalance electrostatic attraction. These ideas are taught in an introductory, calculus-based physics course to biomedical engineers using SCALEUP pedagogy. Results of student mastering of complex problems that cross disciplinary boundaries between biology and physics, as well as the challenges that they face in learning this material will be presented.

  19. Ultrafast collisional ion heating by electrostatic shocks

    PubMed Central

    Turrell, A. E.; Sherlock, M.; Rose, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    High-intensity lasers can be used to generate shockwaves, which have found applications in nuclear fusion, proton imaging, cancer therapies and materials science. Collisionless electrostatic shocks are one type of shockwave widely studied for applications involving ion acceleration. Here we show a novel mechanism for collisionless electrostatic shocks to heat small amounts of solid density matter to temperatures of ∼keV in tens of femtoseconds. Unusually, electrons play no direct role in the heating and it is the ions that determine the heating rate. Ions are heated due to an interplay between the electric field of the shock, the local density increase during the passage of the shock and collisions between different species of ion. In simulations, these factors combine to produce rapid, localized heating of the lighter ion species. Although the heated volume is modest, this would be one of the fastest heating mechanisms discovered if demonstrated in the laboratory. PMID:26563440

  20. Electrostatic Dust Detector with Improved Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    D.P. Boyle, C.H. Skinner, and A. L. Roquemore

    2008-06-09

    Methods to measure the inventory of dust particles and to remove dust if it approaches safety limits will be required in next-step tokamaks such as ITER. An electrostatic dust detector, based on a fine grid of interlocking circuit traces, biased to 30 or 50 V, has been developed for the detection of dust on remote surfaces in air and vacuum environments. Gaining operational experience of dust detection on surfaces in tokamaks is important, however the level of dust generated in contemporary short-pulse tokamaks is comparatively low and high sensitivity is necessary to measure dust on a shot-by-shot basis. We report on modifications in the detection electronics that have increased the sensitivity of the electrostatic dust detector by a factor of up to 120, - a level suitable for measurements on contemporary tokamaks.

  1. Isolation of crystallizing droplets by electrostatic levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Chung, Sang K.

    1990-01-01

    The principles of electrostatic levitation where the positioning and stabilization of a sample are accomplished by applying appropriate electrostatic forces to a charged sample are outlined, and attention is focused on a feedback control algorithm, drop-launching method, and four-drop levitator. Drop levitation in 1-g is discussed, and crystal-growth experiments are presented. An experiment in which the protein concentration of a levitated drop is controlled by a feedback system is described. During levitation, the drop evaporation rate is controlled in a programmed way in order to acquire proper protein concentration levels for both nucleation and growth. The containerless approach of protein crystal growth when applied in the space environment is assessed.

  2. Electrostatic waves in the Jovian magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Barbosa, D. D.; Scarf, F. L.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    Observations by the plasma wave receivers on Voyagers 1 and 2 show that a wide variety of electrostatic waves are present within the Jovian magnetosphere and that the Jovian electrostatic waves are for the most part very similar to those observed in the terrestrial magnetosphere. Bands of emission near the upper hybrid resonance frequency in the dayside outer magnetosphere are detected between higher harmonics of the electron gyrofrequency. Inside of about 23 Jupiter radii, electron cyclotron harmonic emissions appear to be durable features of the inner Jovian magnetosphere and are extremely well confined to the Jovian magnetic equator. The cyclotron emissions extend from just above the local electron gyrofrequency to the upper hybrid resonance frequency.

  3. Test progress on the electrostatic membrane reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihora, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    An extemely lightweight type of precision reflector antenna, being developed for potential deployment from the space shuttle, uses electrostatic forces to tension a thin membrane and form it into a concave reflector surface. The typical shuttle-deployed antenna would have a diameter of 100 meters and an RMS surface smoothness of 10 to 1 mm for operation at 1 to 10 GHz. NASA Langley Research Center built and is currently testing a subscale (16 foot diameter) model of the membrane reflector portion of such an antenna. Preliminary test results and principal factors affecting surface quality are addressed. Factors included are the effect of the perimeter boundary, splicing of the membrane, the long-scale smoothness of commercial membranes, and the spatial controllability of the membrane using voltage adjustments to alter the electrostatic pressure. Only readily available commercial membranes are considered.

  4. Electrostatic trapping of metastable NH molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, Steven; Metsaelae, Markus; Zieger, Peter C.; Scharfenberg, Ludwig; Gilijamse, Joop J.; Meijer, Gerard; Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T. van de

    2007-12-15

    We report on the Stark deceleration and electrostatic trapping of {sup 14}NH (a{sup 1}{delta}) radicals. In the trap, the molecules are excited on the spin-forbidden A{sup 3}{pi}<-a{sup 1}{delta} transition and detected via their subsequent fluorescence to the X{sup 3}{sigma}{sup -} ground state. The 1/e trapping time is 1.4{+-}0.1 s, from which a lower limit of 2.7 s for the radiative lifetime of the a{sup 1}{delta}, v=0, J=2 state is deduced. The spectral profile of the molecules in the trapping field is measured to probe their spatial distribution. Electrostatic trapping of metastable NH followed by optical pumping of the trapped molecules to the electronic ground state is an important step toward accumulation of these radicals in a magnetic trap.

  5. Electrostatic Characterization of Lunar Dust Simulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, C. I.; Buhler, C. R.; Ritz, M. L.

    2008-01-01

    Lunar dust can jeopardize exploration activities due to its ability to cling to most surfaces. In this paper, we report on our measurements of the electrostatic properties of the lunar soil simulants. Methods have been developed to measure the volume resistivity, dielectric constant, chargeability, and charge decay of lunar soil. While the first two parameters have been measured in the past [Olhoeft 1974], the last two have never been measured directly on the lunar regolith or on any of the Apollo samples. Measurements of the electrical properties of the lunar samples are being performed in an attempt to answer important problems that must be solved for the development of an effective dust mitigation technology, namely, how much charge can accumulate on the dust and how long does the charge remain on surfaces. The measurements will help develop coatings that are compatible with the intrinsic electrostatic properties of the lunar regolith.

  6. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatically actuated microshutter arrays consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutters demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  7. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Jones, Justin S.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Zheng, Yun; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatically actuated microshutter array consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutter arrays demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  8. Electrostatic demonstration of free-fall weightlessness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balukovic, Jasmina; Slisko, Josip; Corona Cruz, Adrian

    2015-05-01

    The phenomena of free-fall weightlessness have been demonstrated to students for many years in a number of different ways. The essential basis of all these demonstrations is the fact that in free-falling, gravitationally accelerated systems, the weight force and weight-related forces (for example, friction and hydrostatic forces) disappear. In this article, an original electrostatic demonstration of weightlessness is presented. A charged balloon fixed at the opening of a plastic container cannot lift a light styrofoam sphere sitting on the bottom when the container is at rest. However, while the system is in free-fall, the sphere becomes weightless and the charged balloon is able to lift it electrostatically.

  9. Electrostatic-spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Liang; Sartor, Romain; Gasilova, Natalia; Lu, Yu; Tobolkina, Elena; Liu, Baohong; Girault, Hubert H

    2012-09-01

    An electrostatic-spray ionization (ESTASI) method has been used for mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of samples deposited in or on an insulating substrate. The ionization is induced by a capacitive coupling between an electrode and the sample. In practice, a metallic electrode is placed close to but not in direct contact with the sample. Upon application of a high voltage pulse to the electrode, an electrostatic charging of the sample occurs leading to a bipolar spray pulse. When the voltage is positive, the bipolar spray pulse consists first of cations and then of anions. This method has been applied to a wide range of geometries to emit ions from samples in a silica capillary, in a disposable pipet tip, in a polymer microchannel, or from samples deposited as droplets on a polymer plate. Fractions from capillary electrophoresis were collected on a polymer plate for ESTASI MS analysis. PMID:22876737

  10. Electrostatic waves in the magnetosphere of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S; Gurnett, D. A.; Barbosa, D. D.; Scarf, F. L.

    1987-01-01

    Observations of electrostatic waves in the magnetosphere of Uranus are discussed with attention focused on the Bernstein emissions. The most intense Bernstein waves were observed near the magnetic equator of the planet, even though the tilt of the Uranian magnetic moment is very large relative to the rotational axis. In addition to the Bernstein modes, a number of highly sporadic emissions were detected in the vicinity of the Miranda L shell.

  11. Intermolecular electrostatic energies using density fitting.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, G Andrés; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Darden, Thomas A

    2005-07-22

    A method is presented to calculate the electron-electron and nuclear-electron intermolecular Coulomb interaction energy between two molecules by separately fitting the unperturbed molecular electron density of each monomer. This method is based on the variational Coulomb fitting method which relies on the expansion of the ab initio molecular electron density in site-centered auxiliary basis sets. By expanding the electron density of each monomer in this way the integral expressions for the intermolecular electrostatic calculations are simplified, lowering the operation count as well as the memory usage. Furthermore, this method allows the calculation of intermolecular Coulomb interactions with any level of theory from which a one-electron density matrix can be obtained. Our implementation is initially tested by calculating molecular properties with the density fitting method using three different auxiliary basis sets and comparing them to results obtained from ab initio calculations. These properties include dipoles for a series of molecules, as well as the molecular electrostatic potential and electric field for water. Subsequently, the intermolecular electrostatic energy is tested by calculating ten stationary points on the water dimer potential-energy surface. Results are presented for electron densities obtained at four different levels of theory using two different basis sets, fitted with three auxiliary basis sets. Additionally, a one-dimensional electrostatic energy surface scan is performed for four different systems (H2O dimer, Mg2+-H2O, Cu+-H2O, and n-methyl-formamide dimer). Our results show a very good agreement with ab initio calculations for all properties as well as interaction energies.

  12. Electrostatic drift modes in quantum pair plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Haijun; Cao Jintao; Wu Zhengwei

    2008-10-15

    Electrostatic drift waves in a nonuniform quantum magnetized electron-positron (pair) plasma are investigated. An explicit and straightforward analytical expression of the fluctuation frequency is presented. The effects induced by quantum fluctuations, density gradients, and magnetic field inhomogeneity on the wave frequencies are discussed and a purely quantum drift mode appears. The present analytical investigations are relevant to dense astrophysical objects as well as laboratory ultracold plasmas.

  13. Controlling Charged Particles with Inhomogeneous Electrostatic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrero, Federico A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An energy analyzer for a charged-particle spectrometer may include a top deflection plate and a bottom deflection plate. The top and bottom deflection plates may be non-symmetric and configured to generate an inhomogeneous electrostatic field when a voltage is applied to one of the top or bottom deflection plates. In some instances, the top and bottom deflection plates may be L-shaped deflection plates.

  14. Electrostatic quadrupole DC accelerators for BNCT applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, J.W.; Anderson, O.A.; Reginato, L.L.; Vella, M.C.; Yu, S.S.

    1994-04-01

    A dc electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) accelerator is capable of producing a 2.5 MeV, 100 mA proton beam for the purpose of generating neutrons for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. The ESQ accelerator is better than the conventional aperture column in high beam current application due to the presence of stronger transverse field for beam focusing and for suppressing secondary electrons. The major challenge in this type of accelerator is in developing the proper power supply system.

  15. Airborne virus capture and inactivation by an electrostatic particle collector.

    PubMed

    Kettleson, Eric M; Ramaswami, Bala; Hogan, Christopher J; Lee, Myong-Hwa; Statyukha, Gennadiy A; Biswas, Pratim; Angenent, Largus T

    2009-08-01

    Airborne virus capture and inactivation were studied in an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) at applied voltages from -10 to +10 kV using aerosolized bacteriophages T3 and MS2. For each charging scenario, samples were collected from the effluent air stream and assayed for viable phages using plaque assays and for nucleic acids using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays. At higher applied voltages, more virus particles were captured from air with maximum log reductions of 6.8 and 6.3 for the plaque assay and 4.2 and 3.5 for the qPCR assay at -10 kV for T3 and MS2, respectively. Beyond corona inception (i.e., at applied voltages of -10, -8, +8, and +10 kV), log reduction values obtained with the plaque assay were much higher compared to those of the qPCR assay because nonviable particles, while present in the effluent were unaccounted for in the plaque assay. Comparisons of these assays showed that in-flight inactivation (i.e., inactivation without capture) was greater for the highest applied voltages with a log inactivation of 2.6 for both phages at -10 kV. We have demonstrated great potential for virus capture and inactivation via continual ion and reactive species bombardment when conditions in the ESP are enforced to generate a corona discharge.

  16. Precipitation Indices Low Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Engelen, A. F. V.; Ynsen, F.; Buisman, J.; van der Schrier, G.

    2009-09-01

    Since 1995, KNMI published a series of books(1), presenting an annual reconstruction of weather and climate in the Low Countries, covering the period AD 763-present, or roughly, the last millennium. The reconstructions are based on the interpretation of documentary sources predominantly and comparison with other proxies and instrumental observations. The series also comprises a number of classifications. Amongst them annual classifications for winter and summer temperature and for winter and summer dryness-wetness. The classification of temperature have been reworked into peer reviewed (2) series (AD 1000-present) of seasonal temperatures and temperature indices, the so called LCT (Low Countries Temperature) series, now incorporated in the Millennium databases. Recently we started a study to convert the dryness-wetness classifications into a series of precipitation; the so called LCP (Low Countries Precipitation) series. A brief outline is given here of the applied methodology and preliminary results. The WMO definition for meteorological drought has been followed being that a period is called wet respectively dry when the amount of precipitation is considerable more respectively less than usual (normal). To gain a more quantitative insight for four locations, geographically spread over the Low Countries area (De Bilt, Vlissingen, Maastricht and Uccle), we analysed the statistics of daily precipitation series, covering the period 1900-present. This brought us to the following definition, valid for the Low Countries: A period is considered as (very) dry respectively (very) wet if over a continuous period of at least 60 days (~two months) cq 90 days (~three months) on at least two out of the four locations 50% less resp. 50% more than the normal amount for the location (based on the 1961-1990 normal period) has been measured. This results into the following classification into five drought classes hat could be applied to non instrumental observations: Very wet period

  17. Electrostatic separation of brass from industrial wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Iuga, A.; Morar, R.; Samuila, A.; Mihailescu, M.; Cuglesan, I.; Dascalescu, L.

    1999-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that electrostatic separation can be successfully employed for the recycling of nonferrous metals from chopped electric wire and cable scrap. The aim of this paper was to investigate the possibility of using the electric field forces for the selective sorting of other granular mixtures, such as brass dross. Laboratory tests of electrostatic separation were carried out on three samples: 0.08--1 mm, 0.08--0.2 mm, and 0.2--1 mm, containing more than 66% of brass. Sample 1 was separated in a corona-electrostatic field, generated by a standard electrode arrangement: a grounded rotating roll electrode (diameter 150 mm) and two high-voltage electrodes (wire-type dual corona electrode + tubular electrode). Processing of the other two samples was carried out in a custom-designed separator comprising an extended corona field generated between a matrix-type multineedle corona electrode and a roll electrode of large diameter (250 mm). Chemical analysis of the products showed that more than 90% of the brass can be recovered with a purity higher than 95%. The extended corona field electrode arrangement proposed in this paper seems to be a promising solution for the effective recycling of other granular wastes containing copper, aluminum, and their alloys.

  18. Cloverleaf microgyroscope with electrostatic alignment and tuning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor); Tang, Tony K. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A micro-gyroscope (10) having closed loop output operation by a control voltage (V.sub.ty), that is demodulated by a drive axis (x-axis) signal V.sub.thx of the sense electrodes (S1, S2), providing Coriolis torque rebalance to prevent displacement of the micro-gyroscope (10) on the output axis (y-axis) V.sub.thy.about.0. Closed loop drive axis torque, V.sub.tx maintains a constant drive axis amplitude signal, V.sub.thx. The present invention provides independent alignment and tuning of the micro-gyroscope by using separate electrodes and electrostatic bias voltages to adjust alignment and tuning. A quadrature amplitude signal, or cross-axis transfer function peak amplitude is used to detect misalignment that is corrected to zero by an electrostatic bias voltage adjustment. The cross-axis transfer function is either V.sub.thy/V.sub.ty or V.sub.tnx/V.sub.tx. A quadrature signal noise level, or difference in natural frequencies estimated from measurements of the transfer functions is used to detect residual mistuning, that is corrected to zero by a second electrostatic bias voltage adjustment.

  19. Fabrication of a New Electrostatic Linear Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Takashi; Kondoh, Kazuya; Kumagae, Michihiro; Kawata, Hiroaki; Yasuda, Masaaki; Murata, Kenji; Yoshitake, Masaaki

    2000-12-01

    We propose a new electrostatic linear actuator with a large stroke and a new process for fabricating the actuator. A moving slider with many teeth on both sides is suspended above lower electrodes on a substrate by two bearings. A photoresist is used as a sacrificial layer. Both the slider and the bearings are fabricated by Ni electroplating. The bearings are fabricated by the self-alignment technique. Bearings with 0.6 μm clearance can be easily fabricated. All processes are performed at low temperatures up to 110°C. It is confirmed that the slider can be moved mechanically, and also can be moved by about 10 μm when a voltage pulse of 50 V is applied between the slider and the lower electrodes when the slider is upside down. However, the slider cannot move continuously because of friction. We also calculate the electrostatic force acting on one slider tooth. The simulation result shows that the reduction of the electrostatic force to the vertical direction is very important for mechanical movement of the actuator.

  20. Electrostatic Potential of Specific Mineral Faces

    SciTech Connect

    Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Chatman, Shawn ME; Preocanin, Tajana; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2011-07-05

    Reaction rates of environmental processes occurring at hydrated mineral surfaces are primarily controlled by the electrostatic potential that develops at the interface. This potential depends on the structure of exposed crystal faces, as well as the pH and the type of ions and their interactions with these faces. Despite its importance, experimental methods for determining fundamental electrostatic properties of specific crystal faces such as the point of zero charge are few. Here we show that this information may be obtained from simple, cyclic potentiometric titration using a well characterized single-crystal electrode exposing the face of interest. The method exploits the presence of a hysteresis loop in the titration measurements that allows extraction of key electrostatic descriptors using the Maxwell construction. The approach is demonstrated for hematite (α-Fe2O3) (001), and a thermodynamic proof is provided for the resulting estimate of its point of zero charge. Insight gained from this method will aid in predicting the fate of migrating contaminants, mineral growth/dissolution processes, mineral-microbiological interactions, and in testing surface complexation theories.

  1. Electrostatic Surface Modifications to Improve Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Shmueli, Ron B.; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Gene therapy has the potential to treat a wide variety of diseases including genetic diseases and cancer. Areas covered in this review This review introduces biomaterials used for gene delivery and then focuses on the use of electrostatic surface modifications to improve gene delivery materials. These modifications have been used to stabilize therapeutics in vivo, add cell-specific targeting ligands, and promote controlled release. Coatings of nanoparticles and microparticles as well as non-particulate surface coatings are covered in this review. Electrostatic principles are crucial for the development of multilayer delivery structures fabricated by the layer-by-layer method. What the reader will gain The reader will gain knowledge about the composition of biomaterials used for surface modifications and how these coatings and multilayers can be utilized to improve spatial control and efficiency of delivery. Examples are shown for the delivery of nucleic acids, including DNA and siRNA, to in vitro and in vivo systems. Take home message The versatile and powerful approach of electrostatic coatings and multilayers will lead to the development of enhanced gene therapies. PMID:20201712

  2. Biomolecular electrostatics and solvation: a computational perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Pengyu; Chun, Jaehun; Thomas, Dennis G.; Schnieders, Michael J.; Marucho, Marcelo; Zhang, Jiajing; Baker, Nathan A.

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of molecular interactions is essential for insight into biological systems at the molecular scale. Among the various components of molecular interactions, electrostatics are of special importance because of their long-range nature and their influence on polar or charged molecules, including water, aqueous ions, proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and membrane lipids. In particular, robust models of electrostatic interactions are essential for understanding the solvation properties of biomolecules and the effects of solvation upon biomolecular folding, binding, enzyme catalysis, and dynamics. Electrostatics, therefore, are of central importance to understanding biomolecular structure and modeling interactions within and among biological molecules. This review discusses the solvation of biomolecules with a computational biophysics view towards describing the phenomenon. While our main focus lies on the computational aspect of the models, we provide an overview of the basic elements of biomolecular solvation (e.g., solvent structure, polarization, ion binding, and nonpolar behavior) in order to provide a background to understand the different types of solvation models. PMID:23217364

  3. Structural phylogeny by profile extraction and multiple superimposition using electrostatic congruence as a discriminator

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Rao, Basuthkar J.; Baker, Nathan A.; Asgeirsson, Bjarni

    2013-04-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of proteins using multiple sequence alignment (MSA) assumes an underlying evolutionary relationship in these proteins which occasionally remains undetected due to considerable sequence divergence. Structural alignment programs have been developed to unravel such fuzzy relationships. However, none of these structure based methods have used electrostatic properties to discriminate between spatially equivalent residues. We present a methodology for MSA of a set of related proteins with known structures using electrostatic properties as an additional discriminator (STEEP). STEEP first extracts a profile, then generates a multiple structural superimposition providing a consolidated spatial framework for comparing residues and finally emits the MSA. Residues that are aligned differently by including or excluding electrostatic properties can be targeted by directed evolution experiments to transform the enzymatic properties of one protein into another. We have compared STEEP results to those obtained from a MSA program (ClustalW) and a structural alignment method (MUSTANG) for chymotrypsin serine proteases. Subsequently, we used PhyML to generate phylogenetic trees for the serine and metallo-β-lactamase superfamilies from the STEEP generated MSA, and corroborated the accepted relationships in these superfamilies. We have observed that STEEP acts as a functional classifier when electrostatic congruence is used as a discriminator, and thus identifies potential targets for directed evolution experiments. In summary, STEEP is unique among phylogenetic methods for its ability to use electrostatic congruence to specify mutations that might be the source of the functional divergence in a protein family. Based on our results, we also hypothesize that the active site and its close vicinity contains enough information to infer the correct phylogeny for related proteins.

  4. Anthropogenic Osmium in Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Sedwick, P. N.; Sharma, M.

    2007-12-01

    Here we report the Os isotopic composition for precipitation from Hanover (NH), Soda Springs (CA) and the Ross Sea (Antarctica) as determined by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry. All samples yielded non- radiogenic Os isotopic compositions. Snow and rain samples from Hanover, NH had Os concentrations of 0.8 - 12.2 fg/g (1 fg/g = 1E-15 g/g) and 187Os/188Os from 0.16 - 0.24. Snowpack from the high Sierra Nevada (Central Sierra Snow Laboratory, Soda Springs, CA) yielded Os concentration and isotopic composition of 3.6 fg/g and 0.21, respectively; Antarctic snow deposited above first year pack ice had [Os] = 0.8 fg/g and 187Os/188Os = 0.42. The isotopic ratios indicate that potential natural sources of Os to the atmosphere, such as continental mineral aerosols (187Os/188Os = 1.26) and seawater (187Os/188Os = 1.05) do not contribute bulk of Os to the precipitation. Instead, the isotopic ratios are identical to the platinum ores from the Merensky Reef in the Bushveld Igneous Complex, South Africa and Noril'sk Ni-Cu sulfide deposit associated with the Siberian Flood Basalts, Russia. These two deposits produce greater than 95 percent of the total Pt, Pd and Rh consumed annually primarily by the automotive industry. We infer that anthropogenic Os contribution dominates the isotopic composition of precipitation. The similar and non-radiogenic Os isotopic compositions observed in precipitation from disparate locations suggest that contamination of the troposphere with anthropogenic Os may be global in scale. We think that processing of ore to extract Pt, Pd, and Rh from PGE ores (PGE: group of six closely related elements Os, Ir, Pt, Pd, Rh, and Ru), which involves smelting and converting at high temperature and in the presence of oxygen, releases the volatile, toxic compound OsO4 into the troposphere, where it is mixed and then scavenged by precipitation, thus explaining both the non-radiogenic isotopic composition and the high and variable Os concentrations of

  5. Electrostatic fields in a dusty Martian environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sentman, D. D.

    1991-01-01

    While there have been several studies suggesting the possibility of electrical activity on Mars, to date there have been no measurements to search for evidence of such activity. In the absence of widespread water clouds and convective storm systems similar to those on the Earth and Jupiter, the most likely candidate for the creation of electrostatic charges and fields is triboelectric charging of dust, i.e., the friction between blown dust and the ground, and of dust particles with each other. Terrestrial experience demonstrates that electric fields 5 to 15 kV-m(exp -1) are not uncommon in dust storms and dust devils in desert regions, where the polarity varies according to the chemical composition and grain size. Simple laboratory experiments have demonstrated that modest electrostatic fields of roughly 5,000 V-m(exp -1) may be produced, along with electrical spark discharges and glow discharges, in a simulation of a dusty, turbulent Martian surface environment. While the Viking landers operated for several years with no apparent deleterious effects from electrostatic charging, this may have been at least partly due to good engineering design utilizing pre-1976 electronic circuitry to minimize the possibility of differential charging among the various system components. However, free roaming rovers, astronauts, and airborne probes may conceivably encounter an environment where electrostatic charging is a frequent occurrence, either by way of induction from a static electric field or friction with the dusty surface and atmosphere. This raises the possibility of spark discharges or current surges when subsequent contact is made with other pieces of electrical equipment, and the possibility of damage to modern microelectronic circuitry. Measurements of electrostatic fields on the surface of Mars could therefore be valuable for assessing this danger. Electric field measurements could also be useful for detecting natural discharges that originate in dust storms. This

  6. Precipitation hardening austenitic superalloys

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1985-01-01

    Precipitation hardening, austenitic type superalloys are described. These alloys contain 0.5 to 1.5 weight percent silicon in combination with about 0.05 to 0.5 weight percent of a post irradiation ductility enhancing agent selected from the group of hafnium, yttrium, lanthanum and scandium, alone or in combination with each other. In addition, when hafnium or yttrium are selected, reductions in irradiation induced swelling have been noted.

  7. Duskside relativistic electron precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorentzen, Kirsten Ruth

    1999-10-01

    On August 20, 1996, a balloon-borne X-ray pinhole camera and a high resolution germanium X-ray spectrometer observed an intense X-ray event near Kiruna, Sweden, at 1835 MLT, on an L-shell of 5.8. This X-ray event consisted of seven bursts spaced 100-200 seconds apart, with smaller 10-20 second variations observed within individual bursts. The energy spectra of these bursts show the presence of X-rays with energies greater than 1 MeV, which are best accounted for by atmospheric bremsstrahlung from mono-energetic 1.7 MeV precipitating electrons. The X-ray imager observed no significant motion or small-scale spatial structure in the event, implying that the bursts were temporal in nature. Ultra- violet images from the Polar satellite and energetic particle data from the Los Alamos geosynchronous satellites show a small magnetospheric substorm onset about 24 minutes before the start of the relativistic precipitation event. Since the balloon was south of the auroral oval and there was no associated increase in relativistic electron flux at geosynchronous altitude, the event must be the result of some mechanism selectively precipitating ambient relativistic electrons from the radiation belts. The balloon X-ray observations are analyzed in a magnetospheric context, in order to determine which of several mechanisms for selective precipitation of relativistic electrons can account for the event. Resonance with electromagnetic ion cyclotron mode waves on the equator is the most likely candidate. The drift of substorm-injected warm protons is calculated using input from the geosynchronous satellites. Wave growth in the model is driven by temperature anisotropies in the warm proton population. A numerical solution of the wave dispersion relation shows that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves can be excited in high-density duskside regions such as the plasmasphere or detached plasma regions. These waves can selectively precipitate relativistic electrons of energy 1.7 MeV in

  8. Sonic boom acceptability studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Kevin P.; Sullivan, Brenda M.; Leatherwood, Jack D.; McCurdy, David A.

    1992-04-01

    The determination of the magnitude of sonic boom exposure which would be acceptable to the general population requires, as a starting point, a method to assess and compare individual sonic booms. There is no consensus within the scientific and regulatory communities regarding an appropriate sonic boom assessment metric. Loudness, being a fundamental and well-understood attribute of human hearing was chosen as a means of comparing sonic booms of differing shapes and amplitudes. The figure illustrates the basic steps which yield a calculated value of loudness. Based upon the aircraft configuration and its operating conditions, the sonic boom pressure signature which reaches the ground is calculated. This pressure-time history is transformed to the frequency domain and converted into a one-third octave band spectrum. The essence of the loudness method is to account for the frequency response and integration characteristics of the auditory system. The result of the calculation procedure is a numerical description (perceived level, dB) which represents the loudness of the sonic boom waveform.

  9. Sonic boom acceptability studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Kevin P.; Sullivan, Brenda M.; Leatherwood, Jack D.; Mccurdy, David A.

    1992-01-01

    The determination of the magnitude of sonic boom exposure which would be acceptable to the general population requires, as a starting point, a method to assess and compare individual sonic booms. There is no consensus within the scientific and regulatory communities regarding an appropriate sonic boom assessment metric. Loudness, being a fundamental and well-understood attribute of human hearing was chosen as a means of comparing sonic booms of differing shapes and amplitudes. The figure illustrates the basic steps which yield a calculated value of loudness. Based upon the aircraft configuration and its operating conditions, the sonic boom pressure signature which reaches the ground is calculated. This pressure-time history is transformed to the frequency domain and converted into a one-third octave band spectrum. The essence of the loudness method is to account for the frequency response and integration characteristics of the auditory system. The result of the calculation procedure is a numerical description (perceived level, dB) which represents the loudness of the sonic boom waveform.

  10. Electrostatic potentials of proteins in water: a structured continuum approach.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Andreas; Blossey, Ralf; Rjasanow, Sergej; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Lenhof, Hans-Peter

    2007-01-15

    Electrostatic interactions play a crucial role in many biomolecular processes, including molecular recognition and binding. Biomolecular electrostatics is modulated to a large extent by the water surrounding the molecules. Here, we present a novel approach to the computation of electrostatic potentials which allows the inclusion of water structure into the classical theory of continuum electrostatics. Based on our recent purely differential formulation of nonlocal electrostatics [Hildebrandt, et al. (2004) Phys. Rev. Lett., 93, 108104] we have developed a new algorithm for its efficient numerical solution. The key component of this algorithm is a boundary element solver, having the same computational complexity as established boundary element methods for local continuum electrostatics. This allows, for the first time, the computation of electrostatic potentials and interactions of large biomolecular systems immersed in water including effects of the solvent's structure in a continuum description. We illustrate the applicability of our approach with two examples, the enzymes trypsin and acetylcholinesterase. The approach is applicable to all problems requiring precise prediction of electrostatic interactions in water, such as protein-ligand and protein-protein docking, folding and chromatin regulation. Initial results indicate that this approach may shed new light on biomolecular electrostatics and on aspects of molecular recognition that classical local electrostatics cannot reveal. PMID:17237112

  11. Electrostatic Hazard Considerations for ODC Solvent Replacement Selection Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairbourn, Brad

    1999-01-01

    ODC solvents are used to clean many critical substrates during solid rocket motor production operations. Electrostatic charge generation incidental to these cleaning operations can pose a major safety issue. Therefore, while determining the acceptability of various ODC replacement cleaners, one aspect of the selection criteria included determining the extent of electric charge generation during a typical solvent cleaning operation. A total of six candidate replacement cleaners, sixteen critical substrates, and two types of cleaning swatch materials were studied in simulated cleaning operations. Charge generation and accumulation effects were investigated by measuring the peak voltage and brush discharging effects associated with each cleaning process combination. In some cases, charge generation was found to be very severe. Using the conductivity information for each cleaner, the peak voltage data could in some cases, be qualitatively predicted. Test results indicated that severe charging effects could result in brush discharges that could potentially result in flash fire hazards when occurring in close proximity to flammable vapor/air mixtures. Process controls to effectively mitigate these hazards are discussed.

  12. Precipitation Indices Low Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Engelen, A. F. V.; Ynsen, F.; Buisman, J.; van der Schrier, G.

    2009-09-01

    Since 1995, KNMI published a series of books(1), presenting an annual reconstruction of weather and climate in the Low Countries, covering the period AD 763-present, or roughly, the last millennium. The reconstructions are based on the interpretation of documentary sources predominantly and comparison with other proxies and instrumental observations. The series also comprises a number of classifications. Amongst them annual classifications for winter and summer temperature and for winter and summer dryness-wetness. The classification of temperature have been reworked into peer reviewed (2) series (AD 1000-present) of seasonal temperatures and temperature indices, the so called LCT (Low Countries Temperature) series, now incorporated in the Millennium databases. Recently we started a study to convert the dryness-wetness classifications into a series of precipitation; the so called LCP (Low Countries Precipitation) series. A brief outline is given here of the applied methodology and preliminary results. The WMO definition for meteorological drought has been followed being that a period is called wet respectively dry when the amount of precipitation is considerable more respectively less than usual (normal). To gain a more quantitative insight for four locations, geographically spread over the Low Countries area (De Bilt, Vlissingen, Maastricht and Uccle), we analysed the statistics of daily precipitation series, covering the period 1900-present. This brought us to the following definition, valid for the Low Countries: A period is considered as (very) dry respectively (very) wet if over a continuous period of at least 60 days (~two months) cq 90 days (~three months) on at least two out of the four locations 50% less resp. 50% more than the normal amount for the location (based on the 1961-1990 normal period) has been measured. This results into the following classification into five drought classes hat could be applied to non instrumental observations: Very wet period

  13. Low background counting of 222Rn, 220Rn and 219Rn with electrostatic counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mong, Brian; EXO-200 Collaboration; nEXO Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The radon counting technique based on electrostatic precipitation of progenies in gas followed by alpha spectroscopy has been applied to support the material selection programs of low background, neutrino and dark matter experiments with emphasis on EXO. An array of 8 counters operated by Laurentian University at SNOLAB and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant have reached the sensitivity of 10 atoms/day in the uranium, thorium and actinium chains. Hardware improvements are underway to further increase the capacity and sensitivity in support of nEXO. The radon counting technique based on electrostatic precipitation of progenies in gas followed by alpha spectroscopy has been applied to support the material selection programs of low background, neutrino and dark matter experiments with emphasis on EXO. An array of 8 counters operated by Laurentian University at SNOLAB and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant have reached the sensitivity of 10 atoms/day in the uranium, thorium and actinium chains. Hardware improvements are underway to further increase the capacity and sensitivity in support of nEXO. Supported by NSERC Project Grants ``Search for Double Beta Decay with EXO.''

  14. Excitation of electrostatic waves in the electron cyclotron frequency range during magnetic reconnection in laboratory overdense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwahata, A.; Igami, H.; Kawamori, E.; Kogi, Y.; Inomoto, M.; Ono, Y.

    2014-10-15

    We report the observation of electromagnetic radiation at high harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency that was considered to be converted from electrostatic waves called electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) during magnetic reconnection in laboratory overdense plasmas. The excitation of EBWs was attributed to the thermalization of electrons accelerated by the reconnection electric field around the X-point. The radiative process discussed here is an acceptable explanation for observed radio waves pulsation associated with major flares.

  15. SPARCLE: Electrostatic Tool for Lunar Dust Control

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, P. E.; Curtis, S. A.; Minetto, F.; Cheung, C. Y.; Keller, J. F.; Moore, M.; Calle, C. I.

    2009-03-16

    Successful exploration of most planetary surfaces, with their impact-generated dusty regoliths, will depend on the capabilities to keep surfaces free of the dust which could compromise performance and to collect dust for characterization. Solving the dust problem is essential before we return to the Moon. During the Apollo missions, the discovery was made that regolith fines, or dust, behaved like abrasive velcro, coating surfaces, clogging mechanisms, and making movement progressively more difficult as it was mechanically stirred up during surface operations, and abrading surfaces, including spacesuits, when attempts were made to remove it manually. In addition, some of the astronauts experienced breathing difficulties when exposed to dust that got into the crew compartment. The successful strategy will deal with dust dynamics resulting from interaction between mechanical and electrostatic forces. Here we will describe the surface properties of dust particles, the basis for their behavior, and an electrostatically-based approach and methodology for addressing this issue confirmed by our preliminary results. Our device concept utilizes a focused electron beam to control the electrostatic potential of the surface. A plate of the opposite potential is then used to induce dust migration in the presence of an electrical field. Our goal is a compact device of <5 kg mass and using <5 watts of power to be operational in <5 years with heritage from ionic sweepers for active spacecraft potential control (e.g., on POLAR). Rovers could be fitted with devices that could harness the removal of dust for sampling as part of the extended exploration process on Mercury, Mars, asteroids or outer solar system satellites, as well as the Moon.

  16. Designing Electrostatic Accelerometers for Next Gravity Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Phuong-Anh; Foulon, Bernard; Christophe, Bruno; Liorzou, Françoise; Boulanger, Damien; Lebat, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Square cuboid electrostatic accelerometers sensor core have been used in various combinations in recent and still flying missions (CHAMP, GRACE, GOCE). ONERA is now in the process of delivering such accelerometers for the GRACE Follow-On mission. The goal is to demonstrate the performance benefits of an interferometry laser ranging method for future low-low satellite to satellite missions. The electrostatic accelerometer becoming thus the system main performance limiter, we propose for future missions a new symmetry which will allow for three ultrasensitive axes instead of two. This implies no performance ground testing, as the now cubic proof-mass will be too heavy, but only free fall tests in catapult mode, taking advantage of the additional microgravity testing time offered by the updated ZARM tower. The updated mission will be in better adequacy with the requirements of a next generation of smaller and drag compensated micro-satellites. In addition to the measurement of the surface forces exerted on the spacecraft by the atmospheric drag and by radiation pressures, the accelerometer will become a major part of the attitude and orbit control system by acting as drag free sensor and by accurately measuring the angular accelerations. ONERA also works on a hybridization of the electrostatic accelerometer with an atomic interferometer to take advantage of the absolute nature of the atomic interferometer acceleration measurement and its great accuracy in the [5-100] mHz bandwidth. After a description of the improvement of the GRACE-FO accelerometer with respect to the still in-orbit previous models and a status of its development, the presentation will describe the new cubic configuration and how its operations and performances can be verified in the Bremen drop tower.

  17. SPARCLE: Electrostatic Tool for Lunar Dust Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, P. E.; Curtis, S. A.; Minetto, F.; Cheung, C. Y.; Keller, J. F.; Moore, M.; Calle, C. I.

    2009-03-01

    Successful exploration of most planetary surfaces, with their impact-generated dusty regoliths, will depend on the capabilities to keep surfaces free of the dust which could compromise performance and to collect dust for characterization. Solving the dust problem is essential before we return to the Moon. During the Apollo missions, the discovery was made that regolith fines, or dust, behaved like abrasive velcro, coating surfaces, clogging mechanisms, and making movement progressively more difficult as it was mechanically stirred up during surface operations, and abrading surfaces, including spacesuits, when attempts were made to remove it manually. In addition, some of the astronauts experienced breathing difficulties when exposed to dust that got into the crew compartment. The successful strategy will deal with dust dynamics resulting from interaction between mechanical and electrostatic forces. Here we will describe the surface properties of dust particles, the basis for their behavior, and an electrostatically-based approach and methodology for addressing this issue confirmed by our preliminary results. Our device concept utilizes a focused electron beam to control the electrostatic potential of the surface. A plate of the opposite potential is then used to induce dust migration in the presence of an electrical field. Our goal is a compact device of <5 kg mass and using <5 watts of power to be operational in <5 years with heritage from ionic sweepers for active spacecraft potential control (e.g., on POLAR). Rovers could be fitted with devices that could harness the removal of dust for sampling as part of the extended exploration process on Mercury, Mars, asteroids or outer solar system satellites, as well as the Moon.

  18. Liquid-immersible electrostatic ultrasonic transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, J. H., Jr.; Heyman, J. S.; Yost, W. T.; Torbett, M. A.; Breazeale, M. A. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A broadband megahertz range electrostatic acoustic transducer for use in a liquid environment is described. A liquid tight enclosure includes a metallic conducting membrane as part of its outside surface and has a means inside the liquid tight enclosure for applying a tension to the membrane and for mounting an electrode such that the flat end of the electrode is aproximately parallel to the membrane. The invention includes structure and a method for ensuring that the membrane and the flat end of the electrode are exactly parallel and a fixed predetermined distance from each other.

  19. Desensitizing nano powders to electrostatic discharge ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Steelman, Ryan; Clark, Billy; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Daniels, Michael A.

    2015-08-01

    Electrostatic discharge (ESD) is a main cause for ignition in powder media ranging from grain silos to fireworks. Nanoscale particles are orders of magnitude more ESD ignition sensitive than their micron scale counterparts. This study shows that at least 13 vol. % carbon nanotubes (CNT) added to nano-aluminum and nano-copper oxide particles (nAl + CuO) eliminates ESD ignition sensitivity. The CNT act as a conduit for electric energy and directs electric charge through the powder to desensitize the reactive mixture to ignition. For nanoparticles, the required CNT concentration for desensitizing ESD ignition acts as a diluent to quench energy propagation.

  20. Resonant behavior of dielectric objects (electrostatic resonances).

    PubMed

    Fredkin, D R; Mayergoyz, I D

    2003-12-19

    Resonant behavior of dielectric objects occurs at certain frequencies for which the object permittivity is negative and the free-space wavelength is large in comparison with the object dimensions. Unique physical features of these resonances are studied and a novel technique for the calculation of resonance values of permittivity, and hence resonance frequencies, is proposed. Scale invariance of resonance frequencies, unusually strong orthogonality properties of resonance modes, and a two-dimensional phenomenon of "twin" spectra are reported. The paper concludes with brief discussions of optical controllability of these resonances in semiconductor nanoparticles and a plausible, electrostatic resonance based, mechanism for nucleation and formation of ball lightning.

  1. Cascaded proton acceleration by collisionless electrostatic shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, T. J.; Shen, B. F.; Zhang, X. M.; Yi, L. Q.; Wang, W. P.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Shi, Y.; Liu, C.; Pei, Z. K.

    2015-07-01

    A new scheme for proton acceleration by cascaded collisionless electrostatic shock (CES) is proposed. By irradiating a foil target with a moderate high-intensity laser beam, a stable CES field can be induced, which is employed as the accelerating field for the booster stage of proton acceleration. The mechanism is studied through simulations and theoretical analysis, showing that a 55 MeV seed proton beam can be further accelerated to 265 MeV while keeping a good energy spread. This scheme offers a feasible approach to produce proton beams with energy of hundreds of MeV by existing available high-intensity laser facilities.

  2. Electrostatic decay in a weakly magnetized plasma.

    PubMed

    Layden, A; Cairns, Iver H; Li, B; Robinson, P A

    2013-05-01

    The kinematics of the electrostatic (ES) decay of a Langmuir wave into a Langmuir wave and an ion sound wave are generalized to a weakly magnetized plasma. Unlike the unmagnetized case, ES decay in a magnetized plasma is always kinematically permitted and can produce daughter Langmuir waves with very small wave numbers, which we demonstrate by quasilinear simulations. The simulations further show that ES decay in magnetized plasmas is consistent with STEREO spacecraft observations of transversely polarized Langmuir waves in the solar wind. PMID:23683206

  3. Spiderweb deformation induced by electrostatically charged insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Jimenez, Victor Manuel; Dudley, Robert

    2013-07-01

    Capture success of spider webs has been associated with their microstructure, ornamentation, and wind-induced vibrations. Indirect evidence suggests that statically charged objects can attract silk thread, but web deformations induced by charged insects have not yet been described. Here, we show under laboratory conditions that electrostatically charged honeybees, green bottle flies, fruit flies, aphids, and also water drops falling near webs of cross-spiders (Araneus diadematus) induce rapid thread deformation that enhances the likelihood of physical contact, and thus of prey capture.

  4. Cascaded proton acceleration by collisionless electrostatic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T. J.; Shen, B. F. E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, X. M. E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Yi, L. Q.; Wang, W. P.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Shi, Y.; Liu, C.; Pei, Z. K.

    2015-07-15

    A new scheme for proton acceleration by cascaded collisionless electrostatic shock (CES) is proposed. By irradiating a foil target with a moderate high-intensity laser beam, a stable CES field can be induced, which is employed as the accelerating field for the booster stage of proton acceleration. The mechanism is studied through simulations and theoretical analysis, showing that a 55 MeV seed proton beam can be further accelerated to 265 MeV while keeping a good energy spread. This scheme offers a feasible approach to produce proton beams with energy of hundreds of MeV by existing available high-intensity laser facilities.

  5. Nonadiabatic transitions in electrostatically trapped ammonia molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kirste, Moritz; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard; Sartakov, Boris G.

    2009-05-15

    Nonadiabatic transitions are known to be major loss channels for atoms in magnetic traps but have thus far not been experimentally reported upon for trapped molecules. We have observed and quantified losses due to nonadiabatic transitions for three isotopologues of ammonia in electrostatic traps by comparing the trapping times in traps with a zero and a nonzero electric field at the center. Nonadiabatic transitions are seen to dominate the overall loss rate even for the present samples that are at relatively high temperatures of 30 mK. It is anticipated that losses due to nonadiabatic transitions in electric fields are omnipresent in ongoing experiments on cold molecules.

  6. GRADIO three-axis electrostatic accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, A.

    1987-01-01

    Dedicated accelerometers for satellite gravity gradiometry (GRADIO project) are described. The design profits from experience acquired with the CACTUS accelerometer payload of the satellite CASTOR-D5B and studies of highly accurate accelerometers for inertial navigation. The principle of operation, based on a three-axis electrostatic suspension of a cubic proof mass, is well suited for the measurements of accelerations less than 0.0001 m/sec/sec. A resolution better than 10 to the minus 11th power m/sec/sec/sq root Hz is expected.

  7. Spiderweb deformation induced by electrostatically charged insects

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Jimenez, Victor Manuel; Dudley, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Capture success of spider webs has been associated with their microstructure, ornamentation, and wind-induced vibrations. Indirect evidence suggests that statically charged objects can attract silk thread, but web deformations induced by charged insects have not yet been described. Here, we show under laboratory conditions that electrostatically charged honeybees, green bottle flies, fruit flies, aphids, and also water drops falling near webs of cross-spiders (Araneus diadematus) induce rapid thread deformation that enhances the likelihood of physical contact, and thus of prey capture. PMID:23828093

  8. Electrostatic actuators for portable microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tice, Joshua

    Both developed and developing nations have an urgent need to diagnose disease cheaply, reliably, and independently of centralized facilities. Microfulidic platforms are well-positioned to address the need for portable diagnostics, mainly due to their obvious advantage in size. However, most microfluidic methods rely on equipment outside of the chip either for driving fluid flow (e.g., syringe pumps) or for taking measurements (e.g., lasers or microscopes). The energy and space requirements of the whole system inhibit portability and contribute to costs. To capitalize on the strengths of microfluidic platforms and address the serious needs of society, system components need to be miniaturized. Also, miniaturization should be accomplished as simply as possible, considering that simplicity is usually requisite for achieving truly transformative technology. Herein, I attempt to address the issue of controlling fluid flow in portable microfluidic systems. I focus on systems that are driven by elastomer-based membrane valves, since these valves are inherently simple, yet they are capable of sophisticated fluid manipulation. Others have attempted to modify pneumatic microvalves for portable applications, e.g., by transitioning to electromagnetic, thermopneumatic, or piezoelectric actuation principles. However, none of these strategies maintain the proper balance of simplicity, functionality, and ease of integration. My research centers on electrostatic actuators, due to their conceptual simplicity and the efficacy of electrostatic forces on the microscale. To ensure easy integration with polymer-based systems, and to maintain simplicity in the fabrication procedure, the actuators were constructed solely from poly(dimethylsiloxane) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes. In addition, the actuators were fabricated exclusively with soft-lithographic techniques. A mathematical model was developed to identify actuator parameters compatible with soft-lithography, and also to

  9. ELECTROSTATIC AIR CLEANING DEVICE AND METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Silverman, L.; Anderson, D.M.

    1961-07-18

    A method and apparatus for utilizing friction-charged particulate material from an aerosol are described. A bed of the plastic spheres is prepared, and the aerosol is passed upwardly through the bed at a rate just large enough to maintain the bed in a fluidized state wim over-all circulation of the balls. Wire members criss-crossing through the bed rub against the balls and maintain their surfaces with electrostatic charges. The particulate material in the aerosol adheres to the surfaces of the balls.

  10. Electrostatic gating in carbon nanotube aptasensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Han Yue; Alsager, Omar A.; Zhu, Bicheng; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka; Hodgkiss, Justin M.; Plank, Natalie O. V.

    2016-07-01

    Synthetic DNA aptamer receptors could boost the prospects of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based electronic biosensors if signal transduction can be understood and engineered. Here, we report CNT aptasensors for potassium ions that clearly demonstrate aptamer-induced electrostatic gating of electronic conduction. The CNT network devices were fabricated on flexible substrates via a facile solution processing route and non-covalently functionalised with potassium binding aptamers. Monotonic increases in CNT conduction were observed in response to increasing potassium ion concentration, with a level of detection as low as 10 picomolar. The signal was shown to arise from a specific aptamer-target interaction that stabilises a G-quadruplex structure, bringing high negative charge density near the CNT channel. Electrostatic gating is established via the specificity and the sign of the current response, and by observing its suppression when higher ionic strength decreases the Debye length at the CNT-water interface. Sensitivity towards potassium and selectivity against other ions is demonstrated in both resistive mode and real time transistor mode measurements. The effective device architecture presented, along with the identification of clear response signatures, should inform the development of new electronic biosensors using the growing library of aptamer receptors.Synthetic DNA aptamer receptors could boost the prospects of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based electronic biosensors if signal transduction can be understood and engineered. Here, we report CNT aptasensors for potassium ions that clearly demonstrate aptamer-induced electrostatic gating of electronic conduction. The CNT network devices were fabricated on flexible substrates via a facile solution processing route and non-covalently functionalised with potassium binding aptamers. Monotonic increases in CNT conduction were observed in response to increasing potassium ion concentration, with a level of detection as low as 10

  11. Multiple magnetic microrobot control using electrostatic anchoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawashe, Chytra; Floyd, Steven; Sitti, Metin

    2009-04-01

    Addressing power and control to individual untethered microrobots is a challenge for small-scale robotics. We present a 250×130×100 μm3 magnetic robot wirelessly driven by pulsed external magnetic fields. An induced stick-slip motion results in translation speeds over 8 mm/s. Control of multiple robots is achieved by an array of addressable electrostatic anchoring pads on the surface, which selectively fixes microrobots, preventing translation. We demonstrate control of two microrobots in both uncoupled individual motion and coupled symmetric motion. An estimated anchoring force of 23.0 μN is necessary to effectively fix each microrobot.

  12. RNA topology remolds electrostatic stabilization of viruses.

    PubMed

    Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Wagner, Jef; van der Schoot, Paul; Podgornik, Rudolf; Zandi, Roya

    2014-03-01

    Simple RNA viruses efficiently encapsulate their genome into a nano-sized protein shell: the capsid. Spontaneous coassembly of the genome and the capsid proteins is driven predominantly by electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged RNA and the positively charged inner capsid wall. Using field theoretic formulation we show that the inherently branched RNA secondary structure allows viruses to maximize the amount of encapsulated genome and make assembly more efficient, allowing viral RNAs to out-compete cellular RNAs during replication in infected host cells.

  13. Resonant behavior of dielectric objects (electrostatic resonances).

    PubMed

    Fredkin, D R; Mayergoyz, I D

    2003-12-19

    Resonant behavior of dielectric objects occurs at certain frequencies for which the object permittivity is negative and the free-space wavelength is large in comparison with the object dimensions. Unique physical features of these resonances are studied and a novel technique for the calculation of resonance values of permittivity, and hence resonance frequencies, is proposed. Scale invariance of resonance frequencies, unusually strong orthogonality properties of resonance modes, and a two-dimensional phenomenon of "twin" spectra are reported. The paper concludes with brief discussions of optical controllability of these resonances in semiconductor nanoparticles and a plausible, electrostatic resonance based, mechanism for nucleation and formation of ball lightning. PMID:14754117

  14. Magnetospheric electrostatic emissions and cold plasma densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, R. F.; Birmingham, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    A synoptic study of electric wave, magnetometer, and plasma data from IMP-6 was carried out for times when banded electrostatic waves are observed between harmonics of the electron gyrofrequency in the earth's outer magnetosphere. Four separate classes of such waves were previously identified. The spatial and temporal occurrences of waves in each class are summarized here, as are correlations of occurrence with geomagnetic activity. Most importantly, associations between the observations of waves of different classes and the relative portions of cold and hot electrons present at the position of the spacecraft are established. Finally, evidence for the signature of the loss cone is sought in the plasma data.

  15. Investigation of Neptunium Precipitator Cleanout Options

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, B.C.

    2003-09-08

    Oxalate precipitation followed by filtration is used to prepare plutonium oxalate. Historically, plutonium oxalate has tended to accumulate in the precipitation tanks. These solids are periodically removed by flushing with concentrated (64 percent) nitric acid. The same precipitation tanks will now be used in the processing of neptunium. Literature values indicate that neptunium oxalate may not be as soluble as plutonium oxalate in nitric acid. Although a wide variety of options is available to improve neptunium oxalate solubility for precipitator flushing, most of these options are not practical for use. Many of these options require the use of incompatible or difficult to handle chemicals. Other options would require expensive equipment modifications or are likely to lead to product contamination. Based on review of literature and experimental results, the two best options for flushing the precipitator are (1) 64 percent nitric acid and (2) addition of sodium permanganate follow ed by sodium nitrite. Nitric acid is the easiest option to implement. It is already used in the facility and will not lead to product contamination. Experimental results indicate that neptunium oxalate can be dissolved in concentrated nitric acid (64 percent) at 60 degree C to a concentration of 2.6 to 5.6 grams of Np/liter after at least three hours of heating. A lower concentration (1.1 grams of Np/liter) was measured at 60 degree C after less than two hours of heating. These concentrations are acceptable for flushing if precipitator holdup is low (approximately 100-250 grams), but a second method is required for effective flushing if precipitator holdup is high (approximately 2 kilograms). The most effective method for obtaining higher neptunium concentrations is the use of sodium permanganate followed by the addition of sodium nitrite. There is concern that residual manganese from these flushes could impact product purity. Gas generation during permanganate addition is also a concern

  16. Electrostatic particle trap for ion beam sputter deposition

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Stephen P.; Burkhart, Scott C.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the interception and trapping of or reflection of charged particulate matter generated in ion beam sputter deposition. The apparatus involves an electrostatic particle trap which generates electrostatic fields in the vicinity of the substrate on which target material is being deposited. The electrostatic particle trap consists of an array of electrode surfaces, each maintained at an electrostatic potential, and with their surfaces parallel or perpendicular to the surface of the substrate. The method involves interception and trapping of or reflection of charged particles achieved by generating electrostatic fields in the vicinity of the substrate, and configuring the fields to force the charged particulate material away from the substrate. The electrostatic charged particle trap enables prevention of charged particles from being deposited on the substrate thereby enabling the deposition of extremely low defect density films, such as required for reflective masks of an extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system.

  17. DISSOLUTION OF LANTHANUM FLUORIDE PRECIPITATES

    DOEpatents

    Fries, B.A.

    1959-11-10

    A plutonium separatory ore concentration procedure involving the use of a fluoride type of carrier is presented. An improvement is given in the derivation step in the process for plutonium recovery by carrier precipitation of plutonium values from solution with a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate and subsequent derivation from the resulting plutonium bearing carrier precipitate of an aqueous acidic plutonium-containing solution. The carrier precipitate is contacted with a concentrated aqueous solution of potassium carbonate to effect dissolution therein of at least a part of the precipitate, including the plutonium values. Any remaining precipitate is separated from the resulting solution and dissolves in an aqueous solution containing at least 20% by weight of potassium carbonate. The reacting solutions are combined, and an alkali metal hydroxide added to a concentration of at least 2N to precipitate lanthanum hydroxide concomitantly carrying plutonium values.

  18. Electrostatic potential of point charges inside dielectric oblate spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shaozhong

    2009-01-01

    As a sequel to a previous paper on electrostatic potential of point charges inside dielectric prolate spheroids [J. Electrostatics 66 (2008) 549-560], this note further presents the exact solution to the electrostatic problem of finding the electric potential of point charges inside a dielectric oblate spheroid that is embedded in a dissimilar dielectric medium. Numerical experiments have demonstrated the convergence of the proposed series solutions. PMID:20160934

  19. Electrostatic control of thermoelectricity in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsang; Jeong, Wonho; Kim, Kyeongtae; Lee, Woochul; Reddy, Pramod

    2014-11-01

    Molecular junctions hold significant promise for efficient and high-power-output thermoelectric energy conversion. Recent experiments have probed the thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions. However, electrostatic control of thermoelectric properties via a gate electrode has not been possible due to technical challenges in creating temperature differentials in three-terminal devices. Here, we show that extremely large temperature gradients (exceeding 1 × 10(9) K m(-1)) can be established in nanoscale gaps bridged by molecules, while simultaneously controlling their electronic structure via a gate electrode. Using this platform, we study prototypical Au-biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol-Au and Au-fullerene-Au junctions to demonstrate that the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical conductance of molecular junctions can be simultaneously increased by electrostatic control. Moreover, from our studies of fullerene junctions, we show that thermoelectric properties can be significantly enhanced when the dominant transport orbital is located close to the chemical potential (Fermi level) of the electrodes. These results illustrate the intimate relationship between the thermoelectric properties and charge transmission characteristics of molecular junctions and should enable systematic exploration of the recent computational predictions that promise extremely efficient thermoelectric energy conversion in molecular junctions. PMID:25282046

  20. Intramembrane electrostatic interactions destabilize lipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, Scott D; Vanderlick, T Kyle

    2002-01-01

    Membrane stability is of central concern in many biology and biotechnology processes. It has been suggested that intramembrane electrostatic interactions play a key role in membrane stability. However, due primarily to a lack of supporting experimental evidence, they are not commonly considered in mechanical analyses of lipid membranes. In this paper, we use the micropipette aspiration technique to characterize the elastic moduli and critical tensions of lipid vesicles with varying surface charge. Charge was induced by doping neutral phosphatidylcholine vesicles with anionic lipids phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidic acid. Measurements were taken in potassium chloride (moderate ion-lipid binding) and tetramethylammonium chloride (low ion-lipid binding) solutions. We show that inclusion of anionic lipid does not appreciably alter the areal dilation elasticity of lipid vesicles. However, the tension required for vesicle rupture decreases with increasing anionic lipid fraction and is a function of electrolyte composition. Using vesicles with 30% charged (i.e., unbound) anionic lipid, we measured critical tension reductions of 75%, demonstrating the important role of electrostatic interactions in membrane stability. PMID:12324419