Science.gov

Sample records for acceptance priority ranking

  1. Acceptance Priority Ranking & Annual Capacity Report

    SciTech Connect

    2004-07-31

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended (the Act), assigns the Federal Government the responsibility for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. Section 302(a) of the Act authorizes the Secretary to enter into contracts with the owners and generators of commercial spent nuclear fuel and/or high-level waste. The Standard Contract for Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and/or High-Level Radioactive Waste (Standard Contract) established the contractual mechanism for the Department's acceptance and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. It includes the requirements and operational responsibilities of the parties to the Standard Contract in the areas of administrative matters, fees, terms of payment, waste acceptance criteria, and waste acceptance procedures. The Standard Contract provides for the acquisition of title to the spent nuclear fuel and/or high-level waste by the Department, its transportation to Federal facilities, and its subsequent disposal.

  2. The highest-ranking rooster has priority to announce the break of dawn

    PubMed Central

    Shimmura, Tsuyoshi; Ohashi, Shosei; Yoshimura, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The “cock-a-doodle-doo” crowing of roosters, which symbolizes the break of dawn in many cultures, is controlled by the circadian clock. When one rooster announces the break of dawn, others in the vicinity immediately follow. Chickens are highly social animals, and they develop a linear and fixed hierarchy in small groups. We found that when chickens were housed in small groups, the top-ranking rooster determined the timing of predawn crowing. Specifically, the top-ranking rooster always started to crow first, followed by its subordinates, in descending order of social rank. When the top-ranking rooster was physically removed from a group, the second-ranking rooster initiated crowing. The presence of a dominant rooster significantly reduced the number of predawn crows in subordinates. However, the number of crows induced by external stimuli was independent of social rank, confirming that subordinates have the ability to crow. Although the timing of subordinates’ predawn crowing was strongly dependent on that of the top-ranking rooster, free-running periods of body temperature rhythms differed among individuals, and crowing rhythm did not entrain to a crowing sound stimulus. These results indicate that in a group situation, the top-ranking rooster has priority to announce the break of dawn, and that subordinate roosters are patient enough to wait for the top-ranking rooster’s first crow every morning and thus compromise their circadian clock for social reasons. PMID:26203594

  3. GROUNDWATER QUALITY MONITORING OF WESTERN OIL SHALE DEVELOPMENT: IDENTIFICATION AND PRIORITY RANKING OF POTENTIAL POLLUTION SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the development of a preliminary priority ranking of potential pollution sources with respect to groundwater quality and the associated pollutants for oil shale operations such as proposed for Federal Prototype Leases U-a and U-b in Eastern Utah. The methodol...

  4. Patterns of hypothetical wildlife management priorities as generated by consensus convergence models with ordinal ranked data.

    PubMed

    Lohr, Cheryl A; Cox, Linda J; Lepczyk, Christopher A

    2012-12-30

    Managing wildlife in a publically acceptable fashion is challenging and frequently results in conflict among stakeholders. Several methods of group decision making or decision-making models have been suggested by philosophers and applied scientists to address such conflict. We propose a modification to the data collection process for consensus convergence models (CCM) that may allow wildlife managers to incorporate the priorities of hundreds of stakeholders into management decisions. Previous CCM have relied on small focus groups that represent the broader community to supply data. We propose collecting data via surveys using rank-ordinal data, which will allow managers to assess the priorities of the broader community rather than relying on representatives. By using survey (especially electronic) data rather than focus groups CCM may be modified into a tool that provides informatic solutions to environmental management. Before the proposed modification of the CCM is applied to any wildlife management decisions, several questions pertaining to how various components of a CCM affect the prioritization of management options must be addressed. We used hypothetical CCM to assess how the number of stakeholders, viewpoints, and level of opposition between viewpoints influences the results of a CCM. We found that while the number of stakeholders alone does not influence the results, the number of unique viewpoints does influence the prioritization of management options. If only two extremely opposed groups of stakeholders are engaged in a conflict, CCM will not aid decision-making because the model forces the two sides to compromise and meet in the middle. If an intermediate group is added to the model, then the CCM will favor the intermediate viewpoint, as the diametrically opposed viewpoints balance out each other. CCM are vulnerable to outliers, which can be mitigated by a large sample of stakeholders. However, CCM also lose clarity as the sample size increases

  5. Risk ranking methodology for development of prioritization rationale and determination of priority order for conducting PHAs

    SciTech Connect

    Mannan, M.; Bily, V.J.

    1995-12-31

    The OSHA Process Safety Management rule requires covered facilities to develop and implement a holistic program to prevent or minimize the consequences of catastrophic releases of toxic, reactive, flammable, or explosive chemicals. A process hazards analysis is the centerpiece of the PSM rule. Process hazards analyses using specified methods must be conducted by all covered facilities by May 1997 and reviewed every five years from then. The objective of the process hazards analysis is a systematic review of what could go wrong and what safeguards must be implemented to prevent releases of hazardous chemicals. Paragraph (e) of the PSM rule specifically states that ``the priority order for conducting process hazards analysis (be) based on a rationale which includes such considerations as extent of the process hazards, number of potentially affected employees, age of the process, and operating history of the process``. This paper presents a systematic semi-quantitative methodology for developing the prioritization rationale and choosing the priority order for conducting process hazards analyses. The risk ranking methodology presented in this paper uses a weighted overall risk ranking index that takes into consideration all issues required by the OSHA rule. In addition, the methodology can be adapted to specific plants or corporate cultures to cover other issues as may be necessary.

  6. Priorities determination using novel analytic hierarchy process and median ranked sample set, case study of landfill siting criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younes, Mohammad K.; Nopiah, Z. M.; Basri, N. E. Ahmad; Basri, H.

    2015-02-01

    Integrating environmental, social, political, and economical attributes enhances the decision making process. Multi criteria decision making (MCDM) involves ambiguity and uncertainty due to various preferences. This study presents a model to minimize the uncertainty and ambiguity of human judgments by means of integrating the counter stakeholders with median ranked sample set (MRSS) and Analytic hierarchy process (AHP). The model uses landfill site selection as a MCDM problem. Sixteen experts belong to four clusters that are government, private, institution, and non-governmental organisations participated and their preferences were ranked in four by four matrix. Then the MRSS and the AHP were used to obtain the priorities of landfill siting criteria. Environmental criteria have the highest priority that equals to 48.1% and the distance from surface water, and the faults zones are the most important factors with priorities equal to 18% and 13.7% respectively. In conclusion, the hybrid approach that integrates counter stakeholders MRSS, and AHP is capable of being applied to complex decision making process and its outputs are justified.

  7. Risk ranking priority of carcinogenic and/or genotoxic environmental contaminants in food in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Vromman, V; Maghuin-Rogister, G; Vleminckx, C; Saegerman, C; Pussemier, L; Huyghebaert, A

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the risks of environmental carcinogenic and/or genotoxic contaminants in food. It describes, for each contaminant studied, the carcinogenicity and genotoxicity, the toxicological reference values, the exposure and the risk characterisation. The compounds studied were classified into 3 categories based on a risk assessment. Effects others than carcinogenicity and/or genotoxicity (e.g. endocrine disruption activity) were also taken into account for the classification. Given the low margin of exposure values for arsenic and lead, these two compounds are classified as priority 1 (high concern) for food safety and as a first priority to take actions to reduce exposure. Cadmium, methylmercury, dioxins and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), non-dioxin-like PCB and toxaphene are classified as priority 2 (medium concern). Polybrominated biphenyls, chlordane, heptachlor, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and metabolites, hexachlorobenzene, hexachlorocyclohexane (lindane included), polychlorophenols and their salts are classified as priority 3 (low concern). PMID:24471940

  8. [Priority pollutants ranking and screening of coke industry based on USEtox model].

    PubMed

    Hao, Tian; Du, Peng-Fei; Du, Bin; Zeng, Si-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Thesis aims at evaluating and setting priority to human toxicity and ecotoxicity of coking pollutants. A field research and sampling project are conducted in coke plant in Shanxi so as to complete the coke emission inventory. The USEtox model representing recommended practice in LCIA characterization is applied to the emission inventory to quantify the potential impacts on human toxicity and ecotoxicity of emerging pollutants. Priority pollutants, production procedures and effects of changing plant site on the toxicity are analyzed. As conclusions, benzo(a) pyrene, benzene, Zn and As are identified as the priority pollutants in human toxicity, while pyrene and anthracene in ecotoxicity. Coal charging is the dominant procedure for organic toxicity and priority pollutants include benzo (a) pyrene, benzene, naphthalene, etc. While coke drenching is the dominant procedure for metal toxicity and priority pollutants include Zn, As, Ti, Hg etc. Emission to rural environment can reduce the organic toxicity significantly compared to the emission to urban environment. However, the site changing has no effect on metal toxicity and might increase the risk of the metal pollution to rural water and soil. PMID:24720220

  9. Ranking potential impacts of priority and emerging pollutants in urban wastewater through life cycle impact assessment.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Ivan; José Gómez, M; Molina-Díaz, Antonio; Huijbregts, Mark A J; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R; García-Calvo, Eloy

    2008-12-01

    Life cycle impact assessment (LCIA), a feature of the Life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology, is used in this work outside the LCA framework, as a means to quantify the potential environmental impacts on ecotoxicity and human toxicity of wastewater containing priority and emerging pollutants. In order to do this, so-called characterisation factors are obtained for 98 frequently detected pollutants, using two characterisation models, EDIP97 and USES-LCA. The applicability of this methodology is shown in a case study in which wastewater influent and effluent samples from a Spanish wastewater treatment plant located in the Mediterranean coast were analysed. Characterisation factors were applied to the average concentration of each pollutant, obtaining impact scores for different scenarios: discharging wastewater to aquatic recipient, and using it for crop irrigation. The results show that treated wastewater involves a substantially lower environmental impact when compared to the influent, and pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are very important contributors to toxicity in this wastewater. Ciprofloxacin, fluoxetine, and nicotine constitute the main PPCPs of concern in this case study, while 2,3,7,8-TCDD, Nickel, and hexachlorobenzene are the priority pollutants with highest contribution. Nevertheless, it must be stressed that the new characterisation factors are based on very limited data, especially with regard to toxicology, and therefore they must be seen as a first screening to be improved in the future when more and higher quality data is available. PMID:18951608

  10. Priority evaluation and ranking of transmission system projects computer models and results

    SciTech Connect

    Morozowski, M.; Melo, A.C.G.; Periera, M.V.F. ); Pinto, L.M.V.G. ); Ramos, D.S. )

    1990-08-01

    One of the consequences of the severe economic crisis which has affected Brazil in the past years has been a substantial reduction in the available resources for power system investments. If budget is constrained below the ideal investment level, the problem of defining which generation and/or transmission investments should be postponed becomes very important. The objective of this paper is to describe a methodology for identifying which subset of transmission investments in a given expansion plan can be postponed in order to meet a preestablished budget constraint with the least possible impact on system performance. The methodology is based on the ranking of scheduled reinforcements by a cost/benefit index. The cost corresponds to the deterioration of operating conditions (e.g. increased risk of load curtailment) if the equipment is postponed.

  11. Research Priorities in the Seminary Professorate: Scholarly Research and Academic Writing as Criterion for Rank Advancement in Graduate Theological Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Skip

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to surface definitions for scholarly research employed in Association of Theological Schools seminaries, identify the application of scholarly research as a criteria for rank advancement, and form a scholarly research productivity reference point. The research revealed that while definitions of scholarly…

  12. SITE RANK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Site rank is formulated for ranking the relative hazard of contamination sources and vulnerability of drinking water wells. Site rank can be used with a variety of groundwater flow and transport models.

  13. Social Priorities as Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubert, E.

    2015-12-01

    Decision makers' responses to local risks and expected changes to a community from circumstances like natural hazards, human developments, and demographic changes can greatly affect social and environmental outcomes in a community. Translating physical data based in disciplines like engineering and geosciences into positive outcomes for communities can be challenging and often results in conflict that appears to pit "science" against "the public." Scientists can be reluctant to offer recommendations for action based on their work, often (and often correctly) noting that their role is not to make value judgments for a community - particularly for a community that is not their own. Conversely, decision makers can be frustrated by the lack of guidance they receive to help translate data into effective and acceptable action. The solution posed by this submission, given the goal of co-production of knowledge by scientists and decision makers to foster better community outcomes, is to involve the community directly by integrating social scientific methods that address decision making and community engagement to the scientist-decision maker interaction. Specifically, the missing dataset in many scientist-decision maker interactions is the nature of community priorities. Using scientifically valid methods to rigorously collect and characterize community priorities to help recommend tradeoffs between different outcomes indicated by the work of physical and natural scientists can bridge the gap between science and action by involving the community in the process. This submission presents early work on US preferences for different types of social and environmental outcomes designed to integrate directly with engineering and physical science frameworks like Life Cycle Assessment and Environmental Impact Statements. Cardinal preference data are based on surveys of US adults using tools like the Analytical Hierarchy Process, budget allocation, and ranking.

  14. Rank Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershenson, Carlos

    Studies of rank distributions have been popular for decades, especially since the work of Zipf. For example, if we rank words of a given language by use frequency (most used word in English is 'the', rank 1; second most common word is 'of', rank 2), the distribution can be approximated roughly with a power law. The same applies for cities (most populated city in a country ranks first), earthquakes, metabolism, the Internet, and dozens of other phenomena. We recently proposed ``rank diversity'' to measure how ranks change in time, using the Google Books Ngram dataset. Studying six languages between 1800 and 2009, we found that the rank diversity curves of languages are universal, adjusted with a sigmoid on log-normal scale. We are studying several other datasets (sports, economies, social systems, urban systems, earthquakes, artificial life). Rank diversity seems to be universal, independently of the shape of the rank distribution. I will present our work in progress towards a general description of the features of rank change in time, along with simple models which reproduce it

  15. Low-rank coal study. Volume 5. RD and D program evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    A national program is recommended for research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) of improved technologies for the enviromentally acceptable use of low-rank coals. RD and D project recommendations are outlined in all applicable technology areas, including extraction, transportation, preparation, handling and storage, conventional combustion and environmental control technology, fluidized bed combustion, gasification, liquefaction, and pyrolysis. Basic research topics are identified separately, as well as a series of crosscutting research activities addressing environmental, economic, and regulatory issues. The recommended RD and D activities are classified into Priority I and Priority II categories, reflecting their relative urgency and potential impact on the advancement of low-rank coal development. Summaries of ongoing research projects on low-rank coals in the US are presented in an Appendix, and the relationships of these ongoing efforts to the recommended RD and D program are discussed.

  16. When Does Rank(ABC)= Rank(AB) + Rank(BC) - Rank(B) Hold?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tian, Yongge; Styan, George P. H.

    2002-01-01

    The well-known Frobenius rank inequality established by Frobenius in 1911 states that the rank of the product ABC of three matrices satisfies the inequality rank(ABC) [greater than or equal]rank(AB) + rank(BC) - rank(B) A new necessary and sufficient condition for equality to hold is presented and then some interesting consequences and…

  17. Risk ranking by perception

    SciTech Connect

    Osei, E.K.; Amoh, G.E.A.; Schandorf, C.

    1997-02-01

    The study of people`s perception and acceptability of risk is important in understanding the public reaction to technology and its environmental and health impact. The perception of risk depends on several factors, including early experiences, education, controllability of the risk, the type of consequence, and the type of person(s) who makes the judgment. This paper reviews some of the main factors influencing people`s perception and acceptability of risk. Knowledge about which factors influence the perception of risk may enhance the understanding of different points of view brought into risk controversies, improve risk communication, and facilitate policy making. Results from a risk ranking by perception survey Conducted in Ghana are also presented. 18 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  18. 46 CFR 282.11 - Ranking of flags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... OPERATORS OPERATING-DIFFERENTIAL SUBSIDY FOR LINER VESSELS ENGAGED IN ESSENTIAL SERVICES IN THE FOREIGN... priority of costs which are representative of the flag. For liner cargo vessels, the ranking of...

  19. 46 CFR 282.11 - Ranking of flags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... OPERATORS OPERATING-DIFFERENTIAL SUBSIDY FOR LINER VESSELS ENGAGED IN ESSENTIAL SERVICES IN THE FOREIGN... priority of costs which are representative of the flag. For liner cargo vessels, the ranking of...

  20. Human Resource Managers Rank Their Pressure Points.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herring, Jack

    1983-01-01

    A survey of 700 top-level human resource executives that elicited 309 responses revealed the highest priority ranking of 24 human resource issues to be: productivity improvement, controlling costs of employee benefits, compensation planning and administration, employee communications, upgrading management training development programs,…

  1. Setting priorities for safeguards upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ayat, R.A.; Judd, B.R.; Patenaude, C.J.; Sicherman, A.

    1987-07-10

    This paper describes an analytic approach and a computer program for setting priorities among safeguards upgrades. The approach provides safeguards decision makers with a systematic method for allocating their limited upgrade resources. The priorities are set based on the upgrades cost and their contribution to safeguards effectiveness. Safeguards effectiveness is measured by the probability of defeat for a spectrum of potential insider and outsider adversaries. The computer program, MI$ER, can be used alone or as a companion to ET and SAVI, programs designed to evaluate safeguards effectiveness against insider and outsider threats, respectively. Setting the priority requires judgments about the relative importance (threat likelihoods and consequences) of insider and outsider threats. Although these judgments are inherently subjective, MI$ER can analyze the sensitivity of the upgrade priorities to these weights and determine whether or not they are critical to the priority ranking. MI$ER produces tabular and graphical results for comparing benefits and identifying the most cost-effective upgrades for a given expenditure. This framework provides decision makers with an explicit and consistent analysis to support their upgrades decisions and to allocate the safeguards resources in a cost-effective manner.

  2. Setting priorities for safeguards upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ayat, R.A.; Judd, B.R.; Patenaude, C.J.; Sicherman, A.

    1987-07-01

    This paper describes an analytic approach and a computer program for setting priorities among safeguards upgrades. The approach provides safeguards decision makers with a systematic method for allocating their limited upgrade resources. The priorities are set based on the upgrades cost and their contribution to safeguards effectiveness. Safeguards effectiveness is measured by the probability of defeat for a spectrum of potential insider and outsider adversaries. The computer program, MI$ER, can be used alone or as a companion to ET and SAVI, programs designed to evaluate safeguards effectiveness against insider and outsider threats, respectively. Setting the priority required judgments about the relative importance (threat likelihoods and consequences) of insider and outsider threats. Although these judgments are inherently subjective, MI$ER can analyze the sensitivity of the upgrade priorities to these weights and determine whether or not they are critical to the priority ranking. MI$ER produces tabular and graphical results for comparing benefits and identifying the most cost-effective upgrades for a given expenditure. This framework provides decision makers with an explicit and consistent analysis to support their upgrades decisions and to allocate the safeguards resources in a cost-effective manner.

  3. Attentional Priority Determines Working Memory Precision

    PubMed Central

    Klyszejko, Zuzanna; Rahmati, Masih; Curtis, Clayton E

    2014-01-01

    Visual working memory is a system used to hold information actively in mind for a limited time. The number of items and the precision with which we can store information has limits that define its capacity. How much control do we have over the precision with which we store information when faced with these severe capacity limitations? Here, we tested the hypothesis that rank-ordered attentional priority determines the precision of multiple working memory representations. We conducted two psychophysical experiments that manipulated the priority of multiple items in a two-alternative forced choice task (2AFC) with distance discrimination. In Experiment 1, we varied the probabilities with which memorized items were likely to be tested. To generalize the effects of priority beyond simple cueing, in Experiment 2, we manipulated priority by varying monetary incentives contingent upon successful memory for items tested. Moreover, we illustrate our hypothesis using a simple model that distributed attentional resources across items with rank-ordered priorities. Indeed, we found evidence in both experiments that priority affects the precision of working memory in a monotonic fashion. Our results demonstrate that representations of priority may provide a mechanism by which resources can be allocated to increase the precision with which we encode and briefly store information. PMID:25240420

  4. Your Health Priorities Tool

    MedlinePlus

    ... Care Explore Your Treatment Options: Your Health Priorities Tool Home Why Explore Your Options Start the Conversation ... Home > Your Health Priorities Tool Your Health Priorities Tool If you don’t share details about your ...

  5. 7 CFR 1780.17 - Selection priorities and process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Selection priorities and process. 1780.17 Section... § 1780.17 Selection priorities and process. When ranking eligible applications for consideration for... and other agencies' selection systems, to ensure effective RUS fund utilization, and to assist...

  6. 7 CFR 1780.17 - Selection priorities and process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Selection priorities and process. 1780.17 Section... § 1780.17 Selection priorities and process. When ranking eligible applications for consideration for... and other agencies' selection systems, to ensure effective RUS fund utilization, and to assist...

  7. 7 CFR 1780.17 - Selection priorities and process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Selection priorities and process. 1780.17 Section 1780... § 1780.17 Selection priorities and process. When ranking eligible applications for consideration for... and other agencies' selection systems, to ensure effective RUS fund utilization, and to assist...

  8. 7 CFR 1780.17 - Selection priorities and process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Selection priorities and process. 1780.17 Section... § 1780.17 Selection priorities and process. When ranking eligible applications for consideration for... and other agencies' selection systems, to ensure effective RUS fund utilization, and to assist...

  9. 7 CFR 1780.17 - Selection priorities and process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Selection priorities and process. 1780.17 Section... § 1780.17 Selection priorities and process. When ranking eligible applications for consideration for... and other agencies' selection systems, to ensure effective RUS fund utilization, and to assist...

  10. Playing the Rankings Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machung, Anne

    1998-01-01

    The "U.S. News and World Report" rankings of colleges do not affect institutions equally; the schools impacted most are those that have the most to lose because they benefit from, even rely on, the rankings for prestige and visibility. The magazine relies on the rankings for substantial sales revenues, and has garnered considerable power within…

  11. Order-Theoretical Ranking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpineto, Claudio; Romano, Giovanni

    2000-01-01

    Presents an approach to document ranking that explicitly addresses the word mismatch problem between a query and a document by exploiting interdocument similarity information, based on the theory of concept lattices. Compares information retrieval using concept lattice-based ranking (CLR) to BMR (best-match ranking) and HCR (hierarchical…

  12. 25 CFR 1001.3 - Priority ranking for negotiations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... expressed an interest in participating in the Self-Governance Project. (e) All actions of the tribal... Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SELF-GOVERNANCE... operations under the self-governance option. This narrative should identify any activities that the tribe...

  13. 25 CFR 1001.3 - Priority ranking for negotiations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... expressed an interest in participating in the Self-Governance Project. (e) All actions of the tribal... Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SELF-GOVERNANCE... operations under the self-governance option. This narrative should identify any activities that the tribe...

  14. 25 CFR 1001.3 - Priority ranking for negotiations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... expressed an interest in participating in the Self-Governance Project. (e) All actions of the tribal... Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SELF-GOVERNANCE... operations under the self-governance option. This narrative should identify any activities that the tribe...

  15. 25 CFR 1001.3 - Priority ranking for negotiations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... expressed an interest in participating in the Self-Governance Project. (e) All actions of the tribal... Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SELF-GOVERNANCE... operations under the self-governance option. This narrative should identify any activities that the tribe...

  16. 25 CFR 1001.3 - Priority ranking for negotiations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... expressed an interest in participating in the Self-Governance Project. (e) All actions of the tribal... Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SELF-GOVERNANCE... operations under the self-governance option. This narrative should identify any activities that the tribe...

  17. Rights, Obligations, Priorities: Where Does Adult Literacy Rank?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxenham, John

    2004-01-01

    The World Bank is a body that declares its vision to be a world free of poverty. It has long recognised that poverty and illiteracy are closely correlated and that illiteracy is a hindrance to economic and social development. The 180 or so governments that own the Bank have declared literacy to be a human right, so the Bank itself presumably also…

  18. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D; Bratton, Rob; Marsden, Barry; Srinivasan, Makuteswara; Penfield, Scott; Mitchell, Mark; Windes, Will

    2008-03-01

    Here we report the outcome of the application of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) process to the issue of nuclear-grade graphite for the moderator and structural components of a next generation nuclear plant (NGNP), considering both routine (normal operation) and postulated accident conditions for the NGNP. The NGNP is assumed to be a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), either a gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GTMHR) version [a prismatic-core modular reactor (PMR)] or a pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) version [a pebble bed reactor (PBR)] design, with either a direct- or indirect-cycle gas turbine (Brayton cycle) system for electric power production, and an indirect-cycle component for hydrogen production. NGNP design options with a high-pressure steam generator (Rankine cycle) in the primary loop are not considered in this PIRT. This graphite PIRT was conducted in parallel with four other NRC PIRT activities, taking advantage of the relationships and overlaps in subject matter. The graphite PIRT panel identified numerous phenomena, five of which were ranked high importance-low knowledge. A further nine were ranked with high importance and medium knowledge rank. Two phenomena were ranked with medium importance and low knowledge, and a further 14 were ranked medium importance and medium knowledge rank. The last 12 phenomena were ranked with low importance and high knowledge rank (or similar combinations suggesting they have low priority). The ranking/scoring rationale for the reported graphite phenomena is discussed. Much has been learned about the behavior of graphite in reactor environments in the 60-plus years since the first graphite rectors went into service. The extensive list of references in the Bibliography is plainly testament to this fact. Our current knowledge base is well developed. Although data are lacking for the specific grades being considered for Generation IV (Gen IV

  19. Quantum anonymous ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Wen, Qiao-Yan; Liu, Bin; Su, Qi; Qin, Su-Juan; Gao, Fei

    2014-03-01

    Anonymous ranking is a kind of privacy-preserving ranking whereby each of the involved participants can correctly and anonymously get the rankings of his data. It can be utilized to solve many practical problems, such as anonymously ranking the students' exam scores. We investigate the issue of how quantum mechanics can be of use in maintaining the anonymity of the participants in multiparty ranking and present a series of quantum anonymous multiparty, multidata ranking protocols. In each of these protocols, a participant can get the correct rankings of his data and nobody else can match the identity to his data. Furthermore, the security of these protocols with respect to different kinds of attacks is proved.

  20. Acceptance speech.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, M

    1994-01-01

    In Bangladesh, the assistant administrator of USAID gave an acceptance speech at an awards ceremony on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of oral rehydration solution (ORS). The ceremony celebrated the key role of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B) in the discovery of ORS. Its research activities over the last 25 years have brought ORS to every village in the world, preventing more than a million deaths each year. ORS is the most important medical advance of the 20th century. It is affordable and client-oriented, a true appropriate technology. USAID has provided more than US$ 40 million to ICDDR,B for diarrheal disease and measles research, urban and rural applied family planning and maternal and child health research, and vaccine development. ICDDR,B began as the relatively small Cholera Research Laboratory and has grown into an acclaimed international center for health, family planning, and population research. It leads the world in diarrheal disease research. ICDDR,B is the leading center for applied health research in South Asia. It trains public health specialists from around the world. The government of Bangladesh and the international donor community have actively joined in support of ICDDR,B. The government applies the results of ICDDR,B research to its programs to improve the health and well-being of Bangladeshis. ICDDR,B now also studies acute respiratory diseases and measles. Population and health comprise 1 of USAID's 4 strategic priorities, the others being economic growth, environment, and democracy, USAID promotes people's participation in these 4 areas and in the design and implementation of development projects. USAID is committed to the use and improvement of ORS and to complementary strategies that further reduce diarrhea-related deaths. Continued collaboration with a strong user perspective and integrated services will lead to sustainable development. PMID:12345470

  1. Priority Setting and Influential Factors on Acceptance of Pharmaceutical Recommendations in Collaborative Medication Reviews in an Ambulatory Care Setting – Analysis of a Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial (WestGem-Study)

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Olaf; Mennemann, Hugo; John, Carina; Lautenschläger, Marcus; Mertens-Keller, Damaris; Richling, Katharina; Waltering, Isabel; Hamacher, Stefanie; Felsch, Moritz; Herich, Lena; Czarnecki, Kathrin; Schaffert, Corinna; Jaehde, Ulrich; Köberlein-Neu, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    Background Medication reviews are recognized services to increase quality of therapy and reduce medication risks. The selection of eligible patients with potential to receive a major benefit is based on assumptions rather than on factual data. Acceptance of interprofessional collaboration is crucial to increase the quality of medication therapy. Objective The research question was to identify and prioritize eligible patients for a medication review and to provide evidence-based criteria for patient selection. Acceptance of the prescribing general practitioner to implement pharmaceutical recommendations was measured and factors influencing physicians’ acceptance were explored to obtain an impression on the extent of collaboration in medication review in an ambulatory care setting. Methods Based on data of a cluster-randomized controlled study (WestGem-study), the correlation between patient parameters and the individual performance in a medication review was calculated in a multiple logistic regression model. Physician’s acceptance of the suggested intervention was assessed using feedback forms. Influential factors were analyzed. Results The number of drugs in use (p = 0.001), discrepancies between prescribed and used medicines (p = 0.014), the baseline Medication Appropriateness Index score (p<0.001) and the duration of the intervention (p = 0.006) could be identified as influential factors for a major benefit from a medication review, whereas morbidity (p>0.05) and a low kidney function (p>0.05) do not predetermine the outcome. Longitudinal patient care with repeated reviews showed higher interprofessional acceptance and superior patient benefit. A total of 54.9% of the recommendations in a medication review on drug therapy were accepted for implementation. Conclusions The number of drugs in use and medication reconciliation could be a first rational step in patient selection for a medication review. Most elderly, multimorbid patients with polymedication

  2. Tool for Ranking Research Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, James N.; Scott, Kelly; Smith, Harold

    2005-01-01

    Tool for Research Enhancement Decision Support (TREDS) is a computer program developed to assist managers in ranking options for research aboard the International Space Station (ISS). It could likely also be adapted to perform similar decision-support functions in industrial and academic settings. TREDS provides a ranking of the options, based on a quantifiable assessment of all the relevant programmatic decision factors of benefit, cost, and risk. The computation of the benefit for each option is based on a figure of merit (FOM) for ISS research capacity that incorporates both quantitative and qualitative inputs. Qualitative inputs are gathered and partly quantified by use of the time-tested analytical hierarchical process and used to set weighting factors in the FOM corresponding to priorities determined by the cognizant decision maker(s). Then by use of algorithms developed specifically for this application, TREDS adjusts the projected benefit for each option on the basis of levels of technical implementation, cost, and schedule risk. Based partly on Excel spreadsheets, TREDS provides screens for entering cost, benefit, and risk information. Drop-down boxes are provided for entry of qualitative information. TREDS produces graphical output in multiple formats that can be tailored by users.

  3. How to Rank Journals

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Corey J. A.; Brook, Barry W.

    2016-01-01

    There are now many methods available to assess the relative citation performance of peer-reviewed journals. Regardless of their individual faults and advantages, citation-based metrics are used by researchers to maximize the citation potential of their articles, and by employers to rank academic track records. The absolute value of any particular index is arguably meaningless unless compared to other journals, and different metrics result in divergent rankings. To provide a simple yet more objective way to rank journals within and among disciplines, we developed a κ-resampled composite journal rank incorporating five popular citation indices: Impact Factor, Immediacy Index, Source-Normalized Impact Per Paper, SCImago Journal Rank and Google 5-year h-index; this approach provides an index of relative rank uncertainty. We applied the approach to six sample sets of scientific journals from Ecology (n = 100 journals), Medicine (n = 100), Multidisciplinary (n = 50); Ecology + Multidisciplinary (n = 25), Obstetrics & Gynaecology (n = 25) and Marine Biology & Fisheries (n = 25). We then cross-compared the κ-resampled ranking for the Ecology + Multidisciplinary journal set to the results of a survey of 188 publishing ecologists who were asked to rank the same journals, and found a 0.68–0.84 Spearman’s ρ correlation between the two rankings datasets. Our composite index approach therefore approximates relative journal reputation, at least for that discipline. Agglomerative and divisive clustering and multi-dimensional scaling techniques applied to the Ecology + Multidisciplinary journal set identified specific clusters of similarly ranked journals, with only Nature & Science separating out from the others. When comparing a selection of journals within or among disciplines, we recommend collecting multiple citation-based metrics for a sample of relevant and realistic journals to calculate the composite rankings and their relative uncertainty windows. PMID:26930052

  4. How to Rank Journals.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Corey J A; Brook, Barry W

    2016-01-01

    There are now many methods available to assess the relative citation performance of peer-reviewed journals. Regardless of their individual faults and advantages, citation-based metrics are used by researchers to maximize the citation potential of their articles, and by employers to rank academic track records. The absolute value of any particular index is arguably meaningless unless compared to other journals, and different metrics result in divergent rankings. To provide a simple yet more objective way to rank journals within and among disciplines, we developed a κ-resampled composite journal rank incorporating five popular citation indices: Impact Factor, Immediacy Index, Source-Normalized Impact Per Paper, SCImago Journal Rank and Google 5-year h-index; this approach provides an index of relative rank uncertainty. We applied the approach to six sample sets of scientific journals from Ecology (n = 100 journals), Medicine (n = 100), Multidisciplinary (n = 50); Ecology + Multidisciplinary (n = 25), Obstetrics & Gynaecology (n = 25) and Marine Biology & Fisheries (n = 25). We then cross-compared the κ-resampled ranking for the Ecology + Multidisciplinary journal set to the results of a survey of 188 publishing ecologists who were asked to rank the same journals, and found a 0.68-0.84 Spearman's ρ correlation between the two rankings datasets. Our composite index approach therefore approximates relative journal reputation, at least for that discipline. Agglomerative and divisive clustering and multi-dimensional scaling techniques applied to the Ecology + Multidisciplinary journal set identified specific clusters of similarly ranked journals, with only Nature & Science separating out from the others. When comparing a selection of journals within or among disciplines, we recommend collecting multiple citation-based metrics for a sample of relevant and realistic journals to calculate the composite rankings and their relative uncertainty windows. PMID:26930052

  5. On Rank and Nullity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, David E.

    2012-01-01

    This note explains how Emil Artin's proof that row rank equals column rank for a matrix with entries in a field leads naturally to the formula for the nullity of a matrix and also to an algorithm for solving any system of linear equations in any number of variables. This material could be used in any course on matrix theory or linear algebra.

  6. Hitting the Rankings Jackpot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, David W.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, Samford University was ranked 27th in the nation in a report released by "Forbes" magazine. In this article, the author relates how the people working at Samford University were surprised at its ranking. Although Samford is the largest privately institution in Alabama, its distinguished academic achievements aren't even well-recognized…

  7. Memory Efficient Ranking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffat, Alistair; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes an approximate document ranking process that uses a compact array of in-memory, low-precision approximations for document length. Combined with another rule for reducing the memory required by partial similarity accumulators, the approximation heuristic allows the ranking of large document collections using less than one byte of memory…

  8. Priority arbitration mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Garmire, Derrick L.; Herring, Jay R.; Stunkel, Craig B.

    2007-03-06

    A method is provided for selecting a data source for transmission on one of several logical (virtual) lanes embodied in a single physical connection. Lanes are assigned to either a high priority class or to a low priority class. One of six conditions is employed to determine when re-arbitration of lane priorities is desired. When this occurs a next source for transmission is selected based on a the specification of the maximum number of high priority packets that can be sent after a lower priority transmission has been interrupted. Alternatively, a next source for transmission is selected based on a the specification of the maximum number of high priority packets that can be sent while a lower priority packet is waiting. If initialized correctly, the arbiter keeps all of the packets of a high priority packet contiguous, while allowing lower priority packets to be interrupted by the higher priority packets, but not to the point of starvation of the lower priority packets.

  9. Recurrent fuzzy ranking methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajjari, Tayebeh

    2012-11-01

    With the increasing development of fuzzy set theory in various scientific fields and the need to compare fuzzy numbers in different areas. Therefore, Ranking of fuzzy numbers plays a very important role in linguistic decision-making, engineering, business and some other fuzzy application systems. Several strategies have been proposed for ranking of fuzzy numbers. Each of these techniques has been shown to produce non-intuitive results in certain case. In this paper, we reviewed some recent ranking methods, which will be useful for the researchers who are interested in this area.

  10. Research Publication as a Strategy to Improve International Academic Ranking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tie, Fatt Hee

    2012-01-01

    Many universities in Asia are now focused on enhancing their global academic competitiveness. Various strategies are implemented to restructure, reform and transform universities aimed at improving ranking in the global university league. One significant strategy is to encourage academicians to place priority on publishing in high-impact…

  11. 8 CFR 207.5 - Waiting lists and priority handling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REFUGEES § 207.5 Waiting lists and priority handling. Waiting lists are maintained for each designated refugee group of special humanitarian concern. Each applicant whose application is accepted for filing by... filing is the priority date for purposes of case control. Refugees or groups of refugees may be...

  12. 8 CFR 207.5 - Waiting lists and priority handling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REFUGEES § 207.5 Waiting lists and priority handling. Waiting lists are maintained for each designated refugee group of special humanitarian concern. Each applicant whose application is accepted for filing by... filing is the priority date for purposes of case control. Refugees or groups of refugees may be...

  13. Agenda Priorities for 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Sandra L.

    1995-01-01

    A survey of 130 trustees, presidents, and other higher education executives found that they ranked public opinion toward higher education, changing demographics, and family income and savings rates as the top external trends in higher education. The top-ranked institutional issues included tuition policy and financing; productivity and cost…

  14. Priority in Process Algebras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleaveland, Rance; Luettgen, Gerald; Natarajan, V.

    1999-01-01

    This paper surveys the semantic ramifications of extending traditional process algebras with notions of priority that allow for some transitions to be given precedence over others. These enriched formalisms allow one to model system features such as interrupts, prioritized choice, or real-time behavior. Approaches to priority in process algebras can be classified according to whether the induced notion of preemption on transitions is global or local and whether priorities are static or dynamic. Early work in the area concentrated on global pre-emption and static priorities and led to formalisms for modeling interrupts and aspects of real-time, such as maximal progress, in centralized computing environments. More recent research has investigated localized notions of pre-emption in which the distribution of systems is taken into account, as well as dynamic priority approaches, i.e., those where priority values may change as systems evolve. The latter allows one to model behavioral phenomena such as scheduling algorithms and also enables the efficient encoding of real-time semantics. Technically, this paper studies the different models of priorities by presenting extensions of Milner's Calculus of Communicating Systems (CCS) with static and dynamic priority as well as with notions of global and local pre- emption. In each case the operational semantics of CCS is modified appropriately, behavioral theories based on strong and weak bisimulation are given, and related approaches for different process-algebraic settings are discussed.

  15. Priority setting for new technologies in medicine: A transdisciplinary study

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Jennifer L; Martin, Douglas K; Singer, Peter A

    2002-01-01

    Background Decision makers in health care organizations struggle with how to set priorities for new technologies in medicine. Traditional approaches to priority setting for new technologies in medicine are insufficient and there is no widely accepted model that can guide decision makers. Discussion Daniels and Sabin have developed an ethically based account about how priority setting decisions should be made. We have developed an empirically based account of how priority setting decisions are made. In this paper, we integrate these two accounts into a transdisciplinary model of priority setting for new technologies in medicine that is both ethically and empirically based. Summary We have developed a transdisciplinary model of priority setting that provides guidance to decision makers that they can operationalize to help address priority setting problems in their institution. PMID:12126482

  16. Multiplex PageRank.

    PubMed

    Halu, Arda; Mondragón, Raúl J; Panzarasa, Pietro; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2013-01-01

    Many complex systems can be described as multiplex networks in which the same nodes can interact with one another in different layers, thus forming a set of interacting and co-evolving networks. Examples of such multiplex systems are social networks where people are involved in different types of relationships and interact through various forms of communication media. The ranking of nodes in multiplex networks is one of the most pressing and challenging tasks that research on complex networks is currently facing. When pairs of nodes can be connected through multiple links and in multiple layers, the ranking of nodes should necessarily reflect the importance of nodes in one layer as well as their importance in other interdependent layers. In this paper, we draw on the idea of biased random walks to define the Multiplex PageRank centrality measure in which the effects of the interplay between networks on the centrality of nodes are directly taken into account. In particular, depending on the intensity of the interaction between layers, we define the Additive, Multiplicative, Combined, and Neutral versions of Multiplex PageRank, and show how each version reflects the extent to which the importance of a node in one layer affects the importance the node can gain in another layer. We discuss these measures and apply them to an online multiplex social network. Findings indicate that taking the multiplex nature of the network into account helps uncover the emergence of rankings of nodes that differ from the rankings obtained from one single layer. Results provide support in favor of the salience of multiplex centrality measures, like Multiplex PageRank, for assessing the prominence of nodes embedded in multiple interacting networks, and for shedding a new light on structural properties that would otherwise remain undetected if each of the interacting networks were analyzed in isolation. PMID:24205186

  17. Global conservation priorities for marine turtles.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Bryan P; DiMatteo, Andrew D; Bolten, Alan B; Chaloupka, Milani Y; Hutchinson, Brian J; Abreu-Grobois, F Alberto; Mortimer, Jeanne A; Seminoff, Jeffrey A; Amorocho, Diego; Bjorndal, Karen A; Bourjea, Jérôme; Bowen, Brian W; Briseño Dueñas, Raquel; Casale, Paolo; Choudhury, B C; Costa, Alice; Dutton, Peter H; Fallabrino, Alejandro; Finkbeiner, Elena M; Girard, Alexandre; Girondot, Marc; Hamann, Mark; Hurley, Brendan J; López-Mendilaharsu, Milagros; Marcovaldi, Maria Angela; Musick, John A; Nel, Ronel; Pilcher, Nicolas J; Troëng, Sebastian; Witherington, Blair; Mast, Roderic B

    2011-01-01

    Where conservation resources are limited and conservation targets are diverse, robust yet flexible priority-setting frameworks are vital. Priority-setting is especially important for geographically widespread species with distinct populations subject to multiple threats that operate on different spatial and temporal scales. Marine turtles are widely distributed and exhibit intra-specific variations in population sizes and trends, as well as reproduction and morphology. However, current global extinction risk assessment frameworks do not assess conservation status of spatially and biologically distinct marine turtle Regional Management Units (RMUs), and thus do not capture variations in population trends, impacts of threats, or necessary conservation actions across individual populations. To address this issue, we developed a new assessment framework that allowed us to evaluate, compare and organize marine turtle RMUs according to status and threats criteria. Because conservation priorities can vary widely (i.e. from avoiding imminent extinction to maintaining long-term monitoring efforts) we developed a "conservation priorities portfolio" system using categories of paired risk and threats scores for all RMUs (n = 58). We performed these assessments and rankings globally, by species, by ocean basin, and by recognized geopolitical bodies to identify patterns in risk, threats, and data gaps at different scales. This process resulted in characterization of risk and threats to all marine turtle RMUs, including identification of the world's 11 most endangered marine turtle RMUs based on highest risk and threats scores. This system also highlighted important gaps in available information that is crucial for accurate conservation assessments. Overall, this priority-setting framework can provide guidance for research and conservation priorities at multiple relevant scales, and should serve as a model for conservation status assessments and priority-setting for

  18. Global Conservation Priorities for Marine Turtles

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Bryan P.; DiMatteo, Andrew D.; Bolten, Alan B.; Chaloupka, Milani Y.; Hutchinson, Brian J.; Abreu-Grobois, F. Alberto; Mortimer, Jeanne A.; Seminoff, Jeffrey A.; Amorocho, Diego; Bjorndal, Karen A.; Bourjea, Jérôme; Bowen, Brian W.; Briseño Dueñas, Raquel; Casale, Paolo; Choudhury, B. C.; Costa, Alice; Dutton, Peter H.; Fallabrino, Alejandro; Finkbeiner, Elena M.; Girard, Alexandre; Girondot, Marc; Hamann, Mark; Hurley, Brendan J.; López-Mendilaharsu, Milagros; Marcovaldi, Maria Angela; Musick, John A.; Nel, Ronel; Pilcher, Nicolas J.; Troëng, Sebastian; Witherington, Blair; Mast, Roderic B.

    2011-01-01

    Where conservation resources are limited and conservation targets are diverse, robust yet flexible priority-setting frameworks are vital. Priority-setting is especially important for geographically widespread species with distinct populations subject to multiple threats that operate on different spatial and temporal scales. Marine turtles are widely distributed and exhibit intra-specific variations in population sizes and trends, as well as reproduction and morphology. However, current global extinction risk assessment frameworks do not assess conservation status of spatially and biologically distinct marine turtle Regional Management Units (RMUs), and thus do not capture variations in population trends, impacts of threats, or necessary conservation actions across individual populations. To address this issue, we developed a new assessment framework that allowed us to evaluate, compare and organize marine turtle RMUs according to status and threats criteria. Because conservation priorities can vary widely (i.e. from avoiding imminent extinction to maintaining long-term monitoring efforts) we developed a “conservation priorities portfolio” system using categories of paired risk and threats scores for all RMUs (n = 58). We performed these assessments and rankings globally, by species, by ocean basin, and by recognized geopolitical bodies to identify patterns in risk, threats, and data gaps at different scales. This process resulted in characterization of risk and threats to all marine turtle RMUs, including identification of the world's 11 most endangered marine turtle RMUs based on highest risk and threats scores. This system also highlighted important gaps in available information that is crucial for accurate conservation assessments. Overall, this priority-setting framework can provide guidance for research and conservation priorities at multiple relevant scales, and should serve as a model for conservation status assessments and priority-setting for

  19. Establishing Subject and Topic Priorities in Professional and Graduate Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selby, Lloyd A.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A competency-based curriculum in veterinary public health and preventive medicine was developed that included: principles of epidemiology, environmental health, food quality, community health, and international health. A questionnaire used to establish the rank order, learning weight, and priorities within each category is included with tabulated…

  20. RANKING INDOOR AIR TOXICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The basis of the ranking is 10 monitoring studies chosen to represent "typical" concentrations of the pollutants found indoors. The studies were conducted in the United States during the last 15 years, and mainly focused on concentrations of pollutants in homes, schools, and off...

  1. Responses to the Rankings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Change, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Ten higher education professionals and one college senior comment on the "U.S. News and World Report" rankings of doctoral programs in six liberal arts disciplines. The authors' response to one set of comments and the comments of an executive editor from the magazine are also included. (MSE)

  2. Outflanking the Rankings Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author argues that American higher education is allowing itself to be held hostage by the rankings industry, which can lead institutions to consider actions harmful to the public interest and encourage the public's infatuation with celebrity at the expense of substance. Instead of sitting quietly by during the upcoming ratings…

  3. College Rankings. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holub, Tamara

    The popularity of college ranking surveys published by "U.S. News and World Report" and other magazines is indisputable, but the methodologies used to measure the quality of higher education institutions have come under fire by scholars and college officials. Criticisms have focused on methodological flaws, such as failure to consider differences…

  4. Diversifying customer review rankings.

    PubMed

    Krestel, Ralf; Dokoohaki, Nima

    2015-06-01

    E-commerce Web sites owe much of their popularity to consumer reviews accompanying product descriptions. On-line customers spend hours and hours going through heaps of textual reviews to decide which products to buy. At the same time, each popular product has thousands of user-generated reviews, making it impossible for a buyer to read everything. Current approaches to display reviews to users or recommend an individual review for a product are based on the recency or helpfulness of each review. In this paper, we present a framework to rank product reviews by optimizing the coverage of the ranking with respect to sentiment or aspects, or by summarizing all reviews with the top-K reviews in the ranking. To accomplish this, we make use of the assigned star rating for a product as an indicator for a review's sentiment polarity and compare bag-of-words (language model) with topic models (latent Dirichlet allocation) as a mean to represent aspects. Our evaluation on manually annotated review data from a commercial review Web site demonstrates the effectiveness of our approach, outperforming plain recency ranking by 30% and obtaining best results by combining language and topic model representations. PMID:25795511

  5. 7 CFR 1415.8 - Establishing priority for enrollment of properties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... conversion to uses other than grazing; (3) Plant and animal biodiversity; and (4) In ranking parcels offered... Directors may establish separate ranking pools to address, for example, specific conservation issues raised by State, regional, and national conservation priorities. (f) The NRCS State Conservationist and...

  6. International survey of nursing home research priorities.

    PubMed

    Morley, John E; Caplan, Gideon; Cesari, Matteo; Dong, Birong; Flaherty, Joseph H; Grossberg, George T; Holmerova, Iva; Katz, Paul R; Koopmans, Raymond; Little, Milta O; Martin, Finbarr; Orrell, Martin; Ouslander, Joseph; Rantz, Marilyn; Resnick, Barbara; Rolland, Yves; Tolson, Debbie; Woo, Jean; Vellas, Bruno

    2014-05-01

    This article reports the findings of a policy survey designed to establish research priorities to inform future research strategy and advance nursing home practice. The survey was administered in 2 rounds during 2013, and involved a combination of open questions and ranking exercises to move toward consensus on the research priorities. A key finding was the prioritization of research to underpin the care of people with cognitive impairment/dementia and of the management of the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia within the nursing home. Other important areas were end-of-life care, nutrition, polypharmacy, and developing new approaches to putting evidence-based practices into routine practice in nursing homes. It explores possible innovative educational approaches, reasons why best practices are difficult to implement, and challenges faced in developing high-quality nursing home research. PMID:24703926

  7. Priorities and Practices of Career and Technical Education Directors in Indiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrin, Cory D.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to determine the importance and priority of practices for directors of career and technical education in the state of Indiana. An analysis was prepared to determine the rankings and correlations of importance and priorities of 50 leadership practices as well as 11 categories of practices for the career…

  8. Ranking of refrigerants.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Guillermo; Weckert, Monika; Brüggemann, Rainer; Gerstmann, Silke; Frank, Hartmut

    2008-04-15

    Environmental ranking of refrigerants is of need in many instances. The aim is to assess the relative environmental hazard posed by 40 refrigerants, including those used in the past, those presently used, and some proposed substitutes. Ranking is based upon ozone depletion potential, global warming potential, and atmospheric lifetime and is achieved by applying the Hasse diagram technique, a mathematical method that allows us to assess order relationships of chemicals. The refrigerants are divided into 13 classes, of which the chlorofluorocarbons, hydrofluorocarbons, hydrochlorofluorocarbons, hydrofluoroethers, and hydrocarbons contain the largest number of single substances. The dominance degree, a method for measuring order relationships among classes, is discussed and applied to the 13 refrigerant classes. The results show that some hydrofluoroethers are as problematic as the hydrofluorocarbons. Hydrocarbons and ammonia are the least problematic refrigerants with respect to the three environmental properties. PMID:18497145

  9. The 50 Constellation Priority Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, S.; Joosten, K.; Eppler, D.; Gruener, J.; Mendell, W.; French, R.; Plescia, J.; Spudis, P.; Wargo, M.; Robinson, M.; Lucey, P.

    2009-01-01

    The Constellation program (CxP) has developed a list of 50 sites of interest on the Moon which will be targeted by the LRO narrow angle camera. The list has also been provided to the M team to supplement their targeting list. This list does not represent a "site selection" process; rather the goal was to find "representative" sites and terrains to understand the range of possible surface conditions for human lunar exploration to aid engineering design and operational planning. The list compilers leveraged heavily on past site selection work (e.g. Geoscience and a Lunar Base Workshop - 1988, Site Selection Strategy for a Lunar Outpost - 1990, Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS) - 2005). Considerations included scientific, resource utilization, and operational merits, and a desire to span lunar terrain types. The targets have been organized into two "tiers" of 25 sites each to provide a relative priority ranking in the event of mutual interference. A LEAG SAT (special action team) was established to validate and recommend modifications to the list. This SAT was chaired by Dr. Paul Lucey. They provided their final results to CxP in May. Dr. Wendell Mendell will organize an on-going analysis of the data as they come down to ensure data quality and determine if and when a site has sufficient data to be retired from the list. The list was compiled using the best available data, however, it is understood that with the flood of new lunar data, minor modifications or adjustments may be required.

  10. University Rankings and Social Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marginson, Simon

    2014-01-01

    University rankings widely affect the behaviours of prospective students and their families, university executive leaders, academic faculty, governments and investors in higher education. Yet the social science foundations of global rankings receive little scrutiny. Rankings that simply recycle reputation without any necessary connection to real…

  11. Inclusion Practice Priorities Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montie, Jo; And Others

    This instrument was developed to assist individuals or teams to review best practice indicators regarding the development of inclusive school communities and to establish priority targets for improvement. The instrument covers three areas: (1) school community issues, (2) team issues, and (3) classroom issues. For each area, there is a review…

  12. Rural Development: Research Priorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiting, Larry R., Ed.

    Directed at the problem of providing equitable long term rural development, this collection of papers deals with the criteria on which research and educational priorities should be based, given the vast problems and limited resources in the U.S. today. There are 11 papers in this collection: "National Outlook and Perspective" (a plea for…

  13. Millennial Perspectives and Priorities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Therrell, James A.; Dunneback, Staci K.

    2015-01-01

    Through prioritizing student voice, this study investigated the perspectives of millennial students in relation to their preferences and priorities for how they desired to experience teaching and learning. While not experts, our assumption was that undergraduate students, because of their relatively long experience as students, would be closely in…

  14. Sifting Academic Priorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickeson, Robert C.

    1999-01-01

    Cost control in higher education is hampered by the failure of governing boards to focus on the value and quality of academic programs, and barriers to board priority-setting are significant. However, boards must understand the need for reform, identify responsible administrative leadership, reaffirm institutional mission, define what constitutes…

  15. Priorities of Test Publishers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoepfner, Ralph; Doherty, William J.

    1973-01-01

    The profiles of seven major publishers of elementary-level tests were prepared from systematic ratings of the qualities of their tests. Meaningful rating differences among the publishers' priorities were found and three types of publishers could be identified and described. (Authors)

  16. Ranking and Sequencing Model

    2009-08-13

    This database application (commonly called the Supermodel) provides a repository for managing critical facility/project information, allows the user to subjectively an objectively assess key criteria , quantify project risks, develop ROM cost estimates, determine facility/project end states, ultimately performing risk-based modeling to rank facilities/project based on risk, sequencing project schedules and provides an optimized recommended sequencing/scheduling of these projects which maximize the S&M cost savings to perform closure projects which benefit all stakeholders.

  17. Sum of ranking differences to rank stationary phases used in packed column supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    West, Caroline; Khalikova, Maria A; Lesellier, Eric; Héberger, Károly

    2015-08-28

    The identification of a suitable stationary phase in supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) is a major source of difficulty for those with little experience in this technique. Several protocols have been suggested for column classification in high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gas chromatography (GC), and SFC. However, none of the proposed classification schemes received general acceptance. A fair way to compare columns was proposed with the sum of ranking differences (SRD). In this project, we used the retention data obtained for 86 test compounds with varied polarity and structure, analyzed on 71 different stationary phases encompassing the full range in polarity of commercial packed columns currently available to the SFC chromatographer, with a single set of mobile phase and operating conditions (carbon dioxide-methanol mobile phase, 25°C, 150bar outlet pressure, 3ml/min). First, a reference column was selected and the 70 remaining columns were ranked based on this reference column and the retention data obtained on the 86 analytes. As these analytes previously served for the calculation of linear solvation energy relationships (LSER) on the 71 columns, SRD ranks were compared to LSER methodology. Finally, an external comparison based on the analysis of 10 other analytes (UV filters) related the observed selectivity to SRD ranking. Comparison of elution orders of the UV filters to the SRD rankings is highly supportive of the adequacy of SRD methodology to select similar and dissimilar columns. PMID:26228853

  18. Assigning Priorities for Fixed Priority Preemption Threshold Scheduling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Preemption threshold scheduling (PTS) enhances real-time schedulability by controlling preemptiveness of tasks. This benefit of PTS highly depends on a proper algorithm that assigns each task feasible scheduling attributes, which are priority and preemption threshold. Due to the existence of an efficient optimal preemption threshold assignment algorithm that works with fully assigned priority orderings, we need an optimal priority assignment algorithm for PTS. This paper analyzes the inefficiency or nonoptimality of the previously proposed optimal priority assignment algorithms for PTS. We develop theorems for exhaustively but safely pruning infeasible priority orderings while assigning priorities to tasks for PTS. Based on the developed theorems, we correct the previously proposed optimal priority assignment algorithm for PTS. We also propose a performance improved optimal priority assignment algorithm for PTS proving its optimality. The empirical evaluation results clearly show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26688828

  19. A Mathematical Analysis of Air Traffic Priority Rules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakawicz, Anthony J.; Munoz, Cesar A.; Maddalon, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes priority rules, such as those in Part 91.113 of the Federal Aviation Regulations. Such rules determine which of two aircraft should maneuver in a given conflict scenario. While the rules in 91.113 are well accepted, other concepts of operation for NextGen, such as self separation, may allow for different priority rules. A mathematical framework is presented that can be used to analyze a general set of priority rules and enables proofs of important properties. Specific properties considered in this paper include safety, effectiveness, and stability. A set of rules is said to be safe if it ensures that it is never the case that both aircraft have priority. They are effective if exactly one aircraft has priority in every situation. Finally, a set of rules is called stable if it produces compatible results even under small changes to input data.

  20. Priority management system

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, W.A.

    1990-12-18

    Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO) operates the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the US Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). This plant recovers Uranium-235 and rare gases from spent nuclear fuel. Improved fuel processing and waste management methods are also developed at this site. Facilities at ICPP include spent fuel storage and reprocessing areas, a waste solidification facility and related waste storage bins, remote analytical laboratories, and a coal-fired steam generation plant. Maintaining and modernizing a plant of this complexity presents difficult, but not unique problems in scheduling and resource management. WINCO accomplishes the many tasks inherent in any maintenance and construction program by using a Priority Management System. This system allows WINCO to provide integrated and systematic review of all aspects of design and construction, thus meeting customer requirements. This paper provides an overview of the priority setting process and necessary actions to fully implement the system.

  1. Priorities for Venus Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaze, L. S.; Beauchamp, P. M.; Chin, G.; Crisp, D.; Grimm, R. E.; Herrick, R. R.; Johnston, S.; Limaye, S. S.; Smrekar, S. E.; Ocampo, A.; Thompson, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    Venus remains one of the most enigmatic bodies in our Solar System. Important questions remain regarding the origin and evolution of the atmosphere, the history of the surface and interior, and how the surface and atmosphere interact. In a broader context, understanding Venus has implications for understanding the evolution of terrestrial planets in our Solar System as well as for interpreting the growing set of observations of extra-solar planets. The Venus Exploration Analysis Group (VEXAG), established in 2005, is chartered by NASA's Planetary Science Division and reports its findings to the NASA Advisory Council. Open to all interested scientists, VEXAG regularly evaluates Venus exploration goals, scientific objectives, investigations and critical measurement requirements, including especially recommendations in the NRC Decadal Survey and the Solar System Exploration Strategic Roadmap. At the last general meeting in November 2012, VEXAG resolved to update the scientific priorities and strategies for Venus exploration. To achieve this goal, three major tasks were defined for 2013, (1) update the document prioritizing Goals, Objectives and Investigations for Venus Exploration, (2) develop a Roadmap for Venus exploration that is consistent with VEXAG priorities as well as Planetary Decadal Survey priorities, and (3) develop a white paper on technologies for Venus missions. Proposed versions of all three documents were presented at the VEXAG general meeting in November 2013. Here, we present the findings and final versions of all three documents for community comment and feedback. A follow-on Workshop on Venus Exploration Targets is also being planned for the early summer of 2014. The workshop will provide a forum for the Venus science community to discuss approaches for addressing high priority investigations. Participants will be encouraged to present their ideas for specific targets on Venus (interior, surface and atmosphere) as well as to present specific data

  2. Micronutrient bioavailability research priorities.

    PubMed

    Casgrain, Amélie; Collings, Rachel; Harvey, Linda J; Boza, Julio J; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2010-05-01

    A micronutrient bioavailability workshop, which involved international experts and members of the scientific community and the food industry, with interactive breakout sessions based on synectics principles, was organized by the International Life Sciences Institute Europe Addition of Nutrients to Food Task Force and the European Commission Network of Excellence European Micronutrient Recommendations Aligned. After presentations by experts, a series of "challenge statements" was discussed. The aim was to address topical issues, in particular those that linked bioavailability with the derivation of micronutrient requirements and dietary recommendations, to identify gaps in knowledge and to consider research priorities. Several generic research priorities were identified, including improving the quality of dietary surveys/food composition tables, the need for more metabolic studies that use stable isotopes and high-quality longer-term interventions, and the development of multifactorial mathematical models. Among the common recurrent factors identified as important were polymorphisms/genotype, consideration of the whole diet, chemical form of the micronutrient, and the determination of physiologic requirements. The involvement of all participants in the structured discussions ensured a broad overview of current knowledge, state-of-the-art research, and consideration of priorities for future research. PMID:20200267

  3. The Privileges of Rank

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, Alair

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the effects of peacetime cold war military service on the life course according to four potentially overlapping theories that state that military service (1) was a disruption, (2) was a positive turning point, (3) allowed veterans to accumulate advantage, and (4) was an agent of social reproduction. The article argues that the extent to which the effect of military service on veterans' lives corresponds with one or another of the preceding theories depends on historical shifts in three dimensions: conscription, conflict, and benefits. Military service during the peacetime draft era of the late 1950s had a neutral effect on the socioeconomic attainment of enlisted veterans. However, it had a positive effect on veterans who served as officers, which partly stemmed from status reproduction and selection. Yet net of pre-service and educational differences by rank, officers in this peacetime draft era were still able to accumulate advantage. PMID:20842210

  4. Global Priorities for Marine Biodiversity Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Selig, Elizabeth R.; Turner, Will R.; Troëng, Sebastian; Wallace, Bryan P.; Halpern, Benjamin S.; Kaschner, Kristin; Lascelles, Ben G.; Carpenter, Kent E.; Mittermeier, Russell A.

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, many marine populations have experienced major declines in abundance, but we still know little about where management interventions may help protect the highest levels of marine biodiversity. We used modeled spatial distribution data for nearly 12,500 species to quantify global patterns of species richness and two measures of endemism. By combining these data with spatial information on cumulative human impacts, we identified priority areas where marine biodiversity is most and least impacted by human activities, both within Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs) and Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction (ABNJ). Our analyses highlighted places that are both accepted priorities for marine conservation like the Coral Triangle, as well as less well-known locations in the southwest Indian Ocean, western Pacific Ocean, Arctic and Antarctic Oceans, and within semi-enclosed seas like the Mediterranean and Baltic Seas. Within highly impacted priority areas, climate and fishing were the biggest stressors. Although new priorities may arise as we continue to improve marine species range datasets, results from this work are an essential first step in guiding limited resources to regions where investment could best sustain marine biodiversity. PMID:24416151

  5. Low-rank coal research

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, G. F.; Laudal, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    This work is a compilation of reports on ongoing research at the University of North Dakota. Topics include: Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research (SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control, waste management), Advanced Research and Technology Development (turbine combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation, coal/char reactivity, liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, fine particulate emissions), Combustion Research (fluidized bed combustion, beneficiation of low-rank coals, combustion characterization of low-rank coal fuels, diesel utilization of low-rank coals), Liquefaction Research (low-rank coal direct liquefaction), and Gasification Research (hydrogen production from low-rank coals, advanced wastewater treatment, mild gasification, color and residual COD removal from Synfuel wastewaters, Great Plains Gasification Plant, gasifier optimization).

  6. Wikipedia ranking of world universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lages, José; Patt, Antoine; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2016-03-01

    We use the directed networks between articles of 24 Wikipedia language editions for producing the wikipedia ranking of world Universities (WRWU) using PageRank, 2DRank and CheiRank algorithms. This approach allows to incorporate various cultural views on world universities using the mathematical statistical analysis independent of cultural preferences. The Wikipedia ranking of top 100 universities provides about 60% overlap with the Shanghai university ranking demonstrating the reliable features of this approach. At the same time WRWU incorporates all knowledge accumulated at 24 Wikipedia editions giving stronger highlights for historically important universities leading to a different estimation of efficiency of world countries in university education. The historical development of university ranking is analyzed during ten centuries of their history.

  7. How to Establish Instructional Priorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Railsback, C. E.

    Establishing instructional priorities in public schools is a worthwhile and important process. Because time and money are insufficient to increase staffing in schools, setting priorities is a necessary component of successful managing. Steps to be taken in setting instructional priorities are as follows: (1) Adopt a statement of mission describing…

  8. Network tuned multiple rank aggregation and applications to gene ranking

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    With the development of various high throughput technologies and analysis methods, researchers can study different aspects of a biological phenomenon simultaneously or one aspect repeatedly with different experimental techniques and analysis methods. The output from each study is a rank list of components of interest. Aggregation of the rank lists of components, such as proteins, genes and single nucleotide variants (SNV), produced by these experiments has been proven to be helpful in both filtering the noise and bringing forth a more complete understanding of the biological problems. Current available rank aggregation methods do not consider the network information that has been observed to provide vital contributions in many data integration studies. We developed network tuned rank aggregation methods incorporating network information and demonstrated its superior performance over aggregation methods without network information. The methods are tested on predicting the Gene Ontology function of yeast proteins. We validate the methods using combinations of three gene expression data sets and three protein interaction networks as well as an integrated network by combining the three networks. Results show that the aggregated rank lists are more meaningful if protein interaction network is incorporated. Among the methods compared, CGI_RRA and CGI_Endeavour, which integrate rank lists with networks using CGI [1] followed by rank aggregation using either robust rank aggregation (RRA) [2] or Endeavour [3] perform the best. Finally, we use the methods to locate target genes of transcription factors. PMID:25708095

  9. Beyond Low Rank + Sparse: Multiscale Low Rank Matrix Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Frank; Lustig, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Low rank methods allow us to capture globally correlated components within matrices. The recent low rank + sparse decomposition further enables us to extract sparse entries along with the globally correlated components. In this paper, we present a natural generalization and consider the decomposition of matrices into components of multiple scales. Such decomposition is well motivated in practice as data matrices often exhibit local correlations in multiple scales. Concretely, we propose a multi-scale low rank modeling that represents a data matrix as a sum of block-wise low rank matrices with increasing scales of block sizes. We then consider the inverse problem of decomposing the data matrix into its multi-scale low rank components and approach the problem via a convex formulation. Theoretically, we show that under an incoherence condition, the convex program recovers the multi-scale low rank components exactly. Practically, we provide guidance on selecting the regularization parameters and incorporate cycle spinning to reduce blocking artifacts. Experimentally, we show that the multi-scale low rank decomposition provides a more intuitive decomposition than conventional low rank methods and demonstrate its effectiveness in four applications, including illumination normalization for face images, motion separation for surveillance videos, multi-scale modeling of the dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and collaborative filtering exploiting age information.

  10. Criteria for priority-setting in health care in Uganda: exploration of stakeholders' values.

    PubMed Central

    Kapiriri, Lydia; Norheim, Ole Frithjof

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore stakeholders' acceptance of criteria for setting priorities for the health care system in Uganda. METHODS: A self-administered questionnaire was used. It was distributed to health workers, planners and administrators working in all levels of the Ugandan health care system. It was also distributed to members of the public. Participants were asked how strongly they agreed or disagreed with 18 criteria that could be used to set priorities for allocating health care. A total of 408 people took part. Data were entered and analysed using SPSS statistical software. Predetermined cut-off points were used to rank the criteria into three different categories: high weight (>66% of respondents agreed), average weight (33-66% of respondents agreed) and low weight (<33% of respondents agreed). We also tested for associations between respondents' characteristics and their degree of agreement with the criteria. FINDINGS: High-weight criteria included severity of disease, benefit of the intervention, cost of the intervention, cost-effectiveness of the intervention, quality of the data on effectiveness, the patients age, place of residence, lifestyle, importance of providing equity of access to health care and the community's views. The average-weight criteria included the patient's social status, mental features, physical capabilities, political views, responsibilities for others and gender. Low-weight criteria included the patient's religion, and power and influence. There were few associations between respondents' characteristics and their preferences. CONCLUSION: There was a high degree of acceptance for commonly used disease-related and society-related criteria. There was less agreement about the patient-related criteria. We propose that average-weight criteria should be debated in Uganda and other countries facing the challenge of distributing scarce health care resources. PMID:15112005

  11. 15 CFR 700.11 - Priority ratings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL SECURITY INDUSTRIAL BASE REGULATIONS DEFENSE PRIORITIES AND ALLOCATIONS SYSTEM Industrial Priorities § 700.11 Priority ratings. (a) Levels...

  12. Ranking nodes in growing networks: When PageRank fails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2015-11-01

    PageRank is arguably the most popular ranking algorithm which is being applied in real systems ranging from information to biological and infrastructure networks. Despite its outstanding popularity and broad use in different areas of science, the relation between the algorithm’s efficacy and properties of the network on which it acts has not yet been fully understood. We study here PageRank’s performance on a network model supported by real data, and show that realistic temporal effects make PageRank fail in individuating the most valuable nodes for a broad range of model parameters. Results on real data are in qualitative agreement with our model-based findings. This failure of PageRank reveals that the static approach to information filtering is inappropriate for a broad class of growing systems, and suggest that time-dependent algorithms that are based on the temporal linking patterns of these systems are needed to better rank the nodes.

  13. Maine Environmental Priorities Project: Summary of the Reports from the Technical Working Groups to the Steering Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Environmental Education, Miami, FL.

    The Maine Environmental Priorities Project (MEPP) is a comparative risk project designed to identify, compare, and rank the most serious environmental problems facing Maine. Once the problems are analyzed and ranked according to their threat or risk to Maine's ecological health, human health, and quality of life, the project will propose…

  14. Research Priorities for NCD Prevention and Climate Change: An International Delphi Survey.

    PubMed

    Colagiuri, Ruth; Boylan, Sinead; Morrice, Emily

    2015-10-01

    Climate change and non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are arguably the greatest global challenges of the 21st Century. However, the confluence between them remains under-examined and there is little evidence of a comprehensive, systematic approach to identifying research priorities to mitigate their joint impact. Consequently, we: (i) convened a workshop of academics (n = 25) from the Worldwide Universities Network to identify priority areas at the interface between NCDs and climate change; (ii) conducted a Delphi survey of international opinion leaders in public health and relevant other disciplines; and (iii) convened an expert panel to review and advise on final priorities. Three research areas (water security; transport; conceptualising NCD harms to support policy formation) were listed among the top 10 priorities by >90% of Delphi respondents, and ranked among the top 12 priorities by >60% of respondents who ranked the order of priority. A fourth area (reducing the carbon footprint of cities) was ranked highest by the same >60% of respondents. Our results are consistent with existing frameworks on health and climate change, and extends them by focusing specifically on NCDs. Researching these priorities could progress understanding of climate change and NCDs, and inform global and national policy decisions for mitigating associated harms. PMID:26501301

  15. Research Priorities for NCD Prevention and Climate Change: An International Delphi Survey

    PubMed Central

    Colagiuri, Ruth; Boylan, Sinead; Morrice, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Climate change and non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are arguably the greatest global challenges of the 21st Century. However, the confluence between them remains under-examined and there is little evidence of a comprehensive, systematic approach to identifying research priorities to mitigate their joint impact. Consequently, we: (i) convened a workshop of academics (n = 25) from the Worldwide Universities Network to identify priority areas at the interface between NCDs and climate change; (ii) conducted a Delphi survey of international opinion leaders in public health and relevant other disciplines; and (iii) convened an expert panel to review and advise on final priorities. Three research areas (water security; transport; conceptualising NCD harms to support policy formation) were listed among the top 10 priorities by >90% of Delphi respondents, and ranked among the top 12 priorities by >60% of respondents who ranked the order of priority. A fourth area (reducing the carbon footprint of cities) was ranked highest by the same >60% of respondents. Our results are consistent with existing frameworks on health and climate change, and extends them by focusing specifically on NCDs. Researching these priorities could progress understanding of climate change and NCDs, and inform global and national policy decisions for mitigating associated harms. PMID:26501301

  16. Parental Perception of the Importance of Friendship and Other Outcome Priorities in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrina, Neysa; Carter, Mark; Stephenson, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Parental perceptions of the importance of friendship development in comparison to other outcome priorities are examined in this research. Parents of children with high functioning autism between the age of 5-10?years (N?=?74) were asked to rate and rank the importance of the following six outcome priorities: friendship, social skills, physical and…

  17. Deontics = Betterness + Priority

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Benthem, Johan; Grossi, Davide; Liu, Fenrong

    This paper looks at deontic logic as resulting from both a betterness ordering on states (i.e., a 'deontic preference') and a priority ordering on properties (i.e., a 'law' explicitly representing a standard of behavior). The correspondence between these two orderings offers a rich perspective from which to look at deontic scenarios and puzzles, and in particular at contrary-to-duties. The framework naturally lends itself to describing dynamics involving both orderings, thereby providing a new analysis of norm change as 'betterness change'.

  18. Obsession with Rankings Goes Global

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labi, Aisha

    2008-01-01

    A Chinese list of the world's top universities would seem an unlikely concern for French politicians. But this year, France's legislature took aim at the annual rankings produced by Shanghai Jiao Tong University, which claims to list the 500 best universities in the world. The highest-ranked French entry, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, comes in…

  19. Technical Pitfalls in University Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bougnol, Marie-Laure; Dulá, Jose H.

    2015-01-01

    Academicians, experts, and other stakeholders have contributed extensively to the literature on university rankings also known as "league tables". Often the tone is critical usually focused on the subjective aspects of the process; e.g., the list of the universities' attributes used in the rankings, their respective weights, and the size…

  20. University Rankings in Critical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pusser, Brian; Marginson, Simon

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses global postsecondary ranking systems by using critical-theoretical perspectives on power. This research suggests rankings are at once a useful lens for studying power in higher education and an important instrument for the exercise of power in service of dominant norms in global higher education. (Contains 1 table and 1…

  1. University Ranking as Social Exclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amsler, Sarah S.; Bolsmann, Chris

    2012-01-01

    In this article we explore the dual role of global university rankings in the creation of a new, knowledge-identified, transnational capitalist class and in facilitating new forms of social exclusion. We examine how and why the practice of ranking universities has become widely defined by national and international organisations as an important…

  2. 7 CFR 1465.4 - National priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... identify national priorities to achieve the conservation objectives of AMA. (b) National priorities will be... priorities in conjunction with State and local priorities to prioritize and select AMA applications...

  3. Acceptance speech.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, C K

    1994-01-01

    I am proud and honored to accept this award on behalf of the Government of Bangladesh, and the millions of Bangladeshi children saved by oral rehydration solution. The Government of Bangladesh is grateful for this recognition of its commitment to international health and population research and cost-effective health care for all. The Government of Bangladesh has already made remarkable strides forward in the health and population sector, and this was recognized in UNICEF's 1993 "State of the World's Children". The national contraceptive prevalence rate, at 40%, is higher than that of many developed countries. It is appropriate that Bangladesh, where ORS was discovered, has the largest ORS production capacity in the world. It was remarkable that after the devastating cyclone in 1991, the country was able to produce enough ORS to meet the needs and remain self-sufficient. Similarly, Bangladesh has one of the most effective, flexible and efficient control of diarrheal disease and epidemic response program in the world. Through the country, doctors have been trained in diarrheal disease management, and stores of ORS are maintained ready for any outbreak. Despite grim predictions after the 1991 cyclone and the 1993 floods, relatively few people died from diarrheal disease. This is indicative of the strength of the national program. I want to take this opportunity to acknowledge the contribution of ICDDR, B and the important role it plays in supporting the Government's efforts in the health and population sector. The partnership between the Government of Bangladesh and ICDDR, B has already borne great fruit, and I hope and believe that it will continue to do so for many years in the future. Thank you. PMID:12345479

  4. Basic research needs and priorities in solar energy. Volume II. Technology crosscuts for DOE

    SciTech Connect

    Jayadev, J S; Roessner, D eds.

    1980-01-01

    Priorities for basic research important to the future developments of solar energy are idenified, described, and recommended. SERI surveyed more than 120 leading scientists who were engaged in or knowledgeable of solar-related research. The result is an amalgam of national scientific opinion representing the views of key researchers in relevant disciplines and of SERI staff members. The scientific disciplines included in the report are: chemistry, biology, materials sciences, engineering and mathematics, and the social and behavioral sciences. Each discipline is subdivided into two to five topical areas-and, within each topical area, research needs are described and ranked according to the priorities suggested in the survey. Three categories of priority were established: crucial, important, and needed. A narrative accompanying the description of research needs in each topical area discusses the importance of research in the area for solar energy development and presents the bases for the priority rankings recommended.

  5. [Priority setting: what is it all about, and how does it work?].

    PubMed

    Meyer, T; Raspe, H

    2012-04-01

    This paper introduces the concept of priority setting in health care. Priority setting is understood as a notional approach to find out what to regard as more important or less important in health care. It primarily means to bring aspects into a ranking order. Priority setting is first and foremost theoretical work aimed at preparing decisions. It does not replace these decisions. Priority setting is not restricted to circumstances of scarce resources. It can be used, for example, for working more efficiently, for quality assurance, and also for rationing. Values or value decisions form the basis of priority setting. There should be a societal consensus regarding these values and the way priority setting is conducted. Priority settings can be done to very different objects, including objects from a macro-level, e. g. general goals of health care, from a meso-level, e. g. condition-treatment pairs, as well as from a micro-level, e. g. waiting lists. Swedish national prioritization guidelines serve as an example of how priority setting can be conducted. Here, condition-treatment pairs are developed on the basis of present health care occurrences. Then, priorities from 1 (highest priority) to 10 (lowest priority) are assigned on the basis of a priority setting model. The process includes all relevant stakeholders. Priorities are set on the basis of the severity of the problem, knowledge of the effect of an intervention and its cost-effectiveness, as well as the level of evidence of the knowledge contributing to the decision. In rehabilitation, priority setting is still an unfamiliar topic which only few scientific papers have taken up to date. Different aspects of priority setting that may be deemed important for rehabilitation are introduced. PMID:22570153

  6. Universal scaling in sports ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Weibing; Li, Wei; Cai, Xu; Bulou, Alain; Wang, Qiuping A.

    2012-09-01

    Ranking is a ubiquitous phenomenon in human society. On the web pages of Forbes, one may find all kinds of rankings, such as the world's most powerful people, the world's richest people, the highest-earning tennis players, and so on and so forth. Herewith, we study a specific kind—sports ranking systems in which players' scores and/or prize money are accrued based on their performances in different matches. By investigating 40 data samples which span 12 different sports, we find that the distributions of scores and/or prize money follow universal power laws, with exponents nearly identical for most sports. In order to understand the origin of this universal scaling we focus on the tennis ranking systems. By checking the data we find that, for any pair of players, the probability that the higher-ranked player tops the lower-ranked opponent is proportional to the rank difference between the pair. Such a dependence can be well fitted to a sigmoidal function. By using this feature, we propose a simple toy model which can simulate the competition of players in different matches. The simulations yield results consistent with the empirical findings. Extensive simulation studies indicate that the model is quite robust with respect to the modifications of some parameters.

  7. Priority Queues for Computer Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinman, Jeffrey S. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is embodied in new priority queue data structures for event list management of computer simulations, and includes a new priority queue data structure and an improved event horizon applied to priority queue data structures. ne new priority queue data structure is a Qheap and is made out of linked lists for robust, fast, reliable, and stable event list management and uses a temporary unsorted list to store all items until one of the items is needed. Then the list is sorted, next, the highest priority item is removed, and then the rest of the list is inserted in the Qheap. Also, an event horizon is applied to binary tree and splay tree priority queue data structures to form the improved event horizon for event management.

  8. Priorities for Endometriosis Research

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Peter A. W.; D’Hooghe, Thomas M.; Fazleabas, Asgerally; Gargett, Caroline E.; Giudice, Linda C.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Rombauts, Luk; Salamonsen, Lois A.; Zondervan, Krina T.

    2009-01-01

    Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent disorder where endometrial tissue forms lesions outside the uterus. Endometriosis affects an estimated 10% of women in the reproductive-age group, rising to 30% to 50% in patients with infertility and/or pain, with significant impact on their physical, mental, and social well-being. There is no known cure, and most current medical treatments are not suitable long term due to their side-effect profiles. Endometriosis has an estimated annual cost in the United States of $18.8 to $22 billion (2002 figures). Although endometriosis was first described more than 100 years ago, current knowledge of its pathogenesis, spontaneous evolution, and the pathophysiology of the related infertility and pelvic pain, remain unclear. A consensus workshop was convened following the 10th World Congress on Endometriosis to establish recommendations for priorities in endometriosis research. One major issue identified as impacting on the capacity to undertake endometriosis research is the need for multidisciplinary expertise. A total of 25 recommendations for research have been developed, grouped under 5 subheadings: (1) diagnosis, (2) classification and prognosis, (3) treatment and outcome, (4) epidemiology, and (5) pathophysiology. Endometriosis research is underfunded relative to other diseases with high health care burdens. This may be due to the practical difficulties of developing competitive research proposals on a complex and poorly understood disease, which affects only women. By producing this consensus international research priorities statement it is the hope of the workshop participants that researchers will be encouraged to develop new interdisciplinary research proposals that will attract increased funding support for work on endometriosis. PMID:19196878

  9. Priority nutrition messages.

    PubMed

    1991-01-01

    The Philippine Food and Nutrition Program deliver priority short, simple, clear, and action filled nutrition messages in different languages and dialects to different audiences. Its 1st priority task is to promote breast feeding. It informs mothers that breast milk is the most nutritious food for infants and that it protects them from infectious diseases. The program also encourages breast feeding as long as possible. If mothers cannot breast feed, they should talk to an infant nutrition expert to help them choose the best formula and learn about proper preparation. A 4-6 month infant needs to begin eating small amounts of semisolid nutritious foods. Moreover these foods must include body building foods, such as meat and eggs, and energy providing foods, such as corn and rice. Mothers must 1st attend to food needs of infants and preschoolers since they are more likely to suffer malnutrition than older children and adults. This is especially important when they suffer from an infection. Specifically, the very young need a variety of foods each day including the vitamin and mineral rich vegetables and fruits. In fact, families should grow their own fruits and vegetables to ensure an adequate supply. Hands must be cleaned with soap and water after defecation and before preparing foods. Mothers should add fats and oils when preparing foods because they provide concentrated energy, fatty acids, and fat soluble vitamins. Pregnant mothers must consume increased amounts of fish, beans, and other body building foods as well as regulating foods (vegetables and fruits). Mothers must also space births. They should weigh children each month to monitor nutritional levels. Moreover they must pay attention to signs indicating inadequate and insufficient food intake e.g., underweight and night blindness. PMID:12284666

  10. TripleRank: Ranking Semantic Web Data by Tensor Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Thomas; Schultz, Antje; Sizov, Sergej; Staab, Steffen

    The Semantic Web fosters novel applications targeting a more efficient and satisfying exploitation of the data available on the web, e.g. faceted browsing of linked open data. Large amounts and high diversity of knowledge in the Semantic Web pose the challenging question of appropriate relevance ranking for producing fine-grained and rich descriptions of the available data, e.g. to guide the user along most promising knowledge aspects. Existing methods for graph-based authority ranking lack support for fine-grained latent coherence between resources and predicates (i.e. support for link semantics in the linked data model). In this paper, we present TripleRank, a novel approach for faceted authority ranking in the context of RDF knowledge bases. TripleRank captures the additional latent semantics of Semantic Web data by means of statistical methods in order to produce richer descriptions of the available data. We model the Semantic Web by a 3-dimensional tensor that enables the seamless representation of arbitrary semantic links. For the analysis of that model, we apply the PARAFAC decomposition, which can be seen as a multi-modal counterpart to Web authority ranking with HITS. The result are groupings of resources and predicates that characterize their authority and navigational (hub) properties with respect to identified topics. We have applied TripleRank to multiple data sets from the linked open data community and gathered encouraging feedback in a user evaluation where TripleRank results have been exploited in a faceted browsing scenario.

  11. 8 CFR 207.5 - Waiting lists and priority handling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REFUGEES § 207.5 Waiting lists and priority handling. Waiting lists are maintained for each designated refugee group of special humanitarian concern. Each applicant whose application is accepted for filing by... of case control. Refugees or groups of refugees may be selected from these lists in a manner...

  12. 8 CFR 207.5 - Waiting lists and priority handling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REFUGEES § 207.5 Waiting lists and priority handling. Waiting lists are maintained for each designated refugee group of special humanitarian concern. Each applicant whose application is accepted for filing by... of case control. Refugees or groups of refugees may be selected from these lists in a manner...

  13. 8 CFR 207.5 - Waiting lists and priority handling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REFUGEES § 207.5 Waiting lists and priority handling. Waiting lists are maintained for each designated refugee group of special humanitarian concern. Each applicant whose application is accepted for filing by... of case control. Refugees or groups of refugees may be selected from these lists in a manner...

  14. Combining evidence and values in priority setting: testing the balance sheet method in a low-income country

    PubMed Central

    Makundi, Emmanuel; Kapiriri, Lydia; Norheim, Ole Frithjof

    2007-01-01

    Background Procedures for priority setting need to incorporate both scientific evidence and public values. The aim of this study was to test out a model for priority setting which incorporates both scientific evidence and public values, and to explore use of evidence by a selection of stakeholders and to study reasons for the relative ranking of health care interventions in a setting of extreme resource scarcity. Methods Systematic search for and assessment of relevant evidence for priority setting in a low-income country. Development of a balance sheet according to Eddy's explicit method. Eight group interviews (n-85), using a modified nominal group technique for eliciting individual and group rankings of a given set of health interventions. Results The study procedure made it possible to compare the groups' ranking before and after all the evidence was provided to participants. A rank deviation is significant if the rank order of the same intervention differed by two or more points on the ordinal scale. A comparison between the initial rank and the final rank (before deliberation) showed a rank deviation of 67%. The difference between the initial rank and the final rank after discussion and voting gave a rank deviation of 78%. Conclusion Evidence-based and deliberative decision-making does change priorities significantly in an experimental setting. Our use of the balance sheet method was meant as a demonstration project, but could if properly developed be feasible for health planners, experts and health workers, although more work is needed before it can be used for laypersons. PMID:17892561

  15. The emergence of global disease control priorities.

    PubMed

    Shiffman, Jeremy; Beer, Tanya; Wu, Yonghong

    2002-09-01

    How do global disease control priorities emerge? This paper examines the post-World War II histories of efforts to control three diseases--polio, malaria and tuberculosis--to investigate this issue. The paper draws from the policy studies literature to evaluate three models of the priority generation process. A rational model suggests logical selection based on global burden and the availability of cost-effective interventions. An incremental model suggests a drawn out process in which health priorities emerge gradually and interventions reach affected populations through slow diffusion. A punctuated equilibrium model suggests a more complex pattern: long periods of stability during which interventions are available only to select populations, punctuated by bursts of attention as these interventions spread across the globe in concentrated periods of time. The paper finds that the punctuated equilibrium model corresponds most closely to efforts to control these three diseases. Bursts are associated with the convergence of three conditions: the widespread acceptance of the disease as a threat; a perception that human interventions can control disease transmission; and the formation of a transnational coalition of health actors concerned with fighting the disease. The generation of each condition requires considerable groundwork, the reason for long periods of stability. Initiatives take off rapidly when the conditions couple, the reason for bursts. The paper aims to spark additional research on the subject of global disease control agenda setting, a neglected issue in the health policy literature. PMID:12135988

  16. Influence Analysis of Ranking Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, Wai-Yin; Chan, Wai

    2002-01-01

    Developed diagnostic measures to identify observations in Thurstonian models for ranking data that unduly influence parameter estimates obtained by the partition maximum likelihood approach of W. Chan and P. Bender (1998). (SLD)

  17. Priorities for CMV vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Krause, Philip R; Bialek, Stephanie R; Boppana, Suresh B; Griffiths, Paul D; Laughlin, Catherine A; Ljungman, Per; Mocarski, Edward S; Pass, Robert F; Read, Jennifer S; Schleiss, Mark R; Plotkin, Stanley A

    2013-12-17

    A multidisciplinary meeting addressed priorities related to development of vaccines against cytomegalovirus (CMV), the cause of congenital CMV (cCMV) disease and of serious disease in the immunocompromised. Participants discussed optimal uses of a CMV vaccine, aspects of clinical study design, and the value of additional research. A universal childhood CMV vaccine could potentially rapidly reduce cCMV disease, as infected children are sources of viral transmission to seronegative and seropositive mothers. A vaccine administered to adolescents or adult women could also reduce cCMV disease by making them immune prior to pregnancy. Clinical trials of CMV vaccines in women should evaluate protection against cCMV infection, an essential precursor of cCMV disease, which is a more practical and acceptable endpoint for assessing vaccine effects on maternal-fetal transmission. Clinical trials of vaccines to evaluate prevention of CMV disease in stem cell transplant recipients could use CMV viremia at a level triggering pre-emptive antiviral therapy as an endpoint, because widespread use of pre-emptive and prophylactic antivirals has rendered CMV-induced disease too rare to be a practical endpoint for clinical trials. In solid organ transplant patients, CMV-associated disease is sufficiently common for use as a primary endpoint. Additional research to advance CMV vaccine development should include identifying factors that predict fetal loss due to CMV, determining age-specific incidence and transmission rates, defining the mechanism and relative contributions of maternal reactivation and re-infection to cCMV disease, developing assays that can distinguish between reactivation and re-infection in seropositive vaccinees, further defining predictors of sequelae from cCMV infection, and identifying clinically relevant immune response parameters to CMV (including developing validated assays that could assess CMV antibody avidity) that could lead to the establishment of immune

  18. RANK and RANK ligand expression in primary human osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Branstetter, Daniel; Rohrbach, Kathy; Huang, Li-Ya; Soriano, Rosalia; Tometsko, Mark; Blake, Michelle; Jacob, Allison P; Dougall, William C

    2015-09-01

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) is an essential mediator of osteoclast formation, function and survival. In patients with solid tumor metastasis to the bone, targeting the bone microenvironment by inhibition of RANKL using denosumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific to RANKL, has been demonstrated to prevent tumor-induced osteolysis and subsequent skeletal complications. Recently, a prominent functional role for the RANKL pathway has emerged in the primary bone tumor giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB). Expression of both RANKL and RANK is extremely high in GCTB tumors and denosumab treatment was associated with tumor regression and reduced tumor-associated bone lysis in GCTB patients. In order to address the potential role of the RANKL pathway in another primary bone tumor, this study assessed human RANKL and RANK expression in human primary osteosarcoma (OS) using specific mAbs, validated and optimized for immunohistochemistry (IHC) or flow cytometry. Our results demonstrate RANKL expression was observed in the tumor element in 68% of human OS using IHC. However, the staining intensity was relatively low and only 37% (29/79) of samples exhibited≥10% RANKL positive tumor cells. RANK expression was not observed in OS tumor cells. In contrast, RANK expression was clearly observed in other cells within OS samples, including the myeloid osteoclast precursor compartment, osteoclasts and in giant osteoclast cells. The intensity and frequency of RANKL and RANK staining in OS samples were substantially less than that observed in GCTB samples. The observation that RANKL is expressed in OS cells themselves suggests that these tumors may mediate an osteoclastic response, and anti-RANKL therapy may potentially be protective against bone pathologies in OS. However, the absence of RANK expression in primary human OS cells suggests that any autocrine RANKL/RANK signaling in human OS tumor cells is not operative, and anti-RANKL therapy

  19. 47 CFR 211.6 - Submission and processing of restoration priority requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... NATO, NATO national military authority, and such other requests as the Executive Agent may be... acceptable. (e) Requests for restoration priority assignments made by NATO, NATO national military authority... approved NATO/U.S. procedures. (f) Requests for temporary upgrading of restoration priority...

  20. Priorities for Federal Education Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murnane, Richard J.

    The paper suggests priorities for the federal government's elementary and secondary education data collection efforts. Sections on outputs, inputs, and private schools describe what data is needed, what is already available, and what is recommended for data collection. Recommendations include a high priority for federal funding for the National…

  1. Priorities Statements of Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Community Coll. Board, Springfield.

    In response to recommendations in the Illinois Board of Higher Education's Priorities, Quality, and Productivity report of November 1994, the 52 community colleges in the state prepared priority statements detailing specific college objectives for the current fiscal year (FY). This report provides the second update of the colleges' statements,…

  2. Dreissenid mussel research priorities workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sytsma, Mark; Phillips, Stephen; Counihan, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    On November 4-5, 2015, a Dreissenid Mussel Research Priorities Workshop funded by the Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative occurred at Portland State University. The purpose of the workshop was to update research priorities in the 2010 Quagga-Zebra Mussel Action Plan in light of the westward expansion of mussels in the United States and Canada.

  3. Microextraction of priority pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Leepipatriboon, S.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the priority pollutants, e.g., aromatic hydrocarbons, halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons and halogenated alkanes and alkenes have been studied by a microextraction technique. The compounds studied were benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene for aromatic hydrocarbons; chlorobenzene, m-dichlorobenzene, p-dichlorobenzene, and o-dichlorobenzene for halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons; and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethane, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, choloroform, ethylene chloride, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, carbon tetrachloride, methylene chloride, bromodichloromethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, trichloroethylene and bromoform for halogenated alkanes and alkenes. The organic solvent-to-water sample ratios of study were 1:9, 5:5 and 8:2, respectively. Solvent extractability effect of carbon disulfide, methylene chloride and hexane or iso-octane and the effect of salts, e.g., saturated sodium chloride solution, saturated sodium sulfate solution, 2.00 g of sodium chloride and 2.00 g of sodium sulfate on the percent recovery were investigated in this study. This technique is based on the extraction into an organic solvent phase followed by the measurement of the peak area by a flame ionization detector. Gas chromatography and the internal standard technique were used throughout the stud. The gas chromatographic conditions for each system of study were reported. The standard deviation of this study ranged from 1-16%. The distribution constant, K{sub D}, and the results of percent recovery for each compound are discussed.

  4. 50 CFR 84.31 - An overview of the ranking criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM NATIONAL COASTAL WETLANDS CONSERVATION GRANT PROGRAM Project Selection § 84.31 An overview of the ranking criteria. (a) The primary... § 84.32 are not listed in priority order. (d) Points are assigned on the basis of a completed...

  5. 50 CFR 84.31 - An overview of the ranking criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE AND SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM NATIONAL COASTAL WETLANDS CONSERVATION GRANT PROGRAM Project Selection § 84.31 An overview of the ranking criteria. (a) The primary... § 84.32 are not listed in priority order. (d) Points are assigned on the basis of a completed...

  6. 50 CFR 84.31 - An overview of the ranking criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM NATIONAL COASTAL WETLANDS CONSERVATION GRANT PROGRAM Project Selection § 84.31 An overview of the ranking criteria. (a) The primary... § 84.32 are not listed in priority order. (d) Points are assigned on the basis of a completed...

  7. 50 CFR 84.31 - An overview of the ranking criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE AND SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM NATIONAL COASTAL WETLANDS CONSERVATION GRANT PROGRAM Project Selection § 84.31 An overview of the ranking criteria. (a) The primary... § 84.32 are not listed in priority order. (d) Points are assigned on the basis of a completed...

  8. 25 CFR 170.209 - How will IRRHPP applications be ranked and funded?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How will IRRHPP applications be ranked and funded? 170.209 Section 170.209 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Funding Irr High Priority Project (irrhpp) § 170.209 How will IRRHPP applications...

  9. 25 CFR 170.209 - How will IRRHPP applications be ranked and funded?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How will IRRHPP applications be ranked and funded? 170.209 Section 170.209 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Funding Irr High Priority Project (irrhpp) § 170.209 How will IRRHPP applications...

  10. 25 CFR 170.209 - How will IRRHPP applications be ranked and funded?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true How will IRRHPP applications be ranked and funded? 170.209 Section 170.209 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Funding Irr High Priority Project (irrhpp) § 170.209 How will IRRHPP applications be...

  11. 25 CFR 170.209 - How will IRRHPP applications be ranked and funded?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How will IRRHPP applications be ranked and funded? 170.209 Section 170.209 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Funding Irr High Priority Project (irrhpp) § 170.209 How will IRRHPP applications...

  12. 25 CFR 170.209 - How will IRRHPP applications be ranked and funded?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How will IRRHPP applications be ranked and funded? 170.209 Section 170.209 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Funding Irr High Priority Project (irrhpp) § 170.209 How will IRRHPP applications...

  13. Ranking nodes in growing networks: When PageRank fails

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    PageRank is arguably the most popular ranking algorithm which is being applied in real systems ranging from information to biological and infrastructure networks. Despite its outstanding popularity and broad use in different areas of science, the relation between the algorithm’s efficacy and properties of the network on which it acts has not yet been fully understood. We study here PageRank’s performance on a network model supported by real data, and show that realistic temporal effects make PageRank fail in individuating the most valuable nodes for a broad range of model parameters. Results on real data are in qualitative agreement with our model-based findings. This failure of PageRank reveals that the static approach to information filtering is inappropriate for a broad class of growing systems, and suggest that time-dependent algorithms that are based on the temporal linking patterns of these systems are needed to better rank the nodes. PMID:26553630

  14. Ranking structures and rank-rank correlations of countries: The FIFA and UEFA cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausloos, Marcel; Cloots, Rudi; Gadomski, Adam; Vitanov, Nikolay K.

    2014-04-01

    Ranking of agents competing with each other in complex systems may lead to paradoxes according to the pre-chosen different measures. A discussion is presented on such rank-rank, similar or not, correlations based on the case of European countries ranked by UEFA and FIFA from different soccer competitions. The first question to be answered is whether an empirical and simple law is obtained for such (self-) organizations of complex sociological systems with such different measuring schemes. It is found that the power law form is not the best description contrary to many modern expectations. The stretched exponential is much more adequate. Moreover, it is found that the measuring rules lead to some inner structures in both cases.

  15. A network-based ranking system for US college football

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Juyong; Newman, M. E. J.

    2005-10-01

    American college football faces a conflict created by the desire to stage national championship games between the best teams of a season when there is no conventional play-off system for deciding which those teams are. Instead, ranking of teams is based on their records of wins and losses during the season, but each team plays only a small fraction of eligible opponents, making the system underdetermined or contradictory or both. It is an interesting challenge to create a ranking system that at once is mathematically well founded, gives results in general accord with received wisdom concerning the relative strengths of the teams, and is based upon intuitive principles, allowing it to be accepted readily by fans and experts alike. Here we introduce a one-parameter ranking method that satisfies all of these requirements and is based on a network representation of college football schedules.

  16. Ranking species in mutualistic networks.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-García, Virginia; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the architectural subtleties of ecological networks, believed to confer them enhanced stability and robustness, is a subject of outmost relevance. Mutualistic interactions have been profusely studied and their corresponding bipartite networks, such as plant-pollinator networks, have been reported to exhibit a characteristic "nested" structure. Assessing the importance of any given species in mutualistic networks is a key task when evaluating extinction risks and possible cascade effects. Inspired in a recently introduced algorithm--similar in spirit to Google's PageRank but with a built-in non-linearity--here we propose a method which--by exploiting their nested architecture--allows us to derive a sound ranking of species importance in mutualistic networks. This method clearly outperforms other existing ranking schemes and can become very useful for ecosystem management and biodiversity preservation, where decisions on what aspects of ecosystems to explicitly protect need to be made. PMID:25640575

  17. Ranking species in mutualistic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-García, Virginia; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the architectural subtleties of ecological networks, believed to confer them enhanced stability and robustness, is a subject of outmost relevance. Mutualistic interactions have been profusely studied and their corresponding bipartite networks, such as plant-pollinator networks, have been reported to exhibit a characteristic ``nested'' structure. Assessing the importance of any given species in mutualistic networks is a key task when evaluating extinction risks and possible cascade effects. Inspired in a recently introduced algorithm -similar in spirit to Google's PageRank but with a built-in non-linearity- here we propose a method which -by exploiting their nested architecture- allows us to derive a sound ranking of species importance in mutualistic networks. This method clearly outperforms other existing ranking schemes and can become very useful for ecosystem management and biodiversity preservation, where decisions on what aspects of ecosystems to explicitly protect need to be made.

  18. Ranking species in mutualistic networks

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-García, Virginia; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the architectural subtleties of ecological networks, believed to confer them enhanced stability and robustness, is a subject of outmost relevance. Mutualistic interactions have been profusely studied and their corresponding bipartite networks, such as plant-pollinator networks, have been reported to exhibit a characteristic “nested” structure. Assessing the importance of any given species in mutualistic networks is a key task when evaluating extinction risks and possible cascade effects. Inspired in a recently introduced algorithm –similar in spirit to Google's PageRank but with a built-in non-linearity– here we propose a method which –by exploiting their nested architecture– allows us to derive a sound ranking of species importance in mutualistic networks. This method clearly outperforms other existing ranking schemes and can become very useful for ecosystem management and biodiversity preservation, where decisions on what aspects of ecosystems to explicitly protect need to be made. PMID:25640575

  19. Using multicriteria decision analysis to support research priority setting in biomedical translational research projects.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Gimon; Postmus, Douwe; Buskens, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Translational research is conducted to achieve a predefined set of economic or societal goals. As a result, investment decisions on where available resources have the highest potential in achieving these goals have to be made. In this paper, we first describe how multicriteria decision analysis can assist in defining the decision context and in ensuring that all relevant aspects of the decision problem are incorporated in the decision making process. We then present the results of a case study to support priority setting in a translational research consortium aimed at reducing the burden of disease of type 2 diabetes. During problem structuring, we identified four research alternatives (primary, secondary, tertiary microvascular, and tertiary macrovascular prevention) and a set of six decision criteria. Scoring of these alternatives against the criteria was done using a combination of expert judgement and previously published data. Lastly, decision analysis was performed using stochastic multicriteria acceptability analysis, which allows for the combined use of numerical and ordinal data. We found that the development of novel techniques applied in secondary prevention would be a poor investment of research funds. The ranking of the remaining alternatives was however strongly dependent on the decision maker's preferences for certain criteria. PMID:26495288

  20. A Comparison of Perceptions of Campus Priorities: The "Logical" Library in an Organized Anarchy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Carol A.

    1992-01-01

    A survey of chief academic officers (CAOs) and library directors at 96 research institutions revealed great similarities in their perceptions of institutional priorities; however, the CAOs ranked making electronic information available on campus or supporting the development of a national education/research network much lower than the library…

  1. Rank in Class and College Admission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally class rankings have been used by high schools to determine valedictorians and salutatorians. These rankings have also been used by colleges to make admission decisions and for awarding scholarships. While there is no direct link between college rank and college admission, there is evidence that not using class rank can reduce stress…

  2. The Globalization of College and University Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altbach, Philip G.

    2012-01-01

    In the era of globalization, accountability, and benchmarking, university rankings have achieved a kind of iconic status. The major ones--the Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU, or the "Shanghai rankings"), the QS (Quacquarelli Symonds Limited) World University Rankings, and the "Times Higher Education" World University Rankings…

  3. Time evolution of Wikipedia network ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Young-Ho; Frahm, Klaus M.; Benczúr, András; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2013-12-01

    We study the time evolution of ranking and spectral properties of the Google matrix of English Wikipedia hyperlink network during years 2003-2011. The statistical properties of ranking of Wikipedia articles via PageRank and CheiRank probabilities, as well as the matrix spectrum, are shown to be stabilized for 2007-2011. A special emphasis is done on ranking of Wikipedia personalities and universities. We show that PageRank selection is dominated by politicians while 2DRank, which combines PageRank and CheiRank, gives more accent on personalities of arts. The Wikipedia PageRank of universities recovers 80% of top universities of Shanghai ranking during the considered time period.

  4. Congestion pricing by priority auction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guanxiang; He, Jianhua; Ma, Yajie; Cheng, Wenqing; Yang, Zongkai

    2005-02-01

    This paper analyzes a communication network facing users with a continuous distribution of delay cost per unit time. Priority queueing is often used as a way to provide differential services for users with different delay sensitivities. Delay is a key dimension of network service quality, so priority is a valuable resource which is limited and should to be optimally allocated. We investigate the allocation of priority in queues via a simple bidding mechanism. In our mechanism, arriving users can decide not to enter the network at all or submit an announced delay sensitive value. User entering the network obtains priority over all users who make lower bids, and is charged by a payment function which is designed following an exclusion compensation principle. The payment function is proved to be incentive compatible, so the equilibrium bidding behavior leads to the implementation of "cμ-rule". Social warfare or revenue maximizing by appropriately setting the reserve payment is also analyzed.

  5. A ranking of European veterinary medicines based on environmental risks.

    PubMed

    Kools, Stefan A E; Boxall, Alistair; Moltmann, Johann F; Bryning, Gareth; Koschorreck, Jan; Knacker, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    -administered medicines (feed additives) in comparatively large doses over a long time. For pasture animals, these substances are used less, if at all, and therefore receive lower ranks. Besides that, the risk indices for the aquatic compartment are large for substances used in aquaculture or applied to companion animals. In conclusion, the ranking scheme developed for this project provided a scientifically based and pragmatic means of assessing the relative priority of veterinary medicines for further detailed risk assessment. The outcome of this project will support pharmaceutical industries and competent authorities when seeking authorization for market applications of veterinary pharmaceutical products. PMID:18563959

  6. On Rank Driven Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veerman, J. J. P.; Prieto, F. J.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate a class of models related to the Bak-Sneppen (BS) model, initially proposed to study evolution. The BS model is extremely simple and yet captures some forms of "complex behavior" such as self-organized criticality that is often observed in physical and biological systems. In this model, random fitnesses in are associated to agents located at the vertices of a graph . Their fitnesses are ranked from worst (0) to best (1). At every time-step the agent with the worst fitness and some others with a priori given rank probabilities are replaced by new agents with random fitnesses. We consider two cases: The exogenous case where the new fitnesses are taken from an a priori fixed distribution, and the endogenous case where the new fitnesses are taken from the current distribution as it evolves. We approximate the dynamics by making a simplifying independence assumption. We use Order Statistics and Dynamical Systems to define a rank-driven dynamical system that approximates the evolution of the distribution of the fitnesses in these rank-driven models, as well as in the BS model. For this simplified model we can find the limiting marginal distribution as a function of the initial conditions. Agreement with experimental results of the BS model is excellent.

  7. Querying and Ranking XML Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlieder, Torsten; Meuss, Holger

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of XML, information retrieval, precision, and recall focuses on a retrieval technique that adopts the similarity measure of the vector space model, incorporates the document structure, and supports structured queries. Topics include a query model based on tree matching; structured queries and term-based ranking; and term frequency and…

  8. Low-Rank Preserving Projections.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuwu; Lai, Zhihui; Xu, Yong; Li, Xuelong; Zhang, David; Yuan, Chun

    2016-08-01

    As one of the most popular dimensionality reduction techniques, locality preserving projections (LPP) has been widely used in computer vision and pattern recognition. However, in practical applications, data is always corrupted by noises. For the corrupted data, samples from the same class may not be distributed in the nearest area, thus LPP may lose its effectiveness. In this paper, it is assumed that data is grossly corrupted and the noise matrix is sparse. Based on these assumptions, we propose a novel dimensionality reduction method, named low-rank preserving projections (LRPP) for image classification. LRPP learns a low-rank weight matrix by projecting the data on a low-dimensional subspace. We use the L21 norm as a sparse constraint on the noise matrix and the nuclear norm as a low-rank constraint on the weight matrix. LRPP keeps the global structure of the data during the dimensionality reduction procedure and the learned low rank weight matrix can reduce the disturbance of noises in the data. LRPP can learn a robust subspace from the corrupted data. To verify the performance of LRPP in image dimensionality reduction and classification, we compare LRPP with the state-of-the-art dimensionality reduction methods. The experimental results show the effectiveness and the feasibility of the proposed method with encouraging results. PMID:26277014

  9. Let Us Rank Journalism Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Unlike law, business, and medical schools, as well as universities in general, journalism schools and journalism programs have rarely been ranked. Publishers such as "U.S. News & World Report," "Forbes," "Bloomberg Businessweek," and "Washington Monthly" do not pay them much mind. What is the best…

  10. RELATIVE POTENCY RANKING FOR CHLOROPHENOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently the National Center for Environmental Assessment-Cincinnati completed a feasibility study for developing a toxicity related relative potency ranking scheme for chlorophenols. In this study it was concluded that a large data base exists pertaining to the relative toxicity...

  11. Priority Setting for Improvement of Cervical Cancer Prevention in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Majidi, Azam; Ghiasvand, Reza; Hadji, Maryam; Nahvijou, Azin; Mousavi, Azam-Sadat; Pakgohar, Minoo; Khodakarami, Nahid; Abedini, Mehrandokht; Amouzegar Hashemi, Farnaz; Rahnamaye Farzami, Marjan; Shahsiah, Reza; Sajedinejhad, Sima; Mohagheghi, Mohammad Ali; Nadali, Fatemeh; Rashidian, Arash; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Mogensen, Ole; Zendehdel, Kazem

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer among women worldwide. Organized cervical screening and vaccination against human papilloma virus (HPV) have been successful interventions for prevention of invasive cervical cancer (ICC). Because of cultural and religious considerations, ICC has low incidence in Iran and many other Muslim countries. There is no organized cervical screening in these countries. Therefore, ICC is usually diagnosed in advanced stages with poor prognosis in these countries. We performed a priority setting exercise and suggested priorities for prevention of ICC in this setting. Methods: We invited experts and researchers to a workshop and asked them to list important suggestions for ICC prevention in Iran. After merging similar items and removing the duplicates, we asked the experts to rank the list of suggested items. We used a strategy grid and Go-zone analysis to determine final list of priorities for ICC prevention in Iran. Results: From 26 final items suggested as priorities for prevention of ICC, the most important priorities were developing national guidelines for cervical screening and quality control protocol for patient follow-up and management of precancerous lesions. In addition, we emphasized considering insurance coverage for cervical screening, public awareness, and research priorities, and establishment of a cervical screening registry. Conclusion: A comprehensive approach and implementation of organized cervical screening program is necessary for prevention of ICC in Iran and other low incidence Muslim countries. Because of high cost for vaccination and low incidence of cervical cancer, we do not recommend HPV vaccination for the time being in Iran. PMID:27239863

  12. Delphi survey of priorities in clinical nursing research.

    PubMed

    Lindeman, C A

    1975-01-01

    Using the Delphi technique, a panel of 433 nurse and nonnurse experts was surveyed regarding priorities for clinical research in nursing. Of these, 341 completed all four Delphi survey rounds. Three questions were studied: 1) Is this an area in which nursing should assume primary research responsibility? 2) How important is research on this topic for the profession of nursing? 3) What is the likelihood of change in patient welfare because of research on the topic? Although the nature and amount of data produced prohibited interpretation of the data or delineation of succinct conclusions about priorities for clinical nursing research, responses to the three questions supported these statements: The majority of research areas identified in the questionnaire are areas in which nursing should take research leadership. Although there is some overlap, priorities for professional significance and social or patient welfare relevance are different. In terms of professional significance, highest priority was given to items regarding measuring the quality of care, role, nursing process, and the research process. In terms of patient welfare, several programs of research are discernible in the items ranked in the top ten percent; these include nursing interventions related to stress, care of the aged, pain, and patient education. The Delphi technique also is described. PMID:1042714

  13. Applicants' Self-Reported Priorities in Selecting a Residency Program

    PubMed Central

    Phitayakorn, Roy; Macklin, E. A.; Goldsmith, J.; Weinstein, Debra F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Residency recruitment is a high-stakes activity for all participants, yet there is limited information about how applicants choose among programs. Objective This study evaluated the importance applicants place on various residency program attributes; whether applicant priorities vary by sex, race/ethnicity, or specialty choice; and whether the importance of these factors changes over time. Methods Highly ranked applicants to residency programs at 2 academic medical centers were surveyed annually from 2004 to 2012 regarding the importance of 26 characteristics in selecting a program. Mean ratings of importance for each factor were analyzed to assess priority for the overall applicant group, and whether priorities differed for subgroups (by sex, race/ethnicity, and specialty). Results Of 9669 applicants surveyed, 6285 (65%) responded. The 5 factors with highest rating of importance (overall and across all subgroups) were the program's ability to prepare residents for future training or position, resident esprit de corps, faculty availability and involvement in teaching, depth and breadth of faculty, and variety of patients and clinical resources. Small but significant differences in the ratings of some factors by sex and/or specialty group were identified. Institution-level characteristics, such as call rooms, salary, and benefits, were relatively unimportant. Applicant priorities were stable over the 9-year study period. Conclusions Highly ranked applicants to competitive residency programs value educational aspects of the program most highly, along with resident morale. Top factors were consistent across subgroups and over the 9 years of the study. These findings have implications for resident recruitment strategies. PMID:26217417

  14. Global health prioritiespriorities of the wealthy?

    PubMed Central

    Ollila, Eeva

    2005-01-01

    Health has gained importance on the global agenda. It has become recognized in forums where it was once not addressed. In this article three issues are considered: global health policy actors, global health priorities and the means of addressing the identified health priorities. I argue that the arenas for global health policy-making have shifted from the public spheres towards arenas that include the transnational for-profit sector. Global health policy has become increasingly fragmented and verticalized. Infectious diseases have gained ground as global health priorities, while non-communicable diseases and the broader issues of health systems development have been neglected. Approaches to tackling the health problems are increasingly influenced by trade and industrial interests with the emphasis on technological solutions. PMID:15847685

  15. SibRank: Signed bipartite network analysis for neighbor-based collaborative ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Bita; Haratizadeh, Saman

    2016-09-01

    Collaborative ranking is an emerging field of recommender systems that utilizes users' preference data rather than rating values. Unfortunately, neighbor-based collaborative ranking has gained little attention despite its more flexibility and justifiability. This paper proposes a novel framework, called SibRank that seeks to improve the state of the art neighbor-based collaborative ranking methods. SibRank represents users' preferences as a signed bipartite network, and finds similar users, through a novel personalized ranking algorithm in signed networks.

  16. Twisted Yangians of small rank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guay, Nicolas; Regelskis, Vidas; Wendlandt, Curtis

    2016-04-01

    We study quantized enveloping algebras called twisted Yangians associated with the symmetric pairs of types CI, BDI, and DIII (in Cartan's classification) when the rank is small. We establish isomorphisms between these twisted Yangians and the well known Olshanskii's twisted Yangians of types AI and AII, and also with the Molev-Ragoucy reflection algebras associated with symmetric pairs of type AIII. We also construct isomorphisms with twisted Yangians in Drinfeld's original presentation.

  17. Ranking upper stages in low Earth orbit for active removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmo, L.; Pardini, C.

    2016-05-01

    This paper addresses the problem of ranking the upper stages in orbit in order to evaluate their potential detrimental effects on the debris environment over the long-term, and the relative advantage of having them actively de-orbited. To do so, a new ranking scheme is introduced, applicable to any object in low Earth orbit (LEO) and able to prioritize the target objects potentially most critical for the future preservation of the LEO protected region. Applying the proposed approach, it was found, for instance, that the 22 most massive upper stages abandoned in LEO, at the beginning of 2015, are on the whole equivalent to several hundred average intact objects in sun-synchronous orbit, regarding their latent detrimental effects on the debris environment over the next 200 years. Most of them could therefore be the top priority targets of any worldwide coordinated effort for active removal and the prevention of new collisional debris. The ranking scheme was also applied to other main models of rocket bodies currently in orbit, trying to identify the combinations of orbital elements and upper stage types requiring particular attention.

  18. Social choice functions: A tool for ranking variables involved in action plans against road noise.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Padillo, Alejandro; de Oliveira, Thiago B F; Alves, Matheus; Bazzan, Ana L C; Ruiz, Diego P

    2016-08-01

    Traffic noise is gaining importance in planning and operation of roads in developing countries, and particularly in Europe and Latin America. Many variables with different degrees of importance influence the perception of noise from roads. Thus, the problem of prioritizing road stretches for action against such noise is an important issue in environmental noise management. For example, it can be addressed using multicriteria methods. However, these methodologies require criteria or suitable variables to be ranked according to their relative importance. In the present study, for this ranking, a list of nine variables involved in the decision-making process (called "road stretch priority variables") was presented in the form of questionnaires to high-level experts from Andalusia, southern Spain. These experts ranked the variables by relevance. Using the same data, seven social choice functions (Plurality, Raynaud, Kemeny-Young, Copeland, Simpson, Schulze, and Borda) were used in order to rank the variables. The results indicate that the most important variables were those that take into account the parameters of greatest exposure for the citizens, followed by variables related to the intensity of the problem analyzed. The results show that a combination of the use of social choice functions on aggregated information from expert panels can provide a consensus for ranking priority variables related to road stretches. PMID:27127892

  19. Factors influencing the priority of access to food and their effects on the carcass traits for Japanese Black (Wagyu) cattle.

    PubMed

    Takanishi, N; Oishi, K; Kumagai, H; Uemura, M; Hirooka, H

    2015-12-01

    The factors influencing the priority of access to food and the effects of the priority of access to food on their carcass traits were analyzed for Japanese Black (Wagyu) cattle in a semi-intensive fattening production system. The records of 96 clinically healthy steers and heifers were analyzed. The calves at ∼3 to 4 months of age were allocated to pens with four animals per pen; all four animals in the same pen were of the same sex and of similar body size. The ranking of the animals' priority of access to food (1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th), which was determined by the farm manager, was used as an indicator of social dominance in the present study. Four models including sire line, maternal grandsire line and the difference in the animals' birth dates as fixed effects were used to analyze factors influencing the priority of access to food. Ranking was represented by ordinal scores (highest=4, lowest=1) in Model 1, and the binary scores were assigned in Model 2 (highest=1; 2nd, 3rd and 4th=0), Model 3 (1st and 2nd=1; 3rd and 4th=0) and Model 4 (1st, 2nd and 3rd=1; lowest=0). The results showed that the difference in the animals' birth dates had a significant effect on the establishment of the priority of access to food in Model 3 (P<0.05), suggesting that animals born earlier may become more dominant in the pen. The maternal grandsire line tended to affect the social rank score in Models 2 and 3 (P<0.10). Our results indicated that the maternal grandsire line may affect the temperament of calves through their mothers' genetic performance and thereby more aggressive calves may be more dominant and have higher priority of access to food. On the other hand, there was a significant effect of the priority of access to food on beef marbling score (BMS; P<0.05), and the priority of access to food also tended to influence the carcass weight (P=0.09). The highest BMS was observed for animals with the first rank of the priority of access to food (P<0.05), and the higher-ranking

  20. High-Rank Stakeholders' Perspectives on High-Stakes University Entrance Examinations Reform: Priorities and Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiany, Gholam Reza; Shayestefar, Parvaneh; Samar, Reza Ghafar; Akbari, Ramin

    2013-01-01

    A steady stream of studies on high-stakes tests such as University Entrance Examinations (UEEs) suggests that high-stakes tests reforms serve as the leverage for promoting quality of learning, standards of teaching, and credible forms of accountability. However, such remediation is often not as effective as hoped and success is not necessarily…

  1. The evaluation ranking scale: clarification of methodological and procedural issues.

    PubMed

    Attkisson, C C; Roberts, R E; Pascoe, G C

    1983-01-01

    Compared with CSQ-8, a typical questionnaire approach to assessing global patient satisfaction, the Evaluation Ranking Scale (ERS) had equally good patient acceptability, yielded more normally distributed satisfaction scores, and results allowed comparative information about patients' evaluation of specific service dimensions. The study also addressed key questions that have emerged about the ERS procedure. Patients apparently do not distinguish conceptually between "importance" of dimensions and "satisfaction" with dimensions in the first phase (ranking) of the ERS. Results did confirm that the ERS sequence of ranking and then rating the dimensions is essential to achieving optimal utility of results. The ranking task seems to have an organizing effect on patients' approach to the rating task. This effect does not work to dictate results in the rating phase but rather seems to familiarize patients with the dimensions to be rated thereby yielding greater potential discriminative capacity for the ERS. Finally, results indicate that the ERS can be administered in a flexible fashion that yields additional information about the absolute importance of the six dimensions without loss of desired operating characteristics for the measure. PMID:10267262

  2. Class Rank Weighs Down True Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guskey, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    The process of determining class rank does not help students achieve more or reach higher levels of proficiency. Evidence indicates ranking students may diminish students' motivation. High school educators argue that they are compelled to rank-order graduating students because selective colleges and universities require information about…

  3. 14 CFR 1214.1105 - Final ranking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Final ranking. 1214.1105 Section 1214.1105 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT NASA Astronaut Candidate Recruitment and Selection Program § 1214.1105 Final ranking. Final rankings will be based on a combination...

  4. 14 CFR 1214.1105 - Final ranking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Final ranking. 1214.1105 Section 1214.1105 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT NASA Astronaut Candidate Recruitment and Selection Program § 1214.1105 Final ranking. Final rankings will be based on a combination...

  5. 14 CFR 1214.1105 - Final ranking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final ranking. 1214.1105 Section 1214.1105 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT NASA Astronaut Candidate Recruitment and Selection Program § 1214.1105 Final ranking. Final rankings will be based on a combination...

  6. 14 CFR 1214.1105 - Final ranking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Final ranking. 1214.1105 Section 1214.1105 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT NASA Astronaut Candidate Recruitment and Selection Program § 1214.1105 Final ranking. Final rankings will be based on a combination...

  7. A Comprehensive Analysis of Marketing Journal Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steward, Michelle D.; Lewis, Bruce R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to offer a comprehensive assessment of journal standings in Marketing from two perspectives. The discipline perspective of rankings is obtained from a collection of published journal ranking studies during the past 15 years. The studies in the published ranking stream are assessed for reliability by examining internal…

  8. The Academic Ranking of World Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Nian Cai; Cheng, Ying

    2005-01-01

    Shanghai Jiao Tong University has published on the Internet an Academic Ranking of World Universities that has attracted worldwide attention. Institutions are ranked according to academic or research performance and ranking indicators include major international awards, highly cited researchers in important fields, articles published in selected…

  9. The Privilege of Ranking: Google Plays Ball.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggins, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of ranking systems used in various settings, including college football and academic admissions, focuses on the Google search engine. Explains the PageRank mathematical formula that scores Web pages by connecting the number of links; limitations, including authenticity and accuracy of ranked Web pages; relevancy; adjusting algorithms;…

  10. Report on Tribal Priority Allocations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    As part of Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) funding, Tribal Priority Allocations (TPA) are the principal source of funds for tribal governments and agency offices at the reservation level. According to their unique needs and circumstances, tribes may prioritize funding among eight general categories: government, human services, education, public…

  11. Priorities Statements of Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Community Coll. Board, Springfield.

    Each year since 1994, the 52 community colleges in Illinois prepare priority statements detailing specific college objectives for the current fiscal year (FY). This report provides the third update of the colleges' statements, covering FY 1998. Brief statements, from one to four pages, are provided for the following colleges: Belleville Area…

  12. National Institutional Priorities Report, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    USA Group Noel-Levitz, Iowa City, IA.

    This document reports on a study that gathered information about how colleges and universities view their effectiveness in meeting the expectations of their students. By quantifying the importance that faculty, staff, and administrators place on student expectations, the institution is able to pinpoint its strengths and to assign priorities for…

  13. Setting Priorities for NIOSH Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Richard E.

    1975-01-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is attempting to develop total programs of occupational safety and health protection. It has established research criteria and a priority system for evaluating the order of investigating suspect substances or agents based upon the expected gain of the health benefit. (Author/MW)

  14. Systemwide Communications Plan and Priorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Ann

    The Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges has repeatedly identified the strengthening of communications as a key component to developing the California Community Colleges (CCC) as a system. The genesis of communications planning, activities and priorities took place in 1989 with the Burson-Marsteller Communications Action Plan,…

  15. National Priorities for Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruff, Richard D.; And Others

    National priorities exist that can be served through federal legislation for the funding of vocational education. Four alternatives that are examples of national needs that vocational education would appear to have a potential to address are (1) training and retraining of workers in national critical skill shortage occupations, (2) training and…

  16. National Priorities List book set

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The report provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) sites. The set of documents compiles State-Specific site summary fact sheets on each site being cleaned up under the Superfund program. The individual state sites are available as PB91-921207, and PB91-921209 thru PB91-921258.

  17. National Institutional Priorities Report, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    USA Group Noel-Levitz, Iowa City, IA.

    This report describes the seventh annual National Institutional Priorities Study conducted to determine the perceptions of faculty, administration, and staff regarding areas of highest importance and areas of greatest and least agreement on meeting student expectations. Also identified were the greatest performance gaps between levels of…

  18. National Institutional Priorities Report, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    USA Group Noel-Levitz, Iowa City, IA.

    This report describes the sixth annual National Institutional Priorities Study conducted to determine the perceptions of faculty, administration, and staff regarding areas of highest important and areas of greatest and least agreement on meeting student expectations. Also identified were the greatest performance gaps between levels of importance…

  19. Enrollees Choose Priorities for Medicare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danis, Marion; Biddle, Andrea K.; Goold, Susan Dorr

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility and results of ascertaining Medicare enrollees' priorities for insured medical benefits. Design and Methods: Structured group exercises were conducted with Medicare enrollees from clinical and community settings in central North Carolina. By participating in a decision exercise,…

  20. Science Indicators and Science Priorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Harvey

    1982-01-01

    Discusses science/society interface and difficulties involved in developing realistic science indicators. Topics include: intrinsic vs. extrinsic indicators; four problems society faces as a result of technological activities (toxic chemicals, radioactive wastes, auto safety, cancer); research and development (R&D) priorities; international…

  1. Maternal and perinatal health research priorities beyond 2015: an international survey and prioritization exercise

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality has declined by nearly half since 1990, but over a quarter million women still die every year of causes related to pregnancy and childbirth. Maternal-health related targets are falling short of the 2015 Millennium Development Goals and a post-2015 Development Agenda is emerging. In connection with this, setting global research priorities for the next decade is now required. Methods We adapted the methods of the Child Health and Nutrition Research Initiative (CHNRI) to identify and set global research priorities for maternal and perinatal health for the period 2015 to 2025. Priority research questions were received from various international stakeholders constituting a large reference group, and consolidated into a final list of research questions by a technical working group. Questions on this list were then scored by the reference working group according to five independent and equally weighted criteria. Normalized research priority scores (NRPS) were calculated, and research priority questions were ranked accordingly. Results A list of 190 priority research questions for improving maternal and perinatal health was scored by 140 stakeholders. Most priority research questions (89%) were concerned with the evaluation of implementation and delivery of existing interventions, with research subthemes frequently concerned with training and/or awareness interventions (11%), and access to interventions and/or services (14%). Twenty-one questions (11%) involved the discovery of new interventions or technologies. Conclusions Key research priorities in maternal and perinatal health were identified. The resulting ranked list of research questions provides a valuable resource for health research investors, researchers and other stakeholders. We are hopeful that this exercise will inform the post-2015 Development Agenda and assist donors, research-policy decision makers and researchers to invest in research that will ultimately make the most

  2. Rank-Driven Markov Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinfeld, Michael; Knight, Philip A.; Wade, Andrew R.

    2012-01-01

    We study a class of Markovian systems of N elements taking values in [0,1] that evolve in discrete time t via randomized replacement rules based on the ranks of the elements. These rank-driven processes are inspired by variants of the Bak-Sneppen model of evolution, in which the system represents an evolutionary `fitness landscape' and which is famous as a simple model displaying self-organized criticality. Our main results are concerned with long-time large- N asymptotics for the general model in which, at each time step, K randomly chosen elements are discarded and replaced by independent U[0,1] variables, where the ranks of the elements to be replaced are chosen, independently at each time step, according to a distribution κ N on {1,2,…, N} K . Our main results are that, under appropriate conditions on κ N , the system exhibits threshold behavior at s ∗∈[0,1], where s ∗ is a function of κ N , and the marginal distribution of a randomly selected element converges to U[ s ∗,1] as t→∞ and N→∞. Of this class of models, results in the literature have previously been given for special cases only, namely the `mean-field' or `random neighbor' Bak-Sneppen model. Our proofs avoid the heuristic arguments of some of the previous work and use Foster-Lyapunov ideas. Our results extend existing results and establish their natural, more general context. We derive some more specialized results for the particular case where K=2. One of our technical tools is a result on convergence of stationary distributions for families of uniformly ergodic Markov chains on increasing state-spaces, which may be of independent interest.

  3. Impact of Doximity Residency Rankings on Emergency Medicine Applicant Rank Lists

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, William J.; Hopson, Laura R.; Khandelwal, Sorabh; White, Melissa; Gallahue, Fiona E.; Burkhardt, John; Rolston, Aimee M.; Santen, Sally A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study investigates the impact of the Doximity rankings on the rank list choices made by residency applicants in emergency medicine (EM). Methods We sent an 11-item survey by email to all students who applied to EM residency programs at four different institutions representing diverse geographical regions. Students were asked questions about their perception of Doximity rankings and how it may have impacted their rank list decisions. Results Response rate was 58% of 1,372 opened electronic surveys. This study found that a majority of medical students applying to residency in EM were aware of the Doximity rankings prior to submitting rank lists (67%). One-quarter of these applicants changed the number of programs and ranks of those programs when completing their rank list based on the Doximity rankings (26%). Though the absolute number of programs changed on the rank lists was small, the results demonstrate that the EM Doximity rankings impact applicant decision-making in ranking residency programs. Conclusion While applicants do not find the Doximity rankings to be important compared to other factors in the application process, the Doximity rankings result in a small change in residency applicant ranking behavior. This unvalidated ranking, based principally on reputational data rather than objective outcome criteria, thus has the potential to be detrimental to students, programs, and the public. We feel it important for specialties to develop consensus around measurable training outcomes and provide freely accessible metrics for candidate education. PMID:27330670

  4. Large-scale linear rankSVM.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ching-Pei; Lin, Chih-Jen

    2014-04-01

    Linear rankSVM is one of the widely used methods for learning to rank. Although its performance may be inferior to nonlinear methods such as kernel rankSVM and gradient boosting decision trees, linear rankSVM is useful to quickly produce a baseline model. Furthermore, following its recent development for classification, linear rankSVM may give competitive performance for large and sparse data. A great deal of works have studied linear rankSVM. The focus is on the computational efficiency when the number of preference pairs is large. In this letter, we systematically study existing works, discuss their advantages and disadvantages, and propose an efficient algorithm. We discuss different implementation issues and extensions with detailed experiments. Finally, we develop a robust linear rankSVM tool for public use. PMID:24479776

  5. Two-dimensional ranking of Wikipedia articles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhirov, A. O.; Zhirov, O. V.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2010-10-01

    The Library of Babel, described by Jorge Luis Borges, stores an enormous amount of information. The Library exists ab aeterno. Wikipedia, a free online encyclopaedia, becomes a modern analogue of such a Library. Information retrieval and ranking of Wikipedia articles become the challenge of modern society. While PageRank highlights very well known nodes with many ingoing links, CheiRank highlights very communicative nodes with many outgoing links. In this way the ranking becomes two-dimensional. Using CheiRank and PageRank we analyze the properties of two-dimensional ranking of all Wikipedia English articles and show that it gives their reliable classification with rich and nontrivial features. Detailed studies are done for countries, universities, personalities, physicists, chess players, Dow-Jones companies and other categories.

  6. Energy-related indoor environmental quality research: A priority agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, W.J.; Brager, G.; Burge, H.; Cummings, J.; Levin, H.; Loftness, V.; Mendell, M.J.; Persily, A.; Taylor, S.; Zhang, J.S.

    2002-08-01

    A multidisciplinary team of IEQ and energy researchers has defined a program of priority energy-related IEQ research. This paper describes the methods employed to develop the agenda, and 35 high priority research and development (R&D) project areas related to four broad goals: (1) identifying IEQ problems and opportunities; (2) developing and evaluating energy-efficient technologies for improving IEQ; (3) developing and evaluating energy-efficient practices for improving IEQ; and (4) encouraging or assisting the implementation of technologies or practices for improving IEQ. The identified R&D priorities reflect a strong need to benchmark IEQ conditions in small commercial buildings, schools, and residences. The R&D priorities also reflect the need to better understand how people are affected by IEQ conditions and by the related building characteristics and operation and maintenance practices. The associated research findings will provide a clearer definition of acceptable IEQ that is required to guide the development of technologies, practices, standards, and guidelines. Quantifying the effects of building characteristics and practices on IEQ conditions, in order to provide the basis for development of energy efficient and effective IEQ control measures, was also considered a priority. The development or advancement in a broad range of IEQ tools, technologies, and practices are also a major component of the priority research agenda. Consistent with the focus on ''energy-related'' research priorities, building ventilation and heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and processes are very prominent in the agenda. Research related to moisture and microbiological problems, particularly within hot and humid climates, is also prominent within the agenda. The agenda tends to emphasize research on residences, small commercial buildings, and schools because these types of buildings have been underrepresented in prior research. Most of the research areas

  7. Setting Healthcare Priorities at the Macro and Meso Levels: A Framework for Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Barasa, Edwine W.; Molyneux, Sassy; English, Mike; Cleary, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Priority setting in healthcare is a key determinant of health system performance. However, there is no widely accepted priority setting evaluation framework. We reviewed literature with the aim of developing and proposing a framework for the evaluation of macro and meso level healthcare priority setting practices. Methods: We systematically searched Econlit, PubMed, CINAHL, and EBSCOhost databases and supplemented this with searches in Google Scholar, relevant websites and reference lists of relevant papers. A total of 31 papers on evaluation of priority setting were identified. These were supplemented by broader theoretical literature related to evaluation of priority setting. A conceptual review of selected papers was undertaken. Results: Based on a synthesis of the selected literature, we propose an evaluative framework that requires that priority setting practices at the macro and meso levels of the health system meet the following conditions: (1) Priority setting decisions should incorporate both efficiency and equity considerations as well as the following outcomes; (a) Stakeholder satisfaction, (b) Stakeholder understanding, (c) Shifted priorities (reallocation of resources), and (d) Implementation of decisions. (2) Priority setting processes should also meet the procedural conditions of (a) Stakeholder engagement, (b) Stakeholder empowerment, (c) Transparency, (d) Use of evidence, (e) Revisions, (f) Enforcement, and (g) Being grounded on community values. Conclusion: Available frameworks for the evaluation of priority setting are mostly grounded on procedural requirements, while few have included outcome requirements. There is, however, increasing recognition of the need to incorporate both consequential and procedural considerations in priority setting practices. In this review, we adapt an integrative approach to develop and propose a framework for the evaluation of priority setting practices at the macro and meso levels that draws from these

  8. Photovoltaic-cell-research priorities

    SciTech Connect

    Bornstein, J.G.; Hien, L.K.; Silberglitt, R.

    1983-09-30

    The current state of research and development on photovoltaic materials and advanced concepts are reviewed, and priority research activities for improved photovoltaic cells in the major individual research areas (i.e., silicon, III-V materials, II-VI materials) are identified. Also noted is the importance of reserving a small but finite portion of photovoltaic research funding for out-of-the-mainstream research. The major features of a research management philosophy aimed at attracting the best available scientific resources and research capabilities to photovoltaic research and development are outlined. The priority research activities in the principal areas of photovoltaic research are then summarized and compared, and the overall conclusions of the assessment are presented. (LEW)

  9. Research priorities for shoulder surgery: results of the 2015 James Lind Alliance patient and clinician priority setting partnership

    PubMed Central

    Rangan, Amar; Upadhaya, Sheela; Regan, Sandra; Toye, Francine; Rees, Jonathan L

    2016-01-01

    Objective To run a UK based James Lind Alliance Priority Setting Partnership for ‘Surgery for Common Shoulder Problems’. Setting This was a nationally funded and conducted process. It was organised from a musculoskeletal research centre and Biomedical Research Unit in Oxford. Participants UK shoulder patients, carers and clinicians, involved in treating patients with shoulder pain and shoulder problems that might require surgery. Interventions These were national electronic and paper surveys capturing treatment uncertainties that are important to shoulder patients, carers and clinicians. Outcome measures The outcomes relevant to this study were the survey results and rankings. Results The process took 18 months to complete, with 371 participants contributing 404 in scope questions. The James Lind process then produced a final 10 research priorities and uncertainties that relate to the scope of ‘Surgery for Common Shoulder Problems’. Conclusions The final top 10 UK research priorities have been produced and are now being disseminated to partner organisations and funders to guide funding of shoulder research for the next 5–10 years on topics that are important to patients, their carers and clinicians. PMID:27067892

  10. National Priorities List sites: Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  11. National Priorities List sites: Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  12. National Priorities List sites: Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  13. National Priorities List sites: Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  14. National Priorities List sites: Nebraska

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  15. National Priorities List sites: Delaware

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  16. National Priorities List sites: Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  17. National Priorities List sites: Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  18. National Priorities List sites: Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  19. National Priorities List sites: Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  20. National Priorities List sites: Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  1. National Priorities List sites: Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  2. National Priorities List sites: Maine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  3. National Priorities List sites: Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  4. National Priorities List sites: Connecticut

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  5. National Priorities List sites: Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  6. National Priorities List sites: Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  7. National Priorities List sites: Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  8. National Priorities List sites: Iowa

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  9. National Priorities List sites: Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  10. National Priorities List sites: Vermont

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  11. National Priorities List sites: Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  12. National Priorities List sites: Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  13. National Priorities List sites: Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  14. National Priorities List sites: Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  15. National Priorities List sites: Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  16. National Priorities List sites: Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  17. National Priorities List sites: California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  18. National Priorities List sites: Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  19. National Priorities List sites: Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  20. National Priorities List sites: Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  1. National Priorities List sites: Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  2. National Priorities List sites: Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  3. National Priorities List sites: Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  4. National Priorities List sites: Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  5. National Priorities List sites: Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  6. National Priorities List sites: Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  7. National Priorities List sites: Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  8. Priorities in pediatric epilepsy research

    PubMed Central

    Baca, Christine B.; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Vickrey, Barbara G.; Dlugos, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    The Priorities in Pediatric Epilepsy Research workshop was held in the spirit of patient-centered and patient-driven mandates for developing best practices in care, particularly for epilepsy beginning under age 3 years. The workshop brought together parents, representatives of voluntary advocacy organizations, physicians, allied health professionals, researchers, and administrators to identify priority areas for pediatric epilepsy care and research including implementation and testing of interventions designed to improve care processes and outcomes. Priorities highlighted were 1) patient outcomes, especially seizure control but also behavioral, academic, and social functioning; 2) early and accurate diagnosis and optimal treatment; 3) role and involvement of parents (communication and shared decision-making); and 4) integration of school and community organizations with epilepsy care delivery. Key factors influencing pediatric epilepsy care included the child's impairments and seizure presentation, parents, providers, the health care system, and community systems. Care was represented as a sequential process from initial onset of seizures to referral for comprehensive evaluation when needed. We considered an alternative model in which comprehensive care would be utilized from onset, proactively, rather than reactively after pharmacoresistance became obvious. Barriers, including limited levels of evidence about many aspects of diagnosis and management, access to care—particularly epilepsy specialty and behavioral health care—and implementation, were identified. Progress hinges on coordinated research efforts that systematically address gaps in knowledge and overcoming barriers to access and implementation. The stakes are considerable, and the potential benefits for reduced burden of refractory epilepsy and lifelong disabilities may be enormous. PMID:23966254

  9. Research Priorities in Spasmodic Dysphonia

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Christy L.; Adler, Charles H.; Berke, Gerald S.; Bielamowicz, Steven A.; Blitzer, Andrew; Bressman, Susan B.; Hallett, Mark; Jinnah, H. A.; Juergens, Uwe; Martin, Sandra B.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Sapienza, Christine; Singleton, Andrew; Tanner, Caroline M.; Woodson, Gayle E.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify research priorities for increasing understanding of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and improved treatment of spasmodic dysphonia. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING A multidisciplinary working group was formed including both scientists and clinicians from multiple disciplines, otolaryngology, neurology, speech pathology, genetics and neuroscience, to review currently available information on spasmodic dysphonia and to identify research priorities. RESULTS Operational definitions for spasmodic dysphonia at different levels of certainty were recommended for diagnosis and recommendations made for a multi-center multidisciplinary validation study. CONCLUSIONS The highest priority is to characterize the disorder and identify risk factors that may contribute to its onset. Future research should compare and contrast spasmodic dysphonia with other forms of focal dystonia. Development of animal models is recommended to explore hypotheses related to pathogenesis. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of SD should provide the basis for developing new treatment options and exploratory clinical trials. SIGNIFICANCE This document should foster future research to improve the care of patients with this chronic debilitating voice and speech disorder by otolaryngology, neurology, and speech pathology. PMID:18922334

  10. Priority Planetary Science Missions Identified

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-03-01

    The U.S. National Research Council's (NRC) planetary science decadal survey report, released on 7 March, lays out a grand vision for priority planetary science missions for 2013-2022 within a tightly constrained fiscal environment. The cost-conscious report, issued by NRC's Committee on the Planetary Science Decadal Survey, identifies high-priority flagship missions, recommends a number of potential midsized missions, and indicates support for some smaller missions. The report states that the highest-priority flagship mission for the decade is the Mars Astrobiology Explorer-Cacher (MAX-C)—the first of three components of a NASA/European Space Agency Mars sample return campaign—provided that the mission scope can be reduced so that MAX-C costs no more than $2.5 billion. The currently estimated mission cost of $3.5 billion “would take up a disproportionate near-term share of the overall budget for NASA's Planetary Science Division,” the report notes.

  11. 76 FR 16727 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Procedures for Acceptance or Rejection of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... Acceptance or Rejection of a Rated Order AGENCY: Bureau of Industry and Security, Commerce. ACTION: Notice... Defense Priorities and Allocations Systems regulation (15 CFR 700) must notify the customer of...

  12. Priority Pollutants: I. A Perspective View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, Larry H.; Telliard, William A.

    1979-01-01

    This article relates the historical origins of the EPA's Priority Pollutants list and the development of the Priority Pollutant Protocol. Then, it summarizes the status of the current analytical procedures in their present and still-developing forms. (BB)

  13. An analysis of the PPCF as a theoretical framework for an instrument to examine teacher priorities for selecting curriculum content.

    PubMed

    Ennis, C D; Hooper, L M

    1990-03-01

    The purpose of the research was to develop an instrument to examine physical education teachers' priorities for curricular decision-making. The purpose dimension of the Purpose Process Curriculum Framework (PPCF) was used as the theoretical structure for content decisions. Three studies are reported that investigate the reliability and validity of the proposed instrument. Items were evaluated for relevance and validity of the proposed instrument. They were evaluated for relevance and theoretical consistency by physical education teachers (Study 1) and curriculum specialists (Study 2). Acceptable items were then placed in a ranking format and field tested with physical educators in three school districts (Study 3). Results from Study 1 indicated that secondary level physical education teachers supported the relevance of items to reflect the educational setting in their classes. In Study 2, mean ratings of curriculum specialists established that 19 of the 22 categories were theoretically consistent with the PPCF. However, internal consistency coefficients (alpha) for 10 of the 22 purposes were less than .70. Follow-up field tests with physical educators in Study 3 indicated that only one category, joy of movement, had a coefficient above .70. In this research internal consistency coefficients were too low to make a claim for the reliability of the concept scales of the instrument. The multidimensionality of the purpose concepts raised questions regarding the validity of the PPCF and prohibited the use of the framework as a theoretical basis for instrument development. PMID:2091166

  14. An automated approach for ranking journals to help in clinician decision support.

    PubMed

    Jonnalagadda, Siddhartha R; Moosavinasab, Soheil; Nath, Chinmoy; Li, Dingcheng; Chute, Christopher G; Liu, Hongfang

    2014-01-01

    Point of care access to knowledge from full text journal articles supports decision-making and decreases medical errors. However, it is an overwhelming task to search through full text journal articles and find quality information needed by clinicians. We developed a method to rate journals for a given clinical topic, Congestive Heart Failure (CHF). Our method enables filtering of journals and ranking of journal articles based on source journal in relation to CHF. We also obtained a journal priority score, which automatically rates any journal based on its importance to CHF. Comparing our ranking with data gathered by surveying 169 cardiologists, who publish on CHF, our best Multiple Linear Regression model showed a correlation of 0.880, based on five-fold cross validation. Our ranking system can be extended to other clinical topics. PMID:25954382

  15. 40 CFR 60.16 - Priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Priority list. 60.16 Section 60.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES General Provisions § 60.16 Priority list. Prioritized Major Source Categories Priority Number 1...

  16. 7 CFR 632.12 - Funding priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Funding priorities. 632.12 Section 632.12 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL ABANDONED MINE PROGRAM Qualifications § 632.12 Funding priorities. (a) All eligible applications within a State are to be assigned a funding priority and...

  17. 7 CFR 632.12 - Funding priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Funding priorities. 632.12 Section 632.12 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL ABANDONED MINE PROGRAM Qualifications § 632.12 Funding priorities. (a) All eligible applications within a State are to be assigned a funding priority and...

  18. 7 CFR 632.12 - Funding priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Funding priorities. 632.12 Section 632.12 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL ABANDONED MINE PROGRAM Qualifications § 632.12 Funding priorities. (a) All eligible applications within a State are to be assigned a funding priority and...

  19. 7 CFR 632.12 - Funding priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Funding priorities. 632.12 Section 632.12 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL ABANDONED MINE PROGRAM Qualifications § 632.12 Funding priorities. (a) All eligible applications within a State are to be assigned a funding priority and...

  20. 7 CFR 632.12 - Funding priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Funding priorities. 632.12 Section 632.12 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL ABANDONED MINE PROGRAM Qualifications § 632.12 Funding priorities. (a) All eligible applications within a State are to be assigned a funding priority and...

  1. 7 CFR 1778.7 - Project priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Project priority. 1778.7 Section 1778.7 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY AND IMMINENT COMMUNITY WATER ASSISTANCE GRANTS § 1778.7 Project priority. Paragraph (d... to determine the proposed project's priority for available funds. (b) State Office review....

  2. 7 CFR 1778.7 - Project priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Project priority. 1778.7 Section 1778.7 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY AND IMMINENT COMMUNITY WATER ASSISTANCE GRANTS § 1778.7 Project priority. Paragraph (d... to determine the proposed project's priority for available funds. (b) State Office review....

  3. 7 CFR 1778.7 - Project priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Project priority. 1778.7 Section 1778.7 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY AND IMMINENT COMMUNITY WATER ASSISTANCE GRANTS § 1778.7 Project priority. Paragraph (d... to determine the proposed project's priority for available funds. (b) State Office review....

  4. 7 CFR 1778.7 - Project priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Project priority. 1778.7 Section 1778.7 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY AND IMMINENT COMMUNITY WATER ASSISTANCE GRANTS § 1778.7 Project priority. Paragraph (d... to determine the proposed project's priority for available funds. (b) State Office review....

  5. 40 CFR 60.16 - Priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Priority list. 60.16 Section 60.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES General Provisions § 60.16 Priority list. Prioritized Major Source Categories Priority Number 1...

  6. 40 CFR 60.16 - Priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Priority list. 60.16 Section 60.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES General Provisions § 60.16 Priority list. Prioritized Major Source Categories Priority Number 1...

  7. Decision Tree Modeling for Ranking Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Philip L. H.; Wan, Wai Ming; Lee, Paul H.

    Ranking/preference data arises from many applications in marketing, psychology, and politics. We establish a new decision tree model for the analysis of ranking data by adopting the concept of classification and regression tree. The existing splitting criteria are modified in a way that allows them to precisely measure the impurity of a set of ranking data. Two types of impurity measures for ranking data are introduced, namelyg-wise and top-k measures. Theoretical results show that the new measures exhibit properties of impurity functions. In model assessment, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) is applied to evaluate the tree performance. Experiments are carried out to investigate the predictive performance of the tree model for complete and partially ranked data and promising results are obtained. Finally, a real-world application of the proposed methodology to analyze a set of political rankings data is presented.

  8. Error analysis of stochastic gradient descent ranking.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Tang, Yi; Li, Luoqing; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Xuelong; Tang, Yuanyan

    2013-06-01

    Ranking is always an important task in machine learning and information retrieval, e.g., collaborative filtering, recommender systems, drug discovery, etc. A kernel-based stochastic gradient descent algorithm with the least squares loss is proposed for ranking in this paper. The implementation of this algorithm is simple, and an expression of the solution is derived via a sampling operator and an integral operator. An explicit convergence rate for leaning a ranking function is given in terms of the suitable choices of the step size and the regularization parameter. The analysis technique used here is capacity independent and is novel in error analysis of ranking learning. Experimental results on real-world data have shown the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in ranking tasks, which verifies the theoretical analysis in ranking error. PMID:24083315

  9. Bayesian nonparametric models for ranked set sampling.

    PubMed

    Gemayel, Nader; Stasny, Elizabeth A; Wolfe, Douglas A

    2015-04-01

    Ranked set sampling (RSS) is a data collection technique that combines measurement with judgment ranking for statistical inference. This paper lays out a formal and natural Bayesian framework for RSS that is analogous to its frequentist justification, and that does not require the assumption of perfect ranking or use of any imperfect ranking models. Prior beliefs about the judgment order statistic distributions and their interdependence are embodied by a nonparametric prior distribution. Posterior inference is carried out by means of Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques, and yields estimators of the judgment order statistic distributions (and of functionals of those distributions). PMID:25326663

  10. Email user ranking based on email networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Quang Anh; Vu, Minh Tuan; Frater, Michael; Jiang, Frank

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, four spam-filtering approaches based on the mail networks: Clustering, Extended Clustering Coefficient, PageRank Algorithm and Weighted PageRank Algorithm are analyzed. We also propose a couple of fully worked-out datasets against which the experimental comparisons with the respect to the accuracy of email user ranking and spam filtering are conducted. The results indicate that PageRank algorithm and Extended Clustering Coefficient approaches are better than others. The rate of true detection is over 99.5% while the failed alarm remains below 0.5%.

  11. Ranking chemicals based on chronic toxicity data.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, C T; Stara, J F; Durkin, P R

    1985-12-01

    During the past 3 years, EPA's ECAO/Cincinnati has developed a method to rank chemicals based on chronic toxicity data. This ranking system reflects two primary attributes of every chemical: the minimum effective dose and the type of effect elicited at that dose. The purpose for developing this chronic toxicity ranking system was to provide the EPA with the technical background required to adjust the RQs of hazardous substances designated in Section 101(14) of CERCLA or "Superfund." This approach may have applications to other areas of interest to the EPA and other regulatory agencies where ranking of chemicals based on chronic toxicity is desired. PMID:3843499

  12. Ranking Schools' Academic Performance Using a Fuzzy VIKOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musani, Suhaina; Aziz Jemain, Abdul

    2015-06-01

    Determination rank is structuring alternatives in order of priority. It is based on the criteria determined for each alternative involved. Evaluation criteria are performed and then a composite index composed of each alternative for the purpose of arranging in order of preference alternatives. This practice is known as multiple criteria decision making (MCDM). There are several common approaches to MCDM, one of the practice is known as VIKOR (Multi-criteria Optimization and Compromise Solution). The objective of this study is to develop a rational method for school ranking based on linguistic information of a criterion. The school represents an alternative, while the results for a number of subjects as the criterion. The results of the examination for a course, is given according to the student percentage of each grade. Five grades of excellence, honours, average, pass and fail is used to indicate a level of achievement in linguistics. Linguistic variables are transformed to fuzzy numbers to form a composite index of school performance. Results showed that fuzzy set theory can solve the limitations of using MCDM when there is uncertainty problems exist in the data.

  13. Integrating habitat status, human population pressure, and protection status into biodiversity conservation priority setting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shi, H.; Singh, A.; Kant, S.; Zhu, Z.; Waller, E.

    2005-01-01

    Priority setting is an essential component of biodiversity conservation. Existing methods to identify priority areas for conservation have focused almost entirely on biological factors. We suggest a new relative ranking method for identifying priority conservation areas that integrates both biological and social aspects. It is based on the following criteria: the habitat's status, human population pressure, human efforts to protect habitat, and number of endemic plant and vertebrate species. We used this method to rank 25 hotspots, 17 megadiverse countries, and the hotspots within each megadiverse country. We used consistent, comprehensive, georeferenced, and multiband data sets and analytical remote sensing and geographic information system tools to quantify habitat status, human population pressure, and protection status. The ranking suggests that the Philippines, Atlantic Forest, Mediterranean Basin, Caribbean Islands, Caucasus, and Indo-Burma are the hottest hotspots and that China, the Philippines, and India are the hottest megadiverse countries. The great variation in terms of habitat, protected areas, and population pressure among the hotspots, the megadiverse countries, and the hotspots within the same country suggests the need for hotspot- and country-specific conservation policies. ??2005 Society for Conservation Biology.

  14. Agricultural aviation user requirement priorities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, R. L.; Meeland, T.; Peterson, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    The results are given of a research project pertaining to the development of agricultural aviation user requirement priorities. The raw data utilized in the project was obtained from the National Agricultural Aviation Association. A specially configured poll, developed by the Actuarial Research Corporation was used to solicit responses from NAAA members and others. The primary product of the poll is the specification of seriousness as determined by the respondents for some selected agricultural aviation problem areas identified and defined during the course of an intensive analysis by the Actuarial Research Corporation.

  15. Overview of proposed revisions to the superfund hazard ranking system.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, S; Ortiz, A

    1989-06-01

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 required the federal government to establish criteria for setting priorities among releases of hazardous substances, pollutants, and contaminants. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency responded by developing the Hazard Ranking System (HRS), which is a scoring system used to establish the National Priorities List (NPL). The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 required EPA to amend the HRS so it will more accurately assess relative risks and take into account certain specific elements of risk. On December 23, 1988, EPA published in the Federal Register the proposed rule to revise the HRS. EPA expects to issue the final rule in 1990 after reviewing public comments. This paper describes the proposed revisions and summarizes major technical findings that support the revisions. As a result of the HRS revisions, there may be some changes in the types of sites that score high enough to be placed on the NPL. A projection of those changes is discussed. PMID:2754440

  16. Evaluation and ranking of candidate ceramic wafer engine seal materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.

    1991-01-01

    Modern engineered ceramics offer high temperature capabilities not found in even the best superalloy metals. The high temperature properties of several selected ceramics including aluminum oxide, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride are reviewed as they apply to hypersonic engine seal design. A ranking procedure is employed to objectively differentiate among four different monolithic ceramic materials considered, including: a cold-pressed and sintered aluminum oxide; a sintered alpha-phase silicon carbide; a hot-isostatically pressed silicon nitride; and a cold-pressed and sintered silicon nitride. This procedure is used to narrow the wide range of potential ceramics considered to an acceptable number for future detailed and costly analyses and tests. The materials are numerically scored according to their high temperature flexural strength; high temperature thermal conductivity; resistance to crack growth; resistance to high heating rates; fracture toughness; Weibull modulus; and finally according to their resistance to leakage flow, where materials having coefficients of thermal expansion closely matching the engine panel material resist leakage flow best. The cold-pressed and sintered material (Kyocera SN-251) ranked the highest in the overall ranking especially when implemented in engine panels made of low expansion rate materials being considered for the engine, including Incoloy and titanium alloys.

  17. Evaluation and ranking of candidate ceramic wafer engine seal materials

    SciTech Connect

    Steinetz, B.M.

    1991-05-01

    Modern engineered ceramics offer high temperature capabilities not found in even the best superalloy metals. The high temperature properties of several selected ceramics including aluminum oxide, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride are reviewed as they apply to hypersonic engine seal design. A ranking procedure is employed to objectively differentiate among four different monolithic ceramic materials considered, including: a cold-pressed and sintered aluminum oxide; a sintered alpha-phase silicon carbide; a hot-isostatically pressed silicon nitride; and a cold-pressed and sintered silicon nitride. This procedure is used to narrow the wide range of potential ceramics considered to an acceptable number for future detailed and costly analyses and tests. The materials are numerically scored according to their high temperature flexural strength; high temperature thermal conductivity; resistance to crack growth; resistance to high heating rates; fracture toughness; Weibull modulus; and finally according to their resistance to leakage flow, where materials having coefficients of thermal expansion closely matching the engine panel material resist leakage flow best. The cold-pressed and sintered material (Kyocera SN{sup -251}) ranked the highest in the overall ranking especially when implemented in engine panels made of low expansion rate materials being considered for the engine, including Incoloy and titanium alloys.

  18. Patients' perceptions of need for primary health care services: useful for priority setting?

    PubMed Central

    Hopton, J. L.; Dlugolecka, M.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To assess the feasibility of using patients' perceptions of need for primary health care services to develop priorities. DESIGN--A postal survey of a random sample of 3478 patients registered with five general practices. SETTING--Lothian, Scotland. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Comparison of rankings of 36 different kinds of help or advice according to (a) popularity in the sample size as a whole and in healthy and unhealthy subgroups and (b) health status (severity of need) of potential service users. RESULTS--Popularity rankings differed between the healthy and unhealthy subgroups and the whole sample. Popularity rankings were almost the inverse of rankings based on health status. The analysis identified two areas of substantial need both in terms of popularity and severity: pain management and advice about welfare benefits. CONCLUSIONS--Methodological efforts to ensure equal participation in the processes of assessing health needs and of priority setting do not in themselves promote equity. To promote equity some opinions may need to be given greater weight. PMID:7767195

  19. ATLAS ACCEPTANCE TEST

    SciTech Connect

    J.C. COCHRANE; J.V. PARKER; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    The acceptance test program for Atlas, a 23 MJ pulsed power facility for use in the Los Alamos High Energy Density Hydrodynamics program, has been completed. Completion of this program officially releases Atlas from the construction phase and readies it for experiments. Details of the acceptance test program results and of machine capabilities for experiments will be presented.

  20. Basic research needs and priorities in solar energy. Volume I. Executive summary. Technology crosscuts for DOE

    SciTech Connect

    Jayadev, T S; Roessner, D

    1980-01-01

    This report identifies, describes, and recommends priorities for basic research important to the future development of solar energy. In response to a request from the US Department of Energy, SERI surveyed more than 120 leading scientists who were engaged in or knowledgeable of solar-related research. SERI scientists relied heavily on the opinions of scientists polled, but weighted their own recommendations and opinions equally. The result is an amalgam of national scientific opinion representing the views of key researchers in relevant disciplines and of SERI staff members. The Scientific disciplines included in the report are: chemistry, biology, materials sciences, engineering and mathematics, and the social and behavioral sciences. Each discipline is subdivided into two to five topical areas and, wintin each topical area, research needs are described and ranked according to the priorities suggested in the survey. Three categories of priority were established: Crucial, important, and needed. A narrative accompanying the descripton of research needs in each topical area discusses the importance of research in the area for solar energy development and presents the bases for the priority rankings recommended.

  1. Setting research priorities to improve the health of children and young people with neurodisability: a British Academy of Childhood Disability-James Lind Alliance Research Priority Setting Partnership

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Christopher; Simkiss, Doug; Busk, Mary; Morris, Maureen; Allard, Amanda; Denness, Jacob; Janssens, Astrid; Stimson, Anna; Coghill, Joanna; Robinson, Kelly; Fenton, Mark; Cowan, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To engage young people, parent carers and clinicians in a systematic process to identify and prioritise research questions regarding ways to improve the health and well-being of children and young people with neurodisability. Design British Academy of Childhood Disability (BACD)-James Lind Alliance research priority setting partnership bringing together patients, carers and clinicians as equal stakeholders. Setting UK health service and community. Methods The BACD Strategic Research Group formed the partnership. A Steering Group was established; charity and professional partner organisations were recruited. Suggestions were gathered in an open survey and from research recommendations for statutory guidance. Items were aggregated to formulate indicative research questions and verified as uncertainties from research evidence. An interim survey was used to rank the questions to shortlist topics. A mixed group of stakeholders discussed the top 25 questions at the final priority setting workshop agreeing a final rank order and the top 10 research priorities. Participants Partner organisations were 13 charities and 8 professional societies. 369 people submitted suggestions (40% non-clinicians). 76 people participated in the interim prioritisation (26 parents, 1 young person, 10 charity representatives, 39 clinicians); 22 took part in the final workshop (3 young people, 7 parents, 3 charity representatives, 9 professionals). Results The top three research priorities related to (1) establishing the optimal frequency and intensity (dose) for mainstream therapies, (2) means for selecting and encouraging use of communication strategies and (3) ways to improve children's attitudes towards disability. The top 10 included evaluating interventions to promote mobility, self-efficacy, mental health, continence, physical fitness, educational inclusion and reduce impacts of sleep disturbance. Conclusions The methodology provided a systematic and transparent process to

  2. Mining Feedback in Ranking and Recommendation Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhuang, Ziming

    2009-01-01

    The amount of online information has grown exponentially over the past few decades, and users become more and more dependent on ranking and recommendation systems to address their information seeking needs. The advance in information technologies has enabled users to provide feedback on the utilities of the underlying ranking and recommendation…

  3. A Ranking Method for Evaluating Constructed Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attali, Yigal

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a comparative judgment approach for holistically scored constructed response tasks. In this approach, the grader rank orders (rather than rate) the quality of a small set of responses. A prior automated evaluation of responses guides both set formation and scaling of rankings. Sets are formed to have similar prior scores and…

  4. Public Perception of Cancer Survival Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Jakob D.; Scherr, Courtney L.; Brown, Natasha; Jones, Christina; Christy, Katheryn

    2013-01-01

    Past research has observed that certain subgroups (e.g., individuals who are overweight/obese) have inaccurate estimates of survival rates for particular cancers (e.g., colon cancer). However, no study has examined whether the lay public can accurately rank cancer survival rates in comparison with one another (i.e., rank cancers from most deadly…

  5. A Different Approach to University Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tofallis, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Educationalists are well able to find fault with rankings on numerous grounds and may reject them outright. However, given that they are here to stay, we could also try to improve them wherever possible. All currently published university rankings combine various measures to produce an overall score using an additive approach. The individual…

  6. Rankings and the Global Reputation Race

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazelkorn, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    This chapter delves into the growing influence and impact of rankings on higher education, as a lens through which to view how the race for reputation and status is changing the higher education landscape, both globally and nationally. The author considers the extent to which rankings are driving policy choices and institutional decisions and the…

  7. College Rankings: History, Criticism and Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Luke; Robe, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Today, college quality rankings in news magazines and guidebooks are a big business with tangible impacts on the operation of higher education institutions. The college rankings published annually by "U.S. News and World Report" ("U.S. News") are so influential that Don Hossler of Indiana University derisively claims that higher education is the…

  8. Ranking scientific publications: the effect of nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Liyang; Wei, Tian; Zeng, An; Fan, Ying; di, Zengru

    2014-10-01

    Ranking the significance of scientific publications is a long-standing challenge. The network-based analysis is a natural and common approach for evaluating the scientific credit of papers. Although the number of citations has been widely used as a metric to rank papers, recently some iterative processes such as the well-known PageRank algorithm have been applied to the citation networks to address this problem. In this paper, we introduce nonlinearity to the PageRank algorithm when aggregating resources from different nodes to further enhance the effect of important papers. The validation of our method is performed on the data of American Physical Society (APS) journals. The results indicate that the nonlinearity improves the performance of the PageRank algorithm in terms of ranking effectiveness, as well as robustness against malicious manipulations. Although the nonlinearity analysis is based on the PageRank algorithm, it can be easily extended to other iterative ranking algorithms and similar improvements are expected.

  9. A Rational Method for Ranking Engineering Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glower, Donald D.

    1980-01-01

    Compares two methods for ranking academic programs, the opinion poll v examination of career successes of the program's alumni. For the latter, "Who's Who in Engineering" and levels of research funding provided data. Tables display resulting data and compare rankings by the two methods for chemical engineering and civil engineering. (CS)

  10. The Rankings Game: Who's Playing Whom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burness, John F.

    2008-01-01

    This summer, Forbes magazine published its new rankings of "America's Best Colleges," implying that it had developed a methodology that would give the public the information that it needed to choose a college wisely. "U.S. News & World Report," which in 1983 published the first annual ranking, just announced its latest ratings last week--including…

  11. Ranking scientific publications: the effect of nonlinearity

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Liyang; Wei, Tian; Zeng, An; Fan, Ying; Di, Zengru

    2014-01-01

    Ranking the significance of scientific publications is a long-standing challenge. The network-based analysis is a natural and common approach for evaluating the scientific credit of papers. Although the number of citations has been widely used as a metric to rank papers, recently some iterative processes such as the well-known PageRank algorithm have been applied to the citation networks to address this problem. In this paper, we introduce nonlinearity to the PageRank algorithm when aggregating resources from different nodes to further enhance the effect of important papers. The validation of our method is performed on the data of American Physical Society (APS) journals. The results indicate that the nonlinearity improves the performance of the PageRank algorithm in terms of ranking effectiveness, as well as robustness against malicious manipulations. Although the nonlinearity analysis is based on the PageRank algorithm, it can be easily extended to other iterative ranking algorithms and similar improvements are expected. PMID:25322852

  12. Universal emergence of PageRank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, K. M.; Georgeot, B.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2011-11-01

    The PageRank algorithm enables us to rank the nodes of a network through a specific eigenvector of the Google matrix, using a damping parameter α ∈ ]0, 1[. Using extensive numerical simulations of large web networks, with a special accent on British University networks, we determine numerically and analytically the universal features of the PageRank vector at its emergence when α → 1. The whole network can be divided into a core part and a group of invariant subspaces. For α → 1, PageRank converges to a universal power-law distribution on the invariant subspaces whose size distribution also follows a universal power law. The convergence of PageRank at α → 1 is controlled by eigenvalues of the core part of the Google matrix, which are extremely close to unity, leading to large relaxation times as, for example, in spin glasses.

  13. Tan's Epsilon-Determinant and Ranks of Matrices over Semirings

    PubMed Central

    Mohindru, Preeti; Pereira, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    We use the ϵ-determinant introduced by Ya-Jia Tan to define a family of ranks of matrices over certain semirings. We show that these ranks generalize some known rank functions over semirings such as the determinantal rank. We also show that this family of ranks satisfies the rank-sum and Sylvester inequalities. We classify all bijective linear maps which preserve these ranks.

  14. Ethical priority setting for universal health coverage: challenges in deciding upon fair distribution of health services.

    PubMed

    Norheim, Ole F

    2016-01-01

    Priority setting is inevitable on the path towards universal health coverage. All countries experience a gap between their population's health needs and what is economically feasible for governments to provide. Can priority setting ever be fair and ethically acceptable? Fairness requires that unmet health needs be addressed, but in a fair order. Three criteria for priority setting are widely accepted among ethicists: cost-effectiveness, priority to the worse-off, and financial risk protection. Thus, a fair health system will expand coverage for cost-effective services and give extra priority to those benefiting the worse-off, whilst at the same time providing high financial risk protection. It is considered unacceptable to treat people differently according to their gender, race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, social status, or place of residence. Inequalities in health outcomes associated with such personal characteristics are therefore unfair and should be minimized. This commentary also discusses a third group of contested criteria, including rare diseases, small health benefits, age, and personal responsibility for health, subsequently rejecting them. In conclusion, countries need to agree on criteria and establish transparent and fair priority setting processes. PMID:27170046

  15. A Ranking Approach to Genomic Selection

    PubMed Central

    Blondel, Mathieu; Onogi, Akio; Iwata, Hiroyoshi; Ueda, Naonori

    2015-01-01

    Background Genomic selection (GS) is a recent selective breeding method which uses predictive models based on whole-genome molecular markers. Until now, existing studies formulated GS as the problem of modeling an individual’s breeding value for a particular trait of interest, i.e., as a regression problem. To assess predictive accuracy of the model, the Pearson correlation between observed and predicted trait values was used. Contributions In this paper, we propose to formulate GS as the problem of ranking individuals according to their breeding value. Our proposed framework allows us to employ machine learning methods for ranking which had previously not been considered in the GS literature. To assess ranking accuracy of a model, we introduce a new measure originating from the information retrieval literature called normalized discounted cumulative gain (NDCG). NDCG rewards more strongly models which assign a high rank to individuals with high breeding value. Therefore, NDCG reflects a prerequisite objective in selective breeding: accurate selection of individuals with high breeding value. Results We conducted a comparison of 10 existing regression methods and 3 new ranking methods on 6 datasets, consisting of 4 plant species and 25 traits. Our experimental results suggest that tree-based ensemble methods including McRank, Random Forests and Gradient Boosting Regression Trees achieve excellent ranking accuracy. RKHS regression and RankSVM also achieve good accuracy when used with an RBF kernel. Traditional regression methods such as Bayesian lasso, wBSR and BayesC were found less suitable for ranking. Pearson correlation was found to correlate poorly with NDCG. Our study suggests two important messages. First, ranking methods are a promising research direction in GS. Second, NDCG can be a useful evaluation measure for GS. PMID:26068103

  16. Priorities for global felid conservation.

    PubMed

    Dickman, Amy J; Hinks, Amy E; Macdonald, Ewan A; Burnham, Dawn; Macdonald, David W

    2015-06-01

    Conservation resources are limited, necessitating prioritization of species and locations for action. Most prioritization approaches are based solely on biologically relevant characteristics of taxa or areas and ignore geopolitical realities. Doing so risks a poor return on conservation investment due to nonbiological factors, such as economic or political instability. We considered felids, a taxon which attracts intense conservation attention, to demonstrate a new approach that incorporates both intrinsic species traits and geopolitical characteristics of countries. We developed conservation priority scores for wild felids based on their International Union for Conservation of Nature status, body mass, habitat, range within protected area, evolutionary distinctiveness, and conservation umbrella potential. We used published data on governance, economics and welfare, human population pressures, and conservation policy to assign conservation-likelihood scores to 142 felid-hosting countries. We identified 71 countries as high priorities (above median) for felid conservation. These countries collectively encompassed all 36 felid species and supported an average of 96% of each species' range. Of these countries, 60.6% had below-average conservation-likelihood scores, which indicated these countries are relatively risky conservation investments. Governance was the most common factor limiting conservation likelihood. It was the major contributor to below-median likelihood scores for 62.5% of the 32 felid species occurring in lower-likelihood countries. Governance was followed by economics for which scores were below median for 25% of these species. An average of 58% of species' ranges occurred in 43 higher-priority lower-likelihood countries. Human population pressure was second to governance as a limiting factor when accounting for percentage of species' ranges in each country. As conservation likelihood decreases, it will be increasingly important to identify relevant

  17. Simultaneous update of priority structures

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, J.; Browne, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    To avoid centralized bottlenecks, data structures for multiple computer systems must be simultaneously updatable and yet must have some coherent and consistent state. This can be achieved through judicious partitioning of system data structures and control of access to them in such a manner that (1) either different processes operate upon disjoint segments of a given structure; or (2) processes operate upon the same datum object, in a controlled manner. Partitioning of data structures can be by structure or content. It can also occur at multiple times. In this paper we demonstrate content partitioning of a k-ary tree data structure at runtime, to realize a simultaneously updatable priority queue. The tree algorithms are then generalized to banyan data structures and shown to possess attractive properties of simultaneous update and throughput.

  18. Priorities for tuberculosis research: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Rylance, Jamie; Pai, Madhukar; Lienhardt, Christian; Garner, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Summary Reliable and relevant research can help to improve tuberculosis control worldwide. In recent years, various organisations have assessed research needs and proposed priorities for tuberculosis. We summarise existing priority statements and assess the rigour of the methods used to generate them. We found 33 documents that specifically outline priorities in tuberculosis research. The top priority areas were drug development (28 articles), diagnosis and diagnostic tests (27), epidemiology (20), health services research (16), basic research (13), and vaccine development and use (13). The most focused questions were on the treatment and prevention of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in people co-infected with HIV. Methods used to identify these priorities were varied. Improvements can be made to ensure the process is more rigorous and transparent, and to use existing research or systematic reviews more often. WHO, Stop TB Partnership, and other organisations could adopt an incremental process of priority development, building on the existing knowledge base. PMID:21050822

  19. Expectancies Underlying the Acceptability of Handicaps: The Pervasiveness of the Medical Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abroms, Kippy; Kodera, Thomas L.

    1978-01-01

    Two groups of undergraduate students with diverse backgrounds ranked the acceptability of 15 handicapping conditions of which some were medical disorders and others were sociopsychological or functional impairments. Students adhered to the medical model, basing their judgments of acceptability on the amenability of a given handicap to medical…

  20. Setting research priorities for patients on or nearing dialysis.

    PubMed

    Manns, Braden; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Lillie, Erin; Dip, Sally Crowe P G; Cyr, Annette; Gladish, Michael; Large, Claire; Silverman, Howard; Toth, Brenda; Wolfs, Wim; Laupacis, Andreas

    2014-10-01

    With increasing emphasis among health care providers and funders on patient-centered care, it follows that patients and their caregivers should be included when priorities for research are being established. This study sought to identify the most important unanswered questions about the management of kidney failure from the perspective of adult patients on or nearing dialysis, their caregivers, and the health care professionals who care for these patients. Research uncertainties were identified through a national Canadian survey of adult patients on or nearing dialysis, their caregivers, and health care professionals. Uncertainties were refined by a steering committee that included patients, caregivers, researchers, and clinicians to assemble a short-list of the top 30 uncertainties. Thirty-four people (11 patients; five caregivers; eight physicians; six nurses; and one social worker, pharmacist, physiotherapist, and dietitian each) from across Canada subsequently participated in a workshop to determine the top 10 research questions. In total, 1570 usable research uncertainties were received from 317 respondents to the survey. Among these, 259 unique uncertainties were identified; after ranking, these were reduced to a short-list of 30 uncertainties. During the in-person workshop, the top 10 research uncertainties were identified, which included questions about enhanced communication among patients and providers, dialysis modality options, itching, access to kidney transplantation, heart health, dietary restrictions, depression, and vascular access. These can be used alongside the results of other research priority-setting exercises to guide researchers in designing future studies and inform health care funders. PMID:24832095

  1. Ranking Adverse Drug Reactions With Crowdsourcing

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Assaf; Hoehndorf, Robert; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background There is no publicly available resource that provides the relative severity of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Such a resource would be useful for several applications, including assessment of the risks and benefits of drugs and improvement of patient-centered care. It could also be used to triage predictions of drug adverse events. Objective The intent of the study was to rank ADRs according to severity. Methods We used Internet-based crowdsourcing to rank ADRs according to severity. We assigned 126,512 pairwise comparisons of ADRs to 2589 Amazon Mechanical Turk workers and used these comparisons to rank order 2929 ADRs. Results There is good correlation (rho=.53) between the mortality rates associated with ADRs and their rank. Our ranking highlights severe drug-ADR predictions, such as cardiovascular ADRs for raloxifene and celecoxib. It also triages genes associated with severe ADRs such as epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR), associated with glioblastoma multiforme, and SCN1A, associated with epilepsy. Conclusions ADR ranking lays a first stepping stone in personalized drug risk assessment. Ranking of ADRs using crowdsourcing may have useful clinical and financial implications, and should be further investigated in the context of health care decision making. PMID:25800813

  2. Adiabatic Quantum Algorithm for Search Engine Ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnerone, Silvano; Zanardi, Paolo; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2012-06-01

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm for generating a quantum pure state encoding of the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this algorithm can prepare the quantum PageRank state in a time which, on average, scales polylogarithmically in the number of web pages. We argue that the main topological feature of the underlying web graph allowing for such a scaling is the out-degree distribution. The top-ranked log⁡(n) entries of the quantum PageRank state can then be estimated with a polynomial quantum speed-up. Moreover, the quantum PageRank state can be used in “q-sampling” protocols for testing properties of distributions, which require exponentially fewer measurements than all classical schemes designed for the same task. This can be used to decide whether to run a classical update of the PageRank.

  3. Augmenting the Deliberative Method for Ranking Risks.

    PubMed

    Susel, Irving; Lasley, Trace; Montezemolo, Mark; Piper, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) characterized and prioritized the physical cross-border threats and hazards to the nation stemming from terrorism, market-driven illicit flows of people and goods (illegal immigration, narcotics, funds, counterfeits, and weaponry), and other nonmarket concerns (movement of diseases, pests, and invasive species). These threats and hazards pose a wide diversity of consequences with very different combinations of magnitudes and likelihoods, making it very challenging to prioritize them. This article presents the approach that was used at DHS to arrive at a consensus regarding the threats and hazards that stand out from the rest based on the overall risk they pose. Due to time constraints for the decision analysis, it was not feasible to apply multiattribute methodologies like multiattribute utility theory or the analytic hierarchy process. Using a holistic approach was considered, such as the deliberative method for ranking risks first published in this journal. However, an ordinal ranking alone does not indicate relative or absolute magnitude differences among the risks. Therefore, the use of the deliberative method for ranking risks is not sufficient for deciding whether there is a material difference between the top-ranked and bottom-ranked risks, let alone deciding what the stand-out risks are. To address this limitation of ordinal rankings, the deliberative method for ranking risks was augmented by adding an additional step to transform the ordinal ranking into a ratio scale ranking. This additional step enabled the selection of stand-out risks to help prioritize further analysis. PMID:26224206

  4. Acceptance, values, and probability.

    PubMed

    Steel, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    This essay makes a case for regarding personal probabilities used in Bayesian analyses of confirmation as objects of acceptance and rejection. That in turn entails that personal probabilities are subject to the argument from inductive risk, which aims to show non-epistemic values can legitimately influence scientific decisions about which hypotheses to accept. In a Bayesian context, the argument from inductive risk suggests that value judgments can influence decisions about which probability models to accept for likelihoods and priors. As a consequence, if the argument from inductive risk is sound, then non-epistemic values can affect not only the level of evidence deemed necessary to accept a hypothesis but also degrees of confirmation themselves. PMID:26386533

  5. Newbery Medal Acceptance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Russell

    1988-01-01

    Presents the Newbery Medal acceptance speech of Russell Freedman, writer of children's nonfiction. Discusses the place of nonfiction in the world of children's literature, the evolution of children's biographies, and the author's work on "Lincoln." (ARH)

  6. Newbery Medal Acceptance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleary, Beverly

    1984-01-01

    Reprints the text of Ms. Cleary's Newbery medal acceptance speech in which she gives personal history concerning her development as a writer and her response to the letters she receives from children. (CRH)

  7. Caldecott Medal Acceptance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Provensen, Alice; Provensen, Martin

    1984-01-01

    Reprints the text of the Provensens' Caldecott medal acceptance speech in which they describe their early interest in libraries and literature, the collaborative aspect of their work, and their current interest in aviation. (CRH)

  8. 7 CFR 3431.14 - Priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VETERINARY MEDICINE LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM Administration of the Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program § 3431.14 Priority. Pursuant to NVMSA, the Secretary will...

  9. 15 CFR 700.13 - Acceptance and rejection of rated orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... fill all the rated orders of equal priority status received on the same day, the person must accept... person shall not accept a rated order for delivery on a specific date if unable to fill the order by that date. However, the person must inform the customer of the earliest date on which delivery can be...

  10. 15 CFR 700.13 - Acceptance and rejection of rated orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... fill all the rated orders of equal priority status received on the same day, the person must accept... person shall not accept a rated order for delivery on a specific date if unable to fill the order by that date. However, the person must inform the customer of the earliest date on which delivery can be...

  11. 15 CFR 700.13 - Acceptance and rejection of rated orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... fill all the rated orders of equal priority status received on the same day, the person must accept... person shall not accept a rated order for delivery on a specific date if unable to fill the order by that date. However, the person must inform the customer of the earliest date on which delivery can be...

  12. 10 CFR 217.33 - Acceptance and rejection of rated orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... fill all of the rated orders of equal priority status received on the same day, the person must accept... not accept a rated order for delivery on a specific date if unable to fill the order by that date. However, the person must inform the customer of the earliest date on which delivery can be made and...

  13. 10 CFR 217.33 - Acceptance and rejection of rated orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... fill all of the rated orders of equal priority status received on the same day, the person must accept... not accept a rated order for delivery on a specific date if unable to fill the order by that date. However, the person must inform the customer of the earliest date on which delivery can be made and...

  14. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration

    DOEpatents

    Knudson, Curtis L.; Timpe, Ronald C.

    1991-01-01

    A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and usually coal derived.

  15. Quantum navigation and ranking in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Burillo, Eduardo; Duch, Jordi; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Zueco, David

    2012-01-01

    Complex networks are formal frameworks capturing the interdependencies between the elements of large systems and databases. This formalism allows to use network navigation methods to rank the importance that each constituent has on the global organization of the system. A key example is Pagerank navigation which is at the core of the most used search engine of the World Wide Web. Inspired in this classical algorithm, we define a quantum navigation method providing a unique ranking of the elements of a network. We analyze the convergence of quantum navigation to the stationary rank of networks and show that quantumness decreases the number of navigation steps before convergence. In addition, we show that quantum navigation allows to solve degeneracies found in classical ranks. By implementing the quantum algorithm in real networks, we confirm these improvements and show that quantum coherence unveils new hierarchical features about the global organization of complex systems. PMID:22930671

  16. Quantum Navigation and Ranking in Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Burillo, Eduardo; Duch, Jordi; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Zueco, David

    2012-01-01

    Complex networks are formal frameworks capturing the interdependencies between the elements of large systems and databases. This formalism allows to use network navigation methods to rank the importance that each constituent has on the global organization of the system. A key example is Pagerank navigation which is at the core of the most used search engine of the World Wide Web. Inspired in this classical algorithm, we define a quantum navigation method providing a unique ranking of the elements of a network. We analyze the convergence of quantum navigation to the stationary rank of networks and show that quantumness decreases the number of navigation steps before convergence. In addition, we show that quantum navigation allows to solve degeneracies found in classical ranks. By implementing the quantum algorithm in real networks, we confirm these improvements and show that quantum coherence unveils new hierarchical features about the global organization of complex systems. PMID:22930671

  17. Rasch analysis of rank-ordered data.

    PubMed

    Linacre, John M

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical and practical aspects of several methods for the construction of linear measures from rank-ordered data are presented. The final partial-rankings of 356 professional golfers participating in 47 stroke-play tournaments are used for illustration. The methods include decomposing the rankings into independent paired comparisons without ties, into dependent paired comparisons without ties and into independent paired comparisons with ties. A further method, which is easier to implement, entails modeling each tournament as a partial-credit item in which the rank of each golfer is treated as the observation of a category on a partial-credit rating scale. For the golf data, the partial-credit method yields measures with greater face validity than the paired comparison methods. The methods are implemented with the computer programs FACETS and WINSTEPS. PMID:16385155

  18. Let your users do the ranking.

    SciTech Connect

    Spomer, Judith E.

    2010-12-01

    Ranking search results is a thorny issue for enterprise search. Search engines rank results using a variety of sophisticated algorithms, but users still complain that search can't ever seem to find anything useful or relevant! The challenge is to provide results that are ranked according to the users' definition of relevancy. Sandia National Laboratories has enhanced its commercial search engine to discover user preferences, re-ranking results accordingly. Immediate positive impact was achieved by modeling historical data consisting of user queries and subsequent result clicks. New data is incorporated into the model daily. An important benefit is that results improve naturally and automatically over time as a function of user actions. This session presents the method employed, how it was integrated with the search engine,metrics illustrating the subsequent improvement to the users' search experience, and plans for implementation with Sandia's FAST for SharePoint 2010 search engine.

  19. The role of entropy in word ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehri, Ali; Darooneh, Amir H.

    2011-09-01

    Entropy as a measure of complexity in the systems has been applied for ranking the words in the human written texts. We introduce a novel approach to evaluate accuracy for retrieved indices. We also have an illustrative comparison between proposed entropic metrics and some other methods in extracting the keywords. It seems that, some of the discussed metrics apply similar features for word ranking in the text. This work recommend the entropy as a systematic measure in text mining.

  20. 40 CFR 35.2015 - State priority system and project priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... project. (d) Public participation. (1) In addition to any requirements in 40 CFR part 25, the State shall... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false State priority system and project... State priority system and project priority list. (a) General. The Regional Administrator will...

  1. 40 CFR 35.2015 - State priority system and project priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... project. (d) Public participation. (1) In addition to any requirements in 40 CFR part 25, the State shall... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State priority system and project... State priority system and project priority list. (a) General. The Regional Administrator will...

  2. 40 CFR 35.2015 - State priority system and project priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... project. (d) Public participation. (1) In addition to any requirements in 40 CFR part 25, the State shall... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false State priority system and project... State priority system and project priority list. (a) General. The Regional Administrator will...

  3. 40 CFR 35.2015 - State priority system and project priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... project. (d) Public participation. (1) In addition to any requirements in 40 CFR part 25, the State shall... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false State priority system and project... State priority system and project priority list. (a) General. The Regional Administrator will...

  4. 40 CFR 35.2015 - State priority system and project priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... project. (d) Public participation. (1) In addition to any requirements in 40 CFR part 25, the State shall... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false State priority system and project... State priority system and project priority list. (a) General. The Regional Administrator will...

  5. Learning Spaces as a Strategic Priority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Gene; Erwin, Tom; Barnes, Briony

    2009-01-01

    In April 2007 Butler Community College made learning spaces one of its five strategic priorities. The college had just completed a major renovation of the work spaces for the IT division and had started a project to build a student union and create informal learning spaces at the Andover campus. With learning spaces becoming a strategic priority,…

  6. 38 CFR 17.365 - Admission priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Admission priorities. 17.365 Section 17.365 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Grants to the Republic of the Philippines § 17.365 Admission priorities. Appropriate provisions of §...

  7. 7 CFR 1466.4 - National priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false National priorities. 1466.4 Section 1466.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY INCENTIVES PROGRAM General Provisions § 1466.4 National priorities....

  8. 38 CFR 59.50 - Priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... earlier the application was received, the higher the priority given). Note to paragraph (a)(1): The... subpriorities. ER26JN01.000 (2) Priority group 2. An application not meeting the criteria of paragraph (a)(1) of this section but meeting the criteria of paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section. Projects within...

  9. 10 CFR 580.03 - Curtailment priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) CURTAILMENT PRIORITIES FOR ESSENTIAL AGRICULTURAL USES § 580.03 Curtailment priorities. (a) Notwithstanding any provision of law other than section 401(b) of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978, or any other rule, regulation, or order...

  10. 10 CFR 580.03 - Curtailment priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) CURTAILMENT PRIORITIES FOR ESSENTIAL AGRICULTURAL USES § 580.03 Curtailment priorities. (a) Notwithstanding any provision of law other than section 401(b) of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978, or any other rule, regulation, or order...

  11. 10 CFR 580.03 - Curtailment priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) CURTAILMENT PRIORITIES FOR ESSENTIAL AGRICULTURAL USES § 580.03 Curtailment priorities. (a) Notwithstanding any provision of law other than section 401(b) of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978, or any other rule, regulation, or order...

  12. 10 CFR 580.03 - Curtailment priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) CURTAILMENT PRIORITIES FOR ESSENTIAL AGRICULTURAL USES § 580.03 Curtailment priorities. (a) Notwithstanding any provision of law other than section 401(b) of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978, or any other rule, regulation, or order...

  13. 10 CFR 580.03 - Curtailment priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) CURTAILMENT PRIORITIES FOR ESSENTIAL AGRICULTURAL USES § 580.03 Curtailment priorities. (a) Notwithstanding any provision of law other than section 401(b) of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978, or any other rule, regulation, or order...

  14. Research Priorities in Networking and Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.

    A workshop focused on major research issues in networking and communications. This report defines the context for research priorities and initiatives and deals with issues in networking and communications. Fifteen major research priorities and four research specific initiatives were identified by participants as areas that should be pursued over…

  15. Reframing Recreation as a Public Policy Priority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovell, Phillip

    2011-01-01

    Issues pertaining to children often struggle to become public policy priorities. A clear demonstration of this phenomenon is the degree to which children are supported in the federal budget in comparison to other priorities. If issues pertaining to children struggle for the policy spotlight, subissues pertaining to them face an even greater…

  16. 7 CFR 1775.11 - Priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Priority. 1775.11 Section 1775.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE GRANTS Grant Application Processing § 1775.11 Priority. The application and supporting information will be used...

  17. 38 CFR 17.365 - Admission priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Admission priorities. 17.365 Section 17.365 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Grants to the Republic of the Philippines § 17.365 Admission priorities. Appropriate provisions of §...

  18. 38 CFR 17.365 - Admission priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Admission priorities. 17.365 Section 17.365 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Grants to the Republic of the Philippines § 17.365 Admission priorities. Appropriate provisions of §...

  19. 38 CFR 17.365 - Admission priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Admission priorities. 17.365 Section 17.365 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Grants to the Republic of the Philippines § 17.365 Admission priorities. Appropriate provisions of §...

  20. 38 CFR 17.365 - Admission priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Admission priorities. 17.365 Section 17.365 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Grants to the Republic of the Philippines § 17.365 Admission priorities. Appropriate provisions of §...

  1. Strategic Issues: Priorities for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alamo Community Coll. District, San Antonio, TX.

    Strategic priorities for the Alamo Community College District (ACCD) are identified based on conclusions drawn by the ACCD Community Advisory Council from studies of: (1) Bexar County population characteristics and trends; (2) community economic and social priorities; (3) college enrollment potential; (4) needs and characteristics of the ACCD's…

  2. The Big Rocks: Priority Management for Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Kim

    2008-01-01

    How can a dedicated principal work really, really hard but fail to get significant gains in student achievement? The answer is obvious: by spending too much time on the wrong things and not enough on the right things. The principal's number-one priority is zeroing in on the highest-priority activities for bringing all students to high levels of…

  3. Quality of Educational Life, Priorities for Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, Boulder, CO.

    This report discusses how life on campus has been affected by changes in society and changes in the university's role. These changes have placed new demands upon the higher education system. But dynamics within the system have grown inflexible and dehumanizing as a result of system priorities. These priorities set in motion dynamics that compel…

  4. Rank distributions: a panoramic macroscopic outlook.

    PubMed

    Eliazar, Iddo I; Cohen, Morrel H

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a panoramic macroscopic outlook of rank distributions. We establish a general framework for the analysis of rank distributions, which classifies them into five macroscopic "socioeconomic" states: monarchy, oligarchy-feudalism, criticality, socialism-capitalism, and communism. Oligarchy-feudalism is shown to be characterized by discrete macroscopic rank distributions, and socialism-capitalism is shown to be characterized by continuous macroscopic size distributions. Criticality is a transition state between oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, which can manifest allometric scaling with multifractal spectra. Monarchy and communism are extreme forms of oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, respectively, in which the intrinsic randomness vanishes. The general framework is applied to three different models of rank distributions-top-down, bottom-up, and global-and unveils each model's macroscopic universality and versatility. The global model yields a macroscopic classification of the generalized Zipf law, an omnipresent form of rank distributions observed across the sciences. An amalgamation of the three models establishes a universal rank-distribution explanation for the macroscopic emergence of a prevalent class of continuous size distributions, ones governed by unimodal densities with both Pareto and inverse-Pareto power-law tails. PMID:24580176

  5. Rank distributions: A panoramic macroscopic outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo I.; Cohen, Morrel H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a panoramic macroscopic outlook of rank distributions. We establish a general framework for the analysis of rank distributions, which classifies them into five macroscopic "socioeconomic" states: monarchy, oligarchy-feudalism, criticality, socialism-capitalism, and communism. Oligarchy-feudalism is shown to be characterized by discrete macroscopic rank distributions, and socialism-capitalism is shown to be characterized by continuous macroscopic size distributions. Criticality is a transition state between oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, which can manifest allometric scaling with multifractal spectra. Monarchy and communism are extreme forms of oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, respectively, in which the intrinsic randomness vanishes. The general framework is applied to three different models of rank distributions—top-down, bottom-up, and global—and unveils each model's macroscopic universality and versatility. The global model yields a macroscopic classification of the generalized Zipf law, an omnipresent form of rank distributions observed across the sciences. An amalgamation of the three models establishes a universal rank-distribution explanation for the macroscopic emergence of a prevalent class of continuous size distributions, ones governed by unimodal densities with both Pareto and inverse-Pareto power-law tails.

  6. Hierarchical Rank Aggregation with Applications to Nanotoxicology

    PubMed Central

    Telesca, Donatello; Rallo, Robert; George, Saji; Xia, Tian; Nel, André E.

    2014-01-01

    The development of high throughput screening (HTS) assays in the field of nanotoxicology provide new opportunities for the hazard assessment and ranking of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). It is often necessary to rank lists of materials based on multiple risk assessment parameters, often aggregated across several measures of toxicity and possibly spanning an array of experimental platforms. Bayesian models coupled with the optimization of loss functions have been shown to provide an effective framework for conducting inference on ranks. In this article we present various loss-function-based ranking approaches for comparing ENM within experiments and toxicity parameters. Additionally, we propose a framework for the aggregation of ranks across different sources of evidence while allowing for differential weighting of this evidence based on its reliability and importance in risk ranking. We apply these methods to high throughput toxicity data on two human cell-lines, exposed to eight different nanomaterials, and measured in relation to four cytotoxicity outcomes. This article has supplementary material online. PMID:24839387

  7. RANK as a therapeutic target in cancer.

    PubMed

    González-Suárez, Eva; Sanz-Moreno, Adrián

    2016-06-01

    The RANK signaling pathway has emerged as a new target in breast cancer as receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) and its receptor RANK mediate the pro-tumorigenic role of progesterone in the mammary gland. Thousands of cancer patients worldwide are already taking RANKL inhibitors for the management of bone metastasis, given the relevance of this pathway in osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. RANK signaling also has multiple divergent effects in immunity and inflammation, both in the generation of active immune responses and in the induction of tolerance: it is required for lymph node organogenesis, thymic medullary epithelial development and self-tolerance, and regulates activation of several immune cells and inflammatory processes. The RANK pathway interferes with mammary epithelial differentiation and mediates the major proliferative response of mammary epithelium to progesterone and progesterone-driven expansion of mammary stem cells; it also controls hair follicle and epidermal stem cell homeostasis, pointing to RANK as a key regulator of epithelial stemness. Here we revisit the main functions of RANK signaling in bone remodeling, immune cells and epithelial differentiation. We also discuss the mechanistic evidence that supports its pleiotropic effects on cancer: from bone metastasis to immune and cancer-cell-dependent effects. PMID:26749530

  8. Proximal Priority Laser Therapy: PPLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshiro, Toshio

    2004-09-01

    The author has, in the past, classified treatment methods for pain geometrically as point, line, two-dimensional, three-dimensional treatment and has used these over the years. However as a practitioner of western medicine, the author originally treated pain only directed at the painful site, and encountered cases where local treatment did not suffice. The author proved with SPECT and the Rand Phantom that treating the neck which is the midpoint of the brain, the center of the nervous system and the heart, the center of circulation, increased cerebral blood flow and also that laser emitted to neck will reach the spinal chord no matter from where on the neck the laser is emitted. From such research and 25 years of clinical experience, the author has created an anatomy based, systemic treatment method called the Proximal Priority Laser Therapy (PPLT) where not only the cerebral cortex, spinal chord and peripheral nerves are treated but also the tracts of blood vessels and lymph ducts are treated as well. Treatment method and cases are presented herein.

  9. Fertility as a Priority among At-Risk Adolescent Males Newly Diagnosed with Cancer and Their Parents

    PubMed Central

    Klosky, James L.; Simmons, Jessica L.; Russell, Kathryn M.; Foster, Rebecca H.; Sabbatini, Gina M.; Canavera, Kristin E.; Hodges, Jason R.; Schover, Leslie R.; McDermott, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Infertility is a frequent consequence of cancer therapy and is often associated with psychological distress. Although adult survivors prioritize fertility and parenthood, this issue remains unexplored among adolescent males. This study examined future fertility as a priority (relative to other life goals) at time of diagnosis for at-risk adolescents and their parents. Methods Newly diagnosed adolescent males (n=96; age=13.0-21.9 years) at increased risk for infertility secondary to cancer treatment prioritized eight life goals: to have school/work success, children, friends, wealth, health, a nice home, faith, and a romantic relationship. Patients' parents (fathers, n=30; mothers, n=61) rank-ordered the same priorities for their children. Results “Having children” was ranked as a “top 3” life goal among 43.8% of adolescents, 36.7% of fathers, and 21.3% of mothers. Fertility ranked 3rd among adolescents, 4th among fathers, and 5th among mothers. Future health was ranked the top priority across groups, distinct from all other goals (ps<.001), and fertility ranked higher than home ownership and wealth for all groups (ps<.001). For adolescents, low/moderate fertility risk perception was associated with higher fertility rankings than no/high risk perceptions (p=.01). Conclusions Good health is the most important life goal among adolescents newly diagnosed with cancer and their parents. In this relatively small sample, adolescents prioritized fertility as a top goal, parents also rated fertility as being more important than home ownership and financial wealth. Health care providers should communicate fertility risk and preservation options at diagnosis and facilitate timely discussion among families, who may differ in prioritization of future fertility. PMID:25082365

  10. Phylogenetic Analysis of Conservation Priorities for Aquatic Mammals and Their Terrestrial Relatives, with a Comparison of Methods

    PubMed Central

    May-Collado, Laura J.; Agnarsson, Ingi

    2011-01-01

    Background Habitat loss and overexploitation are among the primary factors threatening populations of many mammal species. Recently, aquatic mammals have been highlighted as particularly vulnerable. Here we test (1) if aquatic mammals emerge as more phylogenetically urgent conservation priorities than their terrestrial relatives, and (2) if high priority species are receiving sufficient conservation effort. We also compare results among some phylogenetic conservation methods. Methodology/Principal Findings A phylogenetic analysis of conservation priorities for all 620 species of Cetartiodactyla and Carnivora, including most aquatic mammals. Conservation priority ranking of aquatic versus terrestrial species is approximately proportional to their diversity. However, nearly all obligated freshwater cetartiodactylans are among the top conservation priority species. Further, ∼74% and 40% of fully aquatic cetartiodactylans and carnivores, respectively, are either threatened or data deficient, more so than their terrestrial relatives. Strikingly, only 3% of all ‘high priority’ species are thought to be stable. An overwhelming 97% of these species thus either show decreasing population trends (87%) or are insufficiently known (10%). Furthermore, a disproportional number of highly evolutionarily distinct species are experiencing population decline, thus, such species should be closely monitored even if not currently threatened. Comparison among methods reveals that exact species ranking differs considerably among methods, nevertheless, most top priority species consistently rank high under any method. While we here favor one approach, we also suggest that a consensus approach may be useful when methods disagree. Conclusions/Significance These results reinforce prior findings, suggesting there is an urgent need to gather basic conservation data for aquatic mammals, and special conservation focus is needed on those confined to freshwater. That evolutionarily distinct

  11. Web document ranking via active learning and kernel principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Fei; Chen, Honghui; Shu, Zhen

    2015-09-01

    Web document ranking arises in many information retrieval (IR) applications, such as the search engine, recommendation system and online advertising. A challenging issue is how to select the representative query-document pairs and informative features as well for better learning and exploring new ranking models to produce an acceptable ranking list of candidate documents of each query. In this study, we propose an active sampling (AS) plus kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) based ranking model, viz. AS-KPCA Regression, to study the document ranking for a retrieval system, i.e. how to choose the representative query-document pairs and features for learning. More precisely, we fill those documents gradually into the training set by AS such that each of which will incur the highest expected DCG loss if unselected. Then, the KPCA is performed via projecting the selected query-document pairs onto p-principal components in the feature space to complete the regression. Hence, we can cut down the computational overhead and depress the impact incurred by noise simultaneously. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to perform the document ranking via dimension reductions in two dimensions, namely, the number of documents and features simultaneously. Our experiments demonstrate that the performance of our approach is better than that of the baseline methods on the public LETOR 4.0 datasets. Our approach brings an improvement against RankBoost as well as other baselines near 20% in terms of MAP metric and less improvements using P@K and NDCG@K, respectively. Moreover, our approach is particularly suitable for document ranking on the noisy dataset in practice.

  12. Setting health research priorities using the CHNRI method: VI. Quantitative properties of human collective opinion

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Sachiyo; Rudan, Igor; Cousens, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Crowdsourcing has become an increasingly important tool to address many problems – from government elections in democracies, stock market prices, to modern online tools such as TripAdvisor or Internet Movie Database (IMDB). The CHNRI method (the acronym for the Child Health and Nutrition Research Initiative) for setting health research priorities has crowdsourcing as the major component, which it uses to generate, assess and prioritize between many competing health research ideas. Methods We conducted a series of analyses using data from a group of 91 scorers to explore the quantitative properties of their collective opinion. We were interested in the stability of their collective opinion as the sample size increases from 15 to 90. From a pool of 91 scorers who took part in a previous CHNRI exercise, we used sampling with replacement to generate multiple random samples of different size. First, for each sample generated, we identified the top 20 ranked research ideas, among 205 that were proposed and scored, and calculated the concordance with the ranking generated by the 91 original scorers. Second, we used rank correlation coefficients to compare the ranks assigned to all 205 proposed research ideas when samples of different size are used. We also analysed the original pool of 91 scorers to to look for evidence of scoring variations based on scorers' characteristics. Results The sample sizes investigated ranged from 15 to 90. The concordance for the top 20 scored research ideas increased with sample sizes up to about 55 experts. At this point, the median level of concordance stabilized at 15/20 top ranked questions (75%), with the interquartile range also generally stable (14–16). There was little further increase in overlap when the sample size increased from 55 to 90. When analysing the ranking of all 205 ideas, the rank correlation coefficient increased as the sample size increased, with a median correlation of 0.95 reached at the sample size

  13. Why do neighbors have different environmental priorities? Analysis of environmental risk perception in a Beirut neighborhood.

    PubMed

    El-Zein, Abbas; Nasrallah, Rola; Nuwayhid, Iman; Kai, Lea; Makhoul, Jihad

    2006-04-01

    Differences in environmental priorities within an urban neighborhood of Beirut are analyzed. The explanatory capabilities of five categories of contextual variables are compared: socioeconomic status, locality, health, behavior, and environmental beliefs. Semi-structured interviews with key individuals in the community and residents were first conducted. Four environmental issues of concern were identified. A survey was carried out to identify the relative priority accorded by respondents to these four issues, and to measure variables likely to explain differences of opinion. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted for each of the four problems. The 99% confidence interval (CI) of the odds ratio (OR) was used as a test of significance. Respondents suffering from a respiratory disease (OR = 6.94, 99%CI = 1.54-31.25), those living in less crowded houses (OR = 4.88, 99%CI = 1.38-17.24), and those not living close to the neighborhood's industrial street (OR=5.26, 99%CI = 1.01-27.78) are significantly more likely to rank poor air quality first. Significant associations are found between poor water quality as first priority and nonpresence of a smoker in the household (OR = 6.12, 99%CI = 1.84-20.32) and perception of water salinity as a problem (OR = 7.46, 99%CI = 1.50-37.03). Males (OR = 6.94, 99%CI = 1.02-47.62) and tenants versus owners (OR = 10.49, 99%CI = 1.36-80.61) are significantly more likely to rank the residential-industrial mix first. Socioeconomic variables retain their explanatory capability in the studied neighborhood, despite relatively small income disparities. Behavioral variables, such as smoking, may be causative factors of priorities. Analyzing relative priorities, rather than "concern" or lack of it, reveals more complex patterns of association. Identifying environmental-perception divide lines can help develop a more inclusive and effective participatory environmental management. PMID:16573631

  14. A Think Aloud Study Comparing the Validity and Acceptability of Discrete Choice and Best Worst Scaling Methods

    PubMed Central

    Whitty, Jennifer A.; Walker, Ruth; Golenko, Xanthe; Ratcliffe, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study provides insights into the validity and acceptability of Discrete Choice Experiment (DCE) and profile-case Best Worst Scaling (BWS) methods for eliciting preferences for health care in a priority-setting context. Methods An adult sample (N = 24) undertook a traditional DCE and a BWS choice task as part of a wider survey on Health Technology Assessment decision criteria. A ‘think aloud’ protocol was applied, whereby participants verbalized their thinking while making choices. Internal validity and acceptability were assessed through a thematic analysis of the decision-making process emerging from the qualitative data and a repeated choice task. Results A thematic analysis of the decision-making process demonstrated clear evidence of ‘trading’ between multiple attribute/levels for the DCE, and to a lesser extent for the BWS task. Limited evidence consistent with a sequential decision-making model was observed for the BWS task. For the BWS task, some participants found choosing the worst attribute/level conceptually challenging. A desire to provide a complete ranking from best to worst was observed. The majority (18,75%) of participants indicated a preference for DCE, as they felt this enabled comparison of alternative full profiles. Those preferring BWS were averse to choosing an undesirable characteristic that was part of a ‘package’, or perceived BWS to be less ethically conflicting or burdensome. In a repeated choice task, more participants were consistent for the DCE (22,92%) than BWS (10,42%) (p = 0.002). Conclusions This study supports the validity and acceptability of the traditional DCE format. Findings relating to the application of BWS profile methods are less definitive. Research avenues to further clarify the comparative merits of these preference elicitation methods are identified. PMID:24759637

  15. Typology of end-of-life priorities in Saudi females: averaging analysis and Q-methodology

    PubMed Central

    Hammami, Muhammad M; Hammami, Safa; Amer, Hala A; Khodr, Nesrine A

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding culture-and sex-related end-of-life preferences is essential to provide quality end-of-life care. We have previously explored end-of-life choices in Saudi males and found important culture-related differences and that Q-methodology is useful in identifying intraculture, opinion-based groups. Here, we explore Saudi females’ end-of-life choices. Methods A volunteer sample of 68 females rank-ordered 47 opinion statements on end-of-life issues into a nine-category symmetrical distribution. The ranking scores of the statements were analyzed by averaging analysis and Q-methodology. Results The mean age of the females in the sample was 30.3 years (range, 19–55 years). Among them, 51% reported average religiosity, 78% reported very good health, 79% reported very good life quality, and 100% reported high-school education or more. The extreme five overall priorities were to be able to say the statement of faith, be at peace with God, die without having the body exposed, maintain dignity, and resolve all conflicts. The extreme five overall dis-priorities were to die in the hospital, die well dressed, be informed about impending death by family/friends rather than doctor, die at peak of life, and not know if one has a fatal illness. Q-methodology identified five opinion-based groups with qualitatively different characteristics: “physical and emotional privacy concerned, family caring” (younger, lower religiosity), “whole person” (higher religiosity), “pain and informational privacy concerned” (lower life quality), “decisional privacy concerned” (older, higher life quality), and “life quantity concerned, family dependent” (high life quality, low life satisfaction). Out of the extreme 14 priorities/dis-priorities for each group, 21%–50% were not represented among the extreme 20 priorities/dis-priorities for the entire sample. Conclusion Consistent with the previously reported findings in Saudi males, transcendence and dying in

  16. Use of Multicriteria Risk Ranking of Zoonotic Diseases in a Developing Country: Case Study of Mongolia.

    PubMed

    McFadden, A M J; Muellner, P; Baljinnyam, Z; Vink, D; Wilson, N

    2016-03-01

    Many developing countries face significant health burdens associated with a high incidence of endemic zoonoses and difficulties in integrated control measures for both the human and animal populations. The objective of this study was to develop and apply a multicriteria ranking model for zoonoses in Mongolia, a country highly affected by zoonotic disease, to inform optimal resource allocation at the national level. Diseases were evaluated based on their impact on human health, livestock sector health and the wider society through affects on the economic value of livestock, as well as the feasibility of control in both the human and livestock population. Data on disease in Mongolia were collected from various government departments including the Mongolian State Central Laboratory, the Mongolian Department of Veterinary and Animal Breeding, the Mongolian Ministry of Health, Mongolian National Center for Communicable Diseases, the National Center for Zoonotic Disease and expert opinion from a workshop with a number of Mongolian Government officials and researchers. A combined score for both impact of the disease and feasibility of its control was calculated. Five zoonotic diseases were determined to be of high priority from this assessment (i.e. ovine brucellosis, echinococcosis (hydatids), rabies, anthrax and bovine brucellosis). The results supported some of the findings for high-priority diseases (namely brucellosis, rabies and anthrax) from a previous priority setting exercise carried out in Mongolia in 2011, but also identified and ranked additional animal diseases of public health importance. While the process of model development was largely Mongolian specific, the experience of developing and parameterizing this multicriteria ranking model could be replicated by other countries where zoonoses have substantive impacts on both animal and human health. PMID:26177028

  17. Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage: identification of nursing research priorities in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Cassiani, Silvia Helena De Bortoli; Bassalobre-Garcia, Alessandra; Reveiz, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To estabilish a regional list for nursing research priorities in health systems and services in the Region of the Americas based on the concepts of Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage. Method: five-stage consensus process: systematic review of literature; appraisal of resulting questions and topics; ranking of the items by graduate program coordinators; discussion and ranking amongst a forum of researchers and public health leaders; and consultation with the Ministries of Health of the Pan American Health Organization's member states. Results: the resulting list of nursing research priorities consists of 276 study questions/ topics, which are sorted into 14 subcategories distributed into six major categories: 1. Policies and education of nursing human resources; 2. Structure, organization and dynamics of health systems and services; 3. Science, technology, innovation, and information systems in public health; 4. Financing of health systems and services; 5. Health policies, governance, and social control; and 6. Social studies in the health field. Conclusion: the list of nursing research priorities is expected to serve as guidance and support for nursing research on health systems and services across Latin America. Not only researchers, but also Ministries of Health, leaders in public health, and research funding agencies are encouraged to use the results of this list to help inform research-funding decisions. PMID:26487014

  18. Network-based target ranking for polypharmacological therapies.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Francesca; Mulas, Francesca; Marini, Pietro; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2013-10-01

    With the growing understanding of complex diseases, the focus of drug discovery has shifted from the well-accepted "one target, one drug" model, to a new "multi-target, multi-drug" model, aimed at systemically modulating multiple targets. In this context, polypharmacology has emerged as a new paradigm to overcome the recent decline in productivity of pharmaceutical research. However, finding methods to evaluate multicomponent therapeutics and ranking synergistic agent combinations is still a demanding task. At the same time, the data gathered on complex diseases has been progressively collected in public data and knowledge repositories, such as protein-protein interaction (PPI) databases. The PPI networks are increasingly used as universal platforms for data integration and analysis. A novel computational network-based approach for feasible and efficient identification of multicomponent synergistic agents is proposed in this paper. Given a complex disease, the method exploits the topological features of the related PPI network to identify possible combinations of hit targets. The best ranked combinations are subsequently computed on the basis of a synergistic score. We illustrate the potential of the method through a study on Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. The results highlight its ability to retrieve novel target candidates, which role is also confirmed by the analysis of the related literature. PMID:23850841

  19. Accept or divert?

    PubMed

    Angelucci, P A

    1999-09-01

    Stretching scarce resources is more than a managerial issue. Should you accept the patient to an understaffed ICU or divert him to another facility? The intense "medical utility" controversy focuses on a situation that critical care nurses now face every day. PMID:10614370

  20. Approaches to acceptable risk

    SciTech Connect

    Whipple, C.

    1997-04-30

    Several alternative approaches to address the question {open_quotes}How safe is safe enough?{close_quotes} are reviewed and an attempt is made to apply the reasoning behind these approaches to the issue of acceptability of radiation exposures received in space. The approaches to the issue of the acceptability of technological risk described here are primarily analytical, and are drawn from examples in the management of environmental health risks. These include risk-based approaches, in which specific quantitative risk targets determine the acceptability of an activity, and cost-benefit and decision analysis, which generally focus on the estimation and evaluation of risks, benefits and costs, in a framework that balances these factors against each other. These analytical methods tend by their quantitative nature to emphasize the magnitude of risks, costs and alternatives, and to downplay other factors, especially those that are not easily expressed in quantitative terms, that affect acceptance or rejection of risk. Such other factors include the issues of risk perceptions and how and by whom risk decisions are made.

  1. 1984 Newbery Acceptance Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleary, Beverly

    1984-01-01

    This acceptance speech for an award honoring "Dear Mr. Henshaw," a book about feelings of a lonely child of divorce intended for eight-, nine-, and ten-year-olds, highlights children's letters to author. Changes in society that affect children, the inception of "Dear Mr. Henshaw," and children's reactions to books are highlighted. (EJS)

  2. Why was Relativity Accepted?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brush, S. G.

    Historians of science have published many studies of the reception of Einstein's special and general theories of relativity. Based on a review of these studies, and my own research on the role of the light-bending prediction in the reception of general relativity, I discuss the role of three kinds of reasons for accepting relativity (1) empirical predictions and explanations; (2) social-psychological factors; and (3) aesthetic-mathematical factors. According to the historical studies, acceptance was a three-stage process. First, a few leading scientists adopted the special theory for aesthetic-mathematical reasons. In the second stage, their enthusiastic advocacy persuaded other scientists to work on the theory and apply it to problems currently of interest in atomic physics. The special theory was accepted by many German physicists by 1910 and had begun to attract some interest in other countries. In the third stage, the confirmation of Einstein's light-bending prediction attracted much public attention and forced all physicists to take the general theory of relativity seriously. In addition to light-bending, the explanation of the advance of Mercury's perihelion was considered strong evidence by theoretical physicists. The American astronomers who conducted successful tests of general relativity became defenders of the theory. There is little evidence that relativity was `socially constructed' but its initial acceptance was facilitated by the prestige and resources of its advocates.

  3. UGV acceptance testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Jeffrey A.; Murphy, Robin R.

    2006-05-01

    With over 100 models of unmanned vehicles now available for military and civilian safety, security or rescue applications, it is important to for agencies to establish acceptance testing. However, there appears to be no general guidelines for what constitutes a reasonable acceptance test. This paper describes i) a preliminary method for acceptance testing by a customer of the mechanical and electrical components of an unmanned ground vehicle system, ii) how it has been applied to a man-packable micro-robot, and iii) discusses the value of testing both to ensure that the customer has a workable system and to improve design. The test method automated the operation of the robot to repeatedly exercise all aspects and combinations of components on the robot for 6 hours. The acceptance testing process uncovered many failures consistent with those shown to occur in the field, showing that testing by the user does predict failures. The process also demonstrated that the testing by the manufacturer can provide important design data that can be used to identify, diagnose, and prevent long-term problems. Also, the structured testing environment showed that sensor systems can be used to predict errors and changes in performance, as well as uncovering unmodeled behavior in subsystems.

  4. Groundwater contaminant plume ranking. [UMTRA Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-08-01

    Containment plumes at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites were ranked to assist in Subpart B (i.e., restoration requirements of 40 CFR Part 192) compliance strategies for each site, to prioritize aquifer restoration, and to budget future requests and allocations. The rankings roughly estimate hazards to the environment and human health, and thus assist in determining for which sites cleanup, if appropriate, will provide the greatest benefits for funds available. The rankings are based on the scores that were obtained using the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Modified Hazard Ranking System (MHRS). The MHRS and HRS consider and score three hazard modes for a site: migration, fire and explosion, and direct contact. The migration hazard mode score reflects the potential for harm to humans or the environment from migration of a hazardous substance off a site by groundwater, surface water, and air; it is a composite of separate scores for each of these routes. For ranking the containment plumes at UMTRA Project sites, it was assumed that each site had been remediated in compliance with the EPA standards and that relict contaminant plumes were present. Therefore, only the groundwater route was scored, and the surface water and air routes were not considered. Section 2.0 of this document describes the assumptions and procedures used to score the groundwater route, and Section 3.0 provides the resulting scores for each site. 40 tabs.

  5. Deep impact: unintended consequences of journal rank.

    PubMed

    Brembs, Björn; Button, Katherine; Munafò, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Most researchers acknowledge an intrinsic hierarchy in the scholarly journals ("journal rank") that they submit their work to, and adjust not only their submission but also their reading strategies accordingly. On the other hand, much has been written about the negative effects of institutionalizing journal rank as an impact measure. So far, contributions to the debate concerning the limitations of journal rank as a scientific impact assessment tool have either lacked data, or relied on only a few studies. In this review, we present the most recent and pertinent data on the consequences of our current scholarly communication system with respect to various measures of scientific quality (such as utility/citations, methodological soundness, expert ratings or retractions). These data corroborate previous hypotheses: using journal rank as an assessment tool is bad scientific practice. Moreover, the data lead us to argue that any journal rank (not only the currently-favored Impact Factor) would have this negative impact. Therefore, we suggest that abandoning journals altogether, in favor of a library-based scholarly communication system, will ultimately be necessary. This new system will use modern information technology to vastly improve the filter, sort and discovery functions of the current journal system. PMID:23805088

  6. Diversity rankings among bacterial lineages in soil.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Noha H; Elshahed, Mostafa S

    2009-03-01

    We used rarefaction curve analysis and diversity ordering-based approaches to rank the 11 most frequently encountered bacterial lineages in soil according to diversity in 5 previously reported 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from agricultural, undisturbed tall grass prairie and forest soils (n=26,140, 28 328, 31 818, 13 001 and 53 533). The Planctomycetes, Firmicutes and the delta-Proteobacteria were consistently ranked among the most diverse lineages in all data sets, whereas the Verrucomicrobia, Gemmatimonadetes and beta-Proteobacteria were consistently ranked among the least diverse. On the other hand, the rankings of alpha-Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Chloroflexi varied widely in different soil clone libraries. In general, lineages exhibiting largest differences in diversity rankings also exhibited the largest difference in relative abundance in the data sets examined. Within these lineages, a positive correlation between relative abundance and diversity was observed within the Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi, and a negative diversity-abundance correlation was observed within the Bacteroidetes. The ecological and evolutionary implications of these results are discussed. PMID:18987677

  7. A low rank approach to automatic differentiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Khalik, H. S.; Hovland, P. D.; Lyons, A.; Stover, T. E.; Utke, J.; Mathematics and Computer Science; North Carolina State Univ.; Univ. of Chicago

    2008-01-01

    This manuscript introduces a new approach for increasing the efficiency of automatic differentiation (AD) computations for estimating the first order derivatives comprising the Jacobian matrix of a complex large-scale computational model. The objective is to approximate the entire Jacobian matrix with minimized computational and storage resources. This is achieved by finding low rank approximations to a Jacobian matrix via the Efficient Subspace Method (ESM). Low rank Jacobian matrices arise in many of today's important scientific and engineering problems, e.g. nuclear reactor calculations, weather climate modeling, geophysical applications, etc. A low rank approximation replaces the original Jacobian matrix J (whose size is dictated by the size of the input and output data streams) with matrices of much smaller dimensions (determined by the numerical rank of the Jacobian matrix). This process reveals the rank of the Jacobian matrix and can be obtained by ESM via a series of r randomized matrix-vector products of the form: Jq, and J{sup T} {omega} which can be evaluated by the AD forward and reverse modes, respectively.

  8. Cairo conference affirms CEDPA priorities.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    The International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) that was held in Cairo during September adopted a 20-year Programme of Action endorsing the empowerment of women as the foundation of sustainable development. 178 countries and more than a 1000 nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), including the Centre for Development and Population Activities (CEDPA), from 100 countries attended the conference and the parallel NGO forum. The final document sets out specific steps for achievement of universal access to a full range of voluntary, quality family planning and reproductive health services for women and men; provision of services for the special needs of adolescents; closure of the gender gap in education; and empowerment of women via education, health care, and economic options. The CEDPA network of alumnae from 30 countries had worked over the 3 years prior to the conference for the inclusion of women's priorities in policies and to achieve consensus among the government and NGO caucuses. 14 alumnae, including Peggy Curlin (CEDPA President and US delegate), were appointed to their countries' delegations and directly influenced the Programme of Action. The NGO Forum provided a place to exchange experiences and expertise; CEDPA mounted an exhibit, "Empowering Women." The network's theme was "Access, Choice, and Participation." With support from the United Nations Population Fund, CEDPA developed a manual, "After Cairo: A Handbook on Advocacy for Women Leaders," which has been distributed at training sessions and workshops and was translated into French (with support from the US Agency for International Development in Mali) for distribution at the Dakar conference in November in preparation for the World Conference on Women. CEDPA and The Global Committee for Cairo honored the secretary-general of the conference, Dr. Nafis Sadik, for her leadership of the ICPD and UNFPA, and Aziza Hussein, co-chair of the NGO steering committee, at a luncheon; Dr. Sadik

  9. DrugE-Rank: improving drug–target interaction prediction of new candidate drugs or targets by ensemble learning to rank

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qingjun; Gao, Junning; Wu, Dongliang; Zhang, Shihua; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Zhu, Shanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Identifying drug–target interactions is an important task in drug discovery. To reduce heavy time and financial cost in experimental way, many computational approaches have been proposed. Although these approaches have used many different principles, their performance is far from satisfactory, especially in predicting drug–target interactions of new candidate drugs or targets. Methods: Approaches based on machine learning for this problem can be divided into two types: feature-based and similarity-based methods. Learning to rank is the most powerful technique in the feature-based methods. Similarity-based methods are well accepted, due to their idea of connecting the chemical and genomic spaces, represented by drug and target similarities, respectively. We propose a new method, DrugE-Rank, to improve the prediction performance by nicely combining the advantages of the two different types of methods. That is, DrugE-Rank uses LTR, for which multiple well-known similarity-based methods can be used as components of ensemble learning. Results: The performance of DrugE-Rank is thoroughly examined by three main experiments using data from DrugBank: (i) cross-validation on FDA (US Food and Drug Administration) approved drugs before March 2014; (ii) independent test on FDA approved drugs after March 2014; and (iii) independent test on FDA experimental drugs. Experimental results show that DrugE-Rank outperforms competing methods significantly, especially achieving more than 30% improvement in Area under Prediction Recall curve for FDA approved new drugs and FDA experimental drugs. Availability: http://datamining-iip.fudan.edu.cn/service/DrugE-Rank Contact: zhusf@fudan.edu.cn Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307615

  10. Range-wide network of priority areas for greater sage-grouse - a design for conserving connected distributions or isolating individual zoos?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crist, Michele R.; Knick, Steven T.; Hanser, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    The network of areas delineated in 11 Western States for prioritizing management of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) represents a grand experiment in conservation biology and reserve design. We used centrality metrics from social network theory to gain insights into how this priority area network might function. The network was highly centralized. Twenty of 188 priority areas accounted for 80 percent of the total centrality scores. These priority areas, characterized by large size and a central location in the range-wide distribution, are strongholds for greater sage-grouse populations and also might function as sources. Mid-ranking priority areas may serve as stepping stones because of their location between large central and smaller peripheral priority areas. The current network design and conservation strategy has risks. The contribution of almost one-half (n = 93) of the priority areas combined for less than 1 percent of the cumulative centrality scores for the network. These priority areas individually are likely too small to support viable sage-grouse populations within their boundary. Without habitat corridors to connect small priority areas either to larger priority areas or as a clustered group within the network, their isolation could lead to loss of sage-grouse within these regions of the network. 

  11. Ordinal Distance Metric Learning for Image Ranking.

    PubMed

    Li, Changsheng; Liu, Qingshan; Liu, Jing; Lu, Hanqing

    2015-07-01

    Recently, distance metric learning (DML) has attracted much attention in image retrieval, but most previous methods only work for image classification and clustering tasks. In this brief, we focus on designing ordinal DML algorithms for image ranking tasks, by which the rank levels among the images can be well measured. We first present a linear ordinal Mahalanobis DML model that tries to preserve both the local geometry information and the ordinal relationship of the data. Then, we develop a nonlinear DML method by kernelizing the above model, considering of real-world image data with nonlinear structures. To further improve the ranking performance, we finally derive a multiple kernel DML approach inspired by the idea of multiple-kernel learning that performs different kernel operators on different kinds of image features. Extensive experiments on four benchmarks demonstrate the power of the proposed algorithms against some related state-of-the-art methods. PMID:25163071

  12. Adjoints and Low-rank Covariance Representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tippett, Michael K.; Cohn, Stephen E.

    2000-01-01

    Quantitative measures of the uncertainty of Earth System estimates can be as important as the estimates themselves. Second moments of estimation errors are described by the covariance matrix, whose direct calculation is impractical when the number of degrees of freedom of the system state is large. Ensemble and reduced-state approaches to prediction and data assimilation replace full estimation error covariance matrices by low-rank approximations. The appropriateness of such approximations depends on the spectrum of the full error covariance matrix, whose calculation is also often impractical. Here we examine the situation where the error covariance is a linear transformation of a forcing error covariance. We use operator norms and adjoints to relate the appropriateness of low-rank representations to the conditioning of this transformation. The analysis is used to investigate low-rank representations of the steady-state response to random forcing of an idealized discrete-time dynamical system.

  13. World University Rankings: Take with a Large Pinch of Salt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Soh Kay

    2011-01-01

    Equating the unequal is misleading, and this happens consistently in comparing rankings from different university ranking systems, as the NUT saga shows. This article illustrates the problem by analyzing the 2011 rankings of the top 100 universities in the AWUR, QSWUR and THEWUR ranking results. It also discusses the reasons why the rankings…

  14. Nominal versus Attained Weights in Universitas 21 Ranking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soh, Kaycheng

    2014-01-01

    Universitas 21 Ranking of National Higher Education Systems (U21 Ranking) is one of the three new ranking systems appearing in 2012. In contrast with the other systems, U21 Ranking uses countries as the unit of analysis. It has several features which lend it with greater trustworthiness, but it also shared some methodological issues with the other…

  15. 5 CFR 451.304 - Payment of Rank Awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Presidential Rank Awards § 451.304 Payment of Rank Awards. (a) Receipt of the Distinguished rank by an SES.... 5376 or 5382, or any award paid under 5 U.S.C. 5384. (b) Receipt of the Meritorious rank by an...

  16. 5 CFR 451.302 - Ranks for senior career employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ranks for senior career employees. 451.302 Section 451.302 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS AWARDS Presidential Rank Awards § 451.302 Ranks for senior career employees. (a) The circumstances under which the President may award the rank...

  17. A logical framework for ranking landslide inventory maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santangelo, Michele; Fiorucci, Federica; Bucci, Francesco; Cardinali, Mauro; Ardizzone, Francesca; Marchesini, Ivan; Cesare Mondini, Alessandro; Reichenbach, Paola; Rossi, Mauro; Guzzetti, Fausto

    2014-05-01

    Landslides inventory maps are essential for quantitative landslide hazard and risk assessments, and for geomorphological and ecological studies. Landslide maps, including geomorphological, event based, multi-temporal, and seasonal inventory maps, are most commonly prepared through the visual interpretation of (i) monoscopic and stereoscopic aerial photographs, (ii) satellite images, (iii) LiDAR derived images, aided by more or less extensive field surveys. Landslide inventory maps are the basic information for a number of different scientific, technical and civil protection purposes, such as: (i) quantitative geomorphic analyses, (ii) erosion studies, (iii) deriving landslide statistics, (iv) urban development planning (v) landslide susceptibility, hazard and risk evaluation, and (vi) landslide monitoring systems. Despite several decades of activity in landslide inventory making, still no worldwide-accepted standards, best practices and protocols exist for the ranking and the production of landslide inventory maps. Standards for the preparation (and/or ranking) of landslide inventories should indicate the minimum amount of information for a landslide inventory map, given the scale, the type of images, the instrumentation available, and the available ancillary data. We recently attempted at a systematic description and evaluation of a total of 22 geomorphological inventories, 6 multi-temporal inventories, 10 event inventories, and 3 seasonal inventories, in the scale range between 1:10,000 and 1:500,000, prepared for areas in different geological and geomorphological settings. All of the analysed inventories were carried out by using image interpretation techniques, or field surveys. Firstly, a detailed characterisation was performed for each landslide inventory, mainly collecting metadata related (i) to the amount of information used for preparing the landslide inventory (i.e. images used, instrumentation, ancillary data, digitalisation method, legend, validation

  18. Acceptability of human risk.

    PubMed Central

    Kasperson, R E

    1983-01-01

    This paper has three objectives: to explore the nature of the problem implicit in the term "risk acceptability," to examine the possible contributions of scientific information to risk standard-setting, and to argue that societal response is best guided by considerations of process rather than formal methods of analysis. Most technological risks are not accepted but are imposed. There is also little reason to expect consensus among individuals on their tolerance of risk. Moreover, debates about risk levels are often at base debates over the adequacy of the institutions which manage the risks. Scientific information can contribute three broad types of analyses to risk-setting deliberations: contextual analysis, equity assessment, and public preference analysis. More effective risk-setting decisions will involve attention to the process used, particularly in regard to the requirements of procedural justice and democratic responsibility. PMID:6418541

  19. Mapping of Florida's Coastal and Marine Resources: Setting Priorities Workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, Lisa; Wolfe, Steven; Raabe, Ellen

    2008-01-01

    of data for mapping; * seek innovative solutions to the primary obstacles identified; * identify the steps needed to move mapping of Florida's oceans and coasts forward, in preparation for a better coordinated, more cost-effective mapping program to allow State and Federal agencies to make better decisions on coastal-resource issues. Over 90 invited participants representing more than 30 State and Federal agencies, universities, NGOs, and private industries played a large role in the success of this two-day workshop. State of Florida agency participants created a ranked priority order for mapping 13 different regions around Florida. The data needed for each of the 13 priority regions were outlined. A matrix considering State and Federal priorities was created, utilizing input from all agencies. The matrix showed overlapping interests of the entities and will allow for partnering and leveraging of resources. The five most basic mapping needs were determined to be bathymetry, high-vertical resolution coastline for sea-level rise scenarios, shoreline change, subsurface geology, and benthic habitats at sufficient scale. There was a clear convergence on the need to coordinate mapping activities around the state. Suggestions for coordination included: * creating a glossary of terms: a standard for specifying agency data-mapping needs; * creating a geographic information officer (GIO) position or permanent organizing group to maintain communications established at this workshop and to maintain progress on the issues identified during the workshop. The person or group could develop a website, maintain a project-status matrix, develop a list of contacts, create links to legislative updates and links to funding sources; * developing a web portal and one-stop/clearinghouse of data. There was general consensus on the need to adopt a single habitat classification system and a strategy to accommodate existing systems smoothly. Unresolve

  20. 38 CFR 59.50 - Priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... that replaces an existing facility; (B) Nursing home renovation (e.g., patient privacy) and...) All other projects (e.g., nurse call systems, patient lifts). (ii) Priority group 1—subpriority 2....

  1. 38 CFR 59.50 - Priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... that replaces an existing facility; (B) Nursing home renovation (e.g., patient privacy) and...) All other projects (e.g., nurse call systems, patient lifts). (ii) Priority group 1—subpriority 2....

  2. SARASOTA BAY PRIORITY COMMITTEE MEETING 2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is a summary of the 2002 Priority Committee meeting with corresponding attachments. The meeting covered the Director's Report and the EPA Biennial Review. Topics discussed included public involvement and education, proposed technical projects, sea grass reporting, p...

  3. PRIORITY POLLUTANT REMOVAL FROM MINE DRAINAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study of the removal of selected priority pollutants from acid mine drainage was conducted at EPA's Crown, West Virginia, site. The pollutants studied were the volatiles benzene, chloroform, methylene chloride, tetrachloroethene, toluene, trans-dichloroethene; the semivolatiles...

  4. 77 FR 65912 - Priority Mail Contract

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-31

    ...The Commission is noticing a recent Postal Service filing concerning an amendment to Priority Mail Contract 19. This notice informs the public of the filing, invites public comment, and takes other administrative...

  5. BIODEGRADABILITY STUDIES WITH ORGANIC PRIORITY POLLUTANT COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ninty-six organic priority pollutants (from EPA Effluent Guidelines Consent Decree) were studied to determine the extent and rate of microbial degradation and the acclimation periods needed for substrate biooxidation. The pollutants have been classified into groups with character...

  6. Texture classification by local rank correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwood, D.; Subbarao, M.; Davis, L. S.

    1985-01-01

    A new approach to texture classification based on local rank correlation is proposed here. Its performance is compared with Laws' method which uses local convolution with feature masks. In the experiments, texture samples are classified based on their distribution of local statistics, either rank correlations or convolutions. The new method achieves generally optimal classification rates. It appears to be more robust because local order statistics are unaffected by local sample differences due to monotonic shifts of texture gray values and are less sensitive to noise.

  7. Predicting accurate probabilities with a ranking loss

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Aditya Krishna; Jiang, Xiaoqian J; Vembu, Shankar; Elkan, Charles; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2013-01-01

    In many real-world applications of machine learning classifiers, it is essential to predict the probability of an example belonging to a particular class. This paper proposes a simple technique for predicting probabilities based on optimizing a ranking loss, followed by isotonic regression. This semi-parametric technique offers both good ranking and regression performance, and models a richer set of probability distributions than statistical workhorses such as logistic regression. We provide experimental results that show the effectiveness of this technique on real-world applications of probability prediction. PMID:25285328

  8. Preference Learning and Ranking by Pairwise Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fürnkranz, Johannes; Hüllermeier, Eyke

    This chapter provides an overview of recent work on preference learning and ranking via pairwise classification. The learning by pairwise comparison (LPC) paradigm is the natural machine learning counterpart to the relational approach to preference modeling and decision making. From a machine learning point of view, LPC is especially appealing as it decomposes a possibly complex prediction problem into a certain number of learning problems of the simplest type, namely binary classification. We explain how to approach different preference learning problems, such as label and instance ranking, within the framework of LPC. We primarily focus on methodological aspects, but also address theoretical questions as well as algorithmic and complexity issues.

  9. Competing priorities in treatment decision-making: a US national survey of individuals with depression and clinicians who treat depression

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Paul J; Forcino, Rachel C; Mishra, Manish; Blitzer, Rachel; Elwyn, Glyn

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify information priorities for consumers and clinicians making depression treatment decisions and assess shared decision-making (SDM) in routine depression care. Design 20 questions related to common features of depression treatments were provided. Participants were initially asked to select which features were important, and in a second stage they were asked to rank their top 5 ‘important features’ in order of importance. Clinicians were asked to provide rankings according to both consumer and clinician perspectives. Consumers completed CollaboRATE, a measure of SDM. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified consumer characteristics associated with CollaboRATE scores. Setting Online cross-sectional surveys fielded in September to December 2014. Participants We administered surveys to convenience samples of US adults with depression and clinicians who treat depression. Consumer sampling was targeted to reflect age, gender and educational attainment of adults with depression in the USA. Primary outcome measures Information priority rankings; CollaboRATE, a 3-item consumer-reported measure of SDM. Results 972 consumers and 244 clinicians completed the surveys. The highest ranked question for both consumers and clinicians was ‘Will the treatment work?’ Clinicians were aware of consumers’ priorities, yet did not always prioritise that information themselves, particularly insurance coverage and cost of treatment. Only 18% of consumers reported high levels of SDM. Working with a psychiatrist (OR 1.87; 95% CI 1.07 to 3.26) and female gender (OR 2.04; 95% CI 1.25 to 3.34) were associated with top CollaboRATE scores. Conclusions While clinicians know what information is important to consumers making depression treatment decisions, they do not always address these concerns. This mismatch, coupled with low SDM, adversely affects the quality of depression care. Development of a decision support intervention based on our findings can improve

  10. Age and Acceptance of Euthanasia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Russell A.

    1980-01-01

    Study explores relationship between age (and sex and race) and acceptance of euthanasia. Women and non-Whites were less accepting because of religiosity. Among older people less acceptance was attributable to their lesser education and greater religiosity. Results suggest that quality of life in old age affects acceptability of euthanasia. (Author)

  11. Rasch analysis for the evaluation of rank of student response time in multiple choice examinations.

    PubMed

    Thompson, James J; Yang, Tong; Chauvin, Sheila W

    2013-01-01

    The availability of computerized testing has broadened the scope of person assessment beyond the usual accuracy-ability domain to include response time analyses. Because there are contexts in which speed is important, e.g. medical practice, it is important to develop tools by which individuals can be evaluated for speed. In this paper, the ability of Rasch measurement to convert ordinal nonparametric rankings of speed to measures is examined and compared to similar measures derived from parametric analysis of response times (pace) and semi-parametric logarithmic time-scaling procedures. Assuming that similar spans of the measures were used, non-parametric methods of raw ranking or percentile-ranking of persons by questions gave statistically acceptable person estimates of speed virtually identical to the parametric or semi-parametric methods. Because no assumptions were made about the underlying time distributions with ranking, generality of conclusions was enhanced. The main drawbacks of the non-parametric ranking procedures were the lack of information on question duration and the overall assignment by the model of variance to the person by question interaction. PMID:24064578

  12. Identifying acne treatment uncertainties via a James Lind Alliance Priority Setting Partnership

    PubMed Central

    Layton, Alison; Eady, E Anne; Peat, Maggie; Whitehouse, Heather; Levell, Nick; Ridd, Matthew; Cowdell, Fiona; Patel, Mahenda; Andrews, Stephen; Oxnard, Christine; Fenton, Mark; Firkins, Lester

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The Acne Priority Setting Partnership (PSP) was set up to identify and rank treatment uncertainties by bringing together people with acne, and professionals providing care within and beyond the National Health Service (NHS). Setting The UK with international participation. Participants Teenagers and adults with acne, parents, partners, nurses, clinicians, pharmacists, private practitioners. Methods Treatment uncertainties were collected via separate online harvesting surveys, embedded within the PSP website, for patients and professionals. A wide variety of approaches were used to promote the surveys to stakeholder groups with a particular emphasis on teenagers and young adults. Survey submissions were collated using keywords and verified as uncertainties by appraising existing evidence. The 30 most popular themes were ranked via weighted scores from an online vote. At a priority setting workshop, patients and professionals discussed the 18 highest-scoring questions from the vote, and reached consensus on the top 10. Results In the harvesting survey, 2310 people, including 652 professionals and 1456 patients (58% aged 24 y or younger), made submissions containing at least one research question. After checking for relevance and rephrasing, a total of 6255 questions were collated into themes. Valid votes ranking the 30 most common themes were obtained from 2807 participants. The top 10 uncertainties prioritised at the workshop were largely focused on management strategies, optimum use of common prescription medications and the role of non-drug based interventions. More female than male patients took part in the harvesting surveys and vote. A wider range of uncertainties were provided by patients compared to professionals. Conclusions Engaging teenagers and young adults in priority setting is achievable using a variety of promotional methods. The top 10 uncertainties reveal an extensive knowledge gap about widely used interventions and the relative merits

  13. Risk comparisons, conflict, and risk acceptability claims.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Branden B

    2004-02-01

    Despite many claims for and against the use of risk comparisons in risk communication, few empirical studies have explored their effect. Even fewer have examined the public's relative preferences among different kinds of risk comparisons. Two studies, published in this journal in 1990 and 2003, used seven measures of "acceptability" to examine public reaction to 14 examples of risk comparisons, as used by a hypothetical factory manager to explain risks of his ethylene oxide plant. This study examined the effect on preferences of scenarios involving low or high conflict between the factory manager and residents of the hypothetical town (as had the 2003 study), and inclusion of a claim that the comparison demonstrated the risks' acceptability. It also tested the Finucane et al. (2000) affect hypothesis that information emphasizing low risks-as in these risk comparisons-would raise benefits estimates without changing risk estimates. Using similar but revised scenarios, risk comparison examples (10 instead of 14), and evaluation measures, an opportunity sample of 303 New Jersey residents rated the comparisons, and the risks and benefits of the factory. On average, all comparisons received positive ratings on all evaluation measures in all conditions. Direct and indirect measures showed that the conflict manipulation worked; overall, No-Conflict and Conflict scenarios evoked scores that were not significantly different. The attachment to each risk comparison of a risk acceptability claim ("So our factory's risks should be acceptable to you.") did not worsen ratings relative to conditions lacking this claim. Readers who did or did not see this claim were equally likely to infer an attempt to persuade them to accept the risk from the comparison. As in the 2003 article, there was great individual variability in inferred rankings of the risk comparisons. However, exposure to the risk comparisons did not reduce risk estimates significantly (while raising benefit estimates

  14. Differentiating innovation priorities among stakeholder in hospital care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Decisions to adopt a particular innovation may vary between stakeholders because individual stakeholders may disagree on the costs and benefits involved. This may translate to disagreement between stakeholders on priorities in the implementation process, possibly explaining the slow diffusion of innovations in health care. In this study, we explore the differences in stakeholder preferences for innovations, and quantify the difference in stakeholder priorities regarding costs and benefits. Methods The decision support technique called the analytic hierarchy process was used to quantify the preferences of stakeholders for nine information technology (IT) innovations in hospital care. The selection of the innovations was based on a literature review and expert judgments. Decision criteria related to the costs and benefits of the innovations were defined. These criteria were improvement in efficiency, health gains, satisfaction with care process, and investments required. Stakeholders judged the importance of the decision criteria and subsequently prioritized the selected IT innovations according to their expectations of how well the innovations would perform for these decision criteria. Results The stakeholder groups (patients, nurses, physicians, managers, health care insurers, and policy makers) had different preference structures for the innovations selected. For instance, self-tests were one of the innovations most preferred by health care insurers and managers, owing to their expected positive impacts on efficiency and health gains. However, physicians, nurses and patients strongly doubted the health gains of self-tests, and accordingly ranked self-tests as the least-preferred innovation. Conclusions The various stakeholder groups had different expectations of the value of the nine IT innovations. The differences are likely due to perceived stakeholder benefits of each innovation, and less to the costs to individual stakeholder groups. This study

  15. Research Priorities on the Relationship between Wasting and Stunting

    PubMed Central

    Khara, Tanya; Dolan, Carmel; Berkley, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Wasting and stunting are global public health problems that frequently co-exist. However, they are usually separated in terms of policy, guidance, programming and financing. Though both wasting and stunting are manifestations of undernutrition caused by disease and poor diet, there are critical gaps in our understanding of the physiological relationship between them, and how interventions for one may affect the other. The aim of this exercise was to establish research priorities in the relationships between wasting and stunting to guide future research investments. Methods and Findings We used the CHNRI (Child Health and Nutrition Research Initiative) methodology for setting research priorities in health. We utilised a group of experts in nutrition, growth and child health to prioritise 30 research questions against three criteria (answerability, usefulness and impact) using an online survey. Eighteen of 25 (72%) experts took part and prioritised research directly related to programming, particularly at the public health level. The highest-rated questions were: “Can interventions outside of the 1000 days, e.g. pre-school, school age and adolescence, lead to catch-up in height and in other developmental markers?”; “What timely interventions work to mitigate seasonal peaks in both wasting and stunting?”; and “What is the optimal formulation of ready-to-use foods to promote optimal ponderal growth and also support linear growth during and after recovery from severe acute malnutrition?” There was a high level of agreement between experts, particularly for the highest ranking questions. Conclusions Increased commitment to rigorous evaluations of treatment and prevention interventions at the public health level, addressing questions of the timing of intervention, and the extent to which impacts for both wasting and stunting can be achieved, is needed to inform global efforts to tackle undernutrition and its consequences. PMID:27159235

  16. 15 CFR 700.20 - Use of priority ratings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL SECURITY INDUSTRIAL BASE REGULATIONS DEFENSE PRIORITIES AND ALLOCATIONS SYSTEM Industrial Priorities for Energy Programs § 700.20 Use...

  17. Patient and provider priorities for self-reported domains of HIV clinical care.

    PubMed

    Fredericksen, Rob J; Edwards, Todd C; Merlin, Jessica S; Gibbons, Laura E; Rao, Deepa; Batey, D Scott; Dant, Lydia; Páez, Edgar; Church, Anna; Crane, Paul K; Crane, Heidi M; Patrick, Donald L

    2015-01-01

    We sought to understand how HIV-infected patients, their providers, and HIV care researchers prioritize self-reported domains of clinical care. Participants rank-ordered two lists of domains. A modified Delphi process was used for providers and researchers. Approximately 25% of patients were interviewed to discuss rationale for rank order choices. List 1 included anger, anxiety, depression, fatigue, physical function, pain, and sleep disturbance. List 2 included alcohol abuse, cognitive function, HIV stigma, HIV and treatment symptoms, medication adherence, positive affect, sexual risk behavior, sexual function, social roles, spirituality/meaning of life, and substance abuse. Seventy-four providers, 80 HIV care researchers, and 66 patients participated. Patients ranked context-based domains, such as HIV stigma, more highly than providers, while health behaviors, such as drug or alcohol use, ranked lower. Patients described a need to address wider-context challenges such as HIV stigma in order to positively impact health behaviors. Divergent patient and provider priorities highlight the importance of incorporating views from all stakeholders and suggests the need for a care approach that more effectively addresses contextual barriers to adverse health behaviors. PMID:26304263

  18. What are your priorities right now? Identifying service needs across recovery stages to inform service development.

    PubMed

    Laudet, Alexandre B; White, William

    2010-01-01

    Substance use disorders (SUD) are, for many, chronic conditions that are typically associated with severe impairments in multiple areas of functioning. "Recovery" from SUD is, for most, a lengthy process; improvements in other areas of functioning do not necessarily follow the attainment of abstinence. The current SUD service model providing intense, short-term, symptom-focused services is ill-suited to address these issues. A recovery-oriented model of care is emerging, which provides coordinated recovery-support services using a chronic-care model of sustained recovery management. Information is needed about substance users' priorities, particularly persons in recovery who are not currently enrolled in treatment, to guide the development of recovery-oriented systems. As a first step in filling this gap, we present qualitative data on current life priorities among a sample of individuals that collectively represent successive recovery stages (N = 356). Findings suggest that many areas of functioning remain challenging long after abstinence is attained, most notably employment and education, family/social relations, and housing. Although the ranking of priorities changes somewhat across recovery stages, employment is consistently the second most important priority, behind working on one's recovery. Study limitations are noted, and the implications of findings for the development and evaluation of recovery-oriented services are discussed. PMID:19631490

  19. VaRank: a simple and powerful tool for ranking genetic variants

    PubMed Central

    Geoffroy, Véronique; Pizot, Cécile; Redin, Claire; Piton, Amélie; Vasli, Nasim; Stoetzel, Corinne; Blavier, André; Laporte, Jocelyn

    2015-01-01

    Background. Most genetic disorders are caused by single nucleotide variations (SNVs) or small insertion/deletions (indels). High throughput sequencing has broadened the catalogue of human variation, including common polymorphisms, rare variations or disease causing mutations. However, identifying one variation among hundreds or thousands of others is still a complex task for biologists, geneticists and clinicians. Results. We have developed VaRank, a command-line tool for the ranking of genetic variants detected by high-throughput sequencing. VaRank scores and prioritizes variants annotated either by Alamut Batch or SnpEff. A barcode allows users to quickly view the presence/absence of variants (with homozygote/heterozygote status) in analyzed samples. VaRank supports the commonly used VCF input format for variants analysis thus allowing it to be easily integrated into NGS bioinformatics analysis pipelines. VaRank has been successfully applied to disease-gene identification as well as to molecular diagnostics setup for several hundred patients. Conclusions. VaRank is implemented in Tcl/Tk, a scripting language which is platform-independent but has been tested only on Unix environment. The source code is available under the GNU GPL, and together with sample data and detailed documentation can be downloaded from http://www.lbgi.fr/VaRank/. PMID:25780760

  20. VaRank: a simple and powerful tool for ranking genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, Véronique; Pizot, Cécile; Redin, Claire; Piton, Amélie; Vasli, Nasim; Stoetzel, Corinne; Blavier, André; Laporte, Jocelyn; Muller, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Background. Most genetic disorders are caused by single nucleotide variations (SNVs) or small insertion/deletions (indels). High throughput sequencing has broadened the catalogue of human variation, including common polymorphisms, rare variations or disease causing mutations. However, identifying one variation among hundreds or thousands of others is still a complex task for biologists, geneticists and clinicians. Results. We have developed VaRank, a command-line tool for the ranking of genetic variants detected by high-throughput sequencing. VaRank scores and prioritizes variants annotated either by Alamut Batch or SnpEff. A barcode allows users to quickly view the presence/absence of variants (with homozygote/heterozygote status) in analyzed samples. VaRank supports the commonly used VCF input format for variants analysis thus allowing it to be easily integrated into NGS bioinformatics analysis pipelines. VaRank has been successfully applied to disease-gene identification as well as to molecular diagnostics setup for several hundred patients. Conclusions. VaRank is implemented in Tcl/Tk, a scripting language which is platform-independent but has been tested only on Unix environment. The source code is available under the GNU GPL, and together with sample data and detailed documentation can be downloaded from http://www.lbgi.fr/VaRank/. PMID:25780760

  1. To Overcome HITS Rank Similarity Confliction of Web Pages using Weight Calculation and Rank Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Rajender; Kumar, Naresh

    2011-12-01

    Search Engine gives an ordered list of web search results in response to a user query, wherein the important pages are usually displayed at the top with less important ones afterwards. It may be possible that the user may have to look for many screen results to get the required documents. In literatures, many page ranking algorithms has been given to find the page rank of a page. For example PageRank is considered in this work. This algorithm treats all the links equally when distributing rank scores. That's why this algorithm some time gives equal importance to all the pages. But in real this can not be happen because, if two pages have same rank then how we can judge which page is more important then other. So this paper proposes another idea to organize the search results and describe which page is more important when confliction of same rank is produced by the PageRank. So that the user can get more relevant and important results easily and in a short span of time.

  2. Community-based decision making and priority setting using the R software: the community priority index.

    PubMed

    Salihu, Hamisu M; Salinas-Miranda, Abraham A; Paothong, Arnut; Wang, Wei; King, Lindsey M

    2015-01-01

    This paper outlines how to compute community priority indices in the context of multicriteria decision making in community settings. A simple R function was developed and validated with community needs assessment data. Particularly, the first part of this paper briefly overviews the existing methods for priority setting and reviews the utility of a multicriteria decision-making approach for community-based prioritization. The second part illustrates how community priority indices can be calculated using the freely available R program to handle community data by showing the computational and mathematical steps of CPI (Community Priority Index) with bootstrapped 95% confidence intervals. PMID:25815045

  3. City Life: Rankings (Livability) versus Perceptions (Satisfaction)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Adam

    2013-01-01

    I investigate the relationship between the popular Mercer city ranking (livability) and survey data (satisfactions). Livability aims to capture "objective" quality of life such as infrastructure. Survey items capture "subjective" quality of life such as satisfaction with city. The relationship between objective measures of quality of life and…

  4. Kinesiology Faculty Citations across Academic Rank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudson, Duane

    2015-01-01

    Citations to research reports are used as a measure for the influence of a scholar's research line when seeking promotion, grants, and awards. The current study documented the distributions of citations to kinesiology scholars of various academic ranks. Google Scholar Citations was searched for user profiles using five research interest areas…

  5. Alternative Class Ranks Using Z-Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Philip H.; Van Niel, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Grades at US colleges and universities have increased precipitously over the last 50 years, suggesting that their signalling power has become attenuated. Moreover, average grades have risen disproportionately in some departments, implying that weak students in departments with high grades may obtain better class ranks than strong students in…

  6. Deep impact: unintended consequences of journal rank

    PubMed Central

    Brembs, Björn; Button, Katherine; Munafò, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Most researchers acknowledge an intrinsic hierarchy in the scholarly journals (“journal rank”) that they submit their work to, and adjust not only their submission but also their reading strategies accordingly. On the other hand, much has been written about the negative effects of institutionalizing journal rank as an impact measure. So far, contributions to the debate concerning the limitations of journal rank as a scientific impact assessment tool have either lacked data, or relied on only a few studies. In this review, we present the most recent and pertinent data on the consequences of our current scholarly communication system with respect to various measures of scientific quality (such as utility/citations, methodological soundness, expert ratings or retractions). These data corroborate previous hypotheses: using journal rank as an assessment tool is bad scientific practice. Moreover, the data lead us to argue that any journal rank (not only the currently-favored Impact Factor) would have this negative impact. Therefore, we suggest that abandoning journals altogether, in favor of a library-based scholarly communication system, will ultimately be necessary. This new system will use modern information technology to vastly improve the filter, sort and discovery functions of the current journal system. PMID:23805088

  7. Spanish Universities and the "Ranking 2005" Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Miguel, Jesus M.; Vaquera, Elizabeth; Sanchez, Jara D.

    2005-01-01

    This article assesses the quality of the Spanish higher education system, focusing mainly on the methodological challenges that the existence of public and private universities represents in the calculation of global higher education rankings. Researchers from the University of Barcelona and the University of Pennsylvania calculated the first…

  8. Efficiently Ranking Hyphotheses in Machine Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve

    1997-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of learning the ranking of a set of alternatives based upon incomplete information (e.g. a limited number of observations). At each decision cycle, the system can output a complete ordering on the hypotheses or decide to gather additional information (e.g. observation) at some cost.

  9. An Application of Sylvester's Rank Inequality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kung, Sidney H.

    2011-01-01

    Using two well known criteria for the diagonalizability of a square matrix plus an extended form of Sylvester's Rank Inequality, the author presents a new condition for the diagonalization of a real matrix from which one can obtain the eigenvectors by simply multiplying some associated matrices without solving a linear system of simultaneous…

  10. Ranks, Rates, and Numbers--and Confusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2008-01-01

    The United States may be the most rank-crazy country in the world, but the world is catching up. The author cites the Organization for Economic and Cooperating and Development (OECD). When the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) started its international studies--the First International Mathematics Study…

  11. Ranking Workplace Competencies: Student and Graduate Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainsbury, Elizabeth; Hodges, Dave; Burchell, Noel; Lay, Mark

    2002-01-01

    New Zealand business students and graduates made similar rankings of the five most important workplace competencies: computer literacy, customer service orientation, teamwork and cooperation, self-confidence, and willingness to learn. Graduates placed greater importance on most of the 24 competencies, resulting in a statistically significant…

  12. Likelihoods for fixed rank nomination networks.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Peter; Fosdick, Bailey; Volfovsky, Alex; Stovel, Katherine

    2013-12-01

    Many studies that gather social network data use survey methods that lead to censored, missing, or otherwise incomplete information. For example, the popular fixed rank nomination (FRN) scheme, often used in studies of schools and businesses, asks study participants to nominate and rank at most a small number of contacts or friends, leaving the existence of other relations uncertain. However, most statistical models are formulated in terms of completely observed binary networks. Statistical analyses of FRN data with such models ignore the censored and ranked nature of the data and could potentially result in misleading statistical inference. To investigate this possibility, we compare Bayesian parameter estimates obtained from a likelihood for complete binary networks with those obtained from likelihoods that are derived from the FRN scheme, and therefore accommodate the ranked and censored nature of the data. We show analytically and via simulation that the binary likelihood can provide misleading inference, particularly for certain model parameters that relate network ties to characteristics of individuals and pairs of individuals. We also compare these different likelihoods in a data analysis of several adolescent social networks. For some of these networks, the parameter estimates from the binary and FRN likelihoods lead to different conclusions, indicating the importance of analyzing FRN data with a method that accounts for the FRN survey design. PMID:25110586

  13. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration

    DOEpatents

    Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.

    1991-07-16

    A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process is described. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and is usually coal-derived.

  14. Suppression pheromone and cockroach rank formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Rong; Chang, Huan-Wen; Chen, Shu-Chun; Ho, Hsiao-Yung

    2009-06-01

    Although agonistic behaviors in the male lobster cockroach ( Nauphoeta cinerea) are well known, the formation of an unstable hierarchy has long been a puzzle. In this study, we investigate how the unstable dominance hierarchy in N. cinerea is maintained via a pheromone signaling system. In agonistic interactions, aggressive posture (AP) is an important behavioral index of aggression. This study showed that, during the formation of a governing hierarchy, thousands of nanograms of 3-hydroxy-2-butanone (3H-2B) were released by the AP-adopting dominant in the first encounter fight, then during the early domination period and that this release of 3H-2B was related to rank maintenance, but not to rank establishment. For rank maintenance, 3H-2B functioned as a suppression pheromone, which suppressed the fighting capability of rivals and kept them in a submissive state. During the period of rank maintenance, as the dominant male gradually decreased his 3H-2B release, the fighting ability of the subordinate gradually developed, as shown by the increasing odds of a subordinate adopting an AP (OSAP). The OSAP was negatively correlated with the amount of 3H-2B released by the dominant and positively correlated with the number of domination days. The same OSAP could be achieved earlier by reducing the amount of 3H-2B released by the dominant indicates that whether the subordinate adopts an offensive strategy depends on what the dominant is doing.

  15. Partial transfer entropy on rank vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugiumtzis, D.

    2013-06-01

    For the evaluation of information flow in bivariate time series, information measures have been employed, such as the transfer entropy (TE), the symbolic transfer entropy (STE), defined similarly to TE but on the ranks of the components of the reconstructed vectors, and the transfer entropy on rank vectors (TERV), similar to STE but forming the ranks for the future samples of the response system with regard to the current reconstructed vector. Here we extend TERV for multivariate time series, and account for the presence of confounding variables, called partial transfer entropy on ranks (PTERV). We investigate the asymptotic properties of PTERV, and also partial STE (PSTE), construct parametric significance tests under approximations with Gaussian and gamma null distributions, and show that the parametric tests cannot achieve the power of the randomization test using time-shifted surrogates. Using simulations on known coupled dynamical systems and applying parametric and randomization significance tests, we show that PTERV performs better than PSTE but worse than the partial transfer entropy (PTE). However, PTERV, unlike PTE, is robust to the presence of drifts in the time series and it is also not affected by the level of detrending.

  16. Subject Gateway Sites and Search Engine Ranking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thelwall, Mike

    2002-01-01

    Discusses subject gateway sites and commercial search engines for the Web and presents an explanation of Google's PageRank algorithm. The principle question addressed is the conditions under which a gateway site will increase the likelihood that a target page is found in search engines. (LRW)

  17. World University Ranking Methodologies: Stability and Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidler, Brian; Parsons, Christine

    2008-01-01

    There has been a steady growth in the number of national university league tables over the last 25 years. By contrast, "World University Rankings" are a more recent development and have received little serious academic scrutiny in peer-reviewed publications. Few researchers have evaluated the sources of data and the statistical approaches used.…

  18. Chapel Hill, Berkeley Head Graduate Rankings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Provides lists ranking the 25 largest producers of bachelor's, certified bachelor's, master's, and doctoral graduates in chemistry. University of North Carolina (Chapel Hill) is the nation's largest producer of bachelor's degree chemistry graduates while the University of California (Berkeley) is the largest producer of Ph.D. chemistry graduates.…

  19. MRI Contrasts in High Rank Rotating Frames

    PubMed Central

    Liimatainen, Timo; Hakkarainen, Hanne; Mangia, Silvia; Huttunen, Janne M.J.; Storino, Christine; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Sorce, Dennis; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom

    2014-01-01

    Purpose MRI relaxation measurements are performed in the presence of a fictitious magnetic field in the recently described technique known as RAFF (Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field). This method operates in the 2nd rotating frame (rank n = 2) by utilizing a non-adiabatic sweep of the radiofrequency effective field to generate the fictitious magnetic field. In the present study, the RAFF method is extended for generating MRI contrasts in rotating frames of ranks 1 ≤ n ≤ 5. The developed method is entitled RAFF in rotating frame of rank n (RAFFn). Methods RAFFn pulses were designed to generate fictitious fields that allow locking of magnetization in rotating frames of rank n. Contrast generated with RAFFn was studied using Bloch-McConnell formalism together with experiments on human and rat brains. Results Tolerance to B0 and B1 inhomogeneities and reduced specific absorption rate with increasing n in RAFFn were demonstrated. Simulations of exchange-induced relaxations revealed enhanced sensitivity of RAFFn to slow exchange. Consistent with such feature, an increased grey/white matter contrast was observed in human and rat brain as n increased. Conclusion RAFFn is a robust and safe rotating frame relaxation method to access slow molecular motions in vivo. PMID:24523028

  20. How HIV/AIDS scale-up has impacted on non- HIV priority services in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Much of the debate as to whether or not the scaling up of HIV service delivery in Africa benefits non-HIV priority services has focused on the use of nationally aggregated data. This paper analyses and presents routine health facility record data to show trend correlations across priority services. Methods Review of district office and health facility client records for 39 health facilities in three districts of Zambia, covering four consecutive years (2004-07). Intra-facility analyses were conducted, service and coverage trends assessed and rank correlations between services measured to compare service trends within facilities. Results VCT, ART and PMTCT client numbers and coverage levels increased rapidly. There were some strong positive correlations in trends within facilities between reproductive health services (family planning and antenatal care) and ART and PMTCT, with Spearman rank correlations ranging from 0.33 to 0.83. Childhood immunisation coverage also increased. Stock-outs of important drugs for non-HIV priority services were significantly more frequent than were stock-outs of antiretroviral drugs. Conclusions The analysis shows scale-up in reproductive health service numbers in the same facilities where HIV services were scaling up. While district childhood immunisations increased overall, this did not necessarily occur in facility catchment areas where HIV service scale-up occurred. The paper demonstrates an approach for comparing correlation trends across different services, using routine health facility information. Larger samples and explanatory studies are needed to understand the client, facility and health systems factors that contribute to positive and negative synergies between priority services. PMID:20825666

  1. Driving Forces and Priorities in the Hungarian Radioactive Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    Takats, F.; Ormai, P.

    2002-02-26

    Hungary, being a candidate state to the European Union, pays particular attention to the measures that are typically considered as good practice within the EU when developing and implementing its national program for the safe management of spent fuel and radioactive waste. The Public Agency for Radioactive Waste Management (PURAM) has been designated to carry out the multilevel tasks in the field of radioactive waste management. In accordance with changes in infrastructure, Hungary is about to make significant strategic and technical decisions. There are several technical priorities for the coming years, such as improving the existing L/ILW repository, construction of a new repository for L/ILW, extension of the interim storage facility for spent fuel and setting up a revised back-end policy. Preparations for decommissioning of the nuclear facilities have to be developed as well. The paper outlines the main problem areas as well as the approach to managing radioactive wastes. It will be concluded that priorities can be set, but key dates and deadlines will always contain an element of uncertainty due to public and political acceptance problems.

  2. Baby-Crying Acceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Tiago; de Magalhães, Sérgio Tenreiro

    The baby's crying is his most important mean of communication. The crying monitoring performed by devices that have been developed doesn't ensure the complete safety of the child. It is necessary to join, to these technological resources, means of communicating the results to the responsible, which would involve the digital processing of information available from crying. The survey carried out, enabled to understand the level of adoption, in the continental territory of Portugal, of a technology that will be able to do such a digital processing. It was used the TAM as the theoretical referential. The statistical analysis showed that there is a good probability of acceptance of such a system.

  3. High acceptance recoil polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    The HARP Collaboration

    1992-12-05

    In order to detect neutrons and protons in the 50 to 600 MeV energy range and measure their polarization, an efficient, low-noise, self-calibrating device is being designed. This detector, known as the High Acceptance Recoil Polarimeter (HARP), is based on the recoil principle of proton detection from np[r arrow]n[prime]p[prime] or pp[r arrow]p[prime]p[prime] scattering (detected particles are underlined) which intrinsically yields polarization information on the incoming particle. HARP will be commissioned to carry out experiments in 1994.

  4. [Golden Key Award Acceptance Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Jesse

    The speaker raises a number of his concerns about education, including the need to pursue excellence, educational opportunity, educational atmosphere, motivation, instruction in priorities, individual responsibility, and personal and social values. (IRT)

  5. Analysis of Critical Earth Observation Priorities for Societal Benefit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zell, E. R.; Huff, A. K.; Carpenter, A. T.; Friedl, L.

    2011-12-01

    To ensure that appropriate near real-time (NRT) and historical Earth observation data are available to benefit society and meet end-user needs, the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) sponsored a multi-disciplinary study to identify a set of critical and common Earth observations associated with 9 Societal Benefit Areas (SBAs): Agriculture, Biodiversity, Climate, Disasters, Ecosystems, Energy, Health, Water, and Weather. GEO is an intergovernmental organization working to improve the availability, access, and use of Earth observations to benefit society through a Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). The study, overseen by the GEO User Interface Committee, focused on the "demand" side of Earth observation needs: which users need what types of data, and when? The methodology for the study was a meta-analysis of over 1,700 publicly available documents addressing Earth observation user priorities, under the guidance of expert advisors from around the world. The result was a ranking of 146 Earth observation parameters that are critical and common to multiple SBAs, based on an ensemble of 4 statistically robust methods. Within the results, key details emerged on NRT observations needed to serve a broad community of users. The NRT observation priorities include meteorological parameters, vegetation indices, land cover and soil property observations, water body and snow cover properties, and atmospheric composition. The results of the study and examples of NRT applications will be presented. The applications are as diverse as the list of priority parameters. For example, NRT meteorological and soil moisture information can support monitoring and forecasting for more than 25 infectious diseases, including epidemic diseases, such as malaria, and diseases of major concern in the U.S., such as Lyme disease. Quickly evolving events that impact forests, such as fires and insect outbreaks, can be monitored and forecasted with a combination of vegetation indices, fuel

  6. Kriging for Simulation Metamodeling: Experimental Design, Reduced Rank Kriging, and Omni-Rank Kriging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosking, Michael Robert

    This dissertation improves an analyst's use of simulation by offering improvements in the utilization of kriging metamodels. There are three main contributions. First an analysis is performed of what comprises good experimental designs for practical (non-toy) problems when using a kriging metamodel. Second is an explanation and demonstration of how reduced rank decompositions can improve the performance of kriging, now referred to as reduced rank kriging. Third is the development of an extension of reduced rank kriging which solves an open question regarding the usage of reduced rank kriging in practice. This extension is called omni-rank kriging. Finally these results are demonstrated on two case studies. The first contribution focuses on experimental design. Sequential designs are generally known to be more efficient than "one shot" designs. However, sequential designs require some sort of pilot design from which the sequential stage can be based. We seek to find good initial designs for these pilot studies, as well as designs which will be effective if there is no following sequential stage. We test a wide variety of designs over a small set of test-bed problems. Our findings indicate that analysts should take advantage of any prior information they have about their problem's shape and/or their goals in metamodeling. In the event of a total lack of information we find that Latin hypercube designs are robust default choices. Our work is most distinguished by its attention to the higher levels of dimensionality. The second contribution introduces and explains an alternative method for kriging when there is noise in the data, which we call reduced rank kriging. Reduced rank kriging is based on using a reduced rank decomposition which artificially smoothes the kriging weights similar to a nugget effect. Our primary focus will be showing how the reduced rank decomposition propagates through kriging empirically. In addition, we show further evidence for our

  7. SU (n) symmetry breaking by rank three and rank two antisymmetric tensor scalars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Stephen L.

    2015-05-01

    We study SU (n) symmetry breaking by rank three and rank two antisymmetric tensor fields. Using tensor analysis, we derive branching rules for the adjoint and antisymmetric tensor representations, and explain why for general SU (n) one finds the same U (1) generator mismatch that we noted earlier in special cases. We then compute the masses of the various scalar fields in the branching expansion, in terms of parameters of the general renormalizable potential for the antisymmetric tensor fields.

  8. Participatory health system priority setting: Evidence from a budget experiment.

    PubMed

    Costa-Font, Joan; Forns, Joan Rovira; Sato, Azusa

    2015-12-01

    Budget experiments can provide additional guidance to health system reform requiring the identification of a subset of programs and services that accrue the highest social value to 'communities'. Such experiments simulate a realistic budget resource allocation assessment among competitive programs, and position citizens as decision makers responsible for making 'collective sacrifices'. This paper explores the use of a participatory budget experiment (with 88 participants clustered in social groups) to model public health care reform, drawing from a set of realistic scenarios for potential health care users. We measure preferences by employing a contingent ranking alongside a budget allocation exercise (termed 'willingness to assign') before and after program cost information is revealed. Evidence suggests that the budget experiment method tested is cognitively feasible and incentive compatible. The main downside is the existence of ex-ante "cost estimation" bias. Additionally, we find that participants appeared to underestimate the net social gain of redistributive programs. Relative social value estimates can serve as a guide to aid priority setting at a health system level. PMID:26517295

  9. Setting Research Priorities for Patients on or Nearing Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Lillie, Erin; Dip, Sally Crowe P.G.; Cyr, Annette; Gladish, Michael; Large, Claire; Silverman, Howard; Toth, Brenda; Wolfs, Wim; Laupacis, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    With increasing emphasis among health care providers and funders on patient-centered care, it follows that patients and their caregivers should be included when priorities for research are being established. This study sought to identify the most important unanswered questions about the management of kidney failure from the perspective of adult patients on or nearing dialysis, their caregivers, and the health care professionals who care for these patients. Research uncertainties were identified through a national Canadian survey of adult patients on or nearing dialysis, their caregivers, and health care professionals. Uncertainties were refined by a steering committee that included patients, caregivers, researchers, and clinicians to assemble a short-list of the top 30 uncertainties. Thirty-four people (11 patients; five caregivers; eight physicians; six nurses; and one social worker, pharmacist, physiotherapist, and dietitian each) from across Canada subsequently participated in a workshop to determine the top 10 research questions. In total, 1570 usable research uncertainties were received from 317 respondents to the survey. Among these, 259 unique uncertainties were identified; after ranking, these were reduced to a short-list of 30 uncertainties. During the in-person workshop, the top 10 research uncertainties were identified, which included questions about enhanced communication among patients and providers, dialysis modality options, itching, access to kidney transplantation, heart health, dietary restrictions, depression, and vascular access. These can be used alongside the results of other research priority–setting exercises to guide researchers in designing future studies and inform health care funders. PMID:24832095

  10. Contraceptive characteristics: the perceptions and priorities of men and women.

    PubMed

    Grady, W R; Klepinger, D H; Nelson-Wally, A

    1999-01-01

    This paper focuses on the effects of gender on the importance of contraceptive characteristics and on how specific contraceptive methods are evaluated by men and women. In particular, the study examines how gender is related to both the importance that individuals assign to seven specific contraceptive characteristics when choosing a method, and to perceptions on the extent to which the five common method types possess each of these characteristics. The data used were derived from two companion surveys conducted in 1991, which included a sample of 1189 men and 740 women who belong to the 20-27 age group. Findings revealed that 90% of women rank pregnancy prevention as the first and single most important contraceptive characteristic when choosing a method, followed by sexually transmitted disease (STD) protection. Among men, STD prevention for themselves and their partner and pregnancy protection were of equal importance. Furthermore, both men and women have a correct understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of a particular method but differ significantly with their perceptions on the relative attractiveness of each method. Gender differences in perceptions on the specific characteristics of contraceptive methods often vary by marital status. These results clearly indicate that gender greatly affects contraceptive method perceptions and priorities. PMID:10435215

  11. Use of cost-effectiveness data in priority setting decisions: experiences from the national guidelines for heart diseases in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Eckard, Nathalie; Janzon, Magnus; Levin, Lars-Åke

    2014-01-01

    Background: The inclusion of cost-effectiveness data, as a basis for priority setting rankings, is a distinguishing feature in the formulation of the Swedish national guidelines. Guidelines are generated with the direct intent to influence health policy and support decisions about the efficient allocation of scarce healthcare resources. Certain medical conditions may be given higher priority rankings i.e. given more resources than others, depending on how serious the medical condition is. This study investigated how a decision-making group, the Priority Setting Group (PSG), used cost-effectiveness data in ranking priority setting decisions in the national guidelines for heart diseases. Methods: A qualitative case study methodology was used to explore the use of such data in ranking priority setting healthcare decisions. The study addressed availability of cost-effectiveness data, evidence understanding, interpretation difficulties, and the reliance on evidence. We were also interested in the explicit use of data in ranking decisions, especially in situations where economic arguments impacted the reasoning behind the decisions. Results: This study showed that cost-effectiveness data was an important and integrated part of the decision-making process. Involvement of a health economist and reliance on the data facilitated the use of cost-effectiveness data. Economic arguments were used both as a fine-tuning instrument and a counterweight for dichotomization. Cost-effectiveness data were used when the overall evidence base was weak and the decision-makers had trouble making decisions due to lack of clinical evidence and in times of uncertainty. Cost-effectiveness data were also used for decisions on the introduction of new expensive medical technologies. Conclusion: Cost-effectiveness data matters in decision-making processes and the results of this study could be applicable to other jurisdictions where health economics is implemented in decision-making. This study

  12. Abundances of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in 14 chinese and american coals and their relation to coal rank and weathering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, R.; Liu, Gaisheng; Zhang, Jiahua; Chou, C.-L.; Liu, J.

    2010-01-01

    The abundances of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on the priority list of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) have been determined in 14 Chinese and American coals. The ranks of the samples range from lignite, bituminous coal, anthracite, to natural coke. Soxhlet extraction was conducted on each coal for 48 h. The extract was analyzed on a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The results show that the total PAH content ranged from 0.31 to 57.6 ??g/g of coal (on a dry basis). It varied with coal rank and is highest in the maturity range of bituminous coal rank. High-molecular-weight (HMW) PAHs are predominant in low-rank coals, but low-molecular-weight (LMW) PAHs are predominant in high-rank coals. The low-sulfur coals have a higher PAH content than high-sulfur coals. It may be explained by an increasing connection between disulfide bonds and PAHs in high-sulfur coal. In addition, it leads us to conclude that the PAH content of coals may be related to the depositional environment. ?? 2010 American Chemical Society.

  13. 10 CFR 217.41 - Requests for priority rating authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Requests for priority rating authority. 217.41 Section 217.41 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL ENERGY PRIORITIES AND ALLOCATIONS SYSTEM Special Priorities Assistance § 217.41 Requests for priority rating authority. (a) If a rated order is likely to be...

  14. 10 CFR 217.41 - Requests for priority rating authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Requests for priority rating authority. 217.41 Section 217.41 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL ENERGY PRIORITIES AND ALLOCATIONS SYSTEM Special Priorities Assistance § 217.41 Requests for priority rating authority. (a) If a rated order is likely to be...

  15. 10 CFR 217.41 - Requests for priority rating authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Requests for priority rating authority. 217.41 Section 217.41 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL ENERGY PRIORITIES AND ALLOCATIONS SYSTEM Special Priorities Assistance § 217.41 Requests for priority rating authority. (a) If a rated order is likely to be...

  16. 49 CFR 33.41 - Requests for priority rating authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Requests for priority rating authority. 33.41 Section 33.41 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION PRIORITIES AND ALLOCATION SYSTEM Special Priorities Assistance § 33.41 Requests for priority rating authority. (a) If a rated order is likely to be delayed because...

  17. Priority of discovery in the life sciences.

    PubMed

    Vale, Ronald D; Hyman, Anthony A

    2016-01-01

    The job of a scientist is to make a discovery and then communicate this new knowledge to others. For a scientist to be successful, he or she needs to be able to claim credit or priority for discoveries throughout their career. However, despite being fundamental to the reward system of science, the principles for establishing the "priority of discovery" are rarely discussed. Here we break down priority into two steps: disclosure, in which the discovery is released to the world-wide community; and validation, in which other scientists assess the accuracy, quality and importance of the work. Currently, in biology, disclosure and an initial validation are combined in a journal publication. Here, we discuss the advantages of separating these steps into disclosure via a preprint, and validation via a combination of peer review at a journal and additional evaluation by the wider scientific community. PMID:27310529

  18. Setting mental health priorities: problems and possibilities.

    PubMed

    Callahan, D

    1994-01-01

    A recent project at the Hastings Center examined the question of priority setting in the provision of mental health services. A central issue was whether those services should be prioritized independently of other health services. The answer to that question was no: they should have full parity. Even so, priority setting can be a complex venture. At the heart of any such effort will be the relationship between empirical evidence on treatment outcomes and efficacy and the political and ethical interests that legitimately bear on interpreting and using that evidence. An argument is made that a priority should be given those whose suffering and inability to function in ordinary life is most pronounced, even if the available treatment for them is comparatively less efficacious than for other conditions. PMID:7935242

  19. Priority of discovery in the life sciences

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Ronald D; Hyman, Anthony A

    2016-01-01

    The job of a scientist is to make a discovery and then communicate this new knowledge to others. For a scientist to be successful, he or she needs to be able to claim credit or priority for discoveries throughout their career. However, despite being fundamental to the reward system of science, the principles for establishing the "priority of discovery" are rarely discussed. Here we break down priority into two steps: disclosure, in which the discovery is released to the world-wide community; and validation, in which other scientists assess the accuracy, quality and importance of the work. Currently, in biology, disclosure and an initial validation are combined in a journal publication. Here, we discuss the advantages of separating these steps into disclosure via a preprint, and validation via a combination of peer review at a journal and additional evaluation by the wider scientific community. PMID:27310529

  20. Reframing recreation as a public policy priority.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Phillip

    2011-01-01

    Recreation has the potential to be an important public policy priority; however, it must be reframed to address critical policy priorities. Few policymakers understand the value and benefits of recreation, requiring practitioners and advocates to closely connect recreation to issues of concern to policymakers. A significant policy opportunity to expand recreational opportunities for children and youth lies in the area of education, including the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. By educating policymakers on the myriad outcomes that can result from quality recreational experiences, including the ways in which recreation can support the education of children and youth, solid,incremental progress can be made in positioning recreation as a public policy priority. PMID:21786415

  1. Social Bookmarking Induced Active Page Ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Tsubasa; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Keita

    Social bookmarking services have recently made it possible for us to register and share our own bookmarks on the web and are attracting attention. The services let us get structured data: (URL, Username, Timestamp, Tag Set). And these data represent user interest in web pages. The number of bookmarks is a barometer of web page value. Some web pages have many bookmarks, but most of those bookmarks may have been posted far in the past. Therefore, even if a web page has many bookmarks, their value is not guaranteed. If most of the bookmarks are very old, the page may be obsolete. In this paper, by focusing on the timestamp sequence of social bookmarkings on web pages, we model their activation levels representing current values. Further, we improve our previously proposed ranking method for web search by introducing the activation level concept. Finally, through experiments, we show effectiveness of the proposed ranking method.

  2. Rank-dependant factorization of entanglement evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siomau, Michael

    2016-05-01

    The description of the entanglement evolution of a complex quantum system can be significantly simplified due to the symmetries of the initial state and the quantum channels, which simultaneously affect parts of the system. Using concurrence as the entanglement measure, we study the entanglement evolution of few qubit systems, when each of the qubits is affected by a local unital channel independently on the others. We found that for low-rank density matrices of the final quantum state, such complex entanglement dynamics can be completely described by a combination of independent factors representing the evolution of entanglement of the initial state, when just one of the qubits is affected by a local channel. We suggest necessary conditions for the rank of the density matrices to represent the entanglement evolution through the factors. Our finding is supported with analytical examples and numerical simulations.

  3. A theory of measuring, electing, and ranking

    PubMed Central

    Balinski, Michel; Laraki, Rida

    2007-01-01

    The impossibility theorems that abound in the theory of social choice show that there can be no satisfactory method for electing and ranking in the context of the traditional, 700-year-old model. A more realistic model, whose antecedents may be traced to Laplace and Galton, leads to a new theory that avoids all impossibilities with a simple and eminently practical method, “the majority judgement.” It has already been tested. PMID:17496140

  4. Graph ranking for exploratory gene data analysis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Microarray technology has made it possible to simultaneously monitor the expression levels of thousands of genes in a single experiment. However, the large number of genes greatly increases the challenges of analyzing, comprehending and interpreting the resulting mass of data. Selecting a subset of important genes is inevitable to address the challenge. Gene selection has been investigated extensively over the last decade. Most selection procedures, however, are not sufficient for accurate inference of underlying biology, because biological significance does not necessarily have to be statistically significant. Additional biological knowledge needs to be integrated into the gene selection procedure. Results We propose a general framework for gene ranking. We construct a bipartite graph from the Gene Ontology (GO) and gene expression data. The graph describes the relationship between genes and their associated molecular functions. Under a species condition, edge weights of the graph are assigned to be gene expression level. Such a graph provides a mathematical means to represent both species-independent and species-dependent biological information. We also develop a new ranking algorithm to analyze the weighted graph via a kernelized spatial depth (KSD) approach. Consequently, the importance of gene and molecular function can be simultaneously ranked by a real-valued measure, KSD, which incorporates the global and local structure of the graph. Over-expressed and under-regulated genes also can be separately ranked. Conclusion The gene-function bigraph integrates molecular function annotations into gene expression data. The relevance of genes is described in the graph (through a common function). The proposed method provides an exploratory framework for gene data analysis. PMID:19811684

  5. RANK-RANKL signalling in cancer.

    PubMed

    Renema, Nathalie; Navet, Benjamin; Heymann, Marie-Françoise; Lezot, Frédéric; Heymann, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    Oncogenic events combined with a favourable environment are the two main factors in the oncological process. The tumour microenvironment is composed of a complex, interconnected network of protagonists, including soluble factors such as cytokines, extracellular matrix components, interacting with fibroblasts, endothelial cells, immune cells and various specific cell types depending on the location of the cancer cells (e.g. pulmonary epithelium, osteoblasts). This diversity defines specific "niches" (e.g. vascular, immune, bone niches) involved in tumour growth and the metastatic process. These actors communicate together by direct intercellular communications and/or in an autocrine/paracrine/endocrine manner involving cytokines and growth factors. Among these glycoproteins, RANKL (receptor activator nuclear factor-κB ligand) and its receptor RANK (receptor activator nuclear factor), members of the TNF and TNFR superfamilies, have stimulated the interest of the scientific community. RANK is frequently expressed by cancer cells in contrast with RANKL which is frequently detected in the tumour microenvironment and together they participate in every step in cancer development. Their activities are markedly regulated by osteoprotegerin (OPG, a soluble decoy receptor) and its ligands, and by LGR4, a membrane receptor able to bind RANKL. The aim of the present review is to provide an overview of the functional implication of the RANK/RANKL system in cancer development, and to underline the most recent clinical studies. PMID:27279652

  6. Rank-frequency relation for Chinese characters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Weibing; Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Li, Bo; Wang, Qiuping A.

    2014-02-01

    We show that the Zipf's law for Chinese characters perfectly holds for sufficiently short texts (few thousand different characters). The scenario of its validity is similar to the Zipf's law for words in short English texts. For long Chinese texts (or for mixtures of short Chinese texts), rank-frequency relations for Chinese characters display a two-layer, hierarchic structure that combines a Zipfian power-law regime for frequent characters (first layer) with an exponential-like regime for less frequent characters (second layer). For these two layers we provide different (though related) theoretical descriptions that include the range of low-frequency characters (hapax legomena). We suggest that this hierarchic structure of the rank-frequency relation connects to semantic features of Chinese characters (number of different meanings and homographies). The comparative analysis of rank-frequency relations for Chinese characters versus English words illustrates the extent to which the characters play for Chinese writers the same role as the words for those writing within alphabetical systems.

  7. [Ranke and modern surgery in Groningen].

    PubMed

    van Gijn, Jan; Gijselhart, Joost P

    2012-01-01

    Hans Rudolph Ranke (1849-1887) studied medicine in Halle, located in the eastern part of Germany, where he also trained as a surgeon under Richard von Volkmann (1830-1889), during which time he became familiar with the new antiseptic technique that had been introduced by Joseph Lister (1827-1912). In 1878 he was appointed head of the department of surgery in Groningen, the Netherlands, where his predecessor had been chronically indisposed and developments were flagging. Within a few months, Ranke had introduced disinfection by using carbolic acid both before and during operations. For the disinfection of wound dressings, he replaced carbolic acid with thymol as this was less pungent and foul-smelling. The rate of postoperative infections dropped to a minimum despite the inadequate housing and living conditions of the patients with infectious diseases. In 1887, at the age of 37, Ranke died after a brief illness - possibly glomerulonephritis - only eight years after he had assumed office. A street in the city of Groningen near its present-day University Medical Centre has been named after him. PMID:23171562

  8. Modified hazard ranking system for sites with mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes. User manual.

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, K.A.; Peloquin, R.A.; Stenner, R.D.

    1986-04-01

    This document describes both the original Hazard Ranking System and the modified Hazard Ranking System as they are to be used in evaluating the relative potential for uncontrolled hazardous substance facilities to cause human health or safety problems or ecological or environmental damage. Detailed instructions for using the mHRS/HRS computer code are provided, along with instructions for performing the calculations by hand. Uniform application of the ranking system will permit the DOE to identify those releases of hazardous substances that pose the greatest hazard to humans or the environment. However, the mHRS/HRS by itself cannot establish priorities for the allocation of funds for remedial action. The mHRS/HRS is a means for applying uniform technical judgment regarding the potential hazards presented by a facility relative to other facilities. It does not address the feasibility, desirability, or degree of cleanup required. Neither does it deal with the readiness or ability of a state to carry out such remedial action, as may be indicated, or to meet other conditions prescribed in CERCLA. 13 refs., 13 figs., 27 tabs.

  9. Setting Priorities for Monitoring and Managing Non-native Plants: Toward a Practical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Christiane; Jeschke, Jonathan M.; Overbeck, Gerhard E.; Kollmann, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Land managers face the challenge to set priorities in monitoring and managing non-native plant species, as resources are limited and not all non-natives become invasive. Existing frameworks that have been proposed to rank non-native species require extensive information on their distribution, abundance, and impact. This information is difficult to obtain and often not available for many species and regions. National watch or priority lists are helpful, but it is questionable whether they provide sufficient information for environmental management on a regional scale. We therefore propose a decision tree that ranks species based on more simple albeit robust information, but still provides reliable management recommendations. To test the decision tree, we collected and evaluated distribution data from non-native plants in highland grasslands of Southern Brazil. We compared the results with a national list from the Brazilian Invasive Species Database for the state to discuss advantages and disadvantages of the different approaches on a regional scale. Out of 38 non-native species found, only four were also present on the national list. If management would solely rely on this list, many species that were identified as spreading based on the decision tree would go unnoticed. With the suggested scheme, it is possible to assign species to active management, to monitoring, or further evaluation. While national lists are certainly important, management on a regional scale should employ additional tools that adequately consider the actual risk of non-natives to become invasive.

  10. Setting Priorities for Monitoring and Managing Non-native Plants: Toward a Practical Approach.

    PubMed

    Koch, Christiane; Jeschke, Jonathan M; Overbeck, Gerhard E; Kollmann, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Land managers face the challenge to set priorities in monitoring and managing non-native plant species, as resources are limited and not all non-natives become invasive. Existing frameworks that have been proposed to rank non-native species require extensive information on their distribution, abundance, and impact. This information is difficult to obtain and often not available for many species and regions. National watch or priority lists are helpful, but it is questionable whether they provide sufficient information for environmental management on a regional scale. We therefore propose a decision tree that ranks species based on more simple albeit robust information, but still provides reliable management recommendations. To test the decision tree, we collected and evaluated distribution data from non-native plants in highland grasslands of Southern Brazil. We compared the results with a national list from the Brazilian Invasive Species Database for the state to discuss advantages and disadvantages of the different approaches on a regional scale. Out of 38 non-native species found, only four were also present on the national list. If management would solely rely on this list, many species that were identified as spreading based on the decision tree would go unnoticed. With the suggested scheme, it is possible to assign species to active management, to monitoring, or further evaluation. While national lists are certainly important, management on a regional scale should employ additional tools that adequately consider the actual risk of non-natives to become invasive. PMID:27272017

  11. Automatic Ranked Output from Boolean Searches in SIRE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noreault, Terry; And Others

    1977-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness using an automatic algorithm to rank the results of Boolean searches of an inverted file design document retrieval system. Relevant documents were ranked significantly higher than nonrelevant documents on output lists. (Author/KP)

  12. Technical Innovation: The Automated Residency Match Rank List.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Colin; Rubinstein, David

    2016-01-01

    The creation of the final rank list for the National Residency Matching Program every year is a laborious task requiring the time and input of numerous faculty members and residents. This article describes the creation of an automated visual rank list to efficiently organize and guide discussion at the yearly rank meeting so that the task may be efficiently and fairly completed. The rank list was created using a PowerPoint (Microsoft) macro that can pull information directly from a spreadsheet to generate a visual rank list that can be modified on-the-fly during the final rank list meeting. An automatically created visual rank list helps facilitate an efficient meeting and creates an open and transparent process leading to the final ranking. PMID:26778579

  13. Rings whose p-ranks do not exceed 1

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, O. S.; Tsarev, A. V. E-mail: an-tsarev@yandex.ru

    2014-04-30

    We consider associative torsion-free rings of finite rank whose p-ranks do not exceed 1. For these rings, certain analogues of Wedderburn's theorem on finite-dimensional algebras are found. Bibliography: 11 titles. (paper)

  14. Higher rank numerical ranges and low rank perturbations of quantum channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chi-Kwong; Poon, Yiu-Tung; Sze, Nung-Sing

    2008-12-01

    For a positive integer k, the rank-k numerical range [Lambda]k(A) of an operator A acting on a Hilbert space of dimension at least k is the set of scalars [lambda] such that PAP=[lambda]P for some rank k orthogonal projection P. In this paper, a close connection between low rank perturbation of an operator A and [Lambda]k(A) is established. In particular, for 1[less-than-or-equals, slant]rrank(F)[less-than-or-equals, slant]r. In quantum computing, this result implies that a quantum channel with a k-dimensional error correcting code under a perturbation of rank at most r will still have a (k-r)-dimensional error correcting code. Moreover, it is shown that if A is normal or if the dimension of A is finite, then [Lambda]k(A) can be obtained as the intersection of [Lambda]k-r(A+F) for a collection of rank r operators F. Examples are given to show that the result fails if A is a general operator. The closure and the interior of the convex set [Lambda]k(A) are completely determined. Analogous results are obtained for [Lambda][infinity](A) defined as the set of scalars [lambda] such that PAP=[lambda]P for an infinite rank orthogonal projection P. It is shown that [Lambda][infinity](A) is the intersection of all [Lambda]k(A) for k=1,2,.... If A-[mu]I is not compact for all , then the closure and the interior of [Lambda][infinity](A) coincide with those of the essential numerical range of A. The situation for the special case when A-[mu]I is compact for some is also studied.

  15. Leak potential index model for use in priority ranking of underground storage tanks at formerly used defense sites. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, L.D.

    1998-03-01

    Abandoned underground storage tanks (USTs) that have not been properly closed at formerlC used defense sites (FUDS) may present potential leaking problems, spilling their hazardous contents into nearby soils, groundwater, and well water. The leaking USTs are potential sources of contaminants generally classified as containerized hazardous, toxic, and radioactive waste (CON/HTRW). CON/IITRW includes petroleum, oil, and lubricants (POL), benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene (BTEX), and radioactive waste products. The risk to the environment and population associated with the leaking USTs depends not only on the source, but on the migration pathway factor (MPF) (i.e., the ability of the medium of transport such as soil or water-to effectively transport the contaminants to the receptor) and finally on the relative vulnerability of the potential receptor. Thus, the assessment of the relative risk begins with the calculation of the potential of the UST to leak. A method of predicting the risk of leakage of these USTs is therefore desirable. presently, however, leak prediction index (LPI) models (which are used to predict the age at which a UST will leak or the probability of a UST leak at any given age) require soil data that are not readily available, or not easily and economically obtained by LPI.model users. The Warren Rogers leak prediction model was developed circa 1981, and has been used for USTs and incorporated into leak prediction models for other types of underground steel structures.

  16. Expanding the landscape of {N} = 2 rank 1 SCFTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyres, Philip C.; Lotito, Matteo; Lü, Yongchao; Martone, Mario

    2016-05-01

    We refine our previous proposal [1-3] for systematically classifying 4d rank-1 {N} = 2 SCFTs by constructing their possible Coulomb branch geometries. Four new recently discussed rank-1 theories [4, 5], including novel {N} = 3 SCFTs, sit beautifully in our refined classification framework. By arguing for the consistency of their RG flows we can make a strong case for the existence of at least four additional rank-1 SCFTs, nearly doubling the number of known rank-1 SCFTs.

  17. 78 FR 29785 - Priority Mail Pricing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION Priority Mail Pricing AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Commission is....452 percent. Id. at 5. The Postal Service indicates that after the price change, the unused...

  18. 7 CFR 4279.155 - Loan priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Loan priorities. 4279.155 Section 4279.155 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUARANTEED LOANMAKING Business and Industry...

  19. 7 CFR 4279.155 - Loan priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Loan priorities. 4279.155 Section 4279.155 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUARANTEED LOANMAKING Business and Industry...

  20. 7 CFR 4279.155 - Loan priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Loan priorities. 4279.155 Section 4279.155 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUARANTEED LOANMAKING Business and Industry...

  1. Pres. Clinton's Education Priorities: Early 1993 Indications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Franklin

    Educators anticipate bold new education reform initiatives from President Bill Clinton and his Education Secretary, Richard Riley. A priority project is college tuition loans, repayable through voluntary public service jobs. The President also supports increased funding for the Head Start Program and money for a national apprenticeship program for…

  2. U.S. Foreign Policy Priorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pell, Claiborne

    1983-01-01

    The three highest priorities for American foreign policy are avoiding nuclear war by working with the Soviet leadership to alter our present collision course, demonstrating our commitment to human rights throughout the world, and ensuring American economic prosperity by strengthening exports and ensuring the stability of the international monetary…

  3. Remembering What's Important: Priorities of School Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnici, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    In "Remembering What's Important: Priorities of School Leadership," Charles A. Bonnici addresses several issues facing school leaders through strategies supported by real-life examples and anecdotes. The issues addressed include questions such as: (1) What is the most urgent issue faced by a new school leader?; (2) How can this leader address the…

  4. The Top Training Priorities for 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Brandon

    2003-01-01

    A survey of 222 training professionals identified current training priorities: soft skills training; technical training; enhancing the quality of training; business skills; business alignment, business impact, and return on investment; online learning; sales training; safety and compliance training; performance management; and human…

  5. 47 CFR 211.5 - Priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Priorities. 211.5 Section 211.5 Telecommunication OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY AND NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL EMERGENCY RESTORATION... intelligence; (4) Distribute essential food and other supplies critical to health; (5) Provide for...

  6. 47 CFR 211.5 - Priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Priorities. 211.5 Section 211.5 Telecommunication OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY AND NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL EMERGENCY RESTORATION... intelligence; (4) Distribute essential food and other supplies critical to health; (5) Provide for...

  7. Gore's Controversial Priorities for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gose, Ben

    2000-01-01

    Evaluates presidential candidate Al Gore's priorities for higher education, noting criticism by some educators of his emphasis on benefits for the middle class and the large number of specific proposals he has offered, including the College Opportunity Tax Cut, 21st Century Teachers' Corps, 401(j) Educational Savings Accounts, the National Tuition…

  8. School Discipline Inequities Become a Federal Priority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    Federal officials are getting the word out that addressing racial disparities in school discipline is a high priority, and they plan to use "disparate-impact analysis" in enforcing school discipline cases--a legal course of action that some civil rights lawyers contend was neglected under the administration of President George W. Bush. In…

  9. National Adult Student Priorities Report, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    USA Group Noel-Levitz, Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents the results of the fourth annual National Adult Student Priorities Study (ASPS) conducted to determine the areas of highest importance to students 25 years and older, the areas of greatest and least satisfaction to these college students, and the greatest performance gaps between levels of importance and levels of…

  10. National Adult Student Priorities Report, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    USA Group Noel-Levitz, Iowa City, IA.

    This report describes the third annual National Adult Student Priorities Study (ASPS), an attempt to determine the areas of highest importance to students aged 25 and older. The 2002 ASPS represents data from 78 colleges and universities representing four-year public, four-year private, and two-year community, junior, and technical institutions.…

  11. Priority Queuing On A Parallel Data Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    Queuing strategy for communications along shared data bus minimizes number of data lines while always assuring user of highest priority given access to bus. New system handles up to 32 user demands on 17 data lines that previously serviced only 17 demands.

  12. 7 CFR 3431.14 - Priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Priority. 3431.14 Section 3431.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE VETERINARY MEDICINE LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM Administration of the Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program §...

  13. 7 CFR 3431.14 - Priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Priority. 3431.14 Section 3431.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE VETERINARY MEDICINE LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM Administration of the Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program §...

  14. 7 CFR 3431.14 - Priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Priority. 3431.14 Section 3431.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE VETERINARY MEDICINE LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM Administration of the Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program §...

  15. 7 CFR 3431.14 - Priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Priority. 3431.14 Section 3431.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE VETERINARY MEDICINE LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM Administration of the Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program §...

  16. 42 CFR 57.1506 - Priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Priority. 57.1506 Section 57.1506 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS GRANTS FOR CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Loan Guarantees and Interest Subsidies to Assist in Construction of...

  17. 45 CFR 2531.20 - Funding priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Funding priorities. 2531.20 Section 2531.20 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE PURPOSES AND AVAILABILITY OF GRANTS FOR INVESTMENT FOR QUALITY AND INNOVATION ACTIVITIES § 2531.20...

  18. 45 CFR 2531.20 - Funding priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Funding priorities. 2531.20 Section 2531.20 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE PURPOSES AND AVAILABILITY OF GRANTS FOR INVESTMENT FOR QUALITY AND INNOVATION ACTIVITIES § 2531.20...

  19. 45 CFR 2531.20 - Funding priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Funding priorities. 2531.20 Section 2531.20 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE PURPOSES AND AVAILABILITY OF GRANTS FOR INVESTMENT FOR QUALITY AND INNOVATION ACTIVITIES § 2531.20...

  20. 45 CFR 2531.20 - Funding priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Funding priorities. 2531.20 Section 2531.20 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE PURPOSES AND AVAILABILITY OF GRANTS FOR INVESTMENT FOR QUALITY AND INNOVATION ACTIVITIES § 2531.20...

  1. 45 CFR 2531.20 - Funding priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Funding priorities. 2531.20 Section 2531.20 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE PURPOSES AND AVAILABILITY OF GRANTS FOR INVESTMENT FOR QUALITY AND INNOVATION ACTIVITIES § 2531.20...

  2. 48 CFR 8.603 - Purchase priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purchase priorities. 8.603 Section 8.603 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION ACQUISITION PLANNING REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition From Federal Prison Industries, Inc. 8.603...

  3. 48 CFR 808.603 - Purchase priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purchase priorities. 808.603 Section 808.603 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition From Federal...

  4. 48 CFR 8.704 - Purchase priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purchase priorities. 8.704 Section 8.704 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION ACQUISITION PLANNING... Prison Industries, Inc., ordering offices shall purchase supplies and services in the...

  5. 7 CFR 1777.13 - Project priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ineligible will be advised of their appeal rights in accordance with 7 CFR part 11. (b) State Office review... not available and advised of their appeal rights as set forth in 7 CFR part 11. (c) National Office... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Project priority. 1777.13 Section 1777.13...

  6. 7 CFR 1778.7 - Project priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... shortage. Grants made in accordance with § 1778.11(b) of this part to assist an established water system remedy an acute shortage of quality water or correct a significant decline in the quantity or quality of... (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY AND IMMINENT COMMUNITY WATER ASSISTANCE GRANTS § 1778.7 Project priority. Paragraph...

  7. Institutional Priority for Diversity at Christian Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paredes-Collins, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    This evaluative study explored the relationship between institutional priority for diversity and minority enrollment at four schools within the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities, a consortium of Christian institutions. This institutional evaluation utilized public resources in order to gather descriptive data on minority enrollment…

  8. Education and Work: A NIE Priority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieder, Corinne H.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a rationale and objectives for NIE's education and work priority area, to discuss the status of current R&D activities within this area, and to describe possible future efforts that are now under discussion. (Author)

  9. 38 CFR 59.50 - Priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...; building construction; egress; building compartmentalization (e.g., smoke barrier, fire walls); fire alarm... acquisition of a nursing home or domiciliary from a State that has a great need for the beds that the State... of establishing priorities under this section: (1) A State has a great need for nursing home...

  10. 38 CFR 59.50 - Priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... construction; egress; building compartmentalization (e.g., smoke barrier, fire walls); fire alarm/detection... acquisition of a nursing home or domiciliary from a State that has a great need for the beds that the State... of establishing priorities under this section: (1) A State has a great need for nursing home...

  11. 7 CFR 1777.13 - Project priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... advised of their appeal rights in accordance with 7 CFR part 11. (b) State Office review. All applications... are not available and advised of their appeal rights as set forth in 7 CFR part 11. (c) National... 7 Agriculture 12 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Project priority. 1777.13 Section 1777.13...

  12. 7 CFR 1777.13 - Project priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ineligible will be advised of their appeal rights in accordance with 7 CFR part 11. (b) State Office review... not available and advised of their appeal rights as set forth in 7 CFR part 11. (c) National Office... 7 Agriculture 12 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Project priority. 1777.13 Section 1777.13...

  13. 7 CFR 1777.13 - Project priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ineligible will be advised of their appeal rights in accordance with 7 CFR part 11. (b) State Office review... not available and advised of their appeal rights as set forth in 7 CFR part 11. (c) National Office... 7 Agriculture 12 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Project priority. 1777.13 Section 1777.13...

  14. 7 CFR 636.5 - National priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING WILDLIFE HABITAT INCENTIVE PROGRAM § 636.5 National priorities. (a) The... or important native fish and wildlife habitats; (2) Protect, restore, develop, or enhance fish and wildlife habitat to benefit at-risk species; (3) Reduce the impacts of invasive species on fish...

  15. 7 CFR 636.5 - National priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING WILDLIFE HABITAT INCENTIVES PROGRAM § 636.5 National priorities. (a) The... or important native fish and wildlife habitats; (2) Protect, restore, develop, or enhance fish and wildlife habitat to benefit at-risk species; (3) Reduce the impacts of invasive species on fish...

  16. 42 CFR 51.24 - Program priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program priorities. 51.24 Section 51.24 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Program Administration...

  17. 42 CFR 51.24 - Program priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program priorities. 51.24 Section 51.24 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Program Administration...

  18. Protecting Our Priorities: 2010 Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    What does "protecting our priorities" mean in an era when economic realities require that institutions of higher education trim their budgets while also providing critical education and training to more and more students--those "human resources" whose skills will be the key to any economic turnaround? This is a question WICHE addresses every day.…

  19. Rethinking funding priorities in mental health research.

    PubMed

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Betts, Virginia Trotter; Greenman, Lisa; Essock, Susan M; Escobar, Javier I; Barch, Deanna; Hogan, Michael F; Areán, Patricia A; Druss, Benjamin G; DiClemente, Ralph J; McGlashan, Thomas H; Jeste, Dilip V; Proctor, Enola K; Ruiz, Pedro; Rush, A John; Canino, Glorisa J; Bell, Carl C; Henry, Renata; Iversen, Portia

    2016-06-01

    Mental health research funding priorities in high-income countries must balance longer-term investment in identifying neurobiological mechanisms of disease with shorter-term funding of novel prevention and treatment strategies to alleviate the current burden of mental illness. Prioritising one area of science over others risks reduced returns on the entire scientific portfolio. PMID:27251688

  20. National priorities list sites: Connecticut, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  1. National priorities list sites: Colorado, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  2. National priorities list sites: Kentucky, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  3. National priorities list sites: West Virginia, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  4. National priorities list sites: Tennessee, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  5. National priorities list sites: Wyoming, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  6. National priorities list sites: Louisiana, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  7. National priorities list sites: North Carolina, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  8. National priorities list sites: Maine, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  9. National priorities list sites: Florida, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  10. National priorities list sites: Minnesota, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  11. National priorities list sites: New Mexico, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  12. National priorities list sites: Arkansas, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  13. National priorities list sites: Washington, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  14. National priorities list sites: New Jersey, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  15. National priorities list sites: Vermont, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  16. National priorities list sites: Oregon, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  17. National priorities list sites: Alaska, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  18. National priorities list sites: Michigan, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  19. National priorities list sites: Mississippi, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  20. National priorities list sites: Alabama, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.