Science.gov

Sample records for acceptable pharmacokinetic properties

  1. Impact of physiochemical properties on pharmacokinetics of protein therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Swami, Rajan; Shahiwala, Aliasgar

    2013-12-01

    Physicochemical properties, such as molecular weight, size, partition coefficient, acid dissociation constant and solubility have a great impact on pharmacokinetics of traditional small molecule drugs and substantially used in development of small drugs. However, predicting pharmacokinetic fate (absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination) of protein therapeutics from their physicochemical parameters is extremely difficult due to the macromolecular nature of therapeutic proteins and peptides. Their structural complexity and immunogenicity are other contributing factors that determine their biological fate. Therefore, to develop generalized strategies concerning development of therapeutic proteins and peptides are highly challenging. However, reviewing the literature, authors found that physiochemical properties, such as molecular weight, charge and structural modification are having great impact on pharmacokinetics of protein therapeutics and an attempt is made to provide the major findings in this manuscript. This manuscript will serve to provide some bases for developing protein therapeutics with desired pharmacokinetic profile.

  2. Studies of the pharmacokinetic properties of nimorazole.

    PubMed Central

    Overgaard, J.; Overgaard, M.; Timothy, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of the hypoxic radio-sensitizer nimorazole were studied in 19 individuals after single oral doses of between 0.5-3.5 g. HPLC measurements showed, after a rapid absorption, a linear relationship between peak plasma concentration and given dose. Mean elimination half life was 3.1 h. A tendency to a dose-dependent variation in the apparent volume of distribution, total body clearance and elimination half life suggest non-linear pharmacokinetics of nimorazole. Tumour concentrations measured in 5 patients gave tumour/plasma ratios between 0.8-1.3. No toxicity was observed. The results indicate that nimorazole may have potential as a clinically useful hypoxic radiosensitizer. PMID:6871077

  3. Synthesis and pharmacokinetic property improvement of deuterated plinabulin 9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianchun; Cheng, Hejuan; Sun, Tianwen; Wang, Shixiao; Ding, Zhongpeng; Dou, Guifang; Meng, Zhiyun; Guan, Huashi; Li, Wenbao

    2017-04-01

    Plinabulin, a potent microtubule-targeting agent, is derived from marine natural diketopiperazine `phenylahistin'. To develop novel plinabulin analogue that could display better pharmacokinetic properties and less side effects, deuterated plinabulin 9 was synthesized and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. In comparison with plinabulin, in vivo pharmacokinetic studies indicated that the deuterated derivative 9 could alter blood circulation behavior obviously, which was proved by increased area under the plasma concentration- time curve (AUC0-∞), reduced clearance (CL), and prolonged total body mean residence time (MRT). The derivative 9 also has higher inhibition rates against BxPC-3, Jurkat and A-431 tumor cell lines as compared with its prototype plinabulin. Therefore, the deuterated compound 9 might be developed as a potential agent for different cancer treatments.

  4. 10 CFR 603.550 - Acceptability of intellectual property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... costs associated with intellectual property if the costs are based on sound estimates of market value of... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Acceptability of intellectual property. 603.550 Section... AGREEMENTS Pre-Award Business Evaluation Cost Sharing § 603.550 Acceptability of intellectual property....

  5. 10 CFR 603.550 - Acceptability of intellectual property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... costs associated with intellectual property if the costs are based on sound estimates of market value of... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Acceptability of intellectual property. 603.550 Section... AGREEMENTS Pre-Award Business Evaluation Cost Sharing § 603.550 Acceptability of intellectual property....

  6. 10 CFR 603.550 - Acceptability of intellectual property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... costs associated with intellectual property if the costs are based on sound estimates of market value of... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Acceptability of intellectual property. 603.550 Section... AGREEMENTS Pre-Award Business Evaluation Cost Sharing § 603.550 Acceptability of intellectual property....

  7. Predicting drug pharmacokinetic properties using molecular interaction fields and SIMCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolohan, Philippa R. N.; Clark, Robert D.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a method that combines molecular interaction fields with soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) Wold:1977 to predict pharmacokinetic drug properties. Several additional considerations to those made in traditional QSAR are required in order to develop a successful QSPR strategy that is capable of accommodating the many complex factors that contribute to key pharmacokinetic properties such as ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) and toxicology. An accurate prediction of oral bioavailability, for example, requires that absorption and first-pass hepatic elimination both be taken into consideration. To accomplish this, general properties of molecules must be related to their solubility and ability to penetrate biological membranes, and specific features must be related to their particular metabolic and toxicological profiles. Here we describe a method, which is applicable to structurally diverse data sets while utilizing as much detailed structural information as possible. We address the issue of the molecular alignment of a structurally diverse set of compounds using idiotropic field orientation (IFO), a generalization of inertial field orientation Clark:1998. We have developed a second flavor of this method, which directly incorporates electrostatics into the molecular alignment. Both variations of IFO produce a characteristic orientation for each structure and the corresponding molecular fields can then be analyzed using SIMCA. Models are presented for human intestinal absorption, blood-brain barrier penetration and bioavailability to demonstrate ways in which this tool can be used early in the drug development process to identify leads likely to exhibit poor pharmacokinetic behavior in pre-clinical studies, and we have explored the influence of conformation and molecular field type on the statistical properties of the models obtained.

  8. Pharmacokinetic properties and in silico ADME modeling in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Honório, Kathia M; Moda, Tiago L; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2013-03-01

    The discovery and development of a new drug are time-consuming, difficult and expensive. This complex process has evolved from classical methods into an integration of modern technologies and innovative strategies addressed to the design of new chemical entities to treat a variety of diseases. The development of new drug candidates is often limited by initial compounds lacking reasonable chemical and biological properties for further lead optimization. Huge libraries of compounds are frequently selected for biological screening using a variety of techniques and standard models to assess potency, affinity and selectivity. In this context, it is very important to study the pharmacokinetic profile of the compounds under investigation. Recent advances have been made in the collection of data and the development of models to assess and predict pharmacokinetic properties (ADME--absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) of bioactive compounds in the early stages of drug discovery projects. This paper provides a brief perspective on the evolution of in silico ADME tools, addressing challenges, limitations, and opportunities in medicinal chemistry.

  9. A Novel Domperidone Hydrogel: Preparation, Characterization, Pharmacokinetic, and Pharmacodynamic Properties

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chun-Hui; Zhao, Bing-Xiang; Huang, Yue; Wang, Ying; Ke, Xi-Yu; Zhao, Bo-Jun; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to prepare a novel domperidone hydrogel. The domperidone dispersion was prepared by the solvent evaporation method. The characteristics of domperidone dispersion were measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffractometry, and solubility test, respectively. Domperidone hydrogel was prepared by directly incorporating the domperidone dispersion in Carbopol hydrogel to increase its mucoadhesive properties to gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The in vivo pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies were investigated to evaluate the relative oral bioavailability and the propulsion efficacy of domperidone hydrogel as compared with market domperidone tablet (Motilium tablet). The particle size of domperidone dispersion in distilled water was 454.0 nm. The results of DSC and X-ray indicated that domperidone in dispersion was in amorphous state. The solubility of domperidone in the dispersion in distilled water, pH of 1, 5, and 7 buffer solution was 45.7-, 63.9-, 13.1-, and 3.7-fold higher than that of raw domperidone, respectively. The area under the plasma concentration curve (AUC0–24) in domperidone hydrogel was 2.2-fold higher than that of tablet. The prolonged propulsion efficacy in the domperidone hydrogel group compared to that in tablet group was observed in the pharmacodynamic test. PMID:21490756

  10. A novel domperidone hydrogel: preparation, characterization, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Hui; Zhao, Bing-Xiang; Huang, Yue; Wang, Ying; Ke, Xi-Yu; Zhao, Bo-Jun; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to prepare a novel domperidone hydrogel. The domperidone dispersion was prepared by the solvent evaporation method. The characteristics of domperidone dispersion were measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffractometry, and solubility test, respectively. Domperidone hydrogel was prepared by directly incorporating the domperidone dispersion in Carbopol hydrogel to increase its mucoadhesive properties to gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The in vivo pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies were investigated to evaluate the relative oral bioavailability and the propulsion efficacy of domperidone hydrogel as compared with market domperidone tablet (Motilium tablet). The particle size of domperidone dispersion in distilled water was 454.0 nm. The results of DSC and X-ray indicated that domperidone in dispersion was in amorphous state. The solubility of domperidone in the dispersion in distilled water, pH of 1, 5, and 7 buffer solution was 45.7-, 63.9-, 13.1-, and 3.7-fold higher than that of raw domperidone, respectively. The area under the plasma concentration curve (AUC(0-24)) in domperidone hydrogel was 2.2-fold higher than that of tablet. The prolonged propulsion efficacy in the domperidone hydrogel group compared to that in tablet group was observed in the pharmacodynamic test.

  11. 42 CFR 35.65 - Acceptable personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Acceptable personal property. 35.65 Section 35.65 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS HOSPITAL AND STATION MANAGEMENT Contributions for the Benefit of Patients § 35.65...

  12. 42 CFR 35.65 - Acceptable personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Acceptable personal property. 35.65 Section 35.65 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS HOSPITAL AND STATION MANAGEMENT Contributions for the Benefit of Patients § 35.65...

  13. 42 CFR 35.65 - Acceptable personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Acceptable personal property. 35.65 Section 35.65 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS HOSPITAL AND STATION MANAGEMENT Contributions for the Benefit of Patients § 35.65...

  14. Comparison of the Pharmacokinetic Properties of Hemoglobin-Based Oxygen Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Kazuaki; Yamasaki, Keishi; Maruyama, Toru; Otagiri, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) is an ideal material for use in the development of an oxygen carrier in view of its innate biological properties. However, the vascular retention of free Hb is too short to permit a full therapeutic effect because Hb is rapidly cleared from the kidney via glomerular filtration or from the liver via the haptogloblin-CD 163 pathway when free Hb is administered in the blood circulation. Attempts have been made to develop alternate acellular and cellular types of Hb based oxygen carriers (HBOCs), in which Hb is processed via various routes in order to regulate its pharmacokinetic properties. These HBOCs have been demonstrated to have superior pharmacokinetic properties including a longer half-life than the Hb molecule in preclinical and clinical trials. The present review summarizes and compares the pharmacokinetic properties of acellular and cellular type HBOCs that have been developed through different approaches, such as polymerization, PEGylation, cross-linking, and encapsulation. PMID:28335469

  15. pkCSM: Predicting Small-Molecule Pharmacokinetic and Toxicity Properties Using Graph-Based Signatures

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Drug development has a high attrition rate, with poor pharmacokinetic and safety properties a significant hurdle. Computational approaches may help minimize these risks. We have developed a novel approach (pkCSM) which uses graph-based signatures to develop predictive models of central ADMET properties for drug development. pkCSM performs as well or better than current methods. A freely accessible web server (http://structure.bioc.cam.ac.uk/pkcsm), which retains no information submitted to it, provides an integrated platform to rapidly evaluate pharmacokinetic and toxicity properties. PMID:25860834

  16. Effect of diabetes mellitus on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of drugs.

    PubMed

    Dostalek, Miroslav; Akhlaghi, Fatemeh; Puzanovova, Martina

    2012-08-01

    The effects of diabetes mellitus on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs have been well described in experimental animal models; however, only minimal data exist for humans and the current knowledge regarding the effects of diabetes on these properties remains unclear. Nevertheless, it has been observed that the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs are changed in subjects with diabetes. It has been reported that diabetes may affect the pharmacokinetics of various drugs by affecting (i) absorption, due to changes in subcutaneous adipose blood flow, muscle blood flow and gastric emptying; (ii) distribution, due to non-enzymatic glycation of albumin; (iii) biotransformation, due to regulation of enzymes/transporters involved in drug biotransformation; and (iv) excretion, due to nephropathy. Previously published data also suggest that diabetes-mediated changes in the pharmacokinetics of a particular drug cannot be translated to others. Although clinical studies exploring the effect of diabetes on pharmacodynamics are still very limited, there is evidence that disease-mediated effects are not limited only to pharmacokinetics but also alter pharmacodynamics. However, for many drugs it remains unclear whether these influences reflect diabetes-mediated changes in pharmacokinetics rather than pharmacodynamics. In addition, even though diabetes-mediated pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics might be anticipated, it is important to study the effect on each drug and not generalize from observed data. The available data indicate that there is a significant variability in drug response in diabetic subjects. The discrepancies between individual clinical studies as well as between ex vivo and clinical studies are probably due to (i) the restricted and focused population of subjects in clinical studies; (ii) failure to consider type, severity and duration of the disease; (iii) histopathological characteristics generally being missing; and (iv) other factors

  17. Toxicity, pharmacokinetics, and photodynamic properties of chlorin e6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostenich, Gennady; Zhuravkin, Ivan N.; Gurinovich, G. P.; Zhavrid, Edvard A.

    1993-03-01

    Toxicity, pharmacokinetics, and the tumor damage effect of chlorin e6 after light irradiation were studied. The results show that chlorin e6 LD50 value in C57Bl mice was 189 +/- 10 mg/kg, in non-inbred white rats it was 99 +/- 14 mg/kg 14 days after the agent iv injection. The concentration of chlorin e6 in blood, liver, kidney, spleen, and tumors (sarcoma M-1 and sarcoma 45) of the rats was determined by the fluorescence method 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 48, and 72 hours after the agent iv injection at the dose of 10 mg/kg. For this purpose chlorin e6 was extracted from tissues by detergent triton X-100. The depth of necrosis spreading in tumor tissue was evaluated after chlorin e6 injection at the doses of 1 - 10 mg/kg and subsequent irradiation by a krypton laser with light energy density of 90 J/cm2, using the method of vital staining with Evans blue. It was found that depending on the agent dose and time interval between chlorin e6 injection and photoradiation, the depth of tumor necrosis varied from 4.0 to 16.6 mm in sarcoma M-1 and from 5.0 to 15.0 in sarcoma 45.

  18. [Physical and pharmacokinetic properties of anesthetics and sedatives used in neuroanesthesia and resuscitation].

    PubMed

    Egreteau, J P; Guedes, Y; L'Azou, D

    1991-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics of anesthetic drugs are widely influenced by their physical properties. Lipo-solubility is the most important characteristic. This parameter conditions tissue diffusion and subsequently potency and duration of action drugs Distribution is unequal in the different compartments of the body. The concept of effective compartment allows a best understanding of relationship between concentration, intensity and duration of action of anesthetic drugs. Constant intravenous infusion route of anesthetic drugs administration requires to be discussed.

  19. 32 CFR 37.550 - May I accept intellectual property as cost sharing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false May I accept intellectual property as cost... Cost Sharing § 37.550 May I accept intellectual property as cost sharing? (a) In most instances, you should not count costs of patents and other intellectual property (e.g., copyrighted material,...

  20. Effects of erdosteine on sputum biochemical and rheologic properties: pharmacokinetics in chronic obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Marchioni, C F; Moretti, M; Muratori, M; Casadei, M C; Guerzoni, P; Scuri, R; Fregnan, G B

    1990-01-01

    Erdosteine is a new thioderivative endowed with mucokinetic, mucolytic, and free-radical-scavenging properties. This study evaluated (in a double-blind design vs. placebo) its efficacy on biochemical and rheologic properties of sputum and on some indices of respiratory function in chronic patients with chronic bronchitis (10 per group), while receiving basic treatment with a controlled-release theophylline preparation. The pharmacokinetics of erdosteine and theophylline were also studied. We found that a 2 week treatment with erdosteine (300 mg 3 times daily) was able to reduce significantly (p less than 0.05) the sputum apparent viscosity, fucose content, and macromolecular dry weight (MDW) with no statistically significant influence on sputum elasticity, DNA, albumin, total proteins, total IgA, lactoferrin, and lysozyme content. The treatment caused a significant increase in the following ratios: total IgA/albumin, lactoferrin/albumin, and lysozyme/albumin. The pharmacokinetics of erdosteine, its metabolites, and theophylline were the same after 1 or 14 days of treatment, evidence both of absence of an enzymatic induction and of an accumulation process. Further confirmation that there was no interference between erdosteine and theophylline was obtained from the data available on the group of patients receiving only theophylline, since its plasma levels and related pharmacokinetic parameters were identical to those obtained in patients receiving both drugs. In conclusion, 2 weeks of therapy with erdosteine reduced the marker of mucus glycoproteins (fucose) in patients with chronic bronchitis but did not interfere with the pharmacokinetics of xanthine derivatives. We also suggest that the significant increment in the IgA/albumin ratio might be related to a sum of other local effects such as reduction of the inflammatory process and enhancement of the humoral defense mechanism.

  1. Comparative Pharmacokinetic Properties and Antitumor Activity of the Marine HDACi Largazole and Largazole Peptide Isostere

    PubMed Central

    Pilon, John L.; Clausen, Dane J.; Hansen, Ryan J.; Lunghofer, Paul J.; Charles, Brad; Rose, Barbara J.; Thamm, Douglas H.; Gustafson, Daniel L.; Bradner, James E.; Williams, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Largazole is a potent class I selective HDACi natural product isolated from the marine cyanobacteria Symploca sp. The purpose of this study was to test synthetic analogs of Largazole to identify potential scaffold structural modifications that would improve the drug-like properties of this clinically relevant natural product. Methods The impact of Largazole scaffold replacements on in vitro growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest, induction of apoptosis, pharmacokinetic properties, and in vivo activity using a xenograft model were investigated. Results In vitro studies in colon, lung, and pancreatic cancer cell lines showed that pyridyl substituted Largazole analogs had low nanomolar/high-picomolar activity on cell proliferation, and induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at concentrations equivalent to or lower than the parent compound Largazole. Using IV bolus delivery at 5mg/kg, two compartmental pharmacokinetic modeling on the peptide isostere analog of Largazole indicated improved pharmacokinetics including AUC, CL, and Vss. In the A549 non-small cell lung carcinoma xenograft model using a dosage of 5 mg/kg administered intraperitoneally every other day, Largazole, Largazole thiol, and Largazole peptide isostere demonstrated tumor growth inhibition (TGI%) of 32, 44, and 66 percent respectively. Moreover, the decreased tumor growth rate for Largazole peptide isostere was statistically significant compared to control (p=0.002) and superior to Largazole (p=0.006). Surprisingly tumor growth inhibition in this system and treatment regimen was not observed with the potent pyridyl-based analogs. Conclusions Our results establish that replacing the depsipepitde linkage in Largazole with an amide may impart pharmacokinetic advantage and that alternative prodrug forms of largazole are feasible. PMID:25616967

  2. First-in-Human Trial of MIV-150 and Zinc Acetate Coformulated in a Carrageenan Gel: Safety, Pharmacokinetics, Acceptability, Adherence, and Pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hoesley, Craig J.; Plagianos, Marlena; Hoskin, Elena; Zhang, Shimin; Teleshova, Natalia; Alami, Mohcine; Novak, Lea; Kleinbeck, Kyle R.; Katzen, Lauren L.; Zydowsky, Thomas M.; Fernández-Romero, José A.; Creasy, George W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of MIV-150 and zinc acetate in a carrageenan gel (PC-1005). Acceptability, adherence, and pharmacodynamics were also explored. Design: A 3-day open-label safety run-in (n = 5) preceded a placebo-controlled, double-blind trial in healthy, HIV-negative, abstinent women randomized (4:1) to vaginally apply 4 mL of PC-1005 or placebo once daily for 14 days. Methods: Assessments included physical examinations, safety labs, colposcopy, biopsies, cervicovaginal lavages (CVLs), and behavioral questionnaires. MIV-150 (plasma, CVL, tissue), zinc (plasma, CVL), and carrageenan (CVL) concentrations were determined with LC-MS/MS, ICP-MS, and ELISA, respectively. CVL antiviral activity was measured using cell-based assays. Safety, acceptability, and adherence were analyzed descriptively. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using noncompartmental techniques and actual sampling times. CVL antiviral EC50 values were calculated using a dose–response inhibition analysis. Results: Participants (n = 20) ranged from 19–44 years old; 52% were black or African American. Among those completing the trial (13/17, PC-1005; 3/3, placebo), 11/17 reported liking the gel overall; 7 recommended reducing the volume. Adverse events, which were primarily mild and/or unrelated, were comparable between groups. Low systemic MIV-150 levels were observed, without accumulation. Plasma zinc levels were unchanged from baseline. Seven of seven CVLs collected 4-hour postdose demonstrated antiviral (HIV, human papillomavirus) activity. High baseline CVL anti–herpes-simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) activity precluded assessment of postdose activity. Conclusions: PC-1005 used vaginally for 14 days was well tolerated. Low systemic levels of MIV-150 were observed. Plasma zinc levels were unchanged. Postdose CVLs had anti-HIV and anti–human papillomavirus activity. These data warrant further development of PC-1005 for HIV and sexually transmitted

  3. Glycoengineering of pertuzumab and its impact on the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Cheng; Chen, Song; Xu, Na; Wang, Chi; Sai, Wen bo; Zhao, Wei; Li, Ying chun; Hu, Xiao jing; Tian, Hong; Gao, Xiang dong; Yao, Wen bing

    2017-01-01

    Pertuzumab is an antihuman HER2 antibody developed for HER2 positive breast cancer. Glycosylation profiles are always the important issue for antibody based therapy. Previous findings have suggested the impact of glycosylation profiles on the function of antibodies, like pharmacodynamics, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). However, the roles of fucose and sialic acid in the function of therapeutic antibodies still need further investigation, especially the role of sialic acid in nonfucosylated antibodies. This study focused on the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of pertuzumab after glycoengineering. Herein, nonfucosylated pertuzumab was produced in CHOFUT8−/− cells, and desialylated pertuzumab was generated by enzymatic hydrolysis. Present data indicated that fucose was critical for ADCC activity by influencing the interaction between pertuzumab and FcγRIIIa, nevertheless removal of sialic acid increased the ADCC and CDC activity of pertuzumab. Meanwhile, regarding to sialic acid, sialidase hydrolysis directly resulted in asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs) dependent clearance in hepatic cells in vitro. The pharmacokinetic assay revealed that co-injection of asialofetuin can protect desialylated pertuzumab against ASGPRs-mediated clearance. Taken together, the present study elucidated the importance of fucose and sialic acid for pertuzumab, and also provided further understanding of the relationship of glycosylation/pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of therapeutic antibody.

  4. Optimisation of pharmacokinetic properties in a neutral series of 11β-HSD1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Scott, James S; Gill, Adrian L; Godfrey, Linda; Groombridge, Sam D; Rees, Amanda; Revill, John; Schofield, Paul; Sörme, Pernilla; Stocker, Andrew; Swales, John G; Whittamore, Paul R O

    2012-11-01

    11β-HSD1 is increasingly seen as an attractive target for the treatment of type II diabetes and other elements of the metabolic syndrome. In this program of work we describe how a series of neutral 2-thioalkyl-pyridine 11β-HSD1 inhibitors were optimized in terms of their pharmacokinetic properties to give compounds with excellent bioavailability in both rat and dog through a core change to pyrimidine. A potential reactive metabolite issue with 4-thioalkyl-pyrimidines was circumvented by a switch from sulfur to carbon substitution.

  5. 41 CFR 102-75.1155 - May an acceptable gift of property be converted to money?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of property be converted to money? 102-75.1155 Section 102-75.1155 Public Contracts and Property...-75.1155 May an acceptable gift of property be converted to money? GSA can determine whether or not a gift of property can and should be converted to money. After conversion, GSA must deposit the...

  6. Hydrogen exchange-mass spectrometry measures stapled peptide conformational dynamics and predicts pharmacokinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiangguo Eric; Wales, Thomas E; Elkin, Carl; Kawahata, Noriyuki; Engen, John R; Annis, D Allen

    2013-12-03

    Peptide drugs have traditionally suffered from poor pharmacokinetic properties due to their conformational flexibility and the interaction of proteases with backbone amide bonds. "Stapled Peptides" are cyclized using an all-hydrocarbon cross-linking strategy to reinforce their α-helical conformation, yielding improved protease resistance and drug-like properties. Here we demonstrate that hydrogen exchange-mass spectrometry (HX-MS) effectively probes the conformational dynamics of Stapled Peptides derived from the survivin-borealin protein-protein interface and predicts their susceptibility to proteolytic degradation. In Stapled Peptides, amide exchange was reduced by over five orders-of-magnitude versus the native peptide sequence depending on staple placement. Furthermore, deuteration kinetics correlated directly with rates of proteolysis to reveal the optimal staple placement for improved drug properties.

  7. Further Evaluation of the Psychometric Properties of the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fledderus, Martine; Oude Voshaar, Martijn A. H.; ten Klooster, Peter M.; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T.

    2012-01-01

    The Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II (AAQ-II) is a self-report measure designed to assess experiential avoidance as conceptualized in acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT). The current study is the first to evaluate the psychometric properties of the AAQ-II in a large sample of adults (N = 376) with mild to moderate levels of depression…

  8. 10 CFR 603.540 - Acceptability of fully depreciated real property or equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acceptability of fully depreciated real property or equipment. 603.540 Section 603.540 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Pre-Award Business Evaluation Cost Sharing § 603.540 Acceptability of fully...

  9. 10 CFR 603.550 - Acceptability of intellectual property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... property (e.g., copyrighted material, including software) as cost sharing because: (1) It is difficult to... the contribution. For example, a for-profit firm may offer the use of commercially available software for which there is an established license fee for use of the product. The costs of the development...

  10. 10 CFR 603.550 - Acceptability of intellectual property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... property (e.g., copyrighted material, including software) as cost sharing because: (1) It is difficult to... the contribution. For example, a for-profit firm may offer the use of commercially available software... the software would not be a reasonable basis for valuing its use....

  11. 48 CFR 28.203-3 - Acceptance of real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... any concurrent owners; whether any real estate taxes are due and payable; and any recorded... of the current real estate tax assessment of the property or a current appraisal dated no earlier... liquidation of pledged real estate. (d) The following format, or any document substantially the same, shall...

  12. 48 CFR 28.203-3 - Acceptance of real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... concurrent owners; whether any real estate taxes are due and payable; and any recorded encumbrances against... real estate tax assessment of the property or a current appraisal dated no earlier than 6 months prior... pledges real estate on Standard Form 28, Affidavit of Individual Surety. Lien on Real Estate I/we...

  13. 48 CFR 28.203-3 - Acceptance of real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... any concurrent owners; whether any real estate taxes are due and payable; and any recorded... of the current real estate tax assessment of the property or a current appraisal dated no earlier... liquidation of pledged real estate. (d) The following format, or any document substantially the same, shall...

  14. 48 CFR 28.203-3 - Acceptance of real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... concurrent owners; whether any real estate taxes are due and payable; and any recorded encumbrances against... real estate tax assessment of the property or a current appraisal dated no earlier than 6 months prior... pledges real estate on Standard Form 28, Affidavit of Individual Surety. Lien on Real Estate I/we...

  15. 48 CFR 28.203-3 - Acceptance of real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... any concurrent owners; whether any real estate taxes are due and payable; and any recorded... of the current real estate tax assessment of the property or a current appraisal dated no earlier... liquidation of pledged real estate. (d) The following format, or any document substantially the same, shall...

  16. Pharmacokinetic Properties of Adenosine Amine Congener in Cochlear Perilymph after Systemic Administration.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hao; Telang, Ravindra S; Sreebhavan, Sreevalsan; Tingle, Malcolm; Thorne, Peter R; Vlajkovic, Srdjan M

    2017-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a global health problem affecting over 5% of the population worldwide. We have shown previously that acute noise-induced cochlear injury can be ameliorated by administration of drugs acting on adenosine receptors in the inner ear, and a selective A1 adenosine receptor agonist adenosine amine congener (ADAC) has emerged as a potentially effective treatment for cochlear injury and resulting hearing loss. This study investigated pharmacokinetic properties of ADAC in rat perilymph after systemic (intravenous) administration using a newly developed liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry detection method. The method was developed and validated in accordance with the USA FDA guidelines including accuracy, precision, specificity, and linearity. Perilymph was sampled from the apical turn of the cochlea to prevent contamination with the cerebrospinal fluid. ADAC was detected in cochlear perilymph within two minutes following intravenous administration and remained in perilymph above its minimal effective concentration for at least two hours. The pharmacokinetic pattern of ADAC was significantly altered by exposure to noise, suggesting transient changes in permeability of the blood-labyrinth barrier and/or cochlear blood flow. This study supports ADAC development as a potential clinical otological treatment for acute sensorineural hearing loss caused by exposure to traumatic noise.

  17. Pharmacokinetic Properties of Adenosine Amine Congener in Cochlear Perilymph after Systemic Administration

    PubMed Central

    Sreebhavan, Sreevalsan; Thorne, Peter R.

    2017-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a global health problem affecting over 5% of the population worldwide. We have shown previously that acute noise-induced cochlear injury can be ameliorated by administration of drugs acting on adenosine receptors in the inner ear, and a selective A1 adenosine receptor agonist adenosine amine congener (ADAC) has emerged as a potentially effective treatment for cochlear injury and resulting hearing loss. This study investigated pharmacokinetic properties of ADAC in rat perilymph after systemic (intravenous) administration using a newly developed liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry detection method. The method was developed and validated in accordance with the USA FDA guidelines including accuracy, precision, specificity, and linearity. Perilymph was sampled from the apical turn of the cochlea to prevent contamination with the cerebrospinal fluid. ADAC was detected in cochlear perilymph within two minutes following intravenous administration and remained in perilymph above its minimal effective concentration for at least two hours. The pharmacokinetic pattern of ADAC was significantly altered by exposure to noise, suggesting transient changes in permeability of the blood-labyrinth barrier and/or cochlear blood flow. This study supports ADAC development as a potential clinical otological treatment for acute sensorineural hearing loss caused by exposure to traumatic noise. PMID:28194422

  18. A novel approach to investigate the effect of methionine oxidation on pharmacokinetic properties of therapeutic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Stracke, Jan; Emrich, Thomas; Rueger, Petra; Schlothauer, Tilman; Kling, Lothar; Knaupp, Alexander; Hertenberger, Hubert; Wolfert, Andreas; Spick, Christian; Lau, Wilma; Drabner, Georg; Reiff, Ulrike; Koll, Hans; Papadimitriou, Apollon

    2014-01-01

    Preserving the chemical and structural integrity of therapeutic antibodies during manufacturing and storage is a major challenge during pharmaceutical development. Oxidation of Fc methionines Met252 and Met428 is frequently observed, which leads to reduced affinity to FcRn and faster plasma clearance if present at high levels. Because oxidation occurs in both positions simultaneously, their individual contribution to the concomitant changes in pharmacokinetic properties has not been clearly established. A novel pH-gradient FcRn affinity chromatography method was applied to isolate three antibody oxidation variants from an oxidized IgG1 preparation based on their FcRn binding properties. Physico-chemical characterization revealed that the three oxidation variants differed predominantly in the number of oxMet252 per IgG (0, 1, or 2), but not significantly in the content of oxMet428. Corresponding to the increase in oxMet252 content, stepwise reduction of FcRn affinity in vitro, as well as faster clearance and shorter terminal half-life, in huFcRn-transgenic mice were observed. A single Met252 oxidation per antibody had no significant effect on pharmacokinetics (PK) compared with unmodified IgG. Importantly, only molecules with both heavy chains oxidized at Met252 exhibited significantly faster clearance. In contrast, Met428 oxidation had no apparent negative effect on PK and even led to somewhat improved FcRn binding and slower clearance. This minor effect, however, seemed to be abrogated by the dominant effect of Met252 oxidation. The novel approach of functional chromatographic separation of IgG oxidation variants followed by physico-chemical and biological characterization has yielded the first experimentally-backed explanation for the unaltered PK properties of antibody preparations containing relatively high Met252 and Met428 oxidation levels.

  19. [Pharmacokinetic and analgesic properties of the injectable dosage form of a new imidazobenzimidazole derivative RU-1205 with kappa agonist activity].

    PubMed

    Spasov, A A; Smirnova, L A; Grechko, O U; Raschenko, A I; Shtareva, D M; Anisimova, V A

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic properties of imidazobenzimidazole derivative compound RU-1205 were investigated after subcutaneous administration to rabbits as a substance and a dosage form (lyophilisates for injection) at a dose of 25 mg/kg. The lyophilisate was characterized by high values of the relative bioavailability. In tests, the "hot plate" and "vinegar cramps" the dosage form and the substance exhibited the same analgesic effect.

  20. Properties and reliability of improved large acceptance optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skutnik, Bolesh J.; Smith, Cheryl; Moran, Kelly; Bakhshpour, Kevin

    2006-02-01

    The high power diode laser systems with their laser diode bars and arrays not only require special fibers to couple directly to the diode emitters, but also require special fibers to couple from the laser to the application sites. These power delivery fibers are much larger than the internal fibers, but must be flexible, and have not only good strength but also good fatigue behavior. This is particularly important for industrial systems using robotic arms or robots to apply the high power laser energy to the treatment site. The optical properties of hard plastic clad silica (HPCS) fibers are well suited for the needs of delivery of high power from diode laser bars and arrays to an application site. New formulations for HPCS fibers have been developed which have demonstrated fibers with good mechanical strength in preliminary tests. A systematic study has been undertaken to determine the strength and fatigue behavior of three 'new' HPCS fibers and to compare them with results for earlier HPCS fibers. Benefits of stronger median dynamic strengths and tighter flaw distributions have been found. Short to medium length time to failure results, indicate that the static fatigue parameters of the new high numerical aperture (NA) optical fibers are at least as good as those for standard NA HPCS fibers, which is an advance from previous results on the older formulation clad fibers.

  1. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of intravenous fenoldopam, a dopamine1-receptor agonist, in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, R R; McCoy, C E; Ziemniak, J A; Frederickson, E D; Goldberg, L I; Murphy, M B

    1988-01-01

    1 The pharmacokinetic properties of intravenous fenoldopam, a selective dopamine1-receptor agonist, were studied in 10 patients with essential hypertension. 2 Reduction in blood pressure was linearly related to the log fenoldopam plasma concentration (r = 0.69) and the log fenoldopam infusion rate (r = 0.71). 3 The mean elimination half-life (+/- s. e. mean) was 9.8 +/- 1.0 min. The total body clearance was 30.3 +/- 2.3 ml kg-1 min-1 and the volume of distribution was 582 +/- 62 ml kg-1. 4 The rapid onset of action, short elimination half-life, linear dose-response relationship, and ease of administration suggest that fenoldopam may have a role where parenteral treatment of hypertension is required. PMID:2897206

  2. Physicochemical, pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties of the zwitterionic antihistamines cetirizine and levocetirizine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen

    2008-01-01

    Cetirizine, marketed as a racemic mixture containing both levocetirizine and dextrocetirizine, is a member of the second generation H(1) antihistamines clinically used for the treatment of symptoms associated with seasonal allergic rhinitis. Recently, its single R-enantiomer levocetirizine has been approved by the FDA as the newest antihistamine. Cetirizine is a piperazine derivative related to the first generation H(1) antagonist hydroxyzine, and is the major metabolite in the blood circulation after hydroxyzine administration in humans. The acid functionality of cetirizine in combination with one of the basic nitrogens of piperazine ring makes this compound a very unique zwitterion. The molecular structure of cetirizine allows its carboxylic group to interact with the basic nitrogen via folded conformers, therefore, it possesses relatively high lipophilicity at physiological pH (LogD=1.5). While both cetirizine and hydroxyzine possess high affinity at the H(1) receptor, the R-configured levocetirizine has much slower dissociation rate from the H(1) receptor than R-hydroxyzine, making it an insurmountable antagonist. In addition, the pharmacokinetics of cetirizine significantly differs from those of the basic and lipophilic hydroxyzine. For example, cetirizine has much lower CNS penetration than hydroxyzine, which may be explained by the zwitterionic structure of cetirizine and its P-glycoprotein activity. Cetirizine exhibits high intestinal absorption in humans and its oral bioavailability is estimated to be greater than 70%. Very importantly, cetirizine, especially levocetirizine, has a negligible interaction with the liver enzymes, and is mainly excreted in the urine as the parent despite its high plasma protein binding (88 approximately 96%). The recommended dose of levocetirizine is 5 mg once daily, while its pharmacokinetic half-life is about 7 h in humans. This review will focus on the physicochemical, pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties of

  3. Production, characterization and pharmacokinetic properties of antibodies with N-linked Mannose-5 glycans

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Marcella; Brown, Darren; Reed, Chae; Chung, Shan; Lutman, Jeff; Stefanich, Eric; Wong, Anne; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Bayer, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The effector functions of therapeutic antibodies are strongly affected by the specific glycans added to the Fc domain during post-translational processing. Antibodies bearing high levels of N-linked mannose-5 glycan (Man5) have been reported to exhibit enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) compared with antibodies with fucosylated complex or hybrid glycans. To better understand the relationship between antibodies with high levels of Man5 and their biological activity in vivo, we developed an approach to generate substantially homogeneous antibodies bearing the Man5 glycoform. A mannosidase inhibitor, kifunensine, was first incorporated in the cell culture process to generate antibodies with a distribution of high mannose glycoforms. Antibodies were then purified and treated with a mannosidase for trimming to Man5 in vitro. This 2-step approach can consistently generate antibodies with > 99% Man5 glycan. Antibodies bearing varying levels of Man5 were studied to compare ADCC and Fcγ receptor binding, and they showed enhanced ADCC activity and increased binding affinity to the FcγRIIIA. In addition, the clearance rate of antibodies bearing Man8/9 and Man5 glycans was determined in a pharmacokinetics study in mice. When compared with historical data, the antibodies bearing the high mannose glycoform exhibited faster clearance rate compared with antibodies bearing the fucosylated complex glycoform, while the pharmacokinetic properties of antibodies with Man8/9 and Man5 glycoforms appeared similar. In addition, we identified the presence of a mannosidase in mouse serum that converted most Man8/9 to Man6 after 24 h. PMID:22699308

  4. 10 CFR 603.540 - Acceptability of fully depreciated real property or equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Acceptability of fully depreciated real property or equipment. 603.540 Section 603.540 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY... time of the negotiations; (c) The effect of any increased maintenance charges or decreased...

  5. 10 CFR 603.540 - Acceptability of fully depreciated real property or equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Acceptability of fully depreciated real property or equipment. 603.540 Section 603.540 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY... time of the negotiations; (c) The effect of any increased maintenance charges or decreased...

  6. 10 CFR 603.540 - Acceptability of fully depreciated real property or equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Acceptability of fully depreciated real property or equipment. 603.540 Section 603.540 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY... time of the negotiations; (c) The effect of any increased maintenance charges or decreased...

  7. 49 CFR 1546.201 - Acceptance and screening of individuals and accessible property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Acceptance and screening of individuals and accessible property. 1546.201 Section 1546.201 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION...

  8. 49 CFR 1546.201 - Acceptance and screening of individuals and accessible property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Acceptance and screening of individuals and accessible property. 1546.201 Section 1546.201 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION...

  9. 49 CFR 1544.201 - Acceptance and screening of individuals and accessible property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Acceptance and screening of individuals and accessible property. 1544.201 Section 1544.201 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION...

  10. 49 CFR 1544.201 - Acceptance and screening of individuals and accessible property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Acceptance and screening of individuals and accessible property. 1544.201 Section 1544.201 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION...

  11. 49 CFR 1546.201 - Acceptance and screening of individuals and accessible property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Acceptance and screening of individuals and accessible property. 1546.201 Section 1546.201 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION...

  12. 49 CFR 1544.201 - Acceptance and screening of individuals and accessible property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Acceptance and screening of individuals and accessible property. 1544.201 Section 1544.201 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION...

  13. 49 CFR 1546.201 - Acceptance and screening of individuals and accessible property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Acceptance and screening of individuals and accessible property. 1546.201 Section 1546.201 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION...

  14. 49 CFR 1544.201 - Acceptance and screening of individuals and accessible property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Acceptance and screening of individuals and accessible property. 1544.201 Section 1544.201 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION...

  15. 49 CFR 1546.201 - Acceptance and screening of individuals and accessible property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Acceptance and screening of individuals and accessible property. 1546.201 Section 1546.201 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION...

  16. 49 CFR 1544.201 - Acceptance and screening of individuals and accessible property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Acceptance and screening of individuals and accessible property. 1544.201 Section 1544.201 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION...

  17. 32 CFR 37.550 - May I accept intellectual property as cost sharing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false May I accept intellectual property as cost sharing? 37.550 Section 37.550 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Pre-Award Business...

  18. 32 CFR 37.550 - May I accept intellectual property as cost sharing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false May I accept intellectual property as cost sharing? 37.550 Section 37.550 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Pre-Award Business...

  19. Pharmacokinetic properties of the synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 and of its metabolites in serum after inhalation.

    PubMed

    Toennes, Stefan W; Geraths, Anna; Pogoda, Werner; Paulke, Alexander; Wunder, Cora; Theunissen, Eef L; Ramaekers, Johannes G

    2017-03-24

    Each year, synthetic cannabinoids are occurring in high numbers in the illicit drug market, but data on their pharmacology and toxicology are scarcely available. Therefore, a pilot study was performed to assess adverse effects of JWH-018, which is one of the oldest and best known synthetic cannabinoids. Six subjects inhaled smoke from 2 and 3mg JWH-018. The drug and nine of its metabolites were analyzed in their blood samples taken during the following 12h by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MSMS). The maximum concentration of JWH-018 reached 2.9-9.9ng/ml after inhalation and markedly decreased during the next 1.5h, followed by a multiexponential decline (t1/2 in median 1.3h and 5.7h). The concentration of the pentanoic acid metabolite was slightly higher than that of the 3-, 4- and 5-hydroxypentyl metabolites and of the 6-hydroxyindol metabolite. The data also suggest a multiexponential decline and slow terminal elimination of JWH-018 and all metabolites. The detection of JWH-018 and of its metabolites in serum requires high analytical sensitivity. The pharmacokinetic properties of inhaled JWH-018 are similar to that of THC. A slow terminal elimination of drug and metabolites may lead to accumulation in chronic users.

  20. Molecular and pharmacokinetic properties of 222 commercially available oral drugs in humans.

    PubMed

    Sakaeda, T; Okamura, N; Nagata, S; Yagami, T; Horinouchi, M; Okumura, K; Yamashita, F; Hashida, M

    2001-08-01

    This study was performed to determine the exclusion criteria that differentiate poorly absorbed drugs from good drug candidates, and to accelerate drug development by exclusion of unnecessary assessment. The molecular and pharmacokinetic properties of 222 commercially available oral drugs were tabulated and their correlations were analyzed. The exclusion criteria obtained were 1) a molecular weight of more than 500, and 2) a ClogP value of more than 5. Exceptions to molecular weight criteria were compounds with a sugar moiety, high atomic weight, and large cyclic structure. It was also suggested that being a substrate for MDRI (P-glycoprotein) does not always result in poor bioavailability, and that drug development by chemical modification of a seed or lead compound with quantitative structure activity relationship analysis can result in lower bioavailability, higher bound fraction and lower urinary excretion, which would hamper later development processes and might result in considerable drug-drug interaction. The criteria should be adjusted according to the pharmacological profiles of the agents in question and depending on the estimated profit, but ignoring these criteria may result in a significant waste of time and money during drug development.

  1. Targeted drug delivery to bone: pharmacokinetic and pharmacological properties of acidic oligopeptide-tagged drugs.

    PubMed

    Takahashi-Nishioka, Tatsuo; Yokogawa, Koichi; Tomatsu, Shunji; Nomura, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Shinjiro; Miyamoto, Ken-Ichi

    2008-03-01

    Site-specific drug delivery to bone is considered to be achievable by utilizing acidic amino acid homopeptides. We found that fluorescence-labeled acidic amino acid (L-Asp or L-Glu) homopeptides containing six or more residues bound strongly to hydroxyapatite, which is a major component of bone, and were selectively delivered to and retained in bone after systemic administration. We explored the applicability of this result for drug delivery by conjugation of estradiol and levofloxacin with an L-Asp hexapeptide. We also similarly tagged an enzyme, tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase, to see whether this would improve the efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy. The L-Asp hexapeptide-tagged drugs, including the enzyme, were selectively delivered to bone in comparison with the untagged drugs. It was expected that the ester linkage to the hexapeptide would be susceptible to hydrolysis in situ, releasing the drug or enzyme from the acidic oligopeptide. An in vivo experiment confirmed the efficacy of L-Asp hexapeptide-tagged estradiol and levofloxacin, although there was some loss of bioactivity of estradiol and levofloxacin in vitro, suggesting that the acidic hexapeptide was partly removed by hydrolysis in the body after delivery to bone. The adverse effect of estradiol on the uterus was greatly reduced by conjugation to the hexapeptide. These results support the usefulness of acidic oligopeptides as bone-targeting carriers for therapeutic agents. We present some pharmacokinetic and pharmacological properties of the L-Asp hexapeptide-tagged drugs and enzyme.

  2. Proniosomal oral tablets for controlled delivery and enhanced pharmacokinetic properties of acemetacin.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Tamer M; Abdallah, Marwa H; Ibrahim, Mahmoud Mokhtar

    2015-04-01

    Free-flowing proniosomal powders of acemetacin (AC) were prepared using the slurry method and maltodextrin as carrier. Positively charged proniosomes composed of 70:20:10 of Span 60/cholesterol (Chol)/stearylamine (SA), respectively, were successively compressed into tablets using direct compression method. The tablets were characterized for weight variability, friability, hardness, drug content uniformity, and dissolution properties. The in vivo evaluation of the prepared proniosomes (powder or tablet forms) after oral administration was investigated by the determination of AC and its active metabolite indomethacin (IND) in the blood of albino rabbits. Results indicated that the increase of Chol from 10% to 20% markedly reduced the efflux of the drug. Further Chol addition from 30% to 50% led to increased AC release rates. The proniosome tablets of AC showed greater hardness and disintegration time and less friability than AC plain tablets. The dissolution of proniosomal tablets indicated a lower drug release percentage compared to powdered proniosomes and AC plain tablets. The mean pharmacokinetic parameters of AC and IND from different formulations indicated increased t 1/2 and area under the curve (AUC) of both AC and IND for proniosomal tablets compared with both proniosomal powders and AC plain tablets. This study suggested the formulation of AC proniosomal powder into tablets to control and extend its pharmacologic effects.

  3. Enhancing the Pharmacokinetic Properties of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Protease Inhibitors Through Rational Design.

    PubMed

    Capek, Petr; Zhang, Yan; Barlow, Deborah J; Houseknecht, Karen L; Smith, Garry R; Dickerson, Tobin J

    2011-06-15

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the etiological agent that causes the neuroparalytic disease botulism, has become a highly studied drug target in light of the potential abuse of this toxin as a weapon of bioterrorism. In particular, small molecule inhibitors of the light chain metalloprotease of BoNT serotype A have received significant attention and a number of small molecule and biologic inhibitors have been reported. However, all small molecules reported have been identified from either primary screens or medicinal chemistry follow-up studies, and the pharmacokinetic profiles of these compounds have not been addressed. In this study, we have removed the pharmacologic liabilities of one of the best compounds reported to date, 2,4-dichlorocinnamate hydroxamic acid, and in the process, uncovered a related class of benzothiophene hydroxamic acids that are significantly more potent inhibitors of the BoNT/A light chain, while also possessing greatly improved ADME properties, with the best compound showing the most potent inhibition of BoNT/A light chain reported (K(i) = 77 nM). Using a strategy of incorporating traditional drug development filters early into the discovery process, potential liabilities in BoNT/A lead compounds have been illuminated and removed, clearing the path for advancement into further pharmacologic optimization and in vivo efficacy testing.

  4. Improving the pharmacokinetic properties of biologics by fusion to an anti-HSA shark VNAR domain.

    PubMed

    Müller, Mischa R; Saunders, Kenneth; Grace, Christopher; Jin, Macy; Piche-Nicholas, Nicole; Steven, John; O'Dwyer, Ronan; Wu, Leeying; Khetemenee, Lam; Vugmeyster, Yulia; Hickling, Timothy P; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila; Olland, Stephane; Gill, Davinder; Jensen, Allan; Barelle, Caroline J

    2012-01-01

    Advances in recombinant antibody technology and protein engineering have provided the opportunity to reduce antibodies to their smallest binding domain components and have concomitantly driven the requirement for devising strategies to increase serum half-life to optimise drug exposure, thereby increasing therapeutic efficacy. In this study, we adopted an immunization route to raise picomolar affinity shark immunoglobulin new antigen receptors (IgNARs) to target human serum albumin (HSA). From our model shark species, Squalus acanthias, a phage display library encompassing the variable binding domain of IgNAR (VNAR) was constructed, screened against target, and positive clones were characterized for affinity and specificity. N-terminal and C-terminal molecular fusions of our lead hit in complex with a naïve VNAR domain were expressed, purified and exhibited the retention of high affinity binding to HSA, but also cross-selectivity to mouse, rat and monkey serum albumin both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the naïve VNAR had enhanced pharmacokinetic (PK) characteristics in both N- and C-terminal orientations and when tested as a three domain construct with naïve VNAR flanking the HSA binding domain at both the N and C termini. Molecules derived from this platform technology also demonstrated the potential for clinical utility by being available via the subcutaneous route of delivery. This study thus demonstrates the first in vivo functional efficacy of a VNAR binding domain with the ability to enhance PK properties and support delivery of multifunctional therapies.

  5. Improvement of pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines pharmacokinetic properties: nanosystem approaches for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Vignaroli, Giulia; Calandro, Pierpaolo; Zamperini, Claudio; Coniglio, Federica; Iovenitti, Giulia; Tavanti, Matteo; Colecchia, David; Dreassi, Elena; Valoti, Massimo; Schenone, Silvia; Chiariello, Mario; Botta, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines are a class of compounds with a good activity against several cancer cell lines. Despite the promising anticancer activity, these molecules showed a poor aqueous solubility. This issue could threat the future development of pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines as clinical drug candidates. With the aim of improving their solubility profile and consequently their pharmacokinetic properties, we have chosen four compounds (1–4) on the base of their anti-neuroblastoma activity and we have developed albumin nanoparticles and liposomes for the selected candidates. Albumin nanoparticles and liposomes were prepared and characterized regarding size and ζ-potential distribution, polidispersity index, entrapment efficiency and activity against SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line. The most promising nanosystem, namely LP-2, was chosen to perform further studies: confocal microscopy, stability and drug release in physiological conditions, and biodistribution. Altogether, the obtained data strongly indicate that the encapsulation of pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines in liposomes represent an effective method to overcome the poor water solubility. PMID:26898318

  6. Cell type-specific and common characteristics of exosomes derived from mouse cell lines: Yield, physicochemical properties, and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Charoenviriyakul, Chonlada; Takahashi, Yuki; Morishita, Masaki; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Nishikawa, Makiya; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes are small membrane vesicles secreted from cells and are expected to be used as drug delivery systems. Important characteristics of exosomes, such as yield, physicochemical properties, and pharmacokinetics, may be different among different cell types. However, there is limited information about the effect of cell type on these characteristics. In the present study, we evaluated these characteristics of exosomes derived from five different types of mouse cell lines: B16BL6 murine melanoma cells, C2C12 murine myoblast cells, NIH3T3 murine fibroblasts cells, MAEC murine aortic endothelial cells, and RAW264.7 murine macrophage-like cells. Exosomes were collected using a differential ultracentrifugation method. The exosomes collected from all the cell types were negatively charged globular vesicles with a diameter of approximately 100nm. C2C12 and RAW264.7 cells produced more exosomes than the other types of cells. The exosomes were labeled with a fusion protein of Gaussia luciferase and lactadherin to evaluate their pharmacokinetics. After intravenous injection into mice, all the exosomes rapidly disappeared from the systemic circulation and mainly distributed to the liver. In conclusion, the exosome yield was significantly different among the cell types, and all the exosomes evaluated in this study showed comparable physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties.

  7. Pharmacokinetic Properties of Artemether, Dihydroartemisinin, Lumefantrine, and Quinine in Pregnant Women with Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Kloprogge, Frank; Dhorda, Mehul; Jullien, Vincent; Nosten, Francois; White, Nicholas J.; Guerin, Philippe J.; Piola, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy alters the pharmacokinetic properties of many drugs used in the treatment of malaria, usually resulting in lower drug exposures. This increases the risks of treatment failure, adverse outcomes for the fetus, and the development of resistance. The pharmacokinetic properties of artemether and its principal metabolite dihydroartemisinin (n = 21), quinine (n = 21), and lumefantrine (n = 26) in pregnant Ugandan women were studied. Lumefantrine pharmacokinetics in a nonpregnant control group (n = 17) were also studied. Frequently sampled patient data were evaluated with noncompartmental analysis. No significant correlation was observed between estimated gestational age and artemether, dihydroartemisinin, lumefantrine, or quinine exposures. Artemether/dihydroartemisinin and quinine exposures were generally low in these pregnant women compared to values reported previously for nonpregnant patients. Median day 7 lumefantrine concentrations were 488 (range, 30.7 to 3,550) ng/ml in pregnant women compared to 720 (339 to 2,150) ng/ml in nonpregnant women (P = 0.128). There was no statistical difference in total lumefantrine exposure or maximum concentration. More studies with appropriate control groups in larger series are needed to characterize the degree to which pregnant women are underdosed with current antimalarial dosing regimens. PMID:23917320

  8. Pharmacokinetic properties of artemether, dihydroartemisinin, lumefantrine, and quinine in pregnant women with uncomplicated plasmodium falciparum malaria in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Tarning, Joel; Kloprogge, Frank; Dhorda, Mehul; Jullien, Vincent; Nosten, Francois; White, Nicholas J; Guerin, Philippe J; Piola, Patrice

    2013-10-01

    Pregnancy alters the pharmacokinetic properties of many drugs used in the treatment of malaria, usually resulting in lower drug exposures. This increases the risks of treatment failure, adverse outcomes for the fetus, and the development of resistance. The pharmacokinetic properties of artemether and its principal metabolite dihydroartemisinin (n = 21), quinine (n = 21), and lumefantrine (n = 26) in pregnant Ugandan women were studied. Lumefantrine pharmacokinetics in a nonpregnant control group (n = 17) were also studied. Frequently sampled patient data were evaluated with noncompartmental analysis. No significant correlation was observed between estimated gestational age and artemether, dihydroartemisinin, lumefantrine, or quinine exposures. Artemether/dihydroartemisinin and quinine exposures were generally low in these pregnant women compared to values reported previously for nonpregnant patients. Median day 7 lumefantrine concentrations were 488 (range, 30.7 to 3,550) ng/ml in pregnant women compared to 720 (339 to 2,150) ng/ml in nonpregnant women (P = 0.128). There was no statistical difference in total lumefantrine exposure or maximum concentration. More studies with appropriate control groups in larger series are needed to characterize the degree to which pregnant women are underdosed with current antimalarial dosing regimens.

  9. Casein peptization, functional properties, and sensory acceptance of processed cheese spreads made with different emulsifying salts.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Clarissa R; Viotto, Walkiria H

    2010-01-01

    "Requeijão cremoso" is a traditional Brazilian processed cheese spread, showing ample acceptance on the national market. Emulsifying salts (ES) are an important factor influencing the characteristics of processed cheeses, but the literature presents conflicting results about their action on cheese functionality. Requeijão cremoso obtained from anhydrous ingredients allows the study of the influence of each type of ES on the cheese properties, since it can be treated as a model system where the variables are limited and well known. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different types of ES (TSC-sodium citrate, SHMP-sodium hexametaphosphate, STPP-sodium tripolyphosphate, and TSPP-tetrasodium pyrophosphate) on the sensory and functional characteristics of requeijão cremoso-processed cheeses obtained from anhydrous ingredients. The physicochemical composition, degree of casein dissociation, fat particle size, melting index, color, texture profile, and sensory acceptance of the cheeses were determined. The functional behavior of processed cheeses was strongly influenced by the type of ES and its physicochemical properties including its ability to bind Ca, the casein dispersion during cooking, and the possible creation of cross-links with casein during cooling. The cheese made with SHMP was the one most differentiated from the others, presenting lower melting index, whiter color, and higher values for hardness, gumminess, and adhesiveness. The differences in texture had an impact on sensory acceptance: with the exception of the sample manufactured with sodium hexametaphosphate, all the samples presented good sensory acceptance.

  10. 1,3-Disubstituted Ureas Functionalized with Ether Groups are Potent Inhibitors of the Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase with Improved Pharmacokinetic Properties

    PubMed Central

    Kim, In-Hae; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Nishi, Kosuke; Kasagami, Takeo; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2008-01-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a therapeutic target for treating hypertension and inflammation. 1,3-Disubstituted ureas functionalized with an ether group are potent sEH inhibitors. However, their relatively low metabolic stability leads to poor pharmacokinetic properties. To improve their bioavailability, we investigated the effect of incorporating various polar groups on the ether function on the inhibition potencies, physical properties, in vitro metabolic stability, and pharmacokinetic properties. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies showed that a hydrophobic linker between the urea group and the ether function is necessary to keep their potency. In addition, urea-ether inhibitors having a polar group such as diethylene glycol or morpholine significantly improved their physical properties and metabolic stability without any loss of inhibitory potency. Furthermore, improved pharmacokinetic properties in murine and canine models were obtained with the resulting inhibitors. These findings will facilitate the usage of sEH inhibitors in animal models of hypertension and inflammation. PMID:17894481

  11. Navy Controls for Invoice, Receipt, Acceptance, and Property Transfer System Need Improvement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-25

    model oversight organization in the Federal Government by leading change, speaking truth, and promoting excellence—a diverse organization, working ...Receipt, Acceptance, and Property Transfer (iR APT ) system (formerly called w ide area work f low) user organization controls administered by the...users more access than required to do their job duties because they created a work around to reject misrouted invoices. Nav y system management did not

  12. Pharmacokinetic properties of γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) in whole blood, serum, and urine.

    PubMed

    Brailsford, Alan D; Cowan, David A; Kicman, Andrew T

    2012-03-01

    Over the last 10-15 years, γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) and γ-butyrolactone have become increasingly popular "club drugs", but they have also gained attention as potential agents of drug-facilitated sexual assault (DFSA). Several studies have attempted to characterize GHB's pharmacokinetic properties in humans, and the aim of this paper is to build on this research with an emphasis on DFSA cases. A 25 mg/kg dose of GHB was given to 12 GHB-naïve volunteers (6 men and 6 women). Urine and blood samples (serum and whole blood) were collected and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry following liquid-liquid extraction. The urinary T(max) was 1 h in 11 volunteers with a mean C(max) of 67.6 mg/L (32.6-161.3 mg/L). Urinary concentrations rapidly decreased to < 10 mg/L (interpretive limit) for 11 volunteers after just 4 h. Data derived from whole blood (mean C(max) = 48.0 mg/L, T(max) = 24.6 min) closely matched that from serum (mean C(max) = 59.4 mg/L, T(max) = 23.3 min), suggesting GHB is distributed into erythrocytes. All 12 volunteers had GHB concentrations of less than 5 mg/L in both whole blood and serum after 3 h. Results verify the rapid elimination of GHB and the limited retrospective power of a concentration-based approach to prove GHB administration in blood and urine and confirm that, in DFSA cases, samples should be collected as soon as possible.

  13. Medicinal properties of mangiferin, structural features, derivative synthesis, pharmacokinetics and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Benard, Outhiriaradjou; Chi, Yuling

    2015-01-01

    The identification of biologically active and potentially therapeutically useful pharmacophores from natural products has been a long-term focus in the pharmaceutical industry. The recent emergence of a worldwide obesity and Type II diabetes epidemic has increased focus upon small molecules that can modulate energy metabolism, insulin sensitivity and fat biology. Interesting preliminary work done on mangiferin (MGF), the predominant constituent of extracts of the mango plant Mangifera indica L., portends potential for this pharmacophore as a novel parent compound for treating metabolic disorders. MGF is comprised of a C-glucosylated xanthone. Owing to the xanthone chemical structure, MGF has a redox active aromatic system and has antioxidant properties. MGF exerts varied and impressive metabolic effects in animals, improving metabolic disorders. For example we have discovered that MGF is a novel activator of the mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, leading to enhancement of carbohydrate utilization in oxidative metabolism, and leading to increased insulin sensitivity in animal models of obesity and insulin resistance. In addition, recent unbiased proteomics studies revealed that MGF upregulates proteins pivotal for mitochondrial bioenergetics and downregulates proteins controlling de novo lipogenesis in liver, helping to explain protective effects of MGF in prevention of liver steatosis. Several chemical studies have achieved synthesis of MGF, suggesting possible synthetic strategies to alter its chemical structure for development of structure-activity relationship (SAR) information. Ultimately, chemical derivatization studies could lead to the eventual development of novel therapeutics based upon the parent pharmacophore structure. Here we provide comprehensive review on chemical features of MGF, synthesis of its derivatives, its pharmacokinetics and biological activities.

  14. Improving the pharmacokinetic properties of biologics by fusion to an anti-HSA shark VNAR domain

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Mischa R.; Saunders, Kenneth; Grace, Christopher; Jin, Macy; Piche-Nicholas, Nicole; Steven, John; O’Dwyer, Ronan; Wu, Leeying; Khetemenee, Lam; Vugmeyster, Yulia; Hickling, Timothy P.; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila; Olland, Stephane; Gill, Davinder; Jensen, Allan; Barelle, Caroline J.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in recombinant antibody technology and protein engineering have provided the opportunity to reduce antibodies to their smallest binding domain components and have concomitantly driven the requirement for devising strategies to increase serum half-life to optimise drug exposure, thereby increasing therapeutic efficacy. In this study, we adopted an immunization route to raise picomolar affinity shark immunoglobulin new antigen receptors (IgNARs) to target human serum albumin (HSA). From our model shark species, Squalus acanthias, a phage display library encompassing the variable binding domain of IgNAR (VNAR) was constructed, screened against target, and positive clones were characterized for affinity and specificity. N-terminal and C-terminal molecular fusions of our lead hit in complex with a naïve VNAR domain were expressed, purified and exhibited the retention of high affinity binding to HSA, but also cross-selectivity to mouse, rat and monkey serum albumin both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the naïve VNAR had enhanced pharmacokinetic (PK) characteristics in both N- and C-terminal orientations and when tested as a three domain construct with naïve VNAR flanking the HSA binding domain at both the N and C termini. Molecules derived from this platform technology also demonstrated the potential for clinical utility by being available via the subcutaneous route of delivery. This study thus demonstrates the first in vivo functional efficacy of a VNAR binding domain with the ability to enhance PK properties and support delivery of multifunctional therapies. PMID:23676205

  15. 41 CFR 102-75.1290 - What happens if the landholding agency requesting the property does not promptly accept custody...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... landholding agency requesting the property does not promptly accept custody and accountability? 102-75.1290... not promptly accept custody and accountability? (a) The requesting agency must assume protection and... accountability for the property. (b) After notifying the requesting agency, GSA may, at its discretion,...

  16. Adapting pharmacokinetic properties of a humanized anti-interleukin-8 antibody for therapeutic applications using site-specific pegylation.

    PubMed

    Leong, S R; DeForge, L; Presta, L; Gonzalez, T; Fan, A; Reichert, M; Chuntharapai, A; Kim, K J; Tumas, D B; Lee, W P; Gribling, P; Snedecor, B; Chen, H; Hsei, V; Schoenhoff, M; Hale, V; Deveney, J; Koumenis, I; Shahrokh, Z; McKay, P; Galan, W; Wagner, B; Narindray, D; Hébert, C; Zapata, G

    2001-11-07

    A neutralizing anti-interleukin-(IL-)8 monoclonal antibody was humanized by grafting the complementary determining regions onto the human IgG framework. Subsequent alanine scanning mutagenesis and phage display enabled the production of an affinity matured antibody with a >100-fold improvement in IL-8 binding. Antibody fragments can be efficiently produced in Escherichia coli but have the limitation of rapid clearance rates in vivo. The Fab' fragment of the antibody was therefore modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) in order to obtain a more desirable pharmacokinetic profile. PEG (5-40 kDa) was site-specifically conjugated to the Fab' via the single free cysteine residue in the hinge region. In vitro binding and bioassays showed little or no loss of activity. The pharmacokinetic profiles of the 20 kDa, 30 kDa, 40 kDa, and 40 kDa branched PEG-Fab' molecules were evaluated in rabbits. Relative to the native Fab', the clearance rates of the PEGylated molecules were decreased by 44-175-fold. In a rabbit ear model of ischemia/reperfusion injury, all PEGylated Fab' molecules were as efficacious in reducing oedema as the original monoclonal antibody. These studies demonstrate that it is possible to customize the pharmacokinetic properties of a Fab' while retaining its antigen binding activity.

  17. Effect of flaxseed flour incorporation on the physical properties and consumer acceptability of cereal bars.

    PubMed

    Khouryieh, H; Aramouni, F

    2013-12-01

    Extensive research has revealed numerous nutritional and health benefits of flaxseed due primarily to its nutrients content. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of flaxseed flour addition on the physical and sensory characteristics of cereal bars. Four formulations of the flaxseed cereal bars were prepared by partially replacing oats with flaxseed flour added at levels of 0 (control), 6%, 12% and 18%. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in water activity, moisture and firmness values between the flaxseed bars and control. Flaxseed addition significantly (p < 0.05) decreased lightness and increased redness of the bars. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) between the 12% flax cereal bars and the control with respect to sensory attributes and overall acceptability. The overall acceptability for both 12% flax bars and the control was in between 'like moderately' and 'like slightly' on the 9-point hedonic scale. The overall acceptability was most highly correlated with flavor acceptability for both control (r = 0.80) and 12% flax (r = 0.82) cereal bars. Flaxseed bars provided 12% dietary fiber of the daily recommended value. These results indicated that flaxseed flour incorporation up to 12% substantially enhanced the nutritional qualities of the cereal bars without affecting their sensory and quality properties.

  18. Psychometric Properties of the Persian Version of the Social Anxiety - Acceptance and Action Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Esmail; Bahrainian, Seyed Abdolmajid; Masjedi Arani, Abbas; Farhoudian, Ali; Gachkar, Latif

    2016-01-01

    Background Social anxiety disorder is often related to specific impairment or distress in different areas of life, including occupational, social and family settings. Objective The purpose of the present study was to examine the psychometric properties of the persian version of the social anxiety-acceptance and action questionnaire (SA-AAQ) in university students. Materials and Methods In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 324 students from Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences participated via the cluster sampling method during year 2015. Factor analysis by the principle component analysis method, internal consistency analysis, and convergent and divergent validity were conducted to examine the validity of the SA-AAQ. To calculate the reliability of the SA-AAQ, Cronbach’s alpha and test-retest reliability were used. Results The results from factor analysis by principle component analysis method yielded three factors that were named acceptance, action and non-judging of experience. The three-factor solution explained 51.82% of the variance. Evidence for the internal consistency of SA-AAQ was obtained via calculating correlations between SA-AAQ and its subscales. Support for convergent and discriminant validity of the SA-AAQ via its correlations with the acceptance and action questionnaire - II, social interaction anxiety scale, cognitive fusion questionnaire, believability of anxious feelings and thoughts questionnaire, valued living questionnaire and WHOQOL- BREF was obtained. The reliability of the SA-AAQ via calculating Cronbach’s alpha and test-retest coefficients yielded values of 0.84 and 0.84, respectively. Conclusions The Iranian version of the SA-AAQ has acceptable levels of psychometric properties in university students. The SA-AAQ is a valid and reliable measure to be utilized in research investigations and therapeutic interventions. PMID:27803719

  19. Simultaneous estimation of pharmacokinetic properties in mice of three anti-tubercular ethambutol analogs obtained from combinatorial lead optimization.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lee; Tomaszewski, Joseph E; Noker, Patricia E; Gorman, Gregory S; Glaze, Elizabeth; Protopopova, Marina

    2005-04-01

    Integrating combinatorial lead optimization of [1,2]-diamine core structure based on ethambutol with high-throughput screening has led us to focus on three promising analogs (SQ37, SQ59 and SQ109) as potential anti-tubercular drug candidates from thousands of synthesized diamine analogs for further characterization of their biopharmaceutical and pharmacokinetic properties by using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and cassette dosing for pharmacokinetic screening. Simultaneous separation of the three analogs was achieved on reversed phase HPLC using a gradient mobile phase composed of MeOH/CH(3)COONH(4) (5mM)/trifluoroacetic acid: 80/20/0.1 (v/v/v). After extraction with acetonitrile from biomatrices, samples were analyzed on the LC/MS/MS system in the positive mode using an electrospray ion source. The retention time for the analogs ranged from 3.70 to 4.48 min. Incubation of SQ37 with plasma at 37 degrees C for 6h resulted in its degradation in human and rat plasma (20-35%), but no significant degradation was observed in mouse and dog plasma. SQ59 was relatively stable in the plasma of the four species. SQ109 was degraded in human and dog plasma (30-40%), but stable in mouse and rat plasma during the 6h incubation. A rapid multiple pharmacokinetic screening was taken by cassette dosing of the three analogs to mice and simultaneous analysis of their plasma concentrations. The analogs showed large Vd(ss) ranging from 11,300 (SQ37), 12,800 (SQ109) to 63,900 ml/kg (SQ59). The clearance ranged from 3240 (SQ109), 3530 (SQ37) and 8043 ml/kg/h (SQ59). The elimination t(1/2) ranged from 4.4 to 21.1h dependent on the routes. The oral bioavailability was 5.1 (SQ59), 20.1 (SQ37) and 7.8% (SQ109), respectively. Both SQ37 and SQ109 possess good pharmacokinetic properties.

  20. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of canakinumab in patients with gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Abhijit; Van, Linh M; Skerjanec, Andrej; Floch, David; Klein, Ulf R; Krammer, Gerhard; Sunkara, Gangadhar; Howard, Dan

    2013-12-01

    Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the anti-interleukin (IL)-1β monoclonal antibody, canakinumab, in gouty arthritis patients from three studies are reported. Canakinumab has low serum clearance (0.214 L/day), low steady-state volume of distribution (7.44 L), a 25.8-day half-life, and approximately 60% subcutaneous absolute bioavailability in a typical 93-kg patient. Creatinine clearance had a small positive impact on serum canakinumab clearance that is not likely to be clinically relevant. Binding to circulating IL-1β was demonstrated by increases in total serum IL-1β following canakinumab dosing. Total IL-1β kinetics and canakinumab pharmacokinetics were characterized by a population-based pharmacokinetic-binding model, where the estimated apparent in vivo dissociation constant (signifying binding affinity of canakinumab to circulating IL-1β) was 0.99 nmol/L in gouty arthritis patients. Canakinumab treatment provided rapid, sustained decreases in C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A, provided superior pain relief to triamcinolone acetonide, and increased time to first recurrent attack (P ≤ 0.01 favoring all canakinumab doses vs. triamcinolone acetonide).

  1. Pharmacokinetic properties, in vitro metabolism and plasma protein binding of govaniadine an alkaloid isolated from Corydalis govaniana Wall.

    PubMed

    Marques, Lucas M M; Callejon, Daniel R; Pinto, Larissa G; de Campos, Michel L; de Oliveira, Anderson R M; Vessecchi, Ricardo; Adhikari, Achyut; Shrestha, Ram L S; Peccinini, Rosangela G; Lopes, Norberto P

    2016-11-30

    Govaniadine (GOV) is an alkaloid isolated from Corydalis govaniana Wall. It has been reported to show a different number of biological activities including anti-urease, leishmanicidal and antinociceptive. The present study aims to characterize the GOV in vitro metabolism after incubation with rat and human liver microsomes (RLM and HLM, respectively) and to evaluate its pharmacokinetic properties. The identification of GOV metabolites was conducted by different mass analyzers: a micrOTOF II-ESI-ToF Bruker Daltonics(®) and an amaZon-SL ion trap (IT) Bruker Daltonics(®). For the pharmacokinetic study of GOV in rats after intravenous administration, a LC-MS/MS method was developed and applied to. The analyses were performed using an Acquity UPLC(®) coupled to an Acquity TQD detector equipped with an ESI interface. The liver microsomal incubation resulted in new O-demethylated, di-hydroxylated and mono-hydroxylated compounds. Regarding the method validation, the calibration curve was linear over the concentration range of 2.5-3150.0ngmL(-1), with a lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) of 2.5ngmL(-1). This method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study. The profile was best fitted to a two-compartment model, the first phase with a high distribution rate constant (α) 0.139±0.086min(-1), reflected by the short distribution half-life (t1/2α) 9.2±8.9min and the later one, with an elimination half-life (t1/2β) 55.1±37.9min. The main plasma protein binding was 96.1%. This is a first report in this field and it will be useful for further development of govaniadine as a drug candidate.

  2. A Novel PEGylation Method for Improving the Pharmacokinetic Properties of Anti-Interleukin-17A RNA Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Otaki, Natsuki; Nagamine, Masakazu; Kayo, Tomoyoshi; Sasaki, Asako; Hiramoto, Shinsuke; Takahashi, Masayuki; Hota, Kuniyoshi; Sato, Hideaki; Yamazaki, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    The obstacles to the development of therapeutic aptamers for systemic inflammatory diseases, such as nuclease degradation and renal clearance, have not been fully overcome. Here, we report a novel PEGylation method, sbC-PEGylation, which improves the pharmacokinetic properties of RNA aptamers that act against interleukin-17A (IL-17A) in mice and monkeys. sbC-PEGylated aptamers were synthesized by coupling the symmetrical branching molecule 2-cyanoethyl-N,N-diisopropyl phosphoroamidite to the 5′ end of the aptamer, before conjugating two polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules to the aptamer. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that compared with conventionally PEGylated aptamers, the sbC-PEGylated aptamer exhibited excellent stability in the blood circulation of mice and monkeys. In addition, one of the sbC-PEGylated aptamers, 17M-382, inhibited the interleukin-6 (IL-6) production induced by IL-17A in NIH3T3 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, and the half-maximal inhibitory concentration of sbC-PEGylated 17M-382 was two times lower than that of non-PEGylated 17M-382. Furthermore, the intraperitoneal administration of sbC-PEGylated 17M-382 significantly inhibited the IL-6 production induced by IL-17A in a mouse air pouch model. Our findings suggest that the novel PEGylation method described in this study, sbC-PEGylation, could be used to develop anti-IL-17A aptamers as a therapeutic option for systemic inflammatory disease. PMID:27827561

  3. A Novel PEGylation Method for Improving the Pharmacokinetic Properties of Anti-Interleukin-17A RNA Aptamers.

    PubMed

    Haruta, Kazuhiko; Otaki, Natsuki; Nagamine, Masakazu; Kayo, Tomoyoshi; Sasaki, Asako; Hiramoto, Shinsuke; Takahashi, Masayuki; Hota, Kuniyoshi; Sato, Hideaki; Yamazaki, Hiroaki

    2017-02-01

    The obstacles to the development of therapeutic aptamers for systemic inflammatory diseases, such as nuclease degradation and renal clearance, have not been fully overcome. Here, we report a novel PEGylation method, sbC-PEGylation, which improves the pharmacokinetic properties of RNA aptamers that act against interleukin-17A (IL-17A) in mice and monkeys. sbC-PEGylated aptamers were synthesized by coupling the symmetrical branching molecule 2-cyanoethyl-N,N-diisopropyl phosphoroamidite to the 5' end of the aptamer, before conjugating two polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules to the aptamer. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that compared with conventionally PEGylated aptamers, the sbC-PEGylated aptamer exhibited excellent stability in the blood circulation of mice and monkeys. In addition, one of the sbC-PEGylated aptamers, 17M-382, inhibited the interleukin-6 (IL-6) production induced by IL-17A in NIH3T3 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, and the half-maximal inhibitory concentration of sbC-PEGylated 17M-382 was two times lower than that of non-PEGylated 17M-382. Furthermore, the intraperitoneal administration of sbC-PEGylated 17M-382 significantly inhibited the IL-6 production induced by IL-17A in a mouse air pouch model. Our findings suggest that the novel PEGylation method described in this study, sbC-PEGylation, could be used to develop anti-IL-17A aptamers as a therapeutic option for systemic inflammatory disease.

  4. Characterization of preclinical in vitro and in vivo ADME properties and prediction of human PK using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for YQA-14, a new dopamine D3 receptor antagonist candidate for treatment of drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Zhuang, Xiaomei; Yang, Cuiping; Li, Zheng; Xiong, Shan; Zhang, Zhiwei; Li, Jin; Lu, Chuang; Zhang, Zhenqing

    2014-07-01

    YQA-14 is a novel and selective dopamine D3 receptor antagonist, with potential for the treatment of drug addiction. However, earlier compounds in its structural class tend to have poor oral bioavailability. The objectives of this study were to characterize the preclinical absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) properties and pharmacokinetics (PK) of YQA-14, then to simulate the clinical PK of YQA-14 using a physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) model to assess the likelihood of developing YQA-14 as a clinical candidate. For human PK prediction, PBPK models were first built in preclinical species, rats and dogs, for validation purposes. The model was then modified by input of human in vitro ADME data obtained from in vitro studies. The study data showed that YQA-14 is a basic lipophilic compound, with rapid absorption (Tmax ~ 1 h) in both rats and dogs. Liver microsomal clearances and in vivo clearances were moderate in rats and dogs consistent with the moderate bioavailability observed in both species. The PBPK models built for rats and dogs simulated the observed PK data well in both species. The PBPK model refined with human data predicted that YQA-14 would have a clearance of 8.0 ml/min/kg, a volume distribution of 1.7 l/kg and a bioavailability of 16.9%. These acceptable PK properties make YQA-14 an improved candidate for further research and development as a potential dopamine D3R antagonism for the treatment of drug addiction in the clinic.

  5. Lisdexamfetamine: A pharmacokinetic review.

    PubMed

    Comiran, Eloisa; Kessler, Félix Henrique; Fröehlich, Pedro Eduardo; Limberger, Renata Pereira

    2016-06-30

    Lisdexamfetamine (LDX) is a d-amphetamine (d-AMPH) pro-drug used to treat Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Binge Eating Disorder (BED) symptoms. The in vivo pharmacodynamics of LDX is the same as that of its active product d-AMPH, although there are a few qualitative and quantitative differences due to pharmacokinetics. Due to the specific pharmacokinetics of the long-acting stimulants, this article revises the pharmacokinetic studies on LDX, the newest amphetamine pro-drug. The Medline/Pubmed, Science Direct and Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (Lilacs and Ibecs) (2007-2016) databases were searched for articles and their list of references. As for basic pharmacokinetics studies, since LDX is a newly developed medication, there are few results concerning biotransformation, distribution and the use of different biological matrices for analysis. This is the first robust review on this topic, gathering data from all clinical pharmacokinetics studies available in the literature. The particular pharmacokinetics of LDX plays a major role in studying this pro-drug, since this knowledge was essential to understand some reports on clinical effects in literature, e.g. the small likelihood of reducing the effect by interactions, the effect of long duration use and the still questionable reduction of the potential for abuse. In general the already well-known pharmacokinetic properties of amphetamine make LDX relatively predictable, simplifying the use of LDX in clinical practice.

  6. Myotoxicity of gemfibrozil in Cynomolgus monkey model and its relationship to pharmacokinetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Aiming; Xie Shuilin; Sun He; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Wei Xiaoxiong; Dai Renke

    2009-03-15

    Fibrate drugs are PPAR{alpha} agonists prescribed for the treatment of dyslipidemia. Severe myotoxicity has been reportedly associated with their use albeit at a low frequency, especially for gemfibrozil. Few studies have investigated the mechanism of fibrate-induced myotoxicity in vivo. Considering the apparent species-related differences in PPAR{alpha} agonist-induced hepatotoxicity, we studied the myotoxicity of gemfibrozil in a Cynomolgus monkey model and explored the relationship between myotoxicity and pharmacokinetics. Six Cynomolgus monkeys were dosed with gemfibrozil twice daily at 600 mg/kg/day for the first two periods (P1 and P2, 8 days and 9 days respectively) and 300 mg/kg/day for the third period (P3, 14 days). Creatine kinase and myoglobin were measured, together with hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity markers. Behavioral responses were recorded for indication of toxicity. Pharmacokinetics was carried out following the 16th dosage of P1 and 17th dosage of P2 when myotoxicity was identified. Multivariable data analysis was employed to explore the relationship between pharmacokinetic parameters and myotoxicity markers. Consequently, myotoxicity occurred in monkey no. 2 (M2) and M6 in P1, M3 and M4 in P2, M3 and M6 in P3. Data analysis showed T80-150 (sustained time above the given concentration) contributed for myotoxicity discriminance and correlated with myotoxicity risk. This study revealed Cynomolgus monkey may be a good animal model for myotoxicity evaluation with sensitivity, reproducibility and similarities to humans. More interestingly, they exhibited a much higher incidence of myotoxicity than that of humans. Sustained high drug concentration plays an important role for the occurrence of myotoxicity. This may suggest an influence of drug transport and metabolism on myotoxicity.

  7. A novel ibuprofen derivative with anti-lung cancer properties: synthesis, formulation, pharmacokinetic and efficacy studies.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ka-Wing; Nie, Ting; Ouyang, Nengtai; Alston, Ninche; Wong, Chi C; Mattheolabakis, George; Papayannis, Ioannis; Huang, Liqun; Rigas, Basil

    2014-12-30

    Phospho-non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (phospho-NSAIDs) are a novel class of NSAID derivatives with potent antitumor activity. However, phospho-NSAIDs have limited stability in vivo due to their rapid hydrolysis by carboxylesterases at their carboxylic ester link. Here, we synthesized phospho-ibuprofen amide (PIA), a metabolically stable analog of phospho-ibuprofen, formulated it in nanocarriers, and evaluated its pharmacokinetics and anticancer efficacy in pre-clinical models of human lung cancer. PIA was 10-fold more potent than ibuprofen in suppressing the growth of human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, an effect mediated by favorably altering cytokinetics and inducing oxidative stress. Pharmacokinetic studies in rats revealed that liposome-encapsulated PIA exhibited remarkable resistance to hydrolysis by carboxylesterases, remaining largely intact in the systemic circulation, and demonstrated selective distribution to the lungs. The antitumor activity of liposomal PIA was evaluated in a metastatic model of human NSCLC in mice. Liposomal PIA strongly inhibited lung tumorigenesis (>95%) and was significantly (p<0.05) more efficacious than ibuprofen. We observed a significant induction of urinary 8-iso-prostaglandin F2αin vivo, which indicates that ROS stress probably plays an important role in mediating the antitumor efficacy of PIA. Our findings suggest that liposomal PIA is a potent agent in the treatment of lung cancer and merits further evaluation.

  8. Pharmacokinetic properties of isorhamnetin, kaempferol and quercetin after oral gavage of total flavones of Hippophae rhamnoides L. in rats using a UPLC-MS method.

    PubMed

    Li, Guowen; Zeng, Xiaoli; Xie, Yan; Cai, Zhenzhen; Moore, Jeffrey C; Yuan, Xiurong; Cheng, Zhihong; Ji, Guang

    2012-01-01

    An ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric (UPLC-MS) method was developed to investigate the pharmacokinetic properties of isorhamnetin, kaempferol and quercetin from a total flavone extract of Hippophae rhamnoides L. (TFH) after single dose oral administration. Rat plasma samples were pretreated using liquid-liquid extraction, and chromatographic separation was performed on a C(18) column using a linear gradient of methanol and formic acid (0.1%). The pharmacokinetic parameters of isorhamnetin, kaempferol and quercetin from TFH in rats were quantitatively determined by UPLC with photodiode array detection (PDA). The qualitative detection of the three flavones was accomplished by selected ion monitoring in negative ion mode ESI-MS. Results of the pharmacokinetic study indicate that the three flavones in TFH were absorbed by passive diffusion in rats, and no "double-peak" phenomenon was observed in C-t curves of the three flavones from TFH except for quercetin. Results of this study indicate that the pharmacokinetic behaviors of isorhamnetin, kaempferol and quercetin when administered together in a complex herbal extract might be different than the individual behaviors of the same compounds administered in their pure forms. Results of this study also demonstrate that UPLC-MS is a rapid and practical method to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of flavones present in an herbal extract.

  9. Pharmacokinetic Properties of Anticancer Agents for the Treatment of CNS Tumors: Update of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Jacus, Megan O.; Daryani, Vinay M.; Harstead, K. Elaine; Patel, Yogesh T.; Throm, Stacy L.; Stewart, Clinton F.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant improvement in outcomes for patients with hematological malignancies and solid tumors over the past 10 years, patients with primary or metastatic brain tumors continue to have a poor prognosis. A primary reason for this is the inability of many chemotherapeutic drugs to penetrate into the brain and brain tumors at concentrations high enough to exert an antitumor effect due to unique barriers and efflux transporters. Several studies have been published recently examining the CNS pharmacokinetics of various anticancer drugs in patients with primary and metastatic brain tumors. To summarize recent advances in the field, this review will critically present studies published within the last 9 years examining brain and cerebrospinal fluid penetration of clinically available anticancer agents for patients with CNS tumors. PMID:26293618

  10. Synthesis, biological activities and pharmacokinetic properties of new fluorinated derivatives of selective PDE4D inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brullo, Chiara; Massa, Matteo; Villa, Carla; Ricciarelli, Roberta; Rivera, Daniela; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Fedele, Ernesto; Barocelli, Elisabetta; Bertoni, Simona; Flammini, Lisa; Bruno, Olga

    2015-07-01

    A new series of selective PDE4D inhibitors has been designed and synthesized by replacing 3-methoxy group with 3-difluoromethoxy isoster moiety in our previously reported cathecolic structures. All compounds showed a good PDE4D3 inhibitory activity, most of them being inactive toward other PDE4 isoforms (PDE4A4, PDE4B2 and PDE4C2). Compound 3b, chosen among the synthesized compounds as the most promising in terms of inhibitory activity, selectivity and safety, showed an improved pharmacokinetic profile compared to its non fluorinated analogue. Spontaneous locomotor activity, assessed in an open field apparatus, showed that, differently from rolipram and diazepam, selective PDE4D inhibitors, such as compounds 3b, 5b and 7b, did not affect locomotion, whereas compound 1b showed a tendency to reduce the distance traveled and to prolong the immobility period, possibly due to a poor selectivity.

  11. Population Pharmacokinetic Properties of Piperaquine in Falciparum Malaria: An Individual Participant Data Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hoglund, Richard M.; Edstein, Michael D.; Thanh, Nguyen Xuan; Zongo, Issaka; Ouedraogo, Jean Bosco; Borrmann, Steffen; Mwai, Leah; Nsanzabana, Christian; Parikh, Sunil; Ashley, Elizabeth A.; Lwin, Khin Maung; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Barnes, Karen I.

    2017-01-01

    Background Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) are the mainstay of the current treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria, but ACT resistance is spreading across Southeast Asia. Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine is one of the five ACTs currently recommended by the World Health Organization. Previous studies suggest that young children (<5 y) with malaria are under-dosed. This study utilised a population-based pharmacokinetic approach to optimise the antimalarial treatment regimen for piperaquine. Methods and Findings Published pharmacokinetic studies on piperaquine were identified through a systematic literature review of articles published between 1 January 1960 and 15 February 2013. Individual plasma piperaquine concentration–time data from 11 clinical studies (8,776 samples from 728 individuals) in adults and children with uncomplicated malaria and healthy volunteers were collated and standardised by the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network. Data were pooled and analysed using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling. Piperaquine pharmacokinetics were described successfully by a three-compartment disposition model with flexible absorption. Body weight influenced clearance and volume parameters significantly, resulting in lower piperaquine exposures in small children (<25 kg) compared to larger children and adults (≥25 kg) after administration of the manufacturers’ currently recommended dose regimens. Simulated median (interquartile range) day 7 plasma concentration was 29.4 (19.3–44.3) ng/ml in small children compared to 38.1 (25.8–56.3) ng/ml in larger children and adults, with the recommended dose regimen. The final model identified a mean (95% confidence interval) increase of 23.7% (15.8%–32.5%) in piperaquine bioavailability between each piperaquine dose occasion. The model also described an enzyme maturation function in very young children, resulting in 50% maturation at 0.575 (0.413–0.711) y of age. An evidence

  12. Novel highly potent serotonin 5-HT7 receptor ligands: structural modifications to improve pharmacokinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Lacivita, Enza; Di Pilato, Pantaleo; Stama, Madia Letizia; Colabufo, Nicola Antonio; Berardi, Francesco; Perrone, Roberto; De Filippis, Bianca; Laviola, Giovanni; Adriani, Walter; Niso, Mauro; Leopoldo, Marcello

    2013-11-15

    Here we report the synthesis, pharmacological and pharmacokinetic evaluation of a pilot set of compounds structurally related to the potent and selective 5-HT7 ligand LP-211. Among the studied compounds, N-pyridin-3-ylmethyl-3-[4-[2-(4-methoxyphenyl)phenyl]piperazin-1-yl]ethoxy]propanamide (4b) showed high affinity for 5-HT7 receptors (K(i)=23.8 nM), selectivity over 5-HT1A receptors (>50-fold), in vitro metabolic stability (82%) and weak interaction with P-glycoprotein (BA/AB=3.3). Compound 4b was injected ip in mice to preliminarily evaluate its distribution between blood and brain.

  13. Pharmacokinetic Properties and Human Use Characteristics of an FDA-Approved Intranasal Naloxone Product for the Treatment of Opioid Overdose.

    PubMed

    Krieter, Philip; Chiang, Nora; Gyaw, Shwe; Skolnick, Phil; Crystal, Roger; Keegan, Fintan; Aker, Julie; Beck, Melissa; Harris, Jennifer

    2016-10-01

    Parenteral naloxone has been approved to treat opiate overdose for over 4 decades. Intranasal naloxone, administered "off label" using improvised devices, has been widely used by both first responders and the lay public to treat overdose. However, these improvised devices require training for effective use, and the recommended volumes (2 to 4 mL) exceed those considered optimum for intranasal administration. The present study compared the pharmacokinetic properties of intranasal naloxone (2 to 8 mg) delivered in low volumes (0.1 to 0.2 mL) using an Aptar Unit-Dose device to an approved (0.4 mg) intramuscular dose. A parallel study assessed the ease of use of this device in a simulated overdose situation. All doses of intranasal naloxone resulted in plasma concentrations and areas under the curve greater than those observed following the intramuscular dose; the time to reach maximum plasma concentrations was not different following intranasal and intramuscular administration. Plasma concentrations of naloxone were dose proportional between 2 and 8 mg and independent of whether drug was administered to 1 or both nostrils. In a study using individuals representative of the general population, >90% were able to perform both critical tasks (inserting nozzle into a nostril and pressing plunger) needed to deliver a simulated dose of naloxone without prior training. Based on both pharmacokinetic and human use studies, a 4-mg dose delivered in a single device (0.1 mL) was selected as the final product. This product can be used by first responders and the lay public, providing an important and potentially life-saving intervention for victims of an opioid overdose.

  14. BI 885578, a Novel IGF1R/INSR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor with Pharmacokinetic Properties That Dissociate Antitumor Efficacy and Perturbation of Glucose Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Michael P; Apgar, Joshua; Garin-Chesa, Pilar; Hofmann, Marco H; Kessler, Dirk; Quant, Jens; Savchenko, Alexander; Schaaf, Otmar; Treu, Matthias; Tye, Heather; Zahn, Stephan K; Zoephel, Andreas; Haaksma, Eric; Adolf, Günther R; Kraut, Norbert

    2015-12-01

    Inhibition of the IGF1R, INSRA, and INSRB receptor tyrosine kinases represents an attractive approach of pharmacologic intervention in cancer, owing to the roles of the IGF1R and INSRA in promoting cell proliferation and survival. However, the central role of the INSRB isoform in glucose homeostasis suggests that prolonged inhibition of this kinase could result in metabolic toxicity. We describe here the profile of the novel compound BI 885578, a potent and selective ATP-competitive IGF1R/INSR tyrosine kinase inhibitor distinguished by rapid intestinal absorption and a short in vivo half-life as a result of rapid metabolic clearance. BI 885578, administered daily per os, displayed an acceptable tolerability profile in mice at doses that significantly reduced the growth of xenografted human GEO and CL-14 colon carcinoma tumors. We found that treatment with BI 885578 is accompanied by increases in circulating glucose and insulin levels, which in turn leads to compensatory hyperphosphorylation of muscle INSRs and subsequent normalization of blood glucose within a few hours. In contrast, the normalization of IGF1R and INSR phosphorylation in GEO tumors occurs at a much slower rate. In accordance with this, BI 885578 led to a prolonged inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in GEO tumors. We propose that the remarkable therapeutic window observed for BI 885578 is achieved by virtue of the distinctive pharmacokinetic properties of the compound, capitalizing on the physiologic mechanisms of glucose homeostasis and differential levels of IGF1R and INSR expression in tumors and normal tissues.

  15. Sensory properties and consumer acceptance of imported and domestic sliced black ripe olives.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soh Min; Kitsawad, Kamolnate; Sigal, Abdulkadir; Flynn, Dan; Guinard, Jean-Xavier

    2012-12-01

    Table olives are healthy and nutritious products with high contents of monounsaturated fatty acids, phenolics, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Understanding sensory cues affecting consumer preferences would enable the increase of olive consumption. The objectives of this study were to characterize the sensory properties of commercial sliced black ripe olives from different regions, including California, Egypt, Morocco, Portugal, and Spain, and to examine the preferences of California consumers for sliced black ripe olives. Sensory profiles and preferences for 20 sliced olive samples were determined using descriptive analysis with a trained panel and a consumer test with 104 users and likers of table olives. Aroma and flavor characteristics separated the olives according to country of origin, and were the main determinants of consumer preferences for sliced olives, even though the biggest differences among the samples were in appearance and texture. Total of 2 consumer segments were identified with 51 and 53 consumers, respectively, that both liked Californian products, but differed in the olives they disliked. Negative drivers of liking for both segments included alcohol, oak barrel, and artificial fruity/floral characteristics; however, consumers from Cluster 1 were further negatively influenced by rancid, gassy, and bitter characteristics. This study stresses the need for sound and appealing flavor quality for table olives to gain wider acceptance among U.S. consumers.

  16. Prodrug design to improve pharmacokinetic and drug delivery properties: challenges to the discovery scientists.

    PubMed

    Jana, S; Mandlekar, S; Marathe, P

    2010-01-01

    The prodrug design is a versatile, powerful method that can be applied to a wide range of parent drug molecules, administration routes, and formulations. Clinically, the majority of prodrugs are used with the aim of enhancing drug permeation by increasing lipophilicity, or by improving aqueous solubility. Prodrug design may improve the bioavailability of parent molecule, and thus can be integrated into the iterative process of lead optimization, rather than employing it as a post-hoc approach. The purpose of this review is to provide an update of advances and progress in the knowledge of current strategic approaches of prodrug design, along with their real-world utility in drug discovery and development. The review covers the type of prodrugs and functional groups that are amenable to prodrug design. Various prodrug approaches for improving oral drug delivery are discussed, with numerous examples of marketed prodrugs, including improved aqueous solubility, improved lipophilicity, transporter-mediated absorption, and prodrug design to achieve site-specific delivery. Tools employed for prodrug screening, and specific challenges in prodrug research and development are also elaborated. This article is intended to encourage discovery scientists to be creative and consider a rationally designed prodrug approach during the lead optimization phase of drug discovery programs, when the structure activity relationship (SAR) for the drug target is incompatible with pharmacokinetic or biopharmaceutical objectives.

  17. Anticancer properties of nimbolide and pharmacokinetic considerations to accelerate its development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingzhi; Phan, Do Dang Khoa; Zhang, Jingwen; Ong, Pei-Shi; Thuya, Win Lwin; Soo, Ross; Wong, Andrea Li-Ann; Yong, Wei Peng; Lee, Soo Chin; Ho, Paul Chi-Lui; Sethi, Gautam; Goh, Boon Cher

    2016-01-01

    Nimbolide is one of the main components in the leaf extract of Azadirachta indica (A. indica). Accumulating evidence from various in vitro and in vivo studies indicates that nimbolide possesses potent anticancer activity against several types of cancer and also shows potential chemopreventive activity in animal models. The main mechanisms of action of nimbolide include anti-proliferation, induction of apoptosis, inhibition of metastasis and angiogenesis, and modulation of carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes. Although multiple pharmacodynamic (PD) studies have been carried out, nimbolide is still at the infant stage in the drug development pipeline due to the lack of systematic pharmacokinetic (PK) studies and long-term toxicological studies. Preclinical PK and toxicological studies are vital in determining the dosage range to support the safety of nimbolide for first-in-human clinical trials. In this review, we will provide a comprehensive summary for the current status of nimbolide as an anticancer and chemopreventive lead compound, and highlight the importance of systematic preclinical PK and toxicological studies in accelerating the process of application of nimbolide as a therapeutic agent against various malignancies. PMID:27027349

  18. Enfuvirtide-PEG conjugate: A potent HIV fusion inhibitor with improved pharmacokinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shuihong; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Zhenxing; Lv, Xun; Gao, George F; Shao, Yiming; Ma, Liying; Li, Xuebing

    2016-10-04

    Enfuvirtide (ENF) is a clinically used peptide drug for the treatment of HIV infections, but its poor pharmacokinetic profile (T1/2 = 1.5 h in rats) and low aqueous solubility make the therapy expensive and inconvenience. In this study, we present a simple and practical strategy to address these problems by conjugating ENF with polyethylene glycol (PEG). Site-specific attachment of a 2 kDa PEG at the N-terminus of ENF resulted in an ENF-PEG (EP) conjugate with high solubility (≥3 mg/mL) and long half-life in rats (T1/2 = 16.1 h). This conjugate showed similar antiviral activity to ENF against various primary HIV-1 isolates (EC50 = 6-91 nM). Mechanistic studies suggested the sources of the antiviral potency. The conjugate bound to a functional domain of the HIV gp41 protein in a helical conformation with high affinity (Kd = 307 nM), thereby inhibiting the gp41-mediated fusion of viral and host-cell membranes. As PEG conjugation has advanced many bioactive proteins and peptides into clinical applications, the EP conjugate described here represents a potential new treatment for HIV infections that may address the unmet medical needs associated with the current ENF therapy.

  19. Use of solubilizers in preclinical formulations: Effect of Cremophor EL on the pharmacokinetic properties on early discovery compounds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Gordon, William Perry; Richmond, Wendy; Groessl, Todd; Tuntland, Tove

    2016-05-25

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether Cremophor EL is a suitable surfactant that can be routinely applied to pharmacokinetic (PK) studies in early drug discovery without influencing the intrinsic PK characteristics of the new chemical entities (NCEs). Cremophor EL, a polyoxyl 35 castor oil, has been used as a solubilization aid for water-insoluble compounds in pre-clinical drug discovery. The effect of Cremophor EL on the PK properties of NCEs was examined in seven structurally diverse discovery compounds after intravenous administration. Significant effects of Cremophor EL on plasma volume of distribution (Vss) and plasma clearance (CL) were observed in compounds with moderate to high Vss or CL. The plasma Vss decreased more than 2-fold and the Vss binning category decreased by one unit (e.g. from moderate to low Vss) in 6 of 7 test compounds. Two to five-fold reduction of CL was observed with these 6 compounds. Effect on the terminal half-life (T1/2) was minimal. Using one of these 7 NCEs, concentration dependent effect of Cremophor EL in the vehicle was also determined. Higher percentage of Cremophor EL in vehicle resulted in progressively increased alterations on the plasma CL and Vss. Taken together, these findings indicated that Cremophor EL altered the intrinsic PK properties of these discovery compounds in a concentration dependent manner.

  20. Psychometric Properties of the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II for Chinese College Students and Elite Chinese Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Chun-Qing; Chung, Pak-Kwong; Si, Gangyan; Liu, Jing Dong

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II (AAQ-II) across two samples of Chinese college students (n = 183 and n = 366) and a sample of elite Chinese athletes (n = 330). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported the existence of a…

  1. 32 CFR 37.540 - May I accept fully depreciated real property or equipment as cost sharing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false May I accept fully depreciated real property or equipment as cost sharing? 37.540 Section 37.540 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Pre-Award...

  2. 32 CFR 37.540 - May I accept fully depreciated real property or equipment as cost sharing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false May I accept fully depreciated real property or equipment as cost sharing? 37.540 Section 37.540 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Pre-Award...

  3. Pharmacokinetic/Toxicity Properties of the New Anti-Staphylococcal Lead Compound SK-03-92

    PubMed Central

    Schwan, William R.; Kolesar, Jill M.; Kabir, M. Shahjahan; Elder, Edmund J.; Williams, Jeffrey B.; Minerath, Rachel; Cook, James M.; Witzigmann, Christopher M.; Monte, Aaron; Flaherty, Tricia

    2015-01-01

    Because of the potential of a new anti-staphylococcal lead compound SK-03-92 as a topical antibiotic, a patch, or an orally active drug, we sought to determine its safety profile and oral bioavailability. SK-03-92 had a high IC50 (125 μg/mL) in vitro against several mammalian cell lines, and mice injected intraperiteonally at the highest dose did not exhibit gross toxicity (e.g., altered gait, ungroomed, significant weight loss). Single dose (100 μg/g) pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis with formulated SK-03-92 showed that peak plasma concentration (1.64 μg/mL) was achieved at 20–30 min. Oral relative bioavailability was 8%, and the drug half-life was 20–30 min, demonstrating that SK-03-92 is likely not a candidate for oral delivery. Five-day and two-week PK analyses demonstrated that SK-03-92 plasma levels were low. Multi-dose analysis showed no gross adverse effects to the mice and a SK-03-92 peak plasma concentration of 2.12 μg/mL with the presence of significant concentrations of breakdown products 15 min after dosing. SK-03-92 appeared to be very safe based on tissue culture and mouse gross toxicity determinations, but the peak plasma concentration suggests that a pro-drug of SK-03-92 or preparation of analogs of SK-03-92 with greater bioavailability and longer half-lives are warranted. PMID:26877886

  4. Sultamicillin. A review of its antibacterial activity, pharmacokinetic properties and therapeutic use.

    PubMed

    Friedel, H A; Campoli-Richards, D M; Goa, K L

    1989-04-01

    associated with sultamicillin was greater than that with comparative antibacterials, sultamicillin-associated diarrhoea was generally mild and transitory, although occasionally severe enough to necessitate discontinuation of treatment. Further studies in larger groups of patients are needed to clarify the therapeutic efficacy and safety of sultamicillin in comparison with other antibacterial regimens, and to determine the optimum single dosage for the treatment of gonorrhoea. Nonetheless, sultamicillin appears to provide a similar pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profile to that of parenteral sulbactam plus ampicillin and, as such, will extend the therapeutic efficacy of ampicillin, with the further advantage of allowing treatment of patients with an oral formulation, thus avoiding the potentially adverse clinical and financial effects of prolonged parenteral therapy.

  5. An Updated Review on Drug-Induced Cholestasis: Mechanisms and Investigation of Physicochemical Properties and Pharmacokinetic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    YANG, KYUNGHEE; KÖCK, KATHLEEN; SEDYKH, ALEXANDER; TROPSHA, ALEXANDER; BROUWER, KIM L.R.

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced cholestasis is an important form of acquired liver disease and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Bile acids are key signaling molecules, but they can exert toxic responses when they accumulate in hepatocytes. This review focuses on the physiological mechanisms of drug-induced cholestasis associated with altered bile acid homeostasis due to direct (e.g. bile acid transporter inhibition) or indirect (e.g. activation of nuclear receptors, altered function/expression of bile acid transporters) processes. Mechanistic information about the effects of a drug on bile acid homeostasis is important when evaluating the cholestatic potential of a compound, but experimental data often are not available. The relationship between physicochemical properties, pharmacokinetic parameters, and inhibition of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) among seventy-seven cholestatic drugs with different pathophysiological mechanisms of cholestasis (i.e. impaired formation of bile vs. physical obstruction of bile flow) was investigated. The utility of in silico models to obtain mechanistic information about the impact of compounds on bile acid homeostasis to aid in predicting the cholestatic potential of drugs is highlighted. PMID:23653385

  6. Pharmacokinetic properties of new antitumor radiopharmaceutical on the basis of diamond nanoporous composites labeled with rhenium-188

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petriev, V. M.; Tishchenko, V. K.; Kuril’chik, A. A.; Skvortsov, V. G.

    2017-01-01

    Today the development of address therapeutic radionuclide delivery systems directly to tumor tissue is of current interest. It can be achieved by the design of drug containers of specific sizes and shapes from carbon-based composite materials. It will be allowed to enhance the efficacy of anticancer therapy and avoid serious side effects. In this work we studied the pharmacokinetic properties of nanodiamond nanoporous composite labeled with rhenium-188 in rats with hepatocholangioma PC-1 after intratumoral injection. It was established that substantial part of injected radioactivity remained in tumor tissue. Within three hours after 188Re-nanoporous composites injection activity in tumor constituted 79.1–91.3% of injected dose (ID). Then activity level declined to 45.9% ID at 120 hours. No more than 1.34% ID entered the bloodstream. In soft organs and tissues, except thyroid gland, the content of compound didn’t exceed 0.3% ID/g. The highest activity in thyroid gland was 6.95% ID/g. In conclusion, received results suggest 188Re-nanoporous composites can be promising radionuclide delivery systems for cancer treatment.

  7. Structure-Activity Relationships of a Series of Echinocandins and the Discovery of CD101, a Highly Stable and Soluble Echinocandin with Distinctive Pharmacokinetic Properties

    PubMed Central

    Laudeman, Christopher P.; Malkar, Navdeep B.; Krishnan, Radha; Polowy, Karen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Echinocandins are a first-line therapy for candidemia and invasive candidiasis. They are generally safe with few drug interactions, but the stability and pharmacokinetic properties of currently approved echinocandins are such that each was developed for daily intravenous infusion. We sought to discover a novel echinocandin with properties that would enable more flexible dosing regimens, alternate routes of delivery, and expanded utility. Derivatives of known echinocandin scaffolds were generated, and an iterative process of design and screening led to the discovery of CD101, a novel echinocandin that has since demonstrated improved chemical stability and pharmacokinetics. Here, we report the structure-activity relationships (including preclinical efficacy and pharmacokinetic data) for the series of echinocandin analogs from which CD101 was selected. In a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis, the test compounds displayed clear dose responses and were generally associated with lower fungal burdens than that of anidulafungin. Single-dose pharmacokinetic studies in beagle dogs revealed a wide disparity in the half-lives and volumes of distribution, with one compound (now known as CD101) displaying a half-life that is nearly 5-fold longer than that of anidulafungin (53.1 h versus 11.6 h, respectively). In vitro activity data against panels of Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. demonstrated that CD101 behaved similarly to approved echinocandins in terms of potency and spectrum of activity, suggesting that the improved efficacy observed in vivo for CD101 is a result of features beyond the antifungal potency inherent to the molecule. Factors that potentially contribute to the improved in vivo efficacy of CD101 are discussed. PMID:27919891

  8. Characterization of in Vitro Pharmacokinetic Properties of Hoodigogenin A from Hoodia gordonii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was aimed to determine ADME properties of Hoodigogenin A, which is aglycone of oxypregnane steroidal glycoside P57AS3 (P57) isolated from Hoodia gordonii. A series of in vitro assays were used to predict its gastric, intestinal and metabolic stability, intestinal and blood brain barrier (...

  9. A novel prodrug strategy for extremely hydrophobic agents: conjugation to symmetrically branched glycerol trimer improves pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties of fenofibrate.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Licht; Watanabe, Masashi; Taoka, Chiaki; Kono, Mai; Tomida, Yosuke; Matsushita, Tsuyoshi; Kamiya, Masaki; Hattori, Hatsuhiko; Ishizawa, Keisuke; Abe, Shinji; Nemoto, Hisao; Tsuchiya, Koichiro

    2013-07-01

    Management of a lipophilic-hydrophilic balance is a key element in drug design to achieve desirable pharmacokinetic characters. Therefore we have created unique modular molecules, symmetrically branched oligoglycerols (BGL), as an alternative way to endow hydrophobic molecules with sufficient hydrophilicity. We have successfully demonstrated amelioration of the water solubility and thermal stability of several hydrophobic agents by covalent conjugation to BGL so far. However, it has not been clarified whether the molecular modification by BGL also improves the pharmacological and/or pharmacokinetic properties indeed. Recently, we synthesized a novel BGL-prodrug derivative of fenofibrate, which is an antihyperlipidemic agent and one of the most hydrophobic medicinal compounds currently used clinically, by conjugating fenofibric acid to symmetrically branched glycerol trimer (BGL003), the simplest BGL. We have previously demonstrated that the hydrophilicity and water solubility of fenofibrate are improved more than 2000 times just by conjugation to the BGL003. To verify our hypothesis that the prodrug strategy with BGL should improve pharmacological efficacy and pharmacokinetic properties of extremely hydrophobic agents such as fenofibrate by the rise in hydrophilicity, we evaluated the BGL003-prodrug derivative of fenofibrate (FF-BGL) using rodent models. Here we demonstrate that the lipid-lowering effects of fenofibrate are much potentiated by chemical conjugation to BGL003 without exhibiting significant toxicity. Plasma concentration of fenofibric acid, an active metabolite of fenofibrate, after single oral administration of FF-BGL was more than 3 times higher than that of fenofibrate, in accordance. In fasting rats, plasma concentration of fenofibric acid after fenofibrate administration was curtailed into less than half of that in ad libitum-fed rats, while FF-BGL showed about the same plasma level even in the starving rats. This is the first report showing that

  10. Charge Variants of an Avastin Biosimilar Isolation, Characterization, In Vitro Properties and Pharmacokinetics in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wan-Hui; Tao, Wen-Jie; Liu, Li-Li; Shen, Zhen-Duo

    2016-01-01

    The similarity between a proposed biosimilar product and the reference product can be affected by many factors. This study is designed to examine whether any subtle difference in the distribution of the charge variants of an Avastin biosimilar can affect its in vitro potency and in vivo PK. Here, the acidic, basic and main peak fractions of a biosimilar product were isolated using high-performance cation-exchange chromatography and were subjected to various studies to compare their in vitro properties and in vivo PK profile. A serial of analytical methods, including size exclusion chromatography (SEC), imaged capillary isoelectric focusing (icIEF) capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and cation-exchange chromatography (CEX-HPLC) were also used to characterize the isolated charge variants. The kinetics constant was measured using a Biacore X100 system. The study indicates the biosimilar product has a high similarity with avastin in physicochemical properties. The potency in vitro and PK profile in rat of charge variants and biosimilar product are consistent with avastin. PMID:26987122

  11. Charge Variants of an Avastin Biosimilar Isolation, Characterization, In Vitro Properties and Pharmacokinetics in Rat.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan-Yan; Wang, Ning; Liu, Wan-Hui; Tao, Wen-Jie; Liu, Li-Li; Shen, Zhen-Duo

    2016-01-01

    The similarity between a proposed biosimilar product and the reference product can be affected by many factors. This study is designed to examine whether any subtle difference in the distribution of the charge variants of an Avastin biosimilar can affect its in vitro potency and in vivo PK. Here, the acidic, basic and main peak fractions of a biosimilar product were isolated using high-performance cation-exchange chromatography and were subjected to various studies to compare their in vitro properties and in vivo PK profile. A serial of analytical methods, including size exclusion chromatography (SEC), imaged capillary isoelectric focusing (icIEF) capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and cation-exchange chromatography (CEX-HPLC) were also used to characterize the isolated charge variants. The kinetics constant was measured using a Biacore X100 system. The study indicates the biosimilar product has a high similarity with avastin in physicochemical properties. The potency in vitro and PK profile in rat of charge variants and biosimilar product are consistent with avastin.

  12. Pharmacokinetic Properties of Single and Repeated Injection of Liposomal Platelet Substitute in a Rat Model of Red Blood Cell Transfusion-Induced Dilutional Thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Mai; Taguchi, Kazuaki; Ogaki, Shigeru; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Kinoshita, Manabu; Nishikawa, Kahoko; Takeoka, Shinji; Ikeda, Yasuo; Handa, Makoto; Otagiri, Masaki; Maruyama, Toru

    2015-11-01

    A preclinical study of dodecapeptide ((400)HHLGGAKQAGDV(411)) (H12)-(adenosine diphosphate, ADP)-liposomes for use as a synthetic platelet (PLT) substitute under conditions of red blood cell (RBC) transfusion-induced dilutional thrombocytopenia is limited to pharmacological effect. In this study, the pharmacokinetics of H12-(ADP)-liposomes in RBC transfusion-induced dilutional thrombocytopenic rats were evaluated. As evidenced by the use of (14) C, (3) H double-radiolabeled H12-(ADP)-liposomes in which the encapsulated ADP and liposomal membrane were labeled with (14) C and (3) H, respectively, the H12-(ADP)-liposomes remained intact in the blood circulation for up to 3 h after injection, and were mainly distributed to the liver and spleen. The encapsulated ADP was mainly eliminated in the urine, whereas the outer membrane was mainly eliminated in the feces. These successive pharmacokinetic properties of the H12-(ADP)-liposomes in RBC transfusion-induced dilutional thrombocytopenic rats were similar to those in healthy rats, except for the shorter retention time in the circulation. When H12-(ADP)-liposomes were repeatedly injected into RBC transfusion-induced dilutional thrombocytopenic rats at intervals of 5 days at a dose of 10 mg lipids/kg, the second dose of injected H12-(ADP)-liposomes were rapidly cleared from the circulation, namely, via the accelerated blood clearance phenomenon. These novel pharmacokinetic findings provide useful information for the further development of H12-(ADP)-liposomes as a PLT substitute.

  13. 76 FR 35213 - AJT Mining Properties, Inc.; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission AJT Mining Properties, Inc.; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application..., 2011, AJT Mining Properties, Inc., filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant to section 4...: Mr. Scott Willis, AJT Mining Properties, Inc., 5601 Tonsgard Court, Juneau, Alaska 99801; phone:...

  14. Effect of addition of thermally modified cowpea protein on sensory acceptability and textural properties of wheat bread and sponge cake.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Lydia; Euston, Stephen R; Ahmed, Mohamed A

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigates the sensory acceptability and textural properties of leavened wheat bread and sponge cake fortified with cow protein isolates that had been denatured and glycated by thermal treatment. Defatted cowpea flour was prepared from cow pea beans and the protein isolate was prepared (CPI) and thermally denatured (DCPI). To prepare glycated cowpea protein isolate (GCPI) the cowpea flour slurry was heat treated before isolation of the protein. CPI was more susceptible to thermal denaturation than GCPI as determined by turbidity and sulphydryl groups resulting in greater loss of solubility. This is attributed to the higher glycation degree and higher carbohydrate content of GCPI as demonstrated by glycoprotein staining of SDS PAGE gels. Water absorption of bread dough was significantly enhanced by DCPI and to a larger extent GCPI compared to the control, resulting in softer texture. CPI resulted in significantly increased crumb hardness in baked bread than the control whereas DCPI or GCPI resulted in significantly softer crumb. Bread fortified with 4% DCPI or GCPI was similar to control as regards sensory and textural properties whereas 4% CPI was significantly different, limiting its inclusion level to 2%. There was a trend for higher sensory acceptability scores for GCPI containing bread compared DCPI. Whole egg was replaced by 20% by GCPI (3.5%) in sponge cake without affecting the sensory acceptability, whereas CPI and DCPI supplemented cakes were significantly different than the control.

  15. Effects of chitosan coating on physical properties and pharmacokinetic behavior of mitoxantrone liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Jie; Ping, Qineng; Song, Yunmei; Qi, Jianping; Cui, Zheng

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the physical properties and in vivo circulation of chitosan (CH)-coated liposomes of mitoxantrone (MTO). Changes in particle size and zeta potential confirmed the existence of a coating layer on the surface of liposomes. The in vitro release of adsorbed CH from the liposomes was significantly slower than CH solution, indicating the stable interaction between CH and liposomes. The physical stability of the CH-coated liposomes was evaluated by measuring the change in particle size before and after freeze-drying and rehydration. The smallest change was observed when saturated adsorption of CH occurred (0.3%). The sustained release in vitro of MTO from CH-coated liposomes confirmed the increased stability of liposomes. Systemic circulation of CH-coated MTO liposomes was examined. The 0.3% CH-coated liposomes showed the longest circulation time. It could be concluded that the prolonged retention time of the liposomes was closely related with CH coating and its stability effect. PMID:20957162

  16. Pharmacokinetics & Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Andrew S.; Salpekar, Jay A.

    2009-01-01

    Medications administered in clinical practice obtain their therapeutic effect only to the extent that the drug is present in the appropriate concentration at the desired site. To achieve this goal, the prescribing clinician must be aware of how a drug may interact with the physiology of the patient. Pharmacokinetics is the study of this process…

  17. Nanodrugs: pharmacokinetics and safety

    PubMed Central

    Onoue, Satomi; Yamada, Shizuo; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2014-01-01

    To date, various nanodrug systems have been developed for different routes of administration, which include dendrimers, nanocrystals, emulsions, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, micelles, and polymeric nanoparticles. Nanodrug systems have been employed to improve the efficacy, safety, physicochemical properties, and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile of pharmaceutical substances. In particular, functionalized nanodrug systems can offer enhanced bioavailability of orally taken drugs, prolonged half-life of injected drugs (by reducing immunogenicity), and targeted delivery to specific tissues. Thus, nanodrug systems might lower the frequency of administration while providing maximized pharmacological effects and minimized systemic side effects, possibly leading to better therapeutic compliance and clinical outcomes. In spite of these attractive pharmacokinetic advantages, recent attention has been drawn to the toxic potential of nanodrugs since they often exhibit in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, and genotoxicity. A better understanding of the pharmacokinetic and safety characteristics of nanodrugs and the limitations of each delivery option is necessary for the further development of efficacious nanodrugs with high therapeutic potential and a wide safety margin. This review highlights the recent progress in nanodrug system development, with a focus on the pharmacokinetic advantages and safety challenges. PMID:24591825

  18. An update on pharmacological, pharmacokinetic properties and drug-drug interactions of rotigotine transdermal system in Parkinson's disease and restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Elshoff, Jan-Peer; Cawello, Willi; Andreas, Jens-Otto; Mathy, Francois-Xavier; Braun, Marina

    2015-04-01

    This narrative review reports on the pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties of rotigotine, a non-ergolinic D₃/D₂/D₁ dopamine receptor agonist approved for the treatment of early- and advanced-stage Parkinson's disease (PD) and moderate to severe restless legs syndrome (RLS). Rotigotine is formulated as a transdermal patch providing continuous drug delivery over 24 h, with a plasma concentration profile similar to that of administration via continuous intravenous infusion. Absolute bioavailability after 24 h transdermal delivery is 37 % of the applied rotigotine dose. Following a single administration of rotigotine transdermal system (24-h patch-on period), most of the absorbed drug is eliminated in urine and feces as sulphated and glucuronidated conjugates within 24 h of patch removal. The drug shows a high apparent volume of distribution (>2500 L) and a total body clearance of 300-600 L/h. Rotigotine transdermal system provides dose-proportional pharmacokinetics up to supratherapeutic dose rates of 24 mg/24 h, with steady-state plasma drug concentrations attained within 1-2 days of daily dosing. The pharmacokinetics of rotigotine transdermal patch are similar in healthy subjects, patients with early- or advanced-stage PD, and patients with RLS when comparing dose-normalized area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and maximum plasma drug concentration (Cmax), as well as half-life and other pharmacokinetic parameters. Also, it is not influenced in a relevant manner by age, sex, ethnicity, advanced renal insufficiency, or moderate hepatic impairment. No clinically relevant drug-drug interactions were observed following co-administration of rotigotine with levodopa/carbidopa, domperidone, or the CYP450 inhibitors cimetidine or omeprazole. Also, pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of an oral hormonal contraceptive were not influenced by rotigotine co-administration. Rotigotine was generally well tolerated, with an adverse event profile

  19. Bardoxolone methyl (CDDO-Me) as a therapeutic agent: an update on its pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Yang; Yang, Yin-Xue; Zhe, Hong; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Triterpenoids have been used for medicinal purposes in many Asian countries because of their anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiproliferative, anticancer, and anticarcinogenic properties. Bardoxolone methyl, the C-28 methyl ester of 2-cyano-3,12-dioxoolean-1,9-dien-28-oic acid (CDDO) known as CDDO-Me or RTA 402, is one of the derivatives of synthetic triterpenoids. CDDO-Me has been used for the treatment of chronic kidney disease, cancer (including leukemia and solid tumors), and other diseases. In this review, we will update our knowledge of the clinical pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of CDDO-Me, highlighting its clinical benefits and the underlying mechanisms involved. The role of the Kelch-like erythroid cell-derived protein with CNC homology-associated protein 1 (Keap1)/the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway in the therapeutic activities of CDDO-Me will be discussed. CDDO-Me contains α,β-unsaturated carbonyl groups on rings A and C that can generate reversible adducts with the thiol groups of Cys residues in target proteins such as Keap1 and IκB kinase. At low nanomolar concentrations, CDDO-Me protects the cells against oxidative stress via inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation, while CDDO-Me at low micromolar concentrations induces apoptosis by increasing reactive oxygen species and decreasinging intracellular glutathione levels. Through Keap1/Nrf2 and nuclear factor-κB pathways, this agent can modulate the activities of a number of important proteins that regulate inflammation, redox balance, cell proliferation and programmed cell death. In a Phase I trial in cancer patients, CDDO-Me was found to have a slow and saturable oral absorption, a relatively long terminal phase half-life (39 hours at 900 mg/day), nonlinearity (dose-dependent) at high doses (600-1,300 mg/day), and high interpatient variability. As a multifunctional agent, CDDO-Me has improved the renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease

  20. Physical properties and sixth graders' acceptance of an extruded ready-to-eat sweetpotato breakfast cereal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dansby, M. Y.; Bovell-Benjamin, A. C.

    2003-01-01

    Extruded ready-to-eat breakfast cereals (RTEBCs) were made from varying levels of sweetpotato flour (SPF), whole-wheat bran (WWB), and extrusion cooking. Moisture, protein, and ash contents were lower in the 100% SPF than the 100% WWB. Carbohydrate, beta-carotene, and ascorbic acid contents were higher in the 100% SPF. Fat, thiamin, riboflavin contents, bulk densities, and the water absorption index were similar for the cereals. However, the expansion ratio was highest in the 100% SPF cereal. The 100% WWB had the lightest color and most fibrous morphology. Extruded RTEBC containing 100% SPF and 75%/25% SPF/WWB were well-liked and acceptable to sixth graders attending an elementary school in Auburn, Alabama, but the 100% WWB was unacceptable.

  1. Molecular Docking and Prediction of Pharmacokinetic Properties of Dual Mechanism Drugs that Block MAO-B and Adenosine A(2A) Receptors for the Treatment of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Azam, Faizul; Madi, Arwa M; Ali, Hamed I

    2012-07-01

    Monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitory potential of adenosine A(2A) receptor (AA(2A)R) antagonists has raised the possibility of designing dual-target-directed drugs that may provide enhanced symptomatic relief and that may also slow the progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) by protecting against further neurodegeneration. To explain the dual inhibition of MAO-B and AA(2A)R at the molecular level, molecular docking technique was employed. Lamarckian genetic algorithm methodology was used for flexible ligand docking studies. A good correlation (R(2)= 0.524 and 0.627 for MAO-B and AA(2A)R, respectively) was established between docking predicted and experimental K(i) values, which confirms that the molecular docking approach is reliable to study the mechanism of dual interaction of caffeinyl analogs with MAO-B and AA(2A)R. Parameters for Lipinski's "Rule-of-Five" were also calculated to estimate the pharmacokinetic properties of dual-target-directed drugs where both MAO-B inhibition and AA(2A)R antagonism exhibited a positive correlation with calculated LogP having a correlation coefficient R(2) of 0.535 and 0.607, respectively. These results provide some beneficial clues in structural modification for designing new inhibitors as dual-target-directed drugs with desired pharmacokinetic properties for the treatment of PD.

  2. Effect of dietary fiber on properties and acceptance of meat products: a review.

    PubMed

    Talukder, Suman

    2015-01-01

    Meat is an important source of all essential nutritional components of our daily diet as it content most of the essential amino acids, fatty acids, vitamins, and minerals which are lack in plant based food, but it is devoid of dietary fiber, which is very essential component for normal physiological/biochemical process. During meat products processing, its functional values can be improved by supplementation of dietary fiber rich vegetative substances like cereal and pulse flour, vegetable and fruits pulp, etc. by this process, a significant proportion of required daily allowance of dietary fiber can be fulfilled for the frequent meat consumers. The consumption of meat products fortified with of dietary fiber can lead to the prevention of diseases like coronary heart disease, diabetes, irritable bowel disease, obesity, etc. On the other hand, the dietary fiber can effectively be incorporated in the processed meat products as binders, extender, and filler, they can significantly replace the unhealthy fat components from the products; increase acceptability by improving nutritional components, pH, water-holding capacity, emulsion stability, shear press value, sensory characters, etc. of finished products. Addition of dietary fiber in the meat products can increase the cooking yield therefore the economic gain as well.

  3. Consumer acceptability and sensory profile of cooked broccoli with mustard seeds added to improve chemoprotective properties.

    PubMed

    Ghawi, Sameer Khalil; Shen, Yuchi; Niranjan, Keshavan; Methven, Lisa

    2014-09-01

    Broccoli, a rich source of glucosinolates, is a commonly consumed vegetable of the Brassica family. Hydrolysis products of glucosinolates, isothiocyanates, have been associated with health benefits and contribute to the flavor of Brassica. However, boiling broccoli causes the myrosinase enzyme needed for hydrolysis to denature. In order to ensure hydrolysis, broccoli must either be mildly cooked or active sources of myrosinase, such as mustard seed powder, can be added postcooking. In this study, samples of broccoli were prepared in 6 different ways; standard boiling, standard boiling followed by the addition of mustard seeds, sous vide cooking at low temperature (70 °C) and sous vide cooking at higher temperature (100 °C) and sous vide cooking at higher temperature followed by the addition of mustard seeds at 2 different concentrations. The majority of consumers disliked the mildly cooked broccoli samples (70 °C, 12 min, sous vide) which had a hard and stringy texture. The highest mean consumer liking was for standard boiled samples (100 °C, 7 min). Addition of 1% mustard seed powder developed sensory attributes, such as pungency, burning sensation, mustard odor, and flavor. One cluster of consumers (32%) found mustard seeds to be a good complement to cooked broccoli; however, the majority disliked the mustard-derived sensory attributes. Where the mustard seeds were partially processed, doubling the addition to 2% led to only the same level of mustard and pungent flavors as 1% unprocessed seeds, and mean consumer liking remained unaltered. This suggests that optimization of the addition level of partially processed mustard seeds may be a route to enhance bioactivity of cooked broccoli without compromising consumer acceptability.

  4. Application of structure-metabolism relationships in the identification of a selective endothelin A antagonist, BMS-193884, with favourable pharmacokinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, W G; Obermeier, M T; Barrish, J C; Chong, S; Marino, A M; Murugesan, N; Wang-Iverson, D; Morrison, R A

    2003-11-01

    1. Based on binding affinity, 2'-amino-N-(3,4-dimethyl-5-isoxazolyl)-4'-(2-methylpropyl)[1,1'-biphenyl]-2-sulfonamide (2) was identified as an initial lead in a programme to identify selective endothelin (ET) receptor antagonists. However, the compound was extensively metabolized in preclinical animal species and human in vitro systems due to oxidative biotransformation. 2. To optimize this structural class, the site of metabolism of 2 was determined. This allowed for focussed structure-activity and structure-metabolism studies aimed at finding more metabolically stable analogues that maintained potency. New analogues were screened for their ET binding characteristics and their stability in rat and human liver microsomes. 3. The use of the microsomal stability screen was tested by the determination of the pharmacokinetic parameters of select analogues. A good correlation was found between reduced rates of rat microsomal metabolism and reduced clearance in the rat. 4. N-(3,4-dimethyl-5-isoxazolyl)-4'-(2-oxazolyl)[1,1'-biphenyl]-2-sulfonamide (3) was identified as an analogue with improved in vitro properties and further studies revealed that the compound had improved pharmacokinetic properties. 5. N-[[2'-[[(3,4-dimethyl-5-isoxazolyl)amino]sulfonyl]-4-(2-oxazolyl)[1,1'-biphenyl]-2-yl]methyl]acetamide (4) was subsequently identified as a compound with superior in vitro properties compared with compound 3, but when tested in vivo it had a substantially increased rate of clearance. Further studies demonstrated that the clearance of this closely related structural analogue was not dictated by metabolic processes, but was mediated by transport-mediated direct biliary excretion. 6. The utility of screening for in vitro liver microsomal stability as part of the lead optimization process for compounds with metabolic liabilities was shown. It was also shown that relatively small molecular changes can dramatically change the disposition of closely related analogues and care

  5. Influence of oak maturation regimen on composition, sensory properties, quality, and consumer acceptability of cabernet sauvignon wines.

    PubMed

    Crump, Anna M; Johnson, Trent E; Wilkinson, Kerry L; Bastian, Susan E P

    2015-02-11

    Oak barrels have long been the preferred method for oak maturation of wine, but barrels contribute significantly to production costs, so alternate oak maturation regimens have been introduced, particularly for wines at lower price points. To date, few studies have investigated consumers' acceptance of wines made using non-traditional oak treatments. In this study, two Cabernet Sauvignon wines were aged using traditional (i.e., barrel) and/or alternative (i.e., stainless steel or plastic tanks and vats, with oak wood added) maturation regimens. Chemical and sensory analyses were subsequently performed to determine the influence on wine composition and sensory properties, that is, the presence of key oak-derived volatile compounds and perceptible oak aromas and flavor. The quality of a subset of wines was rated by a panel of 10 wine experts using a 20-point scoring system, with all wines considered technically sound. Consumer acceptance of wines was also determined. Hedonic ratings ranged from 5.7 to 5.9 (on a 9-point scale), indicating there was no significant difference in consumers' overall liking of each wine. However, segmentation based on individual liking scores identified three distinct clusters comprising consumers with considerably different wine preferences. These results justify wine producers' use of alternative oak maturation regimens to achieve wine styles that appeal to different segments of their target market.

  6. Population pharmacokinetics of exenatide

    PubMed Central

    Mager, Donald E.

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of the present analysis was to develop a core population pharmacokinetic model for the pharmacokinetic properties of immediate‐release (IR) exenatide, which can be used in subsequent analyses of novel sustained‐release formulations. Methods Data from eight clinical trials, evaluating a wide range of doses and different administration routes, were available for analysis. All modelling and simulations were conducted using the nonlinear mixed‐effect modelling program NONMEM. External model validation was performed using data from the phase III clinical trials programme through standard visual predictive checks. Results The pharmacokinetics of IR exenatide was described by a two‐compartment model, and the absorption of subcutaneous exenatide was described with a sequential zero‐order rate constant followed by a saturable nonlinear absorption process. Drug elimination was characterized by two parallel routes (linear and nonlinear), with significant relationships between renal function and the linear elimination route, and between body weight and volume of distribution. For a subject with normal renal function, the linear clearance was estimated to be 5.06 l hr−1. The nonlinear elimination was quantified with a Michaelis–Menten constant (K m) of 567 pg ml−1 and a maximum rate of metabolism (V max) of 1.6 μg h−1. For subcutaneous administration, 37% of the subcutaneous dose is absorbed via the zero‐order process, and the remaining 63% via the nonlinear pathway. Conclusions The present analysis provides a comprehensive population pharmacokinetic model for exenatide, expanding the elimination process to include both linear and nonlinear components, providing a suitable platform for a broad range of concentrations and patient conditions that can be leveraged in future modelling efforts of sustained‐release exenatide formulations. PMID:27650681

  7. Design of a suitable formulation of FK613, a novel antiallergic agent, based on its pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, T; Nagashima, S; Inaba, H; Kajiho, T; Kageyama, H; Sugiyama, A; Nakashima, M

    1996-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of FK613, a novel indolyl piperidine derivative, were investigated after oral administrations of 5, 10 and 20 mg in hard gelatin capsules to healthy male volunteers. FK613 was rapidly and almost completely absorbed, and >89% was recovered in the urine as the unchanged form. The urinary excretion of FK613 was linearly correlated with plasma concentration and its low water solubility was the main concern regarding the safety. In another experiment using a double-blind crossover design, in which 0 (placebo), 5 and 20 mg FK613 were administered to determine the plasma concentration-effect relationship, suppression of the intradermal histamine-induced skin reaction by FK613 was observed. Thus, the maintenance of a plasma concentration of FK613 in the range of 80-250 ng center dot ml-1 was recommended to ensure the suppression of histamine-induced wheal by >50% and not to exceed the solubility in urine. To achieve this, a new hydrogel-type formulation of FK613 was developed, with the aim both of delaying its absorption, so as to suppress the sharp rise in plasma concentration, and of maintaining the effective concentration for a longer period of time. This formulation was administered after meals at the doses of 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 mg, and at repeated doses of 40 mg twice daily for 6.5 days to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and safety in healthy subjects. The area under the plasma concentration curve increased linearly with dose, whereas maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) tended to peak as dose increased, indicating the desirable properties of this formulation. Although Cmax exceeded 250 ng/ml at doses of 30 mg or more, no urinary crystal formation was observed on careful inspection of urine.

  8. Sensitive analysis and simultaneous assessment of pharmacokinetic properties of crocin and crocetin after oral administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Fei, Fei; Zhen, Le; Zhu, Xuanxuan; Wang, Jiankun; Li, Sijia; Geng, Jianliang; Sun, Runbin; Yu, Xiaoyi; Chen, Tingting; Feng, Siqi; Wang, Pei; Yang, Na; Zhu, Yejin; Huang, Jingqiu; Zhao, Yuqing; Aa, Jiye; Wang, Guangji

    2017-02-15

    Crocin and crocetin in rat plasma were simultaneously analysed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectroscopy (UPLC-MS/MS), and method was fully validated. For the first time, levels of both crocin and crocetin in plasma were profiled after oral administration of crocin, and this UPLC-MS/MS approach was applied to evaluate pharmacokinetics and relative bioavailability of crocin and crocetin in rats. It was shown that crocin transformed into crocetin quickly in the gastrointestinal tract, and crocetin was 56-81 fold higher exposed in rat plasma than crocin after oral administration of crocin. A comparison study revealed that an oral administration of equal molar crocin achieved higher exposure of crocetin in rat plasma than that of crocetin. It was suggested that oral administration of crocin has the advantages over crocetin, and crocetin may be the active component potentially responsible for the pharmacological effect of crocin.

  9. Preparation, Properties and Preclinical Pharmacokinetics of Low Molecular Weight Heparin-modified Isoliquiritigenin-loaded Solid Lipid Nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyun; Qiao, Hua; Chen, Ying; Li, Lin; Xia, Huxiong; Shi, Yanbin

    2016-01-01

    Low molecular weight heparin-modified isoliquiritigenin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticle (LMWH-ISL-SLN) was developed for injective application. The morphological observation, particle diameter and zeta potential of LMWH-ISL-SLN were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and a Malvern Zetasizer. Its entrapment efficiency (EE) and drug loading (DL) were determined by ultracentrifuge. The in-vitro release experiments were performed by dialysis technique. The cytotoxic effects of LMWH-ISL-SLN on Hep-G2 cell lines were determined using an MTT assay. Pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution studies were conducted in kunming mice after intravenous administration of LMWH-ISL-SLN. The average drug entrapment efficiency for LMWH-ISL-SLN was (99.80 ± 3.27)%, drug loading was (18.68 ± 1.51)%, mean particle size was (217.53 ± 4.86) nm and zeta potential was (–18.24 ± 2.47) mV. The in-vitro release experiments demonstrated isoliquiritigenin release from LMWH-ISL-SLN was in line with Weibull’s distribution law. Hemolysis test and dose-related toxic effects proved that LMWH-ISL-SLN was a safe and non toxic product when given by intravenous injection. The pharmacokinetics results of LMWH-ISL-SLN showed that the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC0→∞)of LMWH-ISL-SLN was greater than that for the isoliquiritigenin solution in plasma. Tissue distribution study indicated that ISL were mainly distributed in the liver and lung. In conclusion, low molecular weight heparin-modified SLN system is a promising carrier for the intravenous delivery of ISL. PMID:27980562

  10. Quantitative Property-Property Relationship for Screening-Level Prediction of Intrinsic Clearance of Volatile Organic Chemicals in Rats and Its Integration within PBPK Models to Predict Inhalation Pharmacokinetics in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Peyret, Thomas; Krishnan, Kannan

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were (i) to develop a screening-level Quantitative property-property relationship (QPPR) for intrinsic clearance (CLint) obtained from in vivo animal studies and (ii) to incorporate it with human physiology in a PBPK model for predicting the inhalation pharmacokinetics of VOCs. CLint, calculated as the ratio of the in vivo Vmax (μmol/h/kg bw rat) to the Km (μM), was obtained for 26 VOCs from the literature. The QPPR model resulting from stepwise linear regression analysis passed the validation step (R2 = 0.8; leave-one-out cross-validation Q2 = 0.75) for CLint normalized to the phospholipid (PL) affinity of the VOCs. The QPPR facilitated the calculation of CLint (L PL/h/kg bw rat) from the input data on log Pow, log blood: water PC and ionization potential. The predictions of the QPPR as lower and upper bounds of the 95% mean confidence intervals (LMCI and UMCI, resp.) were then integrated within a human PBPK model. The ratio of the maximum (using LMCI for CLint) to minimum (using UMCI for CLint) AUC predicted by the QPPR-PBPK model was 1.36 ± 0.4 and ranged from 1.06 (1,1-dichloroethylene) to 2.8 (isoprene). Overall, the integrated QPPR-PBPK modeling method developed in this study is a pragmatic way of characterizing the impact of the lack of knowledge of CLint in predicting human pharmacokinetics of VOCs, as well as the impact of prediction uncertainty of CLint on human pharmacokinetics of VOCs. PMID:22685458

  11. A comparative analysis of pharmacokinetics properties of diagnostic bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals on the basis of phosphonic acids and technetium-99m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tishchenko, V. K.; Petriev, V. M.; Smoryzanova, O. A.; Zavestovskaya, I. N.

    2017-01-01

    This work is devoted to comparative research of pharmacokinetics properties of four bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals (RPP) on the basis of bi- tetra- and penta-phosphonic acids. Biodistribution studies were performed in intact rats after intravenous injections of 99mTc-hydroxyethylidenediphosphonic acid (99mTc-HEDP), 99mTc-oxabiphor (99mTc-OXB), 99mTc-ethylenediaminetetramethylenephosphonic acid (99mTc-EDTMP) or 99mTc-diethylenetriaminopentakis(methylphosphonic acid) (99mTc-PPA). In the structure of the HEDP contains two phosphonic groups, OENTMP and EDTMP – four phosphonic groups, PPA – five phosphonic groups. Radiochemical yield of labeled 99mTc HEDP, OENTMP, EDTMP, PPA is not less than 95%, the radiochemical impurities does not exceed 5%. The investigated compounds have high stability in vivo and selective accumulation in osseous tissue. The highest concentrations of labeled compounds is reached in 3–24 hours after their intravenous injections. The investigated compounds are rapidly excreted from blood and soft organs and tissues mainly through the urinary routes. So present study has showed that these RPP have properties, which making them promising candidates as a diagnostic pharmaceuticals of bone metastases.

  12. Redox properties of structural Fe in clay minerals. 1. Electrochemical quantification of electron-donating and -accepting capacities of smectites.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Christopher A; Aeschbacher, Michael; Soltermann, Daniela; Voegelin, Andreas; Baeyens, Bart; Marques Fernandes, Maria; Hofstetter, Thomas B; Sander, Michael

    2012-09-04

    Clay minerals often contain redox-active structural iron that participates in electron transfer reactions with environmental pollutants, bacteria, and biological nutrients. Measuring the redox properties of structural Fe in clay minerals using electrochemical approaches, however, has proven to be difficult due to a lack of reactivity between clay minerals and electrodes. Here, we overcome this limitation by using one-electron-transfer mediating compounds to facilitate electron transfer between structural Fe in clay minerals and a vitreous carbon working electrode in an electrochemical cell. Using this approach, the electron-accepting and -donating capacities (Q(EAC) and Q(EDC)) were quantified at applied potentials (E(H)) of -0.60 V and +0.61 V (vs SHE), respectively, for four natural Fe-bearing smectites (i.e., SWa-1, SWy-2, NAu-1, and NAu-2) having different total Fe contents (Fe(total) = 2.3 to 21.2 wt % Fe) and varied initial Fe(2+)/Fe(total) states. For every SWa-1 and SWy-2 sample, all the structural Fe was redox-active over the tested E(H) range, demonstrating reliable quantification of Fe content and redox state. Yet for NAu-1 and NAu-2, a significant fraction of the structural Fe was redox-inactive, which was attributed to Fe-rich smectites requiring more extreme E(H)-values to achieve complete Fe reduction and/or oxidation. The Q(EAC) and Q(EDC) values provided here can be used as benchmarks in future studies examining the extent of reduction and oxidation of Fe-bearing smectites.

  13. [Pharmacokinetics of carbapenems].

    PubMed

    Suchánková, H; Rychlíčková, J; Urbánek, K

    2012-06-01

    Carbapenems, beta-lactam antibiotics, are ideal candidates for the treatment of serious nosocomial infections including sepsis for their exceptionally broad antibacterial spectrum and high efficiency. They are administered parenterally by intravenous infusion. Carbapenems penetrate well and rapidly into many different tissue compartments and the interstitial fluid. They are metabolized by renal dihydropeptidase-1. Therefore, imipenem must be co-administered with an inhibitor of dihydropeptidase-1. Other carbapenems registered in the Czech Republic (meropenem, ertapenem and doripenem) are more stable to this enzyme. Carbapenems are mainly eliminated via the kidneys and dose adjustment in patients with renal impairment is necessary. The elimination half-life of most carbapenems is around 1 hour with the exception of ertapenem, with 3.8-hour half-life, which allows its once-daily use. Carbapenems are a group of antibiotics with time-dependent effect. Their typical pharmaceutical property is a limited stability in solution after dilution. Administration in the prolonged infusion appears to be a convenient strategy to achieve higher efficiency. Pharmacokinetic parameters of carbapenems may vary individually, especially in critically ill patients and those treated by renal replacement therapy. Therefore, individualization of dosing regimens based on knowledge of pharmacokinetic parameters of individual patients may be useful.

  14. In silico optimization of pharmacokinetic properties and receptor binding affinity simultaneously: a 'parallel progression approach to drug design' applied to β-blockers.

    PubMed

    Advani, Poonam; Joseph, Blessy; Ambre, Premlata; Pissurlenkar, Raghuvir; Khedkar, Vijay; Iyer, Krishna; Gabhe, Satish; Iyer, Radhakrishnan P; Coutinho, Evans

    2016-01-01

    The present work exploits the potential of in silico approaches for minimizing attrition of leads in the later stages of drug development. We propose a theoretical approach, wherein 'parallel' information is generated to simultaneously optimize the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of lead candidates. β-blockers, though in use for many years, have suboptimal PKs; hence are an ideal test series for the 'parallel progression approach'. This approach utilizes molecular modeling tools viz. hologram quantitative structure activity relationships, homology modeling, docking, predictive metabolism, and toxicity models. Validated models have been developed for PK parameters such as volume of distribution (log Vd) and clearance (log Cl), which together influence the half-life (t1/2) of a drug. Simultaneously, models for PD in terms of inhibition constant pKi have been developed. Thus, PK and PD properties of β-blockers were concurrently analyzed and after iterative cycling, modifications were proposed that lead to compounds with optimized PK and PD. We report some of the resultant re-engineered β-blockers with improved half-lives and pKi values comparable with marketed β-blockers. These were further analyzed by the docking studies to evaluate their binding poses. Finally, metabolic and toxicological assessment of these molecules was done through in silico methods. The strategy proposed herein has potential universal applicability, and can be used in any drug discovery scenario; provided that the data used is consistent in terms of experimental conditions, endpoints, and methods employed. Thus the 'parallel progression approach' helps to simultaneously fine-tune various properties of the drug and would be an invaluable tool during the drug development process.

  15. Optimizing nanomedicine pharmacokinetics using physiologically based pharmacokinetics modelling.

    PubMed

    Moss, Darren Michael; Siccardi, Marco

    2014-09-01

    The delivery of therapeutic agents is characterized by numerous challenges including poor absorption, low penetration in target tissues and non-specific dissemination in organs, leading to toxicity or poor drug exposure. Several nanomedicine strategies have emerged as an advanced approach to enhance drug delivery and improve the treatment of several diseases. Numerous processes mediate the pharmacokinetics of nanoformulations, with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination (ADME) being poorly understood and often differing substantially from traditional formulations. Understanding how nanoformulation composition and physicochemical properties influence drug distribution in the human body is of central importance when developing future treatment strategies. A helpful pharmacological tool to simulate the distribution of nanoformulations is represented by physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) modelling, which integrates system data describing a population of interest with drug/nanoparticle in vitro data through a mathematical description of ADME. The application of PBPK models for nanomedicine is in its infancy and characterized by several challenges. The integration of property-distribution relationships in PBPK models may benefit nanomedicine research, giving opportunities for innovative development of nanotechnologies. PBPK modelling has the potential to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning nanoformulation disposition and allow for more rapid and accurate determination of their kinetics. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of nanomedicine distribution and the use of PBPK modelling in the characterization of nanoformulations with optimal pharmacokinetics.

  16. Chemical, biochemical, pharmacokinetic, and biological properties of L-680,833: a potent, orally active monocyclic beta-lactam inhibitor of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte elastase.

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, J B; Shah, S K; Finke, P E; Dorn, C P; Hagmann, W K; Hale, J J; Kissinger, A L; Thompson, K R; Brause, K; Chandler, G O

    1993-01-01

    A series of potent and highly selective time-dependent monocyclic beta-lactam inhibitors of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte elastase (PMNE, EC 3.4.21.37) is described. The intrinsic potency of these compounds, as exemplified by L-680,833 (k(inactivation)/K(i) of 622,000 M-1.s-1), is reflected at the cellular level where it inhibits generation of the specific N-terminal cleavage product A alpha-(1-21) from the A alpha chain of fibrinogen by enzyme released from isolated polymorphonuclear leukocytes stimulated with fMet-Leu-Phe with an IC50 of 0.06 microM. The inhibitory activity of L-680,833 is also apparent in whole blood stimulated with A23187, where it inhibits formation of A alpha-(1-21) and PMNE-alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor complex formation with IC50 values of 9 microM. Pharmacokinetic studies indicate that after oral dosing L-680,833 is bioavailable in rats and rhesus monkeys. This oral bioavailability is reflected by the inhibition (i) of tissue damage elicited in hamster lungs by intratracheal instillation of human PMNE and (ii) enzyme released from human PMN stimulated after their transfer into the pleural cavity of mice. The properties of L-680,833 allow it to effectively supplement the activity of natural inhibitors of PMNE in vivo, suggesting that this type of low-molecular-weight synthetic inhibitor could have therapeutic value in diseases where PMNE damages tissue. PMID:8378355

  17. Effect of Vitamin D3 Fortification and Saskatoon Berry Syrup Addition on the Flavor Profile, Acceptability, and Antioxidant Properties of Rooibos Tea (Aspalathus linearis).

    PubMed

    Grant, Jennifer; Ryland, Donna; Isaak, Cara K; Prashar, Suvira; Siow, Yaw L; Taylor, Carla G; Aliani, Michel

    2017-03-01

    The unique characteristics and healthful reputation of caffeine-free rooibos tea (RT) make it an ideal carrier for vitamin D3 supplementation, and a potential base for the addition of Saskatoon berry syrup (SBS), a natural flavor additive. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of vitamin D3 fortification and SBS addition on the flavor profile, consumer acceptability, and antioxidant properties of RT. Six formulations (RT, RT with SBS, RT with SBS and vitamin D3 , RT with vitamin D3 , green tea [GT], and GT with SBS) were evaluated by 12 trained panelists and 114 consumers. The formulations were also assessed for antioxidant capacity, physical characteristics, and untargeted phytochemical content. Sensory results revealed that the mean intensity values for berry and sweet attributes were significantly higher (P < 0.05) while bitter and astringent attributes were significantly lower when SBS was added to RT samples compared to those without syrup. Acceptability of flavor, aftertaste, and overall acceptability were also significantly higher for the RT with SBS. The addition of SBS to RT significantly increased the antioxidant capacities which may increase the related health benefits of RT. SBS contributed several polyphenols, particularly flavonoids, to the tea. Vitamin D3 added to RT formulations did not significantly affect the sensory attributes, acceptability, or antioxidant content. For the development of a functional vitamin D3 fortified iced-tea beverage that can be consumed as part of the daily diet, SBS could be a favorable flavoring additive that may provide additional health benefits.

  18. Physicochemical and Pharmacokinetic Characterization of Amorphous Solid Dispersion of Meloxicam with Enhanced Dissolution Property and Storage Stability.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Masanori; Kimura, Keisuke; Kanda, Atsushi; Kawachi, Takaki; Matsuda, Akitoshi; Yuminoki, Kayo; Hashimoto, Naofumi

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) of meloxicam (MEL) for providing rapid onset of action. ASDs of MEL with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) K-30 (MEL/PVP), HPC-SSL (MEL/HPC), and Eudragit EPO (MEL/EPO) were prepared. The physicochemical properties were characterized by focusing on morphology, crystallinity, dissolution properties, stability, and the interaction of MEL with coexisting polymers. MEL/EPO was physicochemically stable after storage at 40°C/75% RH for 30 days. In contrast, recrystallization of MEL was observed in MEL/PVP and MEL/HPC at 40°C/50% RH for 30 days. Infrared spectroscopic studies and (1)H NMR analyses of MEL/EPO revealed that Eudragit EPO interacted with MEL and reduced intermolecular binding between MEL molecules. Intermolecular interaction of drug molecules is necessary for the formation of crystalline. Thus, the interaction of MEL with Eudragit EPO and interruption of the formation of supramolecular interaction between MEL molecules might lead to the inhibition of crystal growth of MEL. Of all the MEL solid dispersions prepared, MEL/EPO showed the largest improvement in dissolution behavior. Oral administration of MEL/EPO to rats showed rapid and enhanced MEL exposure with a 2.4-fold increase in bioavailability compared with crystalline MEL. Based on these findings, MEL/EPO was physicochemically stable and provided a rapid onset of action and enhanced bioavailability after oral administration.

  19. Paediatric pharmacokinetics: key considerations

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, Hannah Katharine; Marriott, John Francis

    2015-01-01

    A number of anatomical and physiological factors determine the pharmacokinetic profile of a drug. Differences in physiology in paediatric populations compared with adults can influence the concentration of drug within the plasma or tissue. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of anatomical and physiological changes that affect pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs to understand consequences of dose adjustments in infants and children. Pharmacokinetic clinical trials in children are complicated owing to the limitations on blood sample volumes and perception of pain in children resulting from blood sampling. There are alternative sampling techniques that can minimize the invasive nature of such trials. Population based models can also limit the sampling required from each individual by increasing the overall sample size to generate robust pharmacokinetic data. This review details key considerations in the design and development of paediatric pharmacokinetic clinical trials. PMID:25855821

  20. Paediatric pharmacokinetics: key considerations.

    PubMed

    Batchelor, Hannah Katharine; Marriott, John Francis

    2015-03-01

    A number of anatomical and physiological factors determine the pharmacokinetic profile of a drug. Differences in physiology in paediatric populations compared with adults can influence the concentration of drug within the plasma or tissue. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of anatomical and physiological changes that affect pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs to understand consequences of dose adjustments in infants and children. Pharmacokinetic clinical trials in children are complicated owing to the limitations on blood sample volumes and perception of pain in children resulting from blood sampling. There are alternative sampling techniques that can minimize the invasive nature of such trials. Population based models can also limit the sampling required from each individual by increasing the overall sample size to generate robust pharmacokinetic data. This review details key considerations in the design and development of paediatric pharmacokinetic clinical trials.

  1. Biochemical, thrombolytic and pharmacokinetic properties of rt-PA P47G, K49N, a substitution variant of human tissue-type plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Nelles, L; Li, X K; Vanlinthout, I; De Cock, F; Lijnen, H R; Collen, D

    1992-04-02

    rt-PA P47G, K49N, a substitution variant of recombinant human tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA), in which proline at position 47 and lysine at position 49 were replaced by glycine and asparagine respectively, was previously described by Ahern et al. (J Biol Chem 1990; 265:5540-5) to have an extended in vivo half-life with unaltered in vitro fibrinolytic properties. Because this variant might possess an increased in vivo thrombolytic potency, we have constructed its cDNA, expressed it in Chinese hamster ovary cells and determined its biochemical, thrombolytic and pharmacokinetic properties relative to those of home-made rt-PA and of alteplase (Actilyse). The specific fibrinolytic activities on fibrin plates were 160,000 +/- 17,000, 210,000 +/- 88,000 and 460,000 +/- 72,000 IU/mg (mean +/- SEM) for rt-PA P47G, K49N, rt-PA and alteplase, respectively, while the catalytic efficiencies for plasminogen activation (k2/Km) in the absence of fibrin were comparable (1.1 to 1.7 x 10(-3) microM-1s-1). Fibrin enhanced the rate of plasminogen activation by rt-PA P47G, K49N 100-fold and by both wild-type molecules 390-fold. Binding of the variant rt-PA to fibrin was significantly reduced, but its affinity for lysine-Sepharose was unaltered. In an in vitro clot lysis system, consisting of a radiolabeled human plasma clot submersed in plasma, 50% clot lysis in 2 h required 0.67 +/- 0.14 micrograms/ml rt-PA P47G, K49N, 0.36 +/- 0.01 micrograms/ml rt-PA and 0.17 +/- 0.01 micrograms/ml alteplase, respectively (mean +/- SEM; n = 3 or 4). At these doses residual fibrinogen levels at 2 h were in excess of 80%.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicology of theranostic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Homan; Mintri, Shrutika; Menon, Archita Venugopal; Lee, Hea Yeon; Choi, Hak Soo; Kim, Jonghan

    2015-11-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are considered a promising tool in both diagnosis and therapeutics. Theranostic NPs possess the combined properties of targeted imaging and drug delivery within a single entity. While the categorization of theranostic NPs is based on their structure and composition, the pharmacokinetics of NPs are significantly influenced by the physicochemical properties of theranostic NPs as well as the routes of administration. Consequently, altered pharmacokinetics modify the pharmacodynamic efficacy and toxicity of NPs. Although theranostic NPs hold great promise in nanomedicine and biomedical applications, a lack of understanding persists on the mechanisms of the biodistribution and adverse effects of NPs. To better understand the diagnostic and therapeutic functions of NPs, this review discusses the factors that influence the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicology of theranostic NPs, along with several strategies for developing novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of drugs in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Feghali, Maisa; Venkataramanan, Raman; Caritis, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is a complex state where changes in maternal physiology have evolved to favor the development and growth of the placenta and the fetus. These adaptations may affect preexisting disease or result in pregnancy-specific disorders. Similarly, variations in physiology may alter the pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics that determines drug dosing and effect. It follows that detailed pharmacologic information is required to adjust therapeutic treatment strategies during pregnancy. Understanding both pregnancy physiology and the gestation-specific pharmacology of different agents is necessary to achieve effective treatment and limit maternal and fetal risk. Unfortunately, most drug studies have excluded pregnant women based on often-mistaken concerns regarding fetal risk. Furthermore, over two-thirds of women receive prescription drugs while pregnant, with treatment and dosing strategies based on data from healthy male volunteers and non-pregnant women, and with little adjustment for the complex physiology of pregnancy and its unique disease states. This review will describe basic concepts in pharmacokinetics and their clinical relevance and highlight the variations in pregnancy that may impact the pharmacokinetic properties of medications. PMID:26452316

  4. Simulation of differential drug pharmacokinetics under heat and exercise stress using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Pardeep; Peng, Henry T; Cheung, Bob; Edginton, Andrea

    2011-05-01

    Under extreme conditions of heat exposure and exercise stress, the human body undergoes major physiological changes. Perturbations in organ blood flows, gastrointestinal properties, and vascular physiology may impact the body's ability to absorb, distribute, and eliminate drugs. Clinical studies on the effect of these stressors on drug pharmacokinetics demonstrate that the likelihood of pharmacokinetic alteration is dependent on drug properties and the intensity of the stressor. The objectives of this study were to use literature data to quantify the correlation between exercise and heat exposure intensity to changing physiological parameters and further, to use this information for the parameterization of a whole-body, physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for the purposes of determining those drug properties most likely to demonstrate altered drug pharmacokinetics under stress. Cardiac output and most organ blood flows were correlated with heart rate using regression analysis. Other altered parameters included hematocrit and intravascular albumin concentration. Pharmacokinetic simulations of intravenous and oral administration of hypothetical drugs with either a low or high value of lipophilicity, unbound fraction in plasma, and unbound intrinsic hepatic clearance demonstrated that the area under the curve of those drugs with a high unbound intrinsic clearance was most affected (up to a 130% increase) following intravenous administration, whereas following oral administration, pharmacokinetic changes were smaller (<40% increase in area under the curve) for all hypothetical compounds. A midazolam physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was also used to demonstrate that simulated changes in pharmacokinetic parameters under exercise and heat stress were generally consistent with those reported in the literature.

  5. Tianeptine. A review of its pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, and therapeutic efficacy in depression and coexisting anxiety and depression.

    PubMed

    Wilde, M I; Benfield, P

    1995-03-01

    Tianeptine is a novel antidepressant agent, both structurally (modified tricyclic) and in terms of its pharmacodynamic profile. Unlike other antidepressant agents, tianeptine stimulates the uptake of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) in rat brain synaptosomes and rat and human platelets, increases 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels in cerebral tissue and plasma, and reduces serotonergic-induced behaviour. Tianeptine reduces the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal response to stress, antagonises stress-induced behavioural deficits and prevents changes in cerebral morphology. The antidepressant efficacy of tianeptine, as shown in 2 trials of patients with major depression or depressed bipolar disorder with or without melancholia, is greater than that of placebo. In patients with major depression without melancholia or psychotic features, depressed bipolar disorder or dysthymic disorder, the antidepressant efficacy of short term (4 weeks to 3 months) tianeptine therapy appears to be similar to that of amitriptyline, imipramine and fluoxetine and may be superior to that of maprotiline in patients with coexisting depression and anxiety. However, submaximal dosages of amitriptyline and maprotiline were used in these studies. Preliminary evidence suggests that tianeptine may also be effective in patients with endogenous depression. Progressive therapeutic improvements have been observed with up to 1 year of tianeptine treatment, and long term therapy may reduce the rate of relapse or recurrence. Tianeptine is effective in the treatment of depression in elderly and post-alcohol-withdrawal patient subgroups. Tianeptine was more effective in reducing psychic anxiety than placebo in patients with major depression or depressed bipolar disorder with or without melancholia. The overall anxiolytic properties of tianeptine in patients with coexisting depression and anxiety appear to be similar to those of amitriptyline, imipramine and fluoxetine and may be superior to those

  6. Development of a Performance and Processing Property Acceptance Region for Cementitious Low-Level Waste Forms at Savannah River Site - 13174

    SciTech Connect

    Staub, Aaron V.; Reigel, Marissa M.

    2013-07-01

    The Saltstone Production and Disposal Facilities (SPF and SDF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have been treating decontaminated salt solution, a low-level aqueous waste stream (LLW) since facility commissioning in 1990. In 2012, the Saltstone Facilities implemented a new Performance Assessment (PA) that incorporates an alternate design for the disposal facility to ensure that the performance objectives of DOE Order 435.1 and the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) of Fiscal Year 2005 Section 3116 are met. The PA performs long term modeling of the waste form, disposal facility, and disposal site hydrogeology to determine the transport history of radionuclides disposed in the LLW. Saltstone has been successfully used to dispose of LLW in a grout waste form for 15 years. Numerous waste form property assumptions directly impact the fate and transport modeling performed in the PA. The extent of process variability and consequence on performance properties are critical to meeting the assumptions of the PA. The SPF has ensured performance property acceptability by way of implementing control strategies that ensure the process operates within the analyzed limits of variability, but efforts continue to improve the understanding of facility performance in relation to the PA analysis. A similar understanding of the impact of variability on processing parameters is important from the standpoint of the operability of the production facility. The fresh grout slurry properties (particularly slurry rheology and the rate of hydration and structure formation) of the waste form directly impact the pressure and flow rates that can be reliably processed. It is thus equally important to quantify the impact of variability on processing parameters to ensure that the design basis assumptions for the production facility are maintained. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has been pursuing a process that will ultimately establish a property acceptance region (PAR) to incorporate

  7. Effect of variety and processing method on functional properties of traditional sweet potato flour (“elubo”) and sensory acceptability of cooked paste (“amala”)

    PubMed Central

    Fetuga, Ganiyat; Tomlins, Keith; Henshaw, Folake; Idowu, Michael

    2014-01-01

    “Amala” is a generic term in Nigeria, used to describe a thick paste prepared by stirring flour (“elubo”) from yam, cassava or unripe plantain, in hot water, to form a smooth consistency. In order to overcome its high perishability and increase the utilization of sweet potato roots, three varieties of sweet potato roots were processed into flour using two methods. The interactive effect of variety and the processing method had a significant effect (P < 0.05) on all the functional properties of the flour except yellowness, setback viscosity, and peak time. Acceptable sweet potato “amala” with average sensory acceptability score of 7.5 were obtained from yellow-fleshed varieties irrespective of the processing method. Flour that produced acceptable “amala” were characterized by lower values of protein (2.20–3.94%), fiber (1.30–1.65%), total sugar (12.41–38.83 μg/mg), water absorption capacity (168–215 g/100 g), water solubility (8.29–14.65%), swelling power (0.52–0.82 g/g), and higher peak time (6.9–8.7 min). PMID:25493186

  8. How do the Properties of Allan Hills 84001 Compare With Accepted Criteria for Evidence of Ancient Life?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; McKay, D. S.; Thomas-Keprta, K.; Westall, F.; Romanek, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    Criteria for Past Life: To be confident that any sample contains evidence of past life or biogenic activity, one must determine beyond a shadow of a doubt that certain well-established features or biomarker signatures are present in the sample. In the case of martian samples, the criteria for past life have not been established because if life existed on the planet, we have no way of knowing its detailed characteristics. Lacking independent evidence about the nature of possible past life on Mars, the scientific community must use, for the time being, the criteria established for ancient samples from the Earth: (1) Do we know the geologic context of the sample? Is it compatible with past life? (2) Do we know the age of the sample and its stratigraphic location? Are they understood enough to relate possible life to geologic history? (3) Does the sample contain evidence of cellular morphology? (4) What structural remains of colonies or communities exist within the samples? (5) Is there any evidence of biominerals showing chemical or mineral disequilibria? (6) Is there any evidence of stable isotope patterns unique to biology? (7) Are there any organic biomarkers present? (8) Are the features indigenous to the sample? For acceptance of past life in a geologic sample, essentially all of these criteria must he met.

  9. Pharmacokinetics of three different injectable zuclopenthixol preparations.

    PubMed

    Aaes-Jørgensen, T

    1989-01-01

    1. The zuclopenthixol concentrations in serum has been investigated in man and dog after injection of three different zuclopenthixol preparations. These were zuclopenthixol dihydrochloride in aqueous solution, zuclopenthixol acetate in oil and zuclopenthixol decanoate in oil. 2. The pharmacokinetic profiles of the three injectable zuclopenthixol preparations are very different. Maximum serum levels are obtained after about 1 hour for zuclopenthixol dihydrochloride, after 36 hours for zuclopenthixol acetate and after one week for zuclopenthixol decanoate. 3. The different pharmacokinetics of the three injectable zuclopenthixol preparations are reflected in their clinical properties.

  10. Organophosphorus Insecticide Pharmacokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Charles

    2010-01-01

    This chapter highlights a number of current and future applications of pharmacokinetics to assess organophosphate (OP) insecticide dosimetry, biological response and risk in humans exposed to these agents. Organophosphates represent a large family of pesticides where insecticidal as well as toxicological mode of action is associated with their ability to target and inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Pharmacokinetics entails the quantitative integration of physiological and metabolic processes associated with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of drugs and xenobiotics. Pharmacokinetic studies provide important data on the amount of toxicant delivered to a target site as well as species-, age-, gender-specific and dose-dependent differences in biological response. These studies have been conducted with organophosphorus insecticides in multiple species, at various dose levels, and across different routes of exposure to understand their in vivo pharmacokinetics and how they contribute to the observed toxicological response. To access human exposure to organophosphorus insecticides, human pharmacokinetic studies have been conducted and used to develop biological monitoring strategies based on the quantitation of key metabolites in biological fluids. Pharmacokinetic studies with these insecticides are also useful to facilitate extrapolation of dosimetry and biological response from animals to humans and for the assessment of human health risk. In this regard, physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models are being utilized to assess risk and understand the toxicological implications of known or suspected exposures to various insecticides. In this chapter a number of examples are presented that illustrate the utility and limitation of pharmacokinetic studies to address human health concerns associated with organophosphorus insecticides.

  11. Lack of pharmacokinetic interaction as an equivalence problem.

    PubMed

    Steinijans, V W; Hartmann, M; Huber, R; Radtke, H W

    1991-08-01

    The demonstration that concomitant administration of drug B does not affect the pharmacokinetics of drug A can be adequately handled as an equivalence problem. Administration of drug A alone serves as reference and simultaneous administration of drugs A and B as test situation. The range of clinically acceptable variation in the pharmacokinetic characteristics of drug A defines the equivalence range. This will usually correspond to the bioequivalence range accepted for the comparison of different formulations of drug A. Equivalence, i.e. lack of pharmacokinetic interaction, is concluded if the 90%-confidence interval for the ratio (difference) of the expected medians for test and reference is entirely within the equivalence range. This decision procedure ensures that the consumer risk of incorrectly concluding "lack of interaction" is limited to 5%. Moreover, the producer risk of incorrectly concluding "interaction" can be controlled by appropriate sample sizes.

  12. Grepafloxacin: pharmacokinetics and tissue penetration.

    PubMed

    Wise, Richard

    1998-03-01

    Pharmacokinetic and tissue penetration studies of grepafloxacin, a new broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone, show that it has useful properties for the treatment of respiratory tract infections. Grepafloxacin has a volume of distribution that is larger than those of many of the other fluoroquinolones and is concentrated in alveolar macrophages, bronchial mucosa and epithelial lining fluid to a greater extent than are certain other fluoroquinolones. Grepafloxacin concentrations achieved in plasma after a 400-mg oral dose are well in excess of those required to inhibit the respiratory pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis. Streptococcus pneumoniae is also covered for most of the dosing interval, but at normal dose levels grepafloxacin might not inhibit Enterococcus faecalis. The maximum plasma concentrations and area under the concentration---time curve achieved with grepafloxacin suggest that it will be effective for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis. The pharmacokinetics of fluoroquinolones are among their most useful properties. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate whether the differences between grepafloxacin and the other fluoroquinolones are of therapeutic significance.

  13. Optimizing nanomedicine pharmacokinetics using physiologically based pharmacokinetics modelling

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Darren Michael; Siccardi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutic agents is characterized by numerous challenges including poor absorption, low penetration in target tissues and non-specific dissemination in organs, leading to toxicity or poor drug exposure. Several nanomedicine strategies have emerged as an advanced approach to enhance drug delivery and improve the treatment of several diseases. Numerous processes mediate the pharmacokinetics of nanoformulations, with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination (ADME) being poorly understood and often differing substantially from traditional formulations. Understanding how nanoformulation composition and physicochemical properties influence drug distribution in the human body is of central importance when developing future treatment strategies. A helpful pharmacological tool to simulate the distribution of nanoformulations is represented by physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) modelling, which integrates system data describing a population of interest with drug/nanoparticle in vitro data through a mathematical description of ADME. The application of PBPK models for nanomedicine is in its infancy and characterized by several challenges. The integration of property–distribution relationships in PBPK models may benefit nanomedicine research, giving opportunities for innovative development of nanotechnologies. PBPK modelling has the potential to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning nanoformulation disposition and allow for more rapid and accurate determination of their kinetics. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of nanomedicine distribution and the use of PBPK modelling in the characterization of nanoformulations with optimal pharmacokinetics. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Nanomedicine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-17 PMID:24467481

  14. Acceptance speech.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, C K

    1994-01-01

    I am proud and honored to accept this award on behalf of the Government of Bangladesh, and the millions of Bangladeshi children saved by oral rehydration solution. The Government of Bangladesh is grateful for this recognition of its commitment to international health and population research and cost-effective health care for all. The Government of Bangladesh has already made remarkable strides forward in the health and population sector, and this was recognized in UNICEF's 1993 "State of the World's Children". The national contraceptive prevalence rate, at 40%, is higher than that of many developed countries. It is appropriate that Bangladesh, where ORS was discovered, has the largest ORS production capacity in the world. It was remarkable that after the devastating cyclone in 1991, the country was able to produce enough ORS to meet the needs and remain self-sufficient. Similarly, Bangladesh has one of the most effective, flexible and efficient control of diarrheal disease and epidemic response program in the world. Through the country, doctors have been trained in diarrheal disease management, and stores of ORS are maintained ready for any outbreak. Despite grim predictions after the 1991 cyclone and the 1993 floods, relatively few people died from diarrheal disease. This is indicative of the strength of the national program. I want to take this opportunity to acknowledge the contribution of ICDDR, B and the important role it plays in supporting the Government's efforts in the health and population sector. The partnership between the Government of Bangladesh and ICDDR, B has already borne great fruit, and I hope and believe that it will continue to do so for many years in the future. Thank you.

  15. UNCERTAINTIES IN TRICHLOROETHYLENE PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the pharmacokinetics of a chemical¯its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in humans and laboratory animals ¯ is critical to the assessment of its human health risks. For trichloroethylene (TCE), numerous physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK)...

  16. Obstetric analgesia. Clinical pharmacokinetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Kanto, J

    1986-01-01

    All drugs used in obstetric analgesia are more or less lipophilic, their site of action is in the central nervous system, and they have good membrane penetrability in the fetomaternal unit. Thus the dose and method of administration as well as the duration of treatment are important clinical determinants of drug effects in the fetus and newborn. In the past, too much emphasis has been placed on fetomaternal blood concentration ratios of different agents; it is now appreciated that the extent of fetal tissue distribution and the neonatal elimination rate are pharmacokinetically much more important. Extensive fetal tissue distribution is reflected in a low fetomaternal drug concentration ratio, which may be followed by prolonged neonatal elimination of the drug. Currently, the most effective and safest method for obstetric analgesia is regional epidural administration of bupivacaine or lignocaine (lidocaine); only low doses are needed and the newborn is able to handle these agents efficiently. On the basis of pharmacokinetic and neurobehavioural assessments, inhalational anaesthetic agents appear to be more attractive than pethidine (meperidine) or benzodiazepines. Intermittent administration and fast pulmonary elimination of inhalational agents ensure that long-lasting residual effects are unlikely to occur. The kinetics of epidural and intrathecal opiates explain the problems associated with their use in obstetrics. Among the newer drugs used in obstetric analgesia, the properties of meptazinol and isoflurane appear interesting and these agents warrant further study. All drugs used in obstetric analgesia have a potentially detrimental effect on the neonate and, therefore, knowledge of fetal and neonatal pharmacokinetics is of importance to the clinician.

  17. Design and evaluation of a novel series of 2,3-oxidosqualene cyclase inhibitors with low systemic exposure, relationship between pharmacokinetic properties and ocular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Fouchet, Marie-Hélène; Donche, Frédéric; Martin, Christelle; Bouillot, Anne; Junot, Christophe; Boullay, Anne-Bénédicte; Potvain, Florent; Magny, Sylvie Demaria; Coste, Hervé; Walker, Max; Issandou, Marc; Dodic, Nérina

    2008-06-01

    We describe the discovery of novel potent inhibitors of 2,3-oxidosqualene:lanosterol cyclase inhibitors (OSCi) from a focused pharmacophore-based screen. Optimization of the most tractable hits gave a series of compounds showing inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis at 2mg/kg in the rat with distinct pharmacokinetic profiles. Two compounds were selected for toxicological study in the rat for 21 days in order to test the hypothesis that low systemic exposure could be used as a strategy to avoid the ocular side effects previously described with OSCi. We demonstrate that for this series of inhibitors, a reduction of systemic exposure is not sufficient to circumvent cataract liabilities.

  18. [The pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Keizer, R J; Huitema, A D R; Damen, C W N; Schellens, J H M; Beijnen, J H

    2007-03-24

    Monoclonal antibodies (MOABs) are, due to their specificity, increasingly being deployed for therapeutic purposes. MOABs are derived from immunoglobulins and are fully or partially of murine or human origin. They are administered parenterally: mostly intravenously, but subcutaneous or intramuscular administration is also possible, in which case absorption probably occurs through the lymphatic system. The distribution of MOABs from the bloodstream into the tissues is slow and is hampered by the high molecular size of the MOABs, which is a lesser problem for fragments of antibodies (Fab fragments). MOABs are metabolised to peptides and amino acids. This process takes place in many tissues of the body, but probably predominantly in epithelial cells. As a consequence of the saturable binding of the MOAB to its target, a dose-dependent (non-linear) elimination is often observed. Immune reactions can accelerate the elimination of antibodies, partially depending on the degree ofhumanisation of the antibody. Antibodies and endogenous immunoglobulins are protected from elimination by binding to protective receptors (neonatal Fc-receptor; FcRn), which explains their long half-lives (up to 4 weeks). Metabolic pharmacokinetic interactions with other drugs have not been reported and are not expected. It is expected that in the years to come, new MOABs directed towards new targets will appear on the market, as well as existing antibodies with improved pharmacokinetic properties.

  19. A structure-guided optimization of pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-ones as selective inhibitors of EGFR(L858R/T790M) mutant with improved pharmacokinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Huang, Minhao; Xu, Tianfeng; Tong, Linjiang; Yan, Xiao-E; Zhang, Zhang; Xu, Yong; Yun, Caihong; Xie, Hua; Ding, Ke; Lu, Xiaoyun

    2017-01-27

    Structural optimization of pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-ones was conducted to yield a series of new selective EGFR(T790M) inhibitors with improved pharmacokinetic properties. One of the most promising compound 9s potently suppressed EGFR(L858R/T790M) kinase and inhibited the proliferation of H1975 cells with IC50 values of 2.0 nM and 40 nM, respectively. The compound dose-dependently induced reduction of the phosphorylation of EGFR and downstream activation of ERK in NCIH1975 cells. It also exhibited moderate plasma exposure after oral administration and an oral bioavailability value of 16%. Compound 9s may serve as a promising lead compound for further drug discovery overcoming the acquired resistance of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients.

  20. SYMBOLS IN PHARMACOKINETICS1

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Malcolm; Tucker, Geoffrey

    1982-01-01

    To encourage uniformity in the presentation of pharmacokinetic data, a general nomenclature has been developed. The system has wide application. Flexibility is achieved through the use of general variables, constants, qualifying terms and subscripts. Yet, through the use of implied terms, the symbols describing many common variables and constants are simple.

  1. Lumping in pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Brochot, Céline; Tóth, János; Bois, Frédéric Y

    2005-12-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) models simplify biological complexity by dividing the body into interconnected compartments. The time course of the chemical's amount (or concentration) in each compartment is then expressed as a system of ordinary differential equations. The complexity of the resulting system of equations can rapidly increase if a precise description of the organism is needed. However, difficulties arise when the PK model contains more variables and parameters than comfortable for mathematical and computational treatment. To overcome such difficulties, mathematical lumping methods are new and powerful tools. Such methods aim at reducing a differential system by aggregating several variables into one. Typically, the lumped model is still a differential equation system, whose variables are interpretable in terms of variables of the original system. In practice, the reduced model is usually required to satisfy some constraints. For example, it may be necessary to keep state variables of interest for prediction unlumped. To accommodate such constraints, constrained lumping methods have are also available. After presenting the theory, we study, here, through practical examples, the potential of such methods in toxico/pharmacokinetics. As a tutorial, we first simplify a 2-compartment pharmacokinetic model by symbolic lumping. We then explore the reduction of a 6-compartment physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for 1,3-butadiene with numerical constrained lumping. The lumping methods presented here can be easily automated, and are applicable to first-order ordinary differential equation systems.

  2. Acceptance Criteria for Aerospace Structural Adhesives.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ADHESIVES, *AIRFRAMES, PRIMERS, STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING, CHEMICAL COMPOSITION, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION , DATA ACQUISITION , PARTICLE SIZE, ACCEPTANCE TESTS, ELASTOMERS, BONDING, QUALITY CONTROL, .

  3. Pharmacokinetic consequences of spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, L.; Cintron, N. M.

    1991-01-01

    Spaceflight induces a wide range of physiological and biochemical changes, including disruption of gastrointestinal (GI) function, fluid and electrolyte balance, circulatory dynamics, and organ blood flow, as well as hormonal and metabolic perturbations. Any of these changes can influence the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of in-flight medication. That spaceflight may alter bioavailability was proposed when drugs prescribed to alleviate space motion sickness (SMS) had little therapeutic effect. Characterization of the pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic behavior of operationally critical medications is crucial for their effective use in flight; as a first step, we sought to determine whether drugs administered in space actually reach the site of action at concentrations sufficient to elicit the therapeutic response.

  4. Antifungal pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lepak, Alexander J; Andes, David R

    2014-11-10

    Successful treatment of infectious diseases requires choice of the most suitable antimicrobial agent, comprising consideration of drug pharmacokinetics (PK), including penetration into infection site, pathogen susceptibility, optimal route of drug administration, drug dose, frequency of administration, duration of therapy, and drug toxicity. Antimicrobial pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) studies consider these variables and have been useful in drug development, optimizing dosing regimens, determining susceptibility breakpoints, and limiting toxicity of antifungal therapy. Here the concepts of antifungal PK/PD studies are reviewed, with emphasis on methodology and application. The initial sections of this review focus on principles and methodology. Then the pharmacodynamics of each major antifungal drug class (polyenes, flucytosine, azoles, and echinocandins) is discussed. Finally, the review discusses novel areas of pharmacodynamic investigation in the study and application of combination therapy.

  5. Pharmacokinetics of levodopa.

    PubMed

    Contin, Manuela; Martinelli, Paolo

    2010-11-01

    This paper reviews the clinically relevant determinants of levodopa peripheral pharmacokinetics and main observed changes in the levodopa concentration-effect relationship with Parkinson's disease (PD) progression. Available clinically practical strategies to optimise levodopa pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are briefly discussed. Levodopa shows particular pharmacokinetics including an extensive presystemic metabolism, overcome by the combined use of extracerebral inhibitors of the enzyme L: -amino acid decarboxylase and rapid absorption in the proximal small bowel by a saturable facilitated transport system shared with other large neutral amino acids. Drug transport from plasma to the brain is mediated by the same carriers operating in the intestinal mucosa. The main strategies to assure reproducibility of both intestinal absorption and delivery to the brain, and the clinical effect include standardization of levodopa dosing with respect to meal times and a controlled dietary protein intake. Levodopa plasma half-life is very short, resulting in marked plasma drug concentration fluctuations which are matched, as the disease progresses, to swings in the therapeutic response ("wearing-off" phenomena). "Wearing-off" phenomena can also be associated, at the more advanced disease stages, with a "negative", both parkinsonism-exacerbating and dyskinetic effect of levodopa at low, subtherapeutic plasma concentrations. Dyskinesias may also be related to high-levodopa, excessive plasma concentrations. Recognition of the different levodopa toxic response patterns can be difficult on a clinical basis alone and simultaneous monitoring of the levodopa concentration-effect relationship may prove useful to disclose the underlying mechanism and in planning the correct management. Clinically practical strategies to optimise levodopa pharmacokinetics, and possibly its therapeutic response, include liquid drug solutions, controlled release formulations and the use of inhibitors

  6. Effect of Coadministered Fat on the Tolerability, Safety, and Pharmacokinetic Properties of Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine in Papua New Guinean Children with Uncomplicated Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Moore, B. R.; Benjamin, J. M.; Salman, S.; Griffin, S.; Ginny, E.; Page-Sharp, M.; Robinson, L. J.; Siba, P.; Batty, K. T.; Mueller, I.

    2014-01-01

    Coadministration of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PQ) with fat may improve bioavailability and antimalarial efficacy, but it might also increase toxicity. There have been no studies of these potential effects in the pediatric age group. The tolerability, safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of DHA-PQ administered with or without 8.5 g fat were investigated in 30 Papua New Guinean children aged 5 to 10 years diagnosed with uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Three daily 2.5:11.5-mg-base/kg doses were given with water (n = 14, group A) or milk (n = 16, group B), with regular clinical/laboratory assessment and blood sampling over 42 days. Plasma PQ was assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection, and DHA was assayed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Compartmental pharmacokinetic models for PQ and DHA were developed using a population-based approach. DHA-PQ was generally well tolerated, and initial fever and parasite clearance were prompt. There were no differences in the areas under the concentration-time curve (AUC0–∞) for PQ (median, 41,906 versus 36,752 μg · h/liter in groups A and B, respectively; P = 0.24) or DHA (4,047 versus 4,190 μg · h/liter; P = 0.67). There were also no significant between-group differences in prolongation of the corrected electrocardiographic QT interval (QTc) initially during follow-up, but the QTc tended to be higher in group B children at 24 h (mean ± standard deviation [SD], 15 ± 10 versus 6 ± 15 ms0.5 in group A, P = 0.067) and 168 h (10 ± 18 versus 1 ± 23 ms0.5, P = 0.24) when plasma PQ concentrations were relatively low. A small amount of fat does not change the bioavailability of DHA-PQ in children, but a delayed persistent effect on ventricular repolarization cannot be excluded. PMID:25049242

  7. [Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol pharmacokinetics].

    PubMed

    Goullé, J-P; Saussereau, E; Lacroix, C

    2008-08-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta-9-THC) is the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis. Smoking is currently most common use of cannabis. The present review focuses on the pharmacokinetics of THC. The variability of THC in plant material which has significantly increased in recent years leads to variability in tissue THC levels from smoking, which is, in itself, a highly individual process. This variability of THC content has an important impact on drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacology. After smoking THC bioavailability averages 30%. With a 3.55% THC cigarette, a peak plasma level near 160 ng/mL occurs approximately 10 min after inhalation. THC is eliminated quickly from plasma in a multiphasic manner and is widely distributed to tissues, which is responsible for its pharmacologic effects. Body fat then serves as a long-term storage site. This particular pharmacokinetics explains the noncorrelation between THC blood level and clinical effects as is observed for ethanol. A major active 11-hydroxy metabolite is formed after both inhalation and oral dosing (20 and 100% of parent, respectively). The elimination of THC and its many metabolites, mainly THC-COOH, occurs via the feces and urine for several weeks. Thus, to confirm abstinence, urine THC-COOH analysis would be a useful tool. A positive result could be checked by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry THC blood analysis, indicative of a recent cannabis exposure.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of grepafloxacin.

    PubMed

    Efthymiopoulos, C

    1997-12-01

    Grepafloxacin is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic which is rapidly absorbed in healthy volunteers following oral dosing. It reaches peak plasma levels around 2 h after administration, then declines bi-exponentially, with an extended half-life of around 12 h. Grepafloxacin is eliminated primarily through metabolism and is excreted mainly in the faeces. Renal clearance accounts for only 10-15% of the administered dose. Grepafloxacin plasma concentrations increase disproportionately with increasing doses, but this is unlikely to be of clinical significance over the range of therapeutic doses. The rate and extent of absorption are not affected by food or elevated intragastric pH. The pharmacokinetics of grepafloxacin are affected by gender, with these differences relating to variations in body weight. No effect of age on the pharmacokinetics of grepafloxacin was found. Renal impairment does not affect grepafloxacin pharmacokinetics, whereas peak plasma concentrations, areas under plasma concentration-time curves and renal excretion are increased in patients with hepatic impairment. Grepafloxacin can be co-administered with warfarin and theophylline, though reduction of the theophylline dose is necessary. Following oral administration, higher grepafloxacin concentrations are achieved in lung and genital tissues than in serum, indicating its potential in the treatment of respiratory and sexually transmitted diseases. In addition, it exceeds therapeutically effective levels in bile and gall-bladder tissues, and accumulates in polymorphonuclear leucocytes such that it may be useful against intracellular pathogens.

  9. Improvement of "hit-to-lead" optimization by integration of in vitro HTS experimental models for early determination of pharmacokinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Kariv, Ilona; Rourick, Robyn A; Kassel, Daniel B; Chung, Thomas D Y

    2002-09-01

    Development of predictive in vitro surrogate methods for traditional approaches assessing bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of lead compounds must be made to both keep pace with high-throughput (HT) lead identification and to mitigate the high costs associated with progression of compounds with poor chances of developmental success. Indeed opportunities for improvement still exist in the lead optimization phase versus the lead identification phase, where HT methodologies have been nearly optimized. Review of examples, limitations, and development of high-throughput microtiterplate-based assays for evaluating metabolic liabilities, such as in vitro radiometric and fluorometric assays for inhibition of cytochrome p450 (CYP) activity, determination of stability of a compound in liver microsomes, or cloned CYPs coupled to reconstituting systems are described. Parallel approaches to improve speed, resolution, sample preparation, as well as data analysis using LC/MS and LC/MS/MS approaches and technologies to assess compound integrity and biotransformation by automation and multiplexing are also discussed. Realization of the benefits in automation of cell-based models for determining drug permeability to predict drug absorption are still hampered by bottlenecks in analytical analysis of compounds. The implementation and limitations of surrogate physiochemical methods for passive adsorption such as immobilized artificial membranes (IAM) and parallel artificial membrane permeation assays (PAMPA), and compound solubility by laser nephelometry are reviewed as well. Additionally, data from a high-throughput 96-well equilibrium dialysis device, showing good correlation to classical methods, is presented. Finally, the impact of improvements in these downstream bottlenecks in lead optimization and preclinical drug discovery are discussed in this review.

  10. Clinical pharmacokinetics of levetiracetam.

    PubMed

    Patsalos, Philip N

    2004-01-01

    Since 1989, eight new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have been licensed for clinical use. Levetiracetam is the latest to be licensed and is used as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of adult patients with partial seizures with or without secondary generalisation that are refractory to other established first-line AEDs. Pharmacokinetic studies of levetiracetam have been conducted in healthy volunteers, in adults, children and elderly patients with epilepsy, and in patients with renal and hepatic impairment. After oral ingestion, levetiracetam is rapidly absorbed, with peak concentration occurring after 1.3 hours, and its bioavailability is >95%. Co-ingestion of food slows the rate but not the extent of absorption. Levetiracetam is not bound to plasma proteins and has a volume of distribution of 0.5-0.7 L/kg. Plasma concentrations increase in proportion to dose over the clinically relevant dose range (500-5000 mg) and there is no evidence of accumulation during multiple administration. Steady-state blood concentrations are achieved within 24-48 hours. The elimination half-life in adult volunteers, adults with epilepsy, children with epilepsy and elderly volunteers is 6-8, 6-8, 5-7 and 10-11 hours, respectively. Approximately 34% of a levetiracetam dose is metabolised and 66% is excreted in urine unmetabolised; however, the metabolism is not hepatic but occurs primarily in blood by hydrolysis. Autoinduction is not a feature. As clearance is renal in nature it is directly dependent on creatinine clearance. Consequently, dosage adjustments are necessary for patients with moderate to severe renal impairment. To date, no clinically relevant pharmacokinetic interactions between AEDs and levetiracetam have been identified. Similarly, levetiracetam does not interact with digoxin, warfarin and the low-dose contraceptive pill; however, adverse pharmacodynamic interactions with carbamazepine and topiramate have been demonstrated. Overall, the pharmacokinetic characteristics of

  11. Pharmacokinetics of SPECT radiopharmaceuticals for imaging hypoxic tissues.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, L I; Stypinski, D

    1996-09-01

    Although hypoxia has been known for decades to play an important role in the outcome of radiotherapy in oncology, and inspite of the contribution of hypoxia to a myriad of pathologies that involve vascular disease, the selective imaging of hypoxic tissue has attained prominence only within the past decade. Contemporary research in the hypoxia imaging field is based largely on radiosensitizer research of the 1960's and 1970's. Early sensitizer research identified a family of nitro-organic compounds, the N-1 substituted 2-nitroimidazoles as candidate drugs. The early champion, and still the reference standard for therapeutic radiosensitization of hypoxic tumor cells is misonidazole (MISO). Its peripheral neurotoxicity led to failure in clinical studies, but its biological, biophysical and biochemical properties have been investigated in detail and serve as a basis for further design, not only of sensitizers, but of diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals for imaging tissue hypoxia. Pharmacokinetic characterization of radiopharmaceuticals, specifically radiopharmaceuticals for imaging tissue hypoxia, has not been a central theme in their development. The advent of PET, through which quantitative determinations first became possible, opened the field for both descriptive and analytical radiopharmacokinetic studies. In SPECT, however, this approach is still undergoing refinement. This paper addresses some of the underlying issues in radiopharmaceutical pharmacokinetics. There is a paucity of published radiopharmacokinetic data for SPECT hypoxia imaging agents. Consequently, the pharmacokinetic issues for MISO are presented as a basis for development of pharmacokinetics for the chemically-related imaging agents. Properties of an hypoxia marker are described from a pharmacokinetic viewpoint, a theoretical model for descriptive pharmacokinetics is introduced and finally, recent pharmacokinetic studies from our laboratory are described.

  12. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of nonsteroidal androgen receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenqing; Kim, Juhyun; Dalton, James T

    2006-08-01

    Testosterone and structurally related anabolic steroids have been used to treat hypogonadism, muscle wasting, osteoporosis, male contraception, cancer cachexia, anemia, and hormone replacement therapy in aging men or age-related frailty; while antiandrogens may be useful for treatment of conditions like acne, alopecia (male-pattern baldness), hirsutism, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. However, the undesirable physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of steroidal androgen receptor (AR) ligands limited their clinical use. Nonsteroidal AR ligands with improved pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties have been developed to overcome these problems. This review focuses on the pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and pharmacology of clinically used and emerging nonsteroidal AR ligands, including antagonists, agonists, and selective androgen receptor modulators.

  13. Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of Intravenous Nemonoxacin in Healthy Chinese Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Guo-ying; Zhang, Ying-yuan; Guo, Bei-ning; Yu, Ji-cheng; Wu, Xiao-jie; Chen, Yuan-cheng; Wu, Ju-Fang; Shi, Yao-guo

    2014-01-01

    Nemonoxacin (TG-873870) is a novel nonfluorinated quinolone with potent broad-spectrum activity against Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and atypical pathogens, including vancomycin-nonsusceptible methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), quinolone-resistant MRSA, quinolone-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae, and erythromycin-resistant S. pneumoniae. This first-in-human study was aimed at assessing the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic properties of intravenous nemonoxacin in healthy Chinese volunteers. The study comprised a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose escalating safety and tolerability study in 92 subjects and a randomized, single-dose, open-label, 3-period Latin-square crossover pharmacokinetic study in 12 subjects. The study revealed that nemonoxacin infusion was well tolerated up to the maximum dose of 1,250 mg, and the acceptable infusion rates ranged from 0.42 to 5.56 mg/min. Drug-related adverse events (AEs) were mild, transient, and confined to local irritation at the injection site. The pharmacokinetic study revealed that after the administration of 250, 500, and 750 mg of intravenous nemonoxacin, the maximum plasma drug concentration (Cmax) values were 4.826 μg/ml, 7.152 μg/ml, and 11.029 μg/ml, respectively. The corresponding values for the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 72 hours (AUC0–72 h) were 17.05 μg · h/ml, 39.30 μg · h/ml, and 61.98 μg · h/ml. The mean elimination half-life (t1/2) was 11 h, and the mean cumulative drug excretion rate within 72 h ranged from 64.93% to 77.17%. Volunteers treated with 250 to 750 mg nemonoxacin exhibited a linear dose-response relationship between the AUC0–72 h and AUC0–∞. These findings provide further support for the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic properties of intravenous nemonoxacin. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01944774.) PMID:25092690

  14. Bioavailability and pharmacokinetic properties of 2 sustained-release formulations of diclofenac sodium, Voltaren vs inflaban: effect of food on inflaban bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Zmeili, S; Hasan, M; Najib, N; Sallam, E; Deleq, S; Shubair, M

    1996-12-01

    In this study, in vitro characterization, bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of 2 different sustained-release diclofenac sodium dosage forms were compared, Voltaren (100 mg tablets), manufactured by Ciba-Geigy and Inflaban (100 mg enteric-coated tablets), manufactured by the Arab Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Company. The in vitro results demonstrated a faster rate of dissolution for Inflaban as compared to Voltaren, but both products exhibited a sustained-release pattern. The bioavailability study was conducted on 20 healthy male subjects who received a single oral dose (100 mg) of each product according to a randomized 2-way crossover design. Blood samples were obtained over a 26-hour period, and drug concentrations were determined by an HPLC method. Concentration time profiles revealed a sustained-release pattern for both products. The Tlag for Voltaren was 0.8 +/- 0.2 h, significantly shorter than for Inflaban (1.7 +/- 0.2 h) indicating a faster rate of absorption from the upper gastrointestinal tract. The Cmax obtained with Voltaren was significantly higher than that obtained with Inflaban (1,161 +/- 102 and 799 +/- 83, respectively). With respect to Tmax and AUC0-26h parameters, both products were not found to be statistically different. Tmax for Voltaren and Inflaban was 4.2 +/- 0.5 and 4.5 +/- 0.4 h, respectively, whereas AUC0-26h values for both products were 5,423 +/- 562 and 5,237 +/- 520 ng x h/ml, respectively. It is believed that the observed differences between Voltaren and Inflaban are mainly due to the fact that Inflaban is designed as an enteric-coated tablet form, with a core tablet having different sustained-release behavior. In addition, the effect of food on the bioavailability of Inflaban was evaluated in randomly selected 6 male volunteers. Our results revealed that, following light and heavy meals, the AUC0-30 and Cmax were minimally affected by food whereas a significant increase in Tmax and Tlag as compared to fasting conditions was

  15. Identifying 24 h variation in the pharmacokinetics of levofloxacin: a population pharmacokinetic approach

    PubMed Central

    Kervezee, Laura; Stevens, Jasper; Birkhoff, Willem; Kamerling, Ingrid M. C.; de Boer, Theo; Dröge, Melloney; Meijer, Johanna H.

    2015-01-01

    Aim The objective of this study was to investigate whether the pharmacokinetics of orally administered levofloxacin show 24 h variation. Levofloxacin was used as a model compound for solubility and permeability independent absorption and passive renal elimination. Methods In this single centre, crossover, open label study, 12 healthy subjects received an oral dose of 1000 mg levofloxacin at six different time points equally divided over the 24 h period. Population pharmacokinetic modelling was used to identify potential 24 h variation in the pharmacokinetic parameters of this drug. Results The pharmacokinetics of levofloxacin could be described by a one compartment model with first order clearance and a transit compartment to describe drug absorption. The fit of the model was significantly improved when the absorption rate constant was described as a cosine function with a fixed period of 24 h, a relative amplitude of 47% and a peak around 08.00 h in the morning. Despite this variation in absorption rate constant, simulations of a once daily dosing regimen showed that t max, C max and the area under the curve at steady‐state were not affected by the time of drug administration. Conclusion The finding that the absorption rate constant showed considerable 24 h variation may be relevant for drugs with similar physicochemical properties as levofloxacin that have a narrower therapeutic index. Levofloxacin, however, can be dosed without taking into account the time of day, at least in terms of its pharmacokinetics. PMID:26852745

  16. Steady-State Pharmacokinetics of Bupropion SR in Juvenile Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daviss, W. Burleson; Perel, James M.; Rudolph, George R.; Axelson, David A.; Gilchrist, Richard; Nuss, Sharon; Birmaher, Boris; Brent, David A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the steady-state pharmacokinetic properties of bupropion sustained release (SR) and their potential developmental differences in youths. Method: Eleven boys and eight girls aged 11 to 17 years old were prescribed bupropion SR monotherapy for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (n = 16) and/or depressive disorders (n =…

  17. Comparative Pharmacokinetics of Perfluorononanoic acid in Rats and Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) is a fluorinated organic chemical found at low levels in the environment, but is detectable in humans and wildlife. This study compared the pharmacokinetic properties of PFNA in two laboratory rodent species. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats (n ...

  18. Comparative pharmacokinetics of perfluorononanoic acid in rat and mouse

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) is a fluorinated organic chemical found at low levels in the environment, but is detectable in humans and wildlife. The present study compared the pharmacokinetic properties of PFNA in two laboratory rodent species. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rat...

  19. SUBCELLULAR PHARMACOKINETICS AND ITS POTENTIAL FOR LIBRARY FOCUSING (R826652)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Subcellular pharmacokinetics (SP) optimizes biology-related factors in the design of libraries for high throughput screening by defining comparatively narrow ranges of properties (lipophilicity, amphiphilicity, acidity, reactivity, 3D-structural features) of t...

  20. Offer/Acceptance Ratio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Mimi

    1997-01-01

    Explores how human resource professionals, with above average offer/acceptance ratios, streamline their recruitment efforts. Profiles company strategies with internships, internal promotion, cooperative education programs, and how to get candidates to accept offers. Also discusses how to use the offer/acceptance ratio as a measure of program…

  1. Drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics: Technological considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wolf, A.P.

    1992-12-31

    Additionally, the use of PET to examine drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacadynamics and the relationship of these properties to the behavioral, therapeutic and toxic properties of drugs and substances of abuse is emerging as a powerful new scientific tool. The pharmacokinetic properties of a drug, which comprises all of the biological processes which determine the fraction of the drug available, can be measured using the labeled drug itself. For example, the labeled drug can be used to measure the absolute uptake, regional distribution and kinetics of a drug at its site of action in the body. Additionally the labeled drug and whole body its labeled metabolites and thus provide information an potential toxic effects as well as tissue half lives. On the other hand, different labeled tracers can be used to assess drug pharmacodynamics which include the biological Processes involved in the drug`s effects. For example, with appropriate radiotracers, the effects of a drug on metabolism, neurotransmitter activity, blood flew, enzyme activity or other processes can be probed.

  2. Drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics: Technological considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wolf, A.P.

    1992-01-01

    Additionally, the use of PET to examine drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacadynamics and the relationship of these properties to the behavioral, therapeutic and toxic properties of drugs and substances of abuse is emerging as a powerful new scientific tool. The pharmacokinetic properties of a drug, which comprises all of the biological processes which determine the fraction of the drug available, can be measured using the labeled drug itself. For example, the labeled drug can be used to measure the absolute uptake, regional distribution and kinetics of a drug at its site of action in the body. Additionally the labeled drug and whole body its labeled metabolites and thus provide information an potential toxic effects as well as tissue half lives. On the other hand, different labeled tracers can be used to assess drug pharmacodynamics which include the biological Processes involved in the drug's effects. For example, with appropriate radiotracers, the effects of a drug on metabolism, neurotransmitter activity, blood flew, enzyme activity or other processes can be probed.

  3. Rabbit as an animal model for intravitreal pharmacokinetics: Clinical predictability and quality of the published data.

    PubMed

    Del Amo, Eva M; Urtti, Arto

    2015-08-01

    Intravitreal administration is the method of choice in drug delivery to the retina and/or choroid. Rabbit is the most commonly used animal species in intravitreal pharmacokinetics, but it has been criticized as being a poor model of human eye. The critique is based on some anatomical differences, properties of the vitreous humor, and observed differences in drug concentrations in the anterior chamber after intravitreal injections. We have systematically analyzed all published information on intravitreal pharmacokinetics in the rabbit and human eye. The analysis revealed major problems in the design of the pharmacokinetic studies. In this review we provide advice for study design. Overall, the pharmacokinetic parameters (clearance, volume of distribution, half-life) in the human and rabbit eye have good correlation and comparable absolute values. Therefore, reliable rabbit-to-man translation of intravitreal pharmacokinetics should be feasible. The relevant anatomical and physiological parameters in rabbit and man show only small differences. Furthermore, the claimed discrepancy between drug concentrations in the human and rabbit aqueous humor is not supported by the data analysis. Based on the available and properly conducted pharmacokinetic studies, the differences in the vitreous structure in rabbits and human patients do not lead to significant pharmacokinetic differences. This review is the first step towards inter-species translation of intravitreal pharmacokinetics. More information is still needed to dissect the roles of drug delivery systems, disease states, age and ocular manipulation on the intravitreal pharmacokinetics in rabbit and man. Anyway, the published data and the derived pharmacokinetic parameters indicate that the rabbit is a useful animal model in intravitreal pharmacokinetics.

  4. The molecular basis for the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of curcumin and its metabolites in relation to cancer.

    PubMed

    Heger, Michal; van Golen, Rowan F; Broekgaarden, Mans; Michel, Martin C

    2014-01-01

    This review addresses the oncopharmacological properties of curcumin at the molecular level. First, the interactions between curcumin and its molecular targets are addressed on the basis of curcumin's distinct chemical properties, which include H-bond donating and accepting capacity of the β-dicarbonyl moiety and the phenylic hydroxyl groups, H-bond accepting capacity of the methoxy ethers, multivalent metal and nonmetal cation binding properties, high partition coefficient, rotamerization around multiple C-C bonds, and the ability to act as a Michael acceptor. Next, the in vitro chemical stability of curcumin is elaborated in the context of its susceptibility to photochemical and chemical modification and degradation (e.g., alkaline hydrolysis). Specific modification and degradatory pathways are provided, which mainly entail radical-based intermediates, and the in vitro catabolites are identified. The implications of curcumin's (photo)chemical instability are addressed in light of pharmaceutical curcumin preparations, the use of curcumin analogues, and implementation of nanoparticulate drug delivery systems. Furthermore, the pharmacokinetics of curcumin and its most important degradation products are detailed in light of curcumin's poor bioavailability. Particular emphasis is placed on xenobiotic phase I and II metabolism as well as excretion of curcumin in the intestines (first pass), the liver (second pass), and other organs in addition to the pharmacokinetics of curcumin metabolites and their systemic clearance. Lastly, a summary is provided of the clinical pharmacodynamics of curcumin followed by a detailed account of curcumin's direct molecular targets, whereby the phenotypical/biological changes induced in cancer cells upon completion of the curcumin-triggered signaling cascade(s) are addressed in the framework of the hallmarks of cancer. The direct molecular targets include the ErbB family of receptors, protein kinase C, enzymes involved in prostaglandin

  5. Clinical pharmacokinetics of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Keizer, Ron J; Huitema, Alwin D R; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2010-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been used in the treatment of various diseases for over 20 years and combine high specificity with generally low toxicity. Their pharmacokinetic properties differ markedly from those of non-antibody-type drugs, and these properties can have important clinical implications. mAbs are administered intravenously, intramuscularly or subcutaneously. Oral administration is precluded by the molecular size, hydrophilicity and gastric degradation of mAbs. Distribution into tissue is slow because of the molecular size of mAbs, and volumes of distribution are generally low. mAbs are metabolized to peptides and amino acids in several tissues, by circulating phagocytic cells or by their target antigen-containing cells. Antibodies and endogenous immunoglobulins are protected from degradation by binding to protective receptors (the neonatal Fc-receptor [FcRn]), which explains their long elimination half-lives (up to 4 weeks). Population pharmacokinetic analyses have been applied in assessing covariates in the disposition of mAbs. Both linear and nonlinear elimination have been reported for mAbs, which is probably caused by target-mediated disposition. Possible factors influencing elimination of mAbs include the amount of the target antigen, immune reactions to the antibody and patient demographics. Bodyweight and/or body surface area are generally related to clearance of mAbs, but clinical relevance is often low. Metabolic drug-drug interactions are rare for mAbs. Exposure-response relationships have been described for some mAbs. In conclusion, the parenteral administration, slow tissue distribution and long elimination half-life are the most pronounced clinical pharmacokinetic characteristics of mAbs.

  6. Thrombolytic and pharmacokinetic properties of human tissue-type plasminogen activator variants, obtained by deletion and/or duplication of structural/functional domains, in a hamster pulmonary embolism model.

    PubMed

    Collen, D; Lijnen, H R; Vanlinthout, I; Kieckens, L; Nelles, L; Stassen, J M

    1991-02-12

    A pulmonary embolism model in hamsters was used for the quantitative evaluation of the thrombolytic and pharmacokinetic properties of variants of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA). A 25 microliters 125I-fibrin labeled human plasma clot was made in vitro and injected into the jugular vein of heparinized hamsters. The extent of thrombolysis within 90 min was determined as the difference between the radioactivity injected in the jugular vein and that recovered in the heart and lungs. Recombinant t-PA (home-made rt-PA or Activase) infused intravenously over 60 min caused dose-dependent progressive thrombolysis. The results of thrombolytic potency (clot lysis in percent versus dose administered in mg/kg) and of specific thrombolytic activity (clot lysis in percent versus steady state plasma level in microgram/ml) were fitted with an exponentially transformed sigmoidal function y = 100 c/(1 + e-a(ax-eh] and the maximal percent lysis (c), the dose or plasma level at which maximal rate of lysis is achieved (b) and the maximal rate of lysis (z = 1/4 ac.eb) were determined. With rt-PA, these parameters were c = 72 +/- 6% (mean +/- SEM), b = 0.19 +/- 0.08 mg/kg, z = 68 +/- 25% lysis per mg/kg, with corresponding values of 87 +/- 5%, 0.07 +/- 0.03 mg/kg and 150 +/- 38% lysis per mg/kg for Activase (p = NS). Deletion of the finger and growth factor domains in rt-PA (rt-PA-delta FE) was not associated with marked alteration of the thrombolytic potency (c = 90 +/- 30%, b = 0.34 +/- 0.35 mg/kg, and z = 54 +/- 14% per mg/kg), but was associated with a significant reduction of the specific thrombolytic activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Synthesis, structure-property relationships and pharmacokinetic evaluation of ethyl 6-aminonicotinate sulfonylureas as antagonists of the P2Y₁₂ receptor.

    PubMed

    Bach, Peter; Boström, Jonas; Brickmann, Kay; van Giezen, J J J; Groneberg, Robert D; Harvey, Darren M; O'Sullivan, Michael; Zetterberg, Fredrik

    2013-07-01

    The present paper describes the development of a new series of P2Y12 receptor antagonists based on our previously reported piperazinyl urea series 1 (IC50 binding affinity = 0.33 μM, aq solubility <0.1 μM, microsomal CLint (HLM) ≥300 μM/min/mg). By replacement of the urea functionality with a sulfonylurea group we observed increased affinity along with improved stability and solubility as exemplified by 47 (IC50 binding affinity = 0.042 μM, aq solubility = 90 μM, microsomal CLint (HLM) = 70 μM/min/mg). Further improvements in affinity and metabolic stability were achieved by replacing the central piperazine ring with a 3-aminoazetidine as exemplified by 3 (IC50 binding affinity = 0.0062 μM, aq solubility = 83 μM, microsomal CLint (HLM) = 28 μM/min/mg). The improved affinity observed in the in vitro binding assay also translated to the potency observed in the WPA aggregation assay (47: 19 nM and 3: 9.5 nM) and the observed in vitro ADME properties translates to the in vivo PK properties observed in rat. In addition, we found that the chemical stability of the sulfonylureas during prolonged storage in solution was related to the sulfonyl urea linker and depended on the type of solvent and the substitution pattern of the sulfonyl urea functionality.

  8. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1990-01-01

    The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics Panel met on 29-30 Aug. 1988 at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, Texas to discuss pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic implications of space flight and make recommendations for operational and research strategies. Based on the knowledge available on the physiological changes that occur during space flight, the dependence of pharmacokinetics on physiological factors, and the therapeutic requirements for future space missions, the panel made several recommendations for research. It was suggested that using medications available with a large (wide) therapeutic window will avoid unforeseen therapeutic consequences during flight. The sequence for conducting research was outlined as follows: (1) identify ground-based simulation models (e.g., antiorthostatic bed rest) for conducting pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic research; (2) estimate parametric changes in these models using pharmacologic agents that have different pharmacokinetic characteristics and a narrow therapeutic index; (3) verify these findings during flight; and (4) develop and identify appropriate and effective drug delivery systems, dosage forms, and regimens. The panel recommended gaining a thorough understanding of the pharmacokinetic deviations of medications that have a narrow therapeutic index (e.g. cardiovascular drugs and sedative hypnotics) in order to ensure safe and effective treatment during flight with these agents. It was also suggested that basic information on physiological factors such as organ blood flow, protein composition and binding, tissue distribution, and metabolism by hepatic enzymes must be accumulated by conducting ground-based animal and human studies using models of weightlessness. This information will be useful to construct and identify physiologically based pharmacokinetic models that can provide valuable information on the pharmacodynamic consequences of space flight and aid in identifying appropriate therapeutic

  9. LIMS user acceptance testing.

    PubMed

    Klein, Corbett S

    2003-01-01

    Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS) play a key role in the pharmaceutical industry. Thorough and accurate validation of such systems is critical and is a regulatory requirement. LIMS user acceptance testing is one aspect of this testing and enables the user to make a decision to accept or reject implementation of the system. This paper discusses key elements in facilitating the development and execution of a LIMS User Acceptance Test Plan (UATP).

  10. Lead Optimization in Discovery Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics/Case study: The Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Protease Inhibitor SCH 503034.

    PubMed

    Cheng, K-C; Korfmacher, Walter A; White, Ronald E; Njoroge, F George

    2007-06-26

    Lead optimization using drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (DMPK) parameters has become one of the primary focuses of research organizations involved in drug discovery in the last decade. Using a combination of rapid in vivo and in vitro DMPK screening procedures on a large array of compounds during the lead optimization process has resulted in development of compounds that have acceptable DMPK properties. In this review, we present a general screening paradigm that is currently being used as part of drug discovery at Schering-Plough and we describe a case study using the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) protease inhibitor program as an example. By using the DMPK optimization tools, a potent HCV protease inhibitor, SCH 503034, was selected for development as a candidate drug.

  11. On Maximum FODO Acceptance

    SciTech Connect

    Batygin, Yuri Konstantinovich

    2014-12-24

    This note illustrates maximum acceptance of FODO quadrupole focusing channel. Acceptance is the largest Floquet ellipse of a matched beam: A = $\\frac{a^2}{β}$$_{max}$ where a is the aperture of the channel and βmax is the largest value of beta-function in the channel. If aperture of the channel is restricted by a circle of radius a, the s-s acceptance is available for particles oscillating at median plane, y=0. Particles outside median plane will occupy smaller phase space area. In x-y plane, cross section of the accepted beam has a shape of ellipse with truncated boundaries.

  12. Pharmacokinetic study of sulbactomax.

    PubMed

    Payasi, Anurag; Chaudhary, Manu; Gupta, Ankush; Dwivedi, Vivek Kumar; Bhatnagar, Anuj

    2010-08-01

    We have evaluated pharmacokinetics of a fixed dose combination (FDC) of ceftriaxone and sulbactam (2:1) or sulbactomax in eight healthy volunteers. A 1.5 g dose of sulbactomax, 1 g dose of ceftriaxone and 0.5 g sulbactam were given intravenously in a balanced two-ways cross-over study. Serially collected plasma sample was analyzed for ceftriaxone and sulbactam by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The mean peaks of ceftriaxone and sulbactam concentrations in plasma were 152.06+/-6.65 microg/ml and 21.32+/-1.80 microg/ml, respectively and plasma half-lives for ceftriaxone and sulbactam were 5.2+/-0.35 hr and 0.94+/-0.038 hr, respectively. The AUC0-24 for ceftriaxone and sulbactam was 760.16+/-27.68 microg.hr/ml and 20.74+/-2.34 microg.hr/ml, respectively, with elimination rate constant of 0.133+/-0.009 hr(-1) and 0.732+/-0.029 hr(-1), respectively. The kinetics of ceftriaxone and sulbactum did not change in combination as compared to the alone treatment. Also, concentration of the ceftriaxone after 24 hr is higher than the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the most of the gram positive and gram negative bacteria indicating that one dose in a day is sufficient to treat the disease caused by these organisms.

  13. Population pharmacokinetics of daptomycin.

    PubMed

    Dvorchik, Barry; Arbeit, Robert D; Chung, Julia; Liu, Susan; Knebel, William; Kastrissios, Helen

    2004-08-01

    Data from subjects in nine phase 1 (n = 153) and six phase 2/3 (n = 129) clinical trials were combined to identify factors contributing to interindividual variability in daptomycin pharmacokinetics (PK). Over 30 covariates were considered. A two-compartment model with first-order elimination provided the best fit for data on daptomycin concentrations in plasma over time. In the final population PK model, daptomycin plasma clearance (CL) was a function of renal function, body temperature, and sex. Of these factors, renal function contributed most significantly to interindividual variability. CL varied linearly with the estimated creatinine clearance. CL among dialysis subjects was approximately one-third that of healthy subjects (0.27 versus 0.81 liter/h). CL in females was 80% that in males; however, in clinical trials, the outcome was not affected by sex and therefore this effect is not considered clinically meaningful. The relationship with body temperature should be interpreted cautiously since the analysis included only a limited number of subjects who were hyperthermic. The volume of distribution of the peripheral compartment (V2) and intercompartmental clearance (Q) were linearly related to body weight. V2 increased approximately twofold in the presence of an acute infection. No factors were identified that significantly impacted V1. This analysis supports the dosing of daptomycin on a milligram-per-kilogram-of-body-weight basis and suggests that modified dosing regimens are indicated for patients with severe renal disease and for those undergoing dialysis.

  14. Fasudil and SOD Packaged in Peptide-studded-liposomes: Properties, Pharmacokinetics and Ex-vivo Targeting to Isolated Perfused Rat Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nilesh; Al-Saikhan, Fahad I; Patel, Brijeshkumar; Rashid, Jahidur; Ahsan, Fakhrul

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the feasibility of encapsulating two drugs, fasudil and superoxide dismutase (SOD), into liposomes for targeted and inhalational delivery to the pulmonary vasculature to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Nanosized liposomes were prepared by a thin-film formation and extrusion method, and the drugs were encapsulated by a modified freeze-thaw technique. The peptide CARSKNKDC (CAR), a pulmonary-specific targeting sequence, was conjugated on the surface of liposomes. Formulations were optimized for various physicochemical properties, tested for their ex-vivo and in-vivo drug absorption after intratracheal administration, and evaluated for short-term safety in healthy rats. The homogenous nanosized liposomes contained both SOD (~55% entrapment) and fasudil (~40% entrapment), and were stable at 4°C and after nebulization. Liposomes released the drugs in a controlled-release fashion. Compared with plain liposomes, CAR-liposomes increased the uptake by pulmonary endothelial and smooth muscle cells by ~2-fold. CAR-liposomes extended the biological half-lives of SOD and fasudil by ~3-fold. Ex-vivo studies demonstrated that CAR-liposomes were better retained in the lungs than plain liposomes. Bronchoalveolar lavage studies indicated the safety of peptide-equipped liposomes as pulmonary delivery carriers. Overall, this study demonstrates that CAR-liposomes may be used as inhalational carriers for SOD plus fasudil-based combination therapy for PAH. PMID:25888802

  15. Bioavailability and Pharmacokinetics of Genistein: Mechanistic Studies on its ADME

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen; Kulkarni, Kaustubh; Zhu, Wei; Hu, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Genistein, one of the most active natural flavonoids, exerts various biological effects including chemoprevention, antioxidation, antiproliferation and anticancer. More than 30 clinical trials of genistein with various disease indications have been conducted to evaluate its clinical efficacy. Based on many animals and human pharmacokinetic studies, it is well known that the most challenge issue for developing genistein as a chemoprevention agent is the low oral bioavailability, which may be the major reason relating to its ambiguous therapeutic effects and large interindividual variations in clinical trials. In order to better correlate pharmacokinetic to pharmacodynamics results in animals and clinical studies, an in-depth understanding of pharmacokinetic behavior of genistein and its ADME properties are needed. Numerous in vitro/in vivo ADME studies had been conducted to reveal the main factors contributing to the low oral bioavailability of genistein. Therefore, this review focuses on summarizing the most recent progress on mechanistic studies of genistein ADME and provides a systemic view of these processes to explain genistein pharmacokinetic behaviors in vivo. The better understanding of genistein ADME property may lead to development of proper strategy to improve genistein oral bioavailability via mechanism-based approaches. PMID:22583407

  16. UPLC-MS/MS determination of ephedrine, methylephedrine, amygdalin and glycyrrhizic acid in Beagle plasma and its application to a pharmacokinetic study after oral administration of Ma Huang Tang.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tianhua; Fu, Qiang; Wang, Jing; Ma, Shiping

    2015-02-01

    An ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric (UPLC-MS) method was developed to investigate the pharmacokinetic properties of ephedrine, methylephedrine, amygdalin, and glycyrrhizic acid after oral gavage of Ma Huang Tang (MHT) in Beagles. Beagle plasma samples were pretreated using liquid-liquid extraction, and chromatographic separation was performed on a C18 column using a linear gradient of water-formic acid mixture (0.1%). The pharmacokinetic parameters of ephedrine, methylephedrine, amygdalin, and glycyrrhizic acid from MHT in Beagles were quantitatively determined by UPLC with tandem mass detector. The qualitative detection of the four compounds was accomplished by selected ion monitoring in negative/positive ion modes electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Detection was based on multiple reaction monitoring with the precursor-to-product ion transitions m/z 166.096-116.983 (ephedrine), m/z 179.034-146.087 (methylephedrine), m/z 456.351-323.074 (amygdalin), and m/z 821.606-351.062 (glycyrrhizic acid). The selectivity, sensitivity, linearity, accuracy, precision, extraction recovery, ion suppression, and stability were within the acceptable ranges. The method described was successfully applied to reveal the pharmacokinetic properties of ephedrine, methylephedrine, amygdalin, and glycyrrhizic acid after oral gavage of MHT in Beagles.

  17. Pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and excretion studies of l-isocorypalmine using ultra high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weihui; Liu, Jing; Zhao, Xiaoning; Peng, Yan; Wang, Nannan; Lee, David Y W; Dai, Ronghua

    2017-03-01

    l-Isocorypalmine is a newly identified metabolite of l-tetrahydropalmatine with a unique dual pharmacological profile as a partial dopamine receptor 1 agonist and dopamine receptor 2 antagonist properties for treating cocaine use disorder. The purpose of this study was to explore the pharmacokinetic profiles, tissue distribution, and excretion of l-isocorypalmine in Sprague-Dawley rats. A sensitive and reliable ultra high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for determination of l-isocorypalmine in biological samples. The biological samples were extracted by liquid-liquid extraction and separated on a Bonshell ASB C18 column (2.1 × 100 mm, 2.7 μm, Agela) with gradient mobile phase at the flow rate of 0.2 mL/min. The detection was performed by positive electrospray ionization with multiple reaction monitoring mode. Satisfactory linearity, precision, accuracy, extraction recovery, and acceptable matrix effect were achieved. The quantitative method was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and excretion study of l-isocorypalmine. The results showed that l-isocorypalmine was rapidly distributed, and eliminated from rat plasma and manifested linear dynamics in a dose range of 7.5-15 mg/kg. In addition, the results would be helpful for further clinical reference of l-isocorypalmine as a potential candidate drug for the treatment of cocaine addiction.

  18. [Elements of pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics].

    PubMed

    Piette, F; Soubrie, C

    1990-05-21

    A knowledge of pharmacokinetic data is particularly important with drugs that have a narrow margin of safety. Exhaustive pre-marketing pharmacokinetic investigations and pharmacokinetic studies in populations are the two principal means of acquiring such knowledge. Although popular, the concept of half-life which decreases with age for many drugs is insufficient to calculate dosage in elderly people. Measurements of creatinine clearance provide an almost mathematical approach to the dosage of drugs that are excreted exclusively by the kidneys. In contrast, changes in hepatic metabolism with age and pathology are difficult to evaluate, and their consequences are often vaguely perceived. Our knowledge of relationships between age and pharmacodynamics is still in infancy. Owing to the wide consumption of medicine by elderly people, drug interactions are frequent at all stages, including absorption, metabolization, transport and site of action.

  19. Raltegravir Pharmacokinetics during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Watts, D. Heather; Stek, Alice; Best, Brookie M.; Wang, Jiajia; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Cressey, Tim R.; Aweeka, Francesca; Lizak, Patty; Kreitchmann, Regis; Burchett, Sandra K.; Shapiro, David E.; Hawkins, Elizabeth; Smith, Elizabeth; Mirochnick, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the pharmacokinetics (pk) of raltegravir in HIV-infected women during pregnancy and postpartum. Methods IMPAACT 1026s is an on-going prospective study of antiretroviral pk during pregnancy (NCT00042289). Women receiving 400 mg raltegravir twice daily in combination antiretroviral therapy had intensive steady state 12-hour pk profiles performed during pregnancy and at 6–12 weeks postpartum. Targets were trough concentration above 0.035 µg/mL, the estimated tenth percentile in non-pregnant historical controls. Results Median raltegravir AUC was 6.6 µg*hr/mL for second trimester (n= 16), 5.4 µg*hr/mL for third trimester (n=41), and 11.6 µg*hr/mL postpartum (n= 38) (p=0.03 pp vs 2nd trimester, p=0.001 pp vs third trimester). Trough concentrations were above the target in 69%, 80%, and 79% of second trimester, third trimester and postpartum subjects respectively, with wide variability (<0.010–0.917 µg/mL), and no significant difference between third trimester and postpartum trough concentrations was detected. The median ratio of cord blood/maternal raltegravir concentrations was 1.5. HIV RNA levels were < 400 copies/mL in 92% of women at delivery. Adverse events included elevated liver transaminases in one woman and vomiting in one. All infants with known status are HIV-uninfected. Conclusions Median raltegravir AUC was reduced by approximately 50% during pregnancy; trough concentrations were frequently below target both during late pregnancy and postpartum. Raltegravir readily crossed the placenta. High rates of viral suppression at delivery and the lack of a clear relationship between raltegravir concentration and virologic effect in nonpregnant adults suggest that despite the decreased exposure during pregnancy, a higher dose is not necessary. PMID:25162818

  20. Pharmacokinetics of mitragynine in man

    PubMed Central

    Trakulsrichai, Satariya; Sathirakul, Korbtham; Auparakkitanon, Saranya; Krongvorakul, Jatupon; Sueajai, Jetjamnong; Noumjad, Nantida; Sukasem, Chonlaphat; Wananukul, Winai

    2015-01-01

    Background Kratom, known botanically as Mitragyna speciosa (Korth.), is an indigenous tree in Southeast Asia. Kratom is currently easily available worldwide via special shops and the Internet to use as a drug of abuse, opioid alternative, or pain killer. So far, the pharmacokinetics of this plant has been studied only in animals, and there is no such study in humans. The major abundant active alkaloid in Kratom, mitragynine, is one of the promising new chemical substances to be developed as a new drug. The aim of this study was to examine the pharmacokinetics of mitragynine and assess the linearity in pharmacokinetics in chronic users. Methods Since Kratom is illegal in Thailand, studies in healthy subjects would be unethical. We therefore conducted a prospective study by enrolling ten chronic, regular, healthy users. We adjusted the steady state in each subject by giving a known amount of Kratom tea for 7 days before commencement of the experiment. We admitted and gave different oral doses to subjects to confirm linearity in pharmacokinetics. The mitragynine blood concentrations at 17 times points and the urine concentrations during the 24-hour period were collected and measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Results Ten male subjects completed the study without adverse reactions. The median duration of abuse was 1.75 years. We analyzed one subject separately due to the abnormal behavior of blood concentration. From data of nine subjects, the pharmacokinetic parameters established were time to reach the maximum plasma concentration (0.83±0.35 hour), terminal half-life (23.24±16.07 hours), and the apparent volume of distribution (38.04±24.32 L/kg). The urine excretion of unchanged form was 0.14%. The pharmacokinetics were observed to be oral two-compartment model. Conclusion This was the first pharmacokinetic study in humans, which demonstrated linearity and was consistent with the oral two-compartment model with a terminal half

  1. BioDMET: a physiologically based pharmacokinetic simulation tool for assessing proposed solutions to complex biological problems.

    PubMed

    Graf, John F; Scholz, Bernhard J; Zavodszky, Maria I

    2012-02-01

    We developed a detailed, whole-body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling tool for calculating the distribution of pharmaceutical agents in the various tissues and organs of a human or animal as a function of time. Ordinary differential equations (ODEs) represent the circulation of body fluids through organs and tissues at the macroscopic level, and the biological transport mechanisms and biotransformations within cells and their organelles at the molecular scale. Each major organ in the body is modeled as composed of one or more tissues. Tissues are made up of cells and fluid spaces. The model accounts for the circulation of arterial and venous blood as well as lymph. Since its development was fueled by the need to accurately predict the pharmacokinetic properties of imaging agents, BioDMET is more complex than most PBPK models. The anatomical details of the model are important for the imaging simulation endpoints. Model complexity has also been crucial for quickly adapting the tool to different problems without the need to generate a new model for every problem. When simpler models are preferred, the non-critical compartments can be dynamically collapsed to reduce unnecessary complexity. BioDMET has been used for imaging feasibility calculations in oncology, neurology, cardiology, and diabetes. For this purpose, the time concentration data generated by the model is inputted into a physics-based image simulator to establish imageability criteria. These are then used to define agent and physiology property ranges required for successful imaging. BioDMET has lately been adapted to aid the development of antimicrobial therapeutics. Given a range of built-in features and its inherent flexibility to customization, the model can be used to study a variety of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic problems such as the effects of inter-individual differences and disease-states on drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, dosing optimization, and inter

  2. Self-assembly properties of semiconducting donor-acceptor-donor bithienyl derivatives of tetrazine and thiadiazole-effect of the electron accepting central ring.

    PubMed

    Zapala, Joanna; Knor, Marek; Jaroch, Tomasz; Maranda-Niedbala, Agnieszka; Kurach, Ewa; Kotwica, Kamil; Nowakowski, Robert; Djurado, David; Pecaut, Jacques; Zagorska, Malgorzata; Pron, Adam

    2013-11-26

    Scanning tunneling microscopy was used to study the effect of the electron-accepting unit and the alkyl substituent's position on the type and extent of 2D supramolecular organization of penta-ring donor-acceptor-donor (DAD) semiconductors, consisting of either tetrazine or thiadiazole central acceptor ring symmetrically attached to two bithienyl groups. Microscopic observations of monomolecular layers on HOPG of four alkyl derivatives of the studied adsorbates indicate significant differences in their 2D organizations. Ordered monolayers of thiadiazole derivatives are relatively loose and, independent of the position of alkyl substituents, characterized by large intermolecular separation of acceptor units in the adjacent molecules located in the face-to-face configuration. The 2D supramolecular architecture in both derivatives of thiadiazole is very sensitive to the alkyl substituent's position. Significantly different behavior is observed for derivatives of tetrazine (which is a stronger electron acceptor). Stronger intermolecular DA interactions in these adsorbates generate an intermolecular shift in the monolayer, which is a dominant factor determining the 2D structural organization. As a consequence of this molecular arrangement, tetrazine groups (A segments) face thiophene rings (D segments) of the neighboring molecules. Monolayers of tetrazine derivatives are therefore much more densely packed and characterized by similar π-stacking of molecules independently of the position of alkyl substituents. Moreover, a comparative study of 3D supramolecular organization, deduced from the X-ray diffraction patterns, is also presented clearly confirming the polymorphism of the studied adsorbates.

  3. Psychometric Properties and Validity of a Multi-dimensional Risk Perception Scale Developed in the Context of a Microbicide Acceptability Study

    PubMed Central

    Fava, Joseph L.; Severy, Lawrence; Rosen, Rochelle K.; Salomon, Liz; Shulman, Lawrence; Guthrie, Kate Morrow

    2015-01-01

    Currently available risk perception scales tend to focus on risk behaviors and overall risk (vs partner-specific risk). While these types of assessments may be useful in clinical contexts, they may be inadequate for understanding the relationship between sexual risk and motivations to engage in safer sex or one’s willingness to use prevention products during a specific sexual encounter. We present the psychometric evaluation and validation of a scale that includes both general and specific dimensions of sexual risk perception. A one-time, audio computer-assisted self-interview was administered to 531 women aged 18–55 years. Items assessing sexual risk perceptions, both in general and in regards to a specific partner, were examined in the context of a larger study of willingness to use HIV/STD prevention products and preferences for specific product characteristics. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses yielded two sub-scales: general perceived risk and partner-specific perceived risk. Validity analyses demonstrated that the two subscales were related to many sociodemographic and relationship factors. We suggest that this risk perception scale may be useful in research settings where the outcomes of interest are related to motivations to use HIV and STD prevention products and/ or product acceptability. Further, we provide specific guidance on how this risk perception scale might be utilized to understand such motivations with one or more specific partners. PMID:26621151

  4. A comparison of pharmacokinetics between humans and monkeys.

    PubMed

    Akabane, Takafumi; Tabata, Kenji; Kadono, Keitaro; Sakuda, Shuichi; Terashita, Shigeyuki; Teramura, Toshio

    2010-02-01

    To verify the availability of pharmacokinetic parameters in cynomolgus monkeys, hepatic availability (Fh) and the fraction absorbed multiplied by intestinal availability (FaFg) were evaluated to determine their contributions to absolute bioavailability (F) after intravenous and oral administrations. These results were compared with those for humans using 13 commercial drugs for which human pharmacokinetic parameters have been reported. In addition, in vitro studies of these drugs, including membrane permeability, intrinsic clearance, and p-glycoprotein affinity, were performed to classify the drugs on the basis of their pharmacokinetic properties. In the present study, monkeys had a markedly lower F than humans for 8 of 13 drugs. Although there were no obvious differences in Fh between humans and monkeys, a remarkable species difference in FaFg was observed. Subsequently, we compared the FaFg values for monkeys with the in vitro pharmacokinetic properties of each drug. No obvious FaFg differences were observed between humans and monkeys for drugs that undergo almost no in vivo metabolism. In contrast, low FaFg were observed in monkeys for drugs that undergo relatively high metabolism in monkeys. These results suggest that first-pass intestinal metabolism is greater in cynomolgus monkeys than in humans, and that bioavailability in cynomolgus monkeys after oral administration is unsuitable for predicting pharmacokinetics in humans. In addition, a rough correlation was also observed between in vitro metabolic stability and Fg in humans, possibly indicating the potential for Fg prediction in humans using only in vitro parameters after slight modification of the evaluation system for in vitro intestinal metabolism.

  5. Newbery Medal Acceptance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Russell

    1988-01-01

    Presents the Newbery Medal acceptance speech of Russell Freedman, writer of children's nonfiction. Discusses the place of nonfiction in the world of children's literature, the evolution of children's biographies, and the author's work on "Lincoln." (ARH)

  6. Aztreonam pharmacokinetics in burn patients.

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, L V; White, R L; Kays, M B; Brundage, D M; Yarbrough, D

    1991-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of aztreonam in eight adult patients with severe burn injuries (total body surface area burn, 49% +/- 21% [mean +/- standard deviation]) were studied. The time of initiation of study following burn injury was 7.0 +/- 1.4 days. Four patients at first dose and at steady state were studied. Aztreonam concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, and a two-compartment model was used to fit the data. No significant differences in any pharmacokinetic parameters between first dose and steady state were observed. Volume of distribution of the central compartment after first dose (0.14 liters/kg) and volume of distribution at steady state (0.31 liters/kg) were approximately 30% higher than those reported for other patient populations. Total drug clearance and renal drug clearance when normalized to creatinine clearance (CLCR) were similar to those previously reported for other critically ill patients. CLCR was strongly correlated with renal drug clearance (r = 0.94) and total drug clearance (r = 0.95). The extent and degree of burn (percent second or third degree burn) were poorly correlated with all pharmacokinetic parameters with the exception of the volume of distribution at steady state, which was correlated with both total body surface area burn (r = 0.95) and percent second degree burn (r = 0.83). Aztreonam pharmacokinetics are altered as a result of thermal injury; however, CLCR can be used to assess the clearance of aztreonam in burn patients. PMID:2014982

  7. Nephrectomized and hepatectomized animal models as tools in preclinical pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Bill; Agersø, Henrik; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2013-08-01

    Early understanding of the pharmacokinetics and metabolic patterns of new drug candidates is essential for selection of optimal candidates to move further in to the drug development process. In vitro methodologies can be used to investigate metabolic patterns, but in general, they lack several aspects of the whole-body physiology. In contrast, the complexity of intact animals does not necessarily allow individual processes to be identified. Animal models lacking a major excretion organ can be used to investigate these individual metabolic processes. Animal models of nephrectomy and hepatectomy have considerable potential as tools in preclinical pharmacokinetics to assess organs of importance for drug clearance and thereby knowledge of potential metabolic processes to manipulate to improve pharmacokinetic properties of the molecules. Detailed knowledge of anatomy and surgical techniques is crucial to successfully establish the models, and a well-balanced anaesthesia and adequate monitoring of the animals are also of major importance. An obvious drawback of animal models lacking an organ is the disruption of normal homoeostasis and the induction of dramatic and ultimately mortal systemic changes in the animals. Refining of the surgical techniques and the post-operative supportive care of the animals can increase the value of these models by minimizing the systemic changes induced, and thorough validation of nephrectomy and hepatectomy models is needed before use of such models as a tool in preclinical pharmacokinetics. The present MiniReview discusses pros and cons of the available techniques associated with establishing nephrectomy and hepatectomy models.

  8. Cetirizine in horses: pharmacokinetics and effect of ivermectin pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Olsén, L; Ingvast-Larsson, C; Bondesson, U; Broström, H; Tjälve, H; Larsson, P

    2007-06-01

    The pharmacokinetics of the histamine H(1)-antagonist cetirizine and the effects of pretreatment with the antiparasitic macrocyclic lactone ivermectin on the pharmacokinetics of cetirizine were studied in horses. After oral administration of cetirizine at 0.2 mg/kg bw, the mean terminal half-life was 3.4 h (range 2.9-3.7 h) and the maximal plasma concentration 132 ng/mL (101-196 ng/mL). The time to reach maximal plasma concentration was 0.7 h (0.5-0.8 h). Ivermectin (0.2 mg/kg bw) given orally 1.5 h before cetirizine did not affect its pharmacokinetics. However, ivermectin pretreatment 12 h before cetirizine increased the area under the plasma concentration-time curve by 60%. The maximal plasma concentration, terminal half-life and mean residence time also increased significantly following the 12 h pretreatment. Ivermectin is an inhibitor of P-glycoprotein, which is a major drug efflux transporter in cellular membranes at various sites. The elevated plasma levels of cetirizine following the pretreatment with ivermectin may mainly be due to decreased renal secretion, related to inhibition of the P-glycoprotein in the proximal tubular cells of the kidney. The pharmacokinetic properties of cetirizine have characteristics which are suitable for an antihistamine, and this substance may be a useful drug in horses.

  9. Development and Characterization of Pharmacokinetic Parameters of Fast-Dissolving Films Containing Levocetirizine

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Dhagla R.; Patel, Vishnu A.; Chhalotiya, Usmangani K.; Patel, Harsha V.; Kundawala, Aliasgar J.

    2012-01-01

    A fast-dissolving film containing levocetirizine, a non-sedative antihistamine drug, was developed using pullulan, xanthan gum, propylene glycol, and tween 80 as the base materials. The drug content of the prepared films was within an acceptable limit as prescribed by the USP. The film exhibited excellent stability for four months when stored at 40 °C and 75% humidity. In vitro dissolution studies suggested a rapid disintegration, in which most of levocetirizine (93.54 ± 3.9%) dissolved within 90 seconds after insertion into the medium. Subsequently, Sprague–Dawley rats were used to compare the pharmacokinetic properties of the film preparation administered to the oral cavity, to those with oral administration of the pure drug solution. The pharmacokinetic parameters were similar between the two groups in which AUC0–t (ng h/ml), AUC0–∞ (ng h/ml) Cmax (ng/ml), Tmax (min), Kel (h−1), and t1/2 (h) of the reference were 452.033 ± 43.68, 465.78 ± 48.16, 237.16 ± 19.87, 30, 0.453 ± 0.051, and 1.536 ± 0.118, respectively, for the film formulation 447.233 ± 46.24, 458.22 ± 46.74, 233.32 ± 17.19, 30, 0.464 ± 0.060, and 1.496 ± 0.293, respectively. These results suggest that the present levocetirizine containing fast-dissolving film is likely to become one of the choices to treat different allergic conditions. PMID:23008821

  10. Development and characterization of pharmacokinetic parameters of fast-dissolving films containing levocetirizine.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Dhagla R; Patel, Vishnu A; Chhalotiya, Usmangani K; Patel, Harsha V; Kundawala, Aliasgar J

    2012-01-01

    A fast-dissolving film containing levocetirizine, a non-sedative antihistamine drug, was developed using pullulan, xanthan gum, propylene glycol, and tween 80 as the base materials. The drug content of the prepared films was within an acceptable limit as prescribed by the USP. The film exhibited excellent stability for four months when stored at 40 °C and 75% humidity. In vitro dissolution studies suggested a rapid disintegration, in which most of levocetirizine (93.54 ± 3.9%) dissolved within 90 seconds after insertion into the medium. Subsequently, Sprague-Dawley rats were used to compare the pharmacokinetic properties of the film preparation administered to the oral cavity, to those with oral administration of the pure drug solution. The pharmacokinetic parameters were similar between the two groups in which AUC(0-t) (ng h/ml), AUC(0-∞) (ng h/ml) C(max) (ng/ml), T(max) (min), K(el) (h(-1)), and t(1/2) (h) of the reference were 452.033 ± 43.68, 465.78 ± 48.16, 237.16 ± 19.87, 30, 0.453 ± 0.051, and 1.536 ± 0.118, respectively, for the film formulation 447.233 ± 46.24, 458.22 ± 46.74, 233.32 ± 17.19, 30, 0.464 ± 0.060, and 1.496 ± 0.293, respectively. These results suggest that the present levocetirizine containing fast-dissolving film is likely to become one of the choices to treat different allergic conditions.

  11. Roles of the scalar and vector components of the solvation effects on the vibrational properties of hydrogen- or halogen-bond accepting stretching modes.

    PubMed

    Torii, Hajime; Noge, Saori

    2016-04-21

    Solvation-induced vibrational frequency shifts and infrared (IR) intensity changes of the hydrogen- or halogen-bond accepting stretching modes, especially their dependence on the angular position of the hydrogen- or halogen-bond donating molecule, are examined theoretically. Calculations are carried out for some modes of hydrogen- or halogen-bonding molecular complexes, including the S[double bond, length as m-dash]O stretch of dimethyl sulfoxide-(13)C2H2O, the C[triple bond, length as m-dash]N stretch of acetonitrileH2O, and the amide I' mode of the N-methylacetamide-d1BrNC 1 : 1 complex. It is shown that, in all the example cases dealt with in this study, the frequency shift depends rather strongly on the hydrogen- or halogen-bond angle (e.g., S[double bond, length as m-dash]OH angle), with a larger low-frequency shift as the hydrogen or halogen bond becomes more bent, indicating the generality of the results obtained for the amide I' mode of the N-methylacetamide-d1(2)H2O 1 : 1 complex in a previous study. Contrary to our vague expectation, the frequency shift is not well correlated to the hydrogen- or halogen-bond distance or strength, but nevertheless, it is well reproduced by an electrostatic interaction model if it is carefully constructed by considering the scalar and vector components separately in a reasonable way. On the basis of this electrostatic interaction model, the reason why our vague expectation is not realized is clarified, and a unified understanding is achieved on the hydration-induced high-frequency shift of the C[triple bond, length as m-dash]N stretch and the low-frequency shifts of the S[double bond, length as m-dash]O stretch and amide I'. With regard to the IR intensity, it is shown that, in some of the example cases, it also has rather strong angular position dependence. The mechanism of the IR intensity changes is estimated by analyzing the dipole derivative vector, especially its angular relation with the hydrogen or halogen

  12. Can pharmacokinetic variability be controlled for the patient's benefit? The place of TDM for new AEDs.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Svein I

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this brief communication is to update our recent review on therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of the newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The potential value of TDM is discussed in relation to their mode of action and their pharmacokinetic proper-ties. Data on the relationships between serum concentrations and clinical efficacy are limited, and few studies have been designed primarily to study these relationships. As yet there are no generally accepted target ranges for any of the new AEDs. For most drugs a wide range in serum concentration is associated with clinical efficacy,and there is a considerable overlap in serum concentrations related to toxicity and lack of clinical efficacy. Although the available documentation is clearly insufficient, the pharmacological properties of some of the drugs suggest that they may be suitable candidates for TDM. The primary role of TDM for both the newer and established AEDs is to identify an individual's optimum concentration and thus establish a reference value in that patient.

  13. [Pharmacology of misoprostol (pharmacokinetic data, adverse effects and teratogenic effects)].

    PubMed

    Aubert, J; Bejan-Angoulvant, T; Jonville-Bera, A-P

    2014-02-01

    Misoprostol is a synthetic analogue of prostaglandin E1. It is used in gynaecology because of its properties of myometrium smooth muscle cells contraction and its effects on the cervix. Misoprostol oral bioavailability is low and several authors have assessed whether the administration by other routes increased its pharmacodynamic effects. This paper summarizes the pharmacokinetic studies after other routes of administration: vaginal, sublingual, buccal or rectal. It also provides an update on its adverse effects and teratogenic effects.

  14. Protonation of naphthalene proton sponges containing higher N-alkyl groups. Structural consequences on proton accepting properties and intramolecular hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozeryanskii, V. A.; Shevchuk, D. A.; Pozharskii, A. F.; Kazheva, O. N.; Chekhlov, A. N.; Dyachenko, O. A.

    2008-12-01

    1,8-Bis(dipropylamino)naphthalene and 1,8-di(pyrrolydin-1-yl)naphthalene as well as monoprotonated forms of the latter and of 1,8-di(piperidin-1-yl)naphthalene were structurally analyzed and compared with known data for 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene and its protonated form. The N-alkyl groups enlarging the N …N distance (up to ˜2.9 Å) and changing the degree of conjugation between the NAlk 2 and naphthalene moieties modify in a complex way the basicity (p Ka values of conjugated acids) as well as the properties of intramolecular hydrogen bonds both in the solid state and in solution for a set of 1,8-bis(dialkylamino)naphthalenes.

  15. Quantitative structure-pharmacokinetic relationships (QSPR) of beta blockers derived using neural networks.

    PubMed

    Gobburu, J V; Shelver, W H

    1995-07-01

    This study demonstrates the application of neural networks to predict the pharmacokinetic properties of beta-adrenoreceptor antagonists in humans. A congeneric series of 10 beta-blockers, whose critical pharmacokinetic parameters are well established, was selected for the study. An appropriate neural network system was constructed and tested for its ability to predict the pharmacokinetic parameters from the octanol/water partition coefficient (shake flask method), the pKa, or the fraction bound to plasma proteins. Neural networks successfully trained and the predicted pharmacokinetic values agreed well with the experimental values (average difference = 8%). The neural network-predicted values showed better agreement with the experimental values than those predicted by multiple regression techniques (average difference = 47%). Because the neural networks had a large number of connections, two tests were conducted to determine if the networks were memorizing rather than generalizing. The "leave-one-out" method verified the generalization of the networks by demonstrating that any of the compounds could be deleted from the training set and its value correctly predicted by the new network (average error = 19%). The second test involved the prediction of pharmacokinetic properties of compounds never seen by the network, and reasonable results were obtained for three out of four compounds tested. The results indicate neural networks can be a powerful tool in exploration of quantitative structure-pharmacokinetic relationships.

  16. Accepting space radiation risks.

    PubMed

    Schimmerling, Walter

    2010-08-01

    The human exploration of space inevitably involves exposure to radiation. Associated with this exposure are multiple risks, i.e., probabilities that certain aspects of an astronaut's health or performance will be degraded. The management of these risks requires that such probabilities be accurately predicted, that the actual exposures be verified, and that comprehensive records be maintained. Implicit in these actions is the fact that, at some point, a decision has been made to accept a certain level of risk. This paper examines ethical and practical considerations involved in arriving at a determination that risks are acceptable, roles that the parties involved may play, and obligations arising out of reliance on the informed consent paradigm seen as the basis for ethical radiation risk acceptance in space.

  17. Why was Relativity Accepted?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brush, S. G.

    Historians of science have published many studies of the reception of Einstein's special and general theories of relativity. Based on a review of these studies, and my own research on the role of the light-bending prediction in the reception of general relativity, I discuss the role of three kinds of reasons for accepting relativity (1) empirical predictions and explanations; (2) social-psychological factors; and (3) aesthetic-mathematical factors. According to the historical studies, acceptance was a three-stage process. First, a few leading scientists adopted the special theory for aesthetic-mathematical reasons. In the second stage, their enthusiastic advocacy persuaded other scientists to work on the theory and apply it to problems currently of interest in atomic physics. The special theory was accepted by many German physicists by 1910 and had begun to attract some interest in other countries. In the third stage, the confirmation of Einstein's light-bending prediction attracted much public attention and forced all physicists to take the general theory of relativity seriously. In addition to light-bending, the explanation of the advance of Mercury's perihelion was considered strong evidence by theoretical physicists. The American astronomers who conducted successful tests of general relativity became defenders of the theory. There is little evidence that relativity was `socially constructed' but its initial acceptance was facilitated by the prestige and resources of its advocates.

  18. UGV acceptance testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Jeffrey A.; Murphy, Robin R.

    2006-05-01

    With over 100 models of unmanned vehicles now available for military and civilian safety, security or rescue applications, it is important to for agencies to establish acceptance testing. However, there appears to be no general guidelines for what constitutes a reasonable acceptance test. This paper describes i) a preliminary method for acceptance testing by a customer of the mechanical and electrical components of an unmanned ground vehicle system, ii) how it has been applied to a man-packable micro-robot, and iii) discusses the value of testing both to ensure that the customer has a workable system and to improve design. The test method automated the operation of the robot to repeatedly exercise all aspects and combinations of components on the robot for 6 hours. The acceptance testing process uncovered many failures consistent with those shown to occur in the field, showing that testing by the user does predict failures. The process also demonstrated that the testing by the manufacturer can provide important design data that can be used to identify, diagnose, and prevent long-term problems. Also, the structured testing environment showed that sensor systems can be used to predict errors and changes in performance, as well as uncovering unmodeled behavior in subsystems.

  19. Approaches to acceptable risk

    SciTech Connect

    Whipple, C.

    1997-04-30

    Several alternative approaches to address the question {open_quotes}How safe is safe enough?{close_quotes} are reviewed and an attempt is made to apply the reasoning behind these approaches to the issue of acceptability of radiation exposures received in space. The approaches to the issue of the acceptability of technological risk described here are primarily analytical, and are drawn from examples in the management of environmental health risks. These include risk-based approaches, in which specific quantitative risk targets determine the acceptability of an activity, and cost-benefit and decision analysis, which generally focus on the estimation and evaluation of risks, benefits and costs, in a framework that balances these factors against each other. These analytical methods tend by their quantitative nature to emphasize the magnitude of risks, costs and alternatives, and to downplay other factors, especially those that are not easily expressed in quantitative terms, that affect acceptance or rejection of risk. Such other factors include the issues of risk perceptions and how and by whom risk decisions are made.

  20. Pharmacokinetics and RC Circuit Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cock, Mieke De; Janssen, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Most introductory physics courses include a chapter on RC circuits in which the differential equations for the charging and discharging of a capacitor are derived. A number of papers in this journal describe lab experiments dealing with the measurement of different parameters in such RC circuits. In this contribution, we report on a lab experiment we developed for students majoring in pharmacy, using RC circuits to simulate a pharmacokinetic process.

  1. Population Pharmacokinetics of Intranasal Scopolamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Chow, D. S. L.; Putcha, L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: An intranasal gel dosage formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness (SMS).The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) was evaluated using data collected in Phase II IND protocols. We reported earlier statistically significant gender differences in PK parameters of INSCOP at a dose level of 0.4 mg. To identify covariates that influence PK parameters of INSCOP, we examined population covariates of INSCOP PK model for 0.4 mg dose. Methods: Plasma scopolamine concentrations versus time data were collected from 20 normal healthy human subjects (11 male/9 female) after a 0.4 mg dose. Phoenix NLME was employed for PK analysis of these data using gender, body weight and age as covariates for model selection. Model selection was based on a likelihood ratio test on the difference of criteria (-2LL). Statistical significance for base model building and individual covariate analysis was set at P less than 0.05{delta(-2LL)=3.84}. Results: A one-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order elimination best described INSCOP concentration ]time profiles. Inclusion of gender, body weight and age as covariates individually significantly reduced -2LL by the cut-off value of 3.84(P less than 0.05) when tested against the base model. After the forward stepwise selection and backward elimination steps, gender was selected to add to the final model which had significant influence on absorption rate constant (ka) and the volume of distribution (V) of INSCOP. Conclusion: A population pharmacokinetic model for INSCOP has been identified and gender was a significant contributing covariate for the final model. The volume of distribution and Ka were significantly higher in males than in females which confirm gender-dependent pharmacokinetics of scopolamine after administration of a 0.4 mg dose.

  2. [Dalbavancin: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters].

    PubMed

    Azanza, José Ramón; Sádaba, Belén; Reis, Joana

    2017-01-01

    Dalbavancin is a new lipoglycopeptide antibiotic whose structure influences its pharmacokinetic profile. It is not absorbed after oral administration and is therefore administered intravenously. It is distributed through intracellular fluid, reaching adequate concentrations in the skin, bone, blister fluid and synovial fluid. Plasma protein binding is very high. Concentrations in brain tissue and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are inadequate. Excretion is through non-microsomal metabolism with inactive metabolites and through the kidneys by glomerular filtration. Dalbavancin is eliminated slowly, as shown by its clearance value and its terminal elimination half-life, which exceeds 300 hours. This means that adequate concentrations of the drug remain in plasma and tissues for a prolonged period and explains the dosing regimen: a first dose of 1g followed 7 days later by a 500mg dose. The pharmacokinetics are linear and show little intra- and interindividual variability. There are no pharmacokinetic interactions. Dose adjustment is not required for patients with mild or moderate renal insufficiency (creatinine clearance ≥ 30 to 79ml/min). Dosage adjustment is not required in patients regularly receiving elective haemodialysis (3 times/week) and the drug can be administered without consideration of haemodialysis times. In patients with chronic renal insufficiency, whose creatinine clearance is < 30ml/min and who are not regularly receiving elective haemodialysis, the recommended dose should be reduced to 750mg per week, followed 1 week later by 375mg. Dosage adjustment does not seem necessary in patients with liver failure or in older patients. There is no information on the most appropriate dosage in children. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics parameter that best describes the effectiveness of dalbavancin is the ratio between the area under the curve and the minimum inhibitory concentration.

  3. Chirality and pharmacokinetics: an area of neglected dimensionality?

    PubMed

    Hutt, Andrew J

    2007-01-01

    Drug stereochemistry has, until relatively recently, been an area of neglected dimensionality with the development of the majority of synthetic chiral drugs as racemates. This situation has changed in recent years as a result of advances in the chemical technologies associated with the synthesis, analysis and preparative scale resolution of the enantiomers of chiral molecules. As a result of the application of these technologies the potential significance of the differential pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of the enantiomers present in a racemate have become appreciated. Many of the processes involved in drug disposition, i.e. absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion, involve a direct interaction with chiral biological macromolecules, e.g. transporters, membrane lipids and enzymes, and following administration of a racemate the individual enantiomers frequently exhibit different pharmacokinetic profiles and rarely exist in a 1:1 ratio in biological fluids. The magnitude of the differences between a pair of enantiomers observed in their pharmacokinetic parameters tends to be relatively modest in comparison to their pharmacodynamic properties. However, the observed stereoselectivity may be either amplified or attenuated depending on the organisational level, e.g. whole body, organ or macromolecular, the particular parameter represents. Differences in parameters involving a direct interaction between a drug enantiomer and a biological macromolecule, e.g. intrinsic metabolite formation clearance and fraction unbound, tend to be largest, and comparison of parameters reflecting the whole body level of organisation, e.g. half-life, clearance, volume of distribution, may well mask significant stereoselectivity at the macromolecular level. In spite of the recent interest in drug chirality relatively limited pharmacokinetic data are available for the enantiomers of a number of commonly used racemic drugs. Factors influencing the stereo-selectivity of

  4. Pharmacokinetics, drug interactions, and tolerability of paroxetine and paroxetine CR.

    PubMed

    DeVane, C Lindsay

    2003-01-01

    The development of paroxetine hydrochloride began in the late 1970s. An abundance of data have been accumulated from clinical investigations demonstrating the efficacy of paroxetine in the treatment of major depression and anxiety disorders. The published literature contains a substantial amount of supportive data documenting the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of paroxetine. The role of paroxetine in clinically significant drug-drug interactions, especially involving metabolic inhibitory effects on the substrates of cytochrome p450 2D6, has long been suspected, but only isolated cases provide any evidence. Published data for widespread patient morbidity from drug interactions with paroxetine are almost nonexistent. Considerations of the pharmacokinetic properties of paroxetine support a rationale for the development of new dosage forms that maintain the efficacy yet improve the tolerability profile of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Paroxetine controlled-release is an enteric-coated formulation with release features that may enhance clinical outcome by modifying absorption-related pharmacokinetics, improving tolerability, and maintaining therapeutic benefits

  5. Species differences in pharmacokinetics and drug teratogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nau, H.

    1986-12-01

    Interspecies differences in regard to the teratogenicity of drugs can be the result of differing pharmacokinetic processes that determine the crucial concentration-time relationships in the embryo. Maternal absorption, as well as distribution, of the drugs does not usually show great species differences. The first-pass effect after oral application is often more pronounced in animals than man (e.g., valproic acid, 13-cis-retinoic acid), although in some cases the reverse was found (e.g., hydrolysis of valpromide). Existing differences can be adjusted by appropriate choice of the administration route and measurements of drug levels. Many variables determine the placental transfer of drugs: developmental stage, type of placenta, properties of the drug. Even closely related drugs (e.g., retinoids) may differ greatly in regard to placental transfer. Maternal protein binding is an important determinant of placental transfer, since only the free concentration in maternal plasma can equilibrate with the embryo during organogenesis; this parameter differs greatly across species. Laboratory animals usually have a much higher rate of drug elimination than man. Drastic drug level fluctuations are therefore present during teratogenicity testing in animals, but not to do the same degree in human therapy. It must, therefore, be investigated if peak concentrations (such as for valproic acid and possibly caffeine) or the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) (such as for cyclophosphamide and possibly retinoids) correlate with the teratogenic response. Only then is a rational and scientific basis for interspecies comparison possible. It is concluded that the prediction of the human response based on animal studies can be improved by consideration of the appropriate pharmacokinetic determinants.

  6. Species differences in pharmacokinetics and drug teratogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Nau, H

    1986-01-01

    Interspecies differences in regard to the teratogenicity of drugs can be the result of differing pharmacokinetic processes that determine the crucial concentration-time relationships in the embryo. Maternal absorption, as well as distribution, of the drugs does not usually show great species differences. The first-pass effect after oral application is often more pronounced in animals than man (e.g., valproic acid, 13-cis-retinoic acid), although in some cases the reverse was found (e.g., hydrolysis of valpromide). Existing differences can be adjusted by appropriate choice of the administration route and measurements of drug levels. Many variables determine the placental transfer of drugs: developmental stage, type of placenta, properties of the drug. Even closely related drugs (e.g., retinoids) may differ greatly in regard to placental transfer. Maternal protein binding is an important determinant of placental transfer, since only the free concentration in maternal plasma can equilibrate with the embryo during organogenesis; this parameter differs greatly across species (e.g., valproic acid: five times higher free fractions in mouse and hamster than in monkey and man). The metabolic pattern has not yet been demonstrated to be a major cause of species differences, although recent evidence on phenytoin and thalidomide support the hypothesis that some species differences can be the result of differing activation/deactivation pathways. Laboratory animals usually have a much higher rate of drug elimination than man. Drastic drug level fluctuations are therefore present during teratogenicity testing in animals, but not to the same degree in human therapy. It must, therefore, be investigated if peak concentrations (such as for valproic acid and possibly caffeine) or the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) (such as for cyclophosphamide and possibly retinoids) correlate with the teratogenic response. Only then is a rational and scientific basis for interspecies

  7. Pharmacokinetic profiles of anticancer herbal medicines in humans and the clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Chen, X-W; Sneed, K B; Zhou, S-F

    2011-01-01

    A number of herbal medicines are increasingly used by cancer patients worldwide, despite the fact that the clinical evidence that supports their use to fight cancer is weak or lacking. Pharmacokinetic studies have been integrated into modern drug development, but they are generally not needed for herbal remedies. To update our knowledge in this field, this paper highlights the pharmacokinetic properties of anticancer herbal medicines and the clinical relevance. To retrieve relevant data, the authors have searched through computer-based literatures by full text search in Medline (via Pubmed), ScienceDirect, Current Contents Connect (ISI), Cochrance Library, CINAHL (EBSCO), CrossRef Search and Embase ((all from inception to May 2011). An extensive literature search indicatesthat there are limited data on the pharmacokinetic properties of anticancer herbal medicines in humans. There are increasing pharmacokinetic studies of anticancer herbal remedies, but these studies are mainly focused on a small number of herbal medicines including curcumin, ginseng, ginkgo, ginger and milk thistle. For an anticancer herbal medicine, the pharmacological activity is gained when the active agents or the active metabolites reach and sustain proper levels at their sites of action. Both the dose levels and pharmacokinetic processes of active herbal components in the body determine their target-site concentrations and thus the anticancer effect. In this regard, a safe and optimal use of anticancer herbal medicines requires a full understanding of their pharmacokinetic profiles. To optimize the use of anticancer herbal remedies, further studies to explore their pharmacokinetic properties and the relevance to pharmacodynamics and toxicity in humans are certainly warranted.

  8. Acceptability of human risk.

    PubMed

    Kasperson, R E

    1983-10-01

    This paper has three objectives: to explore the nature of the problem implicit in the term "risk acceptability," to examine the possible contributions of scientific information to risk standard-setting, and to argue that societal response is best guided by considerations of process rather than formal methods of analysis. Most technological risks are not accepted but are imposed. There is also little reason to expect consensus among individuals on their tolerance of risk. Moreover, debates about risk levels are often at base debates over the adequacy of the institutions which manage the risks. Scientific information can contribute three broad types of analyses to risk-setting deliberations: contextual analysis, equity assessment, and public preference analysis. More effective risk-setting decisions will involve attention to the process used, particularly in regard to the requirements of procedural justice and democratic responsibility.

  9. Acceptability of human risk.

    PubMed Central

    Kasperson, R E

    1983-01-01

    This paper has three objectives: to explore the nature of the problem implicit in the term "risk acceptability," to examine the possible contributions of scientific information to risk standard-setting, and to argue that societal response is best guided by considerations of process rather than formal methods of analysis. Most technological risks are not accepted but are imposed. There is also little reason to expect consensus among individuals on their tolerance of risk. Moreover, debates about risk levels are often at base debates over the adequacy of the institutions which manage the risks. Scientific information can contribute three broad types of analyses to risk-setting deliberations: contextual analysis, equity assessment, and public preference analysis. More effective risk-setting decisions will involve attention to the process used, particularly in regard to the requirements of procedural justice and democratic responsibility. PMID:6418541

  10. Acceptance Test Plan.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    7 RD-Ai507 154 CCEPTANCE TEST PLN(U) WESTINGHOUSE DEFENSE ND i/i ELECTRO ICS CENTER BALTIMORE MD DEVELOPMENT AND OPERATIONS DIY D C KRRiJS 28 JUN...Ln ACCEPTANCE TEST PLAN FOR SPECIAL RELIABILITY TESTS FOR BROADBAND MICROWAVE AMPLIFIER PANEL David C. Kraus, Reliability Engineer WESTINGHOUSE ...ORGANIZATION b. OFFICE SYMBOL 7g& NAME OF MONITORING ORGANIZATION tIf appdeg ble) WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC CORP. - NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY e. AOORES$ (Ci7t

  11. Age and Acceptance of Euthanasia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Russell A.

    1980-01-01

    Study explores relationship between age (and sex and race) and acceptance of euthanasia. Women and non-Whites were less accepting because of religiosity. Among older people less acceptance was attributable to their lesser education and greater religiosity. Results suggest that quality of life in old age affects acceptability of euthanasia. (Author)

  12. [Quantum-chemical basics of pharmacokinetics (literary review and own investigations)].

    PubMed

    Chekman, I S; Horchakova, N O; Nebesna, T Iu; Kazakova, O O; Luk"ianchuk, V D; Bielienichev, I F; Zviagintseva, T V; Syrova, H O; Zagorodnyĭ, M I; Kravets', D S

    2012-01-01

    The work is devoted to the use of quantum-pharmacological approaches in pharmacokinetic investigations. The main objective of the pharmacological researches is to find new, more active and less toxic drugs. To date, such a search is carried out empirically. The current approach can not fully meet the needs of medicine in the new drugs, requires considerable time and financial costs and does not meet modern standards of bioethics. Quantum pharmacology leads to the synthesis of drugs with desired properties is much faster and more efficient. Computer prediction of pharmacokinetic and biopharmaceutical properties of biologically active substances can make 50-70% more effective development of original drugs.

  13. An integrated pharmacokinetics ontology and corpus for text mining

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Drug pharmacokinetics parameters, drug interaction parameters, and pharmacogenetics data have been unevenly collected in different databases and published extensively in the literature. Without appropriate pharmacokinetics ontology and a well annotated pharmacokinetics corpus, it will be difficult to develop text mining tools for pharmacokinetics data collection from the literature and pharmacokinetics data integration from multiple databases. Description A comprehensive pharmacokinetics ontology was constructed. It can annotate all aspects of in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments and in vivo pharmacokinetics studies. It covers all drug metabolism and transportation enzymes. Using our pharmacokinetics ontology, a PK-corpus was constructed to present four classes of pharmacokinetics abstracts: in vivo pharmacokinetics studies, in vivo pharmacogenetic studies, in vivo drug interaction studies, and in vitro drug interaction studies. A novel hierarchical three level annotation scheme was proposed and implemented to tag key terms, drug interaction sentences, and drug interaction pairs. The utility of the pharmacokinetics ontology was demonstrated by annotating three pharmacokinetics studies; and the utility of the PK-corpus was demonstrated by a drug interaction extraction text mining analysis. Conclusions The pharmacokinetics ontology annotates both in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments and in vivo pharmacokinetics studies. The PK-corpus is a highly valuable resource for the text mining of pharmacokinetics parameters and drug interactions. PMID:23374886

  14. Population pharmacokinetics of abacavir in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Fauchet, Floris; Treluyer, Jean-Marc; Préta, Laure-Helene; Valade, Elodie; Pannier, Emmanuelle; Urien, Saik; Hirt, Déborah

    2014-10-01

    For the first time, a population approach was used to describe abacavir (ABC) pharmacokinetics in HIV-infected pregnant and nonpregnant women. A total of 266 samples from 150 women were obtained. No covariate effect (from age, body weight, pregnancy, or gestational age) on ABC pharmacokinetics was found. Thus, it seems unnecessary to adapt the ABC dosing regimen during pregnancy.

  15. Drug Transport and Pharmacokinetics for Chemical Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Laurent; Kanneganti, Kumud; Kim, Kwang Seok

    2010-01-01

    Experiments in continuous-stirred vessels were proposed to introduce methods in pharmacokinetics and drug transport to chemical engineering students. The activities can be incorporated into the curriculum to illustrate fundamentals learned in the classroom. An appreciation for the role of pharmacokinetics in drug discovery will also be gained…

  16. Applying pharmacokinetics to veterinary clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Trepanier, Lauren A

    2013-09-01

    This article describes clinical examples in which pharmacokinetic parameters can be used to optimize veterinary patient care. Specific applications include extrapolating drug dosages, optimizing therapy with therapeutic drug monitoring, interpreting pharmacokinetic information provided by drug labels and pharmaceutical companies, and adjusting drug dosages in patients with hepatic or renal failure.

  17. Microdosing: the new pharmacokinetic paradigm?

    PubMed

    Zanni, Guido R; Wick, Jeannette Y

    2006-10-01

    Numerous market factors have converged to create a need for change in the drug development process. Public scrutiny, high failure rates for investigational agents, and concern about the use of animals in research, are just a few. In response, some changes in this process are being made. Microdosing--administering very small, radiolabeled doses of investigational agents to humans--is one change that has the potential to save time and money. It is used to elucidate the pharmacokinetic profile of agents. Not all experts agree that it will live up to its promise, but the potential is great.

  18. Pharmacokinetic characteristics of antimicrobials and optimal treatment of urosepsis.

    PubMed

    Wagenlehner, Florian M E; Weidner, Wolfgang; Naber, Kurt G

    2007-01-01

    Urosepsis accounts for approximately 25% of all sepsis cases and may develop from a community-acquired or nosocomial urinary tract infection (UTI). Nevertheless, the underlying UTI is almost exclusively a complicated one with involvement of the parenchymatous urogenital organs (e.g. kidneys, prostate) and mostly associated with any kind of obstructive uropathy. If urosepsis originates from a nosocomial infection, a broad spectrum of Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens have to be expected, which are often multiresistant. In urosepsis, as in other types of sepsis, the severity of sepsis depends mostly upon the host response. The treatment of urosepsis follows the generally accepted rules of the 'Surviving Sepsis' campaign guidelines. Early normalisation of blood pressure and early adequate empirical antibacterial therapy with optimised dosing are equally important to meet the requirements of early goal-directed therapy. In most cases of urosepsis, early control of the infectious focus is possible and as important. Optimal supportive measures need to follow the early phase of resuscitation. To lower mortality from urosepsis, an optimal interdisciplinary approach between intensive care, anti-infective therapy and urology is essential, assisted by easy access to the necessary laboratory and imaging diagnostic procedures. Although most antibacterials achieve high urinary concentrations, there are several unique features of complicated UTI, and thus urosepsis, that influence the activity of antibacterial substances: (i) renal pharmacokinetics differ in unilateral and bilateral renal impairment and in unilateral and bilateral renal obstruction; (ii) variations in pH may influence the activity of certain antibacterials; and (iii) biofilm infection is frequently found under these conditions, which may increase the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of the antibacterials at the site of infection by several hundred folds. Assessment of antibacterial pharmacodynamic

  19. High acceptance recoil polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    The HARP Collaboration

    1992-12-05

    In order to detect neutrons and protons in the 50 to 600 MeV energy range and measure their polarization, an efficient, low-noise, self-calibrating device is being designed. This detector, known as the High Acceptance Recoil Polarimeter (HARP), is based on the recoil principle of proton detection from np[r arrow]n[prime]p[prime] or pp[r arrow]p[prime]p[prime] scattering (detected particles are underlined) which intrinsically yields polarization information on the incoming particle. HARP will be commissioned to carry out experiments in 1994.

  20. Baby-Crying Acceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Tiago; de Magalhães, Sérgio Tenreiro

    The baby's crying is his most important mean of communication. The crying monitoring performed by devices that have been developed doesn't ensure the complete safety of the child. It is necessary to join, to these technological resources, means of communicating the results to the responsible, which would involve the digital processing of information available from crying. The survey carried out, enabled to understand the level of adoption, in the continental territory of Portugal, of a technology that will be able to do such a digital processing. It was used the TAM as the theoretical referential. The statistical analysis showed that there is a good probability of acceptance of such a system.

  1. Pharmacology in space. Part 1. Influence of adaptive changes on pharmacokinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathers, C. M.; Charles, J. B.; Bungo, M. W.

    1989-01-01

    The topic of pharmacology in space, i.e. the administration of drugs during space flight and the subsequent pharmacokinetic handling of the pharmaceuticals, is a new field about which little is known. In a two-part series, Claire Lathers and colleagues highlight some of the current questions in this field. In this first article the physiological and biochemical changes associated with weightlessness in space are discussed. These changes induce adaptive alterations which may influence the pharmacokinetic properties of drugs. The cardiovascular system is of particular relevance here. Also discussed are the classes of pharmacological agent that are most likely to be used during space flight for medical problems and thus, by necessity, will become drugs to be examined in space to determine whether their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties are altered. Therapy of the most common spaceflight ailment-motion sickness-will be considered next month in Part 2.

  2. Preclinical pharmacokinetic analysis of NOV-002, a glutathione disulfide mimetic.

    PubMed

    Uys, J D; Manevich, Y; Devane, L C; He, L; Garret, T E; Pazoles, C J; Tew, K D; Townsend, D M

    2010-09-01

    NOV-002 is a glutathione disulfide (GSSG) mimetic that is the subject of clinical investigation in oncology indications. GSSG is reduced by glutathione reductase (GR) to form glutathione (GSH), thereby maintaining redox homeostasis. The purpose of the study was to report the pharmacokinetic properties of NOV-002 and evaluate the effect that NOV-002 elicits in redox homeostasis. The pharmacokinetic analysis and tissue distribution of NOV-002 and GSH was evaluated in mice following a dose of 250 mg/kg, i.p. The redox potential and total protein thiol status was calculated. Here we show that NOV-002 is a substrate for GR and that GSH is a primary metabolite. Non-linear pharmacokinetic modeling predicted that the estimated absorption and elimination rate constants correspond to a half-life of approximately 13 min with an AUC of 1.18 μgh/mL, a C(max) of 2.16 μg/ml and a volume of distribution of 42.61 L/kg. In addition, measurement of the redox potential and total protein thiol status indicated the generation of a transient oxidative signal in the plasma compartment after administration of NOV-002. These results indicate that NOV-002 exerts kinetic and dynamic effects in mice consistent with the GSSG component as the active pharmacological constituent of the drug. A longer-lasting decrease in total plasma free thiol content was also seen, suggesting that the oxidative effect of the GSSG from NOV-002 was impacting redox homeostasis.

  3. Cetirizine in horses: pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics following repeated oral administration.

    PubMed

    Olsén, Lena; Bondesson, Ulf; Broström, Hans; Tjälve, Hans; Ingvast-Larsson, Carina

    2008-08-01

    The pharmacokinetics of the histamine H(1)-antagonist cetirizine and its effect on histamine-induced cutaneous wheal formation were studied in six healthy horses following repeated oral administration. After three consecutive administrations of cetirizine (0.2 mg/kg body weight, bw) every 12h, the trough plasma concentration of cetirizine was 16+/-4 ng/mL (mean+/-SD) and the wheal formation was inhibited by 45+/-23%. After four additional administrations of cetirizine (0.4 mg/kg bw) every 12 h, the trough plasma concentration was 48+/-15 ng/mL and the wheal formation was inhibited by 68+/-11%. The terminal half-life was about 5.8 h. A pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic link model showed that the maximal inhibition of wheal formation was about 95% and the EC(50) about 18 ng/mL. It is concluded that cetirizine in doses of 0.2-0.4 mg/kg bw administered at 12 h intervals exhibits favourable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties without causing visible side effects, and the drug may therefore be a useful antihistamine in equine medicine.

  4. Effect of zaleplon on digoxin pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.

    PubMed

    Sanchez Garcia, P; Paty, I; Leister, C A; Guerra, P; Frías, J; García Pérez, L E; Darwish, M

    2000-12-15

    The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of digoxin alone and digoxin plus zaleplon were studied. Healthy, nonsmoking men between 18 and 45 years of age were given a single oral dose of digoxin 0.375 mg daily on days 1 through 9. On days 10 through 14, the subjects received digoxin 0.375 mg plus oral zaleplon 10 mg daily. Blood samples were obtained on days 3, 5, 8, 9, and 14, and serum digoxin concentration data were analyzed by model-independent pharmacokinetic methods. Blood pressure, heart rate, PR interval, and QTc interval were recorded to determine the effect of zaleplon on digoxin pharmacodynamics. A total of 20 men completed the study. Maximum serum digoxin concentration and area under the serum digoxin concentration-versus-time curve from 0 to 24 hours met bioequivalence test criteria. There were no significant differences in QTc or PR interval between days 9 (digoxin alone) and 14 (digoxin plus zaleplon), and there were no clinically important changes from baseline to the study's end in vital signs, physical examination findings, or ECG results for individual subjects. Eighteen percent of the subjects who received digoxin alone and 35% of those who received digoxin plus zaleplon reported one or more adverse effects; all were mild and resolved quickly. Zaleplon had no significant effects on selected pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of digoxin.

  5. In vitro-in vivo Pharmacokinetic correlation model for quality assurance of antiretroviral drugs

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo Valencia, Piedad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The in vitro-in vivo pharmacokinetic correlation models (IVIVC) are a fundamental part of the drug discovery and development process. The ability to accurately predict the in vivo pharmacokinetic profile of a drug based on in vitro observations can have several applications during a successful development process. Objective: To develop a comprehensive model to predict the in vivo absorption of antiretroviral drugs based on permeability studies, in vitro and in vivo solubility and demonstrate its correlation with the pharmacokinetic profile in humans. Methods: Analytical tools to test the biopharmaceutical properties of stavudine, lamivudine y zidovudine were developed. The kinetics of dissolution, permeability in caco-2 cells and pharmacokinetics of absorption in rabbits and healthy volunteers were evaluated. Results: The cumulative areas under the curve (AUC) obtained in the permeability study with Caco-2 cells, the dissolution study and the pharmacokinetics in rabbits correlated with the cumulative AUC values in humans. These results demonstrated a direct relation between in vitro data and absorption, both in humans and in the in vivo model. Conclusions: The analytical methods and procedures applied to the development of an IVIVC model showed a strong correlation among themselves. These IVIVC models are proposed as alternative and cost/effective methods to evaluate the biopharmaceutical properties that determine the bioavailability of a drug and their application includes the development process, quality assurance, bioequivalence studies and pharmacosurveillance. PMID:26600625

  6. Pharmacokinetic enhancers in HIV therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Larson, Kajal B; Wang, Kun; Delille, Cecile; Otofokun, Igho; Acosta, Edward P

    2014-10-01

    Maximal and durable viral load suppression is one of the most important goals of HIV therapy and is directly related to adequate drug exposure. Protease inhibitors (PIs), an important component of the antiretroviral armada, were historically associated with poor oral bioavailability and high pill burden. However, because the PIs are metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A enzymes, intentional inhibition of these enzymes leads to higher drug exposure, lower pill burden, and therefore simplified dosing schedules with this class of drug. This is the basis of pharmacokinetic enhancement. In HIV therapy, two pharmacokinetic enhancers or boosting agents are used: ritonavir and cobicistat. Both agents inhibit CYP3A4, with cobicistat being a more specific CYP inhibitor than ritonavir. Unlike ritonavir, cobicistat does not have antiretroviral activity. Cobicistat has been evaluated in clinical trials and was recently approved in the USA as a fixed-dose combination with the integrase inhibitor, elvitegravir and two nucleos(t)ide analogs. Additional studies are examining cobicistat in fixed-dose combinations with various PIs. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of these agents and clinically relevant drug regimens and ongoing trials. Studies with elvitegravir and the novel PI TMC319011 are also discussed.

  7. A comprehensive physiologically based pharmacokinetic ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Published physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models from peer-reviewed articles are often well-parameterized, thoroughly-vetted, and can be utilized as excellent resources for the construction of models pertaining to related chemicals. Specifically, chemical-specific parameters and in vivo pharmacokinetic data used to calibrate these published models can act as valuable starting points for model development of new chemicals with similar molecular structures. A knowledgebase for published PBPK-related articles was compiled to support PBPK model construction for new chemicals based on their close analogues within the knowledgebase, and a web-based interface was developed to allow users to query those close analogues. A list of 689 unique chemicals and their corresponding 1751 articles was created after analysis of 2,245 PBPK-related articles. For each model, the PMID, chemical name, major metabolites, species, gender, life stages and tissue compartments were extracted from the published articles. PaDEL-Descriptor, a Chemistry Development Kit based software, was used to calculate molecular fingerprints. Tanimoto index was implemented in the user interface as measurement of structural similarity. The utility of the PBPK knowledgebase and web-based user interface was demonstrated using two case studies with ethylbenzene and gefitinib. Our PBPK knowledgebase is a novel tool for ranking chemicals based on similarities to other chemicals associated with existi

  8. Population pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate in obese and non‐obese volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Chairat, Kalayanee; Jittamala, Podjanee; Hanpithakpong, Warunee; Day, Nicholas P. J.; White, Nicholas J.; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aims of the present study were to compare the pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir and its active antiviral metabolite oseltamivir carboxylate in obese and non‐obese individuals and to determine the effect of obesity on the pharmacokinetic properties of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate. Methods The population pharmacokinetic properties of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate were evaluated in 12 obese [body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg m−2) and 12 non‐obese (BMI <30 kg m−2) Thai adult volunteers receiving a standard dose of 75 mg and a double dose of 150 mg in a randomized sequence. Concentration–time data were collected and analysed using nonlinear mixed‐effects modelling. Results The pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate were described simultaneously by first‐order absorption, with a one‐compartment disposition model for oseltamivir, followed by a metabolism compartment and a one‐compartment disposition model for oseltamivir carboxylate. Creatinine clearance was a significant predictor of oseltamivir carboxylate clearance {3.84% increase for each 10 ml min−1 increase in creatinine clearance [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.178%, 8.02%]}. Obese individuals had an approximately 25% (95% CI 24%, 28%) higher oseltamivir clearance, 20% higher oseltamivir volume of distribution (95% CI 19%, 23%) and 10% higher oseltamivir carboxylate clearance (95% CI 9%, 11%) compared with non‐obese individuals. However, these altered pharmacokinetic properties were small and did not change the overall exposure to oseltamivir carboxylate. Conclusions The results confirmed that a dose adjustment for oseltamivir in obese individuals is not necessary on the basis of its pharmacokinetics. PMID:26810861

  9. Special endpoint and product specific considerations in pharmaceutical acceptable daily exposure derivation.

    PubMed

    Gould, Janet; Callis, Courtney M; Dolan, David G; Stanard, Brad; Weideman, Patricia A

    2016-08-01

    Recently, a guideline has been published by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) on setting safe limits, permitted daily exposures (PDE) [also called acceptable daily exposures (ADE)], for medicines manufactured in multi-product facilities. The ADE provides a safe exposure limit for inadvertent exposure of a drug due to cross-contamination in manufacturing. The ADE determination encompasses a standard risk assessment, requiring an understanding of the toxicological and pharmacological effects, the mechanism of action, drug compound class, and the dose-response as well as the pharmacokinetic properties of the compound. While the ADE concept has broad application in pharmaceutical safety there are also nuances and specific challenges associated with some toxicological endpoints or drug product categories. In this manuscript we discuss considerations for setting ADEs when the following specific adverse health endpoints may constitute the critical effect: genotoxicity, developmental and reproductive toxicity (DART), and immune system modulation (immunostimulation or immunosuppression), and for specific drug classes, including antibody drug conjugates (ADCs), emerging medicinal therapeutic compounds, and compounds with limited datasets. These are challenging toxicological scenarios that require a careful evaluation of all of the available information in order to establish a health-based safe level.

  10. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lon, Hoi-Kei; Liu, Dongyang; Jusko, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is an array of immune responses to infection and injury. It results from a complex immune cascade and is the basis of many chronic diseases such as arthritis, diabetes, and cancer. Numerous mathematical models have been developed to describe the disease progression and effects of anti-inflammatory drugs. This review illustrates the state of the art in modeling the effects of diverse drugs for treating inflammation, describes relevant biomarkers amenable to modeling, and summarizes major advantages and limitations of the published pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) models. Simple direct inhibitory models are often used to describe in vitro effects of anti-inflammatory drugs. Indirect response models are more mechanism based and have been widely applied to the turnover of symptoms and biomarkers. These, along with target-mediated and transduction models, have been successfully applied to capture the PK/PD of many anti-inflammatory drugs and describe disease progression of inflammation. Biologics have offered opportunities to address specific mechanisms of action, and evolve small systems models to quantitatively capture the underlying physiological processes. More advanced mechanistic models should allow evaluation of the roles of some key mediators in disease progression, assess drug interactions, and better translate drug properties from in vitro and animal data to patients. PMID:23140121

  11. Triprotic acid-base microequilibria and pharmacokinetic sequelae of cetirizine.

    PubMed

    Marosi, Attila; Kovács, Zsuzsanna; Béni, Szabolcs; Kökösi, József; Noszál, Béla

    2009-06-28

    (1)H NMR-pH titrations of cetirizine, the widely used antihistamine and four related compounds were carried out and the related 11 macroscopic protonation constants were determined. The interactivity parameter between the two piperazine amine groups was obtained from two symmetric piperazine derivatives. Combining these two types of datasets, all the 12 microconstants and derived tautomeric constants of cetirizine were calculated. Upon this basis, the conflicting literature data of cetirizine microspeciation were clarified, and the pharmacokinetic absorption-distribution properties could be interpreted. The pH-dependent distribution of the microspecies is provided.

  12. Pharmacokinetics and dosimetry of the anti-androgen vinclozolin after oral administration inthe rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vinclozolin (V) is a fungicide with antiandrogenic properties. To determine the pharmacokinetics and dosimetry of V, adult male rats were administered an oral dose of V (100 mg/kg) in corn oil and sacrificed over time after dosing. V and its metabolites were analyzed in serum and...

  13. Effectiveness, Safety, and Pharmacokinetics of Quetiapine in Aggressive Children with Conduct Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findling, Robert L.; Reed, Michael D.; O'Riordan, Mary Ann; Demeter, Christine A.; Stansbrey, Robert J.; McNamara, Nora K.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To provide an initial description of the effectiveness and pharmacokinetics (PK) of quetiapine in aggressive children with conduct disorder (CD). Method: This 8-week, open-label outpatient trial, enrolled patients ages 6 to 12 years with CD. Outcome measures included the Rating of Aggression Against People and/or Property Scale…

  14. Pharmacokinetics of indomethacin in poultry.

    PubMed

    Cristòfol, C; Valladares, J E; Martí, G; Arboix, M

    2000-01-01

    Indomethacin (INDO) is a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug widely used since the 1970s. The pharmacokinetic behavior of INDO (2 mg/kg) has been studied after intravenous (i.v.) and oral administration to broiler chickens. After i.v. administration, a first fast distribution phase and a later and slower elimination phase were observed. The elimination half-life and mean residence time (MRT) obtained were 1.0 hr and 0.8 hr, respectively. After oral administration, a flip-flop phenomenon was observed giving an elimination half-life and MRT approximately three times and six times higher, respectively, than the i.v. administration. The plasma concentrations after oral administration were sustained during 8-10 hr, giving an antinflammatory cover over the dose producing 50% of maximal effect during this time period.

  15. Oxazepam pharmacokinetics in thyroid disease.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, A K; Khir, A S; Bewsher, P D; Hawksworth, G M

    1984-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of oxazepam, a drug mainly eliminated by a single step glucuronidation reaction, were studied in seven hyperthyroid and six hypothyroid patients before and after treatment. Oxazepam elimination half-life was shorter and apparent oral clearance higher in untreated hyperthyroid patients than after treatment. There was no significant change in oxazepam elimination in hypothyroid subjects. Time to peak concentration (tmax) was reduced in the hyperthyroid state. Hypothyroidism had no significant effect on tmax. Serum bilirubin concentration was lower in the patients while hyperthyroid before treatment than when euthyroid and also lower than in the hypothyroid patients. There was no significant correlation between serum bilirubin concentrations and oxazepam elimination. These results suggest that glucuronyl transferase activity is increased in hyperthyroidism but is not altered in most patients with hypothyroidism. The extent of increase in glucuronyl transferase activity is similar to that produced by enzyme inducing drugs. PMID:6419761

  16. Fluconazole Pharmacokinetics in Burn Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Bradley A.; King, Stephen R.; Wandschneider, Heidi L.; Hickerson, William L.; Hanes, Scott D.; Herring, Vanessa L.; Canada, Todd W.; Hess, Mary M.

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of fluconazole in nine adult patients with severe (30 to 95% total body surface area) burns were studied. There was no significant difference in half-life (t1/2), clearance (CL), or volume of distribution (V) over time in five patients on days 3 and 8 of the study (P > 0.05). Combined parameter estimates (means ± standard deviations) for all nine patients for the two study periods were as follows: t1/2, 24.4 ± 5.8 h; CL, 0.36 ± 0.09 ml/min/kg; and V, 0.72 ± 0.12 liters/kg. These estimates of t1/2 and CL in burn patients were approximately 13% shorter and 30% more rapid, respectively, than the most extreme estimates reported for other populations. PMID:9559811

  17. Population pharmacokinetic analysis of bisoprolol.

    PubMed

    Grevel, J; Thomas, P; Whiting, B

    1989-07-01

    The technique of population pharmacokinetic analysis was employed to study the variability in the dose concentration relationship of bisoprolol during its clinical development. The influence of demographic factors on the variability of clearance was investigated in 3 different populations: group I, patients (including an elderly group) with essential hypertension receiving multiple oral doses of bisoprolol 10 or 20mg for 3 months; group II, patients with different degrees of renal impairment and healthy controls; and group III, patients with different types of hepatic impairment and healthy controls. Patients and controls in groups II and III received only a single oral dose of bisoprolol 10mg. The 3 data sets were analysed separately, using a non-linear mixed effects model (the NONMEM program). A 2-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order absorption described the data adequately. The typical values of volume of central compartment, volume of distribution at steady-state and the absorption rate constant for the 3 populations were: for group I, 68L, 235L, and 0.7h-1; for group II, 28L, 179L, and 0.3h-1; and for group III, 55L, 256L, and 0.4h-1, respectively. Plasma clearance was related to age in group I, to serum creatinine in group II and to aspartate transaminase activity in group III. The 68% confidence limits for clearance and elimination half-life were 8.2 to 21.5 L/h and 7.6 to 19.7h, respectively, for 50-year-old patients in group I. The analysis predicted that progressive increases in serum creatinine or aspartate transaminase activity will result in only a 50% reduction of clearance.

  18. Sonic boom acceptability studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Kevin P.; Sullivan, Brenda M.; Leatherwood, Jack D.; Mccurdy, David A.

    1992-01-01

    The determination of the magnitude of sonic boom exposure which would be acceptable to the general population requires, as a starting point, a method to assess and compare individual sonic booms. There is no consensus within the scientific and regulatory communities regarding an appropriate sonic boom assessment metric. Loudness, being a fundamental and well-understood attribute of human hearing was chosen as a means of comparing sonic booms of differing shapes and amplitudes. The figure illustrates the basic steps which yield a calculated value of loudness. Based upon the aircraft configuration and its operating conditions, the sonic boom pressure signature which reaches the ground is calculated. This pressure-time history is transformed to the frequency domain and converted into a one-third octave band spectrum. The essence of the loudness method is to account for the frequency response and integration characteristics of the auditory system. The result of the calculation procedure is a numerical description (perceived level, dB) which represents the loudness of the sonic boom waveform.

  19. Comparative pharmacokinetics of liquid and lyophilized formulations of IV RhIG immune globulin.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Chris J; Brooks, William; Genereux, Maurice Gilles

    2008-07-01

    To compare the pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of the liquid and lyophilized formulations of Rh(0)(D) immune globulin intravenous (human) (IV RhIG) administered intramuscularly (IM) and intravenously (IV). In 2 randomized, parallel arm, blinded, phase I studies, 142 healthy adult volunteers received a single dose of either the liquid or lyophilized formulation administered IM (300 microg in Study 1; 15 microg/kg in Study 2) or IV (50 microg/kg in Study 1). Pharmacokinetics (area under the curve [AUC}, C(max), t(1/2), T(max)) and safety data were assessed over 84 days. The 2 formulations had comparable pharmacokinetics following both IM and IV administration. The ratios (90% confidence intervals) for AUC and C(max) treatment means were, for most assessments, within the predefined FDA acceptance range of 80%-125%, demonstrating the bioequivalence of the liquid and lyophilized formulations. Both formulations were equally well tolerated. Study results demonstrate comparable safety and pharmacokinetic profiles of the liquid and lyophilized formulations of IV RhIG. These findings suggest that the liquid formulation will be therapeutically equivalent to the lyophilized formulation but in a more convenient ready-to-use dosage form that may also reduce preparation errors.

  20. No pharmacokinetic interaction between lacosamide and valproic acid in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Cawello, Willi; Bonn, Rainer

    2012-11-01

    Two open-label, randomized, multiple-dose clinical studies evaluated the potential for pharmacokinetic interaction between the antiepileptic drugs lacosamide and valproic acid. The influence of lacosamide on valproic acid pharmacokinetics (trial A) and valproic acid on lacosamide pharmacokinetics (trial B) was investigated in 32 healthy male volunteers, 16 in each trial. Volunteers in trial A received valproic acid (300 mg bid) with randomization to either early or late addition of lacosamide (200 mg bid). Those in trial B received lacosamide (200 mg bid) with randomization to either early or late addition of valproic acid (300 mg bid). Area under the concentration-time curve during a 12-hour dosing interval at steady state (AUC(τ,ss)) and maximum steady-state plasma drug concentration (C(max,ss)) were measured for each drug alone and together and tested for equivalence. The point estimates (90% confidence intervals) for AUC(τ,ss) and C(max,ss) were 104% (99%-109%) and 101% (97%-107%), respectively, for valproic acid and 100% (98%-103%) and 101% (96%-107%), respectively, for lacosamide, which were within the generally accepted equivalence range of 80% to 125%. No changes in the rate or extent of absorption, terminal half-life, or time to maximum concentration were observed. These results suggest that lacosamide and valproic acid have no relevant pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction.

  1. A PHARMACOKINETIC PROGRAM (PKFIT) FOR R

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to create a nonlinear regression (including a genetic algorithm) program (R script) to deal with data fitting for pharmacokinetics (PK) in R environment using its available packages. We call this tool as PKfit.

  2. Chiral Pesticide Pharmacokinetics: A Range of Values

    EPA Science Inventory

    Approximately 30% of pesticides are chiral and used as mixtures of two or more stereoisomers. In biological systems, these stereoisomers can exhibit significantly different pharmacokinetics (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination). In spite of these differences, th...

  3. Disposition pathways and pharmacokinetics of herbal medicines in humans.

    PubMed

    He, S-M; Li, C G; Liu, J-P; Chan, E; Duan, W; Zhou, S-F

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic studies have become an integral part of modern drug development, but these studies are not regulatory needs for herbal remedies. This paper updates our current knowledge on the disposition pathways and pharmacokinetic properties of commonly used herbal medicines in humans. To retrieve relevant data, the authors have searched through computer-based literatures by full text search in Medline (via Pubmed), ScienceDirect, Current Contents Connect (ISI), Cochrance Library, CINAHL (EBSCO), CrossRef Search and Embase (all from inception to May 2010). Many herbal compounds undergo Phase I and/or Phase II metabolism in vivo, with cytochrome P450s (CYPs) and uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) playing a major role. Some herbal ingredients are substrates of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) which is highly expressed in the intestine, liver, brain and kidney. As such, the activities of these drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters are determining factors for the in vivo bioavailability, disposition and distribution of herbal remedies. There are increasing pharmacokinetic studies of herbal remedies, but these studies are mainly focused on a small number of herbal remedies including St John's wort, milk thistle, sculcap, curcumin, echinacea, ginseng, ginkgo, and ginger. The pharmacokinetic data of a small number of purified herbal ingredients, including anthocyanins, berberine, catechins, curcumin, lutein and quercetin, are available. For the majority of herbal remedies used in folk medicines, data on their disposition and biological fate in humans are lacking or in paucity. For a herbal medicine, the pharmacological effect is achieved when the bioactive agents or the metabolites reach and sustain proper levels at their sites of action. Both the dose levels and fates of active components in the body govern their target-site concentrations after administration of an herbal remedy. In this regard, a safe and optimal use of herbal medicines requires a

  4. The toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of organophosphonates versus the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oxime antidotes: biological consequences.

    PubMed

    Voicu, Victor A; Thiermann, Horst; Rădulescu, Flavian Stefan; Mircioiu, Constantin; Miron, Dalia Simona

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents basic data on organophosphonate (OP) mechanisms of action, especially by toxicokinetic/toxicodynamic (TK/TD) process correlations. It is generally accepted that at least during onset of OP biological systems interaction, blood and tissue cholinesterase's inhibition represents OP exposure marker and initiating mechanisms for toxicodynamic effects, characteristic for cholinergic crisis. OP penetrability of various biological barriers conditioning TK characteristics are determined by a series of physico-chemical properties. Non-cholinergic effects, direct interactions with cellular structures and subsequent effects (excitotoxicity) triggered by cholinergic crisis are also briefly presented. Opposed to these OP TK/TD characteristics, the authors analysed the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) characteristics and their correlations for oximes, as basic OP antidotes, besides atropine and anticonvulsants. Phosphorilated cholinesterasis reactivators are mono or bispyridinium derivatives with quaternary ammonium atoms, high water solubility, ionized at physiological pH, distribution in extra-cellular space, very low digestive absorption and blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetrability. OP nerve gas acute toxicity is correlated with anti-acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and partition coefficient. The toxicity rank seems to be determined by lipophilicity, besides their specific AChE inhibitory property. It has the effect that acute toxicity is the resultant of a TD process closely linked and dependent in vivo upon molecular descriptors determinant for the TK process. For cholinesterasis reactivators, molecular and PK characteristics limit their effects, especially to the peripheral level. The absent or much reduced BBB penetrability allowed some researchers to suggest that reactivators' penetration and presence at central level are not necessary. The study of PK/PD correlations, molecular descriptors and biological membrane permeability of oximes can

  5. Nanoparticle Drug Loading as a Design Parameter to Improve Docetaxel Pharmacokinetics and Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Kevin S.; Schorzman, Allison N.; Finniss, Mathew C.; Bowerman, Charles J.; Peng, Lei; Luft, J. Christopher; Madden, Andrew; Wang, Andrew Z.; Zamboni, William C.; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) drug loading is one of the key defining characteristics of a NP formulation. However, the effect of NP drug loading on therapeutic efficacy and pharmacokinetics has not been thoroughly evaluated. Herein, we characterized the efficacy, toxicity and pharmacokinetic properties of NP docetaxel formulations that have differential drug loading but are otherwise identical. Particle Replication in Non-wetting Templates (PRINT®), a soft-lithography fabrication technique, was used to formulate NPs with identical size, shape and surface chemistry, but with variable docetaxel loading. The lower weight loading (9%-NP) of docetaxel was found to have a superior pharmacokinetic profile and enhanced efficacy in a murine cancer model when compared to that of a higher docetaxel loading (20%-NP). The 9%-NP docetaxel increased plasma and tumor docetaxel exposure and reduced liver, spleen and lung exposure when compared to that of 20%-NP docetaxel. PMID:23899444

  6. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of Shenfu Injection in beagle dogs after intravenous drip administration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuqiao; Tian, Dali; Huang, Yuyou; Li, Ling; Mao, Juan; Tian, Juan; Ding, Jinsong

    2016-11-01

    Shenfu Injection (SFI) is a well-defined Chinese herbal formulation that is obtained from red ginseng and processed aconite root. The main active constituents in SFI are ginsenosides and aconitum alkaloids. In this work, ginsenosides (ginsenoside Rg1, ginsenoside Rb1 and ginsenoside Rc) and aconitum alkaloids (benzoylmesaconine and fuziline) were used as the index components to explore the pharmacokinetic behavior of SFI. A selective and sensitive HPLC-MS/MS method was developed for the quantification of ginsenosides and aconitum alkaloids in dog plasma and was used to characterize the pharmacokinetics of the five index components after intravenous drip of three different dosages of SFI in beagle dogs. The pharmacokinetic properties of the index components were linear over the dose range of 2-8 mL/kg.

  7. Obstetric analgesia: pharmacokinetics and its relation to neonatal behavioral and adaptive functions.

    PubMed

    Kanto, J; Erkkola, R

    1984-01-01

    The neonatal pharmacokinetic and neurobehavioral properties of certain agents used in obstetric analgesia are reviewed (local anesthetics, opiates, inhalation agents, benzodiazepines). Fetal and neonatal pharmacokinetic alterations partly explain the neurobehavioral differences observed between different drug groups and ways of drug administration. The most effective and safest method with fewest neonatal neurobehavioral effects appears to be regional epidural analgesia performed with plain bupivacaine. The use of epidural opiates remains problematic. Inhalation agents and parenteral pethidine (meperidine) are still clinically useful alternative compounds in circumstances where epidural analgesia is not possible. Pharmacokinetically and according to neurobehavioral assessments, inhalation agents appear to be more attractive than pethidine. Benzodiazepines, especially after high or repeated doses, may cause the so-called floppy-infant syndrome, at least partly, due to a slow neonatal drug elimination.

  8. 45 CFR 2544.150 - How will accepted donations be recorded and used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How will accepted donations be recorded and used... FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE SOLICITATION AND ACCEPTANCE OF DONATIONS § 2544.150 How will accepted donations be recorded and used? (a) All accepted donations of money and other property will...

  9. Pharmacokinetics of oral amantadine in greyhound dogs.

    PubMed

    Norkus, C; Rankin, D; Warner, M; KuKanich, B

    2015-06-01

    This study reports the pharmacokinetics of amantadine in greyhound dogs after oral administration. Five healthy greyhound dogs were used. A single oral dose of 100 mg amantadine hydrochloride (mean dose 2.8 mg/kg as amantadine hydrochloride) was administered to nonfasted subjects. Blood samples were collected at predetermined time points from 0 to 24 h after administration, and plasma concentrations of amantadine were measured by liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analyses were performed. Amantadine was well tolerated in all dogs with no adverse effects observed. The mean (range) amantadine CMAX was 275 ng/mL (225-351 ng/mL) at 2.6 h (1-4 h) with a terminal half-life of 4.96 h (4.11-6.59 h). The results of this study can be used to design dosages to assess multidose pharmacokinetics and dosages designed to achieve targeted concentrations in order to assess the clinical effects of amantadine in a variety of conditions including chronic pain. Further studies should also assess the pharmacokinetics of amantadine in other dog breeds or using population pharmacokinetics studies including multiple dog breeds to assess potential breed-specific differences in the pharmacokinetics of amantadine in dogs.

  10. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic analysis of grepafloxacin.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Y; Hattori, K; Shinsei, M; Matsunaga, N; Iizasa, H; Sasabe, H; Akiyama, H; Miyanmoto, G; Nakashima, E

    2000-09-01

    Grepafloxacin (GPFX) is a synthetic new quinolone antimicrobial agent that possesses an extensive tissue distribution and exhibits a strong antibacterial activity in vivo. In this study, the tissue distribution characteristics of GPFX were examined using tissue concentration-time profiles following intravenous administration to rats. Subsequently, the pharmacokinetics of GPFX were analyzed based on the physiological pharmacokinetic model. The tissue-to-plasma partition coefficients (Kp) of GPFX in rats were high in all tissues except brain. A pharmacokinetic model for rabbits, monkeys and dogs was constructed using the tissue-to-plasma free concentration ratio (Kp,f) of GPFX in rats to simulate the GPFX concentration-time profile in plasma following intravenous administration of GPFX to each animal. The calculation-derived concentrations correlated well with the experimentally-derived data, suggesting that there are no interspecies differences in the high tissue distribution characteristics of GPFX. The clearance rates of GPFX in humans were predicted from the pharmacokinetic parameters of rats, rabbits, monkeys and dogs by an animal scale-up method and a pharmacokinetic model for humans was constructed. The GPFX concentration-time profiles in plasma, following oral administration of GPFX to humans, were predicted within 0.5-1.0 h of mean absorption time and the calculation-derived results were in good agreement with the experimental data. Thus, it is suggested that the concentration-time profile in plasma and all human organs can be predicted from the pharmacokinetic data of animals.

  11. 39 CFR 777.51 - Acceptance of donations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acceptance of donations. 777.51 Section 777.51... ACQUISITION POLICIES Donations § 777.51 Acceptance of donations. Nothing in these regulations shall prevent a person from making a gift or donation of real property or any part thereof, or any interest therein,...

  12. Population Pharmacokinetics of Lumefantrine in Pregnant and Nonpregnant Women With Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Kloprogge, F; Piola, P; Dhorda, M; Muwanga, S; Turyakira, E; Apinan, S; Lindegårdh, N; Nosten, F; Day, N P J; White, N J; Guerin, P J; Tarning, J

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy alters the pharmacokinetic properties of many antimalarial compounds. The objective of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic properties of lumefantrine in pregnant and nonpregnant women with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Uganda after a standard fixed oral artemether–lumefantrine treatment. Dense venous (n = 26) and sparse capillary (n = 90) lumefantrine samples were drawn from pregnant patients. A total of 17 nonpregnant women contributed with dense venous lumefantrine samples. Lumefantrine pharmacokinetics was best described by a flexible absorption model with multiphasic disposition. Pregnancy and body temperature had a significant impact on the pharmacokinetic properties of lumefantrine. Simulations from the final model indicated 27% lower day 7 concentrations in pregnant women compared with nonpregnant women and a decreased median time of 0.92 and 0.42 days above previously defined critical concentration cutoff values (280 and 175 ng/ml, respectively). The standard artemether–lumefantrine dose regimen in P. falciparum malaria may need reevaluation in nonimmune pregnant women. PMID:24226803

  13. Population Pharmacokinetics of Lumefantrine in Pregnant and Nonpregnant Women With Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kloprogge, F; Piola, P; Dhorda, M; Muwanga, S; Turyakira, E; Apinan, S; Lindegårdh, N; Nosten, F; Day, N P J; White, N J; Guerin, P J; Tarning, J

    2013-11-13

    Pregnancy alters the pharmacokinetic properties of many antimalarial compounds. The objective of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic properties of lumefantrine in pregnant and nonpregnant women with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Uganda after a standard fixed oral artemether-lumefantrine treatment. Dense venous (n = 26) and sparse capillary (n = 90) lumefantrine samples were drawn from pregnant patients. A total of 17 nonpregnant women contributed with dense venous lumefantrine samples. Lumefantrine pharmacokinetics was best described by a flexible absorption model with multiphasic disposition. Pregnancy and body temperature had a significant impact on the pharmacokinetic properties of lumefantrine. Simulations from the final model indicated 27% lower day 7 concentrations in pregnant women compared with nonpregnant women and a decreased median time of 0.92 and 0.42 days above previously defined critical concentration cutoff values (280 and 175 ng/ml, respectively). The standard artemether-lumefantrine dose regimen in P. falciparum malaria may need reevaluation in nonimmune pregnant women.CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology (2013) 2, e83; doi:10.1038/psp.2013.59; advance online publication 13 November 2013.

  14. Consumer Acceptability of Intramuscular Fat

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Damian; Joo, Seon-Tea

    2016-01-01

    Fat in meat greatly improves eating quality, yet many consumers avoid visible fat, mainly because of health concerns. Generations of consumers, especially in the English-speaking world, have been convinced by health authorities that animal fat, particularly saturated or solid fat, should be reduced or avoided to maintain a healthy diet. Decades of negative messages regarding animal fats has resulted in general avoidance of fatty cuts of meat. Paradoxically, low fat or lean meat tends to have poor eating quality and flavor and low consumer acceptability. The failure of low-fat high-carbohydrate diets to curb “globesity” has prompted many experts to re-evaluate of the place of fat in human diets, including animal fat. Attitudes towards fat vary dramatically between and within cultures. Previous generations of humans sought out fatty cuts of meat for their superior sensory properties. Many consumers in East and Southeast Asia have traditionally valued more fatty meat cuts. As nutritional messages around dietary fat change, there is evidence that attitudes towards animal fat are changing and many consumers are rediscovering and embracing fattier cuts of meat, including marbled beef. The present work provides a short overview of the unique sensory characteristics of marbled beef and changing consumer preferences for fat in meat in general. PMID:28115880

  15. Between‐Batch Pharmacokinetic Variability Inflates Type I Error Rate in Conventional Bioequivalence Trials: A Randomized Advair Diskus Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, KJ; Mielke, J; Benet, LZ; Jones, B

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated pharmacokinetic differences among manufacturing batches of a US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)‐approved dry powder inhalation product (Advair Diskus 100/50) large enough to establish between‐batch bio‐inequivalence. Here, we provide independent confirmation of pharmacokinetic bio‐inequivalence among Advair Diskus 100/50 batches, and quantify residual and between‐batch variance component magnitudes. These variance estimates are used to consider the type I error rate of the FDA's current two‐way crossover design recommendation. When between‐batch pharmacokinetic variability is substantial, the conventional two‐way crossover design cannot accomplish the objectives of FDA's statistical bioequivalence test (i.e., cannot accurately estimate the test/reference ratio and associated confidence interval). The two‐way crossover, which ignores between‐batch pharmacokinetic variability, yields an artificially narrow confidence interval on the product comparison. The unavoidable consequence is type I error rate inflation, to ∼25%, when between‐batch pharmacokinetic variability is nonzero. This risk of a false bioequivalence conclusion is substantially higher than asserted by regulators as acceptable consumer risk (5%). PMID:27727445

  16. Effects of charge on antibody tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Boswell, C Andrew; Tesar, Devin B; Mukhyala, Kiran; Theil, Frank-Peter; Fielder, Paul J; Khawli, Leslie A

    2010-12-15

    Antibody pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are often governed by biological processes such as binding to antigens and other cognate receptors. Emphasis must also be placed, however, on fundamental physicochemical properties that define antibodies as complex macromolecules, including shape, size, hydrophobicity, and charge. Electrostatic interactions between anionic cell membranes and the predominantly positive surface charge of most antibodies can influence blood concentration and tissue disposition kinetics in a manner that is independent of antigen recognition. In this context, the deliberate modification of antibodies by chemical means has been exploited as a valuable preclinical research tool to investigate the relationship between net molecular charge and biological disposition. Findings from these exploratory investigations may be summarized as follows: (I) shifts in isoelectric point of approximately one pI unit or more can produce measurable changes in tissue distribution and kinetics, (II) increases in net positive charge generally result in increased tissue retention and increased blood clearance, and (III) decreases in net positive charge generally result in decreased tissue retention and increased whole body clearance. Understanding electrostatic interactions between antibodies and biological matrices holds relevance in biotechnology, especially with regard to the development of immunoconjugates. The guiding principles and knowledge gained from preclinical evaluation of chemically modified antibodies will be discussed and placed in the context of therapeutic antibodies that are currently marketed or under development, with a particular emphasis on pharmacokinetic and disposition properties.

  17. Acceptance of tinnitus: validation of the tinnitus acceptance questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Weise, Cornelia; Kleinstäuber, Maria; Hesser, Hugo; Westin, Vendela Zetterqvist; Andersson, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    The concept of acceptance has recently received growing attention within tinnitus research due to the fact that tinnitus acceptance is one of the major targets of psychotherapeutic treatments. Accordingly, acceptance-based treatments will most likely be increasingly offered to tinnitus patients and assessments of acceptance-related behaviours will thus be needed. The current study investigated the factorial structure of the Tinnitus Acceptance Questionnaire (TAQ) and the role of tinnitus acceptance as mediating link between sound perception (i.e. subjective loudness of tinnitus) and tinnitus distress. In total, 424 patients with chronic tinnitus completed the TAQ and validated measures of tinnitus distress, anxiety, and depression online. Confirmatory factor analysis provided support to a good fit of the data to the hypothesised bifactor model (root-mean-square-error of approximation = .065; Comparative Fit Index = .974; Tucker-Lewis Index = .958; standardised root mean square residual = .032). In addition, mediation analysis, using a non-parametric joint coefficient approach, revealed that tinnitus-specific acceptance partially mediated the relation between subjective tinnitus loudness and tinnitus distress (path ab = 5.96; 95% CI: 4.49, 7.69). In a multiple mediator model, tinnitus acceptance had a significantly stronger indirect effect than anxiety. The results confirm the factorial structure of the TAQ and suggest the importance of a general acceptance factor that contributes important unique variance beyond that of the first-order factors activity engagement and tinnitus suppression. Tinnitus acceptance as measured with the TAQ is proposed to be a key construct in tinnitus research and should be further implemented into treatment concepts to reduce tinnitus distress.

  18. Pharmacokinetic Modeling and Optimal Sampling Strategies for Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Rifampin in Patients with Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sturkenboom, Marieke G. G.; Mulder, Leonie W.; de Jager, Arthur; van Altena, Richard; Aarnoutse, Rob E.; de Lange, Wiel C. M.; Proost, Johannes H.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.; van der Werf, Tjip S.

    2015-01-01

    Rifampin, together with isoniazid, has been the backbone of the current first-line treatment of tuberculosis (TB). The ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0–24) to the MIC is the best predictive pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic parameter for determinations of efficacy. The objective of this study was to develop an optimal sampling procedure based on population pharmacokinetics to predict AUC0–24 values. Patients received rifampin orally once daily as part of their anti-TB treatment. A one-compartmental pharmacokinetic population model with first-order absorption and lag time was developed using observed rifampin plasma concentrations from 55 patients. The population pharmacokinetic model was developed using an iterative two-stage Bayesian procedure and was cross-validated. Optimal sampling strategies were calculated using Monte Carlo simulation (n = 1,000). The geometric mean AUC0–24 value was 41.5 (range, 13.5 to 117) mg · h/liter. The median time to maximum concentration of drug in serum (Tmax) was 2.2 h, ranging from 0.4 to 5.7 h. This wide range indicates that obtaining a concentration level at 2 h (C2) would not capture the peak concentration in a large proportion of the population. Optimal sampling using concentrations at 1, 3, and 8 h postdosing was considered clinically suitable with an r2 value of 0.96, a root mean squared error value of 13.2%, and a prediction bias value of −0.4%. This study showed that the rifampin AUC0–24 in TB patients can be predicted with acceptable accuracy and precision using the developed population pharmacokinetic model with optimal sampling at time points 1, 3, and 8 h. PMID:26055359

  19. Pharmacokinetics Application in Biophysics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millet, Philippe; Lemoigne, Yves

    Among the available computerised tomography devices, the Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has the advantage to be sensitive to pico-molar concentrations of radiotracers inside living matter. Devices adapted to small animal imaging are now commercially available and allow us to study the function rather than the structure of living tissues by in vivo analysis. PET methodology, from the physics of electron-positron annihilation to the biophysics involved in tracers, is treated by other authors in this book. The basics of coincidence detection, image reconstruction, spatial resolution and sensitivity are discussed in the paper by R. Ott. The use of compartment analysis combined with pharmacokinetics is described here to illustrate an application to neuroimaging and to show how parametric imaging can bring insight on the in vivo bio-distribution of a radioactive tracer with small animal PET scanners. After reporting on the use of an intracerebral β+ radiosensitive probe (βP), we describe a small animal PET experiment used to measure the density of 5HT 1 a receptors in rat brain.

  20. Leptin pharmacokinetics in male mice

    PubMed Central

    Dobos, Robin C; Agnew, Linda L; Smart, Neil A; McFarlane, James R

    2017-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics of leptin in mammals has not been studied in detail and only one study has examined more than one time point in non-mutant mice and this was in a female mice. This is the first study to describe leptin distribution over a detailed time course in normal male mice. A physiologic dose (12 ng) of radiolabelled leptin was injected into adult male mice via the lateral tail vein and tissues were dissected out and measured for radioactivity over a time course of up to two hours. Major targets were the digestive tract, kidneys, skin and lungs. The brain was not a major target, and 0.15% of the total dose was recovered from the brain 5 min after administration. Major differences appear to exist in the distribution of leptin between the male and female mice, indicating a high degree of sexual dimorphism. Although the half-lives were similar between male and female mice, almost twice the proportion of leptin was recovered from the digestive tract of male mice in comparison to that reported previously for females. This would seem to indicate a major difference in leptin distribution and possibly function between males and females. PMID:27998953

  1. Piperacillin pharmacokinetics in pediatric patients.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, C B; Koup, J R; Opheim, K E; Adelman, L A; Levy, J; Stull, T L; Clausen, C; Smith, A L

    1982-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of piperacillin were studied in 15 pediatric patients (age range, 3.3 to 14.3 years). Piperacillin was administered in a dosage of 1.5 +/- 0.4 g/m2 (mean +/- standard deviation) every 4 to 6 h. Peak serum concentrations ranged from 69 to 354 micrograms/ml. The mean elimination half-life was 37.0 +/- 13.3 min, which is shorter than that observed in most adults with normal renal function. The mean elimination half-life in three patients with renal impairment was 60.1 +/- 12.4 min, and the mean ratio of renal clearance to total clearance was 0.57. These results suggest a significant nonrenal elimination of piperacillin. Based on these data, a dosage of 1.5 g/m2 given as a 30-min infusion every 4 h is suggested for children with normal renal function. For patients with renal impairment, the daily dosage could be calculated as follows: corrected dose = normal dose x (0.35 + [0.65 x (ClCr/0.06)]), where ClCr is the creatinine clearance expressed as liters per minute per square meter. PMID:6215893

  2. Cone penetrometer acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Boechler, G.N.

    1996-09-19

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents the results of acceptance test procedure WHC-SD-WM-ATR-151. Included in this report is a summary of the tests, the results and issues, the signature and sign- off ATP pages, and a summarized table of the specification vs. ATP section that satisfied the specification.

  3. Understanding pharmacokinetics to improve tuberculosis treatment outcome

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Jonathan; Heysell, Scott K

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis (TB) remains the leading cause of death from a curable infectious disease; drug-resistant TB threatens to dismantle all prior gains in global control. Suboptimal circulating anti-TB drug concentrations can lead to lack of cure and acquired drug resistance. Areas covered This review will introduce pharmacokinetic parameters for key anti-TB drugs, as well as the indications and limitations of measuring these parameters in clinical practice. Current and novel methodologies for delivering anti-TB pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic data are highlighted and gaps in operational research described. Expert opinion Individual pharmacokinetic variability is commonplace, underappreciated and difficult to predict without therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). Pharmacokinetic thresholds associated with poor TB treatment outcome in drug-susceptible TB have recently been described and may now guide the application of TDM, but require validation in a variety of settings and comorbidities. Dried blood spots for TDM and prepackaged multidrug plates for minimum inhibitory concentration testing will overcome barriers of accessibility and represent areas for innovation. Operationalizing pharmacokinetics has the potential to improve TB outcomes in the most difficult-to-treat forms of the disease such as multidrug resistance. Clinical studies in these areas are eagerly anticipated and we expect will better define the rational introduction of novel therapeutics. PMID:24597717

  4. Preclinical Pharmacokinetic Analysis of NOV-002, a Glutathione Disulfide Mimetic

    PubMed Central

    Uys, Joachim D.; Manevich, Yefim; DeVane, Lindsay C.; He, Lin; Garret, Tracy E.; Pazoles, Christopher J.; Tew, Kenneth D.; Townsend, Danyelle M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary NOV-002 is a glutathione disulfide (GSSG) mimetic that is in Phase III clinical trials for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer and other oncology indications. GSSG is reduced by glutathione reductase (GR) to form glutathione (GSH), thereby maintaining redox homeostasis. The purpose of the study was to report the pharmacokinetic properties of NOV-002 and evaluate the effect that NOV-002 elicits in redox homeostasis. The pharmacokinetic analysis and tissue distribution of NOV-002 and GSH was evaluated in mice following a dose of 250 mg/kg, i.p. The redox potential and total protein thiol status was calculated. Here we show that NOV-002 is a substrate for GR and that GSH is a primary metabolite. Nonlinear pharmacokinetic modeling predicted that the estimated absorption and elimination rate constants correspond to a half-life of ~13 mins with an AUC of 1.18 μg.h/ml, a Cmax of 2.16 μg/ml and a volume of distribution of 42.61 L/kg. In addition, measurement of the redox potential and total protein thiol status indicated the generation of a transient oxidative signal in the plasma compartment after administration of NOV-002. These results indicate that NOV-002 exerts kinetic and dynamic effects in mice consistent with the GSSG component as the active pharmacological constituent of the drug. A longer-lasting decrease in total plasma free thiol content was also seen, suggesting that the oxidative effect of the GSSG from NOV-002 was impacting redox homeostasis. PMID:20359856

  5. Pharmacokinetics of Cefovecin in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis), Olive Baboons (Papio anubis), and Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatto)

    SciTech Connect

    Raabe, Brigitte M.; Lovaglio, Jamie A.; Grover, GScott; Brown, Scott A.; Boucher, Joseph F.; Yuan, Yang; Civil, Jacqueline R.; Gillhouse, Kimberly A.; Stubbs, Makeida N.; Hoggatt, Amber F.; Halliday, Lisa C.; Fortman, Jeffrey D.

    2011-05-01

    Cefovecin sodium is a long-acting, third-generation, cephalosporin antibiotic approved for the treatment of skin infections in dogs and cats. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin were evaluated in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), olive baboons (Papio anubis), and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatto) by using a single-dose (8 mg/kg SC) dosing regimen. Plasma cefovecin concentrations were determined by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, and a noncompartmental model was used to determine pharmacokinetic parameters. The half-life of cefovecin was 4.95 {+-} 1.47 h in cynomolgus macaques, 9.17 {+-} 1.84 h in olive baboons, and 8.40 {+-} 2.53 h in rhesus macaques. These values are considerably lower than the half-lives previously published for dogs (133 h) and cats (166 h). The extended half-life of cefovecin in dogs and cats is speculated to be due to active reabsorption of drug in the kidney tubules because plasma clearance is well below the normal glomerular filtration rate. In nonhuman primates, renal clearance rates approximated plasma clearance rates, suggesting that active renal reabsorption of cefovecin does not occur in these species. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin in nonhuman primates are vastly different from the pharmacokinetic properties in dogs and cats, precluding its use as a long-acting antibiotic in nonhuman primates. This study highlights the importance of performing pharmacokinetic studies prior to extralabel drug usage.

  6. Pharmacokinetic modeling in aquatic animals. 1. Models and concepts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barron, M.G.; Stehly, Guy R.; Hayton, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    While clinical and toxicological applications of pharmacokinetics have continued to evolve both conceptually and experimentally, pharmacokinetics modeling in aquatic animals has not progressed accordingly. In this paper we present methods and concepts of pharmacokinetic modeling in aquatic animals using multicompartmental, clearance-based, non-compartmental and physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models. These models should be considered as alternatives to traditional approaches, which assume that the animal acts as a single homogeneous compartment based on apparent monoexponential elimination.

  7. When Is It Important to Measure Unbound Drug in Evaluating Nanomedicine Pharmacokinetics?

    PubMed

    Stern, Stephan T; Martinez, Marilyn N; Stevens, David M

    2016-12-01

    Nanoformulations have become important tools for modifying drug disposition, be it from the perspective of enabling prolonged drug release, protecting the drug molecule from metabolism, or achieving targeted delivery. When examining the in vivo pharmacokinetic properties of these formulations, most investigations either focus on systemic concentrations of total (encapsulated plus unencapsulated) drug, or concentrations of encapsulated and unencapsulated drug. However, it is rare to find studies that differentiate between protein-bound and unbound (free) forms of the unencapsulated drug. In light of the unique attributes of these formulations, we cannot simply assume it appropriate to rely upon the protein-binding properties of the traditionally formulated or legacy drug when trying to define the pharmacokinetic or pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic characteristics of these nanoformulations. Therefore, this commentary explores reasons why it is important to consider not only unencapsulated drug, but also the portion of unencapsulated drug that is not bound to plasma proteins. Specifically, we highlight those situations when it may be necessary to include measurement of unencapsulated, unbound drug concentrations as part of the nanoformulation pharmacokinetic evaluation.

  8. What is meant by the term acceptance of technology and locating the acceptance of the CCS Technology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harz, Mario; Vesper, Anton

    2013-04-01

    abstract: The formal language of logic expresses concepts and statements exactly. The logic of relations can serve as an important ressource for the philosophical analysis of technology and the construction of philosophical propositions about acceptance of technology. The theory of logical relations is used to investigate the theoretical structure of how acceptance of technologies can be revealed. The term "ordered tuple" helps to define the basis of the concept of logical relations. The term "acceptance of technology" refers to neither a thing nor a property; but to a complex relationship. The research refers to the study of the properties of this complex relationship. It examines the properties of reflexivity, total reflexivity, symmetry, transitivity, irreflexivity and asymmetry. Using these properties and the rules for forming converses-relations and partial-relations the question is analyzed: What, in general, is meant by the term "acceptance of technology?" These properties have been observed empirically at a discussion forum for the key players in the Brandenburg discourse on the acceptance of CCS technology. The meeting was held on the 8th of May 2012 in St. Nicholas Church, Cottbus (GER). The pragma-dialectical theory of argumentation is used to locate the acceptance of the CCS technology. With the ideal model of critical discussion as the methodological starting point the term "acceptance" can be defined in terms of the four meta-theoretical principles of the theory. That boils down to the findings that acceptance is the externalization of a positive commitment towards a proposition, acceptance is expressed by the speech act "to accept" and acceptance occurs in the dialogical, interactional setting of a critical discussion with the aim of resolving a difference of opinion. In the study differences of opinion about (descriptive, normative, evaluative) standpoints about the CCS technology from everyday problem-solving discussions are investigated. The

  9. Effect of the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole on the pharmacokinetics of extended-release formulations of oxybutynin and tolterodine.

    PubMed

    Dmochowski, Roger; Chen, Andrew; Sathyan, Gayatri; MacDiarmid, Scott; Gidwani, Shalini; Gupta, Suneel

    2005-08-01

    This study assessed the effect of the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole on the bioavailability of the extended-release formulations of oxybutynin and tolterodine. Forty-four healthy volunteers received each of 4 treatments in a 4-period crossover design. The treatments consisted of osmotically controlled extended-release oxybutynin chloride tablets at 10 mg/d or extended-release tolterodine tartrate capsules at 4 mg/d, with and without preceding treatment with 20 mg omeprazole daily for 4 days. Blood samples collected predose and at scheduled time points for 36 hours postdose were analyzed for oxybutynin and its active metabolite, N-desethyloxybutynin, or tolterodine and its active 5-hydroxymethyl metabolite, as appropriate. The AUCinfinity ratios for oxybutynin and its metabolite with and without prior omeprazole fell within the 80% to 125% range (accepted as the criterion for bioequivalence), as did those for tolterodine and its active moiety. The peak concentration ratios for oxybutynin and metabolite also conformed to this range; those for tolterodine did not. Increasing gastric pH with omeprazole does not substantially alter the pharmacokinetic properties of extended-release oxybutynin but may alter those of extended-release tolterodine.

  10. Docetaxel-loaded PLGA and PLGA-PEG nanoparticles for intravenous application: pharmacokinetics and biodistribution profile

    PubMed Central

    Rafiei, Pedram; Haddadi, Azita

    2017-01-01

    Docetaxel is a highly potent anticancer agent being used in a wide spectrum of cancer types. There are important matters of concern regarding the drug’s pharmacokinetics related to the conventional formulation. Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) is a biocompatible/biodegradable polymer with variable physicochemical characteristics, and its application in human has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration. PLGA gives polymeric nanoparticles with unique drug delivery characteristics. The application of PLGA nanoparticles (NPs) as intravenous (IV) sustained-release delivery vehicles for docetaxel can favorably modify pharmacokinetics, biofate, and pharmacotherapy of the drug in cancer patients. Surface modification of PLGA NPs with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) can further enhance NPs’ long-circulating properties. Herein, an optimized fabrication approach has been used for the preparation of PLGA and PLGA–PEG NPs loaded with docetaxel for IV application. Both types of NP formulations demonstrated in vitro characteristics that were considered suitable for IV administration (with long-circulating sustained-release purposes). NP formulations were IV administered to an animal model, and docetaxel’s pharmacokinetic and biodistribution profiles were determined and compared between study groups. PLGA and PEGylated PLGA NPs were able to modify the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of docetaxel. Accordingly, the mode of changes made to pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of docetaxel is attributed to the size and surface properties of NPs. NPs contributed to increased blood residence time of docetaxel fulfilling their role as long-circulating sustained-release drug delivery systems. Surface modification of NPs contributed to more pronounced docetaxel blood concentration, which confirms the role of PEG in conferring long-circulation properties to NPs. PMID:28184163

  11. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic considerations for the next generation protein therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dhaval K.

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly sophisticated protein engineering efforts have been undertaken lately to generate protein therapeutics with desired properties. This has resulted in the discovery of the next generation of protein therapeutics, which include: engineered antibodies, immunoconjugates, bi/multi-specific proteins, antibody mimetic novel scaffolds, and engineered ligands/receptors. These novel protein therapeutics possess unique physicochemical properties and act via a unique mechanism-of-action, which collectively makes their pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) different than other established biological molecules. Consequently, in order to support the discovery and development of these next generation molecules, it becomes important to understand the determinants controlling their PK/PD. This review discusses the determinants that a PK/PD scientist should consider during the design and development of next generation protein therapeutics. In addition, the role of systems PK/PD models in enabling rational development of the next generation protein therapeutics is emphasized. PMID:26373957

  12. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic considerations for the next generation protein therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dhaval K

    2015-10-01

    Increasingly sophisticated protein engineering efforts have been undertaken lately to generate protein therapeutics with desired properties. This has resulted in the discovery of the next generation of protein therapeutics, which include: engineered antibodies, immunoconjugates, bi/multi-specific proteins, antibody mimetic novel scaffolds, and engineered ligands/receptors. These novel protein therapeutics possess unique physicochemical properties and act via a unique mechanism-of-action, which collectively makes their pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) different than other established biological molecules. Consequently, in order to support the discovery and development of these next generation molecules, it becomes important to understand the determinants controlling their PK/PD. This review discusses the determinants that a PK/PD scientist should consider during the design and development of next generation protein therapeutics. In addition, the role of systems PK/PD models in enabling rational development of the next generation protein therapeutics is emphasized.

  13. Physico-chemical effects of the major quassinoids in a standardized Eurycoma longifolia extract (Fr 2) on the bioavailability and pharmacokinetic properties, and their implications for oral antimalarial activity.

    PubMed

    Low, Bin-Seng; Teh, Chin-Hoe; Yuen, Kah-Hay; Chan, Kit-Lam

    2011-03-01

    A simple validated LC-UV method for the phytochemical analysis of four bioactive quassinoids, 13alpha(21)-epoxyeurycomanone (EP), eurycomanone (EN), 13alpha,21-dihydroeurycomanone (ED) and eurycomanol (EL) in rat plasma following oral (200 mg/kg) and intravenous administration (10 mg/kg) of a standardized extract Fr 2 of Eurycoma longifolia Jack was developed for pharmacokinetic and bioavailability studies. The extract Fr 2 contained 4.0%, 18.5%, 0.7% and 9.5% of EP, EN, ED and EL, respectively. Following intravenous administration, EP displayed a relatively longer biological half-life (t1/2 = 0.75 +/- 0.25 h) due primarily to its lower elimination rate constant (k(e)) of 0.84 +/- 0.26 h(-1)) when compared with the t1/2 of 0.35 +/- 0.04 h and k(e) of 2.14 +/- 0.27 h(-1), respectively of EN. Following oral administration, EP showed a higher C(max) of 1.61 +/- 0.41 microg/mL over that of EN (C(max) = 0.53 +/- 0.10 microg/mL). The absolute bioavailability of EP was 9.5-fold higher than that of EN, not because of chemical degradation since both quassinoids were stable at the simulated gastric pH of 1. Instead, the higher log K(ow) value of EP (-0.43) contributed to greater membrane permeability over that of EN (log K(ow) = -1.46) at pH 1. In contrast, EL, being in higher concentration in the extract than EP, was not detected in the plasma after oral administration because of substantial degradation by the gastric juices after 2 h. Similarly, ED, being unstable at the acidic pH and together with its low concentration in Fr 2, was not detectable in the rat plasma. In conclusion, upon oral administration of the bioactive standardized extract Fr 2, EP and EN may be the only quassinoids contributing to the overall antimalarial activity; this is worthy of further investigation.

  14. Optimisation of immunosuppressive therapy using pharmacokinetic principles.

    PubMed

    Grevel, J

    1992-11-01

    Clinical experience with immunosuppressive therapy is more extensive in the area of preventing the rejection of transplanted organs than in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Among the many pharmacological agents presently in use, only prednisone (or methylprednisolone) and cyclosporin require dosage individualisation. Sources of interindividual variability in the pharmacokinetics of prednisone have been identified and are guiding the selection of individual dosage rates. As an alternative, a single timed concentration can determine an apparent value for prednisone clearance from which an individual dosage can be calculated. In contrast, numerous sources of inter- and intraindividual variability in cyclosporin pharmacokinetics prevent the easy selection of safe and effective starting dose rates. Indeed, test doses of cyclosporin followed by series of blood samples and the calculation of individual pharmacokinetic parameters are needed to assure successful immunosuppression right from the start. Furthermore, only continued monitoring sustains immunotherapy vis-à-vis intraindividual variability and a narrow therapeutic range of cyclosporin concentrations.

  15. Elucidation of arctigenin pharmacokinetics after intravenous and oral administrations in rats: integration of in vitro and in vivo findings via semi-mechanistic pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiong; Zhang, Yufeng; Wo, Siukwan; Zuo, Zhong

    2014-11-01

    Although arctigenin (AR) has attracted substantial research interests due to its promising and diverse therapeutic effects, studies regarding its biotransformation were limited. The current study aims to provide information regarding the pharmacokinetic properties of AR via various in vitro and in vivo experiments as well as semi-mechanistic pharmacokinetic modeling. Our in vitro rat microsome incubation studies revealed that glucuronidation was the main intestinal and liver metabolic pathway of AR, which occurred with V max, K m, and Clint of 47.5 ± 3.4 nmol/min/mg, 204 ± 22 μM, and 233 ± 9 μl/min/mg with intestinal microsomes and 2.92 ± 0.07 nmol/min/mg, 22.7 ± 1.2 μM, and 129 ± 4 μl/min/mg with liver microsomes, respectively. In addition, demethylation and hydrolysis of AR occurred with liver microsomes but not with intestinal microsomes. In vitro incubation of AR and its metabolites in intestinal content demonstrated that glucuronides of AR excreted in bile could be further hydrolyzed back to the parent compound, suggesting its potential enterohepatic circulation. Furthermore, rapid formation followed by fast elimination of arctigenic acid (AA) and arctigenin-4'-O-glucuronide (AG) was observed after both intravenous (IV) and oral administrations of AR in rats. Linear pharmacokinetics was observed at three different doses for AR, AA, and AG after IV administration of AR (0.48-2.4 mg/kg, r (2) > 0.99). Finally, an integrated semi-mechanistic pharmacokinetic model using in vitro enzyme kinetic and in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters was successfully developed to describe plasma concentrations of AR, AA, and AG after both IV and oral administration of AR at all tested doses.

  16. Extending the Technology Acceptance Model: Policy Acceptance Model (PAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Tamra

    There has been extensive research on how new ideas and technologies are accepted in society. This has resulted in the creation of many models that are used to discover and assess the contributing factors. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) is one that is a widely accepted model. This model examines people's acceptance of new technologies based on variables that directly correlate to how the end user views the product. This paper introduces the Policy Acceptance Model (PAM), an expansion of TAM, which is designed for the analysis and evaluation of acceptance of new policy implementation. PAM includes the traditional constructs of TAM and adds the variables of age, ethnicity, and family. The model is demonstrated using a survey of people's attitude toward the upcoming healthcare reform in the United States (US) from 72 survey respondents. The aim is that the theory behind this model can be used as a framework that will be applicable to studies looking at the introduction of any new or modified policies.

  17. A PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR ESTIMATING ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Empirical evidence suggests that exposure of Americans to dioxin-like compounds was low during the early decades of the 20th century, then increased during the 1940s and 1950s reaching a peak in the 1960s and 1970s, and progressively decreased to lower levels in the 1980s and 1990s. Such evidence includes dioxin analysis of carbon-dated sediment cores of lakes and rivers, preserved meat samples from different decades of the 20th century, and limited body burden measurements of dioxin-like compounds. Pinsky and Lorber (1998) summarized studies measuring 2,3,7,8-TCDD in blood and adipose tissue finding a range of 10-20 pg/g (ppt) lipid during the 1970s, and 2-10 ppt lipid during the 1980s. This study reviews body burdens of dioxin toxic equivalents, TEQs, to find a range from about 50-80 ppt lipid during the 1970s, 30-50 ppt lipid during the 1980s, and 10-20 ppt lipid during the 1990s (TEQs comprised of the 17 dioxin and furan congeners only). Pinsky and Lorber (1998) investigated historical exposure trends for 2,3,7,8-TCDD by using a single-compartment, first-order pharmacokinetic model. The current study extends this prior effort by modeling dioxin TEQs instead of the single compound, 2,3,7,8-TCDD. TEQs are modeled as though they are a single compound, in contrast to an approach where the individual dioxin and furan congeners are modeled separately. It was found that body burdens of TEQs during the 1970s, 80s, and 90s could be modeled by assuming a histor

  18. Pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin in turkeys.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, D J; Lashev, L D; Yanev, S G; Pandova, B

    2007-06-01

    The pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin (EFL) and its active metabolite ciprofloxacin (CIP) was investigated in 7-8 month old turkeys (6 birds per sex). EFL was administered intravenously (i.v.) and orally (p.o.) at a dose 10 mg kg(-1) body weight. Blood was taken prior to and at 0.17, 0.33, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 24 h following drug administration. The concentrations of EFL and CIP in blood serum were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Serum concentrations versus time were analysed by a noncompartmental analysis. The elimination half-live and the mean residence time of EFL after i.v. injection for the serum were after oral administration 6.64+/-0.90 h, 8.96+/-1.18 h and 6.92+/-0.97 h, 11.91+/-1.87 h, respectively. After single p.o. administration, EFL was absorbed slowly (MAT=2.76+/-0.48 h) with time to reach maximum serum concentrations of 6.33+/-2.54 h. Maximum serum concentrations was 1.23+/-0.30 microg mL(-1). Oral bioavailability for for EFL after oral administration was found to be 69.20+/-1.49%. The ratios C(max)/MIC and AUC(0 --> 24)/MIC were respectively from 161.23+/-5.9 h to 12.90+/-0.5 h for the pharmacodynamic predictor C(max)/MIC, and from 2153.44+/-66.6 h to 137.82+/-4.27 h for AUC(0 --> 24)/MIC, for the different clinically significant microorganisms, whose values for MIC varies from 0.008 microg L(-1) to 0.125 microg mL(-1).

  19. Pharmacokinetics of amantadine in cats.

    PubMed

    Siao, K T; Pypendop, B H; Stanley, S D; Ilkiw, J E

    2011-12-01

    This study reports the pharmacokinetics of amantadine in cats, after both i.v. and oral administration. Six healthy adult domestic shorthair female cats were used. Amantadine HCl (5 mg/kg, equivalent to 4 mg/kg amantadine base) was administered either intravenously or orally in a crossover randomized design. Blood samples were collected immediately prior to amantadine administration, and at various times up to 1440 min following intravenous, or up to 2880 min following oral administration. Plasma amantadine concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and plasma amantadine concentration-time data were fitted to compartmental models. A two-compartment model with elimination from the central compartment best described the disposition of amantadine administered intravenously in cats, and a one-compartment model best described the disposition of oral amantadine in cats. After i.v. administration, the apparent volume of distribution of the central compartment and apparent volume of distribution at steady-state [mean ± SEM (range)], and the clearance and terminal half-life [harmonic mean ± jackknife pseudo-SD (range)] were 1.5 ± 0.3 (0.7-2.5) L/kg, 4.3 ± 0.2 (3.7-5.0) L/kg, 8.2 ± 2.1 (5.9-11.4) mL·min/kg, and 348 ± 49 (307-465) min, respectively. Systemic availability [mean ± SEM (range)] and terminal half-life after oral administration [harmonic mean ± jackknife pseudo-SD (range)] were 130 ± 11 (86-160)% and 324 ± 41 (277-381) min, respectively.

  20. Naproxen pharmacokinetics in the elderly.

    PubMed Central

    Upton, R A; Williams, R L; Kelly, J; Jones, R M

    1984-01-01

    While naproxen pharmacokinetics appear to be altered in the presence of both diminished renal and hepatic function, the degree to which naproxen disposition might be influenced in the elderly by concurrent alteration in these functions is not obvious. Total plasma clearance/bioavailability (CL/F) of naproxen after a single 375 mg oral dose was found to be less in a group of 10 healthy men between 66 and 81 years of age than in 10 healthy men between 22 and 39 years (0.318 +/- 0.078, 0.416 +/- 0.061 l/h). At steady state (375 mg, 12 hourly), however, CL/F was statistically indistinguishable between the two groups. The fraction of naproxen unbound to plasma protein was doubled in elderly subjects, both at peak and trough drug concentrations. The lowered protein binding tended to obscure a 50% decrement in the intrinsic clearance of naproxen in the elderly as estimated by unbound clearance/bioavailability (213 +/- 64, 396 +/- 155 l/h). As a result, mean steady-state plasma concentrations of naproxen were indistinguishable between the elderly and young (64.2 +/- 8.5, 58.2 +/- 8.1 mg/l) but the elderly generated twice the mean steady-state unbound plasma drug concentration (0.157 +/- 0.039, 0.0859 +/- 0.0212 mg/l). Since it is the unbound drug concentration which appears in general to relate more closely to pharmacological and toxic effect, it may be advisable to reduce naproxen doses by half in the elderly, pending plasma drug concentration-response studies in this age group. If a similar perturbation with age occurs in benoxaprofen protein binding as was observed with naproxen, benoxaprofen intrinsic clearance in the elderly might be only one quarter of that in younger individuals; a factor which may contribute to the toxicity of this drug in the elderly. PMID:6487459

  1. Clinical pharmacokinetics of the phosphate binder lanthanum carbonate.

    PubMed

    Damment, Stephen J P; Pennick, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Lanthanum carbonate is considered to be the most potent of a new generation of noncalcium phosphate binders used to treat hyperphosphataemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD), a condition associated with progressive bone and cardiovascular pathology and a markedly elevated risk of death. Its phosphate-binding action involves ionic binding and precipitation of insoluble complexes within the lumen of the intestine, thereby preventing absorption of dietary phosphate. While pharmacokinetics have little relevance to the efficacy of lanthanum carbonate, they are of fundamental importance when it comes to evaluating safety. When administered as lanthanum carbonate, the oral bioavailability of lanthanum is low (approximately 0.001%). The small absorbed fraction is excreted predominantly in bile, with less than 2% being eliminated by the kidneys. Predictably, therefore, plasma exposure and pharmacokinetics have been shown to be similar in healthy human volunteers and CKD stage 5 patients. With almost complete plasma protein binding, free lanthanum concentrations in patients at steady state are <3 pg/mL. These properties greatly reduce systemic exposure, tissue deposition and the potential for adverse effects. While lanthanum has a variety of calcium-like actions in vitro, there is little or no evidence that these occur in vivo. This paradox is explained by the very low concentrations of circulating free lanthanum ions, which are many orders of magnitude lower than reported effect concentrations in vitro. Safety pharmacology and toxicology evaluations have failed to reveal any significant calcium-like actions in vivo, despite inclusion of high intravenous doses in some cases.Lanthanum carbonate has a low propensity to cause systemic drug interactions due to its poor absorption. However, the higher concentrations present in the gastrointestinal tract can form chelates with some drugs, such as fluoroquinolones, and reduce their absorption. The improved understanding of the

  2. [Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antibiotic therapy].

    PubMed

    Beck, S; Wicha, S G; Kloft, C; Kees, M G

    2014-10-01

    Antibiotic agents are crucial pillars in intensive care medicine and must be used rationally and sensibly. In the case of critically ill patients optimal dosing with respect to pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles (PK/PD) can be vital. Preclinical results demonstrated important differences between antibiotic classes and gave rise to differing clinical dosing strategies, e.g. high dose once daily regimens for aminoglycosides or extended/continuous infusion of betalactams. Critically ill patients with altered pharmacokinetic parameters and infections by pathogens with low susceptibility are most likely to benefit from PK/PD-guided therapy.

  3. An overview of the pharmacokinetic disposition of darbepoetin alfa.

    PubMed

    Zamboni, William C; Stewart, Clinton E

    2002-09-01

    Darbepoetin alfa is a new erythropoiesis-stimulating protein that has five carbohydrate chains compared with three in recombinant human erythropoietin (r-HuEPO, epoetin alfa). Owing to its increased carbohydrate content, the terminal half-life of darbepoetin alfa is 2-3-fold greater than that of r-HuEPO in patients with chronic kidney disease or cancer. This pharmacokinetic property may allow for less frequent administration of darbepoetin alfa compared with r-HuEPO. Although several regimens are still being tested, a predictable increase was observed in serum concentrations of darbepoetin alfa and no clinically relevant accumulation was seen with once-weekly administration for up to 48 weeks. Preliminary data in patients with cancer suggest that concurrent chemotherapy may influence the pharmacokinetics of darbepoetin alfa. Therefore, the timing of dosing relative to chemotherapy may be important. Darbepoetin alfa, through its potential for less frequent dosing, offers a more convenient treatment option than r-HuEPO for patients with anemia secondary to cancer or kidney disease.

  4. Single dose pharmacokinetics and tolerance of pancopride in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Dewland, P; Pérez Campos, A; Martinez-Tobed, A

    1995-02-01

    Pancopride (LAS 30451, CAS 121650-80-4) is a new selective 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptor antagonist which has demonstrated antiemetic properties in animal models. The tolerance and pharmacokinetics of pancopride and its effect on the 5-hydroxytryptamine flare test were examined in healthy male volunteers, in three single-dose studies. The studies consisted of two rising dose tolerance and kinetic studies with placebo control, each involving 14 volunteers, and an absolute bioavailability study involving 12 volunteers. The doses used in the rising dose studies were 0.5-20 mg intravenous pancopride in the first study, and 5-40 mg pancopride as oral solution in the second study. For the absolute bioavailability study, 20 mg doses as intravenous infusion, oral tablet and oral solution were compared. Pancopride was well tolerated at these doses in these studies. There were no significant effects on pulse rate, blood pressure, or electrocardiograms, or on haematology or serum biochemistry. Few adverse events were recorded, the most significant being gastrointestinal effects (including diarrhoea and soft stools) seen particularly with the 40 mg oral dose. Pharmacokinetic parameters for the 24 h after dosing were derived from plasma and urine pancopride levels, determined using a capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method. Linear kinetics appeared to apply over the intravenous dose range 5-20 mg. Urinary recovery of unchanged pancopride was in the order of 10-17% over the 24 h after dosing.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Market Acceptance of Smart Growth

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report finds that smart growth developments enjoy market acceptance because of stability in prices over time. Housing resales in smart growth developments often have greater appreciation than their conventional suburban counterparts.

  6. L-286 Acceptance Test Record

    SciTech Connect

    HARMON, B.C.

    2000-01-14

    This document provides a detailed account of how the acceptance testing was conducted for Project L-286, ''200E Area Sanitary Water Plant Effluent Stream Reduction''. The testing of the L-286 instrumentation system was conducted under the direct supervision

  7. Clinical pharmacokinetics and effects of vincristine sulfate in dogs with transmissible venereal tumor (TVT).

    PubMed

    Hantrakul, Supannika; Klangkaew, Narumol; Kunakornsawat, Sunee; Tansatit, Tawewan; Poapolathep, Ammart; Kumagai, Susumu; Poapolathep, Saranya

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetic characteristics of vincristine and their correlation with its clinical effects in dogs with transmissible venereal tumor (TVT). Dogs with TVT were intravenously administered vincristine sulfate at a dose of 0.7 mg/m(2) of body surface area. Blood samples were collected starting from 5 min to 48 hr after drug administration. The plasma concentration of vincristine was determined using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The pharmacokinetic parameters of vincristine were characterized using a two-compartmental pharmacokinetic model. The volume of distribution, distribution half-life, elimination half-life and plasma clearance were 0.660 ± 0.210 l/kg, 21.5 ± 6.90 min, 47.6 ± 14.2 min and 0.010 ± 0.001 l/min/kg, respectively. Tumor regression was determined at weekly interval by a physical examination and histopathological analysis. In our study, three to eight administrations of vincristine at a dose of 0.7 mg/m(2) were able to induce a complete tumor regression without any evidence of gross lesion of disease. Therefore, this investigation provides the pharmacokinetic characteristics of vincristine in dogs with TVT, which may be used as an integration tool to gain a better understanding of the disposition properties of the drug and the correlation of these properties with the drug's clinical effects. In addition, we validated the LC-MS/MS method and found that it is suitable for the pharmacokinetic study of vincristine in dog plasma.

  8. A Qualitative Review on the Pharmacokinetics of Antibiotics in Saliva: Implications on Clinical Pharmacokinetic Monitoring in Humans.

    PubMed

    Kiang, Tony K L; Ensom, Mary H H

    2016-03-01

    We conducted a systematic search to describe the current state of knowledge regarding the utility of saliva for clinical pharmacokinetic monitoring (CPM) of antibiotics. Although the majority of identified studies lacked sufficient pharmacokinetic data needed to assign an appropriate suitability classification, most aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, penicillins/cephalosporins, and tetracyclines are likely not suitable for CPM in saliva. No clear pattern of correlation was observed between physiochemical properties that favor drug distribution into saliva and the likelihood of the antibiotic being classified as suitable for CPM in saliva (and vice versa). Insufficient data were available to determine if pathophysiological conditions affected salivary distribution of antibiotics. Additional confirmatory data are required for drugs (especially in patients) that are deemed likely suitable for CPM in saliva because only a few studies were available and many focused only on healthy subjects. All studies identified had relatively small sample sizes and exhibited large variability. Very few studies reported salivary collection parameters (e.g., salivary flow, pH) that could potentially have some impact on drug distribution into saliva. The available data are heavily weighted on healthy subjects, and insufficient data were available to determine if pathophysiology had effects on saliva drug distribution. Some studies also lacked assay sensitivity for detecting antibiotics in saliva. Overall, this review can be useful to clinicians who desire an overview on the suitability of saliva for conducting CPM of specific antibiotics, or for researchers who wish to fill the identified knowledge gaps to move the science of salivary CPM further.

  9. FIRST REPORTS OF CLINICAL PHARMACOKINETICS IN NIGERIA.

    PubMed

    Michael, O S

    2015-06-01

    The German Friedrich Hartmut Dost (1910-1985) introduced the word Pharmacokinetics. Clinical pharmacokinetics is the direct application of knowledge regarding a drug's pharmacokinetics to a therapeutic situation in an individual or a population. It is the basis of therapeutic drug monitoring with the ultimate goal of keeping drugs safe. This branch of pharmacology has become the most relevant to the sub-specialty of clinical pharmacology. First reports of Clinical Pharmacokinetics in Nigeria can be credited to two gifted Nigerians, Prof Ayodele O. Iyun and Prof Lateef A. Salako, both of whom were affiliated to the great institutions- University of Ibadan (UI) and the Teaching Hospital, University College Hospital (UCH). Prof A.O Iyun was Nigeria's first home-trained Clinical Pharmacologist, while Prof L.A. Salako played a most significant role in the creation of the Department of Clinical Pharmacology, UCH. This edition of the Chronicles highlights a few of the first reports of this exciting branch of pharmacology in Nigeria. This historical review is based on publications listed on the United States National Library of Medicine database (PUBMED).

  10. FIRST REPORTS OF CLINICAL PHARMACOKINETICS IN NIGERIA

    PubMed Central

    Michael, O.S.

    2015-01-01

    The German Friedrich Hartmut Dost (1910-1985) introduced the word Pharmacokinetics. Clinical pharmacokinetics is the direct application of knowledge regarding a drug's pharmacokinetics to a therapeutic situation in an individual or a population. It is the basis of therapeutic drug monitoring with the ultimate goal of keeping drugs safe. This branch of pharmacology has become the most relevant to the sub-specialty of clinical pharmacology. First reports of Clinical Pharmacokinetics in Nigeria can be credited to two gifted Nigerians, Prof Ayodele O. Iyun and Prof Lateef A. Salako, both of whom were affiliated to the great institutions- University of Ibadan (UI) and the Teaching Hospital, University College Hospital (UCH). Prof A.O Iyun was Nigeria's first home-trained Clinical Pharmacologist, while Prof L.A. Salako played a most significant role in the creation of the Department of Clinical Pharmacology, UCH. This edition of the Chronicles highlights a few of the first reports of this exciting branch of pharmacology in Nigeria. This historical review is based on publications listed on the United States National Library of Medicine database (PUBMED). PMID:26807087

  11. Some statistical issues in modelling pharmacokinetic data.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, J K; Jones, B; Jarvis, P

    A fundamental assumption underlying pharmacokinetic compartment modelling is that each subject has a different individual curve. To some extent this runs counter to the statistical principle that similar individuals will have similar curves, thus making inferences to a wider population possible. In population pharmacokinetics, the compromise is to use random effects. We recommend that such models also be used in data rich situations instead of independently fitting individual curves. However, the additional information available in such studies shows that random effects are often not sufficient; generally, an autoregressive process is also required. This has the added advantage that it provides a means of tracking each individual, yielding predictions for the next observation. The compartment model curve being fitted may also be distorted in other ways. A widely held assumption is that most, if not all, pharmacokinetic concentration data follow a log-normal distribution. By examples, we show that this is not generally true, with the gamma distribution often being more suitable. When extreme individuals are present, a heavy-tailed distribution, such as the log Cauchy, can often provide more robust results. Finally, other assumptions that can distort the results include a direct dependence of the variance, or other dispersion parameter, on the mean and setting non-detectable values to some arbitrarily small value instead of treating them as censored. By pointing out these problems with standard methods of statistical modelling of pharmacokinetic data, we hope that commercial software will soon make more flexible and suitable models available.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of Drug Entry into Cochlear Fluids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salt, Alec N.

    2005-01-01

    The inner ear is exposed to aminoglycosides or other drugs either intentionally or as a side effect of clinical treatments directed at other regions of the body. An understanding of the effects of drugs on the inner ear requires knowledge of the pharmacokinetics of the drug once it reaches the cochlear fluids, specifically how much of it reaches…

  13. Obstetric Pharmacokinetic Dosing Studies are Urgently Needed

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Shelley A.; Best, Brookie M.

    2014-01-01

    Use of pharmacotherapy during pregnancy is common and increasing. Physiologic changes during pregnancy may significantly alter the overall systemic drug exposure, necessitating dose changes. A search of PubMed for pharmacokinetic clinical trials showed 494 publications during pregnancy out of 35,921 total pharmacokinetic published studies (1.29%), from the late 1960s through August 31, 2013. Closer examination of pharmacokinetic studies in pregnant women published since 2008 (81 studies) revealed that about a third of the trials were for treatment of acute labor and delivery issues, a third included studies of infectious disease treatment during pregnancy, and the remaining third were for varied ante-partum indications. Approximately, two-thirds of these recent studies were primarily funded by government agencies worldwide, one-quarter were supported by private non-profit foundations or combinations of government and private funding, and slightly <10% were supported by pharmaceutical industry. As highlighted in this review, vast gaps exist in pharmacology information and evidence for appropriate dosing of medications in pregnant women. This lack of knowledge and understanding of drug disposition throughout pregnancy place both the mother and the fetus at risk for avoidable therapeutic misadventures – suboptimal efficacy or excess toxicity – with medication use in pregnancy. Increased efforts to perform and support obstetric dosing and pharmacokinetic studies are greatly needed. PMID:24575394

  14. Ofloxacin pharmacokinetics in mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, C; Lambert, D; Bruguerolle, B; Saux, P; Freney, J; Fleurette, J; Meugnier, H; Gouin, F

    1991-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ofloxacin were studied in 12 intensive care patients, 6 of whom were under controlled mechanical ventilation. All patients had a creatinine clearance of greater than 80 ml/min per 1.73 m2. They were given 3 mg of ofloxacin per kg of body weight intravenously at a constant flow rate in 30 min twice a day for 7 days. Pharmacokinetic studies were performed on days 1 and 7. Between days 1 and 7, significant increases in the alpha (distribution) and beta (elimination) phase half-lives, the area under the serum concentration-time curve, and peak and trough levels in serum were observed, together with a marked decrease (greater than 50%) in total body clearance. Possible contributing factors for alteration of ofloxacin pharmacokinetics in ventilated patients were patient age, liver dysfunction, drug interaction, and drug accumulation in a deep compartment. This study shows that in intensive care patients the pharmacokinetics of ofloxacin differ from those reported for healthy volunteers. PMID:1929329

  15. Heritability of metoprolol and torsemide pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Matthaei, J; Brockmöller, J; Tzvetkov, M V; Sehrt, D; Sachse-Seeboth, C; Hjelmborg, J B; Möller, S; Halekoh, U; Hofmann, U; Schwab, M; Kerb, R

    2015-12-01

    Genetic variation in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol and torsemide due to polymorphisms in CYP2D6, CYP2C9, and OATP1B1 has been extensively studied. However, it is still unknown how much of the variation in pharmacokinetics of these two clinically important drugs in total is due to genetic factors. Metoprolol and torsemide were intravenously administered to 44 monozygotic and 14 dizygotic twin pairs. Metoprolol area under the curve (AUC) varied 4.7-fold and torsemide AUC 3.5-fold. A very high fraction of AUC variations, 91% of metoprolol and 86% of torsemide, were found to be due to additive genetic effects. However, known genetic variants of CYP2D6, -2C9, and OATP1B1 explained only 39%, 2%, and 39% of that variation, respectively. Comparable results for genetically explained variation in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics have been found for other substrates of these enzymes earlier. These findings indicate that a substantial fraction of the heritable variability in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol and torsemide remains to be elucidated.

  16. Nonlinear pharmacokinetics of oral quinidine and verapamil in healthy subjects: a clinical microdosing study.

    PubMed

    Maeda, K; Takano, J; Ikeda, Y; Fujita, T; Oyama, Y; Nozawa, K; Kumagai, Y; Sugiyama, Y

    2011-08-01

    Microdosing studies are effective in enabling the early identification of the pharmacokinetic properties of compounds administered to humans. However, the nonlinearity of the pharmacokinetics between microdose and therapeutic dose, attributable to the saturation of metabolic enzymes and transporters, is a major concern. Verapamil and quinidine are good substrates of both the multidrug resistance 1 transporter (MDR1) and the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 enzyme (CYP3A4). We investigated their dose-dependent pharmacokinetics in healthy subjects. Four different doses of verapamil or quinidine were administered orally to each subject, and the plasma concentrations of the parent drugs and their major metabolites were measured. The dose-normalized area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) values of quinidine and verapamil increased in a dose-dependent manner and were 2.6- and 2.3-fold higher, respectively, at the therapeutic dose than at microdose. These results suggest that the nonlinear pharmacokinetics of these drugs is caused mainly by the saturation of MDR1 and/or CYP3A4 in the small intestine.

  17. The application of cassette dosing for pharmacokinetic screening in small-molecule cancer drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Smith, Nicola F; Raynaud, Florence I; Workman, Paul

    2007-02-01

    Pharmacokinetic evaluation is an essential component of drug discovery and should be conducted early in the process so that those compounds with the best chance of success are prioritized and progressed. However, pharmacokinetic analysis has become a serious bottleneck during the 'hit-to-lead' and lead optimization phases due to the availability of new targets and the large numbers of compounds resulting from advances in synthesis and screening technologies. Cassette dosing, which involves the simultaneous administration of several compounds to a single animal followed by rapid sample analysis by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, was developed to increase the throughput of in vivo pharmacokinetic screening. Although cassette dosing is advantageous in terms of resources and throughput, there are possible complications associated with this approach, such as the potential for compound interactions. Following an overview of the cassette dosing literature, this article focuses on the application of the technique in anticancer drug discovery. Specific examples are discussed, including the evaluation of cassette dosing to assess pharmacokinetic properties in the development of cyclin-dependent kinase and heat shock protein 90 inhibitors. Subject to critical analysis and validation in each case, the use of cassette dosing is recommended in appropriate chemical series to enhance the efficiency of drug discovery and reduce animal usage.

  18. Population pharmacokinetics. Theory and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Whiting, B; Kelman, A W; Grevel, J

    1986-01-01

    Good therapeutic practice should always be based on an understanding of pharmacokinetic variability. This ensures that dosage adjustments can be made to accommodate differences in pharmacokinetics due to genetic, environmental, physiological or pathological factors. The identification of the circumstances in which these factors play a significant role depends on the conduct of pharmacokinetic studies throughout all stages of drug development. Advances in pharmacokinetic data analysis in the last 10 years have opened up a more comprehensive approach to this subject: early traditional small group studies may now be complemented by later population-based studies. This change in emphasis has been largely brought about by the development of appropriate computer software (NONMEM: Nonlinear Mixed Effects Model) and its successful application to the retrospective analysis of clinical data of a number of commonly used drugs, e.g. digoxin, phenytoin, gentamicin, procainamide, mexiletine and lignocaine (lidocaine). Success has been measured in terms of the provision of information which leads to increased efficiency in dosage adjustment, usually based on a subsequent Bayesian feedback procedure. The application of NONMEM to new drugs, however, raises a number of interesting questions, e.g. 'what experimental design strategies should be employed?' and 'can kinetic parameter distributions other than those which are unimodal and normal be identified?' An answer to the later question may be provided by an alternative non-parametric maximum likelihood (NPML) approach. Population kinetic studies generate a considerable amount of demographic and concentration-time data; the effort involved may be wasted unless sufficient attention is paid to the organisation and storage of such information. This is greatly facilitated by the creation of specially designed clinical pharmacokinetic data bases, conveniently stored on microcomputers. A move towards the adoption of population

  19. The posology of oseltamivir in infants with influenza infection using a population pharmacokinetic approach.

    PubMed

    Kamal, M A; Acosta, E P; Kimberlin, D W; Gibiansky, L; Jester, P; Niranjan, V; Rath, B; Clinch, B; Sánchez, P J; Ampofo, K; Whitley, R; Rayner, C R

    2014-09-01

    Infants are at increased risk for morbidity and mortality due to influenza. Until recently, few data were available with which to optimize oseltamivir dosing in this high-risk population. Here, data for 133 infants were pooled from two prospective pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic safety studies to develop a population pharmacokinetic model. A three-compartment model with allometric scaling of all clearance and volume parameters described the disposition of oseltamivir and its carboxylate metabolite (OC). Weight dependence, OC clearance, and volume of distribution increased linearly with age. Analyses showed no association between OC exposure and viral clearance, the development of resistance (phenotypic/genotypic), normalization of body temperature, or safety endpoints. Pharmacokinetic bridging showed that a 3 mg/kg dose yielded acceptable OC exposure and good tolerability while minimizing the risk of underexposure and resistance/treatment failure. These pharmacological analyses formed the basis of the US Food and Drug Administration's recent approval of oseltamivir treatment for infants with influenza aged as young as 2 weeks.

  20. Post-marketing surveillance of generic amoxicillin using a microbiological assay and pharmacokinetic approach in rats.

    PubMed

    de Mattos, Livia I S; Ferraris, Fausto K; Machado, Tiago S C; de Brito, Thais M; Chaves, Amanda S; Pereira, Heliana M; Pinto, Douglas P; da Silva, Diego M D; Amendoeira, Fabio C

    2016-12-01

    Generic medicines were developed to increase population access to health treatment, to reduce costs and to allow drugs with the same outcomes to be purchased at lower prices. They are therapeutically equivalent to their brand-name counterparts and are interchangeable with them. However, the acceptance of generic medicines by physicians and general consumers is often affected by distrust related to quality and efficacy. In this study three different brands of generic amoxicillin were tested. The results showed that two of them were indistinguishable from the innovator in terms of microbiological potency; however, generic B was unable to reach the Brazilian Pharmacopoeia specifications for potency limits. In contrast, generic B was bioequivalent to the innovator amoxicillin in pharmacokinetic assessment and, surprisingly, generic A, which was approved in the microbiological potency assay, lacked pharmacokinetic equivalence compared with the innovator. Both tests, when used singly, may not be effective at detecting quality deviations in antimicrobial medicines, which indicates that pharmacokinetic tests in rats in association with microbiological potency assays are a valuable tool for post-marketing surveillance of generic antibiotics.

  1. Pharmacokinetics-Based Approaches for Bioequivalence Evaluation of Topical Dermatological Drug Products.

    PubMed

    Raney, Sam G; Franz, Thomas J; Lehman, Paul A; Lionberger, Robert; Chen, Mei-Ling

    2015-11-01

    The pharmacokinetic approach has accelerated the development of high-quality generic medicines with extraordinary cost savings, transforming the pharmaceutical industry and healthcare system in the USA. While this is true for systemically absorbed drug products, the availability of generic versions of topical dermatological products remains constrained due to the limited methods accepted for bioequivalence evaluation of these products. The current review explores the possibility of developing appropriate bioequivalence approaches based on pharmacokinetic principles for topical dermatological products. This review focuses on the strengths and limitations of the three most promising pharmacokinetics-based methods to evaluate the performance and bioequivalence of topical dermatological products, which include in vivo skin stripping, in vivo microdialysis, and in vitro permeation testing (IVPT) with excised human skin. It is hoped that recent advances in pharmaceutical and regulatory science will facilitate the development of robust bioequivalence approaches for these dosage forms, enable more efficient methodologies to compare the performance of new drug products in certain pre-approval or post-approval change situations, and promote the availability of high-quality generic versions of topical dermatological products.

  2. Pharmacokinetic differences of some generic tablet gliclazide 80 mg on Pakistani population.

    PubMed

    Obaid, Roohi; Ali, Obaid; Saify, Zafar Saied; Kamil, Noor; Khan, Masood Hameed; Ahmed, T; Ahmed, Syed Waseemuddin

    2004-01-01

    The goal of rational drug therapy is to produce a desired pharmacological response in an acceptable and predictable manner while minimizing the occurrence of undesired events. The Pharmacokinetics of different generics of tablet gliclazide 80 mg was investigated on healthy (10 x 2), Pakistani subjects. For this exploration an open-label, randomized, two-period crossover (Balanced in Complete Block Design) study, was conducted The out come of the said study suggests that all generics were found analogous regarding pharmacokinetic behavior in-spite of having different excipients, concentration of excipients, sources of raw material, manufacturing process, machinery, resources and also inter individual variation of the study. Results of the study also undoubtedly advocate that generics manufactured in different manufacturing units of Pakistan are near to the standard formulation and produce comparable results. No significant differences in pharmacokinetics parameters were observed, however, minor differences might narrate with inter individual variation in human volunteers and in different generic as well as different pharmaceutical unit.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of PSC 833 (valspodar) in its Cremophor EL formulation in rat.

    PubMed

    Binkhathlan, Z; Hamdy, D A; Brocks, D R; Lavasanifar, A

    2010-01-01

    Valspodar is a P-glycoprotein inhibitor widely used in preclinical and clinical studies for overcoming multidrug resistance. Despite this, the pharmacokinetics of valspodar in rat, a commonly used animal model, have not been reported. Here, we report on the pharmacokinetics of valspodar in Sprague-Dawley rats following intravenous and oral administration of its Cremophor EL formulation, which has been used for humans in clinical trials. After intravenous doses, valspodar displayed properties of slow clearance and a large volume of distribution. Its plasma unbound fraction was around 15% in the Cremophor EL formulation used in the study. After 10 mg kg(-1) orally it was rapidly absorbed with an average maximal plasma concentration of 1.48 mg l(-1) within approximately 2 h. The mean bioavailability of valspodar was 42.8%. In rat, valspodar showed properties of low hepatic extraction and wide distribution, similar to that of its structural analogue cyclosporine A.

  4. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    Several court cases involving acquisition, use, and disposal of property by institutions of higher education are briefly summarized in this chapter. Cases discussed touch on such topics as municipal annexation of university property; repurchase of properties temporarily allocated to faculty members; implications of zoning laws and zoning board…

  5. From requirements to acceptance tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Lionel; Pasquier, Helene

    1993-01-01

    From user requirements definition to accepted software system, the software project management wants to be sure that the system will meet the requirements. For the development of a telecommunication satellites Control Centre, C.N.E.S. has used new rules to make the use of tracing matrix easier. From Requirements to Acceptance Tests, each item of a document must have an identifier. A unique matrix traces the system and allows the tracking of the consequences of a change in the requirements. A tool has been developed, to import documents into a relational data base. Each record of the data base corresponds to an item of a document, the access key is the item identifier. Tracing matrix is also processed, providing automatically links between the different documents. It enables the reading on the same screen of traced items. For example one can read simultaneously the User Requirements items, the corresponding Software Requirements items and the Acceptance Tests.

  6. Defining acceptable conditions in wilderness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggenbuck, J. W.; Williams, D. R.; Watson, A. E.

    1993-03-01

    The limits of acceptable change (LAC) planning framework recognizes that forest managers must decide what indicators of wilderness conditions best represent resource naturalness and high-quality visitor experiences and how much change from the pristine is acceptable for each indicator. Visitor opinions on the aspects of the wilderness that have great impact on their experience can provide valuable input to selection of indicators. Cohutta, Georgia; Caney Creek, Arkansas; Upland Island, Texas; and Rattlesnake, Montana, wilderness visitors have high shared agreement that littering and damage to trees in campsites, noise, and seeing wildlife are very important influences on wilderness experiences. Camping within sight or sound of other people influences experience quality more than do encounters on the trails. Visitors’ standards of acceptable conditions within wilderness vary considerably, suggesting a potential need to manage different zones within wilderness for different clientele groups and experiences. Standards across wildernesses, however, are remarkably similar.

  7. Phytosomal curcumin: A review of pharmacokinetic, experimental and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Hamed; Shakeri, Abolfazl; Rashidi, Bahman; Jalili, Amin; Banikazemi, Zarrin; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2017-01-01

    Curcumin, a hydrophobic polyphenol, is the principal constituent extracted from dried rhizomes of Curcuma longa L. (turmeric). Curcumin is known as a strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory agent that has different pharmacological effects. In addition, several studies have demonstrated that curcumin is safe even at dosages as high as 8g per day; however, instability at physiological pH, low solubility in water and rapid metabolism results in a low oral bioavailability of curcumin. The phytosomal formulation of curcumin (a complex of curcumin with phosphatidylcholine) has been shown to improve curcumin bioavailability. Existence of phospholipids in phytosomes leads to specific physicochemical properties such as amphiphilic nature that allows dispersion in both hydrophilic and lipophilic media. The efficacy and safety of curcumin phytosomes have been shown against several human diseases including cancer, osteoarthritis, diabetic microangiopathy and retinopathy, and inflammatory diseases. This review focuses on the pharmacokinetics as well as pharmacological and clinical effects of phytosomal curcumin.

  8. Asparaginase pharmacokinetics and implications of therapeutic drug monitoring.

    PubMed

    Asselin, Barbara; Rizzari, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    Asparaginase is widely used in chemotherapeutic regimens for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and has led to a substantial improvement in cure rates, especially in children. Optimal therapeutic effects depend on a complete and sustained depletion of serum asparagine. However, pronounced interpatient variability, differences in pharmacokinetic properties between asparaginases and the formation of asparaginase antibodies make it difficult to predict the degree of asparagine depletion that will result from a given dose of asparaginase. The pharmacological principles underlying asparaginase therapy in the treatment of ALL are summarized in this article. A better understanding of the many factors that influence asparaginase activity and subsequent asparagine depletion may allow physicians to tailor treatment to the individual, maximizing therapeutic effect and minimizing treatment-related toxicity. Therapeutic drug monitoring provides a means of assessing a patient's current depletion status and can be used to better evaluate the potential benefit of treatment adjustments.

  9. Discovery of 7-aminofuro[2,3-c]pyridine inhibitors of TAK1: optimization of kinase selectivity and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Hornberger, Keith R; Chen, Xin; Crew, Andrew P; Kleinberg, Andrew; Ma, Lifu; Mulvihill, Mark J; Wang, Jing; Wilde, Victoria L; Albertella, Mark; Bittner, Mark; Cooke, Andrew; Kadhim, Salam; Kahler, Jennifer; Maresca, Paul; May, Earl; Meyn, Peter; Romashko, Darlene; Tokar, Brianna; Turton, Roy

    2013-08-15

    The kinase selectivity and pharmacokinetic optimization of a series of 7-aminofuro[2,3-c]pyridine inhibitors of TAK1 is described. The intersection of insights from molecular modeling, computational prediction of metabolic sites, and in vitro metabolite identification studies resulted in a simple and unique solution to both of these problems. These efforts culminated in the discovery of compound 13a, a potent, relatively selective inhibitor of TAK1 with good pharmacokinetic properties in mice, which was active in an in vivo model of ovarian cancer.

  10. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model to identify mechanisms contributing to entacapone low bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Alqahtani, Saeed; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2015-12-01

    Entacapone is an inhibitor of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and is being used to extend the therapeutic effect of levodopa in patients with advanced and fluctuating Parkinson's disease. Entacapone has low and variable oral bioavailability and the underlying mechanism(s) for this behavior have not been studied. To explain such behavior and to characterize the dynamic changes in the metabolism of entacapone, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model was developed integrating in silico, in vitro and in vivo pharmacokinetic data. The model was developed and verified in healthy volunteers and subsequently expanded to predict the pharmacokinetic parameters of entacapone phosphate, a prodrug of entacapone, and to assess the impact of hepatic impairment on the pharmacokinetics of entacapone. Low and inter-individual variability in bioavailability could be attributed to the extensive first-pass metabolism by UGTs in the liver and, to a lesser extent, the small intestine. The predictive performance of this model was acceptable with predicted Cmax , AUC and PD parameters lying within 20% of the observed data. The model indicates that the low bioavailability could be attributed to the extensive first-pass effect of entacapone.

  11. Prediction of Pharmacokinetic Parameters Using a Genetic Algorithm Combined with an Artificial Neural Network for a Series of Alkaloid Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Zandkarimi, Majid; Shafiei, Mohammad; Hadizadeh, Farzin; Darbandi, Mohammad Ali; Tabrizian, Kaveh

    2014-01-01

    An important goal for drug development within the pharmaceutical industry is the application of simple methods to determine human pharmacokinetic parameters. Effective computing tools are able to increase scientists’ ability to make precise selections of chemical compounds in accordance with desired pharmacokinetic and safety profiles. This work presents a method for making predictions of the clearance, plasma protein binding, and volume of distribution for alkaloid drugs. The tools used in this method were genetic algorithms (GAs) combined with artificial neural networks (ANNs) and these were applied to select the most relevant molecular descriptors and to develop quantitative structure-pharmacokinetic relationship (QSPkR) models. Results showed that three-dimensional structural descriptors had more influence on QSPkR models. The models developed in this study were able to predict systemic clearance, volume of distribution, and plasma protein binding with normalized root mean square error (NRMSE) values of 0.151, 0.263, and 0.423, respectively. These results demonstrate an acceptable level of efficiency of the developed models for the prediction of pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:24634842

  12. VolSurf: a new tool for the pharmacokinetic optimization of lead compounds.

    PubMed

    Cruciani, G; Pastor, M; Guba, W

    2000-10-01

    A method for the modeling and prediction of pharmacokinetic properties based on computed molecular interaction fields and multivariate statistics has been investigated in different experimental datasets. The program VolSurf was used to correlate 3D molecular structures with physico-chemical and pharmacokinetic properties. In membrane partitioning, VolSurf produced a two-component model explaining 94% of the total variation with a predictive q(2) of 0.90. This result was achieved without conformational sampling and without any quantum-chemical calculation. For the prediction of blood-brain barrier penetration the VolSurf model was able to predict the BBB profile for most of the drugs in the external prediction set. In Caco-2 and MDCK permeation experiments, VolSurf was used with success to establish statistical models and to predict the behaviour of new compounds. The method thus appears as a valuable new property filter in virtual screening and as a novel tool in optimizing the pharmacokinetic profile of pharmaceutically relevant compounds.

  13. 41 CFR 102-75.1150 - What happens to the gift if GSA determines it to be acceptable?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... if GSA determines it to be acceptable? 102-75.1150 Section 102-75.1150 Public Contracts and Property...-75.1150 What happens to the gift if GSA determines it to be acceptable? When GSA determines that the gift is acceptable and can be accepted and used in the form in which it was offered, GSA must...

  14. Drug Dosing in Obese Children: A Systematic Review of Current Pharmacokinetic Data

    PubMed Central

    Harskamp-van Ginkel, Margreet W.; Hill, Kevin D.; Becker, Kristian; Testoni, Daniela; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Gonzalez, Daniel; Barrett, Jeffrey S.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Siegel, David A.; Banks, Patricia; Watt, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Obesity affects nearly one sixth of U.S. children and results in alterations to body composition and physiology that can affect drug disposition, possibly leading to therapeutic failure or toxicity. The depth of available literature regarding obesity’s effect on drug safety, pharmacokinetics (PK) and dosing in obese children is unknown. OBJECTIVE To perform a systematic literature review describing the current evidence of the effect of obesity on drug disposition in children. EVIDENCE REVIEW We searched the Medline, Cochrane, and Embase databases (January 1970–December 2012) and included studies if they contained clearance, volume of distribution, or drug concentration data in obese children (age ≤18 years). We compared exposure and weight-normalized volume of distribution and clearance between obese and non-obese children. We explored the relationship between drug physicochemical properties and clearance and volume of distribution. FINDINGS Twenty studies met inclusion criteria and contained pharmacokinetic data for 21 drugs. The median number of obese children studied per drug was 10 (range 1–112), ages ranged from 0–29 years. Dosing schema varied and were based on a fixed dose (n=6, 29%), body weight (n=10, 48%), and body surface area (n=4, 19%). Clinically significant pharmacokinetic alterations were observed in obese children for 65% (11/17) of studied drugs. Pharmacokinetic alterations resulted in substantial differences in exposure between obese and non-obese children for 38% (5/13) of drugs. We found no association between drug lipophilicity or Biopharmaceutical Drug Disposition Classification System class and changes in volume of distribution or clearance due to obesity. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Consensus is lacking on the most appropriate weight-based dosing strategy. Prospective pharmacokinetic trials in obese children are needed to ensure therapeutic efficacy and enhance drug safety. PMID:25961828

  15. Effect of famotidine on the pharmacokinetics of apixaban, an oral direct factor Xa inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Upreti, Vijay V; Song, Yan; Wang, Jessie; Byon, Wonkyung; Boyd, Rebecca A; Pursley, Janice M; LaCreta, Frank; Frost, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    Background Apixaban is an oral, selective, direct factor Xa inhibitor approved for thromboprophylaxis after orthopedic surgery and stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation, and under development for treatment of venous thromboembolism. This study investigated the effect of a gastric acid suppressant, famotidine (a histamine H2-receptor antagonist), on the pharmacokinetics of apixaban in healthy subjects. Methods This two-period, two-treatment crossover study randomized 18 healthy subjects to receive a single oral dose of apixaban 10 mg with and without a single oral dose of famotidine 40 mg administered 3 hours before dosing with apixaban. Plasma apixaban concentrations were measured up to 60 hours post-dose and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. Results Famotidine did not affect maximum apixaban plasma concentration (Cmax) or area under the plasma concentration-time curve from zero to infinite time (AUC∞). Point estimates for ratios of geometric means with and without famotidine were close to unity for Cmax (0.978) and AUC∞ (1.007), and 90% confidence intervals were entirely contained within the 80%–125% no-effect interval. Administration of apixaban alone and with famotidine was well tolerated. Conclusion Famotidine does not affect the pharmacokinetics of apixaban, consistent with the physicochemical properties of apixaban (lack of an ionizable group and pH-independent solubility). Apixaban pharmacokinetics would not be affected by an increase in gastrointestinal pH due to underlying conditions (eg, achlorhydria), or by gastrointestinal pH-mediated effects of other histamine H2-receptor antagonists, antacids, or proton pump inhibitors. Given that famotidine is also an inhibitor of the human organic cation transporter (hOCT), these results indicate that apixaban pharmacokinetics are not influenced by hOCT uptake transporter inhibitors. Overall, these results support that apixaban can be administered without regard to coadministration

  16. Effect of pregnancy on emtricitabine pharmacokinetics*

    PubMed Central

    Stek, AM; Best, BM; Luo, W; Capparelli, E; Burchett, S; Hu, C; Li, H; Read, JS; Jennings, A; Barr, E; Smith, E; Rossi, SS; Mirochnick, M

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to describe emtricitabine pharmacokinetics during pregnancy and postpartum. Methods The International Maternal Pediatric and Adolescent AIDS Clinical Trials (IMPAACT), formerly Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group (PACTG), study P1026s is a prospective pharmacokinetic study of HIV-infected pregnant women taking antiretrovirals for clinical indications, including a cohort taking emtricitabine 200 mg once daily. Intensive steady-state 24-hour emtricitabine pharmacokinetic profiles were performed during the third trimester and 6–12 weeks postpartum, and on maternal and umbilical cord blood samples collected at delivery. Emtricitabine was measured by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry with a quantification limit of 0.0118 mg/L. The target emtricitabine area under the concentration versus time curve, from time 0 to 24 hours post dose (AUC0-24), was ≥7 mg h/L (≤30% reduction from the typical AUC of 10 mg h/L in nonpregnant historical controls). Third-trimester and postpartum pharmacokinetics were compared within subjects. Results Twenty-six women had pharmacokinetics assessed during the third trimester (median 35 weeks of gestation) and 22 postpartum (median 8 weeks postpartum). Mean [90% confidence interval (CI)] emtricitabine pharmacokinetic parameters during the third trimester vs. postpartum were, respectively: AUC: 8.0 (7.1–8.9) vs. 9.7 (8.6–10.9) mg h/L (P = 0.072); apparent clearance (CL/F): 25.0 (22.6–28.3) vs. 20.6 (18.4–23.2) L/h (P = 0.025); 24 hour post dose concentration (C24): 0.058 (0.037–0.063) vs. 0.085 (0.070–0.010) mg/L (P = 0.006). The mean cord:maternal ratio was 1.2 (90% CI 1.0–1.5). The viral load was <400 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL in 24 of 26 women in the third trimester, in 24 of 26 at delivery, and in 15 of 19 postpartum. Within-subject comparisons demonstrated significantly higher CL/F and significantly lower C24 during pregnancy; however, the C24 was well above the inhibitory

  17. Clinical pharmacokinetics of new-generation antiepileptic drugs at the extremes of age: an update.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Domenico; Perucca, Emilio

    2013-08-01

    Epilepsies occur across the entire age range, and their incidence peaks in the first years of life and in the elderly. Therefore, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are commonly used at the extremes of age. Rational prescribing in these age groups requires not only an understanding of the drugs' pharmacodynamic properties, but also careful consideration of potential age-related changes in their pharmacokinetic profile. The present article, which updates a review published in 2006 in this journal, focuses on recent findings on the pharmacokinetics of new-generation AEDs in neonates, infants, children, and the elderly. Significant new information on the pharmacokinetics of new AEDs in the perinatal period has been acquired, particularly for lamotrigine and levetiracetam. As a result of slow maturation of the enzymes involved in glucuronide conjugation, lamotrigine elimination occurs at a particularly slow rate in neonates, and becomes gradually more efficient during the first months of life. In the case of levetiracetam, elimination occurs primarily by renal excretion and is also slow at birth, but drug clearance increases rapidly thereafter and can even double within 1 week. In general, infants older than 2-3 months and children show higher drug clearance (normalized for body weight) than adults. This pattern was confirmed in recent studies that investigated the pediatric pharmacokinetics of several new AEDs, including levetiracetam, rufinamide, stiripentol, and eslicarbazepine acetate. At the other extreme of age, in the elderly, drug clearance is generally reduced compared with younger adults because of less efficient drug-metabolizing activity, decreased renal function, or both. This general pattern, described previously for several AEDs, was confirmed in recent studies on the effect of old age on the clearance of felbamate, levetiracetam, pregabalin, lacosamide, and retigabine. For those drugs which are predominantly eliminated by renal excretion, aging

  18. Further Conceptualization of Treatment Acceptability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Stacy L.

    2008-01-01

    A review and extension of previous conceptualizations of treatment acceptability is provided in light of progress within the area of behavior treatment development and implementation. Factors including legislation, advances in research, and service delivery models are examined as to their relationship with a comprehensive conceptualization of…

  19. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twohig, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    This is the introductory article to a special series in Cognitive and Behavioral Practice on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). Instead of each article herein reviewing the basics of ACT, this article contains that review. This article provides a description of where ACT fits within the larger category of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT):…

  20. Nitrogen trailer acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Kostelnik, A.J.

    1996-02-12

    This Acceptance Test Report documents compliance with the requirements of specification WHC-S-0249. The equipment was tested according to WHC-SD-WM-ATP-108 Rev.0. The equipment being tested is a portable contained nitrogen supply. The test was conducted at Norco`s facility.

  1. Imaginary Companions and Peer Acceptance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleason, Tracy R.

    2004-01-01

    Early research on imaginary companions suggests that children who create them do so to compensate for poor social relationships. Consequently, the peer acceptance of children with imaginary companions was compared to that of their peers. Sociometrics were conducted on 88 preschool-aged children; 11 had invisible companions, 16 had personified…

  2. Euthanasia Acceptance: An Attitudinal Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klopfer, Fredrick J.; Price, William F.

    The study presented was conducted to examine potential relationships between attitudes regarding the dying process, including acceptance of euthanasia, and other attitudinal or demographic attributes. The data of the survey was comprised of responses given by 331 respondents to a door-to-door interview. Results are discussed in terms of preferred…

  3. Helping Our Children Accept Themselves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Mae

    1984-01-01

    Parents of a child with muscular dystrophy recount their reactions to learning of the diagnosis, their gradual acceptance, and their son's resistance, which was gradually lessened when he was provided with more information and treated more normally as a member of the family. (CL)

  4. The Holy Grail of Polymer Therapeutics for Cancer Therapy: An Overview on the Pharmacokinetics and Bio Distribution.

    PubMed

    Dyawanapelly, Sathish; Junnuthula, Vijayabhaskar Reddy; Singh, AkhileshVikram

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, multifaceted clinical benefits of polymeric therapeutics have been reported. Over the past decades, cancer has been one of the leading causes of mortality in the world. Many clinically approved chemotherapeutics encounter potential challenges against deadly cancer. Moreover, safety and efficacy of anticancer agents have been limited by undesirable pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. To address these limitations, various polymer drug conjugates are being studied and developed to improve the antitumor efficacy. Among other therapeutics, polymer therapeutics are well established platforms that circumvent anticancer therapeutics from enzymatic metabolism via direct conjugation to therapeutic molecules. Interestingly, polymer therapeutics meets an unmet need of small molecules. Further clinical study showed that polymer-drug conjugation can achieve desired pharmacokinetics and biodistribution properties of several anticancer drugs. The present retrospective review mainly enlightens the most recent preclinical and clinical studies include safety, stability, pharmacokinetic behavior and distribution of polymer therapeutics.

  5. Pharmacokinetics-pharmacology disconnection of herbal medicines and its potential solutions with cellular pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingwei; Zhou, Fang; Lu, Meng; Ji, Wei; Niu, Fang; Zha, Weibin; Wu, Xiaolan; Hao, Haiping; Wang, Guangji

    2012-06-01

    Recently, there is a global trend of using herbal medicines to treat various chronic diseases and promote health. But the controversy over the safety and efficacy of herbal medicines is a focus of attention, primarily because of the many unknown and unrevealed natures of herbal medicines, which strongly restricts their application and development. Pharmacokinetics is a bridge linking the herbal medicines and their pharmacological responses. It is assumed in traditional pharmacokinetics that an excellent drug should have appropriate pharmacokinetic behaviours and its pharmacological effect is related with plasma drug concentrations. However, most herbal medicines exhibit excellent pharmacological responses despite poor pharmacokinetic behaviours. As most drugs are intracellulartargeted, we put forward cellular pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic strategy, which is focused on the intracellular fate of drugs. This strategy could partially explain the marked pharmacological activities of herbal medicines from their intracellular pharmacokinetic behaviours, rather than their plasma concentrations. It is a helpful complementarity to traditional pharmacokinetics, and takes a potential role in the research and development of new herb-origined drugs. In this review, the pharmacokinetics-pharmacology disconnections of herbal medicines (such as ginseng, berberine and danshen) are retrospected. Then our proposed cellular pharmacokineticpharmacodynamic strategy, its characteristics, as well as its research procedures are described, followed by the subcellular distributions of drug transporters and metabolic enzymes which are the determinants of cellular pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics. Finally, our successful applications of cellular pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic strategy in elucidating ginsenoside Rh2 as an adjuvant agent and tanshinone IIA as an anticancer agent are illustrated.

  6. Pharmacokinetics of oral ketorolac in the rat.

    PubMed

    Granados-Soto, V; Flores-Murrieta, F J

    1995-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ketorolac, a potent analgesic agent used for relief of moderate to severe pain, has been studied in rats who received oral doses of 1, 3.2 or 5.6 mg/kg of ketorolac tromethamine. Blood samples were obtained at selected times during 24 h after medication, and ketorolac concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. After administration of ketorolac, blood concentrations increased rapidly reaching a dose-dependent maximal concentration in about 20 min. Then, concentrations decayed with a half-life of about 6 h. A linear increase in Cmax and AUC as a function of the dose was observed, and not statistically significant difference was observed in AUC/dose or Cmax/dose between doses, indicating that pharmacokinetics of ketorolac is linear in the range of doses studied.

  7. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models for Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Plawecki, Martin H.; Han, Jae-Joon; Doerschuk, Peter C.; Ramchandani, Vijay A.; O'Connor, Sean J.

    2012-01-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models have been used to describe the distribution and elimination of ethanol after intravenous administration. These models have been used to estimate the ethanol infusion profile that is sufficient for achieving a prescribed breath ethanol concentration time course in individuals, providing a useful platform for several pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic investigations. Mathematical foundations of these models are examined, including the derivation of an explicit set of governing equations in the form of a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. These equations can then be used to formulate and refine parameter identification and control strategies. Finally, a framework in which models related to this model can be constructed and analyzed is described. PMID:19126448

  8. Whatever happened to cassette-dosing pharmacokinetics?

    PubMed

    Manitpisitkul, Prasarn; White, Ronald E

    2004-08-01

    Cassette dosing is a procedure that is used for rapidly assessing the pharmacokinetics of a series of discovery drug candidates by dosing a mixture of compounds rather than a single compound. Cassette dosing has advantages and disadvantages associated with its use, which leads to controversy about how and if it should be used. To assess the current practices of the pharmaceutical industry regarding cassette dosing, a survey of several pharmaceutical companies was conducted. Analysis of the survey revealed that opinion on this subject is divided within the pharmaceutical industry. In addition, it was determined that approximately only a half of those companies that perform in vivo pharmacokinetic screening use cassette dosing for this purpose.

  9. Pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of drotaverine in humans.

    PubMed

    Bolaji, O O; Onyeji, C O; Ogundaini, A O; Olugbade, T A; Ogunbona, F A

    1996-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of drotaverine was studied in 10 healthy volunteers after administration of single 80 mg oral and intravenous doses of the HCl salt of the drug, in a crossover fashion. Plasma and urine samples were analyzed for the unchanged drug by HPLC. The pharmacokinetic parameters, such as elimination half-life, plasma clearance, renal clearance and apparent volume of distribution, were not influenced by the route of drug administration. The drug was mainly eliminated by non-renal routes since renal clearance accounted for only 0.31 +/- 0.13% of the total plasma clearance. The absolute bioavailability was variable and ranged from 24.5-91% with a mean of 58.2 +/- 18.2% (mean +/- SD). It is suggested that the high variation in the bioavailability of drotaverine HCl after oral administration may result in significant interindividual differences in therapeutic response.

  10. Tranexamic Acid Mechanisms and Pharmacokinetics in Traumatic Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0373 TITLE: Tranexamic Acid Mechanisms and Pharmacokinetics in Traumatic Injury PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Philip C...Tranexamic Acid Mechanisms and Pharmacokinetics In Traumatic Injury 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0373 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 8 Title: Tranexamic Acid Mechanisms and Pharmacokinetics In Traumatic Injury (TAMPITI Trial

  11. Grammaticality, Acceptability, and Probability: A Probabilistic View of Linguistic Knowledge.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jey Han; Clark, Alexander; Lappin, Shalom

    2016-10-12

    The question of whether humans represent grammatical knowledge as a binary condition on membership in a set of well-formed sentences, or as a probabilistic property has been the subject of debate among linguists, psychologists, and cognitive scientists for many decades. Acceptability judgments present a serious problem for both classical binary and probabilistic theories of grammaticality. These judgements are gradient in nature, and so cannot be directly accommodated in a binary formal grammar. However, it is also not possible to simply reduce acceptability to probability. The acceptability of a sentence is not the same as the likelihood of its occurrence, which is, in part, determined by factors like sentence length and lexical frequency. In this paper, we present the results of a set of large-scale experiments using crowd-sourced acceptability judgments that demonstrate gradience to be a pervasive feature in acceptability judgments. We then show how one can predict acceptability judgments on the basis of probability by augmenting probabilistic language models with an acceptability measure. This is a function that normalizes probability values to eliminate the confounding factors of length and lexical frequency. We describe a sequence of modeling experiments with unsupervised language models drawn from state-of-the-art machine learning methods in natural language processing. Several of these models achieve very encouraging levels of accuracy in the acceptability prediction task, as measured by the correlation between the acceptability measure scores and mean human acceptability values. We consider the relevance of these results to the debate on the nature of grammatical competence, and we argue that they support the view that linguistic knowledge can be intrinsically probabilistic.

  12. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldblatt, Steven M.; Piele, Philip K.

    This chapter reviews 1982 cases related to school property. Cases involving citizen efforts to overturn school board decisions to close schools dominate the property chapter, and courts continue to uphold school board authority to close schools, transfer students, and sell or lease the buildings. Ten cases involving detachment and attachment of…

  13. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickel, Robert D.; Zeller, Trisha A.

    A number of cases related to property issues involving institutions of higher education are examined in this chapter. Cases discussed touch on such topics as funding for property and equipment acquisition; opposition to building construction or demolition; zoning issues; building construction and equipment contracts; and lease agreements. Current…

  14. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.; Johnson, Margaret M.

    This chapter deals with 1981 cases involving disputes over property. Cases involving the detachment and attachment of land continue to dominate the property chapter with 11 cases reported, the same number summarized in last year's chapter. One case involving school board referenda raised the interesting question of whether or not a state could…

  15. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    Chapter 7 of a book on school law, this chapter deals with 1979 cases involving disputes over property. Cases involving taxpayer attempts to prevent the construction of school buildings dominate this year's property chapter, as they did last year's. Yet, paradoxically, there is also a significant increase in cases in which taxpayers tried to…

  16. Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Afatinib.

    PubMed

    Wind, Sven; Schnell, David; Ebner, Thomas; Freiwald, Matthias; Stopfer, Peter

    2017-03-01

    Afatinib is an oral, irreversible ErbB family blocker that covalently binds to the kinase domains of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), human EGFRs (HER) 2, and HER4, resulting in irreversible inhibition of tyrosine kinase autophosphorylation. Studies in healthy volunteers and patients with advanced solid tumours have shown that once-daily afatinib has time-independent pharmacokinetic characteristics. Maximum plasma concentrations of afatinib are reached approximately 2-5 h after oral administration and thereafter decline, at least bi-exponentially. Food reduces total exposure to afatinib. Over the clinical dose range of 20-50 mg, afatinib exposure increases slightly more than dose proportional. Afatinib metabolism is minimal, with unchanged drug predominantly excreted in the faeces and approximately 5 % in urine. Apart from the parent drug afatinib, the major circulation species in human plasma are the covalently bound adducts to plasma protein. The effective elimination half-life is approximately 37 h, consistent with an accumulation of drug exposure by 2.5- to 3.4-fold based on area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) after multiple dosing. The pharmacokinetic profile of afatinib is consistent across a range of patient populations. Age, ethnicity, smoking status and hepatic function had no influence on afatinib pharmacokinetics, while females and patients with low body weight had increased exposure to afatinib. Renal function is correlated with afatinib exposure, but, as for sex and body weight, the effect size for patients with severe renal impairment (approximately 50 % increase in AUC) is only mildly relative to the extent of unexplained interpatient variability in afatinib exposure. Afatinib has a low potential as a victim or perpetrator of drug-drug interactions, especially with cytochrome P450-modulating agents. However, concomitant treatment with potent inhibitors or inducers of the P-glycoprotein transporter can affect the

  17. Pharmacokinetics of Tenofovir During Pregnancy and Postpartum

    PubMed Central

    Best, Brookie M.; Burchett, Sandra; Li, Hong; Stek, Alice; Hu, Chengcheng; Wang, Jiajia; Hawkins, Elizabeth; Byroads, Mark; Watts, D. Heather; Smith, Elizabeth; Fletcher, Courtney V.; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Mirochnick, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Tenofovir disoproxol fumarate (TDF) is increasingly used in HAART regimens of pregnant women, but limited data exist on pregnancy pharmacokinetics of chronically-dosed TDF. This study described tenofovir pharmacokinetics during pregnancy and postpartum. Methods IMPAACT P1026s is a prospective, non-blinded pharmacokinetic study of HIV-infected pregnant women that included a cohort receiving 300 mg TDF once daily. Steady-state 24-hour pharmacokinetic profiles were measured at 2nd and 3rd trimester and postpartum, with maternal and umbilical cord samples at delivery. Tenofovir was measured by LC-MS. The target AUC was ≥ 1.99 mcg•hr/mL (non-pregnant historical control 10th percentile). Results Median tenofovir AUC was decreased during the 2nd (1.9 mcg•hr/mL) and 3rd (2.4 mcg•hr/mL, p=0.005) trimesters versus postpartum (3.0 mcg•hr/mL). Tenofovir AUC exceeded the target for 2/4 (50%) 2nd trimester; 27/37 (73%; 95% CI: 56%, 86%) 3rd trimester; and 27/32 (84%; 95% CI: 67%, 95%) postpartum women (p>0.05). Median 2nd/3rd trimester troughs were lower (39/54 ng/mL) than postpartum (61 ng/mL). Median 3rd trimester weight was heavier for subjects below target AUC versus those above target (97.9 vs. 74.2 kg, p = 0.006). Median ratio of cord blood to maternal concentrations was 0.88. No infants were HIV infected. Conclusions This study found lower tenofovir AUC and troughs during pregnancy. Transplacental passage with chronic TDF use during pregnancy was high. Standard TDF doses appear appropriate for most HIV-infected pregnant women but therapeutic drug monitoring with dose adjustment should be considered in pregnant women with high weight (> 90kg) or inadequate HIV RNA response. PMID:25959631

  18. Pharmacokinetic analysis of cefquinome in healthy chickens.

    PubMed

    Xie, W; Zhang, X; Wang, T; Du, S

    2013-01-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics of cefquinome (CEQ) in chickens was determined after intravenous (IV) and intramuscular (IM) administration of 2 mg/kg body weight. Plasma concentrations were measured by high performance liquid chromatography assay with an ultraviolet detector at 265 nm wavelength. 2. Plasma concentration-time data after IV administration were best fitted by a two-compartment model. The pharmacokinetic parameters following IV injection were distribution half-life 0·43 ± 0·19 h, elimination half-life 1·29 ± 0·10 h, total body clearance 0·35 ± 0·04 l/kg/h, area under curve 5·33 ± 0·55 µg/h/ml and volume of distribution at steady state 0·49 ± 0·05 l/kg. 3. Plasma concentration-time data after IM administration were best described by a two-compartment model. The pharmacokinetic parameters after IM administration were absorption half-life 0·07 ± 0·02 h, distribution half-life 0·58 ± 0·27 h, elimination half-life 1·35 ± 0·20 h, peak concentration 3·04 ± 0·71 µg/ml and bioavailability 95·81 ± 5·81%. 4. Cefquinome kinetics in chicken and data from other species were summarised and analysed to provide a comprehensive understanding of CEQ pharmacokinetics.

  19. Population pharmacokinetics of micafungin in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Gumbo, Tawanda; Hiemenz, John; Ma, Lei; Keirns, James J; Buell, Donald N; Drusano, George L

    2008-03-01

    We performed population pharmacokinetic analysis of micafungin in adult patients treated with doses between 12.5 and 200 mg/day. Our analysis identified a breakpoint patient weight of 66.3 kg above which serum clearance increased by approximately 50%. Patients with weight >66.3 kg may need larger doses to achieve similar exposures to those <66.3 kg. However, the clinical implications are still unknown.

  20. Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism of Allopurinol Riboside,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    095 Pharmacokinetics and metabolism of allopurinol riboside T"ere are no safe and effective oral drugs to treat leishmaniasis and Chagas ’ disease. Thc...leishmaniasis and Chagas ’ disease. 2 .3 typically require muLltiple parenteral doses. are e\\pen- [hese diseases occur in millions of people on a world- sive...40 ° C until analysis. Urine samples and perchloric allopurinol riboside were quantitated (in 85 determina acid extracts of plasma were analyzed for

  1. Pre-formulation characterization and pharmacokinetic evaluation of resveratrol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson-Barnes, Keila Delores

    Resveratrol, a natural compound found in grapes has potential chemotherapy effects but very low oral bioavailability in humans. The objectives of this study are to quantitatively characterized and understand the physiochemical properties and the pharmacokinetic evaluation of resveratrol. Solubility of resveratrol was measured in 10 common solvents at 25°C using HPLC. The solution state pH stability of resveratrol was assessed in various USP buffers ranging from pH 2-10 for 24 hours at 37 °C. Human plasma protein binding was determined using ultracentrifugation technique. Stability of resveratrol in human and rat plasma was also assessed at 37°C. Aliquots of blank plasma were spiked with a standard drug concentration to yield final plasma concentration of 50 mug/mL. Samples were analyzed for resveratrol concentration up to 96 hours. A group (n=8) of jugular vein-cannulated adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were evaluated and received intravenous dose of 20 mg/kg resveratrol. Serial blood samples were collected up to 8 hours after the dose. Plasma concentrations of resveratrol were measured by an established LC-MS/MS method. Pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed using noncompartmental methods. Resveratrol is more soluble in alcohol and PEG-400, and stable in acidic pH. It binds highly to plasma proteins, and degrades slower in human then rat plasma. Resveratrol exhibits bioexponential disposition after intravenous administration and has a short elimination half-life. Resveratrol displays bioexponential disposition following intravenous administration. The estimated mean maximum concentration was 1045.5 ng/mL and rapidly dropped below 100 ng/mL within 30 minutes. The area under the concentration time curve (AUC) for resveratrol was 13888.7 min*ng/mL The mean terminal elimination half-life was 50.9 minutes. The mean total body clearance (Cl) and volume of distribution of trans-resveratrol were 1711.9mL/min/kg and 91087.8 mL/kg, respectively. Pre

  2. Interaction of licorice on glycyrrhizin pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Cantelli-Forti, G; Maffei, F; Hrelia, P; Bugamelli, F; Bernardi, M; D'Intino, P; Maranesi, M; Raggi, M A

    1994-01-01

    The effects of components of aqueous licorice root extract (LE) on the pharmacokinetics of glycyrrhizin (G) and glycyrrhetic acid (GA) were investigated in rats and humans. The aim of this work was to define the role of pharmacokinetics in G toxicity. In the procedure, G and GA were detected in biological fluids by means of recently improved HPLC methods. Significantly lower G and GA plasma levels were found in rats and humans treated with LE compared to the levels obtained with those in which G alone was administered. The pharmacokinetic curves showed significant differences in the areas under the plasma-time curve (AUC), Cmax, and Tmax parameters. The data obtained from urine samples are in agreement with the above results and confirm a reduced bioavailability of G present in LE compared to pure G. This should be attributed to the interaction during intestinal absorption between the G constituent and the several components in LE. The modified bioavailability could explain the various clinical adverse effects resulting from the chronic oral administration of G alone as opposed to LE. PMID:7698088

  3. Clinical pharmacokinetics of levodopa in parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bianchine, J R; Shaw, G M

    1976-01-01

    Although levodopa has provided a major advance in the treatment of parkinsonism, its maximum benefits have not yet been realised, in part because of its complicated pharmacokinetics. This review summarises that available pharmacokinetic data involving levodopa, especially as it relates to therapeutic response of parkinsonian patients. A large number of factors, including protein intake, gastric emptying time, pyridoxine ingestion, and dopa decarboxylase activity, affect plasma levels of levodopa attained following oral administration of this drug. Other variables influence the rate of brain uptake of levodopa from the blood. Even so, plasma levodopa concentration correlates significantly with dosage size in a large parkinsonian population and also coincides with therapeutic response in many, but not all, patients. Therefore, in certain instances, valuable information may be derived by correlating clinical response with plasma levodopa concentration. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of homovanillic acid, a major metabolite of dopamine, may have some value in predicting clinical response to levodopa. This relationship, however, has not been firmly established. Concentration of homovanillic acid or levodopa in body fluids may also be closely related to certain adverse side-effects, including abnormal involuntary movements, gastric discomfort and psychiatric disturbances. Evidence indicates that a clearer understanding of levodopa pharmacokinetics may improve the clinical management of parkinsonism.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of Tyrosol Metabolites in Rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Da-Hye; Kim, Yang-Ji; Kim, Min Jung; Ahn, Jiyun; Ha, Tae-Youl; Lee, Sang Hee; Jang, Young Jin; Jung, Chang Hwa

    2016-01-21

    Tyrosol is considered a potential antioxidant; however, little is known regarding the pharmacokinetics of its metabolites. To study the pharmacokinetics of tyrosol-derived metabolites after oral administration of a single dose of tyrosol, we attempted to identify tyrosol metabolites in rat plasma by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS). Two tyrosol metabolites (M1 and M2) were detected in the plasma. M1 was identified as tyrosol-4-sulfate (T4S) with an [M - H](-) ion at m/z 217. While M2 showed an [M - H](-) ion at m/z 151.0, its metabolite was not identified. Pharmacokinetic analysis of T4S and M2 showed rapid uptake after oral administration of tyrosol within 1 h. The metabolites were rapidly distributed in most organs and tissues and eliminated within 4 h. The greatest T4S deposition by tissue weight was observed in the liver, followed by the kidney and spleen, while M2 was most concentrated in the kidney followed by the liver and spleen. These findings indicate that T4S and M2 were distributed mainly in tissues with an abundant blood supply and were rapidly excreted in urine.

  5. Ethanol Pharmacokinetics in Neonates and Infants

    PubMed Central

    Marek, Elizabeth; Kraft, Walter K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ethanol has been used for years in neonatal and infant liquid medications, yet the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of ethanol in this vulnerable population have not been well characterized. The purpose of this review is to raise awareness of ethanol use as an excipient in neonatal and infant medications and to provide insight, based on the available evidence, into clearance rates of ethanol in babies. We also discuss ethanol pharmacokinetics in adults, theoretical pharmacokinetic changes in neonates and infants as it may apply to ethanol disposition, and case reports involving ethanol exposure in neonates and infants. Materials and methods This study was a narrative review in which relevant papers were selected using databases and scientific search engines such as PubMed with the key words ethanol, infant, and newborninfant. Results It remains unclear what ethanol exposure is safe for neonates and infants. The Food and Drug Administration and American Academy of Pediatrics have both taken action, by either setting limits of ethanol content in over-the-counter medications or by recommending restricted exposure to ethanol-containing pediatric formulations. Conclusions Until the short- and long-term health effects of chronic ethanol administration can be further characterized, ethanol-containing medications should be used with caution. PMID:25379066

  6. Pharmacokinetics of oral terbinafine in adult horses.

    PubMed

    Younkin, T J; Davis, E G; Kukanich, B

    2016-11-24

    The primary study objective was to compare the pharmacokinetics of p.o. terbinafine alone to p.o. terbinafine administered with p.o. cimetidine in healthy adult horses. The second objective was to assess the pharmacokinetics of terbinafine when administered per rectum in two different suspensions at 30 mg/kg to adult horses. Six healthy adult horses were included in this crossover study. Plasma terbinafine concentrations were quantified with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. The half-life (geometric mean) was 8.38 and 10.76 h, for p.o. alone and p.o. with cimetidine, respectively. The mean maximum plasma concentrations were 0.291 μg/mL at 1.54 h and 0.418 μg/mL at 1.28 h for p.o. alone and p.o. with cimetidine, respectively. Terbinafine with cimetidine had an average CMAX 44% higher and the relative F was 153% compared p.o. terbinafine alone, but was not statistically different (P > 0.05). Terbinafine was infrequently detected when administered per rectum in two different suspensions (water or olive oil). Minor adverse effects included oral irritation, fever, and colic. All resolved spontaneously. More pharmacokinetic studies are indicated assessing drug-drug interactions and using multiple dosing intervals to improve our knowledge of effective oral dosing, the potential for drug accumulation, and systemic adverse effect of terbinafine in horses.

  7. Predictive Performance of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Renally Cleared Drugs in Children

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, W; Johnson, TN; Xu, H; Cheung, SYA; Bui, KH; Li, J; Al‐Huniti, N

    2016-01-01

    Predictive performance of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) and population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) models of drugs predominantly eliminated through kidney in the pediatric population was evaluated. After optimization using adult clinical data, the verified PBPK models can predict 33 of 34 drug clearance within twofold of the observed values in children 1 month and older. More specifically, 10 of 11 of predicted clearance values were within 1.5‐fold of those observed in children between 1 month and 2 years old. The PopPK approach also predicted 19 of 21 drug clearance within twofold of the observed values in children. In summary, our analysis demonstrated both PBPK and PopPK adult models, after verification with additional adult pharmacokinetic (PK) studies and incorporation of known ontogeny of renal filtration, could be applied for dosing regimen recommendation in children 1 month and older for renally eliminated drugs in a first‐in‐pediatric study. PMID:27566992

  8. Bioequivalence studies of omnitrope, the first biosimilar/rhGH follow-on protein: two comparative phase 1 randomized studies and population pharmacokinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Stanhope, Richard; Sörgel, Fritz; Gravel, Patricia; Pannatier Schuetz, Yannic B; Zabransky, Markus; Muenzberg, Michael

    2010-11-01

    This article discusses the bioequivalence of Omnitrope (Sandoz's rhGH biosimilar) and Genotropin (reference rhGH product), assessed in the first 2 clinical phase 1 studies conducted during the development of Omnitrope. Both of these phase 1 studies were randomized, double-blind, crossover studies, each involving 24 healthy volunteers who underwent pituitary somatrope cell down-regulation using octreotide. Three different formulations of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) were compared: Omnitrope lyophilisate, Omnitrope liquid and Genotropin (lyophilized powder for injection). Both pharmacokinetics (area under the curve [AUC], C(max), t(max) and t(1/2)) and pharmacodynamics (serum levels of insulin-like growth factor 1, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 and non-esterified fatty acid) were assessed after a single subcutaneous injection of 5 mg rhGH. The 3 formulations had comparable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. All the 90% confidence intervals of the ratios of the least squares means for the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters AUC and C(max) were within the predefined FDA and EMEA acceptance range of 80%-125% for bioequivalence. In addition, a comparative population pharmacokinetic analysis further supports that Omnitrope lyophilisate, Omnitrope liquid and Genotropin can be regarded as equivalent in terms of pharmacokinetics. Therefore, Omnitrope lyophilisate was demonstrated to be bioequivalent to both Genotropin and the Omnitrope liquid formulation.

  9. Acceptability of reactors in space

    SciTech Connect

    Buden, D.

    1981-01-01

    Reactors are the key to our future expansion into space. However, there has been some confusion in the public as to whether they are a safe and acceptable technology for use in space. The answer to these questions is explored. The US position is that when reactors are the preferred technical choice, that they can be used safely. In fact, it does not appear that reactors add measurably to the risk associated with the Space Transportation System.

  10. Acceptability of reactors in space

    SciTech Connect

    Buden, D.

    1981-04-01

    Reactors are the key to our future expansion into space. However, there has been some confusion in the public as to whether they are a safe and acceptable technology for use in space. The answer to these questions is explored. The US position is that when reactors are the preferred technical choice, that they can be used safely. In fact, it dies not appear that reactors add measurably to the risk associated with the Space Transportation System.

  11. Pharmacokinetics of orally administered oseltamivir in healthy obese and nonobese Thai subjects.

    PubMed

    Jittamala, Podjanee; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Tarning, Joel; Lindegardh, Niklas; Hanpithakpong, Warunee; Taylor, Walter Robert John; Lawpoolsri, Saranath; Charunwattana, Prakaykaew; Panapipat, Salwaluk; White, Nicholas J; Day, Nicholas P J

    2014-01-01

    Oseltamivir is the most widely used anti-influenza drug. In the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, in which the influenza viruses were oseltamivir sensitive, obesity was identified as a risk factor for severe disease and unfavorable outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic properties of oseltamivir and its active metabolite, oseltamivir carboxylate, in obese and nonobese healthy subjects. A single-dose, randomized, two-sequence crossover study was conducted in 12 obese and 12 nonobese healthy Thai volunteers. Each volunteer was given 75 mg and 150 mg oseltamivir orally with an intervening washout period of more than 3 days. The pharmacokinetic properties of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate were evaluated using a noncompartmental approach. The median (range) body mass indexes (BMIs) for obese subjects were 33.8 kg/m(2) (30.8 to 43.2) and 22.2 (18.8 to 24.2) for nonobese subjects. The pharmacokinetic parameters of oseltamivir carboxylate, the active metabolite of oseltamivir, were not significantly different between obese and nonobese subjects for both 75-mg and 150-mg doses. Both doses were well tolerated. Despite the lower dose per kilogram body weight in obese subjects, there was no significant difference in the exposure of oseltamivir carboxylate between the obese and nonobese groups. Standard dosing is appropriate for obese subjects. (The study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT 01049763.).

  12. Pharmacokinetic profile of phytoconstituent(s) isolated from medicinal plants—A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Piyush; Shah, Rishi; Lohidasan, Sathiyanarayanan; Mahadik, K.R.

    2015-01-01

    Herbal medicine, the backbone of traditional medicine, has played an important role in human health and welfare for a long period. Traditional therapeutic approaches of regional significance are found in Africa, South and Central America, China, India, Tibet, Indonesia, and the Pacific Islands. The considerable scientific significance and commercial potential of traditional medicines have resulted in increased international attention and global market demands for herbal medicines, especially Chinese herbal medicines. Herbal medicines currently are the primary form of health care for the poor in the developing countries, and also are widely used as a supplement or substitute for conventional drugs in developed countries. These traditional medicines have a pivotal role in the treatment of various ailments and more than 50% of drugs used in Western pharmacopoeia are isolated from herbs or derived from modifications of chemicals found in plants. Herbal medicines usually contain a complex mixture of various bioactive molecules, which make its standardization complicated, and there is little information about all compounds responsible for pharmacological activity. Several research papers have been published that claim pharmacological activity of herbal medicines but few are discussing the role of the exact phytoconstituent. Understanding the pharmacokinetic profile of such phytoconstituents is essential. Although there are research papers that deal with pharmacokinetic properties of phytoconstituents, there are a number of phytoconstituents yet to be explored for their kinetic properties. This article reviews the pharmacokinetic profile of 50 different therapeutically effective traditional medicinal plants from the year 2003 onward. PMID:26587392

  13. Pharmacokinetics of 2 Formulations of Transdermal Fentanyl in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Amy M; Kelly, Richard; Fetterer, David P; Rico, Pedro J; Bailey, Emily J

    2016-01-01

    Fentanyl is a μ-opioid agonist that often is used as the analgesic component for balanced anesthesia in both human and veterinary patients. Minimal information has been published regarding appropriate dosing, and the pharmacokinetics of fentanyl are unknown in NHP. The pharmacokinetic properties of 2 transdermal fentanyl delivery methods, a solution (2.6 and 1.95 mg/kg) and a patch (25 µg/h), were determined when applied topically to the dorsal scapular area of cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Serum fentanyl concentrations were analyzed by using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. Compared with the patch, the transdermal fentanyl solution generated higher drug concentrations over longer time. Adverse reactions occurred in the macaques that received the transdermal fentanyl solution at 2.6 mg/kg. Both preparations showed significant interanimal variability in the maximal serum drug levels, time to achieve maximal fentanyl levels, elimination half-life, and AUC values. Both the maximal concentration and the time at which this concentration occurred were increased in macaques compared with most other species after application of the transdermal fentanyl patch and compared with dogs after application of the transdermal fentanyl solution. The pharmacokinetic properties of transdermal fentanyl in macaques are markedly different from those in other veterinary species and preclude its use as a long-acting analgesic drug in NHP. PMID:27423151

  14. 41 CFR 101-27.506 - Determination of acceptability for credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.5-Return of GSA Stock Items § 101-27.506 Determination of acceptability for credit... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Determination of acceptability for credit. 101-27.506 Section 101-27.506 Public Contracts and Property Management...

  15. Terbinafine pharmacokinetics after single dose oral administration in the dog.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Mary R; May, Elizabeth R; Imerman, Paula M; Felz, Charles; Day, Timothy A; Carlson, Steve A; Noxon, James O

    2011-12-01

    Terbinafine is an allylamine antifungal prescribed for the treatment of mycoses in humans. It is increasingly being used in veterinary patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic properties of terbinafine in dogs after a single oral dose. Ten healthy adult dogs were included in the study. A single dose of terbinafine (30-35 mg/kg) was administered orally, and blood samples were periodically collected over a 24 h period during which dogs were monitored for adverse effects. Two of 10 dogs developed transient ocular changes. A high-performance liquid chromatography assay was developed and used to determine plasma terbinafine concentrations. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using PK Solutions(®) computer software. Area under the curve (AUC) from time 0 to 24 h was 15.4 μg·h/mL (range 5-27), maximal plasma concentration (C(max) ) was 3.5 μg/mL (range 3-4.9 μg/mL) and time to C(max) (T(max) ) was 3.6 h (range 2-6 h). The time above minimal inhibitory concentration (T > MIC) as well as AUC/MIC was calculated for important invasive fungal pathogens and dermatophytes. The T > MIC was 17-18 h for Blastomyces dermatitidis, Histoplasma capsulatum and dermatophytes (Microsporum spp. and Trichophyton mentagrophytes), while the MIC for Sporothrix schenckii and Coccidioides immitis was exceeded for 9.5-11 h. The AUC/MIC values ranged from 9 to 13 μg h/mL for these fungi. Our results provide evidence supporting the use of terbinafine as an oral therapeutic agent for treating systemic and subcutaneous mycoses in dogs.

  16. Pharmacokinetics of quercetin-loaded nanodroplets with ultrasound activation and their use for bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Li-Wen; Hou, Mei-Ling; Hung, Shuo-Hui; Lin, Lie-Chwen; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2015-01-01

    Bubble formulations have both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. However, research on nanobubbles/nanodroplets remains in the initial stages. In this study, a nanodroplet formulation was prepared and loaded with a novel class of chemotherapeutic drug, ie, quercetin, to observe its pharmacokinetic properties and ultrasonic bioimaging of specific sites, namely the abdominal vein and bladder. Four parallel groups were designed to investigate the effects of ultrasound and nanodroplets on the pharmacokinetics of quercetin. These groups were quercetin alone, quercetin triggered with ultrasound, quercetin-encapsulated in nanodroplets, and quercetin encapsulated in nanodroplets triggered with ultrasound. Spherical vesicles with a mean diameter of 280 nm were formed, and quercetin was completely encapsulated within. In vivo ultrasonic imaging confirmed that the nanodroplets could be treated by ultrasound. The results indicate that the initial 5-minute serum concentration, area under the concentration–time curve, elimination half-life, and clearance of quercetin were significantly enhanced by nanodroplets with or without ultrasound. PMID:25945049

  17. Antimicrobial pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic issues in the critically ill with severe sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Julie M; Roberts, Jason A; Lipman, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) are important considerations, particularly in critically ill patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. The pathophysiologic changes that occur in these conditions can have a major effect on pharmacokinetic parameters, which in turn could result in failure to achieve pharmacodynamic targets for antimicrobials thus adversely affecting clinical outcome. This paper discusses the pathophysiologic changes that occur during severe sepsis and septic shock and the consequent effects on antimicrobial PK and PD. The effect of PK/PD on specific antimicrobial classes is discussed and a rational framework for antimicrobial dosing is provided. Knowledge of PK/PD properties of antimicrobials can be used to personalize dosing regimens not only to maximize antimicrobial activity but also to minimize toxicity and reduce the development of antimicrobial resistance.

  18. Pharmacokinetics and tolerance of nicotinamide combined with radiation therapy in patients with glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Cartei, F; Danesi, R; Ducci, F; Fatigante, L; Caciagli, P G; Tacca, M; Laddaga, M

    1994-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic properties of nicotinamide and its tolerance were studied in seven patients affected by glioblastoma multiforme and treated with two fractions per day of radiation therapy. Nicotinamide was given orally at two daily doses of 4 g and then 2 g separated by a 6-h-interval. The treatment was well tolerated in almost all patients and had no effect on blood pressure, cardiac rhythm or body temperature. Pharmacokinetic analysis showed peak plasma levels (Cmax) above 100 mg/l 45 minutes after the administration of both doses. This was followed by a biexponential decay of plasma concentrations with a thermal half life of 9.4h. Tumours were irradiated 1 hour after each drug dose to match with drug Cmax in plasma, and although it is too early to evaluate the tumour response, the drug levels achieved should be sufficient to improve radiation therapy.

  19. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a new reformulated microemulsion and the long-chain triglyceride emulsion of propofol in beagle dogs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S-H; Ghim, J-L; Song, M-H; Choi, H-G; Choi, B-M; Lee, H-M; Lee, E-K; Roh, Y-J; Noh, G-J

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Microemulsion propofol was developed to eliminate lipid solvent-related adverse events of long-chain triglyceride emulsion (LCT) propofol. We compared dose proportionality, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of both formulations. Experimental approach: The study was a randomized, two-period and crossover design with 7-day wash-out period. Microemulsion and LCT propofol were administered by zero-order infusion (0.75, 1.00 and 1.25 mg·kg−1·min−1) for 20 min in 30 beagle dogs (male/female = 5/5 for each rate). Arterial samples were collected at preset intervals. The electroencephalographic approximate entropy (ApEn) was used as a measure of propofol effect. Dose proportionality, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic bioequivalence were evaluated by non-compartmental analyses. Population analysis was performed using nonlinear mixed effects modelling. Key results: Both formulations showed dose proportionality at the applied dose range. The ratios of geometric means of AUClast and AUCinf between both formulations were acceptable for bioequivalence, whereas that of Cmax was not. The pharmacodynamic bioequivalence was indicated by the arithmetic means of AAC (areas above the ApEn time curves) and E0 (baseline ApEn)–Emax (maximally decreased ApEn) between both formulations. The pharmacokinetics of both formulations were best described by three compartment models. Body weight was a significant covariate for V1 of both formulations and sex for k21 of microemulsion propofol. The blood-brain equilibration rate constants (ke0, min−1) were 0.476 and 0.696 for microemulsion and LCT propofol respectively. Conclusions and implications: Microemulsion propofol was pharmacodynamically bioequivalent to LCT propofol although pharmacokinetic bioequivalence was incomplete, and demonstrated linear pharmacokinetics at the applied dose ranges. PMID:19925493

  20. Population Pharmacokinetics of Benznidazole in Adult Patients with Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aldasoro, E.; Guerrero, L.; Posada, E.; Serret, N.; Mejía, T.; Urbina, J. A.; Gascón, J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to build a population pharmacokinetic (popPK) model to characterize benznidazole (BNZ) pharmacokinetics in adults with chronic Chagas disease. This study was a prospective, open-label, single-center clinical trial approved by the local ethics committee. Patients received BNZ at 2.5 mg/kg of body weight/12 h (Abarax, Elea Laboratory, Argentina) for 60 days. Plasma BNZ samples were taken several times during the study and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV-visible detection (HPLC-UV). The popPK analysis was done with NONMEMv.7.3. Demographic and biological data were tested as covariates. Intraindividual, interoccasion, and residual variabilities were modeled. Internal and external validations were completed to assess the robustness of the model. Later on, simulations were performed to generate BNZ concentration-time course profiles for different dosage regimens. A total of 358 plasma BNZ concentrations from 39 patients were included in the analysis. A one-compartment PK model characterized by clearance (CL/F) and the apparent volume of distribution (V/F), with first-order absorption (Ka) and elimination, adequately described the data (CL/F, 1.73 liters/h; V/F, 89.6 liters; and Ka, 1.15 h−1). No covariates were found to be significant for CL/F and V/F. Internal and external validations of the final model showed adequate results. Data from simulations revealed that a dose of 2.5 mg/kg/12 h might lead to overexposure in most patients. A lower dose (2.5 mg/kg/24 h) was able to achieve trough BNZ plasma concentrations within the accepted therapeutic range of 3 to 6 mg/liter. In summary, we developed a population PK model for BNZ in adults with chronic Chagas disease. Dosing simulations showed that a BNZ dose of 2.5 mg/kg/24 h will adequately keep BNZ trough plasma concentrations within the recommended target range for the majority of patients. (This study has been registered at EudraCT under number 2011

  1. Pharmacokinetics of chlorogenic acid and corydaline in DA-9701, a new botanical gastroprokinetic agent, in rats.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji Won; Kim, Ju Myung; Jeong, Jin Seok; Son, Miwon; Lee, Hye Suk; Lee, Myung Gull; Kang, Hee Eun

    2014-07-01

    1.Few studies describing the pharmacokinetic properties of chlorogenic acid (CA) and corydaline (CRD) which are marker compounds of a new prokinetic botanical agent, DA-9701, have been reported. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the pharmacokinetic properties CA and CRD following intravenous and oral administration of pure CA (1-8 mg/kg) or CRD (1.1-4.5 mg/kg) and their equivalent dose of DA-9701 to rats. 2.  Dose-proportional AUC and dose-independent clearance (10.3-12.1 ml/min/kg) of CA were observed following its administration. Oral administration of CA as DA-9701 did not influence the oral pharmacokinetic parameters of CA. Incomplete absorption of CA, its decomposition in the gastrointestinal tract, and/or pre-systemic metabolism resulted in extremely low oral bioavailability (F) of CA (0.478-0.899%). 3.  CRD showed greater dose-normalized AUC in the higher dose group than that in lower dose group(s) after its administration due to saturation of its metabolism via decreased non-renal clearance (by 51.3%) and first-pass extraction. As a result, the F of CRD following 4.5 mg/kg oral CRD (21.1%) was considerably greater than those of the lower dose groups (9.10 and 13.8%). However, oral administration of CRD as DA-9701 showed linear pharmacokinetics as a result of increased AUC and F in lower-dose groups (by 182% and 78.5%, respectively) compared to those of pure CRD. The greater oral AUC of CRD for DA-9701 than for pure CRD could be due to decreased hepatic and/or GI first-pass extraction of CRD by other components in DA-9701.

  2. Developing a New Instrument for Assessing Acceptance of Change

    PubMed Central

    Di Fabio, Annamaria; Gori, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the usefulness of going beyond the concept of resistance to change and capitalizing on the use of a model that includes positivity and acceptance of change. We first discuss the theoretical background of this new construct in the work and organizational fields and then evaluate the psychometric properties of a new measure for assessing acceptance of change. The results of exploratory factor analysis indicated a factor structure with five principal dimensions; besides confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) goodness of fit indices indicated a good fit of the model to the data. All the dimensions showed good values of internal consistency. The results of the present study indicate that the Acceptance of Change Scale (ACS) is a brief and easily administered instrument with good psychometric properties that can promote the development of clients' strengths and the growth of a sense of Self, thereby helping them choose their own way without losing any opportunities in their lives and their work. PMID:27303356

  3. Axelrod model: accepting or discussing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybiec, Bartlomiej; Mitarai, Namiko; Sneppen, Kim

    2012-10-01

    Agents building social systems are characterized by complex states, and interactions among individuals can align their opinions. The Axelrod model describes how local interactions can result in emergence of cultural domains. We propose two variants of the Axelrod model where local consensus is reached either by listening and accepting one of neighbors' opinion or two agents discuss their opinion and achieve an agreement with mixed opinions. We show that the local agreement rule affects the character of the transition between the single culture and the multiculture regimes.

  4. Measuring Attitudes toward Acceptable and Unacceptable Parenting Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budd, Karen S.; Behling, Steven; Li, Yan; Parikshak, Sangeeta; Gershenson, Rachel A.; Feuer, Rachel; Danko, Christina M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the properties of a new rating instrument, the Parenting Questionnaire (PQ), designed to measure attitudes about acceptable and unacceptable parenting practices. In Study 1, subject matter experts representing culturally diverse psychologists, parents, and college students were consulted to identify 110 items receiving high…

  5. 46 CFR 164.120-7 - Acceptance criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Fire Retardant Resins for Lifeboats and Rescue Boats § 164.120-7 Acceptance... Lifesaving Equipment 1 Property Test methods (c) Material Identification Tests 2 (1) Uncatalyzed Liquid...

  6. Clinical pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in new drug development: the capecitabine experience.

    PubMed

    Blesch, Karen S; Gieschke, Ronald; Tsukamoto, Yuko; Reigner, Bruno G; Burger, Hans U; Steimer, Jean-Louis

    2003-05-01

    Preclinical studies, along with Phase I, II, and III clinical trials demonstrate the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety and efficacy of a new drug under well controlled circumstances in relatively homogeneous populations. However, these types of studies generally do not answer important questions about variability in specific factors that predict pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PKPD) activity, in turn affecting safety and efficacy. Semi-physiological and clinical PKPD modeling and simulation offer the possibility of utilizing data obtained in the laboratory and the clinic to make accurate characterizations and predictions of PKPD activity in the target population, based on variability in predictive factors. Capecitabine is an orally administered pro-drug of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), designed to exploit tissue-specific differences in metabolic enzyme activities in order to enhance efficacy and safety. It undergoes extensive metabolism in multiple physiologic compartments, and presents particular challenges for predicting pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic activity in humans. Clinical and physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) and pharmacodynamic models were developed to characterize the activity of capecitabine and its metabolites, and the clinical consequences under varying physiological conditions such as creatinine clearance or activity of key metabolic enzymes. The results of the modeling investigations were consistent with capecitabine's rational design as a triple pro-drug of 5-FU. This paper reviews and discusses the PKPD and PBPK modeling approaches used in capecitabine development to provide a more thorough understanding of what the key predictors of its PBPK activity are, and how variability in these predictors may affect its PKPD, and ultimately, clinical outcomes.

  7. KINPLOT: An Interactive Pharmacokinetics Graphics Program for Digital Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Robert C.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Inability to see the relevance of mathematics to understanding the time course of drugs in the body may discourage interest in pharmacokinetics. A UNC-developed computer graphics simulation program helps visualize the nature of pharmacokinetic-patient interactions, generates classroom handouts, and is used in the pharmaceuticals industry to…

  8. Multiple-Dose Pharmacokinetics of Fluvoxamine in Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labellarte, Michael; Biederman, Joseph; Emslie, Graham; Ferguson, James; Khan, Arifulla; Ruckle, Jon; Sallee, Randy; Riddle, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the pharmacokinetics of fluvoxamine in children and adolescents and to compare pharmacokinetic data from adolescents to adults from a previous study. Method: Fluvoxamine was titrated to a target dose of 100 mg b.i.d. in children (6-11 years) and 150 mg b.i.d. in adolescents (12-17 years) with obsessive-compulsive disorder…

  9. PHARMACOKINETIC/PHARMACODYNAMIC MODELING OF PERMETHRIN IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was used to describe pharmacokinetics of permethrin and calibrated using experimental data on the concentration time-course of cis- and trans-permethrin in rat blood and brain tissues following oral administration...

  10. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    Numerous cases in this year's chapter dealt with the same topics of previous years--contracts and bids for building construction, and detachment and annexation of a portion of a school district. The courts continued to attribute board discretionary authority to school boards in school property matters. Intergovernmental disputes over ownership or…

  11. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.; Forsberg, James R.

    This chapter summarizes and analyze all state supreme court and federal court decisions as well as other significant court decisions involving school property. The cases discussed are generally limited to those decided during 1974 and reported in the General Digest on or before March 1, 1975. In their discussion, the authors attempt to integrate…

  12. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    A review of cases involving higher education property matters shows that many are concerned with building construction, equipment installation, or repair contracts. A number of other cases involve routine conflicts between colleges or universities and other governmental entities over matters such as requests for special exceptions to zoning…

  13. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.; Forsberg, James R.

    This chapter summarizes recent state supreme court and federal court decisions involving school property. The cases discussed are generally limited to those decided during 1975 and reported in the General Digest as of March 1976. In their discussion, the authors attempt to integrate related cases and to illuminate any unifying legal principles…

  14. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    Reflecting widespread unhappiness with the growing tax burdens in this country, the most active area of litigation reported in the property chapter this year involves various attempts by taxpayers to prevent the construction or remodeling of public school facilities. While some taxpayers fought to keep schools from being built, others in New York…

  15. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    The author notes that controversies over construction bids and contracts continue to represent the largest number of property cases reported in this year's chapter. Most of these cases are routine disputes between colleges or universities and contractors over such issues as the return of bid bonds, recovery of additional costs for construction…

  16. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.; Johnson, Margaret M.

    While the number of cases dealing with school property issues was significantly lower than in previous years, a significant number of cases involving the detachment and attachment of land to school districts arose. Eight of the eleven cases dealing with land detachment come from Illinois. The cases concerned requests from parents that their…

  17. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.; Forsberg, James R.

    While the types of cases reported in this year's chapter are essentially the same as those reported in last year's, the number of certain types of cases have changed--in some instances significantly. For example, the number of cases raising constitutional issues in the areas of school construction, location, and property use have declined. On the…

  18. Insights into drug discovery from natural medicines using reverse pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Hao, Haiping; Zheng, Xiao; Wang, Guangji

    2014-04-01

    Natural medicines (NMs) are indispensable sources for the development of modern drugs. However, the targets for most natural compounds are unknown and the current pharmacokinetic evaluation systems developed for target-defined drugs may not be directly applicable to NM-based drug discovery, which is a major hindrance in bringing natural compounds to the clinic. Here, we propose the concept of 'reverse pharmacokinetics' and discuss how a 'reverse pharmacokinetics' perspective could help clarify key questions in modern drug discovery from NMs with validated clinical benefits, thereby strengthening the translational potential. Reverse pharmacokinetics can provide physiologically relevant clues to the target identification and mechanistic study of NMs, which may also innovate drug discovery for complex diseases. We anticipate that an evolving deep understanding of the novel mode of action of natural compounds with a reverse pharmacokinetic insight may improve discovery of both single ingredient and multiple-component modern drugs from NMs.

  19. A Pharmacokinetics Module Taught Within a Pediatrics Pharmacotherapy Course

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Roxane

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To review the effectiveness of a pedagogical approach and methods used to teach pediatric pharmacokinetics to a large class of pharmacy students in a required course in the third-year of a bachelor of science in pharmacy program. Design. The pharmacokinetic sessions emphasized facilitating student understanding of the basic pharmacokinetic principles learned in earlier courses and applying that knowledge to pediatric case scenarios. This was accomplished using lectures with PowerPoint slides followed by small-group, context-focused discussions that required students to apply the principles outlined in the lecture. Evaluation. Student understanding of the pharmacokinetics concepts discussed within the course was assessed via a written examination. Conclusion. The small-group context-focused approach to teaching pediatric pharmacokinetics in a large class size with minimal resources allowed opportunities for students to apply their foundational knowledge in an interactive and engaging atmosphere. PMID:23966729

  20. Pharmacokinetics and absolute bioavailability of phenobarbital in neonates and young infants, a population pharmacokinetic modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Marsot, Amélie; Brevaut-Malaty, Véronique; Vialet, Renaud; Boulamery, Audrey; Bruguerolle, Bernard; Simon, Nicolas

    2014-08-01

    Phenobarbital is widely used for treatment of neonatal seizures. Its optimal use in neonates and young infants requires information regarding pharmacokinetics. The objective of this study is to characterize the absolute bioavailability of phenobarbital in neonates and young infants, a pharmacokinetic parameter which has not yet been investigated. Routine clinical pharmacokinetic data were retrospectively collected from 48 neonates and infants (weight: 0.7-10 kg; patient's postnatal age: 0-206 days; GA: 27-42 weeks) treated with phenobarbital, who were administered as intravenous or suspension by oral routes and hospitalized in a paediatric intensive care unit. Total mean dose of 4.6 mg/kg (3.1-10.6 mg/kg) per day was administered by 30-min infusion or by oral route. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using a nonlinear mixed-effect population model software). Data were modelled with an allometric pharmacokinetic model, using three-fourths scaling exponent for clearance (CL). The population typical mean [per cent relative standard error (%RSE)] values for CL, apparent volume of distribution (Vd ) and bioavailability (F) were 0.0054 L/H/kg (7%), 0.64 L/kg (15%) and 48.9% (22%), respectively. The interindividual variability of CL, Vd , F (%RSE) and residual variability (%RSE) was 17% (31%), 50% (27%), 39% (27%) and 7.2 mg/L (29%), respectively. The absolute bioavailability of phenobarbital in neonates and infants was estimated. The dose should be increased when switching from intravenous to oral administration.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of chlorpromazine and key metabolites.

    PubMed

    Yeung, P K; Hubbard, J W; Korchinski, E D; Midha, K K

    1993-01-01

    A study was carried out in 11 healthy young men to investigate the pharmacokinetics of chlorpromazine (CPZ) after a bolus intravenous (i.v.) dose (10 mg) and three single oral doses (25, 50 and 100 mg), with a washout period of two weeks between doses. Plasma levels of CPZ, CPZ N-oxide (CPZNO), CPZ sulfoxide (CPZSO) and both free and conjugated 7-hydroxy-CPZ (7-HOCPZ) were measured by extraction radioimmunoassays. CPZ exhibited multicompartmental pharmacokinetics in most subjects. There was wide between-subject variability in half life (11.05 h), volume of distribution (1215 l), volume of distribution at steady state (642 l) and mean residence time (8.88 h), whereas systemic clearance was somewhat less variable (76.6 l.h-1). All metabolites were present in measurable concentrations in the plasma of 9 of 11 subjects after i.v. CPZ, whereas free 7-HOCPZ was not detected in the other 2 individuals. With the exception of CPZNO, the biological half lives of the primary metabolites were longer than the half life of CPZ. After oral administration, the percentage of CPZ reaching the systemic circulation intact (F%) was very low (4-38%) and dose dependent. Moreover, both within-subject and between-subject variances were very high. The maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the plasma concentration versus time curve extrapolated to infinite time (AUC) showed evidence of nonlinearity, whereas half life did not appear to be dose dependent. These data suggest that the high degree of variability in the pharmacokinetics of CPZ is a result of extensive first pass metabolism rather than variation in half life.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. The pharmacokinetics of meloxicam in vultures.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, V; Wolter, K; Cromarty, A D; Bartels, P; Bekker, L; McGaw, L; Taggart, M A; Cuthbert, R; Swan, G E

    2008-04-01

    Vulture populations across the Asian subcontinent have declined dramatically in the last 15 years and are now on the verge of extinction. Although the cause of the population decline was initially unknown, the decrease has recently been conclusively linked to the use of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac in cattle that inadvertently ended up in the vulture food chain. With the vulture numbers continuing to decline by up to 48% a year, the Indian, Nepali and Pakistan governments have recently banned the manufacture and importation of veterinary diclofenac. They have also suggested meloxicam as an alternate anti-inflammatory for use in cattle. This recommendation was based on extensive acute safety studies in the African White-backed vulture (Gyps africanus), which evaluated worst case scenarios of maximum intake based on a once in three day feeding pattern. However, the possible cumulative pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in vultures receiving multiple daily doses of meloxicam over time were not assessed. At present very little pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic information is available to add further support for the safety of meloxicam in this animal species. This article discusses the oral and intramuscular pharmacokinetics of meloxicam in Cape Griffon vultures (Gyps coprotheres). Therapeutic drug monitoring was also undertaken in White-backed, Egyptian (Neophron pernopterus) and one Lappet Faced vulture (Torgos tracheliotos). In all these species, meloxicam was characterized by a short half-life of elimination. The rapid metabolism of meloxicam in combination with a short duration of effect in the studied species Gyps vultures shown in this study makes it unlikely that the drug could accumulate. This confirms the safety of repeated exposure to meloxicam in vultures of this genus.

  3. Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Lenalidomide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nianhang; Zhou, Simon; Palmisano, Maria

    2017-02-01

    Lenalidomide is a lead therapeutic in multiple myeloma and deletion 5q myelodysplastic syndromes and shows promising activities in other hematologic malignancies. This article presents a comprehensive review of the clinical pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of lenalidomide. Oral lenalidomide is rapidly and highly absorbed (>90 % of dose) under fasting conditions. Food affects oral absorption, reducing area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) by 20 % and maximum concentration (C max) by 50 %. The increase in AUC and C max is dose proportional, and interindividual variability in plasma exposure is low to moderate. Lenalidomide distributes into semen but is undetectable 3 days after stopping treatment. Biotransformation of lenalidomide in humans includes chiral inversion, trivial hydroxylation, and slow non-enzymatic hydrolysis. Approximately 82 % of an oral dose is excreted as lenalidomide in urine within 24 h. Lenalidomide has a short half-life (3-4 h) and does not accumulate in plasma upon repeated dosing. Its pharmacokinetics are consistent across patient populations, regardless of the type of hematologic malignancy. Renal function is the only important factor affecting lenalidomide plasma exposure. Lenalidomide has no QT prolongation risk at approved doses, and higher plasma exposure to lenalidomide is associated with increased risk of neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Despite being a weak substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in vitro, lenalidomide does not have clinically significant pharmacokinetic interactions with P-gp substrates/inhibitors in controlled studies. The AUC-matched dose adjustment is recommended for patients with renal impairment at the start of therapy. No dose adjustment for lenalidomide is needed on the basis of age, ethnicity, mild hepatic impairment, or drug-drug interactions.

  4. Fenbendazole pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and potentiation in horses.

    PubMed

    McKellar, Q A; Gokbulut, C; Muzandu, K; Benchaoui, H

    2002-11-01

    The present study was designed to describe the pharmacokinetics and fecal excretion of fenbendazole (FBZ) and fenbendazole sulphoxide (FBZSO) and their metabolites in horses, to investigate the effects which concurrent feeding has on the absorption and pharmacokinetics of FBZ, and to determine the effect of coadministration of the metabolic inhibitor piperonyl-butoxide on the in vivo pharmacokinetics and in vitro liver microsomal metabolism of sulfide and sulfoxide benzimidazoles. The effect of piperonyl-butoxide on the enantiomeric genesis of the sulfoxide moiety was also investigated. Following administration of FBZSO and FBZ, the fenbendazole sulphone metabolite predominated in plasma, and the C(max) and area under the plasma curve (AUC) values for each moiety were larger (P < 0.001) following FBZSO than FBZ. In feces the administered parent molecule predominated. The combined AUC for active benzimidazole moieties following oral administration of FBZ (10 mg/kg) in horses was almost 4 times as high in unfed horses (2.19 microg x h/ml) than in fed horses (0.59 microg x h/ml), and coadministration of piperonyl-butoxide significantly increased the AUC and C(max) of active moieties following intravenous administration of FBZSO and oral administration of FBZ. When FBZSO was administered i.v. as a racemate, the first enantiomer of oxfendazole (FBZSO-1) predominated in plasma, however, following coadministration with piperonyl-butoxide, the second enantiomer of oxfendazole (FBZSO-2) predominated for 10 h. Piperonyl-butoxide significantly reduced the oxidative metabolism of FBZSO and FBZ in equine liver microsomes and altered the ratio of enantiomers FBZSO-1/FBZSO-2 from >4:1 to 1:1. It is concluded that in horses efficacy of FBZSO and FBZ could be improved by administration to unfed animals and coadministration with piperonyl-butoxide.

  5. Clinical pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of lacosamide.

    PubMed

    Cawello, Willi

    2015-09-01

    Lacosamide-a third-generation antiepileptic drug available in multiple formulations-was first approved in 2008 as adjunctive therapy for partial-onset seizures (POS) in adults. In 2014, lacosamide was approved as monotherapy for POS by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A loading dose administration was approved in 2013 by the European Medicines Agency and in 2014 by the FDA. Unlike traditional sodium channel blockers affecting fast inactivation, lacosamide selectively enhances sodium channel slow inactivation. This mechanism of action results in stabilization of hyperexcitable neuronal membranes, inhibition of neuronal firing and reduction in long-term channel availability without affecting physiological function. Lacosamide is rapidly absorbed, with maximum plasma concentrations reached 0.5-4 h after intake. Oral bioavailability is high (100 %) for a dose up to 800 mg. Bioavailability is irrespective of food intake. Variability in pharmacokinetic parameters is low (coefficients of variation almost all <20 %). The pharmacokinetic profile of lacosamide is consistent in healthy subjects and across different patient populations studied. Lacosamide elimination from plasma occurs with a terminal half-life of approximately 13 h in young subjects and 14-16 h in elderly subjects; this difference does not impact the dose regimen. Lacosamide produces a pharmacodynamic effect that is closely correlated with its plasma concentration. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationship for reduction of seizure frequency can be described by a maximum effect (E max) model. Lacosamide does not induce or inhibit cytochrome P450 enzymes or known drug transporter systems, has low protein binding of less than 15 % and, because it has multiple elimination pathways, it has no clinically relevant interactions with commonly prescribed medications.

  6. Lipid nanocarriers: influence of lipids on product development and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Kamla; Keshri, Lav; Shah, Mayank

    2011-01-01

    Lipid nanocarriers are on the forefront of the rapidly developing field of nanotechnology with several potential applications in drug delivery. Owing to their size-dependent properties, lipid nanoparticles offer the possibility for development of new therapeutics and an alternative system to other colloidal counterparts for drug administration. An important point to be considered in the selection of a lipid for the carrier system is its effect on the properties of the nanocarrier and also its intended use, as different types of lipids differ in their nature. Researchers around the globe have tapped the potential of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) in developing formulation(s) that can be administered by various routes such as oral, ocular, parenteral, topical, and pulmonary. Since the start of this millennium, a new generation of lipid nanoparticles, namely nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs), lipid drug conjugates (LDCs), and pharmacosomes, has evolved that have the potential to overcome the limitations of SLNs. The current review article presents broad considerations on the influence of various types of lipids on the diverse characteristics of nanocarriers, encompassing their physicochemical, formulation, pharmacokinetic, and cytotoxic aspects.

  7. A three-tiered approach for linking pharmacokinetic ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The power of the adverse outcome pathway (AOP) framework arises from its utilization of pathway-based data to describe the initial interaction of a chemical with a molecular target (molecular initiating event; (MIE), followed by a progression through a series of key events that lead to an adverse outcome relevant for regulatory purposes. The AOP itself is not chemical specific, thus providing the biological context necessary for interpreting high throughput (HT) toxicity screening results. Application of the AOP framework and HT predictions in ecological and human health risk assessment, however, requires the consideration of chemical-specific properties that influence external exposure doses and target tissue doses. To address this requirement, a three-tiered approach was developed to provide a workflow for connecting biology-based AOPs to biochemical-based pharmacokinetic properties (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion; ADME), and then to chemical/human activity-based exposure pathways. This approach included: (1) The power of the adverse outcome pathway (AOP) framework arisesfrom its utilization of pathway-based data to describe the initial interaction of a chemical with a molecular target (molecular initiating event; (MIE), followed by a progression through a series of key events that lead to an adverse outcome relevant for regulatory purposes. The AOP itself is not chemical specific, thus providing the biological context necessary for interpreti

  8. Single-Ascending-Dose Pharmacokinetic Study of Tribendimidine in Opisthorchis viverrini-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Duthaler, Urs; Sayasone, Somphou; Vanobbergen, Fiona; Penny, Melissa A.; Odermatt, Peter; Huwyler, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Praziquantel is the only drug available for the treatment of Opisthorchis viverrini infections. Tribendimidine has emerged as a potential treatment alternative; however, its pharmacokinetic (PK) properties have not been sufficiently studied to date. Via two phase IIa dose-finding studies, 68 O. viverrini patients were treated with 25- to 600-mg doses of tribendimidine using 50- and 200-mg tablet formulations. Plasma, blood, and dried blood spots (DBS) were sampled at selected time points. The two main metabolites of tribendimidine, active deacetylated amidantel (dADT) and acetylated dADT (adADT), were analyzed in plasma, blood, and DBS. PK parameters were estimated by noncompartmental analysis. An acceptable agreement among plasma and DBS concentrations was observed, with a mean bias of ≤10%, and 60% dADT and 74% adADT concentrations being within ±20% margins. We found that 200-mg tribendimidine tablets possess immediate floating characteristics, which led to variable time to maximal concentration of drug (Tmax) values (2 to 24 h) between individuals. Dose proportionality was observed for dADT from 25 to 200 mg using 50-mg tablets, but at higher dosages (200 to 600 mg), saturation occurred. The median ratio of the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0–24) of dADT to the AUC0–24 of adADT ranged from 0.8 to 26.4, suggesting substantial differences in acetylation rates. Cure rates ranged from 11% (25-mg dose) to 100% (400-mg dose). Cured patients showed significantly higher dADT maximal serum concentrations (Cmax) and AUC0–24 values than uncured patients. Tribendimidine is a promising drug for the treatment of opisthorchiasis. However, the tablet formulation should be optimized to achieve consistent absorption among patients. Further studies are warranted to assess the large differences between individuals in the rate of metabolic turnover of dADT to adADT. (This study has been registered with the ISRCTN Registry under no. ISRCTN

  9. Ginkgo biloba extracts: a review of the pharmacokinetics of the active ingredients.

    PubMed

    Ude, Christian; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred; Wurglics, Mario

    2013-09-01

    Ginkgo biloba is among the most favourite and best explored herbal drugs. Standardized extracts of Ginkgo biloba represent the only herbal alternative to synthetic antidementia drugs in the therapy of cognitive decline and Alzheimer's diseases. The clinical efficiency of such standardized Ginkgo biloba extracts (GBE) is still controversial, but authors of numerous international clinical studies recommended the use of GBE in the described therapies.Extracts of Ginkgo biloba are a mixture of substances with a wide variety of physical and chemical properties and activities. Numerous pharmacological investigations lead to the conclusion that the terpene trilactones (TTL) and the flavonoids of GBE are responsible for the main pharmacological effects of the extract in the therapy of cognitive decline. Therefore, the quality of GBE products must be oriented on a defined quantity of TTL and flavonoids. Furthermore, because of their toxic potential the amount of ginkgolic acid should be less than 5 ppm.However, data on pharmacokinetics and bioavailability, especially related to the central nervous system (CNS), which is the target tissue, are relatively rare. A few investigations characterize the TTL and flavonoids of Ginkgo biloba pharmacokinetically in plasma and in the brain. Recent investigations show that significant levels of TTL and Ginkgo biloba flavonoids cross the blood-brain barrier and enter the CNS of rats after oral application of GBE. Knowledge about the pharmacokinetic behaviour of these substances is necessary to discuss the pharmacological results on a more realistic basis.

  10. Development of a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model of the Rat Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Badhan, Raj K. Singh; Chenel, Marylore; Penny, Jeffrey I.

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) drug disposition is dictated by a drug’s physicochemical properties and its ability to permeate physiological barriers. The blood–brain barrier (BBB), blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier and centrally located drug transporter proteins influence drug disposition within the central nervous system. Attainment of adequate brain-to-plasma and cerebrospinal fluid-to-plasma partitioning is important in determining the efficacy of centrally acting therapeutics. We have developed a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of the rat CNS which incorporates brain interstitial fluid (ISF), choroidal epithelial and total cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compartments and accurately predicts CNS pharmacokinetics. The model yielded reasonable predictions of unbound brain-to-plasma partition ratio (Kpuu,brain) and CSF:plasma ratio (CSF:Plasmau) using a series of in vitro permeability and unbound fraction parameters. When using in vitro permeability data obtained from L-mdr1a cells to estimate rat in vivo permeability, the model successfully predicted, to within 4-fold, Kpuu,brain and CSF:Plasmau for 81.5% of compounds simulated. The model presented allows for simultaneous simulation and analysis of both brain biophase and CSF to accurately predict CNS pharmacokinetics from preclinical drug parameters routinely available during discovery and development pathways. PMID:24647103

  11. Enantioselective pharmacokinetics of ketoprofen in calves after intramuscular administration of a racemic mixture.

    PubMed

    Plessers, E; Watteyn, A; Wyns, H; Pardon, B; De Baere, S; De Backer, P; Croubels, S

    2015-08-01

    The pharmacokinetic properties of ketoprofen were determined in 4-week-old calves after intramuscular (i.m.) injection of a racemic mixture at a dose of 3 mg/kg body weight. Due to possible enantioselective disposition kinetics and chiral inversion, the plasma concentrations of the R(-) and S(+) enantiomer were quantified separately, using a stereospecific HPLC-UV assay. A distinct predominance of the S(+) enantiomer was observed, as well as significantly different pharmacokinetic parameters between R(-) and S(+) ketoprofen. More in specific, a greater value for the mean area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC(0→∞)) (46.92 ± 7.75 and 11.13 ± 2.18 μg·h/mL for the S(+) and R(-) enantiomer, respectively), a lower apparent clearance (Cl/F) (32.8 ± 5.7 and 139.0 ± 25.1 mL/h·kg for the S(+) and R(-) enantiomer, respectively) and a lower apparent volume of distribution (V(d)/F) (139 ± 14.7 and 496 ± 139.4 mL/kg for the S(+) and R(-) enantiomer, respectively) were calculated for the S(+) enantiomer, indicating enantioselective pharmacokinetics for ketoprofen in calves following i.m. administration.

  12. Pharmacokinetics and physiologic effects of alprazolam after a single oral dose in healthy mares.

    PubMed

    Wong, D M; Davis, J L; Alcott, C J; Hepworth-Warren, K L; Galow-Kersh, N L; Rice, S; Coetzee, J F

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic properties and physiologic effects of a single oral dose of alprazolam in horses. Seven adult female horses received an oral administration of alprazolam at a dosage of 0.04 mg/kg body weight. Blood samples were collected at various time points and assayed for alprazolam and its metabolite, α-hydroxyalprazolam, using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic disposition of alprazolam was analyzed by a one-compartmental approach. Mean plasma pharmacokinetic parameters (±SD) following single-dose administration of alprazolam were as follows: Cmax 14.76 ± 3.72 ng/mL and area under the curve (AUC0-∞ ) 358.77 ± 76.26 ng·h/mL. Median (range) Tmax was 3 h (1-12 h). Alpha-hydroxyalprazolam concentrations were detected in each horse, although concentrations were low (Cmax 1.36 ± 0.28 ng/mL). Repeat physical examinations and assessment of the degree of sedation and ataxia were performed every 12 h to evaluate for adverse effects. Oral alprazolam tablets were absorbed in adult horses and no clinically relevant adverse events were observed. Further evaluation of repeated dosing and safety of administration of alprazolam to horses is warranted.

  13. Studying Student Teachers' Acceptance of Role Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Michael D.; Davis, Concetta M.

    1980-01-01

    There is variance in the way in which student teachers accept responsibility for the teaching act. This study explains why some variables may affect student teachers' acceptance of role responsibilities. (CM)

  14. [Subjective well-being and self acceptance].

    PubMed

    Makino, Y; Tagami, F

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between subjective well-being and self acceptance, and to design a happiness self-writing program to increase self acceptance and subjective well-being of adolescents. In study 1, we examined the relationship between social interaction and self acceptance. In study 2, we created a happiness self-writing program in cognitive behavioral approach, and examined whether the program promoted self acceptance and subjective well-being. Results indicated that acceptance of self-openness, an aspect of self acceptance, was related to subjective well-being. The happiness self-writing program increased subjective well-being, but it was not found to have increased self acceptance. It was discussed why the program could promote subjective well-being, but not self acceptance.

  15. Pharmacokinetics of EDP-420 after Ascending Single Oral Doses in Healthy Adult Volunteers▿

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Li-Juan; Wang, Michelle; Or, Yat Sun

    2009-01-01

    EDP-420 (EP-013420, S-013420) is a first-in-class bicyclolide (bridged bicyclic macrolide) currently in clinical development for the treatment of respiratory tract infections. It has good preclinical pharmacokinetic properties across multiple species and potent in vitro and in vivo activity against respiratory tract infection pathogens, including Haemophilus influenzae, atypical organisms (e.g., Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Legionella pneumophila), and multidrug-resistant streptococci. The safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of an orally administered EDP-420 suspension in 40 healthy adult subjects were assessed in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, ascending single-dose study. Eligible subjects were sequentially randomized into one of five study groups (i.e., 100-, 200-, 400-, 800-, or 1,200-mg dosing groups) consisting of eight subjects (six active and two placebo) each. EDP-420 was well tolerated. There were no serious adverse events reported, nor were there any dose-limiting clinical or laboratory adverse events reported. EDP-420 was rapidly absorbed after a single oral dose. The mean plasma terminal half-life ranged from 15.6 to 20.1 h with low clearance. At the 400-mg dose, the area under the curve was 14.4 μg·h/ml, which well exceeded the required area under the concentration-time curve to cover common respiratory tract infection pathogens based on preclinical pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling. The long half-life and high systemic exposure of EDP-420 support once-daily dosing and may allow for shorter treatment durations compared to other macrolide antibiotics. Based on its human pharmacokinetic profiles, taken together with its in vitro/in vivo activity against common respiratory pathogens, EDP-420 warrants efficacy trials for the treatment of respiratory tract infections. PMID:19223626

  16. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic-based optimization of levofloxacin administration in the treatment of MDR-TB.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Samiksha; Van't Boveneind-Vrubleuskaya, Natasha; Akkerman, Onno W; de Lange, Wiel C M; van Soolingen, Dick; Kosterink, Jos G W; van der Werf, Tjip S; Wilffert, Bob; Touw, Daniel J; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C

    2016-10-01

    The emergence of MDR-TB and XDR-TB has complicated TB treatment success. Among many factors that contribute to the development of resistance, low drug exposure is not the least important. This review summarizes the available information on pharmacokinetic properties of levofloxacin in relation to microbial susceptibilities, in order to optimize the dose and make general treatment recommendations. A total of 37 studies on adult (32 studies) and paediatric (5 studies) MDR-TB patients were included. Among the 32 adult studies, 19 were on susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates to levofloxacin by MIC, 1 was on susceptibility of M. tuberculosis isolates to levofloxacin by MBC, 1 was on susceptibility of M. tuberculosis isolates to levofloxacin by mutant prevention concentration and 4 were on pharmacokinetics of levofloxacin, and 7 others were included. Likewise, out of five studies on children, two dealt with levofloxacin pharmacokinetic parameters, one reviewed CSF concentrations and two dealt with background information. In adult MDR-TB patients, standard dosing of once-daily 1000 mg levofloxacin in TB treatment did not consistently attain the target concentration (i.e. fAUC/MIC >100 and fAUC/MBC >100) in 80% of the patients with MIC and MBC of 1 mg/L, leaving them at risk of developing drug resistance. However, with an MIC of 0.5 mg/L, 100% of the patients achieved the target concentration. Similarly, paediatric patients failed consistently in achieving given pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic targets due to age-related differences, demanding a shift towards once daily dosing of 15-20 mg/kg. Therefore, we recommend therapeutic drug monitoring for patients with strains having MICs of ≥0.5 mg/L and suggest revising the cut-off value from 2 to 1 mg/L.

  17. Pharmacokinetic parameters and biodistribution of soluble cytokine receptors.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, C A; Beckmann, M P; Mohler, K; Maliszewski, C R; Fanslow, W C; Lynch, D H

    1993-01-01

    The potential use of soluble cytokine receptors as therapeutics in disease states when excessive or prolonged cytokine expression leads to pathogenesis is just beginning (Van Brunt, 1989). The inhibitory effects of soluble receptors have been found to be highly potent and specific for their respective cytokines (Maliszewski and Fanslow, 1990; Maliszewski et al., 1990). Recent in vivo data have shown that exogenously administered soluble receptors can function as cytokine antagonists and suppress autoimmune inflammatory responses (Jacobs et al., 1991a), allograft rejection, and alloreactivity (Fanslow et al., 1990b). The proposed frequency of administration and dosage of a therapeutic agent is dependent on the half-life of the agent and the route of administration. The elimination or half-life of a drug usually depends on its physiochemical properties (molecular size, glycosylation, isoelectric point, and hydrophobic/hydrophilic properties) (DiPalma and DiGregorio, 1990; Katzung, 1984). The half-life will also depend on the mechanism of clearance for that specific receptor. Once pharmacokinetic data are available for soluble receptors, the therapeutic potential of these molecules can be better evaluated. Only limited pharmacokinetic data are currently available for soluble cytokine receptors (Jacobs et al., 1991b). For sIL-1R, the majority of an intravenously administered dose was cleared in the second elimination phase, with a reasonably long half-life (6.3 hr), such that the entire dose was not eliminated until 35 hr. If administration is by subcutaneous injection, the half-life was even more prolonged. One explanation for the prolonged half-life is the minimal distribution to liver and kidneys and thus low levels of clearance by these organs. In contrast, elimination of intravenously administered sIL-4R was relatively rapid, with a short half-life (2.3 hr). This appeared mainly due to liver distribution and clearance, which has been the highest observed for any

  18. Interaction between Red Yeast Rice and CYP450 Enzymes/P-Glycoprotein and Its Implication for the Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Lovastatin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-Hao; Uang, Yow-Shieng; Wang, Shang-Ta; Yang, Jyh-Chin; Lin, Chun-Jung

    2012-01-01

    Red yeast rice (RYR) can reduce cholesterol through its active component, lovastatin. This study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic properties of lovastatin in RYR products and potential RYR-drug interactions. Extracts of three registered RYR products (LipoCol Forte, Cholestin, and Xuezhikang) were more effective than pure lovastatin in inhibiting the activities of cytochrome P450 enzymes and P-glycoprotein. Among CYP450 enzymes, RYR showed the highest inhibition on CYP1A2 and CYP2C19, with comparable inhibitory potencies to the corresponding typical inhibitors. In healthy volunteers taking the RYR product LipoCol Forte, the pharmacokinetic properties of lovastatin and lovastatin acid were linear in the dose range of 1 to 4 capsules taken as a single dose and no significant accumulation was observed after multiple dosing. Concomitant use of one LipoCol Forte capsule with nifedipine did not change the pharmacokinetics of nifedipine. Yet, concomitant use of gemfibrozil with LipoCol Forte resulted in a significant increase in the plasma concentration of lovastatin acid. These findings suggest that the use of RYR products may not have effects on the pharmacokinetics of concomitant comedications despite their effects to inhibit the activities of CYP450 enzymes and P-gp, whereas gemfibrozil affects the pharmacokinetics of lovastatin acid when used concomitantly with RYR products. PMID:23227093

  19. Pharmacokinetic Properties of a New Glutamic Acid Derivative Glutaron.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, L A; Ryabukha, A F; Kuznetsov, K A; Suchkov, E A; Perfilova, V N; Tyurenkov, I N

    2015-06-01

    Inhomogenous distribution of glutaron in organs and tissues was found after intravenous and peroral administration: the agent demonstrated high affinity to organs with high degree of vascularization (lungs and heart) and elimination (kidney). Glutaron easily penetrates through the blood-brain barrier, which is consistent with its concentration in the adipose tissue.

  20. Influence of cirrhosis on lamotrigine pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Marcellin, P; de Bony, F; Garret, C; Altman, C; Boige, V; Castelnau, C; Laurent-Puig, P; Trinchet, J C; Rolan, P; Chen, C; Mamet, J P; Bidault, R

    2001-01-01

    Aims Lamotrigine, an antiepileptic drug, is cleared from the systemic circulation mainly by glucuronidation. The possibility of changes in the pharmacokinetics of lamotrigine in plasma owing to hepatic dysfunction has been evaluated. Methods Thirty-six subjects, including 24 patients with various degrees of liver cirrhosis and 12 healthy volunteers received a single 100 mg dose of lamotrgine. Blood samples were taken for 7 days in all subjects, except nine with severe cirrhosis, who had a 29 day blood sampling period. Results The pharmacokinetics of lamotrigine were comparable between the patients with moderate cirrhosis (corresponding to Child-Pugh grade A) and the healthy subjects. Plasma oral clearance mean ratios (90% confidence interval) in patients with severe cirrhosis without or with ascites (corresponding, respectively, to Child-Pugh grade B and C) to healthy subjects were, respectively, 60% (44%, 83%) and 36% (25%, 52%). Plasma half-life mean ratios (90% confidence interval) in these two patient groups to healthy subjects were, respectively, 204% (149%, 278%) and 287% (202%, 408%). Conclusions Lamotrigine administered as a single oral dose of 100 mg was well tolerated in all groups. Initial, escalation and maintenance doses should generally be reduced by approximately 50 or 75% in patients with Child-Pugh Grade B or C cirrhosis. Escalation and maintenance doses should be adjusted according to clinical response. PMID:11421997

  1. Fractional dynamics pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Verotta, Davide

    2010-06-01

    While an increasing number of fractional order integrals and differential equations applications have been reported in the physics, signal processing, engineering and bioengineering literatures, little attention has been paid to this class of models in the pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) literature. One of the reasons is computational: while the analytical solution of fractional differential equations is available in special cases, it this turns out that even the simplest PKPD models that can be constructed using fractional calculus do not allow an analytical solution. In this paper, we first introduce new families of PKPD models incorporating fractional order integrals and differential equations, and, second, exemplify and investigate their qualitative behavior. The families represent extensions of frequently used PK link and PD direct and indirect action models, using the tools of fractional calculus. In addition the PD models can be a function of a variable, the active drug, which can smoothly transition from concentration to exposure, to hyper-exposure, according to a fractional integral transformation. To investigate the behavior of the models we propose, we implement numerical algorithms for fractional integration and for the numerical solution of a system of fractional differential equations. For simplicity, in our investigation we concentrate on the pharmacodynamic side of the models, assuming standard (integer order) pharmacokinetics.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of tilidine in terminal renal failure.

    PubMed

    Seiler, K U; Jähnchen, E; Trenk, D; Brennscheidt, U; Heintz, B

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of tilidine and its metabolites during the dialysis procedure and in the dialysis-free interval. Tilidine is a prodrug that is metabolized presystemically into the active metabolite nortilidine. Nortilidine is degraded thereafter to bisnortilidine and several polar metabolites. Nine patients with a creatinine clearance < 5 ml/min were treated in a crossover design with single oral doses of 1.5 mg/kg on the day of dialysis (dialysis performed from 3 to 6 hours after drug administration) and on a day in the dialysis-free interval. Blood samples were taken frequently and analyzed for tilidine, nortilidine, and bisnortilidine. Drug and metabolite concentrations were also measured in aliquots of dialysate collected during dialysis. Only negligible amounts of tilidine, nortilidine, and bisnortilidine (about 0.9% of the dose) were recovered from the dialysate. The pharmacokinetics of nortilidine and its inactive metabolite bisnortilidine was not affected by dialysis. The presystemic apparent clearance of the prodrug tilidine was decreased significantly during the dialysis-free interval. A significant decrease of the rate of elimination and an increase of the AUC of bisnortilidine were observed if these parameters were compared with data obtained from healthy volunteers. The plasma concentrations of nortilidine were comparable in patients and normal volunteers. Thus, a reduction of the dose of tilidine in patients with severely impaired kidney function seems not to be required. Tilidine and its metabolites cannot be removed from the body by dialysis.

  3. Grepafloxacin pharmacokinetics in individuals with hepatic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Efthymiopoulos, C; Bramer, S L; Maroli, A; Flaherty, J F; Wolfe, E; Bass, N; Somberg, K

    1997-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of grepafloxacin, a new broad spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotic, were studied in 2 trials involving 14 healthy volunteers, 10 individuals with mild (Child-Pugh Class A) impairment of liver function, and 12 with moderate (Child-Pugh Class B or C) hepatic impairment. All participants received an oral dose of grepafloxacin 400 mg, daily for 7 days, and plasma and urine grepafloxacin concentrations were measured over 7 days. The pooled data from participants with impaired liver function showed that, compared with healthy individuals, peak plasma grepafloxacin concentrations, area under the plasma concentration-time curve and proportion of the dose excreted in the urine were increased. In addition, apparent total clearance was reduced in the presence of hepatic dysfunction. Peak concentrations were increased by 36% and 48% in individuals with Class A and B disease, respectively; the corresponding reductions in clearance were 33% and 55%, respectively. Child-Pugh scores and components of the scores showed no correlation with any pharmacokinetic variables. Based on these findings, we recommend a daily grepafloxacin dose of 400 mg in patients with mild hepatic impairment, irrespective of the severity of infection. Grepafloxacin should not be used in patients with moderate or severe liver disease.

  4. Single dose pharmacokinetics of terbinafine in cats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ang; Ding, Huanzhong; Liu, Yiming; Gao, Yan; Zeng, Zhenling

    2012-08-01

    The pharmacokinetics of terbinafine was studied in six healthy fasted cats following a single intravenous and oral administration at a dose of 10 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg, respectively, according to a two-period crossover design. Plasma terbinafine concentrations were determined using a reverse phase liquid chromatographic method. The pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by non-compartmental analysis with WinNonlin 5.2.1 software. After intravenous administration, the terminal half-life and area under the curve from time 0 to infinity were 10.40 ± 4.56 h, 15.20 ± 3.61 h·µg/ml, respectively. After oral dosing, the mean maximum concentration was 3.22 ± 0.60 µg/ml, reached at 1.33 ± 0.41 h. The terminal half-life, area under the curve from time 0 to infinity and apparent volume of distribution were 8.01 ± 3.46 h, 13.77 ± 4.99 h·µg/ml, 25.63 ± 6.29 l/kg, respectively. The absolute bioavailability of terbinafine hydrochloride tablets after oral administration was 31.00 ± 10.85%. Although bioavailability was low, excellent penetration at the site of infection and low minimum inhibitory concentrations values provided terbinafine with good efficacy against dermatophyte infections.

  5. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of iron preparations.

    PubMed

    Geisser, Peter; Burckhardt, Susanna

    2011-01-04

    Standard approaches are not appropriate when assessing pharmacokinetics of iron supplements due to the ubiquity of endogenous iron, its compartmentalized sites of action, and the complexity of the iron metabolism. The primary site of action of iron is the erythrocyte, and, in contrast to conventional drugs, no drug-receptor interaction takes place. Notably, the process of erythropoiesis, i.e., formation of new erythrocytes, takes 3-4 weeks. Accordingly, serum iron concentration and area under the curve (AUC) are clinically irrelevant for assessing iron utilization. Iron can be administered intravenously in the form of polynuclear iron(III)-hydroxide complexes with carbohydrate ligands or orally as iron(II) (ferrous) salts or iron(III) (ferric) complexes. Several approaches have been employed to study the pharmacodynamics of iron after oral administration. Quantification of iron uptake from radiolabeled preparations by the whole body or the erythrocytes is optimal, but alternatively total iron transfer can be calculated based on known elimination rates and the intrinsic reactivity of individual preparations. Degradation kinetics, and thus the safety, of parenteral iron preparations are directly related to the molecular weight and the stability of the complex. High oral iron doses or rapid release of iron from intravenous iron preparations can saturate the iron transport system, resulting in oxidative stress with adverse clinical and subclinical consequences. Appropriate pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics analyses will greatly assist our understanding of the likely contribution of novel preparations to the management of anemia.

  6. Pharmacokinetic study of Noni fruit extract.

    PubMed

    Issell, Brian F; Franke, Adrian; Fielding, Robert M

    2008-01-01

    Many different products containing Noni (Morinda citrifolia) fruit extracts are sold throughout the world for health restoration and maintenance. Despite a large business enterprise fueling Noni's popularity, there is a lack of standardization of products and no scientific evidence of Noni's clinical efficacy and safety. There is also no evidence to indicate an optimal therapeutic dose or dosing interval. In an initial volunteer, scopoletin was identified as a bioactive marker of Noni exposure and a candidate for product standardization and pharmacokinetic studies. Subsequently, capsules containing the whole freeze-dried fruit of Noni were orally administered to nine healthy volunteers (3 per group) at doses of 1,500 mg (3 × 500 mg), 2,000 mg (4 × 500 mg) and 2,500 mg (5 × 500 mg). Plasma and urine samples were obtained from each subject prior to dosing and at 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 8 h after dosing. Concentrations of scopoletin were determined by HPLC with PDA (scanning at 200-700 nm) and MS detection. Scopoletin rapidly enters the plasma after Noni ingestion, maintaining levels in the range of 0.5 to 5 ng/mL for at least 8 h after dosing. Scopoletin bioavailability appears to be low, with significant intersubject variability. We conclude that scopoletin can be used as a relatively specific marker of Noni exposure in the blood and particularly in urine when its pharmacokinetics is considered appropriately.

  7. Pharmacokinetic studies of active triterpenoid saponins and the total secondary saponin from Anemone raddeana Regel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dandan; Lei, Tianli; Lv, Chongning; Zhao, Huimin; Xu, Haiyan; Lu, Jincai

    2017-02-15

    The rhizome of Anemone raddeana Regel, a Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) which has a robust history treating rheumatism and neuralgia. The total secondary saponin (TSS) from it has demonstrated antitumor activity. In this study, a rapid and validated LC-MS/MS method was developed to simultaneously determine the active compounds (Hederacolchiside A1 and Eleutheroside K). Analytes were separated on a reverse-phase C18 column with acetonitrile-water (5mmol/L ammonium acetate) as the mobile phase. This assay showed acceptable linearity (r>0.99) over the concentration range 5-1000 nmol/L for two analytes. The intra- and inter-day precision was within 8.06% and accuracy was ranged from -3.16% to 3.34% for two analytes. The mean extraction recoveries of analytes and IS from rat plasma were all more than 76.0%. Under the developed analytical conditions, the obtained values of main pharmacokinetic parameters (Cmax and AUC0-t) indicated that the pure compounds were more efficient than the TSS extract in Hederacolchiside A1 and Eleutheroside K absorption. In addition, pharmacokinetic studies of two individual compounds demonstrated their poor oral absorption in rat ((a)F%, 0.019-1.521). In the study of absorption and transportation of Hederacolchiside A1 and Eleutheroside K in Caco-2 cell monolayer model, the uptake permeability was in 10(-6)cm/sec range suggesting poor absorption, which confirmed the previous pharmacokinetic profiles in vivo. Interestingly, the uptake ratio of them declined significantly when treated with phloridzin (SGLT1 inhibitor). It indicated that the absorption of Hederacolchiside A1 in intestine was mainly through positive transport and SGLT1 might participate in its active absorption.

  8. Comparison of Dapivirine Vaginal Gel and Film Formulation Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics (FAME 02B).

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jennifer A; Marzinke, Mark A; Bakshi, Rahul P; Fuchs, Edward J; Radebaugh, Christine L; Aung, Wutyi; Spiegel, Hans M L; Coleman, Jenell S; Rohan, Lisa C; Hendrix, Craig W

    2017-04-01

    While preexposure prophylaxis with oral tenofovir/emtricitabine reduces HIV acquisition rates, poor adherence to and acceptability of vaginal gels and the potential for evolving drug resistance have led to development of vaginal film formulations and other antiretroviral drugs, respectively, including the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor dapivirine. In this two-arm crossover study of a novel fast-dissolving dapivirine film and a previously studied semisolid dapivirine gel, 10 healthy women received a single 1.25 mg vaginal dose of each study product; one withdrew after the first dose. Clinical, pharmacokinetic, and antiviral pharmacodynamic assessments (ex vivo HIV-BaL challenge of tissue explants) were performed over 168 h postdose. Six of ten participants experienced mild to moderate adverse effects, similar between products, with no severe adverse events or adverse events attributed to study products. There were no statistically significant differences in plasma, cervicovaginal fluid (CVF), or cervical tissue dapivirine concentrations between the gel and film (all p > .05). CVF dapivirine concentrations were 1.5 and 6 log10 greater than tissue and plasma concentrations, respectively (p < .001). Both film and gel demonstrated reduced cervical tissue infectivity after ex vivo HIV challenge 5 h postdose, compared to baseline and 72-h postdose biopsies (p < .05 for gel, p = .06 for film). There was no difference in ex vivo explant HIV challenge between gel and film. The dapivirine film and gel performed similarly in terms of tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and antiviral effect. Dapivirine film may provide an alternative to pharmacokinetically comparable dapivirine gel formulations. Effectiveness remains to be tested.

  9. Clinical pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of linagliptin.

    PubMed

    Graefe-Mody, Ulrike; Retlich, Silke; Friedrich, Christian

    2012-07-01

    Linagliptin is an orally active small-molecule inhibitor of dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4, which was first licensed in the US, Europe, Japan and other territories in 2011 to improve glycaemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Linagliptin is the first and thus far the only DPP-4 inhibitor, and oral antihyperglycaemic drug in general, to be approved as a single-strength once-daily dose (5 mg). Compared with other available DPP-4 inhibitors, linagliptin has a unique pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile that is characterized by target-mediated nonlinear pharmacokinetics, concentration-dependent protein binding, minimal renal clearance and no requirements for dose adjustment for any intrinsic or extrinsic factor. After single or multiple oral doses of 1-10 mg, linagliptin displays less than dose-proportional increases in maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) and area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC). Linagliptin is rapidly absorbed after oral administration, with C(max) occurring after approximately 90 minutes, and reaches steady-state concentrations within 4 days. With the therapeutic dose, steady-state C(max) (11-12 nmol/L) and AUC (∼150 nmol · h/L) are approximately 1.3-fold greater than after a single dose, indicating little drug accumulation with repeat dosing. Linagliptin exhibits concentration-dependent protein binding in human plasma in vitro (99% at 1 nmol/L to 75-89% at >30 nmol/L) and has a large apparent volume of distribution, demonstrating extensive distribution into tissues. The nonlinear pharmacokinetics of linagliptin are best described by a two-compartmental model that incorporates target-mediated drug disposition resulting from high-affinity, saturable binding to DPP-4. The oral bioavailability of linagliptin estimated with this model is approximately 30%. Linagliptin has a long terminal half-life (>100 hours); however, its accumulation half-life is much shorter (approximately 10 hours), accounting for the rapid

  10. 48 CFR 2911.103 - Market acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Market acceptance. 2911... DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Selecting And Developing Requirements Documents 2911.103 Market acceptance. The... offered have either achieved commercial market acceptance or been satisfactorily supplied to an...

  11. 48 CFR 11.103 - Market acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Market acceptance. 11.103... DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Selecting and Developing Requirements Documents 11.103 Market acceptance. (a) Section... either— (i) Achieved commercial market acceptance; or (ii) Been satisfactorily supplied to an...

  12. Older Adults' Acceptance of Information Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Lin; Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick; Salvendy, Gavriel

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated variables contributing to older adults' information technology acceptance through a survey, which was used to find factors explaining and predicting older adults' information technology acceptance behaviors. Four factors, including needs satisfaction, perceived usability, support availability, and public acceptance, were…

  13. 46 CFR 28.73 - Accepted organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Accepted organizations. 28.73 Section 28.73 Shipping... INDUSTRY VESSELS General Provisions § 28.73 Accepted organizations. An organization desiring to be designated by the Commandant as an accepted organization must request such designation in writing. As...

  14. 46 CFR 28.73 - Accepted organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Accepted organizations. 28.73 Section 28.73 Shipping... INDUSTRY VESSELS General Provisions § 28.73 Accepted organizations. An organization desiring to be designated by the Commandant as an accepted organization must request such designation in writing. As...

  15. 46 CFR 28.73 - Accepted organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Accepted organizations. 28.73 Section 28.73 Shipping... INDUSTRY VESSELS General Provisions § 28.73 Accepted organizations. An organization desiring to be designated by the Commandant as an accepted organization must request such designation in writing. As...

  16. 46 CFR 28.73 - Accepted organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Accepted organizations. 28.73 Section 28.73 Shipping... INDUSTRY VESSELS General Provisions § 28.73 Accepted organizations. An organization desiring to be designated by the Commandant as an accepted organization must request such designation in writing. As...

  17. 46 CFR 28.73 - Accepted organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accepted organizations. 28.73 Section 28.73 Shipping... INDUSTRY VESSELS General Provisions § 28.73 Accepted organizations. An organization desiring to be designated by the Commandant as an accepted organization must request such designation in writing. As...

  18. 48 CFR 2911.103 - Market acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... offered have either achieved commercial market acceptance or been satisfactorily supplied to an agency... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Market acceptance. 2911... DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Selecting And Developing Requirements Documents 2911.103 Market acceptance....

  19. 21 CFR 820.86 - Acceptance status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acceptance status. 820.86 Section 820.86 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Acceptance Activities § 820.86 Acceptance status. Each manufacturer...

  20. 48 CFR 11.103 - Market acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Market acceptance. 11.103... DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Selecting and Developing Requirements Documents 11.103 Market acceptance. (a) Section... either— (i) Achieved commercial market acceptance; or (ii) Been satisfactorily supplied to an...

  1. 48 CFR 11.103 - Market acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Market acceptance. 11.103... DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Selecting and Developing Requirements Documents 11.103 Market acceptance. (a) 41 U.S...) Achieved commercial market acceptance; or (ii) Been satisfactorily supplied to an agency under current...

  2. 48 CFR 2911.103 - Market acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Market acceptance. 2911.103... DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Selecting And Developing Requirements Documents 2911.103 Market acceptance. The... offered have either achieved commercial market acceptance or been satisfactorily supplied to an...

  3. 48 CFR 11.103 - Market acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Market acceptance. 11.103... DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Selecting and Developing Requirements Documents 11.103 Market acceptance. (a) Section... either— (i) Achieved commercial market acceptance; or (ii) Been satisfactorily supplied to an...

  4. 48 CFR 2911.103 - Market acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Market acceptance. 2911... DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Selecting And Developing Requirements Documents 2911.103 Market acceptance. The... offered have either achieved commercial market acceptance or been satisfactorily supplied to an...

  5. 48 CFR 2911.103 - Market acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Market acceptance. 2911... DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Selecting And Developing Requirements Documents 2911.103 Market acceptance. The... offered have either achieved commercial market acceptance or been satisfactorily supplied to an...

  6. The relation between remembered parental acceptance in childhood and self-acceptance among young Turkish adults.

    PubMed

    Kuyumcu, Behire; Rohner, Ronald P

    2016-05-11

    This study examined the relation between young adults' age and remembrances of parental acceptance in childhood, and their current self-acceptance. The study was based on a sample of 236 young adults in Turkey (139 women and 97 men). The adult version of the Parental Acceptance-Rejection/Control Questionnaire for mothers and fathers along with the Self-Acceptance subscale of the Psychological Well-Being Scale, and the Personal Information Form were used as measures. Results showed that both men and women tended to remember having been accepted in childhood by both their mothers and fathers. Women, however, reported more maternal and paternal acceptance in childhood than did men. Similarly, the level of self-acceptance was high among both men and women. However, women's self-acceptance was higher than men's. Correlational analyses showed that self-acceptance was positively related to remembrances of maternal and paternal acceptance among both women and men. Results indicated that age and remembered paternal acceptance significantly predicted women's self-acceptance. Age and remembered maternal acceptance made significant and independent contributions to men's self-acceptance. Men's remembrances of paternal acceptance in childhood did not make significant contribution to their self-acceptance. Finally, the relation between women's age and self-acceptance was significantly moderated by remembrances of paternal acceptance in childhood.

  7. Nonlinear pharmacokinetics of 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine in mice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong-Wu; Jiang, Xi-Ling; Yu, Ai-Ming

    2011-07-01

    5-Methoxy-N,N,-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT), an abused serotonergic indolealkylamine drug, was placed into Schedule I controlled substance status in the United States as of January 19, 2011. In previous studies, we have shown the impact of monoamine oxidase A and cytochrome P450 2D6 enzymes on 5-MeO-DMT metabolism and pharmacokinetics. The aim of this study was to investigate 5-MeO-DMT pharmacokinetic properties after intravenous or intraperitoneal administration of three different doses (2, 10, and 20 mg/kg) to CYP2D6-humanized (Tg-CYP2D6) and wild-type control mice. Systemic exposure [area under the curve (AUC)] to 5-MeO-DMT was increased nonproportionally with the increase in dose. The existence of nonlinearity in serum 5-MeO-DMT pharmacokinetics was clearly manifested by dose-normalized AUC values, which were approximately 1.5- to 2.0-fold (intravenous) and 1.8- to 2.7-fold (intraperitoneal) higher in wild-type or Tg-CYP2D6 mice dosed with 10 and 20 mg/kg 5-MeO-DMT, respectively, than those in mice treated with 2 mg/kg 5-MeO-DMT. Furthermore, a two-compartment model including first-order absorption, nonlinear (Michaelis-Menten) elimination, and CYP2D6-dependent linear elimination from the central compartment was developed to characterize the intravenous and intraperitoneal pharmacokinetic data for 5-MeO-DMT in wild-type and Tg-CYP2D6 mice. In addition, 5-MeO-DMT was readily detected in mouse brain after drug treatment, and brain 5-MeO-DMT concentrations were also increased nonproportionally with the increase of dose. The results establish a nonlinear pharmacokinetic property for 5-MeO-DMT in mice, suggesting that the risk of 5-MeO-DMT intoxication may be increased nonproportionally at higher doses.

  8. A novel paclitaxel microemulsion containing a reduced amount of Cremophor EL: pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and in vivo antitumor efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wu, Ke-Chun; Zhao, Bing-Xiang; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Xin; Chen, Su; Nie, Shu-Fang; Pan, Wei-San; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prepare a novel paclitaxel (PTX) microemulsion containing a reduced amount of Cremophor EL (CrEL) which had similar pharmacokinetics and antitumor efficacy as the commercially available PTX injection, but a significantly reduced allergic effect due to the CrEL. The pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, in vivo antitumor activity and safety of PTX microemulsion was evaluated. The results of pharmacokinetic and distribution properties of PTX in the microemulsion were similar to those of the PTX injection. The antitumor efficacy of the PTX microemulsion in OVCRA-3 and A 549 tumor-bearing animals was similar to that of PTX injection. The PTX microemulsion did not cause haemolysis, erythrocyte agglutination or simulative reaction. The incidence and degree of allergic reactions exhibited by the PTX microemulsion group, with or without premedication, were significantly lower than those in the PTX injection group (P < .01). In conclusion, the PTX microemulsion had similar pharmacokinetics and anti-tumor efficacy to the PTX injection, but a significantly reduced allergic effect due to CrEL, indicating that the PTX microemulsion overcomes the disadvantages of the conventional PTX injection and is one way of avoiding the limitations of current injection product while providing suitable therapeutic efficacy.

  9. Pharmacokinetics study of calf thymus DNA in rats and beagle dogs with (3)H-labeling and tracing method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuoye; Talbi, Amer; Wang, Xin; Song, Hanlin; Chen, Xijing

    2014-01-01

    This study developed a radioisotope detection and tracing method to investigate the pharmacokinetic properties of calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) in rats and beagle dogs. The radioactivity labeling result was detected through gel electrophoresis analysis, and pharmacokinetic analytical methods for (3)H-ctDNA in rat and beagle dog plasma were developed, respectively. Full method validation indicated that the established radioisotope method was sensitive, specific, rapid and reliable, and the results were all in accordance with the analysis requirement in biological samples. After intravenous administration of the planned doses of (3)H-ctDNA to the rats and beagle dogs, plasma concentrations from the various dose groups declined rapidly. In addition, the radioactive concentration of (3)H-ctDNA in the plasma from single and multiple dosings decreased in a similar trend. Through comparative analysis of the pharmacokinetic parameters, we inferred that the elimination of ctDNA accorded with the linear pharmacokinetic characteristic. The results demonstrated that ctDNA was rapidly eliminated in rat and beagle dog plasma and would not accumulate, indicating the safe use of ctDNA as an immunoadsorptive material without bringing out potential risk.

  10. Pharmacokinetic Profile of µSMIN Plus™, a new Micronized Diosmin Formulation, after Oral Administration in Rats.

    PubMed

    Russo, Rosario; Mancinelli, Angelo; Ciccone, Michele; Terruzzi, Fabio; Pisano, Claudio; Severino, Lorella

    2015-09-01

    Diosmin is a naturally occurring flavonoid present in citrus fruits and other plants belonging to the Rutaceae family. It is used for the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) for its pheblotonic and vaso-active properties, safety and tolerability as well. The aim of the current in vivo study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic profile of a branded micronized diosmin (µSMIN Plus™) compared with plain micronized diosmin in male Sprague-Dawley rats. After oral administration by gastric gavage, blood samples were collected via jugular vein catheters at regular time intervals from baseline up to 24 hours. Plasma concentrations were assessed by LC/MS. For each animal, the following pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using a non-compartmental analysis: maximum plasma drug concentration (Cmax), time to reach Cmax (Tmax), area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-last), elimination half-life (t½), and relative oral bioavailability (%F). The results of the current study clearly showed an improvement in the pharmacokinetic parameters in animals treated with µSMIN Plus™ compared with animals treated with micronized diosmin. In particular, µSMIN Plus™ showed a 4-fold increased bioavailability compared with micronized diosmin. In conclusion, the results from the current study provided a preliminary pharmacokinetic profile for µSMIN Plus™, which may represent a new tool for CVI management.

  11. A UPLC-MS/MS method for simultaneous quantitation of three monoterpene glycosides and four alkaloids in rat plasma: application to a comparative pharmacokinetic study of Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan and single herb extract.

    PubMed

    Ai, Yu; Wu, Yun; Wang, Fenrong; Ma, Wen; Bian, Qiaoxia; Lee, David Y-W; Dai, Ronghua

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a sensitive and reliable ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method for simultaneous quantitation of three monoterpene glycosides (paeoniflorin, alibiflorin and oxypaeoniflorin) and four alkaloids (tetrahydropalmatine, corydaline, dehydrocorydaline and berberine), the main active ingredients of Radix Paeoniae Rubra extract (RPE) and Corydalis yanhusuo extract (CYE) in Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan (HLXLD), and to compare the pharmacokinetics of these active ingredients in normal and arthritic rats orally administrated with HLXLD or RPE/CYE alone. The analytes and internal standard (IS) (geniposide) were separated on a XBridge C18 column (150 × 4.6 mm, 3.5 µm) using gradient elution with the mobile phase consisting of methanol and 0.01% formic acid in water at a flow rate of 0.6 ml/min. The detection of the analytes was performed on Acquity UPLC-MS/MS system with an electrospray ionization and multiple reaction monitoring mode via polarity switching between negative (for monoterpene glycosides) and positive (for alkaloids) ionization mode. The lower limits of quantification were 2.5, 1, 0.5, 0.2, 0.2, 0.02 and 0.01 ng/ml for paeoniflorin, alibiflorin, oxypaeoniflorin, tetrahydropalmatine, corydaline, dehydrocorydaline and berberine, respectively. Intra-day and inter-day precision and accuracy of analytes were well within acceptance criteria (15%). The mean extraction recoveries of analytes and IS from rat plasma were all more than 83.1%. The validated method has been successfully applied to determination of the analytes. Results showed that there were remarkable differences in pharmacokinetic properties of the analytes between herbal formula and single herb group, normal and arthritic group.

  12. Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Insulin Glargine 300 U/mL.

    PubMed

    Clements, Jennifer N; Threatt, Tiffaney; Ward, Eileen; Shealy, Kayce M

    2017-05-01

    Concentrated insulin analogs have recently been approved and are available for clinical use in the management of diabetes mellitus. One new product is insulin glargine U-300 (Sanofi), a basal concentrated insulin of 300 U/mL. Several studies have been conducted and completed evaluating blood samples for the pharmacokinetics of insulin glargine U-300 and euglycemic clamp procedures for the pharmacodynamics. This concentrated insulin has a low within-day variability and high day-to-day reproducibility, allowing for a more constant and prolonged duration of action, compared with insulin glargine U-100 (100 U/mL). Insulin glargine U-300 is equally effective, when compared with insulin glargine U-100 for glycemic control in patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus. Insulin glargine U-300 has a similar efficacy profile to insulin glargine U-100 for glycemic control, yet with lower rates of nocturnal and severe hypoglycemia. Insulin glargine U-300 can be considered an acceptable basal insulin for patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus, and it has a potential role among patients who are naïve to insulin therapy or require titration of basal insulin. Titration of insulin glargine U-300 would result in less volume and a lower risk of hypoglycemia, compared with insulin glargine U-100. This article evaluates and summarizes the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of insulin glargine U-300, for patients with type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus, and summarizes its application to clinical practice.

  13. Ceftriaxone pharmacokinetics by new simple and sensitive ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography method.

    PubMed

    Campos, Michel Leandro; de Moura Alonso, Juliana; Dos Santos Martins, Evelin; Oliveira, Jonata Augusto; Hussni, Carlos Alberto; Peccinini, Rosângela Gonçalves

    2017-02-27

    Ceftriaxone is a cephalosporin antibiotic with a potent antimicrobial activity and excellent penetration in most body fluids such as pleural, peritoneal, spinal and brain. These facts contribute to the application of ceftriaxone in the treatment of bacterial peritonitis, an abdominal disorder in veterinary medicine, with potential risk of death. The determination of ceftriaxone levels in plasma and peritoneal fluid may be used to assess the pharmacokinetic profile at various instances of administration and allows observing if the concentrations needed are being achieved. Therefore a method was developed and validated for the determination of ceftriaxone in plasma and peritoneal fluid which after was applied in a pharmacokinetic profile study. The bioanalytical method validation was performed according to widely acceptable experiments. Two horses were used as a model of the method applicability; ceftriaxone was intraperitoneally administered to these animals as a single dose. The plasma and peritoneal fluid analysis were performed using an UHPLC system in reverse phase chromatography mode in fully validated conditions. The methods have shown linearity between 0.49 and 500μg/mL for plasma, and between 0.24 and 500μg/mL for peritoneal fluid. The quantitative analysis of ceftriaxone in these matrices allows monitoring of the therapy. This method showed improved sensitivity as well as the quantitation in peritoneal fluid.

  14. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacokinetic variability of heroin and its metabolites: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Rook, Elisabeth J; Huitema, Alwin D R; van den Brink, Wim; van Ree, Jan M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the pharmacokinetics of heroin after intravenous, oral, intranasal, intramuscular and rectal application and after inhalation in humans, with a special focus on heroin maintenance therapy in heroin dependent patients. In heroin maintenance therapy high doses pharmaceutically prepared heroin (up to 1000 mg/day) are prescribed to chronic heroin dependents, who do not respond to conventional interventions such as methadone maintenance treatment. Possible drug-drug interactions with the hydrolysis of heroin into 6-monoacetylmorphine and morphine, the glucuronidation of morphine and interactions with drug transporting proteins are described. Since renal and hepatic impairment is common in the special population of heroin dependent patients, specific attention was paid on the impact of renal and hepatic impairment. Hepatic impairment did not seem to have a clinically relevant effect on the pharmacokinetics of heroin and its metabolites. However, some modest effects of renal impairment have been noted, and therefore control of the creatinine clearance during heroin-assisted treatment seems recommendable.

  15. Development of a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Sirolimus: Predicting Bioavailability Based on Intestinal CYP3A Content

    PubMed Central

    Emoto, C; Fukuda, T; Cox, S; Christians, U; Vinks, A A

    2013-01-01

    Sirolimus is an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and is increasingly being used in transplantation and cancer therapies. Sirolimus has low oral bioavailability and exhibits large pharmacokinetic variability. The underlying mechanisms for this variability have not been explored to a large extent. Sirolimus metabolism was characterized by in vitro intrinsic clearance estimation. Pathway contribution ranked from CYP3A4 > CYP3A5 > CYP2C8. With the well stirred and Qgut models sirolimus bioavailability was predicted at 15%. Interindividual differences in bioavailability could be attributed to variable intestinal CYP3A expression. The physiologically-based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) model developed in Simcyp predicted a high distribution of sirolimus into adipose tissue and another elimination pathway in addition to CYP-mediated metabolism. PBPK model predictive performance was acceptable with Cmax and area under the curve (AUC) estimates within 20% of observed data in a dose escalation study. The model also showed potential to assess the impact of hepatic impairment and drug–drug interaction (DDI) on sirolimus pharmacokinetics. PMID:23884207

  16. The pharmacokinetic effect of coadministration of apremilast and methotrexate in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong; Zhou, Simon; Nissel, James; Wu, Anfan; Lau, Henry; Palmisano, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Apremilast is a novel agent for the treatment of inflammatory based autoimmune disorders. The objective of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetic effects of co administration of apremilast and methotrexate on both agents. This was an open-label, multi-center, 3-treatment period, sequential study conducted in otherwise healthy subjects with psoriatic arthritis or rheumatoid arthritis who were receiving a stable oral dose of methotrexate between 7.5 to 20 mg once weekly. Subjects received their dose of methotrexate on Days 1 and 8 of the study in addition to Apremilast 30 mg oral every 12 hours on Days 3–8. Pharmacokinectic profiles of methotrexate and 7-OH methotrexate were characterized after methotrexate alone (Day 1) and after co-administration of methotrexate and Apremilast (on Day 8). The pharmacokinetic profile of Apremilast was characterized after Apremilast alone (on Day 7) and after co-administration of methotrexate and Apremilast (on Day 8). The 90% confidence interval of the ratio of the geometric means for the Cmax and AUC parameters for methotrexate, 7-OH methotrexate, and Apremilast alone and after co-adminstration are all within the FDA acceptance range for equivalency (80–125%). This study showed that methotrexate and apremilast can be co-administered without any effect on the pharmacokinetic exposure of either agent. PMID:26097790

  17. The pharmacokinetic effect of coadministration of apremilast and methotrexate in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Zhou, Simon; Nissel, James; Wu, Anfan; Lau, Henry; Palmisano, Maria

    2014-11-01

    Apremilast is a novel agent for the treatment of inflammatory based autoimmune disorders. The objective of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetic effects of co administration of apremilast and methotrexate on both agents. This was an open-label, multi-center, 3-treatment period, sequential study conducted in otherwise healthy subjects with psoriatic arthritis or rheumatoid arthritis who were receiving a stable oral dose of methotrexate between 7.5 to 20 mg once weekly. Subjects received their dose of methotrexate on Days 1 and 8 of the study in addition to Apremilast 30 mg oral every 12 hours on Days 3-8. Pharmacokinectic profiles of methotrexate and 7-OH methotrexate were characterized after methotrexate alone (Day 1) and after co-administration of methotrexate and Apremilast (on Day 8). The pharmacokinetic profile of Apremilast was characterized after Apremilast alone (on Day 7) and after co-administration of methotrexate and Apremilast (on Day 8). The 90% confidence interval of the ratio of the geometric means for the Cmax and AUC parameters for methotrexate, 7-OH methotrexate, and Apremilast alone and after co-adminstration are all within the FDA acceptance range for equivalency (80-125%). This study showed that methotrexate and apremilast can be co-administered without any effect on the pharmacokinetic exposure of either agent.

  18. Dynamic model for simulating the acceptance problem of nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect

    Seifritz, W.; Mennig, J.

    1987-01-01

    Nonlinear dynamics are attaining greater interest in different fields of application. Since the early 1980s, these methods have been applied intensively to a variety of very different general problems, such as the description of political and economic processes as well as the symbiotic behavior in the flora and fauna. The authors have tried to apply these mathematical methods to the dynamic behavior inherent in the problem of the acceptance of nuclear energy. The model, which simplifies the real situation, is two-dimensional and describes the symbiosis of two individuals: the capacity of nuclear power plants P and their acceptance A by the public. It is clear that in reality the acceptance problem depends on a series of other variables as well. However, it is believed that our investigations reveal some universal properties inherent to our socioeconomic system: nonlinearity and dissipative processes.

  19. Acceptability of GM foods among Pakistani consumers.

    PubMed

    Ali, Akhter; Rahut, Dil Bahadur; Imtiaz, Muhammad

    2016-04-02

    In Pakistan majority of the consumers do not have information about genetically modified (GM) foods. In developing countries particularly in Pakistan few studies have focused on consumers' acceptability about GM foods. Using comprehensive primary dataset collected from 320 consumers in 2013 from Pakistan, this study analyzes the determinants of consumers' acceptability of GM foods. The data was analyzed by employing the bivariate probit model and censored least absolute deviation (CLAD) models. The empirical results indicated that urban consumers are more aware of GM foods compared to rural consumers. The acceptance of GM foods was more among females' consumers as compared to male consumers. In addition, the older consumers were more willing to accept GM food compared to young consumers. The acceptability of GM foods was also higher among wealthier households. Low price is the key factor leading to the acceptability of GM foods. The acceptability of the GM foods also reduces the risks among Pakistani consumers.

  20. Tanshinones: Sources, Pharmacokinetics and Anti-Cancer Activities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Jiang, Peixin; Ye, Min; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Jiang, Cheng; Lü, Junxuan

    2012-01-01

    Tanshinones are a class of abietane diterpene compound isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza (Danshen or Tanshen in Chinese), a well-known herb in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Since they were first identified in the 1930s, more than 40 lipophilic tanshinones and structurally related compounds have been isolated from Danshen. In recent decades, numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the isolation, identification, synthesis and pharmacology of tanshinones. In addition to the well-studied cardiovascular activities, tanshinones have been investigated more recently for their anti-cancer activities in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we update the herbal and alternative sources of tanshinones, and the pharmacokinetics of selected tanshinones. We discuss anti-cancer properties and identify critical issues for future research. Whereas previous studies have suggested anti-cancer potential of tanshinones affecting multiple cellular processes and molecular targets in cell culture models, data from in vivo potency assessment experiments in preclinical models vary greatly due to lack of uniformity of solvent vehicles and routes of administration. Chemical modifications and novel formulations had been made to address the poor oral bioavailability of tanshinones. So far, human clinical trials have been far from ideal in their design and execution for the purpose of supporting an anti-cancer indication of tanshinones. PMID:23202971

  1. A Review: Pharmaceutical and Pharmacokinetic Aspect of Nanocrystalline Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dhaval A; Murdande, Sharad B; Dave, Rutesh H

    2016-01-01

    Nanocrystals have emerged as a potential formulation strategy to eliminate the bioavailability-related problems by enhancing the initial dissolution rate and moderately super-saturating the thermodynamic solubility. This review contains an in-depth knowledge of, the processing method for formulation, an accurate quantitative assessment of the solubility and dissolution rates and their correlation to observe pharmacokinetic data. Poor aqueous solubility is considered the major hurdle in the development of pharmaceutical compounds. Because of a lack of understanding with regard to the change in the thermodynamic and kinetic properties (i.e., solubility and dissolution rate) upon nanosizing, we critically reviewed the literatures for solubility determination to understand the significance and accuracy of the implemented analytical method. In the latter part, we reviewed reports that have quantitatively studied the effect of the particle size and the surface area change on the initial dissolution rate enhancement using alternative approaches besides the sink condition dissolution. The lack of an apparent relationship between the dissolution rate enhancement and the observed bioavailability are discussed by reviewing the reported in vivo data on animal models along with the particle size and food effect. The review will provide comprehensive information to the pharmaceutical scientist in the area of nanoparticulate drug delivery.

  2. Palmitoylethanolamide for the treatment of pain: pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielsson, Linda; Mattsson, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) has been suggested to have useful analgesic properties and to be devoid of unwanted effects. Here, we have examined critically this contention, and discussed available data concerning the pharmacokinetics of PEA and its formulation. Sixteen clinical trials, six case reports/pilot studies and a meta‐analysis of PEA as an analgesic have been published in the literature. For treatment times up to 49 days, the current clinical data argue against serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs) at an incidence of 1/200 or greater. For treatment lasting more than 60 days, the number of patients is insufficient to rule out a frequency of ADRs of less than 1/100. The six published randomized clinical trials are of variable quality. Presentation of data without information on data spread and nonreporting of data at times other than the final measurement were among issues that were identified. Further, there are no head‐to‐head clinical comparisons of unmicronized vs. micronized formulations of PEA, and so evidence for superiority of one formulation over the other is currently lacking. Nevertheless, the available clinical data support the contention that PEA has analgesic actions and motivate further study of this compound, particularly with respect to head‐to‐head comparisons of unmicronized vs. micronized formulations of PEA and comparisons with currently recommended treatments. PMID:27220803

  3. Palmitoylethanolamide for the treatment of pain: pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Linda; Mattsson, Sofia; Fowler, Christopher J

    2016-10-01

    Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) has been suggested to have useful analgesic properties and to be devoid of unwanted effects. Here, we have examined critically this contention, and discussed available data concerning the pharmacokinetics of PEA and its formulation. Sixteen clinical trials, six case reports/pilot studies and a meta-analysis of PEA as an analgesic have been published in the literature. For treatment times up to 49 days, the current clinical data argue against serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs) at an incidence of 1/200 or greater. For treatment lasting more than 60 days, the number of patients is insufficient to rule out a frequency of ADRs of less than 1/100. The six published randomized clinical trials are of variable quality. Presentation of data without information on data spread and nonreporting of data at times other than the final measurement were among issues that were identified. Further, there are no head-to-head clinical comparisons of unmicronized vs. micronized formulations of PEA, and so evidence for superiority of one formulation over the other is currently lacking. Nevertheless, the available clinical data support the contention that PEA has analgesic actions and motivate further study of this compound, particularly with respect to head-to-head comparisons of unmicronized vs. micronized formulations of PEA and comparisons with currently recommended treatments.

  4. The effects of acetaminophen on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of warfarin.

    PubMed

    Kwan, D; Bartle, W R; Walker, S E

    1999-01-01

    The oral anticoagulant warfarin is clinically administered as a racemic mixture of two enantiomers, (R) and (S). Many relevant drug interactions with warfarin have been attributed to the specific metabolic inhibition of the elimination of the more pharmacologically active (S)-enantiomer. To investigate reports that acetaminophen can potentiate the anticoagulant effect of warfarin, 20 healthy male volunteers were each given single oral 20 mg doses of racemic warfarin on three separate occasions: (1) alone, (2) after 1 day of acetaminophen (4 g/d), and (3) after 2 weeks of acetaminophen (4 g/d). The urinary excretion pattern of acetaminophen and its metabolites was not significantly altered over its course of administration. The (R)- and (S)-enantiomers of warfarin exhibited significantly different pharmacokinetic properties. However, acetaminophen did not alter the disposition of either (R)- or (S)-warfarin. All subjects exhibited a pharmacodynamic response to racemic warfarin. The response was not significantly altered in the presence of acute or chronic acetaminophen dosing, as assessed by prothrombin time and factor VII concentrations.

  5. Biowaiver: an alternative to in vivo pharmacokinetic bioequivalence studies.

    PubMed

    Mishra, V; Gupta, U; Jain, N K

    2010-03-01

    Bioequivalence is a vital concern in drug development even more significant in the case of Narrow Therapeutic Index (NTI) drugs. In clinical development of New Chemical Entities (NCE), bioequivalence studies necessitate to be performed when the formulation of the pharmaceutical dosage form has been changed. In vivo pharmacokinetic data can be used as surrogate parameters for in vivo solubility and permeability data. The Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) has emerged as a helpful tool in product development by alluding to the in vivo performance of the active substance. The bio-relevance of the BCS properties and the in vitro release are best expressed through a correlation between in vitro and in vivo data. Recently BCS has been implemented for waiving bioequivalence studies on the basis of the solubility and gastrointestinal permeability of drug substance and can be strategically deployed to save time and resources during generic drug development. The BCS has been adopted as a very useful tool for in vivo drug design and development worldwide, particularly in terms of regulatory standards. A BCS-based biowaiver has become an important and cost-saving tool in approval of generic drugs.

  6. Lessons for the clinic from rituximab pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Golay, Josée; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Foà, Robin; Gaidano, Gianluca; Gamba, Enrica; Pane, Fabrizio; Pinto, Antonello; Specchia, Giorgina; Zaja, Francesco; Regazzi, Mario

    2013-01-01

    The anti-CD20 antibody rituximab (RTX; Rituxan®, MabThera®) was the first anti-cancer antibody approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 1997 and it is now the most-studied unconjugated therapeutic antibody. The knowledge gained over the past 15 y on the pharmacodynamics (PD) of this antibody has led to the development of a new generation of anti-CD20 antibodies with enhanced efficacy in vitro. Studies on the pharmacokinetics (PK) properties and the effect of factors such as tumor load and localization, antibody concentration in the circulation and gender on both PK and clinical response has allowed the design of optimized schedules and novel routes of RTX administration. Although clinical results using newer anti-CD20 antibodies, such as ofatumumab and obinutuzumab, and novel administration schedules for RTX are still being evaluated, the knowledge gained so far on RTX PK and PD should also be relevant for other unconjugated monoclonal antibody therapeutics, and will be critically reviewed here. PMID:23933992

  7. Factors Controlling the Pharmacokinetics, Biodistribution and Intratumoral Penetration of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ernsting, Mark J.; Murakami, Mami; Roy, Aniruddha; Li, Shyh-Dar

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle drug delivery to the tumor is impacted by multiple factors: nanoparticles must evade clearance by renal filtration and the reticuloendothelial system, extravasate through the enlarged endothelial gaps in tumors, penetrate through dense stroma in the tumor microenvironment to reach the tumor cells, remain in the tumor tissue for a prolonged period of time, and finally release the active agent to induce pharmacological effect. The physicochemical properties of nanoparticles such as size, shape, surface charge, surface chemistry (PEGylation, ligand conjugation) and composition affect the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, intratumoral penetration and tumor bioavailability. On the other hand, tumor biology (blood flow, perfusion, permeability, interstitial fluid pressure and stroma content) and patient characteristics (age, gender, tumor type, tumor location, body composition and prior treatments) also have impact on drug delivery by nanoparticles. It is now believed that both nanoparticles and the tumor microenvironment have to be optimized or adjusted for optimal delivery. This review provides a comprehensive summary of how these nanoparticle and biological factors impact nanoparticle delivery to tumors, with discussion on how the tumor microenvironment can be adjusted and how patients can be stratified by imaging methods to receive the maximal benefit of nanomedicine. Perspectives and future directions are also provided. PMID:24075927

  8. The toxicity and pharmacokinetics of carbon nanotubes as an effective drug carrier.

    PubMed

    Luo, En; Song, Guodong; Li, Yunfeng; Shi, Pengwei; Hu, Jing; Lin, Yunfeng

    2013-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown broad potential in biomedical applications, given their unique mechanical, optical, and chemical properties. Functionalized carbon nanotubes not only can deliver drug into specific organs but also can inherently produce heating by near-infrared laser radiation for cancer therapy. However, the toxicological and pharmacological profile of such carbon nanotube system will have to be determined prior to any clinical study undertaken. For providing a guide to develop safe drug carriers, this review discusses the functionalization, toxicity and pharmacokinetics of carbon nanotubes. Lastly, the drug delivery and thermal ablation on carbon nanotubes are proposed.

  9. Pharmacokinetic profile of cocaine following intravenous administration in the female rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Parlaman, Joshua P.; Thompson, Barbara L.; Levitt, Pat; Stanwood, Gregg D.

    2007-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure in a rabbit intravenous model has revealed selective disruption of brain development and pharmacological responsiveness. We therefore examined the pharmacokinetic properties of cocaine in this model. Dutch-belted rabbits were surgically implanted with a catheter in the carotid artery, allowed to recover, and then injected intravenously with a cocaine bolus. Cocaine and benzoylecgonine concentrations were measured in arterial blood plasma and analyzed by nonlinear regression and noncompartmental analyses. Peak cocaine concentration occurred by 30s, was transient, and distribution was rapid. The profile of cocaine in the rabbit is similar to that observed in humans using cocaine at recreational doses. PMID:17383635

  10. Acceptance sampling using judgmental and randomly selected samples

    SciTech Connect

    Sego, Landon H.; Shulman, Stanley A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Wilson, John E.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Sieber, W. Karl

    2010-09-01

    We present a Bayesian model for acceptance sampling where the population consists of two groups, each with different levels of risk of containing unacceptable items. Expert opinion, or judgment, may be required to distinguish between the high and low-risk groups. Hence, high-risk items are likely to be identifed (and sampled) using expert judgment, while the remaining low-risk items are sampled randomly. We focus on the situation where all observed samples must be acceptable. Consequently, the objective of the statistical inference is to quantify the probability that a large percentage of the unsampled items in the population are also acceptable. We demonstrate that traditional (frequentist) acceptance sampling and simpler Bayesian formulations of the problem are essentially special cases of the proposed model. We explore the properties of the model in detail, and discuss the conditions necessary to ensure that required samples sizes are non-decreasing function of the population size. The method is applicable to a variety of acceptance sampling problems, and, in particular, to environmental sampling where the objective is to demonstrate the safety of reoccupying a remediated facility that has been contaminated with a lethal agent.

  11. Comparison of three physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models of benzene disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Bois, F.Y.; Woodruff, T.J.; Spear, R.C.

    1990-12-21

    We assess the goodness of fit of three physiologically-based models of benzene pharmacokinetics to experimental data in Fischer-344 rats. These models were independently developed and published. Large differences in the quality of the fit are observed. In addition, the parameter values leading to acceptable fits are spread over the entire range of physiologically plausible values and can be quite different from average or standard values. On the other hand, choosing standard values for the parameters does not ensure good predictions of all tissue levels. These results emphasize the difficulty of a rigorous calibration of physiological models, and the need for further research in this area. For risk assessment purposes, simpler models, making equivalent use of the crucial data, are probably preferable. 29 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Ethinyl estradiol and 17β-estradiol in combined oral contraceptives: pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Stanczyk, Frank Z; Archer, David F; Bhavnani, Bhagu R

    2013-06-01

    The need to seek improved combined oral contraceptive (COC) efficacy, with fewer health risks and better acceptability, has been ongoing since the introduction of COCs more than 50 years ago. New progestin formulations combined with lower doses of ethinyl estradiol (EE), the predominant estrogenic component of COCs, have reduced the incidence of venous thromboembolism and other negative outcomes of COC treatment. Previous attempts to use endogenous 17β-estradiol (E₂) instead of EE were limited primarily by poor cycle control. The recent introduction of E₂-based formulations has renewed interest to determine if there are potential benefits of using E₂ in COCs. These formulations have been shown to have similar efficacy and cycle control as EE-based COCs. This review provides a brief summary of the pharmacology of EE and E₂, including metabolism, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, as well as adverse effects of these estrogens.

  13. Acceptance in Romantic Relationships: The Frequency and Acceptability of Partner Behavior Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doss, Brian D.; Christensen, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Despite the recent emphasis on acceptance in romantic relationships, no validated measure of relationship acceptance presently exists. To fill this gap, the 20-item Frequency and Acceptability of Partner Behavior Inventory (FAPBI; A. Christensen & N. S. Jacobson, 1997) was created to assess separately the acceptability and frequency of both…

  14. 24 CFR 203.202 - Plan acceptability and acceptance renewal criteria-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUD acceptance of such change or modification, except that changes mandated by other applicable laws... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plan acceptability and acceptance... Underwriting Procedures Insured Ten-Year Protection Plans (plan) § 203.202 Plan acceptability and...

  15. Application of a novel liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of antazoline in human plasma: Result of ELEPHANT-I [ELEctrophysiological, pharmacokinetic and hemodynamic effects of PHenazolinum (ANTazoline mesylate)] human pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Giebułtowicz, Joanna; Piotrowski, Roman; Baran, Jakub; Kułakowski, Piotr; Wroczyński, Piotr

    2016-05-10

    Antazoline is a first-generation antihistaminic agent with antiarrhythmic quinidine-like properties. In some countries, it is widely used for termination of cardiac arrhythmias, especially atrial fibrillation (AF). However, no human pharmacokinetic studies have been conducted with intravenous antazoline. The aim of our study was to develop and validate a novel liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the determination of antazoline in human plasma: the ELEPHANT-I [ELEctrophysiological, pharmacokinetic and hemodynamic effects of PHenazolinum (ANTazoline mesylate)] human pharmacokinetic study. Antazoline was extracted from plasma using liquid-liquid extraction. The concentration of the analyte was measured by LC-MS/MS with xylometazoline as an internal standard. The method was validated for linearity, precision, accuracy, stability (freeze/thaw stability, stability in autosampler, short and long term stability), dilution integrity and matrix effect. The analyzed validation criteria were fulfilled. The method was applied to a pharmacokinetic study involving 10 healthy volunteers. Following a single intravenous dose of antazoline mesylate (100 mg), the plasma concentration profile showed a relative fast elimination with a terminal elimination half-life of 2.29 h. A relatively high volume of distribution was observed (Vss=315 L). The values of mean residence time (MRT∞), area under the curve (AUC∞) and clearance were 3.45 h, 0.91 mg h L(-1) and 80.5 L h(-1), respectively. One volunteer showed significant differences in pharmacokinetic parameters. In conclusion, the proposed new LC-MS/MS method was successfully used for the first time for the determination of antazoline in human plasma.

  16. Pharmacokinetics and metabolism of brotizolam in humans

    PubMed Central

    Bechtel, W. D.

    1983-01-01

    1 Pharmacokinetic studies were performed in healthy young volunteers and in elderly patients after oral administration of single doses (0.5 mg), increasing doses (0.5-1.5 mg), and multiple doses (1.0 mg) of brotizolam. 2 Brotizolam was absorbed quickly from the gastro-intestinal tract. Elimination half-lives were in the range of 3.6-7.9 h. 3 In healthy young volunteers as well as in elderly patients, there was neither a tendency for brotizolam to accumulate nor was there any indication of enzyme induction. 4 Brotizolam was metabolized almost completely into hydroxylated compounds which were conjugated prior to renal excretion. 5 After oral administration of [14C]-brotizolam, two-thirds of excretion of radioactivity was renal and was completed within 4 days. PMID:6661373

  17. Pharmacokinetics of flunixin meglumine in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hardie, E M; Hardee, G E; Rawlings, C A

    1985-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of flunixin meglumine, a potent nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent, were studied in 6 intact, awake dogs. Plasma samples were obtained up to 12 hours after IV administration of flunixin meglumine. Flunixin concentration was determined, using high performance liquid chromatography. Plasma data best fit a 2-compartment model. Distribution half-life was 0.55 hour; elimination half-life was 3.7 hours; volume of distribution (area) was 0.35 L/kg; volume of distribution at steady state was 0.18 L/kg; volume of the central compartment was 0.079 L/kg; and total body clearance was 0.064 L/hr/kg. Flunixin concentrations obtained over a 6-hour period in 3 dogs with septic peritonitis did not differ significantly from those obtained from healthy dogs.

  18. Liposomal anticancer therapy: pharmacokinetic and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Di Paolo, A

    2004-11-01

    Liposomes, which are vesicles composed of a phospholipid bilayer surrounding an aqueous milieu, represent a new strategy for anticancer drug delivery. Extravasation and accumulation of liposomal drugs within neoplastic tissues are possible because of the leaky vasculature and scarce lymphatic vessels of tumours (the enhanced permeability and retention effect). Furthermore, liposomal chemotherapeutic agents display distinctive pharmacokinetic characteristics, because they possess longer elimination half-lives, reduced clearance and smaller volume of distribution with respect to corresponding free drugs. Taken together, these features lead to highest levels of cytotoxic agents in tumours, as demonstrated in preclinical models and clinical trials, whereas healthy tissues are spared from toxicity. In fact, liposomal drugs (i.e., doxorubicin), alone or in combination with other cytotoxic agents, lead to improved clinical effectiveness and ameliorated toxicity profile with respect to corresponding free drugs when they are used for the treatment of metastatic breast and ovarian cancers, and Kaposi's sarcoma.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of moxidectin and doramectin in goats.

    PubMed

    Escudero, E; Carceles, C M; Diaz, M S; Sutra, J F; Galtier, P; Alvinerie, M

    1999-10-01

    The pharmacokinetic behaviour of doramectin after a single subcutaneous administration and moxidectin following a single subcutaneous or oral drench were studied in goats at a dosage of 0.2 mg kg(-1). The drug plasma concentration-time data were analysed by compartmental pharmacokinetics and non-compartmental methods. Maximum plasma concentrations of moxidectin were attained earlier and to a greater extent than doramectin (shorter t(max) and greater C(max) and AUC than doramectin). MRT of doramectin (4.91 +/- 0.07 days) was also significantly shorter than that of moxidectin (12.43 +/- 1.28 days). Then, the exposure of animals to doramectin in comparison with moxidectin was significantly shorter. The apparent absorption rate of moxidectin was not significantly different after oral and subcutaneous administration but the extent of absorption, reflected in the peak concentration (C(max)) and the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC), of the subcutaneous injection (24.27 +/- 1.99 ng ml(-1) and 136.72 +/- 7.35 ng d ml(-1) respectively) was significantly greater than that of the oral administration (15.53 +/- 1.27 ng ml(-1) and 36.72 +/- 4.05 ng d ml(-1) respectively). The mean residence time (MRT) of moxidectin didn't differ significantly when administered orally or subcutaneously. Therefore low oral bioavailability and the early emergence of resistance in this minor species may be related. These results deserve to be correlated with efficacy studies for refining dosage requirements of endectocides in this species.

  20. Pharmacokinetics of metoprolol during pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Rachel J; Eyal, Sara; Easterling, Thomas R; Caritis, Steve N; Venkataraman, Raman; Hankins, Gary; Rytting, Erik; Thummel, Kenneth; Kelly, Edward J; Risler, Linda; Phillips, Brian; Honaker, Matthew T; Shen, Danny D; Hebert, Mary F

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the steady-state pharmacokinetics of metoprolol during pregnancy and lactation. Serial plasma, urine, and breast milk concentrations of metoprolol and its metabolite, α-hydroxymetoprolol, were measured over 1 dosing interval in women treated with metoprolol (25-750 mg/day) during early pregnancy (n = 4), mid-pregnancy (n = 14), and late pregnancy (n = 15), as well as postpartum (n = 9) with (n = 4) and without (n = 5) lactation. Subjects were genotyped for CYP2D6 loss-of-function allelic variants. Using paired analysis, mean metoprolol apparent oral clearance was significantly higher in mid-pregnancy (361 ± 223 L/h, n = 5, P < .05) and late pregnancy (568 ± 273 L/h, n = 8, P < .05) compared with ≥3 months postpartum (200 ± 131 and 192 ± 98 L/h, respectively). When the comparison was limited to extensive metabolizers (EMs), metoprolol apparent oral clearance was significantly higher during both mid- and late pregnancy (P < .05). Relative infant exposure to metoprolol through breast milk was <1.0% of maternal weight-adjusted dose (n = 3). Because of the large, pregnancy-induced changes in metoprolol pharmacokinetics, if inadequate clinical responses are encountered, clinicians who prescribe metoprolol during pregnancy should be prepared to make aggressive changes in dosage (dose and frequency) or consider using an alternate beta-blocker.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of intrarectal omeprazole in alpacas.

    PubMed

    Marmulak, T; Stanley, S; Kass, P H; Wiebe, V; McKemie, D; Pusterla, N

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of omeprazole in three different vehicles when administered rectally to six alpacas. Alpacas were given single doses of omeprazole (4 mg/kg) in a double-blinded, randomized cross-over design with a 1 week washout period. Omeprazole formulations consisted of (1) Treatment A: omeprazole paste mixed in surgical lubricant (2) Treatment B: omeprazole capsule contents in 8.4% sodium bicarbonate and (3) Treatment C: omeprazole capsule contents in surgical lubricant and 8.4% sodium bicarbonate solution. Plasma samples were drawn at 0, 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 180, 300 and 480 min. Omeprazole plasma concentrations were determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic results demonstrated median peak plasma concentrations (C(max)) of 7.35 (3.2-15.2), 7.30 (1.7-10.9) and 8.65 (1.8-19.3) ng/mL and median area under the concentration curve (AUC((0-180))) of 747 (237-1681) min x ng/mL, 552.9 (39-1063) min x ng/mL, and 972 (107-1841) min x ng/mL for treatments A, B and C, respectively. The median half-lives were similar between groups: 38, 50, and 53 min. As a result of the low measured omeprazole plasma concentrations, it is assumed that rectal absorption of omeprazole is poor in alpacas and not an effective route of administration.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of Intranasal Scopolamine Gel Formulation (Inscop)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Jason L.; Du, Brian; Daniels, Vernie; Simmons, Rita; Buckey, Jay; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2009-01-01

    Space Motion Sickness (SMS) is commonly experienced by astronauts and often requires treatment with medications during early flight days of space missions. Orally administered scopolamine is commonly used by astronauts to prevent SMS. Bioavailability of oral (PO) SMS medications is often low and highly variable. Intranasal (IN) administration of medications achieves higher and more reliable bioavailability than from an equivalent PO dose. Methods: To test the safety and reliability of INSCOP, two clinical studies were performed, a dose escalation study and a comparison study administering INSCOP during normal ambulation and head down tilt bedrest. Efficacy was evaluated by testing INSCOP with two, different motion sickness inducing paradigms. Results: Preliminary results indicate that INSCOP demonstrates linear pharmacokinetics and a low side effect profile. In head down tilt bedrest, relative bioavailability of INSCOP was increased for females at both doses (0.2 and 0.4 mg) and for males at the higher dose (0.4 mg) but is reduced at the lower dose (0.2 mg) compared to normal ambulation. INSCOP displays gender specific differences during ABR. One of the treatment efficacy trials conducted at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center demonstrated that INSCOP is efficacious at both doses (0.2 and 0.4 mg) in suppressing motion sickness symptoms as indicated by longer chair ride times with INSCOP administration than with placebo, and efficacy increases with dose. Similar results were seen using another motion sickness simulator, the motion simulator dome, at the Naval Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory, with significantly increased time in the dome in motion-susceptible subjects when using INSCOP compared to untreated controls. Conclusion: Higher bioavailability, linear pharmacokinetics, a low incidence of side effects, and a favorable efficacy profile make INSCOP a desirable formulation for prophylactic and rescue treatment of astronauts in space and military personnel on

  3. Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Cabozantinib.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Steven A; Miles, Dale R; Nguyen, Linh T

    2017-05-01

    Cabozantinib inhibits receptor tyrosine kinases involved in tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. The capsule formulation (Cometriq(®)) is approved for the treatment of progressive metastatic medullary thyroid cancer at a 140-mg free base equivalent dose. The tablet formulation (Cabometyx™, 60-mg free base equivalent dose) is approved for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma following anti-angiogenic therapy. Cabozantinib displays a long terminal plasma half-life (~120 h) and accumulates ~fivefold by day 15 following daily dosing based on area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC). Four identified inactive metabolites constitute >65 % of total cabozantinib-related AUC following a single 140-mg free base equivalent dose. Cabozantinib AUC was increased by 63-81 % or 7-30 % in subjects with mild/moderate hepatic or renal impairment, respectively; by 34-38 % with concomitant cytochrome P450 3A4 inhibitor ketoconazole; and by 57 % following a high-fat meal. Cabozantinib AUC was decreased by 76-77 % with concomitant cytochrome P450 3A4 inducer rifampin, and was unaffected following administration of proton pump inhibitor esomeprazole. Cabozantinib is a potent in vitro inhibitor of P-glycoprotein, and multidrug and toxin extrusion transporter 1 and 2-K, and is a substrate for multidrug resistance protein 2. No clinically significant covariates affecting cabozantinib pharmacokinetics were identified in a population pharmacokinetic analysis. Patients with medullary thyroid cancer with low model-predicted apparent clearance were more likely to dose hold/reduce cabozantinib early, and had a lower average dose through day 85. However, longitudinal tumor modeling suggests that cabozantinib dose reductions from 140 to 60 mg/day did not markedly reduce tumor growth inhibition in medullary thyroid cancer patients.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of fenoterol in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    von Mandach, U; Böni, R; Danko, J; Huch, R; Huch, A

    1995-02-01

    The beta 2-sympathomimetic drug fenoterol (fenoterol hydrobromide, CAS 1944-12-3, Partusisten) is routinely used to inhibit uterine contractions (tocolysis). Investigations of plasma concentrations of those receiving i.v. or oral tocolysis often show different results, both within particular groups of pregnant women and in comparison with non-pregnant persons. The aim of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics of fenoterol in pregnant women, an important factor which so far had not been known. Four healthy pregnant women with similar weight and gestational age and all with premature labor were administered a continuous intravenous infusion of 4 micrograms fenoterol/min. During and up to 24 hours after the end of the infusion, venous blood samples were taken in order to determine the fenoterol plasma concentrations by radioimmunoassay. From a steady state concentration (css) of 2242 +/- 391 pg/ml (x +/- S.E.), a non-linear two-phased plasma elimination was seen with half-lives t1/2 of 11.40 min and 4.87 h. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-12h) was 6.27 ng/ml x h. The total clearance (Cltot) was 114.8 l/h. These data are nearly the same as the data already known for healthy non-pregnant (male) volunteers. The deviations which are seen in the plasma concentrations in pregnant women in comparison to non-pregnant persons during or after continuous i.v. infusion can therefore not be caused by differences in the pharmacokinetics. Other factors, however, such as body weight and/or gestational age, might influence the results.

  5. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in clinical use of scopolamine.

    PubMed

    Renner, Ulf D; Oertel, Reinhard; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2005-10-01

    The alkaloid L-(-)-scopolamine [L-(-)-hyoscine] competitively inhibits muscarinic receptors for acetylcholine and acts as a nonselective muscarinic antagonist, producing both peripheral antimuscarinic properties and central sedative, antiemetic, and amnestic effects. The parasympatholytic scopolamine, structurally very similar to atropine (racemate of hyoscyamine), is used in conditions requiring decreased parasympathetic activity, primarily for its effect on the eye, gastrointestinal tract, heart, and salivary and bronchial secretion glands, and in special circumstances for a CNS action. Therefore, scopolamine is most suitable for premedication before anesthesia and for antiemetic effects. This alkaloid is the most effective single agent to prevent motion sickness. Scopolamine was the first drug to be made commercially available in a transdermal therapeutic system (TTS-patch) delivering alkaloid. Recently, pharmacokinetic data on scopolamine in different biozlogic matrices were obtained most efficiently using liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) or gas chromatography online coupled to mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic parameters are dependent on the dosage form (oral dose, tablets; parenteral application; IV infusion; SC and IM injection). Scopolamine has a limited bioavailability if orally administered. The maximum drug concentration occurs approximately 0.5 hours after oral administration. Because only 2.6% of nonmetabolized L-(-)-scopolamine is excreted in urine, a first-pass metabolism is suggested to occur after oral administration of scopolamine. Because of its short half-life in plasma and dose-dependent adverse effects (in particular hallucinations and the less serious reactions, eg, vertigo, dry mouth, drowsiness), the clinical use of scopolamine administered orally or parenterally is limited. To minimize the relatively high incidence of side effects, the transdermal dosage form has been developed. The commercially available TTS

  6. 24 CFR 200.926c - Model code provisions for use in partially accepted code jurisdictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Model code provisions for use in partially accepted code jurisdictions. 200.926c Section 200.926c Housing and Urban Development Regulations... Minimum Property Standards § 200.926c Model code provisions for use in partially accepted...

  7. 46 CFR 50.25-10 - Acceptance of piping components by specific letter or approved plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Acceptance of Material and Piping Components § 50.25-10 Acceptance... approved plan must do the following: (1) Submit an engineering type catalog or representative drawings of... specifications by comparing details of the materials' chemical composition, mechanical properties, method...

  8. 46 CFR 50.25-10 - Acceptance of piping components by specific letter or approved plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Acceptance of Material and Piping Components § 50.25-10 Acceptance... approved plan must do the following: (1) Submit an engineering type catalog or representative drawings of... specifications by comparing details of the materials' chemical composition, mechanical properties, method...

  9. Solid lipid nanoparticles as oral delivery systems of phenolic compounds: Overcoming pharmacokinetic limitations for nutraceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Sara; Madureira, Ana Raquel; Campos, Débora; Sarmento, Bruno; Gomes, Ana Maria; Pintado, Manuela; Reis, Flávio

    2017-06-13

    Drug delivery systems, accompanied by nanoparticle technology, have recently emerged as prominent solutions to improve the pharmacokinetic properties, namely bioavailability, of therapeutic and nutraceutical agents. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have received much attention from researchers due to their potential to protect or improve drug properties. SLNs have been reported to be an alternative system to traditional carriers, such as emulsions, liposomes, and polymeric nanoparticles. Phenolic compounds are widespread in plant-derived foodstuffs and therefore abundant in our diet. Over the last decades, phenolic compounds have received considerable attention due to several health promoting properties, mostly related to their antioxidant activity, which can have important implications for health. However, most of these compounds have been associated with poor bioavailability being poorly absorbed, rapidly metabolized and eliminated, which compromises its biological and pharmacological benefits. This paper provides a systematic review of the use of SLNs as oral delivery systems of phenolic compounds, in order to overcome pharmacokinetic limitations of these compounds and improved nutraceutical potential. In vitro studies, as well as works describing topical and oral treatments will be revisited and discussed. The classification, synthesis, and clinical application of these nanomaterials will be also considered in this review article.

  10. Computational approaches and metrics required for formulating biologically realistic nanomaterial pharmacokinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riviere, Jim E.; Scoglio, Caterina; Sahneh, Faryad D.; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.

    2013-01-01

    The field of nanomaterial pharmacokinetics is in its infancy, with major advances largely restricted by a lack of biologically relevant metrics, fundamental differences between particles and small molecules of organic chemicals and drugs relative to biological processes involved in disposition, a scarcity of sufficiently rich and characterized in vivo data and a lack of computational approaches to integrating nanomaterial properties to biological endpoints. A central concept that links nanomaterial properties to biological disposition, in addition to their colloidal properties, is the tendency to form a biocorona which modulates biological interactions including cellular uptake and biodistribution. Pharmacokinetic models must take this crucial process into consideration to accurately predict in vivo disposition, especially when extrapolating from laboratory animals to humans since allometric principles may not be applicable. The dynamics of corona formation, which modulates biological interactions including cellular uptake and biodistribution, is thereby a crucial process involved in the rate and extent of biodisposition. The challenge will be to develop a quantitative metric that characterizes a nanoparticle's surface adsorption forces that are important for predicting biocorona dynamics. These types of integrative quantitative approaches discussed in this paper for the dynamics of corona formation must be developed before realistic engineered nanomaterial risk assessment can be accomplished.

  11. Nonlinear Population Pharmacokinetics of Sirolimus in Patients With Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, K; Cohen, E E W; House, L K; Ramírez, J; Zhang, W; Ratain, M J; Bies, R R

    2012-01-01

    Sirolimus, the prototypical inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin, has substantial antitumor activity. In this study, sirolimus showed nonlinear pharmacokinetic characteristics over a wide dose range (from 1 to 60 mg/week). The objective of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) model to describe the nonlinearity of sirolimus. Whole blood concentration data, obtained from four phase I clinical trials, were analyzed using a nonlinear mixed-effects modeling (NONMEM) approach. The influence of potential covariates was evaluated. Model robustness was assessed using nonparametric bootstrap and visual predictive check approaches. The data were well described by a two-compartment model incorporating a saturable Michaelis–Menten kinetic absorption process. A covariate analysis identified hematocrit as influencing the oral clearance of sirolimus. The visual predictive check indicated that the final pharmacokinetic model adequately predicted observed concentrations. The pharmacokinetics of sirolimus, based on whole blood concentrations, appears to be nonlinear due to saturable absorption. PMID:23887441

  12. Enhancing the Modeling of PFOA Pharmacokinetics with Bayesian Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The detail sufficient to describe the pharmacokinetics (PK) for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and the methods necessary to combine information from multiple data sets are both subjects of ongoing investigation. Bayesian analysis provides tools to accommodate these goals. We exa...

  13. Explicit Pharmacokinetic Modeling: Tools for Documentation, Verification, and Portability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative estimates of tissue dosimetry of environmental chemicals due to multiple exposure pathways require the use of complex mathematical models, such as physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models. The process of translating the abstract mathematics of a PBPK mode...

  14. Impact of release characteristics of sinomenine hydrochloride dosage forms on its pharmacokinetics in beagle dogs

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jin; Shi, Jie-Ming; Zhang, Tian-Hong; Gao, Kun; Mao, Jing-Jing; Li, Bing; Sun, Ying-Hua; He, Zhong-Gui

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of release behavior of sustained-release dosage forms of sinomenine hydrochloride (SM•HCl) on its pharmacokinetics in beagle dogs. METHODS: The in vitro release behavior of two SM•HCl dosage forms, including commercial 12-h sustained-release tablets and 24-h sustained-release pellets prepared in our laboratory, was examined. The two dosage forms were orally administrated to beagle dogs, and then the in vivo SM•HCl pharmacokinetics was investigated and compared. RESULTS: The optimal SM•HCl sustained-release formulation was achieved by mixing slow- and rapid-release pellets (9:1, w/w). The SM•HCl release profiles of the sustained-release pellets were scarcely influenced by the pH of the dissolution medium. Release from the 12-h sustained-release tablets was markedly quicker than that from the 24-h sustained-release pellets, the cumulative release up to 12-h was 99.9% vs 68.7%. From a pharmacokinetic standpoint, the 24-h SM•HCl sustained-release pellets had longer tmax and lower Cmax compared to the 12-h sustained-release tablets, the tmax being 2.67×0.52 h vs 9.83×0.98 h and the Cmax being 1 334.45±368.76 ng/mL vs 893.12±292.55 ng/mL, respectively. However, the AUC0-tn of two SM•HCl dosage forms was comparable and both preparations were statistically bioequivalent. Furthermore, the two preparations had good correlations between SM•HCl percentage absorption in vivo and the cumulative percentage release in vitro. CONCLUSION: The in vitro release properties of the dosage forms strongly affect their pharmacokinetic behavior in vivo. Therefore, managing the in vitro release behavior of dosage forms is a promising strategy for obtaining the optimal in vivo pharmacokinetic characteristics and safe therapeutic drug concentration-time curves. PMID:16052686

  15. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Pharmacogenomics of Immunosuppressants in Allogeneic Haematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Part I.

    PubMed

    McCune, Jeannine S; Bemer, Meagan J

    2016-05-01

    Although immunosuppressive treatments and target concentration intervention (TCI) have significantly contributed to the success of allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT), there is currently no consensus on the best immunosuppressive strategies. Compared with solid organ transplantation, alloHCT is unique because of the potential for bidirectional reactions (i.e. host-versus-graft and graft-versus-host). Postgraft immunosuppression typically includes a calcineurin inhibitor (cyclosporine or tacrolimus) and a short course of methotrexate after high-dose myeloablative conditioning, or a calcineurin inhibitor and mycophenolate mofetil after reduced-intensity conditioning. There are evolving roles for the antithymyocyte globulins (ATGs) and sirolimus as postgraft immunosuppression. A review of the pharmacokinetics and TCI of the main postgraft immunosuppressants is presented in this two-part review. All immunosuppressants are characterized by large intra- and interindividual pharmacokinetic variability and by narrow therapeutic indices. It is essential to understand immunosuppressants' pharmacokinetic properties and how to use them for individualized treatment incorporating TCI to improve outcomes. TCI, which is mandatory for the calcineurin inhibitors and sirolimus, has become an integral part of postgraft immunosuppression. TCI is usually based on trough concentration monitoring, but other approaches include measurement of the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) over the dosing interval or limited sampling schedules with maximum a posteriori Bayesian personalization approaches. Interpretation of pharmacodynamic results is hindered by the prevalence of studies enrolling only a small number of patients, variability in the allogeneic graft source and variability in postgraft immunosuppression. Given the curative potential of alloHCT, the pharmacodynamics of these immunosuppressants deserves to be explored in depth. Development of

  16. Pharmacokinetics of a new ivermectin/praziquantel oil suspension after intramuscular administration in pigs.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shusheng; Chen, Linlin; Guo, Zhaoxu; Hu, Xiuzhi; He, Jiakang; Wang, Gang; Zhao, Tingting; Xiao, Xilong

    2012-04-30

    A new oil suspension containing 0.15% ivermectin and 15% praziquantel for intramuscular injection was developed, and corresponding pharmacokinetics studies were conducted in swine. The combination product is a white- to cream-colored oil suspension and its physical properties such as settling volume ratio, redispersibility, syringeability and flowability are well consistent with the Technical Standards by the Ministry of Agriculture of the People's Republic of China. The pharmacokinetic study consists of two parts. First, the experiments were carried out to compare the pharmacokinetic parameters of the combination product and those same products with praziquantel or ivermectin removed merely. The results showed that no significant change in the major pharmacokinetic parameters (t(1/2z), T(max), C(max), AUC(INF), TimeDur) was observed when either of the component was removed from the combination product, indicating that ivermectin and praziquantel do not interfere with each other when being used together. Second, the pharmacokinetics of the combination product were compared with those of their respective single product. The results showed that the C(max) (15.94 ng/mL) of ivermectin in combination product was 9.01 times higher than the single product, while the AUC(INF) (1925.61 ng h/mL) was 6.02 times higher. Meanwhile, the C(max) (1.48 μg/mL), AUC(INF) (17.08μgh/mL), t(1/2z) (20.25 h), TimeDur3 (42.01 h) and TimeDur4 (16.60 h) of praziquantel in combination product were improved with a factor of 5.48, 13.66, 8.58, 10.10 and 7.31 times when compared with the single product, respectively. Therefore, the efficacy of the combination product was significantly prolonged, especially for praziquantel, so that comprehensive efficacy of controlling parasites sensitive to ivermectin and praziquantel can be achieved with one-single use of it.

  17. Importance of pharmacokinetics in the management of hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Hemophilia A and hemophilia B are caused by congenital deficiency of factor VIII and factor IX, respectively, and may lead to recurrent, spontaneous bleeding into the muscles and joints resulting in disabling arthropathy. Effective management is available in the form of prophylactic infusions of clotting factor concentrates which have been demonstrated to prevent bleeding episodes and greatly improve the quality of life of these patients. Prophylaxis is, however, expensive. Usual dosing regimens rely on weight based calculations but dosing with an understanding of an individual's pharmacokinetic response has been demonstrated to be more effective in predicting clotting factor levels that protect against bleeding episodes. Standard pharmacokinetic studies require a prohibitive number of time sampling points but recent population or Bayesian pharmacokinetics can be used to provide an accurate estimation of an individual's pharmacokinetic response using a limited number of sampling time points. The use of population pharmacokinetics has the potential to greatly increase the use of pharmacokinetic dosing regimens and optimize the use of clotting factor concentrates in patients with hemophilia.

  18. Predicting Age-appropriate Pharmacokinetics of Six Volatile Organic Compounds in the Rat Utilizing Physiologically-based Pharmacokinetic Modeling (T)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The capability of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to incorporate ageappropriate physiological and chemical-specific parameters was utilized in this study to predict changes in internal dosimetry for six volatile organic compounds (VOCs) across different ages o...

  19. PREDICTING AGE-DEPENDENT PHARMACOKINETICS OF SIX VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS UTILIZING PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING OF RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, age-appropriate physiological and chemical-specific parameters were incorporated into a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict changes in internal dosimetry for six volatile organic compounds (VOCs) across different lifestages of the rat and ...

  20. Predicting Age-Appropriate Pharmacokinetics of Six Volatile Organic Compounds in the Rat Utilizing Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    The capability of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models to incorporate age-appropriate physiological and chemical-specific parameters was utilized to predict changes in internal dosimetry for six volatile organic compounds (VOCs) across different ages of rats.