Science.gov

Sample records for acceptance test plan

  1. Acceptance Test Plan.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    7 RD-Ai507 154 CCEPTANCE TEST PLN(U) WESTINGHOUSE DEFENSE ND i/i ELECTRO ICS CENTER BALTIMORE MD DEVELOPMENT AND OPERATIONS DIY D C KRRiJS 28 JUN...Ln ACCEPTANCE TEST PLAN FOR SPECIAL RELIABILITY TESTS FOR BROADBAND MICROWAVE AMPLIFIER PANEL David C. Kraus, Reliability Engineer WESTINGHOUSE ...ORGANIZATION b. OFFICE SYMBOL 7g& NAME OF MONITORING ORGANIZATION tIf appdeg ble) WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC CORP. - NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY e. AOORES$ (Ci7t

  2. Acceptance Test Plan for ANSYS Software

    SciTech Connect

    CREA, B.A.

    2000-10-25

    This plan governs the acceptance testing of the ANSYS software (Full Mechanical Release 5.5) for use on Project Word Management Contract (PHMC) computer systems (either UNIX or Microsoft Windows/NT). There are two phases to the acceptance testing covered by this test plan: program execution in accordance with the guidance provided in installation manuals; and ensuring results of the execution are consistent with the expected physical behavior of the system being modeled.

  3. Emperical Tests of Acceptance Sampling Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, K. Preston, Jr.; Johnson, Kenneth L.

    2012-01-01

    Acceptance sampling is a quality control procedure applied as an alternative to 100% inspection. A random sample of items is drawn from a lot to determine the fraction of items which have a required quality characteristic. Both the number of items to be inspected and the criterion for determining conformance of the lot to the requirement are given by an appropriate sampling plan with specified risks of Type I and Type II sampling errors. In this paper, we present the results of empirical tests of the accuracy of selected sampling plans reported in the literature. These plans are for measureable quality characteristics which are known have either binomial, exponential, normal, gamma, Weibull, inverse Gaussian, or Poisson distributions. In the main, results support the accepted wisdom that variables acceptance plans are superior to attributes (binomial) acceptance plans, in the sense that these provide comparable protection against risks at reduced sampling cost. For the Gaussian and Weibull plans, however, there are ranges of the shape parameters for which the required sample sizes are in fact larger than the corresponding attributes plans, dramatically so for instances of large skew. Tests further confirm that the published inverse-Gaussian (IG) plan is flawed, as reported by White and Johnson (2011).

  4. Electromagnetic induction moisture measurement system acceptance test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, G.F., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of this acceptance test plan (ATP) is to verify that the mechanical, electrical and software features of the ElectroMagnetic Induction (EMI) probe are operating as designed,and that the unit is ready for field service. The accepted EMI and Surface Moisture Measurement Systems (SMMS) will be used primarily in support of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Safety Programs for moisture measurement of organic and ferrocyanide watch list tanks.

  5. Acceptance Test Plan for the Sludge Pickup Adaptor

    SciTech Connect

    PITNER, A.L.

    2000-03-29

    This test plan documents the acceptance testing of the sludge pickup adapter for potential use during PSI Phases 3 and 4 fuel cleanliness inspection activities. The adaptex is attached to the strainer tip of the vacuum wand and used to suction up residual sludge captured in a sludge collection tray. The material is vacuumed into a chamber of known volume in the sludge pickup adapter. The device serves as an aid in helping to determine whether the observed quantity of sludge is within allowable limits (1.4 cm{sup 3} per fuel assembly). This functionality test involves underwater testing in the 305 Building Cold Test Facility to verify that sludge can be successfully vacuumed from a collection tray. Ancillary activities in this acceptance test include demonstration that the sludge pickup adapter CM be successfully attached to and detached from the vacuum wand underwater.

  6. Acceptance test plan for the Waste Information Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, D.F.

    1994-09-14

    This document describes the acceptance test plan for the WICS system. The Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Hazardous Material Control Group (HMC) of the 222-S Laboratory has requested the development of a system to help resolve many of the difficulties associated with tracking and data collection of containers and drums of waste. This system has been identified as Waste Information and Control System (WICS). The request for developing and implementing WICS has been made to the Automation and Simulation Engineering Group (ASE).

  7. General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT) Acceptance Test Plan [Draft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dove, Edwin; Hughes, Steve

    2007-01-01

    The information presented in this Acceptance Test Plan document shows the current status of the General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT). GMAT is a software system developed by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in collaboration with the private sector. The GMAT development team continuously performs acceptance tests in order to verify that the software continues to operate properly after updates are made. The GMAT Development team consists of NASA/GSFC Code 583 software developers, NASA/GSFC Code 595 analysts, and contractors of varying professions. GMAT was developed to provide a development approach that maintains involvement from the private sector and academia, encourages collaborative funding from multiple government agencies and the private sector, and promotes the transfer of technology from government funded research to the private sector. GMAT contains many capabilities, such as integrated formation flying modeling and MATLAB compatibility. The propagation capabilities in GMAT allow for fully coupled dynamics modeling of multiple spacecraft, in any flight regime. Other capabilities in GMAT inclucle: user definable coordinate systems, 3-D graphics in any coordinate system GMAT can calculate, 2-D plots, branch commands, solvers, optimizers, GMAT functions, planetary ephemeris sources including DE405, DE200, SLP and analytic models, script events, impulsive and finite maneuver models, and many more. GMAT runs on Windows, Mac, and Linux platforms. Both the Graphical User Interface (GUI) and the GMAT engine were built and tested on all of the mentioned platforms. GMAT was designed for intuitive use from both the GUI and with an importable script language similar to that of MATLAB.

  8. Rotary mode core sampling service trailer Acceptance Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kostelnik, A.J.

    1994-11-28

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) will document compliance with the requirements of specification WHC-S-056 Rev.2 including ECNs 608798 and 616386. The equipment being tested is a furniture type trailer with storage cabinets, lighting and HVAC systems installed. The unit was purchased as a Design and Fabrication procurement activity. The ATP be performed by representatives of the Westinghouse Hanford Company with the assistance of the Seller at the Seller`s location.

  9. 49 CFR 232.505 - Pre-revenue service acceptance testing plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... acceptance tests; (3) Correct any safety deficiencies identified by FRA in the design of the equipment or in... measure or determine the success or failure of the tests. If acceptance is to be based on extrapolation of... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pre-revenue service acceptance testing plan....

  10. LIMS user acceptance testing.

    PubMed

    Klein, Corbett S

    2003-01-01

    Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS) play a key role in the pharmaceutical industry. Thorough and accurate validation of such systems is critical and is a regulatory requirement. LIMS user acceptance testing is one aspect of this testing and enables the user to make a decision to accept or reject implementation of the system. This paper discusses key elements in facilitating the development and execution of a LIMS User Acceptance Test Plan (UATP).

  11. Acceptance testing for battery-electric bus procurements: Planning, inspection, and testing guidelines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This Acceptance Test Plan (ATP) is intended to guide the inspection and testing of the bus(es) fabricated by Contractor for Buyer in accordance with the contract(s) dated MM, DD, YYYY, and the subsequent change orders and contract modifications. The inspection worksheets and report forms presented in the Appendix are intended to assist in documentation of the inspection process and its findings. Alternatively, existing Contractor worksheets and reports may be used if it can be demonstrated that all relevant technical criteria are encompassed therein. This ATP is intended solely as a guide for the inspection and testing of the bus(es), their associated service, operating, training, and maintenance manuals, mechanical and electrical schematics, software and interfaces, and the special tools delivered in accordance with the technical specifications of the contract(s) cited above. Determination of the Contractor`s compliance with contractual provisions other than those of the technical specifications is beyond the scope of this ATP. Furthermore, this ATP is not intended to determine compliance of Contractor`s Bid Package with requirements of the bid solicitation, nor is it intended to be used in activities associated with the Design Review specified in the contractual documents.

  12. Resolve! Version 2.5: Flammable Gas Accident Analysis Tool Acceptance Test Plan and Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    LAVENDER, J.C.

    2000-10-17

    RESOLVE! Version 2 .5 is designed to quantify the risk and uncertainty of combustion accidents in double-shell tanks (DSTs) and single-shell tanks (SSTs). The purpose of the acceptance testing is to ensure that all of the options and features of the computer code run; to verify that the calculated results are consistent with each other; and to evaluate the effects of the changes to the parameter values on the frequency and consequence trends associated with flammable gas deflagrations or detonations.

  13. W-026 acceptance test plan plant control system software (submittal {number_sign} 216)

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, T.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-14

    Acceptance Testing of the WRAP 1 Plant Control System software will be conducted throughout the construction of WRAP 1 with final testing on the glovebox software being completed in December 1996. The software tests will be broken out into five sections; one for each of the four Local Control Units and one for the supervisory software modules. The acceptance test report will contain completed copies of the software tests along with the applicable test log and completed Exception Test Reports.

  14. An Early-Accept Modification to the Test Plans of Military Standard 781C

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-17

    r4 0 0. a co -V en .4 m N *F e 000 a 1 - 4 P4N H P C 4 e 0 0 I൱ 0 n 00 .0-% e o n Cl -N r-4 V-4 J ~ 0 04O 100 coc N~ 0.. 4 % y q C oC 4c (a0 Ř...reverse side US tnecoesan7wd identify by block nmm~ bot ) LIFE TESTING SEQUENTIAL TESTING RELIABILITY DESIGN ACCEPTANCE TESTS EXPONENTIAL DISTRIBUTION

  15. W-026 acceptance test plan plant control system hardware (submittal {number_sign} 216)

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, T.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-14

    Acceptance Testing of the WRAP 1 Plant Control System Hardware will be conducted throughout the construction of WRAP I with the final testing on the Process Area hardware being completed in November 1996. The hardware tests will be broken out by the following functional areas; Local Control Units, Operator Control Stations in the WRAP Control Room, DMS Server, PCS Server, Operator Interface Units, printers, DNS terminals, WRAP Local Area Network/Communications, and bar code equipment. This document will contain completed copies of each of the hardware tests along with the applicable test logs and completed test exception reports.

  16. 49 CFR 232.505 - Pre-revenue service acceptance testing plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... its system the operating railroad or railroads shall submit a pre-revenue service acceptance testing... the new brake system technology into revenue service, the operating railroad or railroads shall: (1... compatibility of the equipment with the operating system (track, signals, etc.) of the railroad. A description...

  17. UGV acceptance testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Jeffrey A.; Murphy, Robin R.

    2006-05-01

    With over 100 models of unmanned vehicles now available for military and civilian safety, security or rescue applications, it is important to for agencies to establish acceptance testing. However, there appears to be no general guidelines for what constitutes a reasonable acceptance test. This paper describes i) a preliminary method for acceptance testing by a customer of the mechanical and electrical components of an unmanned ground vehicle system, ii) how it has been applied to a man-packable micro-robot, and iii) discusses the value of testing both to ensure that the customer has a workable system and to improve design. The test method automated the operation of the robot to repeatedly exercise all aspects and combinations of components on the robot for 6 hours. The acceptance testing process uncovered many failures consistent with those shown to occur in the field, showing that testing by the user does predict failures. The process also demonstrated that the testing by the manufacturer can provide important design data that can be used to identify, diagnose, and prevent long-term problems. Also, the structured testing environment showed that sensor systems can be used to predict errors and changes in performance, as well as uncovering unmodeled behavior in subsystems.

  18. 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Demonstration Test Gamma Cart Acceptance Test Procedure and Quality Test Plan (ATP and QTP)

    SciTech Connect

    WHITE, D.A.

    2000-03-01

    Shop Test of the Gamma Cart System to be used in the AZ-101 Mixer Pump Demonstration Test. Tests hardware and software. This procedure involves testing the Instrumentation involved with the Gamma Cart System, local and remote, including: depth indicators, speed controls, interface to data acquisition software and the raising and lowering functions. This Procedure will be performed twice, once for each Gamma Cart System. This procedure does not test the accuracy of the data acquisition software.

  19. 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Demonstration Test Gamma Cart Acceptance Test Procedure and Quality Test Plan (ATP and QTP)

    SciTech Connect

    WHITE, D.A.

    2000-01-27

    Shop test of the sludge mobilization cart system to be used in the AZ-101 Mixer Pump Demonstration Test Tests hardware and software. This procedure involves testing the Instrumentation involved with the Gamma Cart System, local and remote, including depth indicators, speed controls, interface to data acquisition software and the raising and lowering functions. This Procedure will be performed twice, once for each Gamma Cart System. This procedure does not test the accuracy of the data acquisition software.

  20. Test plan :

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, Stephen F.

    2013-05-01

    This test plan is a document that provides a systematic approach to the planned testing of rooftop structures to determine their actual load carrying capacity. This document identifies typical tests to be performed, the responsible parties for testing, the general feature of the tests, the testing approach, test deliverables, testing schedule, monitoring requirements, and environmental and safety compliance.

  1. 49 CFR 238.111 - Pre-revenue service acceptance testing plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... equipment on its system prior to placing such equipment in revenue service for the first time on its railroad to ensure the compatibility of the equipment with the railroad's operating system (including the track, and signal system). A description of such testing shall be retained by the railroad and made...

  2. Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Acceptance Test Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect

    Kent Norris

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of the Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) role in the evaluation of the SAPHIRE 8 Software Acceptance Test Plan is to assess the approach to be taken for intended testing activities. The plan typically identifies the items to be tested, the requirements being tested, the testing to be performed, test schedules, personnel requirements, reporting requirements, evaluation criteria, and any risks requiring contingency planning. The IV&V team began this endeavor after the software engineering and software development of SAPHIRE had already been in production.

  3. Cone penetrometer acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Boechler, G.N.

    1996-09-19

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents the results of acceptance test procedure WHC-SD-WM-ATR-151. Included in this report is a summary of the tests, the results and issues, the signature and sign- off ATP pages, and a summarized table of the specification vs. ATP section that satisfied the specification.

  4. PACS component testing: beta and acceptance testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honeyman-Buck, Janice C.; Frost, Meryll M.; Staab, Edward V.

    1997-05-01

    The functionality and performance expectations of all PACS components must be specified at the time of purchase and tested completely upon delivery to assure customer satisfaction and successful adoption of the new technology. This process may be more elaborate if the customer agrees to serve as a Beta test site for a new component or a new revision of an existing component.A carefully designed test plan will save time at installation, will allow the customer and vendor to agree on expectations, and will assure that the installation will proceed as planned. This paper describes the test procedure used at the University of Florida to accept each PACS component, either a commercial product, or one developed in house. A set of documents contain descriptions of the pre-installation environment, sets of studies to be used in the test, installation checklist, functional usage reports, subjective evaluations, and problem reporting forms. Training and user documentation is also reviewed and 'help lists' are created to help users perform the most common functions. Although details in the documents are changed to match the type of component being tested, the general form of the test remains the same. A formal procedure for testing the functionality and performance of new equipment can save time for both the vendor and the customer and, if specified at the time of purchase, can serve to document the expectations of the customer. Following these procedures will assure a successful installation and improve customer satisfaction.

  5. L-286 Acceptance Test Record

    SciTech Connect

    HARMON, B.C.

    2000-01-14

    This document provides a detailed account of how the acceptance testing was conducted for Project L-286, ''200E Area Sanitary Water Plant Effluent Stream Reduction''. The testing of the L-286 instrumentation system was conducted under the direct supervision

  6. Nitrogen trailer acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Kostelnik, A.J.

    1996-02-12

    This Acceptance Test Report documents compliance with the requirements of specification WHC-S-0249. The equipment was tested according to WHC-SD-WM-ATP-108 Rev.0. The equipment being tested is a portable contained nitrogen supply. The test was conducted at Norco`s facility.

  7. Expanding HIV testing and counselling into communities: Feasibility, acceptability, and effects of an integrated family planning/HTC service delivery model by Village Health Teams in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Brunie, Aurélie; Wamala-Mucheri, Patricia; Akol, Angela; Mercer, Sarah; Chen, Mario

    2016-10-01

    Improving HIV testing and counselling (HTC) requires a range of strategies. This article reports on HTC service delivery by Village Health Teams (VHTs) in Uganda in the context of a model integrating this new component into pre-existing family planning services. Eight health centres from matched pairs were randomly allocated to intervention or control. After being trained, 36 VHTs reporting to selected facilities in the intervention group started offering HTC along with family planning, while VHTs in the control group provided family planning only. Proficiency testing was conducted as external quality assurance. A survey of all 36 VHTs and 137 family planning clients in the intervention group and 119 clients in the control group and a review of record data were conducted after 10 months. Survey responses by VHTs and their clients in the intervention group demonstrate knowledge of counselling messages and safe testing. External quality assessment results provide additional evidence of competency. Eighty per cent of the family planning clients surveyed in the intervention group received an HIV test during the intervention; 27% of those were first-time testers. More clients had ever tested for HIV in the intervention group compared with the control; clients also retested more often. Findings indicate that this model is feasible and acceptable for expanding quality HTC into communities. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number [NCT02244398]. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. From requirements to acceptance tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Lionel; Pasquier, Helene

    1993-01-01

    From user requirements definition to accepted software system, the software project management wants to be sure that the system will meet the requirements. For the development of a telecommunication satellites Control Centre, C.N.E.S. has used new rules to make the use of tracing matrix easier. From Requirements to Acceptance Tests, each item of a document must have an identifier. A unique matrix traces the system and allows the tracking of the consequences of a change in the requirements. A tool has been developed, to import documents into a relational data base. Each record of the data base corresponds to an item of a document, the access key is the item identifier. Tracing matrix is also processed, providing automatically links between the different documents. It enables the reading on the same screen of traced items. For example one can read simultaneously the User Requirements items, the corresponding Software Requirements items and the Acceptance Tests.

  9. W-026, acceptance test report manipulator system

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, T.L.

    1997-04-15

    The purpose of the WRAP Manipulator System Acceptance Test Plan (ATP) is to verify that the 4 glovebox sets of WRAP manipulator components, including rail/carriage, slave arm, master controller and auxiliary equipment, meets the requirements of the functional segments of 14590 specification. The demonstration of performance elements of the ATP are performed as a part of the Assembly specifications. Manipulator integration is integrated in the performance testing of the gloveboxes. Each requirement of the Assembly specification will be carried out in conjunction with glovebox performance tests.

  10. 24 CFR 203.202 - Plan acceptability and acceptance renewal criteria-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUD acceptance of such change or modification, except that changes mandated by other applicable laws... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plan acceptability and acceptance... Underwriting Procedures Insured Ten-Year Protection Plans (plan) § 203.202 Plan acceptability and...

  11. Specific test and evaluation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, W.H.

    1998-03-20

    The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made to the 241-AX-B Valve Pit by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system`s performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a lower tier document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation Plan (TEP). Testing includes Validations and Verifications (e.g., Commercial Grade Item Dedication activities), Factory Acceptance Tests (FATs), installation tests and inspections, Construction Acceptance Tests (CATs), Acceptance Test Procedures (ATPs), Pre-Operational Test Procedures (POTPs), and Operational Test Procedures (OTPs). It should be noted that POTPs are not required for testing of the transfer line addition. The STEP will be utilized in conjunction with the TEP for verification and validation.

  12. Apollo experience report environmental acceptance testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laubach, C. H. M.

    1976-01-01

    Environmental acceptance testing was used extensively to screen selected spacecraft hardware for workmanship defects and manufacturing flaws. The minimum acceptance levels and durations and methods for their establishment are described. Component selection and test monitoring, as well as test implementation requirements, are included. Apollo spacecraft environmental acceptance test results are summarized, and recommendations for future programs are presented.

  13. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)

    SciTech Connect

    NNSA /NSO Waste Management Project

    2008-06-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal.

  14. Specific test and evaluation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, W.H.

    1997-12-09

    The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made to the 241-AN-A Valve Pit by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system`s performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a ``lower tier`` document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation Plan (TEP) This STEP encompasses all testing activities required to demonstrate compliance to the project design criteria as it relates to the modifications of the AN-A valve pit. The Project Design Specifications (PDS) identify the specific testing activities required for the Project. Testing includes Validations and Verifications (e.g., Commercial Grade Item Dedication activities), Factory Acceptance Tests (FATs), installation tests and inspections, Construction Acceptance Tests (CATs), Acceptance Test Procedures (ATPs), Pre-Operational Test Procedures (POTPs), and Operational Test Procedures (OTPs). It should be noted that POTPs are not required for testing of the modifications to the 241-AN-A Valve Pit. The STEP will be utilized in conjunction with the TEP for verification and validation.

  15. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, Waste Acceptance Criteria

    1999-05-01

    This document provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the Nevada Test Site.

  16. Nitrogen chiller acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Kostelnik, A.J.

    1995-03-07

    This document includes the inspection and testing requirements for the Nitrogen Chiller unit. The Chiller will support the Rotary Mode core Sampling System during the summer. The Chiller cools the Nitrogen Purge Gas that is used when drilling in tank wastes to cool the drill bit.

  17. Aircraft Assessment and Acceptance Testing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    tranamettre certainm de ces rapports au client lora- qu’ils ont trait A une caractldrimtique particulibre ou originals de lavion de type. -un examen critique...employment concepts) by personnel with the same qualifi- cations as those who will operate, maintain , and support the system when deployed. The policy on... maintainability to be expected when deployed. 5. Determine if the system is safe and ready for operational testing. 6. Accumulate and provide data to estimate the

  18. DACS upgrade acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Zuehlke, A.C.

    1994-12-21

    The DACS, which is housed in a trailer located just outside of the north fence at the SY tank farm, receives input signals from a variety of sensors located in and around the SY-101 tank. These sensors provide information such as: (1) tank vapor space and ventilation system H{sub 2} concentration; (2) tank waste temperature; (3) tank pressure; (4) waste density; (5) operating pump parameters such as speed, flow, rotational position, discharge pressure, and internal temperature; (6) strain (for major equipment); and (7) waste level. The output of these sensors is conditioned and transmitted to the DACS computers where these signals are displayed, recorded, and monitored for out-of-specification conditions. If abnormal conditions are detected, then, in certain situations, the DACS automatically generates alarms and causes the system to abort pump operations. The report documents testing performed per WHC-SD-WM-ATP-082. Rev. 0-13.

  19. Cone penetrometer moisture probe acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, G.A.

    1996-04-23

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents the results of WHC-SD-WM-ATP-146 (Prototype Cone Penetrometer Moisture Probe Acceptance Test Procedure) and WHC-SD-WM-ATP-145 (Cone Penetrometer Moisture Probe Acceptance Test Procedure). The master copy of WHC-SD-WM-ATP-145 can be found in Appendix A and the master copy of WHC-SD-WM-ATP-146 can be found in Appendix B. Also included with this report is a matrix showing design criteria of the cone penetrometer moisture probe and the verification method used (Appendix C).

  20. Generator acceptance test and inspection report

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, B.R.

    1997-07-24

    This Acceptance Test Report(ATR) is the completed testing and inspection of the new portable generator. The testing and inspection is to verify that the generator provided by the vendor meets the requirements of specification WHC-S-0252, Revision 2. Attached is various other documentation to support the inspection and testing.

  1. EPA proposes St. Regis Paper Co. Cleanup Plan, accepting comments

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    For Immediate Release No.16-OPA006 EPA proposes St. Regis Paper Co. Cleanup Plan; accepting comments CHICAGO (March 30, 2016) -- U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is issuing a proposed plan to clean up soil contamin

  2. Gas characterization system software acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Vo, C.V.

    1996-03-28

    This document details the results of software acceptance testing of gas characterization systems. The gas characterization systems will be used to monitor the vapor spaces of waste tanks known to contain measurable concentrations of flammable gases.

  3. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2005-07-01

    This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal.

  4. Acceptance Testing--Course Readiness Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaczka, Eugene; Singer, Frank

    For several semesters, the teaching staff of the administrative statistics course at The University of Massachusetts have engaged in "acceptance testing"--the screening of incoming students for some very basic skills with an open book, unlimited time, repeatable test. Test results demonstrated that successful completion of prerequisite…

  5. 46 CFR 50.25-10 - Acceptance of piping components by specific letter or approved plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... manufacture, and complete chemical and mechanical test results with an accepted material specification. (3...) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Acceptance of Material and Piping Components § 50.25-10 Acceptance... approved plan must do the following: (1) Submit an engineering type catalog or representative drawings...

  6. 46 CFR 50.25-10 - Acceptance of piping components by specific letter or approved plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... manufacture, and complete chemical and mechanical test results with an accepted material specification. (3...) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Acceptance of Material and Piping Components § 50.25-10 Acceptance... approved plan must do the following: (1) Submit an engineering type catalog or representative drawings...

  7. Test Methods for Acceptance Testing of Telescopes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    instrument. Although various interferometer configurations are used, they all basically operate on the same principle. The beam from a stable continuous...a Goerz with a nominal focal length of 92 inches. This lens has been recoated and carefully aligned to produce excellent image quality. The focus...test. Such requirements are necessary when the procuring agency has no facilities for performing adequate tests. It is also an excellent policy even

  8. Induction graphitizing furnace acceptance test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The induction furnace was designed to provide the controlled temperature and environment required for the post-cure, carbonization and graphitization processes for the fabrication of a fibrous graphite NERVA nozzle extension. The acceptance testing required six tests and a total operating time of 298 hrs. Low temperature mode operations, 120 to 850 C, were completed in one test run. High temperature mode operations, 120 to 2750 C, were completed during five tests.

  9. Void fraction instrument acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Pearce, K.L.

    1994-09-15

    This acceptance test procedure (ATP) was written to test the void fraction instrument (VFI) and verify that the unit is ready for field service. The procedure verifies that the mechanical and electrical features (not specifically addressed in the software ATP) and software alarms are operating as designed.

  10. W-087 Acceptance test procedure. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, A.W.

    1997-06-10

    This Acceptance Test Procedure/Operational Test Procedure (ATP/OTP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the Electrical/Instrumentation and Mechanical systems function as required by project criteria and to verify proper operation of the integrated system including the interlocks.

  11. Acceptance test report: Backup power system

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, D.B.

    1996-01-26

    Acceptance Test Report for construction functional testing of Project W-030 Backup Power System. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. Backup power includes a single 125 KW diesel generator, three 10-kva uninterruptible power supply units, and all necessary control.

  12. Validating new toxicology tests for regulatory acceptance.

    PubMed

    Zeiger, E; Stokes, W S

    1998-02-01

    Before a new or revised toxicology test is considered acceptable for safety evaluation of new substances, the test users and the industrial and regulatory decision makers must feel comfortable with it, and the decisions it supports. Comfort with, and the acceptance of, a new test comes after knowing that it has been validated for its proposed use. The validation process is designed to determine the operational characteristics of a test, that is, its reliability and relevance, in addition to its strengths and limitations. The reliability of a test is measured by its reproducibility. Its relevance is judged by its mechanistic relationship to the health effects of concern, and its ability to predict or identify those effects. The U.S. government has recently formed the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM) to work with federal agencies and test developers to coordinate the evaluation and adoption of new test methods. The ICCVAM will provide guidance to agencies and other stakeholders on criteria and processes for development, validation, and acceptance of tests; coordinate technical reviews of proposed new tests of interagency interest; facilitate information sharing among agencies; and serve as an interagency resource and communications link with parties outside of the federal government on matters of test method validation.

  13. Validating new toxicology tests for regulatory acceptance

    PubMed

    Zeiger; Stokes

    1998-02-01

    Before a new or revised toxicology test is considered acceptable for safety evaluation of new substances, the test users and the industrial and regulatory decision makers must feel comfortable with it, and the decisions it supports. Comfort with, and the acceptance of, a new test comes after knowing that it has been validated for its proposed use. The validation process is designed to determine the operational characteristics of a test, that is, its reliability and relevance, in addition to its strengths and limitations. The reliability of a test is measured by its reproducibility. Its relevance is judged by its mechanistic relationship to the health effects of concern, and its ability to predict or identify those effects. The U.S. government has recently formed the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM) to work with federal agencies and test developers to coordinate the evaluation and adoption of new test methods. The ICCVAM will provide guidance to agencies and other stakeholders on criteria and processes for development, validation, and acceptance of tests; coordinate technical reviews of proposed new tests of interagency interest; facilitate information sharing among agencies; and serve as an interagency resource and communications link with parties outside of the federal government on matters of test method validation. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  14. Cone penetrometer moisture probe acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, G.A.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the procedure to be used for acceptance testing of the Cone Penetrometer Moisture Probe (CPMP) system. The system includes the probe and detectors, the winch system, the NIM bin electronics, the thermistor, the laptop computer, Input/Output (I/O) interfaces, LabVIEW` application with automatic scanning features and the calibration chamber. This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) will cover the function of all the components, and demonstrate data flow through the system, winch functions, and detector and temperature sensor sub- system functions in accordance with the Functional Design Criteria (FDC) specified in WHC-SD-WM-FDC-047.

  15. Acceptance test report 2721-Z upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Keck, R.D.

    1998-02-03

    This test procedure provides instructions for acceptance testing of modifications to the 2721-Z diesel-generator system made by Project C-189. The modifications include (1) replacing the generator NUMA-LOGIC controller with connection to the PFP distributed control system (DCS), (2) replacing ATSI with a breaker switching scheme for 2736-ZB backup power and (3) providing a method for generator load and system testing.

  16. Retained gas sampler system acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, N.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-18

    Acceptance test results for the Retained Gas Sampler System (RGSS) obtained in the 306E laboratory are reported. The RGSS will be utilized to retrieve and analyze samples from the Hanford flammable gas watch-list tanks to determine the quantity and chemistry of gases confined within the waste.

  17. Development and application of an acceptance testing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendley, Rex D.; Noonan, Caroline H.; Hall, Kenneth R.

    1992-01-01

    The process of acceptance testing large software systems for NASA has been analyzed, and an empirical planning model of the process constructed. This model gives managers accurate predictions of the staffing needed, the productivity of a test team, and the rate at which the system will pass. Applying the model to a new system shows a high level of agreement between the model and actual performance. The model also gives managers an objective measure of process improvement.

  18. Intelligibility and Acceptability Testing for Speech Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-22

    speakers, 3 males and 3 females ; iistening crews include at least 12 listeners. There are 21 rating scales, 10 signal quality scales, 8 background quality ...34Preliminaries to Speech Analysis: the Distinctive Features and their Correlates ," Tech Rep. No. 13 Acoustics Laboratory, MIT. Kang, G.S. and L.J...highly reliable measures of speech intelligibility, and subjective acceptability tests can be used to evaluate voice quality . These tests are often

  19. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2005-10-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

  20. Honeywell Modular Automation System Acceptance Test Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    STUBBS, A.M.

    1999-09-21

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) is to verify the operability of the three new furnaces as controlled by the new Honeywell Modular Automation System (MAS). The Honeywell MAS is being installed in PFP to control the three thermal stabilization furnaces in glovebox HA-211. The ATP provides instructions for testing the configuration of the Honeywell MAS at the Plutonium Finishing Plant(PFP). The test will be a field test of the analog inputs, analog outputs, and software interlocks. The interlock test will check the digital input and outputs. Field equipment will not be connected forth is test. Simulated signals will be used to test thermocouple, limit switch, and vacuum pump inputs to the PLUMAS.

  1. 105K West Isolation Barrier Acceptance Test results

    SciTech Connect

    McCracken, K.J.; Irwin, J.J.

    1995-05-18

    The objective of this document is to report and interpret the findings of the isolation barrier acceptance tests performed in 105KW/100K. The tests were performed in accordance with the test plan and acceptance test procedure. The test report contains the test data. This document compares the test data against the criteria. A discussion of the leak rate analytical characterization describes how the flow characteristics flow rate will be determined using the test data from the test report. Two modes of water loss were considered; basin and/or discharge chute leakage, and evaporation. An initial test established baseline leakage data and instrumentation performance. Test 2 evaluated the sealing performance of the isolation barrier by inducing an 11 in. (27.9 cm) level differential across the barrier. The leak rate at this 11 in. (27.9 cm) level is extrapolated to the 16 ft. (4.9 m) level differential postulated in the DBE post seismic event. If the leak rate, adjusted for evaporation and basin leakage (determined from Test 1), is less than the SAR limit of 1,500 gph (5,680 lph) at a 16 ft (4.9 m) level differential, the barriers pass the acceptance test.

  2. Acceptance testing for PACS: from methodology to design to implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Brent J.; Huang, H. K.

    2004-04-01

    Acceptance Testing (AT) is a crucial step in the implementation process of a PACS within a clinical environment. AT determines whether the PACS is ready for clinical use and marks the official sign off of the PACS product. Most PACS vendors have Acceptance Testing (AT) plans, however, these plans do not provide a complete and robust evaluation of the full system. In addition, different sites will have different special requirements that vendor AT plans do not cover. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a protocol for AT design and present case studies of AT performed on clinical PACS. A methodology is presented that includes identifying testing components within PACS, quality assurance for both functionality and performance, and technical testing focusing on key single points-of-failure within the PACS product. Tools and resources that provide assistance in performing AT are discussed. In addition, implementation of the AT within the clinical environment and the overall implementation timeline of the PACS process are presented. Finally, case studies of actual AT of clinical PACS performed in the healthcare environment will be reviewed. The methodology for designing and implementing a robust AT plan for PACS was documented and has been used in PACS acceptance tests in several sites. This methodology can be applied to any PACS and can be used as a validation for the PACS product being acquired by radiology departments and hospitals. A methodology for AT design and implementation was presented that can be applied to future PACS installations. A robust AT plan for a PACS installation can increase both the utilization and satisfaction of a successful implementation of a PACS product that benefits both vendor and customer.

  3. Site acceptance test, W-030 MICON system

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, L.F., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-10

    Monitoring and control of the W-030 ventilation upgrade is provided by a distributed control system (DCS) furnished by MICON Corporation. After shipment to the Hanford Site, the site acceptance test (SAT) for this system was conducted in a laboratory environment over a six month period, involving four distinct phases and numerous hardware and software modifications required to correct test exceptions. The final results is a system which is not fully compliant with procurement specifications but is determined to meet minimum Project W-030 safety and functional requirements. A negotiated settlement was reached with the supplier to establish a `path forward` for system implementation. This report documents the `as-run` status of the SAT. The SAT was completed in August of 1995. It was later followed by comprehensive acceptance testing of the W-030 control-logic configuration software; results are documented in WHC-SD-W030-ATR-011. Further testing is reported as part of process system startup operational testing, performed after the MICON installation.

  4. Nevada test site waste acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This document provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the NTS. Review each section of this document. This document is not intended to include all of the requirements; rather, it is meant as a guide toward meeting the regulations. All references in this document should be observed to avoid omission of requirements on which acceptance or rejection of waste will be based. The Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document.

  5. Payload test philosophy. [JPL views on qualification/acceptance testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gindorf, T.

    1979-01-01

    The general philosophy of how JPL views payload qualification/acceptance testing for programs that are done either in-house or by contractors is described. Particular attention is given to mission risk classifications, preliminary critical design reviews, environmental design requirements, the thermal and dynamics development tests, and the flight spacecraft system test.

  6. Payload test philosophy. [JPL views on qualification/acceptance testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gindorf, T.

    1979-01-01

    The general philosophy of how JPL views payload qualification/acceptance testing for programs that are done either in-house or by contractors is described. Particular attention is given to mission risk classifications, preliminary critical design reviews, environmental design requirements, the thermal and dynamics development tests, and the flight spacecraft system test.

  7. Commissioning and initial acceptance tests for a commercial convolution dose calculation algorithm for radiotherapy treatment planning in comparison with Monte Carlo simulation and measurement.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Farhad; Mahdavi, Seyed Rabi; Mostaar, Ahmad; Motamedi, Mohsen

    2012-07-01

    In this study the commissioning of a dose calculation algorithm in a currently used treatment planning system was performed and the calculation accuracy of two available methods in the treatment planning system i.e., collapsed cone convolution (CCC) and equivalent tissue air ratio (ETAR) was verified in tissue heterogeneities. For this purpose an inhomogeneous phantom (IMRT thorax phantom) was used and dose curves obtained by the TPS (treatment planning system) were compared with experimental measurements and Monte Carlo (MCNP code) simulation. Dose measurements were performed by using EDR2 radiographic films within the phantom. Dose difference (DD) between experimental results and two calculation methods was obtained. Results indicate maximum difference of 12% in the lung and 3% in the bone tissue of the phantom between two methods and the CCC algorithm shows more accurate depth dose curves in tissue heterogeneities. Simulation results show the accurate dose estimation by MCNP4C in soft tissue region of the phantom and also better results than ETAR method in bone and lung tissues.

  8. AMSD Test Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Hadaway, James; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA MSFC is the lead center on the Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD) project and therefore has responsibility for testing each AMSD mirror to certify its compliance with the SOW. To accomplish this task it is necessary to accurately characterize each mirror's Radius of Curvature, Optical Axis Vertex Location, Conic Constant and Surface Figure Error. A key challenge is how to measure these parameters in the presence of gravity sag. This presentation will outline the MSFC/UAH team's proposed AMSD test plan.

  9. Acceptance Test Report for 241-U compressed air system

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, R.D.

    1994-10-20

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents the results of acceptance testing of a newly upgraded compressed air system at 241-U Farm. The system was installed and the test successfully performed under work package 2W-92-01027.

  10. LCLS Undulator Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-11-24

    This note presents the test plan for the LCLS undulators. The undulators will be measured and tuned in the Magnetic Measurement Facility at SLAC. The requirements for tuning are well established and are summarized. A brief discussion of the measurement equipment is presented. This is followed by the detailed test plan in which each step is enumerated. Finally, the measurement results and storage format are presented. The LCLS consists of 33 undulator segments, hereafter referred to as undulators, plus 6 spares and one reference undulator. The undulators must be tuned to meet strict requirements. They must also be fiducialized to allow alignment with other components. This note details the plan for tuning and fiducializing the LCLS undulators. The note begins with the list of tuning and fiducialization requirements. The laboratory in which the work will be performed and the relevant equipment is then briefly described. This is followed by a detailed test plan in which all the steps of tuning and fiducialization are enumerated.

  11. Acceptance test procedure for shuttle actuators simulator (elevon subsystem)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, J.

    1976-01-01

    The acceptance test procedure is described for the Lockheed Electronics Elevon Servoactuator Simulator to be used in the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory (SAIL). The intent of this acceptance test procedure is to comply with the technical Shuttle Actuators Simulator Requirements. Acceptance tests will be performed on each Elevon Servoactuator Simulator.

  12. MIT validation probe acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Escamilla, S.A.

    1994-08-23

    As part of the Multi-Functional Instrument Trees (MITs) a Validation Probe is being fabricated by Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL). The Validation Probe assembly is equipped with a Winch, depth counter, and a Resistance Temperature Detector (RTD) which will render a means for verifying the temperature readings of which will render a means for verifying the temperature readings of the MIT thermocouples. The purpose of this Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) is to provide verification that the Validation Probe functions properly and accordingly to LANL design and specification. This ATP will be used for all Validation Probes procured from LANL. The ATP consists of a receiving inspection, RTD ambient temperature; RTD electrical failure, RTD insulation resistance, and accurate depth counter operation inspections. The Validation Probe is composed of an intank probe, a cable and winching system, and a riser extension (probe guide) which bolts onto the MIT. The validation`s thermal sensor is an RTD that is housed in a 0.062 inch diameter, magnesium oxide fill, 316 stainless steel tube. The sheath configuration provides a means for spring loading the sensor firmly against the validation tube`s inner wall. A 45 pound cylindrical body is connected above the sheath and is used as a force to lower the probe into the tank. This cylindrical body also provides the means to interconnect both electrically and mechanically to the winch system which lowers the probe to a specified location within the validation tube located in the tank.

  13. Model test plan for HV pulse testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, W. G.; Schweickart, D. L.

    This pulse test plan will contain the configuration, operation and maintenance test requirements, equipment requirements, and procedures for high-voltage pulse testing of aerospace high power experimental and operational parts and equipment. The plan details peak voltage and test pulse rise time and fall time as they are applied to evaluate electrical insulation within electrical and electronic system components.

  14. 46 CFR 164.023-11 - Acceptance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Acceptance tests. 164.023-11 Section 164.023-11 Shipping...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Thread for Personal Flotation Devices § 164.023-11 Acceptance tests. (a) Performance testing. Manufacturers shall ensure that the performance tests described in § 164.023-7 (a) or...

  15. 46 CFR 164.023-11 - Acceptance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Acceptance tests. 164.023-11 Section 164.023-11 Shipping...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Thread for Personal Flotation Devices § 164.023-11 Acceptance tests. (a) Performance testing. Manufacturers shall ensure that the performance tests described in § 164.023-7 (a) or...

  16. Probabilistic Requirements (Partial) Verification Methods Best Practices Improvement. Variables Acceptance Sampling Calculators: Empirical Testing. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kenneth L.; White, K. Preston, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center was requested to improve on the Best Practices document produced for the NESC assessment, Verification of Probabilistic Requirements for the Constellation Program, by giving a recommended procedure for using acceptance sampling by variables techniques as an alternative to the potentially resource-intensive acceptance sampling by attributes method given in the document. In this paper, the results of empirical tests intended to assess the accuracy of acceptance sampling plan calculators implemented for six variable distributions are presented.

  17. Acceptability of self-testing for trichomoniasis increases with experience

    PubMed Central

    Huppert, Jill S; Hesse, Elizabeth A; Bernard, Molly A; Xiao, Yang; Huang, Bin; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Kahn, Jessica A

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Self-testing and point-of-care (POC) tests could improve the detection of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in adolescents. This study aimed to (1) validate a scale measuring acceptability of self-testing for trichomoniasis, (2) compare acceptability of self versus clinician testing using a POC test for trichomoniasis, (3) examine changes in acceptability after experience and review of results, and (4) examine predictors of acceptability. Methods Women (14–22 years old) performed the POC test and completed surveys assessing acceptability of self and clinician testing at baseline, after testing, and after discussion of results. Factor analysis examined scale structure; changes in mean scale scores were assessed with mixed models. Generalised linear models examined predictors of acceptability. Results Of 247 participants, 54 (22%) had a positive POC test for trichomoniasis. Factor analysis confirmed four acceptability subscales: trust of results, confidence, comfort, and effects of testing. At baseline, trust and confidence were higher, and comfort was lower, for clinician versus self testing. For self-testing, all subscale scores increased from baseline to after testing, and trust increased from after testing to after discussion. Trust of self and clinician results was not significantly different after discussion. A positive attitude towards home testing predicted higher self-test acceptability on all subscales. Tampon use was associated with increased self-test comfort at baseline. Concordance between self and clinician results predicted increased trust of self testing after discussion. Conclusions Many young women lack confidence in their ability to self-test for trichomoniasis. Allowing women to try a POC test and review the results with a clinician increases acceptability of self-testing. PMID:21795289

  18. 14 CFR 151.123 - Procedures: Offer; amendment; acceptance; advance planning agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures: Offer; amendment; acceptance... Planning and Engineering Proposals § 151.123 Procedures: Offer; amendment; acceptance; advance planning.... FAA's offer and the sponsor's acceptance constitute an advance planning grant agreement between...

  19. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria, December 2000

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-01

    This document establishes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office waste acceptance criteria. The waste acceptance criteria provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed waste for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites for storage or disposal.

  20. 105-KE Isolation Barrier Leak Rate Acceptance Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    McCracken, K.J.

    1995-06-14

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) contains the completed and signed Acceptance Procedure (ATP) for the 105-KE Isolations Barrier Leak Rate Test. The Test Engineer`s log, the completed sections of the ATP in the Appendix for Repeat Testing (Appendix K), the approved WHC J-7s (Appendix H), the data logger files (Appendices T and U), and the post test calibration checks (Appendix V) are included.

  1. Acceptance test report for the safety class shutdown system

    SciTech Connect

    Zuroff, W.F.

    1996-10-17

    This document provides the Acceptance Test Report for the successful testing of the Safety Shutdown Circuit. The test was done in accordance with the requirements that were defined in WHC-SD-WM-SCH-003, Interim Stabilization Safety Class Trip Circuit CGI Dedication Criteria. The actual test procedure document was contained in WHC-SD-WM-ATP-185, Acceptance Test Procedure for the Safety Class Shutdown System.

  2. Acceptance test procedure for High Pressure Water Jet System

    SciTech Connect

    Crystal, J.B.

    1995-05-30

    The overall objective of the acceptance test is to demonstrate a combined system. This includes associated tools and equipment necessary to perform cleaning in the 105 K East Basin (KE) for achieving optimum reduction in the level of contamination/dose rate on canisters prior to removal from the KE Basin and subsequent packaging for disposal. Acceptance tests shall include necessary hardware to achieve acceptance of the cleaning phase of canisters. This acceptance test procedure will define the acceptance testing criteria of the high pressure water jet cleaning fixture. The focus of this procedure will be to provide guidelines and instructions to control, evaluate and document the acceptance testing for cleaning effectiveness and method(s) of removing the contaminated surface layer from the canister presently identified in KE Basin. Additionally, the desired result of the acceptance test will be to deliver to K Basins a thoroughly tested and proven system for underwater decontamination and dose reduction. This report discusses the acceptance test procedure for the High Pressure Water Jet.

  3. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation & Control Skid V

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-08-14

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designated as ''V''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop.

  4. APU diaphragm testing. Test plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelley, Richard

    1992-01-01

    Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) fuel (hydrazine) tanks have had to be removed from the Columbia Shuttle (OV-102) because they have been in service for 11 years, which is the limit of their useful life. As part of an effort to determine whether the useful life of the fuel tanks can be extended, examination of the ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) diaphragm and the metal from one of the APU tanks is required. The JSC Propulsion and Power Division has requested White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) to examine the EPR diaphragm thoroughly and the metal casing generally from one tank. The objective is to examine the EPR diaphragm for signs of degradation that may limit the life of its function in the APU propellant tank. The metal casing will also be examined for signs of surface corrosion.

  5. Operator coil monitoring acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Erhart, M.F.

    1995-06-05

    The readiness of the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) to provide monitoring and control of the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) abort coils from the Master and RSS stations will be systematically tested during performance of this procedure. It should be noted that these are not physical abort coils but software coils controlled by the software`s ladder logic. The readiness of the DACS to properly interface with the ENRAF wire level gauge installed in the SY101 storage tank will also be tested. During this test, a verification of all abort coil indications will be conducted at the DACS Development Facility in the 306E Building by injecting an input signal for each DACS sensor that has an associated abort coil until the abort coil actuates, and then ensuring that the status of the abort coil indicated at the Master and RSS stations correct. Each abort coil will also be tested to ensure that the ``ENABLE`` and ``DISABLE`` controls from the Master and RSS stations function correctly, and only with the use of proper passwords.

  6. Operator coil monitoring Acceptance Test Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Erhart, M.F.

    1995-05-16

    The readiness of the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) to provide monitoring and control of the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) abort coils from the Master and RSS stations will be systematically tested during performance of this procedure. It should be noted that these are not physical abort coils but software coils controlled by the software`s ladder logic. The readiness of the DACS to properly interface with the ENRAF wire level gauge installed in the SY-101 storage tank will also be tested. During this test, a verification of all abort coil indications will be conducted at the DACS Development Facility in the 306E Building by injecting an input signal for each DACS sensor that has an associated abort coil until the abort coil actuates, and then ensuring that the status of the abort coil indicated at the Master and RSS stations is correct. Each abort coil will also be tested to ensure that the ``ENABLE`` and ``DISABLE`` controls from the Master and RSS stations function correctly, and only with the use of proper passwords.

  7. Acceptance test report for core sample trucks 3 and 4

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, J.E.

    1996-04-10

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Report is to provide documentation for the acceptance testing of the rotary mode core sample trucks 3 and 4, designated as HO-68K-4600 and HO-68K-4647, respectively. This report conforms to the guidelines established in WHC-IP-1026, ``Engineering Practice Guidelines,`` Appendix M, ``Acceptance Test Procedures and Reports.`` Rotary mode core sample trucks 3 and 4 were based upon the design of the second core sample truck (HO-68K-4345) which was constructed to implement rotary mode sampling of the waste tanks at Hanford. Successful completion of acceptance testing on June 30, 1995 verified that all design requirements were met. This report is divided into four sections, beginning with general information. Acceptance testing was performed on trucks 3 and 4 during the months of March through June, 1995. All testing was performed at the ``Rock Slinger`` test site in the 200 West area. The sequence of testing was determined by equipment availability, and the initial revision of the Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) was used for both trucks. Testing was directed by ICF-KH, with the support of WHC Characterization Equipment Engineering and Characterization Project Operations. Testing was completed per the ATP without discrepancies or deviations, except as noted.

  8. 10 CFR 36.41 - Construction monitoring and acceptance testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Construction monitoring and acceptance testing. 36.41 Section 36.41 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Design and Performance Requirements for Irradiators § 36.41 Construction monitoring and acceptance...

  9. GMS/DACS interface acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Zuehlke, A.C.

    1994-10-10

    The DACS, which is housed in a trailer located just outside of the north fence at the SY tank farm, receives input signals from a variety of sensors located in and around the SY-101 tank. These sensors provide information such as: tank vapor space and ventilation system H{sub 2} concentration; tank waste temperature; tank pressure; waste density; operating pump parameters such as speed, flow, rotational position, discharge pressure, and internal temperature; strain (for major equipment); and waste level. The output of these sensors is conditioned and transmitted to the DACS computers where these signals are displayed, recorded, and monitored for out-of-specification conditions. If abnormal conditions are detected, then, in certain situations, the DACS automatically generates alarms and causes the system to abort pump operations. The portions of the system to be tested include: new RGA5 gas monitor; existing gas chromatographs; FTIR; B and K (Photo) NH{sub 3} equipment; any new or changed Genesis screens; and I/O Drop 13.

  10. The Murmansk Initiative - RF: Acceptance Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, C.; Wester, D. W.; Dyer, R. S.; Soerlie, A. A.; Moller, B.; Barnes, E.

    2002-02-26

    The Murmansk Initiative-RF (MI) was conceived to provide the Russian Federation (RF) with the capacity to manage low-level liquid radioactive waste (LLRW) and comply with the requirements of the London Convention that prohibit ocean dumping. The trilateral project among Norway, the RF, and the United States of America (U.S.) began in 1994 and was the first to utilize exclusively Russian subcontractors to upgrade and expand an existing LLRW treatment plant on the premises of RTP Atomflot in Murmansk, Russia. The project moved quickly through the design phase. Progress during the construction phase was somewhat slower because of difficulties with acquisition of hardware, inexperience with automated instrumentation and control equipment, and unexpected design changes in the cementation unit. The project advanced into the test-operation phase, which is currently underway, in June 2001. Initial runs with liquid waste have revealed that procedures for unloading spent ion-exchange sorbents could be improved and that sludges formed during removal of alkaline-earth metals should be compacted in order for the facility to operate at its full potential. Resolution of these issues is expected within the next few months.

  11. Factory Acceptance Test Procedure Westinghouse 100 ton Hydraulic Trailer

    SciTech Connect

    Aftanas, B.L.

    1994-11-16

    This Factory Acceptance Test Procedure (FAT) is for the Westinghouse 100 Ton Hydraulic Trailer. The trailer will be used for the removal of the 101-SY pump. This procedure includes: safety check and safety procedures; pre-operation check out; startup; leveling trailer; functional/proofload test; proofload testing; and rolling load test.

  12. Acceptance Test Procedure for Cathodic Protection, Rectifier 11

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, F.T.

    1995-04-28

    This Acceptance Test Procedure for Project W-030 Cathodic Protection Installation, 241-AY and 241-AZ Tank Farm Ventilation Upgrade, has been prepared to demonstrate that the cathodic protection system functions as required by project criteria.

  13. Product acceptance environmental and destructive testing for reliability.

    SciTech Connect

    Dvorack, Michael A.; Kerschen, Thomas J.; Collins, Elmer W.

    2007-08-01

    To determine whether a component is meeting its reliability requirement during production, acceptance sampling is employed in which selected units coming off the production line are subjected to additional environmental and/or destructive tests that are within the normal environment space to which the component is expected to be exposed throughout its life in the Stockpile. This report describes what these tests are and how they are scored for reliability purposes. The roles of screens, Engineering Use Only tests, and next assembly product acceptance testing are also discussed, along with both the advantages and disadvantages of environmental and destructive testing.

  14. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-02-17

    In June 28, 1997, the Low Level Waste (LLW) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13031A-85. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, lidder/delidder device and the supercompactor were also conducted. As of November 24, 1997, 2 of the 131 test exceptions that affect the LLW glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test Exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

  15. W-026, transuranic waste (TRU) glovebox acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-03-11

    On July 18, 1997, the Transuranic (TRU) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13021A-86. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, sorting table, lidder/delidder device and the TRU empty drum compactor were also conducted. As of February 25, 1998, 10 of the 102 test exceptions that affect the TRU glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

  16. Test plan for Simulated Saltcake Retrieval Test

    SciTech Connect

    HERTING, D.L.

    2000-07-19

    This document describes the plan for a bench-scale laboratory test to evaluate physical and chemical parameters associated with dissolution of a simulated saltcake waste. Parameters to be measured during the test include water addition rate, liquid drainage rate, visual observations of flow patterns, physical appearance and volume of dissolving saltcake, chemical composition of drained liquid, and polarized light microscopy analysis of solids.

  17. Instrumentation Cables Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Muna, Alice Baca; LaFleur, Chris Bensdotter

    2016-10-01

    A fire at a nuclear power plant (NPP) has the potential to damage structures, systems, and components important to safety, if not promptly detected and suppressed. At Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Plant on March 22, 1975, a fire in the reactor building damaged electrical power and control systems. Damage to instrumentation cables impeded the function of both normal and standby reactor coolant systems, and degraded the operators’ plant monitoring capability. This event resulted in additional NRC involvement with utilities to ensure that NPPs are properly protected from fire as intended by the NRC principle design criteria (i.e., general design criteria 3, Fire Protection). Current guidance and methods for both deterministic and performance based approaches typically make conservative (bounding) assumptions regarding the fire-induced failure modes of instrumentation cables and those failure modes effects on component and system response. Numerous fire testing programs have been conducted in the past to evaluate the failure modes and effects of electrical cables exposed to severe thermal conditions. However, that testing has primarily focused on control circuits with only a limited number of tests performed on instrumentation circuits. In 2001, the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) conducted a series of cable fire tests designed to address specific aspects of the cable failure and circuit fault issues of concern1. The NRC was invited to observe and participate in that program. The NRC sponsored Sandia National Laboratories to support this participation, whom among other things, added a 4-20 mA instrumentation circuit and instrumentation cabling to six of the tests. Although limited, one insight drawn from those instrumentation circuits tests was that the failure characteristics appeared to depend on the cable insulation material. The results showed that for thermoset insulated cables, the instrument reading tended to drift

  18. Biodiesel Test Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    operational.  Materials testing is conducted to determine the compatibility of the boat and engine fuel system fuel- wetted parts with B100. Alion...R&DC | G. W. Johnson, et al. Public | July 2014 equipment manufacturer (OEM), Cummins, performed a similar audit of fuel- wetted engine components...onboard fuel requirement. A waiver will avoid the need to have fuel delivered at the completion of each mission to top off the tanks; instead the fuel

  19. Evaluation and certification of heater assemblies developed for thermal vacuum acceptance testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    Preparation of Rockwell International's Thermal Vacuum Chamber for acceptance testing of a mass produced satellite required the development of unique quartz lamp and hot wire heater assemblies. Testing performed on the basic elements of these heaters is described, as is the final testing done to certify that the heater assemblies meet the thermal requirements for acceptance testing. The methods and procedures of thermal mapping used during the development and final certification of these heater assemblies are presented. The absence of a definitive standard for determining flux distribution and heating boundaries for heaters of this type required the development of a test plan incorporating several thermal mapping techniques. These techniques include the development of heat flux using a multiple calorimeter array for both vacuum and ambient test conditions, and a photographic method for detecting heating boundaries. The test plan and thermal mapping techniques are discussed.

  20. Vendor System Vulnerability Testing Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Davidson

    2005-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prepared this generic test plan to provide clients (vendors, end users, program sponsors, etc.) with a sense of the scope and depth of vulnerability testing performed at the INL’s Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Test Bed and to serve as an example of such a plan. Although this test plan specifically addresses vulnerability testing of systems applied to the energy sector (electric/power transmission and distribution and oil and gas systems), it is generic enough to be applied to control systems used in other critical infrastructures such as the transportation sector, water/waste water sector, or hazardous chemical production facilities. The SCADA Test Bed is established at the INL as a testing environment to evaluate the security vulnerabilities of SCADA systems, energy management systems (EMS), and distributed control systems. It now supports multiple programs sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, other government agencies, and private sector clients. This particular test plan applies to testing conducted on a SCADA/EMS provided by a vendor. Before performing detailed vulnerability testing of a SCADA/EMS, an as delivered baseline examination of the system is conducted, to establish a starting point for all-subsequent testing. The series of baseline tests document factory delivered defaults, system configuration, and potential configuration changes to aid in the development of a security plan for in depth vulnerability testing. The baseline test document is provided to the System Provider,a who evaluates the baseline report and provides recommendations to the system configuration to enhance the security profile of the baseline system. Vulnerability testing is then conducted at the SCADA Test Bed, which provides an in-depth security analysis of the Vendor’s system.b a. The term System Provider replaces the name of the company/organization providing the system

  1. ISOLOK VALVE ACCEPTANCE TESTING FOR DWPF SME SAMPLING PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T.; Hera, K.; Coleman, C.; Jones, M.; Wiedenman, B.

    2011-12-05

    Evaluation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. Of the opportunities, a focus area related to optimizing the equipment and efficiency of the sample turnaround time for DWPF Analytical Laboratory was identified. The Mechanical Systems & Custom Equipment Development (MS&CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluated the possibility of using an Isolok{reg_sign} sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard{reg_sign} valve for taking process samples. Previous viability testing was conducted with favorable results using the Isolok sampler and reported in SRNL-STI-2010-00749 (1). This task has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time and decrease CPC cycle time. This report summarizes the results from acceptance testing which was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 (2) and which was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNL-RP-2011-00145 (3). The Isolok to be tested is the same model which was tested, qualified, and installed in the Sludge Receipt Adjustment Tank (SRAT) sample system. RW-0333P QA requirements apply to this task. This task was to qualify the Isolok sampler for use in the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) sampling process. The Hydragard, which is the current baseline sampling method, was used for comparison to the Isolok sampling data. The Isolok sampler is an air powered grab sampler used to 'pull' a sample volume from a process line. The operation of the sampler is shown in Figure 1. The image on the left shows the Isolok's spool extended into the process line and the image on the right shows the sampler retracted and then dispensing the liquid into the sampling container. To determine tank homogeneity, a Coliwasa sampler was used to grab samples at a high and low location within the mixing tank. Data from the two locations

  2. Digface characterization test plan (remote testing)

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, K.; Hyde, R.; Allen, S.

    1993-08-01

    The objective of the Digface Characterization (DFC) Remote Testing project is to remotely deploy a sensor head (Mini-Lab) across a digface to determine if it can characterize the contents below the surface. The purpose of this project is to provide a robotics technology that allows removal of workers from hazards, increases speed of operations, and reduces life cycle costs compared to alternate methods and technologies. The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is funding the demonstration, testing, and evaluation of DFC. This document describes the test plan for the DFC remote deployment demonstration for the BWID. The purposes of the test plan are to establish test parameters so that the demonstration results are deemed useful and usable and perform the demonstration in a safe manner and within all regulatory requirements.

  3. Avionics test bed development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, L. H.; Parks, J. M.; Murdock, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    The plan is for a facility for the early investigation and evaluation of new concepts for the control of large space structures, orbiter attached flex body experiments, and orbiter enhancements. This plan outlines a distributed data processing facility that will utilize the current JSC laboratory resources for the test bed development. The future studies required for implementation, the management system for project control, and the baseline system configuration are described.

  4. Acceptance test report for the L-070 project

    SciTech Connect

    Loll, C.M., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-10

    This document contains the acceptance test report for the mechanical equipment and instrumentation installed per the L-070 project. The systems that were tested were the pump controls for the 3906 Lift Station and the 350-A Lift Station. The verification of an alarm signal installed between the 3906 lift station and the 340 Facility (3707F Bldg.) was also performed.

  5. Acceptance test report, plutonium finishing plant life safety upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, S.G.

    1994-12-02

    This acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that modifications to the Fir Protection systems function as required by project criteria. The ATP will test the Fire Alarm Control Panels, Flow Alarm Pressure Switch, Heat Detectors, Smoke Detectors, Flow Switches, Manual Pull Stations, and Gong/Door By Pass Switches.

  6. Acceptance test report for portable exhauster POR-007/Skid E

    SciTech Connect

    Kriskovich, J.R.

    1998-07-24

    This document describes Acceptance Testing performed on Portable Exhauster POR-007/Skid E. It includes measurements of bearing vibration levels, pressure decay testing, programmable logic controller interlocks, high vacuum, flow and pressure control functional testing. The purpose of Acceptance testing documented by this report was to demonstrate compliance of the exhausters with the performance criteria established within HNF-0490, Rev. 1 following a repair and upgrade effort at Hanford. In addition, data obtained during this testing is required for the resolution of outstanding Non-conformance Reports (NCR), and finally, to demonstrate the functionality of the associated software for the pressure control and high vacuum exhauster operating modes provided for by W-320. Additional testing not required by the ATP was also performed to assist in the disposition and close out of receiving inspection report and for application design information (system curve). Results of this testing are also captured within this document.

  7. Acceptance test report for the Westinghouse 100 ton hydraulic trailer

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, R.A.

    1995-03-06

    The SY-101 Equipment Removal System 100 Ton Hydraulic Trailer was designed and built by KAMP Systems, Inc. Performance of the Acceptance Test Procedure at KAMP`s facility in Ontario, California (termed Phase 1 in this report) was interrupted by discrepancies noted with the main hydraulic cylinder. The main cylinder was removed and sent to REMCO for repair while the trailer was sent to Lampson`s facility in Pasco, Washington. The Acceptance Test Procedure was modified and performance resumed at Lampson (termed Phase 2 in this report) after receipt of the repaired cylinder. At the successful conclusion of Phase 2 testing the trailer was accepted as meeting all the performance criteria specified.

  8. Regulatory perspectives on acceptability testing of dosage forms in children.

    PubMed

    Kozarewicz, Piotr

    2014-08-05

    Current knowledge about the age-appropriateness of different dosage forms is still fragmented or limited. Applicants are asked to demonstrate that the target age group(s) can manage the dosage form or propose an alternative strategy. However, questions remain about how far the applicant must go and what percentage of patients must find the strategy 'acceptable'. The aim of this overview is to provide an update on current thinking and understanding of the problem, and discuss issues relating to the acceptability testing. This overview should be considered as means to start a wider discussion which hopefully will result in a harmonised, globally acceptable approach for confirmation of the acceptability in the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. 14 CFR 151.123 - Procedures: Offer; amendment; acceptance; advance planning agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Planning and Engineering Proposals § 151.123 Procedures: Offer; amendment; acceptance; advance planning... to begin airport development within three years after the date of sponsor's written acceptance of a grant offer. The sponsor's intention must be evidenced by an appropriate written statement in the...

  10. Project W-320 acceptance test report for AY-farm electrical distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Bevins, R.R.

    1998-04-02

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the AY-Farm Electrical Distribution System functions as required by the design criteria. This test is divided into three parts to support the planned construction schedule; Section 8 tests Mini-Power Pane AY102-PPI and the EES; Section 9 tests the SSS support systems; Section 10 tests the SSS and the Multi-Pak Group Control Panel. This test does not include the operation of end-use components (loads) supplied from the distribution system. Tests of the end-use components (loads) will be performed by other W-320 ATPs.

  11. How to pass a sensor acceptance test: using the gap between acceptance criteria and operational performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijl, Piet

    2016-10-01

    When acquiring a new imaging system and operational task performance is a critical factor for success, it is necessary to specify minimum acceptance requirements that need to be met using a sensor performance model and/or performance tests. Currently, there exist a variety of models and test from different origin (defense, security, road safety, optometry) and they all do different predictions. This study reviews a number of frequently used methods and shows the effects that small changes in procedure or threshold criteria can have on the outcome of a test. For example, a system may meet the acceptance requirements but not satisfy the needs for the operational task, or the choice of test may determine the rank order of candidate sensors. The goal of the paper is to make people aware of the pitfalls associated with the acquisition process, by i) illustrating potential tricks to have a system accepted that is actually not suited for the operational task, and ii) providing tips to avoid this unwanted situation.

  12. ENRAF Series 854 Advanced Technology Gauge (ATG) Acceptance Test Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    HUBER, J.H.

    1999-08-17

    This procedure provides acceptance testing for Enraf Series 854 level gauges used to monitor levels in Hanford Waste Storage Tanks. The test will verify that the gauge functions according to the manufacturer's instructions and specifications and is properly setup prior to being delivered to the tank farm area. This ATP does not set up the gauge for any specific tank, but is generalized to permit testing the gauge prior to installation package preparation.

  13. Acceptance test report for the AY-102 ENRAF densitometer

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, J.H.

    1998-03-23

    On February 11, 1998, the AY-1 02, Riser 15E ENRAF Densitometer was acceptance tested per HNF-SD-WM-ATP-077. The test was performed at the Department of Energy`s Hanford Site, 200 East Area, building MO-407. The test validated the functionality of the Densitometer for use by project W-320, C-1 06 Retrieval. The purpose of the test procedure was to verify the functionality of the ENRAF Series 854 ATG densitometer. Typically, all ENRAF Series 854 ATGs are acceptance tested before transport to the field. The ATP, as performed for level gauges, sets default program values within the gauge and verifies the gauge`s force transducer calibration.

  14. Test Planning Approach and Lessons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Douglas A.; Brown, Kendall K.

    2004-01-01

    As NASA began technology risk reduction activities and planning for the next generation launch vehicle under the Space Launch Initiative (SLI), now the Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) Program, a review of past large liquid rocket engine development programs was performed. The intent of the review was to identify any significant lessons from the development testing programs that could be applied to current and future engine development programs. Because the primary prototype engine in design at the time of this study was the Boeing-Rocketdyne RS-84, the study was slightly biased towards LOX/RP-1 liquid propellant engines. However, the significant lessons identified are universal. It is anticipated that these lessons will serve as a reference for test planning in the Engine Systems Group at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Towards the end of F-1 and J-2 engine development testing, NASA/MSFC asked Rocketdyne to review those test programs. The result was a document titled, Study to Accelerate Development by Test of a Rocket Engine (R-8099). The "intent (of this study) is to apply this thinking and learning to more efficiently develop rocket engines to high reliability with improved cost effectivenes" Additionally, several other engine programs were reviewed - such as SSME, NSTS, STME, MC-1, and RS-83- to support or refute the R-8099. R-8099 revealed two primary lessons for test planning, which were supported by the other engine development programs. First, engine development programs can benefit from arranging the test program for engine system testing as early as feasible. The best test for determining environments is at the system level, the closest to the operational flight environment. Secondly, the component testing, which tends to be elaborate, should instead be geared towards reducing risk to enable system test. Technical risk can be reduced at the component level, but the design can only be truly verified and validated after engine system testing.

  15. Remote Excavation System test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, S.; Hyde, R.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Office of Technology Development (OTD) established the Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP) to integrate robotic development activities on a national basis; provide needs-oriented, timely, and economical robotics technology to support environmental and waste operations activities at Department of Energy (DOE) sites; and provide the focus and direction for the near term (less than five years) and guidance for the tong-term (five to twenty years) research and development efforts for site-specific problems. The RTDP consists of several programs including the Buried Waste Robotics Program (BWRP), which addresses remote buried waste applications. The Remote Excavation System (RES) was developed under the RTDP to provide a safer method of excavating hazardous materials for both the DOE and the Department of Defense (DOD). The excavator, initially developed by the DOD as a manually-operated small excavator, has been modified for teleoperation with joint funding from the BWRP and the DOD. The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) and the Uranium Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) are funding the demonstration, testing, and evaluation of the RES covered in this test plan. This document covers testing both at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), as funded by BWID and USID. This document describes the tests planned for the RES demonstration for the BWRP. The purposes of the test plan are (1) to establish test parameters to ensure that the demonstration results are deemed useful and usable and (2) to demonstrate performance in a safe manner within all regulatory requirements.

  16. Standard-D hydrogen monitoring system acceptance test

    SciTech Connect

    Lott, D.T., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-24

    This document details the results of the field Acceptance Testing of the Standard-D Hydrogen Monitoring System on the waste tank exhaust stacks in 241-AW and 241-AN tank farm. The monitors will be used to measure hydrogen and ammonia from the exhaust stacks.

  17. Gas characterization system 241-AW-101 field acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, T.C.

    1996-03-01

    This document details the field Acceptance Testing of a gas characterization system being installed on waste tank 241-AW-101. The gas characterization systems will be used to monitor the vapor spaces of waste tanks known to contain measurable concentrations of flammable gases.

  18. 46 CFR 164.013-5 - Acceptance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Acceptance tests. 164.013-5 Section 164.013-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Foam, Unicellular Polyethylene (Buoyant, Slab, Slitted Trigonal Pattern...

  19. 46 CFR 164.013-5 - Acceptance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Acceptance tests. 164.013-5 Section 164.013-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Foam, Unicellular Polyethylene (Buoyant, Slab, Slitted Trigonal...

  20. 46 CFR 164.013-5 - Acceptance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Acceptance tests. 164.013-5 Section 164.013-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Foam, Unicellular Polyethylene (Buoyant, Slab, Slitted Trigonal...

  1. 46 CFR 164.013-5 - Acceptance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Acceptance tests. 164.013-5 Section 164.013-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Foam, Unicellular Polyethylene (Buoyant, Slab, Slitted Trigonal...

  2. 46 CFR 164.013-5 - Acceptance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Acceptance tests. 164.013-5 Section 164.013-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Foam, Unicellular Polyethylene (Buoyant, Slab, Slitted Trigonal...

  3. SEP BIMOD variable conductance heat pipes acceptance and characterization tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemminger, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    A series of six heat pipes, similar in design to those flown on the Comunications Technology Satellite Hermes, for use in a prototype Solar Electric Propulsion BIMOD thrust module are evaluated. The results of acceptance and characterization tests performed on the heat pipe subassemble are reported. The performance of all the heat pipes met, or exceeded, design specifications.

  4. Waste feed delivery test and evaluation plan

    SciTech Connect

    O'TOOLE, S.M.

    1999-09-30

    This plan documents the Waste Feed Delivery Program test and evaluation planning and implementation approach. The purpose of this document is to define and communicate the Waste Feed Delivery Program Test and Evaluation scope, objectives, planning and implementation approach.

  5. Automatically generated acceptance test: A software reliability experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Protzel, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    This study presents results of a software reliability experiment investigating the feasibility of a new error detection method. The method can be used as an acceptance test and is solely based on empirical data about the behavior of internal states of a program. The experimental design uses the existing environment of a multi-version experiment previously conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center, in which the launch interceptor problem is used as a model. This allows the controlled experimental investigation of versions with well-known single and multiple faults, and the availability of an oracle permits the determination of the error detection performance of the test. Fault interaction phenomena are observed that have an amplifying effect on the number of error occurrences. Preliminary results indicate that all faults examined so far are detected by the acceptance test. This shows promise for further investigations, and for the employment of this test method on other applications.

  6. Acceptability of HIV self-testing: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Krause, Janne; Subklew-Sehume, Friederike; Kenyon, Chris; Colebunders, Robert

    2013-08-08

    The uptake of HIV testing and counselling services remains low in risk groups around the world. Fear of stigmatisation, discrimination and breach of confidentiality results in low service usage among risk groups. HIV self-testing (HST) is a confidential HIV testing option that enables people to find out their status in the privacy of their homes. We evaluated the acceptability of HST and the benefits and challenges linked to the introduction of HST. A literature review was conducted on the acceptability of HST in projects in which HST was offered to study participants. Besides acceptability rates of HST, accuracy rates of self-testing, referral rates of HIV-positive individuals into medical care, disclosure rates and rates of first-time testers were assessed. In addition, the utilisation rate of a telephone hotline for counselling issues and clients` attitudes towards HST were extracted. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria (HST had been offered effectively to study participants and had been administered by participants themselves) and demonstrated universally high acceptability of HST among study populations. Studies included populations from resource poor settings (Kenya and Malawi) and from high-income countries (USA, Spain and Singapore). The majority of study participants were able to perform HST accurately with no or little support from trained staff. Participants appreciated the confidentiality and privacy but felt that the provision of adequate counselling services was inadequate. The review demonstrates that HST is an acceptable testing alternative for risk groups and can be performed accurately by the majority of self-testers. Clients especially value the privacy and confidentiality of HST. Linkage to counselling as well as to treatment and care services remain major challenges.

  7. Redstone Test Stand Accepted Into National Register of Historical Places

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    On October 02, 1976, Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Redstone test stand was received into the National Registry of Historical Places. Photographed in front of the Redstone test stand are Dr. William R. Lucas, MSFC Center Director from June 15, 1974 until July 3, 1986, as he is accepting a certificate of registration from Madison County Commission Chairman James Record, and Huntsville architect Harvie Jones.

  8. PUREX (SAMCONS) uninterruptible power supply (UPS) acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Blackaby, W.B.

    1997-09-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure for the PUREX Surveillance and Monitoring and Control System (SAMCONS) Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) provides for testing and verifying the proper operation of the control panel alarms and trouble functions, the 6roper functioning of the AC inverter, ability of the battery supply to maintain the SAMCONS load for a minimum of two hours , and proper interaction with the SAMCONS Video graphic displays for alarm displays.

  9. Recommended Acceptance Testing Procedure for Network Enabled Training Simulators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    interoperability. However, at present there is no uniform testing procedure. This report details a recommended acceptance testing procedure for network...with a Bachelor of Applied Science, majoring in computer science. Mr Ross joined the Air Operations Division in 2003, and works in the Advanced...Distributed Simulation Laboratory; researching communications and interoperability issues in the area of Advanced Distributed Simulation. Mr Ross is a

  10. Proposed Performance Evaluation Acceptance Test for Heat Recovery Incinerators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    1985). D 3176, Method for Ultimate Analysis of Coal and Coke (1984). D 3180, Method for Calculating Coal and Coke Analyses from As-Determined to Differ...or approval of the use of such commercial products . The findings of this report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position...such as coal or oil fired boilers, no standard performance test is available to assess field performance or to use as an acceptance test for the HRI

  11. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA, JUNE 2006

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2006-06-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

  12. Startup of the FFTF sodium cooled reactor. [Acceptance Test Program

    SciTech Connect

    Redekopp, R.D.; Umek, A.M.

    1981-03-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located on the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington, is a 3 Loop 400 MW(t) sodium cooled fast reactor with a primary mission to test fuels and materials for development of the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR). Bringing FFTF to a condition to accomplish this mission is the goal of the Acceptance Test Program (ATP). This program was the mechanism for achieving startup of the FFTF. Highlights of the ATP involving the system inerting, liquid metal and inerted cell testing and initial ascent to full power are discussed.

  13. Avionics test bed development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, L. H.; Parks, J. M.; Murdock, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    A development plan for a proposed avionics test bed facility for the early investigation and evaluation of new concepts for the control of large space structures, orbiter attached flex body experiments, and orbiter enhancements is presented. A distributed data processing facility that utilizes the current laboratory resources for the test bed development is outlined. Future studies required for implementation, the management system for project control, and the baseline system configuration are defined. A background analysis of the specific hardware system for the preliminary baseline avionics test bed system is included.

  14. Regional planning acceptance by residents of Northern New York, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrow, Patricia; Gaige, Barbara; Harris, Glenn; Kennedy, Joyce; King, Leslie; Raymond, William; Werbitsky, Darrin

    1984-01-01

    This study compares the effectiveness of two regional planning agencies in terms of public support for various planning activities. The Adirondack Park Agency and the Temporary State Commission on Tug Hill have fundamentally different approaches to planning. The Adirondack Park Agency has implemented a restrictive regulatory program with little citizen participation by Adirondack residents. The Tug Hill Commission has implemented an advisory and coordinating program with an emphasis on public input. Residents of two towns in each region were surveyed to determine environmental concern and support for regional planning activities. Respondents from both regions favored a planning agency that incorporates citizen input; controls air, water, and toxic waste pollution; and develops recreation areas. They strongly opposed an agency that regulates private land-use. Basic demographic characteristics and levels of environmental concern were similar in all four towns, but receptivity to various planning activities was consistently greater among residents of the Tug Hill Region. Paired comparisons of the four towns demonstrated no differences between towns of the same region and significant differences between towns of different regions. Public support for regional planning is greater in the Tug Hill Region than in the Adirondack Park.

  15. 40 CFR 60.1075 - When must I accept comments on the materials separation plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... materials separation plan? 60.1075 Section 60.1075 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of... Requirements: Materials Separation Plan § 60.1075 When must I accept comments on the materials separation plan...

  16. 40 CFR 60.1075 - When must I accept comments on the materials separation plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... materials separation plan? 60.1075 Section 60.1075 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of... Requirements: Materials Separation Plan § 60.1075 When must I accept comments on the materials separation plan...

  17. 40 CFR 60.1075 - When must I accept comments on the materials separation plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... materials separation plan? 60.1075 Section 60.1075 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of... Requirements: Materials Separation Plan § 60.1075 When must I accept comments on the materials separation plan...

  18. 40 CFR 60.1075 - When must I accept comments on the materials separation plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... materials separation plan? 60.1075 Section 60.1075 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of... Requirements: Materials Separation Plan § 60.1075 When must I accept comments on the materials separation plan...

  19. 40 CFR 60.1075 - When must I accept comments on the materials separation plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... materials separation plan? 60.1075 Section 60.1075 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of... Requirements: Materials Separation Plan § 60.1075 When must I accept comments on the materials separation plan...

  20. Limits of acceptable change planning in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness: 1985 to 1997 (FIDL)

    Treesearch

    Dan Ritter

    1997-01-01

    In 1985 the Forest Supervisors and staff of the Bitterroot, Clearwater, and Nez Perce National Forests met and agreed to an action plan for implementing a Limits of Acceptable Change (LAC) planning process for the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness (SBW). The process, which was to include a citizens task force, was to produce a completed management plan in 2 years. Eight...

  1. Low Health Literacy Is Associated with HIV Test Acceptance

    PubMed Central

    Barragán, Maribel; Hicks, Giselle; Williams, Mark V; Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Duffus, Wayne; del Rio, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Background The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has proposed increasing the proportion of people who learn their HIV serostatus. The health care setting represents a logical site to accomplish this goal. However, little is known about factors that determine acceptability of HIV testing in health care settings, particularly patients' health literacy. Objective To evaluate the association between patients' health literacy and acceptance of HIV testing among individuals at an urgent care center (UCC). Methods As part of a prospective study that sought to increase HIV testing at a UCC located in an inner-city hospital serving an indigent population, we surveyed patients who had been offered an HIV test by their providers and had accepted or refused testing. Pretest counseling was provided using a low-literacy brochure given to patients upon registration into the clinic. We measured health literacy level using the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM) scale. Results Three hundred seventy-two patients were enrolled in the study. In univariate analysis, no statistically significant difference between HIV test acceptors or refusers was found for gender, race/ethnicity, marital status, income, type of health insurance, educational level, or type of test offered. Acceptors were more likely to have a low literacy level (odds ratio [OR], 1.763; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.084 to 2.866) and be less than 40 years old (OR, 1.639; 95% CI, 1.085 to 2.475). In multivariate analysis, low health literacy was shown to be a predictor of HIV test acceptance controlling for age and education (OR, 2.017; 95% CI, 1.190 to 3.418). Conclusions Low health literacy was shown to be a predictor of HIV test acceptance. Patients presenting to a UCC with poorer health literacy appear more willing to comply with health care providers' recommendations to undergo HIV testing than those with adequate health literacy when an “opt-out” strategy combined with a low

  2. NASA's Plan for SDLS Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    The Space Data Link Security (SDLS) Protocol is a Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) standard which extends the known Data Link protocols to secure data being sent over a space link by providing confidentiality and integrity services. This plan outlines the approach by National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) in performing testing of the SDLS protocol using a prototype based on an existing NASA missions simulator.

  3. Surface moisture measurement system hardware acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, G.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-28

    This document summarizes the results of the hardware acceptance test for the Surface Moisture Measurement System (SMMS). This test verified that the mechanical and electrical features of the SMMS functioned as designed and that the unit is ready for field service. The bulk of hardware testing was performed at the 306E Facility in the 300 Area and the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility in the 400 Area. The SMMS was developed primarily in support of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Safety Programs for moisture measurement in organic and ferrocyanide watch list tanks.

  4. Procedure control and acceptance sampling plans for donor sperm banks: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Castilla, Jose Antonio; Sánchez-León, Maria; Garrido, Antonio; Ramirez, Juan P; Clavero, Ana; Martínez, Luis

    2007-01-01

    The publication of European Directive 2004/23/EC in the European Parliament and in the European Council on 31 March 2004 concerning the setting of standards of quality and safety for the donation, procurement, testing, processing, preservation, storage and distribution of human cells and tissues made it obligatory for sperm banks to set up quality control systems to ensure, among other goals, the satisfactory control of all procedures carried out. The objective of the present study is to set out guidelines that will make it possible to ensure the quality of the donors and frozen specimens accepted and the homogeneity of the samples supplied by a sperm bank. For this purpose, we shall describe clear-cut criteria for the acceptance of donors and frozen sperm, taking into account both analytic variability and the biological variations to be expected in semen parameters. Furthermore, we shall show how the evaluation of the results of a frozen semen specimen, on the basis of analysing a single straw after such freezing, does not guarantee the homogeneity of all the straws. Therefore, we must design a sampling plan to take into consideration all the straws obtained from a donor. This kind of plan will depend on different parameters, such as acceptable levels of quality and the tolerable rate of straws with defective semen, and will involve certain risks, both for the sperm bank and for the client. The establishment of these acceptance control criteria for frozen specimens and for donors could be of practical use for the control of the procedures applied in the operation of a sperm bank.

  5. Regional planning acceptance by residents of northern New York, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrow, P.; Gaige, B.; Harris, G.; Kennedy, J.; King, L.; Raymond, W.; Werbitsky, D.

    1984-01-01

    This study compares the effectiveness of two regional planning agencies in terms of public support for various planning activities. The Adirondack Park Agency has implemented a restrictive regulatory program with little citizen participation by Adirondack residents. The Tug Hill Commission has implemented an advisory and coordinating program with an emphasis on public input. A survey of residents of two towns in each region found that respondents from both regions favored a planning agency that incorporates citizen input; controls air, water, and toxic waste pollution; and develops recreation areas. They strongly opposed an agency that regulates private land-use. Basic demographic characteristics and levels of environmental concern were similar in all four towns, but receptivity to various planning activities was consistently greater among residents of the Tug Hill Region. Paired comparisons of the four towns demonstrated no differences between towns of different regions. Public support for regional planning is greater in the Tug Hill Region than in the Adirondack Park. 19 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  6. MCO combustible gas management leak test acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    SHERRELL, D.L.

    1999-05-11

    Existing leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed multi-canister overpacks (MCO) were evaluated to ensure that MCOs can be handled and stored in stagnant air without compromising the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project's overall strategy to prevent accumulation of combustible gas mixtures within MCO's or within their surroundings. The document concludes that the integrated leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed MCOs (1 x 10{sup -5} std cc/sec and 1 x 10{sup -7} std cc/sec, respectively) are adequate to meet all current and foreseeable needs of the project, including capability to demonstrate compliance with the NFPA 60 Paragraph 3-3 requirement to maintain hydrogen concentrations [within the air atmosphere CSB tubes] t or below 1 vol% (i.e., at or below 25% of the LFL).

  7. Project W-049H Collection System Acceptance Test

    SciTech Connect

    Buckles, D.I.

    1994-11-11

    The Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) Program for Project W-049H covers the following activities: Disposal system, Collection system, Instrumentation and control system. Each activity has its own ATP. The purpose of the ATPs is to verify that the systems have been constructed in accordance with the construction documents and to demonstrate that the systems function as required by the Project criteria. This ATP has been prepared to demonstrate that the Collection System Instrumentation functions as required by project criteria.

  8. Acceptance test report for 241-AW process air system

    SciTech Connect

    Kostelnik, A.J.

    1994-10-06

    The acceptance test procedure (ATP) for the compressed air system at building 241-AW-273 was completed on March 11, 1993. The system was upgraded to provide a reliable source of compressed air to the tank farm. The upgrade included the demolition of the existing air compressor and associated piping, as well as the installation of a new air compressor with a closed loop cooling system. A compressed air cross-tie was added to allow the process air compressor to function as a back-up to the existing instrument air compressor. The purpose of the ATP was to achieve three primary objectives: verify system upgrade in accordance with the design media; provide functional test of system components and controls; and prepare the system for the Operational Test. The ATP was successfully completed with thirteen exceptions, which were resolved prior to completing the acceptance test. The repaired exceptions had no impact to safety or the environment and are briefly summarized. Testing ensured that the system was installed per design, that its components function as required and that it is ready for operational testing and subsequent turnover to operations.

  9. Acceptance testing of integrated picture archiving and communications systems.

    PubMed

    Lewis, T E; Horton, M C; Kinsey, T V; Shelton, P D

    1999-05-01

    An integrated picture archiving and communication system (PACS) is a large investment in both money and resources. With all of the components and systems contained in the PACS, a methodical set of protocols and procedures must be developed to test all aspects of the PACS within the short time allocated for contract compliance. For the Department of Defense (DoD), acceptance testing (AT) sets the protocols and procedures. Broken down into modules and test procedures that group like components and systems, the AT protocol maximizes the efficiency and thoroughness of testing all aspects of an integrated PACS. A standardized and methodical protocol reduces the probability of functionality or performance limitations being overlooked. The AT protocol allows complete PACS testing within the 30 days allocated by the digital imaging network (DIN)-PACS contract. AT shortcomings identified during the testing phase properly allows for resolution before complete acceptance of the system. This presentation will describe the evolution of the process, the components of the DoD AT protocol, the benefits of the AT process, and its significance to the successful implementation of a PACS. This is a US government work. There are no restrictions on its use.

  10. 242A Distributed Control System Year 2000 Acceptance Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    TEATS, M.C.

    1999-08-31

    This report documents acceptance test results for the 242-A Evaporator distributive control system upgrade to D/3 version 9.0-2 for year 2000 compliance. This report documents the test results obtained by acceptance testing as directed by procedure HNF-2695. This verification procedure will document the initial testing and evaluation of the potential 242-A Distributed Control System (DCS) operating difficulties across the year 2000 boundary and the calendar adjustments needed for the leap year. Baseline system performance data will be recorded using current, as-is operating system software. Data will also be collected for operating system software that has been modified to correct year 2000 problems. This verification procedure is intended to be generic such that it may be performed on any D/3{trademark} (GSE Process Solutions, Inc.) distributed control system that runs with the VMSTM (Digital Equipment Corporation) operating system. This test may be run on simulation or production systems depending upon facility status. On production systems, DCS outages will occur nine times throughout performance of the test. These outages are expected to last about 10 minutes each.

  11. Acceptance test report for portable exhauster POR-008/Skid F

    SciTech Connect

    Kriskovich, J.R.

    1998-07-24

    Portable Exhauster POR-008 was procured via HNF-0490, Specification for a Portable Exhausted System for Waste Tank Ventilation. Prior to taking ownership, acceptance testing was performed at the vendors. However at the conclusion of testing a number of issues remained that required resolution before the exhausters could be used by Project W-320. The purpose of acceptance testing documented by this report was to demonstrate compliance of the exhausters with the performance criteria established within HNF-O49O, Rev. 1 following a repair and upgrade effort at Hanford. In addition, data obtained during this testing is required for the resolution of outstanding Non-conformance Reports (NCR), and finally, to demonstrate the functionality of the associated software for the pressure control and high vacuum exhauster operating modes provided for by W-320. Additional testing not required by the ATP was also performed to assist in the disposition and close out of receiving inspection report and for application design information (system curve). Results of this testing are also captured within this document.

  12. Project W-049H collection system Acceptance Test Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, M.C.

    1994-11-11

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) for the Project W-049H, Treated Effluent Disposal Facility, is to verify that the collection system equipment installed as Pump Station No. 1 (225-W) and Pump Station No. 2 (225-E) have been installed in accordance with the design documents and function as required by the project criteria. This will be a wet test with potable water being introduced into the pump pits to test for leakage. Potable water will also be employed in the testing of the pumps and related mechanical equipment. All Instrument and Control equipment related to the pump stations will be checked electronically with simulated inputs/outputs when actual input/output signals are unavailable. Water from Pump Station 1 will be moved through the TEDF piping system and discharged into the disposal ponds. This will check the proper function of the air/vac valves not tested during construction, and the automated samplers.

  13. Project W-049H instrument and control Acceptance Test Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, M.C.

    1994-11-16

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) for the Project W-049H, Treated Effluent Disposal Facility, is to verify that the instrument and control systems have been installed in accordance with the design documents and function as required by the project criteria. The instrument and control system includes three operator control stations, modems, and general purpose LAN interface cabinets in the Effluent Treatment Facility control room; two pump stations; disposal station pumping building; and all local control units installed in the fold. Testing will be performed using actual signals when available and simulated signals when actual signals are unavailable.

  14. 7 CFR 1717.605 - Design standards, plans and specifications, construction standards, and RUS accepted materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... system design, construction standards, and the use of RUS accepted materials. Borrowers must comply with... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Design standards, plans and specifications, construction standards, and RUS accepted materials. 1717.605 Section 1717.605 Agriculture Regulations of the...

  15. 46 CFR 50.25-10 - Acceptance of piping components by specific letter or approved plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Acceptance of Material and Piping Components § 50.25-10 Acceptance... approved plan must do the following: (1) Submit an engineering type catalog or representative drawings of... specifications by comparing details of the materials' chemical composition, mechanical properties, method...

  16. LERF Basin 44 Process Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    LUECK, K.J.

    1999-08-31

    This document presents a plan to process a portion of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) Basin 44 wastewater through the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). The objective of this process test is to determine the most effective/efficient method to treat the wastewater currently stored in LERF Basin 44. The process test will determine the operational parameters necessary to comply with facility effluent discharge permit limits (Ecology 1995) and the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) acceptance criteria (BHI-00139), while achieving ALARA goals and maintaining the integrity of facility equipment. A major focus of the test plan centers on control of contamination due to leaks and/or facility maintenance. As a pre-startup item, all known leaks will be fixed before the start of the test. During the course of the test, a variety of contamination control measures will be evaluated for implementation during the treatment of the remaining Basin 44 inventory. Of special interest will be techniques and tools used to prevent contamination spread during sampling and when opening contaminated facility equipment/piping. At the conclusion of the test, a post ALARA review will be performed to identify lessons learned from the test run which can be applied to the treatment of the remaining Basin 44 inventory. The volume of wastewater to be treated during this test run is 500,000 gallons. This volume limit is necessary to maintain the ETF radiological inventory limits per the approved authorization basis. The duration of the process test is approximately 30 days.

  17. Acceptability of VTOL aircraft noise determined by absolute subjective testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sternfeld, H., Jr.; Hinterkeuser, E. G.; Hackman, R. B.; Davis, J.

    1972-01-01

    A program was conducted during which test subjects evaluated the simulated sounds of a helicopter, a tilt wing aircraft, and a 15 second, 90 PNdB (indoors) turbojet aircraft used as reference. Over 20,000 evaluations were made while the test subjects were engaged in work and leisure activities. The effects of level, exposure time, distance and aircraft design on subjective acceptability were evaluated. Some of the important conclusions are: (1) To be judged equal in annoyance to the reference jet sound, the helicopter and tilt wing sounds must be 4 to 5 PNdB lower when lasting 15 seconds in duration. (2) To be judged significantly more acceptable than the reference jet sound, the helicopter sound must be 10 PNdB lower when lasting 15 seconds in duration. (3) To be judged significantly more acceptable than the reference jet sound, the tilt wing sound must be 12 PNdB lower when lasting 15 seconds in duration. (4) The relative effect of changing the duration of a sound upon its subjectively rated annoyance diminishes with increasing duration. It varies from 2 PNdB per doubling of duration for intervals of 15 to 30 seconds, to 0.75 PNdB per doubling of duration for intervals of 120 to 240 seconds.

  18. Dissolution test for low-activity waste product acceptance.

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, W. L.

    1998-05-20

    We have measured the mean and standard deviation of the solution concentrations of B, Na, and Si attained in replicate dissolution tests conducted at temperatures of 20, 40, and 70 C, for durations of 3 and 7 days, and at glass/water mass ratios of 1:10 and 1:1. These and other tests were conducted to evaluate the adequacy of the test methods specified in privatization contracts and to develop a data base that can be used to evaluate the reliability of reported results for tests performed on the waste products. Tests were conducted with a glass that we formulated to be similar to low-activity waste products that will be produced during the remediation of Hanford tank wastes. Statistical analyses indicated that, while the mean concentrations of B, Na, and Si were affected by the values of test parameters, the standard deviation of replicate tests was not. The precision of the tests was determined primarily by uncertainties in the analysis of the test solutions. Replicate measurements of other glass properties that must be reported for Hanford low-activity waste products were measured to evaluate the possible adoption of the glass used in these tests as a standard test material for the product acceptance process.

  19. When is diagnostic testing inappropriate or irrational? Acceptable regret approach.

    PubMed

    Hozo, Iztok; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    The authors provide a new model within the framework of theories of bounded rationality for the observed physicians' behavior that their ordering of diagnostic tests may not be rational. Contrary to the prevailing thinking, the authors find that physicians do not act irrationally or inappropriately when they order diagnostic tests in usual clinical practice. When acceptable regret (i.e., regret that a decision maker finds tolerable upon making a wrong decision) is taken into account, the authors show that physicians tend to order diagnostic tests at a higher level of pretest probability of disease than predicted by expected utility theory. They also show why physicians tend to overtest when regret about erroneous decisions is extremely small. Finally, they explain variations in the practice of medicine. They demonstrate that in the same clinical situation, different decision makers might have different acceptable regret thresholds for withholding treatment, for ordering a diagnostic test, or for administering treatment. This in turn means that for some decision makers, the most rational strategy is to do nothing, whereas for others, it may be to order a diagnostic test, and still for others, choosing treatment may be the most rational course of action.

  20. Nevada Test Site waste acceptance criteria [Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    Revision one updates the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the NTS. Review each section of this document. This document is not intended to include all of the requirements; rather, it is meant as a guide toward meeting the regulations. All references in this document should be observed to avoid omission of requirements on which acceptance or rejection of waste will be based. The Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document.

  1. AUSSAT-B spacecraft qualification and acceptance testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, Gordon H. S.; Day, Robert S.; Gatta, John D.

    The AUSSAT-B spacecraft are the first two examples of the new HS601 series of body stabi1ized satellites being built by Hughes Aircraft Company. Prior to the first launch in early 1992, the satellites will have been subjected to extensive unit, subsystem, and system level tests. The satellites will also undergo thorough in-orbit tests after being delivered on-station. This paper concentrates on the subsystem and system level tests for qualification and acceptance of the satellites. Because the anticipated market for the HS601 design includes both commercial and Government (including military) applications the qualification and protoflight philosophy adopted for the first flight spacecraft program represents a potentially unique combination of test requirements.

  2. Procedures for acceptance testing of solar energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, D. L.; Joncich, D. M.

    1984-04-01

    This report describes research on the use of simple, low-cost meters for measuring the performance of solar energy systems in Army buildings and for comparing the measured performance with the design specification requirements. The requirements of meters for measuring the performance of solar energy systems were defined. A BTU-Meter for measuring heat transfer was designed, and commercial meters for taking other measurements were obtained. The meters were installed in a solar system in the laboratory and a pilot test of the acceptance test was done. Suggested draft revisions to Corps of Engineers design documents were prepared; designers could use these revisions to include acceptance testing provisions in solar energy system design. It was found that in a short-duration test, simple, low-cost meters can be used to determine whether a newly installed solar energy system is operating as specified. The simplicity of the metering approach allows designers to routinely include metering in the solar system design. The contractor can easily install the meters with the other solar components. Since the meters are so versatile, they can be used continuously for long-term performance monitoring. This gives the designer performance data and allows maintenance personnel to detect and diagnose solar equipment malfunctions. Thus, solar energy system metering can provide a unified, low-cost approach for meeting the wide range of measurement needs of Army solar energy systems.

  3. Acceptance test report for project C-157 ``T-Plant electrical upgrade``

    SciTech Connect

    Jeppson, L.A.

    1997-08-05

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents for record purposes the field results, acceptance, and approvals of the completed acceptance test per WHC-SD-Cl57-ATP-001, Rev. 0, ``Acceptance Test Proceedure for Project C-157 `T Plant Electrical Upgrade``` The test was completed and approved without any problems or exceptions.

  4. Acceptance test report: Field test of mixer pump for 241-AN-107 caustic addition project

    SciTech Connect

    Leshikar, G.A.

    1997-05-16

    The field acceptance test of a 75 HP mixer pump (Hazleton serial number N-20801) installed in Tank 241-AN-107 was conducted from October 1995 thru February 1996. The objectives defined in the acceptance test were successfully met, with two exceptions recorded. The acceptance test encompassed field verification of mixer pump turntable rotation set-up and operation, verification that the pump instrumentation functions within established limits, facilitation of baseline data collection from the mixer pump mounted ultrasonic instrumentation, verification of mixer pump water flush system operation and validation of a procedure for its operation, and several brief test runs (bump) of the mixer pump.

  5. Effect of reference foods in repeated acceptability tests: testing familiar and novel foods using 2 acceptability scales.

    PubMed

    El Dine, A Nasser; Olabi, A

    2009-03-01

    Hedonic tests are routinely used to assess the acceptance of food products. However, these single tests may not be the best approach for predicting long-term use. The objectives of this study were, first, to check whether a difference from reference score is more sensitive to changes in hedonic scores, second, to assess whether the labeled affective scale (LAM) is more sensitive to differences than the 9-point scale, and third, to assess the effect of repeated exposure on the hedonic scores of neophilic and neophobic panelists for familiar and novel foods. Two groups of 41 panelists were tested with either the 9-point hedonic scale or LAM scale. Panelists received a food neophobia questionnaire and were subsequently classified to neophobic, neophilic, or neutral. Ten foods, including 5 novel and 5 familiar, were used. In each session, 5 to 6 foods were served twice/week for 4 wk. Serving frequency ranged between 1 and 8 times (1, 2, 4, 6, 8). Data analyses were performed 3 times, using either absolute acceptability scores or relative scores, that is, the difference between absolute scores and scores for either the reference (cracker, RELFAM) or a novel food (pickled-ginger, RELNOV) served in every session. The 3 analyses (absolute, RELFAM, and RELNOV) generated similar results with respect to the number of significant differences between foods. There was no major drift in acceptability scores with sessions. A significant food effect was obtained (P < 0.05) and a significant food x neophobia (P < 0.05) was noted for 2 novel foods, pickled ginger, and lychee, whereby neophobic panelists were less accepting of them. Both scales were equally sensitive with some advantages for LAM over the 9-point hedonic scale.

  6. Perceived Use and Acceptance of Cloud Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) Implementation in the Manufacturing Industries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adeboje, Adewale

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain an insight into perceived use and acceptance for implementing an enterprise resource planning system and the decision whether to contract out the enterprise resource planning (ERP) service to a cloud provider. Cloud-based ERP systems can provide many advantages to the normal implementation of the same systems…

  7. Perceived Use and Acceptance of Cloud Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) Implementation in the Manufacturing Industries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adeboje, Adewale

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain an insight into perceived use and acceptance for implementing an enterprise resource planning system and the decision whether to contract out the enterprise resource planning (ERP) service to a cloud provider. Cloud-based ERP systems can provide many advantages to the normal implementation of the same systems…

  8. Acceptance test procedure for SY Tank Farm replacement exhauster unit

    SciTech Connect

    Becken, G.W.

    1994-12-16

    The proper functioning of a new 241-SY Tank Farm replacement exhauster will be acceptance tested, to establish operability and to provide an operational baseline for the equipment. During this test, a verification of all of the alarm and control circuits associated with the exhaust, which provide operating controls and/or signals to local and remote alarm/annunciator panels, shall be performed. Test signals for sensors that provide alarms, warnings, and/or interlocks will be applied to verify that alarm, warning, and interlock setpoints are correct. Alarm and warning lights, controls, and local and remote readouts for the exhauster will be verified to be adequate for proper operation of the exhauster. Testing per this procedure shall be conducted in two phases. The first phase of testing, to verify alarm, warning, and interlock setpoints primarily, will be performed in the MO-566 Fab Shop. The second phase of testing, to verify proper operation and acceptable interface with other tank farm systems, will be conducted after the exhauster and all associated support and monitoring equipment have been installed in the SY Tank Farm. The exhauster, which is mounted on a skid and which will eventually be located in the SY tank farm, receives input signals from a variety of sensors mounted on the skid and associated equipment. These sensors provide information such as: exhauster system inlet vacuum pressure; prefilter and HEPA filter differential pressures; exhaust stack sampler status; exhaust fan status; system status (running/shut down); and radiation monitoring systems status. The output of these sensors is transmitted to the exhauster annunciator panel where the signals are displayed and monitored for out-of-specification conditions.

  9. Outline test plan for test series I

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    The overall technical objectives for the Phase 1 programme of the Grimethorpe Experimental Facility were presented in a draft document ''Phase 1 Research Programme: Baseline and Modified Option Cases'', produced in May 1979 and discussed at subsequent Technical Committee Meetings. The technical objectives for Test Series 1 presented in this document have developed from those outlined in the May 79 baseline; all the changes from the earlier outline are recorded. The data collection systems expected to be used are also presented. It is planned to carry out experiments to meet the objectives in three sub-series each along a different ''good fluidisation'' line determined at high, medium and low velocities. The high velocity sub-series has four runs including the original design conditions for Tube Bank 'A'. The medium velocity sub-series has seven runs and involves operating Tube Bank 'A' at what are to be its optimum operating conditions. The low velocity sub-series has six runs including the CURL Link Test operating conditions.

  10. 7 CFR 1755.400 - RUS standard for acceptance tests and measurements of telecommunications plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false RUS standard for acceptance tests and measurements of..., ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS, AND STANDARD CONTRACT FORMS § 1755.400 RUS standard for acceptance tests and... acceptance tests and measurements on installed copper and fiber optic telecommunications plant and equipment....

  11. Topographical mapping system for radiological and hazardous environments acceptance testing

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, G.A.; Dochat, G.R.

    1997-12-01

    During the summer of 1996, the Topographical Mapping System (TMS) for hazardous and radiological environments and its accompanying three-dimensional (3-D) visualization tool, the Interactive Computer-Enhanced Remote-Viewing System (ICERVS), were delivered to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL and Mechanical Technology, Inc., performed final acceptance testing of the TMS during the next eight months. The TMS was calibrated and characterized during this period. This paper covers the calibration, characterization, and acceptance testing of the TMS. Development of the TMS and ICERVS was initiated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the purpose of characterization and remediation of underground storage tanks (USTs) at DOE sites across the country. DOE required a 3-D, topographical mapping system suitable for use in hazardous and radiological environments. The intended application is the mapping of the interior of USTs as part of DOE`s waste characterization and remediation efforts and to obtain baseline data on the content of the storage tank interiors as well as data on changes in the tank contents and levels brought about by waste remediation steps. Initially targeted for deployment at the Hanford Washington site, the TMS is designed to be a self-contained, compact, and reconfigurable system that is capable of providing rapid, variable-resolution mapping information in poorly characterized workspaces with a minimum of operator intervention.

  12. Topographical mapping system for radiological and hazardous environments acceptance testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Gary A.; Dochat, G. R.

    1997-09-01

    During the summer of 1996, the topographical mapping system (TMS) for hazardous and radiological environments and its accompanying three-dimensional (3-D) visualization tool, the interactive computer-enhanced remote-viewing system (ICERVS), were delivered to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL and Mechanical Technology, Inc., performed final acceptance testing of the TMS during the next eight months. The TMS was calibrated and characterized during this period. This paper covers the calibration, characterization, and acceptance testing of the TMS. Development of the TMS and the ICERVS was initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the purpose of characterization and remediation of underground storage tanks (USTs) at DOE sites across the country. DOE required a 3-D, topographical mapping system suitable for use in hazardous and radiological environments. The intended application is the mapping of the interior of USTs as part of DOE's waste characterization and remediation efforts and to obtain baseline data on the content of the storage tank interiors as well as data on changes in the tank contents and levels brought about by waste remediation steps. Initially targeted for deployment at the Hanford Washington site, the TMS is designed to be a self-contained, compact, reconfigurable system that is capable of providing rapid, variable-resolution mapping information in poorly characterized workspaces with a minimum of operator intervention.

  13. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping and Instrumentation Control Skid ''K''

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNS, B.R.

    1999-10-28

    This is a Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) HNF-4276. This test report provides the results of the inspection and testing of the new Pumping and Instrumentation Control (PIC) skid designed as ''K''. The ATP was successfully completed. A copy of the completed ATP is in the Appendix of this document.

  14. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid N

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-02-03

    This is a Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) RPP-5489. This test report provides the results of the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''N''. The ATP was successfully completed. A copy of the completed ATP is in the Appendix of this document.

  15. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid L

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    1999-11-09

    This is a Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) RPP-5055. This test report provides the results of the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''L''. The ATP was successfully completed. A copy of the completed ATP is in the Appendix of this document.

  16. Acceptance test procedure, 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase III testing

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, G.A.

    1994-11-21

    This Acceptance Test Procedure is for the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase III Testing. This procedure will test the sealing integrity of the Flexible Receiver System to ensure that release of waste and aerosols will be minimized during the removal of the test mixer pump from tank SY-101.

  17. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid M

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    1999-12-13

    This is a Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) RPP-5073. This test report provides the results of the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''M''. The ATP was successfully completed. A copy of the completed ATP is in the Appendix of this document.

  18. Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2012-09-26

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone – a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF

  19. Factory acceptance test results for the DIRSP projection optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Matthew C.; Ward, Craig S.

    2000-07-01

    The Factory Acceptance Test (FAT) results for the projection optical subsystem (POS) of US Army STIRCOM's dynamic infrared scene projector (DIRSP) are presented in this paper. DIRSP is a low background (-35 degrees Celsius) hardware-in-the- loop (HWIL), long-wave infrared (LWIR) scene projector built by Mission Research Corporation (MRC) for use by the Redstone Technical Test Center (RTTC). It has an effective emitter array size of 1632 X 672 suspended-membrane micro-resistor elements. The POS is responsible for generating this effective array size from three smaller arrays using a mosaic image combiner, adding background light from an external blackbody, and collimating the combined radiation with a 5:1 vacuum enclosed -35 degree Celsius zoom lens. The FAT results reported demonstrate good POS performance compared to the design for focal length, F/#, MTF and apparent temperature.

  20. 78 FR 53483 - Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 3

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... COMMISSION Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 3 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Determination of inspections, tests, analyses, and..., tests, and analyses have been successfully completed, and that the specified acceptance criteria are...

  1. 78 FR 53484 - Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 4

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... COMMISSION Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 4 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Determination of inspections, tests, analyses, and..., tests, and analyses have been successfully completed, and that the specified acceptance criteria are...

  2. Acceptance Test Report for AMS-4 Continuous Air Monitors (CAM) at 241AN Exhausters

    SciTech Connect

    SCAIEF, C.C.

    1999-11-11

    This report provides the completed copy and test results of the Acceptance Test Procedure (TWR-4713). Test results were actually hand written in the ATP including redline changes. All acceptance criteria steps were completed satisfactorily without exceptions.

  3. Type of Speech Material Affects Acceptable Noise Level Test Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Xaver; Dingemanse, Gertjan; Goedegebure, André; Janse, Esther

    2016-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) test, in which individuals indicate what level of noise they are willing to put up with while following speech, has been used to guide hearing aid fitting decisions and has been found to relate to prospective hearing aid use. Unlike objective measures of speech perception ability, ANL outcome is not related to individual hearing loss or age, but rather reflects an individual’s inherent acceptance of competing noise while listening to speech. As such, the measure may predict aspects of hearing aid success. Crucially, however, recent studies have questioned its repeatability (test–retest reliability). The first question for this study was whether the inconsistent results regarding the repeatability of the ANL test may be due to differences in speech material types used in previous studies. Second, it is unclear whether meaningfulness and semantic coherence of the speech modify ANL outcome. To investigate these questions, we compared ANLs obtained with three types of materials: the International Speech Test Signal (ISTS), which is non-meaningful and semantically non-coherent by definition, passages consisting of concatenated meaningful standard audiology sentences, and longer fragments taken from conversational speech. We included conversational speech as this type of speech material is most representative of everyday listening. Additionally, we investigated whether ANL outcomes, obtained with these three different speech materials, were associated with self-reported limitations due to hearing problems and listening effort in everyday life, as assessed by a questionnaire. ANL data were collected for 57 relatively good-hearing adult participants with an age range representative for hearing aid users. Results showed that meaningfulness, but not semantic coherence of the speech material affected ANL. Less noise was accepted for the non-meaningful ISTS signal than for the meaningful speech materials. ANL repeatability was comparable

  4. Acceptance test procedure for Project W-049H

    SciTech Connect

    Buckles, D.I.

    1994-09-29

    The Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) program for Project W-049H (200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility [TEDF]) covers three activities as follows: (1) Disposal System; (2) Collection System; and (3) Instrumentation and Control System. Each activity has its own ATP. The purpose of the ATPs is to reverify that the systems have been constructed in accordance with the construction documents and to demonstrate that the systems function as required by the Project criteria. The Disposal System ATP covers the testing of the following: disposal line flowmeters, room air temperatures in the Disposal Station Sampling Building, effluent valves and position indicators, disposal pond level monitors, automated sampler, pressure relief valves, and overflow diversion sluice gates. The Collection System ATP covers the testing of the two pump stations and all equipment installed therein. The Instrumentation and Control (I and C) ATP covers the testing of the entire TEDF I and C system. This includes 3 OCS units, modem, and GPLI cabinets in the ETC control room; 2 pump stations; disposal station sampling building; and all LCUs installed in the field.

  5. Loss on Ignition Furnace Acceptance and Operability Test Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSTON, D.C.

    2000-08-23

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Procedure and Operability Test Procedure (ATP/OTP)is to verify the operability of newly installed Loss on Ignition (LOI) equipment, including a model 1608FL CMTM Furnace, a dessicator, and balance. The operability of the furnace will be verified. The arrangement of the equipment placed in Glovebox 157-3/4 to perform LOI testing on samples supplied from the Thermal Stabilization line will be verified. In addition to verifying proper operation of the furnace, this ATP/OTP will also verify the air flow through the filters, verify a damper setting to establish and maintain the required differential pressure between the glovebox and the room pressure, and test the integrity of the newly installed HEPA filter. In order to provide objective evidence of proper performance of the furnace, the furnace must heat 15 crucibles, mounted on a crucible rack, to 1000 C, according to a program entered into the furnace controller located outside the glovebox. The glovebox differential pressure will be set to provide the 0.5 to 2.0 inches of water (gauge) negative pressure inside the glovebox with an expected airflow of 100 to 125 cubic feet per minute (cfm) through the inlet filter. The glovebox inlet G1 filter will be flow tested to ensure the integrity of the filter connections and the efficiency of the filter medium. The newly installed windows and glovebox extension, as well as all disturbed joints, will be sonically tested via ultra probe to verify no leaks are present. The procedure for DOS testing of the filter is found in Appendix A.

  6. Loss on Ignition Furnace Acceptance and Operability Test Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON, D.C.

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Procedure and Operability Test Procedure (ATP/OTP)is to verify the operability of newly installed LOI equipment, including a model 1608FL CM{trademark} Furnace, a dessicator, and balance. The operability of the furnace will be verified. The arrangement of the equipment placed in Glovebox 157-3/4 to perform Loss on Ignition (LOI) testing on samples supplied from the Thermal Stabilization line will be verified. In addition to verifying proper operation of the furnace, this ATP/OTP will also verify the air flow through the filters, verify a damper setting to establish and maintain the required differential pressure between the glovebox and the room pressure, and test the integrity of the newly installed HEPA filter. In order to provide objective evidence of proper performance of the furnace, the furnace must heat 15 crucibles, mounted on a crucible rack, to 1000 C, according to a program entered into the furnace controller located outside the glovebox. The glovebox differential pressure will be set to provide the 0.5 to 2.0 inches of water (gauge) negative pressure inside the glovebox with an airflow of 100 to 125 cubic feet per minute (cfm) through the inlet filter. The glovebox inlet Glfilter will he flow tested to ensure the integrity of the filter connections and the efficiency of the filter medium. The newly installed windows and glovebox extension, as well as all disturbed joints, will be sonically tested via ultra probe to verify no leaks are present. The procedure for DOS testing of the filter is found in Appendix A.

  7. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid P

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-03-29

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) provides the test results for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''P''. The ATR summaries the results and provides a copy of the ATP and inspections in the Appendix.

  8. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid Q

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-05-11

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) provides the test results for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''Q''. The ATR summaries the results and provides a copy of the ATP and inspections in the Appendix.

  9. 241-SY-101 Pump Decon System Acceptance Test Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Talachy, S.A.; Cleveland, K.J.

    1995-04-12

    The SY-101 Pump Decon System has components that consist of the water filter skid to assembly operation, the pump pit flooding system, and the system set up using air blow the water out of the decon hose. The Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) consists of four parts. The first part will calibrate water and flow meters. The second part will determine the pressure loss on the water traveling through the filter skid at various flow rates. The third part will determine the length of time it takes to drain 1350 gallons of water out of a tank through 300 feet of discharge hose. The fourth part will verify that the calculated air volume and pressure in an air receiver is adequate to blow all the water out of a 2 inch diameter water hose.

  10. Standard-B hydrogen monitoring system acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, T.T.

    1994-09-08

    Test Engineering was supported by Tank Waste Remediation System Safety Programs Engineering Support in the performance of an Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) to qualify the Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS) cabinet installed on waste tank 241-SY-103. The June 7, 1994 ATP performance was controlled by West Waste Tank Farms work package 2W-94-322. The ATP was conducted following the final installation of a second Whittaker electro-chemical hydrogen monitoring cell. The cabinet had been sited on the waste tank two years earlier, but never connected to the exhaust vent header to monitor Tank 241-SY-103 vent header exhaust gases. The cabinet was then modified, to remove two undesirable solid state hydrogen monitors and install a second Whittaker electro-chemical hydrogen monitoring sensor and signal conditioning. The ATP was used to assure that the cabinet wiring and components were properly installed and labeled and that the two years without operation had not seriously damaged the installed equipment. Electrical and pneumatic tests were performed to assure system integrity.

  11. Acceptability of a theory of planned behaviour email-based nutrition intervention.

    PubMed

    Kothe, E J; Mullan, B A

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated feasibility and acceptability of a new email-delivered intervention promoting fruit and vegetable consumption in a university-based population of Australian young adults. The study explored whether there are differences in the reported feasibility and acceptability between demographic groups within the population of interest and at three levels of intervention intensity. The email-delivered intervention program consists of an implementation intention 'planning task' and between 3 and 15 short email messages over a 15-day study period. The intervention program was developed using the Theory of Planned Behaviour and was designed to modify perceived behavioural control. One hundred and ten participants (mean age = 19.21 years, 25.6% male) completed the feasibility and acceptability questionnaire at Day 15. This questionnaire contained items about all intervention components. High acceptability and feasibility scores were found for all intervention parts and at all levels of intervention intensity. There were few significant differences in the reported acceptability of items between key demographic sub-groups, and no differences in reported acceptability at different levels of intervention intensity. These results suggest that this email-delivered intervention is an acceptable and feasible tool for promoting fruit and vegetable consumption for participants in the target population.

  12. Test report for run-in acceptance testing of hydrogen mitigation retrieval Pump-3

    SciTech Connect

    Berglin, B.G.

    1997-08-15

    This report will provide the findings of the demonstration test conducted on the Double-Shell Tank (DST) 241-SY-101 HMR Pump-3 in accordance with WHC-SDWM-TP-434 ``Test plan for run-in acceptance testing of hydrogen mitigation/retrieval pump-3`` at the 400 Area Maintenance and Storage Facility (MASF) building from 7 June 1996 through 30 July 1996 per work package 4A-96-92/W. The DST 241-SY-101 hydrogen mitigation retrieval Pump-3 is a 200-HP submersible electric driven pump that has been modified for use in the DST 241-SY-101 containing mixed waste located in the 200W area. The pump has a motor driven rotation mechanism that allows the pump column to rotate through 355{degree}. Prior to operation, pre-operational checks were performed which included loop calibration grooming and alignment of instruments, learning how plumb HMR-3 assembly hung in a vertical position and bump test of the motor to determine rotation direction. The pump was tested in the MASF Large Diameter Cleaning Vessel (LDCV) with process water at controlled temperatures and levels. In addition, the water temperature of the cooling water to the motor oil heat exchanger was recorded during testing. A 480-volt source powered a Variable Frequency Drive (VFD). The VFD powered the pump at various frequencies and voltages to control speed and power output of the pump. A second VFD powered the oil cooling pump. A third VFD was not available to operate the rotational drive motor during the 72 hour test, so it was demonstrated as operational before and after the test. A Mini Acquisition and Control System (Mini-DACS) controls pump functions and monitoring of the pump parameters. The Mini-DACS consists of three computers, software and some Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC). Startup and shutdown of either the pump motor or the oil cooling pump can be accomplished by the Mini-DACS. When the pump was in operation, the Mini-DACS monitors automatically collects data electronically. However, some required data

  13. Single Event Effect (SEE) Test Planning 101

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Pellish, Jonathan; Berg, Melanie D.

    2011-01-01

    This is a course on SEE Test Plan development. It is an introductory discussion of the items that go into planning an SEE test that should complement the SEE test methodology used. Material will only cover heavy ion SEE testing and not proton, LASER, or other though many of the discussed items may be applicable. While standards and guidelines for how-to perform single event effects (SEE) testing have existed almost since the first cyclotron testing, guidance on the development of SEE test plans has not been as easy to find. In this section of the short course, we attempt to rectify this lack. We consider the approach outlined here as a "living" document: mission specific constraints and new technology related issues always need to be taken into account. We note that we will use the term "test planning" in the context of those items being included in a test plan.

  14. Acceptance of a test vegetable after repeated exposures among preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Noradilah, M J; Zahara, A M

    2012-04-01

    Low vegetable consumption in children is always a matter of concern. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of multiple exposures on acceptance of a test vegetable among preschoolers aged 6 years. This study was conducted in two phases. The first phase was a cross-sectional study among 68 Malay children (37 boys; 31 girls) from 6 kindergartens in Muar, Johor. This phase was aimed at determining the selection of the most suitable vegetable as the test vegetable. Data on demographics, usual preparation methods of vegetables, frequency of vegetables served and consumed by the children at home and parents' perception of the children's liking towards vegetables were obtained through the questionnaire. In phase 2, 42 preschoolers (20 boys; 22 girls) from 3 kindergartens from phase 1 were randomly selected. Meals consisting of the test vegetable, that is, round cabbage were provided to the children during lunch time at the kindergartens for 3 days consecutively. Thirty-six grams of stir-fried cabbage was served each time and the leftover was weighed. There was a significant increase in intake of the test vegetable from first day (21.58 +/- 9.55 g) to the third day of exposure (28.26 +/- 8.35 g), z = -3.317, p = 0.002. Based on feedback from the parents, the level of liking towards the test vegetable was significantly increased after the intervention (p = 0.038). It is suggested that multiple exposures to vegetables could be a strategy to increase consumption of vegetables among preschoolers.

  15. Acceptance test report, 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase 3 testing

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, G.A.

    1995-02-06

    This document summarizes the results of the phase 3 acceptance test of the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System (FRS). The purpose of this acceptance test is to verify the sealing integrity of the FRS to ensure that the release of waste and aerosols will be minimized during the removal of the test mixer pump from Tank 241-SY-101. The FRS is one of six major components of the Equipment Removal System, which has been designed to retrieve, transport, and store the mixer pump. This acceptance test was performed at the 306E Facility in the 300 area from January 10, 1995 to January 17, 1995. The Phase 3 test consisted of two parts. Part one was a water leak test of the seal between the blast shield and mock load distribution frame (LDF) to ensure that significant contamination of the pump pit and waste interaction with the aluminum impact-limiting material under the LDF are prevented during the pump removal operation. The second part of this acceptance test was an air leak test of the assembled flexible receiver system. The purpose of this test was to verify that the release of hazardous aerosols will be minimized if the tank dome pressure becomes slightly positive during the decontamination of the mixer pump.

  16. Proceedings - Limits of Acceptable Change and related planning processes: Progress and future directions

    Treesearch

    Stephen F. McCool; David N. Cole

    1997-01-01

    Experience with Limits of Acceptable Change (LAC) and related planning processes has accumulated since the mid-1980's. These processes were developoed as a means of dealing with recreation carrying capacity issues in wilderness and National Parks. These processes clearly also have application outside of protected areas and to issues other than recreation...

  17. Empirical Testing of a Theoretical Extension of the Technology Acceptance Model: An Exploratory Study of Educational Wikis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xun

    2010-01-01

    This study extended the technology acceptance model and empirically tested the new model with wikis, a new type of educational technology. Based on social cognitive theory and the theory of planned behavior, three new variables, wiki self-efficacy, online posting anxiety, and perceived behavioral control, were added to the original technology…

  18. Rock support system development test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Patricio, J.G. . Rockwell Hanford Operations)

    1984-03-30

    The Test Plan has been prepared to support design activities for the development of a rock support system for a Nuclear Waste Repository in Basalt (NWRB). The rock support system is assumed to consist of a combination of shotcrete and rock bolts. The seven testing activities include mix development and physical testing of shotcrete, durability testing of shotcrete, durability testing of rock bolt grouts, field tests on rock bolts, field testing of shotcrete, and heated room test. The objective of the Test Plan is to develop required data through combined laboratory, field, and office studies for design and design validation of the rock support system. The overall Test Plan is developed to provide a logical progression from laboratory tests performed to characterize fundamental thermomechanical properties of shotcrete and grouts, to field tests on rock bolts and shotcrete, and in situ performance tests. 21 refs., 15 figs., 33 tabs.

  19. 78 FR 38411 - Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 4; Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... acceptance criteria are met for Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria (ITAAC) E.2.5.04.05.05... COMMISSION Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 4; Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Determination of inspections, tests, analyses, and...

  20. Overcoming Denial through the Group: A Test of Acceptance Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rugel, Robert P.; Barry, Denise

    1990-01-01

    Found participants (N=28) in alcohol treatment groups showed decreases in denial of drinking problems and decreases in psychopathology following 12 weeks of group counseling. Determined greater self-acceptance was associated with experiencing acceptance by group and with greater decreases in denial; decreases in denial and psychopathology were…

  1. Influence of gender of the teaching staff on students' acceptance of a virtual implant planning course.

    PubMed

    Nkenke, Emeka; Vairaktaris, Elefterios; Schaller, Hans-Günter; Perisanidis, Christos; Eitner, Stephan

    2017-02-09

    Acceptance of new technology is influenced by a number of situational and social factors. So far, only limited data are available on the influence of the teaching staff's gender on the acceptance of virtual dental implant planning by students. This study aimed at assessing the influence of the teaching staff's gender on the acceptance of a virtual implant planning course by male and female undergraduate dental students and their general attitude toward implantology. Two groups of third-year dental students (group 1, 9 males, 22 females; group 2, 12 males, 20 females) attended a virtual dental implant planning course. For the first group the teaching staff was all-male, while the teaching staff was all-female for the second group. After completion of the course the students filled in a technology acceptance questionnaire. An all-female teaching staff led to a degree of technology acceptance that did not differ significantly for male and female students. When the teaching staff was all-male, significant differences for technology acceptance occurred between male and female students. However, male as well as female students attributed the practice of implantology to both genders of dentists, equally, without statistically significant difference independent of the gender of the teaching staff. The more evenly distributed degree of technology acceptance of students of both genders being taught by a female staff is a favorable effect which may be explained by the more egalitarian style of women. Therefore, while feminization in dentistry proceeds, adequate measures should be taken to increase the number of female teachers.

  2. In situ vitrification large-scale operational acceptance test analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Buelt, J.L.; Carter, J.G.

    1986-05-01

    A thermal treatment process is currently under study to provide possible enhancement of in-place stabilization of transuranic and chemically contaminated soil sites. The process is known as in situ vitrification (ISV). In situ vitrification is a remedial action process that destroys solid and liquid organic contaminants and incorporates radionuclides into a glass-like material that renders contaminants substantially less mobile and less likely to impact the environment. A large-scale operational acceptance test (LSOAT) was recently completed in which more than 180 t of vitrified soil were produced in each of three adjacent settings. The LSOAT demonstrated that the process conforms to the functional design criteria necessary for the large-scale radioactive test (LSRT) to be conducted following verification of the performance capabilities of the process. The energy requirements and vitrified block size, shape, and mass are sufficiently equivalent to those predicted by the ISV mathematical model to confirm its usefulness as a predictive tool. The LSOAT demonstrated an electrode replacement technique, which can be used if an electrode fails, and techniques have been identified to minimize air oxidation, thereby extending electrode life. A statistical analysis was employed during the LSOAT to identify graphite collars and an insulative surface as successful cold cap subsidence techniques. The LSOAT also showed that even under worst-case conditions, the off-gas system exceeds the flow requirements necessary to maintain a negative pressure on the hood covering the area being vitrified. The retention of simulated radionuclides and chemicals in the soil and off-gas system exceeds requirements so that projected emissions are one to two orders of magnitude below the maximum permissible concentrations of contaminants at the stack.

  3. Acceptance test procedure for the 105-KW isolation barrier leak rate

    SciTech Connect

    McCracken, K.J.

    1995-05-19

    This acceptance test procedure shall be used to: First establish a basin water loss rate prior to installation of the two isolation barriers between the main basin and the discharge chute in K-Basin West. Second, perform an acceptance test to verify an acceptable leakage rate through the barrier seals. This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared in accordance with CM-6-1 EP 4.2, Standard Engineering Practices.

  4. Chain Sampling as Used in Armor Acceptance Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    excessive (attribute), or he may measure the time in milk before the cereal becomes soggy (variable). Sampling by attributes is a dichotomous situation...introduces a new pre-sweetened breakfast cereal , they spend millions of dollars in advertisement costs with the hope that the consumer will sample it. Here...the consumer con- siders the entire supply of this new cereal as a single manufactured lot, to be accepted or rejected. Product acceptance, in this

  5. 33 CFR 155.1065 - Procedures for plan submission, approval, requests for acceptance of alternative planning...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... complete English language copy of a vessel response plan to Commandant (CG-5431), Coast Guard, 2100 2nd St... appeal that determination to the Prevention Policy Directorate for Marine Safety, Security,...

  6. 33 CFR 155.1065 - Procedures for plan submission, approval, requests for acceptance of alternative planning...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... HAZARDOUS MATERIAL POLLUTION PREVENTION REGULATIONS FOR VESSELS Tank Vessel Response Plans for Oil § 155... as a primary cargo, unmanned vessels carrying oil as a primary cargo, or vessels carrying oil as a...

  7. CMC Bench Scale Material Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Fitzsimmons; Gerard Pelletier; Dave Grimmett

    2006-05-30

    The test plan detailed in this topical report supports Task 3.5 of the project titled ''Development of Technologies and Capabilities for Coal Energy Resources - Advanced Gasification Systems Development (AGSD)''. The purpose of these tests is to verify that materials planned for use in an advanced gasifier pilot plant will withstand the environments in a commercial gasifier. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) has developed this test plan with technical assistance from ceramic scientists at the Dept. of Energy Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Albany Research Center who will perform the environmental exposure tests.

  8. Service User- and Carer-Reported Measures of Involvement in Mental Health Care Planning: Methodological Quality and Acceptability to Users

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Chris J.; Bee, Penny E.; Walker, Lauren; Price, Owen; Lovell, Karina

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increasing service user and carer involvement in mental health care planning is a key healthcare priority but one that is difficult to achieve in practice. To better understand and measure user and carer involvement, it is crucial to have measurement questionnaires that are both psychometrically robust and acceptable to the end user. Methods: We conducted a systematic review using the terms “care plan$,” “mental health,” “user perspective$,” and “user participation” and their linguistic variants as search terms. Databases were searched from inception to November 2012, with an update search at the end of September 2014. We included any articles that described the development, validation or use of a user and/or carer-reported outcome measures of involvement in mental health care planning. We assessed the psychometric quality of each instrument using the “Evaluating the Measurement of Patient-Reported Outcomes” (EMPRO) criteria. Acceptability of each instrument was assessed using novel criteria developed in consultation with a mental health service user and carer consultation group. Results: We identified eleven papers describing the use, development, and/or validation of nine user/carer-reported outcome measures. Psychometric properties were sparsely reported and the questionnaires met few service user/carer-nominated attributes for acceptability. Where reported, basic psychometric statistics were of good quality, indicating that some measures may perform well if subjected to more rigorous psychometric tests. The majority were deemed to be too long for use in practice. Discussion: Multiple instruments are available to measure user/carer involvement in mental health care planning but are either of poor quality or poorly described. Existing measures cannot be considered psychometrically robust by modern standards, and cannot currently be recommended for use. Our review has identified an important knowledge gap, and an urgent need to

  9. Cassini RTG acceptance test results and RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M.

    1997-12-31

    Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, mass properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents the thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F-2, F-6, and F-7. F-5 is the backup RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at the Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on these tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also shown. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over 5% are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission.

  10. Cassini RTG acceptance test results and RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M.

    1997-06-01

    Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents The thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F-2, F-6, and F-7. F-5 is tile back-up RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at die Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on than tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also showing. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over five percent are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission.

  11. Cassini RTG Acceptance Test Results and RTG Performance on Galileo and Ulysses

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Kelly, C. E.; Klee, P. M.

    1997-06-01

    Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents The thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F 2, F 6, and F 7. F 5 is tile back up RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at die Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on than tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also showing. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over five percent are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission.

  12. Experimental Test Plan for Grouting H-3 Calcine

    SciTech Connect

    Alan K. Herbst

    2006-01-01

    Approximately 4400 cubic meters of solid high-level waste called calcine are stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Under the Idaho Cleanup Project, dual disposal paths are being investigated. The first path includes calcine retrieval, package "as-is", and ship to the Monitored Geological Repository (MGR). The second path involves treatment of the calcine with such methods as vitrification or grouting. This test plan outlines the hot bench scale tests to grout actual calcine and verify that the waste form properties meet the waste acceptance criteria. This is a necessary sequential step in the process of qualifying a new waste form for repository acceptance. The archive H-3 calcine samples at the Contaminated Equipment Maintenance Building attached to New Waste Calcining Facility will be used in these tests at the Remote Analytical Laboratory. The tests are scheduled for the second quarter of fiscal year 2007.

  13. SU-E-T-60: A Plan Quality Index in IMRT QA That Is Independent of the Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D; Kang, S; Kim, T; Kim, K; Cho, M; Shin, D; Suh, T; Kim, S; Park, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In IMRT QA, plan quality evaluation is made based on pass rate under preset acceptance criteria, mostly using gamma-values. This method is convenient but, its Result highly depends on what the acceptance criteria are and suffers from the lack of sensitivity in judging how good the plan is. In this study, we introduced a simple but effective plan quality index of IMRT QA based on dose difference only to supplement such shortcomings, and investigated its validity. Methods: The proposed index is a single value which is calculated mainly based on point-by-point comparison between planned and measured dose distributions, and it becomes “1” in an ideal case. A systematic evaluation was performed with one-dimensional test dose distributions. For 3 hypothetical dose profiles, various displacements (in both dose and space) were introduced, the proposed index was calculated for each case, and the behavior of obtained indices was analyzed and compared with that of gamma evaluation. In addition, the feasibility of the index was assessed with clinical IMRT/VMAT/SBRT QA cases for different sites (prostate, head & neck, liver, lung, spine, and abdomen). Results: The proposed index showed more robust correlation with the amount of induced displacement compared to the gamma evaluation method. No matter what the acceptance criteria are (e.g., whether 3%/3mm or 2%/2mm), it was possible to clearly rank every case with the proposed index while it was difficult to do with the gamma evaluation method. Conclusion: IMRT plan quality can be evaluated quantitatively by the proposed index. It is considered that the proposed index would provide useful information for better judging the level of goodness of each plan and its Result is independent of the acceptance criteria. This work was supported by the Radiation Technology R&D program (No. 2013M2A2A7043498) and the Mid-career Researcher Program (2014R1A2A1A10050270) through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the

  14. Responding to Tobacco Craving: Experimental Test of Acceptance versus Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Litvin, Erika B.; Kovacs, Michelle A.; Hayes, Pattie L.; Brandon, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) provides a theoretical rationale for “acceptance” of thoughts and feelings, and proscribes suppression, a more intuitive and commonly used coping strategy. Suppression is theorized to have negative consequences not applicable to acceptance, including depletion in self-control and ironic post-suppression rebound effects. However, it remains largely unknown whether these strategies differentially affect frequency of drug-related thoughts, craving intensity, drug use behavior, or other relevant outcomes. Adult smokers (N =162) were randomly assigned to receive a brief laboratory-based coping intervention (acceptance or suppression) or were not given coping instructions (control group) and then were exposed to smoking cues. Results indicated that the suppression group was successful at suppressing thoughts of smoking, as they reported fewer thoughts of smoking than the other two groups. Also, both coping strategies were associated with benefit with respect to craving and affect. However, there were no group differences in depletion, nor did any rebound effects occur when coping was discontinued. Following the laboratory session, all participants attempted to quit or at least reduce their smoking for three days; the acceptance and suppression groups resumed use of their strategy. At 3-day follow-up, the acceptance and suppression groups reported greater self-efficacy for avoiding smoking when experiencing craving, compared to the control group. However, there were no group differences in number of cigarettes smoked during the three days. This study provides support for the value of acceptance-based coping, but also suggests that more research is needed to differentiate its benefits compared to suppression. PMID:23106639

  15. Acceptance of family planning amongst patients attending Dhulikhel hospital obstetrics and gynecology department.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, A; Kayastha, B; Manandhar, S; Chawla, C D

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of contraceptive methods is an important factor for an individual to use or not use of family planning methods. In Nepal, at least one modern method of family planning is universal amongst both men and women. To assess the knowledge, attitude regarding various family planning methods and practice of contraceptives amongst couples attending Dhulikhel Hospital Obstetrics and Gynecology Department. Five hundred and fifteen couples were interviewed. Their knowledge, attitude and practice of contraception were evaluated with the help of pre-evaluated questionnaire. The other variable used were the age of the couple, parity, educational status and economic status having effect on the contraceptive acceptance were taken into consideration. Descriptive analysis was conducted to obtain percentages. We observed that 74.98% of women were in the age group of 20-29 years and 59.22% of men were within the age group of 20-29 years. Teen age mothers were 17.86% and teen age fathers were 1.35%. In our study, we observed that higher the educational level better was the acceptance for family planning methods. The higher income group had less number of children compared to lesser income group. In our study, we noticed that all the couples knew about different methods of family planning, main sources of information were television, pamphlets and healthworkers. Only 16 males had undergone vasectomy and 32 women had undergone tubectomy. Fewer number of vasectomy was due to the belief that undergoing vasectomy will make the male partner weak physically. 13.20% of women preferred Depot medroxy progesterone as a temporary method of family planning, 13% of males preferred condom as a temporary method of family planning. We conclude that education plays a vital role in the acceptance of family planning. As couples who have higher education level tend to have higher income and they have lesser number of children. They are more receptive towards counseling and agree upon the various

  16. Space Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 2.0 Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Carly; Vogel, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Following successful completion of the space suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 1.0 development and testing in 2011, the second system-level prototype, PLSS 2.0, was developed in 2012 to continue the maturation of the advanced PLSS design which is intended to reduce consumables, improve reliability and robustness, and incorporate additional sensing and functional capabilities over the current Space Shuttle/International Space Station Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) PLSS. PLSS 2.0 represents the first attempt at a packaged design comprising first generation or later component prototypes and medium fidelity interfaces within a flight-like representative volume. Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) is carryover terminology from the Space Shuttle Program referring to the series of test sequences used to verify functionality of the EMU PLSS prior to installation into the Space Shuttle airlock for launch. As applied to the PLSS 2.0 development and testing effort, PIA testing designated the series of 27 independent test sequences devised to verify component and subsystem functionality, perform in situ instrument calibrations, generate mapping data to define set-points for control algorithms, evaluate hardware performance against advanced PLSS design requirements, and provide quantitative and qualitative feedback on evolving design requirements and performance specifications. PLSS 2.0 PIA testing was carried out from 3/20/13 - 3/15/14 using a variety of test configurations to perform test sequences that ranged from stand-alone component testing to system-level testing, with evaluations becoming increasingly integrated as the test series progressed. Each of the 27 test sequences was vetted independently, with verification of basic functionality required before completion. Because PLSS 2.0 design requirements were evolving concurrently with PLSS 2.0 PIA testing, the requirements were used as guidelines to assess performance during the tests; after the completion of PIA

  17. Space Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 2.0 Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anchondo, Ian; Cox, Marlon; Meginnis, Carly; Westheimer, David; Vogel, Matt R.

    2016-01-01

    Following successful completion of the space suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 1.0 development and testing in 2011, the second system-level prototype, PLSS 2.0, was developed in 2012 to continue the maturation of the advanced PLSS design. This advanced PLSS is intended to reduce consumables, improve reliability and robustness, and incorporate additional sensing and functional capabilities over the current Space Shuttle/International Space Station Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) PLSS. PLSS 2.0 represents the first attempt at a packaged design comprising first generation or later component prototypes and medium fidelity interfaces within a flight-like representative volume. Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) is carryover terminology from the Space Shuttle Program referring to the series of test sequences used to verify functionality of the EMU PLSS prior to installation into the Space Shuttle airlock for launch. As applied to the PLSS 2.0 development and testing effort, PIA testing designated the series of 27 independent test sequences devised to verify component and subsystem functionality, perform in situ instrument calibrations, generate mapping data, define set-points, evaluate control algorithms, evaluate hardware performance against advanced PLSS design requirements, and provide quantitative and qualitative feedback on evolving design requirements and performance specifications. PLSS 2.0 PIA testing was carried out in 2013 and 2014 using a variety of test configurations to perform test sequences that ranged from stand-alone component testing to system-level testing, with evaluations becoming increasingly integrated as the test series progressed. Each of the 27 test sequences was vetted independently, with verification of basic functionality required before completion. Because PLSS 2.0 design requirements were evolving concurrently with PLSS 2.0 PIA testing, the requirements were used as guidelines to assess performance during the tests; after the

  18. Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Product Acceptance Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D.

    1999-06-22

    'The Hanford Site has been used to produce nuclear materials for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors. A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste, largely generated during Pu production, exists in 177 underground single- and double-shell tanks. These wastes are to be retrieved and separated into low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) fractions. The DOE is proceeding with an approach to privatize the treatment and immobilization of Handord''s LAW and HLW.'

  19. Feasibility and Acceptability of a Dignity Therapy/Life Plan Intervention for Patients With Advanced Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dose, Ann Marie; Hubbard, Joleen M; Mansfield, Aaron S; McCabe, Pamela J; Krecke, Catherine A; Sloan, Jeff A

    2017-09-01

    To determine the feasibility and acceptability of a dignity therapy/life plan intervention in the outpatient oncology setting.
. Pilot descriptive study.
. Outpatient clinic in a tertiary oncology center. 
. 18 patients within 12 months after diagnosis undergoing treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer or non-small cell lung cancer.
. Patients received dignity therapy, consisting of a focused life review/values clarification interview session and two subsequent sessions to produce a generativity document, which they can use later as they wish. Participants also wrote a life plan, in which they listed future hopes and dreams. Intervention feasibility and acceptability for patients and oncology clinician satisfaction were assessed.
. Among the 18 patients completing the intervention, almost all felt it was worthwhile, would do it again, had their expectations met or exceeded, would recommend it to others, and said the timing was just right.
. This psychosocial intervention was found to be feasible and acceptable to patients with cancer undergoing active treatment.
. Nurses may be in an ideal position to offer a dignity therapy/life plan intervention to patients with advanced cancer during treatment.

  20. 30 CFR 282.23 - Testing Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... detailed Mining Plan than is obtainable under an approved Delineation Plan, to prepare feasibility studies, to carry out a pilot program to evaluate processing techniques or technology or mining equipment, or to determine environmental effects by a pilot test mining operation, the lessee shall submit a...

  1. GPS test range mission planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Iris P.; Hancock, Thomas P.

    The principal features of the Test Range User Mission Planner (TRUMP), a PC-resident tool designed to aid in deploying and utilizing GPS-based test range assets, are reviewed. TRUMP features time history plots of time-space-position information (TSPI); performance based on a dynamic GPS/inertial system simulation; time history plots of TSPI data link connectivity; digital terrain elevation data maps with user-defined cultural features; and two-dimensional coverage plots of ground-based test range assets. Some functions to be added during the next development phase are discussed.

  2. Proposed acceptance, qualification, and characterization tests for thin-film PV modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waddington, D.; Mrig, L.; Deblasio, R.; Ross, R.

    1988-01-01

    Details of a proposed test program for PV thin-film modules which the Department of Energy has directed the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) to prepare are presented. Results of one of the characterization tests that SERI has performed are also presented. The objective is to establish a common approach to testing modules that will be acceptable to both users and manufacturers. The tests include acceptance, qualification, and characterization tests. Acceptance tests verify that randomly selected modules have similar characteristics. Qualification tests are based on accelerated test methods designed to simulate adverse conditions. Characterization tests provide data on performance in a predefined environment.

  3. Electronic Systems Test Laboratory (ESTL) User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ESTL. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  4. Radiant Heat Test Facility (RHTF): User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelPapa, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the RHTF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non- NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  5. Structures Test Laboratory (STL). User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zipay, John J.

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the STL. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  6. Vibration and Acoustic Test Facility (VATF): User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fantasia, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the VATF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  7. Antenna Test Facility (ATF): User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ATF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  8. For your interest? The ethical acceptability of using non-invasive prenatal testing to test 'purely for information'.

    PubMed

    Deans, Zuzana; Clarke, Angus J; Newson, Ainsley J

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) is an emerging form of prenatal genetic testing that provides information about the genetic constitution of a foetus without the risk of pregnancy loss as a direct result of the test procedure. As with other prenatal tests, information from NIPT can help to make a decision about termination of pregnancy, plan contingencies for birth or prepare parents to raise a child with a genetic condition. NIPT can also be used by women and couples to test purely 'for information'. Here, no particular action is envisaged following the test; it is motivated entirely by an interest in the result. The fact that NIPT can be performed without posing a risk to the pregnancy could give rise to an increase in such requests. In this paper, we examine the ethical aspects of using NIPT 'purely for information', including the competing interests of the prospective parents and the future child, and the acceptability of testing for 'frivolous' reasons. Drawing on several clinical scenarios, we claim that arguments about testing children for genetic conditions are relevant to this debate. In addition, we raise ethical concerns over the potential for objectification of the child. We conclude that, in most cases, using NIPT to test for adult-onset conditions, carrier status or non-serious traits presenting in childhood would be unacceptable. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Firefighters' communication transceiver test plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, R. J.

    1984-05-01

    The requirements for the operational testing of the firefighters communication transceiver were identified. The major concerns centered around the integrity and reliability of the firefighter/microphone interface. The major concern about the radio hardware was that it be intrinsically safe in hazardous atmospheres and that the system not interfere with the fit or facial seal of self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA). The greatest concern for operational testing purposes as the reliability and clarity of the line of communication between the firefighter and those on the fireground with whom he must maintain contact. A desire to test any units developed in both training exercises and in real responses to hazardous material incidents was expressed. It is felt that a VOX-microphone built into the SCBA facemask gives the best performance. A voice-pickup product device which combines a bone conduction microphone and a speaker into a single ear mounted unit is examined.

  10. Firefighters' communication transceiver test plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    The requirements for the operational testing of the firefighters communication transceiver were identified. The major concerns centered around the integrity and reliability of the firefighter/microphone interface. The major concern about the radio hardware was that it be intrinsically safe in hazardous atmospheres and that the system not interfere with the fit or facial seal of self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA). The greatest concern for operational testing purposes as the reliability and clarity of the line of communication between the firefighter and those on the fireground with whom he must maintain contact. A desire to test any units developed in both training exercises and in real responses to hazardous material incidents was expressed. It is felt that a VOX-microphone built into the SCBA facemask gives the best performance. A voice-pickup product device which combines a bone conduction microphone and a speaker into a single ear mounted unit is examined.

  11. CANMET Gasifier Liner Coupon Material Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Fitzsimmons; Alan Darby; Fred Widman

    2005-10-30

    The test plan detailed in this topical report supports Task 1 of the project titled ''Development of Technologies and Capabilities for Coal Energy Resources - Advanced Gasification Systems Development (AGSD)''. The purpose of these tests is to verify that materials planned for use in an advanced gasifier pilot plant will withstand the environments in a commercial gasifier. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) has developed and designed the cooled liner test assembly article that will be tested at CANMET Energy Technology Centre (CETC-O) in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (CETC-O). The Test Plan TP-00364 is duplicated in its entirety, with formatting changes to comply with the format required for this Topical Report. The table of contents has been modified to include the additional material required by this topical report. Test Request example and drawings of non-proprietary nature are also included as appendices.

  12. EVALUATION OF ARG-1 SAMPLES PREPARED BY CESIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION DURING THE ISOLOK SME ACCEPTABILITY TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T.; Hera, K.; Coleman, C.

    2011-12-05

    Evaluation of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. The Mechanical Systems & Custom Equipment Development (MS&CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recently completed the evaluation of one of these opportunities - the possibility of using an Isolok sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard valve for taking DWPF process samples at the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). The use of an Isolok for SME sampling has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time, and decrease CPC cycle time. The SME acceptability testing for the Isolok was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 and was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNLRP-2011-00145. RW-0333P QA requirements applied to the task, and the results from the investigation were documented in SRNL-STI-2011-00693. Measurement of the chemical composition of study samples was a critical component of the SME acceptability testing of the Isolok. A sampling and analytical plan supported the investigation with the analytical plan directing that the study samples be prepared by a cesium carbonate (Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) fusion dissolution method and analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The use of the cesium carbonate preparation method for the Isolok testing provided an opportunity for an additional assessment of this dissolution method, which is being investigated as a potential replacement for the two methods (i.e., sodium peroxide fusion and mixed acid dissolution) that have been used at the DWPF for the analysis of SME samples. Earlier testing of the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method yielded promising results which led to a TTR from Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) to SRNL for additional support and an associated TTQAP to direct the SRNL efforts. A technical report resulting

  13. Acceptance Test Report for Gamma Carts A and B

    SciTech Connect

    FULLER, P.J.

    2000-03-16

    Report of Shop Test of the Gamma Cart System to be used in the AZ-101 Mixer Pump Demonstration Test. Reports of the hardware and software tests. The objective of the testing was to verify in the shop that the hardware and software operated according to design specifications before field-testing and installation.

  14. PDSS/IMC qualification test software acceptance procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Tests to be performed for qualifying the payload development support system image motion compensator (IMC) are identified. The performance of these tests will verify the IMC interfaces and thereby verify the qualification test software.

  15. Space shuttle horizontal flight test plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosley, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    A horizontal takeoff flight test concept for testing space shuttle vehicles is presented. The guidelines used in planning and support requirements for the flight tests are developed. Details of the test program are provided. The instrumentation requirements are defined. The limitations imposed by the short flight endurance and restricted maneuvering capability of the shuttle booster/orbiter in the horizontal mode are described. The test program covers the following investigations. (1) stall and lift boundary tests, (2)takeoff and landing tests, (3) level flight speed power tests, (4) longitudinal and laterial directional dynamic stability, and (5) static directional stability.

  16. 46 CFR 54.05-17 - Weld toughness test acceptance criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Weld toughness test acceptance criteria. 54.05-17 Section 54.05-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-17 Weld toughness test acceptance criteria. (a) For Charpy V-notch...

  17. 46 CFR 54.05-17 - Weld toughness test acceptance criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Weld toughness test acceptance criteria. 54.05-17 Section 54.05-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-17 Weld toughness test acceptance criteria. (a) For Charpy V-notch...

  18. 46 CFR 54.05-17 - Weld toughness test acceptance criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Weld toughness test acceptance criteria. 54.05-17 Section 54.05-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-17 Weld toughness test acceptance criteria. (a) For Charpy V-notch...

  19. 46 CFR 54.05-17 - Weld toughness test acceptance criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Weld toughness test acceptance criteria. 54.05-17 Section 54.05-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-17 Weld toughness test acceptance criteria. (a) For Charpy V-notch...

  20. 46 CFR 54.05-17 - Weld toughness test acceptance criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Weld toughness test acceptance criteria. 54.05-17 Section 54.05-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-17 Weld toughness test acceptance criteria. (a) For Charpy V-notch...

  1. Department of Defense picture archiving and communication system acceptance testing: results and identification of problem components.

    PubMed

    Allison, Scott A; Sweet, Clifford F; Beall, Douglas P; Lewis, Thomas E; Monroe, Thomas

    2005-09-01

    The PACS implementation process is complicated requiring a tremendous amount of time, resources, and planning. The Department of Defense (DOD) has significant experience in developing and refining PACS acceptance testing (AT) protocols that assure contract compliance, clinical safety, and functionality. The DOD's AT experience under the initial Medical Diagnostic Imaging Support System contract led to the current Digital Imaging Network-Picture Archiving and Communications Systems (DIN-PACS) contract AT protocol. To identify the most common system and component deficiencies under the current DIN-PACS AT protocol, 14 tri-service sites were evaluated during 1998-2000. Sixteen system deficiency citations with 154 separate types of limitations were noted with problems involving the workstation, interfaces, and the Radiology Information System comprising more than 50% of the citations. Larger PACS deployments were associated with a higher number of deficiencies. The most commonly cited systems deficiencies were among the most expensive components of the PACS.

  2. Opportunistic screening for genital chlamydial infection. I: Acceptability of urine testing in primary and secondary healthcare settings

    PubMed Central

    Pimenta, J; Catchpole, M; Rogers, P; Perkins, E; Jackson, N; Carlisle, C; Randall, S; Hopwood, J; Hewitt, G; Underhill, G; Mallinson, H; McLean, L; Gleave, T; Tobin, J; Harindra, V; Ghosh, A

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the acceptability of opportunistic screening for Chlamydia trachomatis in young people in a range of healthcare settings. Design: An opportunistic screening programme (1 September 1999 to 31 August 2000) using urine samples tested by ligase chain reaction (LCR). Data on uptake and testing were collected and in-depth interviews were used for programme evaluation. Setting: General practice, family planning, genitourinary medicine clinics, adolescent sexual health clinics, termination of pregnancy clinics, and women's services in hospitals (antenatal, colposcopy, gynaecology and infertility clinics) in two health authorities (Wirral and Portsmouth and South East Hampshire). Main participants: Sexually active women aged between 16 and 24 years attending healthcare settings for any reason. Main outcome measures: Uptake data: proportion of women accepting a test by area, healthcare setting, and age; overall population coverage achieved in 1 year. Evaluation data: participants' attitudes and views towards opportunistic screening and urine testing. Results: Acceptance of testing by women (16–24 years) was 76% in Portsmouth and 84% in Wirral. Acceptance was lower in younger women (Portsmouth only) and varied by healthcare setting within each site. 50% of the target female population were screened in Portsmouth and 39% in Wirral. Both the opportunistic offer of screening and the method of screening were universally acceptable. Major factors influencing a decision to accept screening were the non-invasive nature of testing and treatment, desire to protect future fertility, and the experimental nature of the screening programme. Conclusions: An opportunistic model of urine screening for chlamydial infection is a practical, universally acceptable method of screening. PMID:12576607

  3. Program overview of peacekeeper flight test planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodbury, S.; Gorman, R. G.

    1983-11-01

    This paper will present an overview of the planning involved in designing the flight test program for the Peacekeeper weapon system. Items to be discussed are: the Peacekeeper missile and launch facilities description; the overall flight test objectives progression from first flight through initial operational capability (IOC); mission design and data acquisition; impact of range safety constraints; requirement for development of new range sensors; program plans for mission evaluation and the integration of test reports; and a short discussion of the universal documentation system (UDS).

  4. Advanced Materials Laboratory User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orndoff, Evelyne

    2012-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the Advanced Materials Laboratory. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  5. Light Duty Utility Arm Software Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kiebel, G.R.

    1995-12-18

    This plan describes how validation testing of the software will be implemented for the integrated control and data acquisition system of the Light Duty Utility Arm System (LDUA). The purpose of LDUA software validation testing is to demonstrate and document that the LDUA software meets its software requirements specification.

  6. End User Acceptance - Requirements or Specifications, Certification, Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Judith

    2013-01-01

    NASA follows top level safety requirement of two-failure tolerance (t hree levels of controls or design for minimum risk) to all catastroph ic hazards in the design of safe li-ion batteries for space use. ? R igorous development testing at appropriate levels to credible offnominal conditions and review of test data. ? Implement robust design con trols based on test results and test again to confirm safety at the a ppropriate levels. ? Stringent testing of all (100%) flight batteries (from button cells to large batteries).

  7. Testing the acceptability of liquid fish oil in older adults.

    PubMed

    Yaxley, Alison; Miller, Michelle D; Fraser, Robert J; Cobiac, Lynne; Crotty, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory conditions likely to benefit from fish oil therapy are prevalent in older adults however acceptability in this group is uncertain. This study aimed to assess the palatability of a range of liquid fish oil concentrations, the frequency and extent of side effects, and to summarise any effects on adherence to fish oil therapy in older adults. One hundred patients (>=60 years) completed a randomised, single-blind palatability study, conducted in two parts. In part one, 50 subjects, blinded to random sample order, consumed multiple liquid fish oil samples (2x10%, 40% and 100%). In part two, 50 subjects tasted one concentration, or 100% extra light olive oil (control). Pleasantness of taste was scored on a 5-point Likert scale. Side effects were recorded 24-hr post-tasting. Results of part one showed that 9/50 participants reported increasingly unpleasant taste with increasing fish oil concentration. 14/50 reported unpleasant taste for 100% fish oil vs 7/50 for 10%. 14/50 reported side effects which would not affect compliance with therapy. For part two, 1/12 reported unpleasant taste for 100% vs 0/13 for 10% fish oil or control. 4/50 reported side effects and 2/4 indicated these would prevent ongoing fish oil therapy. The authors conclude that taste itself is not a deterrent to fish oil therapy. Furthermore, reported adverse effects may not be a true reaction to fish oil, or dissuade patients from compliance. Liquid fish oil supplements are acceptable to older adults, therefore should be investigated as a therapy for geriatric conditions.

  8. Acceptance Test Report for 241-SY Pump Cradle Hydraulic System

    SciTech Connect

    Koons, B.M.

    1995-03-08

    The purpose of this ATP is to verify that hydraulic system/cylinder procured to replace the cable/winch system on the 101-SY Mitigation Pump cradle assembly fulfills its functional requirements for raising and lowering the cradle assembly between 70 and 90 degrees, both with and without pump. A system design review was performed on the 101-SY Cradle Hydraulic System by the vendor before shipping (See WHC-SD-WM-DRR-045, 241-SY-101 Cradle Hydraulic System Design Review). The scope of this plan focuses on verification of the systems ability to rotate the cradle assembly and any load through the required range of motion.

  9. Tank Monitoring and Control System (TMACS) Acceptance Test Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    BARNES, D.A.

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe tests performed to validate Revision 12.0 of the TMACS Monitor and Control System (TMACS) and verify that the software functions as intended by design. This document is intended to test the software portion of TMACS. The tests will be performed on the development system. The software to be tested is the TMACS knowledge bases (KB) and the I/O driver/services. The development system will not be communicating to field equipment; instead, the field equipment is simulated using emulators or multiplexers in the lab.

  10. Project B610 process control configuration acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Silvan, G.R.

    1995-06-27

    The purpose of this test is to verify the Westinghouse configuration of the MICON A/S Distributed Control System for project B610. The following will be verified: (1) proper assignment and operation of all field inputs to and outputs from the MICON Termination panels; (2) proper operation of all display data on the operators` console; (3) proper operation of all required alarms; and (4) proper operation of all required interlocks. This test only verifies the proper operation of the Westinghouse control configuration (or program). It will not be responsible for verifying proper operation of the MICON hardware or operating software. Neither does it test any of the B610 instrument. The MICON hardware and software has been tested as part of the equipment procurement. Instrumentation and wiring installed under project B620 will be tested under a separate functional test. In some cases, precise transmitter ranges, alarm setpoints, and controller tuning parameters are not available at this time. Therefore, approximate values are used during the test. This should not affect the proper operation of the configuration or the validity of this test. Final values will be assigned during operability testing.

  11. 78 FR 65007 - Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 3

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-30

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has determined that the inspections, tests, and analyses have been successfully completed, and that the specified acceptance criteria are met for Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria (ITAAC), 2.1.03.11 for the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 3.

  12. Retrofit and acceptance test of 30-cm ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poeschel, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Six 30 cm mercury thrusters were modified to the J-series design and evaluated using standardized test procedures. The thruster performance meets the design objectives (lifetime objective requires verification), and documentation (drawings, etc.) for the design is completed and upgraded. The retrofit modifications are described and the test data for the modifications are presented and discussed.

  13. Acceptance test procedure: RMW Land Disposal Facility Project W-025

    SciTech Connect

    Roscha, V.

    1994-12-12

    This ATP establishes field testing procedures to demonstrate that the electrical/instrumentation system functions as intended by design for the Radioactive Mixed Waste Land Disposal Facility. Procedures are outlined for the field testing of the following: electrical heat trace system; transducers and meter/controllers; pumps; leachate storage tank; and building power and lighting.

  14. Citizen CATE Experiment: Prototype Testing and Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penn, Matthew; Baer, Bob; Isberner, Fred

    2015-05-01

    An off-the-shelf small refracting telescope and digital imaging system was purchased and tested for application to a citizen science experiment to be run during the 2017 total solar eclipse. Ease of set-up, imaging ability, and sensitivity tests were done, and then the telescope was shipped to take data at the 2015 total solar eclipse from the Faroe Islands. Details of the equipment, results from the tests, and plans for future eclipses are discussed.

  15. DEEP VADOSE ZONE TREATABILITY TEST PLAN

    SciTech Connect

    GB CHRONISTER; MJ TRUEX

    2009-07-02

    {sm_bullet} Treatability test plan published in 2008 {sm_bullet} Outlines technology treatability activities for evaluating application of in situ technologies and surface barriers to deep vadose zone contamination (technetium and uranium) {sm_bullet} Key elements - Desiccation testing - Testing of gas-delivered reactants for in situ treatment of uranium - Evaluating surface barrier application to deep vadose zone - Evaluating in situ grouting and soil flushing

  16. Surface stability test plan for protective barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    Natural-material protective barriers for long-term isolation of buried waste have been identified as integral components of a plan to isolate a number of Hanford defense waste sites. Standards currently being developed for internal and external barrier performance will mandate a barrier surface layer that is resistant to the eolian erosion processes of wind erosion (deflation) and windborne particle deposition (formation of sand dunes). Thus, experiments are needed to measure rates of eolian erosion processes impacting those surfaces under different surface and climatological conditions. Data from these studies will provide information for use in the evaluation of selected surface layers as a means of providing stable cover over waste sites throughout the design life span of protective barriers. The multi-year test plan described in this plan is directed at understanding processes of wind erosion and windborne particle deposition, providing measurements of erosion rates for models, and suggesting construction materials and methods for reducing the effect of long-term eolian erosion on the barrier. Specifically, this plan describes possible methods to measure rates of eolian erosion, including field and laboratory procedure. Advantages and disadvantages of laboratory (wind tunnel) tests are discussed, and continued wind tunnel tests are recommended for wind erosion studies. A comparison between field and wind tunnel erosive forces is discussed. Plans for testing surfaces are described. Guidance is also presented for studying the processes controlling sand dune and blowout formation. 24 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Specialized Environmental Chamber Test Complex: User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montz, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the Specialized Environmental Test Complex. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  18. Waste retrieval sluicing system data acquisition system acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Bevins, R.R.

    1998-07-31

    This document describes the test procedure for the Project W-320 Tank C-106 Sluicing Data Acquisition System (W-320 DAS). The Software Test portion will test items identified in the WRSS DAS System Description (SD), HNF-2115. Traceability to HNF-2115 will be via a reference that follows in parenthesis, after the test section title. The Field Test portion will test sensor operability, analog to digital conversion, and alarm setpoints for field instrumentation. The W-320 DAS supplies data to assist thermal modeling of tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. It is designed to be a central repository for information from sources that would otherwise have to be read, recorded, and integrated manually. Thus, completion of the DAS requires communication with several different data collection devices and output to a usable PC data formats. This test procedure will demonstrate that the DAS functions as required by the project requirements stated in Section 3 of the W-320 DAS System Description, HNF-2115.

  19. Tank Monitoring and Control Sys (TMACS) Acceptance Test Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    WANDLING, R.R.

    1999-11-08

    The purpose of this document is to describe tests performed to validate Revision 11.2 of the TMACS Monitor and Control System (TMCACS) and verify that the software functions as intended by design. The tests will be performed on the development system. The software to be tested is the TMACS knowledge bases (KB) and the I/O driver/services. The development system will not be talking to field equipment; instead, the field equipment is simulated using emulators or multiplexers in the lab.

  20. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid U

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-12-05

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''U''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop.

  1. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid T

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-05-18

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing Of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''T''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop.

  2. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid V

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-05-18

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control. (PIC) skid designed as ''V''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop.

  3. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid R

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-05-11

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''R''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop.

  4. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid W

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-05-18

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''W''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop.

  5. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid Q

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-03-27

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''Q''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop.

  6. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid T

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-06-20

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designated as ''T''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop.

  7. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping and Instrumentation Control Skid L

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    1999-10-11

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping and Instrumentation Control (PIC) skid designed as ''L''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the shop.

  8. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping and Instrumentation Control Skid N

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    1999-12-13

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping and Instrumentation Control (PIC) skid designed as ''N''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the shop.

  9. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid P

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-03-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''P''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop.

  10. MAC mini acceptance test procedure, software Version 3.0

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, V.K.

    1994-10-17

    The K Basins Materials Accounting (MAC) programs had some major improvements made to it to organize the main-tables by Location, Canister, and Material. This ATP describes how the code was to be tested to verify its correctness.

  11. 46 CFR 164.023-11 - Acceptance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... identification tests are conducted: (1) The average length/weight ratio of the thread in meters per kilogram... analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimeter, or other equivalent means adequate...

  12. 46 CFR 164.023-11 - Acceptance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... identification tests are conducted: (1) The average length/weight ratio of the thread in meters per kilogram... analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimeter, or other equivalent means adequate...

  13. CSI computer system/remote interface unit acceptance test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Dean W., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The validation tests conducted on the Control/Structures Interaction (CSI) Computer System (CCS)/Remote Interface Unit (RIU) is discussed. The CCS/RIU consists of a commercially available, Langley Research Center (LaRC) programmed, space flight qualified computer and a flight data acquisition and filtering computer, developed at LaRC. The tests were performed in the Space Structures Research Laboratory (SSRL) and included open loop excitation, closed loop control, safing, RIU digital filtering, and RIU stand alone testing with the CSI Evolutionary Model (CEM) Phase-0 testbed. The test results indicated that the CCS/RIU system is comparable to ground based systems in performing real-time control-structure experiments.

  14. Acceptance Criterion for Hydrogen Embrittlement Testing of Coated Fasteners

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    testing chambers/ adapters and ASTM F519/F1940 certified specimens (RSLTM) RSLTM Technology Center Laboratory Testing Services and hands-on training...Program Causes for Service Failures Processing error – 20% (Insufficient hydrogen bake-out treatment) Fault: Manufacturer Over- torquing – 10...Lubricant, wrench ) Fault: User Bending in combination with Coating – 70% (Long thin screws, others)+ (Galvanic couple as a hydrogen pump) Fault: Design

  15. Redstone Test Stand Accepted Into National Register of Historical Places

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    On October 02, 1976, Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Redstone test stand was received into the National Registry of Historical Places. Photographed in front of the Redstone test stand along with their wives are (left to right), Madison County Commission Chairman James Record, Dr. William R. Lucas, MSFC Center Director from June 15, 1974 until July 3, 1986, (holding certificate), Ed, Buckbee, Space and Rocket Center Director; Harvie Jones, Huntsville Architect; Dick Smith; and Joe Jones.

  16. Acceptance Test Procedure: SY101 air pallet system

    SciTech Connect

    Koons, B.M.

    1995-05-30

    The purpose of this test procedure is to verify that the system(s) procured to load the SY-101 Mitigation Test Pump package fulfills its functional requirements. It will also help determine the man dose expected due to handling of the package during the actual event. The scope of this procedure focuses on the ability of the air pallets and container saddles to carry the container package from the new 100 foot concrete pad into 2403-WD where it will be stored awaiting final disposition. This test attempts to simulate the actual event of depositing the SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test pump into the 2403-WD building. However, at the time of testing road modifications required to drive the 100 ton trailer into CWC were not performed. Therefore a flatbed trailer will be use to transport the container to CWC. The time required to off load the container from the 100 ton trailer will be recorded for man dose evaluation on location. The cranes used for this test will also be different than the actual event. This is not considered to be an issue due to minimal effects on man dose.

  17. Acceptance test procedure for the MO-293 (1722) 10-wide mobile office

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, S.C.

    1994-12-28

    This Acceptance Test Procedure has been prepared to demonstrate that the Fire Protection System functions as required by project criteria. The test results will be issued as an acceptance test report after all the testing is complete. This facility is part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. An appendix is provided as a checklist of activities to be performed by the fire alarm system installer to ensure proper installation and operation.

  18. Fire alarm system acceptance test procedure for Project W-164, Sample Equipment Cleaning Facility

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, P.J.

    1995-04-17

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the Fire Protection System functions as required by project criteria. The test results will be issued as an acceptance test report (ATR) after all testing is complete. Components that are covered by this procedure are the fire alarm control system, power transfer to battery backup, switching circuits, alarm input devices, and battery capacity and recharge capability. Bldg 6268 is part of the Effluent Treatment and Laboratory Project.

  19. SU-E-P-46: Clinical Acceptance Testing and Implementation of a Portable CT Unit

    SciTech Connect

    LaFrance, M; Marsh, S; Hicks, R; O’Donnell-Moran, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Planning for the first installation in New England of a new portable CT unit to be used in the Operating Room required the integration of many departments including Surgery, Neurosurgery, Information Services, Clinical Engineering, Radiology and Medical Physics/Radiation Safety. Acceptance testing and the quality assurance procedures were designed to optimize image quality and patient and personnel radiation exposure. Methods: The vendor’s protocols were tested using the CT Dosimetry phantoms. The system displayed the CTDIw instead of the CTDIvol while testing the unit. Radiation exposure was compared to existing CT scanners from installed CT units throughout the facility. Brainlab measures all 4 periphery slots on the CT Dosimetry phantom. The ACR measures only the superior slot for the periphery measurement. A comprehensive radiation survey was also performed for several locations. Results: The CTDIvol measurements were comparable for the following studies: brain, C-Spine, and sinuses. However, the mobile CT measurements were slightly higher than other CT units but within acceptable tolerance if measured using the ACR method.Based on scatter measurements, it was determined if any personnel were to stay in the OR Suite during image acquisition that the appropriate lead apron and thyroid shields had to be worn.In addition, to reduce unnecessary scatter, there were two mobile 6 foot wide shields (1/16″ lead equivalent) available to protect personnel in the room and adjacent areas. Conclusion: Intraoperative CT provides the physician new opportunities for evaluation of the progression of surgical resections and device placement at the cost of increasing the amount of trained personnel required to perform this procedure. It also brings with it challenges to keep the radiation exposure to the patients and staff within reasonable limits.

  20. KSC 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) Operational Acceptance Test (OAT) Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbre, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    This report documents analysis results of the Kennedy Space Center updated 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) Operational Acceptance Test (OAT). This test was designed to demonstrate that the new DRWP operates in a similar manner to the previous DRWP for use as a situational awareness asset for mission operations at the Eastern Range to identify rapid changes in the wind environment that weather balloons cannot depict. Data examination and two analyses showed that the updated DRWP meets the specifications in the OAT test plan and performs at least as well as the previous DRWP. Data examination verified that the DRWP provides complete profiles every five minutes from 1.8-19.5 km in vertical increments of 150 m. Analysis of 5,426 wind component reports from 49 concurrent DRWP and balloon profiles presented root mean square (RMS) wind component differences around 2.0 m/s. The DRWP's effective vertical resolution (EVR) was found to be 300 m for both the westerly and southerly wind component, which the best EVR possible given the DRWP's vertical sampling interval. A third analysis quantified the sensitivity to rejecting data that do not have adequate signal by assessing the number of first-guess propagations at each altitude. This report documents the data, quality control procedures, methodology, and results of each analysis. It also shows that analysis of the updated DRWP produced results that were at least as good as the previous DRWP with proper rationale. The report recommends acceptance of the updated DRWP for situational awareness usage as per the OAT's intent.

  1. Public acceptance and real testing of a nuclear repository

    SciTech Connect

    Brotzen, O.

    1995-12-31

    A local referendum and national polls show predominant distrust of the current disposal concept for spent nuclear fuel in Sweden. Plain neglect of in-place testing and monitoring of repository performance may be a contributing factor. The long periods of time involved in safe disposal call for thorough study of the potential and limitations of accelerated tests. The variation in some time involved in safe disposal call for thorough study of the potential and limitations of accelerated tests. The variation in some rate-determining factors attainable in an open repository suggests that results may be obtained which after backfilling would need periods of time comparable to those required for decay of the most harmful, strongly sorbed radionuclides. Focus should be on the isolation and containment of radionuclides in the accessible nearfield, rather than on nuclide release and transport through the inaccessible farfield. Tentative approaches are outlined, regarding nearfield groundwater control and barrier performance, and the local geochemical record, for decisions before excavations start, before development of disposal areas in a repository, and before emplacement of spent fuel, and also for monitoring performance thereafter. All tests should provide input to a strict and public licensing procedure, which ensures that no phase in disposal can be seen as a point of no return endangering future generations.

  2. MAC mini acceptance test procedures, software Version 3.3

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, V.K.

    1994-10-17

    The K Basins Materials Accounting (MAC) programs had some improvements made to it to to change slightly the access authorized users had to the modification of critical data. This ATP describes how the code was to be tested to verify its correctness.

  3. Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope: integration, testing, and commissioning planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Simon; Gonzales, Kerry; Hubbard, Robert P.; Liang, Chen; Kneale, Ruth A.; McBride, William R.; Sekulic, Predrag; Williams, Timothy R.

    2016-08-01

    The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) has been in its construction phase since 2010, anticipating the onset of the integration, test, and commissioning (IT&C) phase in early 2017, and the commencement of science verification in 2019. The works on Haleakala are progressing at a phenomenal rate and many of the various subsystems are either through or about to enter their Factory (or Laboratory) acceptance. The delays in obtaining site planning permissions, while a serious issue for Project Management, has allowed the sub-systems to develop well ahead of their required delivery to site. We have benefited from the knowledge that many sub-systems will be on site and ready for integration well before affecting the critical path. Opportunities have been presented for additional laboratory/factory testing which, while not free, significantly reduce the risks of potential delays and rework on site. From the perspective of IT&C this has provided an opportunity to develop the IT&C plans and schedules free from the pressures of imminent deployment. In this paper we describe the ongoing planning of the Integration, Testing and Commissioning (IT&C) phase of the project in particular the detailed planning phase that we are currently developing.

  4. Decision Models for Determining the Optimal Life Test Sampling Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechval, Nicholas A.; Nechval, Konstantin N.; Purgailis, Maris; Berzins, Gundars; Strelchonok, Vladimir F.

    2010-11-01

    Life test sampling plan is a technique, which consists of sampling, inspection, and decision making in determining the acceptance or rejection of a batch of products by experiments for examining the continuous usage time of the products. In life testing studies, the lifetime is usually assumed to be distributed as either a one-parameter exponential distribution, or a two-parameter Weibull distribution with the assumption that the shape parameter is known. Such oversimplified assumptions can facilitate the follow-up analyses, but may overlook the fact that the lifetime distribution can significantly affect the estimation of the failure rate of a product. Moreover, sampling costs, inspection costs, warranty costs, and rejection costs are all essential, and ought to be considered in choosing an appropriate sampling plan. The choice of an appropriate life test sampling plan is a crucial decision problem because a good plan not only can help producers save testing time, and reduce testing cost; but it also can positively affect the image of the product, and thus attract more consumers to buy it. This paper develops the frequentist (non-Bayesian) decision models for determining the optimal life test sampling plans with an aim of cost minimization by identifying the appropriate number of product failures in a sample that should be used as a threshold in judging the rejection of a batch. The two-parameter exponential and Weibull distributions with two unknown parameters are assumed to be appropriate for modelling the lifetime of a product. A practical numerical application is employed to demonstrate the proposed approach.

  5. AGR-1 Irradiation Experiment Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    John T. Maki

    2009-10-01

    This document presents the current state of planning for the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment will be irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The test will contain six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule will contain a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. The irradiation is planned for about 700 effective full power days (approximately 2.4 calendar years) with a time-averaged, volume-average temperature of approximately 1050 °C. Average fuel burnup, for the entire test, will be greater than 17.7 % FIMA, and the fuel will experience fast neutron fluences between 2.4 and 4.5 x 1025 n/m2 (E>0.18 MeV).

  6. Characteristics of patients who accept and decline ED rapid HIV testing.

    PubMed

    Schechter-Perkins, Elissa M; Koppelman, Elisa; Mitchell, Patricia M; Morgan, Jake R; Kutzen, Randie; Drainoni, Mari-Lynn

    2014-09-01

    Understanding differences between patients who accept and decline HIV testing is important for developing methods to reduce decliner rates among patients at risk for undiagnosed HIV. The objectives of this study were to determine the rates of acceptance and reasons for declining, and to determine if differences exist in patient or visit characteristics between those who accept and decline testing. This was a retrospective medical record review of all patients offered an emergency department (ED) HIV test from 11/1/11 to 10/31/12. Patient demographic characteristics, health characteristics, and ED visit characteristics were compared to assess differences between those who accept and those who decline testing. Of 4510 ED patients offered an HIV test, 3470 accepted for an acceptance rate of 77%. The most common reasons for declining were "no perceived risk" and "tested in the last 3 months." Those who accepted testing were more likely to be unmarried, less than age 35, Hispanic or African American, Spanish speaking, foreign born, have no primary care provider, report no pain at triage, have a daytime ED visit, and be discharged from the ED compared to admitted. Sex, employment status, and ED length of stay did not affect whether patients accepted testing. Acceptance of ED-based rapid HIV testing is not universal, and there are both patient and visit characteristics consistently associated with declining testing. This detracts from the goal of using the ED to screen a large number of at-risk patients who do not have access to testing elsewhere. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Solar panel acceptance testing using a pulsed solar simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hershey, T. L.

    1977-01-01

    Utilizing specific parameters as area of an individual cell, number in series and parallel, and established coefficient of current and voltage temperature dependence, a solar array irradiated with one solar constant at AMO and at ambient temperature can be characterized by a current-voltage curve for different intensities, temperatures, and even different configurations. Calibration techniques include: uniformity in area, depth and time, absolute and transfer irradiance standards, dynamic and functional check out procedures. Typical data are given for individual cell (2x2 cm) to complete flat solar array (5x5 feet) with 2660 cells and on cylindrical test items with up to 10,000 cells. The time and energy saving of such testing techniques are emphasized.

  8. TDS and BMT for CASES ADF (ADF RAMS), acceptance test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Hugh W.

    1992-01-01

    The Controls, Astrophysics, and Structures Experiment (CASES) is a proposed experiment to collect x ray images of the galactic center and solar disk with unprecedented resolution. This requires precision pointing and suppression of vibrations in the long, flexible structure that comprises the 32-m x ray telescope optical bench. Two separate electro-optical sensors systems are provided for the ground test facility (GTF). The Boom Motion Tracker (BMT) measures eigenvector data for post-mission use in system identification. The Tip Displacement Sensor (TDS) measures boom tip position and is used as feedback for the closed-loop control system that stabilizes the boom. The deployment and testing of the BMT and TDS systems is summarized.

  9. Summary of Tray Pack Field Acceptance Tests and Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    test was conducted during 18-22 September 1984 at Fort Bragg, Fayetteville, NC. Eighteen items were tested since Turkey/Gravy, Chocolate Cake and...5.27 [3] (7.14) 5.54 [3] (7.08) 6.52 A (6.78) Chocolate Cake 4.63 R (6.68) 4 4.83 R (7.46) Egg Loaf w/Cheese 2.95 R (4.82) 3.33 R (5.24) 4.09 R (4.01...6.83) 7.3R A (6.60) Chocolate Pudding 5.52 [1] A (6.57) 5.49 [3) (6.64) 4.71 R (6.65) Turkey Sl w/Gravy [4) [4) 6.85 A Blueberry Cake [4] [4] 6.51 A

  10. Test report for run-in acceptance testing of hydrogen mitigation test pump-2

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, A.K.; Kolowith, R.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides the results of the run-in test of the replacement mixer pump for the Tank 241-SY-101. The test was conducted at the 400 Area MASF facility between August 12 and September 29, 1994. The report includes findings, analysis, recommendations, and corrective actions taken.

  11. WRAP low level waste restricted waste management (LLW RWM) glovebox acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Leist, K.J.

    1997-11-24

    On April 22, 1997, the Low Level Waste Restricted Waste Management (LLW RWM) glovebox was tested using acceptance test procedure 13027A-87. Mr. Robert L. Warmenhoven served as test director, Mr. Kendrick Leist acted as test operator and test witness, and Michael Lane provided miscellaneous software support. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine glovebox control system interlocks, operator Interface Unit (OIU) menus, alarms, and messages. Basic drum port and lift table control sequences were demonstrated. OIU menus, messages, and alarm sequences were examined, with few exceptions noted. Barcode testing was bypassed, due to the lack of installed equipment as well as the switch from basic reliance on fixed bar code readers to the enhanced use of portable bar code readers. Bar code testing was completed during performance of the LLW RWM OTP. Mechanical and control deficiencies were documented as Test Exceptions during performance of this Acceptance Test. These items are attached as Appendix A to this report.

  12. Test, Control and Monitor System maintenance plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, David P.; Lougheed, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    The maintenance requirements for Test, Control, and Monitor System (TCMS) and the method for satisfying these requirements prior to First Need Date (FND) of the last TCMS set are described. The method for satisfying maintenance requirements following FND of the last TCMS set will be addressed by a revision to this plan. This maintenance plan serves as the basic planning document for maintenance of this equipment by the NASA Payloads Directorate (CM) and the Payload Ground Operations Contractor (PGOC) at KSC. The terms TCMS Operations and Maintenance (O&M), Payloads Logistics, TCMS Sustaining Engineering, Payload Communications, and Integrated Network Services refer to the appropriate NASA and PGOC organization. For the duration of their contract, the Core Electronic Contractor (CEC) will provide a Set Support Team (SST). One of the primary purposes of this team is to help NASA and PGOC operate and maintain TCMS. It is assumed that SST is an integral part of TCMS O&M. The purpose of this plan is to describe the maintenance concept for TCMS hardware and system software in order to facilitate activation, transition planning, and continuing operation. When software maintenance is mentioned in this plan, it refers to maintenance of TCMS system software.

  13. Integrated development and testing plan for the plutonium immobilization project

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, T.

    1998-07-01

    This integrated plan for the DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) describes the technology development and major project activities necessary to support the deployment of the immobilization approach for disposition of surplus weapons-usable plutonium. The plan describes details of the development and testing (D&T) tasks needed to provide technical data for design and operation of a plutonium immobilization plant based on the ceramic can-in-canister technology (''Immobilization Fissile Material Disposition Program Final Immobilization Form Assessment and Recommendation'', UCRL-ID-128705, October 3, 1997). The plan also presents tasks for characterization and performance testing of the immobilization form to support a repository licensing application and to develop the basis for repository acceptance of the plutonium form. Essential elements of the plant project (design, construction, facility activation, etc.) are described, but not developed in detail, to indicate how the D&T results tie into the overall plant project. Given the importance of repository acceptance, specific activities to be conducted by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW) to incorporate the plutonium form in the repository licensing application are provided in this document, together with a summary of how immobilization D&T activities provide input to the license activity. The ultimate goal of the Immobilization Project is to develop, construct, and operate facilities that will immobilize from about 18 to 50 tonnes (MT) of U.S. surplus weapons usable plutonium materials in a manner that meets the ''spent fuel'' standard (Fissile Materials Storage and Disposition Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision, ''Storage and Disposition Final PEIS'', issued January 14, 1997, 62 Federal Register 3014) and is acceptable for disposal in a geologic repository. In the can-in-canister technology, this is accomplished by encapsulating the plutonium

  14. MBA acceptance test procedures, software Version 1.4

    SciTech Connect

    Mullaney, J.E.; Russell, V.K.

    1994-10-17

    The Mass Balance Program (MBA) is an adjunct to the Materials Accounting database system, Version 3.4. MBA was written to equip the personnel performing K-Basin encapsulation tasks with a conservative estimate of accumulated sludge during the processing of canisters into and out of the chute. The K Basins Materials Balance programs had some minor improvements made to it to feedback the chute processing status to the operator better. This ATP describes how the code was to be tested to verify its correctness.

  15. 40 CFR 60.1135 - When must I accept comments on the siting analysis and revised materials separation plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... siting analysis and revised materials separation plan? 60.1135 Section 60.1135 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY... revised materials separation plan? (a) You must accept verbal comments at the public meeting. (b) You must...

  16. 40 CFR 60.1135 - When must I accept comments on the siting analysis and revised materials separation plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... siting analysis and revised materials separation plan? 60.1135 Section 60.1135 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY... revised materials separation plan? (a) You must accept verbal comments at the public meeting. (b) You must...

  17. 40 CFR 60.1135 - When must I accept comments on the siting analysis and revised materials separation plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... siting analysis and revised materials separation plan? 60.1135 Section 60.1135 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY... revised materials separation plan? (a) You must accept verbal comments at the public meeting. (b) You must...

  18. 40 CFR 60.1135 - When must I accept comments on the siting analysis and revised materials separation plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... siting analysis and revised materials separation plan? 60.1135 Section 60.1135 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY... revised materials separation plan? (a) You must accept verbal comments at the public meeting. (b) You must...

  19. 40 CFR 60.1135 - When must I accept comments on the siting analysis and revised materials separation plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... siting analysis and revised materials separation plan? 60.1135 Section 60.1135 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY... revised materials separation plan? (a) You must accept verbal comments at the public meeting. (b) You must...

  20. Vibroacoustic test plan evaluation: Parameter variation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahle, C. V.; Gongloef, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    Statistical decision models are shown to provide a viable method of evaluating the cost effectiveness of alternate vibroacoustic test plans and the associated test levels. The methodology developed provides a major step toward the development of a realistic tool to quantitatively tailor test programs to specific payloads. Testing is considered at the no test, component, subassembly, or system level of assembly. Component redundancy and partial loss of flight data are considered. Most and probabilistic costs are considered, and incipient failures resulting from ground tests are treated. Optimums defining both component and assembly test levels are indicated for the modified test plans considered. modeling simplifications must be considered in interpreting the results relative to a particular payload. New parameters introduced were a no test option, flight by flight failure probabilities, and a cost to design components for higher vibration requirements. Parameters varied were the shuttle payload bay internal acoustic environment, the STS launch cost, the component retest/repair cost, and the amount of redundancy in the housekeeping section of the payload reliability model.

  1. Project B610 process control configuration acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Silvan, G.R.

    1994-09-20

    The purpose of this test is to verify the Westinghouse configuration of the MICON A/S Distributed Control System for project B610. The following will be verified: proper assignment and operation of all field inputs to and outputs from the MICON Termination panels; proper operation of all display data on the operator`s console; proper operation of all required alarms; and proper operation of all required interlocks. The MICON A/S control system is configured to replace all the control, indication, and alarm panels now located in the Power Control Room. Nine systems are covered by this control configuration, 2736-ZB HVAC, 234-5Z HVAC, Process Vacuum, Dry Air, 291-Z Closed Loop Cooling, Building Accelerometer, Evacuation Siren, Stack CAMs, and Fire. The 2736-ZB HVAC system consists of the ventilation controls for 2736-ZB and 2736-Z as well as alarms for the emergency generators and 232-Z. The 234-5Z HVAC system is the ventilation controls for 235-5Z and 236-Z buildings. Process Vacuum covers the controls for the 26 inch vacuum system. Dry Air covers the controls for the steam and electric air dryers. The 291-Z Closed Loop Cooling system consists of the status indications and alarms for the 291-Z compressor and vacuum pump closed loop cooling system. The rest of closed loop cooling was tested earlier. The Building Accelerometer system consists of the status indications for the two seismic system accelerometers. The Evacuation Siren system includes the controls for the evacuation and take cover sirens. Stack CAMs cover the alarms for the various building ventilation stack continuous air monitors. Finally, the Fire system covers the various fire alarms now located in Room 321-A.

  2. 14 CFR 135.301 - Crewmember: Tests and checks, grace provisions, training to accepted standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... provisions, training to accepted standards. 135.301 Section 135.301 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING..., grace provisions, training to accepted standards. (a) If a crewmember who is required to take a test...

  3. 14 CFR 135.301 - Crewmember: Tests and checks, grace provisions, training to accepted standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... provisions, training to accepted standards. 135.301 Section 135.301 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING..., grace provisions, training to accepted standards. (a) If a crewmember who is required to take a test...

  4. 14 CFR 135.301 - Crewmember: Tests and checks, grace provisions, training to accepted standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... provisions, training to accepted standards. 135.301 Section 135.301 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING..., grace provisions, training to accepted standards. (a) If a crewmember who is required to take a test...

  5. 14 CFR 135.301 - Crewmember: Tests and checks, grace provisions, training to accepted standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... provisions, training to accepted standards. 135.301 Section 135.301 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING..., grace provisions, training to accepted standards. (a) If a crewmember who is required to take a test...

  6. Test Plan - Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.; Fowley, M. D.

    2012-05-10

    This plan documents the highlights of the Solids Accumulations Scouting Studies test; a project, from Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), that began on February 1, 2012. During the last 12 weeks considerable progress has been made to design and plan methods that will be used to estimate the concentration and distribution of heavy fissile solids in accumulated solids in the Hanford double-shell tank (DST) 241-AW-105 (AW-105), which is the primary goal of this task. This DST will be one of the several waste feed delivery staging tanks designated to feed the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Note that over the length of the waste feed delivery mission AW-105 is currently identified as having the most fill empty cycles of any DST feed tanks, which is the reason for modeling this particular tank. At SRNL an existing test facility, the Mixing Demonstration Tank, which will be modified for the present work, will use stainless steel particles in a simulant that represents Hanford waste to perform mock staging tanks transfers that will allow solids to accumulate in the tank heel. The concentration and location of the mock fissile particles will be measured in these scoping studies to produce information that will be used to better plan larger scaled tests. Included in these studies is a secondary goal of developing measurement methods to accomplish the primary goal. These methods will be evaluated for use in the larger scale experiments. Included in this plan are the several pretest activities that will validate the measurement techniques that are currently in various phases of construction. Aspects of each technique, e.g., particle separations, volume determinations, topographical mapping, and core sampling, have been tested in bench-top trials, as discussed herein, but the actual equipment to be employed during the full test will need evaluation after fabrication and integration into the test facility.

  7. Alternatives to animal testing: research, trends, validation, regulatory acceptance.

    PubMed

    Huggins, Jane

    2003-01-01

    Current trends and issues in the development of alternatives to the use of animals in biomedical experimentation are discussed in this position paper. Eight topics are considered and include refinement of acute toxicity assays; eye corrosion/irritation alternatives; skin corrosion/irritation alternatives; contact sensitization alternatives; developmental/reproductive testing alternatives; genetic engineering (transgenic) assays; toxicogenomics; and validation of alternative methods. The discussion of refinement of acute toxicity assays is focused primarily on developments with regard to reduction of the number of animals used in the LD(50) assay. However, the substitution of humane endpoints such as clinical signs of toxicity for lethality in these assays is also evaluated. Alternative assays for eye corrosion/irritation as well as those for skin corrosion/irritation are described with particular attention paid to the outcomes, both successful and unsuccessful, of several validation efforts. Alternative assays for contact sensitization and developmental/reproductive toxicity are presented as examples of methods designed for the examination of interactions between toxins and somewhat more complex physiological systems. Moreover, genetic engineering and toxicogenomics are discussed with an eye toward the future of biological experimentation in general. The implications of gene manipulation for research animals, specifically, are also examined. Finally, validation methods are investigated as to their effectiveness, or lack thereof, and suggestions for their standardization and improvement, as well as implementation are reviewed.

  8. Tests to Help Plan Opportunity Moves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Rover engineers check how a test rover moves in material chosen to simulate some difficult Mars driving conditions. The scene is inside the In-Situ Instrument Laboratory at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. These tests in early May 2005 were designed to help plan the best way for the rover Opportunity to drive off of a soft-sand dune that the rover dug itself into the previous week. The mixture of sandy and powdery material brought in for these specific tests matched the way the soil underneath Opportunity caked onto wheels, filling the spaces between the cleats on the wheels.

  9. Tests to Help Plan Opportunity Moves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Rover engineers check how a test rover moves in material chosen to simulate some difficult Mars driving conditions. The scene is inside the In-Situ Instrument Laboratory at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. These tests in early May 2005 were designed to help plan the best way for the rover Opportunity to drive off of a soft-sand dune that the rover dug itself into the previous week. The mixture of sandy and powdery material brought in for these specific tests matched the way the soil underneath Opportunity caked onto wheels, filling the spaces between the cleats on the wheels.

  10. Acceptance of Genetic Testing in a General Population: Age, Education and Gender Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aro, A. R.; Hakonen, A.; Hietala, M.; Lonnqvist, J.; Niemela, P.; Peltonen, L; Aula, P.

    1997-01-01

    Effects of age, education, and gender on acceptance of genetic testing were studied. Finnish participants responded to a questionnaire presenting reasons for and against genetic testing (N=1,967). Intentions to take genetic tests, worries, and experience of genetic test or hereditary disease were also assessed. Results are presented and discussed.…

  11. Acceptance of Genetic Testing in a General Population: Age, Education and Gender Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aro, A. R.; Hakonen, A.; Hietala, M.; Lonnqvist, J.; Niemela, P.; Peltonen, L; Aula, P.

    1997-01-01

    Effects of age, education, and gender on acceptance of genetic testing were studied. Finnish participants responded to a questionnaire presenting reasons for and against genetic testing (N=1,967). Intentions to take genetic tests, worries, and experience of genetic test or hereditary disease were also assessed. Results are presented and discussed.…

  12. Acceptance Test Report for the high pressure water jet system canister cleaning fixture

    SciTech Connect

    Burdin, J.R.

    1995-10-25

    This Acceptance Test confirmed the test results and recommendations, documented in WHC-SD-SNF-DTR-001, Rev. 0 Development Test Report for the High Pressure Water Jet System Nozzles, for decontaminating empty fuel canisters in KE-Basin. Optimum water pressure, water flow rate, nozzle size and overall configuration were tested

  13. Halogen occultation experiment intergrated test plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauldin, L. E., III; Butterfield, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    The test program plan is presented for the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) instrument, which is being developed in-house at the Langley Research Center for the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). This comprehensive test program was developed to demonstrate that the HALOE instrument meets its performance requirements and maintains integrity through UARS flight environments. Each component, subsystem, and system level test is described in sufficient detail to allow development of the necessary test setups and test procedures. Additionally, the management system for implementing this test program is given. The HALOE instrument is a gas correlation radiometer that measures vertical distribution of eight upper atmospheric constituents: O3, HC1, HF, NO, CH4, H2O, NO2, and CO2.

  14. Acceptability of Family-Centered Advanced Care Planning for Adolescents With HIV.

    PubMed

    Dallas, Ronald H; Kimmel, Allison; Wilkins, Megan L; Rana, Sohail; Garcia, Ana; Cheng, Yao I; Wang, Jichuan; Lyon, Maureen E

    2016-12-01

    Small pilot studies support the appropriateness of engaging adolescents with chronic or life-limiting illnesses in pediatric advance care planning (pACP). We do not yet know if pACP is acceptable, feasible, and worthwhile, even if emotionally intense, in a fully powered randomized controlled trial. We conducted a prospective 2-arm randomized controlled trial at 6 US urban hospitals. Adolescent/family member dyads were randomized to receive the 1-session-a-week 3-session FAmily-CEntered Advance Care Planning (FACE) pACP intervention (1, ACP Survey; 2, Goals of Care Conversation/Treatment Preferences; 3, Completion of Advance Directive) or active comparator (1, Developmental History; 2, Safety Tips; 3, Nutrition/Exercise). The Satisfaction Questionnaire was administered to participants independently after each session by a blinded research assistant. We enrolled 53% of eligible participants and intervened with 97 adolescent/family dyads. Adolescents ranged in age from 14 to 21 years; 54% were male individuals; 93% African American; and 73% perinatally infected. Attendance was 99% for all 3 sessions in each arm. At session 3, FACE adolescents and family dyad members, respectively, found the session useful (98%, 98%) and helpful (98%, 100%), despite feelings of sadness (25%, 17%). FACE adolescents' improvement in the total subscale A score (useful, helpful, like a load off my mind, satisfied, something I needed to do, courageous, worthwhile) was better than control adolescents at session 3 (β = 1.16, P = .02). There were no adverse events. FACE enabled worthwhile conversations, while simultaneously eliciting intense emotions. No participants withdrew, 99% of those enrolled completed each session, and there were no adverse events, evidence of pACP's feasibility, acceptability, and safety. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  15. 3D augmented reality for improving social acceptance and public participation in wind farms planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, S.; Klein, T. M.

    2016-09-01

    Wind energy is one of the most important source of renewable energy characterized by a significant growth in the last decades and giving a more and more relevant contribution to the energy supply. One of the main disadvantages of a faster integration of wind energy into the energy mix is related to the visual impact of wind turbines on the landscape. In addition, the siting of new massive infrastructures has the potential to threaten a community's well-being if new projects are perceived being unfair. The public perception of the impact of wind turbines on the landscape is also crucial for their acceptance. The implementation of wind energy projects is hampered often because of a lack of planning or communication tools enabling a more transparent and efficient interaction between all stakeholders involved in the projects (i.e. developers, local communities and administrations, NGOs, etc.). Concerning the visual assessment of wind farms, a critical gap lies in effective visualization tools to improve the public perception of alternative wind turbines layouts. In this paper, we describe the advantages of a 3D dynamical and interactive visualization platform for an augmented reality to support wind energy planners in order to enhance the social acceptance of new wind energy projects.

  16. Acceptance Test Procedure for AMS-4 Continuous Air Monitors (CAM) at 241-AN Exhausters

    SciTech Connect

    FREEMAN, R.D.

    1999-09-22

    This supporting document provides detailed instruction for ensuring the existing alarms and interlocks are in an acceptable condition prior to performing the functional test of the AMS-4 installation.

  17. GEOCHEMICAL TESTING AND MODEL DEVELOPMENT - RESIDUAL TANK WASTE TEST PLAN

    SciTech Connect

    CANTRELL KJ; CONNELLY MP

    2010-03-09

    This Test Plan describes the testing and chemical analyses release rate studies on tank residual samples collected following the retrieval of waste from the tank. This work will provide the data required to develop a contaminant release model for the tank residuals from both sludge and salt cake single-shell tanks. The data are intended for use in the long-term performance assessment and conceptual model development.

  18. Tonopah Test Range closure sites revegetation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.C.; Hall, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    This document is a revegetation plan for long-term stabilization (revegetation) of land disturbed by activities associated with the closure of a Bomblet Pit and the Five Points Landfill. Both sites are on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) located in south-central Nevada. This document contains general reclamation practices and procedures that will be followed during the revegetation of these sites. The revegetation procedures proposed have been developed over several years of research and include the results of reclamation trials at Area 11 and Area 19 on the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and more recently at the Double Tracks (Nellis Air Force Range) reclamation demonstration plots. In addition, the results of reclamation efforts and concurrent research efforts at the Yucca Mountain Project have been considered in the preparation of this revegetation plan.

  19. W-026, acceptance test report LLW supercompactor (submittal {number_sign}567)

    SciTech Connect

    Leist, K.J.

    1997-05-22

    The purpose of this acceptance test report was to verify the assembly is correct and complete and meets all the specification and performance requirements. On May 15--16, 1996, the LLW Supercompactor functional demonstrations and performance tests were carried out. These tests were carried out in accordance with the Acceptance Test Procedure, submittal 565, dated 5/3/96. The tests were performed by Herman Miller and Gene Rice of INET Corporation and Richard Lawrence and other PCL personnel. The VIHC representative on May 15, 1996 was Doug Dunlap and on May 16, 1996 the representative was Ken Leist.

  20. Acceptance of HIV Antibody Testing Among Women in Domestic Violence Shelters

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliff, Tanya M.; Zlotnick, Caron; Cu-Uvin, Susan; Payne, Nanetta; Sly, Kaye; Flanigan, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine which factors derived from an adapted version of the Health Belief Model are associated with HIV testing among women at domestic violence shelters in the rural south (N = 112). Participants were administered self-report questionnaires to assess for test acceptance and were offered private and free HIV rapid testing. A logistic regression analysis was performed. Results indicated that higher perceived susceptibility and higher PTSD symptoms predicted a greater likelihood of HIV test acceptance. The most common reason given for not testing was a lack of time. Implications are discussed. PMID:26085820

  1. Women's career priority is associated with attitudes towards family planning and ethical acceptance of reproductive technologies.

    PubMed

    Simoni, Michael K; Mu, Lin; Collins, Stephen C

    2017-10-01

    Do women who place high importance on career success have different perceptions of pregnancy planning, delayed reproduction, and the ethical acceptability of ART than women with less emphasis on their career? Career-focused women place more importance on pregnancy planning, have greater confidence in delayed childbearing, and are more ethically accepting of donor gamete ART than women who do not place as much importance on career success. Women in high-professional careers are more likely to delay childbearing while simultaneously possessing a stronger desire for motherhood. The underlying values which enable these competing desires have not been elucidated. This cross-sectional study utilized data from the National Survey of Fertility Barriers (NSFB), a nationally representative telephone survey of US women aged 25-45. Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the NSFB surveyed 4712 women from 2004 to 2007. In addition to demographic data, the NSFB obtained information about the reproductive history and personal values of participants. Weighted multivariate regression analysis was used to assess reproductive values in career-focused women. In total, 48.8% of women considered success in work very important, while 17.3% considered it somewhat or not important. Women who placed less value on career success were less likely to consider pregnancy planning important and were less optimistic about the success of delayed childbearing than their work-centric counterparts. Women less focused on their careers were also more likely to have serious ethical concerns about donor gametes, but less likely to have ethical concerns about IUI or IVF, when compared to career-focused women. Intention to bear children could not be evaluated in the setting of career intentions due to a lack of data on when the participant intended on pursuing motherhood. Political preferences on reproductive health were also not evaluated. The validity

  2. Acceptance Plan and Performance Measurement Methodology for the ITER Cryoline System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badgujar, S.; Bonneton, M.; Shah, N.; Chalifour, M.; Chang, H.-S.; Fauve, E.; Forgeas, A.; Navion-Maillot, N.; Sarkar, B.

    The cryoline (CL) systemof ITER consists of a complex network of vacuum insulated multi and single process pipe lines distributed over three different areas with a total length of about 5 km. The thermal performance of the CL system will be measured during the final acceptance tests using the ITER cryoplant and cryo-distribution (CD) infrastructure. The method proposed is based on temperature measurementsof a small calibrated cryogenic helium flow through lines. Thecryoplant will be set to establish constant pressure and temperature whereas dedicated heater and valves in the CD will be used to generate stable mass flow rate.

  3. Space telescope observatory management system preliminary test and verification plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritz, J. S.; Kaldenbach, C. F.; Williams, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    The preliminary plan for the Space Telescope Observatory Management System Test and Verification (TAV) is provided. Methodology, test scenarios, test plans and procedure formats, schedules, and the TAV organization are included. Supporting information is provided.

  4. 46 CFR 159.007-5 - Production inspections and tests: Application for acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Production Inspection and Tests of Approved Equipment and Materials § 159.007-5 Production inspections and...) Is accepted by the Commandant for approval inspections and tests of the equipment or material under... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Production inspections and tests: Application...

  5. 46 CFR 159.007-5 - Production inspections and tests: Application for acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Production Inspection and Tests of Approved Equipment and Materials § 159.007-5 Production inspections and...) Is accepted by the Commandant for approval inspections and tests of the equipment or material under... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Production inspections and tests: Application...

  6. 46 CFR 159.007-5 - Production inspections and tests: Application for acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Production Inspection and Tests of Approved Equipment and Materials § 159.007-5 Production inspections and...) Is accepted by the Commandant for approval inspections and tests of the equipment or material under... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Production inspections and tests: Application...

  7. 14 CFR 125.293 - Crewmember: Tests and checks, grace provisions, accepted standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT Flight Crewmember Requirements § 125.293 Crewmember: Tests and checks, grace provisions, accepted standards. (a) If a crewmember who is required to take a test or a flight check under this part completes the test or flight check in the calendar month before or after the calendar month in which it...

  8. 14 CFR 125.293 - Crewmember: Tests and checks, grace provisions, accepted standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT Flight Crewmember Requirements § 125.293 Crewmember: Tests and checks, grace provisions, accepted standards. (a) If a crewmember who is required to take a test or a flight check under this part completes the test or flight check in the calendar month before or after the calendar month in which it...

  9. 14 CFR 125.293 - Crewmember: Tests and checks, grace provisions, accepted standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT Flight Crewmember Requirements § 125.293 Crewmember: Tests and checks, grace provisions, accepted standards. (a) If a crewmember who is required to take a test or a flight check under this part completes the test or flight check in the calendar month before or after the calendar month in which it...

  10. 14 CFR 125.293 - Crewmember: Tests and checks, grace provisions, accepted standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT Flight Crewmember Requirements § 125.293 Crewmember: Tests and checks, grace provisions, accepted standards. (a) If a crewmember who is required to take a test or a flight check under this part completes the test or flight check in the calendar month before or after the calendar month in which it...

  11. 14 CFR 125.293 - Crewmember: Tests and checks, grace provisions, accepted standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT Flight Crewmember Requirements § 125.293 Crewmember: Tests and checks, grace provisions, accepted standards. (a) If a crewmember who is required to take a test or a flight check under this part completes the test or flight check in the calendar month before or after the calendar month in which it...

  12. Acceptance test report for W-030 monitor and control system (MCS) software

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, B.G.

    1996-05-06

    This report documents the test performed under `Acceptance Test Procedure WHC-SD-W030-ATP-011, Rev. 0`, for `Project W-030 Tank Farm Ventilation Upgrade`. This report covers testing of the Software Control Logic for the MICON Monitoring and Control System (MCS).

  13. Test plan for ISV laboratory-pyrolysis testing

    SciTech Connect

    McAtee, R.E.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of the laboratory-pyrolysis studies is to obtain information on the high temperature (< 1200{degree}C) degradation and alteration of organic chemicals and materials similar to those found in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Pit 9. This test plan describes experimental procedures, sampling and analysis strategy, sampling procedures, sample control, and document management. It addresses safety issues in the experimental apparatus and procedures, personal training, and hazardous waste disposal. Finally, it describes the data quality objectives using the EPA tiered approach to treatability studies to define where research/scoping tests fit into these studies and the EPA analytical levels required for the tests.

  14. Test plan for ISV laboratory-pyrolysis testing

    SciTech Connect

    McAtee, R.E.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of the laboratory-pyrolysis studies is to obtain information on the high temperature (< 1200{degree}C) degradation and alteration of organic chemicals and materials similar to those found in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Pit 9. This test plan describes experimental procedures, sampling and analysis strategy, sampling procedures, sample control, and document management. It addresses safety issues in the experimental apparatus and procedures, personal training, and hazardous waste disposal. Finally, it describes the data quality objectives using the EPA tiered approach to treatability studies to define where research/scoping tests fit into these studies and the EPA analytical levels required for the tests.

  15. Integrated Test and Evaluation Flight Test 3 Flight Test Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, Michael Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    The desire and ability to fly Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in the National Airspace System (NAS) is of increasing urgency. The application of unmanned aircraft to perform national security, defense, scientific, and emergency management are driving the critical need for less restrictive access by UAS to the NAS. UAS represent a new capability that will provide a variety of services in the government (public) and commercial (civil) aviation sectors. The growth of this potential industry has not yet been realized due to the lack of a common understanding of what is required to safely operate UAS in the NAS. NASA's UAS Integration into the NAS Project is conducting research in the areas of Separation Assurance/Sense and Avoid Interoperability, Human Systems Integration (HSI), and Communication to support reducing the barriers of UAS access to the NAS. This research is broken into two research themes namely, UAS Integration and Test Infrastructure. UAS Integration focuses on airspace integration procedures and performance standards to enable UAS integration in the air transportation system, covering Sense and Avoid (SAA) performance standards, command and control performance standards, and human systems integration. The focus of Test Infrastructure is to enable development and validation of airspace integration procedures and performance standards, including the integrated test and evaluation. In support of the integrated test and evaluation efforts, the Project will develop an adaptable, scalable, and schedulable relevant test environment capable of evaluating concepts and technologies for unmanned aircraft systems to safely operate in the NAS. To accomplish this task, the Project will conduct a series of Human-in-the-Loop and Flight Test activities that integrate key concepts, technologies and/or procedures in a relevant air traffic environment. Each of the integrated events will build on the technical achievements, fidelity and complexity of the previous tests and

  16. Dynamic simulations for preparing the acceptance test of JT-60SA cryogenic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirillo, R.; Hoa, C.; Michel, F.; Poncet, J. M.; Rousset, B.

    2016-12-01

    Power generation in the future could be provided by thermo-nuclear fusion reactors like tokamaks. There inside, the fusion reaction takes place thanks to the generation of plasmas at hundreds of millions of degrees that must be confined magnetically with superconductive coils, cooled down to around 4.5 K. Within this frame, an experimental tokamak device, JT-60SA is currently under construction in Naka (Japan). The plasma works cyclically and the coil system is subject to pulsed heat loads. In order to size the refrigerator close to the average power and hence optimizing investment and operational costs, measures have to be taken to smooth the heat load. Here we present a dynamic model of the JT-60SA's Auxiliary Cold box (ACB) for preparing the acceptance tests of the refrigeration system planned in 2016 in Naka. The aim of this study is to simulate the pulsed load scenarios using different process controls. All the simulations have been performed with EcosimPro® and the associated cryogenic library: CRYOLIB.

  17. Acceptability of interferon-gamma release assays among healthcare workers who receive routine employee tuberculosis testing.

    PubMed

    Hirsch-Moverman, Yael; Wall, Kirsten; Weinfurter, Paul; Munk, Elizabeth; Moran, Joyce Ann; Maiuris, Allison; Khan, Amera; DeLuca, Nichlas

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) undergo annual testing for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). Compare acceptability of tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) among HCWs. HCWs at four medical centers in the US were administered an acceptability questionnaire including a brief objective description of both tests and eliciting attitudes regarding TST and IGRAs, confidence in results, and likelihood of taking LTBI treatment. Of 406 participants, 75% had never heard of IGRAs. IGRAs were preferred to TST. Belief in accuracy of hypothetical positive results of TST or IGRA and willingness to accept LTBI treatment were similar across tests. When presented with hypothetical discordant results, HCWs expressed more confidence in IGRAs. Perceived accuracy of results was the most important factor in test preferences. Although HCWs preferred and indicated more confidence in IGRAs, the likelihood that HCWs would believe LTBI diagnosis and initiate treatment based on positive results was similar for TST and IGRAs.

  18. 118-B-1 excavation treatability test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The Hanford 118-B-1 Burial Ground Treatability Study has been required by milestone change request {number_sign}M-15-93-04, dated September 30, 1993. The change request requires that a treatability test be conducted at the 100-B Area to obtain additional engineering information for remedial design of burial grounds receiving waste from 100 Area removal actions. This treatability study has two purposes: (1) to support development of the Proposed Plan (PP) and Record of Decision (ROD), which will identify the approach to be used for burial ground remediation, and (2) to provide specific engineering information for receiving waste generated from the 100 Area removal actions. Data generated from this test also will provide critical performance and cost information necessary for remedy evaluation in the detailed analysis of alternatives during preparation of the focused feasibility study (FFS). This treatability testing supports the following 100 Area alternatives: (1) excavation and disposal, and (2) excavation, sorting, (treatment), and disposal.

  19. Test Plan: WIPP bin-scale CH TRU waste tests

    SciTech Connect

    Molecke, M.A.

    1990-08-01

    This WIPP Bin-Scale CH TRU Waste Test program described herein will provide relevant composition and kinetic rate data on gas generation and consumption resulting from TRU waste degradation, as impacted by synergistic interactions due to multiple degradation modes, waste form preparation, long-term repository environmental effects, engineered barrier materials, and, possibly, engineered modifications to be developed. Similar data on waste-brine leachate compositions and potentially hazardous volatile organic compounds released by the wastes will also be provided. The quantitative data output from these tests and associated technical expertise are required by the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) program studies, and for the scientific benefit of the overall WIPP project. This Test Plan describes the necessary scientific and technical aspects, justifications, and rational for successfully initiating and conducting the WIPP Bin-Scale CH TRU Waste Test program. This Test Plan is the controlling scientific design definition and overall requirements document for this WIPP in situ test, as defined by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), scientific advisor to the US Department of Energy, WIPP Project Office (DOE/WPO). 55 refs., 16 figs., 19 tabs.

  20. Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Judkoff, R.; Polly, B.; Bianchi, M.; Neymark, J.; Kennedy, M.

    2011-08-01

    This publication summarizes building energy simulation test for existing homes (BESTEST-EX): instructions for implementing the test procedure, calibration tests reference results, and example acceptance-range criteria.

  1. 14 CFR 437.25 - Flight test plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flight test plan. 437.25 Section 437.25... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS Requirements to Obtain an Experimental Permit Flight Test Plan § 437.25 Flight test plan. An applicant must— (a) Describe any flight test program, including estimated...

  2. 14 CFR 437.25 - Flight test plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flight test plan. 437.25 Section 437.25... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS Requirements to Obtain an Experimental Permit Flight Test Plan § 437.25 Flight test plan. An applicant must— (a) Describe any flight test program, including estimated...

  3. 14 CFR 437.25 - Flight test plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flight test plan. 437.25 Section 437.25... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS Requirements to Obtain an Experimental Permit Flight Test Plan § 437.25 Flight test plan. An applicant must— (a) Describe any flight test program, including estimated...

  4. Test plan for qualification of the S-type fiberglass materials for use as the liquid observation well casing

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    This test plan presents the guidelines and requirements for acceptance of the S-type fiberglass material for use as the liquid observation well casing material. The plan for evaluating the physical properties of the candidate fiberglass materials when subjected to radiation, corrosive chemicals, and high temperatures typically found in the waste tanks are outlined. The tests also include tube connection evaluations. Finally, the test plan identifies the participants, their responsibilities, and the schedule for completion of the work.

  5. Nevada Test Site Groundwater Well Rehabilitation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    David B. Hudson

    2006-12-01

    This plan describes actions to improve the utility and credibility of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) interim groundwater monitoring program. The two principal actions are: (1) well maintenance/rehabilitation activities and (2) the deployment of dedicated low-cost and reliable jack-pumps for groundwater sampling from deep monitoring wells. The scope of this proposal is to perform these actions on some number of nine selected wells (Figure 1) to evaluate whether these actions are achievable, practical, cost effective, and result in improved groundwater data quality.

  6. Standard-B auto grab sampler hydrogen monitoring system, Acceptance Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lott, D.T.

    1995-05-18

    Project W-369, Watch List Tank Hydrogen Monitors, installed a Standard-C Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS) on the Flammable gas waste tank AN-104. General Support Projects (8K510) was support by Test Engineering (7CH30) in the performance of the Acceptance Test Procedures (ATP) to qualify the SHMS cabinets on the waste tank. The ATP`s performance was controlled by Tank Farm work package. This completed ATP is transmitted by EDT-601748 as an Acceptance Test Report (ATR) in accordance with WHC-6-1, EP 4.2 and EP 1.12.

  7. Single Event Effects (SEE) Testing: Practical Approach to Test Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Pellish, Jonathan Allen; Berg, Melanie D.

    2014-01-01

    While standards and guidelines for performing SEE testing have existed for several decades, guidance for developing SEE test plans has not been as easy to find. In this presentation, the variety of areas that need to be considered ranging from resource issues (funds, personnel, schedule) to extremely technical challenges (particle interaction and circuit application), shall be discussed. Note: we consider the approach outlined here as a "living" document: Mission-specific constraints and new technology related issues always need to be taken into account.

  8. 29 CFR 4231.6 - Plan solvency tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Plan solvency tests. 4231.6 Section 4231.6 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION INSOLVENCY, REORGANIZATION, TERMINATION, AND OTHER RULES APPLICABLE TO MULTIEMPLOYER PLANS MERGERS AND TRANSFERS BETWEEN MULTIEMPLOYER PLANS § 4231.6 Plan solvency tests. (a) In...

  9. Delinquency and Peer Acceptance in Adolescence: A Within-Person Test of Moffitt’s Hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    Rulison, Kelly L; Kreager, Derek A.; Osgood, D. Wayne

    2015-01-01

    We tested two hypotheses derived from Moffitt’s (1993) taxonomic theory of antisocial behavior, both of which are central to her explanation for the rise in delinquency during adolescence. Specifically, we tested whether persistently delinquent individuals become more accepted by their peers during adolescence and whether individuals who abstain from delinquent behavior become less accepted. Participants were 4,359 adolescents from 14 communities in the PROSPER study, which assessed friendship networks and delinquency from 6th (M = 11.8 years) to 9th (M = 15.3 years) grade. We operationalized peer acceptance as: number of nominations received (indegree centrality), attractiveness as a friend (adjusted indegree centrality), and network bridging potential (betweenness centrality) and tested the hypotheses using multilevel modeling. Contrary to Moffitt’s hypothesis, persistently delinquent youth did not become more accepted between early and middle adolescence, and although abstainers were less accepted in early adolescence, they became more accepted over time. Results were similar for boys and girls; when differences occurred, they provided no support for Moffitt’s hypotheses for boys and were opposite of her hypotheses for girls. Sensitivity analyses using alternative strategies and additional data to identify persistently delinquent adolescents produced similar results. We explore the implications of these results for Moffitt’s assertions that social mimicry of persistently antisocial adolescents leads to increases in delinquency and that social isolation leads to abstention. PMID:25243328

  10. 100 area excavation treatability test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This test plan documents the requirements for a treatability study on field radionuclide analysis and dust control techniques. These systems will be used during remedial actions involving excavation. The data from this treatability study will be used to support the feasibility study (FS) process. Development and screening of remedial alternatives for the 100 Area, using existing data, have been completed and are documented in the 100 Area Feasibility Study, Phases 1 and 2 (DOE-RL 1992a). Based on the results of the FS, the Treatability Study Program Plan (DOE-RL 1992b) identifies and prioritizes treatability studies for the 100 Area. The data from the treatability study program support future focused FS, interim remedial measures (IRM) selection, operable unit final remedy selection, remedial design, and remedial actions. Excavation is one of the high-priority, near-term, treatability study needs identified in the program plan (DOE-RL 1992b). Excavation of contaminated soils and buried solid wastes is included in several of the alternatives identified in the 100 Area FS. Although a common activity, excavation has only been used occasionally at the Hanford Site for waste removal applications.

  11. Delinquency and Peer Acceptance in Adolescence: A Within-Person Test of Moffitt's Hypotheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rulison, Kelly L.; Kreager, Derek A.; Osgood, D. Wayne

    2014-01-01

    We tested 2 hypotheses derived from Moffitt's (1993) taxonomic theory of antisocial behavior, both of which are central to her explanation for the rise in delinquency during adolescence. We tested whether persistently delinquent individuals become more accepted by their peers during adolescence and whether individuals who abstain from delinquent…

  12. 46 CFR 159.007-5 - Production inspections and tests: Application for acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Production inspections and tests: Application for acceptance. 159.007-5 Section 159.007-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL APPROVAL OF EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS Production Inspection and Tests of Approved...

  13. 46 CFR 159.007-5 - Production inspections and tests: Application for acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Production inspections and tests: Application for acceptance. 159.007-5 Section 159.007-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL APPROVAL OF EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS Production Inspection and Tests of Approved...

  14. Understanding Student Teachers' Behavioural Intention to Use Technology: Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) Validation and Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Kung-Teck; Osman, Rosma bt; Goh, Pauline Swee Choo; Rahmat, Mohd Khairezan

    2013-01-01

    This study sets out to validate and test the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) in the context of Malaysian student teachers' integration of their technology in teaching and learning. To establish factorial validity, data collected from 302 respondents were tested against the TAM using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and structural equation…

  15. Delinquency and Peer Acceptance in Adolescence: A Within-Person Test of Moffitt's Hypotheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rulison, Kelly L.; Kreager, Derek A.; Osgood, D. Wayne

    2014-01-01

    We tested 2 hypotheses derived from Moffitt's (1993) taxonomic theory of antisocial behavior, both of which are central to her explanation for the rise in delinquency during adolescence. We tested whether persistently delinquent individuals become more accepted by their peers during adolescence and whether individuals who abstain from delinquent…

  16. 241-AZ-101 Waste Tank Color Video Camera System Shop Acceptance Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    WERRY, S.M.

    2000-03-23

    This report includes shop acceptance test results. The test was performed prior to installation at tank AZ-101. Both the camera system and camera purge system were originally sought and procured as a part of initial waste retrieval project W-151.

  17. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid V

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-07-25

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) verifies proper construction per the design drawings and tests for proper functioning of the Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid ''V''. The scope section lists the systems and functions to be checked. This ATP will be performed at the Site Fabrication Services (SFS) shop upon completion of the construction of the PIC skid.

  18. Enraf series 854 Advanced Technology Gauge (ATG) acceptance test procedure. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, G.A.

    1995-05-08

    This procedure provides acceptance testing for Enraf Series 854 level gauges used to monitor levels in Hanford Waste Storage Tanks. The test will verify that the gauge functions according to the manufacturer`s instructions and specifications and is properly setup prior to being delivered to the tank farm area.

  19. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping and Instrumentation Control Skid M

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    1999-11-09

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) verifies proper construction per the design drawings and tests for proper functioning of the Pumping and Instrumentation Control (PIC) skid ''M''. The Scope section lists the systems and functions to be checked. This ATP will be performed at the Site Fabrication Service's (SFS) shop upon completion of construction of the PIC skid.

  20. Acceptability of Sexually Transmitted Infection Testing Using Self-Collected Vaginal Swabs among College Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fielder, Robyn L.; Carey, Kate B.; Carey, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the acceptability of sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing using self-collected vaginal swabs (SCVS) among college women. Participants: First-year female students ("N" = 483). Methods: Participants were offered free testing for 3 STIs using SCVS in April 2010 and later completed a survey regarding their…

  1. Field Validation of Statistically-Based Acceptance Plan for Bituminous Airport Pavements. Volume 4. Computer Simulation of Multiple Acceptance Criteria.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    projects were analyzed to determine mean, variance and correlation values obtained in field construction. Computer simulation was used to investigate the...integral, the trivariate normal cumulative distribution function (CDF), can not be obtained analytically. Consequently, the only practical way to determine...Marshall test results, and 2. numerical integration to obtain a measure of the quality of the asphalt mixture in terms of the trivariate PWL. Multivariate

  2. Parking and routing information system phase 1 evaluation -- Individual evaluation test plans

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, R.J.

    1997-04-01

    A parking and routing information system (PARIS) is being designed and deployed at a test site on the Mountain Home Veterans Administration campus in Johnson City, Tennessee using three sensor technologies. The purpose of the PARIS project is to demonstrate innovative integration of vehicle sensing technologies with parking management strategies to improve mobility and relieve congestion associated with a growing medical/technology complex. This technical memorandum presents the four individual evaluation test plans, System Performance Individual Evaluation Test Plan, User Acceptance Individual Evaluation Test Plan, Institutional and Business Issues Individual Evaluation Test Plan, and Transportation Systems Individual Evaluation Test Plan, which were developed to support ORNL`s responsibilities and functions during the four studies. The plans define the level of effort required to satisfy the data collection, processing, and analysis requirements for the assessment of the system performance, user acceptance, institutional and business issues, and transportation systems components of the PARIS phase 1 evaluation. Each plan is divided into three subsections: executive summary, detailed study design, and study management.

  3. Accelerated test plan for nickel cadmium spacecraft batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennigan, T. J.

    1973-01-01

    An accelerated test matrix is outlined that includes acceptance, baseline and post-cycling tests, chemical and physical analyses, and the data analysis procedures to be used in determining the feasibility of an accelerated test for sealed, nickel cadmium cells.

  4. Aerosol can puncture device operational test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Leist, K.J.

    1994-05-03

    Puncturing of aerosol cans is performed in the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1 (WRAP 1) process as a requirement of the waste disposal acceptance criteria for both transuranic (TRU) waste and low-level waste (LLW). These cans have contained such things as paints, lubricating oils, paint removers, insecticides, and cleaning supplies which were used in radioactive facilities. Due to Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Fire Protection concerns of the baseline system`s fire/explosion proof characteristics, a study was undertaken to compare the baseline system`s design to commercially available puncturing devices. While the study found no areas which might indicate a risk of fire or explosion, WHC Fire Protection determined that the puncturing system must have a demonstrated record of safe operation. This could be obtained either by testing the baseline design by an independent laboratory, or by substituting a commercially available device. As a result of these efforts, the commercially available Aerosolv can puncturing device was chosen to replace the baseline design. Two concerns were raised with the system. Premature blinding of the coalescing/carbon filter, due to its proximity to the puncture and draining operation; and overpressurization of the collection bottle due to its small volume and by blinding of the filter assembly. As a result of these concerns, testing was deemed necessary. The objective of this report is to outline test procedures for the Aerosolv.

  5. End item test plan for the Ultraviolet Spectrometer Experiment S169

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    The test plan defines the tests to be conducted, identifies and describes all test items, and states the objectives of all tests required to verify that the performance and design goals of the Contract End Item Specification, 7232-0009, have been met and that flight hardware is acceptable. Additionally, environmental conditions, testing time or cycles, allowable maintenance, logging requirements, manner of analysis and utilization of test results, disposition of test specimens, retest requirements, location of tests, facilities and support requirements, and the time phasing of the tests are presented.

  6. Formulation of consumables management models: Test plan for the mission planning processor working model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connelly, L. C.

    1977-01-01

    The test plan and test procedures to be used in the verification and validation of the software being implemented in the mission planning processor working model program are documented. The mission planning processor is a user oriented tool for consumables management and is part of the total consumables subsystem management concept. An overview of the working model is presented. Execution of the test plan will comprehensively exercise the working model software. An overview of the test plan, including a testing schedule, is presented along with the test plan for the unit, module, and system levels. The criteria used to validate the working model results for each consumables subsystem is discussed.

  7. Family Planning Practices Prior to the Acceptance of Tubectomy: A Study Among Women Attending a Maternity Home in Bangalore,India

    PubMed Central

    V, Srividya; Kumar, Jayanth

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The extent of acceptance of contraceptive methods still varies within societies. Reliance on sterilisation is appearing earlier in marriage and among ever-younger ages and lower parities. Aim and Objective: To study the family planning practices adopted by women who undergo tubectomy before the acceptance of tubectomy. Material and Methods: Cross–sectional study of tubectomy acceptors who attended a corporation referral maternity home in Bangalore, India by interview method using a pre–designed a pre–tested structured questionnaire. Results: Majority 295(73.9%) of the study subjects had not practised any method of contraception before they underwent sterilisation. Increase in the education levels of the study subjects was associated with an increase in the contraceptive use (temporary methods) before they accepted tubectomy; this association was found to be statistically significant (p<0.0001). PMID:24086862

  8. Test plan for the retrieval demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Valentich, D.J.

    1993-05-01

    This test plan describes a simulated buried waste retrieval demonstration that will be performed at the Caterpillar, Inc., Edwards Training Center located near Peoria, Illinois. The purpose of the demonstration is to determine the effectiveness of using readily available excavation equipment to retrieve, size, and handle various simulated waste forms that are similar in size, structure, and composition to those expected to be found in US Department of Energy contaminated waste pits and trenches. The objectives of this demonstration are to: meet and maintain daily production goals of 80 yd{sup 3}/day; minimize spillage and dust generation through careful and deliberate operations; document and evaluate methods for manipulating, sizing, and/or working around large objects; and document and evaluate requirements for operator augmentation and remote operation for hot test pit excavation operations. Four conditions comprising the range of environments to be evaluated include excavation of random material from below grade; stacked boxes and barrels from below grade; random materials from at grade; and stacked boxes and barrels from at grade. Results of the retrieval demonstration will reduce unknowns in the body of knowledge about retrieval equipment and procedural options for removal of buried transuranic (TRU) waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It is anticipated that DOE will factor this information into a remedial investigation/feasibility plan leading to a final record of decision for disposition of buried TRU waste.

  9. 100 Area soil washing treatability test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This test plan describes specifications, responsibilities, and general methodology for conducting a soil washing treatability study as applied to source unit contamination in the 100 Area. The objective ofthis treatability study is to evaluate the use of physical separation systems and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating chemically and radioactively contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. The purpose of separating these fractions is to minimize the volume of soil requiring permanent disposal. It is anticipated that this treatability study will be performed in two phases of testing, a remedy screening phase and a remedy selection phase. The remedy screening phase consists of laboratory- and bench-scale studies performed by Battelle Pacific Northwest laboratories (PNL) under a work order issued by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). This phase will be used to provide qualitative evaluation of the potential effectiveness of the soil washing technology. The remedy selection phase, consists of pilot-scale testing performed under a separate service contract to be competitively bid under Westinghouse Hanford direction. The remedy selection phase will provide data to support evaluation of the soil washing technology in future feasibility studies for Interim Remedial Measures (IRMs) or final operable unit (OU) remedies. Performance data from these tests will indicate whether applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) or cleanup goals can be met at the site(s) by application of soil washing. The remedy selection tests wig also allow estimation of costs associated with implementation to the accuracy required for the Feasibility Study.

  10. 46 CFR 50.25-10 - Acceptance of piping components by specific letter or approved plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Acceptance of Material and Piping Components § 50.25-10 Acceptance... service for which it is intended. (2) Identify materials used to fabricate the component. Materials must... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Acceptance of piping components by specific letter or...

  11. Factors of Online Learning Adoption: A Comparative Juxtaposition of the Theory of Planned Behaviour and the Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ndubisi, Nelson

    2006-01-01

    Organisational investments in information technologies have increased significantly in the past few decades. All around the globe and in Malaysia particularly, a number of educational institutions are experimenting with e-learning. Adopting the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) and the technology acceptance model (TAM) this article tries to…

  12. Factors of Online Learning Adoption: A Comparative Juxtaposition of the Theory of Planned Behaviour and the Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ndubisi, Nelson

    2006-01-01

    Organisational investments in information technologies have increased significantly in the past few decades. All around the globe and in Malaysia particularly, a number of educational institutions are experimenting with e-learning. Adopting the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) and the technology acceptance model (TAM) this article tries to…

  13. The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and Pre-Service Teachers' Technology Acceptance: A Validation Study Using Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teo, Timothy; Tan, Lynde

    2012-01-01

    This study applies the theory of planned behavior (TPB), a theory that is commonly used in commercial settings, to the educational context to explain pre-service teachers' technology acceptance. It is also interested in examining its validity when used for this purpose. It has found evidence that the TPB is a valid model to explain pre-service…

  14. The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and Pre-Service Teachers' Technology Acceptance: A Validation Study Using Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teo, Timothy; Tan, Lynde

    2012-01-01

    This study applies the theory of planned behavior (TPB), a theory that is commonly used in commercial settings, to the educational context to explain pre-service teachers' technology acceptance. It is also interested in examining its validity when used for this purpose. It has found evidence that the TPB is a valid model to explain pre-service…

  15. High acceptance of an early dyslexia screening test involving genetic analyses in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Wilcke, Arndt; Müller, Bent; Schaadt, Gesa; Kirsten, Holger; Boltze, Johannes; Angela, h c; Friederici, D; Emmrich, Frank; Brauer, Jens; Wilcke, Arndt; Neef, Nicole; Boltze, Johannes; Skeide, Michael; Kirsten, Holger; Schaadt, Gesa; Müller, Bent; Kraft, Indra; Czepezauer, Ivonne; Bobovnikov, Nadin

    2016-01-01

    Dyslexia is a developmental disorder characterized by severe problems in the acquisition of reading and writing skills. It has a strong neurobiological basis. Genetic influence is estimated at 50–70%. One of the central problems with dyslexia is its late diagnosis, normally not before the end of the 2nd grade, resulting in the loss of several years for early therapy. Currently, research is focusing on the development of early tests for dyslexia, which may be based on EEG and genetics. Our aim was to determine the acceptance of such a future test among parents. We conducted a representative survey in Germany with 1000 parents of children aged 3–7 years, with and without experience of dyslexia. 88.7% of the parents supported the introduction of an early test for dyslexia based on EEG and genetics; 82.8% would have their own children tested, and 57.9% were willing to pay for the test if health insurance did not cover the costs. Test acceptance was significantly higher if parents had prior experience with dyslexia. The perceived benefits of such a test were early recognition and remediation and, preventing deficits. Concerns regarded the precision of the test, its potentially stigmatizing effect and its costs. The high overall support for the test leads to the conclusion that parents would accept a test for dyslexia based on EEG and genetics. PMID:26036858

  16. High acceptance of an early dyslexia screening test involving genetic analyses in Germany.

    PubMed

    Wilcke, Arndt; Müller, Bent; Schaadt, Gesa; Kirsten, Holger; Boltze, Johannes

    2016-02-01

    Dyslexia is a developmental disorder characterized by severe problems in the acquisition of reading and writing skills. It has a strong neurobiological basis. Genetic influence is estimated at 50-70%. One of the central problems with dyslexia is its late diagnosis, normally not before the end of the 2nd grade, resulting in the loss of several years for early therapy. Currently, research is focusing on the development of early tests for dyslexia, which may be based on EEG and genetics. Our aim was to determine the acceptance of such a future test among parents. We conducted a representative survey in Germany with 1000 parents of children aged 3-7 years, with and without experience of dyslexia. 88.7% of the parents supported the introduction of an early test for dyslexia based on EEG and genetics; 82.8% would have their own children tested, and 57.9% were willing to pay for the test if health insurance did not cover the costs. Test acceptance was significantly higher if parents had prior experience with dyslexia. The perceived benefits of such a test were early recognition and remediation and, preventing deficits. Concerns regarded the precision of the test, its potentially stigmatizing effect and its costs. The high overall support for the test leads to the conclusion that parents would accept a test for dyslexia based on EEG and genetics.

  17. TESTING AND ACCEPTANCE OF FUEL PLATES FOR RERTR FUEL DEVELOPMENT EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Wight; G.A. Moore; S.C. Taylor

    2008-10-01

    This paper discusses how candidate fuel plates for RERTR Fuel Development experiments are examined and tested for acceptance prior to reactor insertion. These tests include destructive and nondestructive examinations (DE and NDE). The DE includes blister annealing for dispersion fuel plates, bend testing of adjacent cladding, and microscopic examination of archive fuel plates. The NDE includes Ultrasonic (UT) scanning and radiography. UT tests include an ultrasonic scan for areas of “debonds” and a high frequency ultrasonic scan to determine the "minimum cladding" over the fuel. Radiography inspections include identifying fuel outside of the maximum fuel zone and measurements and calculations for fuel density. Details of each test are provided and acceptance criteria are defined. These tests help to provide a high level of confidence the fuel plate will perform in the reactor without a breach in the cladding.

  18. 49 CFR 238.107 - Inspection, testing, and maintenance plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Inspection, testing, and maintenance plan. 238.107... Requirements § 238.107 Inspection, testing, and maintenance plan. (a) General. Beginning on January 1, 2002... develop, and provide to FRA upon request, a detailed inspection, testing, and maintenance plan...

  19. Local tolerance testing under REACH: Accepted non-animal methods are not on equal footing with animal tests.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Ursula G; Hill, Erin H; Curren, Rodger D; Raabe, Hans A; Kolle, Susanne N; Teubner, Wera; Mehling, Annette; Landsiedel, Robert

    2016-07-01

    In general, no single non-animal method can cover the complexity of any given animal test. Therefore, fixed sets of in vitro (and in chemico) methods have been combined into testing strategies for skin and eye irritation and skin sensitisation testing, with pre-defined prediction models for substance classification. Many of these methods have been adopted as OECD test guidelines. Various testing strategies have been successfully validated in extensive in-house and inter-laboratory studies, but they have not yet received formal acceptance for substance classification. Therefore, under the European REACH Regulation, data from testing strategies can, in general, only be used in so-called weight-of-evidence approaches. While animal testing data generated under the specific REACH information requirements are per se sufficient, the sufficiency of weight-of-evidence approaches can be questioned under the REACH system, and further animal testing can be required. This constitutes an imbalance between the regulatory acceptance of data from approved non-animal methods and animal tests that is not justified on scientific grounds. To ensure that testing strategies for local tolerance testing truly serve to replace animal testing for the REACH registration 2018 deadline (when the majority of existing chemicals have to be registered), clarity on their regulatory acceptance as complete replacements is urgently required. 2016 FRAME.

  20. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC), Rev. 7-01

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2009-05-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NTSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal.

  1. Long-Term Materials Test Program: materials exposure test plan

    SciTech Connect

    1981-12-01

    The Long Term Materials Test Program is designed to identify promising corrosion resistant materials for coal-fired gas turbine applications. Resistance of materials to long term accelerated corrosion will be determined through realistic PFB environmental exposure of candidate turbine materials for up to 14,000 hours. Selected materials also will be evaluated for their ability to withstand the combined erosive and corrosive aspects of the PFB effluent. A pressurized fluidized bed combustor facility has been constructed at the General Electric Coal Utilization Research Laboratory at Malta, New York. The 12-inch diameter combustor will burn high sulfur coal with moderate-to-high chlorine and alkali levels and utilize dolomite as the sulfur sorbent. Hot gas cleanup is achieved using three stages of cyclone separators. Downstream of the cylone separators, a low velocity test section (approx. 30 ft/s) capable of housing 180 pin specimens 1/4'' diameter has been installed to assess the corrosion resistance of the various materials at three different temperatures ranging from 1300 to 1600/sup 0/F. Following the low velocity test section is a high velocity test section consisting of four cascades of airfoil shaped specimens, six specimens per cascade. This high velocity test section is being used to evaluate the combined effects of erosion and corrosion on the degradation of gas turbine materials at gas velocities of 800 to 1400 ft/s. This report summarizes the materials selection and materials exposure test plan for the Long Term Materials Test.

  2. 105 K east ion exchange and cartridge filter restart instrumentation acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehurst, R.

    1996-01-08

    Acceptance Test Report following the completion of ATP-012 for the 105KE CP-A and CP-A Computer and PLC Panels. The test was conducted from 11/13/95 to 12/11/95. Three test discrepancies were generated during the ATP and all were dispositioned and closed. All sections were completed except Section 5.9 which was deleted per ECN 190556.

  3. HNS-I small-scale gap-test acceptance-criteria investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Demerson, E.L.

    1982-12-01

    HNS-I small scale gap tests were conducted at three densities to determine the effect of density on gap sensitivity and the reproducibility of the gap test. Density was found to have a lower effect on sensitivity than the existing HNS-I acceptance region indicates. The reproducibility of the gap test was determined to be +- 0.21 db at a 95% confidence level.

  4. W-026 acceptance test report plant control system hardware (submittal {number_sign} 220.C)

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, T.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-14

    Acceptance Testing of the WRAP1 Plant Control System Hardware was conducted throughout the construction of WRAPI with the final testing on the Process Area hardware being completed in November 1996. The hardware tests were broken out by the following functional areas; Local Control Units, Operator Control Stations in the WRAP Control Room, DMS Server, PCS Server, Operator Interface Units, printers, DMS terminals, WRAP Local Area Network/Communications, and bar code equipment. This document contains a completed copy of each of the hardware tests along with the applicable test logs and completed test exception reports.

  5. Search Hanford Accessible Reports Electronically system test plan and documentation: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    White, E.L.

    1994-12-07

    The purpose of this document is to describe the following items: the approach, resources, and sequence of the testing activities; identifies the components and features to be tested; the personnel responsible for testing; the risks associated with this plan; and test cases and procedures. This document contains all test documentation for the SHARE system. The Search Hanford Accessible Reports Electronically (SHARE) testing process is based upon WHC-CM-3-10, Software Practices, Section SP-3.3 REV 0, and Appendix J REV 0. These procedures and guidelines are based on IEEE Standard 829-1983. The planning in this document was further influenced through guidance in IEEE Standard 1012-1986. This document contains the System, Acceptance, Integration and Component Test Plans, Designs, Procedures, and Cases for SHARE. The Test Cases and procedures have been attached to the document.

  6. Exploring the reliability and acceptability of cognitive tests for Indigenous Australians: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Dingwall, Kylie M; Gray, Allison O; McCarthy, Annette R; Delima, Jennifer F; Bowden, Stephen C

    2017-08-02

    Reliable cognitive assessment for Indigenous Australians is difficult given that mainstream tests typically rely on Western concepts, content and values. A test's psychometric properties should therefore be assessed prior to use in other cultures. The aim of this pilot study was to examine the reliability and acceptability of four cognitive tests for Australian Aboriginal people. Participants were 40 male and 44 female (N = 84) Aboriginal patients from Alice Springs Hospital. Four tests were assessed for reliability and acceptability - Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Screen (RUDAS) (n = 19), PEBL Corsi Blocks (Corsi) (n = 19), Story Memory Recall Test (SMRT) (n = 17) and a CogState battery (n = 18). Participants performed one to three of the tests with repeated assessment to determine test-retest reliability. Qualitative interviews were conducted and analysed based on an adapted phenomenological approach to explore test acceptability. An Indigenous Reference Group gave advice and guidance. Intra-class correlations (ICC) for test retest reliability ranged from r = 0.58 (CogState One Back accuracy) to 0.86 (RUDAS). Themes emerged relating to general impressions, impacts on understanding and performance, appropriateness, task preferences and suggested improvements. RUDAS, CogState Identification task, and SMRT showed the highest reliabilities. Overall the tests were viewed as a positive challenge and an opportunity to learn about the brain despite provoking some anxiety in the patients. Caveats for test acceptability included issues related to language, impacts of convalescence and cultural relevance.

  7. HotSpot Software Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, H; Homann, S G

    2009-03-12

    This Software Test Plan (STP) describes the procedures used to verify and validate that the HotSpot Health Physics Codes meet the requirements of its user base, which includes: (1) Users of the PC version of HotSpot conducting consequence assessment, hazard assessment and safety analysis calculations; and (2) Users of the NARAC Web and iClient software tools, which allow users to run HotSpot for consequence assessment modeling. This plan is intended to meet Critical Recommendation 2 from the Software Evaluation of HotSpot and DOE Safety Software Toolbox Recommendation for inclusion of HotSpot in the Department of Energy (DOE) Safety Software Toolbox. These users and sponsors of the HotSpot software and the organizations they represent constitute the intended audience for this document. HotSpot software is maintained for the Department of Energy Office of Emergency Operations by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). An overview of HotSpot and NARAC are provided.

  8. Utility-Scale Power Tower Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Kearney, D.

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of these Guidelines is to provide direction for conducting performance acceptance testing for large power tower solar systems that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The recommendations have been developed under a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontract and reviewed by stakeholders representing concerned organizations and interests throughout the concentrating solar power (CSP) community. An earlier NREL report provided similar guidelines for parabolic trough systems. These Guidelines recommend certain methods, instrumentation, equipment operating requirements, and calculation methods. When tests are run in accordance with these Guidelines, we expect that the test results will yield a valid indication of the actual performance of the tested equipment. But these are only recommendations--to be carefully considered by the contractual parties involved in the Acceptance Tests--and we expect that modifications may be required to fit the particular characteristics of a specific project.

  9. Effectiveness and relevance of MR acceptance testing: results of an 8 year audit.

    PubMed

    McRobbie, D W; Quest, R A

    2002-06-01

    The effectiveness and relevance of independent acceptance testing was assessed by means of an audit of acceptance procedures for 17 MRI systems, with field strengths in the range 0.5-1.5 T, acquired over 8 years. Signal-to-noise ratio and geometric linearity were found to be the image quality parameters most likely to fall below acceptable or expected standards. These received confirmed successful corrective action in 69% of instances. Non-uniformity, ghosting and poor fat suppression were the next most common non-compliant parameters, but yielded less satisfactory outcomes. Spatial resolution was not found to be a sensitive parameter in determining acceptability. 49% of all non-compliant parameters received verifiable corrective attention. A schedule of actual acceptance criteria is presented and shown to be reasonable. Parameter failure rates were shown not to have improved with time. A safety audit of 11 of the installations revealed the most common failings to be inadequate suite layout and poor use of signs. The mean number of safety issues per installation identified as requiring attention was 5, from a questionnaire of 100 points. A number of anecdotal errors and omissions are reported. The data support the importance of an appropriate acceptance procedure for new clinical MRI equipment and for the involvement of a suitably qualified safety adviser on the project team from the outset.

  10. Limited Production (LP) Precision Runway Monitor (PRM) Operational Test and Evaluation integration and OT and E Operational Test Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livings, Jeffrey

    1995-05-01

    This document defines the Test Plan and corresponding Test Verification Requirements Traceability Matrix (TVRTM) that will be used to conduct the Limited Production (LP) Precision Runway Monitor (PRM) Operational Test and Evaluation (OT and E) Integration and OT and E Operational tests. These tests will be conducted at the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport following the Contractor Site Acceptance Test. The LP PRM OT and E test effort will concentrate on Operational Effectiveness and Suitability. The Operational Effectiveness Test consists of a review of the contractor performed Development Test and Evaluation (DT and E) and Site Acceptance Tests. This review will evaluate whether each of the Measures of Effectiveness had been satisfactorily tested and whether the results meet the Minimum Acceptable Operational REquirements MAORs). This review will be conducted solely by test engineers and does not require the PRM system. The Operational Suitability Tests will expose the test participants (Air Traffic (AT) Controllers and Airway Facilities (AF) Technicians) to the PRM system in an operational environment while they perform specified operational procedures. These tests will be conducted in two separate phases: AT Suitability and AF Suitability. Each of these phases is focused on the specific test participants.

  11. AGC-1 Irradiation Experiment Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    R. L. Bratton

    2006-05-01

    The Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC) irradiation test program supports the acquisition of irradiated graphite performance data to assist in the selection of the technology to be used for the VHTR. Six irradiations are planned to investigate compressive creep in graphite subjected to a neutron field and obtain irradiated mechanical properties of vibrationally molded, extruded, and iso-molded graphites for comparison. The experiments will be conducted at three temperatures: 600, 900, and 1200°C. At each temperature, two different capsules will be irradiated to different fluence levels, the first from 0.5 to 4 dpa and the second from 4 to 7 dpa. AGC-1 is the first of the six capsules designed for ATR and will focus on the prismatic fluence range.

  12. Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) Resource Management Plan (RMP) describes the NTS Stewardship Mission and how its accomplishment will preserve the resources of the ecoregion while accomplishing the objectives of the mission. The NTS Stewardship Mission is to manage the land and facilities at the NTS as a unique and valuable national resource. The RMP has defined goals for twelve resource areas based on the principles of ecosystem management. These goals were established using an interdisciplinary team of DOE/NV resource specialists with input from surrounding land managers, private parties, and representatives of Native American governments. The overall goal of the RMP is to facilitate improved NTS land use management decisions within the Great Basin and Mojave Desert ecoregions.

  13. Physics of Colloids in Space--Plus (PCS+) Experiment Completed Flight Acceptance Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael P.

    2004-01-01

    The Physics of Colloids in Space--Plus (PCS+) experiment successfully completed system-level flight acceptance testing in the fall of 2003. This testing included electromagnetic interference (EMI) testing, vibration testing, and thermal testing. PCS+, an Expedite the Process of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Rack payload will deploy a second set of colloid samples within the PCS flight hardware system that flew on the International Space Station (ISS) from April 2001 to June 2002. PCS+ is slated to return to the ISS in late 2004 or early 2005.

  14. Small, high-pressure ratio compressor mechanical acceptance test, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metty, G. R.; Shoup, W. I.

    1973-01-01

    The fabrication and mechanical testing of the high-pressure-ratio compressor are reported. Mechanical testing was performed to demonstrate overspeed capability, adequate rotor dynamics, electrical isolation of the gas bearing trunnion mounted diffuser and shroud and the effect of operating parameters (speed and pressure ratio) on clearance of the compressor test rig. The speed range covered was 20 to 120 percent of rated speed (80,000 rpm). Following these tests an acceptance test which consisted of a 5 hour run at 80,000 rpm was made with approximately design impeller to shroud clearances. For Vol. 1, see N73-26483.

  15. Acceptance test procedure for a portable, self-contained nitrogen supply

    SciTech Connect

    Kostelnik, A.J.

    1994-10-04

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) will document compliance with the requirements of WHC-S-0249 Rev. 1 and ECN 606112. The equipment being tested is a Portable, Self-Contained Nitrogen Supply. The unit was purchased as a Design and Fabrication procurement activity. The Functional Test was written by the Seller and is contained in Appendix A. The Functional test will be performed by the Seller with representatives of the Westinghouse Hanford Company performing inspection and witnessing the functional test at the Seller`s location.

  16. Photographic copy of site plan for proposed Test Stand "D" ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of site plan for proposed Test Stand "D" in 1958. The contemporary site plans of test stands "A," "B," and "C" are also visible, along with the interconnecting tunnel system. California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Plant Engineering "Site Plan for Proposed Test Stand "D" - Edwards Test Station," drawing no. ESP/22-0, 14 November 1958 - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand D, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. Project W-314 specific test and evaluation plan for AZ tank farm upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, W.H.

    1998-08-12

    The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made by the addition of the SN-631 transfer line from the AZ-O1A pit to the AZ-02A pit by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system`s performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a lower tier document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation P1 an (TEP). Testing includes Validations and Verifications (e.g., Commercial Grade Item Dedication activities, etc), Factory Tests and Inspections (FTIs), installation tests and inspections, Construction Tests and Inspections (CTIs), Acceptance Test Procedures (ATPs), Pre-Operational Test Procedures (POTPs), and Operational Test Procedures (OTPs). The STEP will be utilized in conjunction with the TEP for verification and validation.

  18. Acceptance Test Report for the Modular Automation System (MAS) Manufactured by Honeywell Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON, D.L.

    2000-02-01

    This document details the performance of the acceptance test of the Honeywell MAS Control System for equipment to be installed in gloveboxes HA-20MB and HA-211 at a later date. Equipment that was anticipated included 6 stabilization furnaces, only three and their associated equipment were installed.

  19. Development of Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines for Large Commercial Parabolic Trough Solar Fields: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kearney, D.; Mehos, M.

    2010-12-01

    Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the EPC contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of engineering code developed for this purpose, NREL has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The fundamental differences between acceptance of a solar power plant and a conventional fossil-fired plant are the transient nature of the energy source and the necessity to utilize an analytical performance model in the acceptance process. These factors bring into play the need to establish methods to measure steady state performance, potential impacts of transient processes, comparison to performance model results, and the possible requirement to test, or model, multi-day performance within the scope of the acceptance test procedure. The power block and BOP are not within the boundaries of this guideline. The current guideline is restricted to the solar thermal performance of parabolic trough systems and has been critiqued by a broad range of stakeholders in CSP development and technology.

  20. 49 CFR 180.411 - Acceptable results of tests and inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Acceptable results of tests and inspections. 180.411 Section 180.411 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CONTINUING QUALIFICATION AND MAINTENANCE OF PACKAGING...

  1. Integrating Telemedicine for Disaster Response: Testing the Emergency Telemedicine Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Theresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is little evidence that technology acceptance is well understood in healthcare. The hospital environment is complex and dynamic creating a challenge when new technology is introduced because it impacts current processes and workflows which can significantly affect patient care delivery and outcomes. This study tested the effect…

  2. 46 CFR 162.060-12 - Use and acceptance of existing test data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Ballast Water Management Systems § 162.060-12 Use and acceptance of existing test data. (a) A manufacturer whose ballast water management... International Maritime Organization's Guidelines for Approval of Ballast Water Management Systems (G8) may use...

  3. 46 CFR 162.060-12 - Use and acceptance of existing test data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Ballast Water Management Systems § 162.060-12 Use and acceptance of existing test data. (a) A manufacturer whose ballast water management... International Maritime Organization's Guidelines for Approval of Ballast Water Management Systems (G8) may use...

  4. 46 CFR 162.060-12 - Use and acceptance of existing test data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Ballast Water Management Systems § 162.060-12 Use and acceptance of existing test data. (a) A manufacturer whose ballast water management... International Maritime Organization's Guidelines for Approval of Ballast Water Management Systems (G8) may use...

  5. 40 CFR 600.009 - Hearing on acceptance of test data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hearing on acceptance of test data. 600.009 Section 600.009 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES General Provisions § 600.009...

  6. Integrating Telemedicine for Disaster Response: Testing the Emergency Telemedicine Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Theresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is little evidence that technology acceptance is well understood in healthcare. The hospital environment is complex and dynamic creating a challenge when new technology is introduced because it impacts current processes and workflows which can significantly affect patient care delivery and outcomes. This study tested the effect…

  7. 49 CFR 180.511 - Acceptable results of inspections and tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., a tank car is qualified for use if it successfully passes the inspections and tests set forth below... QUALIFICATION AND MAINTENANCE OF PACKAGINGS Qualification and Maintenance of Tank Cars § 180.511 Acceptable... the tank in accordance with § 180.515. (a) Visual inspection. A tank car successfully passes...

  8. 49 CFR 180.511 - Acceptable results of inspections and tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., a tank car is qualified for use if it successfully passes the inspections and tests set forth below... QUALIFICATION AND MAINTENANCE OF PACKAGINGS Qualification and Maintenance of Tank Cars § 180.511 Acceptable... the tank in accordance with § 180.515. (a) Visual inspection. A tank car successfully passes...

  9. 40 CFR 600.009 - Hearing on acceptance of test data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hearing on acceptance of test data. 600.009 Section 600.009 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES General Provisions §...

  10. 40 CFR 600.009 - Hearing on acceptance of test data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hearing on acceptance of test data. 600.009 Section 600.009 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES General Provisions §...

  11. 77 FR 51880 - Requirements for Maintenance of Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Parts 2 and 52 RIN 3150-AI77 Requirements for Maintenance of Inspections, Tests, Analyses... the finding under 10 CFR 52.103(g), as the ITAAC maintenance period. Most recently, the NRC held two... maintenance programs to ensure that structures, systems, and components continue to meet the ITAAC acceptance...

  12. Characterization and acceptance testing of fully depleted thick CCDs for the large synoptic survey telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, Ivan V.; Haupt, Justine; O'Connor, Paul; Smith, Thomas; Takacs, Peter; Neal, Homer; Chiang, Jim

    2016-07-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) camera will be made as a mosaic assembled of 189 large format Charge Coupled Devices (CCD). They are n-channel, 100 micron thick devices operated in the over depleted regime. There are 16 segments, 1 million pixels each, that are read out through separate amplifiers. The image quality and readout speed expected from LSST camera translates into strict acceptance requirements for individual sensors. Prototype sensors and preproduction CCDs were delivered by vendors and they have been used for developing test procedures and protocols. Building upon this experience, two test stands were designed and commissioned at Brookhaven National Laboratory for production electro-optical testing. In this article, the sensor acceptance criteria are outlined and discussed, the test stand design and used equipment are presented and the results from commissioning sensor runs are shown.

  13. Toward optimizing patient-specific IMRT QA techniques in the accurate detection of dosimetrically acceptable and unacceptable patient plans.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Elizabeth M; Balter, Peter A; Stingo, Francesco C; Jones, Jimmy; Followill, David S; Kry, Stephen F

    2014-12-01

    The authors investigated the performance of several patient-specific intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA) dosimeters in terms of their ability to correctly identify dosimetrically acceptable and unacceptable IMRT patient plans, as determined by an in-house-designed multiple ion chamber phantom used as the gold standard. A further goal was to examine optimal threshold criteria that were consistent and based on the same criteria among the various dosimeters. The authors used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to determine the sensitivity and specificity of (1) a 2D diode array undergoing anterior irradiation with field-by-field evaluation, (2) a 2D diode array undergoing anterior irradiation with composite evaluation, (3) a 2D diode array using planned irradiation angles with composite evaluation, (4) a helical diode array, (5) radiographic film, and (6) an ion chamber. This was done with a variety of evaluation criteria for a set of 15 dosimetrically unacceptable and 9 acceptable clinical IMRT patient plans, where acceptability was defined on the basis of multiple ion chamber measurements using independent ion chambers and a phantom. The area under the curve (AUC) on the ROC curves was used to compare dosimeter performance across all thresholds. Optimal threshold values were obtained from the ROC curves while incorporating considerations for cost and prevalence of unacceptable plans. Using common clinical acceptance thresholds, most devices performed very poorly in terms of identifying unacceptable plans. Grouping the detector performance based on AUC showed two significantly different groups. The ion chamber, radiographic film, helical diode array, and anterior-delivered composite 2D diode array were in the better-performing group, whereas the anterior-delivered field-by-field and planned gantry angle delivery using the 2D diode array performed less well. Additionally, based on the AUCs, there was no significant difference

  14. Toward optimizing patient-specific IMRT QA techniques in the accurate detection of dosimetrically acceptable and unacceptable patient plans

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Elizabeth M.; Balter, Peter A.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Jones, Jimmy; Followill, David S.; Kry, Stephen F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated the performance of several patient-specific intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA) dosimeters in terms of their ability to correctly identify dosimetrically acceptable and unacceptable IMRT patient plans, as determined by an in-house-designed multiple ion chamber phantom used as the gold standard. A further goal was to examine optimal threshold criteria that were consistent and based on the same criteria among the various dosimeters. Methods: The authors used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to determine the sensitivity and specificity of (1) a 2D diode array undergoing anterior irradiation with field-by-field evaluation, (2) a 2D diode array undergoing anterior irradiation with composite evaluation, (3) a 2D diode array using planned irradiation angles with composite evaluation, (4) a helical diode array, (5) radiographic film, and (6) an ion chamber. This was done with a variety of evaluation criteria for a set of 15 dosimetrically unacceptable and 9 acceptable clinical IMRT patient plans, where acceptability was defined on the basis of multiple ion chamber measurements using independent ion chambers and a phantom. The area under the curve (AUC) on the ROC curves was used to compare dosimeter performance across all thresholds. Optimal threshold values were obtained from the ROC curves while incorporating considerations for cost and prevalence of unacceptable plans. Results: Using common clinical acceptance thresholds, most devices performed very poorly in terms of identifying unacceptable plans. Grouping the detector performance based on AUC showed two significantly different groups. The ion chamber, radiographic film, helical diode array, and anterior-delivered composite 2D diode array were in the better-performing group, whereas the anterior-delivered field-by-field and planned gantry angle delivery using the 2D diode array performed less well. Additionally, based on the AUCs, there

  15. Toward optimizing patient-specific IMRT QA techniques in the accurate detection of dosimetrically acceptable and unacceptable patient plans

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, Elizabeth M.; Balter, Peter A.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Jones, Jimmy; Followill, David S.; Kry, Stephen F.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The authors investigated the performance of several patient-specific intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA) dosimeters in terms of their ability to correctly identify dosimetrically acceptable and unacceptable IMRT patient plans, as determined by an in-house-designed multiple ion chamber phantom used as the gold standard. A further goal was to examine optimal threshold criteria that were consistent and based on the same criteria among the various dosimeters. Methods: The authors used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to determine the sensitivity and specificity of (1) a 2D diode array undergoing anterior irradiation with field-by-field evaluation, (2) a 2D diode array undergoing anterior irradiation with composite evaluation, (3) a 2D diode array using planned irradiation angles with composite evaluation, (4) a helical diode array, (5) radiographic film, and (6) an ion chamber. This was done with a variety of evaluation criteria for a set of 15 dosimetrically unacceptable and 9 acceptable clinical IMRT patient plans, where acceptability was defined on the basis of multiple ion chamber measurements using independent ion chambers and a phantom. The area under the curve (AUC) on the ROC curves was used to compare dosimeter performance across all thresholds. Optimal threshold values were obtained from the ROC curves while incorporating considerations for cost and prevalence of unacceptable plans. Results: Using common clinical acceptance thresholds, most devices performed very poorly in terms of identifying unacceptable plans. Grouping the detector performance based on AUC showed two significantly different groups. The ion chamber, radiographic film, helical diode array, and anterior-delivered composite 2D diode array were in the better-performing group, whereas the anterior-delivered field-by-field and planned gantry angle delivery using the 2D diode array performed less well. Additionally, based on the AUCs, there

  16. Uptake and acceptability of antenatal HIV testing: randomised controlled trial of different methods of offering the test.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, W. M.; Johnstone, F. D.; Boyd, F. M.; Goldberg, D. J.; Hart, G. J.; Prescott, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the uptake and acceptability of different methods of a universal offer of voluntary HIV testing to pregnant women. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial involving four combinations of written and verbal communication, followed by the direct offer of a test. The control group received no information and no direct offer of a test, although testing was available on request. SETTING: Hospital antenatal clinic covering most of the population of the city of Edinburgh. SUBJECTS: 3024 pregnant women booking at the clinic over a 10 month period. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Uptake of HIV testing and women's knowledge, satisfaction, and anxiety. RESULTS: Uptake rates were 6% for those in the control group and 35% for those directly offered the test. Neither the style of leaflet nor the length of discussion had an effect on uptake. Significant independent predictors of uptake were a direct test offer; the midwife seen; and being unmarried, previously tested, and younger age. Knowledge of the specific benefits of testing increased with the amount of information given, but neither satisfaction nor anxiety was affected by the type of offer. CONCLUSIONS: The universal offer of HIV testing is not intrusive and is acceptable to pregnant women. A policy of offering the HIV test to all women resulted in higher uptake and did not increase anxiety or dissatisfaction. Uptake depends more on the midwife than the method of offering the test. Low uptake rates and inadequate detection of HIV infection point to the need to assess a more routine approach to testing. PMID:9472506

  17. Space shuttle orbiter vehicle star tracker test program plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    The development model test program was written to provide guidance for essential star tracker test support to the Space Shuttle Orbiter Program. The program organization included test equipment preparation, prototype baseline/acceptance tests, prototype total performance tests, and prototype special tests. Test configurations, preparation phase, documentation, scheduling, and manpower requirements are discussed. The test program permits an early evaluation of the tracker's performance prior to completion and testing of the final flight models.

  18. Acceptance test procedure for K basins dose reduction project clean and coat equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Creed, R.F.

    1996-03-11

    This document is the Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) for the clean and coat equipment designed by Oceaneering Hanford, Inc. under purchase order MDK-XVC-406988 for use in the 105 K East Basin. The ATP provides the guidelines and criteria to test the equipment`s ability to clean and coat the concrete perimeter, divider walls, and dummy elevator pit above the existing water level. This equipment was designed and built in support of the Spent Nuclear Fuel, Dose Reduction Project. The ATP will be performed at the 305 test facility in the 300 Area at Hanford. The test results will be documented in WHC-SD-SNF-ATR-020.

  19. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid Q

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-02-14

    This Test Plan provides a test method to dedicate the leak detection relays used on the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skids. The new skids are fabricated on-site. The leak detection system is a safety class system per the Authorization Basis.

  20. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid P

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-02-14

    This Test Plan provides a test method to dedicate the leak detection relays used on the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skids. The new skids are fabricated on-site. The leak detection system is a safety class system per the Authorization Basis.

  1. Test of the technology acceptance model for the internet in pediatrics.

    PubMed Central

    Chismar, William G.; Wiley-Patton, Sonja

    2002-01-01

    There is growing recognition of the importance of the Internet and, more generally, information technology to pediatric care. However, acceptance of these technologies has been low. Attitudes of physicians can play a pivotal role in the adoption session. This study tests the extension to a widely used model in the information systems literature: the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). Data were collected in a survey of pediatricians to see how well the extended model, TAM2, fits in the medical arena. Our results partially confirm the model; significant parts of the model were not confirmed. The primary factors in pediatricians' acceptance of technology applications relate to their usefulness and job relevance. Little weight is given to ease of use and social factors. We discuss possible explanations for the discrepancies and suggest future research. PMID:12463806

  2. Test of the technology acceptance model for the internet in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Chismar, William G; Wiley-Patton, Sonja

    2002-01-01

    There is growing recognition of the importance of the Internet and, more generally, information technology to pediatric care. However, acceptance of these technologies has been low. Attitudes of physicians can play a pivotal role in the adoption session. This study tests the extension to a widely used model in the information systems literature: the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). Data were collected in a survey of pediatricians to see how well the extended model, TAM2, fits in the medical arena. Our results partially confirm the model; significant parts of the model were not confirmed. The primary factors in pediatricians' acceptance of technology applications relate to their usefulness and job relevance. Little weight is given to ease of use and social factors. We discuss possible explanations for the discrepancies and suggest future research.

  3. Power, sex, and rape myth acceptance: testing two models of rape proclivity.

    PubMed

    Chapleau, Kristine M; Oswald, Debra L

    2010-01-01

    Power and sex are thought to be important factors associated with sexual aggression. The goal of this study was to offer a dual-process model to determine how both an implicit power-sex association and explicit power-sex beliefs contribute to rape myth acceptance and rape proclivity. In Study 1, an explicit measure of power-sex beliefs was developed using a participant sample of 131 college students (54% female; age: M = 20.2 years, SD = 3.5 years). In Study 2, 108 male college students (age: M = 19.1 years, SD = 1.3 years) completed a power-sex implicit association test and three explicit measures assessing power-sex beliefs, rape myth acceptance, and rape proclivity. Two models of rape proclivity were compared. The best-fitting model showed that rape myth acceptance mediated the relationships between rape proclivity and an implicit power-sex association, as well as explicit power-sex beliefs.

  4. Test Plan for the overburden removal demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, P.; Thompson, D.; Winberg, M.; Skaggs, J.

    1993-06-01

    The removal of soil overburdens from contaminated pits and trenches involves using equipment that will remove a small layer of soil from 3 to 6 in. at any time. As a layer of soil is removed, overburden characterization techniques perform surveys to a depth that exceeds each overburden removal layer to ensure that the removed soil will be free of contamination. It is generally expected that no contamination will be found in the soil overburden, which was brought in after the waste was put in place. It is anticipated that some containers in the waste zone have lost their integrity, and the waste leakage from those containers has migrated by gravity downward into the waste zone. To maintain a safe work environment, this method of overburden removal should allow safe preparation of a pit or trench for final remediation. To demonstrate the soil overburden techniques, the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program has contracted vendor services to provide equipment and techniques demonstrating soil overburden removal technology. The demonstration will include tests that will evaluate equipment performance and techniques for removal of overburden soil, control of contamination spread, and dust control. To evaluate the performance of these techniques, air particulate samples, physical measurements of the excavation soil cuts, maneuverability measurements, and time versus volume (rate) of soil removal data will be collected during removal operations. To provide a medium for sample evaluation, the overburden will be spiked at specific locations and depths with rare earth tracers. This test plan will be describe the objectives of the demonstration, data quality objectives, methods to be used to operate the equipment and use the techniques in the test area, and methods to be used in collecting data during the demonstration.

  5. Safety and quality assurance of chemotherapeutic preparations in a hospital production unit: acceptance sampling plan and economic impact.

    PubMed

    Paci, A; Borget, I; Mercier, L; Azar, Y; Desmaris, R P; Bourget, P

    2012-06-01

    The opportunity to apply a sampling plan was evaluated. Costs were computed by a microcosting study. In 2003, a sampling plan was defined to reduce the number of chemotherapy quality controls while preserving the same level of quality. Recent qualitative and quantitative changes led us to define a second sampling plan supplemented by an economic evaluation to determine the cost and cost-savings of quality control. The study considers preparation produced during four semesters classified into three groups. The first one includes drugs produced below 200 batches a semester. Group 2, those for which the lot of preparation lots would have been rejected twice among these four semesters. Group 3, those would have been accepted (≥3 'acceptable lot'). A single sampling plan by attributes was applied to this group with an acceptance quality level of 1.65% and a lot tolerance percent defective below 5%. A micro-costing study was conducted on quality control, from the sampling to the validation of the results. Among 39 cytotoxic drugs, 11 were sampled which enabled to avoid a mean of 17,512 control assays per year. Each batch of the 28 non-sampled drugs was however analyzed. Costs were estimated at 2.98€ and 5.25€ for control assays depending of the analytical method. The savings from the application of the sampling plans was 153,207€ in 6 years. The sampling plan allowed maintaining constancy in number of controls and the level of quality with significant costsavings, despite a substantial increase in drugs to assay and in the number of preparations produced.

  6. Implementation and acceptability of strategies instituted for engaging men in family planning services in Kibaha district, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Msovela, Judith; Tengia-Kessy, Anna

    2016-11-21

    Men as the main decision makers in most of African families have an important role to play towards acceptance of family planning methods. This study sought to identify strategies used to engage men in family planning services and determine the extent to which men in Kibaha district in Tanzania accept these interventions. We conducted a cross sectional study using both quantitative and qualitative techniques. We used a questionnaire to interview a random sample of 365 of currently married or cohabiting men who had at least one child under the age of five years. We further conducted in-depth interviews with health workers involved in delivering reproductive health services as well as community dispensers of family planning commodities. Descriptive analysis was used to determine the extent to which men were engaged in family planning services. The data from the indepth interviews were analysed manually according to the predetermined themes, guided by the grounded theory to identify the existing strategies used to encourage male involvement in family planning services. According to the key informants, strategies that are used to encourage men to engage in family planning services include invitations through their spouses, either verbally or by using partner notification cards, incorporating family planning messages during monthly meetings and community outreach reproductive health programs. Of 365 men responding to the questionnaire, only 31 (8.4%) said they were invited to accompany their spouses to family planning clinics. Among them, 71% (22/31) visited family planning clinics. A third (32%) of the respondents had heard of community health meetings and only 20.7% of them attended these meetings. More than a third (12/34) of men who attended these meeting asserted that family planning messages targeting men featured in the agenda and subsequently half of them visited health facilities for family planning services. Existing strategies such as invitations to clinics

  7. Acceptance test procedure, 241-SY-101/241-C-106 shot loading system

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrom, M.J.

    1994-11-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure is for the 241-SY-101/241-C-106 Shot Loading System. The procedure will test the components of the Shot Loading System and its capability of adequately loading shot into the annular space of the Container. The loaded shot will provide shielding as required for transporting and storage of a contaminated pump after removal from the tank. This test serves as verification that the SLS is acceptable for use in the pump removal operations for Tanks 241-SY-101, 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. The pump removal operation for these three tanks will be performed by two different organizations with different equipment, but the Shot Loading System will be compatible between the two operations.

  8. Modeling of a Parabolic Trough Solar Field for Acceptance Testing: A Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, M. J.; Mehos, M. S.; Kearney, D. W.; McMahan, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    As deployment of parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) systems ramps up, the need for reliable and robust performance acceptance test guidelines for the solar field is also amplified. Project owners and/or EPC contractors often require extensive solar field performance testing as part of the plant commissioning process in order to ensure that actual solar field performance satisfies both technical specifications and performance guaranties between the involved parties. Performance test code work is currently underway at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in collaboration with the SolarPACES Task-I activity, and within the ASME PTC-52 committee. One important aspect of acceptance testing is the selection of a robust technology performance model. NREL1 has developed a detailed parabolic trough performance model within the SAM software tool. This model is capable of predicting solar field, sub-system, and component performance. It has further been modified for this work to support calculation at subhourly time steps. This paper presents the methodology and results of a case study comparing actual performance data for a parabolic trough solar field to the predicted results using the modified SAM trough model. Due to data limitations, the methodology is applied to a single collector loop, though it applies to larger subfields and entire solar fields. Special consideration is provided for the model formulation, improvements to the model formulation based on comparison with the collected data, and uncertainty associated with the measured data. Additionally, this paper identifies modeling considerations that are of particular importance in the solar field acceptance testing process and uses the model to provide preliminary recommendations regarding acceptable steady-state testing conditions at the single-loop level.

  9. Acceptability of Testing Children for Tobacco-Smoke Exposure: A National Parent Survey

    PubMed Central

    Tanski, Susanne E.; McMillen, Robert C.; Ross, Kaile M.; Lipstein, Ellen A.; Hipple, Bethany J.; Friebely, Joan; Klein, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tests are available to measure children's exposure to tobacco smoke. One potential barrier to testing children for tobacco-smoke exposure is the belief that parents who smoke would not want their child tested. No previous surveys have assessed whether testing children for exposure to tobacco smoke in the context of their child's primary care visit is acceptable to parents. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether testing children for tobacco-smoke exposure is acceptable to parents. DESIGN AND METHODS: We conducted a national random-digit-dial telephone survey of households from September to November 2006. The sample was weighted by race and gender, based on the 2005 US Census, to be representative of the US population. RESULTS: Of 2070 eligible respondents contacted, 1803 (87.1%) completed the surveys. Among 477 parents in the sample, 60.1% thought that children should be tested for tobacco-smoke exposure at their child's doctor visit. Among the parental smokers sampled, 62.0% thought that children should be tested for tobacco-smoke exposure at the child's doctor visit. In bivariate analysis, lower parental education level, allowing smoking in the home, nonwhite race, and female gender were each associated (P < .05) with wanting the child tested for tobacco-smoke exposure. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of nonsmoking and smoking parents want their children tested for tobacco-smoke exposure during the child's health care visit. PMID:21422089

  10. Preference for physician vs. nurse-initiated opt-out screening on HIV test acceptance.

    PubMed

    Kinsler, Janni J; Sayles, Jennifer N; Cunningham, William E; Mahajan, Anish

    2013-01-01

    Provider-initiated opt-out HIV screening suggests that providers should routinely order HIV tests unless a patient declines. However, data on how providers will respond to this new screening model are scarce. Documented concerns from the providers' perspectives have included time constraints of a typical patient encounter, and discomfort with discussing sexual history and risk behavior with patients. To address these potential barriers, nurse-initiated screening has been proposed as an approach to increasing screening rates in general medical and urgent care settings. This study compares patient acceptability of provider-initiated opt-out HIV screening with nurse-initiated opt-out HIV screening among 220 patients between the ages of 18-64 from two publically funded "safety-net" outpatient clinics in Los Angeles County. Our study found that 77% of patients agreed to HIV testing using opt-out screening, and that HIV test acceptance was higher with the physician-initiated opt-out model compared with the nurse-initiated opt-out model (adjusted odds ratios = 2.92; 95% CI = 1.37-6.22). These findings indicate that adding opt-out screening to primary care providers responsibilities may be an acceptable and effective strategy for addressing the perennially low HIV testing rates, particularly among low income, traditionally underserved patient populations among whom the epidemic is expanding most rapidly.

  11. Acceptance test report for the 241-AN-107 caustic addition mixer pump data logger

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, J.L.

    1996-04-05

    The Acceptance Test Procedure for the 241-AN-107 Caustic Addition Mixer Pump Data logger, WHC-SD-WM-ATP-149, was started on September 25, 1995, and completed November 13, 1995. K.G. Carothers of Tank Waste Remediation Engineering requested the test procedure and ICF Kaiser Control Systems Engineering group wrote the test procedure and executed it at the 305 building in 300 area and at the 241-AN Tank Farm in 200 East area. The purpose of this report is to document that the Caustic addition Mixer Pump Data logger, functioned as intended as installed at 241-AN-107 tank farm.

  12. A speech reception in noise test for preschool children (the Galker-test): Validity, reliability and acceptance.

    PubMed

    Lauritsen, Maj-Britt Glenn; Kreiner, Svend; Söderström, Margareta; Dørup, Jens; Lous, Jørgen

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluates initial validity and reliability of the "Galker test of speech reception in noise" developed for Danish preschool children suspected to have problems with hearing or understanding speech against strict psychometric standards and assesses acceptance by the children. The Galker test is an audio-visual, computerised, word discrimination test in background noise, originally comprised of 50 word pairs. Three hundred and eighty eight children attending ordinary day care centres and aged 3-5 years were included. With multiple regression and the Rasch item response model it was examined whether the total score of the Galker test validly reflected item responses across subgroups defined by sex, age, bilingualism, tympanometry, audiometry and verbal comprehension. A total of 370 children (95%) accepted testing and 339 (87%) completed all 50 items. The analysis showed that 35 items fitted the Rasch model. Reliability was 0.75 before and after exclusion of the 15 non-fitting items. In the stepwise linear regression model age group of children could explain 20% of the variation in Galker-35-score, sex 1%, second language at home 4%, tympanometry in best ear 2%, and parental education another 2%. Other variable did not reach significance. The Galker-35 was well accepted by children down to the age of 3 years and results indicate that the scale represents construct valid and reliable measurement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of label and location of testing on acceptability of cream cheese varying in fat content.

    PubMed

    Daillant-Spinnler, B; Issanchou, S

    1995-04-01

    The acceptability of low-, medium- and high-fat versions of a cream cheese to consumers was measured in different conditions by rating overall distance from ideal. The influence of label (unlabelled vs. commercial package) differed according to the cream cheese fat-level habits of the assessors and to the fat level of the product. In labelled testing, high-fat cream cheese was more highly accepted by high- and medium-fat users and low-fat cream cheese seemed to be further from ideal for high-fat users. The location of testing (home vs. laboratory) affected the rating of only the high-fat product: consumers are more severe on it at home than in the laboratory.

  14. MCC/shuttle test plan. Volume 1: Philosophy and guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The Mission Control Center/Shuttle Test Plan is defined from development through operations to a level of detail which will support the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and contractor management in the following areas: test management, test tool development, and resource and schedule planning.

  15. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Inpatients with Psychosis (the REACH Study): Protocol for Treatment Development and Pilot Testing

    PubMed Central

    Gaudiano, Brandon A.; Davis, Carter H.; Epstein-Lubow, Gary; Johnson, Jennifer E.; Mueser, Kim T.; Miller, Ivan W.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders frequently require treatment at inpatient hospitals during periods of acute illness for crisis management and stabilization. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), a “third wave” cognitive-behavioral intervention that employs innovative mindfulness-based strategies, has shown initial efficacy in randomized controlled trials for improving acute and post-discharge outcomes in patients with psychosis when studied in acute-care psychiatric hospitals in the U.S. However, the intervention has not been widely adopted in its current form because of its use of an individual-only format and delivery by doctoral-level research therapists with extensive prior experience using ACT. The aim of the Researching the Effectiveness of Acceptance-based Coping during Hospitalization (REACH) Study is to adapt a promising acute-care psychosocial treatment for inpatients with psychosis, and to pilot test its effectiveness in a routine inpatient setting. More specifically, we describe our plans to: (a) further develop and refine the treatment and training protocols, (b) conduct an open trial and make further modifications based on the experience gained, and (c) conduct a pilot randomized controlled trial in preparation for a future fully-powered clinical trial testing the effectiveness of ACT. PMID:28475123

  16. Objective criteria for acceptability and constancy tests of digital subtraction angiography.

    PubMed

    de las Heras, Hugo; Torres, Ricardo; Fernández-Soto, José Miguel; Vañó, Eliseo

    2016-01-01

    Demonstrate an objective procedure to quantify image quality in digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and suggest thresholds for acceptability and constancy tests. Series of images were obtained in a DSA system simulating a small (paediatric) and a large patient using the dynamic phantom described in the IEC and DIN standards for acceptance tests of DSA equipment. Image quality was quantified using measurements of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Overall scores combining the CNR of 10-100 mg/ml Iodine at a vascular diameter of 1-4 mm in a homogeneous background were defined. Phantom entrance surface air kerma (Ka,e) was measured with an ionisation chamber. The visibility of a low-contrast vessel in DSA images has been identified with a CNR value of 0.50 ± 0.03. Despite using 14 times more Ka,e (8.85 vs 0.63 mGy/image), the protocol for large patients showed a decrease in the overall score CNRsum of 67% (4.21 ± 0.06 vs 2.10 ± 0.05). The uncertainty in the results of the objective method was below 5%. Objective evaluation of DSA images using CNR is feasible with dedicated phantom measurements. An objective methodology has been suggested for acceptance tests compliant with the IEC/DIN standards. The defined overall scores can serve to fix a reproducible baseline for constancy tests, as well as to study the device stability within one acquisition series and compare different imaging protocols. This work provides aspects that have not been included in the recent European guidelines on Criteria for Acceptability of Medical Radiological Equipment. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Test report for run-in acceptance testing of Project W-151 300 HP mixing pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Berglin, B.G.

    1998-01-29

    This report documents the results of a performance demonstration and operational checkout of three 300 HP mixer pumps in accordance with WHC-SD-WI51-TS-001 ``Mixer Pump Test Specification for Project W-151`` and Statement of Work 8K520-EMN-95-004 ``Mixer Pump Performance Demonstration at MASF`` in the 400 Area Maintenance and Storage Facility (MASF) building. Testing of the pumps was performed by Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Engineering and funded by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project W-151. Testing began with the first pump on 04-01-95 and ended with the third pump on 11-01-96. Prior to testing, the MASF was modified and prepared to meet the pump testing requirements set forth by the Test Specification and the Statement of Work.

  18. In search of acceptable alternatives to the murine histamine sensitisation test (HIST): what is possible and practical?

    PubMed

    Wagner, L; Isbrucker, R; Locht, C; Arciniega, J; Costanzo, A; McFarland, R; Oh, H; Hoonakker, M; Descamps, J; Andersen, S R; Gupta, R K; Markey, K; Chapsal, J M; Lidster, K; Casey, W; Allen, D

    2016-01-01

    The 'International Workshop on Alternatives to the Murine Histamine Sensitization Test for Acellular Pertussis Vaccines: In Search of Acceptable Alternatives to the Murine Histamine Sensitization Test (HIST): What is Possible and Practical?' was held on 4 and 5 March 2015 in London, United Kingdom. Participants discussed the results of the data generated from an international collaborative study (BSP114 Phase 2) sponsored by the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & Health Care (EDQM) to determine if a modified Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell-based clustering assay is a suitable alternative to replace HIST. Workshop participants agreed that protocol transferability demonstrated in the collaborative study indicates that a standardised CHO cell assay is adequate for measuring pure PTx in reference preparations. However, vaccine manufacturers would still need to demonstrate that the method is valid to detect or measure residual PTx in their specific adjuvanted products. The 2 modified CHO cell protocols included in the study (the Direct and the Indirect Methods) deserve further consideration as alternatives to HIST. Using the CHO cell assay, an in vitro alternative, for acellular pertussis (aP) vaccine batch release testing would reduce the number of animals used for aP vaccine safety testing. A strategic, stepwise adoption plan was proposed, in which the alternative test would be used for release purposes first, and then, once sufficient confidence in its suitable performance has been gained, its use would be extended to stability testing.

  19. Social trust, risk perceptions and public acceptance of recycled water: testing a social-psychological model.

    PubMed

    Ross, Victoria L; Fielding, Kelly S; Louis, Winnifred R

    2014-05-01

    Faced with a severe drought, the residents of the regional city of Toowoomba, in South East Queensland, Australia were asked to consider a potable wastewater reuse scheme to supplement drinking water supplies. As public risk perceptions and trust have been shown to be key factors in acceptance of potable reuse projects, this research developed and tested a social-psychological model of trust, risk perceptions and acceptance. Participants (N = 380) were surveyed a few weeks before a referendum was held in which residents voted against the controversial scheme. Analysis using structural equation modelling showed that the more community members perceived that the water authority used fair procedures (e.g., consulting with the community and providing accurate information), the greater their sense of shared identity with the water authority. Shared social identity in turn influenced trust via increased source credibility, that is, perceptions that the water authority is competent and has the community's interest at heart. The findings also support past research showing that higher levels of trust in the water authority were associated with lower perceptions of risk, which in turn were associated with higher levels of acceptance, and vice versa. The findings have a practical application for improving public acceptance of potable recycled water schemes.

  20. Factors influencing acceptability of voluntary counselling and HIV-testing among pregnant women in Northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    de Paoli, M M; Manongi, R; Klepp, K-I

    2004-05-01

    Guided by the conceptual framework of the Health Belief Model, this study aimed to identify factors associated with pregnant women's expressed willingness to accept voluntary counselling and HIV-testing (VCT). A cross-sectional interview survey of 500 pregnant women, complemented by focus group discussions, was conducted in the Kilimanjaro region of Tanzania. Constructs derived from the Health Belief Model explained 41.7% of women's willingness to accept VCT. Perceived high personal susceptibility to HIV/AIDS, barriers related to confidentiality and partner involvement, self-efficacy regarding alternative feeding methods and religion were all shown to be associated with willingness to accept VCT. The women's acceptance of VCT seems to depend upon their perceiving that VCT and alternative feeding strategies provide clear benefits, primarily for the child. Whether a positive attitude to VCT and alternative feeding strategies are transformed into actual behaviour depends on a set of complicated decisions in which several potential psychological consequences are assessed. Sharing the diagnosis with partners may not have the intended effect if there is a lack of sensitivity to the women's fear of blame and rejection. If pregnant women are to fully participate in and benefit from mother-to-child-transmission prevention efforts, their partners must be committed and involved in the process.

  1. Role of public involvement in the limits of acceptable change wilderness planning system

    Treesearch

    Edwin E. Krumpe; Stephen F. McCool

    1997-01-01

    Implementation of the LAC within politicized contexts requires that managers/planners involve the public in ways significantly different from the traditional rational-comprehensive paradigm of natural resource planning. In politicized contexts, the lack of clear agreement about goals and disagreement among scientists about cause-effect relationships requires planning...

  2. FINAL DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE IN GERMANY: PLAN APPROVAL PROCESS OF KONRAD MINE AND ACCEPTANCE REQUIREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bandt, Gabriele; Posnatzki, Britta; Beckers, Klaus-Arno

    2003-02-27

    Currently no final repository for any type of radioactive waste is operated in Germany. Preliminary Final Storage Acceptance Requirements for radioactive waste packages were published in 1995. Up to now these are the basis for treatment of radioactive waste in Germany. After licensing of the final repository these preliminary waste acceptance requirements are completed with licensing conditions. Some of these conditions affect the preliminary waste acceptance requirements, e. g. behavior of chemo-toxic substances in case of accidents in the final repository or the allowed maximum concentration of fissile material. The presented examples of radioactive waste conditioning campaigns demonstrate that no difficulties are expected in management, characterization and quality assurance of radioactive wastes due to the licensing conditions.

  3. Fast flux test facility, transition project plan

    SciTech Connect

    Guttenberg, S.

    1994-11-15

    The FFTF Transition Project Plan, Revision 1, provides changes and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition.

  4. 13. Photographic copy of site plan displaying Test Stand 'C' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photographic copy of site plan displaying Test Stand 'C' (4217/E-18), Test Stand 'D' (4223/E-24), and Control and Recording Center (4221/E-22) with ancillary structures, and connecting roads and services. California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Facilities Engineering and Construction Office 'Repairs to Test Stand 'C,' Edwards Test Station, Legend & Site Plan M-1,' drawing no. ESP/115, August 14, 1987. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand C, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  5. W-026 acceptance test report system integration equipment (SIE)(submittal {number_sign} 018.6.A)

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, T.L.

    1997-01-27

    Acceptance testing of the System Integration Equipment (SIE) at Hanford was performed in two stages. The first was inconclusive, and resulted in a number of findings. These finding. are summarized as part of this report. The second stage of testing addressed these findings, and performed full system testing per the approved test procedure. This report includes summaries of all testing, results and finding.. Although the SIE did not in some cases perform as required for plant operations, it did perform per the system specification. (These discrepancies were noted and are addressed elsewhere.) Following testing, the system was formaLLy accepted. Documentation of this acceptance is incLuded in this report.

  6. Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA) Battery Test Operations User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salinas, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ESTA Battery Test Operations. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  7. Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA) Electrical Power Systems Test Operations: User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salinas, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ESTA Electrical Power Systems Test Laboratory. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  8. Automated Interactive Simulation Model (AISIM) Vax Version 5.0 Acceptance Test Procedures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-29

    DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED Prepared For ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS DIVISION AIR FORCE SYSTEMS COMMAND DEPUTY FOR DEVELOPMENT PLANS AND SUPPORT SYSTEMS HANSCOM AIR...RESULTS TEST RESULTS 8. Delete temporary AISIM files delf p(testdbl) Current parameters are % listed. User is asked to continue or abort. User enters...ADDITIONAL INPUTS/ FUNCTION/COMMANDS EXPECTED RESULTS TEST RESULTS 28. Define plot definitions in preparation for batch mode processing. a p(testdbc) See

  9. Identifying and reducing disparities in successful addiction treatment completion: testing the role of Medicaid payment acceptance.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Erick G; Garner, Bryan R; Cook, Benjamin; Kong, Yinfei; Vega, William A; Gelberg, Lillian

    2017-05-25

    Medicaid has become the largest payer of substance use disorder treatment and may enhance access to quality care and reduce disparities. We tested whether treatment programs' acceptance of Medicaid payments was associated with reduced disparities between Mexican Americans and non-Latino Whites. We analyzed client and program data from 122 publicly funded treatment programs in 2010 and 112 programs in 2013. These data were merged with information regarding 15,412 adult clients from both periods, of whom we selected only Mexican Americans (n = 7130, 46.3%) and non-Latino Whites (n = 8282, 53.7%). We used multilevel logistic regression and variance decomposition to examine associations and underlying factors associated with Mexican American and White differences in treatment completion. Variables of interest included client demographics; drug use severity and mental health issues; and program license, accreditation, and acceptance of Medicaid payments. Mexican Americans had lower odds of treatment completion (OR = 0.677; 95% CI = 0.534, 0.859) compared to non-Latino Whites. This disparity was explained in part by primary drug used, greater drug use severity, history of mental health disorders, and program acceptance of Medicaid payments. The interaction between Mexican Americans and acceptance of Medicaid was statistically significant (OR = 1.284; 95% CI = 1.008, 1.637). Findings highlighted key program and client drivers of this disparity and the promising role of program acceptance of Medicaid payment to eliminate disparities in treatment completion among Mexican Americans. Implications for health policy during the Trump Administration are discussed.

  10. HARD PAN I Test Series Test and Instrumentation Plans. Volume I. Test Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-01

    2785 pounds explosive weight) of 60 grain/ft will be used for the test series. The explosive used in the detonating cord is Pentaerythritol ...and through the synthesis of results of two-dimensional parametric analysis studies for the range of conditions applicable to Minuteman. b. Three

  11. Acceptance of and barriers to voluntary HIV counselling and testing among adults in Guizhou province, China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wei; Detels, Roger; Feng, Yuji; Wu, Zunyou; Shen, Limei; Li, Yu; Li, Zezhen; Chen, Fang; Wang, Aimin; Liu, Taiming

    2007-12-01

    To find and compare the levels of acceptance of and barriers to voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) among adults in two different counties of Guizhou province, China, one in which the China CARES project was operating and the other in which it was not. A longitudinal design with two-stage cluster sampling was employed. A total of 1012 participants were recruited in the two counties. All participants were interviewed, then given a coupon for free VCT after the interview. Participants were paid for returning the coupon within 2 months, whether tested or not. The uptake of VCT was measured within 2 months after the interview. The study found that the levels of HIV/AIDS knowledge and acceptability of VCT among the adults in both counties were low. Although 459 participants (43.5%) expressed an intent to use the VCT services, only 193 (16.5%) actually visited the VCT facilities, and only 42 (3.7%) actually took an HIV test within 2 months after the interview. The use of VCT was related to occupation, age, transportation difficulties, health status, ethnicity, and high-risk behaviors. The main barriers to HIV testing included perceiving oneself as low risk, fear of unsolicited disclosure, and fear of stigma and discrimination that would result from taking the test. Education about HIV/AIDS and VCT needs to be improved, and levels of stigma and discrimination reduced, in order to enhance the uptake of VCT services, an essential step for the initiation of treatment.

  12. Test/QA Plan for Mold-Resistant Gypsum Board Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document serves as the test and quality assurance (QA) plan for mold-resistant gypsum board testing. The quality management plan (QMP) under which this work is conducted is the Verification Testing of Air Pollution Control Technology Quality Management Plan, Revision 2.2, Fe...

  13. Carrier screening for cystic fibrosis: test acceptance and one year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Levenkron, J C; Loader, S; Rowley, P T

    1997-12-31

    We identified 124 carriers among 4,879 patients of prenatal care providers in the Rochester region. Six factors were identified that together permitted a correct classification regarding test acceptance for 77.5% of all subjects. For those pregnant, the most influential of these factors was a more accepting attitude toward abortion. As an indication for abortion, cystic fibrosis (CF) ranked between mild and moderate mental retardation. Of the 124 carrier women identified, we obtained 1-year follow-up information on 100. Mean score for CF knowledge at 1 year (77.4 +/- 13.2%), although significantly lower than immediately after counseling (84 +/- 12.4%), was still significantly higher than after detection but before counseling (51.1% +/- 20.7%). Anxiety about having a child with CF significantly declined from 25.8 +/- 8.0 SD immediately after counseling to 18.9 +/- 7.8 at 1 year (Spielberger State Anxiety Scale). Although 15 carriers regretted having been tested, 83% believed that they benefited from testing, 83% would make the same decision to be tested over again, and 79% would recommend testing to a friend. We conclude that, for most women, CF carrier screening accomplished its purpose: most carriers detected came for counseling, had their partners tested, and, if their partners were also carriers, had prenatal diagnosis. The major undesirable outcomes were that many women testing negative did not understand that a negative result did not exclude being a carrier and that three women found to be carriers did not have their partners tested because of anxiety or the unacceptability of pregnancy termination and therefore may not have carefully considered their decision to be tested. Both of these undesirable outcomes could have been avoided by greater attention to pretest patient education by the primary care provider.

  14. Perceived acceptability of home-based couples voluntary HIV counseling and testing in Northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Njau, B; Watt, M H; Ostermann, J; Manongi, R; Sikkema, K J

    2012-01-01

    It is estimated that 5.6% of the Tanzanian population ages 15-49 are infected with HIV, but only 30% of adults have ever had an HIV test. Couples' testing has proven to increase testing coverage and introduce HIV prevention, but barriers include access to testing services and unequal gender dynamics in relationships. Innovative approaches are needed to address barriers to couple's testing and increase uptake of HIV testing. Using qualitative data collection methods, a formative study was conducted to assess the acceptability of a home-based couples counseling and testing (HBCCT) approach. Eligible study participants included married men and women, HIV-infected individuals, health care and home-based care providers, voluntary counseling and testing counselors, and community leaders. A total of 91 individuals participated in focus group discussions (FGDs) and in-depth interviews conducted between September 2009 and January 2010 in rural settings in Northern Tanzania. An HBCCT intervention appears to be broadly acceptable among participants. Benefits of HBCCT were identified in terms of access, confidentiality, and strengthening the relationship. Fears of negative consequences from knowing one's HIV status, including stigma, blame, physical abuse, or divorce, remain a concern and a potential barrier to the successful provision of the intervention. Lessons for implementation highlighted the importance of appointments for home visits, building relationships of confidence and trust between counselors and clients, and assessing and responding to a couple's readiness to undergo HIV testing. HBCCT should addresses HIV stigma, emphasize confidentiality, and improve communication skills for disclosure and decision-making among couples.

  15. Home-based voluntary HIV counselling and testing found highly acceptable and to reduce inequalities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Low uptake of voluntary HIV counselling and testing (VCT) in sub-Saharan Africa is raising acceptability concerns which might be associated with ways by which it is offered. We investigated the acceptability of home-based delivery of counselling and HIV testing in urban and rural populations in Zambia where VCT has been offered mostly from local clinics. Methods A population-based HIV survey was conducted in selected communities in 2003 (n = 5035). All participants stating willingness to be HIV tested were offered VCT at home and all counselling was conducted in the participants' homes. In the urban area post-test counselling and giving of results were done the following day whereas in rural areas this could take 1-3 weeks. Results Of those who indicated willingness to be HIV tested, 76.1% (95%CI 74.9-77.2) were counselled and received the test result. Overall, there was an increase in the proportion ever HIV tested from 18% before provision of home-based VCT to 38% after. The highest increase was in rural areas; among young rural men aged 15-24 years up from 14% to 42% vs. for urban men from 17% to 37%. Test rates by educational attainment changed from being positively associated to be evenly distributed after home-based VCT. Conclusions A high uptake was achieved by delivering HIV counselling and testing at home. The highest uptakes were seen in rural areas, in young people and groups with low educational attainment, resulting in substantial reductions in existing inequalities in accessing VCT services. PMID:20553631

  16. 46 CFR 159.007-7 - Application for acceptance for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Application for acceptance for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action. 159.007-7 Section 159.007-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF....007-7 Application for acceptance for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action. (a) From...

  17. 46 CFR 159.007-7 - Application for acceptance for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Application for acceptance for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action. 159.007-7 Section 159.007-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF....007-7 Application for acceptance for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action. (a) From...

  18. 46 CFR 159.007-7 - Application for acceptance for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Application for acceptance for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action. 159.007-7 Section 159.007-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF....007-7 Application for acceptance for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action. (a) From...

  19. 46 CFR 159.007-7 - Application for acceptance for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application for acceptance for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action. 159.007-7 Section 159.007-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF....007-7 Application for acceptance for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action. (a) From...

  20. 10 CFR 51.108 - Public hearings on Commission findings that inspections, tests, analyses, and acceptance criteria...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., tests, analyses, and acceptance criteria of combined licenses are met. 51.108 Section 51.108 Energy...) Production and Utilization Facilities § 51.108 Public hearings on Commission findings that inspections, tests, analyses, and acceptance criteria of combined licenses are met. In any public hearing requested under...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix Xv to Part 86 - Procedure for Determining an Acceptable Exhaust Regeneration Durability-Data Test Schedule for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Procedure for Determining an Acceptable Exhaust Regeneration Durability-Data Test Schedule for Diesel Cycle Vehicles Equipped With... Appendix XV to Part 86—Procedure for Determining an Acceptable Exhaust Regeneration Durability-Data Test...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix Xv to Part 86 - Procedure for Determining an Acceptable Exhaust Regeneration Durability-Data Test Schedule for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedure for Determining an Acceptable Exhaust Regeneration Durability-Data Test Schedule for Diesel Cycle Vehicles Equipped With... Appendix XV to Part 86—Procedure for Determining an Acceptable Exhaust Regeneration Durability-Data Test...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix Xv to Part 86 - Procedure for Determining an Acceptable Exhaust Regeneration Durability-Data Test Schedule for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Procedure for Determining an Acceptable Exhaust Regeneration Durability-Data Test Schedule for Diesel Cycle Vehicles Equipped With... Appendix XV to Part 86—Procedure for Determining an Acceptable Exhaust Regeneration Durability-Data Test...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix Xv to Part 86 - Procedure for Determining an Acceptable Exhaust Regeneration Durability-Data Test Schedule for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Procedure for Determining an Acceptable Exhaust Regeneration Durability-Data Test Schedule for Diesel Cycle Vehicles Equipped With... Appendix XV to Part 86—Procedure for Determining an Acceptable Exhaust Regeneration Durability-Data Test...

  5. 10 CFR 26.91 - Acceptable devices for conducting initial and confirmatory tests for alcohol and methods of use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Acceptable devices for conducting initial and confirmatory tests for alcohol and methods of use. 26.91 Section 26.91 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.91 Acceptable devices for conducting...

  6. 10 CFR 26.91 - Acceptable devices for conducting initial and confirmatory tests for alcohol and methods of use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Acceptable devices for conducting initial and confirmatory tests for alcohol and methods of use. 26.91 Section 26.91 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.91 Acceptable devices for conducting...

  7. 10 CFR 26.91 - Acceptable devices for conducting initial and confirmatory tests for alcohol and methods of use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Acceptable devices for conducting initial and confirmatory tests for alcohol and methods of use. 26.91 Section 26.91 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.91 Acceptable devices for conducting...

  8. Space station propulsion technology: Space station propulsion system test bed test plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briley, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    Testing of the hydrogen/oxygen Space Station Propulsion System will demonstrate the technology readiness for the IOC application. To facilitate early demonstration of this technology and to allow demonstration of maturing technology, this testing will be performed with the components installed on a test bed which simulated the Space Station Structure. The test plan contains a description of the test bed, test objective, instrumentation plan, and controls plan. Each of these is discussed in detail.

  9. Feasibility and effectiveness of integrating provider-initiated testing and counselling within family planning services in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Liambila, Wilson; Askew, Ian; Mwangi, Juma; Ayisi, Robert; Kibaru, Josephine; Mullick, Saiqa

    2009-11-01

    To assess an intervention for increasing access to and use of HIV testing among family planning clients through provider-initiated testing and counselling for HIV. Two versions of the intervention were prospectively compared using a prepost intervention only design. Health facilities were purposively selected and family planning consultations randomly selected. Twenty-three public-sector hospitals, health centres and dispensaries in two districts of Central Province, Kenya. One group of 28 family planning providers were trained in the integrated family planning-HIV counselling intervention and in providing HIV testing and counselling to family planning clients requesting a test during the consultation and another group of 47 family planning providers were trained in the intervention and in referring clients interested in an HIV test. Samples of family planning clients willing to be observed and interviewed were randomly selected (538 preintervention, 520 postintervention) and their informed consent obtained to observe their consultation. All family planning providers were trained in an algorithm that integrates HIV/sexually transmitted infection prevention counselling, including offering HIV testing and counselling, with family planning counselling. Clients choosing to be tested were either referred or tested during the consultation by a trained family planning provider. The proportion of family planning clients with whom HIV testing was discussed; the proportion offered HIV testing; and the proportion choosing to have a test. The proportion of consultations in which HIV prevention counselling was provided and HIV testing offered increased significantly. The proportion of clients requesting an HIV test increased from 1 to 26%; approximately one third of these had never been tested previously. Provider-initiated testing and counselling is feasible and acceptable in family planning services, does not adversely affect the quality of the family planning consultation

  10. 7. PHOTOCOPY, PLANS, ELEVATIONS, AND SECTION DRAWING FOR MISSILE TEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. PHOTOCOPY, PLANS, ELEVATIONS, AND SECTION DRAWING FOR MISSILE TEST AND ASSEMBLY BUILDING. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Missile Test & Assembly Building, South end of launch area, northeast of Generator Building No. 3, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  11. Aeronautical Mobile Satellite Service (AMSS) Test Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    ICAO ) . It also contains a description of the Communications Test Facility (CTF) which will be used to perform the tests. An appendix includes a brief description of each test to be performed along with setup and data to be recorded.

  12. 14 CFR 437.25 - Flight test plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight test plan. 437.25 Section 437.25 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS Requirements to Obtain an Experimental Permit Flight Test Plan...

  13. 14 CFR 437.25 - Flight test plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flight test plan. 437.25 Section 437.25 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS Requirements to Obtain an Experimental Permit Flight Test Plan...

  14. 49 CFR 238.107 - Inspection, testing, and maintenance plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... plan that relates to employee working conditions. (d) The inspection, testing, and maintenance plan... this section is not intended to address and should not include procedures to address employee working conditions that arise in the course of conducting the inspections, tests, and maintenance set forth in...

  15. 49 CFR 238.107 - Inspection, testing, and maintenance plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... plan that relates to employee working conditions. (d) The inspection, testing, and maintenance plan... this section is not intended to address and should not include procedures to address employee working conditions that arise in the course of conducting the inspections, tests, and maintenance set forth in...

  16. Detailed Test Plan Redundant Sensor Strapdown IMU Evaluation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwell, T.; Miyatake, Y.; Wedekind, D. E.

    1971-01-01

    The test plan for a redundant sensor strapdown inertial measuring unit evaluation program is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) test philosophy and limitations, (2) test sequence, (3) equipment specifications, (4) general operating procedures, (5) calibration procedures, (6) alignment test phase, and (7) navigation test phase. The data and analysis requirements are analyzed.

  17. ENRAF Series 854 Advanced Technology Gauge (ATG) with SPU II card for Leak Detector Use Acceptance Test Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    SMITH, S.G.

    1999-10-21

    The following Acceptance Test Procedure was written to test the ENRAF series 854 ATG with SPU II card prior to installation in the Tank Farms. The procedure sets various parameters and verifies the gauge and alarms functionality.

  18. Mod-2 wind turbine project assessment and cluster test plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    An assessment of the Mod-2 Wind Turbine project is presented based on initial goals and present results. Specifically, the Mod-2 background, project flow, and a chronology of events/results leading to Mod-2 acceptance is presented. After checkout/acceptance of the three operating turbines, NASA/LeRC will continue management of a two year test program performed at the DOE Goodnoe Hills test site. This test program is expected to yield data necessary for the continued development and optimization of wind energy systems. These test activities, the implementation of, and the results to date are also presented.

  19. Predictors of HIV-related risk perception and PrEP acceptability among young adult female family planning patients.

    PubMed

    Garfinkel, Danielle B; Alexander, Kamila A; McDonald-Mosley, Reagan; Willie, Tiara C; Decker, Michele R

    2017-06-01

    HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) presents new opportunities for HIV prevention. While women comprise approximately 20% of new HIV infections in the US, significant questions remain about how to most effectively facilitate PrEP uptake for this population. Family planning clinics are a dominant source of health care for young women and support an estimated 4.5 million women annually. We explore characteristics associated with HIV risk perception and PrEP acceptability among young adult women seeking reproductive health services in a high-prevalence setting. A cross-sectional, clinic-based survey was conducted with women ages 18-35 (n = 146) seeking health care at two family planning clinics in the greater Baltimore, Maryland area, from January to April 2014. An estimated 22% of women reported being worried about HIV risk, and 60% reported they would consider taking a pill daily to prevent HIV. In adjusted models, HIV-related worry was associated with having no college education, being single or dating more than one person, practicing consistent condom use during vaginal sex, and having ever traded sex. PrEP acceptability was significantly associated with being Black (71% vs. 49%, AOR 2.23, CI: 1.89-2.64) and having ever traded sex (83% vs. 58%, AOR 4.94, CI: 2.00-12.22). For women with a history of intimate partner violence (IPV), PrEP acceptability was significantly lower (57% vs. 62%, AOR .71, CI: .59-.85) relative to their non-abused counterparts. Results suggest that family planning clinics may be a natural setting for PrEP discussion and roll-out. They should be considered in the context of integrating HIV prevention with reproductive health services. Women with a trauma history may need additional support for implementing HIV prevention in the form of PrEP.

  20. Project W-314 Polyurea Special Protective Coating (SPC) Test Plan Chemical Compatibility and Physical Characteristics Testing

    SciTech Connect

    MAUSER, R.W.

    2001-01-15

    This Test Plan outlines the testing to be done on the Special Protective Coating (SPC) Polyurea which includes: Tank Waste Compatibility, Decontamination Factor Testing, and Adhesion Strength Testing after a sample has been exposed to Radiation.

  1. Testing the validity and acceptability of the diagnostic criteria for Hoarding Disorder: a DSM-5 survey.

    PubMed

    Mataix-Cols, D; Fernández de la Cruz, L; Nakao, T; Pertusa, A

    2011-12-01

    The DSM-5 Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Sub-Workgroup is recommending the creation of a new diagnostic category named Hoarding Disorder (HD). The validity and acceptability of the proposed diagnostic criteria have yet to be formally tested. Obsessive-compulsive disorder/hoarding experts and random members of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) were shown eight brief clinical vignettes (four cases meeting criteria for HD, three with hoarding behaviour secondary to other mental disorders, and one with subclinical hoarding behaviour) and asked to decide the most appropriate diagnosis in each case. Participants were also asked about the perceived acceptability of the criteria and whether they supported the inclusion of HD in the main manual. Altogether, 211 experts and 48 APA members completed the survey (30% and 10% response rates, respectively). The sensitivity and specificity of the HD diagnosis and the individual criteria were high (80-90%) across various types of professionals, irrespective of their experience with hoarding cases. About 90% of participants in both samples thought the criteria would be very/somewhat acceptable for professionals and sufferers. Most experts (70%) supported the inclusion of HD in the main manual, whereas only 50% of the APA members did. The proposed criteria for HD have high sensitivity and specificity. The criteria are also deemed acceptable for professionals and sufferers alike. Training of professionals and the development and validation of semi-structured diagnostic instruments should improve diagnostic accuracy even further. A field trial is now needed to confirm these encouraging findings with real patients in real clinical settings.

  2. Audio Development Laboratory (ADL) User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romero, Andy

    2012-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ADL. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  3. Chamber B Thermal/Vacuum Chamber: User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montz, Mike E.

    2012-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of Chamber B. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  4. Utility-Scale Parabolic Trough Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines, April 2009 - December 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Kearney, D.

    2011-05-01

    Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of ASME or other international test codes developed for this purpose, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The Guidelines contained here are specifically written for parabolic trough collector systems with a heat-transport system using a high-temperature synthetic oil, but the basic principles are relevant to other CSP systems.

  5. Acceptance Performance Test Guideline for Utility Scale Parabolic Trough and Other CSP Solar Thermal Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Mehos, M. S.; Wagner, M. J.; Kearney, D. W.

    2011-08-01

    Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of ASME or other international test codes developed for this purpose, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. Progress on interim guidelines was presented at SolarPACES 2010. Significant additions and modifications were made to the guidelines since that time, resulting in a final report published by NREL in April 2011. This paper summarizes those changes, which emphasize criteria for assuring thermal equilibrium and steady state conditions within the solar field.

  6. Acceptance Testing of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael; Fisher, John; Kliss, Mark; Tleimat, Maher; Quinn, Gregory; Fort, James; Nalette, Tim; Baker, Gale

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the results of acceptance testing of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal (VPCAR) technology. The VPCAR technology is currently being developed by NASA as a Mars transit vehicle water recycling system. NASA has recently completed a grant to develop a next generation VPCAR system. This grant was peer reviewed and funded through the Advanced Life Support (ALS) National Research Announcement (NRA). The grant funded a contract with Water Reuse Technology Inc. to construct an engineering development unit. This contract concluded with the shipment of the final deliverable to NASA on 8/31/03. The objective of the acceptance testing was to characterize the performance of this new system. This paper presents the results of mass power, and volume measurements for the delivered system. In addition, product water purity analysis for a Mars transit mission and a planetary base wastewater ersatz are provided. Acoustic noise levels, interface specifications and system reliability results are also discussed. An assessment of the readiness of the technology for human testing and recommendations for future improvements are provided.

  7. Acceptance Testing of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael; Fisher, John; Kliss, Mark; Tleimat, Maher; Quinn, Gregory; Fort, James; Nalette, Tim; Baker, Gale

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the results of acceptance testing of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal (VPCAR) technology. The VPCAR technology is currently being developed by NASA as a Mars transit vehicle water recycling system. NASA has recently completed a grant to develop a next generation VPCAR system. This grant was peer reviewed and funded through the Advanced Life Support (ALS) National Research Announcement (NRA). The grant funded a contract with Water Reuse Technology Inc. to construct an engineering development unit. This contract concluded with the shipment of the final deliverable to NASA on 8/31/03. The objective of the acceptance testing was to characterize the performance of this new system. This paper presents the results of mass power, and volume measurements for the delivered system. In addition, product water purity analysis for a Mars transit mission and a planetary base wastewater ersatz are provided. Acoustic noise levels, interface specifications and system reliability results are also discussed. An assessment of the readiness of the technology for human testing and recommendations for future improvements are provided.

  8. International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Acceptance Testing for the Pressurized Mating Adapters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2008-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of three subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Supply (ACS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). PMAs 1 and 2 flew to ISS on Flight 2A and Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA) 3 flew to ISS on Flight 3A. This paper provides a summary of the PMAs ECLS design and a detailed discussion of the ISS ECLS Acceptance Testing methodologies utilized for the PMAs.

  9. Is family planning already accepted by the present generation? Freshmen's view on family planning at University of North Sumatera, Medan. (Third report).

    PubMed

    Syarifuddin, A; Thahir, I; Hasibuan, B; Siregar, Z; Siregar, H

    1988-01-01

    A survey of 1997 freshmen entering the University of North Sumatera, Medan, on their attitude toward family planning was conducted in July 1985, and compared to results of 2 prior surveys taken in 1982 and 1977. The most common sources of knowledge about family planning were newspapers (14.5%), TV (11.5%) and health workers (4.1%). 41% of the students were 1st or 2nd born. Most expected to marry at 25-29 years of age, or after graduation, in line with the government family planning campaign. The average desired family size was 2.83 children, compared to 3.05 and 3.37 in prior surveys. 31.3% wanted 2 boys and 1 girl, 26.6% wanted 1 boy and 1 girl and 12.6% wanted 2 boys and 2 girls. The most popular single reason chosen for the expected family size was good family life, by 27.2%, according to the government slogan. Virtually no one chose future security or tradition as their primary reason. 97.8% expressed readiness to accept family planning, up from 72.7% in the 1st survey. Methods chosen were IUD by 35.0%, followed by pills and periodic abstinence. The survey demonstrates the effectiveness of government family planning education.

  10. Formulation of a candidate glass for use as an acceptance test standard material

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, W.L.; Strachan, D.M.; Wolf, S.F.

    1998-04-01

    In this report, the authors discuss the formulation of a glass that will be used in a laboratory testing program designed to measure the precision of test methods identified in the privatization contracts for the immobilization of Hanford low-activity wastes. Tests will be conducted with that glass to measure the reproducibility of tests and analyses that must be performed by glass producers as a part of the product acceptance procedure. Test results will be used to determine if the contractually required tests and analyses are adequate for evaluating the acceptability of likely immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) products. They will also be used to evaluate if the glass designed for use in these tests can be used as an analytical standard test material for verifying results reported by vendors for tests withg ILAW products. The results of those tests and analyses will be presented in a separate report. The purpose of this report is to document the strategy used to formulate the glass to be used in the testing program. The low-activity waste reference glass LRM that will be used in the testing program was formulated to be compositionally similar to ILAW products to be made with wastes from Hanford. Since the ILAW product compositions have not been disclosed by the vendors participating in the Hanford privatization project, the composition of LRM was formulated based on simulated Hanford waste stream and amounts of added glass forming chemicals typical for vitrified waste forms. The major components are 54 mass % SiO{sub 2}, 20 mass % Na{sub 2}O, 10 mass % Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 8 mass % B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and 1.5 mass % K{sub 2}O. Small amounts of other chemicals not present in Hanford wastes were also included in the glass, since they may be included as chemical additives in ILAW products. This was done so that the use of LRM as a composition standard could be evaluated. Radionuclides were not included in LRM because a nonradioactive material was desired.

  11. Disintegration of sublingual tablets: proposal for a validated test method and acceptance criterion.

    PubMed

    Weda, M; van Riet-Nales, D A; van Aalst, P; de Kaste, D; Lekkerkerker, J F F

    2006-12-01

    In the Netherlands the market share of isosorbide dinitrate 5 mg sublingual tablets is dominated by 2 products (A and B). In the last few years complaints have been received from health care professionals on product B. During patient use the disintegration of the tablet was reported to be slow and/or incomplete, and ineffectiveness was experienced. In the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) no requirement is present for the disintegration time of sublingual tablets. The purpose of this study was to compare the in vitro disintegration time of products A and B, and to establish a suitable test method and acceptance criterion. A and B were tested with the Ph. Eur. method described in the monograph on disintegration of tablets and capsules as well as with 3 modified tests using the same Ph. Eur. apparatus, but without movement of the basket-rack assembly. In modified test 1 and modified test 2 water was used as medium (900 ml and 50 ml respectively), whereas in modified test 3 artificial saliva was used (50 ml). In addition, disintegration was tested in Nessler tubes with 0.5 and 2 ml of water. Finally, the Ph. Eur. method was also applied to other sublingual tablets with other drug substances on the Dutch market. With modified test 3 no disintegration could be achieved within 20 min. With the Ph. Eur. method and modified tests 1 and 2 product A and B differed significantly (p < 0. 001), with product B having longer disintegration times. These 3 methods were capable of discriminating between products and between batches. The time measured with the Ph. Eur. method was significantly lower compared to modified tests 1 and 2 (p < 0.001) and correlated well with the Nessler tube results. It is concluded that the in vivo complaints on product B could be related to the in vitro data. Furthermore, it is proposed that for immediate release of sublingual tablets the disintegration time should be tested. The Ph. Eur. method is considered suitable for this test. In view of the

  12. U.S. EPA proposes Allied Landfill Cleanup Plan, accepting comments

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    For Immediate Release No. 14-OPA152 Chicago (Sept. 22) -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is issuing a proposed plan to clean up the Allied Paper Landfill in Kalamazoo, Michigan, a part of the Allied Paper/Portage Creek/Kalamazoo Rive

  13. Acceptance criteria for the evaluation of Category 1 fuel cycle facility physical security plans

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, P.A.

    1991-10-01

    This NUREG document presents criteria developed from US Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations for the evaluation of physical security plans submitted by Category 1 fuel facility licensees. Category 1 refers to those licensees who use or possess a formula quantity of strategic special nuclear material.

  14. Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) standby plan

    SciTech Connect

    Hulvey, R.K.

    1997-03-06

    The FFTF Standby Plan, Revision 0, provides changes to the major elements and project baselines to maintain the FFTF plant in a standby condition and to continue washing sodium from irradiated reactor fuel. The Plan is consistent with the Memorandum of Decision approved by the Secretary of Energy on January 17, 1997, which directed that FFTF be maintained in a standby condition to permit the Department to make a decision on whether the facility should play a future role in the Department of Energy`s dual track tritium production strategy. This decision would be made in parallel with the intended December 1998 decision on the selection of the primary, long- term source of tritium. This also allows the Department to review the economic and technical feasibility of using the FFTF to produce isotopes for the medical community. Formal direction has been received from DOE-RL and Fluor 2020 Daniel Hanford to implement the FFTF standby decision. The objective of the Plan is maintain the condition of the FFTF systems, equipment and personnel to preserve the option for plant restart within three and one-half years of a decision to restart, while continuing deactivation work which is consistent with the standby mode.

  15. Aeronautical Mobile Satellite Service (AMSS) test plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandlin, Sean M.

    1991-05-01

    A test program is described which will be conducted by the Federal Aviation Administration to support the validation of Standards and Recommended Practices being developed for the Aeronautical Mobile Satellite Service by the International Civil Aviation Organization. A description of the Communication Test Facility is also presented which will be used to perform the tests. A brief description is also included of each test to be performed along with setup and data to be recorded.

  16. 30 CFR 282.23 - Testing Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... techniques or technology or mining equipment, or to determine environmental effects by a pilot test mining... commercial fishing. (n) A description of potential environmental impacts of testing activities including the... potential environmental impacts of the proposed testing activities and the domestic socioeconomic effects...

  17. Test plan for the Rapid Geophysical Surveyor

    SciTech Connect

    Roybal, L.G.

    1993-06-01

    This document describes the test plant for demonstrating and testing a set of optically pumped cesium-based total field magnetometers using the Rapid Geophysical Surveyor platform. The proposed testing will be used to assess the function of these magnetometers as deployed on the Rapid Geophysical Surveyor and evaluate the practical utility of high resolution magnetic data for supporting waste retrieval efforts.

  18. Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan: Annual summary, January 2000

    SciTech Connect

    2000-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan published in December of 1998 (DOE/NV--518) describes the Nevada Test Site stewardship mission and how its accomplishment will preserve the resources of the ecoregion while accomplishing the objectives of the mission. As part of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, DOE Nevada Operations Office has committed to perform and publish an annual summary review of DOE Nevada Operations' stewardship of the Nevada Test Site. This annual summary includes a description of progress made toward the goals of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, pertinent monitoring data, actions that were taken to adapt to changing conditions, and any other changes to the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan.

  19. Treatability Test Plan for an In Situ Biostimulation Reducing Barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vince R.; Long, Philip E.; Brockman, Fred J.; Oostrom, Mart; Hubbard, Susan; Borden, Robert C.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

    2007-07-21

    This treatability test plan supports a new, integrated strategy to accelerate cleanup of chromium in the Hanford 100 Areas. This plan includes performing a field-scale treatability test for bioreduction of chromate, nitrate, and dissolved oxygen. In addition to remediating a portion of the plume and demonstrating reduction of electron acceptors in the plume, the data from this test will be valuable for designing a full-scale bioremediation system to apply at this and other chromium plumes at Hanford.

  20. 40 CFR 60.2541 - In lieu of a state plan submittal, are there other acceptable option(s) for a state to meet its...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... there other acceptable option(s) for a state to meet its Clean Air Act section 111(d)/129(b)(2... of a state plan submittal, are there other acceptable option(s) for a state to meet its Clean Air Act section 111(d)/129(b)(2) obligations? Yes, a state may meet its Clean Air Act section...