Science.gov

Sample records for acceptable turbine life

  1. Boiler-turbine life extension

    SciTech Connect

    Natzkov, S.; Nikolov, M.

    1995-12-01

    The design life of the main power equipment-boilers and turbines is about 105 working hours. The possibilities for life extension are after normatively regulated control tests. The diagnostics and methodology for Boilers and Turbines Elements Remaining Life Assessment using up to date computer programs, destructive and nondestructive control of metal of key elements of units equipment, metal creep and low cycle fatigue calculations. As well as data for most common damages and some technical decisions for elements life extension are presented.

  2. The acceptability of ending a patient's life

    PubMed Central

    Guedj, M; Gibert, M; Maudet, A; Munoz, S; Mullet, E; Sorum, P

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To clarify how lay people and health professionals judge the acceptability of ending the life of a terminally ill patient. Design: Participants judged this acceptability in a set of 16 scenarios that combined four factors: the identity of the actor (patient or physician), the patient's statement or not of a desire to have his life ended, the nature of the action as relatively active (injecting a toxin) or passive (disconnecting life support), and the type of suffering (intractable physical pain, complete dependence, or severe psychiatric illness). Participants: 115 lay people and 72 health professionals (22 nurse's aides, 44 nurses, six physicians) in Toulouse, France. Main measurements: Mean acceptability ratings for each scenario for each group. Results: Life ending interventions are more acceptable to lay people than to the health professionals. For both, acceptability is highest for intractable physical suffering; is higher when patients end their own lives than when physicians do so; and, when physicians are the actors, is higher when patients have expressed a desire to die (voluntary euthanasia) than when they have not (involuntary euthanasia). In contrast, when patients perform the action, acceptability for the lay people and nurse's aides does not depend on whether the patient has expressed a desire to die, while for the nurses and physicians unassisted suicide is more acceptable than physician assisted suicide. Conclusions: Lay participants judge the acceptability of life ending actions in largely the same way as do healthcare professionals. PMID:15923476

  3. Establishment of noise acceptance criteria for wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, D. G.; Shepherd, K. P.; Grosveld, F.

    1981-01-01

    A program is being conducted to develop noise criteria for wind turbines which minimize annoyance and which can be used in design specifications for future machines. The approach consists of presenting wind turbine noise stimuli to test subjects in a laboratory listening chamber. The responses of the subjects are recorded for a range of stimuli which encompass the designs, operating conditions, and ambient noise levels of current and future installations. Results to date have established the threshold of detectability for a range of impulsive stimuli of the type associated with blade/tower-wake interactions. The status of the ongoing psychoacoustic tests, the subjective data, and the approach to the development of noise acceptance criteria are described.

  4. Turbine blade nonlinear structural and life analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Laflen, J. H.; Halford, G. R.; Kaufman, A.

    1982-01-01

    The utility of advanced structural analysis and life prediction techniques was evaluated for the life assessment of a commercial air-cooled turbine blade with a history of tip cracking. Three dimensional, nonlinear finite element structural analyses were performed for the blade tip region. The computed strain-temperature history of the critical location was imposed on a uniaxial strain controlled test specimen to evaluate the validity of the structural analysis method. Experimental results indicated higher peak stresses and greater stress relaxation than the analytical predictions. Life predictions using the Strainrange Partitioning and Frequency Modified approaches predicted 1200 to 4420 cycles and 2700 cycles to crack initiation, respectively, compared to an observed life of 3000 cycles.

  5. Laser cladding and inspection for life extension of turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Failor, J.

    1995-03-01

    Turbine blades used in commercial aviation require very close tolerances in order to maintain engine performance. Blade tip clearances and shroud gap limits are held to within several thousandths, keeping air bypasses and vibration to a minimum. At both the maintenance and overhaul levels, components are inspected to serviceable guidelines and turbine blades that exceed acceptable service limits were, until recently, removed and tagged unserviceable or discarded. Laser cladding offers a cost saving alternative to the replacement of unserviceable turbine blades. With today`s automation systems and an effective quality control procedure in place this process can produce acceptable yields.

  6. Nonlinear structural and life analyses of a turbine blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1982-01-01

    The most critical structural requirements that aircraft gas turbine engines must meet result from the diversity of extreme environmental conditions in the turbine section components. Accurate life assessment of the components under these conditions requires sound analytical tools and techniques. The utility of advanced structural analysis techniques and advanced life prediction techniques in the life assessment of hot-section components was evaluated. The extend to which a three-dimensional cyclic isoparametric finite element analysis of a hot-section component would improve the accuracy of component life predictions was assessed. At the same time, high temperature life prediction theories such as strainrange partitioning and the frequency modified approaches were applied and their efficiency judged. A stress analysis was performed on a commercial air-cooled turbine blade. The evaluation of the life prediction methods indicated that none of those studied were satisfactory.

  7. Full Life Wind Turbine Gearbox Lubricating Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, Glenn A.; Jungk, Manfred; Bryant, Jonathan J.; Lauer, Rebecca S.; Chobot, Anthony; Mayer, Tyler; Palmer, Shane; Kauffman, Robert E.

    2012-02-28

    portion of savings comes in Levelized Replacement Cost, which is dictated by the assumption on gearbox reliability. Thus, verifying and quantifying the potential of PFPE fluid to effect gearbox reliability is the key assumption that would need to be further validated. In summary the proof of concept to use PFPE fluid as wind turbine gear box lubricant was validated with this project. The increase in life time was qualitatively demonstrated and this supports the need for future activity of field trials and laboratory aging studies to quantify the predicted 20 year life. With micro-pitting being the major failure mechanism in the last years, recent publications show that white etch cracking of bearings seem to have the highest impact on wind turbine reliability. With its higher film thicknesses compared to PAO reference oils, PFPE fluids have the potential to reduce this failure occurrence as well.

  8. Effects of hydroelectric turbine passage on fish early life stages

    SciTech Connect

    Cada, G.F.

    1991-01-01

    Turbine-passage mortality has been studied extensively for juveniles and adults of migratory fish species, but few studies have directly quantified mortality of fish eggs and larvae. An analysis of literature relating to component stresses of turbine passage (i.e., pressure changes, blade contact, and shear) indicates that mortality of early life stages of fish would be relatively low at low-head, bulb turbine installations. The shear forces and pressure regimes normally experienced are insufficient to cause high mortality rates. The probability of contact with turbine blades is related to the size of the fish; less than 5% of entrained ichthyoplankton would be killed by the blades in a bulb turbine. Other sources of mortality (e.g., cavitation and entrainment of fish acclimated to deep water) are controlled by operation of the facility and thus are mitigable. Because turbine-passage mortality among fish early life stages can be very difficult to estimate directly, it may be more fruitful to base the need for mitigation at any given site on detailed knowledge of turbine characteristics and the susceptibility of the fish community to entrainment. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  9. The Acceptability Limit in Food Shelf Life Studies.

    PubMed

    Manzocco, Lara

    2016-07-26

    Despite its apparently intuitive nature, the acceptability limit is probably the most difficult parameter to be defined when developing a shelf life test. Although it dramatically affects the final shelf life value, it is surprising that discussion on its nature has been largely neglected in the literature and only rare indications about the possible methodologies for its determination are available in the literature. This is due to the fact that the definition of this parameter is a consumer- and market-oriented issue, requiring a rational evaluation of the potential negative consequences of food unacceptability in the actual market scenario. This paper critically analyzes the features of the acceptability limit and the role of the decision maker. The methodologies supporting the choice of the acceptability limit as well as acceptability limit values proposed in the literature to calculate shelf life of different foods are reviewed. PMID:26593702

  10. Determination of Turbine Blade Life from Engine Field Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Soditus, Sherry M.

    2013-01-01

    It is probable that no two engine companies determine the life of their engines or their components in the same way or apply the same experience and safety factors to their designs. Knowing the failure mode that is most likely to occur minimizes the amount of uncertainty and simplifies failure and life analysis. Available data regarding failure mode for aircraft engine blades, while favoring low-cycle, thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF) as the controlling mode of failure, are not definitive. Sixteen high-pressure turbine (HPT) T-1 blade sets were removed from commercial aircraft engines that had been commercially flown by a single airline and inspected for damage. Each set contained 82 blades. The damage was cataloged into three categories related to their mode of failure: (1) TMF, (2) Oxidation/erosion (O/E), and (3) Other. From these field data, the turbine blade life was determined as well as the lives related to individual blade failure modes using Johnson-Weibull analysis. A simplified formula for calculating turbine blade life and reliability was formulated. The L10 blade life was calculated to be 2427 cycles (11 077 hr). The resulting blade life attributed to O/E equaled that attributed to TMF. The category that contributed most to blade failure was Other. If there were no blade failures attributed to O/E and TMF, the overall blade L(sub 10) life would increase approximately 11 to 17 percent.

  11. Determination of Turbine Blade Life from Engine Field Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Soditus, Sherry M.

    2012-01-01

    It is probable that no two engine companies determine the life of their engines or their components in the same way or apply the same experience and safety factors to their designs. Knowing the failure mode that is most likely to occur minimizes the amount of uncertainty and simplifies failure and life analysis. Available data regarding failure mode for aircraft engine blades, while favoring low-cycle, thermal mechanical fatigue as the controlling mode of failure, are not definitive. Sixteen high-pressure turbine (HPT) T-1 blade sets were removed from commercial aircraft engines that had been commercially flown by a single airline and inspected for damage. Each set contained 82 blades. The damage was cataloged into three categories related to their mode of failure: (1) Thermal-mechanical fatigue, (2) Oxidation/Erosion, and (3) "Other." From these field data, the turbine blade life was determined as well as the lives related to individual blade failure modes using Johnson-Weibull analysis. A simplified formula for calculating turbine blade life and reliability was formulated. The L(sub 10) blade life was calculated to be 2427 cycles (11 077 hr). The resulting blade life attributed to oxidation/erosion equaled that attributed to thermal-mechanical fatigue. The category that contributed most to blade failure was Other. If there were there no blade failures attributed to oxidation/erosion and thermal-mechanical fatigue, the overall blade L(sub 10) life would increase approximately 11 to 17 percent.

  12. Life Assessment of Steam Turbine Components Based on Viscoplastic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woo-Sung; Fleury, Eric; Kim, Bum-Shin; Hyun, Jung-Seob

    Unsteady thermal and mechanical loading in turbine components is caused due to the transient regimes arising during start-ups and shut-downs and due to changes in the operating regime in steam power plants; this results in nonuniform strain and stress distribution. Thus, an accurate knowledge of the stresses caused by various loading conditions is required to ensure the integrity and to ensure an accurate life assessment of the components of a turbine. Although the materials of the components of the steam turbine deform inelastically at a high temperature, currently, only elastic calculations are performed for safety and simplicity. Numerous models have been proposed to describe the viscoplastic (time-dependent) behavior; these models are rather elaborate and it is difficult to incorporate them into a finite element code in order to simulate the loading of complex structures. In this paper, the total lifetime of the components of a steam turbine was calculated by combining the viscoplastic constitutive equation with the ABAQUS finite element code. Viscoplastic analysis was conducted by focusing mainly on simplified constitutive equations with linear kinematic hardening, which is simple enough to be used effectively in computer simulation. The von Mises stress distribution of an HIP turbine rotor was calculated during the cold start-up operation of the rotor, and a reasonable number of cycles were obtained from the equation of Langer.

  13. Stress analysis and life prediction of gas turbine blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsiung, H. C.; Dunn, A. J.; Woodling, D. R.; Loh, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    A stress analysis procedure is presented for a redesign of the Space Shuttle Main Engine high pressure fuel turbopump turbine blades. The analysis consists of the one-dimensional scoping analysis to support the design layout and the follow-on three-dimensional finite element analysis to confirm the blade design at operating loading conditions. Blade life is evaluated based on high-cycle fatigue and low-cycle fatigue.

  14. The J-2X Fuel Turbopump - Turbine Nozzle Low Cycle Fatigue Acceptance Rationale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, Lakiesha V.; Duke, Gregory C.; Newman, Wesley R.; Reynolds, David C.

    2011-01-01

    The J-2X Fuel Turbopump (FTP) turbine, which drives the pump that feeds hydrogen to the J-2X engine for main combustion, is based on the J-2S design developed in the early 1970 s. Updated materials and manufacturing processes have been incorporated to meet current requirements. This paper addresses an analytical concern that the J-2X Fuel Turbine Nozzle Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) analysis did not meet safety factor requirements per program structural assessment criteria. High strains in the nozzle airfoil during engine transients were predicted to be caused by thermally induced stresses between the vane hub, vane shroud, and airfoil. The heritage J-2 nozzle was of a similar design and experienced cracks in the same area where analysis predicted cracks in the J-2X design. Redesign options that did not significantly impact the overall turbine configuration were unsuccessful. An approach using component tests and displacement controlled fracture mechanics analysis to evaluate LCF crack initiation and growth rate was developed. The results of this testing and analysis were used to define the level of inspection on development engine test units. The programmatic impact of developing crack initiation/growth rate/arrest data was significant for the J-2X program. Final Design Certification Review acceptance logic will ultimately be developed utilizing this test and analytical data.

  15. Probabilistic Analysis of Aircraft Gas Turbine Disk Life and Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melis, Matthew E.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.; August, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Two series of low cycle fatigue (LCF) test data for two groups of different aircraft gas turbine engine compressor disk geometries were reanalyzed and compared using Weibull statistics. Both groups of disks were manufactured from titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) alloy. A NASA Glenn Research Center developed probabilistic computer code Probable Cause was used to predict disk life and reliability. A material-life factor A was determined for titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) alloy based upon fatigue disk data and successfully applied to predict the life of the disks as a function of speed. A comparison was made with the currently used life prediction method based upon crack growth rate. Applying an endurance limit to the computer code did not significantly affect the predicted lives under engine operating conditions. Failure location prediction correlates with those experimentally observed in the LCF tests. A reasonable correlation was obtained between the predicted disk lives using the Probable Cause code and a modified crack growth method for life prediction. Both methods slightly overpredict life for one disk group and significantly under predict it for the other.

  16. Thermal barrier coating life modeling in aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissley, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Analytical models for predicting ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) spalling life in aircraft gas turbine engines are presented. Electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) and plasma sprayed TBC systems are discussed. An overview of the following TBC spalling mechanisms is presented: metal oxidation at the ceramic-metal interface, ceramic-metal interface stress singularities at edges and corners, ceramic-metal interface stresses caused by radius of curvature and interface roughness, material properties and mechanical behavior, temperature gradients, component design features and object impact damage. TBC spalling life analytical models are proposed based on observations of TBC spalling and plausible failure theories. TBC spalling was assumed to occur when the imposed stresses exceed the material strength (at or near the ceramic-metal interface). TBC failure knowledge gaps caused by lack of experimental evidence and analytical understanding are noted. The analytical models are considered initial engineering approaches that capture observed TBC failure trends.

  17. Structural changes and damage of single-crystal turbine blades during life tests of an aviation gas turbine engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospennikova, O. G.; Orlov, M. R.; Kolodochkina, V. G.; Nazarkin, R. M.

    2015-04-01

    The irreversible structural changes of the single-crystal ZhS32-VI nickel superalloy blades of a high-pressure turbine that occur during life tests of a gas turbine engine are studied. The main operation damages in the hottest section of the blade airfoil are found to be the fracture of the heat-resistant coating in the leading edge and the formation of thermomechanical fatigue cracks. The possibility of reconditioning repair of the blades is considered.

  18. Combustion Turbine (CT) Hot Section Coating Life Management

    SciTech Connect

    R. Viswanathan; D. Gandy; K. Krzywosz; S. Cheruvu; E. Wan

    2003-09-30

    The integrity of coatings used in hot section components of combustion turbines is crucial to the reliability of the buckets. This project was initiated in recognition of the need for predicting the life of coatings analytically, and non-destructively; correspondingly, three principal tasks were established. Task 1, with the objective of analytically developing stress, strain and temperature distributions in the bucket and thereby predicting thermal fatigue (TMF) damage for various operating conditions; Task 2 with the objective of developing eddy current techniques to measure both TMF damage and general degradation of coatings and, Task 3 with the objective of developing mechanism based algorithms. Task 4 would be aimed at verifying analytical predictions from Task 1 and the NDE predictions from Task 3 against field observations. Task 5 would develop a risk-based decision analysis model to make run/repair decisions. This report is a record of the progress to date on these four tasks.

  19. Combustion Turbine (CT) Hot Section Coating Life Management

    SciTech Connect

    S. Cheruvu; K. Krzywosz

    2004-09-30

    The integrity of coatings used in hot section components of combustion turbines is crucial to the reliability of the buckets. This project was initiated in recognition of the need for predicting the life of coatings analytically, and non-destructively; correspondingly, four principal tasks were established. Task 1, with the objective of analytically developing stress, strain and temperature distributions in the bucket and thereby predicting thermal fatigue (TMF) damage for various operating conditions; Task 2 with the objective of developing eddy current techniques to measure both TMF damage and general degradation of coatings and, Task 3 with the objective of developing mechanism based algorithms. Task 4 is aimed at verifying analytical predictions from Task 1 and the NDE predictions from Task 3 against field observations.

  20. COMBUSTION TURBINE (CT) HOT SECTION COATING LIFE MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    D. Gandy; R. Viswanathan; S. Cheruvu; K. Krzywosz

    2006-03-31

    The integrity of coatings used in hot section components of combustion turbines is crucial to the reliability of the buckets. This project was initiated in recognition of the need for predicting the life of coatings analytically, and non-destructively; correspondingly, four principal tasks were established. Task 1, with the objective of analytically developing stress, strain and temperature distributions in the bucket and thereby predicting thermal fatigue (TMF) damage for various operating conditions; Task 2 with the objective of developing eddy current techniques to measure both TMF damage and general degradation of coatings and, Task 3 with the objective of developing mechanism based algorithms. Task 4 is aimed at verifying analytical predictions from Task 1 and the NDE predictions from Task 3 against field observations.

  1. Combustion Turbine (CT) Hot Section Coating Life Management

    SciTech Connect

    S. Cheruvu; K. Krzywosz

    2005-03-31

    The integrity of coatings used in hot section components of combustion turbines is crucial to the reliability of the buckets. This project was initiated in recognition of the need for predicting the life of coatings analytically, and non-destructively; correspondingly, four principal tasks were established. Task 1, with the objective of analytically developing stress, strain and temperature distributions in the bucket and thereby predicting thermal fatigue (TMF) damage for various operating conditions; Task 2 with the objective of developing eddy current techniques to measure both TMF damage and general degradation of coatings and, Task 3 with the objective of developing mechanism based algorithms. Task 4 is aimed at verifying analytical predictions from Task 1 and the NDE predictions from Task 3 against field observations.

  2. COMBUSTION TURBINE (CT) HOT SECTION COATING LIFE MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    R. Viswanathan; K. Krzywosz; S. Cheruvu; E. Wan

    2003-04-01

    The integrity of coatings used in hot section components of combustion turbines is crucial to the reliability of the buckets. This project was initiated in recognition of the need for predicting the life of coatings analytically, and non destructively; correspondingly, three principal tasks were established. Task 1, with the objective of analytically developing stress, strain and temperature distributions in the bucket and thereby predicting thermal fatigue (TMF) damage for various operating conditions; Task 2 with the objective of developing eddy current techniques to measure both TMF damage and general degradation of coatings and, Task 3, with the objective of developing mechanism based algorithms. Task 4 would be aimed at verifying analytical predictions from Task 1 and the NDE predictions from Task 3 against field observations. Task 5 would develop a risk-based decision analysis model to make run/repair decisions. This report is a record of the progress to date on these 3 tasks.

  3. Combustion Turbine (CT) Hot Section Coating Life Management

    SciTech Connect

    R. Viswanathan; D. Gandy; K. Krzywosz; S. Cheruvu; E. Wan

    2004-03-31

    The integrity of coatings used in hot section components of combustion turbines is crucial to the reliability of the buckets. This project was initiated in recognition of the need for predicting the life of coatings analytically, and non-destructively; correspondingly, three principal tasks were established. Task 1, with the objective of analytically developing stress, strain and temperature distributions in the bucket and thereby predicting thermal fatigue (TMF) damage for various operating conditions; Task 2 with the objective of developing eddy current techniques to measure both TMF damage and general degradation of coatings and, Task 3 with the objective of developing mechanism based algorithms. Task 4 would be aimed at verifying analytical predictions from Task 1 and the NDE predictions from Task 3 against field observations. Task 5 would develop a risk-based decision analysis model to make run/repair decisions. This report is a record of the progress to date on these four tasks.

  4. COMBUSTION TURBINE (CT) HOT SECTION COATING LIFE MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    R. Viswanathan; K. Krzywosz; S. Cheruvu; E. Wan

    2002-08-09

    The integrity of coatings used in hot section components of combustion turbine is crucial to the reliability of the buckets. This project was initiated in recognition of the need for predicting the life of coatings analytically, and non destructively; correspondingly, three principal tasks were established. Task 1, with the objective of analytically developing stress, strain and temperature distributions in the bucket and thereby predicting thermal fatigue (TMF) damage for various operating conditions; Task 2 with the objective of developing eddy current techniques to measure both TMF damage and general degradation of coatings and, Task 3, with the objective of developing mechanism based algorithms. This report is a record of the progress to date on these 3 key tasks. Two supporting tasks relating to field validation (Task 4) and economic analysis (Task 5) have not yet been initiated.

  5. COMBUSTION TURBINE (CT) HOT SECTION COATING LIFE MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    R. Viswanathan; D. Gandy; K. Krzywosz; S. Cheruvu; E. Wan

    2002-12-02

    The integrity of coatings used in hot section components of combustion turbine is crucial to the reliability of the buckets. This project was initiated in recognition of the need for predicting the life of coatings analytically, and non destructively; correspondingly, three principal tasks were established. Task 1, with the objective of analytically developing stress, strain and temperature distributions in the bucket and thereby predicting thermal fatigue (TMF) damage for various operating conditions; Task 2 with the objective of developing eddy current techniques to measure both TMF damage and general degradation of coatings and, Task 3, with the objective of developing mechanism based algorithms. This report is a record of the progress to date on these 3 key tasks. Two supporting tasks relating to field validation (Task 4) and economic analysis (Task 5) have not yet been initiated.

  6. Fatigue life prediction modeling for turbine hot section materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.; Meyer, T. G.; Nelson, R. S.; Nissley, D. M.; Swanson, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    A major objective of the fatigue and fracture efforts under the Hot Section Technology (HOST) program was to significantly improve the analytic life prediction tools used by the aeronautical gas turbine engine industry. This was achieved in the areas of high-temperature thermal and mechanical fatigue of bare and coated high-temperature superalloys. The cyclic crack initiation and propagation resistance of nominally isotropic polycrystalline and highly anisotropic single crystal alloys were addressed. Life prediction modeling efforts were devoted to creep-fatigue interaction, oxidation, coatings interactions, multiaxiality of stress-strain states, mean stress effects, cumulative damage, and thermomechanical fatigue. The fatigue crack initiation life models developed to date include the Cyclic Damage Accumulation (CDA) and the Total Strain Version of Strainrange Partitioning (TS-SRP) for nominally isotropic materials, and the Tensile Hysteretic Energy Model for anisotropic superalloys. A fatigue model is being developed based upon the concepts of Path-Independent Integrals (PII) for describing cyclic crack growth under complex nonlinear response at the crack tip due to thermomechanical loading conditions. A micromechanistic oxidation crack extension model was derived. The models are described and discussed.

  7. Fatigue life prediction modeling for turbine hot section materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.; Meyer, T. G.; Nelson, R. S.; Nissley, D. M.; Swanson, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    A major objective of the fatigue and fracture efforts under the NASA Hot Section Technology (HOST) program was to significantly improve the analytic life prediction tools used by the aeronautical gas turbine engine industry. This was achieved in the areas of high-temperature thermal and mechanical fatigue of bare and coated high-temperature superalloys. The cyclic crack initiation and propagation resistance of nominally isotropic polycrystalline and highly anisotropic single crystal alloys were addressed. Life prediction modeling efforts were devoted to creep-fatigue interaction, oxidation, coatings interactions, multiaxiality of stress-strain states, mean stress effects, cumulative damage, and thermomechanical fatigue. The fatigue crack initiation life models developed to date include the Cyclic Damage Accumulation (CDA) and the Total Strain Version of Strainrange Partitioning (TS-SRP) for nominally isotropic materials, and the Tensile Hysteretic Energy Model for anisotropic superalloys. A fatigue model is being developed based upon the concepts of Path-Independent Integrals (PII) for describing cyclic crack growth under complex nonlinear response at the crack tip due to thermomechanical loading conditions. A micromechanistic oxidation crack extension model was derived. The models are described and discussed.

  8. The LIFE computer code: Fatigue life prediction for vertical axis wind turbine components

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, H.J.; Ashwill, T.D.; Slack, N.

    1987-08-01

    The LIFE computer code was originally written by Veers to analyze the fatigue life of a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) blade. The basic assumptions built into this analysis tool are: the fatigue life of a blade component is independent of the mean stress; the frequency distribution of the vibratory stresses may be described adequately by a Rayleigh probability density function; and damage accumulates linearly (Miner's Rule). Further, the yearly distribution of wind is assumed to follow a Rayleigh distribution. The original program has been updated to run in an interactive mode on a personal computer with a BASIC interpreter and 256K RAM. Additional capabilities included in this update include: the generalization of the Rayleigh function for the wind speed distribution to a Weibull function; the addition of two constitutive rules for the evaluation of the effects of mean stress on fatigue life; interactive data input; and the inclusion of a stress concentration factor into the analysis.

  9. Life prediction of advanced materials for gas turbine application

    SciTech Connect

    Zamrik, S.Y.; Ray, A.; Koss, D.A.

    1995-10-01

    Most of the studies on the low cycle fatigue life prediction have been reported under isothermal conditions where the deformation of the material is strain dependent. In the development of gas turbines, components such as blades and vanes are exposed to temperature variations in addition to strain cycling. As a result, the deformation process becomes temperature and strain dependent. Therefore, the life of the component becomes sensitive to temperature-strain cycling which produces a process known as {open_quotes}thermomechanical fatigue, or TMF{close_quotes}. The TMF fatigue failure phenomenon has been modeled using conventional fatigue life prediction methods, which are not sufficiently accurate to quantitatively establish an allowable design procedure. To add to the complexity of TMF life prediction, blade and vane substrates are normally coated with aluminide, overlay or thermal barrier type coatings (TBC) where the durability of the component is dominated by the coating/substrate constitutive response and by the fatigue behavior of the coating. A number of issues arise from TMF depending on the type of temperature/strain phase cycle: (1) time-dependent inelastic behavior can significantly affect the stress response. For example, creep relaxation during a tensile or compressive loading at elevated temperatures leads to a progressive increase in the mean stress level under cyclic loading. (2) the mismatch in elastic and thermal expansion properties between the coating and the substrate can lead to significant deviations in the coating stress levels due to changes in the elastic modulii. (3) the {open_quotes}dry{close_quotes} corrosion resistance coatings applied to the substrate may act as primary crack initiation sites. Crack initiation in the coating is a function of the coating composition, its mechanical properties, creep relaxation behavior, thermal strain range and the strain/temperature phase relationship.

  10. Thermal barrier coating life modeling in aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissley, D. M.

    1997-03-01

    Analytical models for predicting ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) spalling life in aircraft gas tur-bine engines are presented. Electron beam/physical vapor-deposited and plasma-sprayed TBC systems are discussed. An overview of the following TBC spalling mechanisms is presented: (1) metal oxidation at the ceramic/metal interface, (2) ceramic/metal interface stresses caused by radius of curvature and inter-face roughness, (3) material properties and mechanical behavior, (4) component design features, (5) tem-perature gradients, (6) ceramic/metal interface stress singularities at edges and corners, and (7) object impact damage. Analytical models for TBC spalling life are proposed based on observations of TBC spall-ing and plausible failure theories. Spalling was assumed to occur when the imposed stresses exceed the material strength (at or near the ceramic/metal interface). Knowledge gaps caused by lack of experimen-tal evidence and analytical understanding of TBC failure are noted. The analytical models are considered initial engineering approaches that capture observed TBC spalling failure trends.

  11. Thermal barrier coating life modeling in aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissley, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    Analytical models useful for predicting ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) spalling life in aircraft gas turbine engines are presented. Electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) and plasma sprayed TBC systems are discussed. TBC spalling was attributed to a combination of mechanisms such as metal oxidation at the ceramic-metal interface, ceramic-metal interface stress concentrations at free surfaces due to dissimilar materials, ceramic-metal interface stresses caused by local radius of curvature and interface roughness, material properties and mechanical behavior, transient temperature gradients across the ceramic layer and component design features. TBC spalling life analytical models were developed based on observations of TBC failure modes and plausible failure theories. TBC failure was assumed to occur when the imposed stresses exceeded the material strength (at or near the ceramic-metal interface). TBC failure knowledge gaps caused by lack of experimental evidence and analytical understanding are noted. The analytical models are considered initial engineering approaches that capture observed TBC failure trends.

  12. Reinforced wind turbine blades--an environmental life cycle evaluation.

    PubMed

    Merugula, Laura; Khanna, Vikas; Bakshi, Bhavik R

    2012-09-01

    A fiberglass composite reinforced with carbon nanofibers (CNF) at the resin-fiber interface is being developed for potential use in wind turbine blades. An energy and midpoint impact assessment was performed to gauge impacts of scaling production to blades 40 m and longer. Higher loadings force trade-offs in energy return on investment and midpoint impacts relative to the base case while remaining superior to thermoelectric power generation in these indicators. Energy-intensive production of CNFs forces impacts disproportionate to mass contribution. The polymer nanocomposite increases a 2 MW plant's global warming potential nearly 100% per kWh electricity generated with 5% CNF by mass in the blades if no increase in electrical output is realized. The relative scale of impact must be compensated by systematic improvements whether by deployment in higher potential zones or by increased life span; the trade-offs are expected to be significantly lessened with CNF manufacturing maturity. Significant challenges are faced in evaluating emerging technologies including uncertainty in future scenarios and process scaling. Inventories available for raw materials and monte carlos analysis have been used to gain insight to impacts of this development. PMID:22857256

  13. Development and Life Prediction of Erosion Resistant Turbine Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2010-01-01

    Future rotorcraft propulsion systems are required to operate under highly-loaded conditions and in harsh sand erosion environments, thereby imposing significant material design and durability issues. The incorporation of advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in high pressure turbine systems enables engine designs with higher inlet temperatures, thus improving the engine efficiency, power density and reliability. The impact and erosion resistance of turbine thermal barrier coating systems are crucial to the turbine coating technology application, because a robust turbine blade TBC system is a prerequisite for fully utilizing the potential coating technology benefit in the rotorcraft propulsion. This paper describes the turbine blade TBC development in addressing the coating impact and erosion resistance. Advanced thermal barrier coating systems with improved performance have also been validated in laboratory simulated engine erosion and/or thermal gradient environments. A preliminary life prediction modeling approach to emphasize the turbine blade coating erosion is also presented.

  14. Wind Turbine Design Guideline DG03: Yaw and Pitch Rolling Bearing Life

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, T.; Rumbarger, J. H.; Butterfield, C. P.

    2009-12-01

    This report describes the design criteria, calculation methods, and applicable standards recommended for use in performance and life analyses of ball and roller (rolling) bearings for yaw and pitch motion support in wind turbine applications. The formulae presented here for rolling bearing analytical methods and bearing-life ratings are consistent with methods in current use by wind turbine designers and rolling-bearing manufacturers.

  15. Uncertainty Analysis in Fatigue Life Prediction of Gas Turbine Blades Using Bayesian Inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Feng; Zhu, Shun-Peng; Li, Jing; Peng, Weiwen; Huang, Hong-Zhong

    2015-12-01

    This paper investigates Bayesian model selection for fatigue life estimation of gas turbine blades considering model uncertainty and parameter uncertainty. Fatigue life estimation of gas turbine blades is a critical issue for the operation and health management of modern aircraft engines. Since lots of life prediction models have been presented to predict the fatigue life of gas turbine blades, model uncertainty and model selection among these models have consequently become an important issue in the lifecycle management of turbine blades. In this paper, fatigue life estimation is carried out by considering model uncertainty and parameter uncertainty simultaneously. It is formulated as the joint posterior distribution of a fatigue life prediction model and its model parameters using Bayesian inference method. Bayes factor is incorporated to implement the model selection with the quantified model uncertainty. Markov Chain Monte Carlo method is used to facilitate the calculation. A pictorial framework and a step-by-step procedure of the Bayesian inference method for fatigue life estimation considering model uncertainty are presented. Fatigue life estimation of a gas turbine blade is implemented to demonstrate the proposed method.

  16. Acceptance test report, plutonium finishing plant life safety upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, S.G.

    1994-12-02

    This acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that modifications to the Fir Protection systems function as required by project criteria. The ATP will test the Fire Alarm Control Panels, Flow Alarm Pressure Switch, Heat Detectors, Smoke Detectors, Flow Switches, Manual Pull Stations, and Gong/Door By Pass Switches.

  17. Acceptance of illness and satisfaction with life among malaria patients in rivers state, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Health condition is one of the basic factors affecting satisfaction with life, and the level of illness acceptance. The purpose of the study was to analyse the level of illness acceptance, the level of satisfaction with life among malaria patients, and the level of trust placed in the physician and the nurse. Methods The study employs the method of diagnostic survey based on standardised AIS and SWLS scales, as well as Anderson and Dedrick’s PPTS and PNTS scales. Results The average AIS level was 12 points, while the average level of SwL at the SWLS scale was 16.5 points. The average level of trust in the physician and the nurse amounted to 50.6 points and 51.4 points, respectively. The correlation between the level of illness acceptance and self-evaluated satisfaction with life was statistically significant, with R = 0.56. The marital status influenced the level of illness acceptance with p < 0.05 and the level of satisfaction with life with p < 0.05. The employment status affected the level of satisfaction with life with p < 0.05 and the level of illness acceptance with p < 0.05. Conclusions The majority of malaria patients did not accept their illness, while the level of satisfaction with life was low. The majority of respondents trusted their physician and nurse. There is a statistically significant correlation between the level of illness acceptance and the self-evaluated satisfaction with life. The marital status had a statistically significant effect on the acceptance of illness and the satisfaction with life. The individuals who had a job demonstrated higher levels of quality of life and illness acceptance. PMID:24885562

  18. Fatigue life prediction for wind turbines: A case study on loading spectra and parameter sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, H.J.; Veers, P.S.; Ashwill, T.D.

    1992-01-01

    Wind turbines are fatigue-critical machines used to produce electrical energy from the wind. These rotating machines are subjected to environmental loadings that are highly irregular in nature. Historical examples of fatigue problems in both research and commercial wind turbine development are presented. Some example data on wind turbine environments, loadings and material properties are also shown. Before a description of how the authors have chosen to attack the cumulative damage assessment, questions are presented for the reader's reflection. The solution technique used by the authors is then presented, followed by a case study applying the procedures to an actual wind turbine blade joint. The wind turbine is the 34-meter diameter vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) erected by Sandia National Laboratories near Bushland, Texas. The case study examines parameter sensitivities for realistic uncertainties in inputs defining the turbine environment, stress response and material properties. The fatigue lifetimes are calculated using a fatigue analysis program, called LIFE2, which was developed at Sandia. The LIFE2 code, described in some detail in an appendix, is a PC-based, menu-driven package that leads the user through the steps required to characterize the loading and material properties, then uses Miner's rule or a linear crack propagation rule to numerically calculate the time to failure. Only S-n based cumulative damage applications are illustrated here. The LIFE2 code is available to educational institutions for use as a case study in describing complicated loading histories and for use by students in examining, hands on, parameter sensitivity of fatigue life analysis.

  19. Fatigue life prediction for wind turbines: A case study on loading spectra and parameter sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, H. J.; Veers, P. S.; Ashwill, T. D.

    Wind turbines are fatigue-critical machines used to produce electrical energy from the wind. These rotating machines are subjected to environmental loadings that are highly irregular in nature. Historical examples of fatigue problems in both research and commercial wind turbine development are presented. Some example data on wind turbine environments, loadings and material properties are also shown. Before a description of how the authors have chosen to attack the cumulative damage assessment, questions are presented for the reader's reflection. The solution technique used by the authors is then presented, followed by a case study applying the procedures to an actual wind turbine blade joint. The wind turbine is the 34-meter diameter vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) erected by Sandia National Laboratories near Bushland, Texas. The case study examines parameter sensitivities for realistic uncertainties in inputs defining the turbine environment, stress response and material properties. The fatigue lifetimes are calculated using a fatigue analysis program, called LIFE2, which was developed at Sandia. The LIFE2 code, described in some detail in an appendix, is a PC-based, menu-driven package that leads the user through the steps required to characterize the loading and material properties, then uses Miner's rule or a linear crack propagation rule to numerically calculate the time to failure. Only S-n based cumulative damage applications are illustrated here. The LIFE2 code is available to educational institutions for use as a case study in describing complicated loading histories and for use by students in examining, hands on, parameter sensitivity of fatigue life analysis.

  20. 20 CFR 418.2260 - What major life-changing event evidence will we not accept?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What major life-changing event evidence will we not accept? 418.2260 Section 418.2260 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION MEDICARE... Using A More Recent Tax Year's Modified Adjusted Gross Income § 418.2260 What major life-changing...

  1. 20 CFR 418.1260 - What major life-changing event evidence will we not accept?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What major life-changing event evidence will we not accept? 418.1260 Section 418.1260 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION MEDICARE... Year's Modified Adjusted Gross Income § 418.1260 What major life-changing event evidence will we...

  2. 20 CFR 418.2260 - What major life-changing event evidence will we not accept?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What major life-changing event evidence will we not accept? 418.2260 Section 418.2260 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION MEDICARE... Using A More Recent Tax Year's Modified Adjusted Gross Income § 418.2260 What major life-changing...

  3. 20 CFR 418.1260 - What major life-changing event evidence will we not accept?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What major life-changing event evidence will we not accept? 418.1260 Section 418.1260 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION MEDICARE... Year's Modified Adjusted Gross Income § 418.1260 What major life-changing event evidence will we...

  4. 20 CFR 418.1260 - What major life-changing event evidence will we not accept?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What major life-changing event evidence will we not accept? 418.1260 Section 418.1260 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION MEDICARE... Year's Modified Adjusted Gross Income § 418.1260 What major life-changing event evidence will we...

  5. Life prediction of turbine components: On-going studies at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.; Grisaffe, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    An overview is presented of the many studies at NASA-Lewis that form the turbine component life prediction program. This program has three phases: (1) development of life prediction methods for major failure modes through materials studies, (2) evaluation and improvement of these methods through a variety of burner rig studies on simulated components in research engines and advanced rigs. These three phases form a cooperative, interdisciplinary program. A bibliography of Lewis publications on fatigue, oxidation and coatings, and turbine engine alloys is included.

  6. The Life Assessment of Steam Turbine Rotors for Fossil Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sungho; Song, Geewook; Kim, Bumshin; Hyun, Jungseb; Ha, Jeongsoo

    The operational mode of thermal power plants has been changed from base load to duty cycle. From the changeover, fossil power plants cannot avoid frequent thermal transient states, for example, start up and stop, which results in thermal fatigue damage at the heavy section components. The rotor is the highest capital cost component in a steam turbine and requires long outage for replacing with a new one. For an optimized power plant operational life, inspection management of the rotor is necessary. It is known in general that the start-up and shutdown operations greatly affect the steam turbine life. The start-up operational condition is especially severe because of the rapid temperature and rotational speed increase, which causes damage and reduction of life of the main components life of the steam turbine. The start-up stress of a rotor which is directly related to life is composed of thermal and rotational stresses. The thermal stress is due to the variation of steam flow temperature and rotational stress is due to the rotational speed of the turbine. In this paper, the analysis method for the start-up stress of a rotor is proposed, which considers simultaneously temperature and rotational speed transition, and includes a case study regarding a 500MW fossil power plant steam turbine rotor. Also, the method of quantitative damage estimation for fatigue-creep damage to operational conditions, is described. The method can be applied to find weak points for fatigue-creep damage. Using the method, total life consumption can be obtained, and can be also be used for determining future operational modes and life extension of old fossil power units.

  7. Progress toward life modeling of thermal barrier coatings for aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    Progress toward developing life models for simulating the behavior of thermal barrier coatings in aircraffft gas turbine engines is discussed. A preliminary laboratory model is described as are current efforts to develop engine-capable models. Current understanding of failure mechanisms is also summarized.

  8. Grainex Mar-M 247 Turbine Disk Life Study for NASA's High Temperature High Speed Turbine Seal Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Irebert R.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental and analytical fatigue life study was performed on the Grainex Mar-M 247 disk used in NASA s Turbine Seal Test Facility. To preclude fatigue cracks from growing to critical size in the NASA disk bolt holes due to cyclic loading at severe test conditions, a retirement-for-cause methodology was adopted to detect and monitor cracks within the bolt holes using eddy-current inspection. For the NASA disk material that was tested, the fatigue strain-life to crack initiation at a total strain of 0.5 percent, a minimum to maximum strain ratio of 0, and a bolt hole temperature of 649 C was calculated to be 665 cycles using -99.95 percent prediction intervals. The fatigue crack propagation life was calculated to be 367 cycles after implementing a safety factor of 2 on life. Thus, the NASA disk bolt hole total life or retirement life was determined to be 1032 cycles at a crack depth of 0.501 mm. An initial NASA disk bolt hole inspection at 665 cycles is suggested with 50 cycle inspection intervals thereafter to monitor fatigue crack growth.

  9. A parametric physics based creep life prediction approach to gas turbine blade conceptual design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Marcus Edward Brockbank

    The required useful service lives of gas turbine components and parts are naturally one of the major design constraints limiting the gas turbine design space. For example, the required service life of a turbine blade limits the firing temperature in the combustor, which in turn limits the performance of the gas turbine. For a cooled turbine blade, it also determines the necessary cooling flow, which has a strong impact on the turbine efficiency. In most gas turbine design practices, the life prediction is only emphasized during or after the detailed design has been completed. Limited life prediction efforts have been made in the early design stages, but these efforts capture only a few of the necessary key factors, such as centrifugal stress. Furthermore, the early stage prediction methods are usually hard coded in the gas turbine system design tools and hidden from the system designer's view. The common failure mechanisms affecting the service life, such as creep, fatigue and oxidation, are highly sensitive to the material temperatures and/or stresses. Calculation of these temperatures and stresses requires that the geometry, material properties, and operating conditions be known; information not typically available in early stages of design. Even without awareness of the errors, the resulting inaccuracy in the life prediction may mislead the system designers when examining a design space which is bounded indirectly by the inaccurate required life constraints. Furthermore, because intensive creep lifing analysis is possible only towards the end of the design process, any errors or changes will cost the engine manufacturer significant money; money that could be saved if more comprehensive creep lifing predictions were possible in the early stages of design. A rapid, physics-based life prediction method could address this problem by enabling the system designer to investigate the design space more thoroughly and accurately. Although not meant as a final decision

  10. The acceptability of ending a patient's life: a France-Portugal-Spain comparison.

    PubMed

    Mullet, Etienne; Neto, Félix; Pinto, Conceiçao; Raich, Rosa Maria; Sastre, Maria Teresa Munoz; Sorum, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    The views of French, Portuguese, and Spanish people on end-of-life decisions were compared. Two hundred seventy-seven adults from Barcelona, Oporto, and Toulouse judged the acceptability of life-ending procedures in 42 scenarios composed of all combinations of 3 factors: the patient's age (30 or 80 years), the patient's life expectancy (days, weeks, or months), and the type of procedure (suicide, suicide assisted by the physician, euthanasia by the physician at the request of a suffering patient, euthanasia of a comatose patient at the family's request, euthanasia of a comatose patient as stipulated in the patient's advance directives, euthanasia of a comatose patient without advance directions and without a request from the family, or euthanasia of a suffering patient without a request from the patient). In all 3 countries, the type of procedure had the major effect. The 4 procedures implemented by the patient or at the patient's request were, on average, considered acceptable. The 2 procedures not implemented at the patient's request were considered unacceptable. Euthanasia of a comatose patient at the request of the family was judged mildly acceptable. The attitudes of the people in Toulouse, Oporto, and Barcelona concerning the acceptability of ending a patient's life have now largely converged, although Spanish participants were statistically significantly more accepting than French and Portuguese participants. PMID:24521043

  11. Optimization of monitoring and inspections in the life-cycle of wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanish Nithin, Anu; Omenzetter, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    The past decade has witnessed a surge in the offshore wind farm developments across the world. Although this form of cleaner and greener energy is beneficial and eco-friendly, the production of wind energy entails high life-cycle costs. The costs associated with inspections, monitoring and repairs of wind turbines are primary contributors to the high costs of electricity produced in this way and are disadvantageous in today's competitive economic environment. There is limited research being done in the probabilistic optimization of life-cycle costs of offshore wind turbines structures and their components. This paper proposes a framework for assessing the life cycle cost of wind turbine structures subject to damage and deterioration. The objective of the paper is to develop a mathematical probabilistic cost assessment framework which considers deterioration, inspection, monitoring, repair and maintenance models and their uncertainties. The uncertainties are etched in the accuracy and precision of the monitoring and inspection methods and can be considered through the probability of damage detection of each method. Schedules for inspection, monitoring and repair actions are demonstrated using a decision tree. Examples of a generalised deterioration process integrated with the cost analysis using a decision tree are shown for a wind turbine foundation structure.

  12. Integrated approach for stress based lifing of aero gas turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu, Abdullahi Obonyegba

    In order to analyse the turbine blade life, the damage due to the combined thermal and mechanical loads should be adequately accounted for. This is more challenging when detailed component geometry is limited. Therefore, a compromise between the level of geometric detail and the complexity of the lifing method to be implemented would be necessary. This research focuses on how the life assessment of aero engine turbine blades can be done, considering the balance between available design inputs and adequate level of fidelity. Accordingly, the thesis contributes to developing a generic turbine blade lifing method that is based on the engine thermodynamic cycle; as well as integrating critical design/technological factors and operational parameters that influence the aero engine blade life. To this end, thermo-mechanical fatigue was identified as the critical damage phenomenon driving the life of the turbine blade.. The developed approach integrates software tools and numerical models created using the minimum design information typically available at the early design stages. Using finite element analysis of an idealised blade geometry, the approach captures relevant impacts of thermal gradients and thermal stresses that contribute to the thermo-mechanical fatigue damage on the gas turbine blade. The blade life is evaluated using the Neu/Sehitoglu thermo-mechanical fatigue model that considers damage accumulation due to fatigue, oxidation, and creep. The leading edge is examined as a critical part of the blade to estimate the damage severity for different design factors and operational parameters. The outputs of the research can be used to better understand how the environment and the operating conditions of the aircraft affect the blade life consumption and therefore what is the impact on the maintenance cost and the availability of the propulsion system. This research also finds that the environmental (oxidation) effect drives the blade life and the blade coolant

  13. Studying the possibility of extending the service life of VPT-50-4 turbines after long-term operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, S. N.; Sudakov, A. V.

    2012-03-01

    We describe the stages of works on examining the technical state and extending the service life of the main elements of steam turbines. As an example we analyze unique experience gained from activities performed from 1993 to 2010 for examining the technical state and determining the remaining service life of VPT-50-4 turbines operating under the same conditions at the same thermal power station with a view to extend their service life.

  14. Evaluating the impact of wind turbine noise on health-related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Daniel; McBride, David; Welch, David; Dirks, Kim N; Hill, Erin M

    2011-01-01

    We report a cross-sectional study comparing the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of individuals residing in the proximity of a wind farm to those residing in a demographically matched area sufficiently displaced from wind turbines. The study employed a nonequivalent comparison group posttest-only design. Self-administered questionnaires, which included the brief version of the World Health Organization quality of life scale, were delivered to residents in two adjacent areas in semirural New Zealand. Participants were also asked to identify annoying noises, indicate their degree of noise sensitivity, and rate amenity. Statistically significant differences were noted in some HRQOL domain scores, with residents living within 2 km of a turbine installation reporting lower overall quality of life, physical quality of life, and environmental quality of life. Those exposed to turbine noise also reported significantly lower sleep quality, and rated their environment as less restful. Our data suggest that wind farm noise can negatively impact facets of HRQOL. PMID:21959113

  15. Factors Affecting the Quality of Life and the Illness Acceptance of Pregnant Women with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bień, Agnieszka; Rzońca, Ewa; Kańczugowska, Angelika; Iwanowicz-Palus, Grażyna

    2015-01-01

    The paper contains an analysis of the factors affecting the quality of life (QoL) and the illness acceptance of diabetic pregnant women. The study was performed between January and April, 2013. It included 114 pregnant women with diabetes, hospitalized in the High Risk Pregnancy Wards of several hospitals in Lublin, Poland. The study used a diagnostic survey with questionnaires. The research instruments used were: The WHOQOL-Bref questionnaire and the Acceptance of Illness Scale (AIS). The women’s general quality of life was slightly higher than their perceived general health. A higher quality of life was reported by women with a very good financial standing, very good perceived health, moderate self-reported knowledge of diabetes, and also by those only treated with diet and stating that the illness did not interfere with their lives (p < 0.05). Women with a very good financial standing (p < 0.009), high self-reported health (p < 0.002), and those treated with by means of a diet (p < 0.04) had a higher acceptance of illness. A higher acceptance of illness contributes to a higher general quality of life and a better perception of one’s health. PMID:26703697

  16. Modeling the effects of control systems of wind turbine fatigue life

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, K.G.; Laino, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    In this study we look at the effect on fatigue life of two types of control systems. First, we investigate the Micon 65, an upwind, three bladed turbine with a simple yaw control system. Results indicate that increased fatigue damage to the blade root can be attributed to continuous operation at significant yaw error allowed by the control system. Next, we model a two-bladed teetered rotor turbine using three different control systems to adjust flap deflections. The first two limit peak power output, the third limits peak power and cyclic power output over the entire range of operation. Results for simulations conducted both with and without active control are compared to determine how active control affects fatigue life. Improvement in fatigue lifetimes were seen for all control schemes, with increasing fatigue lifetime corresponding to increased flap deflection activity. 13 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Tracking and Control of Gas Turbine Engine Component Damage/Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaw, Link C.; Wu, Dong N.; Bryg, David J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes damage mechanisms and the methods of controlling damages to extend the on-wing life of critical gas turbine engine components. Particularly, two types of damage mechanisms are discussed: creep/rupture and thermo-mechanical fatigue. To control these damages and extend the life of engine hot-section components, we have investigated two methodologies to be implemented as additional control logic for the on-board electronic control unit. This new logic, the life-extending control (LEC), interacts with the engine control and monitoring unit and modifies the fuel flow to reduce component damages in a flight mission. The LEC methodologies were demonstrated in a real-time, hardware-in-the-loop simulation. The results show that LEC is not only a new paradigm for engine control design, but also a promising technology for extending the service life of engine components, hence reducing the life cycle cost of the engine.

  18. The effects of video compression on acceptability of images for monitoring life sciences experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.; Chuang, Sherry L.

    1992-01-01

    Future manned space operations for Space Station Freedom will call for a variety of carefully planned multimedia digital communications, including full-frame-rate color video, to support remote operations of scientific experiments. This paper presents the results of an investigation to determine if video compression is a viable solution to transmission bandwidth constraints. It reports on the impact of different levels of compression and associated calculational parameters on image acceptability to investigators in life-sciences research at ARC. Three nonhuman life-sciences disciplines (plant, rodent, and primate biology) were selected for this study. A total of 33 subjects viewed experimental scenes in their own scientific disciplines. Ten plant scientists viewed still images of wheat stalks at various stages of growth. Each image was compressed to four different compression levels using the Joint Photographic Expert Group (JPEG) standard algorithm, and the images were presented in random order. Twelve and eleven staffmembers viewed 30-sec videotaped segments showing small rodents and a small primate, respectively. Each segment was repeated at four different compression levels in random order using an inverse cosine transform (ICT) algorithm. Each viewer made a series of subjective image-quality ratings. There was a significant difference in image ratings according to the type of scene viewed within disciplines; thus, ratings were scene dependent. Image (still and motion) acceptability does, in fact, vary according to compression level. The JPEG still-image-compression levels, even with the large range of 5:1 to 120:1 in this study, yielded equally high levels of acceptability. In contrast, the ICT algorithm for motion compression yielded a sharp decline in acceptability below 768 kb/sec. Therefore, if video compression is to be used as a solution for overcoming transmission bandwidth constraints, the effective management of the ratio and compression parameters

  19. A specialized program for life extension of HP-IP steam turbine rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Leon-Salamanca, T.; Monaco, M.C.

    1996-12-31

    Significant cracking in the HP stages of two HP-IP steam turbine rotors required the development of programs to assess the impact of the cracking observed at the seal land surfaces on the integrity of the rotor under daily hot starts. Originally designed for base-load operation, the units ar constrained in their operation by design (minimal steam bypass capability to the condenser) and environmental concerns (noise abatement). Combined with daily starts, these operational constraints subject the HP-IP steam turbine rotors to excessive thermal stresses. A program of analysis, inspection, and plant operation modification has been developed to continue operation of the unit for the least overall cost. This paper covers analysis of the cracking, strategies for its control, and innovative nondestructive ultrasonic inspection techniques used to monitor the condition of the rotor. To minimize inspection time, a unique, computer-based ultrasonic boreside scanning system was used to examine the blade attachment areas with the rotors in place. Five boreside inspections have been conducted with an expansion to include a portion of the IP stages. The overall program has extended by ten years the useful operating life of two turbine units previously recommended for replacement or repair. The cost savings to the utility have been considerable because no replacement rotors were required, repair costs were reduced, and the in-place inspection reduced downtime and disassembly costs. Results of the four-year program are presented in this paper.

  20. Variations in gear fatigue life for different wind turbine braking strategies

    SciTech Connect

    McNiff, B.P. ); Musial, W.D. ); Errichello, R. )

    1991-06-01

    A large number of gearbox failures have occurred in the wind industry in a relatively short period, many because service loads were underestimated. High-torque transients that occur during starting and stopping are difficult to predict and may be overlooked in specifying gearbox design. Although these events comprise a small portion of total load cycles, they can be the most damaging. The severity of these loads varies dramatically with the specific configuration of the wind turbine. The large number of failures in Danish-designed Micon 65 wind turbines prompted this investigation. The high-speed and low-speed shaft torques were measured on a two-stage helical gearbox of a single Micon 65 turbine. Transient events and normal running loads were combined statistically to obtain a typical annual load spectrum. The pitting and bending fatigue lives of the gear teeth were calculated by using Miner's rule for four different high-speed shaft brake configurations. Each breaking scenario was run for both a high- and a low-turbulence normal operating load spectrum. The analysis showed increases in gear life by up to a factor of 25 when the standard high-speed shaft brake is replaced with a dynamic brake or modified with a damper. 9 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Acceptance Testing for the Pressurized Mating Adapters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2008-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of three subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Supply (ACS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). PMAs 1 and 2 flew to ISS on Flight 2A and Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA) 3 flew to ISS on Flight 3A. This paper provides a summary of the PMAs ECLS design and a detailed discussion of the ISS ECLS Acceptance Testing methodologies utilized for the PMAs.

  2. Vortex-induced vibration effect on fatigue life estimate of turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Y. L.; Leung, R. C. K.; So, R. M. C.

    2007-11-01

    An analysis of a turbine blade fatigue life that includes the physics of fluid-structure interaction on the high cycle fatigue (HCF) life estimate of turbine blades is carried out. The rotor wake excitation is modeled by rows of Karman vortices superimposed on an inviscid uniform flow. The vortex-induced vibration problem is modeled by a linear cascade composed of five turbine blades and the coupled Euler and structural dynamics equations are numerically solved using a time-marching boundary element technique. The analysis can be applied to any blade geometries; it is not limited to the blade geometry considered here. Two major design parameters have been identified; the ratio of blade spacing to blade chord length s/ c of the stator, and the normalized frequency parameter c/ d which is related to the wake passing frequency of the rotor. For a rigid cascade, it is found that aerodynamic resonance prevails at the resonant c/ d values corresponding to an isolated blade while s/ c is responsible for the level of the aerodynamic response. If the central blades were elastic, the parameter s/ c plays a different role in the fluid-structure interaction problem. With a c/ d that could lead to structural resonance for an isolated blade, changing s/ c would stabilize the aerodynamic and structural response of the elastic blade in a cascade. On the contrary, an improper choice of s/ c might turn the elastic blade response into structural resonance even though the oncoming c/ d is non-resonant. The results of the nonlinear effects of c/ d and s/ c could be used together with the Campbell diagram to obtain an improved HCF design of rotor-stator pair.

  3. Contribution of Leisure Satisfaction, Acceptance Disability, and Social Relationship to Life Satisfaction among Korean Individuals with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Junhyoung; Schilling, Mary Lou; Kim, May; Han, Areum

    2016-01-01

    There is a dearth of literature that explores the relationships among leisure satisfaction, acceptance of disability, social relationships, and life satisfaction among adults with intellectual disability from Eastern countries. The purpose of this study was to examine how leisure satisfaction, disability acceptance, and social relationships are…

  4. Fatigue Life Analysis of Turbine Disks Based on Load Spectra of Aero-engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Feng; Lv, Zhiqiang; Cai, Wei; Zhu, Shun-Peng; Huang, Hong-Zhong

    2016-04-01

    Load spectra of aero-engines reflect the process of operating aircrafts as well as the changes of parameters of aircrafts. According to flight hours and speed cycle numbers of the aero-engines, the relationship between load spectra and the fatigue life of main components of the aero-engines is obtained. Based on distribution function and a generalized stress-strength interference model, the cumulative fatigue damage of aero-engines is then calculated. After applying the analysis of load spectra and the cumulative fatigue damage theory, the fatigue life of the first-stage turbine disks of the aero-engines is evaluated by using the S-N curve and Miner's rule in this paper.

  5. Data-Mining Toolset Developed for Determining Turbine Engine Part Life Consumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.

    2003-01-01

    The current practice in aerospace turbine engine maintenance is to remove components defined as life-limited parts after a fixed time, on the basis of a predetermined number of flight cycles. Under this schedule-based maintenance practice, the worst-case usage scenario is used to determine the usable life of the component. As shown, this practice often requires removing a part before its useful life is fully consumed, thus leading to higher maintenance cost. To address this issue, the NASA Glenn Research Center, in a collaborative effort with Pratt & Whitney, has developed a generic modular toolset that uses data-mining technology to parameterize life usage models for maintenance purposes. The toolset enables a "condition-based" maintenance approach, where parts are removed on the basis of the cumulative history of the severity of operation they have experienced. The toolset uses data-mining technology to tune life-consumption models on the basis of operating and maintenance histories. The flight operating conditions, represented by measured variables within the engine, are correlated with repair records for the engines, generating a relationship between the operating condition of the part and its service life. As shown, with the condition-based maintenance approach, the lifelimited part is in service until its usable life is fully consumed. This approach will lower maintenance costs while maintaining the safety of the propulsion system. The toolset is a modular program that is easily customizable by users. First, appropriate parametric damage accumulation models, which will be functions of engine variables, must be defined. The tool then optimizes the models to match the historical data by computing an effective-cycle metric that reduces the unexplained variability in component life due to each damage mode by accounting for the variability in operational severity. The damage increment due to operating conditions experienced during each flight is used to compute

  6. The influence of tinnitus acceptance on the quality of life and psychological distress in patients with chronic tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Riedl, David; Rumpold, Gerhard; Schmidt, Annette; Zorowka, Patrick G.; Bliem, Harald R.; Moschen, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings show the importance of acceptance in the treatment of chronic tinnitus. So far, very limited research investigating the different levels of tinnitus acceptance has been conducted. The aim of this study was to investigate the quality of life (QoL) and psychological distress in patients with chronic tinnitus who reported different levels of tinnitus acceptance. The sample consisted of outpatients taking part in a tinnitus coping group (n = 97). Correlations between tinnitus acceptance, psychological distress, and QoL were calculated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to calculate a cutoff score for the German “Tinnitus Acceptance Questionnaire” (CTAQ-G) and to evaluate the screening abilities of the CTAQ-G. Independent sample t-tests were conducted to compare QoL and psychological distress in patients with low tinnitus acceptance and high tinnitus acceptance. A cutoff point for CTAQ-G of 62.5 was defined, differentiating between patients with “low-to-mild tinnitus acceptance” and “moderate-to-high tinnitus acceptance.” Patients with higher levels of tinnitus acceptance reported a significantly higher QoL and lower psychological distress. Tinnitus acceptance plays an important role for patients with chronic tinnitus. Increased levels of acceptance are related to better QoL and less psychological distress. PMID:26356381

  7. A Computer Code for Gas Turbine Engine Weight And Disk Life Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Michael T.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Halliwell, Ian; Wickenheiser, Tim (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Reliable engine-weight estimation at the conceptual design stage is critical to the development of new aircraft engines. It helps to identify the best engine concept amongst several candidates. In this paper, the major enhancements to NASA's engine-weight estimate computer code (WATE) are described. These enhancements include the incorporation of improved weight-calculation routines for the compressor and turbine disks using the finite-difference technique. Furthermore, the stress distribution for various disk geometries was also incorporated, for a life-prediction module to calculate disk life. A material database, consisting of the material data of most of the commonly-used aerospace materials, has also been incorporated into WATE. Collectively, these enhancements provide a more realistic and systematic way to calculate the engine weight. They also provide additional insight into the design trade-off between engine life and engine weight. To demonstrate the new capabilities, the enhanced WATE code is used to perform an engine weight/life trade-off assessment on a production aircraft engine.

  8. Emotional non-acceptance links early life stress and blunted cortisol reactivity to social threat.

    PubMed

    Cărnuţă, Mihai; Crişan, Liviu G; Vulturar, Romana; Opre, Adrian; Miu, Andrei C

    2015-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) has been recently associated with blunted cortisol reactivity and emotion dysregulation, but no study until now examined whether these characteristics are related. The main goal of this study was to examine the potential mediator role of emotion dysregulation in the relation between ELS and cortisol reactivity to social threat. Only women who were free of psychiatric and endocrine disorders, had regular menstrual cycle and did not use oral contraceptives were selected for this study (N=62). After filling in ELS and multidimensional emotion dysregulation measures, participants underwent the Trier Social Stress Test during which cortisol and autonomic responses were assessed. Most participants (85.5%) reported one or more major stressful events (i.e., physical abuse, sexual abuse, major parental conflicts, death of a family or close friend, severe illness) experienced before age 17. ELS was negatively associated with cortisol reactivity and positively associated with skin conductance level (SCL) reactivity, but it did not influence heart rate and respiratory sinus arrhythmia. In addition, ELS was positively related to emotional non-acceptance (i.e., a tendency to develop secondary emotional responses to one's negative emotions), and the latter was negatively related to cortisol responses and positively related to SCL responses. Bootstrapping analyses indicated that emotional non-acceptance was a significant mediator in the relationships between ELS and both cortisol and SCL responses. Emotional non-acceptance is thus one of the psychological mechanisms underlying blunted cortisol and increased sympathetic reactivity in young healthy volunteers with a history of ELS. PMID:25462891

  9. Loading Analysis of Composite Wind Turbine Blade for Fatigue Life Prediction of Adhesively Bonded Root Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimi-Majd, Davood; Azimzadeh, Vahid; Mohammadi, Bijan

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays wind energy is widely used as a non-polluting cost-effective renewable energy resource. During the lifetime of a composite wind turbine which is about 20 years, the rotor blades are subjected to different cyclic loads such as aerodynamics, centrifugal and gravitational forces. These loading conditions, cause to fatigue failure of the blade at the adhesively bonded root joint, where the highest bending moments will occur and consequently, is the most critical zone of the blade. So it is important to estimate the fatigue life of the root joint. The cohesive zone model is one of the best methods for prediction of initiation and propagation of debonding at the root joint. The advantage of this method is the possibility of modeling the debonding without any requirement to the remeshing. However in order to use this approach, it is necessary to analyze the cyclic loading condition at the root joint. For this purpose after implementing a cohesive interface element in the Ansys finite element software, one blade of a horizontal axis wind turbine with 46 m rotor diameter was modelled in full scale. Then after applying loads on the blade under different condition of the blade in a full rotation, the critical condition of the blade is obtained based on the delamination index and also the load ratio on the root joint in fatigue cycles is calculated. These data are the inputs for fatigue damage growth analysis of the root joint by using CZM approach that will be investigated in future work.

  10. Combining Turbine Blade-Strike and Life Cycle Models to Assess Mitigation Strategies for Fish Passing Dams

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, John W.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Leonardsson, Kjell; Zabel, Richard W.; Lundqvist, Hans

    2008-08-01

    Combining the two models produced a rapid, cost effective tool for assessing dam passage impacts to fish populations and prioritizing among mitigation strategies for conserving fish stocks in regulated rivers. Estimated mortality of juvenile and adult Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and sea trout (S. trutta) passing turbines at two dams in northern Sweden was significantly higher for Kaplan turbines compared to Francis turbines, and for adult fish compared to juveniles based on blade strike models. Mean probability of mortality ranged from 6.7% for salmon smolts passing Francis turbines to >100% for adult salmon passing Kaplan turbines. Life cycle modeling allowed benefits to be assessed for three alternatives that mitigated this mortality. Salmon population responses varied considerably among alternatives and rivers: growth rates improved as much as 17.9%, female escapements increased up to 669%, and more than 1,300 additional female salmon were produced in one case. Protecting both smolts and adults provided benefits, and in one river, mitigating turbine mortality alone was estimated to have met the production capacity of the available habitat.

  11. Strain-Life Assessment of Grainex Mar-M 247 for NASA's Turbine Seal Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Irebert R.; Halford, Gary R.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Rimnac, Clare M.

    2004-01-01

    NASA s Turbine Seal Test Facility is used to test air-to-air seals for use primarily in advanced jet engine applications. Combinations of high temperature, high speed, and high pressure limit the disk life, due to the concern of crack initiation in the bolt holes of the Grainex Mar-M 247 disk. The primary purpose of this current work is to determine an inspection interval to ensure safe operation. The current work presents high temperature fatigue strain-life data for test specimens cut from an actual Grainex Mar-M 247 disk. Several different strain-life models were compared to the experimental data including the Manson-Hirschberg Method of Universal Slopes, the Halford-Nachtigall Mean Stress Method, and the Modified Morrow Method. The Halford-Nachtigall Method resulted in only an 18 percent difference between predicted and experimental results. Using the experimental data at a 99.95 percent prediction level and the presence of 6 bolt holes it was found that the disk should be inspected after 665 cycles based on a total strain of 0.5 percent at 649 C.

  12. Estimation of the residual life of steam-turbine condensers based on statistical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murmansky, B. E.; Aronson, K. E.; Brodov, Yu. M.

    2015-11-01

    The article presents the results of a study aimed at estimation of the state and prediction of the residual life of steam-turbine condensers on the basis of statistical analysis. The possibility of such evaluation during the operation of steam-turbine plants with accuracy sufficient for practical purposes is demonstrated. It is shown that identification of the operating period, viz., the initial period, the normal operation period, or the period of the lifetime exhaustion, as well as determination of the condenser's operating time at the moment when the failure of an individual tube occurs, is very important for statistical evaluation of the condenser state. Two statistical models are proposed and comparative analysis of the results calculated by these models for the residual life of the condensers at the Reftinskaya SDPP has been performed. The first model can be used when comprehensive information about the condenser's operating time before the tubes have failed is available as well as a priori information—or information based on analysis of the condenser tube metal—that the condenser is in its normal operation period. In this case, the fact of exhaustion of the condenser's lifetime is established by reaching the limit of the failed condenser tubes, which is determined by technical and economic analysis of losses caused by operating the turbine with a reduced heat-exchange surface of the condenser. The distribution function for the operating time of the failed tubes is approximated by a normal distribution. In the cases when no precise information on the condenser tubes' operating time is available at the thermoelectric power plant (TEPP), the second statistical model based on censored samples is proposed for estimation of the condenser state. An expression to assess the confidence interval that determines the significant difference between the distribution functions for complete and censored operating time values has been derived. It is shown that this model

  13. Effects of geometry and materials on low cycle fatigue life of turbine blades in LOX/hydrogen rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R. M.; Gross, L. A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an advanced turbine blade test program aimed at improving turbine blade low cycle fatigue (LCF) life. A total of 21 blades were tested in a blade thermal tester. The blades were made of MAR-M-246(Hf)DS and PWA-1480SC in six different geometries. The test results show that the PWA-1480SC material improved life by a factor of 1.7 to 3.0 over the current MAR-M-246(Hf)DS. The geometry changes yielded life improvements as high as 20 times the baseline blade made of PWA-1480SC and 34 times the baseline MAR-M-246DS blade.

  14. Contact Stress Analysis and Fatigue Life Prediction of a Turbine Fan Disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liang; Zhu, Shun-Peng; Lv, Zhiqiang; Zuo, Fang-Jun; Huang, Hong-Zhong

    2016-06-01

    Fan discs are critical components of an aero engine. In this paper, contact stress and life prediction of a turbine fan disc were investigated. A simplified pin/disc model was conducted to simulate the practical working condition under applied loads using finite element (FE) analysis. This study is devoted to examining the effects of interface condition of pin/disc such as gap and coefficient upon the maximum stress. The FE model indicated that the maximum stress occurs at the top right corner in the second pin hole, and larger gap or friction coefficient has a significant effect on the maximum stress. In addition, FE analysis without considering friction is also conducted. The results show that the dangerous point is similar to the result which considers friction and the stress state is relatively larger than that of considering friction. Finally, based on FE analysis result, life prediction for the fan disc is conducted to combine the material S-N curve, mean stress effects and concentration stress factor obtained by means of FE method.

  15. Case Studies of Fatigue Life Improvement Using Low Plasticity Burnishing in Gas Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prevey, Paul S.; Shepard, Michael; Ravindranath, Ravi A.; Gabb, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    Surface enhancement technologies such as shot peening, laser shock peening (LSP), and low plasticity burnishing (LPB) can provide substantial fatigue life improvement. However, to be effective, the compressive residual stresses that increase fatigue strength must be retained in service. For successful integration into turbine design, the process must be affordable and compatible with the manufacturing environment. LPB provides thermally stable compression of comparable magnitude and even greater depth than other methods, and can be performed in conventional machine shop environments on CNC machine tools. LPB provides a means to extend the fatigue lives of both new and legacy aircraft engines and ground-based turbines. Improving fatigue performance by introducing deep stable layers of compressive residual stress avoids the generally cost prohibitive alternative of modifying either material or design. The X-ray diffraction based background studies of thermal and mechanical stability of surface enhancement techniques are briefly reviewed, demonstrating the importance of minimizing cold work. The LPB process, tooling, and control systems are described. An overview of current research programs conducted for engine OEMs and the military to apply LPB to a variety of engine and aging aircraft components are presented. Fatigue performance and residual stress data developed to date for several case studies are presented including: * The effect of LPB on the fatigue performance of the nickel based super alloy IN718, showing fatigue benefit of thermal stability at engine temperatures. * An order of magnitude improvement in damage tolerance of LPB processed Ti-6-4 fan blade leading edges. * Elimination of the fretting fatigue debit for Ti-6-4 with prior LPB. * Corrosion fatigue mitigation with LPB in Carpenter 450 steel. *Damage tolerance improvement in 17-4PH steel. Where appropriate, the performance of LPB is compared to conventional shot peening after exposure to engine

  16. An assessment of quality of life using the WHOQOL-BREF among participants living in the vicinity of wind turbines.

    PubMed

    Feder, Katya; Michaud, David S; Keith, Stephen E; Voicescu, Sonia A; Marro, Leonora; Than, John; Guay, Mireille; Denning, Allison; Bower, Tara J; Lavigne, Eric; Whelan, Chantal; van den Berg, Frits

    2015-10-01

    Living within the vicinity of wind turbines may have adverse impacts on health measures associated with quality of life (QOL). There are few studies in this area and inconsistent findings preclude definitive conclusions regarding the impact that exposure to wind turbine noise (WTN) may have on QOL. In the current study (officially titled the Community Noise and Health Study or CNHS), the World Health Organization QOL-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF) questionnaire provided an evaluation of QOL in relation to WTN levels among randomly selected participants aged 18-79 (606 males, 632 females) living between 0.25 and 11.22 km from wind turbines (response rate 78.9%). In the multiple regression analyses, WTN levels were not found to be related to scores on the Physical, Psychological, Social or Environment domains, or to rated QOL and Satisfaction with Health questions. However, some wind turbine-related variables were associated with scores on the WHOQOL-BREF, irrespective of WTN levels. Hearing wind turbines for less than one year (compared to not at all and greater than one year) was associated with improved (i.e. higher) scores on the Psychological domain (p=0.0108). Lower scores on both the Physical and Environment domains (p=0.0218 and p=0.0372, respectively), were observed among participants reporting high visual annoyance toward wind turbines. Personal benefit from having wind turbines in the area was related to higher scores on the Physical domain (p=0.0417). Other variables significantly related to one or more domains, included sex, age, marital status, employment, education, income, alcohol consumption, smoking status, chronic diseases and sleep disorders. Collectively, results do not support an association between exposure to WTN up to 46 dBA and QOL assessed using the WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire. PMID:26176420

  17. Space Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 2.0 Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Carly; Vogel, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Following successful completion of the space suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 1.0 development and testing in 2011, the second system-level prototype, PLSS 2.0, was developed in 2012 to continue the maturation of the advanced PLSS design which is intended to reduce consumables, improve reliability and robustness, and incorporate additional sensing and functional capabilities over the current Space Shuttle/International Space Station Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) PLSS. PLSS 2.0 represents the first attempt at a packaged design comprising first generation or later component prototypes and medium fidelity interfaces within a flight-like representative volume. Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) is carryover terminology from the Space Shuttle Program referring to the series of test sequences used to verify functionality of the EMU PLSS prior to installation into the Space Shuttle airlock for launch. As applied to the PLSS 2.0 development and testing effort, PIA testing designated the series of 27 independent test sequences devised to verify component and subsystem functionality, perform in situ instrument calibrations, generate mapping data to define set-points for control algorithms, evaluate hardware performance against advanced PLSS design requirements, and provide quantitative and qualitative feedback on evolving design requirements and performance specifications. PLSS 2.0 PIA testing was carried out from 3/20/13 - 3/15/14 using a variety of test configurations to perform test sequences that ranged from stand-alone component testing to system-level testing, with evaluations becoming increasingly integrated as the test series progressed. Each of the 27 test sequences was vetted independently, with verification of basic functionality required before completion. Because PLSS 2.0 design requirements were evolving concurrently with PLSS 2.0 PIA testing, the requirements were used as guidelines to assess performance during the tests; after the completion of PIA

  18. Space Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 2.0 Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anchondo, Ian; Cox, Marlon; Meginnis, Carly; Westheimer, David; Vogel, Matt R.

    2016-01-01

    Following successful completion of the space suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 1.0 development and testing in 2011, the second system-level prototype, PLSS 2.0, was developed in 2012 to continue the maturation of the advanced PLSS design. This advanced PLSS is intended to reduce consumables, improve reliability and robustness, and incorporate additional sensing and functional capabilities over the current Space Shuttle/International Space Station Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) PLSS. PLSS 2.0 represents the first attempt at a packaged design comprising first generation or later component prototypes and medium fidelity interfaces within a flight-like representative volume. Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) is carryover terminology from the Space Shuttle Program referring to the series of test sequences used to verify functionality of the EMU PLSS prior to installation into the Space Shuttle airlock for launch. As applied to the PLSS 2.0 development and testing effort, PIA testing designated the series of 27 independent test sequences devised to verify component and subsystem functionality, perform in situ instrument calibrations, generate mapping data, define set-points, evaluate control algorithms, evaluate hardware performance against advanced PLSS design requirements, and provide quantitative and qualitative feedback on evolving design requirements and performance specifications. PLSS 2.0 PIA testing was carried out in 2013 and 2014 using a variety of test configurations to perform test sequences that ranged from stand-alone component testing to system-level testing, with evaluations becoming increasingly integrated as the test series progressed. Each of the 27 test sequences was vetted independently, with verification of basic functionality required before completion. Because PLSS 2.0 design requirements were evolving concurrently with PLSS 2.0 PIA testing, the requirements were used as guidelines to assess performance during the tests; after the

  19. Oil-Free Rotor Support Technologies for Long Life, Closed Cycle Brayton Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucero, John M.; DellaCorte, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this study is to provide technological support to ensure successful life and operation of a 50-300 kW dynamic power conversion system specifically with response to the rotor support system. By utilizing technical expertise in tribology, bearings, rotordynamic, solid lubricant coatings and extensive test facilities, valuable input for mission success is provided. A discussion of the history of closed cycle Brayton turboalternators (TA) will be included. This includes the 2 kW Mini-Brayton Rotating Unit (Mini-BRU), the 10kW Brayton Rotating Unit (BRU) and the 125 kW turboalternator-compressor (TAC) designed in mid 1970's. Also included is the development of air-cycle machines and terrestrial oil-free gas turbine power systems in the form of microturbines, specifically Capstone microturbines. A short discussion of the self-acting compliant surface hydrodynamic fluid film bearings, or foil bearings, will follow, including a short history of the load capacity advances, the NASA coatings advancements as well as design model advances. Successes in terrestrial based machines will be noted and NASA tribology and bearing research test facilities will be described. Finally, implementation of a four step integration process will be included in the discussion.

  20. 20 CFR 418.1260 - What major life-changing event evidence will we not accept?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... through 404.721 of this chapter. (b) We will not accept evidence of marriage that fails to meet the requirements in §§ 404.725 through 404.727 of this chapter. (c) We will not accept evidence that your...

  1. How do the Properties of Allan Hills 84001 Compare With Accepted Criteria for Evidence of Ancient Life?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; McKay, D. S.; Thomas-Keprta, K.; Westall, F.; Romanek, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    Criteria for Past Life: To be confident that any sample contains evidence of past life or biogenic activity, one must determine beyond a shadow of a doubt that certain well-established features or biomarker signatures are present in the sample. In the case of martian samples, the criteria for past life have not been established because if life existed on the planet, we have no way of knowing its detailed characteristics. Lacking independent evidence about the nature of possible past life on Mars, the scientific community must use, for the time being, the criteria established for ancient samples from the Earth: (1) Do we know the geologic context of the sample? Is it compatible with past life? (2) Do we know the age of the sample and its stratigraphic location? Are they understood enough to relate possible life to geologic history? (3) Does the sample contain evidence of cellular morphology? (4) What structural remains of colonies or communities exist within the samples? (5) Is there any evidence of biominerals showing chemical or mineral disequilibria? (6) Is there any evidence of stable isotope patterns unique to biology? (7) Are there any organic biomarkers present? (8) Are the features indigenous to the sample? For acceptance of past life in a geologic sample, essentially all of these criteria must he met.

  2. Refrigerated poultry breast fillets packed in modified atmosphere and irradiated: bacteriological evaluation, shelf life and sensory acceptance

    PubMed Central

    Mantilla, Samira Pirola Santos; Santos, Érica Barbosa; de Freitas, Mônica Queiroz; de Carvalho Vital, Helio; Mano, Sérgio Borges; Franc, Robson Maia

    2012-01-01

    In the present study the effects on shelf life and sensory acceptance of gamma-irradiated refrigerated poultry breast fillets subjected to modified atmosphere packaging (80% CO2/20% N2 or vacuum) were investigated. After irradiation with 2 kGy, sensory acceptance tests and monitoring of bacterial growth were performed in order to determine the sanitary quality of the samples. It has been found that irradiation, used in combination with modified atmosphere packaging, can double the shelf life of refrigerated poultry breast fillets by reducing the populations of aerobic mesophilic and psychrotrophic bacteria, enterobacteria, coliforms, Listeria spp. and Aeromonas spp., without significantly modifying its color or its overall appearance, the lactic acid bacteria being the most resistant to exposure to radiation and carbon dioxide. PMID:24031967

  3. International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Acceptance Testing for Node 1 Temperature and Humidity Control Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Node 1 Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of five subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Storage (ACS), Atmosphere Revitalization (AR), Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). This paper will provide a summary of the Node 1 ECLS THC subsystem design and a detailed discussion of the ISS ECLS Acceptance Testing methodology utilized for this subsystem.The International Space Station (ISS) Node 1 Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of five subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Storage (ACS), Atmosphere Revitalization (AR), Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). This paper will provide a summary of the Node 1 ECLS THC subsystem design and a detailed discussion of the ISS ECLS Acceptance Testing methodology utilized for this subsystem.

  4. International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Acceptance Testing for Node 1 Atmosphere Control and Supply Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2009-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Node 1 Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of five subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Supply (ACS), Atmosphere Revitalization (AR), Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). This paper provides a summary of the Node 1 ECLS ACS subsystem design and a detailed discussion of the ISS ECLS Acceptance Testing methodology utilized for that subsystem.

  5. Breast-feeding duration: influence on taste acceptance over the first year of life.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Camille; Chabanet, Claire; Laval, Caroline; Issanchou, Sylvie; Nicklaus, Sophie

    2013-03-28

    Early feeding experiences, e.g. related to milk feeding, can affect later food and taste preferences. However, consequences of breast-feeding on taste acceptance are under-investigated. The objective of the present study was to examine the impact of exclusive breast-feeding duration (DEB) on taste acceptance at 6 and 12 months in the same infants (n 122). Mothers recorded the DEB. Acceptance of solutions of each of the five basic tastes relative to water was evaluated in the laboratory at 6 and 12 months by the ingestion ratio (IR). Kendall correlations were calculated between the DEB and the IR. Only 16 % completed at least 6 months of exclusive breast-feeding; 79 % had begun complementary feeding by 6 months. At 6 months, infants preferred sweet, salty and umami solutions over water and were indifferent to sour and bitter solutions. The longer an infant was breast-fed, the more s/he accepted the umami solution at 6 months. At 12 months, infants preferred sweet and salty solutions over water and were indifferent to sour, bitter and umami solutions. The relationship between the DEB and acceptance of the umami solution was not observed at 12 months. No relationship was observed between the DEB and sweet, salty, sour and bitter taste acceptance at 6 or 12 months. The association between the DEB and umami taste acceptance at 6 months may relate to the higher glutamate content of human milk compared with formula milk. Beyond the acknowledged metabolic benefits of breast-feeding, this suggests that prolonged breast-feeding could also be associated with an impact on sensory preference at the beginning of complementary feeding. PMID:22874663

  6. Variety is the spice of life: Strategies for promoting fruit and vegetable acceptance during infancy ☆

    PubMed Central

    Mennella, Julie A.; Nicklaus, Sophie; Jagolino, Amanda L.; Yourshaw, Lauren M.

    2009-01-01

    The present manuscript describes two experimental studies that were conducted to explore the effects of an 8-day exposure to a particular food or a variety of foods between and/or within meals on fruit and vegetable acceptance in 74 infants. Whether the dietary experience modified acceptance depended on the flavors of foods experienced, whether the experience occurred between or within meals or both, and whether the target food was a fruit or vegetable. In the first study, we found that 8 days of dietary exposure to pears or a variety of fruits between meals (not including pears) resulted in greater consumption of pears by the infants but this increased acceptance did not generalize to green beans. In the second study, we found that 8 days of vegetable variety both between and within meals led to increased acceptance of green beans, carrots and spinach. Those infants who experienced green beans alone or a variety of vegetables between meals also tended to eat more green beans after the exposure. These findings suggest that not only can infants clearly discriminate flavors but repeated opportunities to taste a particular or a varietyof foods may promote willingness to eat fruits and vegetables, the consumption of which is generally low in the pediatric population and the acceptance of which is difficult to enhance beyond toddlerhood. PMID:18222499

  7. Numerical simulation of 3D flow past a real-life marine hydrokinetic turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Seokkoo; Borazjani, Iman; Colby, Jonathan A.; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2012-04-01

    We simulate three-dimensional, turbulent flow past an axial-flow marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbine mounted on the bed of a rectangular open channel by adapting a computational framework developed for carrying out high-resolution large-eddy simulation (LES) in arbitrarily complex domains involving moving or stationary boundaries. The complex turbine geometry, including the rotor and all stationary components, is handled by employing the curvilinear immersed boundary (CURVIB) method [1,2]. Velocity boundary conditions near all solid surfaces are reconstructed using a wall model based on solving the simplified boundary layer equations [2]. To demonstrate the capabilities of the model we apply it to simulate the flow past a Gen4 axial flow MHK turbine developed by Verdant Power for the Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy (RITE) project in the East River in New York City, USA. We carry out systematic grid refinement studies, using grids with up to 185 million nodes, for only the turbine rotor placed in an infinite free stream to show that the computed torque converges to a grid insensitive value, which is in good agreement with field measurements. We also carry out LES for the complete turbine configuration, including the pylon, nacelle and rotor, mounted on the bed of a straight rectangular open channel. The computed results illustrate the complexity of the flow and show that the power output of the complete turbine is primarily dependent on the rotor geometry and tip speed ratio, and is not affected by the stationary components of the turbine and the presence of the channel bed. The complete turbine simulation also reveals that the downstream wake of the turbine consists of three main regions: (1) the outer layer with the spiral blade tip vortices rotating in the same direction as the blades; (2) the counter-rotating inner layer surrounded by the spiral tip vortices; and (3) the core layer co-rotating with respect to the tip vortices. This study is the first to report the

  8. Storage shelf-life and consumer acceptance of pre-cooked reindeer meat products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential for production of premium reindeer meat in Alaska is high and pre-cooked reindeer meat products are of great interest to producers and processors. There has been limited work on process, development and consumer acceptance of pre-cooked reindeer meat. Our objective was to assess consu...

  9. The Impact of Rendered Protein Meal Oxidation Level on Shelf-Life, Sensory Characteristics, and Acceptability in Extruded Pet Food

    PubMed Central

    Chanadang, Sirichat; Koppel, Kadri; Aldrich, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Sensory analysis was used to determine the changes due to the storage time on extruded pet food prepared from two different rendered protein meals: (i) beef meat and bone meal (BMBM); (ii) chicken byproduct meal (CPBM). Extrusion is a process where feed is pressed through a die in order to create shapes and increase digestibility. Descriptive sensory analysis using a human panel found an increase in undesirable sensory attributes (e.g., oxidized oil, rancid) in extruded pet food over storage time, especially the one prepared from chicken by product meal without antioxidants. The small increase in oxidized and rancid aromas of BMBM samples did not affect pet owners’ acceptability of the products. CPBM samples without antioxidants showed a notable increase in oxidized and rancid aroma over storage time and, thus, affected product acceptability negatively. This finding indicated that human sensory analysis can be used as a tool to track the changes of pet food characteristics due to storage, as well as estimate the shelf-life of the products. Abstract Pet foods are expected to have a shelf-life for 12 months or more. Sensory analysis can be used to determine changes in products and to estimate products’ shelf-life. The objectives of this study were to (1) investigate how increasing levels of oxidation in rendered protein meals used to produce extruded pet food affected the sensory properties and (2) determine the effect of shelf-life on pet owners’ acceptability of extruded pet food diet formulated without the use of preservative. Pet food diets contained beef meat bone meal (BMBM) and chicken byproduct meal (CBPM) in which the oxidation was retarded with ethoxyquin, mixed tocopherols, or none at all, and then extruded into dry pet foods. These samples represented low, medium, and high oxidation levels, respectively. Samples were stored for 0, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months at ambient temperature. Each time point, samples were evaluated by six highly

  10. The Impact of Rendered Protein Meal Oxidation Level on Shelf-Life, Sensory Characteristics, and Acceptability in Extruded Pet Food.

    PubMed

    Chanadang, Sirichat; Koppel, Kadri; Aldrich, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Pet foods are expected to have a shelf-life for 12 months or more. Sensory analysis can be used to determine changes in products and to estimate products' shelf-life. The objectives of this study were to (1) investigate how increasing levels of oxidation in rendered protein meals used to produce extruded pet food affected the sensory properties and (2) determine the effect of shelf-life on pet owners' acceptability of extruded pet food diet formulated without the use of preservative. Pet food diets contained beef meat bone meal (BMBM) and chicken byproduct meal (CBPM) in which the oxidation was retarded with ethoxyquin, mixed tocopherols, or none at all, and then extruded into dry pet foods. These samples represented low, medium, and high oxidation levels, respectively. Samples were stored for 0, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months at ambient temperature. Each time point, samples were evaluated by six highly trained descriptive panelists for sensory attributes related to oxidation. Samples without preservatives were chosen for the acceptability test, since the differences in sensory characteristics over storage time were more distinguishable in those samples. Pet owners evaluated samples for aroma, appearance and overall liking. Descriptive sensory analysis detected significant changes in oxidized-related sensory characteristics over storage time. However, the differences for CBPM samples were more pronounced and directional. The consumer study showed no differences in pet owners' acceptability for BMBM samples. However, the noticeable increase in aroma characteristics (rancid aroma 0.33-4.21) in CBPM samples over storage time did have a negative effect on consumer's liking (overall liking 5.52-4.95). PMID:27483326

  11. CMC Property Variability and Life Prediction Methods for Turbine Engine Component Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheplak, Matthew L.

    2004-01-01

    The ever increasing need for lower density and higher temperature-capable materials for aircraft engines has led to the development of Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs). Today's aircraft engines operate with >3000"F gas temperatures at the entrance to the turbine section, but unless heavily cooled, metallic components cannot operate above approx.2000 F. CMCs attempt to push component capability to nearly 2700 F with much less cooling, which can help improve engine efficiency and performance in terms of better fuel efficiency, higher thrust, and reduced emissions. The NASA Glenn Research Center has been researching the benefits of the SiC/SiC CMC for engine applications. A CMC is made up of a matrix material, fibers, and an interphase, which is a protective coating over the fibers. There are several methods or architectures in which the orientation of the fibers can be manipulated to achieve a particular material property objective as well as a particular component geometric shape and size. The required shape manipulation can be a limiting factor in the design and performance of the component if there is a lack of bending capability of the fiber as making the fiber more flexible typically sacrifices strength and other fiber properties. Various analysis codes are available (pcGINA, CEMCAN) that can predict the effective Young's Moduli, thermal conductivities, coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE), and various other properties of a CMC. There are also various analysis codes (NASAlife) that can be used to predict the life of CMCs under expected engine service conditions. The objective of this summer study is to utilize and optimize these codes for examining the tradeoffs between CMC properties and the complex fiber architectures that will be needed for several different component designs. For example, for the pcGINA code, there are six variations of architecture available. Depending on which architecture is analyzed, the user is able to specify the fiber tow size, tow

  12. The effect of wind turbine noise on sleep and quality of life: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Onakpoya, Igho J; O'Sullivan, Jack; Thompson, Matthew J; Heneghan, Carl J

    2015-09-01

    Noise generated by wind turbines has been reported to affect sleep and quality of life (QOL), but the relationship is unclear. Our objective was to explore the association between wind turbine noise, sleep disturbance and quality of life, using data from published observational studies. We searched Medline, Embase, Global Health and Google Scholar databases. No language restrictions were imposed. Hand searches of bibliography of retrieved full texts were also conducted. The reporting quality of included studies was assessed using the STROBE guidelines. Two reviewers independently determined the eligibility of studies, assessed the quality of included studies, and extracted the data. We included eight studies with a total of 2433 participants. All studies were cross-sectional, and the overall reporting quality was moderate. Meta-analysis of six studies (n=2364) revealed that the odds of being annoyed is significantly increased by wind turbine noise (OR: 4.08; 95% CI: 2.37 to 7.04; p<0.00001). The odds of sleep disturbance was also significantly increased with greater exposure to wind turbine noise (OR: 2.94; 95% CI: 1.98 to 4.37; p<0.00001). Four studies reported that wind turbine noise significantly interfered with QOL. Further, visual perception of wind turbine generators was associated with greater frequency of reported negative health effects. In conclusion, there is some evidence that exposure to wind turbine noise is associated with increased odds of annoyance and sleep problems. Individual attitudes could influence the type of response to noise from wind turbines. Experimental and observational studies investigating the relationship between wind turbine noise and health are warranted. PMID:25982992

  13. The effects of video compression on acceptability of images for monitoring life sciences' experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.; Chuang, Sherry L.

    1993-01-01

    Current plans indicate that there will be a large number of life science experiments carried out during the thirty year-long mission of the Biological Flight Research Laboratory (BFRL) on board Space Station Freedom (SSF). Non-human life science experiments will be performed in the BFRL. Two distinct types of activities have already been identified for this facility: (1) collect, store, distribute, analyze and manage engineering and science data from the Habitats, Glovebox and Centrifuge, (2) perform a broad range of remote science activities in the Glovebox and Habitat chambers in conjunction with the remotely located principal investigator (PI). These activities require extensive video coverage, viewing and/or recording and distribution to video displays on board SSF and to the ground. This paper concentrates mainly on the second type of activity. Each of the two BFRL habitat racks are designed to be configurable for either six rodent habitats per rack, four plant habitats per rack, or a combination of the above. Two video cameras will be installed in each habitat with a spare attachment for a third camera when needed. Therefore, a video system that can accommodate up to 12-18 camera inputs per habitat rack must be considered.

  14. Can home care maintain an acceptable quality of life for patients with terminal cancer and their relatives?

    PubMed

    Hinton, J

    1994-01-01

    This prospective study was designed to assess whether patients with terminal cancer, and their relatives, find that competent home care sufficiently maintains comfort and helps adjustment. A random sample from a home care service with readily available beds comprised 77 adults and their relatives who were able and willing to be interviewed separately each week. They were asked the nature and degree of current problems and regular assessments were made of some qualities of life including mood, attitude to the condition, perceived help and preferred place of care. These patients had 90% of their care at home; 29% died at home but 30% were finally admitted for one to three days and 41% for longer. In the final eight weeks, tolerable physical symptoms were volunteered by a mean of 63% each week and psychological symptoms by 17%. Some distress was felt by 11% of patients; this was usually from pain, depression, dyspnoea, anxiety or weakness, and generally did not persist. Relatives suffered grief, strain or their own ill health. Patients' and relatives' reports generally matched except for the strain on carers. Regular assessments found that 64% of patients thought death certain or probable, and 27% thought it possible. Various proportions coped by optimism, fighting their disease, partial suppression or denial, but 50% reached positive acceptance. Relatives were more aware and accepting. About three-quarters of patients and half the relatives were composed, often enjoying life. Serious depression affected 5% of patients and anxiety 4%, but relatives' manifest depression in the later stages increased to 17% and anxiety to 14%. Many consciously disguised their feelings. Treatment was usually praised but realistic preference for home care fell steadily from 100% to 54% of patients and 45% of relatives. At follow-up most relatives approved of where patients had received care and died. PMID:7952369

  15. Non-destructive measurement and role of surface residual stress monitoring in residual life assessment of a steam turbine blading material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu-Gaunkar, Gajanana; Rawat, M. S.; Prasad, C. R.

    2014-02-01

    Steam turbine blades in power generation equipment are made from martensitic stainless steels having high strength, good toughness and corrosion resistance. However, these steels are susceptible to pitting which can promote early failures of blades in the turbines, particularly in the low pressure dry/wet areas by stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue. Presence of tensile residual stresses is known to accelerate failures whereas compressive stresses can help in delaying failures. Shot peening has been employed as an effective tool to induce compressive residual stresses which offset a part of local surface tensile stresses in the surface layers of components. Maintaining local stresses at stress raisers, such as pits formed during service, below a threshold level can help in preventing the initiation microcracks and failures. The thickness of the layer in compression will, however, depend of the shot peening parameters and should extend below the bottom of corrosion pits. The magnitude of surface compressive drops progressively during service exposure and over time the effectiveness of shot peening is lost making the material susceptible to micro-crack initiation once again. Measurement and monitoring of surface residual stress therefore becomes important for assessing residual life of components in service. This paper shows the applicability of surface stress monitoring to life assessment of steam turbine blade material based on data generated in laboratory on residual surface stress measurements in relation to fatigue exposure. An empirical model is proposed to calculate the remaining life of shot peened steam turbine blades in service.

  16. Life modeling of thermal barrier coatings for aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating life models developed under the NASA Lewis Research Center's Hot Section Technology (HOST) program are summarized. An initial laboratory model and three design-capable models are discussed. Current understanding of coating failure mechanisms are also summarized.

  17. Changes in quality of life and perceptions of general health before and after operation of wind turbines.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Leila; Bigelow, Philip; McColl, Stephen; Majowicz, Shannon; Gohari, Mahmood; Waterhouse, Ryan

    2016-09-01

    Ontario is Canada's provincial leader in wind energy, with over 4000 MW of installed capacity supplying approximately five percent of the province's electricity demand. Wind energy is now one of the fastest-growing sources of renewable power in Canada and many other countries. However, its possible negative impact on population health, as a new source of environmental noise, has raised concerns for people living in proximity to wind turbines (WTs). The aims of this study were to assess the effect of individual differences and annoyance on the self-reported general health and health-related quality of life (QOL) of nearby residents, using a pre- and post-exposure design. Prospective cohort data were collected before and after WT operations, from the individuals (n = 43) in Ontario, Canada. General health and QOL metrics were measured using standard scales, such as SF12, life satisfaction scales developed by Diener (SWLS) and the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS-SWL). The mean values for the Mental Component Score of SF12 (p = 0.002), SWLS (p < 0.001), and CCHS-SWL (p = 0.044) significantly worsened after WT operation for those participants who had a negative attitude to WTs, who voiced concerns about property devaluation, and/or who reported being visually or noise annoyed. PMID:27321878

  18. Extending the Technology Acceptance Model to Explore the Intention to Use Second Life for Enhancing Healthcare Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Meyrick; Herold, David Kurt; Choo, Tat-Ming; Chan, Kitty

    2012-01-01

    Learners need to have good reasons to engage and accept e-learning. They need to understand that unless they do, the outcomes will be less favourable. The technology acceptance model (TAM) is the most widely recognized model addressing why users accept or reject technology. This study describes the development and evaluation of a virtual…

  19. Predicting Noise From Wind Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    1990-01-01

    Computer program WINDY predicts broadband noise spectra of horizontal-axis wind-turbine generators. Enables adequate assessment of impact of broadband wind-turbine noise. Effects of turbulence, trailing-edge wakes, and bluntness taken into account. Program has practical application in design and siting of wind-turbine machines acceptable to community. Written in GW-Basic.

  20. Effect of salts of organic acids on Listeria monocytogenes, shelf life, meat quality, and consumer acceptability of beef frankfurters.

    PubMed

    Morey, Amit; Bowers, Jordan W J; Bauermeister, Laura J; Singh, Manpreet; Huang, Tung-Shi; McKee, Shelly R

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate anti-listerial efficacy of salts of organic acids, and their impact on the quality of frankfurters. Beef frankfurters were manufactured by incorporating organic acids in 5 different combinations: (1) control (no marinade addition; C); (2) sodium lactate (2% wt/wt; SL); (3) potassium lactate (2% wt/wt; PL); (4) sodium citrate (0.75% wt/wt; SC); and (5) sodium lactate (2% wt/wt)/sodium diacetate (0.25% wt/wt; SL/SD). Cooked frankfurters were inoculated with streptomycin-resistant (1500 μg/mL) L. monocytogenes (7 log₁₀ CFU/frank). Inoculated and noninoculated frankfurters were vacuum packaged and stored at 4 °C. Samples were taken weekly up to 10 wk for estimation of L. monocytogenes as well as aerobic plate count (APC) and psychrotrophs (PSY), respectively. Total of 2 independent trials of the entire experiment were conducted. Noninoculated beef frankfurters were evaluated weekly by untrained sensory panelists for 7 wk. SL, PL, and SC treatments did not (P > 0.05) adversely affect consumer acceptability through 8 wk although, SL/SD treatment was significantly (P ≤ 0.05) less preferred across all sensory attributes. SL/SD treatment negatively affected product quality, but was able to control APC, PSY, and L. monocytogenes levels. SC performed similar to the control throughout the 8, 9, and 10 wk storage periods, providing no benefit for inhibiting L. monocytogenes (increasing from 7 logs CFU/frank to 10 logs CFU/frank throughout storage) or extending shelf life of the beef frankfurters. In conclusion, 2% SL and PL, and 2% SL/0.25% SD may be effective L. monocytogenes inhibitors (maintaining inoculation levels of 7 logs CFU/frank during storage), but changes in SL/SD treatment formulation should be studied to improve product quality. PMID:24460770

  1. TBCs for Gas Turbines under Thermomechanical Loadings: Failure Behaviour and Life Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, T.; Trunova, O.; Herzog, R.; Singheiser, L.

    2012-10-01

    The present contribution gives an overview about recent research on a thermal barrier coating (TBC) system consisted of (i) an intermetallic MCrAlY-alloy Bondcoat (BC) applied by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) and (ii) an Yttria Stabilised Zirconia (YSZ) top coat air plasma sprayed (APS) at Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-1). The influence of high temperature dwell time, maximum and minimum temperature on crack growth kinetics during thermal cycling of such plasma sprayed TBCs is investigated using infrared pulse thermography (IT), acoustic emission (AE) analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Thermocyclic life in terms of accumulated time at maximum temperature decreases with increasing high temperature dwell time and increases with increasing minimum temperature. AE analysis proves that crack growth mainly occurs during cooling at temperatures below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of the BC. Superimposed mechanical load cycles accelerate delamination crack growth and, in case of sufficiently high mechanical loadings, result in premature fatigue failure of the substrate. A life prediction model based on TGO growth kinetics and a fracture mechanics approach has been developed which accounts for the influence of maximum and minimum temperature as well as of high temperature dwell time with good accuracy in an extremely wide parameter range.

  2. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    2002-04-01

    Blade fatigue life is an important element in determining the economic viability of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). VAWT-SAL Vertical Axis Wind Turbine- Stochastic Aerodynamic Loads Ver 3.2 numerically simulates the stochastic (random0 aerodynamic loads of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) created by the atomspheric turbulence. The program takes into account the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and assumed turbulence properties.

  3. Lithium-Ion Ultracapacitors integrated with Wind Turbines Power Conversion Systems to Extend Operating Life and Improve Output Power Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Adel Nasiri

    2012-05-23

    In this project we designed and modeled a system for a full conversion wind turbine and built a scaled down model which utilizes Lithium-Ion Capacitors on the DC bus. One of the objectives is to reduce the mechanical stress on the gearbox and drivetrain of the wind turbine by adjusting the torque on generator side according to incoming wind power. Another objective is to provide short-term support for wind energy to be more “grid friendly” in order to ultimately increase wind energy penetration. These supports include power smoothing, power ramp rate limitation, low voltage ride through, and frequency (inertia) support. This research shows how energy storage in small scale and in an economical fashion can make a significant impact on performance of wind turbines. Gearbox and drivetrain premature failures are among high cost maintenance items for wind turbines. Since the capacitors are directly applied on the turbine DC bus and their integration does not require addition hardware, the cost of the additional system can be reasonable for the wind turbine manufacturers and utility companies.

  4. Calculation of gas temperature at the outlet of the combustion chamber and in the air-gas channel of a gas-turbine unit by data of acceptance tests in accordance with ISO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyuk, A. G.; Karpunin, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a high accuracy method enabling performance of the calculation of real values of the initial temperature of a gas turbine unit (GTU), i.e., the gas temperature at the outlet of the combustion chamber, in a situation where manufacturers do not disclose this information. The features of the definition of the initial temperature of the GTU according to ISO standards were analyzed. It is noted that the true temperatures for high-temperature GTUs is significantly higher than values determined according to ISO standards. A computational procedure for the determination of gas temperatures in the air-gas channel of the gas turbine and cooling air consumptions over blade rims is proposed. As starting equations, the heat balance equation and the flow mixing equation for the combustion chamber are assumed. Results of acceptance GTU tests according to ISO standards and statistical dependencies of required cooling air consumptions on the gas temperature and the blade metal are also used for calculations. An example of the calculation is given for one of the units. Using a developed computer program, the temperatures in the air-gas channel of certain GTUs are calculated, taking into account their design features. These calculations are performed on the previously published procedure for the detailed calculation of the cooled gas turbine subject to additional losses arising because of the presence of the cooling system. The accuracy of calculations by the computer program is confirmed by conducting verification calculations for the GTU of the Mitsubishi Comp. and comparing results with published data of the company. Calculation data for temperatures were compared with the experimental data and the characteristics of the GTU, and the error of the proposed method is estimated.

  5. Torque ripple in a Darrieus, vertical axis wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Reuter, R.C. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Interaction between a steady wind and a rotating, Darrieus, vertical axis wind turbine produces time periodic aerodynamic loads which cause time dependent torque variations, referred to as torque ripple, to occur in the mechanical link between the turbine and the electrical generator. There is concern for the effect of torque ripple upon fatigue life of drive train components and upon power quality. An analytical solution characterizing the phenomenon of torque ripple has been obtained which is based upon a Fourier expansion of the time dependent features of the problem. Numerical results for torque ripple, some experimental data, determination of acceptable levels and methods of controlling it, are presented and discussed.

  6. Advanced turbine design for coal-fueled engines

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.H.; Johnson, B.V.

    1993-04-01

    The investigators conclude that: (1) Turbine erosion resistance was shown to be improved by a factor of 5 by varying the turbine design. Increasing the number of stages and increasing the mean radius reduces the peak predicted erosion rates for 2-D flows on the blade airfoil from values which are 6 times those of the vane to values of erosion which are comparable to those of the vane airfoils. (2) Turbine erosion was a strong function of airfoil shape depending on particle diameter. Different airfoil shapes for the same turbine operating condition resulted in a factor of 7 change in airfoil erosion for the smallest particles studied (5 micron). (3) Predicted erosion for the various turbines analyzed was a strong function of particle diameter and weaker function of particle density. (4) Three dimensional secondary flows were shown to cause increases in peak and average erosion on the vane and blade airfoils. Additionally, the interblade secondary flows and stationary outer case caused unique erosion patterns which were not obtainable with 2-D analyses. (5) Analysis of the results indicate that hot gas cleanup systems are necessary to achieve acceptable turbine life in direct-fired, coal-fueled systems. In addition, serious consequences arise when hot gas filter systems fail for even short time periods. For a complete failure of the filter system, a 0.030 in. thick corrosion-resistant protective coating on a turbine blade would be eroded at some locations within eight minutes.

  7. Advanced turbine design for coal-fueled engines. Phase 1, Erosion of turbine hot gas path blading: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.H.; Johnson, B.V.

    1993-04-01

    The investigators conclude that: (1) Turbine erosion resistance was shown to be improved by a factor of 5 by varying the turbine design. Increasing the number of stages and increasing the mean radius reduces the peak predicted erosion rates for 2-D flows on the blade airfoil from values which are 6 times those of the vane to values of erosion which are comparable to those of the vane airfoils. (2) Turbine erosion was a strong function of airfoil shape depending on particle diameter. Different airfoil shapes for the same turbine operating condition resulted in a factor of 7 change in airfoil erosion for the smallest particles studied (5 micron). (3) Predicted erosion for the various turbines analyzed was a strong function of particle diameter and weaker function of particle density. (4) Three dimensional secondary flows were shown to cause increases in peak and average erosion on the vane and blade airfoils. Additionally, the interblade secondary flows and stationary outer case caused unique erosion patterns which were not obtainable with 2-D analyses. (5) Analysis of the results indicate that hot gas cleanup systems are necessary to achieve acceptable turbine life in direct-fired, coal-fueled systems. In addition, serious consequences arise when hot gas filter systems fail for even short time periods. For a complete failure of the filter system, a 0.030 in. thick corrosion-resistant protective coating on a turbine blade would be eroded at some locations within eight minutes.

  8. Low cycle fatigue life of two nickel-base casting alloys in a hydrogen environment. [for high-pressure oxidizer turbopump turbine nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Samples of two nickel-base casting alloys, Mar-M-246 (a Martin Company alloy) and 713LC (a low-carbon modification of the alloy 713C developed by International Nickel Company) were tested as candidate materials for the high-pressure fuel and high-pressure oxidizer turbopump turbine nozzles. The samples were subjected to tensile tests and to low cycle fatigue tests in high-pressure hydrogen to study the influence of the hydrogen environment. The Mar-M-246 material was found to have a three times higher cyclic life in hydrogen than the 713LC alloy, and was selected as the nozzle material.

  9. Turbine blade vibration dampening

    DOEpatents

    Cornelius, C.C.; Pytanowski, G.P.; Vendituoli, J.S.

    1997-07-08

    The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass ``M`` or combined mass ``CM`` of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics. 5 figs.

  10. Turbine blade vibration dampening

    DOEpatents

    Cornelius, Charles C.; Pytanowski, Gregory P.; Vendituoli, Jonathan S.

    1997-07-08

    The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass "M" or combined mass "CM" of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics.

  11. The affective profiles, psychological well-being, and harmony: environmental mastery and self-acceptance predict the sense of a harmonious life

    PubMed Central

    Al Nima, Ali; Kjell, Oscar N.E.

    2014-01-01

    Background. An important outcome from the debate on whether wellness equals happiness, is the need of research focusing on how psychological well-being might influence humans’ ability to adapt to the changing environment and live in harmony. To get a detailed picture of the influence of positive and negative affect, the current study employed the affective profiles model in which individuals are categorised into groups based on either high positive and low negative affect (self-fulfilling); high positive and high negative affect (high affective); low positive and low negative affect (low affective); and high negative and low positive affect (self-destructive). The aims were to (1) investigate differences between affective profiles in psychological well-being and harmony and (2) how psychological well-being and its dimensions relate to harmony within the four affective profiles. Method. 500 participants (mean age = 34.14 years, SD. = ±12.75 years; 187 males and 313 females) were recruited online and required to answer three self-report measures: The Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule; The Scales of Psychological Well-Being (short version) and The Harmony in Life Scale. We conducted a Multivariate Analysis of Variance where the affective profiles and gender were the independent factors and psychological well-being composite score, its six dimensions as well as the harmony in life score were the dependent factors. In addition, we conducted four multi-group (i.e., the four affective profiles) moderation analyses with the psychological well-being dimensions as predictors and harmony in life as the dependent variables. Results. Individuals categorised as self-fulfilling, as compared to the other profiles, tended to score higher on the psychological well-being dimensions: positive relations, environmental mastery, self-acceptance, autonomy, personal growth, and purpose in life. In addition, 47% to 66% of the variance of the harmony in life was explained by

  12. Advanced turbine study. [airfoil coling in rocket turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Experiments to determine the available increase in turbine horsepower achieved by increasing turbine inlet temperature over a range of 1800 to 2600 R, while applying current gas turbine airfoil cling technology are discussed. Four cases of rocket turbine operating conditions were investigated. Two of the cases used O2/H2 propellant, one with a fuel flowrate of 160 pps, the other 80 pps. Two cases used O2/CH4 propellant, each having different fuel flowrates, pressure ratios, and inlet pressures. Film cooling was found to be the required scheme for these rocket turbine applications because of the high heat flux environments. Conventional convective or impingement cooling, used in jet engines, is inadequate in a rocket turbine environment because of the resulting high temperature gradients in the airfoil wall, causing high strains and low cyclic life. The hydrogen-rich turbine environment experienced a loss, or no gain, in delivered horsepower as turbine inlet temperature was increased at constant airfoil life. The effects of film cooling with regard to reduced flow available for turbine work, dilution of mainstream gas temperature and cooling reentry losses, offset the relatively low specific work capability of hydrogen when increasing turbine inlet temperature over the 1800 to 2600 R range. However, the methane-rich environment experienced an increase in delivered horsepower as turbine inlet temperature was increased at constant airfoil life. The results of a materials survey and heat transfer and durability analysis are discussed.

  13. Turbinate surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Turbinectomy; Turbinoplasty; Turbinate reduction; Nasal airway surgery ... There are several types of turbinate surgery: Turbinectomy: All or part of the lower turbinate is taken out. This can be done in several different ways, but sometimes a ...

  14. Feasibility and Acceptability of a Collaborative Care Intervention To Improve Symptoms and Quality of Life in Chronic Heart Failure: Mixed Methods Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hooker, Stephanie; Nowels, Carolyn T.; Main, Deborah S.; Meek, Paula; McBryde, Connor; Hattler, Brack; Lorenz, Karl A.; Heidenreich, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: People with chronic heart failure (HF) suffer from numerous symptoms that worsen quality of life. The CASA (Collaborative Care to Alleviate Symptoms and Adjust to Illness) intervention was designed to improve symptoms and quality of life by integrating palliative and psychosocial care into chronic care. Objective: Our aim was to determine the feasibility and acceptability of CASA and identify necessary improvements. Methods: We conducted a prospective mixed-methods pilot trial. The CASA intervention included (1) nurse phone visits involving structured symptom assessments and guidelines to alleviate breathlessness, fatigue, pain, or depression; (2) structured phone counseling targeting adjustment to illness and depression if present; and (3) weekly team meetings with a palliative care specialist, cardiologist, and primary care physician focused on medical recommendations to primary care providers (PCPs, physician or nurse practioners) to improve symptoms. Study subjects were outpatients with chronic HF from a Veteran's Affairs hospital (n=15) and a university hospital (n=2). Measurements included feasibility (cohort retention rate, medical recommendation implementation rate, missing data, quality of care) and acceptability (an end-of-study semi-structured participant interview). Results: Participants were male with a median age of 63 years. One withdrew early and there were <5% missing data. Overall, 85% of 87 collaborative care team medical recommendations were implemented. All participants who screened positive for depression were either treated for depression or thought to not have a depressive disorder. In the qualitative interviews, patients reported a positive experience and provided several constructive critiques. Conclusions: The CASA intervention was feasible based on participant enrollment, cohort retention, implementation of medical recommendations, minimal missing data, and acceptability. Several intervention changes were made based

  15. Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter)

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1992-10-20

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meat this technical challenge: a baseline ceramic barrier filter ILEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300[degree]F. This document reports the status of a program in the nineteenth quarter to develop this ILEC technology for direct coal-fired turbine power plants.

  16. Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (Moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter)

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1992-01-20

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge: a baseline ceramic barrier filter ILEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300{degrees}F. This document reports the status of a program in the seventeenth quarter to develop this ILEC technology for direct coal-fired turbine power plants.

  17. The Healthy for Life Taekwondo Pilot Study: A Preliminary Evaluation of Effects on Executive Function and BMI, Feasibility, and Acceptability

    PubMed Central

    Lakes, Kimberley D.; Bryars, Tracy; Sirisinahal, Swetha; Salim, Nimrah; Arastoo, Sara; Emmerson, Natasha; Kang, Daniel; Shim, Lois; Wong, Doug; Kang, Chang Jin

    2013-01-01

    There is growing consensus that exercise improves cognitive functioning, but research is needed to identify exercise interventions that optimize effects on cognition. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate Taekwondo implemented in public middle school physical education (PE). Two classes were randomly assigned to either: five sessions per week of PE or three sessions of PE and two sessions of Taekwondo. In PE sessions, evidence-based curriculum to address the Presidential Core Fitness Guidelines and California Physical Fitness Tests was implemented. Taekwondo sessions included traditional techniques and forms taught in an environment emphasizing respect and self-control. Sixty students were evaluated at baseline and during the last week of the intervention (nine months later). Differences in mean residualized change scores for parent-rated inhibitory behavioral control yielded a significant, large effect size (d =.95, p =.00), reflecting greater improvement among Taekwondo students. Results from an executive function computer-administered task revealed greater accuracy on the congruent trial (d = 2.00, p = .02) for Taekwondo students. Differences in mean residualized change scores for BMI z scores yielded a moderate, non-significant effect size (d = − .51, p = .16). The majority of Taekwondo students reported positive perceptions of Taekwondo and perceived self-improvement in self-control and physical fitness. Results suggest that Taekwondo is an exercise program that improves cognitive functioning and is both feasible and acceptable to implement in a public school setting. PMID:24563664

  18. The Healthy for Life Taekwondo Pilot Study: A Preliminary Evaluation of Effects on Executive Function and BMI, Feasibility, and Acceptability.

    PubMed

    Lakes, Kimberley D; Bryars, Tracy; Sirisinahal, Swetha; Salim, Nimrah; Arastoo, Sara; Emmerson, Natasha; Kang, Daniel; Shim, Lois; Wong, Doug; Kang, Chang Jin

    2013-10-01

    There is growing consensus that exercise improves cognitive functioning, but research is needed to identify exercise interventions that optimize effects on cognition. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate Taekwondo implemented in public middle school physical education (PE). Two classes were randomly assigned to either: five sessions per week of PE or three sessions of PE and two sessions of Taekwondo. In PE sessions, evidence-based curriculum to address the Presidential Core Fitness Guidelines and California Physical Fitness Tests was implemented. Taekwondo sessions included traditional techniques and forms taught in an environment emphasizing respect and self-control. Sixty students were evaluated at baseline and during the last week of the intervention (nine months later). Differences in mean residualized change scores for parent-rated inhibitory behavioral control yielded a significant, large effect size (d =.95, p =.00), reflecting greater improvement among Taekwondo students. Results from an executive function computer-administered task revealed greater accuracy on the congruent trial (d = 2.00, p = .02) for Taekwondo students. Differences in mean residualized change scores for BMI z scores yielded a moderate, non-significant effect size (d = - .51, p = .16). The majority of Taekwondo students reported positive perceptions of Taekwondo and perceived self-improvement in self-control and physical fitness. Results suggest that Taekwondo is an exercise program that improves cognitive functioning and is both feasible and acceptable to implement in a public school setting. PMID:24563664

  19. MOD-2 wind turbine development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, L. H.; Andrews, J. S.; Zimmerman, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    The development of the Mod-2 turbine, designed to achieve a cost of electricity for the 100th production unit that will be competitive with conventional electric power generation is discussed. The Mod-2 wind turbine system (WTS) background, project flow, and a chronology of events and problem areas leading to Mod-2 acceptance are addressed. The role of the participating utility during site preparation, turbine erection and testing, remote operation, and routine operation and maintenance activity is reviewed. The technical areas discussed pertain to system performance, loads, and controls. Research and technical development of multimegawatt turbines is summarized.

  20. Age and Acceptance of Euthanasia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Russell A.

    1980-01-01

    Study explores relationship between age (and sex and race) and acceptance of euthanasia. Women and non-Whites were less accepting because of religiosity. Among older people less acceptance was attributable to their lesser education and greater religiosity. Results suggest that quality of life in old age affects acceptability of euthanasia. (Author)

  1. Outpatient treatment of low-risk venous thromboembolism with monotherapy oral anticoagulation: patient quality of life outcomes and clinician acceptance

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Jeffrey A; Kahler, Zachary P; Beam, Daren M

    2016-01-01

    Background Oral monotherapy anticoagulation has facilitated home treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in outpatients. Objectives The aim of this study was to measure efficacy, safety, as well as patient and physician perceptions produced by a protocol that selected VTE patients as low-risk patients by the Hestia criteria, and initiated home anticoagulation with an oral factor Xa antagonist. Methods Patients were administered the Venous Insufficiency Epidemiological and Economic Study Quality of life/Symptoms questionnaire [VEINEs QoL/Sym] and the physical component summary [PCS] from the Rand 36-Item Short Form Health Survey [SF36]). The primary outcomes were VTE recurrence and hemorrhage at 30 days. Secondary outcomes compared psychometric test scores between patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) to those with pulmonary embolism (PE). Patient perceptions were abstracted from written comments and physician perceptions specific to PE outpatient treatment obtained from structured survey. Results From April 2013 to September 2015, 253 patients were treated, including 67 with PE. Within 30 days, 2/253 patients had recurrent DVT and 2/253 had major hemorrhage; all four had DVT at enrollment. The initial PCS scores did not differ between DVT and PE patients (37.2±13.9 and 38.0±12.1, respectively) and both DVT and PE patients had similar improvement over the treatment period (42.2±12.9 and 43.4±12.7, respectively), consistent with prior literature. The most common adverse event was menorrhagia, present in 15% of women. Themes from patient-written responses reflected satisfaction with increased autonomy. Physicians’ (N=116) before-to-after protocol comfort level with home treatment of PE increased 48% on visual analog scale. Conclusion Hestia-negative VTE patients treated with oral monotherapy at home had low rates of VTE recurrence and bleeding, as well as quality of life measurements similar to prior reports. PMID:27143861

  2. Modeling of thermal effects when investigating the thermal fatigue life of the blades of a gas-turbine engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchuk, L. V.

    1982-10-01

    Problems associated with the modeling of the thermal state of gas turbine blades during testing on a gasdynamic test stand are discussed with emphasis on those cases where similarity of the boundary conditions of heat transfer cannot be achieved. A blading design method is proposed which makes it possible to obtain thermal and stressed states close to those observed under actual service conditions in the regions of thermal stress concentration. The required local heat flows are achieved by programmed control of the gas flow temperature.

  3. An innovative method for the preparation of mum (Thai fermented sausages) with acceptable technological quality and extended shelf-life.

    PubMed

    Wanangkarn, Amornrat; Liu, Deng-Cheng; Swetwiwathana, Adisorn; Tan, Fa-Jui

    2012-11-15

    Freshly-manufactured mum sausages were assigned to two processing methods (process I: stored at ∼30 °C for 14 days; process II: stored at ∼30 °C for three days, vacuum-packaged, and stored at 4 °C until day 28). Physicochemical, microbial, textural, and sensory properties of samples were analysed. The results showed that dehydration was more intense in process I samples, and resulted in lower moisture content and water activity. Significant decreases in pH values, and increases in lactic acid were observed in both samples by day 3. The total microflora and lactic acid bacteria counts increased rapidly during the fermentation and then decreased while the Enterobacteriaceae counts decreased steadily. Too much dehydration resulted in tough textures and unacceptable sensory qualities for process I samples. In conclusion, after three days of fermentation, with vacuum-packaging, ripening and storage at 4 °C up to 28 days, it is possible to produce mum sausages with better qualities and an extended shelf life. PMID:22868122

  4. Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Presentations were made concerning the development of design analysis tools for combustor liners, turbine vanes, and turbine blades. Presentations were divided into six sections: instrumentation, combustion, turbine heat transfer, structural analysis, fatigue and fracture, surface protective coatings, constitutive behavior of materials, stress-strain response and life prediction methods.

  5. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    Radial turbines have been used extensively in many applications including small ground based electrical power generators, automotive engine turbochargers and aircraft auxiliary power units. In all of these applications the turbine inlet temperature is limited to a value commensurate with the material strength limitations and life requirements of uncooled metal rotors. To take advantage of all the benefits that higher temperatures offer, such as increased turbine specific power output or higher cycle thermal efficiency, requires improved high temperature materials and/or blade cooling. Extensive research is on-going to advance the material properties of high temperature superalloys as well as composite materials including ceramics. The use of ceramics with their high temperature potential and low cost is particularly appealing for radial turbines. However until these programs reach fruition the only way to make significant step increases beyond the present material temperature barriers is to cool the radial blading.

  6. Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine/Combined Cycle Reliability, Availability & Maintainability

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard Angello

    2005-09-30

    Power generators are concerned with the maintenance costs associated with the advanced turbines that they are purchasing. Since these machines do not have fully established Operation and Maintenance (O&M) track records, power generators face financial risk due to uncertain future maintenance costs. This risk is of particular concern, as the electricity industry transitions to a competitive business environment in which unexpected O&M costs cannot be passed through to consumers. These concerns have accelerated the need for intelligent software-based diagnostic systems that can monitor the health of a combustion turbine in real time and provide valuable information on the machine's performance to its owner/operators. EPRI, Impact Technologies, Boyce Engineering, and Progress Energy have teamed to develop a suite of intelligent software tools integrated with a diagnostic monitoring platform that, in real time, interpret data to assess the 'total health' of combustion turbines. The 'Combustion Turbine Health Management System' (CTHMS) will consist of a series of 'Dynamic Link Library' (DLL) programs residing on a diagnostic monitoring platform that accepts turbine health data from existing monitoring instrumentation. CTHMS interprets sensor and instrument outputs, correlates them to a machine's condition, provide interpretative analyses, project servicing intervals, and estimate remaining component life. In addition, the CTHMS enables real-time anomaly detection and diagnostics of performance and mechanical faults, enabling power producers to more accurately predict critical component remaining useful life and turbine degradation.

  7. Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (moving bed, fluid contactor/ceramic filter). Twenty-second quarterly status report, January--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1993-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge: A baseline ceramic barrier filter ILEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300{degrees}F. This document reports the status of a program in the nineteenth quarter to develop this ILEC technology for direct coal-fired turbine power plants.

  8. Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines, (moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter). Twenty-fourth quarterly status report, July--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1993-12-31

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge: a baseline ceramic barrier filter ILEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300{degree}F. This document reports the status of a program in the nineteenth quarter to develop this ILEC technology for direct coal-fired turbine power plants.

  9. Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter). Twentieth quarterly status report, July--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1992-10-20

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meat this technical challenge: a baseline ceramic barrier filter ILEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300{degree}F. This document reports the status of a program in the nineteenth quarter to develop this ILEC technology for direct coal-fired turbine power plants.

  10. Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter). Twenty-third quarterly status report, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1993-07-19

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge: A baseline ceramic barrier filter ILEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300{degrees}F. This document reports the status of a program in the nineteenth quarter to develop this ILEC technology for direct coal-fired turbine power plants.

  11. Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (Moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter). Seventeenth quarterly status report, October--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1992-01-20

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge: a baseline ceramic barrier filter ILEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300{degrees}F. This document reports the status of a program in the seventeenth quarter to develop this ILEC technology for direct coal-fired turbine power plants.

  12. ADVANCED MONITORING TO IMPROVE COMBUSTION TURBINE/COMBINED CYCLE CT/(CC) RELIABILITY, AVAILABILITY AND MAINTAINABILITY (RAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard Angello

    2004-09-30

    Power generators are concerned with the maintenance costs associated with the advanced turbines that they are purchasing. Since these machines do not have fully established operation and maintenance (O&M) track records, power generators face financial risk due to uncertain future maintenance costs. This risk is of particular concern, as the electricity industry transitions to a competitive business environment in which unexpected O&M costs cannot be passed through to consumers. These concerns have accelerated the need for intelligent software-based diagnostic systems that can monitor the health of a combustion turbine in real time and provide valuable information on the machine's performance to its owner/operators. EPRI, Impact Technologies, Boyce Engineering, and Progress Energy have teamed to develop a suite of intelligent software tools integrated with a diagnostic monitoring platform that will, in real time, interpret data to assess the ''total health'' of combustion turbines. The Combustion Turbine Health Management System (CTHM) will consist of a series of dynamic link library (DLL) programs residing on a diagnostic monitoring platform that accepts turbine health data from existing monitoring instrumentation. The CTHM system will be a significant improvement over currently available techniques for turbine monitoring and diagnostics. CTHM will interpret sensor and instrument outputs, correlate them to a machine's condition, provide interpretative analyses, project servicing intervals, and estimate remaining component life. In addition, it will enable real-time anomaly detection and diagnostics of performance and mechanical faults, enabling power producers to more accurately predict critical component remaining useful life and turbine degradation.

  13. ADVANCED MONITORING TO IMPROVE COMBUSTION TURBINE/COMBINED CYCLE CT/(CC) RELIABILITY, AVAILABILITY AND MAINTAINABILITY (RAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard Angello

    2004-03-31

    Power generators are concerned with the maintenance costs associated with the advanced turbines that they are purchasing. Since these machines do not have fully established operation and maintenance (O&M) track records, power generators face financial risk due to uncertain future maintenance costs. This risk is of particular concern, as the electricity industry transitions to a competitive business environment in which unexpected O&M costs cannot be passed through to consumers. These concerns have accelerated the need for intelligent software-based diagnostic systems that can monitor the health of a combustion turbine in real time and provide valuable information on the machine's performance to its owner/operators. EPRI, Impact Technologies, Boyce Engineering, and Progress Energy have teamed to develop a suite of intelligent software tools integrated with a diagnostic monitoring platform that will, in real time, interpret data to assess the ''total health'' of combustion turbines. The Combustion Turbine Health Management System (CTHM) will consist of a series of dynamic link library (DLL) programs residing on a diagnostic monitoring platform that accepts turbine health data from existing monitoring instrumentation. The CTHM system will be a significant improvement over currently available techniques for turbine monitoring and diagnostics. CTHM will interpret sensor and instrument outputs, correlate them to a machine's condition, provide interpretative analyses, project servicing intervals, and estimate remaining component life. In addition, it will enable real-time anomaly detection and diagnostics of performance and mechanical faults, enabling power producers to more accurately predict critical component remaining useful life and turbine degradation.

  14. Variable stator radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogo, C.; Hajek, T.; Chen, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    A radial turbine stage with a variable area nozzle was investigated. A high work capacity turbine design with a known high performance base was modified to accept a fixed vane stagger angle moveable sidewall nozzle. The nozzle area was varied by moving the forward and rearward sidewalls. Diffusing and accelerating rotor inlet ramps were evaluated in combinations with hub and shroud rotor exit rings. Performance of contoured sidewalls and the location of the sidewall split line with respect to the rotor inlet was compared to the baseline. Performance and rotor exit survey data are presented for 31 different geometries. Detail survey data at the nozzle exit are given in contour plot format for five configurations. A data base is provided for a variable geometry concept that is a viable alternative to the more common pivoted vane variable geometry radial turbine.

  15. Wind turbine reliability : understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-11-01

    Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. Cost of energy (COE) is a key project evaluation metric, both in commercial applications and in the U.S. federal wind energy program. To reflect this commercial reality, the wind energy research community has adopted COE as a decision-making and technology evaluation metric. The COE metric accounts for the effects of reliability through levelized replacement cost and unscheduled maintenance cost parameters. However, unlike the other cost contributors, such as initial capital investment and scheduled maintenance and operating expenses, costs associated with component failures are necessarily speculative. They are based on assumptions about the reliability of components that in many cases have not been operated for a complete life cycle. Due to the logistical and practical difficulty of replacing major components in a wind turbine, unanticipated failures (especially serial failures) can have a large impact on the economics of a project. The uncertainty associated with long-term component reliability has direct bearing on the confidence level associated with COE projections. In addition, wind turbine technology is evolving. New materials and designs are being incorporated in contemporary wind turbines with the ultimate goal of reducing weight, controlling loads, and improving energy capture. While the goal of these innovations is reduction in the COE, there is a

  16. Adhesive and Protective Characteristics of Ceramic Coating A-417 and Its Effect on Engine Life of Forged Refractaloy-26 (AMS 5760) and Cast Stellite 21 (AMS 5385) Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Floyd B; Gyorgak, Charles A

    1953-01-01

    The adhesive and protective characteristics of National Bureau of Standards Coating A-417 were investigated, as well as the effect of the coating on the life of forged Refractaloy 26 and cast Stellite 21 turbine blades. Coated and uncoated blades were run in a full-scale J33-9 engine and were subjected to simulated service operations consisting of consecutive 20-minute cycles (15 min at rated speed and approximately 5 min at idle). The ceramic coating adhered well to Refractaloy 26 and Stellite 21 turbine blades operated at 1500 degrees F. The coating also prevented corrosion of the Refractaloy 26, a corrosion-sensitive nickel-base alloy, and of the Stellite 21, a relatively corrosion-resistant cobalt-base alloy. Although the coating prevented corrosion of both alloys, it had no apparent effect on blade life.

  17. Structural-Response Analysis, Fatigue-Life Prediction, and Material Selection for 1 MW Horizontal-Axis Wind-Turbine Blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Arakere, G.; Subramanian, E.; Sellappan, V.; Vallejo, A.; Ozen, M.

    2010-08-01

    The problem of mechanical design, performance prediction (e.g., flap-wise/ edge-wise bending stiffness, fatigue-controlled life, the extent of bending-to-torsion coupling), and material selection for a prototypical 1 MW horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) blade is investigated using various computer-aided engineering tools. For example, a computer program was developed which can automatically generate both a geometrical model and a full finite-element input deck for a given single HAWT-blade with a given airfoil shape, size, and the type and position of the interior load-bearing longitudinal beam/shear-webs. In addition, composite-material laminate lay-up can be specified and varied in order to obtain a best combination of the blade aerodynamic efficiency and longevity. A simple procedure for HAWT-blade material selection is also developed which attempts to identify the optimal material candidates for a given set of functional requirements, longevity and low weight.

  18. Steam Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Turbonetics Energy, Inc.'s steam turbines are used as power generating systems in the oil and gas, chemical, pharmaceuticals, metals and mining, and pulp and paper industries. The Turbonetics line benefited from use of NASA research data on radial inflow steam turbines and from company contact with personnel of Lewis Research Center, also use of Lewis-developed computer programs to determine performance characteristics of turbines.

  19. Refurbishing steam turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Valenti, M.

    1997-12-01

    Power-plant operators are reducing maintenance costs of their aging steam turbines by using wire-arc spray coating and shot peening to prolong the service life of components, and by replacing outmoded bearings and seals with newer designs. Steam-turbine operators are pressed with the challenge of keeping their aging machines functioning in the face of wear problems that are exacerbated by the demand for higher efficiencies. These problems include intense thermal cycling during both start-up and shutdown, water particles in steam and solid particles in the air that pit smooth surfaces, and load changes that cause metal fatigue.

  20. A New Ductility Exhaustion Model for High Temperature Low Cycle Fatigue Life Prediction of Turbine Disk Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shun-Peng; Huang, Hong-Zhong; Li, Haiqing; Sun, Rui; Zuo, Ming J.

    2011-06-01

    Based on ductility exhaustion theory and the generalized energy-based damage parameter, a new viscosity-based life prediction model is introduced to account for the mean strain/stress effects in the low cycle fatigue regime. The loading waveform parameters and cyclic hardening effects are also incorporated within this model. It is assumed that damage accrues by means of viscous flow and ductility consumption is only related to plastic strain and creep strain under high temperature low cycle fatigue conditions. In the developed model, dynamic viscosity is used to describe the flow behavior. This model provides a better prediction of Superalloy GH4133's fatigue behavior when compared to Goswami's ductility model and the generalized damage parameter. Under non-zero mean strain conditions, moreover, the proposed model provides more accurate predictions of Superalloy GH4133's fatigue behavior than that with zero mean strains.

  1. Feasibility study of pultruded blades for wind turbine rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Migliore, P.G.; Cheney, M.C.

    2000-02-28

    In work performed under subcontract to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a preliminary design study and proof-of-concept field test were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using pultruded blades for wind turbine rotors. A 400 kW turbine was selected for the design study, and a scaled 80 kW rotor was fabricated and tested as a demonstration of the concept. To examine the feasibility of pultruded blades, several issues were addressed, including power performance, tower strikes, yaw stability, stall flutter, fatigue, and rotor cost. Results showed that with proper design, rotors using pultruded blades demonstrate acceptable fatigue life and stable yaw behavior without tower strikes. Furthermore, blades using this technology may be manufactured for approximately half the cost of conventional blades. Field tests of the scaled rotor provided experimental data on power performance and loads while verifying stable yaw operation.

  2. Do Ethical Judgments Depend on the Type of Response Scale? Comparing Acceptability versus Unacceptability Judgments in the Case of Life-Ending Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sastre, Maria Teresa Munoz; Gonzalez, Charlene; Lhermitte, Astrid; Sorum, Paul C.; Mullet, Etienne

    2010-01-01

    Using Functional Measurement (Anderson, 2008), Frileux, Lelievre, Munoz Sastre, Mullet, and Sorum (2003) examined the joint impact of several key factors on lay people's judgments of the acceptability of physicians' interventions to end patients' lives. The level of acceptability was high, and the information integration rule that best described…

  3. Turbine system

    DOEpatents

    McMahan, Kevin Weston; Dillard, Daniel Jackson

    2016-05-03

    A turbine system is disclosed. The turbine system includes a transition duct having an inlet, an outlet, and a passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The turbine system further includes a turbine section connected to the transition duct. The turbine section includes a plurality of shroud blocks at least partially defining a hot gas path, a plurality of buckets at least partially disposed in the hot gas path, and a plurality of nozzles at least partially disposed in the hot gas path. At least one of a shroud block, a bucket, or a nozzle includes means for withstanding high temperatures.

  4. Wind turbine response to parameter variation of analytic inflow vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, M. Maureen; Robinson, Michael C.; Balas, Mark J.

    2006-05-01

    As larger wind turbines are placed on taller towers, rotors frequently operate in atmospheric conditions that support organized, coherent turbulent structures. It is hypothesized that these structures have a detrimental impact on the blade fatigue life experienced by the wind turbine. These structures are extremely difficult to identify with sophisticated anemometry such as ultrasonic anemometers. This study was performed to identify the vortex characteristics that contribute to high-amplitude cyclic blade loads, assuming that these vortices exist under certain atmospheric conditions. This study does not attempt to demonstrate the existence of these coherent turbulent structures. In order to ascertain the idealized worst-case scenario for vortical inflow structures impinging on a wind turbine rotor, we created a simple, analytic vortex model. The Rankine vortex model assumes that the vortex core undergoes solid body rotation to avoid a singularity at the vortex centre and is surrounded by a two-dimensional potential flow field. Using the wind turbine as a sensor and the FAST wind turbine dynamics code with limited degrees of freedom, we determined the aerodynamic loads imparted to the wind turbine by the vortex structure. We varied the size, strength, rotational direction, plane of rotation, and location of the vortex over a wide range of operating parameters. We identified the vortex conformation with the most significant effect on the blade root bending moment cyclic amplitude. Vortices with radii on the scale of the rotor diameter or smaller caused blade root bending moment cyclic amplitudes that contribute to high damage density. The rotational orientation, clockwise or counter-clockwise, produces little difference in the bending moment response. Vortices in the XZ plane produce bending moment amplitudes significantly greater than vortices in the YZ plane. Published in 2005 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Received: 9 April 2004; Revised: 14 March 2005; Accepted: 19

  5. Glenn-HT Code Validated for Complex Turbine Blade Cooling Passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, David L.

    2003-01-01

    This work is motivated by the need to accurately predict heat transfer in turbomachinery. For efficient gas turbine operation, flow temperatures in the hot gas path exceed acceptable metal temperatures in many regions of the engine. So that the integrity of the parts can be maintained for an acceptable engine life, the parts must be cooled. Efficient cooling schemes require accurate heat transfer prediction to minimize regions that are overcooled and, even more importantly, to ensure adequate cooling in high-heat-flux regions.

  6. Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1993-07-01

    The United States Department of.Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of coal-fired turbine technology in the areas of Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles, and Direct Coal-Fired Turbines. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of coal-fired turbine systems is high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating an Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concept that has been configured to meet this technical challenge. This ceramic barrier filter, ILEC concept simultaneously controls sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in high-pressure fuel gases or combustion gases, and is considering cleaning temperatures up to 2100{degrees}F. This document describes Phase II of the program, the design, construction, and shakedown of a bench-scale facility to test and confirm the feasibility of this ILEC technology.

  7. Hydraulic design development of Xiluodu Francis turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. L.; Li, G. Y.; Shi, Q. H.; Wang, Z. N.

    2012-11-01

    Hydraulic optimization design with CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) method, hydraulic optimization measures and model test results in the hydraulic development of Xiluodu hydropower station by DFEM (Dongfang Electric Machinery) of DEC (Dongfang Electric Corporation) of China were analyzed in this paper. The hydraulic development conditions of turbine, selection of design parameter, comparison of geometric parameters and optimization measure of turbine flow components were expatiated. And the measures of improving turbine hydraulic performance and the results of model turbine acceptance experiment were discussed in details.

  8. Advanced turbine systems program

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, C.; Mukavetz, D.W.; Knickerbocker, T.K.; Ali, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    In accordance with the goals of the DOE program, improvements in the gas turbine are the primary focus of Allison activity during Phase I. To this end Allison conducted a survey of potentially applicable gas turbine cycles and selected the advanced combined cycle as reference system. Extensive analysis of two versions of the advanced combined cycle was performed against the requirement for a 60% thermal efficiency (LHV) utility-sized, natural gas fired system. This analysis resulted in technology requirements for this system. Additional analysis determined emissions potential for the system, established a coal-fueled derivative system and a commercialization plan. This report deals with the technical requirements for a system that meets the thermal efficiency goal. Allison initially investigated four basic thermodynamic cycles: Humid air turbine, intercalate-recuperated systems, advanced combined cycle, chemically recuperated cycle. Our survey and cycle analysis indicated that au had the potential of reaching 60% thermal efficiency. We also concluded that engine hot section technology would be a critical technology regardless of which cycle was chosen. Based on this result Allison chose to concentrate on the advanced combined cycle. This cycle is well known and understood by the utility turbine user community and is therefore likely to be acceptable to users.

  9. Advanced turbine systems program

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, C.; Mukavetz, D.W.; Knickerbocker, T.K.; Ali, S.A.

    1992-12-31

    In accordance with the goals of the DOE program, improvements in the gas turbine are the primary focus of Allison activity during Phase I. To this end Allison conducted a survey of potentially applicable gas turbine cycles and selected the advanced combined cycle as reference system. Extensive analysis of two versions of the advanced combined cycle was performed against the requirement for a 60% thermal efficiency (LHV) utility-sized, natural gas fired system. This analysis resulted in technology requirements for this system. Additional analysis determined emissions potential for the system, established a coal-fueled derivative system and a commercialization plan. This report deals with the technical requirements for a system that meets the thermal efficiency goal. Allison initially investigated four basic thermodynamic cycles: Humid air turbine, intercalate-recuperated systems, advanced combined cycle, chemically recuperated cycle. Our survey and cycle analysis indicated that au had the potential of reaching 60% thermal efficiency. We also concluded that engine hot section technology would be a critical technology regardless of which cycle was chosen. Based on this result Allison chose to concentrate on the advanced combined cycle. This cycle is well known and understood by the utility turbine user community and is therefore likely to be acceptable to users.

  10. ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Gaul

    2004-04-21

    Natural gas combustion turbines are rapidly becoming the primary technology of choice for generating electricity. At least half of the new generating capacity added in the US over the next twenty years will be combustion turbine systems. The Department of Energy has cosponsored with Siemens Westinghouse, a program to maintain the technology lead in gas turbine systems. The very ambitious eight year program was designed to demonstrate a highly efficient and commercially acceptable power plant, with the ability to fire a wide range of fuels. The main goal of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program was to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost effective competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Performance targets were focused on natural gas as a fuel and included: System efficiency that exceeds 60% (lower heating value basis); Less than 10 ppmv NO{sub x} emissions without the use of post combustion controls; Busbar electricity that are less than 10% of state of the art systems; Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) equivalent to current systems; Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals; and Commercial systems by the year 2000. In a parallel effort, the program was to focus on adapting the ATS engine to coal-derived or biomass fuels. In Phase 1 of the ATS Program, preliminary investigators on different gas turbine cycles demonstrated that net plant LHV based efficiency greater than 60% was achievable. In Phase 2 the more promising cycles were evaluated in greater detail and the closed-loop steam-cooled combined cycle was selected for development because it offered the best solution with least risk for achieving the ATS Program goals for plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity and RAM. Phase 2 also involved conceptual ATS engine and plant design and technology developments in aerodynamics, sealing

  11. Turbine Manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The machinery pictured is a set of Turbodyne steam turbines which power a sugar mill at Bell Glade, Florida. A NASA-developed computer program called NASTRAN aided development of these and other turbines manufactured by Turbodyne Corporation's Steam Turbine Division, Wellsville, New York. An acronym for NASA Structural Analysis Program, NASTRAN is a predictive tool which advises development teams how a structural design will perform under service use conditions. Turbodyne uses NASTRAN to analyze the dynamic behavior of steam turbine components, achieving substantial savings in development costs. One of the most widely used spinoffs, NASTRAN is made available to private industry through NASA's Computer Software Management Information Center (COSMIC) at the University of Georgia.

  12. Large, horizontal-axis wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linscott, B. S.; Perkins, P.; Dennett, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    Development of the technology for safe, reliable, environmentally acceptable large wind turbines that have the potential to generate a significant amount of electricity at costs competitive with conventional electric generating systems are presented. In addition, these large wind turbines must be fully compatible with electric utility operations and interface requirements. There are several ongoing large wind system development projects and applied research efforts directed toward meeting the technology requirements for utility applications. Detailed information on these projects is provided. The Mod-O research facility and current applied research effort in aerodynamics, structural dynamics and aeroelasticity, composite and hybrid composite materials, and multiple system interaction are described. A chronology of component research and technology development for large, horizontal axis wind turbines is presented. Wind characteristics, wind turbine economics, and the impact of wind turbines on the environment are reported. The need for continued wind turbine research and technology development is explored. Over 40 references are sited and a bibliography is included.

  13. Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines. Twenty-sixth quarterly report: Quarterly status for the period January--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1994-04-15

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science and Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge: a baseline ceramic barrier filter ILEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300{degree}F. This document reports the status of a program in the twenty-sixth quarter to develop this ILEC technology.

  14. Aerothermal experiments in turbine rim seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittman, Lionel Obadiah, Jr.

    Purge flows are necessary for ensuring that hot gasses do not penetrate the thermally sensitive rim seal and disk cavity regions of turbines. The temperature and mass flow rate of the purge air can affect the component life and aerodynamic performance of a turbine stage. Therefore it is of interest to understand the basic mechanisms that govern this complex flow problem. The present work focuses on two turbine rim seal investigations. The first focused on temperature measurements in the rim cavity region of a rotating, high-speed, low-pressure turbine as means to quantify a rim seal's effectiveness. The seal had a realistic geometry with a small axial overlap between the stationary and rotating components. The purge flow rate was varied from 0 to 1 percent of the core mass flow rate. The results will describe the temperatures as well as the seal's effectiveness as a function of the purge flow rate, and turbine operating point. The second was a study on the effect of purge flow on the aerodynamic performance of a turbine stage. Exit flow field surveys were taken in both a low pressure turbine stage and a high pressure turbine stage. Also a computational study was done on the low pressure turbine stage to add insight into the effect of purge flow on turbine stage performance. In addition, the computation results provide insight into the effect of purge flow on the low pressure turbine blade passage flow field.

  15. Turbine design review text

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Three-volume publication covers theoretical, design, and performance aspects of turbines. Volumes cover thermodynamic and fluid-dynamic concepts, velocity diagram design, turbine blade aerodynamic design, turbine energy losses, supersonic turbines, radial-inflow turbines, turbine cooling, and aerodynamic performance testing.

  16. Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology (HOST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Research and plans concerning aircraft gas turbine engine hot section durability problems were discussed. Under the topics of structural analysis, fatigue and fracture, surface protective coatings, combustion, turbine heat transfer, and instrumentation specific points addressed were the thermal and fluid environment around liners, blades, and vanes, material coatings, constitutive behavior, stress-strain response, and life prediction methods for the three components.

  17. Technology Acceptance Related to Second Life[TM], Social Networking, Twitter[TM], and Content Management Systems: Are Agricultural Students Ready, Willing, and Able?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphrey, Theresa Pesl; Rutherford, Tracy A.; Doerfert, David L.; Edgar, Leslie D.; Edgar, Don W.

    2012-01-01

    Technology has the potential to improve education but only if it is applied with purpose and consideration of the audience. Understanding technology's role in education goes beyond the comparison of tools; there is a need to better understand student acceptance of technology so appropriate educational scaffolding and support can be provided. The…

  18. ADVANCED MONITORING TO IMPROVE COMBUSTION TURBINE/COMBINED CYCLE CT/(CC) RELIABILITY, AVAILABILITY AND MAINTAINABILITY (RAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard Angello

    2003-09-30

    Power generators are concerned with the maintenance costs associated with the advanced turbines that they are purchasing. Since these machines do not have fully established operation and maintenance (O&M) track records, power generators face financial risk due to uncertain future maintenance costs. This risk is of particular concern, as the electricity industry transitions to a competitive business environment in which unexpected O&M costs cannot be passed through to consumers. These concerns have accelerated the need for intelligent software-based diagnostic systems that can monitor the health of a combustion turbine in real time and provide valuable information on the machine's performance to its owner/operators. Such systems would interpret sensor and instrument outputs, correlate them to the machine's condition, provide interpretative analyses, forward projections of servicing intervals, estimate remaining component life, and identify faults. EPRI, Impact Technologies, Boyce Engineering, and Progress Energy have teamed to develop a suite of intelligent software tools integrated with a diagnostic monitoring platform that will, in real time, interpret data to assess the ''total health'' of combustion turbines. The Combustion Turbine Health Management System (CTHM) will consist of a series of dynamic link library (DLL) programs residing on a diagnostic monitoring platform that accepts turbine health data from existing monitoring instrumentation. The CTHM system will be a significant improvement over currently available techniques for turbine monitoring and diagnostics. CTHM will interpret sensor and instrument outputs, correlate them to a machine's condition, provide interpretative analyses, project servicing intervals, and estimate remaining component life. In addition, it will enable real-time anomaly detection and diagnostics of performance and mechanical faults, enabling power producers to more accurately predict critical component remaining useful life and

  19. Wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Cheney, Jr., Marvin C.

    1982-01-01

    A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

  20. Wind Turbine Contingency Control Through Generator De-Rating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan; Goebel, Kai; Balas, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Maximizing turbine up-time and reducing maintenance costs are key technology drivers for wind turbine operators. Components within wind turbines are subject to considerable stresses due to unpredictable environmental conditions resulting from rapidly changing local dynamics. In that context, systems health management has the aim to assess the state-of-health of components within a wind turbine, to estimate remaining life, and to aid in autonomous decision-making to minimize damage to the turbine. Advanced contingency control is one way to enable autonomous decision-making by providing the mechanism to enable safe and efficient turbine operation. The work reported herein explores the integration of condition monitoring of wind turbines with contingency control to balance the trade-offs between maintaining system health and energy capture. The contingency control involves de-rating the generator operating point to achieve reduced loads on the wind turbine. Results are demonstrated using a high fidelity simulator of a utility-scale wind turbine.

  1. Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines. Twenty-eighth quarterly report, July--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1996-02-01

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of advanced, coal-fueled turbine power plants such as pressurized fluid bed combustion and coal gasification combined cycles. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the coal-fueled turbine is high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure process gases. This document reports the status of a program in the twenty-seventh quarter to develop this ILEC technology.

  2. TMF design considerations in turbine airfoils of advanced turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Date, C. G.; Zamrik, S. Y.; Adams, J. H.; Frani, N. E.

    A review of thermal-mechanicalfatigue (TMF) in advanced turbine engines is presented. The review includes examples of typical thermal-mechnical loadings encountered in the design of hot section blades and vanes. Specific issues related to TMF behavior are presented and the associated impact on component life analysis and design is discussed.

  3. Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology (HOST) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Daniel E.; Ensign, C. Robert

    1986-01-01

    The Hot Section Technology (HOST) Project is a NASA-sponsored endeavor to improve the durability of advanced gas turbine engines for commercial and military aircraft. Through improvements in the analytical models and life prediction systems, designs for future hot section components, the combustor and turbine, will be more accurately analyzed and will incorporate features required for longer life in the more hostile operating environment of high performance engines.

  4. Air cooling of disk of a solid integrally cast turbine rotor for an automotive gas turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    A thermal analysis is made of surface cooling of a solid, integrally cast turbine rotor disk for an automotive gas turbine engine. Air purge and impingement cooling schemes are considered and compared with an uncooled reference case. Substantial reductions in blade temperature are predicted with each of the cooling schemes studied. It is shown that air cooling can result in a substantial gain in the stress-rupture life of the blade. Alternatively, increases in the turbine inlet temperature are possible.

  5. Acceptance speech.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, M

    1994-01-01

    In Bangladesh, the assistant administrator of USAID gave an acceptance speech at an awards ceremony on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of oral rehydration solution (ORS). The ceremony celebrated the key role of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B) in the discovery of ORS. Its research activities over the last 25 years have brought ORS to every village in the world, preventing more than a million deaths each year. ORS is the most important medical advance of the 20th century. It is affordable and client-oriented, a true appropriate technology. USAID has provided more than US$ 40 million to ICDDR,B for diarrheal disease and measles research, urban and rural applied family planning and maternal and child health research, and vaccine development. ICDDR,B began as the relatively small Cholera Research Laboratory and has grown into an acclaimed international center for health, family planning, and population research. It leads the world in diarrheal disease research. ICDDR,B is the leading center for applied health research in South Asia. It trains public health specialists from around the world. The government of Bangladesh and the international donor community have actively joined in support of ICDDR,B. The government applies the results of ICDDR,B research to its programs to improve the health and well-being of Bangladeshis. ICDDR,B now also studies acute respiratory diseases and measles. Population and health comprise 1 of USAID's 4 strategic priorities, the others being economic growth, environment, and democracy, USAID promotes people's participation in these 4 areas and in the design and implementation of development projects. USAID is committed to the use and improvement of ORS and to complementary strategies that further reduce diarrhea-related deaths. Continued collaboration with a strong user perspective and integrated services will lead to sustainable development. PMID:12345470

  6. Acceptance speech.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, C K

    1994-01-01

    I am proud and honored to accept this award on behalf of the Government of Bangladesh, and the millions of Bangladeshi children saved by oral rehydration solution. The Government of Bangladesh is grateful for this recognition of its commitment to international health and population research and cost-effective health care for all. The Government of Bangladesh has already made remarkable strides forward in the health and population sector, and this was recognized in UNICEF's 1993 "State of the World's Children". The national contraceptive prevalence rate, at 40%, is higher than that of many developed countries. It is appropriate that Bangladesh, where ORS was discovered, has the largest ORS production capacity in the world. It was remarkable that after the devastating cyclone in 1991, the country was able to produce enough ORS to meet the needs and remain self-sufficient. Similarly, Bangladesh has one of the most effective, flexible and efficient control of diarrheal disease and epidemic response program in the world. Through the country, doctors have been trained in diarrheal disease management, and stores of ORS are maintained ready for any outbreak. Despite grim predictions after the 1991 cyclone and the 1993 floods, relatively few people died from diarrheal disease. This is indicative of the strength of the national program. I want to take this opportunity to acknowledge the contribution of ICDDR, B and the important role it plays in supporting the Government's efforts in the health and population sector. The partnership between the Government of Bangladesh and ICDDR, B has already borne great fruit, and I hope and believe that it will continue to do so for many years in the future. Thank you. PMID:12345479

  7. Generic turbine design study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The purpose of Task 12, Generic Turbine Design Study was to develop a conceptual design of a combustion turbine system that would perform in a pressurized fluidized bed combustor (PFBC) application. A single inlet/outlet casing design that modifies the W251B12 combustion turbine to provide compressed air to the PFBC and accept clean hot air from the PFBC was developed. Performance calculations show that the net power output expected, at an inlet temperature of 59{degrees}F, is 20,250 kW.

  8. Mod-2 wind turbine system development. Volume 2: Detailed report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Progress in the design, fabrication, and testing of a wind turbine system is reported. The development of the MOD-2 wind turbine through acceptance testing and initial operational evaluation is documented. The MOD-2 project intends to develop early commercialization of wind energy. The first wind turbine farm (three MOD-2 units) are now being operated at the Bonneville Power Administration site near Goldendale, Washington.

  9. Strainrange partitioning behavior of an automotive turbine alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annis, C. G.; Vanwanderham, M. C.; Wallace, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    This report addresses Strainrange Partitioning, an advanced life prediction analysis procedure, as applied to CA-101 (cast IN 792 + Hf), an alloy proposed for turbine disks in automotive gas turbine engines. The methodology was successful in predicting specimen life under thermal-mechanical cycling, to within a factor of + or - 2.

  10. A Pilot Feasibility and Acceptability Study of Yoga/Meditation on the Quality of Life and Markers of Stress in Persons Living with HIV Who Also Use Crack Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Adarsh; Lewis, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Persons living with HIV (PLWH) who also use crack cocaine may have stressful, chaotic lives and typically do not engage in standard medical care that addresses a multitude of extenuating life circumstances. Yoga/meditation (YM) improves quality of life (QOL) and biomarkers of stress, but the effect of this intervention is almost unknown in PLWH, particularly those who use crack cocaine. Objectives: This pilot study sought to compare the feasibility and acceptability of 60-minute, twice-per-week sessions of YM for 2 months with those of no-contact control and to evaluate the effects of the intervention on QOL (according to the Short Form-36, Perceived Stress Scale [PSS], and Impact of Events Scale [IES]) and salivary cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) among PLWH who use crack cocaine. Design: Participants were randomly assigned to YM or no-contact control and were assessed at baseline, 2 months after the intervention, and 4 months' follow-up. Results: The YM program was acceptable and feasible, with high overall attendance (89%) and individual participation in yoga sessions (83%). YM participants showed modest improvements on QOL. The PSS total score and the IES intrusion score improved significantly 2 months after the intervention, but cortisol and DHEA-S did not change. Conclusions: This pilot study showed a high level of feasibility and acceptability and modest effects on measures of QOL among PLWH who use crack cocaine. The results suggest utility of YM as a simple, safe, and inexpensive format to improve QOL in a population that has many medical difficulties and extenuating stressors. PMID:25695849

  11. Damage mitigating control for wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Richard A.

    2007-12-01

    In the last few decades the wind industry has made great strides in reducing the cost of energy of utility scale wind turbines. In an attempt to reduce infrastructure costs and improve efficiency, the trend has been to develop larger variations of existing designs. In the past, the wind turbine controller was used primarily for rotor speed control and prevention of catastrophic damage from extreme wind conditions or component failures. The recent trend of wind turbine growing in size has resulted in wind turbines becoming much more flexible, and now the emphasis of wind turbine controls research focuses on how to damp resonances and avoid dangerous excitations that may lead to structural failure. Control of the fatigue loads on the wind turbine structure addresses neglects the fatigue mechanism of the material. The conversion of loads into stresses and those stresses into fatigue damage is a highly nonlinear process and is based on the so-called "cycle-counting" methods. Since the cycle counting methodology is difficult to convert into the time or frequency domains, these components have been generally avoided in controls research. Without modeling the damage dynamics, the wind turbine controller cannot efficiently reduce the fatigue of the structural components. The result is that only small decreases of fatigue damage are realized by current load reduction strategies at the expense of excessive control actuation. This dissertation introduces the concept of Damage Mitigating Control (DMC) as it applies to utility scale Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWTs). The work presented extends earlier work in damage mitigating and life extending control in several ways and then applies then applies this control strategy to reduce the fatigue damage suffered by wind turbines during operation. By modeling fatigue damage dynamics within the wind turbine controller, the life of the turbine can be extended significantly without sacrificing performance.

  12. Single Rotor Turbine

    DOEpatents

    Platts, David A.

    2004-10-26

    A rotor for use in turbine applications has a centrifugal compressor having axially disposed spaced apart fins forming passages and an axial turbine having hollow turbine blades interleaved with the fins and through which fluid from the centrifugal compressor flows.

  13. SMART POWER TURBINE

    SciTech Connect

    Nirm V. Nirmalan

    2003-11-01

    Gas turbines are the choice technology for high-performance power generation and are employed in both simple and combined cycle configurations around the world. The Smart Power Turbine (SPT) program has developed new technologies that are needed to further extend the performance and economic attractiveness of gas turbines for power generation. Today's power generation gas turbines control firing temperatures indirectly, by measuring the exhaust gas temperature and then mathematically calculating the peak combustor temperatures. But temperatures in the turbine hot gas path vary a great deal, making it difficult to control firing temperatures precisely enough to achieve optimal performance. Similarly, there is no current way to assess deterioration of turbine hot-gas-path components without shutting down the turbine. Consequently, maintenance and component replacements are often scheduled according to conservative design practices based on historical fleet-averaged data. Since fuel heating values vary with the prevalent natural gas fuel, the inability to measure heating value directly, with sufficient accuracy and timeliness, can lead to maintenance and operational decisions that are less than optimal. GE Global Research Center, under this Smart Power Turbine program, has developed a suite of novel sensors that would measure combustor flame temperature, online fuel lower heating value (LHV), and hot-gas-path component life directly. The feasibility of using the ratio of the integrated intensities of portions of the OH emission band to determine the specific average temperature of a premixed methane or natural-gas-fueled combustion flame was demonstrated. The temperature determined is the temperature of the plasma included in the field of view of the sensor. Two sensor types were investigated: the first used a low-resolution fiber optic spectrometer; the second was a SiC dual photodiode chip. Both methods worked. Sensitivity to flame temperature changes was remarkably

  14. Mod-2 wind turbine system development. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The development of the MOD-2 wind turbine through acceptance testing and initial operational evaluation is documented. Pitch control hydraulic system, yaw control system, drive train, electrical power station, control system, operations and maintenance experience, and availability are discussed.

  15. Plan Turbines 3 & 4, Side View Turbines ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Plan - Turbines 3 & 4, Side View - Turbines 3 & 4, Section A-A - American Falls Water, Power & Light Company, Island Power Plant, Snake River, below American Falls Dam, American Falls, Power County, ID

  16. Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology (HOST) Project of the NASA Lewis Research Center sponsored a workshop to discuss current research pertinent to turbine engine durability problems. Presentations were made concerning the hot section environment and the behavior of combustion liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. The presentations were divided into six sessions: Instrumentation, Combustion, Turbine Heat Transfer, Structural Analysis, Fatigue and Fracture, and Surface Protection. Topics discussed included modeling of thermal and fluid-flow phenomena, structural analysis, fatigue and fracture, surface protective coatings, constitutive behavior of materials, stress-strain response, and life-prediction methods. Researchers from industry, academia, and government presented results of their work sponsored by the HOST project.

  17. Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter)

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1992-04-20

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge: a baseline ceramic barrier filter nEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300[degrees]F. This document reports the status of a program in the eighteenth quarter to develop this ILEC technology for direct coal-fired turbine power plants.

  18. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect

    Joesph Fadok

    2008-01-01

    advanced hydrogen turbine that meets the aggressive targets set forth for the advanced hydrogen turbine, including increased rotor inlet temperature (RIT), lower total cooling and leakage air (TCLA) flow, higher pressure ratio, and higher mass flow through the turbine compared to the baseline. Maintaining efficiency with high mass flow Syngas combustion is achieved using a large high AN2 blade 4, which has been identified as a significant advancement beyond the current state-of-the-art. Preliminary results showed feasibility of a rotor system capable of increased power output and operating conditions above the baseline. In addition, several concepts were developed for casing components to address higher operating conditions. Rare earth modified bond coat for the purpose of reducing oxidation and TBC spallation demonstrated an increase in TBC spallation life of almost 40%. The results from Phase 1 identified two TBC compositions which satisfy the thermal conductivity requirements and have demonstrated phase stability up to temperatures of 1850 C. The potential to join alloys using a bonding process has been demonstrated and initial HVOF spray deposition trials were promising. The qualitative ranking of alloys and coatings in environmental conditions was also performed using isothermal tests where significant variations in alloy degradation were observed as a function of gas composition. Initial basic system configuration schematics and working system descriptions have been produced to define key boundary data and support estimation of costs. Review of existing materials in use for hydrogen transportation show benefits or tradeoffs for materials that could be used in this type of applications. Hydrogen safety will become a larger risk than when using natural gas fuel as the work done to date in other areas has shown direct implications for this type of use. Studies were conducted which showed reduced CO{sub 2} and NOx emissions with increased plant efficiency. An approach to

  19. Wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Traudt, R.F.

    1986-12-30

    This patent describes a wind turbine device having a main rotatable driven shaft, elongated blades operatively mounted on the main shaft for unitary rotation with the main shaft. The blade extends substantially radially away from the main shaft and is adapted to fold downwind under naturally occurring forces and simultaneously feather in direct response to the folding movement. A means associated with the blades is included for increasing the rate of fold relative to the rate of feather as the speed of rotation increases.

  20. Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter). Twenty-ninth quarterly status report, October--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1996-02-01

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of advanced, coal-fueled turbine power plants such as pressurized fluid bed combustion and coal gasification combined cycles. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the coal-fueled turbine is high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure process gases. This document reports the status of a program in the twenty-seventh quarter to develop this ILEC technology.

  1. Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter). Twenty-seventh quarterly status report, April--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1994-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of advanced, coal-fueled turbine power plants such as pressurized fluid bed combustion and coal gasification combined cycles. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the coal-fueled turbine is high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure process gases. This document reports the status of a program in the twenty-seventh quarter to develop this ILEC technology.

  2. Large-scale wind turbine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show how structural technology was applied in the design of modern wind turbines, which were recently brought to an advanced stage of development as sources of renewable power. Wind turbine structures present many difficult problems because they are relatively slender and flexible; subject to vibration and aeroelastic instabilities; acted upon by loads which are often nondeterministic; operated continuously with little maintenance in all weather; and dominated by life-cycle cost considerations. Progress in horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) development was paced by progress in the understanding of structural loads, modeling of structural dynamic response, and designing of innovative structural response. During the past 15 years a series of large HAWTs was developed. This has culminated in the recent completion of the world's largest operating wind turbine, the 3.2 MW Mod-5B power plane installed on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Some of the applications of structures technology to wind turbine will be illustrated by referring to the Mod-5B design. First, a video overview will be presented to provide familiarization with the Mod-5B project and the important components of the wind turbine system. Next, the structural requirements for large-scale wind turbines will be discussed, emphasizing the difficult fatigue-life requirements. Finally, the procedures used to design the structure will be presented, including the use of the fracture mechanics approach for determining allowable fatigue stresses.

  3. Large-scale wind turbine structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spera, David A.

    1988-05-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show how structural technology was applied in the design of modern wind turbines, which were recently brought to an advanced stage of development as sources of renewable power. Wind turbine structures present many difficult problems because they are relatively slender and flexible; subject to vibration and aeroelastic instabilities; acted upon by loads which are often nondeterministic; operated continuously with little maintenance in all weather; and dominated by life-cycle cost considerations. Progress in horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) development was paced by progress in the understanding of structural loads, modeling of structural dynamic response, and designing of innovative structural response. During the past 15 years a series of large HAWTs was developed. This has culminated in the recent completion of the world's largest operating wind turbine, the 3.2 MW Mod-5B power plane installed on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Some of the applications of structures technology to wind turbine will be illustrated by referring to the Mod-5B design. First, a video overview will be presented to provide familiarization with the Mod-5B project and the important components of the wind turbine system. Next, the structural requirements for large-scale wind turbines will be discussed, emphasizing the difficult fatigue-life requirements. Finally, the procedures used to design the structure will be presented, including the use of the fracture mechanics approach for determining allowable fatigue stresses.

  4. The 200-kilowatt wind turbine project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The three 200 kilowatt wind turbines described, compose the first of three separate systems. Proposed wind turbines of the two other systems, although similar in design, are larger in both physical size and rated power generation. The overall objective of the project is to obtain early operation and performance data while gaining initial experience in the operation of large, horizontal-axis wind turbines in typical utility environments. Several of the key issues addressed include the following: (1) impact of the variable power output (due to varying wind speeds) on the utility grid (2) compatibility with utility requirements (voltage and frequency control of generated power) (3) demonstration of unattended, fail-safe operation (4) reliability of the wind turbine system (5) required maintenance and (6) initial public reaction and acceptance.

  5. Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Presentations were made concerning the hot section environment and behavior of combustion liners, turbine blades, and waves. The presentations were divided into six sessions: instrumentation, combustion, turbine heat transfer, structural analysis, fatigue and fracture, and surface properties. The principal objective of each session was to disseminate research results to date, along with future plans. Topics discussed included modeling of thermal and fluid flow phenomena, structural analysis, fatigue and fracture, surface protective coatings, constitutive behavior, stress-strain response, and life prediction methods.

  6. Cost/benefit studies of advanced materials technologies for future aircraft turbine engines: Materials for advanced turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, M.; Wilbers, L.

    1982-01-01

    Cost benefit studies were conducted on six advanced materials and processes technologies applicable to commercial engines planned for production in the 1985 to 1990 time frame. These technologies consisted of thermal barrier coatings for combustor and high pressure turbine airfoils, directionally solidified eutectic high pressure turbine blades, (both cast and fabricated), and mixers, tail cones, and piping made of titanium-aluminum alloys. A fabricated titanium fan blisk, an advanced turbine disk alloy with improved low cycle fatigue life, and a long-life high pressure turbine blade abrasive tip and ceramic shroud system were also analyzed. Technologies showing considerable promise as to benefits, low development costs, and high probability of success were thermal barrier coating, directionally solidified eutectic turbine blades, and abrasive-tip blades/ceramic-shroud turbine systems.

  7. Loads measurements on the AWT-26 prototype wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, T.J.

    1995-09-01

    This paper will present a selection of fatigue loads measurements from the AWT-26 wind turbine. The fatigue loads presented will be stratified by wind speed and turbulence intensity. Corresponding fatigue predictions will be presented, giving an indication of the sensitivity of fatigue life to the turbine operating wind speed and turbulence intensity. Some comparisons will be made between the design load cases used (based on preliminary testing) and the loads measurements taken from the prototype wind turbine.

  8. NEXT GENERATION TURBINE PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    William H. Day

    2002-05-03

    The Next Generation Turbine (NGT) Program's technological development focused on a study of the feasibility of turbine systems greater than 30 MW that offer improvement over the 1999 state-of-the-art systems. This program targeted goals of 50 percent turndown ratios, 15 percent reduction in generation cost/kW hour, improved service life, reduced emissions, 400 starts/year with 10 minutes to full load, and multiple fuel usage. Improvement in reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM), while reducing operations, maintenance, and capital costs by 15 percent, was pursued. This program builds on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work being carried out by Pratt & Whitney (P&W) for P&W Power Systems (PWPS), which is a company under the auspices of the United Technologies Corporation (UTC). This study was part of the overall Department of Energy (DOE) NGT Program that extends out to the year 2008. A follow-on plan for further full-scale component hardware testing is conceptualized for years 2002 through 2008 to insure a smooth and efficient transition to the marketplace for advanced turbine design and cycle technology. This program teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), P&W, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), kraftWork Systems Inc., a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, and Multiphase Power and Processing Technologies (MPPT), an off-site subcontractor. Under the auspices of the NGT Program, a series of analyses were performed to identify the NGT engine system's ability to serve multiple uses. The majority were in conjunction with a coal-fired plant, or used coal as the system fuel. Identified also was the ability of the NGT system to serve as the basis of an advanced performance cycle: the humid air turbine (HAT) cycle. The HAT cycle is also used with coal gasification in an integrated cycle HAT (IGHAT). The NGT systems identified were: (1) Feedwater heating retrofit to an existing coal-fired steam plant, which could supply

  9. Why Do Women Accept the Rape Myth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabone, Christopher; And Others

    The rape myth, defined as prejudicial, stereotyped, or false beliefs about rape, rape victims, and rapists, is accepted by individuals from varied walks of life, including women. It has been suggested that rape myth acceptance (RMA) among women serves a protective function by enabling women to dissociate themselves from a rape victim's experience.…

  10. The forecast of the development of the market for gas turbine equipment in the years 2013-2021 (review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, V. V.

    2013-09-01

    The data are given, according to which, 12521 power-generating gas turbines will be manufactured in 2011-2021. More than 32% of these turbines will be made by Solar, while products made by General Electric will account for 41% (in terms of money). Servicing of gas turbine units provided by firms manufacturing them will gain wide acceptance.

  11. Wind Turbines Benefit Crops

    SciTech Connect

    Takle, Gene

    2010-01-01

    Ames Laboratory associate scientist Gene Takle talks about research into the effect of wind turbines on nearby crops. Preliminary results show the turbines may have a positive effect by cooling and drying the crops and assisting with carbon dioxide uptake.

  12. Wind Turbines Benefit Crops

    ScienceCinema

    Takle, Gene

    2013-03-01

    Ames Laboratory associate scientist Gene Takle talks about research into the effect of wind turbines on nearby crops. Preliminary results show the turbines may have a positive effect by cooling and drying the crops and assisting with carbon dioxide uptake.

  13. Feasibility of water injection into the turbine coolant to permit gas turbine contingency power for helicopter application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanfossen, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    A system which would allow a substantially increased output from a turboshaft engine for brief periods in emergency situations with little or no loss of turbine stress rupture life is proposed and studied analytically. The increased engine output is obtained by overtemperaturing the turbine; however, the temperature of the compressor bleed air used for hot section cooling is lowered by injecting and evaporating water. This decrease in cooling air temperature can offset the effect of increased gas temperature and increased shaft speed and thus keep turbine blade stress rupture life constant. The analysis utilized the NASA-Navy-Engine-Program or NNEP computer code to model the turboshaft engine in both design and off-design modes. This report is concerned with the effect of the proposed method of power augmentation on the engine cycle and turbine components. A simple cycle turboshaft engine with a 16:1 pressure ratio and a 1533 K (2760 R) turbine inlet temperature operating at sea level static conditions was studied to determine the possible power increase and the effect on turbine stress rupture life that could be expected using the proposed emergency cooling scheme. The analysis showed a 54 percent increse in output power can be achieved with no loss in gas generator turbine stress rupture life. A 231 K (415 F) rise in turbine inlet temperature is required for this level of augmentation. The required water flow rate was found to be .0109 kg water per kg of engine air flow.

  14. Study on the turbine vane and blade for a 1500 C class industrial gas turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amagasa, S.; Shimomura, K.; Kadowaki, M.; Takeishi, K.; Kawai, H.; Aoki, S.; Aoyama, K.

    1994-07-01

    This paper describes the summary of a three-year development program for the first-stage stationary vane and rotating blade for the next generation, 1500 C class, high-efficiency gas turbine. In such a high-temperature gas turbine, the first turbine vane and blade are the most important hot parts. Full-coverage film cooling (FCFC) is adopted for the cooling scheme, and directionally solidified (DS) nickel base superalloy and thermal barrier coating (TBC) will be used to prolong the creep and thermal fatigue life. The concept of the cooling configuration, fundamental cascade test results, and material test results will be presented.

  15. Open-Cycle Gas Turbine/Steam Turbine Combined Cycles with synthetic fuels from coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, R. P.; Corman, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    The Open-Cycle Gas Turbine/Steam Turbine Combined Cycle can be an effective energy conversion system for converting coal to electricity. The intermediate step in this energy conversion process is to convert the coal into a fuel acceptable to a gas turbine. This can be accomplished by producing a synthetic gas or liquid, and by removing, in the fuel conversion step, the elements in the fuel that would be harmful to the environment if combusted. In this paper, two open-cycle gas turbine combined systems are evaluated: one employing an integrated low-Btu gasifier, and one utilizing a semi-clean liquid fuel. A consistent technical/economic information base is developed for these two systems, and is compared with a reference steam plant burning coal directly in a conventional furnace.

  16. Analysis and Tests of Pultruded Blades for Wind Turbine Rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheney, M. C.; Olsen, T.; Quandt, G.; Archidiacono, P.

    1999-07-19

    PS Enterprises, Inc. investigated a flexible, downwind, free-yaw, five-blade rotor system employing pultruded blades. A rotor was designed, manufactured and tested in the field. A preliminary design study and proof of concept test were conducted to assess the feasibility of using pultruded blades for wind turbine rotors. A 400 kW turbine was selected for the design study and a scaled 80 kW rotor was fabricated and field tested as a demonstration of the concept. The design studies continued to support the premise that pultruded blades offer the potential for significant reductions in rotor weight and cost. The field test provided experimental performance and loads data that compared well with predictions using the FLEXDYNE aeroelastic analysis. The field test also demonstrated stable yaw behavior and the absence of stall flutter over the wind conditions tested. During the final year of the contract, several studies were conducted by a number of independent consultants to address specific technical issues related to pultruded blades that could impact the commercial viability of turbines using this technology. The issues included performance, tower strikes, yaw stability, stall flutter, fatigue, and costs. While the performance of straight pultruded blades was projected to suffer a penalty of about 13% over fully twisted and tapered blades, the study showed that an aerodynamic fairing over the inner 40% could recover 85% of that loss while still keeping the blade cost well below that of conventional blades. Other results of the study showed that with proper design, rotors using pultruded blades could operate without aeroelastic problems, have acceptable fatigue life, and cost less than half that of rotors employing conventionally manufactured blades.

  17. Economic aspects of advanced coal-fired gas turbine locomotives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liddle, S. G.; Bonzo, B. B.; Houser, B. C.

    1983-01-01

    Increases in the price of such conventional fuels as Diesel No. 2, as well as advancements in turbine technology, have prompted the present economic assessment of coal-fired gas turbine locomotive engines. A regenerative open cycle internal combustion gas turbine engine may be used, given the development of ceramic hot section components. Otherwise, an external combustion gas turbine engine appears attractive, since although its thermal efficiency is lower than that of a Diesel engine, its fuel is far less expensive. Attention is given to such a powerplant which will use a fluidized bed coal combustor. A life cycle cost analysis yields figures that are approximately half those typical of present locomotive engines.

  18. Advanced Sensor Fish Device for ImprovedTurbine Design

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.

    2009-09-14

    Juvenile salmon (smolts) passing through hydroelectric turbines are subjected to environmental conditions that can potentially kill or injure them. Many turbines are reaching the end of their operational life expectancies and will be replaced with new turbines that incorporate advanced “fish friendly” designs devised to prevent injury and death to fish. To design a fish friendly turbine, it is first necessary to define the current conditions fish encounter. One such device used by biologists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was the sensor fish device to collect data that measures the forces fish experience during passage through hydroelectric projects.

  19. Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter). Eighteenth quarterly status report, January--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1992-04-20

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge: a baseline ceramic barrier filter nEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300{degrees}F. This document reports the status of a program in the eighteenth quarter to develop this ILEC technology for direct coal-fired turbine power plants.

  20. Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter). Twenty-fifth quarterly report, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1993-12-31

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been reconfigured to meet this technical challenge: a baseline ceramic barrier filter ILEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300{degree}F. This document reports the status of a program in the twenty-fifth quarter to develop this ILEC technology for direct coal-fired turbine power plants.

  1. Sliding vane geometry turbines

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Harold Huimin; Zhang, Jizhong; Hu, Liangjun; Hanna, Dave R

    2014-12-30

    Various systems and methods are described for a variable geometry turbine. In one example, a turbine nozzle comprises a central axis and a nozzle vane. The nozzle vane includes a stationary vane and a sliding vane. The sliding vane is positioned to slide in a direction substantially tangent to an inner circumference of the turbine nozzle and in contact with the stationary vane.

  2. Large wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Donovon, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    The development associated with large wind turbine systems is briefly described. The scope of this activity includes the development of several large wind turbines ranging in size from 100 kW to several megawatt levels. A description of the wind turbine systems, their programmatic status and a summary of their potential costs is included.

  3. Integrated low emissions cleanup system for coal fueled turbines Phase III bench-scale testing and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1995-08-01

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of coal-fired turbine technologies such as Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC), coal Gasification Combined Cycles (GCC), and Direct Coal-Fired Turbines (DCFT). A major technical development challenge remaining for coal-fired turbine systems is high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental emissions standards, as well as to ensure acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, has evaluated an Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concept that has been configured to meet this technical challenge. This ceramic hot gas filter (HGF), ILEC concept controls particulate emissions, while simultaneously contributing to the control of sulfur and alkali vapor contaminants in high-temperature, high-pressure, fuel gases or combustion gases. This document reports on the results of Phase III of the ILEC evaluation program, the final phase of the program. In Phase III, a bench-scale ILEC facility has been tested to (1) confirm the feasibility of the ILEC concept, and (2) to resolve some major filter cake behavior issues identified in PFBC, HGF applications.

  4. Turbine Imaging Technology Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Moursund, Russell A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2004-12-31

    The goal of this project was to identify and evaluate imaging alternatives for observing the behavior of juvenile fish within an operating Kaplan turbine unit with a focus on methods to quantify fish injury mechanisms inside an operating turbine unit. Imaging methods are particularly needed to observe the approach and interaction of fish with turbine structural elements. This evaluation documents both the opportunities and constraints for observing juvenile fish at specific locations during turbine passage. The information may be used to acquire the scientific knowledge to make structural improvements and create opportunities for industry to modify turbines and improve fish passage conditions.

  5. Conceptual design study of an Improved Gas Turbine (IGT) powertrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Design concepts for an improved automotive gas turbine powertrain are discussed. Twenty percent fuel economy improvement (over 1976), competitive costs (initial and life cycle), high reliability/life, low emissions, and noise/safety compliance were among the factors considered. The powertrain selected consists of a two shaft gas turbine engine with variable geometry aerodynamic components and a single disk rotating regenerator. The regenerator disk, gasifier turbine rotor, and several hot section flowpath parts are ceramic. The powertrain utilizes a conventional automatic transmission. The closest competitor was a single shaft turbine engine matched to a continuously variable transmission (CVT). Both candidate powertrain systems were found to be similar in many respects; however, the CVT represented a significant increase in development cost, technical risk, and production start-up costs over the conventional automatic transmission. Installation of the gas turbine powertrain was investigated for a transverse mounted, front wheel drive vehicle.

  6. Wind turbine rotor assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, H. W.

    1984-11-20

    A vertical axis wind turbine having a horizontal arm member which supports an upright blade assembly. Bearing structure coupling the blade assembly to the turbine arm permits blade movement about its longitudinal axis as well as flexing motion of the blade assembly about axes perpendicular to the longitudinal axis. A latching mechanism automatically locks the blade assembly to its supporting arm during normal turbine operation and automatically unlocks same when the turbine is at rest. For overspeed prevention, a centrifugally actuated arm functions to unlatch the blade assembly permitting same to slipstream or feather into the wind. Manually actuated means are also provided for unlatching the moving blade assembly. The turbine arm additionally carries a switching mechanism in circuit with a turbine generator with said mechanism functioning to open and hence protect the generator circuit in the event of an overspeed condition of the turbine.

  7. Bilateral inferior turbinate osteoma.

    PubMed

    Sahemey, R; Warfield, A T; Ahmed, S

    2016-01-01

    Osteomas are the most common benign osteoclastic tumours of the paranasal sinuses. However, nasal cavity and turbinate osteomas are extremely rare. Only nine middle turbinate, three inferior turbinate and one inferior turbinate osteoma cases have been reported to date. The present case report describes the management and follow-up of symptomatic bilateral inferior turbinate osteoma.A 60-year-old female presented with symptoms of bilateral nasal obstruction and right-sided epiphora. Radiological investigation found hypertrophic bony changes involving both inferior turbinates. The patient was managed successfully by endoscopic inferior turbinectomies in order to achieve a patent airway, with no further recurrence of tumour after 3 months postoperatively.To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of bilateral inferior turbinate osteoma. We describe a safe and minimally invasive method of tumour resection, which has a better cosmetic outcome compared with other approaches. PMID:27534890

  8. The NASA Lewis large wind turbine program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Baldwin, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The program is directed toward development of the technology for safe, reliable, environmentally acceptable large wind turbines that have the potential to generate a significant amount of electricity at costs competitive with conventional electric generation systems. In addition, these large wind turbines must be fully compatible with electric utility operations and interface requirements. Advances are made by gaining a better understanding of the system design drivers, improvements in the analytical design tools, verification of design methods with operating field data, and the incorporation of new technology and innovative designs. An overview of the program activities is presented and includes results from the first and second generation field machines (Mod-OA, -1, and -2), the design phase of the third generation wind turbine (Mod-5) and the advanced technology projects. Also included is the status of the Department of Interior WTS-4 machine.

  9. Shoosing the appropriate size wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Lynette, R.

    1996-12-31

    Within the past several years, wind turbines rated at 400 kW and higher have been introduced into the market, and some manufacturers are developing machines rated at 750 - 1,000+ kW. This raises the question: What is the appropriate size for utility-grade wind turbines today? The answer depends upon the site where the machines will be used and the local conditions. The issues discussed in the paper are: (1) Site-Related (a) Visual, noise, erosion, television interference, interference with aviation (b) Siting efficiency (2) Logistics (a) Adequacy of roads and bridges to accept large vehicles (b) Availability and cost of cranes for erection and maintenance (c) Capability of local repair/overhauls (3) Cost Effectiveness (a) Capital costs (1) Wind Turbine (2) Infrastructure costs (b) Maintenance costs (4) Technical/Financial Risk. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  10. Advanced General Aviation Turbine Engine (GATE) concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lays, E. J.; Murray, G. L.

    1979-01-01

    Concepts are discussed that project turbine engine cost savings through use of geometrically constrained components designed for low rotational speeds and low stress to permit manufacturing economies. Aerodynamic development of geometrically constrained components is recommended to maximize component efficiency. Conceptual engines, airplane applications, airplane performance, engine cost, and engine-related life cycle costs are presented. The powerplants proposed offer encouragement with respect to fuel efficiency and life cycle costs, and make possible remarkable airplane performance gains.

  11. Minimum fan turbine inlet temperature mode evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Nobbs, Steven G.

    1995-01-01

    Measured reductions in turbine temperature which resulted from the application of the F-15 performance seeking control (PSC) minimum fan turbine inlet temperature (FTIT) mode during the dual-engine test phase is presented as a function of net propulsive force and flight condition. Data were collected at altitudes of 30,000 and 45,000 feet at military and partial afterburning power settings. The FTIT reductions for the supersonic tests are less than at subsonic Mach numbers because of the increased modeling and control complexity. In addition, the propulsion system was designed to be optimized at the mid supersonic Mach number range. Subsonically at military power, FTIT reductions were above 70 R for either the left or right engines, and repeatable for the right engine. At partial afterburner and supersonic conditions, the level of FTIT reductions were at least 25 R and as much as 55 R. Considering that the turbine operates at or very near its temperature limit at these high power settings, these seemingly small temperature reductions may significantly lengthen the life of the turbine. In general, the minimum FTIT mode has performed well, demonstrating significant temperature reductions at military and partial afterburner power. Decreases of over 100 R at cruise flight conditions were identified. Temperature reductions of this magnitude could significantly extend turbine life and reduce replacement costs.

  12. Coalescing Wind Turbine Wakes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Sirnivas, S.; Moriarty, P.; Nielsen, F. G.; Skaare, B.; Byklum, E.

    2015-06-18

    A team of researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Statoil used large-eddy simulations to numerically investigate the merging wakes from upstream offshore wind turbines. Merging wakes are typical phenomena in wind farm flows in which neighboring turbine wakes consolidate to form complex flow patterns that are as yet not well understood. In the present study, three 6-MW turbines in a row were subjected to a neutrally stable atmospheric boundary layer flow. As a result, the wake from the farthest upstream turbine conjoined the downstream wake, which significantly altered the subsequent velocity deficit structures, turbulence intensity, and the globalmore » meandering behavior. The complexity increased even more when the combined wakes from the two upstream turbines mixed with the wake generated by the last turbine, thereby forming a "triplet" structure. Although the influence of the wake generated by the first turbine decayed with downstream distance, the mutated wakes from the second turbine continued to influence the downstream wake. Two mirror-image angles of wind directions that yielded partial wakes impinging on the downstream turbines yielded asymmetric wake profiles that could be attributed to the changing flow directions in the rotor plane induced by the Coriolis force. In conclusion, the turbine wakes persisted for extended distances in the present study, which is a result of low aerodynamic surface roughness typically found in offshore conditions« less

  13. Coalescing Wind Turbine Wakes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Sirnivas, S.; Moriarty, P.; Nielsen, F. G.; Skaare, B.; Byklum, E.

    2015-06-18

    A team of researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Statoil used large-eddy simulations to numerically investigate the merging wakes from upstream offshore wind turbines. Merging wakes are typical phenomena in wind farm flows in which neighboring turbine wakes consolidate to form complex flow patterns that are as yet not well understood. In the present study, three 6-MW turbines in a row were subjected to a neutrally stable atmospheric boundary layer flow. As a result, the wake from the farthest upstream turbine conjoined the downstream wake, which significantly altered the subsequent velocity deficit structures, turbulence intensity, and the global meandering behavior. The complexity increased even more when the combined wakes from the two upstream turbines mixed with the wake generated by the last turbine, thereby forming a "triplet" structure. Although the influence of the wake generated by the first turbine decayed with downstream distance, the mutated wakes from the second turbine continued to influence the downstream wake. Two mirror-image angles of wind directions that yielded partial wakes impinging on the downstream turbines yielded asymmetric wake profiles that could be attributed to the changing flow directions in the rotor plane induced by the Coriolis force. In conclusion, the turbine wakes persisted for extended distances in the present study, which is a result of low aerodynamic surface roughness typically found in offshore conditions

  14. Turbine turbobrake systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodisman, Michael I.

    Short duration rotating turbine facilities are a recent development in the field of turbine research. Turbine braking devices can be used to maintain the turbine at the desired test speed, resulting in a longer usable test time. The Isentropic Light Piston Cascade at the Defence Research Agency in Pyestock will perform heat transfer and aerodynamic tests on the first stage of a Rolls-Royce turbine (MT1) linked to a new type of brake, the 'axial turbo brake'. The axial turbo brake is driven by the turbine's exhaust gas and is isolated from the turbine by a choked throat. The turbo brake's power absorption must be controlled to match the power developed by the turbine stage for a constant speed run. Both the turbo brake blade shape and novel power control system were developed from tests on a 0.17 scale test rig. The turbo brake's braking is controlled through by-pass of flow over the blade tips and partial blockage of the turbo brake's exit annulus. Also described is the mechanical design, development and manufacture of the full size turbo brake, turbine disc and turbine blades, which have been successfully spun tested to their overspeed condition. Finally, a theory for self-pumping turbo brakes is developed. These devices would have additional applications because they do not require a supply of high pressure gas to drive them.

  15. Turbine engine interstage seal

    SciTech Connect

    Clevenger, L.L.

    1993-08-10

    A seal structure is described for a turbine engine, the turbine engine including a housing surrounding a centrifugal compressor having a rotor, and a radial inflow turbine including a turbine rotor, the compressor rotor and the turbine rotor being disposed in back-to-back relation, the turbine rotor being drivingly connected with the compressor rotor and axially spaced therefrom to define an annular gap there between, the gap radially bounded at its outer periphery by the housing and at its inner periphery by an annular surface intermediate the compressor rotor and the turbine rotor an annular sealing member disposed in the gap to control air flow from the compressor toward the turbine; the annular sealing member the first axial direction, and a third annular wall portion joining with the second annular wall portion and extending inward therefrom towards the surface intermediate the compressor rotor and the turbine rotor, and biasing means cooperating with the housing for urging the seal structure toward the turbine rotor.

  16. Coalescing Wind Turbine Wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Sirnivas, S.; Moriarty, P.; Nielsen, F. G.; Skaare, B.; Byklum, E.

    2015-06-01

    A team of researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Statoil used large-eddy simulations to numerically investigate the merging wakes from upstream offshore wind turbines. Merging wakes are typical phenomena in wind farm flows in which neighboring turbine wakes consolidate to form complex flow patterns that are as yet not well understood. In the present study, three 6-MW turbines in a row were subjected to a neutrally stable atmospheric boundary layer flow. As a result, the wake from the farthest upstream turbine conjoined the downstream wake, which significantly altered the subsequent velocity deficit structures, turbulence intensity, and the global meandering behavior. The complexity increased even more when the combined wakes from the two upstream turbines mixed with the wake generated by the last turbine, thereby forming a “triplet” structure. Although the influence of the wake generated by the first turbine decayed with downstream distance, the mutated wakes from the second turbine continued to influence the downstream wake. Two mirror-image angles of wind directions that yielded partial wakes impinging on the downstream turbines yielded asymmetric wake profiles that could be attributed to the changing flow directions in the rotor plane induced by the Coriolis force. The turbine wakes persisted for extended distances in the present study, which is a result of low aerodynamic surface roughness typically found in offshore conditions.

  17. 30. VICTOR WATER TURBINE, STILWELLBIERCE CO., DAYTON, OHIO. SIMILAR TURBINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. VICTOR WATER TURBINE, STILWELL-BIERCE CO., DAYTON, OHIO. SIMILAR TURBINE TO LEFT (DOUBLE TURBINE SYSTEM), PHOTO TAKEN FROM PENSTOCK. - Prattville Manufacturing Company, Number One, 242 South Court Street, Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  18. Mod 2 Wind Turbine Development Project

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    The primary objective in the development of Mod 2 was to design a wind turbine to produce energy for less than 5 cents/kWh based on 1980 cost forecasts. The pricing method used to project the Mod 2 energy costs is the levelized fixed charge rate approach, generally accepted in the electric utility industry as a basis for relative ranking of energy alternatives. This method derives a levelized energy price necessary to recover utility's purchasing, installing, owning, operating, and maintenance costs.

  19. Very Low Head Turbine Deployment in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, P.; Williams, C.; Sasseville, Remi; Anderson, N.

    2014-03-01

    -river live passage tests for a wide variety of fish species. Latest test results indicate fish passage survivability close to 100%. Further fish studies are planned in Canada later this year. Successful deployment must meet societal requirements to gain community acceptance and public approval. Aesthetics considerations include low noise, disguised control buildings and vigilant turbine integration into the low profile existing structures. The resulting design was selected for deployment at existing historic National Park waterway structures. The integration of all of these design elements permits the successful deployment of the VLH turbine in Canada.

  20. High-temperature turbine technology program. Turbine subsystem design report: Low-Btu gas

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, M.W.

    1980-12-01

    The objective of the US Department of Energy High-Temperature Turbine Technology (DOE-HTTT) program is to bring to technology readiness a high-temperature (2600/sup 0/F to 3000/sup 0/F firing temperature) turbine within a 6- to 10-year duration, Phase II has addressed the performance of component design and technology testing in critical areas to confirm the design concepts identified in the earlier Phase I program. Based on the testing and support studies completed under Phase II, this report describes the updated turbine subsystem design for a coal-derived gas fuel (low-Btu gas) operation at 2600/sup 0/F turbine firing temperature. A commercial IGCC plant configuration would contain four gas turbines. These gas turbines utilize an existing axial flow compressor from the GE product line MS6001 machine. A complete description of the Primary Reference Design-Overall Plant Design Description has been developed and has been documented. Trends in overall plant performance improvement at higher pressure ratio and higher firing temperature are shown. It should be noted that the effect of pressure ratio on efficiency is significally enhanced at higher firing temperatures. It is shown that any improvement in overall plant thermal efficiency reflects about the same level of gain in Cost of Electricity (COE). The IGCC concepts are shown to be competitive in both performance and cost at current and near-term gas turbine firing temperatures of 1985/sup 0/F to 2100/sup 0/F. The savings that can be accumulated over a thirty-year plant life for a water-cooled gas turbine in an IGCC plant as compared to a state-of-the-art coal-fired steam plant are estimated. A total of $500 million over the life of a 1000 MW plant is projected. Also, this IGCC power plant has significant environmental advantages over equivalent coal-fired steam power plants.

  1. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett Lee; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-09-19

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  2. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2007-02-27

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  3. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-07-11

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  4. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2006-10-10

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  5. Small turbines, big unknown

    SciTech Connect

    Gipe, P.

    1995-07-01

    While financial markets focus on the wheeling and dealing of the big wind companies, the small wind turbine industry quietly keeps churning out its smaller but effective machines. Some, the micro turbines, are so small they can be carried by hand. Though worldwide sales of small wind turbines fall far short of even one large windpower plant, figures reach $8 million to $10 million annually and could be as much as twice that if batteries and engineering services are included.

  6. Dynamic stall on wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Butterfield, C.P.; Simms, D.; Scott, G. ); Hansen, A.C. )

    1991-12-01

    Dynamic loads must be predicted accurately in order to estimate the fatigue life of wind turbines operating in turbulent environments. Dynamic stall contributes to increased dynamic loads during normal operation of all types of horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWTs). This report illustrates how dynamic stall varies throughout the blade span of a 10 m HAWT during yawed and unyawed operating conditions. Lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficients during dynamics stall are discussed. Resulting dynamic loads are presented, and the effects of dynamic stall on yaw loads are demonstrated using a yaw loads dynamic analysis (YAWDYN). 12 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Mod-2 wind turbine project assessment and cluster test plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    An assessment of the Mod-2 Wind Turbine project is presented based on initial goals and present results. Specifically, the Mod-2 background, project flow, and a chronology of events/results leading to Mod-2 acceptance is presented. After checkout/acceptance of the three operating turbines, NASA/LeRC will continue management of a two year test program performed at the DOE Goodnoe Hills test site. This test program is expected to yield data necessary for the continued development and optimization of wind energy systems. These test activities, the implementation of, and the results to date are also presented.

  8. Rampressor Turbine Design

    SciTech Connect

    Ramgen Power Systems

    2003-09-30

    The design of a unique gas turbine engine is presented. The first Rampressor Turbine engine rig will be a configuration where the Rampressor rotor is integrated into an existing industrial gas turbine engine. The Rampressor rotor compresses air which is burned in a traditional stationary combustion system in order to increase the enthalpy of the compressed air. The combustion products are then expanded through a conventional gas turbine which provides both compressor and electrical power. This in turn produces shaft torque, which drives a generator to provide electricity. The design and the associated design process of such an engine are discussed in this report.

  9. Wind Turbine Structural Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. R. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    A workshop on wind turbine structural dynamics was held to review and document current United States work on the dynamic behavior of large wind turbines, primarily of the horizontal-axis type, and to identify and discuss other wind turbine configurations that may have lower cost and weight. Information was exchanged on the following topics: (1) Methods for calculating dynamic loads; (2) Aeroelasticity stability (3) Wind loads, both steady and transient; (4) Critical design conditions; (5) Drive train dynamics; and (6) Behavior of operating wind turbines.

  10. Hermetic turbine generator

    DOEpatents

    Meacher, John S.; Ruscitto, David E.

    1982-01-01

    A Rankine cycle turbine drives an electric generator and a feed pump, all on a single shaft, and all enclosed within a hermetically sealed case. The shaft is vertically oriented with the turbine exhaust directed downward and the shaft is supported on hydrodynamic fluid film bearings using the process fluid as lubricant and coolant. The selection of process fluid, type of turbine, operating speed, system power rating, and cycle state points are uniquely coordinated to achieve high turbine efficiency at the temperature levels imposed by the recovery of waste heat from the more prevalent industrial processes.

  11. Experimental turbine VT-400

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitek, Pavel; Milčák, Petr; Noga, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    The experimental air turbine VT400 is located in hall laboratories of the Department of Power System Engineering. It is a single-stage air turbine located in the suction of the compressor. It is able to solve various problems concerning the construction solution of turbine stages. The content of the article will deal mainly with the description of measurements on this turbine. The up-to-now research on this test rig will be briefly mentioned, too, as well as the description of the ongoing reconstruction.

  12. Generalized group chain acceptance sampling plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zain, Zakiyah; Mughal, Abdur Razzaque; Aziz, Nazrina

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we proposed an acceptance sampling plan based on generalized group chain truncated life test. The decision on acceptance of a submitted lot can be made by using the cumulative information of the immediately preceding samples. The design parameters of the proposed plan such as the minimum number of groups are found to satisfy the desired quality standard. The benefits of this plan include smaller sample size and reduced overall costs.

  13. Numerical Simulations of Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Turbines Using the Blade Element Momentum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javaherchi, Teymour; Thulin, Oskar; Aliseda, Alberto

    2011-11-01

    Energy extraction from the available kinetic energy in tidal currents via Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines has recently attracted scientists' attention as a highly predictable source of renewable energy. The strongest tidal resources have a concentrated nature that require close turbine spacing in a farm of MHK turbines. This tight spacing, however, will lead to interaction of the downstream turbines with the turbulent wake generated by upstream turbines. This interaction can significantly reduce the power generated and possibly result in structural failure before the expected service life is completed. Development of a numerical methodology to study the turbine-wake interaction can provide a tool for optimization of turbine spacing to maximize the power generated in turbine arrays. In this work, we will present numerical simulations of the flow field in a farm of horizontal axis MHK turbines using the Blade Element Momentum Theory (BEMT). We compare the value of integral variables (i.e. efficiency, power, torque and etc.) calculated for each turbine in the farm for different arrangements with varying streamwise and lateral offsets between turbines. We find that BEMT provides accurate estimates of turbine efficiency under uniform flow conditions, but overpredicts the efficiency of downstream turbines when they are strongly affected by the wakes. Supported by DOE through the National Northwest Marine Renewable Energy Center.

  14. ATLAS ACCEPTANCE TEST

    SciTech Connect

    J.C. COCHRANE; J.V. PARKER; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    The acceptance test program for Atlas, a 23 MJ pulsed power facility for use in the Los Alamos High Energy Density Hydrodynamics program, has been completed. Completion of this program officially releases Atlas from the construction phase and readies it for experiments. Details of the acceptance test program results and of machine capabilities for experiments will be presented.

  15. Axial-thrust responses due to a gas turbine's rotor blade distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebele-Alawa, B. T.

    2010-11-01

    The axial thrust imposed on the shaft of a gas turbine depends upon its rotor blade inlet inclination to the turbine's axial direction: this inclination can change due to the distortions resulting from fouling, aging, tip rubbing, erosion, thermal-fatigue cracks, and corrosion. Relevant influential parameters for an operational gas turbine were measured. Theoretical predictions for the behavior of the same turbine were obtained from computer simulations. The results of both measurements and theoretical predictions were compared and showed qualitative correspondence. The rotor blade profile distortions result in significant increases in the axial thrust on the compressor, which adversely affects the gas turbine's thermodynamic performance, reliability, and operational life.

  16. Hydrogen Storage in Wind Turbine Towers

    SciTech Connect

    Kottenstette, R.; Cotrell, J.

    2003-09-01

    Low-cost hydrogen storage is recognized as a cornerstone of a renewables-hydrogen economy. Modern utility-scale wind turbine towers are typically conical steel structures that, in addition to supporting the rotor, could be used to store hydrogen. This study has three objectives: (1) Identify the paramount considerations associated with using a wind turbine tower for hydrogen storage; (2)Propose and analyze a cost-effective design for a hydrogen-storing tower; and (3) Compare the cost of storage in hydrogen towers to the cost of storage in conventional pressure vessels. The paramount considerations associated with a hydrogen tower are corrosion (in the form of hydrogen embrittlement) and structural failure (through bursting or fatigue life degradation). Although hydrogen embrittlement (HE) requires more research, it does not appear to prohibit the use of turbine towers for hydrogen storage. Furthermore, the structural modifications required to store hydrogen in a tower are not cost prohibitive.

  17. Fuel Interchangeability Considerations for Gas Turbine Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, D.H.

    2007-10-01

    In recent years domestic natural gas has experienced a considerable growth in demand particularly in the power generation industry. However, the desire for energy security, lower fuel costs and a reduction in carbon emissions has produced an increase in demand for alternative fuel sources. Current strategies for reducing the environmental impact of natural gas combustion in gas turbine engines used for power generation experience such hurdles as flashback, lean blow-off and combustion dynamics. These issues will continue as turbines are presented with coal syngas, gasified coal, biomass, LNG and high hydrogen content fuels. As it may be impractical to physically test a given turbine on all of the possible fuel blends it may experience over its life cycle, the need to predict fuel interchangeability becomes imperative. This study considers a number of historical parameters typically used to determine fuel interchangeability. Also addressed is the need for improved reaction mechanisms capable of accurately modeling the combustion of natural gas alternatives.

  18. Cooled variable nozzle radial turbine for rotor craft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogo, C.

    1981-01-01

    An advanced, small 2.27 kb/sec (5 lbs/sec), high temperature, variable area radial turbine was studied for a rotor craft application. Variable capacity cycles including single-shaft and free-turbine engine configurations were analyzed to define an optimum engine design configuration. Parametric optimizations were made on cooled and uncooled rotor configurations. A detailed structural and heat transfer analysis was conducted to provide a 4000-hour life HP turbine with material properties of the 1988 time frame. A pivoted vane and a moveable sidewall geometry were analyzed. Cooling and variable geometry penalties were included in the cycle analysis. A variable geometry free-turbine engine configuration with a design 1477K (2200 F) inlet temperature and a compressor pressure ratio of 16:1 was selected. An uncooled HP radial turbine rotor with a moveable sidewall nozzle showed the highest performance potential for a time weighted duty cycle.

  19. Single rotor turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Platts, David A.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented a turbine engine with a single rotor which cools the engine, functions as a radial compressor, pushes air through the engine to the ignition point, and acts as an axial turbine for powering the compressor. The invention engine is designed to use a simple scheme of conventional passage shapes to provide both a radial and axial flow pattern through the single rotor, thereby allowing the radial intake air flow to cool the turbine blades and turbine exhaust gases in an axial flow to be used for energy transfer. In an alternative embodiment, an electric generator is incorporated in the engine to specifically adapt the invention for power generation. Magnets are embedded in the exhaust face of the single rotor proximate to a ring of stationary magnetic cores with windings to provide for the generation of electricity. In this alternative embodiment, the turbine is a radial inflow turbine rather than an axial turbine as used in the first embodiment. Radial inflow passages of conventional design are interleaved with radial compressor passages to allow the intake air to cool the turbine blades.

  20. Turbine disc sealing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2013-03-05

    A disc seal assembly for use in a turbine engine. The disc seal assembly includes a plurality of outwardly extending sealing flange members that define a plurality of fluid pockets. The sealing flange members define a labyrinth flow path therebetween to limit leakage between a hot gas path and a disc cavity in the turbine engine.

  1. 77 FR 28371 - Lockhart Power Company, Inc.; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Motions To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ...; (4) a powerhouse containing a single 1.24-megawatt turbine-generator unit; (5) a 510-foot-long...-hours annually. Lockhart Power Company, Inc. proposes to repair or upgrade the turbine unit and return... Energy Regulatory Commission Lockhart Power Company, Inc.; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing...

  2. Ceramic Cerami Turbine Nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1997-04-01

    A turbine nozzle vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes an outer shroud and an inner shroud having a plurality of horizontally segmented vanes therebetween being positioned by a connecting member positioning segmented vanes in functional relationship one to another. The turbine nozzle vane assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

  3. Graphene in turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, D. K.; Swain, P. K.; Sahoo, S.

    2016-07-01

    Graphene, the two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterial, draws interest of several researchers due to its many superior properties. It has extensive applications in numerous fields. A turbine is a hydraulic machine which extracts energy from a fluid and converts it into useful work. Recently, Gudukeya and Madanhire have tried to increase the efficiency of Pelton turbine. Beucher et al. have also tried the same by reducing friction between fluid and turbine blades. In this paper, we study the advantages of using graphene as a coating on Pelton turbine blades. It is found that the efficiency of turbines increases, running and maintenance cost is reduced with more power output. By the application of graphene in pipes, cavitation will be reduced, durability of pipes will increase, operation and maintenance cost of water power plants will be less.

  4. Cascaded humidified advanced turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Nakhamkin, M.; Swenson, E.C.; Cohn, A.; Bradshaw, D.; Taylor, R.; Wilson, J.M.; Gaul, G.; Jahnke, F.; Polsky, M.

    1995-05-01

    This article describes how, by combining the best features of simple- and combined-cycle gas turbine power plants, the CHAT cycle concept offers power producers a clean, more efficient and less expensive alternative to both. The patented cascaded advanced turbine and its cascaded humidified advanced turbine (CHAT) derivative offer utilities and other power producers a practical advanced gas turbine power plant by combining commercially-available gas turbine and industrial compressor technologies in a unique way. Compared to combined-cycle plants, a CHAT power plant has lower emissions and specific capital costs-approximately 20 percent lower than what is presently available. Further, CHAT`s operating characteristics are especially well-suited to load following quick start-up scenarios and they are less susceptible to power degradation from higher ambient air temperature conditions.

  5. Ceramic turbine nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, James E.; Norton, Paul F.

    1996-01-01

    A turbine nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes a plurality of segmented vane defining a first vane segment and a second vane segment. Each of the first and second vane segments having a vertical portion. Each of the first vane segments and the second vane segments being positioned in functional relationship one to another within a recess formed within an outer shroud and an inner shroud. The turbine nozzle and shroud assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

  6. Ceramic turbine nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, J.E.; Norton, P.F.

    1996-12-17

    A turbine nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components have a preestablished rate of thermal expansion greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes a plurality of segmented vane defining a first vane segment and a second vane segment, each of the first and second vane segments having a vertical portion, and each of the first vane segments and the second vane segments being positioned in functional relationship one to another within a recess formed within an outer shroud and an inner shroud. The turbine nozzle and shroud assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component. 4 figs.

  7. AGT-102 automotive gas turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Development of a gas turbine powertrain with a 30% fuel economy improvement over a comparable S1 reciprocating engine, operation within 0.41 HC, 3.4 CO, and 0.40 NOx grams per mile emissions levels, and ability to use a variety of alternate fuels is summarized. The powertrain concept consists of a single-shaft engine with a ceramic inner shell for containment of hot gasses and support of twin regenerators. It uses a fixed-geometry, lean, premixed, prevaporized combustor, and a ceramic radial turbine rotor supported by an air-lubricated journal bearing. The engine is coupled to the vehicle through a widerange continuously variable transmission, which utilizes gearing and a variable-ratio metal compression belt. A response assist flywheel is used to achieve acceptable levels of engine response. The package offers a 100 lb weight advantage in a Chrysler K Car front-wheel-drive installation. Initial layout studies, preliminary transient thermal analysis, ceramic inner housing structural analysis, and detailed performance analysis were carried out for the basic engine.

  8. The calculation of fluid-structure interaction and fatigue analysis for Francis turbine runner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. F.; Li, H. L.; Zhu, F. W.

    2012-11-01

    Francis turbine, as a widely used hydro turbine, is especially suited for the hydropower station with high hydraulic head and higher hydraulic head. For such turbine generator units all around the world, the crack streaks usually come out after a long time use and the resulted accidents may cause huge losses. Hence, it is meaningful to refine the design assuring the stability and safety of the Francis turbine. In this paper, the stiffness and strength as well as the fatigue life of the Francis turbine are studied. Concerning on the turbine of one certain hydropower station, the flow field inside the turbine are first simulated and the pressure distribution around the blades are derived. Meanwhile, the stress distributions of the blades are also obtained. Based on these, the fatigue analyses are applied on the turbine. According to the results of fatigue analyses, some optimal designs on the turbine are verified. The results show that with the optimal designs, the hydraulic performances of the turbine do not change too much while the maximum stress on the turbine decrease and the fatigue life increase as well.

  9. Airfoil Heat Transfer Characteristics in Syngas and Hydrogen Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzotta, D.W.; Chyu, M.K.; Alvin, M.A.

    2007-05-01

    Hydrogen or coal-derivative syngas turbines promise increased efficiency with exceptionally low NOx emissions compared to the natural gas based turbines. To reach this goal, turbine inlet temperature (TIT) will need to be elevated to a level exceeding 1700°C [1, 2]. The thermal load induced by such a temperature increase alone will lead to immense challenges in maintaining material integrity of turbine components. In addition, as working fluid in the gas path will primarily be steam, possibly mixed with carbon oxides, the aero-thermal characteristic in a hydrogen turbine is expected to be far different from that of air/nitrogen enriched gas stream in a gas turbine. For instance, steam has distinctly higher density and specific heat in comparison to a mixture of air and combustion gases as they are expanded in a conventional gas turbine. Even if the temperature limits remain about the same, the expansion in a hydrogen turbine will have to proceed with a greater enthalpy drop and therefore requires a larger number of stages. This also implies that the flow areas may need to be expanded and blade span to be enlarged. Meanwhile, a greater number of stages and hot surfaces need to be protected. This also suggests that current cooling technology available for modern day gas turbines has to be significantly improved. The ultimate goal of the present study is to systematically investigate critical issues concerning cooling technology as it is applicable to oxy-fuel and hydrogen turbine systems, and the main scope is to develop viable means to estimate the thermal load on the turbine “gas side”, that is eventually to be removed from the “coolant side”, and to comparatively quantify the implication of external heat load and potential thermal barrier coating (TBC) degradation on the component durability and lifing. The analysis is based on two well-tested commercial codes, FLUENT and ANSYS.

  10. Automotive gas turbine fuel control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A fuel control system is reported for automotive-type gas turbines and particulary advanced gas turbines utilizing variable geometry components to improve mileage and reduce pollution emission. The fuel control system compensates for fuel density variations, inlet temperature variations, turbine vane actuation, acceleration, and turbine braking. These parameters are utilized to control various orifices, spool valves and pistons.

  11. Cooled snubber structure for turbine blades

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Clinton A; Campbell, Christian X; Whalley, Andrew; Marra, John J

    2014-04-01

    A turbine blade assembly in a turbine engine. The turbine blade assembly includes a turbine blade and a first snubber structure. The turbine blade includes an internal cooling passage containing cooling air. The first snubber structure extends outwardly from a sidewall of the turbine blade and includes a hollow interior portion that receives cooling air from the internal cooling passage of the turbine blade.

  12. Wind turbine reliability :understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.

    SciTech Connect

    Walford, Christopher A. (Global Energy Concepts. Kirkland, WA)

    2006-03-01

    Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. This paper outlines the issues relevant to wind turbine reliability for wind turbine power generation projects. The first sections describe the current state of the industry, identify the cost elements associated with wind farm O&M and availability and discuss the causes of uncertainty in estimating wind turbine component reliability. The latter sections discuss the means for reducing O&M costs and propose O&M related research and development efforts that could be pursued by the wind energy research community to reduce cost of energy.

  13. Acceptance, values, and probability.

    PubMed

    Steel, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    This essay makes a case for regarding personal probabilities used in Bayesian analyses of confirmation as objects of acceptance and rejection. That in turn entails that personal probabilities are subject to the argument from inductive risk, which aims to show non-epistemic values can legitimately influence scientific decisions about which hypotheses to accept. In a Bayesian context, the argument from inductive risk suggests that value judgments can influence decisions about which probability models to accept for likelihoods and priors. As a consequence, if the argument from inductive risk is sound, then non-epistemic values can affect not only the level of evidence deemed necessary to accept a hypothesis but also degrees of confirmation themselves. PMID:26386533

  14. Newbery Medal Acceptance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Russell

    1988-01-01

    Presents the Newbery Medal acceptance speech of Russell Freedman, writer of children's nonfiction. Discusses the place of nonfiction in the world of children's literature, the evolution of children's biographies, and the author's work on "Lincoln." (ARH)

  15. Newbery Medal Acceptance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleary, Beverly

    1984-01-01

    Reprints the text of Ms. Cleary's Newbery medal acceptance speech in which she gives personal history concerning her development as a writer and her response to the letters she receives from children. (CRH)

  16. Caldecott Medal Acceptance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Provensen, Alice; Provensen, Martin

    1984-01-01

    Reprints the text of the Provensens' Caldecott medal acceptance speech in which they describe their early interest in libraries and literature, the collaborative aspect of their work, and their current interest in aviation. (CRH)

  17. Modeling stochastic wind loads on vertical axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Veers, P.S.

    1984-01-01

    The Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) is a machine which extracts energy from the wind. Since random turbulence is always present, the effect of this turbulence on the wind turbine fatigue life must be evaluated. This problem is approached by numerically simulating the turbulence and calculating, in the time domain, the aerodynamic loads on the turbine blades. These loads are reduced to the form of power and cross spectral densities which can be used in standard linear structural analysis codes. The relative importance of the turbulence on blade loads is determined.

  18. Modeling stochastic wind loads on vertical axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Veers, P.S.

    1984-09-01

    The Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) is a machine which extracts energy from the wind. Since random turbulence is always present, the effect of this turbulence on the wind turbine fatigue life must be evaluated. This problem is approached by numerically simulating the turbulence and calculating, in the time domain, the aerodynamic loads on the turbine blades. These loads are reduced to the form of power and cross spectral densities which can be used in standard linear structural analysis codes. The relative importance of the turbulence on blade loads is determined.

  19. Wind Turbine Gearbox Failure Modes - A Brief (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, S.; McDade, M.; Errichello, R.

    2011-10-01

    Wind turbine gearboxes are not always meeting 20-year design life. Premature failure of gearboxes increases cost of energy, turbine downtime, unplanned maintenance, gearbox replacement and rebuild, and increased warranty reserves. The problem is widespread, affects most Original Equipment Manufacturers, and is not caused by manufacturing practices. There is a need to improve gearbox reliability and reduce turbine downtime. The topics of this presentation are: GRC (Gearbox Reliability Collaborative) technical approach; Gearbox failure database; Recorded incidents summary; Top failure modes for bearings; Top failure modes for gears; GRC test gearbox; Bearing nomenclature; Test history; Real damage; Gear sets; Bearings; Observations; and Summary. 5 refs.

  20. Transient CFD simulation of a Francis turbine startup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolle, J.; Morissette, J. F.; Giroux, A. M.

    2012-11-01

    To assess the life expectancy of hydraulic turbines, it is essential to obtain the loading on the blades, especially during transient operations known to be the most damaging. This paper presents a simplified CFD setup to model the startup phase of a Francis turbine while it goes from rest to speed no-load condition. The fluid domain included one distributor sector coupled with one runner passage. The guide vane motion and change in the angular velocity were included in a commercial code with user functions. Comparisons between numerical results and measurements acquired on a full-size turbine showed that most of the flow physics occurring during startup were captured.

  1. Advanced Turbine Systems Program industrial system concept development

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, S.

    1995-12-31

    Solar approached Phase II of ATS program with the goal of 50% thermal efficiency. An intercolled and recuperated gas turbine was identified as the ultimate system to meet this goal in a commercial gas turbine environment. With commercial input from detailed market studies and DOE`s ATS program, Solar redefined the company`s proposed ATS to fit both market and sponsor (DOE) requirements. Resulting optimized recuperated gas turbine will be developed in two sizes, 5 and 15 MWe. It will show a thermal efficiency of about 43%, a 23% improvement over current industrial gas turbines. Other ATS goals--emissions, RAMD (reliability, availability, maintainability, durability), cost of power--will be met or exceeded. During FY95, advanced development of key materials, combustion and component technologies proceeded to the point of acceptance for inclusion in ATS Phase III.

  2. Demonstration and evaluation of gas turbine transit buses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Gas Turbine Transit Bus Demonstration Program was designed to demonstrate and evaluate the operation of gas turbine engines in transit coaches in revenue service compared with diesel powered coaches. The main objective of the program was to accelerate development and commercialization of automotive gas turbines. The benefits from the installation of this engine in a transit coach were expected to be reduced weight, cleaner exhaust emissions, lower noise levels, reduced engine vibration and maintenance requirements, improved reliability and vehicle performance, greater engine braking capability, and superior cold weather starting. Four RTS-II advanced design transit coaches were converted to gas turbine power using engines and transmissions. Development, acceptance, performance and systems tests were performed on the coaches prior to the revenue service demonstration.

  3. Numerical investigation of wind turbine and wind farm aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvaraj, Suganthi

    A numerical method based on the solution of Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations and actuator disk representation of turbine rotor is developed and implemented in the OpenFOAM software suite for aerodynamic analysis of horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT). The method and the implementation are validated against the 1-D momentum theory, the blade element momentum theory and against experimental data. The model is used for analyzing aerodynamics of a novel dual rotor wind turbine concept and wind farms. Horizontal axis wind turbines suffer from aerodynamic inefficiencies in the blade root region (near the hub) due to several non-aerodynamic constraints (e.g., manufacturing, transportation, cost, etc.). A new dual-rotor wind turbine (DRWT) concept is proposed that aims at mitigating these losses. A DRWT is designed using an existing turbine rotor for the main rotor (Risoe turbine and NREL 5 MW turbine), while the secondary rotor is designed using a high lift to drag ratio airfoil (the DU 96 airfoil from TU Delft). The numerical aerodynamic analysis method developed as a part of this thesis is used to optimize the design. The new DRWT design gives an improvement of about 7% in aerodynamic efficiency over the single rotor turbine. Wind turbines are typically deployed in clusters called wind farms. HAWTs also suffer from aerodynamic losses in a wind farm due to interactions with wind turbine wakes. An interesting mesoscale meteorological phenomenon called "surface flow convergence" believed to be caused by wind turbine arrays is investigated using the numerical method developed here. This phenomenon is believed to be caused by the pressure gradient set up by wind turbines operating in close proximity in a farm. A conceptual/hypothetical wind farm simulation validates the hypothesis that a pressure gradient is setup in wind farms due to turbines and that it can cause flow veering of the order of 10 degrees. Simulations of a real wind farm (Story County) are also

  4. Terry turbine controls guide

    SciTech Connect

    Golas, R.S. . Steam Turbine Motor and Generator Div.); Wheeler, K.A. )

    1990-09-01

    While utility experience with Terry turbines has been positive, controls and adjustments of controls have required frequent attention. This technical guide addresses the Terry turbine controls, such as trip system, throttle valve linkage and governors. This guide will familiarize personnel who have not had prior experience with the design, organization and setup of these control systems. This document provides instructions for a broad range of utility personnel on optimum methods for the repair, maintenance, adjustment, and troubleshooting of the Terry turbine controls. The guide includes an engineering description of the operation and prevalent failure mechanisms, preventive and predictive maintenance suggestions, repair and adjustment methods, and spare parts recommendations. This guide will be a standalone updated reference manual. It will include drawings and descriptions affecting all required maintenance on the control system, and does not cover site specific appurtenances. Included are both generic and specific recommendations for utility maintenance engineers and technicians. These recommendations will help implement an effective maintenance or upgrade program for Terry turbine controls. This guide is a valuable resource for operating history and common control related problems. The preparation of this manual included the review of the applicable INPO Standby Turbine-Driven Pump Operating Experience Compilation. Individual utilities can use this guide to review their specific maintenance practices and develop improved procedures where applicable. The guide can also be used by some utilities to upgrade their Terry turbine control system. The guide is applicable to the nuclear industry and any other industry utilizing the Terry turbine models included in the document.

  5. Analysis of the Environmental Impact on Remanufacturing Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa Skrainka, Manuel R.

    To deliver clean energy the use of wind turbines is essential. In June 2011 there was an installed wind capacity equivalent to 211,000MW world-wide (WWEA, 2011). By the end of the year 2009 the U.S. had 35,100MW of wind energy installed capacity to generate electricity (AWEA, 2010). This industry has grown in recent years and is expected to grow even more in the future. The environmental impacts that will arise from the increased number of wind turbines and their end-of-life should be addressed, as large amounts of resources will be required to satisfy the current and future market demands for wind turbines. Since future 10MW wind turbines are expected to be as heavy as 1000 tons each, the study of the environmental response of profitable retirement strategies, such as remanufacturing for these machines, must be considered. Because of the increased number of wind turbines and the materials used, this study provides a comparison between the environmental impacts from remanufacturing the components installed inside the nacelle of multi-megawatt wind turbines and wind turbines manufactured using new components. The study methodology is the following: • Describe the life-cycle and the materials and processes employed for the manufacture and remanufacturing for components inside the nacelle. • Identify remanufacturing alternatives for the components inside the nacelle at the end of the expected life-time service of wind turbines. • Evaluate the environmental impacts from the remanufactured components and compare the results with the impacts of the manufacturing of new components using SimaPro. • Conduct sensitivity analysis over the critical parameters of the life cycle assessment • Propose the most environmentally friendly options for the retirement of each major component of wind turbines. After an analysis of the scenarios the goal of the study is to evaluate remanufacturing as an end-of-life option from an environmental perspective for commercial multi

  6. System-Level Design of a Shape Memory Alloy Actuator for Active Clearance Control in the High-Pressure Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCastro, Jonathan A.; Melcher, Kevin J.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes results of a numerical analysis evaluating the feasibility of high-temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMA) for active clearance control actuation in the high-pressure turbine section of a modern turbofan engine. The prototype actuator concept considered here consists of parallel HTSMA wires attached to the shroud that is located on the exterior of the turbine case. A transient model of an HTSMA actuator was used to evaluate active clearance control at various operating points in a test bed aircraft engine simulation. For the engine under consideration, each actuator must be designed to counteract loads from 380 to 2000 lbf and displace at least 0.033 inches. Design results show that an actuator comprised of 10 wires 2 inches in length is adequate for control at critical engine operating points and still exhibits acceptable failsafe operability and cycle life. A proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller with integrator windup protection was implemented to control clearance amidst engine transients during a normal mission. Simulation results show that the control system exhibits minimal variability in clearance control performance across the operating envelope. The final actuator design is sufficiently small to fit within the limited space outside the high-pressure turbine case and is shown to consume only small amounts of bleed air to adequately regulate temperature.

  7. Gas turbine combustor transition

    DOEpatents

    Coslow, Billy Joe; Whidden, Graydon Lane

    1999-01-01

    A method of converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit.

  8. Gas turbine combustor transition

    DOEpatents

    Coslow, B.J.; Whidden, G.L.

    1999-05-25

    A method is described for converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit. 7 figs.

  9. Estimating turbine limit load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    A method for estimating turbine limit-load pressure ratio from turbine map information is presented and demonstrated. It is based on a mean line analysis at the last-rotor exit. The required map information includes choke flow rate at all speeds as well as pressure ratio and efficiency at the onset of choke at design speed. One- and two-stage turbines are analyzed to compare the results with those from a more rigorous off-design flow analysis and to show the sensitivities of the computed limit-load pressure ratios to changes in the key assumptions.

  10. Aviation turbine fuels, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, E M

    1981-03-01

    Properties of some aviation turbine fuels marketed in the United States during 1980 are presented in this report. The samples represented are typical 1980 production and were analyzed in the laboratories of 17 manufacturers of aviation turbine (jet) fuels. The data were submitted for study, calculation, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE), Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC), Bartlesville, Oklahoma, and the American Petroleum Institute (API). Results for the properties of 98 samples of aviation turbine fuels are included in the report for military grades JP-4 and JP-5 and commercial type Jet A.

  11. Composite turbine bucket assembly

    DOEpatents

    Liotta, Gary Charles; Garcia-Crespo, Andres

    2014-05-20

    A composite turbine blade assembly includes a ceramic blade including an airfoil portion, a shank portion and an attachment portion; and a transition assembly adapted to attach the ceramic blade to a turbine disk or rotor, the transition assembly including first and second transition components clamped together, trapping said ceramic airfoil therebetween. Interior surfaces of the first and second transition portions are formed to mate with the shank portion and the attachment portion of the ceramic blade, and exterior surfaces of said first and second transition components are formed to include an attachment feature enabling the transition assembly to be attached to the turbine rotor or disk.

  12. Wind turbine acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, Harvey H.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    1990-01-01

    Available information on the physical characteristics of the noise generated by wind turbines is summarized, with example sound pressure time histories, narrow- and broadband frequency spectra, and noise radiation patterns. Reviewed are noise measurement standards, analysis technology, and a method of characterizing wind turbine noise. Prediction methods are given for both low-frequency rotational harmonics and broadband noise components. Also included are atmospheric propagation data showing the effects of distance and refraction by wind shear. Human perception thresholds, based on laboratory and field tests, are given. Building vibration analysis methods are summarized. The bibliography of this report lists technical publications on all aspects of wind turbine acoustics.

  13. NWTC Researchers Field-Test Advanced Control Turbine Systems to Increase Performance, Decrease Structural Loading of Wind Turbines and Plants

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) are studying component controls, including new advanced actuators and sensors, for both conventional turbines as well as wind plants. This research will help develop innovative control strategies that reduce aerodynamic structural loads and improve performance. Structural loads can cause damage that increase maintenance costs and shorten the life of a turbine or wind plant.

  14. The design of an air-cooled metallic high temperature radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Philip H.; Roelke, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    Recent trends in small advanced gas turbine engines call for higher turbine inlet temperatures. Advances in radial turbine technology have opened the way for a cooled metallic radial turbine capable of withstanding turbine inlet temperatures of 2500 F while meeting the challenge of high efficiency in this small flow size range. In response to this need, a small air-cooled radial turbine has been designed utilizing internal blade coolant passages. The coolant flow passage design is uniquely tailored to simultaneously meet rotor cooling needs and rotor fabrication constraints. The rotor flow-path design seeks to realize improved aerodynamic blade loading characteristics and high efficiency while satisfying rotor life requirements. An up-scaled version of the final engine rotor is currently under fabrication and, after instrumentation, will be tested in the warm turbine test facility at the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  15. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    ATTAP activities were highlighted by test bed engine design and development activities; ceramic component design; materials and engine component characterization; ceramic component process development and fabrication; component rig testing; and test bed engine fabrication and testing. Specifically, ATTAP aims to develop and demonstrate the technology of structural ceramics that have the potential for competitive automotive engine life cycle cost and for operating for 3500 hours in a turbine engine environment at temperatures up to 1371 C (2500 F).

  16. Turbine instabilities: Case histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laws, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Several possible causes of turbine rotor instability are discussed and the related design features of a wide range of turbomachinery types and sizes are considered. The instrumentation options available for detecting rotor instability and assessing its severity are also discussed.

  17. Variables in turbine erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baughman, J. R.; Spies, R.

    1970-01-01

    Study of impact erosion in the operation of turbomachinery is undertaken to predict the results for particular designs. The test program investigates the effects of turbine stator blade shape, rotor blade shape, and variations in test conditions.

  18. Gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Lawlor, Shawn P.; Roberts, II, William Byron

    2016-03-08

    A gas turbine engine with a compressor rotor having compressor impulse blades that delivers gas at supersonic conditions to a stator. The stator includes a one or more aerodynamic ducts that each have a converging portion and a diverging portion for deceleration of the selected gas to subsonic conditions and to deliver a high pressure oxidant containing gas to flameholders. The flameholders may be provided as trapped vortex combustors, for combustion of a fuel to produce hot pressurized combustion gases. The hot pressurized combustion gases are choked before passing out of an aerodynamic duct to a turbine. Work is recovered in a turbine by expanding the combustion gases through impulse blades. By balancing the axial loading on compressor impulse blades and turbine impulse blades, asymmetrical thrust is minimized or avoided.

  19. Turbines in the sky

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, R.V.; Riple, J.C.

    1987-07-01

    Gas turbines are being investigated as power sources for the proposed Star Wars weapons flatforms. The gas turbine engine offers the best opportunity for exploiting the high-temperature potential of both nuclear and chemical combustion. The use of mature gas turbine technology and existing materials would result in highly reliable PCUs capable of meeting SDI's requirements. However, operation under the temperature limits imposed by existing materials would result in a prohibitively heavy system. Cooled blades would somewhat increase temperature capability; however the turbine's mass, though reduced, would still be unacceptably large. The greatest improvements would result from the ability to operate at temperatures of up to 2000 K, pressures up to 14 MPa, and stress up to 690 MPa.

  20. Turbine nozzle positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Norton, Paul F.; Shaffer, James E.

    1996-01-30

    A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes an outer shroud having a mounting leg with an opening defined therein, a tip shoe ring having a mounting member with an opening defined therein, a nozzle support ring having a plurality of holes therein and a pin positioned in the corresponding opening in the outer shroud, opening in the tip shoe ring and the hole in the nozzle support ring. A rolling joint is provided between metallic components of the gas turbine engine and the nozzle guide vane assembly. The nozzle guide vane assembly is positioned radially about a central axis of the gas turbine engine and axially aligned with a combustor of the gas turbine engine.

  1. Turbine nozzle positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Norton, P.F.; Shaffer, J.E.

    1996-01-30

    A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes an outer shroud having a mounting leg with an opening defined therein, a tip shoe ring having a mounting member with an opening defined therein, a nozzle support ring having a plurality of holes therein and a pin positioned in the corresponding opening in the outer shroud, opening in the tip shoe ring and the hole in the nozzle support ring. A rolling joint is provided between metallic components of the gas turbine engine and the nozzle guide vane assembly. The nozzle guide vane assembly is positioned radially about a central axis of the gas turbine engine and axially aligned with a combustor of the gas turbine engine. 9 figs.

  2. Oil-Free Turbomachinery Technologies for Long-Life, Maintenance-Free Power Generation Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Turbines have long been used to convert thermal energy to shaft work for power generation. Conventional turbines rely upon oil-lubricated rotor supports (bearings, seals, etc.) to achieve low wear, high efficiency and reliability. Emerging Oil-Free technologies such as gas foil bearings and magnetic bearings offer a path for reduced weight and complexity and truly maintenance free systems. Oil-Free gas turbines, using gaseous and liquid fuels are commercially available in power outputs to at least 250kWe and are gaining acceptance for remote power generation where maintenance is a challenge. Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) turbines are an approach to power generation that is well suited for long life space missions. In these systems, a recirculating gas is heated by nuclear, solar or other heat energy source then fed into a high-speed turbine that drives an electrical generator. For closed cycle systems such as these, the working fluid also passes through the bearing compartments thus serving as a lubricant and bearing coolant. Compliant surface foil gas bearings are well suited for the rotor support systems of these advanced turbines. Foil bearings develop a thin hydrodynamic gas film that separates the rotating shaft from the bearing preventing wear. During start-up and shut down when speeds are low, rubbing occurs. Solid lubricants are used to reduce starting torque and minimize wear. Other emerging technologies such as magnetic bearings can also contribute to robust and reliable Oil-Free turbomachinery. In this presentation, Oil-Free technologies for advanced rotor support systems will be reviewed as will the integration and development processes recommended for implementation.

  3. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    The technology of high temperature cooled radial turbines is reviewed. Aerodynamic performance considerations are described. Heat transfer and structural analysis are addressed, and in doing so the following topics are covered: cooling considerations, hot side convection, coolant side convection, and rotor mechanical analysis. Cooled rotor concepts and fabrication are described, and the following are covered in this context: internally cooled rotor, hot isostatic pressure bonded rotor, laminated rotor, split blade rotor, and the NASA radial turbine program.

  4. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    The technology of high temperature cooled radial turbines is reviewed. Aerodynamic performance considerations are described. Heat transfer and structural analysis are addressed, and in doing so the following topics are covered: cooling considerations, hot side convection, coolant side convection, and rotor mechanical analysis. Cooled rotor concepts and fabrication are described, and the following are covered in this context: internally cooled rotor, hot isostatic pressure bonded rotor, laminated rotor, split blade rotor, and the NASA radial turbine program.

  5. Test Rig for Active Turbine Blade Tip Clearance Control Concepts: An Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Shawn; Steinetz, Bruce; Oswald, Jay; DeCastro, Jonathan; Melcher, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    The objective is to develop and demonstrate a fast-acting active clearance control system to improve turbine engine performance, reduce emissions, and increase service life. System studies have shown the benefits of reducing blade tip clearances in modern turbine engines. Minimizing blade tip clearances throughout the engine will contribute materially to meeting NASA's Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) turbine engine project goals. NASA GRC is examining two candidate approaches including rub-avoidance and regeneration which are explained in subsequent slides.

  6. Heat pipe turbine vane cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, L.; Faghri, A.

    1995-10-01

    The applicability of using heat pipe principles to cool gas turbine vanes is addressed in this beginning program. This innovative concept involves fitting out the vane interior as a heat pipe and extending the vane into an adjacent heat sink, thus transferring the vane incident heat transfer through the heat pipe to heat sink. This design provides an extremely high heat transfer rate and an uniform temperature along the vane due to the internal change of phase of the heat pipe working fluid. Furthermore, this technology can also eliminate hot spots at the vane leading and trailing edges and increase the vane life by preventing thermal fatigue cracking. There is also the possibility of requiring no bleed air from the compressor, and therefore eliminating engine performance losses resulting from the diversion of compressor discharge air. Significant improvement in gas turbine performance can be achieved by using heat pipe technology in place of conventional air cooled vanes. A detailed numerical analysis of a heat pipe vane will be made and an experimental model will be designed in the first year of this new program.

  7. Heat pipe turbine vane cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, L.; Faghri, A.

    1995-12-31

    The applicability of using heat pipe principles to cool gas turbine vanes is addressed in this beginning program. This innovative concept involves fitting out the vane interior as a heat pipe and extending the vane into an adjacent heat sink, thus transferring the vane incident heat transfer through the heat pipe to heat sink. This design provides an extremely high heat transfer rate and a uniform temperature along the vane due to the internal change of phase of the heat pipe working fluid. Furthermore, this technology can also eliminate hot spots at the vane leading and trailing edges and increase the vane life by preventing thermal fatigue cracking. There is also the possibility of requiring no bleed air from the compressor, and therefore eliminating engine performance losses resulting from the diversion of compressor discharge air. Significant improvement in gas turbine performance can be achieved by using heat pipe technology in place of conventional air cooled vanes. A detailed numerical analysis of a heat pipe vane will be made and an experimental model will be designed in the first year of this new program.

  8. New technology in turbine aerodynamics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.; Moffitt, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    Cursory review of some recent work that has been done in turbine aerodynamic research. Topics discussed include the aerodynamic effect of turbine coolant, high work-factor (ratio of stage work to square of blade speed) turbines, and computer methods for turbine design and performance prediction. Experimental cooled-turbine aerodynamics programs using two-dimensional cascades, full annular cascades, and cold rotating turbine stage tests are discussed with some typical results presented. Analytically predicted results for cooled blade performance are compared to experimental results. The problems and some of the current programs associated with the use of very high work factors for fan-drive turbines of high-bypass-ratio engines are discussed. Computer programs have been developed for turbine design-point performance, off-design performance, supersonic blade profile design, and the calculation of channel velocities for subsonic and transonic flowfields. The use of these programs for the design and analysis of axial and radial turbines is discussed.

  9. Fatigue case study and loading spectra for wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, H. J.

    The paper discusses two aspects of Sandia's Wind Energy Program. The first section of the paper presents a case study of fatigue in wind turbines. This case study was prepared for the American Society of Testing Material's (ASTM) Standard Technical Publication (STP) on fatigue education. Using the LIFE2 code, the student is lead through the process of cumulative damage summation for wind turbines and typical data are used to demonstrate the range of life estimates that will result from typical parameter variations. The second section summarizes the results from a workshop held by Sandia and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to discuss fatigue life prediction methodologies. This section summarizes the workshop discussions on the use of statistical modeling to deduce the shape and magnitude of the low-probability-of-occurrence, high-stress tail of the load distribution on a wind turbine during normal operation.

  10. Simulation-Based Approach for Site-Specific Optimization of Hydrokinetic Turbine Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, F.; Chawdhary, S.; Yang, X.; Khosronejad, A.; Angelidis, D.

    2014-12-01

    A simulation-based approach has been developed to enable site-specific optimization of tidal and current turbine arrays in real-life waterways. The computational code is based on the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory Virtual StreamLab (VSL3D), which is able to carry out high-fidelity simulations of turbulent flow and sediment transport processes in rivers and streams taking into account the arbitrary geometrical complexity characterizing natural waterways. The computational framework can be used either in turbine-resolving mode, to take into account all geometrical details of the turbine, or with the turbines parameterized as actuator disks or actuator lines. Locally refined grids are employed to dramatically increase the resolution of the simulation and enable efficient simulations of multi-turbine arrays. Turbine/sediment interactions are simulated using the coupled hydro-morphodynamic module of VSL3D. The predictive capabilities of the resulting computational framework will be demonstrated by applying it to simulate turbulent flow past a tri-frame configuration of hydrokinetic turbines in a rigid-bed turbulent open channel flow as well as turbines mounted on mobile bed open channels to investigate turbine/sediment interactions. The utility of the simulation-based approach for guiding the optimal development of turbine arrays in real-life waterways will also be discussed and demonstrated. This work was supported by NSF grant IIP-1318201. Simulations were carried out at the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  11. Wind Turbine Box - energy fluxes around a characteristic wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calaf, Marc; Cortina, Gerard; Sharma, Varun

    2015-11-01

    This research project presents a new tool, so called ``Wind Turbine Box'', that allows for the direct comparison between the flow around a single wind turbine and the flow around a characteristic wind turbine immersed within a large wind farm. The Wind Turbine Box consists of a limited control volume defined around each wind turbine that is timely co-aligned with each corresponding turbine's yaw-angle. Hence it is possible to extract flow statistics around each wind turbine, regardless of whether the turbine is fully isolated or it is plunged within a large wind farm. The Wind Turbine Box tool has been used to compute the energy fluxes around a characteristic wind turbine of a large wind farm to better understand the wake replenishment processes throughout a complete diurnal cycle. The effective loading of the wind farm has been gradually increased, ranging from quasi-isolated wind turbines to a highly packed wind farm. For this purpose, several Large Eddy Simulations have been run, forced with a constant geostrophic wind and a time varying surface temperature extracted from a selected period of the CASES-99 field experiment. Results illustrate the differences in the flow dynamics as it evolves around a characteristic wind turbine within a large wind farm and its asymptotic transition to the fully developed wind turbine array boundary layer.

  12. Turbine Design and Application, Volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Turbine technology concepts for thermodynamic and fluid dynamics are presented along with velocity diagrams, losses, mechanical design, operation and performance. Designs discussed include: supersonic turbines, radial-inflow turbines, and turbine cooling.

  13. Computer acceptance of older adults.

    PubMed

    Nägle, Sibylle; Schmidt, Ludger

    2012-01-01

    Even though computers play a massive role in everyday life of modern societies, older adults, and especially older women, are less likely to use a computer, and they perform fewer activities on it than younger adults. To get a better understanding of the factors affecting older adults' intention towards and usage of computers, the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Usage of Technology (UTAUT) was applied as part of a more extensive study with 52 users and non-users of computers, ranging in age from 50 to 90 years. The model covers various aspects of computer usage in old age via four key constructs, namely performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influences, and facilitating conditions, as well as the variables gender, age, experience, and voluntariness it. Interestingly, next to performance expectancy, facilitating conditions showed the strongest correlation with use as well as with intention. Effort expectancy showed no significant correlation with the intention of older adults to use a computer. PMID:22317258

  14. Operational-Condition-Independent Criteria Dedicated to Monitoring Wind Turbine Generators: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, W.; Sheng, S.; Court, R.

    2012-08-01

    To date the existing wind turbine condition monitoring technologies and commercially available systems have not been fully accepted for improving wind turbine availability and reducing their operation and maintenance costs. One of the main reasons is that wind turbines are subject to constantly varying loads and operate at variable rotational speeds. As a consequence, the influences of turbine faults and the effects of varying load and speed are coupled together in wind turbine condition monitoring signals. So, there is an urgent need to either introduce some operational condition de-coupling procedures into the current wind turbine condition monitoring techniques or develop a new operational condition independent wind turbine condition monitoring technique to maintain high turbine availability and achieve the expected economic benefits from wind. The purpose of this paper is to develop such a technique. In the paper, three operational condition independent criteria are developed dedicated for monitoring the operation and health condition of wind turbine generators. All proposed criteria have been tested through both simulated and practical experiments. The experiments have shown that these criteria provide a solution for detecting both mechanical and electrical faults occurring in wind turbine generators.

  15. Accept or divert?

    PubMed

    Angelucci, P A

    1999-09-01

    Stretching scarce resources is more than a managerial issue. Should you accept the patient to an understaffed ICU or divert him to another facility? The intense "medical utility" controversy focuses on a situation that critical care nurses now face every day. PMID:10614370

  16. Approaches to acceptable risk

    SciTech Connect

    Whipple, C.

    1997-04-30

    Several alternative approaches to address the question {open_quotes}How safe is safe enough?{close_quotes} are reviewed and an attempt is made to apply the reasoning behind these approaches to the issue of acceptability of radiation exposures received in space. The approaches to the issue of the acceptability of technological risk described here are primarily analytical, and are drawn from examples in the management of environmental health risks. These include risk-based approaches, in which specific quantitative risk targets determine the acceptability of an activity, and cost-benefit and decision analysis, which generally focus on the estimation and evaluation of risks, benefits and costs, in a framework that balances these factors against each other. These analytical methods tend by their quantitative nature to emphasize the magnitude of risks, costs and alternatives, and to downplay other factors, especially those that are not easily expressed in quantitative terms, that affect acceptance or rejection of risk. Such other factors include the issues of risk perceptions and how and by whom risk decisions are made.

  17. 1984 Newbery Acceptance Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleary, Beverly

    1984-01-01

    This acceptance speech for an award honoring "Dear Mr. Henshaw," a book about feelings of a lonely child of divorce intended for eight-, nine-, and ten-year-olds, highlights children's letters to author. Changes in society that affect children, the inception of "Dear Mr. Henshaw," and children's reactions to books are highlighted. (EJS)

  18. Why was Relativity Accepted?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brush, S. G.

    Historians of science have published many studies of the reception of Einstein's special and general theories of relativity. Based on a review of these studies, and my own research on the role of the light-bending prediction in the reception of general relativity, I discuss the role of three kinds of reasons for accepting relativity (1) empirical predictions and explanations; (2) social-psychological factors; and (3) aesthetic-mathematical factors. According to the historical studies, acceptance was a three-stage process. First, a few leading scientists adopted the special theory for aesthetic-mathematical reasons. In the second stage, their enthusiastic advocacy persuaded other scientists to work on the theory and apply it to problems currently of interest in atomic physics. The special theory was accepted by many German physicists by 1910 and had begun to attract some interest in other countries. In the third stage, the confirmation of Einstein's light-bending prediction attracted much public attention and forced all physicists to take the general theory of relativity seriously. In addition to light-bending, the explanation of the advance of Mercury's perihelion was considered strong evidence by theoretical physicists. The American astronomers who conducted successful tests of general relativity became defenders of the theory. There is little evidence that relativity was `socially constructed' but its initial acceptance was facilitated by the prestige and resources of its advocates.

  19. UGV acceptance testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Jeffrey A.; Murphy, Robin R.

    2006-05-01

    With over 100 models of unmanned vehicles now available for military and civilian safety, security or rescue applications, it is important to for agencies to establish acceptance testing. However, there appears to be no general guidelines for what constitutes a reasonable acceptance test. This paper describes i) a preliminary method for acceptance testing by a customer of the mechanical and electrical components of an unmanned ground vehicle system, ii) how it has been applied to a man-packable micro-robot, and iii) discusses the value of testing both to ensure that the customer has a workable system and to improve design. The test method automated the operation of the robot to repeatedly exercise all aspects and combinations of components on the robot for 6 hours. The acceptance testing process uncovered many failures consistent with those shown to occur in the field, showing that testing by the user does predict failures. The process also demonstrated that the testing by the manufacturer can provide important design data that can be used to identify, diagnose, and prevent long-term problems. Also, the structured testing environment showed that sensor systems can be used to predict errors and changes in performance, as well as uncovering unmodeled behavior in subsystems.

  20. 76. TURBINE HALL, UNIT 2 SHOWING BOTH TURBINE AND CONDENSER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    76. TURBINE HALL, UNIT 2 SHOWING BOTH TURBINE AND CONDENSER (SEE ALSO, DRAWING No. 12 OF 13) - Delaware County Electric Company, Chester Station, Delaware River at South end of Ward Street, Chester, Delaware County, PA

  1. 40. VIEW OF TURBINE HALL LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT WESTINGHOUSEPARSONS TURBINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. VIEW OF TURBINE HALL LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT WESTINGHOUSE-PARSONS TURBINE NUMBER 2. THIS UNIT WAS INSTALLED IN 1925. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Cos Cob Power Plant, Sound Shore Drive, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  2. Rotor thermal stress monitoring in steam turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonín, Bouberle; Jan, Jakl; Jindřich, Liška

    2015-11-01

    One of the issues of steam turbines diagnostics is monitoring of rotor thermal stress that arises from nonuniform temperature field. The effort of steam turbine operator is to operate steam turbine in such conditions, that rotor thermal stress doesn't exceed the specified limits. If rotor thermal stress limits are exceeded for a long time during machine operation, the rotor fatigue life is shortened and this may lead to unexpected machine failure. Thermal stress plays important role during turbine cold startup, when occur the most significant differences of temperatures through rotor cross section. The temperature field can't be measured directly in the entire rotor cross section and standardly the temperature is measured by thermocouple mounted in stator part. From this reason method for numerical solution of partial differential equation of heat propagation through rotor cross section must be combined with method for calculation of temperature on rotor surface. In the first part of this article, the application of finite volume method for calculation of rotor thermal stress is described. The second part of article deals with optimal trend generation of thermal flux, that could be used for optimal machine loading.

  3. Measurements and observations of noise from a 4.2 megawatt (WTS-4) wind turbine generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, K. P.; Hubbard, H. H.

    1983-01-01

    Noise measurements and calculations are being made for large wind turbine generators to develop a data base for use in designing and siting such systems for community acceptance. As part of this program, measurements were made on the WTS-4 wind turbine generator during its acceptance runs. This paper presents the results of these exploratory measurements for power output conditions in the range 1.0 to 4.2 MW. Data include noise levels, spectra, radiation patterns, effects of distance, and the associated perception thresholds for use in the further development of acceptance criteria for this type of machine.

  4. Prediction of turbine blade vibratory response due to upstream vane distress

    SciTech Connect

    Panovsky, J.; Carson, S.M.

    1998-07-01

    Turbine blades and vanes operate in a hostile environment, which leads to deterioration of these components over time. This paper describes detailed calculations to predict the vibratory response of a high-pressure turbine blade due to the excitation produced by a single distressed upstream vane in a modern turbofan engine. The approach includes detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of the steady flowfield produced by the distressed vane, Fourier decomposition of the flow variables to determine the harmonic content, unsteady CFD analysis to determine the resulting vibratory response of the blade, and crack propagation analysis to determine blade life. Predictions of vibratory stress and threshold crack size are summarized as functions of vane distress level. The results, which indicate that this type of vane distress can indeed be a significant excitation source for the blades, are shown to be in good agreement with engine experience. The method provides, for the first time, a quantitative approach to setting limits for acceptable levels of vane distress in the field.

  5. Turbine inner shroud and turbine assembly containing such inner shroud

    DOEpatents

    Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran; Corman, Gregory Scot; Dean, Anthony John; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Mirdamadi, Massoud

    2001-01-01

    A turbine inner shroud and a turbine assembly. The turbine assembly includes a turbine stator having a longitudinal axis and having an outer shroud block with opposing and longitudinally outward facing first and second sides having open slots. A ceramic inner shroud has longitudinally inward facing hook portions which can longitudinally and radially surround a portion of the sides of the outer shroud block. In one attachment, the hook portions are engageable with, and are positioned within, the open slots.

  6. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings for commercial gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, Susan Manning; Gupta, Dinesh K.; Sheffler, Keith D.

    1991-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of the short history, current status, and future prospects of ceramic thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine engines. Particular attention is given to plasma-sprayed and electron beam-physical vapor deposited yttria-stabilized (7 wt pct Y2O3) zirconia systems. Recent advances include improvements in the spallation life of thermal barrier coatings, improved bond coat composition and spraying techniques, and improved component design. The discussion also covers field experience, life prediction modeling, and future directions in ceramic coatings in relation to gas turbine engine design.

  7. NEXT GENERATION TURBINE SYSTEM STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Macri

    2002-02-28

    Rolls-Royce has completed a preliminary design and marketing study under a Department of Energy (DOE) cost shared contract (DE-AC26-00NT40852) to analyze the feasibility of developing a clean, high efficiency, and flexible Next Generation Turbine (NGT) system to meet the power generation market needs of the year 2007 and beyond. Rolls-Royce evaluated the full range of its most advanced commercial aerospace and aeroderivative engines alongside the special technologies necessary to achieve the aggressive efficiency, performance, emissions, economic, and flexibility targets desired by the DOE. Heavy emphasis was placed on evaluating the technical risks and the economic viability of various concept and technology options available. This was necessary to ensure the resulting advanced NGT system would provide extensive public benefits and significant customer benefits without introducing unacceptable levels of technical and operational risk that would impair the market acceptance of the resulting product. Two advanced cycle configurations were identified as offering significant advantages over current combined cycle products available in the market. In addition, balance of plant (BOP) technologies, as well as capabilities to improve the reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) of industrial gas turbine engines, have been identified. A customer focused survey and economic analysis of a proposed Rolls-Royce NGT product configuration was also accomplished as a part of this research study. The proposed Rolls-Royce NGT solution could offer customers clean, flexible power generation systems with very high efficiencies, similar to combined cycle plants, but at a much lower specific cost, similar to those of simple cycle plants.

  8. Task 8.4 - High Temperature Turbine Disk Development

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-27

    The goal of this task is to demonstrate a bonding technique to produce a dual-alloy turbine disk concept which will satisfy the diverse property requirements of the rim and hub areas of the disk. The program examines methods of attaching a cast superalloy rim with sufficient rupture strength to a fine grain hub materials with the required LCF properties. The goals of the program were established in the context of a preliminary turbine design by Solar Turbines, Inc. designated ATS 5. The initial target for the ATS 5 application was to allow rim operating temperatures in the 1350-1400 {degrees} F range. The life goal of the Dual-Alloy Disk was envisioned to maintain Solar`s standard turbine disk philosophy of 1000,000 hours.

  9. Acceptance of Conditional Suicide and Euthanasia among Adult Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, David; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Analysis indicates that religious intensity, sex, age, and education are important associational variables regarding attitudes toward suicide and euthanasia. Males are more accepting than females. Females are influenced by family life conditions. Males are influenced by health status. (JMF)

  10. Ceramic stationary gas turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Roode, M. van

    1995-10-01

    The performance of current industrial gas turbines is limited by the temperature and strength capabilities of the metallic structural materials in the engine hot section. Because of their superior high-temperature strength and durability, ceramics can be used as structural materials for hot section components (blades, nozzles, combustor liners) in innovative designs at increased turbine firing temperatures. The benefits include the ability to increase the turbine inlet temperature (TIT) to about 1200{degrees}C ({approx}2200{degrees}F) or more with uncooled ceramics. It has been projected that fully optimized stationary gas turbines would have a {approx}20 percent gain in thermal efficiency and {approx}40 percent gain in output power in simple cycle compared to all metal-engines with air-cooled components. Annual fuel savings in cogeneration in the U.S. would be on the order of 0.2 Quad by 2010. Emissions reductions to under 10 ppmv NO{sub x} are also forecast. This paper describes the progress on a three-phase, 6-year program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, to achieve significant performance improvements and emissions reductions in stationary gas turbines by replacing metallic hot section components with ceramic parts. Progress is being reported for the period September 1, 1994, through September 30, 1995.

  11. Ceramic stationary gas turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Roode, M. van

    1995-12-31

    The performance of current industrial gas turbines is limited by the temperature and strength capabilities of the metallic structural materials in the engine hot section. Because of their superior high-temperature strength and durability, ceramics can be used as structural materials for hot section components (blades, nozzles, combustor liners) in innovative designs at increased turbine firing temperatures. The benefits include the ability to increase the turbine inlet temperature (TIT) to about 1200{degrees}C ({approx}2200{degrees}F) or more with uncooled ceramics. It has been projected that fully optimized stationary gas turbines would have a {approx}20 percent gain in thermal efficiency and {approx}40 percent gain in output power in simple cycle compared to all metal-engines with air-cooled components. Annual fuel savings in cogeneration in the U.S. would be on the order of 0.2 Quad by 2010. Emissions reductions to under 10 ppmv NO{sub x} are also forecast. This paper describes the progress on a three-phase, 6-year program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, to achieve significant performance improvements and emissions reductions in stationary gas turbines by replacing metallic hot section components with ceramic parts. Progress is being reported for the period September 1, 1994, through September 30, 1995.

  12. Floating wind turbine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterna, Larry A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A floating wind turbine system with a tower structure that includes at least one stability arm extending therefrom and that is anchored to the sea floor with a rotatable position retention device that facilitates deep water installations. Variable buoyancy for the wind turbine system is provided by buoyancy chambers that are integral to the tower itself as well as the stability arm. Pumps are included for adjusting the buoyancy as an aid in system transport, installation, repair and removal. The wind turbine rotor is located downwind of the tower structure to allow the wind turbine to follow the wind direction without an active yaw drive system. The support tower and stability arm structure is designed to balance tension in the tether with buoyancy, gravity and wind forces in such a way that the top of the support tower leans downwind, providing a large clearance between the support tower and the rotor blade tips. This large clearance facilitates the use of articulated rotor hubs to reduced damaging structural dynamic loads. Major components of the turbine can be assembled at the shore and transported to an offshore installation site.

  13. Ceramics for ATS industrial turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Wenglarz, R.; Ali, S.; Layne, A.

    1996-05-01

    US DOE and most US manufacturers of stationary gas turbines are participating in a major national effort to develop advanced turbine systems (ATS). The ATS program will achieve ultrahigh efficiencies, environmental superiority, and cost competitiveness compared with current combustion turbine systems. A major factor in the improved efficiencies of simple cycle ATS gas turbines will be higher operating efficiencies than curren engines. These temperatures strain the limits of metallic alloy and flow-path cooling technologies. Ceramics materials offer a potential alterative to cooled turbine alloys for ATS turbines due to higher melting points than metallics. This paper evaluates ceramics technology and plant economic issues for ATS industrial turbine systems. A program with the objective of demonstrating first-stage ceramic vanes in a commerical industrial turbine is also described.

  14. Lean, premixed, prevaporized combustion for aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    The application of lean, premixed, prevaporized combustion to aircraft turbine engine systems can result in benefits in terms of superior combustion performance, improved combustor and turbine durability, and environmentally acceptable pollutant emissions. Lean, premixed prevaporized combustion is particularly attractive for reducing the oxides of nitrogen emissions during high altitude cruise. The NASA stratospheric cruise emission reduction program will evolve and demonstrate lean, premixed, prevaporized combustion technology for aircraft engines. This multiphased program is described. In addition, the various elements of the fundamental studies phase of the program are reviewed, and results to date of many of these studies are summarized.

  15. An automotive transmission for automotive gas turbine power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polak, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    A joint government-industry program was initiated to investigate the two-shaft gas turbine concept as an alternative to present-day automotive powerplants. Both were examined, compared and evaluated on the basis of the federal automotive driving cycle in terms of specific fuel/power/speed characteristics of the engine and the efficiency and performance of the transmission. The results showed that an optimum match of vehicle, gas turbine engine, and conventional automatic transmission is capable of a significant improvement in fuel economy. This system offers many advantages that should lead to its wide acceptance in future vehicles.

  16. Fuzzy Regulator Design for Wind Turbine Yaw Control

    PubMed Central

    Koulouras, Grigorios

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes the development of an advanced fuzzy logic controller which aims to perform intelligent automatic control of the yaw movement of wind turbines. The specific fuzzy controller takes into account both the wind velocity and the acceptable yaw error correlation in order to achieve maximum performance efficacy. In this way, the proposed yaw control system is remarkably adaptive to the existing conditions. In this way, the wind turbine is enabled to retain its power output close to its nominal value and at the same time preserve its yaw system from pointless movement. Thorough simulation tests evaluate the proposed system effectiveness. PMID:24693237

  17. Acceptability of human risk.

    PubMed Central

    Kasperson, R E

    1983-01-01

    This paper has three objectives: to explore the nature of the problem implicit in the term "risk acceptability," to examine the possible contributions of scientific information to risk standard-setting, and to argue that societal response is best guided by considerations of process rather than formal methods of analysis. Most technological risks are not accepted but are imposed. There is also little reason to expect consensus among individuals on their tolerance of risk. Moreover, debates about risk levels are often at base debates over the adequacy of the institutions which manage the risks. Scientific information can contribute three broad types of analyses to risk-setting deliberations: contextual analysis, equity assessment, and public preference analysis. More effective risk-setting decisions will involve attention to the process used, particularly in regard to the requirements of procedural justice and democratic responsibility. PMID:6418541

  18. Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Ultrasonic Acoustic Deterrent for Reducing Bat Fatalities at Wind Turbines.

    PubMed

    Arnett, Edward B; Hein, Cris D; Schirmacher, Michael R; Huso, Manuela M P; Szewczak, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Large numbers of bats are killed by wind turbines worldwide and minimizing fatalities is critically important to bat conservation and acceptance of wind energy development. We implemented a 2-year study testing the effectiveness of an ultrasonic acoustic deterrent for reducing bat fatalities at a wind energy facility in Pennsylvania. We randomly selected control and treatment turbines that were searched daily in summer and fall 2009 and 2010. Estimates of fatality, corrected for field biases, were compared between treatment and control turbines. In 2009, we estimated 21-51% fewer bats were killed per treatment turbine than per control turbine. In 2010, we determined an approximate 9% inherent difference between treatment and control turbines and when factored into our analysis, variation increased and between 2% more and 64% fewer bats were killed per treatment turbine relative to control turbines. We estimated twice as many hoary bats were killed per control turbine than treatment turbine, and nearly twice as many silver-haired bats in 2009. In 2010, although we estimated nearly twice as many hoary bats and nearly 4 times as many silver-haired bats killed per control turbine than at treatment turbines during the treatment period, these only represented an approximate 20% increase in fatality relative to the pre-treatment period for these species when accounting for inherent differences between turbine sets. Our findings suggest broadband ultrasound broadcasts may reduce bat fatalities by discouraging bats from approaching sound sources. However, effectiveness of ultrasonic deterrents is limited by distance and area ultrasound can be broadcast, in part due to rapid attenuation in humid conditions. We caution that an operational deterrent device is not yet available and further modifications and experimentation are needed. Future efforts must also evaluate cost-effectiveness of deterrents in relation to curtailment strategies to allow a cost-benefit analysis for

  19. Evaluation of Blade-Strike Models for Estimating the Biological Performance of Large Kaplan Hydro Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2005-11-30

    BioIndex testing of hydro-turbines is sought as an analog to the hydraulic index testing conducted on hydro-turbines to optimize their power production efficiency. In BioIndex testing the goal is to identify those operations within the range identified by Index testing where the survival of fish passing through the turbine is maximized. BioIndex testing includes the immediate tailrace region as well as the turbine environment between a turbine's intake trashracks and the exit of its draft tube. The US Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of Energy have been evaluating a variety of means, such as numerical and physical turbine models, to investigate the quality of flow through a hydro-turbine and other aspects of the turbine environment that determine its safety for fish. The goal is to use these tools to develop hypotheses identifying turbine operations and predictions of their biological performance that can be tested at prototype scales. Acceptance of hypotheses would be the means for validation of new operating rules for the turbine tested that would be in place when fish were passing through the turbines. The overall goal of this project is to evaluate the performance of numerical blade strike models as a tool to aid development of testable hypotheses for bioIndexing. Evaluation of the performance of numerical blade strike models is accomplished by comparing predictions of fish mortality resulting from strike by turbine runner blades with observations made using live test fish at mainstem Columbia River Dams and with other predictions of blade strike made using observations of beads passing through a 1:25 scale physical turbine model.

  20. Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Ultrasonic Acoustic Deterrent for Reducing Bat Fatalities at Wind Turbines

    PubMed Central

    Arnett, Edward B.; Hein, Cris D.; Schirmacher, Michael R.; Huso, Manuela M. P.; Szewczak, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    Large numbers of bats are killed by wind turbines worldwide and minimizing fatalities is critically important to bat conservation and acceptance of wind energy development. We implemented a 2-year study testing the effectiveness of an ultrasonic acoustic deterrent for reducing bat fatalities at a wind energy facility in Pennsylvania. We randomly selected control and treatment turbines that were searched daily in summer and fall 2009 and 2010. Estimates of fatality, corrected for field biases, were compared between treatment and control turbines. In 2009, we estimated 21–51% fewer bats were killed per treatment turbine than per control turbine. In 2010, we determined an approximate 9% inherent difference between treatment and control turbines and when factored into our analysis, variation increased and between 2% more and 64% fewer bats were killed per treatment turbine relative to control turbines. We estimated twice as many hoary bats were killed per control turbine than treatment turbine, and nearly twice as many silver-haired bats in 2009. In 2010, although we estimated nearly twice as many hoary bats and nearly 4 times as many silver-haired bats killed per control turbine than at treatment turbines during the treatment period, these only represented an approximate 20% increase in fatality relative to the pre-treatment period for these species when accounting for inherent differences between turbine sets. Our findings suggest broadband ultrasound broadcasts may reduce bat fatalities by discouraging bats from approaching sound sources. However, effectiveness of ultrasonic deterrents is limited by distance and area ultrasound can be broadcast, in part due to rapid attenuation in humid conditions. We caution that an operational deterrent device is not yet available and further modifications and experimentation are needed. Future efforts must also evaluate cost-effectiveness of deterrents in relation to curtailment strategies to allow a cost-benefit analysis for

  1. Evaluating the effectiveness of an ultrasonic acoustic deterrent for reducing bat fatalities at wind turbines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arnett, Edward B.; Hein, Cris D.; Schirmacher, Michael R.; Huso, Manuela M.P.; Szewczak, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    Large numbers of bats are killed by wind turbines worldwide and minimizing fatalities is critically important to bat conservation and acceptance of wind energy development. We implemented a 2-year study testing the effectiveness of an ultrasonic acoustic deterrent for reducing bat fatalities at a wind energy facility in Pennsylvania. We randomly selected control and treatment turbines that were searched daily in summer and fall 2009 and 2010. Estimates of fatality, corrected for field biases, were compared between treatment and control turbines. In 2009, we estimated 21–51% fewer bats were killed per treatment turbine than per control turbine. In 2010, we determined an approximate 9% inherent difference between treatment and control turbines and when factored into our analysis, variation increased and between 2% more and 64% fewer bats were killed per treatment turbine relative to control turbines. We estimated twice as many hoary bats were killed per control turbine than treatment turbine, and nearly twice as many silver-haired bats in 2009. In 2010, although we estimated nearly twice as many hoary bats and nearly 4 times as many silver-haired bats killed per control turbine than at treatment turbines during the treatment period, these only represented an approximate 20% increase in fatality relative to the pre-treatment period for these species when accounting for inherent differences between turbine sets. Our findings suggest broadband ultrasound broadcasts may reduce bat fatalities by discouraging bats from approaching sound sources. However, effectiveness of ultrasonic deterrents is limited by distance and area ultrasound can be broadcast, in part due to rapid attenuation in humid conditions. We caution that an operational deterrent device is not yet available and further modifications and experimentation are needed. Future efforts must also evaluate cost-effectiveness of deterrents in relation to curtailment strategies to allow a cost-benefit analysis for

  2. Acceptability for French People of Physician-Assisted Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frileux, Stephanie; Sastre, Maria Teresa Munoz; Antonini, Sophie; Mullet, Etienne; Sorum, Paul Clay

    2004-01-01

    Our aim was to understand better how people judge the acceptability of physician-assisted suicide (PAS). We found that, for people in France of all ages and for elderly people with life-threatening illnesses, acceptability is an additive combination of the number of requests for PAS, the patient's age, the amount of physical suffering, and the…

  3. Increasing Our Acceptance as Parents of Children with Special Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loewenstein, David

    2007-01-01

    Accepting the limitations of a child whose life was supposed to be imbued with endless possibilities requires parents to come to terms with expectations of themselves and the world around them. In this article, the author offers some helpful strategies for fostering acceptance and strengthening family relationships: (1) Remember that parenting is…

  4. Catalytic Combustion for Ultra-Low NOx Hydrogen Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Etemad, Shahrokh; Baird, Benjamin; Alavandi, Sandeep

    2011-06-30

    Precision Combustion, Inc., (PCI) in close collaboration with Solar Turbines, Incorporated, has developed and demonstrated a combustion system for hydrogen fueled turbines that reduces NOx to low single digit level while maintaining or improving current levels of efficiency and eliminating emissions of carbon dioxide. Full scale Rich Catalytic Hydrogen (RCH1) injector was developed and successfully tested at Solar Turbines, Incorporated high pressure test facility demonstrating low single digit NOx emissions for hydrogen fuel in the range of 2200F-2750F. This development work was based on initial subscale development for faster turnaround and reduced cost. Subscale testing provided promising results for 42% and 52% H2 with NOx emissions of less than 2 ppm with improved flame stability. In addition, catalytic reactor element testing for substrate oxidation, thermal cyclic injector testing to simulate start-stop operation in a gas turbine environment, and steady state 15 atm. operation testing were performed successfully. The testing demonstrated stable and robust catalytic element component life for gas turbine conditions. The benefit of the catalytic hydrogen combustor technology includes capability of delivering near-zero NOx without costly post-combustion controls and without requirement for added sulfur control. In addition, reduced acoustics increase gas turbine component life. These advantages advances Department of Energy (DOE’s) objectives for achievement of low single digit NOx emissions, improvement in efficiency vs. postcombustion controls, fuel flexibility, a significant net reduction in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system net capital and operating costs, and a route to commercialization across the power generation field from micro turbines to industrial and utility turbines.

  5. Wind turbine spoiler

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, W.N.

    An aerodynamic spoiler system for a vertical axis wind turbine includes spoilers on the blades initially stored near the rotor axis to minimize drag. A solenoid latch adjacent the central support tower releases the spoilers and centrifugal force causes the spoilers to move up the turbine blades away from the rotor axis, thereby producing a braking effect and actual slowing of the associated wind turbine, if desired. The spoiler system can also be used as an infinitely variable power control by regulated movement of the spoilers on the blades over the range between the undeployed and fully deployed positions. This is done by the use of a suitable powered reel and cable located at the rotor tower to move the spoilers.

  6. Turbine airfoil manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kortovich, C.

    1995-10-01

    The efficiency and effectiveness of the gas turbine engine is directly related to the turbine inlet temperatures. The ability to increase these temperatures has occurred as a result of improvements in materials, design, and processing techniques. A generic sequence indicating the relationship of these factors to temperature capability is schematically shown in Figure 1 for aircraft engine and land based engine materials. A basic contribution that is not captured by the Figure is the significant improvement in process and manufacturing capability that has accompanied each of these innovations. It is this capability that has allowed the designs and innovations to be applied on a high volume, cost effective scale in the aircraft gas turbine market.

  7. Wind Turbine Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Spera, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    This book reviews advances in aerodynamics, structural dynamics and fatigue, wind characteristics, acoustic and electromagnetic emissions, commercial wind power applications, and utility power systems that use wind power plants. The book examines the choices made by inventors, designers, and builders of turbines; absorb their practical lessons; and presents the experience of a wide range of wind-energy professionals. Included are sources of technical information, side-by-side comparisons of commercial wind turbines, technical data on wind turbines of various sizes and types, and fundamental equations for engineers designing and analyzing systems. This book would be useful to practicing engineers, designers, meteorologists, researchers, utility project managers and planners, wind power plant developers, and equipment manufacturers, as well as students and teachers.

  8. Turbine Airfoil Deposition Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    Gas turbine failures associated with sea-salt ingestion and sulfur-containing fuel impurities have directed attention to alkali sulfate deposition and the associated hot corrosion of gas turbine (GT) blades under some GT operating conditions. These salt deposits form thin, molten films which undermine the protective metal oxide coating normally found on GT blades. The prediction of molten salt deposition, flow and oxide dissolution, and their effects on the lifetime of turbine blades are examined. Goals include rationalizing and helping to predict corrosion patterns on operational GT rotor blades and stators, and ultimately providing some of the tools required to design laboratory simulators and future corrosion-resistant high-performance engines. Necessary background developments are reviewed first, and then recent results and tentative conclusions are presented along with a brief account of the present research plans.

  9. Upgrading jet turbine technology

    SciTech Connect

    Valenti, M.

    1995-12-01

    This article describes a joint government/industry program that is developing a new breed of turbine components, including bearings, blades, and seals, to double the propulsion capacity of both military and commercial jet engines. Although the tensions of the Cold War have receded with the demise of the Soviet Union, the US continually seeks to improve the operational readiness of its weapon systems. The challenge facing the Pentagon today is maintaining US technological superiority in the face of post-Cold War budget cuts. A model program for doing so is the joint government/industry Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology program, or IHPTET (pronounced ip-tet). The goal of the IHPTET program is to develop technologies that will double the propulsion capability of military turbine engines by the turn of the century.

  10. Gas turbine sealing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Wiebe, David J; Wessell, Brian J; Ebert, Todd; Beeck, Alexander; Liang, George; Marussich, Walter H

    2013-02-19

    A gas turbine includes forward and aft rows of rotatable blades, a row of stationary vanes between the forward and aft rows of rotatable blades, an annular intermediate disc, and a seal housing apparatus. The forward and aft rows of rotatable blades are coupled to respective first and second portions of a disc/rotor assembly. The annular intermediate disc is coupled to the disc/rotor assembly so as to be rotatable with the disc/rotor assembly during operation of the gas turbine. The annular intermediate disc includes a forward side coupled to the first portion of the disc/rotor assembly and an aft side coupled to the second portion of the disc/rotor assembly. The seal housing apparatus is coupled to the annular intermediate disc so as to be rotatable with the annular intermediate disc and the disc/rotor assembly during operation of the gas turbine.

  11. Wind Turbine Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, Harvey H.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    2009-01-01

    Wind turbine generators, ranging in size from a few kilowatts to several megawatts, are producing electricity both singly and in wind power stations that encompass hundreds of machines. Many installations are in uninhabited areas far from established residences, and therefore there are no apparent environmental impacts in terms of noise. There is, however, the potential for situations in which the radiated noise can be heard by residents of adjacent neighborhoods, particularly those neighborhoods with low ambient noise levels. A widely publicized incident of this nature occurred with the operation of the experimental Mod-1 2-MW wind turbine, which is described in detail elsewhere. Pioneering studies which were conducted at the Mod-1 site on the causes and remedies of noise from wind turbines form the foundation of much of the technology described in this chapter.

  12. Wind turbine system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, O.J.

    1982-05-18

    A wind turbine system utilizes a bicycle wheel type turbine having airfoils mounted on various spoke pairs. The vertical yaw axis lies in the horizontal projection of the airfoils to offer better control of the system; for example, automatic stowage in the case of excessive wind is provided since the superstructure of the turbine provides a torque around the vertical yaw axis which moves the wheel into a stowed position. At the same time, the wheel diameter can be made larger and thus heavier since the drive connection to the generator also helps support the weight of the wheel, since it is a rim drive. Greater electrical generation is also provided since an air scoop facing into the wind allows the effective generator capacity to be increased with air velocity. Lastly, the radial rate of change of the angle of the airfoils can be closely controlled.

  13. Turbine nozzle attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Norton, Paul F.; Shaffer, James E.

    1995-01-01

    A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes a pair of legs extending radially outwardly from an outer shroud and a pair of mounting legs extending radially inwardly from an inner shroud. Each of the pair of legs and mounting legs have a pair of holes therein. A plurality of members attached to the gas turbine engine have a plurality of bores therein which axially align with corresponding ones of the pair of holes in the legs. A plurality of pins are positioned within the corresponding holes and bores radially positioning the nozzle guide vane assembly about a central axis of the gas turbine engine.

  14. Wind turbine spoiler

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, William N.

    1985-01-01

    An aerodynamic spoiler system for a vertical axis wind turbine includes spoilers on the blades initially stored near the rotor axis to minimize drag. A solenoid latch adjacent the central support tower releases the spoilers and centrifugal force causes the spoilers to move up the turbine blades away from the rotor axis, thereby producing a braking effect and actual slowing of the associated wind turbine, if desired. The spoiler system can also be used as an infinitely variable power control by regulated movement of the spoilers on the blades over the range between the undeployed and fully deployed positions. This is done by the use of a suitable powered reel and cable located at the rotor tower to move the spoilers.

  15. Turbine nozzle attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Norton, P.F.; Shaffer, J.E.

    1995-10-24

    A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and is attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes a pair of legs extending radially outwardly from an outer shroud and a pair of mounting legs extending radially inwardly from an inner shroud. Each of the pair of legs and mounting legs have a pair of holes therein. A plurality of members attached to the gas turbine engine have a plurality of bores therein which axially align with corresponding ones of the pair of holes in the legs. A plurality of pins are positioned within the corresponding holes and bores radially positioning the nozzle guide vane assembly about a central axis of the gas turbine engine. 3 figs.

  16. Wind Turbine With Concentric Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhonen, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Wind Turbine device is relatively compact and efficient. Converging inner and outer ducts increase pressure difference across blades of wind turbine. Turbine shaft drives alternator housed inside exit cone. Suitable for installation on such existing structures as water towers, barns, houses, and commercial buildings.

  17. Steam generators, turbines, and condensers. Volume six

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Volume six covers steam generators (How steam is generated, steam generation in a PWR, vertical U-tube steam generators, once-through steam generators, how much steam do steam generators make.), turbines (basic turbine principles, impulse turbines, reaction turbines, turbine stages, turbine arrangements, turbine steam flow, steam admission to turbines, turbine seals and supports, turbine oil system, generators), and condensers (need for condensers, basic condenser principles, condenser arrangements, heat transfer in condensers, air removal from condensers, circulating water system, heat loss to the circulating water system, factors affecting condenser performance, condenser auxiliaries).

  18. Advanced wind turbine design

    SciTech Connect

    Jamieson, P.M.; Jaffrey, A.

    1995-09-01

    Garrad Hassan have a project in progress funded by the UK Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) to assess the prospects and cost benefits of advanced wind turbine design. In the course of this work, a new concept, the coned rotor design, has been developed. This enables a wind turbine system to operate in effect with variable rotor diameter augmenting energy capture in light winds and shedding loads in storm conditions. Comparisons with conventional design suggest that a major benefit in reduced cost of wind generated electricity may be possible.

  19. Vertical axis wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij

    2011-03-08

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

  20. Multiple piece turbine airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Kimmel, Keith D; Wilson, Jr., Jack W.

    2010-11-02

    A turbine airfoil, such as a rotor blade or a stator vane, for a gas turbine engine, the airfoil formed as a shell and spar construction with a plurality of dog bone struts each mounted within openings formed within the shell and spar to allow for relative motion between the spar and shell in the airfoil chordwise direction while also forming a seal between adjacent cooling channels. The struts provide the seal as well as prevent bulging of the shell from the spar due to the cooling air pressure.

  1. Ceramic gas turbine shroud

    DOEpatents

    Shi, Jun; Green, Kevin E.

    2014-07-22

    An example gas turbine engine shroud includes a first annular ceramic wall having an inner side for resisting high temperature turbine engine gasses and an outer side with a plurality of radial slots. A second annular metallic wall is positioned radially outwardly of and enclosing the first annular ceramic wall and has a plurality of tabs in communication with the slot of the first annular ceramic wall. The tabs of the second annular metallic wall and slots of the first annular ceramic wall are in communication such that the first annular ceramic wall and second annular metallic wall are affixed.

  2. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, P.A.

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  3. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1984-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  4. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1982-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  5. Improved turbine disk design to increase reliability of aircraft jet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alver, A. S.; Wong, J. K.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted on a bore entry cooled turbine disk for the first stage of the JT8D-17 high pressure turbine which had the potential to improve disk life over existing design. The disk analysis included the consideration of transient and steady state temperature, blade loading, creep, low cycle fatigue, fracture mechanics and manufacturing flaws. The improvement in life of the bore entry cooled turbine disk was determined by comparing it with the existing disk made of both conventional and advanced (Astroloy) disk materials. The improvement in crack initiation life of the Astroloy bore entry cooled disk is 87% and 67% over the existing disk made of Waspaloy and Astroloy, respectively. Improvement in crack propagation life is 124% over the Waspaloy and 465% over the Astroloy disks. The available kinetic energies of disk fragments calculated for the three disks indicate a lower fragment energy level for the bore entry cooled turbine disk.

  6. Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology (HOST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A two-day workshop on the research and plans for turbine engine hot section durability problems was held on October 25 and 26, 1983, at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Presentations were made during six sessions, including structural analysis, fatigue and fracture, surface protective coatings, combustion, turbine heat transfer, and instrumentation, that dealt with the thermal and fluid environment around liners, blades, and vanes, and with material coatings, constitutive behavior, stress-strain response, and life prediction methods for the three components. The principal objective of each session was to disseminate the research results to date, along with future plans, in each of the six areas. Contract and government researchers presented results of their work.

  7. Steam turbine upgrading: low-hanging fruit

    SciTech Connect

    Peltier, R.

    2006-04-15

    The thermodynamic performance of the steam turbine, more than any other plant component, determines overall plant efficiency. Upgrading steam path components and using computerized design tools and manufacturing techniques to minimise internal leaks are two ways to give tired steam turbines a new lease on life. The article presents three case studies that illustrate how to do that. These are at Unit 1 of Dairyland's J.P. Madgett Station in Alma, WI, a coal-fired subcritical steam plant; the four units at AmerenUE's 600 MW coal-fired Labadie plant west of St. Louis; and Unit 3 of KeyPlan Corp's Northport Power Station on Long Island. 8 figs.

  8. Visualization techniques to experimentally model flow and heat transfer in turbine and aircraft flow passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Louis M.; Hippensteele, Steven A.

    1991-01-01

    Increased attention to fuel economy and increased thrust requirements have increased the demand for higher aircraft gas turbine engine efficiency through the use of higher turbine inlet temperatures. These higher temperatures increase the importance of understanding the heat transfer patterns which occur throughout the turbine passages. It is often necessary to use a special coating or some form of cooling to maintain metal temperatures at a level which the metal can withstand for long periods of time. Effective cooling schemes can result in significant fuel savings through higher allowable turbine inlet temperatures and can increase engine life. Before proceeding with the development of any new turbine it is economically desirable to create both mathematical and experimental models to study and predict flow characteristics and temperature distributions. Some of the methods are described used to physically model heat transfer patterns, cooling schemes, and other complex flow patterns associated with turbine and aircraft passages.

  9. Integrating Systems Health Management with Adaptive Controls for a Utility-Scale Wind Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Goebel, Kai; Trinh, Khanh V.; Balas, Mark J.; Frost, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing turbine up-time and reducing maintenance costs are key technology drivers for wind turbine operators. Components within wind turbines are subject to considerable stresses due to unpredictable environmental conditions resulting from rapidly changing local dynamics. Systems health management has the aim to assess the state-of-health of components within a wind turbine, to estimate remaining life, and to aid in autonomous decision-making to minimize damage. Advanced adaptive controls can provide the mechanism to enable optimized operations that also provide the enabling technology for Systems Health Management goals. The work reported herein explores the integration of condition monitoring of wind turbine blades with contingency management and adaptive controls. Results are demonstrated using a high fidelity simulator of a utility-scale wind turbine.

  10. Turbine meters for liquid measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Wass, D.J.; Allen, C.R.

    1995-12-01

    Liquid turbine meters operate in response to fundamental engineering principles, Operation with a single moving part produces excellent longevity and reliability. Liquid turbine meters display wide rangeability, high accuracy, excellent repeatability, low pressure drop and moderate cost. Liquid turbine meters may be applied to many different fluids with different physical properties and corrosive tendencies. The marriage of liquid turbine meters to electronic instruments allows instantaneous flow calculations and produces the flexibility to display data, store data, transmit data in the most convenient form. Liquid turbine meters should be the first flow measurement instrument considered for liquid measurement applications.

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics based Fault Simulations of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyoo-seon; Asim, Taimoor; Mishra, Rakesh

    2012-05-01

    Due to depleting fossil fuels and a rapid increase in the fuel prices globally, the search for alternative energy sources is becoming more and more significant. One of such energy source is the wind energy which can be harnessed with the use of wind turbines. The fundamental principle of wind turbines is to convert the wind energy into first mechanical and then into electrical form. The relatively simple operation of such turbines has stirred the researchers to come up with innovative designs for global acceptance and to make these turbines commercially viable. Furthermore, the maintenance of wind turbines has long been a topic of interest. Condition based monitoring of wind turbines is essential to maintain continuous operation of wind turbines. The present work focuses on the difference in the outputs of a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) under different operational conditions. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technique has been used for various blade configurations of a VAWT. The results indicate that there is significant degradation in the performance output of wind turbines as the number of blades broken or missing from the VAWT increases. The study predicts the faults in the blades of VAWTs by monitoring its output.

  12. Baby-Crying Acceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Tiago; de Magalhães, Sérgio Tenreiro

    The baby's crying is his most important mean of communication. The crying monitoring performed by devices that have been developed doesn't ensure the complete safety of the child. It is necessary to join, to these technological resources, means of communicating the results to the responsible, which would involve the digital processing of information available from crying. The survey carried out, enabled to understand the level of adoption, in the continental territory of Portugal, of a technology that will be able to do such a digital processing. It was used the TAM as the theoretical referential. The statistical analysis showed that there is a good probability of acceptance of such a system.

  13. High acceptance recoil polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    The HARP Collaboration

    1992-12-05

    In order to detect neutrons and protons in the 50 to 600 MeV energy range and measure their polarization, an efficient, low-noise, self-calibrating device is being designed. This detector, known as the High Acceptance Recoil Polarimeter (HARP), is based on the recoil principle of proton detection from np[r arrow]n[prime]p[prime] or pp[r arrow]p[prime]p[prime] scattering (detected particles are underlined) which intrinsically yields polarization information on the incoming particle. HARP will be commissioned to carry out experiments in 1994.

  14. Fatigue Reliability of Gas Turbine Engine Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruse, Thomas A.; Mahadevan, Sankaran; Tryon, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    The results of an investigation are described for fatigue reliability in engine structures. The description consists of two parts. Part 1 is for method development. Part 2 is a specific case study. In Part 1, the essential concepts and practical approaches to damage tolerance design in the gas turbine industry are summarized. These have evolved over the years in response to flight safety certification requirements. The effect of Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods on these methods is also reviewed. Assessment methods based on probabilistic fracture mechanics, with regard to both crack initiation and crack growth, are outlined. Limit state modeling techniques from structural reliability theory are shown to be appropriate for application to this problem, for both individual failure mode and system-level assessment. In Part 2, the results of a case study for the high pressure turbine of a turboprop engine are described. The response surface approach is used to construct a fatigue performance function. This performance function is used with the First Order Reliability Method (FORM) to determine the probability of failure and the sensitivity of the fatigue life to the engine parameters for the first stage disk rim of the two stage turbine. A hybrid combination of regression and Monte Carlo simulation is to use incorporate time dependent random variables. System reliability is used to determine the system probability of failure, and the sensitivity of the system fatigue life to the engine parameters of the high pressure turbine. 'ne variation in the primary hot gas and secondary cooling air, the uncertainty of the complex mission loading, and the scatter in the material data are considered.

  15. Small hydraulic turbine drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostafinski, W. A.

    1970-01-01

    Turbine, driven by the fluid being pumped, requires no external controls, is completely integrated into the flow system, and has bearings which utilize the main fluid for lubrication and cooling. Torque capabilities compare favorably with those developed by positive displacement hydraulic motors.

  16. Liquid rocket engine turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Criteria for the design and development of turbines for rocket engines to meet specific performance, and installation requirements are summarized. The total design problem, and design elements are identified, and the current technology pertaining to these elements is described. Recommended practices for achieving a successful design are included.

  17. Turbine blade damping study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominic, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Research results and progress on the performance of bladed systems is reported the different topics discussed include: the study of turbine blade damping; forced vibrations of friction damped beam moistures in two dimensions; and a users manual for a computer program for dynamic analysis of bladed systems.

  18. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The development and progress of the Advanced Gas Turbine engine program is examined. An analysis of the role of ceramics in the design and major engine components is included. Projected fuel economy, emissions and performance standards, and versatility in fuel use are also discussed.

  19. Turbine imaging technology assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Moursund, R. A.; Carlson, T. J.

    2004-12-01

    The goal of this project was to identify and evaluate imaging technologies for observing juvenile fish within a Kaplan turbine, and specifically that would enable scientists to determine mechanisms of fish injury within an operating turbine unit. This report documents the opportunities and constraints for observing juvenile fish at specific locations during turbine passage. These observations were used to make modifications to dam structures and operations to improve conditions for fish passage while maintaining or improving hydropower production. The physical and hydraulic environment that fish experience as they pass through the hydroelectric plants were studied and the regions with the greatest potential for injury were defined. Biological response data were also studied to determine the probable types of injuries sustained in the turbine intake and what types of injuries are detectable with imaging technologies. The study grouped injury-causing mechanisms into two categories: fluid (pressure/cavitation, shear, turbulence) and mechanical (strike/collision, grinding/pinching, scraping). The physical constraints of the environment, together with the likely types of injuries to fish, provided the parameters needed for a rigorous imaging technology evaluation. Types of technology evaluated included both tracking and imaging systems using acoustic technologies (such as sonar and acoustic tags) and optic technologies (such as pulsed-laser videography, which is high-speed videography using a laser as the flash). Criteria for determining image data quality such as frame rate, target detectability, and resolution were used to quantify the minimum requirements of an imaging sensor.

  20. Blade for turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suciu, Gabriel L. (Inventor); Babu, Michael (Inventor); Murdock, James R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A blade for a turbine engine having a centerline. The blade comprises: a root section extending at an angle relative to the centerline; and an airfoil section extending from the root section. The root section is directly adjacent said airfoil section. In other words, the blade is neckless. The blade is part of a rotor assembly, and is preferably a fan blade.

  1. Crescentic ramp turbine stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ching-Pang (Inventor); Tam, Anna (Inventor); Kirtley, Kevin Richard (Inventor); Lamson, Scott Henry (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A turbine stage includes a row of airfoils joined to corresponding platforms to define flow passages therebetween. Each airfoil includes opposite pressure and suction sides and extends in chord between opposite leading and trailing edges. Each platform includes a crescentic ramp increasing in height from the leading and trailing edges toward the midchord of the airfoil along the pressure side thereof.

  2. Piezoelectric wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, Ravi Anant; Priya, Shashank

    2013-03-01

    In past few years, there has been significant focus towards developing small scale renewable energy based power sources for powering wireless sensor nodes in remote locations such as highways and bridges to conduct continuous health monitoring. These prior efforts have led to the development of micro-scale solar modules, hydrogen fuel cells and various vibration based energy harvesters. However, the cost effectiveness, reliability, and practicality of these solutions remain a concern. Harvesting the wind energy using micro-to-small scale wind turbines can be an excellent solution in variety of outdoor scenarios provided they can operate at few miles per hour of wind speed. The conventional electromagnetic generator used in the wind mills always has some cogging torque which restricts their operation above certain cut-in wind speed. This study aims to develop a novel piezoelectric wind turbine that utilizes bimorph actuators for electro-mechanical energy conversion. This device utilizes a Savonius rotor that is connected to a disk having magnets at the periphery. The piezoelectric actuators arranged circumferentially around the disk also have magnets at the tip which interacts with the magnetic field of the rotating disk and produces cyclical deflection. The wind tunnel experiments were conducted between 2-12 mph of wind speeds to characterize and optimize the power output of the wind turbine. Further, testing was conducted in the open environment to quantify the response to random wind gusts. An attempt was made towards integration of the piezoelectric wind turbine with the wireless sensor node.

  3. Turbine vane structure

    DOEpatents

    Irwin, John A.

    1980-08-19

    A liquid cooled stator blade assembly for a gas turbine engine includes an outer shroud having a pair of liquid inlets and a pair of liquid outlets supplied through a header and wherein means including tubes support the header radially outwardly of the shroud and also couple the header with the pair of liquid inlets and outlets. A pair of turbine vanes extend radially between the shroud and a vane platform to define a gas turbine motive fluid passage therebetween; and each of the vanes is cooled by an internal body casting of super alloy material with a grooved layer of highly heat conductive material that includes spaced apart flat surface trailing edges in alignment with a flat trailing edge of the casting joined to wall segments of the liner which are juxtaposed with respect to the internal casting to form an array of parallel liquid inlet passages on one side of the vane and a second plurality of parallel liquid return passages on the opposite side of the vane; and a superalloy heat and wear resistant imperforate skin covers the outer surface of the composite blade including the internal casting and the heat conductive layer; a separate trailing edge section includes an internal casting and an outer skin butt connected to the end surfaces of the internal casting and the heat conductive layer to form an easily assembled liquid cooled trailing edge section in the turbine vane.

  4. Numerical evaluation of single central jet for turbine disk cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbaraman, M. R.; Hadid, A. H.; McConnaughey, P. K.

    The cooling arrangement of the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP) incorporates two jet rings, each of which produces 19 high-velocity coolant jets. At some operating conditions, the frequency of excitation associated with the 19 jets coincides with the natural frequency of the turbine blades, contributing to fatigue cracking of blade shanks. In this paper, an alternate turbine disk cooling arrangement, applicable to disk faces of zero hub radius, is evaluated, which consists of a single coolant jet impinging at the center of the turbine disk. Results of the CFD analysis show that replacing the jet ring with a single central coolant jet in the HPOTP leads to an acceptable thermal environment at the disk rim. Based on the predictions of flow and temperature fields for operating conditions, the single central jet cooling system was recommended for implementation into the development program of the Technology Test Bed Engine at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center.

  5. T55 power turbine rotor multiplane-multispeed balancing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    A rotordynamic analysis of the T55-L-11C engine was used to evaluate the balancing needs of the power turbine and to optimize the balancing procedure. As a result, recommendations were made for implementation of a multiplane-multispeed balancing plan. Precision collars for the attachment of trial weights to a slender rotor were designed enabling demonstration balancing on production hardware. The quality of the balance was then evaluated by installing a high speed balanced power turbine in an engine and running in a test cell at the Corpus Christi Army depot. The engine used had been tested prior to the turbine changeout and showed acceptable overall vibration levels for the engine were significantly reduced, demonstrating the ability of multiplane-multispeed balancing to control engine vibration.

  6. Water table tests of proposed heat transfer tunnels for small turbine vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, P. L.

    1974-01-01

    Water-table flow tests were conducted for proposed heat-transfer tunnels which were designed to provide uniform flow into their respective test sections of a single core engine turbine vane and a full annular ring of helicopter turbine vanes. Water-table tests were also performed for the single-vane test section of the core engine tunnel. The flow in the heat-transfer tunnels was shown to be acceptable.

  7. Thermostable Shelf Life Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perchonok, M. H.; Antonini, D. K.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this project is to determine the shelf life end-point of various food items by means of actual measurement or mathematical projection. The primary goal of the Advanced Food Technology Project in these long duration exploratory missions is to provide the crew with a palatable, nutritious and safe food system while minimizing volume, mass, and waste. The Mars missions could be as long as 2.5 years with the potential of the food being positioned prior to the crew arrival. Therefore, it is anticipated that foods that are used during the Mars missions will require a 5 year shelf life. Shelf life criteria are safety, nutrition, and acceptability. Any of these criteria can be the limiting factor in determining the food's shelf life. Due to the heat sterilization process used for the thermostabilized food items, safety will be preserved as long as the integrity of the package is maintained. Nutrition and acceptability will change over time. Since the food can be the sole source of nutrition to the crew, a significant loss in nutrition may determine when the shelf life endpoint has occurred. Shelf life can be defined when the food item is no longer acceptable. Acceptability can be defined in terms of appearance, flavor, texture, or aroma. Results from shelf life studies of the thermostabilized food items suggest that the shelf life of the foods range from 0 months to 8 years, depending on formulation.

  8. Thermostabilized Shelf Life Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perchonok, Michele H.; Catauro, Patricia M.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this project is to determine the shelf life end-point of various food items by means of actual measurement or mathematical projection. The primary goal of the Advanced Food Technology Project in these long duration exploratory missions is to provide the crew with a palatable, nutritious and safe food system while minimizing volume, mass, and waste. The Mars missions could be as long as 2.5 years with the potential of the food being positioned prior to the crew arrival. Therefore, it is anticipated that foods that are used during the Mars missions will require a 5 year shelf life. Shelf life criteria are safety, nutrition, and acceptability. Any of these criteria can be the limiting factor in determining the food's shelf life. Due to the heat sterilization process used for the thermostabilized food items, safety will be preserved as long as the integrity of the package is maintained. Nutrition and acceptability will change over time. Since the food can be the sole source of nutrition to the crew, a significant loss in nutrition may determine when the shelf life endpoint has occurred. Shelf life can be defined when the food item is no longer acceptable. Acceptability can be defined in terms of appearance, flavor, texture, or aroma. Results from shelf life studies of the thermostabilized food items suggest that the shelf life of the foods range from 0 months to 8 years, depending on formulation.

  9. Is parasitoid acceptance of different host species dynamic?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Choice of host individuals by parasitoids is dynamic, varying with physiological state and experience. In particular, female parasitoids with high egg loads and low life expectancy are more willing to accept low quality hosts than females with low egg loads and high life expectancy. However, studi...

  10. Turbine blade tip gap reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2012-09-11

    A turbine blade sealing system for reducing a gap between a tip of a turbine blade and a stationary shroud of a turbine engine. The sealing system includes a plurality of flexible seal strips extending from a pressure side of a turbine blade generally orthogonal to the turbine blade. During operation of the turbine engine, the flexible seal strips flex radially outward extending towards the stationary shroud of the turbine engine, thereby reducing the leakage of air past the turbine blades and increasing the efficiency of the turbine engine.

  11. Control and stabilization of the DOE/NASA Mod-1 two megawatt wind turbine generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, R. S.; Bowler, C. E. J.; Piwko, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes the controls design, performance simulation process and specialized dynamic considerations for the DOE/NASA Mod 1 wind turbine generator (WTG). It shows controls, structural and utility interface considerations of the wind turbine generator and shows how a wind turbine generator can be integrated with a synchronous power system. Differences with respect to fossil or hydro generation and their implications are vital to long-term WTG reliability and availability and acceptance by utilities and consumers. The paper describes the control performance requirements to provide stable pitch and excitation control with drivetrain torsional dynamics, and the control of power swing stability and utility feeder voltage due to wind gusts.

  12. 75 FR 143 - Lockhart Power Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-04

    ... applicant proposes to install a single submersible turbine/generator unit in the hydro canal bank and... COMMISSION Lockhart Power Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions To Intervene... Power Company. e. Name of Project: Lockhart Project. f. Location: The project is located on the...

  13. Wind Turbine Response to Analytic Inflow Vortex Parameters Variation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, M. M.; Robinson, M. C.; Balas, M. J.

    2003-11-01

    As larger wind turbines are placed on taller towers, rotors frequently operate in atmospheric conditions that support organized, coherent turbulent structures. It is hypothesized that these structures have a detrimental impact on the blade fatigue life experienced by the wind turbine. These structures are extremely difficult to identify with sophisticated anemometry such as ultra-sonic anemometers. In order to ascertain the idealized worst-case scenario for vortical inflow structures impinging on a wind turbine rotor, we created a simple, analytic vortex model. The Rankine vortex model assumes the vortex core undergoes solid body rotation to avoid a singularity at the vortex center and is surrounded by a 2-dimensional potential flow field. Using the wind turbine as a sensor and the FAST wind turbine dynamics code with limited degrees of freedom, we determined the aerodynamic loads imparted to the wind turbine by the vortex structure. The size, strength, rotational direction, plan e of rotation, and location of the vortex were varied over a wide range of operating parameters. We identified the vortex conformation with the most significant effect on blade root bending moment cycle amplitude. Vortices with radii on the scale of the rotor diameter or smaller caused blade root bending moment cyclic amplitudes that lead to reduced fatigue life. The rotational orientation, clockwise or counter-clockwise produces little difference in the bending moment response. Vortices in the XZ plane produce bending moment amplitudes significantly greater than vortices in the YZ plane. The response to vortices in the inflow is similar for both 2- and 3-blade turbines.

  14. New technology in turbine aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.; Moffitt, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    A cursory review is presented of some of the recent work that has been done in turbine aerodynamic research at NASA-Lewis Research Center. Topics discussed include the aerodynamic effect of turbine coolant, high work-factor (ratio of stage work to square of blade speed) turbines, and computer methods for turbine design and performance prediction. An extensive bibliography is included. Experimental cooled-turbine aerodynamics programs using two-dimensional cascades, full annular cascades, and cold rotating turbine stage tests are discussed with some typical results presented. Analytically predicted results for cooled blade performance are compared to experimental results. The problems and some of the current programs associated with the use of very high work factors for fan-drive turbines of high-bypass-ratio engines are discussed. Turbines currently being investigated make use of advanced blading concepts designed to maintain high efficiency under conditions of high aerodynamic loading. Computer programs have been developed for turbine design-point performance, off-design performance, supersonic blade profile design, and the calculation of channel velocities for subsonic and transonic flow fields. The use of these programs for the design and analysis of axial and radial turbines is discussed.

  15. Turbine repair process, repaired coating, and repaired turbine component

    DOEpatents

    Das, Rupak; Delvaux, John McConnell; Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-11-03

    A turbine repair process, a repaired coating, and a repaired turbine component are disclosed. The turbine repair process includes providing a turbine component having a higher-pressure region and a lower-pressure region, introducing particles into the higher-pressure region, and at least partially repairing an opening between the higher-pressure region and the lower-pressure region with at least one of the particles to form a repaired turbine component. The repaired coating includes a silicon material, a ceramic matrix composite material, and a repaired region having the silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material. The repaired turbine component a ceramic matrix composite layer and a repaired region having silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material.

  16. Analysis of a Turbine Blade Failure in a Military Turbojet Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Benudhar; Satpathy, R. K.; Panigrahi, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with failure analysis of a low-pressure turbine blade of a straight flow turbojet engine. The blade is made of a wrought precipitation hardened Nickel base superalloy with oxidation-resistant diffusion aluminizing coating. The failure mode is found to be fatigue with multiple cracks inside the blade having crack origin at metal carbides. In addition to the damage in the coating, carbide banding has been observed in few blades. Carbide banding may be defined as inclusions in the form of highly elongated along deformation direction. The size, shape and banding of carbides and their location critically affect the failure of blades. Carbon content needs to be optimized to reduce interdendritic segregation and thereby provide improved fatigue and stress rupture life. Hence, optimization of size, shape and distribution of carbides in the billet and forging parameters during manufacturing of blade play a vital role to eliminate/reduce extent of banding. Reference micrographs as acceptance criteria are essential for evaluation of raw material and blade. There is a need to define the acceptance criteria for carbide bandings and introduce more sensitive ultrasonic check during billet and on finished blade inspection.

  17. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP) and Hybrid Vehicle Turbine Engine Technology Support project (HVTE-TS): Final summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This final technical report was prepared by Rolls-Royce Allison summarizing the multiyear activities of the Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP) and the Hybrid Vehicle Turbine Engine Technology Support (HVTE-TS) project. The ATTAP program was initiated in October 1987 and continued through 1993 under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Propulsion Systems, Advanced Propulsion Division. ATTAP was intended to advance the technological readiness of the automotive ceramic gas turbine engine. The target application was the prime power unit coupled to conventional transmissions and powertrains. During the early 1990s, hybrid electric powered automotive propulsion systems became the focus of development and demonstration efforts by the US auto industry and the Department of energy. Thus in 1994, the original ATTAP technology focus was redirected to meet the needs of advanced gas turbine electric generator sets. As a result, the program was restructured to provide the required hybrid vehicle turbine engine technology support and the project renamed HVTE-TS. The overall objective of the combined ATTAP and HVTE-TS projects was to develop and demonstrate structural ceramic components that have the potential for competitive automotive engine life cycle cost and for operating 3,500 hr in an advanced high temperature turbine engine environment. This report describes materials characterization and ceramic component development, ceramic components, hot gasifier rig testing, test-bed engine testing, combustion development, insulation development, and regenerator system development. 130 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Analytical modeling of turbine wakes in yawed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastankhah, Majid; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Increasing wind energy production has become a unanimous plan for virtually all the developed countries. In addition to constructing new wind farms, this goal can be achieved by making wind farms more efficient. Control strategies in wind farms, such as manipulating the yaw angle of the turbines, have the potential to make wind farms more efficient. Costly numerical simulations or measurements cannot be, however, employed to assess the viability of this strategy in the numerous different scenarios happening in real wind farms. In this study, we aim to develop an inexpensive and simple analytical model that is able for the first time to predict the whole wake of a yawed turbine with an acceptable accuracy. The proposed analytical model is built upon the simplified version of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Apart from the ability of the model to predict wake flows in yawed conditions, it can provide a better understanding of turbine wakes in this complex situation. For example, it can give valuable insights on how the wake deflection varies by changing turbine and incoming flow characteristics, such as the thrust coefficient of the turbine or the ambient turbulence.

  19. Development of large, horizontal-axis wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, D. H.; Kennard, J.

    1985-01-01

    A program to develop large, horizontal-axis wind turbines is discussed. The program is directed toward developing the technology for safe, reliable, environmentally acceptable large wind turbines that can generate a significant amount of electricity at costs competitive with those of conventional electricity-generating systems. In addition, these large wind turbines must be fully compatible with electric utility operations and interface requirements. Several ongoing projects in large-wind-turbine development are directed toward meeting the technology requirements for utility applications. The machines based on first-generation technology (Mod-OA and Mod-1) successfully completed their planned periods of experimental operation in June, 1982. The second-generation machines (Mod-2) are in operation at selected utility sites. A third-generation machine (Mod-5) is under contract. Erection and initial operation of the Mod-5 in Hawaii should take place in 1986. Each successive generation of technology increased reliability and energy capture while reducing the cost of electricity. These advances are being made by gaining a better understanding of the system-design drivers, improving the analytical design tools, verifying design methods with operating field data, and incorporating new technology and innovative designs. Information is given on the results from the first- and second-generation machines (Mod-OA, - 1, and -2), the status of the Department of Interior, and the status of the third-generation wind turbine (Mod-5).

  20. Curved centerline air intake for a gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruehr, W. C.; Younghans, J. L.; Smith, E. B. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An inlet for a gas turbine engine was disposed about a curved centerline for the purpose of accepting intake air that is flowing at an angle to engine centerline and progressively turning that intake airflow along a curved path into alignment with the engine. This curved inlet is intended for use in under the wing locations and similar regions where airflow direction is altered by aerodynamic characteristics of the airplane. By curving the inlet, aerodynamic loss and acoustic generation and emission are decreased.

  1. Tuning of PID controllers for boiler-turbine units.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wen; Liu, Jizhen; Fang, Fang; Chen, Yanqiao

    2004-10-01

    A simple two-by-two model for a boiler-turbine unit is demonstrated in this paper. The model can capture the essential dynamics of a unit. The design of a coordinated controller is discussed based on this model. A PID control structure is derived, and a tuning procedure is proposed. The examples show that the method is easy to apply and can achieve acceptable performance. PMID:15535395

  2. Improving Turbine Performance with Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.

    2007-01-01

    Under the new NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program, efforts are on-going within the Supersonics Project aimed at the implementation of advanced SiC/SiC ceramic composites into hot section components of future gas turbine engines. Due to recent NASA advancements in SiC-based fibers and matrices, these composites are lighter and capable of much higher service temperatures than current metallic superalloys, which in turn will allow the engines to operate at higher efficiencies and reduced emissions. This presentation briefly reviews studies within Task 6.3.3 that are primarily aimed at developing physics-based concepts, tools, and process/property models for micro- and macro-structural design, fabrication, and lifing of SiC/SiC turbine components in general and airfoils in particular. Particular emphasis is currently being placed on understanding and modeling (1) creep effects on residual stress development within the component, (2) fiber architecture effects on key composite properties such as design strength, and (3) preform formation processes so that the optimum architectures can be implemented into complex-shaped components, such as turbine vanes and blades.

  3. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Reports technical effort by AlliedSignal Engines in sixth year of DOE/NASA funded project. Topics include: gas turbine engine design modifications of production APU to incorporate ceramic components; fabrication and processing of silicon nitride blades and nozzles; component and engine testing; and refinement and development of critical ceramics technologies, including: hot corrosion testing and environmental life predictive model; advanced NDE methods for internal flaws in ceramic components; and improved carbon pulverization modeling during impact. ATTAP project is oriented toward developing high-risk technology of ceramic structural component design and fabrication to carry forward to commercial production by 'bridging the gap' between structural ceramics in the laboratory and near-term commercial heat engine application. Current ATTAP project goal is to support accelerated commercialization of advanced, high-temperature engines for hybrid vehicles and other applications. Project objectives are to provide essential and substantial early field experience demonstrating ceramic component reliability and durability in modified, available, gas turbine engine applications; and to scale-up and improve manufacturing processes of ceramic turbine engine components and demonstrate application of these processes in the production environment.

  4. Turbine Seal Research at NASA GRC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Delgado, Irebert R.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Low-leakage, long-life turbomachinery seals are important to both Space and Aeronautics Missions. (1) Increased payload capability (2) Decreased specific fuel consumption and emissions (3) Decreased direct operating costs. NASA GRC has a history of significant accomplishments and collaboration with industry and academia in seals research. NASA's unique, state-of-the-art High Temperature, High Speed Turbine Seal Test Facility is an asset to the U.S. Engine / Seal Community. Current focus is on developing experimentally validated compliant, non-contacting, high temperature seal designs, analysis, and design methodologies to enable commercialization.

  5. 2013 SYR Accepted Poster Abstracts.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    SYR 2013 Accepted Poster abstracts: 1. Benefits of Yoga as a Wellness Practice in a Veterans Affairs (VA) Health Care Setting: If You Build It, Will They Come? 2. Yoga-based Psychotherapy Group With Urban Youth Exposed to Trauma. 3. Embodied Health: The Effects of a Mind�Body Course for Medical Students. 4. Interoceptive Awareness and Vegetable Intake After a Yoga and Stress Management Intervention. 5. Yoga Reduces Performance Anxiety in Adolescent Musicians. 6. Designing and Implementing a Therapeutic Yoga Program for Older Women With Knee Osteoarthritis. 7. Yoga and Life Skills Eating Disorder Prevention Among 5th Grade Females: A Controlled Trial. 8. A Randomized, Controlled Trial Comparing the Impact of Yoga and Physical Education on the Emotional and Behavioral Functioning of Middle School Children. 9. Feasibility of a Multisite, Community based Randomized Study of Yoga and Wellness Education for Women With Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy. 10. A Delphi Study for the Development of Protocol Guidelines for Yoga Interventions in Mental Health. 11. Impact Investigation of Breathwalk Daily Practice: Canada�India Collaborative Study. 12. Yoga Improves Distress, Fatigue, and Insomnia in Older Veteran Cancer Survivors: Results of a Pilot Study. 13. Assessment of Kundalini Mantra and Meditation as an Adjunctive Treatment With Mental Health Consumers. 14. Kundalini Yoga Therapy Versus Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Co-Occurring Mood Disorder. 15. Baseline Differences in Women Versus Men Initiating Yoga Programs to Aid Smoking Cessation: Quitting in Balance Versus QuitStrong. 16. Pranayam Practice: Impact on Focus and Everyday Life of Work and Relationships. 17. Participation in a Tailored Yoga Program is Associated With Improved Physical Health in Persons With Arthritis. 18. Effects of Yoga on Blood Pressure: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. 19. A Quasi-experimental Trial of a Yoga based Intervention to Reduce Stress and

  6. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, John

    2015-09-30

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratories, Siemens has completed the Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development Program to develop an advanced gas turbine for incorporation into future coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. All the scheduled DOE Milestones were completed and significant technical progress was made in the development of new technologies and concepts. Advanced computer simulations and modeling, as well as subscale, full scale laboratory, rig and engine testing were utilized to evaluate and select concepts for further development. Program Requirements of: A 3 to 5 percentage point improvement in overall plant combined cycle efficiency when compared to the reference baseline plant; 20 to 30 percent reduction in overall plant capital cost when compared to the reference baseline plant; and NOx emissions of 2 PPM out of the stack. were all met. The program was completed on schedule and within the allotted budget

  7. Turbine Chemistry Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Wey, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    Many of the engine exhaust species resulting in significant environmental impact exist in trace amounts. Recent research, e.g., conducted at MIT-AM, has pointed to the intra-engine environment as a possible site for important trace chemistry activity. In addition, the key processes affecting the trace species activity occurring downstream in the air passages of the turbine and exhaust nozzle are not well understood. Most recently, an effort has been initiated at NASA Glenn Research Center under the UEET Program to evaluate and further develop CFD-based technology for modeling and simulation of intra-engine trace chemical changes relevant to atmospheric effects of pollutant emissions from aircraft engines. This presentation will describe the current effort conducted at Glenn; some preliminary results relevant to the trace species chemistry in a turbine passage will also be presented to indicate the progress to date.

  8. Airborne Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

  9. Advanced turbine study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of an advanced convective cooling concept applied to rocket turbine airfoils which operate in a high pressure hydrogen and methane environment was investigated. The concept consists of a central structural member in which grooves are machined. The grooves are temporarily filled with a removable filler and the entire airfoil is covered with a layer of electroformed nickel, or nickel base alloy. After removal of the filler, the low thermal resistance of the nickel closure causes the wall temperature to be reduced by heat transfer to the coolant. The program is divided in the following tasks: (1) turbine performance appraisal; (2) coolant geometry evaluation; (3) test hardware design and analysis; and (4) test airfoil fabrication.

  10. Turbine seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Little, David A.

    2013-04-16

    A seal assembly that limits gas leakage from a hot gas path to one or more disc cavities in a turbine engine. The seal assembly includes a seal apparatus that limits gas leakage from the hot gas path to a respective one of the disc cavities. The seal apparatus comprises a plurality of blade members rotatable with a blade structure. The blade members are associated with the blade structure and extend toward adjacent stationary components. Each blade member includes a leading edge and a trailing edge, the leading edge of each blade member being located circumferentially in front of the blade member's corresponding trailing edge in a direction of rotation of the turbine rotor. The blade members are arranged such that a space having a component in a circumferential direction is defined between adjacent circumferentially spaced blade members.

  11. Gas turbine sealing apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, John Joseph; Wessell, Brian J.; Liang, George

    2013-03-05

    A sealing apparatus in a gas turbine. The sealing apparatus includes a seal housing apparatus coupled to a disc/rotor assembly so as to be rotatable therewith during operation of the gas turbine. The seal housing apparatus comprises a base member, a first leg portion, a second leg portion, and spanning structure. The base member extends generally axially between forward and aft rows of rotatable blades and is positioned adjacent to a row of stationary vanes. The first leg portion extends radially inwardly from the base member and is coupled to the disc/rotor assembly. The second leg portion is axially spaced from the first leg portion, extends radially inwardly from the base member, and is coupled to the disc/rotor assembly. The spanning structure extends between and is rigidly coupled to each of the base member, the first leg portion, and the second leg portion.

  12. Wind turbine acoustic standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, D. G.; Shepherd, K. P.; Grosveld, F.

    1981-01-01

    A program is being conducted to develop noise standards for wind turbines which minimize annoyance and which can be used to design specifications. The approach consists of presenting wind turbine noise stimuli to test subjects in a laboratory listening chamber. The responses of the subjects are recorded for a range of stimuli which encompass the designs, operating conditions, and ambient noise levels of current and future installations. Results to date have established the threshold of detectability for a range of impulsive stimuli of the type associated with blade/tower wake interactions. The status of the ongoing psychoacoustic tests, the subjective data, and the approach to the development of acoustic criteria/standards are described.

  13. Multiple piece turbine airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Kimmel, Keith D

    2010-11-09

    A turbine airfoil, such as a rotor blade or a stator vane, for a gas turbine engine, the airfoil formed as a shell and spar construction with a plurality of hook shaped struts each mounted within channels extending in a spanwise direction of the spar and the shell to allow for relative motion between the spar and shell in the airfoil chordwise direction while also fanning a seal between adjacent cooling channels. The struts provide the seal as well as prevent bulging of the shell from the spar due to the cooling air pressure. The hook struts have a hooked shaped end and a rounded shaped end in order to insert the struts into the spar.

  14. Turbine vane plate assembly

    DOEpatents

    Schiavo Jr., Anthony L.

    2006-01-10

    A turbine vane assembly includes a turbine vane having first and second shrouds with an elongated airfoil extending between. Each end of the airfoil transitions into a shroud at a respective junction. Each of the shrouds has a plurality of cooling passages, and the airfoil has a plurality of cooling passages extending between the first and second shrouds. A substantially flat inner plate and an outer plate are coupled to each of the first and second shrouds so as to form inner and outer plenums. Each inner plenum is defined between at least the junction and the substantially flat inner plate; each outer plenum is defined between at least the substantially flat inner plate and the outer plate. Each inner plenum is in fluid communication with a respective outer plenum through at least one of the cooling passages in the respective shroud.

  15. Modern control design for flexible wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Alan Duane

    Control can improve energy capture and reduce dynamic loads in wind turbines. In the 1970s and 1980s wind turbines used classical control designs to regulate power and speed. The methods used, however, were not always successful. These systems often had bandwidths large enough to destabilize low-damped flexible modes leading to high dynamic load fatigue failures. Modern turbines are larger, mounted on taller towers, and are more dynamically active than their predecessors. Control systems to regulate turbine power and maintain stable closed-loop behavior in the presence of turbulent wind inflow will be critical for these designs. New advanced control approaches and paradigms must account for low-damped flexible modes in order to reduce structural dynamic loading and achieve the 20--25 year operational life required of today's machines. This thesis applies modern state-space control design methods to a two-bladed teetering hub upwind machine located at the National Wind Technology Center. The design objective is to regulate turbine speed and enhance damping in several low-damped flexible modes of the turbine. Starting with simple control algorithms based on linear models, complexity is added incrementally until the desired performance is firmly established. The controls approach is based on the Disturbance Accommodating Control (DAC) method and provides accountability for wind-speed fluctuations. First, controls are designed using the single control input rotor collective pitch to stabilize the 1st drive-train torsion as well as the tower 1st fore-aft bending modes. Generator torque is then incorporated as an additional control input. This reduces some of the demand placed on the rotor collective pitch control system and enhances 1st drive train torsion mode damping. Individual blade pitch control is then used to attenuate wind disturbances having spatial variation over the rotor and effectively reduces blade flap deflections due to wind shear. Finally, results from

  16. Snubber assembly for turbine blades

    DOEpatents

    Marra, John J

    2013-09-03

    A snubber associated with a rotatable turbine blade in a turbine engine, the turbine blade including a pressure sidewall and a suction sidewall opposed from the pressure wall. The snubber assembly includes a first snubber structure associated with the pressure sidewall of the turbine blade, a second snubber structure associated with the suction sidewall of the turbine blade, and a support structure. The support structure extends through the blade and is rigidly coupled at a first end portion thereof to the first snubber structure and at a second end portion thereof to the second snubber structure. Centrifugal loads exerted by the first and second snubber structures caused by rotation thereof during operation of the engine are at least partially transferred to the support structure, such that centrifugal loads exerted on the pressure and suctions sidewalls of the turbine blade by the first and second snubber structures are reduced.

  17. Relation of Engine Turbine-blade Life to Stress-rupture Properties of the Alloys, Stellite 21, Hastelloy B, Cast S-816, Forged S-816, X-40, Nimonic 80, Refractaloy 26, N-155, and Inconel X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, F B; Yaker, C

    1951-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to relate the engine performance of the heat-resistant alloys, Stellite 21, Hastelloy B, cast S-816, forged S-816, X-40, Nimonic 80, Refractory 26, N-155, and Iconel X to their stress-rupture properties. The engine test consisted of the repetition of a 20-minute cycle, 15 minutes at rated speed and approximately 5 minutes at idle. The results of the investigation indicated a direct correlation between stress-rupture life and blade life for the relatively low-strength alloys. The stress-rupture life and blade life for the relatively high-strength alloys did not correlate because of the effects of the vibratory stresses and the corrosive-gas atmosphere.

  18. Transition in Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The concept of a large disturbance bypass mechanism for the initiation of transition is reviewed and studied. This mechanism, or some manifestation thereof, is suspected to be at work in the boundary layers present in a turbine flow passage. Discussion is presented on four relevant subtopics: (1) the effect of upstream disturbances and wakes on transition; (2) transition prediction models, code development, and verification; (3) transition and turbulence measurement techniques; and (4) the hydrodynamic condition of low Reynolds number boundary layers.

  19. Superconducting wind turbine generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamsen, A. B.; Mijatovic, N.; Seiler, E.; Zirngibl, T.; Træholt, C.; Nørgård, P. B.; Pedersen, N. F.; Andersen, N. H.; Østergård, J.

    2010-03-01

    We have examined the potential of 10 MW superconducting direct drive generators to enter the European offshore wind power market and estimated that the production of about 1200 superconducting turbines until 2030 would correspond to 10% of the EU offshore market. The expected properties of future offshore turbines of 8 and 10 MW have been determined from an up-scaling of an existing 5 MW turbine and the necessary properties of the superconducting drive train are discussed. We have found that the absence of the gear box is the main benefit and the reduced weight and size is secondary. However, the main challenge of the superconducting direct drive technology is to prove that the reliability is superior to the alternative drive trains based on gearboxes or permanent magnets. A strategy of successive testing of superconducting direct drive trains in real wind turbines of 10 kW, 100 kW, 1 MW and 10 MW is suggested to secure the accumulation of reliability experience. Finally, the quantities of high temperature superconducting tape needed for a 10 kW and an extreme high field 10 MW generator are found to be 7.5 km and 1500 km, respectively. A more realistic estimate is 200-300 km of tape per 10 MW generator and it is concluded that the present production capacity of coated conductors must be increased by a factor of 36 by 2020, resulting in a ten times lower price of the tape in order to reach a realistic price level for the superconducting drive train.

  20. The small turbine revolution

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.L.

    1995-07-01

    Until the mid-1960s, improvements in technology and economies of scale made each new generating unit installed less expensive than the previous one. Later, bigger was still better. Larger units cost less per kilowatt than smaller units. Today, that may be changing. In some situations, distributed generation -the use of small, dispersed units (usually gas turbines) in the place of large central stations- can be the most attractive option.

  1. Gas turbine premixing systems

    DOEpatents

    Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Evulet, Andrei Tristan; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2013-12-31

    Methods and systems are provided for premixing combustion fuel and air within gas turbines. In one embodiment, a combustor includes an upstream mixing panel configured to direct compressed air and combustion fuel through premixing zone to form a fuel-air mixture. The combustor includes a downstream mixing panel configured to mix additional combustion fuel with the fule-air mixture to form a combustion mixture.

  2. Wind turbine generator system

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschbaum, H.S.

    1982-11-02

    Wind turbine generator systems incorporating a multi-speed pole amplitude modulated type dynamo electric machine allow efficient operation at consecutive speeds in a ratio preferably less than 2:1. A current limiting reactor, preferably including an inductance coil, and an over-running clutch, are utilized in conjunction with any multi-speed generation system to alleviate impact on a utility grid during switching among operational speeds.

  3. Airfoils for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, James L.; Somers, Dan M.

    1996-01-01

    Airfoils for the blade of a wind turbine wherein each airfoil is characterized by a thickness in a range from 16%-24% and a maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoils include a family of airfoils for a blade 15 to 25 meters in length, a family of airfoils for a blade 1 to 5 meters in length, and a family of airfoils for a blade 5 to 10 meters in length.

  4. Airfoils for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

    1996-10-08

    Airfoils are disclosed for the blade of a wind turbine wherein each airfoil is characterized by a thickness in a range from 16%-24% and a maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoils include a family of airfoils for a blade 15 to 25 meters in length, a family of airfoils for a blade 1 to 5 meters in length, and a family of airfoils for a blade 5 to 10 meters in length. 10 figs.

  5. Coating Life Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, J. A.; Gedwill, M. A.

    1984-01-01

    Hot-section gas-turbine components typically require some form of coating for oxidation and corrosion protection. Efficient use of coatings requires reliable and accurate predictions of the protective life of the coating. Currently engine inspections and component replacements are often made on a conservative basis. As a result, there is a constant need to improve and develop the life-prediction capability of metallic coatings for use in various service environments. The purpose of this present work is aimed at developing of an improved methodology for predicting metallic coating lives in an oxidizing environment and in a corrosive environment.

  6. Tornado type wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Ch.-T.

    1984-06-05

    A tornado type wind turbine has a vertically disposed wind collecting tower with spaced apart inner and outer walls and a central bore. The upper end of the tower is open while the lower end of the structure is in communication with a wind intake chamber. An opening in the wind chamber is positioned over a turbine which is in driving communication with an electrical generator. An opening between the inner and outer walls at the lower end of the tower permits radially flowing air to enter the space between the inner and outer walls while a vertically disposed opening in the wind collecting tower permits tangentially flowing air to enter the central bore. A porous portion of the inner wall permits the radially flowing air to interact with the tangentially flowing air so as to create an intensified vortex flow which exits out of the top opening of the tower so as to create a low pressure core and thus draw air through the opening of the wind intake chamber so as to drive the turbine.

  7. Tornado type wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Cheng-Ting

    1984-01-01

    A tornado type wind turbine has a vertically disposed wind collecting tower with spaced apart inner and outer walls and a central bore. The upper end of the tower is open while the lower end of the structure is in communication with a wind intake chamber. An opening in the wind chamber is positioned over a turbine which is in driving communication with an electrical generator. An opening between the inner and outer walls at the lower end of the tower permits radially flowing air to enter the space between the inner and outer walls while a vertically disposed opening in the wind collecting tower permits tangentially flowing air to enter the central bore. A porous portion of the inner wall permits the radially flowing air to interact with the tangentially flowing air so as to create an intensified vortex flow which exits out of the top opening of the tower so as to create a low pressure core and thus draw air through the opening of the wind intake chamber so as to drive the turbine.

  8. Power turbine ventilation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakeman, Thomas G. (Inventor); Brown, Richard W. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Air control mechanism within a power turbine section of a gas turbine engine. The power turbine section includes a rotor and at least one variable pitch propulsor blade. The propulsor blade is coupled to and extends radially outwardly of the rotor. A first annular fairing is rotatable with the propulsor blade and interposed between the propulsor blade and the rotor. A second fairing is located longitudinally adjacent to the first fairing. The first fairing and the second fairing are differentially rotatable. The air control mechanism includes a platform fixedly coupled to a radially inner end of the propulsor blade. The platform is generally positioned in a first opening and a first fairing. The platform and the first fairing define an outer space. In a first position corresponding with a first propulsor blade pitch, the platform is substantially conformal with the first fairing. In a second position corresponding with the second propulsor blade pitch, an edge portion of the platform is displaced radially outwardly from the first fairing. When the blades are in the second position and rotating about the engine axis, the displacement of the edge portion with respect to the first fairing allows air to flow from the outer space to the annular cavity.

  9. Sonic boom acceptability studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Kevin P.; Sullivan, Brenda M.; Leatherwood, Jack D.; McCurdy, David A.

    1992-04-01

    The determination of the magnitude of sonic boom exposure which would be acceptable to the general population requires, as a starting point, a method to assess and compare individual sonic booms. There is no consensus within the scientific and regulatory communities regarding an appropriate sonic boom assessment metric. Loudness, being a fundamental and well-understood attribute of human hearing was chosen as a means of comparing sonic booms of differing shapes and amplitudes. The figure illustrates the basic steps which yield a calculated value of loudness. Based upon the aircraft configuration and its operating conditions, the sonic boom pressure signature which reaches the ground is calculated. This pressure-time history is transformed to the frequency domain and converted into a one-third octave band spectrum. The essence of the loudness method is to account for the frequency response and integration characteristics of the auditory system. The result of the calculation procedure is a numerical description (perceived level, dB) which represents the loudness of the sonic boom waveform.

  10. Sonic boom acceptability studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Kevin P.; Sullivan, Brenda M.; Leatherwood, Jack D.; Mccurdy, David A.

    1992-01-01

    The determination of the magnitude of sonic boom exposure which would be acceptable to the general population requires, as a starting point, a method to assess and compare individual sonic booms. There is no consensus within the scientific and regulatory communities regarding an appropriate sonic boom assessment metric. Loudness, being a fundamental and well-understood attribute of human hearing was chosen as a means of comparing sonic booms of differing shapes and amplitudes. The figure illustrates the basic steps which yield a calculated value of loudness. Based upon the aircraft configuration and its operating conditions, the sonic boom pressure signature which reaches the ground is calculated. This pressure-time history is transformed to the frequency domain and converted into a one-third octave band spectrum. The essence of the loudness method is to account for the frequency response and integration characteristics of the auditory system. The result of the calculation procedure is a numerical description (perceived level, dB) which represents the loudness of the sonic boom waveform.

  11. Smoother Turbine Blades Resist Thermal Shock Better

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czerniak, Paul; Longenecker, Kent; Paulus, Don; Ullman, Zane

    1991-01-01

    Surface treatment increases resistance of turbine blades to low-cycle fatigue. Smoothing removes small flaws where cracks start. Intended for blades in turbines subject to thermal shock of rapid starting. No recrystallization occurs at rocket-turbine operating temperatures.

  12. CMC Technology Advancements for Gas Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    CMC research at NASA Glenn is focused on aircraft propulsion applications. The objective is to enable reduced engine emissions and fuel consumption for more environmentally friendly aircraft. Engine system studies show that incorporation of ceramic composites into turbine engines will enable significant reductions in emissions and fuel burn due to increased engine efficiency resulting from reduced cooling requirements for hot section components. This presentation will describe recent progress and challenges in developing fiber and matrix constituents for 2700 F CMC turbine applications. In addition, ongoing research in the development of durable environmental barrier coatings, ceramic joining integration technologies and life prediction methods for CMC engine components will be reviewed.

  13. Cf6 jet engine performance improvement: high pressure turbine roundness

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W.D.; Fasching, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    An improved high pressure turbine stator reducing fuel consumption in current CF6-50 turbofan engines was developed. The feasibility of the roundness and clearance response improvements was demonstrated. Application of these improvements will result in a cruise SFC reduction of 0.22 percent for new engines. For high time engines, the improved roundness and response characteristics results in an 0.5 percent reduction in cruise SFC. A basic life capability of the improved HP turbine stator in over 800 simulated flight cycles without any sign of significant distress is shown.

  14. Damage tolerance and structural monitoring for wind turbine blades.

    PubMed

    McGugan, M; Pereira, G; Sørensen, B F; Toftegaard, H; Branner, K

    2015-02-28

    The paper proposes a methodology for reliable design and maintenance of wind turbine rotor blades using a condition monitoring approach and a damage tolerance index coupling the material and structure. By improving the understanding of material properties that control damage propagation it will be possible to combine damage tolerant structural design, monitoring systems, inspection techniques and modelling to manage the life cycle of the structures. This will allow an efficient operation of the wind turbine in terms of load alleviation, limited maintenance and repair leading to a more effective exploitation of offshore wind. PMID:25583858

  15. Damage tolerance and structural monitoring for wind turbine blades

    PubMed Central

    McGugan, M.; Pereira, G.; Sørensen, B. F.; Toftegaard, H.; Branner, K.

    2015-01-01

    The paper proposes a methodology for reliable design and maintenance of wind turbine rotor blades using a condition monitoring approach and a damage tolerance index coupling the material and structure. By improving the understanding of material properties that control damage propagation it will be possible to combine damage tolerant structural design, monitoring systems, inspection techniques and modelling to manage the life cycle of the structures. This will allow an efficient operation of the wind turbine in terms of load alleviation, limited maintenance and repair leading to a more effective exploitation of offshore wind. PMID:25583858

  16. CF6 jet engine performance improvement: High pressure turbine roundness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. D.; Fasching, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    An improved high pressure turbine stator reducing fuel consumption in current CF6-50 turbofan engines was developed. The feasibility of the roundness and clearance response improvements was demonstrated. Application of these improvements will result in a cruise SFC reduction of 0.22 percent for new engines. For high time engines, the improved roundness and response characteristics results in an 0.5 percent reduction in cruise SFC. A basic life capability of the improved HP turbine stator in over 800 simulated flight cycles without any sign of significant distress is shown.

  17. Ejector-turbine studies and experimental data. Final report, August 1, 1979-October 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Minardi, J.E.; Lawson, M.O.; Krolak, R.V.; Newman, R.K.; von Ohain, H.P.; Salyer, I.O.; Wattendorf, F.L.; Boehman, L.I.; Braden, R.P.

    1982-11-01

    An innovative low-power Rankine turbine concept is described which promises competitive efficiencies, low cost, significant reduction in rpm, low maintenance, and long-life operation over similarly rated turbines. The cycle uses a highly efficient two-fluid ejector which greatly lowers the turbine inlet pressure and temperature. The two-fluid ejector cycle is shown by theoretical studies to be capable of transferring energy at efficiencies in excess of 90% from a high-power flux fluid medium to a low-power flux fluid medium. The volume flow of the thermodynamic fluid can be augmented by as much as one-hundred fold. For very low-power turbine applications this could result in far-more-favorable turbine sizes and rpm. One major application for this type turbine is the heating and cooling with heat pumps. The concept permits engine cycles that cover an extremely broad range of peak temperatures, including those corresponding to stoichiometric combustion of hydrocarbon fuels, waste heat sources, and solar. Actual test data indicated ejector efficiencies as high as 85%. A two-fluid, ejector turbine was designed and tested. The turbine achieved 94% of design power. Additional data indicated that the ejector attached to the turbine operated on the supersonic branch.

  18. Visualization and analysis of vortex-turbine intersections in wind farms.

    PubMed

    Shafii, Sohail; Obermaier, Herald; Linn, Rodman; Koo, Eunmo; Hlawitschka, Mario; Garth, Christoph; Hamann, Bernd; Joy, Kenneth I

    2013-09-01

    Characterizing the interplay between the vortices and forces acting on a wind turbine's blades in a qualitative and quantitative way holds the potential for significantly improving large wind turbine design. This paper introduces an integrated pipeline for highly effective wind and force field analysis and visualization. We extract vortices induced by a turbine's rotation in a wind field, and characterize vortices in conjunction with numerically simulated forces on the blade surfaces as these vortices strike another turbine's blades downstream. The scientifically relevant issue to be studied is the relationship between the extracted, approximate locations on the blades where vortices strike the blades and the forces that exist in those locations. This integrated approach is used to detect and analyze turbulent flow that causes local impact on the wind turbine blade structure. The results that we present are based on analyzing the wind and force field data sets generated by numerical simulations, and allow domain scientists to relate vortex-blade interactions with power output loss in turbines and turbine life expectancy. Our methods have the potential to improve turbine design to save costs related to turbine operation and maintenance. PMID:23846101

  19. Visualization and Analysis of Vortex-Turbine Intersections in Wind Farms.

    PubMed

    Shafii, Sohail; Obermaier, Harald; Linn, Rodman; Koo, Eunmo; Hlawitschka, Mario; Garth, Christoph; Hamann, Bernd; Joy, Kenneth

    2013-02-13

    Characterizing the interplay between the vortices and forces acting on a wind turbine's blades in a qualitative and quantitative way holds the potential for significantly improving large wind turbine design. The paper introduces an integrated pipeline for highly effective wind and force field analysis and visualization. We extract vortices induced by a turbine's rotation in a wind field, and characterize vortices in conjunction with numerically simulated forces on the blade surfaces as these vortices strike another turbine's blades downstream. The scientifically relevant issue to be studied is the relationship between the extracted, approximate locations on the blades where vortices strike the blades and the forces that exist in those locations. This integrated approach is used to detect and analyze turbulent flow that causes local impact on the wind turbine blade structure. The results that we present are based on analyzing the wind and force field data sets generated by numerical simulations, and allow domain scientists to relate vortex-blade interactions with power output loss in turbines and turbine life-expectancy. Our methods have the potential to improve turbine design in order to save costs related to turbine operation and maintenance. PMID:23420226

  20. Probabilistic characterization of wind turbine blades via aeroelasticity and spinning finite element formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, Antonio; Swartz, R. Andrew

    2012-04-01

    Wind energy is an increasingly important component of this nation's renewable energy portfolio, however safe and economical wind turbine operation is a critical need to ensure continued adoption. Safe operation of wind turbine structures requires not only information regarding their condition, but their operational environment. Given the difficulty inherent in SHM processes for wind turbines (damage detection, location, and characterization), some uncertainty in conditional assessment is expected. Furthermore, given the stochastic nature of the loading on turbine structures, a probabilistic framework is appropriate to characterize their risk of failure at a given time. Such information will be invaluable to turbine controllers, allowing them to operate the structures within acceptable risk profiles. This study explores the characterization of the turbine loading and response envelopes for critical failure modes of the turbine blade structures. A framework is presented to develop an analytical estimation of the loading environment (including loading effects) based on the dynamic behavior of the blades. This is influenced by behaviors including along and across-wind aero-elastic effects, wind shear gradient, tower shadow effects, and centrifugal stiffening effects. The proposed solution includes methods that are based on modal decomposition of the blades and require frequent updates to the estimated modal properties to account for the time-varying nature of the turbine and its environment. The estimated demand statistics are compared to a code-based resistance curve to determine a probabilistic estimate of the risk of blade failure given the loading environment.

  1. Regenerative superheated steam turbine cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, L. C.; Stovall, T. K.

    1980-01-01

    PRESTO computer program was developed to analyze performance of wide range of steam turbine cycles with special attention given to regenerative superheated steam turbine cycles. It can be used to model standard turbine cycles, including such features as process steam extraction, induction and feedwater heating by external sources, peaking, and high back pressure. Expansion line efficiencies, exhaust loss, leakages, mechanical losses, and generator losses are used to calculate cycle heat rate and generator output. Program provides power engineer with flexible aid for design and analysis of steam turbine systems.

  2. Shaken, not stirred: The recipe for a fish-friendly turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Cada, G.F.

    1997-03-01

    It is generally agreed that injuries and mortalities among turbine-passed fish can result from several mechanisms, including rapid and extreme water pressure changes, cavitation, shear, turbulence, and mechanical injuries (strike and grinding). Advances in the instrumentation available for monitoring hydraulic conditions and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques now make it possible both to estimate accurately the levels of these potential injury mechanisms in operating turbines and to predict the levels in new turbine designs. This knowledge can be used to {open_quotes}design-out{close_quotes} the most significant injury mechanisms in the next generation of turbines. However, further improvements in turbine design are limited by a poor understanding of the levels of mechanical and hydraulic stresses that can be tolerated by turbine-passed fish. The turbine designers need numbers (biological criteria) that define a safety zone for fish within which pressures, shear forces, cavitation, and chance of mechanical strike are all at acceptable levels for survival. This paper presents the results of a literature review of fish responses to the types of biological stresses associated with turbine passage, as studied separately under controlled conditions in the laboratory rather than in combination at field sites. Some of the controlled laboratory and field studies reviewed here were bioassays carried out for reasons unrelated to hydropower production. Analysis of this literature was used to develop provisional biological criteria for hydroelectric turbine designers. These biological criteria have been utilized in the U.S. Department of Energy`s Advanced Hydropower Turbine System (AHTS) Program to evaluate the results of conceptual engineering designs and the potential value of future turbine models and prototypes.

  3. Design and aero-acoustic analysis of a counter-rotating wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Vineesh V.

    Wind turbines have become an integral part of the energy business because they are one of the most economical and reliable sources of renewable energy. Conventional wind turbines are capable of capturing less than half of the energy present in the wind. Hence, to make the wind turbines more efficient, it is important to increase their performance. A horizontal axis wind turbine with multiple rotors is one concept that can achieve a higher power conversion rate. Also, a concern for wind energy is the noise generated by wind turbines. Hence, an investigation into the acoustic behavior of a multi-rotor horizontal axis wind turbine is required. In response to the need of a wind turbine design with higher power coefficient, a unique design of a counter-rotating horizontal axis wind turbine (CR-HAWT) is proposed. The Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory is used to aerodynamically design the blades of the two rotors. Modifications are made to the BEM theory to accommodate the interaction of the two rotors. The tower effect on the noise generation of the downwind rotor is investigated. Predictions are made for the total noise generated by the wind turbine at its design operating conditions. A total power coefficient of 65.2% is predicted for the proposed CR-HAWT design. A low tip speed ratio is chosen to minimize the noise generation. The aeroacoustic analysis of the CR-HAWT shows that the noise generated at its design operating conditions is within an acceptable range. Thus, the CR-HAWT is predicted to be a quiet wind turbine with a high power coefficient, making it highly desirable for small wind turbine applications.

  4. Composite wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Cheng-Huat

    Researchers in wind energy industry are constantly moving forward to develop higher efficiency wind turbine. One major component for wind turbine design is to have cost effective wind turbine blades. In addition to correct aerodynamic shape and blade geometry, blade performance can be enhanced further through aero-elastic tailoring design and material selections. An analytical tool for blade design has been improved and validated. This analytical tool is utilized to resolve issues related to elastic tailoring design. The investigation looks into two major issues related to the design and fabrication of a bend-twist-coupled blade. Various design parameters for a blade such as materials, laminate lay-up, skin thickness, ply orientation, internal spar, etc. have been examined for designing a bend-twist-coupled blade. The parametric study indicates that the critical design parameters are the ply material, the ply orientation, and the volume fraction ratio between the anisotropic layers and orthotropic layers. To produce a blade having the bend-twist coupling characteristics, the fiber lay-ups at the top and bottom skins of the blade must have a "mirror" lay-up in relation to the middle plane of the blade. Such lay-up causes fiber discontinuation at the seam. The joint design at the seam is one major consideration in fabricating a truly anisotropic blade. A new joint design was proposed and tensile failure tests were carried out for both the old and new joint designs. The tests investigated the effects of different types of joint designs, the laminate lay-up at the joints, and the stacking sequence of the joint retention strength. A major component of a wind turbine blade, D-spar, was designed to maximum coupling. Two D-spars were then fabricated using the new joint design; one of them was subjected to both static and modal testings. Traditionally, wind turbine blades are made of low cost glass material; however, carbon fibers are proposed as alternative material. Our

  5. 44. KNIGHT WATER IMPULSE TURBINES 12'. THESE TWO TURBINES ARE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. KNIGHT WATER IMPULSE TURBINES 12'. THESE TWO TURBINES ARE SIMILAR TO THOSE THAT POWER THE FOUNDRY AND ENABLE PRODUCTION OF CAST MACHINERY PARTS SUCH AS THOSE IN THE BACKGROUND, RECENTLY MADE FOR RESTORING RAILROAD TURNTABLES IN CAMINO, FOLSOM, PLACERVILLE, AND PARIS, CALIFORNIA. - Knight Foundry, 13 Eureka Street, Sutter Creek, Amador County, CA

  6. 63. VIEW OF TYPICAL TURBINE IN TURBINE WELL IN POWERHOUSE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. VIEW OF TYPICAL TURBINE IN TURBINE WELL IN POWERHOUSE, LOOKING DOWN THE SHAFT FROM JUST ABOVE NORMAL WATER LEVEL. LADDER IS ON DOWNSTREAM WALL. PHOTOGRAPHER STOOD ON DECK SHOWN IN LOWER LEFT CORNER - Swan Falls Dam, Snake River, Kuna, Ada County, ID

  7. Novel Diagnostics to Investigate Turbine-Turbine Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakumar, B. J.; Pol, S.

    2011-11-01

    Strong aerodynamic interactions between upstream wind turbine wakes and downstream turbine blades cause fatigue loads and reduce turbine reliability. The wake structure also mediates the vertical flux of momentum and affects the power output of downstream turbines in turbine arrays. Despite their importance, our current understanding of wake-turbine interactions and wake structure is limited, especially under complex operating conditions such as yawed inflow and dynamic stall. Traditional diagnostics such as sonic anemometers, hotwires, and lidars suffer from interference and accuracy limitations and prove inadequate. At LANL, we have developed a Large Field-of-View Particle Image Velocimeter (LF-PIV) capable of measuring 3 m ×1 m (per camera) wake and inflow regions around a 5m-scale turbine. This scalable diagnostic operates in conjunction with a hub-mounted Rotating PIV (R-PIV) diagnostic to observe blade boundary layer and separation while the turbine is in operation. We discuss the diagnostic development challenges, solutions used to overcome these, and the interesting physics that these diagnostics promise to illuminate. Supported by LANL LDRD grant 20100040DR (PI: Curtt Ammerman).

  8. Life prediction systems for critical rotating components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Susan E.

    1993-01-01

    With the advent of advanced materials in rotating gas turbine engine components, the methodologies for life prediction of these parts must also increase in sophistication and capability. Pratt & Whitney's view of generic requirements for composite component life prediction systems are presented, efforts underway to develop these systems are discussed, and industry participation in key areas requiring development is solicited.

  9. Air Force fuel mainburner/turbine effects programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    A program for the determination of fuel property effects on aircraft gas turbine engine mainburners and turbines is discussed. The six engines selected as test candidates are the J79, J85, J57, TF30, TF39, and F100. Fuels election is the responsibility of the contractors with two fuels as exceptions. The petroleum JP-4 is to be used as a baseline in all tests. The shale JP-4 is to be used in nearly all tests. Fuel properties are to be correlated with combustion system performance paramters. In addition, life predictions are to be made for combustor and turbine hardware. These predictions are to be based on a typical mission for each system, measured metal temperatures and temperature gradients, and oxidation/corrosion effects.

  10. Application study of magnetic fluid seal in hydraulic turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Z. Y.; Zhang, W.

    2012-11-01

    The waterpower resources of our country are abundant, and the hydroelectric power is developed, but at present the main shaft sealing device of hydraulic turbine is easy to wear and tear and the leakage is great. The magnetic fluid seal has the advantages of no contact, no wear, self-healing, long life and so on. In this paper, the magnetic fluid seal would be used in the main shaft of hydraulic turbine, the sealing structure was built the model, meshed the geometry, applied loads and solved by using MULTIPHYSICS in ANSYS software, the influence of the various sealing structural parameters such as tooth width, height, slot width, sealing gap on the sealing property were analyzed, the magnetic fluid sealing device suitable for large-diameter shaft and sealing water was designed, the sealing problem of the hydraulic turbine main shaft was solved effectively which will bring huge economic benefits.

  11. Characterization and Impact of Low Frequency Wind Turbine Noise Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finch, James

    Wind turbine noise is a complex issue that requires due diligence to minimize any potential impact on quality of life. This study enhances existing knowledge of wind turbine noise through focused analyses of downwind sound propagation, directionality, and the low frequency component of the noise. Measurements were conducted at four wind speeds according to a design of experiments at incremental distances and angles. Wind turbine noise is shown to be highly directional, while downwind sound propagation is spherical with limited ground absorption. The noise is found to have a significant low frequency component that is largely independent of wind speed over the 20-250 Hz range. The generated low frequency noise is shown to be audible above 40 Hz at the MOE setback distance of 550 m. Infrasound levels exhibit higher dependency on wind speed, but remain below audible levels up to 15 m/s.

  12. Health effects and wind turbines: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    . Conclusions What both types of studies have in common is the conclusion that wind turbines can be a source of annoyance for some people. The difference between both types is the reason for annoyance. While it is acknowledged that noise from wind turbines can be annoying to some and associated with some reported health effects (e.g., sleep disturbance), especially when found at sound pressure levels greater than 40 db(A), given that annoyance appears to be more strongly related to visual cues and attitude than to noise itself, self reported health effects of people living near wind turbines are more likely attributed to physical manifestation from an annoyed state than from wind turbines themselves. In other words, it appears that it is the change in the environment that is associated with reported health effects and not a turbine-specific variable like audible noise or infrasound. Regardless of its cause, a certain level of annoyance in a population can be expected (as with any number of projects that change the local environment) and the acceptable level is a policy decision to be made by elected officials and their government representatives where the benefits of wind power are weighted against their cons. Assessing the effects of wind turbines on human health is an emerging field and conducting further research into the effects of wind turbines (and environmental changes) on human health, emotional and physical, is warranted. PMID:21914211

  13. A Numerical Investigation of Turbine Noise Source Hierarchy and Its Acoustic Transmission Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale; Envia, Edmane

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the relative importance of the various turbine noise generation mechanisms and the characteristics of the turbine acoustic transmission loss are essential ingredients in developing robust reduced-order models for predicting the turbine noise signature. A computationally based investigation has been undertaken to help guide the development of a turbine noise prediction capability that does not rely on empiricism. The investigation relies on highly detailed numerical simulations of the unsteady flowfield inside a modern high-pressure turbine (HPT). The simulations are developed using TURBO, which is an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) code capable of multi-stage simulations. The purpose of this study is twofold. First, to determine an estimate of the relative importance of the contributions to the coherent part of the acoustic signature of a turbine from the three potential sources of turbine noise generation, namely, blade-row viscous interaction, potential field interaction, and entropic source associated with the interaction of the blade rows with the temperature nonuniformities caused by the incomplete mixing of the hot fluid and the cooling flow. Second, to develop an understanding of the turbine acoustic transmission characteristics and to assess the applicability of existing empirical and analytical transmission loss models to realistic geometries and flow conditions for modern turbine designs. The investigation so far has concentrated on two simulations: (1) a single-stage HPT and (2) a two-stage HPT and the associated inter-turbine duct/strut segment. The simulations are designed to resolve up to the second harmonic of the blade passing frequency tone in accordance with accepted rules for second order solvers like TURBO. The calculations include blade and vane cooling flows and a radial profile of pressure and temperature at the turbine inlet. The calculation can be modified later to include the combustor pattern factor at the

  14. Coupled Dynamic Modeling of Floating Wind Turbine Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wayman, E. N.; Sclavounos, P. D.; Butterfield, S.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

    2006-03-01

    was also performed. Key cost components included the material and construction costs of the buoy; material and installation costs of the tethers, mooring lines, and anchor technologies; costs of transporting and installing the system at the chosen site; and the cost of mounting the wind turbine to the platform. The two systems were evaluated based on their static and dynamic performance and the total system installed cost. Both systems demonstrated acceptable motions, and have estimated costs of $1.4-$1.8 million, not including the cost of the wind turbine, the power electronics, or the electrical transmission.

  15. Materials and structural aspects of advanced gas-turbine helicopter engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Acurio, J.

    1979-01-01

    Advances in materials, coatings, turbine cooling technology, structural and design concepts, and component-life prediction of helicopter gas-turbine-engine components are presented. Stationary parts including the inlet particle separator, the front frame, rotor tip seals, vanes and combustors and rotating components - compressor blades, disks, and turbine blades - are discussed. Advanced composite materials are considered for the front frame and compressor blades, prealloyed powder superalloys will increase strength and reduce costs of disks, the oxide dispersion strengthened alloys will have 100C higher use temperature in combustors and vanes than conventional superalloys, ceramics will provide the highest use temperature of 1400C for stator vanes and 1370C for turbine blades, and directionally solidified eutectics will afford up to 50C temperature advantage at turbine blade operating conditions. Coatings for surface protection at higher surface temperatures and design trends in turbine cooling technology are discussed. New analytical methods of life prediction such as strain gage partitioning for high temperature prediction, fatigue life, computerized prediction of oxidation resistance, and advanced techniques for estimating coating life are described.

  16. Contingency power for a small turboshaft engine by using water injection into turbine cooling air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biesiadny, Thomas J.; Klann, Gary A.

    1992-01-01

    Because of one-engine-inoperative (OEI) requirements, together with hot-gas reingestion and hot-day, high-altitude take-off situations, power augmentation for multiengine rotorcraft has always been of critical interest. However, power augmentation by using overtemperature at the turbine inlet will shorten turbine life unless a method of limiting thermal and mechanical stress is found. A possible solution involves allowing the turbine inlet temperature to rise to augment power while injecting water into the turbine cooling air to limit hot-section metal temperatures. An experimental water injection device was installed in an engine and successfully tested. Although concern for unprotected subcomponents in the engine hot section prevented demonstration of the technique's maximum potential, it was still possible to demonstrate increases in power while maintaining nearly constant turbine rotor blade temperature.

  17. Contingency power for small turboshaft engines using water injection into turbine cooling air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biesiadny, Thomas J.; Berger, Brett; Klann, Gary A.; Clark, David A.

    1987-01-01

    Because of one engine inoperative requirements, together with hot-gas reingestion and hot day, high altitude takeoff situations, power augmentation for multiengine rotorcraft has always been of critical interest. However, power augmentation using overtemperature at the turbine inlet will shorten turbine life unless a method of limiting thermal and mechanical stresses is found. A possible solution involves allowing the turbine inlet temperature to rise to augment power while injecting water into the turbine cooling air to limit hot-section metal temperatures. An experimental water injection device was installed in an engine and successfully tested. Although concern for unprotected subcomponents in the engine hot section prevented demonstration of the technique's maximum potential, it was still possible to demonstrate increases in power while maintaining nearly constant turbine rotor blade temperature.

  18. Development of a procedure for substantiating replacement terms for the condenser tubes of steam turbine installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronson, K. E.; Ryabchikov, A. Yu.; Brodov, Yu. M.; Loginov, M. I.

    2013-08-01

    Results obtained from elaboration of a procedure for estimating replacement terms for the condenser tube systems of steam turbine installations are presented. Censored data processing methods are used in performing statistical assessment of replacement terms. The service life of condenser tubes blanked off in the course of turbine operation is assumed to be known (complete operation time), and that for tubes blanked off during the turbine repair process is assumed to be undetermined (censored operation time). The criterion for estimating the replacement term for a condenser tube system is defined as the ratio between the number of tubes blanked off during a repair and in the course of turbine operation. The procedure is validated by the results from a study on analyzing the damageability of tubes made of different materials for the condensers of 11 turbines with capacities ranging from 25 to 500 MW.

  19. Tribological advancements for reliable wind turbine performance.

    PubMed

    Kotzalas, Michael N; Doll, Gary L

    2010-10-28

    Wind turbines have had various limitations to their mechanical system reliability owing to tribological problems over the past few decades. While several studies show that turbines are becoming more reliable, it is still not at an overall acceptable level to the operators based on their current business models. Data show that the electrical components are the most problematic; however, the parts are small, thus easy and inexpensive to replace in the nacelle, on top of the tower. It is the tribological issues that receive the most attention as they have higher costs associated with repair or replacement. These include the blade pitch systems, nacelle yaw systems, main shaft bearings, gearboxes and generator bearings, which are the focus of this review paper. The major tribological issues in wind turbines and the technological developments to understand and solve them are discussed within. The study starts with an overview of fretting corrosion, rolling contact fatigue, and frictional torque of the blade pitch and nacelle yaw bearings, and references to some of the recent design approaches applied to solve them. Also included is a brief overview into lubricant contamination issues in the gearbox and electric current discharge or arcing damage of the generator bearings. The primary focus of this review is the detailed examination of main shaft spherical roller bearing micropitting and gearbox bearing scuffing, micropitting and the newer phenomenon of white-etch area flaking. The main shaft and gearbox are integrally related and are the most commonly referred to items involving expensive repair costs and downtime. As such, the latest research and developments related to the cause of the wear and damage modes and the technologies used or proposed to solve them are presented. PMID:20855322

  20. Managing turbinate hypertrophy: coblation vs. radiofrequency treatment.

    PubMed

    Passali, D; Loglisci, M; Politi, L; Passali, G C; Kern, E

    2016-06-01

    The role of inferior turbinate hypertrophy in the reduction of nasal airflow is well established. Although chronic nasal obstruction is not life- threatening, it significantly impairs patients' quality of life, affecting many aspects of daily activities; therefore, patients seek medical intervention. 40 patients were selected (27 males and 13 females) between 27 and 64 years of age with a symptom of nasal obstruction. The patients were divided in two groups: Group 1: coblation, 25 patients (18 males and 7 females); Group 2: radiofrequency, 15 patients (7 males and 6 females). These 40 patients were followed for 3 years. Patients were analyzed using both subjective and objective methods. The visual analog scale (VAS) subjective data and objective data including both active anterior rhinomanometry and acoustic rhinometry were recorded and analyzed. Data were collected pre-operatively and at 1 and 3 years post-operatively. According to our data, both coblation and radiofrequency turbinate reduction benefit patients with good results. The complications, found during the follow-up, are limited to minimal bleeding and crusting. Coblation and radiofrequency were significantly less painful than others procedures during the early post-operative period. In our study, both coblation and radiofrequency provide an improvement in nasal airflow with a reduction in nasal obstructive symptoms in the short term, but their efficacy tended to decrease within 3 years. PMID:26321749

  1. Studies of Mini-Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Stacey; Endo, Masaki; Romanko, Michael; Williamson, Chk

    2013-11-01

    Urban environments are inaccessible to large wind turbines of the classical ``windmill'' design. By exploring small-scale vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWTs), wind energy can possibly be harvested from the constrained spaces within cities. We present a comprehensive study of blade offset pitch angle and relative blade size (ratio of blade chordlength/turbine diameter, c/D). We find that the optimal pitch angle for a symmetric blade is the angle at which the midpoint chordline is tangent to the turbine circumference. Also, a turbine with conventional blades of small c/D ratio (c/D = 0.12) - typical of large scale turbines - do not operate well at low Reynolds numbers. On the other hand, the maximum coefficient of power for turbines with larger c/D ratio (c/D = 0.36) is much higher than for the conventional small-blades. As blade size increases, the operating range of TSR (Tip Speed Ratio) also increases, making large-chord turbines more robust to the prevailing wind conditions. Surprisingly, the regime of TSR for maximum power extracted, at these low Reynolds numbers, corresponds with small or even negative power predictions, based on streamtube theory.

  2. Fretting in aircraft turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. L.; Bill, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of fretting in aircraft turbine engines is discussed. Critical fretting can occur on fan, compressor, and turbine blade mountings, as well as on splines, rolling element bearing races, and secondary sealing elements of face type seals. Structural fatigue failures have been shown to occur at fretted areas on component parts. Methods used by designers to reduce the effects of fretting are given.

  3. Kshara application for turbinate hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Kotrannavar, Vijay Kumar S; Angadi, Savita S

    2013-10-01

    Nasapratinaha (nasal obstruction) is a commonly encountered disease in clinical practice. It is one of the nasal disorders, explained in Ayurveda, having nasal obstruction leading to difficulty in breathing as the main cardinal feature. In contemporary science, this condition can be correlated with various diseases such as turbinate hypertrophy, deviated nasal septum, nasal mass, mucosal congestion, allergic rhinitis, and others; among which turbinate hypertrophy is a common cause. Turbinate hypertrophy can be treated with surgical and medical methods. The medical treatment has limitation for prolonged use because of health purpose, surgical approaches too have failed to achieve desired results in turbinate hypertrophy due to complications and high recurrence rate. The medical and surgical managements have their own limitations, merits, and demerits like synechiae formation, rhinitis sicca, severe bleeding, or osteonecrosis of the turbinate bone A parasurgical treatment explained in Ayurveda, known as kshara pratisarana, which is a minimal invasive and precise procedure for this ailment, tried to overcome this problem. 'Kshara Karma' is a popular treatment modality in Ayurveda, which has been advocated in disorders of nose like arbuda (tumor) and adhimamsa (muscular growth). Clinical observation has shown its effectiveness in the management of turbinate hypertrophy. A case report of 45-year-old male who presented with complaints of frequent nasal obstruction, nasal discharge, discomfort in nose, and headache; and diagnosed as turbinate hypertrophy has been presented here. The patient was treated with one application of Kshara over the turbinates. The treatment was effective and no recurrence was noticed in the follow up. PMID:24459392

  4. Fatigue reliability of wind turbine components

    SciTech Connect

    Veers, P.S.

    1990-01-01

    Fatigue life estimates for wind turbine components can be extremely variable due to both inherently random and uncertain parameters. A structural reliability analysis is used to qualify the probability that the fatigue life will fall short of a selected target. Reliability analysis also produces measures of the relative importance of the various sources of uncertainty and the sensitivity of the reliability to each input parameter. The process of obtaining reliability estimates is briefly outlined. An example fatigue reliability calculation for a blade joint is formulated; reliability estimates, importance factors, and sensitivities are produced. Guidance in selecting distribution functions for the random variables used to model the random and uncertain parameters is also provided. 5 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  5. SUSTAINABLE CONCRETE FOR WIND TURBINE FOUNDATIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    BERNDT,M.L.

    2004-06-01

    The use of wind power to generate electricity continues to grow, especially given commitments by various countries throughout the world to ensure that a significant percentage of energy comes from renewable sources. In order to meet such objectives, increasingly larger turbines with higher capacity are being developed. The engineering aspects of larger turbine development tend to focus on design and materials for blades and towers. However, foundations are also a critical component of large wind turbines and represent a significant cost of wind energy projects. Ongoing wind research at BNL is examining two areas: (a) structural response analysis of wind turbine-tower-foundation systems and (b) materials engineering of foundations. This work is investigating the dynamic interactions in wind turbine systems, which in turn assists the wind industry in achieving improved reliability and more cost efficient foundation designs. The results reported herein cover initial studies of concrete mix designs for large wind turbine foundations and how these may be tailored to reduce cost and incorporate sustainability and life cycle concepts. The approach taken was to investigate material substitutions so that the environmental, energy and CO{sub 2}-impact of concrete could be reduced. The use of high volumes of ''waste'' materials in concrete was examined. These materials included fly ash, blast furnace slag and recycled concrete aggregate. In addition, the use of steel fiber reinforcement as a means to improve mechanical properties and potentially reduce the amount of bar reinforcement in concrete foundations was studied. Four basic mixes were considered. These were: (1) conventional mix with no material substitutions, (2) 50% replacement of cement with fly ash, (3) 50% replacement of cement with blast furnace slag and (4) 25% replacement of cement with fly ash and 25% replacement with blast furnace slag. Variations on these mixes included the addition of 1% by volume steel

  6. Optimum propeller wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderson, R. J.; Archer, R. D.

    1983-12-01

    The Prandtl-Betz-Theodorsen theory of heavily loaded airscrews has been adapted to the design of propeller windmills which are to be optimized for maximum power coefficient. It is shown that the simpler, light-loading, constant-area wake assumption can generate significantly different 'optimum' performance and geometry, and that it is therefore not appropriate to the design of propeller wind turbines when operating in their normal range of high-tip-speed-to-wind-speed ratio. Design curves for optimum power coefficient are presented and an example of the design of a typical two-blade optimum rotor is given.

  7. Turbine airfoil film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hylton, Larry D.

    1986-10-01

    Emphasis is placed on developing more accurate analytical models for predicting turbine airfoil external heat transfer rates. Performance goals of new engines require highly refined, accurate design tools to meet durability requirements. In order to obtain improvements in analytical capabilities, programs are required which focus on enhancing analytical techniques through verification of new models by comparison with relevant experimental data. The objectives of the current program are to develop an analytical approach, based on boundary layer theory, for predicting the effects of airfoil film cooling on downstream heat transfer rates and to verify the resulting analytical method by comparison of predictions with hot cascade data obtained under this program.

  8. Wind Turbine Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thresher, R. W. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    Recent progress in the analysis and prediction of the dynamic behavior of wind turbine generators is discussed. The following areas were addressed: (1) the adequacy of state of the art analysis tools for designing the next generation of wind power systems; (2) the use of state of the art analysis tools designers; and (3) verifications of theory which might be lacking or inadequate. Summaries of these informative discussions as well as the questions and answers which followed each paper are documented in the proceedings.

  9. Alternative aviation turbine fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.

    1977-01-01

    The efficient utilization of fossil fuels by future jet aircraft may necessitate the broadening of current aviation turbine fuel specifications. The most significant changes in specifications would be an increased aromatics content and a higher final boiling point in order to minimize refinery energy consumption and costs. These changes would increase the freezing point and might lower the thermal stability of the fuel and could cause increased pollutant emissions, increased smoke and carbon formation, increased combustor liner temperatures, and poorer ignition characteristics. This paper discusses the effects that broadened specification fuels may have on present-day jet aircraft and engine components and the technology required to use fuels with broadened specifications.

  10. Trends in gas turbine development

    SciTech Connect

    Day, W.H.

    1999-07-01

    This paper represents the Gas Turbine Association's view of the gas turbine industry's R and D needs following the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program which is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Some of this information was discussed at the workshop Next Generation Gas Turbine Power Systems, which was held in Austin, TX, February 9--10, 1999, sponsored by DOE-Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), reference 1. The general idea is to establish public-private partnerships to reduce the risks involved in the development of new technologies which results in public benefits. The recommendations in this paper are focused on gas turbines > 30 MW output. Specific GTA recommendations on smaller systems are not addressed here. They will be addressed in conjunction with DOE-Energy Efficiency.

  11. Surgery of the turbinates and “empty nose” syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scheithauer, Marc Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Surgical therapy of the inferior and/or middle turbinate is indicated when conservative treatment options have failed. The desired goal is a reduction of the soft tissue volume of the turbinates regarding the individual anatomic findings, whilst simultaneously conserving as much mucosa as possible. As the turbinates serve as a functional entity within the nose, they ensure climatisation, humidification and cleaning of the inhaled air. Thus free nasal breathing means a decent quality of life, as well. Regarding the multitude of different surgical techniques, we confirm that no ideal standard technique for turbinate reduction has been developed so far. Moreover, there is a lack of prospective and comparable long-term studies, which makes it difficult to recommend evidence-based surgical techniques. However, the anterior turbinoplasty seems to fulfil the preconditions of limited tissue reduction and mucosa-preservation, and therefore it is the method of choice today. Radical resection of the turbinates may lead to severe functional disturbances developing a secondary atrophic rhinitis. The “empty nose” syndrome is a specific entity within the secondary atrophic rhinitis where intranasal changes in airflow result in disturbed climatisation and also interfere with pulmonary function. Results deriving from an actual in vivo study of climatisation and airflow in “empty nose” patients are presented. PMID:22073107

  12. Conceptual design study of an improved gas turbine powertrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, W. I.

    1980-01-01

    The conceptual design for an improved gas turbine (IGT) powertrain and vehicle was investigated. Cycle parameters, rotor systems, and component technology were reviewed and a dual rotor gas turbine concept was selected and optimized for best vehicle fuel economy. The engine had a two stage centrifugal compressor with a design pressure ratio of 5.28, two axial turbine stages with advanced high temperature alloy integral wheels, variable power turbine nozzle for turbine temperature and output torque control, catalytic combustor, and annular ceramic recuperator. The engine was rated at 54.81 kW, using water injection on hot days to maintain vehicle acceleration. The estimated vehicle fuel economy was 11.9 km/l in the combined driving cycle, 43 percent over the 1976 compact automobile. The estimated IGT production vehicle selling price was 10 percent over the comparable piston engine vehicle, but the improved fuel economy and reduced maintenance and repair resulted in a 9 percent reduction in life cycle cost.

  13. Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Mesh Generator

    2014-01-24

    VAWTGen is a mesh generator for creating a finite element beam mesh of arbitrary vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWT). The software accepts input files specifying tower and blade structural and aerodynamic descriptions and constructs a VAWT using a minimal set of inputs. VAWTs with an arbitrary number of blades can be constructed with or without a central tower. Strut connections between the tower and blades can be specified in an arbitrary manner. The software also facilitatesmore » specifying arbitrary joints between structural components and concentrated structural tenns (mass and stiffness). The output files which describe the VAWT configuration are intended to be used with the Offshore Wind ENergy Simulation (OWENS) Toolkit software for structural dynamics analysis of VAWTs. Furthermore, VAWTGen is useful for visualizing output from the OWENS analysis software.« less

  14. Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Mesh Generator

    SciTech Connect

    2014-01-24

    VAWTGen is a mesh generator for creating a finite element beam mesh of arbitrary vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWT). The software accepts input files specifying tower and blade structural and aerodynamic descriptions and constructs a VAWT using a minimal set of inputs. VAWTs with an arbitrary number of blades can be constructed with or without a central tower. Strut connections between the tower and blades can be specified in an arbitrary manner. The software also facilitates specifying arbitrary joints between structural components and concentrated structural tenns (mass and stiffness). The output files which describe the VAWT configuration are intended to be used with the Offshore Wind ENergy Simulation (OWENS) Toolkit software for structural dynamics analysis of VAWTs. Furthermore, VAWTGen is useful for visualizing output from the OWENS analysis software.

  15. Calculation of gas turbine characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamaev, B. I.; Murashko, V. L.

    2016-04-01

    The reasons and regularities of vapor flow and turbine parameter variation depending on the total pressure drop rate π* and rotor rotation frequency n are studied, as exemplified by a two-stage compressor turbine of a power-generating gas turbine installation. The turbine characteristic is calculated in a wide range of mode parameters using the method in which analytical dependences provide high accuracy for the calculated flow output angle and different types of gas dynamic losses are determined with account of the influence of blade row geometry, blade surface roughness, angles, compressibility, Reynolds number, and flow turbulence. The method provides satisfactory agreement of results of calculation and turbine testing. In the design mode, the operation conditions for the blade rows are favorable, the flow output velocities are close to the optimal ones, the angles of incidence are small, and the flow "choking" modes (with respect to consumption) in the rows are absent. High performance and a nearly axial flow behind the turbine are obtained. Reduction of the rotor rotation frequency and variation of the pressure drop change the flow parameters, the parameters of the stages and the turbine, as well as the form of the characteristic. In particular, for decreased n, nonmonotonic variation of the second stage reactivity with increasing π* is observed. It is demonstrated that the turbine characteristic is mainly determined by the influence of the angles of incidence and the velocity at the output of the rows on the losses and the flow output angle. The account of the growing flow output angle due to the positive angle of incidence for decreased rotation frequencies results in a considerable change of the characteristic: poorer performance, redistribution of the pressure drop at the stages, and change of reactivities, growth of the turbine capacity, and change of the angle and flow velocity behind the turbine.

  16. Accepters and Rejecters of Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Harriett A.; Elton, Charles F.

    Personality differences between students who accept or reject proffered counseling assistance were investigated by comparing personality traits of 116 male students at the University of Kentucky who accepted or rejected letters of invitation to group counseling. Factor analysis of Omnibus Personality Inventory (OPI) scores to two groups of 60 and…

  17. Cone penetrometer acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Boechler, G.N.

    1996-09-19

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents the results of acceptance test procedure WHC-SD-WM-ATR-151. Included in this report is a summary of the tests, the results and issues, the signature and sign- off ATP pages, and a summarized table of the specification vs. ATP section that satisfied the specification.

  18. TURBINE COOLING FLOW AND THE RESULTING DECREASE IN TURBINE EFFICIENCY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauntner, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    This algorithm has been developed for calculating both the quantity of compressor bleed flow required to cool a turbine and the resulting decrease in efficiency due to cooling air injected into the gas stream. Because of the trend toward higher turbine inlet temperatures, it is important to accurately predict the required cooling flow. This program is intended for use with axial flow, air-breathing jet propulsion engines with a variety of airfoil cooling configurations. The algorithm results have compared extremely well with figures given by major engine manufacturers for given bulk metal temperatures and cooling configurations. The program calculates the required cooling flow and corresponding decrease in stage efficiency for each row of airfoils throughout the turbine. These values are combined with the thermodynamic efficiency of the uncooled turbine to predict the total bleed airflow required and the altered turbine efficiency. There are ten airfoil cooling configurations and the algorithm allows a different option for each row of cooled airfoils. Materials technology is incorporated and requires the date of the first year of service for the turbine stator vane and rotor blade. The user must specify pressure, temperatures, and gas flows into the turbine. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 3080 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 61K of 8 bit bytes. This program was developed in 1980.

  19. Wind turbine rotor

    SciTech Connect

    Baskin, J. M.; Miller, G. E.; Wiesner, W.

    1985-12-10

    A fixed pitch wind turbine rotor is teeter mounted onto a low speed input shaft which is connected to the input of a step-up transmission. The output of the transmission is connected to a rotary pole amplitude modulated induction machine which is operable as a generator at a plurality of discreet speeds of rotation and is also operable as a startup motor for the rotor. A switch responsive to the rotational speed of the wind turbine rotor switches the generator from one speed of operation to the other. The rotor hub and the inner body portions of two blades which extend radially outwardly in opposite directions from the hub, are constructed from steel. The outer end portions of the blade are constructed from a lighter material, such as wood, and are both thinner and narrower than the remainder of the rotor. The outer end section of each blade includes a main body portion and a trailing edge portion which is hinge-connected to the main body portion. Each blade includes a centrifugal force operated positioning means which normally holds the drag brake section in a retracted position, but operates in response to a predetermined magnitude of centrifugal force to move the drag brake section into its deployed position. Each blade has an airfoil cross section and each blade has a plus twist inner portion adjacent the hub changing to first a zero twist and then a minus twist as it extends radially outwardly from the hub.

  20. R and D for improved efficiency small steam turbines, Phase II. Report No. 1380-3. First quarterly technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Dr., W.; Maillar, K. M.; Bender, D. A.; Brassert, W. L.; Capone, P. A.; Carter, A. F.; Heitmann, A. M.; Holland, J. E.; Lord, R. E.; Thirumalaisamy, S. N.

    1980-09-01

    Progress made in the second phase of a two-phase research, design and prototype development program is presented. Phase II consists of the detailed design of the prototype radial inflow steam turbine configuration selected during the first phase and subsequent fabrication and testing. At this time, the detailed aerodynamic design of the stage flowpath has been completed except for the crossover piping from the first stage exhaust to the second stage inlet. In addition, mechanical design effort has resulted in a definition of a rotor system. The aerodynamic design included the optimization of the overall flowpath geometry of the stages specified in the initial phase of the program. The detailed aerodynamic designs of the rotor blades, nozzle vanes, scroll and diffuser were based on the optimized geometry. The final blading selected for the stage is a radial design with 26 blades, 13 of which are splitters. Sixteen nozzle vanes have been specified. The mechanical design of the rotor system to date has included the specification of the rotor wheels and shafts with their polygon connection, and the design of the thrust and journal bearings and the gearing. In addition, various shaft sealing arrangements have been evaluated, subject to the constraints indicated by initial rotordynamic analyses. Indications are that a reasonably effective labyrinth seal is not precluded by shaft length limitations. As this type of seal has been long accepted by steam turbine users, its use in the prototype is most likely. Proven components have been specified wherever possible, i.e., redesign/development could not be justified. The rotor system has been designed for at least 100,000 hours life with the most severe operating conditions and loads. The system cannot be considered complete, however, until dynamic response of the rotors for all possible operating conditions is shown to be within acceptable limits.

  1. Towers for Offshore Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurian, V. J.; Narayanan, S. P.; Ganapathy, C.

    2010-06-01

    Increasing energy demand coupled with pollution free production of energy has found a viable solution in wind energy. Land based windmills have been utilized for power generation for more than two thousand years. In modern times wind generated power has become popular in many countries. Offshore wind turbines are being used in a number of countries to tap the energy from wind over the oceans and convert to electric energy. The advantages of offshore wind turbines as compared to land are that offshore winds flow at higher speed than onshore winds and the more available space. In some land based settings, for better efficiency, turbines are separated as much as 10 rotor diameters from each other. In offshore applications where only two wind directions are likely to predominate, the distances between the turbines arranged in a line can be shortened to as little as two or four rotor diameters. Today, more than a dozen offshore European wind facilities with turbine ratings of 450 kw to 3.6 MW exist offshore in very shallow waters of 5 to 12 m. Compared to onshore wind turbines, offshore wind turbines are bigger and the tower height in offshore are in the range of 60 to 80 m. The water depths in oceans where offshore turbines can be located are within 30 m. However as the distance from land increases, the costs of building and maintaining the turbines and transmitting the power back to shore also increase sharply. The objective of this paper is to review the parameters of design for the maximum efficiency of offshore wind turbines and to develop types offshore towers to support the wind turbines. The methodology of design of offshore towers to support the wind turbine would be given and the environmental loads for the design of the towers would be calculated for specific cases. The marine corrosion on the towers and the methods to control the corrosion also would be briefly presented. As the wind speeds tend to increase with distance from the shore, turbines build father

  2. Real-Time Closed Loop Modulated Turbine Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyam, Vikram; Culley, Dennis E.; Eldridge, Jeffrey; Jones, Scott; Woike, Mark; Cuy, Michael

    2014-01-01

    It has been noted by industry that in addition to dramatic variations of temperature over a given blade surface, blade-to-blade variations also exist despite identical design. These variations result from manufacturing variations, uneven wear and deposition over the life of the part as well as limitations in the uniformity of coolant distribution in the baseline cooling design. It is proposed to combine recent advances in optical sensing, actuation, and film cooling concepts to develop a workable active, closed-loop modulated turbine cooling system to improve by 10 to 20 the turbine thermal state over the flight mission, to improve engine life and to dramatically reduce turbine cooling air usage and aircraft fuel burn. A reduction in oxides of nitrogen (NOx) can also be achieved by using the excess coolant to improve mixing in the combustor especially for rotorcraft engines. Recent patents filed by industry and universities relate to modulating endwall cooling using valves. These schemes are complex, add weight and are limited to the endwalls. The novelty of the proposed approach is twofold 1) Fluidic diverters that have no moving parts are used to modulate cooling and can operate under a wide range of conditions and environments. 2) Real-time optical sensing to map the thermal state of the turbine has never been attempted in realistic engine conditions.

  3. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) Technology Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Technical work on the design and effort leading to the testing of a 74.5 kW (100 hp) automotive gas turbine engine is reviewed. Development of the engine compressor, gasifier turbine, power turbine, combustor, regenerator, and secondary system is discussed. Ceramic materials development and the application of such materials in the gas turbine engine components is described.

  4. Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The Turbine Engine Section Technology (HOST) Project Office of the Lewis Research Center sponsored a workshop to discuss current research pertinent to turbine engine hot section durability problems. Presentations were made concerning hot section environment and the behavior of combustion liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes.

  5. Cable connected active tuned mass dampers for control of in-plane vibrations of wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, B.; Basu, B.

    2014-11-01

    In-plane vibrations of wind turbine blades are of concern in modern multi-megawatt wind turbines. Today's turbines with capacities of up to 7.5 MW have very large, flexible blades. As blades have grown longer the increasing flexibility has led to vibration problems. Vibration of blades can reduce the power produced by the turbine and decrease the fatigue life of the turbine. In this paper a new active control strategy is designed and implemented to control the in-plane vibration of large wind turbine blades which in general is not aerodynamically damped. A cable connected active tuned mass damper (CCATMD) system is proposed for the mitigation of in-plane blade vibration. An Euler-Lagrangian wind turbine model based on energy formulation has been developed for this purpose which considers the structural dynamics of the system and the interaction between in-plane and out-of-plane vibrations and also the interaction between the blades and the tower including the CCATMDs. The CCATMDs are located inside the blades and are controlled by an LQR controller. The turbine is subject to turbulent aerodynamic loading simulated using a modification to the classic Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory with turbulence generated from rotationally sampled spectra. The turbine is also subject to gravity loading. The effect of centrifugal stiffening of the rotating blades has also been considered. Results show that the use of the proposed new active control scheme significantly reduces the in-plane vibration of large, flexible wind turbine blades.

  6. Fixed-time life tests based on fuzzy life characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanagawa, Akihiro; Ohta, Hiroshi

    1992-06-01

    This paper deals with a reliability demonstration test with type-I censoring and presents a formulation based on fuzzy-set theory. Acceptable and rejectable MTBFs are represented in terms of a fuzzy concept, and Bayes' theorem plays an important role in the formulation. The proposed life test is useful when it is difficult to specify acceptable and rejectable MTBFs strictly.

  7. Potential benefits of a ceramic thermal barrier coating on large power generation gas turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, J. S.; Nainiger, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating design option offers benefit in terms of reduced electricity costs when used in utility gas turbines. Options considered include: increased firing temperature, increased component life, reduced cooling air requirements, and increased corrosion resistance (resulting in increased tolerance for dirty fuels). Performance and cost data were obtained. Simple, recuperated and combined cycle applications were considered, and distillate and residual fuels were assumed. The results indicate that thermal barrier coatings could produce large electricity cost savings if these coatings permit turbine operation with residual fuels at distillate-rated firing temperatures. The results also show that increased turbine inlet temperature can result in substantial savings in fuel and capital costs.

  8. Combustion Dynamics and Control for Ultra Low Emissions in Aircraft Gas-Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Future aircraft engines must provide ultra-low emissions and high efficiency at low cost while maintaining the reliability and operability of present day engines. The demands for increased performance and decreased emissions have resulted in advanced combustor designs that are critically dependent on efficient fuel/air mixing and lean operation. However, all combustors, but most notably lean-burning low-emissions combustors, are susceptible to combustion instabilities. These instabilities are typically caused by the interaction of the fluctuating heat release of the combustion process with naturally occurring acoustic resonances. These interactions can produce large pressure oscillations within the combustor and can reduce component life and potentially lead to premature mechanical failures. Active Combustion Control which consists of feedback-based control of the fuel-air mixing process can provide an approach to achieving acceptable combustor dynamic behavior while minimizing emissions, and thus can provide flexibility during the combustor design process. The NASA Glenn Active Combustion Control Technology activity aims to demonstrate active control in a realistic environment relevant to aircraft engines by providing experiments tied to aircraft gas turbine combustors. The intent is to allow the technology maturity of active combustion control to advance to eventual demonstration in an engine environment. Work at NASA Glenn has shown that active combustion control, utilizing advanced algorithms working through high frequency fuel actuation, can effectively suppress instabilities in a combustor which emulates the instabilities found in an aircraft gas turbine engine. Current efforts are aimed at extending these active control technologies to advanced ultra-low-emissions combustors such as those employing multi-point lean direct injection.

  9. Analyzing the influence of combustion gas on a gas turbine by radiation thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan; Wang, Lixin; Feng, Chi; Kipngetich, Ketui Daniel

    2015-11-01

    High temperature is the main focus in ongoing development of gas turbines. With increasing turbine inlet temperature, turbine blades undergo complex thermal and structural loading subjecting them to large thermal gradients and, consequently, severe thermal stresses and strain. In order to improve the reliability, safety, and service life of blades, accurate measurement of turbine blade temperature is necessary. A gas turbine can generate high-temperature and high-pressure gas that interferes greatly with radiation from turbine blades. In addition, if the gas along the optical path is not completely transparent, blade temperature measurement is subject to significant measurement error in the gas absorption spectrum. In this study, we analyze gas turbine combustion gases using the κ-distribution method combined with the HITEMP and HITRAN databases to calculate the transmission and emissivity of mixed gases. We propose spectral window methods to analyze the radiation characteristics of high-temperature gas under different spectral ranges, which can be used to select the wavelengths used in multispectral temperature measurement on turbine blades and estimate measurement error in the part of the spectrum with smaller influence (transmission > 0.98).

  10. Three-dimensional CFD simulation and aeroacoustics analysis of wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili, Fardin

    Wind turbines release aerodynamic noise that is one of the most barriers in wind energy development and public acceptance. Aeroacoustics is the noise generated by the interaction of blades, specifically the tip and trailing edge, with inflow turbulence structures and subsequent boundary layer separation and vortex shedding in the wake region. The objective of this study is to analyze the effects of different aerodynamic conditions on the performance and the aeroacoustic issue of wind turbines. Aerodynamic and aeroacoustic operation of a wind turbine is analyzed using a three-dimensional CFD and aeroacoustics model and using a commercial CFD Software, STAR-CCM+. Blades are modeled based on NREL S825 airfoil shape due to its high maximum lift and low profile drag. Wind turbine aerodynamic performance as well as broadband aeroacoustic noise with a focus on the trailing end, tip, inflow turbulence and boundary layer separation is investigated over a range of operating conditions.

  11. Design and development of a ceramic radial turbine for the AGT101

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, D. G.; Gupta, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    An acceptable and feasible ceramic turbine wheel design has been achieved, and the relevant temperature, stress, and success probability analyses are discussed. The design is described, the materials selection presented, and the engine cycle conditions analysis parameters shown. Measured MOR four-point strengths are indicated for room and elevated temperatures, and engine conditions are analyzed for various cycle states, materials, power states, turbine inlet temperatures, and speeds. An advanced gas turbine ceramic turbine rotor thermal and stress model is developed, and cumulative probability of survival is shown for first and third-year properties of SiC and Si3N4 rotors under different operating conditions, computed for both blade and hub regions. Temperature and stress distributions for steady-state and worst-case shutdown transients are depicted.

  12. Integrating certification into the US Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory Turbine Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Butterfield, C P; Link, H; Smith, B

    1997-07-01

    The Wind Turbine Research Program conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) employs a comprehensive engineering development process which includes regular design, testing, and documentation reviews throughout the process. This process follows accepted international procedures, including the International Standards Organization ISO 9001. International wind turbine certification practice typically requires a review of only the final design and testing results of a wind turbine system. Using this approach, if the design does not meet requirements, the designer is faced with the lengthy and inefficient process of rerunning engineering calculations or tests or even redesigning major components. NREL has recognized the similarity between its development process and international certification practice and has integrated the two. The result is a comprehensive engineering development process, which enables subcontractors participating in the DOE/NREL Wind Turbine Research Program to develop a mature product, which is ready for commercialization and certification.

  13. Experimental Investigation of A Twin Shaft Micro Gas-Turbine System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadig, Hussain; Sulaiman, Shaharin Anwar; Ibrahim, Idris

    2013-06-01

    Due to the fast depletion of fossil fuels and its negative impact on the environment, more attention has been concentrated to find new resources, policies and technologies, which meet the global needs with regard to fuel sustainability and emissions. In this paper, as a step to study the effect of burning low calorific value fuels on gas-turbine performance; a 50 kW slightly pressurized non-premixed tubular combustor along with turbocharger based twin shaft micro gas-turbine was designed and fabricated. A series of tests were conducted to characterize the system using LPG fuel. The tests include the analysis of the temperature profile, pressure and combustor efficiency as well as air fuel ratio and speed of the second turbine. The tests showed a stable operation with acceptable efficiency, air fuel ratio, and temperature gradient for the single and twin shaft turbines.

  14. Energy potential and early operational experience for large wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, W. H.; Thomas, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Projections for the total potential output of large wind turbines in the U.S. are reviewed. NASA has developed nine large windpowered generators, of 100 kW, 200 kW, 2 MW, and 2.5 MW capacities, with rotors 100-300 ft in diameter, and all with horizontal axes. Approximately 214,000 sq miles of the U.S. have been determined as having substantial wind regimes and terrain suitable for large wind turbine siting. This translates into 340,000 Mod 2 (2.5 MW) wind turbines producing 4.9 quads of electricity annually, equivalent to saving 2.5 billion barrels of oil/yr. The cost of electricity is seen as the critical factor in utility acceptance of large wind turbines, and the Mod 2 machines are noted to achieve the 2-4 cents/kWh (1977 dollars) COE which is necessary. Problems such as pollution, including visual, auditory, EM, and land use difficulties are considered, and solutions are indicated.

  15. Power fluctuations smoothing and regulations in wind turbine generator systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babazadehrokni, Hamed

    Wind is one of the most popular renewable energy sources and it has the potential to become the biggest energy source in future. Since the wind does not always blow constantly, the output wind power is not constant which may make some problem for the power grid. According to the grid code which is set by independent system operator, ISO, wind turbine generator systems need to follow some standards such as the predetermined acceptable power fluctuations. In order to smooth the output powers, the energy storage system and some power electronics modules are employed. The utilized power electronics modules in the wind turbine system can pursue many different goals, such as maintaining the voltage stability, frequency stability, providing the available and predetermined output active and reactive power. On the other side, the energy storage system can help achieving some of these goals but its main job is to store the extra energy when not needed and release the stored energy when needed. The energy storage system can be designed in different sizes, material and also combination of different energy storage systems (hybrid designs). Combination of power electronics devises and also energy storage system helps the wind turbine systems to smooth the output power according to the provided standards. In addition prediction of wind speed may improve the performance of wind turbine generator systems. In this research study all these three topics are studied and the obtained results are written in 10 papers which 7 of them are published and three of them are under process.

  16. H gas turbine combined cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Corman, J.

    1995-10-01

    A major step has been taken in the development of the Next Power Generation System - {open_quotes}H{close_quotes} Technology Combined Cycle. This new gas turbine combined-cycle system increases thermal performance to the 60% level by increasing gas turbine operating temperature to 1430 C (2600 F) at a pressure ratio of 23 to 1. Although this represents a significant increase in operating temperature for the gas turbine, the potential for single digit NOx levels (based upon 15% O{sub 2}, in the exhaust) has been retained. The combined effect of performance increase and environmental control is achieved by an innovative closed loop steam cooling system which tightly integrates the gas turbine and steam turbine cycles. The {open_quotes}H{close_quotes} Gas Turbine Combined Cycle System meets the goals and objectives of the DOE Advanced Turbine System Program. The development and demonstration of this new system is being carried out as part of the Industrial/Government cooperative agreement under the ATS Program. This program will achieve first commercial operation of this new system before the end of the century.

  17. Two stage turbine for rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, Joseph P.

    1993-11-01

    The aerodynamic design and rig test evaluation of a small counter-rotating turbine system is described. The advanced turbine airfoils were designed and tested by Pratt & Whitney. The technology represented by this turbine is being developed for a turbopump to be used in an advanced upper stage rocket engine. The advanced engine will use a hydrogen expander cycle and achieve high performance through efficient combustion of hydrogen/oxygen propellants, high combustion pressure, and high area ratio exhaust nozzle expansion. Engine performance goals require that the turbopump drive turbines achieve high efficiency at low gas flow rates. The low mass flow rates and high operating pressures result in very small airfoil heights and diameters. The high efficiency and small size requirements present a challenging turbine design problem. The shrouded axial turbine blades are 50 percent reaction with a maximum thickness to chord ratio near 1. At 6 deg from the tangential direction, the nozzle and blade exit flow angles are well below the traditional design minimum limits. The blade turning angle of 160 deg also exceeds the maximum limits used in traditional turbine designs.

  18. Two stage turbine for rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.

    1993-01-01

    The aerodynamic design and rig test evaluation of a small counter-rotating turbine system is described. The advanced turbine airfoils were designed and tested by Pratt & Whitney. The technology represented by this turbine is being developed for a turbopump to be used in an advanced upper stage rocket engine. The advanced engine will use a hydrogen expander cycle and achieve high performance through efficient combustion of hydrogen/oxygen propellants, high combustion pressure, and high area ratio exhaust nozzle expansion. Engine performance goals require that the turbopump drive turbines achieve high efficiency at low gas flow rates. The low mass flow rates and high operating pressures result in very small airfoil heights and diameters. The high efficiency and small size requirements present a challenging turbine design problem. The shrouded axial turbine blades are 50 percent reaction with a maximum thickness to chord ratio near 1. At 6 deg from the tangential direction, the nozzle and blade exit flow angles are well below the traditional design minimum limits. The blade turning angle of 160 deg also exceeds the maximum limits used in traditional turbine designs.

  19. Reliability improvements and modernization of low pressure turbine cylinders for steam-turbine generator power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Aneja, I.K. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the use of 2-D and 3-D finite element analysis to determine the cause of distress in certain components in the low pressure turbines for large power plants. The same finite element models are then used for parametric evaluation of various alternates to increase component fatigue life. Finally, the 3-D finite element model is used for designing a new cylinder which can withstand severe cyclic duty operation requirements and can also be used for modernization of existing old power plants.

  20. Synchronization of the DOE/NASA 100-kilowatt wind turbine generator with a large utility network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    The DOE/NASA 100 kilowatt wind turbine generator system was synchronized with a large utility network. The system equipments and procedures associated with the synchronization process were described. Time history traces of typical synchronizations were presented indicating that power and current transients resulting from the synchronizing procedure are limited to acceptable magnitudes.

  1. Optimization of hydraulic turbine diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravec, Prokop; Hliník, Juraj; Rudolf, Pavel

    2016-03-01

    Hydraulic turbine diffuser recovers pressure energy from residual kinetic energy on turbine runner outlet. Efficiency of this process is especially important for high specific speed turbines, where almost 50% of available head is utilized within diffuser. Magnitude of the coefficient of pressure recovery can be significantly influenced by designing its proper shape. Present paper focuses on mathematical shape optimization method coupled with CFD. First method is based on direct search Nelder-Mead algorithm, while the second method employs adjoint solver and morphing. Results obtained with both methods are discussed and their advantages/disadvantages summarized.

  2. Advanced ceramic coating development for industrial/utility gas turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersson, C. A.; Lau, S. K.; Bratton, R. J.; Lee, S. Y.; Rieke, K. L.; Allen, J.; Munson, K. E.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of ceramic coatings on the lifetimes of metal turbine components and on the performance of a utility turbine, as well as of the turbine operational cycle on the ceramic coatings were determined. When operating the turbine under conditions of constant cooling flow, the first row blades run 55K cooler, and as a result, have 10 times the creep rupture life, 10 times the low cycle fatigue life and twice the corrosion life with only slight decreases in both specific power and efficiency. When operating the turbine at constant metal temperature and reduced cooling flow, both specific power and efficiency increases, with no change in component lifetime. The most severe thermal transient of the turbine causes the coating bond stresses to approach 60% of the bond strengths. Ceramic coating failures was studied. Analytic models based on fracture mechanics theories, combined with measured properties quantitatively assessed both single and multiple thermal cycle failures which allowed the prediction of coating lifetime. Qualitative models for corrosion failures are also presented.

  3. 11. Power room, view of Westinghouse steam turbine: turbine RPM6,000, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Power room, view of Westinghouse steam turbine: turbine RPM-6,000, governor RPM-1017, turbine number 8695, manufactured by Westinghouse Electric Manufacturing company, East Pittsburg, Pennsylvania - Norfolk Manufacturing Company Cotton Mill, 90 Milton Street, Dedham, Norfolk County, MA

  4. Capability Extension to the Turbine Off-Design Computer Program AXOD With Applications to the Highly Loaded Fan-Drive Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shu-cheng S.

    2011-01-01

    The axial flow turbine off-design computer program AXOD has been upgraded to include the outlet guide vane (OGV) into its acceptable turbine configurations. The mathematical bases and the techniques used for the code implementation are described and discussed in lengths in this paper. This extended capability is verified and validated with two cases of highly loaded fan-drive turbines, designed and tested in the V/STOL Program of NASA. The first case is a 4 1/2-stage turbine with an average stage loading factor of 4.66, designed by Pratt & Whitney Aircraft. The second case is a 3 1/2-stage turbine with an average loading factor of 4.0, designed in-house by the NASA Lewis Research Center (now the NASA Glenn Research Center). Both cases were experimentally tested in the turbine facility located at the Glenn Research Center. The processes conducted in these studies are described in detail in this paper, and the results in comparison with the experimental data are presented and discussed. The comparisons between the AXOD results and the experimental data are in excellent agreement.

  5. Pump for spawning channels includes a turbine and motor. Turbine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Pump for spawning channels includes a turbine and motor. Turbine is Berkeley H-17500, model 8C2PH, Serial No. 2889, B.M. No. 4886 - Berkeley Pump Co. The Motor is G.E. Induction Motor, model 5K4256XA3YI, serial no. GAJ728337, Tri-Clad. View looking northeast. - Prairie Creek Fish Hatchery, Hwy. 101, Orick, Humboldt County, CA

  6. A simulation model for risk assessment of turbine wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safie, Fayssal M.; Hage, Richard T.

    A simulation model has been successfully developed to evaluate the risk of the Space Shuttle auxiliary power unit (APU) turbine wheels for a specific inspection policy. Besides being an effective tool for risk/reliability evaluation, the simulation model also allows the analyst to study the trade-offs between wheel reliability, wheel life, inspection interval, and rejection crack size. For example, in the APU application, sensitivity analysis results showed that the wheel life limit has the least effect on wheel reliability when compared to the effect of the inspection interval and the rejection crack size. In summary, the simulation model developed represents a flexible tool to predict turbine wheel reliability and study the risk under different inspection policies.

  7. A simulation model for risk assessment of turbine wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safie, Fayssal M.; Hage, Richard T.

    1991-01-01

    A simulation model has been successfully developed to evaluate the risk of the Space Shuttle auxiliary power unit (APU) turbine wheels for a specific inspection policy. Besides being an effective tool for risk/reliability evaluation, the simulation model also allows the analyst to study the trade-offs between wheel reliability, wheel life, inspection interval, and rejection crack size. For example, in the APU application, sensitivity analysis results showed that the wheel life limit has the least effect on wheel reliability when compared to the effect of the inspection interval and the rejection crack size. In summary, the simulation model developed represents a flexible tool to predict turbine wheel reliability and study the risk under different inspection policies.

  8. Turbine blade cooling

    DOEpatents

    Staub, Fred Wolf; Willett, Fred Thomas

    1999-07-20

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

  9. Turbine blade cooling

    DOEpatents

    Staub, Fred Wolf; Willett, Fred Thomas

    2000-01-01

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

  10. Turbine blade cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Staub, F.W.; Willett, F.T.

    1999-07-20

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number. 13 figs.

  11. Gas turbine combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burd, Steven W. (Inventor); Cheung, Albert K. (Inventor); Dempsey, Dae K. (Inventor); Hoke, James B. (Inventor); Kramer, Stephen K. (Inventor); Ols, John T. (Inventor); Smith, Reid Dyer Curtis (Inventor); Sowa, William A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A gas turbine engine has a combustor module including an annular combustor having a liner assembly that defines an annular combustion chamber having a length, L. The liner assembly includes a radially inner liner, a radially outer liner that circumscribes the inner liner, and a bulkhead, having a height, H1, which extends between the respective forward ends of the inner liner and the outer liner. The combustor has an exit height, H3, at the respective aft ends of the inner liner and the outer liner interior. The annular combustor has a ratio H1/H3 having a value less than or equal to 1.7. The annular combustor may also have a ration L/H3 having a value less than or equal to 6.0.

  12. Multiple piece turbine blade

    DOEpatents

    Kimmel, Keith D

    2012-05-29

    A turbine rotor blade with a spar and shell construction, the spar including an internal cooling supply channel extending from an inlet end on a root section and ending near the tip end, and a plurality of external cooling channels formed on both side of the spar, where a middle external cooling channel is connected to the internal cooling supply channels through a row of holes located at a middle section of the channels. The spar and the shell are held together by hooks that define serpentine flow passages for the cooling air and include an upper serpentine flow circuit and a lower serpentine flow circuit. the serpentine flow circuits all discharge into a leading edge passage or a trailing edge passage.

  13. Turbine Blade Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKay, Rebecca

    2001-01-01

    The High Speed Research Airfoil Alloy Program developed a fourth-generation alloy with up to an +85 F increase in creep rupture capability over current production airfoil alloys. Since improved strength is typically obtained when the limits of microstructural stability are exceeded slightly, it is not surprising that this alloy has a tendency to exhibit microstructural instabilities after high temperature exposures. This presentation will discuss recent results obtained on coated fourth-generation alloys for subsonic turbine blade applications under the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program. Progress made in reducing microstructural instabilities in these alloys will be presented. In addition, plans will be presented for advanced alloy development and for computational modeling, which will aid future alloy development efforts.

  14. Sprayed skin turbine component

    DOEpatents

    Allen, David B

    2013-06-04

    Fabricating a turbine component (50) by casting a core structure (30), forming an array of pits (24) in an outer surface (32) of the core structure, depositing a transient liquid phase (TLP) material (40) on the outer surface of the core structure, the TLP containing a melting-point depressant, depositing a skin (42) on the outer surface of the core structure over the TLP material, and heating the assembly, thus forming both a diffusion bond and a mechanical interlock between the skin and the core structure. The heating diffuses the melting-point depressant away from the interface. Subsurface cooling channels (35) may be formed by forming grooves (34) in the outer surface of the core structure, filling the grooves with a fugitive filler (36), depositing and bonding the skin (42), then removing the fugitive material.

  15. Wind turbine rotor aileron

    DOEpatents

    Coleman, Clint; Kurth, William T.

    1994-06-14

    A wind turbine has a rotor with at least one blade which has an aileron which is adjusted by an actuator. A hinge has two portions, one for mounting a stationary hinge arm to the blade, the other for coupling to the aileron actuator. Several types of hinges can be used, along with different actuators. The aileron is designed so that it has a constant chord with a number of identical sub-assemblies. The leading edge of the aileron has at least one curved portion so that the aileron does not vent over a certain range of angles, but vents if the position is outside the range. A cyclic actuator can be mounted to the aileron to adjust the position periodically. Generally, the aileron will be adjusted over a range related to the rotational position of the blade. A method for operating the cyclic assembly is also described.

  16. PREDICTING TURBINE STAGE PERFORMANCE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    This program was developed to predict turbine stage performance taking into account the effects of complex passage geometries. The method uses a quasi-3D inviscid-flow analysis iteratively coupled to calculated losses so that changes in losses result in changes in the flow distribution. In this manner the effects of both the geometry on the flow distribution and the flow distribution on losses are accounted for. The flow may be subsonic or shock-free transonic. The blade row may be fixed or rotating, and the blades may be twisted and leaned. This program has been applied to axial and radial turbines, and is helpful in the analysis of mixed flow machines. This program is a combination of the flow analysis programs MERIDL and TSONIC coupled to the boundary layer program BLAYER. The subsonic flow solution is obtained by a finite difference, stream function analysis. Transonic blade-to-blade solutions are obtained using information from the finite difference, stream function solution with a reduced flow factor. Upstream and downstream flow variables may vary from hub to shroud and provision is made to correct for loss of stagnation pressure. Boundary layer analyses are made to determine profile and end-wall friction losses. Empirical loss models are used to account for incidence, secondary flow, disc windage, and clearance losses. The total losses are then used to calculate stator, rotor, and stage efficiency. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 370/3033 under TSS with a central memory requirement of approximately 4.5 Megs of 8 bit bytes. This program was developed in 1985.

  17. Accepted scientific research works (abstracts).

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    These are the 39 accepted abstracts for IAYT's Symposium on Yoga Research (SYR) September 24-24, 2014 at the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health and published in the Final Program Guide and Abstracts. PMID:25645134

  18. L-286 Acceptance Test Record

    SciTech Connect

    HARMON, B.C.

    2000-01-14

    This document provides a detailed account of how the acceptance testing was conducted for Project L-286, ''200E Area Sanitary Water Plant Effluent Stream Reduction''. The testing of the L-286 instrumentation system was conducted under the direct supervision

  19. Computer-Aided Design Of Turbine Blades And Vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Wayne Q.

    1988-01-01

    Quasi-three-dimensional method for determining aerothermodynamic configuration of turbine uses computer-interactive analysis and design and computer-interactive graphics. Design procedure executed rapidly so designer easily repeats it to arrive at best performance, size, structural integrity, and engine life. Sequence of events in aerothermodynamic analysis and design starts with engine-balance equations and ends with boundary-layer analysis and viscous-flow calculations. Analysis-and-design procedure interactive and iterative throughout.

  20. Test evaluation of a laminated wood wind turbine blade concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    A series of tests conducted on a root end section of a laminated wood wind turbine blade are reported. The blade to hub transition of the wood blade uses steel studs cast into the wood D spar with a filled epoxy. Both individual studs and a full scale, short length, root section were tested. Results indicate that the bonded stud concept is more than adequate for both the 30 year life fatigue loads and for the high wind or hurricane gust loads.