Science.gov

Sample records for accepted models surface

  1. Extending the Technology Acceptance Model: Policy Acceptance Model (PAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Tamra

    There has been extensive research on how new ideas and technologies are accepted in society. This has resulted in the creation of many models that are used to discover and assess the contributing factors. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) is one that is a widely accepted model. This model examines people's acceptance of new technologies based on variables that directly correlate to how the end user views the product. This paper introduces the Policy Acceptance Model (PAM), an expansion of TAM, which is designed for the analysis and evaluation of acceptance of new policy implementation. PAM includes the traditional constructs of TAM and adds the variables of age, ethnicity, and family. The model is demonstrated using a survey of people's attitude toward the upcoming healthcare reform in the United States (US) from 72 survey respondents. The aim is that the theory behind this model can be used as a framework that will be applicable to studies looking at the introduction of any new or modified policies.

  2. 16 CFR 1505.7 - Maximum acceptable surface temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maximum acceptable surface temperatures... ARTICLES INTENDED FOR USE BY CHILDREN Regulations § 1505.7 Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. The maximum acceptable surface temperatures for electrically operated toys shall be as follows: Surface...

  3. 16 CFR 1505.7 - Maximum acceptable surface temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maximum acceptable surface temperatures... ARTICLES INTENDED FOR USE BY CHILDREN Regulations § 1505.7 Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. The maximum acceptable surface temperatures for electrically operated toys shall be as follows: Surface...

  4. 16 CFR 1505.7 - Maximum acceptable surface temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maximum acceptable surface temperatures... ARTICLES INTENDED FOR USE BY CHILDREN Regulations § 1505.7 Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. The maximum acceptable surface temperatures for electrically operated toys shall be as follows: Surface...

  5. 16 CFR 1505.7 - Maximum acceptable surface temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maximum acceptable surface temperatures... ARTICLES INTENDED FOR USE BY CHILDREN Regulations § 1505.7 Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. The maximum acceptable surface temperatures for electrically operated toys shall be as follows: Surface...

  6. 16 CFR 1505.7 - Maximum acceptable surface temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum acceptable surface temperatures... ARTICLES INTENDED FOR USE BY CHILDREN Regulations § 1505.7 Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. The maximum acceptable surface temperatures for electrically operated toys shall be as follows: Surface...

  7. Integrated Model for E-Learning Acceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadiani; Rodziah, A.; Hasan, S. M.; Rusli, A.; Noraini, C.

    2016-01-01

    E-learning is not going to work if the system is not used in accordance with user needs. User Interface is very important to encourage using the application. Many theories had discuss about user interface usability evaluation and technology acceptance separately, actually why we do not make it correlation between interface usability evaluation and user acceptance to enhance e-learning process. Therefore, the evaluation model for e-learning interface acceptance is considered important to investigate. The aim of this study is to propose the integrated e-learning user interface acceptance evaluation model. This model was combined some theories of e-learning interface measurement such as, user learning style, usability evaluation, and the user benefit. We formulated in constructive questionnaires which were shared at 125 English Language School (ELS) students. This research statistics used Structural Equation Model using LISREL v8.80 and MANOVA analysis.

  8. Model of aircraft passenger acceptance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, I. D.

    1978-01-01

    A technique developed to evaluate the passenger response to a transportation system environment is described. Reactions to motion, noise, temperature, seating, ventilation, sudden jolts and descents are modeled. Statistics are presented for the age, sex, occupation, and income distributions of the candidates analyzed. Values are noted for the relative importance of system variables such as time savings, on-time arrival, convenience, comfort, safety, the ability to read and write, and onboard services.

  9. Chinese Nurses' Acceptance of PDA: A Cross-Sectional Survey Using a Technology Acceptance Model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanling; Xiao, Qian; Sun, Liu; Wu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    This study explores Chinese nurses' acceptance of PDA, using a questionnaire based on the framework of Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). 357 nurses were involved in the study. The results reveal the scores of the nurses' acceptance of PDA were means 3.18~3.36 in four dimensions. The younger of nurses, the higher nurses' title, the longer previous usage time, the more experienced using PDA, and the more acceptance of PDA. Therefore, the hospital administrators may change strategies to enhance nurses' acceptance of PDA, and promote the wide application of PDA.

  10. Measuring Technology Acceptance Level of Turkish Pre-Service English Teachers by Using Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirmizi, Özkan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate technology acceptance of prospective English teachers by using Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) in Turkish context. The study is based on Structural Equation Model (SEM). The participants of the study from English Language Teaching Departments of Hacettepe, Gazi and Baskent Universities. The participants…

  11. Technology, Demographic Characteristics and E-Learning Acceptance: A Conceptual Model Based on Extended Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarhini, Ali; Elyas, Tariq; Akour, Mohammad Ali; Al-Salti, Zahran

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to develop an amalgamated conceptual model of technology acceptance that explains how individual, social, cultural and organizational factors affect the students' acceptance and usage behaviour of the Web-based learning systems. More specifically, the proposed model extends the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to…

  12. Technological Diffusion within Educational Institutions: Applying the Technology Acceptance Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolski, Stacy; Jackson, Sally

    Expectancy models of behavior such as the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) and the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) offer guidelines that aid efforts to facilitate use of new technology. These models remind us that both acceptance of and resistance to technology use are grounded in beliefs and norms regarding the technology. Although TAM is widely…

  13. Gerontechnology acceptance by elderly Hong Kong Chinese: a senior technology acceptance model (STAM).

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; Chan, Alan Hoi Shou

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and test a senior technology acceptance model (STAM) aimed at understanding the acceptance of gerontechnology by older Hong Kong Chinese people. The proposed STAM extended previous technology acceptance models and theories by adding age-related health and ability characteristics of older people. The proposed STAM was empirically tested using a cross-sectional questionnaire survey with a sample of 1012 seniors aged 55 and over in Hong Kong. The result showed that STAM was strongly supported and could explain 68% of the variance in the use of gerontechnology. For older Hong Kong Chinese, individual attributes, which include age, gender, education, gerontechnology self-efficacy and anxiety, and health and ability characteristics, as well as facilitating conditions explicitly and directly affected technology acceptance. These were better predictors of gerontechnology usage behaviour (UB) than the conventionally used attitudinal factors (usefulness and ease of use).

  14. Evaluation of the Acceptance of Audience Response System by Corporations Using the Technology Acceptance Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Hsing-Hui; Lu, Ta-Jung; Wann, Jong-Wen

    The purpose of this research is to explore enterprises' acceptance of Audience Response System (ARS) using Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). The findings show that (1) IT characteristics and facilitating conditions could be external variables of TAM. (2) The degree of E-business has positive significant correlation with behavioral intention of employees. (3) TAM is a good model to predict and explain IT acceptance. (4) Demographic variables, industry and firm characteristics have no significant correlation with ARS acceptance. The results provide useful information to managers and ARS providers that (1) ARS providers should focus more on creating different usages to enhance interactivity and employees' using intention. (2) Managers should pay attention to build sound internal facilitating conditions for introducing IT. (3) According to the degree of E-business, managers should set up strategic stages of introducing IT. (4) Providers should increase product promotion and also leverage academic and government to promote ARS.

  15. Modeling Patients' Acceptance of Provider-delivered E-health

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, E. Vance; Lankton, Nancy K.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Health care providers are beginning to deliver a range of Internet-based services to patients; however, it is not clear which of these e-health services patients need or desire. The authors propose that patients' acceptance of provider-delivered e-health can be modeled in advance of application development by measuring the effects of several key antecedents to e-health use and applying models of acceptance developed in the information technology (IT) field. Design: This study tested three theoretical models of IT acceptance among patients who had recently registered for access to provider-delivered e-health. Measurements: An online questionnaire administered items measuring perceptual constructs from the IT acceptance models (intrinsic motivation, perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness/extrinsic motivation, and behavioral intention to use e-health) and five hypothesized antecedents (satisfaction with medical care, health care knowledge, Internet dependence, information-seeking preference, and health care need). Responses were collected and stored in a central database. Results: All tested IT acceptance models performed well in predicting patients' behavioral intention to use e-health. Antecedent factors of satisfaction with provider, information-seeking preference, and Internet dependence uniquely predicted constructs in the models. Conclusion: Information technology acceptance models provide a means to understand which aspects of e-health are valued by patients and how this may affect future use. In addition, antecedents to the models can be used to predict e-health acceptance in advance of system development. PMID:15064290

  16. Examining Engineering & Technology Students' Acceptance of Network Virtualization Technology Using the Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yousif, Wael K.

    2010-01-01

    This causal and correlational study was designed to extend the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) and to test its applicability to Valencia Community College (VCC) Engineering and Technology students as the target user group when investigating the factors influencing their decision to adopt and to utilize VMware as the target technology. In…

  17. User Acceptance of Long-Term Evolution (LTE) Services: An Application of Extended Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Eunil; Kim, Ki Joon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to propose an integrated path model in order to explore user acceptance of long-term evolution (LTE) services by examining potential causal relationships between key psychological factors and user intention to use the services. Design/methodology/approach: Online survey data collected from 1,344 users are analysed…

  18. User Acceptance of YouTube for Procedural Learning: An Extension of the Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Doo Young; Lehto, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was framed using the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to identify determinants affecting behavioral intention to use YouTube. Most importantly, this research emphasizes the motives for using YouTube, which is notable given its extrinsic task goal of being used for procedural learning tasks. Our conceptual framework included two…

  19. Development and application of an acceptance testing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendley, Rex D.; Noonan, Caroline H.; Hall, Kenneth R.

    1992-01-01

    The process of acceptance testing large software systems for NASA has been analyzed, and an empirical planning model of the process constructed. This model gives managers accurate predictions of the staffing needed, the productivity of a test team, and the rate at which the system will pass. Applying the model to a new system shows a high level of agreement between the model and actual performance. The model also gives managers an objective measure of process improvement.

  20. A Causal Model of Teacher Acceptance of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Jui-Ling; Lieu, Pang-Tien; Liang, Jung-Hui; Liu, Hsiang-Te; Wong, Seng-lee

    2012-01-01

    This study proposes a causal model for investigating teacher acceptance of technology. We received 258 effective replies from teachers at public and private universities in Taiwan. A questionnaire survey was utilized to test the proposed model. The Lisrel was applied to test the proposed hypotheses. The result shows that computer self-efficacy has…

  1. Examining the Factors Affecting PDA Acceptance among Physicians: An Extended Technology Acceptance Model.

    PubMed

    Basak, Ecem; Gumussoy, Cigdem Altin; Calisir, Fethi

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at identifying the factors affecting the intention to use personal digital assistant (PDA) technology among physicians in Turkey using an extended Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). A structural equation-modeling approach was used to identify the variables that significantly affect the intention to use PDA technology. The data were collected from 339 physicians in Turkey. Results indicated that 71% of the physicians' intention to use PDA technology is explained by perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use. On comparing both, the perceived ease of use has the strongest effect, whereas the effect of perceived enjoyment on behavioral intention to use is found to be insignificant. This study concludes with the recommendations for managers and possible future research.

  2. Predicting User Acceptance of Collaborative Technologies: An Extension of the Technology Acceptance Model for E-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Ronnie; Vogel, Doug

    2013-01-01

    Collaborative technologies support group work in project-based environments. In this study, we enhance the technology acceptance model to explain the factors that influence the acceptance of Google Applications for collaborative learning. The enhanced model was empirically evaluated using survey data collected from 136 students enrolled in a…

  3. Acceptance of health information technology in health professionals: an application of the revised technology acceptance model.

    PubMed

    Ketikidis, Panayiotis; Dimitrovski, Tomislav; Lazuras, Lambros; Bath, Peter A

    2012-06-01

    The response of health professionals to the use of health information technology (HIT) is an important research topic that can partly explain the success or failure of any HIT application. The present study applied a modified version of the revised technology acceptance model (TAM) to assess the relevant beliefs and acceptance of HIT systems in a sample of health professionals (n = 133). Structured anonymous questionnaires were used and a cross-sectional design was employed. The main outcome measure was the intention to use HIT systems. ANOVA was employed to examine differences in TAM-related variables between nurses and medical doctors, and no significant differences were found. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess the predictors of HIT usage intentions. The findings showed that perceived ease of use, but not usefulness, relevance and subjective norms directly predicted HIT usage intentions. The present findings suggest that a modification of the original TAM approach is needed to better understand health professionals' support and endorsement of HIT. Perceived ease of use, relevance of HIT to the medical and nursing professions, as well as social influences, should be tapped by information campaigns aiming to enhance support for HIT in healthcare settings.

  4. Modeling of the charge acceptance of lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thele, M.; Schiffer, J.; Karden, E.; Surewaard, E.; Sauer, D. U.

    This paper presents a model for flooded and VRLA batteries that is parameterized by impedance spectroscopy and includes the overcharging effects to allow charge-acceptance simulations (e.g. for regenerative-braking drive-cycle profiles). The full dynamic behavior and the short-term charge/discharge history is taken into account. This is achieved by a detailed modeling of the sulfate crystal growth and modeling of the internal gas recombination cycle. The model is applicable in the full realistic temperature and current range of automotive applications. For model validation, several load profiles (covering the dynamics and the current range appearing in electrically assisted or hybrid cars) are examined and the charge-acceptance limiting effects are elaborately discussed. The validation measurements have been performed for different types of lead-acid batteries (flooded and VRLA). The model is therefore an important tool for the development of automotive power nets, but it also allows to analyze different charging strategies and energy gains which can be achieved during regenerative-braking.

  5. Surface complexation modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adsorption-desorption reactions are important processes that affect the transport of contaminants in the environment. Surface complexation models are chemical models that can account for the effects of variable chemical conditions, such as pH, on adsorption reactions. These models define specific ...

  6. Factors Influencing the Acceptance of Web-Based Training in Malaysia: Applying the Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hashim, Junaidah

    2008-01-01

    Companies in Malaysia are beginning to use web-based training to reduce the cost of training and to provide employees with greater access to instruction. However, some people are uncomfortable with technology and prefer person-to-person methods of training. This study examines the acceptance of web-based training among a convenience sample of 261…

  7. The History of UTAUT Model and Its Impact on ICT Acceptance and Usage by Academicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oye, N. D.; Iahad, N. A.; Rahim, N. Ab.

    2014-01-01

    This paper started with the review of the history of technology acceptance model from TRA to UTAUT. The expected contribution is to bring to lime light the current development stage of the technology acceptance model. Based on this, the paper examined the impact of UTAUT model on ICT acceptance and usage in HEIs. The UTAUT model theory was…

  8. Influence of Gender and Computer Teaching Efficacy on Computer Acceptance among Malaysian Student Teachers: An Extended Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Kung-Teck; Teo, Timothy; Russo, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to validate the technology acceptance model (TAM) in an educational context and explore the role of gender and computer teaching efficacy as external variables. From the literature, it appeared that only limited studies had developed models to explain statistically the chain of influence of computer teaching efficacy…

  9. Modeling Computer Usage Intentions of Tertiary Students in a Developing Country through the Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afari-Kumah, Eben; Achampong, Akwasi Kyere

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to examine the computer usage intentions of Ghanaian Tertiary Students. The Technology Acceptance Model was adopted as the theoretical framework to ascertain whether it could help explain behavioral intentions of individuals to accept and use technology. Factor analysis was used to assess the construct validity of the initial…

  10. Identifying Ghanaian Pre-Service Teachers' Readiness for Computer Use: A Technology Acceptance Model Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gyamfi, Stephen Adu

    2016-01-01

    This study extends the technology acceptance model to identify factors that influence technology acceptance among pre-service teachers in Ghana. Data from 380 usable questionnaires were tested against the research model. Utilising the extended technology acceptance model (TAM) as a research framework, the study found that: pre-service teachers'…

  11. Modeling eBook acceptance: A study on mathematics teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalal, Azlin Abd; Ayub, Ahmad Fauzi Mohd; Tarmizi, Rohani Ahmad

    2014-12-01

    The integration and effectiveness of eBook utilization in Mathematics teaching and learning greatly relied upon the teachers, hence the need to understand their perceptions and beliefs. The eBook, an individual laptop completed with digitized textbook sofwares, were provided for each students in line with the concept of 1 student:1 laptop. This study focuses on predicting a model on the acceptance of the eBook among Mathematics teachers. Data was collected from 304 mathematics teachers in selected schools using a survey questionnaire. The selection were based on the proportionate stratified sampling. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) were employed where the model was tested and evaluated and was found to have a good fit. The variance explained for the teachers' attitude towards eBook is approximately 69.1% where perceived usefulness appeared to be a stronger determinant compared to perceived ease of use. This study concluded that the attitude of mathematics teachers towards eBook depends largely on the perception of how useful the eBook is on improving their teaching performance, implying that teachers should be kept updated with the latest mathematical application and sofwares to use with the eBook to ensure positive attitude towards using it in class.

  12. PCB contaminated dust on indoor surfaces--health risks and acceptable surface concentrations in residential and occupational settings.

    PubMed

    Kuusisto, Sari; Lindroos, Outi; Rantio, Tiina; Priha, Eero; Tuhkanen, Tuula

    2007-04-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been used in diverse purposes such as indoor paints. Removal of these paints with dust creating techniques, like sandblasting, will result in contamination of building surfaces with PCB-containing dust. Objectives of this study was to analyze the PCB concentrations on surfaces after sandblasting with silica using wipe samples and estimate the resulting health risks and further calculate the risk based acceptable PCB surface concentrations that do not cause incremental lifetime cancer risk higher that 10(-5) or does not cause immunosupression effects in residential use or in occupational settings. Both deterministic and probabilistic approaches were used. The total PCB concentrations on surfaces ranged from 10 to 1100 microg/m(2). Estimated cancer risk was 1.2 x 10(-4) for childhood exposure, 1.3 x 10(-5) for adult residents and 1.5 x 10(-5) for occupational exposure. Probabilistic risk assessment revealed that point estimates were quite reasonable and located between 45th and 79th percentiles on probabilistic distribution of risk. The noncancer risks were calculated as hazard quotients (HQ) which ranged from 3.3 to 35 depending on the exposure scenario. Acceptable surface concentrations based on noncancer effects that are protective for 95% of exposed population were 7 microg/m(2) for residential use, 65 microg/m(2) for residential use if only adults will be exposed and 140 microg/m(2) for occupational use. Preliminary cleanup experiment revealed that when contaminated dust was carefully removed with industrial vacuum cleaner and further washed with terpene containing liquid the surface concentration dropped below the acceptable levels calculated in this study.

  13. Do I Have to Learn Something New? Mental Models and the Acceptance of Replacement Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Wei; Xu, Peng

    2011-01-01

    Few studies in technology acceptance have explicitly addressed the acceptance of replacement technologies, technologies that replace legacy ones that have been in use. This article explores this issue through the theoretical lens of mental models. We contend that accepting replacement technologies entails both mental model maintenance and mental…

  14. The Adult Roles Models Program: Feasibility, Acceptability, and Initial Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Ellen Johnson; Dean, Randa; Perez, Amanda; Rivera, Angelic

    2014-01-01

    We present the feasibility and acceptability of a parent sexuality education program led by peer educators in community settings. We also report the results of an outcome evaluation with 71 parents who were randomized to the intervention or a control group, and surveyed one month prior to and six months after the 4-week intervention. The program was highly feasible and acceptable to participants, and the curriculum was implemented with a high level of fidelity and facilitator quality. Pilot data show promising outcomes for increasing parental knowledge, communication, and monitoring of their adolescent children. PMID:24883051

  15. Modeling pinnacle reefs and their associated surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, D.E.; Henize, S.

    1989-03-01

    Although computer mapping programs are becoming widely available, simple to use, and powerful, the blind application of these programs often produces poor results. By considering the environment of deposition, postdepositional events, and scale of map when computer mapping, a better result can be achieved. To demonstrate the importance of these issues, data from Antrim and Kalkaska Counties, Michigan, were used to model pinnacle reefs in the Northern trend of the Michigan basin. The data consisted of 640 wells containing tops, facies, and show information for six units: Niagaran Gray, Niagaran Brown, Salina A1 evaporite, Salina A1 carbonate, Salina A2 evaporite, and Salina A2 carbonate. Building grids and contour maps of the Niagaran Brown (pinnacle) surface, using standard algorithms, produced a surface that either projected below or above the interreef surface. By using a mix of standard algorithms, the pinnacles and interreef surface were acceptably modeled. The Salina evaporites and carbonates are usually modeled using an isochore gridding approach. However, using this approach did not produce surfaces that reflected the geologist's interpretation. Simple modifications of the isochore approach allowed more accurate representation of the geologic interpretation. The evaporite surface models were built assuming they paralleled a paleowater surface. The carbonate surface models were built assuming they draped the surface existing at the time of deposition. Large- and small-scale maps were built for these data. Facies and show information were also mapped. Combined maps of several variables were constructed and evaluated for potential pinnacle locations.

  16. Hybrid E-Learning Acceptance Model: Learner Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Hassan M. Selim

    2010-01-01

    E-learning tools and technologies have been used to supplement conventional courses in higher education institutions creating a "hybrid" e-learning module that aims to enhance the learning experiences of students. Few studies have addressed the acceptance of hybrid e-learning by learners and the factors affecting the learners'…

  17. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy as a Unified Model of Behavior Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Steven C.; Pistorello, Jacqueline; Levin, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    The present article summarizes the assumptions, model, techniques, evidence, and diversity/social justice commitments of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). ACT focused on six processes (acceptance, defusion, self, now, values, and action) that bear on a single overall target (psychological flexibility). The ACT model of behavior change has…

  18. Applying the Technology Acceptance Model and flow theory to Cyworld user behavior: implication of the Web2.0 user acceptance.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong-Hee; Kim, Won-Yong; Kim, Won-Young

    2008-06-01

    This study explores attitudinal and behavioral patterns when using Cyworld by adopting an expanded Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). A model for Cyworld acceptance is used to examine how various factors modified from the TAM influence acceptance and its antecedents. This model is examined through an empirical study involving Cyworld users using structural equation modeling techniques. The model shows reasonably good measurement properties and the constructs are validated. The results not only confirm the model but also reveal general factors applicable to Web2.0. A set of constructs in the model can be the Web2.0-specific factors, playing as enhancing factor to attitudes and intention.

  19. Uncertainties in Surface Layer Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendergrass, W.

    2015-12-01

    A central problem for micrometeorologists has been the relationship of air-surface exchange rates of momentum and heat to quantities that can be predicted with confidence. The flux-gradient profile developed through Monin-Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST) provides an integration of the dimensionless wind shear expression where is an empirically derived expression for stable and unstable atmospheric conditions. Empirically derived expressions are far from universally accepted (Garratt, 1992, Table A5). Regardless of what form of these relationships might be used, their significance over any short period of time is questionable since all of these relationships between fluxes and gradients apply to averages that might rarely occur. It is well accepted that the assumption of stationarity and homogeneity do not reflect the true chaotic nature of the processes that control the variables considered in these relationships, with the net consequence that the levels of predictability theoretically attainable might never be realized in practice. This matter is of direct relevance to modern prognostic models which construct forecasts by assuming the universal applicability of relationships among averages for the lower atmosphere, which rarely maintains an average state. Under a Cooperative research and Development Agreement between NOAA and Duke Energy Generation, NOAA/ATDD conducted atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) research using Duke renewable energy sites as research testbeds. One aspect of this research has been the evaluation of legacy flux-gradient formulations (the ϕ functions, see Monin and Obukhov, 1954) for the exchange of heat and momentum. At the Duke Energy Ocotillo site, NOAA/ATDD installed sonic anemometers reporting wind and temperature fluctuations at 10Hz at eight elevations. From these observations, ϕM and ϕH were derived from a two-year database of mean and turbulent wind and temperature observations. From this extensive measurement database, using a

  20. Modelling acceptance of sunlight in high and low photovoltaic concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Leutz, Ralf

    2014-09-26

    A simple model incorporating linear radiation characteristics, along with the optical trains and geometrical concentration ratios of solar concentrators is presented with performance examples for optical trains of HCPV, LCPV and benchmark flat-plate PV.

  1. Family support and acceptance, gay male identity formation, and psychological adjustment: a path model.

    PubMed

    Elizur, Y; Ziv, M

    2001-01-01

    While heterosexist family undermining has been demonstrated to be a developmental risk factor in the life of persons with same-gender orientation, the issue of protective family factors is both controversial and relatively neglected. In this study of Israeli gay males (N = 114), we focused on the interrelations of family support, family acceptance and family knowledge of gay orientation, and gay male identity formation, and their effects on mental health and self-esteem. A path model was proposed based on the hypotheses that family support, family acceptance, family knowledge, and gay identity formation have an impact on psychological adjustment, and that family support has an effect on gay identity formation that is mediated by family acceptance. The assessment of gay identity formation was based on an established stage model that was streamlined for cross-cultural practice by defining three basic processes of same-gender identity formation: self-definition, self-acceptance, and disclosure (Elizur & Mintzer, 2001). The testing of our conceptual path model demonstrated an excellent fit with the data. An alternative model that hypothesized effects of gay male identity on family acceptance and family knowledge did not fit the data. Interpreting these results, we propose that the main effect of family support/acceptance on gay identity is related to the process of disclosure, and that both general family support and family acceptance of same-gender orientation play a significant role in the psychological adjustment of gay men.

  2. 24 CFR 200.926c - Model code provisions for use in partially accepted code jurisdictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Model code provisions for use in... Minimum Property Standards § 200.926c Model code provisions for use in partially accepted code..., those portions of one of the model codes with which the property must comply. Schedule for Model...

  3. Adolescents' unconditional acceptance by parents and teachers and educational outcomes: A structural model of gender differences.

    PubMed

    Makri-Botsari, Evi

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to detect gender specific patterns in the network of relations between unconditionality of parental and teacher acceptance in the form of unconditional positive regard and a range of educational outcomes, as indexed by academic self-perception, academic intrinsic motivation, and academic achievement. To test the role of gender as a moderator, a multi-group analysis was employed within the framework of structural equation modelling with increasing restrictions placed on the structural paths across genders. The results on a sample of 427 adolescents in grades 7-9 showed that conditionality of acceptance undermined level of perceived acceptance for both social agents. Moreover, unconditionality of teacher acceptance exerted stronger influences on students' educational outcomes than unconditionality of parental acceptance, with effect sizes being larger for girls than for boys. PMID:26057875

  4. Adolescents' unconditional acceptance by parents and teachers and educational outcomes: A structural model of gender differences.

    PubMed

    Makri-Botsari, Evi

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to detect gender specific patterns in the network of relations between unconditionality of parental and teacher acceptance in the form of unconditional positive regard and a range of educational outcomes, as indexed by academic self-perception, academic intrinsic motivation, and academic achievement. To test the role of gender as a moderator, a multi-group analysis was employed within the framework of structural equation modelling with increasing restrictions placed on the structural paths across genders. The results on a sample of 427 adolescents in grades 7-9 showed that conditionality of acceptance undermined level of perceived acceptance for both social agents. Moreover, unconditionality of teacher acceptance exerted stronger influences on students' educational outcomes than unconditionality of parental acceptance, with effect sizes being larger for girls than for boys.

  5. Theory development in health care informatics: Information and communication technology acceptance model (ICTAM) improves the explanatory and predictive power of technology acceptance models.

    PubMed

    An, Ji-Young

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this web-based study was to explain and predict consumers' acceptance and usage behavior of Internet health information and services. Toward this goal, the Information and Communication Technology Acceptance Model (ICTAM) was developed and tested. Individuals who received a flyer through the LISTSERV of HealthGuide were eligible to participate. The study population was eighteen years old and older who had used Internet health information and services for a minimum of 6 months. For the analyses, SPSS (version 13.0) and AMOS (version 5.0) were employed. More than half of the respondents were women (n = 110, 55%). The average age of the respondents was 35.16 years (S.D. = 10.07). A majority reported at least some college education (n = 126, 63%). All of the observed factors accounted for 75.53% of the total variance explained. The fit indices of the structural model were within an acceptable range: chi2/df = 2.38 (chi2 = 1786.31, df = 752); GFI = .71; RMSEA = .08; CFI = .86; NFI = .78. The results of this study provide empirical support for the continued development of ICTAM in the area of health consumers' information and communication technology acceptance.

  6. Predicting nurses' use of healthcare technology using the technology acceptance model: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Strudwick, Gillian

    2015-05-01

    The benefits of healthcare technologies can only be attained if nurses accept and intend to fully use them. One of the most common models utilized to understand user acceptance of technology is the Technology Acceptance Model. This model and modified versions of it have only recently been applied in the healthcare literature among nurse participants. An integrative literature review was conducted on this topic. Ovid/MEDLINE, PubMed, Google Scholar, and CINAHL were searched yielding a total of 982 references. Upon eliminating duplicates and applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, the review included a total of four dissertations, three symposium proceedings, and 13 peer-reviewed journal articles. These documents were appraised and reviewed. The results show that a modified Technology Acceptance Model with added variables could provide a better explanation of nurses' acceptance of healthcare technology. These added variables to modified versions of the Technology Acceptance Model are discussed, and the studies' methodologies are critiqued. Limitations of the studies included in the integrative review are also examined.

  7. Surface Water Response Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    During response to spills, or for facility planning, the vulnerability of downstream water resources is a major concern. How long and at what concentration do spilled contaminants reach downstream receptors? Models have the potential to answer these questions, but only if they ...

  8. A Multivariate Model for the Study of Parental Acceptance-Rejection and Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohner, Ronald P.; Rohner, Evelyn C.

    This paper proposes a multivariate strategy for the study of parental acceptance-rejection and child abuse and describes a research study on parental rejection and child abuse which illustrates the advantages of using a multivariate, (rather than a simple-model) approach. The multivariate model is a combination of three simple models used to study…

  9. A proposed model of factors influencing hydrogen fuel cell vehicle acceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanina, N. H. Noor; Kwe Lu, Tan; Fadhilah, A. R.

    2016-03-01

    Issues such as environmental problem and energy insecurity keep worsening as a result of energy use from household to huge industries including automotive industry. Recently, a new type of zero emission vehicle, hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (HFCV) has received attention. Although there are argues on the feasibility of hydrogen as the future fuel, there is another important issue, which is the acceptance of HFCV. The study of technology acceptance in the early stage is a vital key for a successful introduction and penetration of a technology. This paper proposes a model of factors influencing green vehicle acceptance, specifically HFCV. This model is built base on two technology acceptance theories and other empirical studies of vehicle acceptance. It aims to provide a base for finding the key factors influencing new sustainable energy fuelled vehicle, HFCV acceptance which is achieved by explaining intention to accept HFCV. Intention is influenced by attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioural control from Theory of Planned Behaviour and personal norm from Norm Activation Theory. In the framework, attitude is influenced by perceptions of benefits and risks, and social trust. Perceived behavioural control is influenced by government interventions. Personal norm is influenced by outcome efficacy and problem awareness.

  10. ICT and OTs: a model of information and communication technology acceptance and utilisation by occupational therapists.

    PubMed

    Schaper, Louise K; Pervan, Graham P

    2007-06-01

    There is evidence to suggest that health professionals are reluctant to accept and utilise information and communication technologies (ICT) and concern is growing within health informatics research that this is contributing to the lag in adoption and utilisation of ICT across the health sector. Technology acceptance research within the field of information systems has been limited in its application to health and there is a concurrent need to develop and gain empirical support for models of technology acceptance within health and to examine acceptance and utilisation issues amongst health professionals to improve the success of information system implementation in this arena. This paper outlines a project that examines ICT acceptance and utilisation by Australian occupational therapists. It describes the theoretical basis behind the development of a research model and the methodology being employed to empirically validate the model using substantial quantitative, qualitative and longitudinal data. Preliminary results from Phase II of the study are presented. The theoretical significance of this work is that it uses a thoroughly constructed research model, with potentially the largest sample size ever tested, to extend technology acceptance research into the health sector.

  11. Test of the technology acceptance model for the internet in pediatrics.

    PubMed Central

    Chismar, William G.; Wiley-Patton, Sonja

    2002-01-01

    There is growing recognition of the importance of the Internet and, more generally, information technology to pediatric care. However, acceptance of these technologies has been low. Attitudes of physicians can play a pivotal role in the adoption session. This study tests the extension to a widely used model in the information systems literature: the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). Data were collected in a survey of pediatricians to see how well the extended model, TAM2, fits in the medical arena. Our results partially confirm the model; significant parts of the model were not confirmed. The primary factors in pediatricians' acceptance of technology applications relate to their usefulness and job relevance. Little weight is given to ease of use and social factors. We discuss possible explanations for the discrepancies and suggest future research. PMID:12463806

  12. THE TECHNOLOGY ACCEPTANCE MODEL: ITS PAST AND ITS FUTURE IN HEALTH CARE

    PubMed Central

    HOLDEN, RICHARD J.; KARSH, BEN-TZION

    2009-01-01

    Increasing interest in end users’ reactions to health information technology (IT) has elevated the importance of theories that predict and explain health IT acceptance and use. This paper reviews the application of one such theory, the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), to health care. We reviewed 16 data sets analyzed in over 20 studies of clinicians using health IT for patient care. Studies differed greatly in samples and settings, health ITs studied, research models, relationships tested, and construct operationalization. Certain TAM relationships were consistently found to be significant, whereas others were inconsistent. Several key relationships were infrequently assessed. Findings show that TAM predicts a substantial portion of the use or acceptance of health IT, but that the theory may benefit from several additions and modifications. Aside from improved study quality, standardization, and theoretically motivated additions to the model, an important future direction for TAM is to adapt the model specifically to the health care context, using beliefs elicitation methods. PMID:19615467

  13. The technology acceptance model: its past and its future in health care.

    PubMed

    Holden, Richard J; Karsh, Ben-Tzion

    2010-02-01

    Increasing interest in end users' reactions to health information technology (IT) has elevated the importance of theories that predict and explain health IT acceptance and use. This paper reviews the application of one such theory, the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), to health care. We reviewed 16 data sets analyzed in over 20 studies of clinicians using health IT for patient care. Studies differed greatly in samples and settings, health ITs studied, research models, relationships tested, and construct operationalization. Certain TAM relationships were consistently found to be significant, whereas others were inconsistent. Several key relationships were infrequently assessed. Findings show that TAM predicts a substantial portion of the use or acceptance of health IT, but that the theory may benefit from several additions and modifications. Aside from improved study quality, standardization, and theoretically motivated additions to the model, an important future direction for TAM is to adapt the model specifically to the health care context, using beliefs elicitation methods.

  14. Modeling the acceptance of clinical information systems among hospital medical staff: an extended TAM model.

    PubMed

    Melas, Christos D; Zampetakis, Leonidas A; Dimopoulou, Anastasia; Moustakis, Vassilis

    2011-08-01

    Recent empirical research has utilized the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to advance the understanding of doctors' and nurses' technology acceptance in the workplace. However, the majority of the reported studies are either qualitative in nature or use small convenience samples of medical staff. Additionally, in very few studies moderators are either used or assessed despite their importance in TAM based research. The present study focuses on the application of TAM in order to explain the intention to use clinical information systems, in a random sample of 604 medical staff (534 physicians) working in 14 hospitals in Greece. We introduce physicians' specialty as a moderator in TAM and test medical staff's information and communication technology (ICT) knowledge and ICT feature demands, as external variables. The results show that TAM predicts a substantial proportion of the intention to use clinical information systems. Findings make a contribution to the literature by replicating, explaining and advancing the TAM, whereas theory is benefited by the addition of external variables and medical specialty as a moderator. Recommendations for further research are discussed.

  15. Uncertainty in urban stormwater quality modelling: the effect of acceptability threshold in the GLUE methodology.

    PubMed

    Freni, Gabriele; Mannina, Giorgio; Viviani, Gaspare

    2008-04-01

    Uncertainty analysis in integrated urban drainage modelling is of growing importance in the field of water quality. However, only few studies deal with uncertainty quantification in urban drainage modelling; furthermore, the few existing studies mainly focus on quantitative sewer flow modelling rather than uncertainty in water quality aspects. In this context, the generalised likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE) methodology was applied for the evaluation of the uncertainty of an integrated urban drainage model and some of its subjective hypotheses have been explored. More specifically, the influence of the subjective choice of the acceptability threshold has been detected in order to gain insights regarding its effect on the model results. The model has been applied to the Savena case study (Bologna, Italy) where water quality and quantity data were available. The model results show a strong influence of the acceptability threshold selection and confirm the importance of modeller's experience in the application of GLUE uncertainty analysis.

  16. Extending the Technology Acceptance Model to Explore the Intention to Use Second Life for Enhancing Healthcare Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Meyrick; Herold, David Kurt; Choo, Tat-Ming; Chan, Kitty

    2012-01-01

    Learners need to have good reasons to engage and accept e-learning. They need to understand that unless they do, the outcomes will be less favourable. The technology acceptance model (TAM) is the most widely recognized model addressing why users accept or reject technology. This study describes the development and evaluation of a virtual…

  17. Surface models of Mars, 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Data derived from Mariners 6, 7, and 9, Russian Mars probes, and photographic and radar observations conducted from earth are used to develop engineering models of Martian surface properties. These models are used in mission planning and in the design of landing and exploration vehicles. Optical models needed in the design of camera systems, dielectric properties needed in the design of radar systems, and thermal properties needed in the design of the spacecraft thermal control system are included.

  18. Accept/decline decision module for the liver simulated allocation model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Phil; Gupta, Diwakar; Israni, Ajay K; Kasiske, Bertram L

    2015-03-01

    Simulated allocation models (SAMs) are used to evaluate organ allocation policies. An important component of SAMs is a module that decides whether each potential recipient will accept an offered organ. The objective of this study was to develop and test accept-or-decline classifiers based on several machine-learning methods in an effort to improve the SAM for liver allocation. Feature selection and imbalance correction methods were tested and best approaches identified for application to organ transplant data. Then, we used 2011 liver match-run data to compare classifiers based on logistic regression, support vector machines, boosting, classification and regression trees, and Random Forests. Finally, because the accept-or-decline module will be embedded in a simulation model, we also developed an evaluation tool for comparing performance of predictors, which we call sample-path accuracy. The Random Forest method resulted in the smallest overall error rate, and boosting techniques had greater accuracy when both sensitivity and specificity were simultaneously considered important. Our comparisons show that no method dominates all others on all performance measures of interest. A logistic regression-based classifier is easy to implement and allows for pinpointing the contribution of each feature toward the probability of acceptance. Other methods we tested did not have a similar interpretation. The Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients decided to use the logistic regression-based accept-decline decision module in the next generation of liver SAM.

  19. An Investigation of the Integrated Model of User Technology Acceptance: Internet User Samples in Four Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fusilier, Marcelline; Durlabhji, Subhash; Cucchi, Alain

    2008-01-01

    National background of users may influence the process of technology acceptance. The present study explored this issue with the new, integrated technology use model proposed by Sun and Zhang (2006). Data were collected from samples of college students in India, Mauritius, Reunion Island, and United States. Questionnaire methodology and…

  20. Perceived Convenience in an Extended Technology Acceptance Model: Mobile Technology and English Learning for College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Chi-Cheng; Yan, Chi-Fang; Tseng, Ju-Shih

    2012-01-01

    Since convenience is one of the features for mobile learning, does it affect attitude and intention of using mobile technology? The technology acceptance model (TAM), proposed by David (1989), was extended with perceived convenience in the present study. With regard to English language mobile learning, the variables in the extended TAM and its…

  1. Invariance of an Extended Technology Acceptance Model Across Gender and Age Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Tunku Badariah Tunku; Madarsha, Kamal Basha; Zainuddin, Ahmad Marzuki; Ismail, Nik Ahmad Hisham; Khairani, Ahmad Zamri; Nordin, Mohamad Sahari

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we examined the likelihood of a TAME (extended technology acceptance model), in which the interrelationships among computer self-efficacy, perceived usefulness, intention to use and self-reported use of computer-mediated technology were tested. In addition, the gender- and age-invariant of its causal structure were evaluated. The…

  2. Extended TAM Model: Impacts of Convenience on Acceptance and Use of Moodle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Hsiao-hui; Chang, Yu-ying

    2013-01-01

    The increasing online access to courses, programs, and information has shifted the control and responsibility of learning process from instructors to learners. Learners' perceptions of and attitudes toward e-learning constitute a critical factor to the success of such system. The purpose of this study is to take TAM (technology acceptance model)…

  3. The technology acceptance model: predicting nurses' intention to use telemedicine technology (eICU).

    PubMed

    Kowitlawakul, Yanika

    2011-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine factors and predictors that influence nurses' intention to use the eICU technology, to examine the applicability of the Technology Acceptance Model in explaining nurses' intention to use the eICU technology in healthcare settings, and to provide psychometric evidence of the measurement scales used in the study. The study involved 117 participants from two healthcare systems. The Telemedicine Technology Acceptance Model was developed based on the original Technology Acceptance Model that was initially developed by Fred Davis in 1986. The eICU Acceptance Survey was used as an instrument for the study. Content validity was examined, and the reliability of the instrument was tested. The results show that perceived usefulness is the most influential factor that influences nurses' intention to use the eICU technology. The principal factors that influence perceived usefulness are perceived ease of use, support from physicians, and years working in the hospital. The model fit was reasonably adequate and able to explain 58% of the variance (R = 0.58) in intention to use the eICU technology with the nursing sample.

  4. Examining the Factors That Contribute to Successful Database Application Implementation Using the Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nworji, Alexander O.

    2013-01-01

    Most organizations spend millions of dollars due to the impact of improperly implemented database application systems as evidenced by poor data quality problems. The purpose of this quantitative study was to use, and extend, the technology acceptance model (TAM) to assess the impact of information quality and technical quality factors on database…

  5. Improving sleep with mindfulness and acceptance: a metacognitive model of insomnia.

    PubMed

    Ong, Jason C; Ulmer, Christi S; Manber, Rachel

    2012-11-01

    While there is an accumulating evidence to suggest that therapies using mindfulness and acceptance-based approaches have benefits for improving the symptoms of insomnia, it is unclear how these treatments work. The goal of this paper is to present a conceptual framework for the cognitive mechanisms of insomnia based upon mindfulness and acceptance approaches. The existing cognitive and behavioral models of insomnia are first reviewed and a two-level model of cognitive (primary) and metacognitive (secondary) arousal is presented in the context of insomnia. We then focus on the role of metacognition in mindfulness and acceptance-based therapies, followed by a review of these therapies in the treatment of insomnia. A conceptual framework is presented detailing the mechanisms of metacognition in the context of insomnia treatments. This model proposes that increasing awareness of the mental and physical states that are present when experiencing insomnia symptoms and then learning how to shift mental processes can promote an adaptive stance to one's response to these symptoms. These metacognitive processes are characterized by balanced appraisals, cognitive flexibility, equanimity, and commitment to values and are posited to reduce sleep-related arousal, leading to remission from insomnia. We hope that this model will further the understanding and impact of mindfulness and acceptance-based approaches to insomnia.

  6. 24 CFR 200.926c - Model code provisions for use in partially accepted code jurisdictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Model code provisions for use in partially accepted code jurisdictions. 200.926c Section 200.926c Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT...

  7. Understanding Student Teachers' Behavioural Intention to Use Technology: Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) Validation and Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Kung-Teck; Osman, Rosma bt; Goh, Pauline Swee Choo; Rahmat, Mohd Khairezan

    2013-01-01

    This study sets out to validate and test the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) in the context of Malaysian student teachers' integration of their technology in teaching and learning. To establish factorial validity, data collected from 302 respondents were tested against the TAM using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and structural equation…

  8. An opinion diffusion model with decision-making groups: The influence of the opinion's acceptability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhichao; Xiong, Yang; Xu, Yiwen

    2016-11-01

    An opinion dynamic model with decision-making groups was proposed to study the process of adopting new opinions or ideas by individuals. The opinion's acceptability is introduced to distinguish the general character of different opinions. The simulation results on a free-scale network demonstrate that when two opinions have similar acceptability, the opinion supported by more decision-making groups in the beginning will eventually win the support of more agents, whereas an opinion supported by fewer decision-making groups in the beginning may be supported by the majority at the end only if it has better acceptability, and if the tolerance threshold of the society is higher than a specific value.

  9. Modeling of a Parabolic Trough Solar Field for Acceptance Testing: A Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, M. J.; Mehos, M. S.; Kearney, D. W.; McMahan, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    As deployment of parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) systems ramps up, the need for reliable and robust performance acceptance test guidelines for the solar field is also amplified. Project owners and/or EPC contractors often require extensive solar field performance testing as part of the plant commissioning process in order to ensure that actual solar field performance satisfies both technical specifications and performance guaranties between the involved parties. Performance test code work is currently underway at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in collaboration with the SolarPACES Task-I activity, and within the ASME PTC-52 committee. One important aspect of acceptance testing is the selection of a robust technology performance model. NREL1 has developed a detailed parabolic trough performance model within the SAM software tool. This model is capable of predicting solar field, sub-system, and component performance. It has further been modified for this work to support calculation at subhourly time steps. This paper presents the methodology and results of a case study comparing actual performance data for a parabolic trough solar field to the predicted results using the modified SAM trough model. Due to data limitations, the methodology is applied to a single collector loop, though it applies to larger subfields and entire solar fields. Special consideration is provided for the model formulation, improvements to the model formulation based on comparison with the collected data, and uncertainty associated with the measured data. Additionally, this paper identifies modeling considerations that are of particular importance in the solar field acceptance testing process and uses the model to provide preliminary recommendations regarding acceptable steady-state testing conditions at the single-loop level.

  10. Improved Criteria for Acceptable Yield Point Elongation in Surface Critical Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. David Matlock; Dr. John Speer

    2007-05-30

    Yield point elongation (YPE) is considered undesirable in surface critical applications where steel is formed since "strain lines" or Luders bands are created during forming. This project will examine in detail the formation of luders bands in industrially relevant strain states including the influence of substrate properties and coatings on Luders appearance. Mechanical testing and surface profilometry were the primary methods of investigation.

  11. Understanding intention to use electronic information resources: A theoretical extension of the technology acceptance model (TAM).

    PubMed

    Tao, Donghua

    2008-11-06

    This study extended the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) by examining the roles of two aspects of e-resource characteristics, namely, information quality and system quality, in predicting public health students' intention to use e-resources for completing research paper assignments. Both focus groups and a questionnaire were used to collect data. Descriptive analysis, data screening, and Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) techniques were used for data analysis. The study found that perceived usefulness played a major role in determining students' intention to use e-resources. Perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use fully mediated the impact that information quality and system quality had on behavior intention. The research model enriches the existing technology acceptance literature by extending TAM. Representing two aspects of e-resource characteristics provides greater explanatory information for diagnosing problems of system design, development, and implementation.

  12. Social trust, risk perceptions and public acceptance of recycled water: testing a social-psychological model.

    PubMed

    Ross, Victoria L; Fielding, Kelly S; Louis, Winnifred R

    2014-05-01

    Faced with a severe drought, the residents of the regional city of Toowoomba, in South East Queensland, Australia were asked to consider a potable wastewater reuse scheme to supplement drinking water supplies. As public risk perceptions and trust have been shown to be key factors in acceptance of potable reuse projects, this research developed and tested a social-psychological model of trust, risk perceptions and acceptance. Participants (N = 380) were surveyed a few weeks before a referendum was held in which residents voted against the controversial scheme. Analysis using structural equation modelling showed that the more community members perceived that the water authority used fair procedures (e.g., consulting with the community and providing accurate information), the greater their sense of shared identity with the water authority. Shared social identity in turn influenced trust via increased source credibility, that is, perceptions that the water authority is competent and has the community's interest at heart. The findings also support past research showing that higher levels of trust in the water authority were associated with lower perceptions of risk, which in turn were associated with higher levels of acceptance, and vice versa. The findings have a practical application for improving public acceptance of potable recycled water schemes. PMID:24603028

  13. Social trust, risk perceptions and public acceptance of recycled water: testing a social-psychological model.

    PubMed

    Ross, Victoria L; Fielding, Kelly S; Louis, Winnifred R

    2014-05-01

    Faced with a severe drought, the residents of the regional city of Toowoomba, in South East Queensland, Australia were asked to consider a potable wastewater reuse scheme to supplement drinking water supplies. As public risk perceptions and trust have been shown to be key factors in acceptance of potable reuse projects, this research developed and tested a social-psychological model of trust, risk perceptions and acceptance. Participants (N = 380) were surveyed a few weeks before a referendum was held in which residents voted against the controversial scheme. Analysis using structural equation modelling showed that the more community members perceived that the water authority used fair procedures (e.g., consulting with the community and providing accurate information), the greater their sense of shared identity with the water authority. Shared social identity in turn influenced trust via increased source credibility, that is, perceptions that the water authority is competent and has the community's interest at heart. The findings also support past research showing that higher levels of trust in the water authority were associated with lower perceptions of risk, which in turn were associated with higher levels of acceptance, and vice versa. The findings have a practical application for improving public acceptance of potable recycled water schemes.

  14. The acceptance of in silico models for REACH: Requirements, barriers, and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In silico models have prompted considerable interest and debate because of their potential value in predicting the properties of chemical substances for regulatory purposes. The European REACH legislation promotes innovation and encourages the use of alternative methods, but in practice the use of in silico models is still very limited. There are many stakeholders influencing the regulatory trajectory of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) models, including regulators, industry, model developers and consultants. Here we outline some of the issues and challenges involved in the acceptance of these methods for regulatory purposes. PMID:21982269

  15. Adding Innovation Diffusion Theory to the Technology Acceptance Model: Supporting Employees' Intentions to Use E-Learning Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Hsieh, Yi-Chuan; Hsu, Chia-Ning

    2011-01-01

    This study intends to investigate factors affecting business employees' behavioral intentions to use the e-learning system. Combining the innovation diffusion theory (IDT) with the technology acceptance model (TAM), the present study proposes an extended technology acceptance model. The proposed model was tested with data collected from 552…

  16. The Effects of a Modified Treatment Package with and without Feeder Modeling on One Child's Acceptance of Novel Foods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiverling, Laura; Harclerode, Whitney; Williams, Keith

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine if sequential presentation with feeder modeling would lead to an increase in bites accepted of new foods compared to sequential presentation without feeder modeling in a typically developing 4-year-old boy with food selectivity. The participant's acceptance of novel foods increased both in the modeling and…

  17. Integrating Health Belief Model and Technology Acceptance Model: An Investigation of Health-Related Internet Use

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Today, people use the Internet to satisfy health-related information and communication needs. In Malaysia, Internet use for health management has become increasingly significant due to the increase in the incidence of chronic diseases, in particular among urban women and their desire to stay healthy. Past studies adopted the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) and Health Belief Model (HBM) independently to explain Internet use for health-related purposes. Although both the TAM and HBM have their own merits, independently they lack the ability to explain the cognition and the related mechanism in which individuals use the Internet for health purposes. Objective This study aimed to examine the influence of perceived health risk and health consciousness on health-related Internet use based on the HBM. Drawing on the TAM, it also tested the mediating effects of perceived usefulness of the Internet for health information and attitude toward Internet use for health purposes for the relationship between health-related factors, namely perceived health risk and health consciousness on health-related Internet use. Methods Data obtained for the current study were collected using purposive sampling; the sample consisted of women in Malaysia who had Internet access. The partial least squares structural equation modeling method was used to test the research hypotheses developed. Results Perceived health risk (β=.135, t 1999=2.676) and health consciousness (β=.447, t 1999=9.168) had a positive influence on health-related Internet use. Moreover, perceived usefulness of the Internet and attitude toward Internet use for health-related purposes partially mediated the influence of health consciousness on health-related Internet use (β=.025, t 1999=3.234), whereas the effect of perceived health risk on health-related Internet use was fully mediated by perceived usefulness of the Internet and attitude (β=.029, t 1999=3.609). These results suggest the central role of

  18. Integration of Heterogenous Digital Surface Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesch, R.; Ginzler, C.

    2011-08-01

    The application of extended digital surface models often reveals, that despite an acceptable global accuracy for a given dataset, the local accuracy of the model can vary in a wide range. For high resolution applications which cover the spatial extent of a whole country, this can be a major drawback. Within the Swiss National Forest Inventory (NFI), two digital surface models are available, one derived from LiDAR point data and the other from aerial images. Automatic photogrammetric image matching with ADS80 aerial infrared images with 25cm and 50cm resolution is used to generate a surface model (ADS-DSM) with 1m resolution covering whole switzerland (approx. 41000 km2). The spatially corresponding LiDAR dataset has a global point density of 0.5 points per m2 and is mainly used in applications as interpolated grid with 2m resolution (LiDAR-DSM). Although both surface models seem to offer a comparable accuracy from a global view, local analysis shows significant differences. Both datasets have been acquired over several years. Concerning LiDAR-DSM, different flight patterns and inconsistent quality control result in a significantly varying point density. The image acquisition of the ADS-DSM is also stretched over several years and the model generation is hampered by clouds, varying illumination and shadow effects. Nevertheless many classification and feature extraction applications requiring high resolution data depend on the local accuracy of the used surface model, therefore precise knowledge of the local data quality is essential. The commercial photogrammetric software NGATE (part of SOCET SET) generates the image based surface model (ADS-DSM) and delivers also a map with figures of merit (FOM) of the matching process for each calculated height pixel. The FOM-map contains matching codes like high slope, excessive shift or low correlation. For the generation of the LiDAR-DSM only first- and last-pulse data was available. Therefore only the point distribution can

  19. An Empirical Assessment of a Technology Acceptance Model for Apps in Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Briz-Ponce, Laura; García-Peñalvo, Francisco José

    2015-11-01

    The evolution and the growth of mobile applications ("apps") in our society is a reality. This general trend is still upward and the app use has also penetrated the medical education community. However, there is a lot of unawareness of the students' and professionals' point of view about introducing "apps" within Medical School curriculum. The aim of this research is to design, implement and verify that the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) can be employed to measure and explain the acceptance of mobile technology and "apps" within Medical Education. The methodology was based on a survey distributed to students and medical professionals from University of Salamanca. This model explains 46.7% of behavioral intention to use mobile devise or "apps" for learning and will help us to justify and understand the current situation of introducing "apps" into the Medical School curriculum. PMID:26411928

  20. An Empirical Assessment of a Technology Acceptance Model for Apps in Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Briz-Ponce, Laura; García-Peñalvo, Francisco José

    2015-11-01

    The evolution and the growth of mobile applications ("apps") in our society is a reality. This general trend is still upward and the app use has also penetrated the medical education community. However, there is a lot of unawareness of the students' and professionals' point of view about introducing "apps" within Medical School curriculum. The aim of this research is to design, implement and verify that the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) can be employed to measure and explain the acceptance of mobile technology and "apps" within Medical Education. The methodology was based on a survey distributed to students and medical professionals from University of Salamanca. This model explains 46.7% of behavioral intention to use mobile devise or "apps" for learning and will help us to justify and understand the current situation of introducing "apps" into the Medical School curriculum.

  1. A comprehensive examination of the model underlying acceptance and commitment therapy for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Vowles, Kevin E; Sowden, Gail; Ashworth, Julie

    2014-05-01

    The therapeutic model underlying Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is reasonably well-established as it applies to chronic pain. Several studies have examined measures of single ACT processes, or subsets of processes, and have almost uniformly indicated reliable relations with patient functioning. To date, however, no study has performed a comprehensive examination of the entire ACT model, including all of its component processes, as it relates to functioning. The present study performed this examination in 274 individuals with chronic pain presenting for an assessment appointment. Participants completed a battery of self-report questionnaires, assessing multiple aspects of the ACT model, as well as pain intensity, disability, and emotional distress. Initial exploratory factor analyses examined measures of the ACT model and measures of patient functioning separately with each analysis identifying three factors. Next, the fit of a model including ACT processes on the one hand and patient functioning on the other was examined using Structural Equation Modeling. Overall model fit was acceptable and indicated moderate correlations among the ACT processes themselves, as well as significant relations with pain intensity, emotional distress, and disability. These analyses build on the existing literature by providing, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive evaluation of the ACT theoretical model in chronic pain to date.

  2. Results of an emergency response atmospheric dispersion model comparison using a state accepted statistical protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Ciolek, J.T. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant, located approximately 26 km northwest of downtown Denver, Colorado, has developed an emergency response atmospheric dispersion model for complex terrain applications. Plant personnel would use the model, known as the Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC) (Hodgin 1985) to project plume impacts and provide off-site protective action recommendations to the State of Colorado should a hazardous material release occur from the facility. The Colorado Department of Health (CDH) entered into an interagency agreement with the Rocky Flats Plant prime contractor, EG&G Rocky Flats, and the US Department of Energy to evaluate TRAC as an acceptable emergency response tool. After exhaustive research of similar evaluation processes from other emergency response and regulatory organizations, the interagency committee devised a formal acceptance process. The process contains an evaluation protocol (Hodgin and Smith 1992), descriptions of responsibilities, an identified experimental data set to use in the evaluation, and judgment criteria for model acceptance. The evaluation protocol is general enough to allow for different implementations. This paper explains one implementation, shows protocol results for a test case, and presents results of a comparison between versions of TRAC with different wind Field codes: a two dimensional mass consistent code called WINDS (Fosberg et al. 1976) that has been extended to three dimensions, and a fully 3 dimensional mass conserving code called NUATMOS (Ross and Smith 1987, Ross et al. 1988).

  3. Lunar surface vehicle model competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    During Fall and Winter quarters, Georgia Tech's School of Mechanical Engineering students designed machines and devices related to Lunar Base construction tasks. These include joint projects with Textile Engineering students. Topics studied included lunar environment simulator via drop tower technology, lunar rated fasteners, lunar habitat shelter, design of a lunar surface trenching machine, lunar support system, lunar worksite illumination (daytime), lunar regolith bagging system, sunlight diffusing tent for lunar worksite, service apparatus for lunar launch vehicles, lunar communication/power cables and teleoperated deployment machine, lunar regolith bag collection and emplacement device, soil stabilization mat for lunar launch/landing site, lunar rated fastening systems for robotic implementation, lunar surface cable/conduit and automated deployment system, lunar regolith bagging system, and lunar rated fasteners and fastening systems. A special topics team of five Spring quarter students designed and constructed a remotely controlled crane implement for the SKITTER model.

  4. Acceptance and Angular Resolution of an Infill Array for the Pierre Auger Surface Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, C.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Allekotte, I.; Etchegoyen, A.; Supanitsky, D.; Medina-Tanco, G.

    2007-02-12

    The Pierre Auger Observatory has been designed to study the highest-energy cosmic rays in nature (E {>=} 1019 eV). The determination of their arrival direction, energy and composition is performed by the analysis of the atmospheric showers they produce. The Auger Surface Array will consist of 1600 water Cerenkov detectors placed in an equilateral triangular grid of 1.5 km. In this paper we show how adding a ''small'' area of surface detectors at half the above mentioned spacing would make it possible to lower the detection threshold by one order of magnitude, thus allowing the Observatory to reach lower energies where the cross-over from galactic to extragalactic sources is expected. We also analyze the angular resolution that can be attained with such an infill array.

  5. Applying the Extended Technology Acceptance Model to the Use of Clickers in Student Learning: Some Evidence from Macroeconomics Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Xiaoyu; Gao, Yuan

    2011-01-01

    This paper applies the extended technology acceptance model (exTAM) in information systems research to the use of clickers in student learning. The technology acceptance model (TAM) posits that perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness of technology influence users' attitudes toward using and intention to use technology. Research subsequent…

  6. The Acceptance Model of Intuitive Eating: A Comparison of Women in Emerging Adulthood, Early Adulthood, and Middle Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Augustus-Horvath, Casey L.; Tylka, Tracy L.

    2011-01-01

    The acceptance model of intuitive eating (Avalos & Tylka, 2006) posits that body acceptance by others helps women appreciate their body and resist adopting an observer's perspective of their body, which contribute to their eating intuitively/adaptively. We extended this model by integrating body mass index (BMI) into its structure and…

  7. Circuit model of surface arcing

    SciTech Connect

    Robiscoe, R.T.; Sui, Z.

    1988-11-01

    An electrical breakdown on a highly charged dielectric surface can result in a discharge along the surface, i.e., a flashover arc. We construct a simple circuit model for such an arc: the discharge of a capacitor C (related to the initial charged area) through a series inductor L and resistor R (related to the arc considered as a plasma). The arc current assumes a very simple form over most of its dynamic range, and such measured arc quantities as total charge transport, pulse width, peak current, and rise time are easily calculated. Moreover, straightforward a priori estimates of C, L, and R values give calculated arc quantities in good agreement with observation, for both typical magnitudes and areal scaling. We also analyze the effect on areal scaling of allowing the arc resistance R to ''switch'' during the evolution of the arc, from a small value characteristic of the arc plasma to a large value characteristic of the dielectric surface. Finally, we consider some aspects of the electromagnetic radiation generated by the arc.

  8. Theory development in nursing and healthcare informatics: a model explaining and predicting information and communication technology acceptance by healthcare consumers.

    PubMed

    An, Ji-Young; Hayman, Laura L; Panniers, Teresa; Carty, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    About 110 million American adults are looking for health information and services on the Internet. Identification of the factors influencing healthcare consumers' technology acceptance is requisite to understanding their acceptance and usage behavior of online health information and related services. The purpose of this article is to describe the development of the Information and Communication Technology Acceptance Model (ICTAM). From the literature reviewed, ICTAM was developed with emphasis on integrating multidisciplinary perspectives from divergent frameworks and empirical findings into a unified model with regard to healthcare consumers' acceptance and usage behavior of information and services on the Internet.

  9. Modelling Facebook Usage among University Students in Thailand: The Role of Emotional Attachment in an Extended Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teo, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the factors that influenced the use of Facebook among university students. Using an extended technology acceptance model (TAM) with emotional attachment (EA) as an external variable, a sample of 498 students from a public-funded Thailand university were surveyed on their responses to five variables hypothesized…

  10. Measuring the Moderating Effect of Gender and Age on E-Learning Acceptance in England: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach for an Extended Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarhini, Ali; Hone, Kate; Liu, Xiaohui

    2014-01-01

    The success of an e-learning intervention depends to a considerable extent on student acceptance and use of the technology. Therefore, it has become imperative for practitioners and policymakers to understand the factors affecting the user acceptance of e-learning systems in order to enhance the students' learning experience. Based on an extended…

  11. Comparison of eggshell surface sanitization technologies and impacts on consumer acceptability.

    PubMed

    Al-Ajeeli, Morouj N; Taylor, T Matthew; Alvarado, Christine Z; Coufal, Craig D

    2016-05-01

    Shell eggs can be contaminated with many types of microorganisms, including bacterial pathogens, and thus present a risk for the transmission of foodborne disease to consumers. Currently, most United States egg processors utilize egg washing and sanitization systems to decontaminate surfaces of shell eggs prior to packaging. However, previous research has indicated that current shell egg sanitization technologies employed in the commercial egg industry may not completely eliminate bacteria from the surface of eggshells, and thus alternative egg sanitization technologies with the potential for increased microbial reductions on eggshells should be investigated. The objectives of this study were to compare the antimicrobial efficacy and consumer sensory attributes of industry-available eggshell sanitization methods (chlorine and quaternary ammonium compounds (QAC) applied via spray) to various alternative egg sanitization technologies. Eggs (White Leghorn hens; n=195) were obtained for evaluation of sanitizer-induced reduction in mesophilic aerobic bacteria (n=90) or inoculated Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) reduction (n=105). Sanitizing treatments evaluated in this experiment were: chlorine spray (100 ppm available chlorine), QAC spray (200 ppm), peracetic acid spray (PAA; 135 ppm) alone or in combination with ultraviolet light (UV; 254 nm), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2; 3.5% solution) spray in combination with UV (H2O2+UV). For enumeration of aerobic bacteria, eggs were sampled at 0, 7, and 14 days of storage at 4°C; surviving SE cells from inoculated eggs were enumerated by differential plating. Sensory trials were conducted to determine consumer liking of scrambled eggs made from eggs sanitized with chlorine, QAC, H2O2+UV, or no treatment (control). The H2O2 and UV treatment resulted in the greatest reductions in eggshell aerobic plate counts compared to other treatments throughout egg storage (P<0.05). All treatments utilized reduced SE below the limit of

  12. Comparison of eggshell surface sanitization technologies and impacts on consumer acceptability.

    PubMed

    Al-Ajeeli, Morouj N; Taylor, T Matthew; Alvarado, Christine Z; Coufal, Craig D

    2016-05-01

    Shell eggs can be contaminated with many types of microorganisms, including bacterial pathogens, and thus present a risk for the transmission of foodborne disease to consumers. Currently, most United States egg processors utilize egg washing and sanitization systems to decontaminate surfaces of shell eggs prior to packaging. However, previous research has indicated that current shell egg sanitization technologies employed in the commercial egg industry may not completely eliminate bacteria from the surface of eggshells, and thus alternative egg sanitization technologies with the potential for increased microbial reductions on eggshells should be investigated. The objectives of this study were to compare the antimicrobial efficacy and consumer sensory attributes of industry-available eggshell sanitization methods (chlorine and quaternary ammonium compounds (QAC) applied via spray) to various alternative egg sanitization technologies. Eggs (White Leghorn hens; n=195) were obtained for evaluation of sanitizer-induced reduction in mesophilic aerobic bacteria (n=90) or inoculated Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) reduction (n=105). Sanitizing treatments evaluated in this experiment were: chlorine spray (100 ppm available chlorine), QAC spray (200 ppm), peracetic acid spray (PAA; 135 ppm) alone or in combination with ultraviolet light (UV; 254 nm), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2; 3.5% solution) spray in combination with UV (H2O2+UV). For enumeration of aerobic bacteria, eggs were sampled at 0, 7, and 14 days of storage at 4°C; surviving SE cells from inoculated eggs were enumerated by differential plating. Sensory trials were conducted to determine consumer liking of scrambled eggs made from eggs sanitized with chlorine, QAC, H2O2+UV, or no treatment (control). The H2O2 and UV treatment resulted in the greatest reductions in eggshell aerobic plate counts compared to other treatments throughout egg storage (P<0.05). All treatments utilized reduced SE below the limit of

  13. Variation transmission model for setting acceptance criteria in a multi-staged pharmaceutical manufacturing process.

    PubMed

    Montes, Richard O

    2012-03-01

    Pharmaceutical manufacturing processes consist of a series of stages (e.g., reaction, workup, isolation) to generate the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). Outputs at intermediate stages (in-process control) and API need to be controlled within acceptance criteria to assure final drug product quality. In this paper, two methods based on tolerance interval to derive such acceptance criteria will be evaluated. The first method is serial worst case (SWC), an industry risk minimization strategy, wherein input materials and process parameters of a stage are fixed at their worst-case settings to calculate the maximum level expected from the stage. This maximum output then becomes input to the next stage wherein process parameters are again fixed at worst-case setting. The procedure is serially repeated throughout the process until the final stage. The calculated limits using SWC can be artificially high and may not reflect the actual process performance. The second method is the variation transmission (VT) using autoregressive model, wherein variation transmitted up to a stage is estimated by accounting for the recursive structure of the errors at each stage. Computer simulations at varying extent of variation transmission and process stage variability are performed. For the scenarios tested, VT method is demonstrated to better maintain the simulated confidence level and more precisely estimate the true proportion parameter than SWC. Real data examples are also presented that corroborate the findings from the simulation. Overall, VT is recommended for setting acceptance criteria in a multi-staged pharmaceutical manufacturing process.

  14. Development of a prediction model on the acceptance of electronic laboratory notebooks in academic environments.

    PubMed

    Kloeckner, Frederik; Farkas, Robert; Franken, Tobias; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Documentation of research data plays a key role in the biomedical engineering innovation processes. It makes an important contribution to the protection of intellectual property, the traceability of results and fulfilling the regulatory requirement. Because of the increasing digitalization in laboratories, an electronic alternative to the commonly-used paper-bound notebooks could contribute to the production of sophisticated documentation. However, compared to in an industrial environment, the use of electronic laboratory notebooks is not widespread in academic laboratories. Little is known about the acceptance of an electronic documentation system and the underlying reasons for this. Thus, this paper aims to establish a prediction model on the potential preference and acceptance of scientists either for paper-based or electronic documentation. The underlying data for the analysis originate from an online survey of 101 scientists in industrial, academic and clinical environments. Various parameters were analyzed to identify crucial factors for the system preference using binary logistic regression. The analysis showed significant dependency between the documentation system preference and the supposed workload associated with the documentation system (p<0.006; odds ratio=58.543) and an additional personal component. Because of the dependency of system choice on specific parameters it is possible to predict the acceptance of an electronic laboratory notebook before implementation.

  15. Evaluation of teledermatology adoption by health-care professionals using a modified Technology Acceptance Model.

    PubMed

    Orruño, Estibalitz; Gagnon, Marie Pierre; Asua, José; Ben Abdeljelil, Anis

    2011-01-01

    We examined the main factors affecting the intention of physicians to use teledermatology using a modified Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). The investigation was carried out during a teledermatology pilot study conducted in Spain. A total of 276 questionnaires were sent to physicians by email and 171 responded (62%). Cronbach's alpha was acceptably high for all constructs. Theoretical variables were well correlated with each other and with the dependent variable (Intention to Use). Logistic regression indicated that the original TAM model was good at predicting physicians' intention to use teledermatology and that the variables Perceived Usefulness and Perceived Ease of Use were both significant (odds ratios of 8.4 and 7.4, respectively). When other theoretical variables were added, the model was still significant and it also became more powerful. However, the only significant predictor in the modified model was Facilitators with an odds ratio of 9.9. Thus the TAM was good at predicting physicians' intention to use teledermatology. However, the most important variable was the perception of Facilitators to using the technology (e.g. infrastructure, training and support).

  16. Acceptability of telemedicine and other cancer genetic counseling models of service delivery in geographically remote settings.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Eileen; Lamb, Amanda; Grillo, Barbara; Lucas, Lee; Miesfeldt, Susan

    2014-04-01

    This work examined acceptability of cancer genetic counseling models of service delivery among Maine residents at risk for hereditary cancer susceptibility disorders. Pre-counseling, participants ranked characteristics reflecting models of care from most to least important including: mode-of-communication (in-person versus telegenetics), provider level of training (genetic specialty versus some training/experience), delivery format (one-on-one versus group counseling), and location (local versus tertiary service requiring travel). Associations between models of care characteristic rankings and patient characteristics, including rural residence, perceived cancer risk, and perceived risk for a hereditary cancer risk susceptibility disorder were examined. A total of 149/300 (49.7% response rate) individuals from 11/16 Maine counties responded; 30.8% were from rural counties; 92.2% indicated that an important/the most important model of care characteristic is provider professional qualifications. Among other characteristics, 65.1% ranked one-on-one counseling as important/the most important. In-person and local counseling were ranked the two least important characteristics (51.8% and 52.1% important/the most important, respectively). Responses did not vary by patient characteristics with the exception of greater acceptance of group counseling among those at perceived high personal cancer risk. Cancer telegenetic services hold promise for access to expert providers in a one-on-one format for rurally remote clients.

  17. Computational model of collective nest selection by ants with heterogeneous acceptance thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Naoki; O'shea-Wheller, Thomas A.; Doran, Carolina; Franks, Nigel R.

    2015-01-01

    Collective decision-making is a characteristic of societies ranging from ants to humans. The ant Temnothorax albipennis is known to use quorum sensing to collectively decide on a new home; emigration to a new nest site occurs when the number of ants favouring the new site becomes quorate. There are several possible mechanisms by which ant colonies can select the best nest site among alternatives based on a quorum mechanism. In this study, we use computational models to examine the implications of heterogeneous acceptance thresholds across individual ants in collective nest choice behaviour. We take a minimalist approach to develop a differential equation model and a corresponding non-spatial agent-based model. We show, consistent with existing empirical evidence, that heterogeneity in acceptance thresholds is a viable mechanism for efficient nest choice behaviour. In particular, we show that the proposed models show speed–accuracy trade-offs and speed–cohesion trade-offs when we vary the number of scouts or the quorum threshold. PMID:26543578

  18. Computational model of collective nest selection by ants with heterogeneous acceptance thresholds.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Naoki; O'shea-Wheller, Thomas A; Doran, Carolina; Franks, Nigel R

    2015-06-01

    Collective decision-making is a characteristic of societies ranging from ants to humans. The ant Temnothorax albipennis is known to use quorum sensing to collectively decide on a new home; emigration to a new nest site occurs when the number of ants favouring the new site becomes quorate. There are several possible mechanisms by which ant colonies can select the best nest site among alternatives based on a quorum mechanism. In this study, we use computational models to examine the implications of heterogeneous acceptance thresholds across individual ants in collective nest choice behaviour. We take a minimalist approach to develop a differential equation model and a corresponding non-spatial agent-based model. We show, consistent with existing empirical evidence, that heterogeneity in acceptance thresholds is a viable mechanism for efficient nest choice behaviour. In particular, we show that the proposed models show speed-accuracy trade-offs and speed-cohesion trade-offs when we vary the number of scouts or the quorum threshold. PMID:26543578

  19. Surface Contact Model for Comets and Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmore, Lars James C.; Trease, Brian P.; Acikmese, Behcet; Mandic, Milan; Carson, John M.

    2011-01-01

    A contact force model was developed for use in touch and go (TAG) surface sampling simulations on small celestial bodies such as comets and asteroids. In TAG scenarios, a spacecraft descending toward the surface of a small body comes into contact with the surface for a short duration of time, collects material samples with a sampler device, and then ascends to leave the surface. The surface contact required 6-DOF (degrees of freedom) dynamics models due to coupling of the attitude and translation dynamics during the contact. The model described here is for contact scenarios that utilize a rotating brush wheel sampler (BWS) to collect surface material. The model includes stiffness and damping of the surface material during BWS vertical motion, lateral friction from the BWS dragging across the surface, and lateral shear from the rotating BWS scooping the surface material. This model is useful for any mission to asteroids or comets that incorporates surface sampling operations.

  20. Phobos surface spectra mineralogical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajola, M.; Lazzarin, M.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Roush, T. L.; Pendleton, Y.; Bertini, I.; Magrin, S.; Carli, C.; La Forgia, F.; Barbieri, C.

    2014-04-01

    A mineralogical model composed of a mixture of Tagish Lake meteorite (TL) and Pyroxene Glass (PM80) was presented in [1] to explain the surface reflectance of Phobos from 0.25 to 4.0 μm. The positive results we obtained, when comparing the OSIRIS data [2] extended in wavelength to include the [3,4] spectra, forced us to perform a wider comparison between our TL-PM80 model and the CRISM and OMEGA Phobos spectra presented in [5]. Such spectra cover three different regions of interest (ROIs) situated in the Phobos sub-Mars hemisphere: the interior of the Stickney crater, its eastern rim, and its proximity terrain southeast of the Reldresal crater. We decided to vary the percentage mixture of the components of our model (80% TL, 20% PM80), between pure TL and pure PM80, by means of the radiative transfer code based on the [6] formulation of the slab approximation. Once this spectral range was derived, see Fig. 1, we attempted to compare it with the [5] spectra between 0.4 and 2.6 μm, i.e. below the thermal emitted radiation, to see if any spectral match was possible. We observed that CRISM scaled spectra above 1.10 μm fall within pure Tagish Lake composition and the [1] model. The CRISM data below 1.10 μm present more discrepancies with our models, in particular for the Stickney's rim spectrum. Nevertheless the TL and PM80 components seem to be good mineralogical candidates on Phobos. We performed the same analysis with the OMEGA data and, again, we found out that the Stickney's rim spectrum lies out of our model range, while the two remaining spectra still lie between pure TL and 80% TL - 20% PM80, but indicating that a different, more complicated mixture is expected in order to explain properly both the spectral trend and the possible absorption bands located above 2.0 μm. Within this analysis, we point out that a big fraction of TL material (modeled pure or present with a minimum percentage of 80% mixed together with 20% PM80) seems to explain Phobos spectral

  1. An Elaboration Likelihood Model Based Longitudinal Analysis of Attitude Change during the Process of IT Acceptance via Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Woong-Kyu

    2012-01-01

    The principal objective of this study was to gain insight into attitude changes occurring during IT acceptance from the perspective of elaboration likelihood model (ELM). In particular, the primary target of this study was the process of IT acceptance through an education program. Although the Internet and computers are now quite ubiquitous, and…

  2. An Investigation of Employees' Use of E-Learning Systems: Applying the Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Hsieh, Yi-Chuan; Chen, Yen-Hsun

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to apply the technology acceptance model to examine the employees' attitudes and acceptance of electronic learning (e-learning) systems in organisations. This study examines four factors (organisational support, computer self-efficacy, prior experience and task equivocality) that are believed to influence…

  3. An Exploration of Student Internet Use in India: The Technology Acceptance Model and the Theory of Planned Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fusilier, Marcelline; Durlabhji, Subhash

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore behavioral processes involved in internet technology acceptance and use with a sample in India, a developing country that can potentially benefit from greater participation in the web economy. Design/methodology/approach - User experience was incorporated into the technology acceptance model (TAM)…

  4. Investigating Students' Acceptance and Self-Efficacy of E-Learning at Al-Aqsa University Based on TAM Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahdi, Hasan Rebhi

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed at investigating the influence of E-learning Self-Efficacy (ELSE) on the acceptance of e-learning by using the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). According to the TAM which used as the theoretical basis, both of the Perceived Usefulness (PU) and the Perceived Ease of Use (PEOU) influence directly the end user's Behavioral Intention…

  5. Factors of adoption of mobile information technology by homecare nurses: a technology acceptance model 2 approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiying; Cocosila, Mihail; Archer, Norm

    2010-01-01

    Pervasive healthcare support through mobile information technology solutions is playing an increasing role in the attempt to improve healthcare and reduce costs. Despite the apparent attractiveness, many mobile applications have failed or have not been implemented as predicted. Among factors possibly leading to such outcomes, technology adoption is a key problem. This must be investigated early in the development process because healthcare is a particularly sensitive area with vital social implications. Moreover, it is important to investigate technology acceptance using the support of scientific tools validated for relevant information systems research. This article presents an empirical study based on the Technology Acceptance Model 2 in mobile homecare nursing. The study elicited the perceptions of 91 Canadian nurses who used personal digital assistants for 1 month in their daily activities. A partial least squares modeling data analysis revealed that nurse's perception of usefulness is the main factor in the adoption of mobile technology, having subjective norm and image within the organization as significant antecedents. Overall, this study was the first attempt at investigating scientifically, through a pertinent information systems research model, user adoption of mobile systems by homecare nursing personnel.

  6. Testing the Electronic Personal Health Record Acceptance Model by Nurses for Managing Their Own Health

    PubMed Central

    Trinkoff, A.M.; Storr, C.L.; Wilson, M.L.; Gurses, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background To our knowledge, no evidence is available on health care professionals’ use of electronic personal health records (ePHRs) for their health management. We therefore focused on nurses’ personal use of ePHRs using a modified technology acceptance model. Objectives To examine (1) the psychometric properties of the ePHR acceptance model, (2) the associations of perceived usefulness, ease of use, data privacy and security protection, and perception of self as health-promoting role models to nurses’ own ePHR use, and (3) the moderating influences of age, chronic illness and medication use, and providers’ use of electronic health record (EHRs) on the associations between the ePHR acceptance constructs and ePHR use. Methods A convenience sample of registered nurses, those working in one of 12 hospitals in the Maryland and Washington, DC areas and members of the nursing informatics community (AMIA and HIMSS), were invited to respond to an anonymous online survey; 847 responded. Multiple logistic regression identified associations between the model constructs and ePHR use, and the moderating effect. Results Overall, ePHRs were used by 47%. Sufficient reliability for all scales was found. Three constructs were significantly related to nurses’ own ePHR use after adjusting for covariates: usefulness, data privacy and security protection, and health-promoting role model. Nurses with providers that used EHRs who perceived a higher level of data privacy and security protection had greater odds of ePHR use than those whose providers did not use EHRs. Older nurses with a higher self-perception as health-promoting role models had greater odds of ePHR use than younger nurses. Conclusions Nurses who use ePHRs for their personal health might promote adoption by the general public by serving as health-promoting role models. They can contribute to improvements in patient education and ePHR design, and serve as crucial resources when working with their

  7. Electronic Health Record Patient Portal Adoption by Health Care Consumers: An Acceptance Model and Survey

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The future of health care delivery is becoming more citizen centered, as today’s user is more active, better informed, and more demanding. Worldwide governments are promoting online health services, such as electronic health record (EHR) patient portals and, as a result, the deployment and use of these services. Overall, this makes the adoption of patient-accessible EHR portals an important field to study and understand. Objective The aim of this study is to understand the factors that drive individuals to adopt EHR portals. Methods We applied a new adoption model using, as a starting point, Ventkatesh's Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology in a consumer context (UTAUT2) by integrating a new construct specific to health care, a new moderator, and new relationships. To test the research model, we used the partial least squares (PLS) causal modelling approach. An online questionnaire was administrated. We collected 360 valid responses. Results The statistically significant drivers of behavioral intention are performance expectancy (beta=.200; t=3.619), effort expectancy (beta=.185; t=2.907), habit (beta=.388; t=7.320), and self-perception (beta=.098; t=2.285). The predictors of use behavior are habit (beta=0.206; t=2.752) and behavioral intention (beta=0.258; t=4.036). The model explained 49.7% of the variance in behavioral intention and 26.8% of the variance in use behavior. Conclusions Our research helps to understand the desired technology characteristics of EHR portals. By testing an information technology acceptance model, we are able to determine what is more valued by patients when it comes to deciding whether to adopt EHR portals or not. The inclusion of specific constructs and relationships related to the health care consumer area also had a significant impact on understanding the adoption of EHR portals. PMID:26935646

  8. Development of a Health Information Technology Acceptance Model Using Consumers’ Health Behavior Intention

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background For effective health promotion using health information technology (HIT), it is mandatory that health consumers have the behavioral intention to measure, store, and manage their own health data. Understanding health consumers’ intention and behavior is needed to develop and implement effective and efficient strategies. Objective To develop and verify the extended Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) in health care by describing health consumers’ behavioral intention of using HIT. Methods This study used a cross-sectional descriptive correlational design. We extended TAM by adding more antecedents and mediating variables to enhance the model’s explanatory power and to make it more applicable to health consumers’ behavioral intention. Additional antecedents and mediating variables were added to the hypothetical model, based on their theoretical relevance, from the Health Belief Model and theory of planned behavior, along with the TAM. We undertook structural equation analysis to examine the specific nature of the relationship involved in understanding consumers’ use of HIT. Study participants were 728 members recruited from three Internet health portals in Korea. Data were collected by a Web-based survey using a structured self-administered questionnaire. Results The overall fitness indices for the model developed in this study indicated an acceptable fit of the model. All path coefficients were statistically significant. This study showed that perceived threat, perceived usefulness, and perceived ease of use significantly affected health consumers’ attitude and behavioral intention. Health consumers’ health status, health belief and concerns, subjective norm, HIT characteristics, and HIT self-efficacy had a strong indirect impact on attitude and behavioral intention through the mediators of perceived threat, perceived usefulness, and perceived ease of use. Conclusions An extended TAM in the HIT arena was found to be valid to describe health

  9. Intention to use and actual use of electronic information resources: further exploring Technology Acceptance Model (TAM).

    PubMed

    Tao, Donghua

    2009-11-14

    Following up a previous study that examined public health students' intention to use e-resources for completing research paper assignments, the present study proposed two models to investigate whether or not public health students actually used the e-resources they intended to use and whether or not the determinants of intention to use predict actual use of e-resources. Focus groups and pre- and post-questionnaires were used to collect data. Descriptive analysis, data screening, and Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) techniques were used for data analysis. The study found that the determinants of intention-to-use significantly predict actual use behavior. Direct impact of perceived usefulness and indirect impact of perceived ease of use to both behavior intention and actual behavior indicated the importance of ease of use at the early stage of technology acceptance. Non-significant intention-behavior relationship prompted thoughts on the measurement of actual behavior and multidimensional characteristics of the intention construct.

  10. Surface modeling of soil antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wen-jiao; Yue, Tian-xiang; Du, Zheng-ping; Wang, Zong; Li, Xue-wen

    2016-02-01

    Large numbers of livestock and poultry feces are continuously applied into soils in intensive vegetable cultivation areas, and then some veterinary antibiotics are persistent existed in soils and cause health risk. For the spatial heterogeneity of antibiotic residues, developing a suitable technique to interpolate soil antibiotic residues is still a challenge. In this study, we developed an effective interpolator, high accuracy surface modeling (HASM) combined vegetable types, to predict the spatial patterns of soil antibiotics, using 100 surface soil samples collected from an intensive vegetable cultivation area located in east of China, and the fluoroquinolones (FQs), including ciprofloxacin (CFX), enrofloxacin (EFX) and norfloxacin (NFX), were analyzed as the target antibiotics. The results show that vegetable type is an effective factor to be combined to improve the interpolator performance. HASM achieves less mean absolute errors (MAEs) and root mean square errors (RMSEs) for total FQs (NFX+CFX+EFX), NFX, CFX and EFX than kriging with external drift (KED), stratified kriging (StK), ordinary kriging (OK) and inverse distance weighting (IDW). The MAE of HASM for FQs is 55.1 μg/kg, and the MAEs of KED, StK, OK and IDW are 99.0 μg/kg, 102.8 μg/kg, 106.3 μg/kg and 108.7 μg/kg, respectively. Further, RMSE simulated by HASM for FQs (CFX, EFX and NFX) are 106.2 μg/kg (88.6 μg/kg, 20.4 μg/kg and 39.2 μg/kg), and less 30% (27%, 22% and 36%), 33% (27%, 27% and 43%), 38% (34%, 23% and 41%) and 42% (32%, 35% and 51%) than the ones by KED, StK, OK and IDW, respectively. HASM also provides better maps with more details and more consistent maximum and minimum values of soil antibiotics compared with the measured data. The better performance can be concluded that HASM takes the vegetable type information as global approximate information, and takes local sampling data as its optimum control constraints.

  11. Surface modeling of soil antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wen-jiao; Yue, Tian-xiang; Du, Zheng-ping; Wang, Zong; Li, Xue-wen

    2016-02-01

    Large numbers of livestock and poultry feces are continuously applied into soils in intensive vegetable cultivation areas, and then some veterinary antibiotics are persistent existed in soils and cause health risk. For the spatial heterogeneity of antibiotic residues, developing a suitable technique to interpolate soil antibiotic residues is still a challenge. In this study, we developed an effective interpolator, high accuracy surface modeling (HASM) combined vegetable types, to predict the spatial patterns of soil antibiotics, using 100 surface soil samples collected from an intensive vegetable cultivation area located in east of China, and the fluoroquinolones (FQs), including ciprofloxacin (CFX), enrofloxacin (EFX) and norfloxacin (NFX), were analyzed as the target antibiotics. The results show that vegetable type is an effective factor to be combined to improve the interpolator performance. HASM achieves less mean absolute errors (MAEs) and root mean square errors (RMSEs) for total FQs (NFX+CFX+EFX), NFX, CFX and EFX than kriging with external drift (KED), stratified kriging (StK), ordinary kriging (OK) and inverse distance weighting (IDW). The MAE of HASM for FQs is 55.1 μg/kg, and the MAEs of KED, StK, OK and IDW are 99.0 μg/kg, 102.8 μg/kg, 106.3 μg/kg and 108.7 μg/kg, respectively. Further, RMSE simulated by HASM for FQs (CFX, EFX and NFX) are 106.2 μg/kg (88.6 μg/kg, 20.4 μg/kg and 39.2 μg/kg), and less 30% (27%, 22% and 36%), 33% (27%, 27% and 43%), 38% (34%, 23% and 41%) and 42% (32%, 35% and 51%) than the ones by KED, StK, OK and IDW, respectively. HASM also provides better maps with more details and more consistent maximum and minimum values of soil antibiotics compared with the measured data. The better performance can be concluded that HASM takes the vegetable type information as global approximate information, and takes local sampling data as its optimum control constraints. PMID:26613514

  12. Comparing Cognitive, Metacognitive, and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Models of Depression: a Longitudinal Study Survey.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Francisco J; Odriozola-González, Paula

    2015-06-16

    This study analyzed the interrelationships between key constructs of cognitive therapy (CT; depressogenic schemas), metacognitive therapy (MCT; dysfunctional metacognitive beliefs), and acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT; psychological inflexibility) in the prediction of depressive symptoms. With a lapse of nine months, 106 nonclinical participants responded twice to an anonymous online survey containing the following questionnaires: the Depression subscale of the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS), the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale Revised (DAS-R), the Positive beliefs, Negative beliefs and Need to control subscales of the Metacognitions Questionnaire-30 (MCQ-30), and the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire - II (AAQ-II). Results showed that when controlling for baseline levels of depressive symptoms and demographic variables, psychological inflexibility longitudinally mediated the effect of depressogenic schemas (path ab = .023, SE = .010; 95% BC CI [.008, .048]) and dysfunctional metacognitive beliefs on depressive symptoms (positive metacognitive beliefs: path ab = .052, SE = .031; 95% BC CI [.005, .134]; negative metacognitive beliefs: path ab = .087, SE = .049; 95% BC CI [.016, .214]; need to control: path ab = .087, SE = .051; 95% BC CI [.013, .220]). Results are discussed emphasizing the role of psychological inflexibility in the CT and MCT models of depression.

  13. Consumer acceptance and stability of spray dried betanin in model juices.

    PubMed

    Kaimainen, Mika; Laaksonen, Oskar; Järvenpää, Eila; Sandell, Mari; Huopalahti, Rainer

    2015-11-15

    Spray dried beetroot powder was used to colour model juices, and the consumer acceptance of the juices and stability of the colour during storage at 60 °C, 20 °C, 4 °C, and -20 °C were studied. The majority of the consumers preferred the model juices coloured with anthocyanins or beetroot extract over model juices coloured with spray dried beetroot powder. The consumers preferred more intensely coloured samples over lighter samples. Spray dried betanin samples were described as 'unnatural' and 'artificial' whereas the colour of beetroot extract was described more 'natural' and 'real juice'. No beetroot-derived off-odours or off-flavours were perceived in the model juices coloured with beetroot powder. Colour stability in model juices was greatly dependent on storage temperature with better stability at lower temperatures. Colour stability in the spray dried powder was very good at 20 °C. Betacyanins from beetroot could be a potential colourant for food products that are stored cold. PMID:25977043

  14. Consumer acceptance and stability of spray dried betanin in model juices.

    PubMed

    Kaimainen, Mika; Laaksonen, Oskar; Järvenpää, Eila; Sandell, Mari; Huopalahti, Rainer

    2015-11-15

    Spray dried beetroot powder was used to colour model juices, and the consumer acceptance of the juices and stability of the colour during storage at 60 °C, 20 °C, 4 °C, and -20 °C were studied. The majority of the consumers preferred the model juices coloured with anthocyanins or beetroot extract over model juices coloured with spray dried beetroot powder. The consumers preferred more intensely coloured samples over lighter samples. Spray dried betanin samples were described as 'unnatural' and 'artificial' whereas the colour of beetroot extract was described more 'natural' and 'real juice'. No beetroot-derived off-odours or off-flavours were perceived in the model juices coloured with beetroot powder. Colour stability in model juices was greatly dependent on storage temperature with better stability at lower temperatures. Colour stability in the spray dried powder was very good at 20 °C. Betacyanins from beetroot could be a potential colourant for food products that are stored cold.

  15. ICT & OTs: a model of information and communications technology acceptance and utilisation by occupational therapists (part 2).

    PubMed

    Schaper, Louise; Pervan, Graham

    2007-01-01

    The research reported in this paper describes the development, empirical validation and analysis of a model of technology acceptance by Australian occupational therapists. The study described involved the collection of quantitative data through a national survey. The theoretical significance of this work is that it uses a thoroughly constructed research model, with one of the largest sample sizes ever tested (n=1605), to extend technology acceptance research into the health sector. Results provide strong support for the model. This work reveals the complexity of the constructs and relationships that influence technology acceptance and highlights the need to include sociotechnical and system issues in studies of technology acceptance in healthcare to improve information system implementation success in this arena. The results of this study have practical and theoretical implications for health informaticians and researchers in the field of health informatics and information systems, tertiary educators, Commonwealth and State Governments and the allied health professions.

  16. Where there's smoke: Cigarette use, social acceptability, and spatial approaches to multilevel modeling.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Heather A

    2015-09-01

    I contribute to understandings of how context is related to individual outcomes by assessing the added value of combining multilevel and spatial modeling techniques. This methodological approach leads to substantive contributions to the smoking literature, including improved clarity on the central contextual factors and the examination of one manifestation of the social acceptability hypothesis. For this analysis I use restricted-use natality data from the Vital Statistics, and county-level data from the 2005-9 ACS. Critically, the results suggest that spatial considerations are still relevant in a multilevel framework. In addition, I argue that spatial processes help explain the relationships linking racial/ethnic minority concentration to lower overall odds of smoking. PMID:26188587

  17. WHERE THERE’S SMOKE: CIGARETTE USE, SOCIAL ACCEPTABILITY, AND SPATIAL APPROACHES TO MULTILEVEL MODELING

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Heather A.

    2015-01-01

    I contribute to understandings of how context is related to individual outcomes by assessing the added value of combining multilevel and spatial modeling techniques. This methodological approach leads to substantive contributions to the smoking literature, including improved clarity on the central contextual factors and the examination of one manifestation of the social acceptability hypothesis. For this analysis I use restricted-use natality data from the Vital Statistics, and county-level data from the 2005–9 ACS. Critically, the results suggest that spatial considerations are still relevant in a multilevel framework. In addition, I argue that spatial processes help explain the relationships linking racial/ethnic minority concentration to lower overall odds of smoking. PMID:26188587

  18. Dynamical Modeling of Surface Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brackbill, Jeremiah U.; Kothe, Douglas B.

    1996-01-01

    In a recent review it is said that free-surface flows 'represent some of the difficult remaining challenges in computational fluid dynamics'. There has been progress with the development of new approaches to treating interfaces, such as the level-set method and the improvement of older methods such as the VOF method. A common theme of many of the new developments has been the regularization of discontinuities at the interface. One example of this approach is the continuum surface force (CSF) formulation for surface tension, which replaces the surface stress given by Laplace's equation by an equivalent volume force. Here, we describe how CSF formulation might be made more useful. Specifically, we consider a derivation of the CSF equations from a minimization of surface energy as outlined by Jacqmin (1996). This reformulation suggests that if one eliminates the computation of curvature in terms of a unit normal vector, parasitic currents may be eliminated. For this reformulation to work, it is necessary that transition region thickness be controlled. Various means for this, in addition to the one discussed by Jacqmin (1996), are discussed.

  19. The development of a model for predicting passenger acceptance of short-haul air transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlthau, A. R.; Jacobson, I. D.

    1977-01-01

    Meaningful criteria and methodology for assessing, particularly in the area of ride quality, the potential acceptability to the traveling public of present and future transportation systems were investigated. Ride quality was found to be one of the important variables affecting the decision of users of air transportation, and to be influenced by several environmental factors, especially motion, noise, pressure, temperature, and seating. Models were developed to quantify the relationship of subjective comfort to all of these parameters and then were exercised for a variety of situations. Passenger satisfaction was found to be strongly related to ride quality and was so modeled. A computer program was developed to assess the comfort and satisfaction levels of passengers on aircraft subjected to arbitrary flight profiles over arbitrary terrain. A model was deduced of the manner in which passengers integrate isolated segments of a flight to obtain an overall trip comfort rating. A method was established for assessing the influence of other links (e.g., access, terminal conditions) in the overall passenger trip.

  20. The acceptance model of intuitive eating: a comparison of women in emerging adulthood, early adulthood, and middle adulthood.

    PubMed

    Augustus-Horvath, Casey L; Tylka, Tracy L

    2011-01-01

    The acceptance model of intuitive eating (Avalos & Tylka, 2006) posits that body acceptance by others helps women appreciate their body and resist adopting an observer's perspective of their body, which contribute to their eating intuitively/adaptively. We extended this model by integrating body mass index (BMI) into its structure and investigating it with emerging (ages 18-25 years old, n = 318), early (ages 26-39 years old, n = 238), and middle (ages 40-65 years old, n = 245) adult women. Multiple-group analysis revealed that this model fit the data for all age groups. Body appreciation and resistance to adopt an observer's perspective mediated the body acceptance by others-intuitive eating link. Body acceptance by others mediated the social support-body appreciation and BMI-body appreciation links. Early and middle adult women had stronger negative BMI-body acceptance by others and BMI-intuitive eating relationships and a stronger positive body acceptance by others-body appreciation relationship than emerging adult women. Early adult women had a stronger positive resistance to adopt observer's perspective-body appreciation relationship than emerging and middle adult women.

  1. A Review of Surface Water Quality Models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shibei; Jia, Peng; Qi, Changjun; Ding, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Surface water quality models can be useful tools to simulate and predict the levels, distributions, and risks of chemical pollutants in a given water body. The modeling results from these models under different pollution scenarios are very important components of environmental impact assessment and can provide a basis and technique support for environmental management agencies to make right decisions. Whether the model results are right or not can impact the reasonability and scientificity of the authorized construct projects and the availability of pollution control measures. We reviewed the development of surface water quality models at three stages and analyzed the suitability, precisions, and methods among different models. Standardization of water quality models can help environmental management agencies guarantee the consistency in application of water quality models for regulatory purposes. We concluded the status of standardization of these models in developed countries and put forward available measures for the standardization of these surface water quality models, especially in developing countries. PMID:23853533

  2. Single switch surface hopping for a model of pyrazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasser, Caroline; Swart, Torben

    2008-07-01

    The single switch trajectory surface hopping algorithm is tested for numerical simulations of a two-state three-mode model for the internal conversion of pyrazine through a conical intersection of potential energy surfaces. The algorithm is compared to two other surface hopping approaches, namely, Tully's method of the fewest switches [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1061 (1990)] and the method by Voronin et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 6057 (1998)]. The single switch algorithm achieves the most accurate results. Replacing its deterministic nonadiabatic branching condition by a probabilistic accept-reject criterion, one obtains the method of Voronin et al. without momentum adjustment. This probabilistic version of the single switch approach outperforms the considered algorithms in terms of accuracy, memory requirement, and runtime.

  3. A Quantitative Examination of User Experience as an Antecedent to Student Perception in Technology Acceptance Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Rory

    2013-01-01

    Internet-enabled mobile devices have increased the accessibility of learning content for students. Given the ubiquitous nature of mobile computing technology, a thorough understanding of the acceptance factors that impact a learner's intention to use mobile technology as an augment to their studies is warranted. Student acceptance of mobile…

  4. Determinants of Intention to Use eLearning Based on the Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Punnoose, Alfie Chacko

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find some of the predominant factors that determine the intention of students to use eLearning in the future. Since eLearning is not just a technology acceptance decision but also involves cognition, this study extended its search beyond the normal technology acceptance variables into variables that could affect…

  5. Low surface pressure models for Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, J.

    1978-01-01

    The inversion model for the atmosphere of Titan is reviewed. The basic features of the model are: a cold surface (80 K), a warm stratosphere (160 K) and a low surface pressure (20 mbar). The model is consistent with all existing thermal infrared spectrophotometry, but it cannot preclude the existence of an opaque, cloud, thick atmosphere. The model excludes other gases than methane as bulk constituents. Radio wavelengths observations, including recent data from the very large array, are discussed. These long wavelength observations may be the only direct means of sampling the surface environment before an entry probe or flyby.

  6. Empirical Testing of a Theoretical Extension of the Technology Acceptance Model: An Exploratory Study of Educational Wikis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xun

    2010-01-01

    This study extended the technology acceptance model and empirically tested the new model with wikis, a new type of educational technology. Based on social cognitive theory and the theory of planned behavior, three new variables, wiki self-efficacy, online posting anxiety, and perceived behavioral control, were added to the original technology…

  7. Learning with Interactive Whiteboards: Determining the Factors on Promoting Interactive Whiteboards to Students by Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilic, Eylem; Güler, Çetin; Çelik, H. Eray; Tatli, Cemal

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the factors which might affect the intention to use interactive whiteboards (IWBs) by university students, using Technology Acceptance Model by the structural equation modeling approach. The following hypothesis guided the current study: H1. There is a positive relationship between IWB…

  8. [The Technology Acceptance Model and Its Application in a Telehealth Program for the Elderly With Chronic Illnesses].

    PubMed

    Chang, Chi-Ping

    2015-06-01

    Many technology developments hold the potential to improve the quality of life of people and make life easier and more comfortable. New technologies have been well accepted by most people. Information sharing in particular is a major catalyst of change in our current technology-based society. Technology has widely innovated life and drastically changed lifestyles. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), a model developed to address the rapid advances in computer technology, is used to explain and predict user acceptance of new information technology. In the past, businesses have used the TAM as an assessment tool to predict user acceptance when introducing new technology products. They have also used external factors in the model to influence user perceptions and beliefs and to ensure the successful spread of new technologies. Informatization plays a critical role in healthcare services. Due to the rapid aging of populations and upward trends in the incidence of chronic illness, requirements for long-term care have increased in both quality and quantity. Therefore, there has been an increased emphasis on integrating healthcare and information technology. However, most elderly are significantly less adept at technology use than the general population. Therefore, we reexamined the effect that the essential concepts in a TAM exerted on technology acceptance. In the present study, the technology acceptance experience with regard to telehealth of the elderly was used as an example to explain how the revised technology acceptance model (TAM 2) may be effectively applied to enhance the understanding of technology care among nurses. The results may serve as a reference for future research on healthcare-technology use in long-term care or in elderly populations.

  9. Response Surface Modeling Using Multivariate Orthogonal Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.; DeLoach, Richard

    2001-01-01

    A nonlinear modeling technique was used to characterize response surfaces for non-dimensional longitudinal aerodynamic force and moment coefficients, based on wind tunnel data from a commercial jet transport model. Data were collected using two experimental procedures - one based on modem design of experiments (MDOE), and one using a classical one factor at a time (OFAT) approach. The nonlinear modeling technique used multivariate orthogonal functions generated from the independent variable data as modeling functions in a least squares context to characterize the response surfaces. Model terms were selected automatically using a prediction error metric. Prediction error bounds computed from the modeling data alone were found to be- a good measure of actual prediction error for prediction points within the inference space. Root-mean-square model fit error and prediction error were less than 4 percent of the mean response value in all cases. Efficacy and prediction performance of the response surface models identified from both MDOE and OFAT experiments were investigated.

  10. A detailed DSMC surface chemistry model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanova Shumakova, A. N.; Kashkovsky, A. V.; Bondar, Ye. A.

    2014-12-01

    This work is aimed at development of detailed molecular surface chemistry models for DSMC method, their implementation into the SMILE++ software system, verification and validation. An approach to construction of DSMC suface chemistry models based on macroscopic reaction rate data was proposed. The approach was applied to macroscopic data for the air mixture of Deutschmann et al. The resulting DSMC surface chemistry model was implemented into SMILE++ software system and verified for thermal equilibrium conditions.

  11. Physician Acceptance of a Physician-Pharmacist Collaborative Treatment Model for Hypertension Management in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Smith, Steven M; Hasan, Michaela; Huebschmann, Amy G; Penaloza, Richard; Schorr-Ratzlaff, Wagner; Sieja, Amber; Roscoe, Nicholai; Trinkley, Katy E

    2015-09-01

    Physician-pharmacist collaborative care (PPCC) is effective in improving blood pressure (BP) control, but primary care provider (PCP) engagement in such models has not been well-studied. The authors analyzed data from PPCC referrals to 108 PCPs, for patients with uncontrolled hypertension, assessing the proportion of referral requests approved, disapproved, and not responded to, and reasons for disapproval. Of 2232 persons with uncontrolled hypertension, PPCC referral requests were sent for 1516 (67.9%): 950 (62.7%) were approved, 406 (26.8%) were disapproved, and 160 (10.6%) received no response. Approval rates differed widely by PCP with a median approval rate of 75% (interquartile range, 41%-100%). The most common reasons for disapproval were: PCP prefers to manage hypertension (19%), and BP controlled per PCP (18%); 8% of cases were considered too complex for PPCC. Provider acceptance of a PPCC hypertension clinic was generally high and sustained but varied widely among PCPs. No single reason for disapproval predominated.

  12. Coupled land surface/hydrologic/atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pielke, Roger; Steyaert, Lou; Arritt, Ray; Lahtakia, Mercedes; Smith, Chris; Ziegler, Conrad; Soong, Su Tzai; Avissar, Roni; Wetzel, Peter; Sellers, Piers

    1993-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: prototype land cover characteristics data base for the conterminous United States; surface evapotranspiration effects on cumulus convection and implications for mesoscale models; the use of complex treatment of surface hydrology and thermodynamics within a mesoscale model and some related issues; initialization of soil-water content for regional-scale atmospheric prediction models; impact of surface properties on dryline and MCS evolution; a numerical simulation of heavy precipitation over the complex topography of California; representing mesoscale fluxes induced by landscape discontinuities in global climate models; emphasizing the role of subgrid-scale heterogeneity in surface-air interaction; and problems with modeling and measuring biosphere-atmosphere exchanges of energy, water, and carbon on large scales.

  13. Experience With Bayesian Image Based Surface Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutz, John C.

    2005-01-01

    Bayesian surface modeling from images requires modeling both the surface and the image generation process, in order to optimize the models by comparing actual and generated images. Thus it differs greatly, both conceptually and in computational difficulty, from conventional stereo surface recovery techniques. But it offers the possibility of using any number of images, taken under quite different conditions, and by different instruments that provide independent and often complementary information, to generate a single surface model that fuses all available information. I describe an implemented system, with a brief introduction to the underlying mathematical models and the compromises made for computational efficiency. I describe successes and failures achieved on actual imagery, where we went wrong and what we did right, and how our approach could be improved. Lastly I discuss how the same approach can be extended to distinct types of instruments, to achieve true sensor fusion.

  14. Integrating social capital theory, social cognitive theory, and the technology acceptance model to explore a behavioral model of telehealth systems.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Hung

    2014-05-01

    Telehealth has become an increasingly applied solution to delivering health care to rural and underserved areas by remote health care professionals. This study integrated social capital theory, social cognitive theory, and the technology acceptance model (TAM) to develop a comprehensive behavioral model for analyzing the relationships among social capital factors (social capital theory), technological factors (TAM), and system self-efficacy (social cognitive theory) in telehealth. The proposed framework was validated with 365 respondents from Nantou County, located in Central Taiwan. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to assess the causal relationships that were hypothesized in the proposed model. The finding indicates that elderly residents generally reported positive perceptions toward the telehealth system. Generally, the findings show that social capital factors (social trust, institutional trust, and social participation) significantly positively affect the technological factors (perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness respectively), which influenced usage intention. This study also confirmed that system self-efficacy was the salient antecedent of perceived ease of use. In addition, regarding the samples, the proposed model fitted considerably well. The proposed integrative psychosocial-technological model may serve as a theoretical basis for future research and can also offer empirical foresight to practitioners and researchers in the health departments of governments, hospitals, and rural communities. PMID:24810577

  15. Integrating Social Capital Theory, Social Cognitive Theory, and the Technology Acceptance Model to Explore a Behavioral Model of Telehealth Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chung-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Telehealth has become an increasingly applied solution to delivering health care to rural and underserved areas by remote health care professionals. This study integrated social capital theory, social cognitive theory, and the technology acceptance model (TAM) to develop a comprehensive behavioral model for analyzing the relationships among social capital factors (social capital theory), technological factors (TAM), and system self-efficacy (social cognitive theory) in telehealth. The proposed framework was validated with 365 respondents from Nantou County, located in Central Taiwan. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to assess the causal relationships that were hypothesized in the proposed model. The finding indicates that elderly residents generally reported positive perceptions toward the telehealth system. Generally, the findings show that social capital factors (social trust, institutional trust, and social participation) significantly positively affect the technological factors (perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness respectively), which influenced usage intention. This study also confirmed that system self-efficacy was the salient antecedent of perceived ease of use. In addition, regarding the samples, the proposed model fitted considerably well. The proposed integrative psychosocial-technological model may serve as a theoretical basis for future research and can also offer empirical foresight to practitioners and researchers in the health departments of governments, hospitals, and rural communities. PMID:24810577

  16. Integrating social capital theory, social cognitive theory, and the technology acceptance model to explore a behavioral model of telehealth systems.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Hung

    2014-05-07

    Telehealth has become an increasingly applied solution to delivering health care to rural and underserved areas by remote health care professionals. This study integrated social capital theory, social cognitive theory, and the technology acceptance model (TAM) to develop a comprehensive behavioral model for analyzing the relationships among social capital factors (social capital theory), technological factors (TAM), and system self-efficacy (social cognitive theory) in telehealth. The proposed framework was validated with 365 respondents from Nantou County, located in Central Taiwan. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to assess the causal relationships that were hypothesized in the proposed model. The finding indicates that elderly residents generally reported positive perceptions toward the telehealth system. Generally, the findings show that social capital factors (social trust, institutional trust, and social participation) significantly positively affect the technological factors (perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness respectively), which influenced usage intention. This study also confirmed that system self-efficacy was the salient antecedent of perceived ease of use. In addition, regarding the samples, the proposed model fitted considerably well. The proposed integrative psychosocial-technological model may serve as a theoretical basis for future research and can also offer empirical foresight to practitioners and researchers in the health departments of governments, hospitals, and rural communities.

  17. Generalized Models for Rock Joint Surface Shapes

    PubMed Central

    Du, Shigui; Hu, Yunjin; Hu, Xiaofei

    2014-01-01

    Generalized models of joint surface shapes are the foundation for mechanism studies on the mechanical effects of rock joint surface shapes. Based on extensive field investigations of rock joint surface shapes, generalized models for three level shapes named macroscopic outline, surface undulating shape, and microcosmic roughness were established through statistical analyses of 20,078 rock joint surface profiles. The relative amplitude of profile curves was used as a borderline for the division of different level shapes. The study results show that the macroscopic outline has three basic features such as planar, arc-shaped, and stepped; the surface undulating shape has three basic features such as planar, undulating, and stepped; and the microcosmic roughness has two basic features such as smooth and rough. PMID:25152901

  18. Generalized models for rock joint surface shapes.

    PubMed

    Du, Shigui; Hu, Yunjin; Hu, Xiaofei

    2014-01-01

    Generalized models of joint surface shapes are the foundation for mechanism studies on the mechanical effects of rock joint surface shapes. Based on extensive field investigations of rock joint surface shapes, generalized models for three level shapes named macroscopic outline, surface undulating shape, and microcosmic roughness were established through statistical analyses of 20,078 rock joint surface profiles. The relative amplitude of profile curves was used as a borderline for the division of different level shapes. The study results show that the macroscopic outline has three basic features such as planar, arc-shaped, and stepped; the surface undulating shape has three basic features such as planar, undulating, and stepped; and the microcosmic roughness has two basic features such as smooth and rough.

  19. Quantitative and qualitative variation of fat in model vanilla custard desserts: effects on sensory properties and consumer acceptance.

    PubMed

    Tomaschunas, Maja; Köhn, Ehrhard; Bennwitz, Petra; Hinrichs, Jörg; Busch-Stockfisch, Mechthild

    2013-06-01

    The effects of variation in fat content (0.1% to 15.8%) and type of fat, using different types of milk, dairy cream, or vegetable fat cream, on sensory characteristics and consumer acceptance of starch-based vanilla model custards were studied. Descriptive analysis with trained panelists and consumer testing with untrained assessors were applied. Descriptive data were related to hedonic data using principal component analysis to determine drivers of liking and disliking. Results demonstrated an increasing effect of fat concerning visual and oral thickness, creamy flavor, and fat-related texture properties, as well as a decreasing effect concerning yellow color and surface shine. A lack of fat caused moderate intensities in pudding-like flavor attributes and an intensive jelly texture. Adding a vegetable fat cream led to lower intensities in attributes yellow color, cooked flavor, thick, and jelly texture, whereas intensities in vegetable fat flavor and fat-related texture properties increased. All consumers favored custards with medium fat contents, being high in pudding-like and vegetable fat flavor as well as in fat-related texture attributes. Nonfat custards were rejected due to jelly texture and moderate intensities in pudding-flavor attributes. High-fat samples were liked by some consumers, but their high intensities in thickness, white color, and creamy flavor also drove disliking for others.

  20. An Improved MUSIC Model for Gibbsite Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Scott C.; Bickmore, Barry R.; Tadanier, Christopher J.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2004-06-01

    Here we use gibbsite as a model system with which to test a recently published, bond-valence method for predicting intrinsic pKa values for surface functional groups on oxides. At issue is whether the method is adequate when valence parameters for the functional groups are derived from ab initio structure optimization of surfaces terminated by vacuum. If not, ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations of solvated surfaces (which are much more computationally expensive) will have to be used. To do this, we had to evaluate extant gibbsite potentiometric titration data that where some estimate of edge and basal surface area was available. Applying BET and recently developed atomic force microscopy methods, we found that most of these data sets were flawed, in that their surface area estimates were probably wrong. Similarly, there may have been problems with many of the titration procedures. However, one data set was adequate on both counts, and we applied our method of surface pKa int prediction to fitting a MUSIC model to this data with considerable success—several features of the titration data were predicted well. However, the model fit was certainly not perfect, and we experienced some difficulties optimizing highly charged, vacuum-terminated surfaces. Therefore, we conclude that we probably need to do AIMD simulations of solvated surfaces to adequately predict intrinsic pKa values for surface functional groups.

  1. The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and Pre-Service Teachers' Technology Acceptance: A Validation Study Using Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teo, Timothy; Tan, Lynde

    2012-01-01

    This study applies the theory of planned behavior (TPB), a theory that is commonly used in commercial settings, to the educational context to explain pre-service teachers' technology acceptance. It is also interested in examining its validity when used for this purpose. It has found evidence that the TPB is a valid model to explain pre-service…

  2. Efficiency of the Technology Acceptance Model to Explain Pre-Service Teachers' Intention to Use Technology: A Turkish Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teo, Timothy; Ursavas, Omer Faruk; Bahcekapili, Ekrem

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess the efficiency of the technology acceptance model (TAM) to explain pre-service teachers' intention to use technology in Turkey. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 197 pre-service teachers from a Turkish university completed a survey questionnaire measuring their responses to four constructs…

  3. Factors of Online Learning Adoption: A Comparative Juxtaposition of the Theory of Planned Behaviour and the Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ndubisi, Nelson

    2006-01-01

    Organisational investments in information technologies have increased significantly in the past few decades. All around the globe and in Malaysia particularly, a number of educational institutions are experimenting with e-learning. Adopting the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) and the technology acceptance model (TAM) this article tries to…

  4. A Quantitative Study of Faculty Perceptions and Attitudes on Asynchronous Virtual Teamwork Using the Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolusky, G. Anthony

    2016-01-01

    This quantitative study used a web-based questionnaire to assess the attitudes and perceptions of online and hybrid faculty towards student-centered asynchronous virtual teamwork (AVT) using the technology acceptance model (TAM) of Davis (1989). AVT is online student participation in a team approach to problem-solving culminating in a written…

  5. Validating the Technology Acceptance Model in the Context of the Laboratory Information System-Electronic Health Record Interface System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aquino, Cesar A.

    2014-01-01

    This study represents a research validating the efficacy of Davis' Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) by pairing it with the Organizational Change Readiness Theory (OCRT) to develop another extension to the TAM, using the medical Laboratory Information Systems (LIS)--Electronic Health Records (EHR) interface as the medium. The TAM posits that it is…

  6. Minimal model for spoof acoustoelastic surface states

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, J. Willatzen, M.; Liang, Z.

    2014-12-15

    Similar to textured perfect electric conductors for electromagnetic waves sustaining artificial or spoof surface plasmons we present an equivalent phenomena for the case of sound. Aided by a minimal model that is able to capture the complex wave interaction of elastic cavity modes and airborne sound radiation in perfect rigid panels, we construct designer acoustoelastic surface waves that are entirely controlled by the geometrical environment. Comparisons to results obtained by full-wave simulations confirm the feasibility of the model and we demonstrate illustrative examples such as resonant transmissions and waveguiding to show a few examples of many where spoof elastic surface waves are useful.

  7. Uncertainty and Sensitivity in Surface Dynamics Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettner, Albert J.; Syvitski, James P. M.

    2016-05-01

    Papers for this special issue on 'Uncertainty and Sensitivity in Surface Dynamics Modeling' heralds from papers submitted after the 2014 annual meeting of the Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System or CSDMS. CSDMS facilitates a diverse community of experts (now in 68 countries) that collectively investigate the Earth's surface-the dynamic interface between lithosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, and atmosphere, by promoting, developing, supporting and disseminating integrated open source software modules. By organizing more than 1500 researchers, CSDMS has the privilege of identifying community strengths and weaknesses in the practice of software development. We recognize, for example, that progress has been slow on identifying and quantifying uncertainty and sensitivity in numerical modeling of earth's surface dynamics. This special issue is meant to raise awareness for these important subjects and highlight state-of-the-art progress.

  8. Investigating IT Faculty Resistance to Learning Management System Adoption Using Latent Variables in an Acceptance Technology Model.

    PubMed

    Bousbahi, Fatiha; Alrazgan, Muna Saleh

    2015-01-01

    To enhance instruction in higher education, many universities in the Middle East have chosen to introduce learning management systems (LMS) to their institutions. However, this new educational technology is not being used at its full potential and faces resistance from faculty members. To investigate this phenomenon, we conducted an empirical research study to uncover factors influencing faculty members' acceptance of LMS. Thus, in the Fall semester of 2014, Information Technology faculty members were surveyed to better understand their perceptions of the incorporation of LMS into their courses. The results showed that personal factors such as motivation, load anxiety, and organizational support play important roles in the perception of the usefulness of LMS among IT faculty members. These findings suggest adding these constructs in order to extend the Technology acceptance model (TAM) for LMS acceptance, which can help stakeholders of the university to implement the use of this system. This may assist in planning and evaluating the use of e-learning.

  9. Investigating IT Faculty Resistance to Learning Management System Adoption Using Latent Variables in an Acceptance Technology Model.

    PubMed

    Bousbahi, Fatiha; Alrazgan, Muna Saleh

    2015-01-01

    To enhance instruction in higher education, many universities in the Middle East have chosen to introduce learning management systems (LMS) to their institutions. However, this new educational technology is not being used at its full potential and faces resistance from faculty members. To investigate this phenomenon, we conducted an empirical research study to uncover factors influencing faculty members' acceptance of LMS. Thus, in the Fall semester of 2014, Information Technology faculty members were surveyed to better understand their perceptions of the incorporation of LMS into their courses. The results showed that personal factors such as motivation, load anxiety, and organizational support play important roles in the perception of the usefulness of LMS among IT faculty members. These findings suggest adding these constructs in order to extend the Technology acceptance model (TAM) for LMS acceptance, which can help stakeholders of the university to implement the use of this system. This may assist in planning and evaluating the use of e-learning. PMID:26491712

  10. Investigating IT Faculty Resistance to Learning Management System Adoption Using Latent Variables in an Acceptance Technology Model

    PubMed Central

    Bousbahi, Fatiha; Alrazgan, Muna Saleh

    2015-01-01

    To enhance instruction in higher education, many universities in the Middle East have chosen to introduce learning management systems (LMS) to their institutions. However, this new educational technology is not being used at its full potential and faces resistance from faculty members. To investigate this phenomenon, we conducted an empirical research study to uncover factors influencing faculty members' acceptance of LMS. Thus, in the Fall semester of 2014, Information Technology faculty members were surveyed to better understand their perceptions of the incorporation of LMS into their courses. The results showed that personal factors such as motivation, load anxiety, and organizational support play important roles in the perception of the usefulness of LMS among IT faculty members. These findings suggest adding these constructs in order to extend the Technology acceptance model (TAM) for LMS acceptance, which can help stakeholders of the university to implement the use of this system. This may assist in planning and evaluating the use of e-learning. PMID:26491712

  11. Surface Adsorption in Nonpolarizable Atomic Models.

    PubMed

    Whitmer, Jonathan K; Joshi, Abhijeet A; Carlton, Rebecca J; Abbott, Nicholas L; de Pablo, Juan J

    2014-12-01

    Many ionic solutions exhibit species-dependent properties, including surface tension and the salting-out of proteins. These effects may be loosely quantified in terms of the Hofmeister series, first identified in the context of protein solubility. Here, our interest is to develop atomistic models capable of capturing Hofmeister effects rigorously. Importantly, we aim to capture this dependence in computationally cheap "hard" ionic models, which do not exhibit dynamic polarization. To do this, we have performed an investigation detailing the effects of the water model on these properties. Though incredibly important, the role of water models in simulation of ionic solutions and biological systems is essentially unexplored. We quantify this via the ion-dependent surface attraction of the halide series (Cl, Br, I) and, in so doing, determine the relative importance of various hypothesized contributions to ionic surface free energies. Importantly, we demonstrate surface adsorption can result in hard ionic models combined with a thermodynamically accurate representation of the water molecule (TIP4Q). The effect observed in simulations of iodide is commensurate with previous calculations of the surface potential of mean force in rigid molecular dynamics and polarizable density-functional models. Our calculations are direct simulation evidence of the subtle but sensitive role of water thermodynamics in atomistic simulations.

  12. An analytic model for the Phobos surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, Thomas C.

    1991-01-01

    Analytic expressions are derived to model the surface topography and the normal to the surface of Phobos. The analytic expressions are comprised of a spherical harmonic expansion for the global figure of Phobos, augmented by addition terms for the large crater Stickney and other craters. Over 300 craters were measured in more than 100 Viking Orbiter images to produce the model. In general, the largest craters were measured since they have a significant effect on topography. The topographic model derived has a global spatial and topographic accuracy ranging from about 100 m in areas having the highest resolution and convergent, stereo coverage, up to 500 m in the poorest areas.

  13. An analytic model for the PHOBOS surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duxbury, T. C.

    1991-02-01

    Analytic expressions are derived to model the surface topography and the normal to the surface of Phobos. The analytic expressions are comprised of a spherical harmonic expansion for the global figure of Phobos, augmented by addition terms for the large crater Stickney and other craters. Over 300 craters were measured in more than 100 Viking Orbiter images to produce the model. In general, the largest craters were measured since they have a significant effect on topography. The topographic model derived has a global spatial and topographic accuracy ranging from about 100 m in areas having the highest resolution and convergent, stereo coverage, up to 500 m in the poorest areas.

  14. Laser Induced Aluminum Surface Breakdown Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yen-Sen; Liu, Jiwen; Zhang, Sijun; Wang, Ten-See (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Laser powered propulsion systems involve complex fluid dynamics, thermodynamics and radiative transfer processes. Based on an unstructured grid, pressure-based computational aerothermodynamics; platform, several sub-models describing such underlying physics as laser ray tracing and focusing, thermal non-equilibrium, plasma radiation and air spark ignition have been developed. This proposed work shall extend the numerical platform and existing sub-models to include the aluminum wall surface Inverse Bremsstrahlung (IB) effect from which surface ablation and free-electron generation can be initiated without relying on the air spark ignition sub-model. The following tasks will be performed to accomplish the research objectives.

  15. Using the UTAUT Model to Examine the Acceptance Behavior of Synchronous Collaboration to Support Peer Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yi Chun; Huang, Yong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The teaching of translation has received considerable attention in recent years. Research on translation in collaborative learning contexts, however, has been less studied. In this study, we use a tool of synchronous collaboration to assist students in experiencing a peer translation process. Afterward, the unified theory of acceptance and use of…

  16. Adult Role Models: Feasibility, Acceptability, and Initial Outcomes for Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colarossi, Lisa; Silver, Ellen Johnson; Dean, Randa; Perez, Amanda; Rivera, Angelic

    2014-01-01

    The authors present the feasibility and acceptability of a parent sexuality education program led by peer educators in community settings. They also report the results of an outcome evaluation with 71 parents who were randomized to the intervention or a control group and surveyed one month prior to and six months after the four-week intervention.…

  17. Exploring Students' Intention to Use LINE for Academic Purposes Based on Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van De Bogart, Willard; Wichadee, Saovapa

    2015-01-01

    The LINE application is often conceived as purely social space; however, the authors of this paper wanted to determine if it could be used for academic purposes. In this study, we examined how undergraduate students accepted LINE in terms of using it for classroom-related activities (e.g., submit homework, follow up course information queries,…

  18. Integrating Telemedicine for Disaster Response: Testing the Emergency Telemedicine Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Theresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is little evidence that technology acceptance is well understood in healthcare. The hospital environment is complex and dynamic creating a challenge when new technology is introduced because it impacts current processes and workflows which can significantly affect patient care delivery and outcomes. This study tested the effect…

  19. WebCT--The Quasimoderating Effect of Perceived Affective Quality on an Extending Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez-Franco, Manuel J.

    2010-01-01

    Perceived affective quality is an attractive area of research in Information System. Specifically, understanding the intrinsic and extrinsic individual factors and interaction effects that influence Information and Communications Technology (ICT) acceptance and adoption--in higher education--continues to be a focal interest in learning research.…

  20. An Investigation of University Student Readiness Towards M-Learning Using Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iqbal, Shakeel; Bhatti, Zeeshan Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    M-learning is learning delivered via mobile devices and mobile technology. The research indicates that this medium of learning has potential to enhance formal as well as informal learning. However, acceptance of m-learning greatly depends upon the personal attitude of students towards this medium; therefore this study focuses only on the…

  1. Test of the technology acceptance model for a Web-based information system in a Hong Kong Chinese sample.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Emily Yee Man; Sachs, John

    2006-12-01

    The modified technology acceptance model was used to predict actual Blackboard usage (a web-based information system) in a sample of 57 Hong Kong student teachers whose mean age was 27.8 yr. (SD = 6.9). While the general form of the model was supported, Application-specific Self-efficacy was a more powerful predictor of system use than Behavioural Intention as predicted by the theory of reasoned action. Thus in this cultural and educational context, it has been shown that the model does not fully mediate the effect of Self-efficacy on System Use. Also, users' Enjoyment exerted considerable influence on the component variables of Usefulness and Ease of Use and on Application-specific Self-efficacy, thus indirectly influencing system usage. Consequently, efforts to gain students' acceptance and, therefore, use of information systems such as Blackboard must pay adequate attention to users' Self-efficacy and motivational variables such as Enjoyment.

  2. Stress exposure and generation: A conjoint longitudinal model of body dysmorphic symptoms, peer acceptance, popularity, and victimization.

    PubMed

    Webb, Haley J; Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J; Mastro, Shawna

    2016-09-01

    This study examined the bidirectional (conjoint) longitudinal pathways linking adolescents' body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) symptoms with self- and peer-reported social functioning. Participants were 367 Australian students (45.5% boys, mean age=12.01 years) who participated in two waves of a longitudinal study with a 12-month lag between assessments. Participants self-reported their symptoms characteristic of BDD, and perception of peer acceptance. Classmates reported who was popular and victimized in their grade, and rated their liking (acceptance) of their classmates. In support of both stress exposure and stress generation models, T1 victimization was significantly associated with more symptoms characteristic of BDD at T2 relative to T1, and higher symptom level at T1 was associated with lower perceptions of peer acceptance at T2 relative to T1. These results support the hypothesized bidirectional model, whereby adverse social experiences negatively impact symptoms characteristic of BDD over time, and symptoms also exacerbate low perceptions of peer-acceptance. PMID:27236472

  3. Stress exposure and generation: A conjoint longitudinal model of body dysmorphic symptoms, peer acceptance, popularity, and victimization.

    PubMed

    Webb, Haley J; Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J; Mastro, Shawna

    2016-09-01

    This study examined the bidirectional (conjoint) longitudinal pathways linking adolescents' body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) symptoms with self- and peer-reported social functioning. Participants were 367 Australian students (45.5% boys, mean age=12.01 years) who participated in two waves of a longitudinal study with a 12-month lag between assessments. Participants self-reported their symptoms characteristic of BDD, and perception of peer acceptance. Classmates reported who was popular and victimized in their grade, and rated their liking (acceptance) of their classmates. In support of both stress exposure and stress generation models, T1 victimization was significantly associated with more symptoms characteristic of BDD at T2 relative to T1, and higher symptom level at T1 was associated with lower perceptions of peer acceptance at T2 relative to T1. These results support the hypothesized bidirectional model, whereby adverse social experiences negatively impact symptoms characteristic of BDD over time, and symptoms also exacerbate low perceptions of peer-acceptance.

  4. Anomalous sea surface reverberation scale model experiments.

    PubMed

    Neighbors, T H; Bjørnø, L

    2006-12-22

    Low frequency sea surface sound backscattering from approximately 100 Hz to a few kHz observed from the 1960s broadband measurements using explosive charges to the Critical Sea Test measurements conducted in the 1990 s is substantially higher than explained by rough sea surface scattering theory. Alternative theories for explaining this difference range from scattering by bubble plumes/clouds formed by breaking waves to stochastic scattering from fluctuating bubble layers near the sea surface. In each case, theories focus on reverberation in the absence of the large-scale surface wave height fluctuations that are characteristic of a sea that produces bubble clouds and plumes. At shallow grazing angles, shadowing of bubble plumes and clouds caused by surface wave height fluctuations may induce first order changes in the backscattered signal strength. To understand the magnitude of shadowing effects under controlled and repeatable conditions, scale model experiments were performed in a 3 m x 1.5 m x 1.5 m tank at the Technical University of Denmark. The experiments used a 1 MHz transducer as the source and receiver, a computer controlled data acquisition system, a scale model target, and a surface wave generator. The scattered signal strength fluctuations observed at shallow angles are characteristic of the predicted ocean environment. These experiments demonstrate that shadowing has a first order impact on bubble plume and cloud scattering strength and emphasize the usefulness of model scale experiments for studying underwater acoustic events under controlled conditions.

  5. Radiative transfer modeling of surface chemical deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Kulp, Thomas J.

    2016-05-01

    Remote detection of a surface-bound chemical relies on the recognition of a pattern, or "signature," that is distinct from the background. Such signatures are a function of a chemical's fundamental optical properties, but also depend upon its specific morphology. Importantly, the same chemical can exhibit vastly different signatures depending on the size of particles composing the deposit. We present a parameterized model to account for such morphological effects on surface-deposited chemical signatures. This model leverages computational tools developed within the planetary and atmospheric science communities, beginning with T-matrix and ray-tracing approaches for evaluating the scattering and extinction properties of individual particles based on their size and shape, and the complex refractive index of the material itself. These individual-particle properties then serve as input to the Ambartsumian invariant imbedding solution for the reflectance of a particulate surface composed of these particles. The inputs to the model include parameters associated with a functionalized form of the particle size distribution (PSD) as well as parameters associated with the particle packing density and surface roughness. The model is numerically inverted via Sandia's Dakota package, optimizing agreement between modeled and measured reflectance spectra, which we demonstrate on data acquired on five size-selected silica powders over the 4-16 μm wavelength range. Agreements between modeled and measured reflectance spectra are assessed, while the optimized PSDs resulting from the spectral fitting are then compared to PSD data acquired from independent particle size measurements.

  6. Modelling the appearance of heritage metallic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, L.; Hindmarch, J.; Robson, S.; Terras, M.

    2014-06-01

    Polished metallic surfaces exhibit a high degree of specularity, which makes them difficult to reproduce accurately. We have applied two different techniques for modelling a heritage object known as the Islamic handbag. Photogrammetric multi-view stereo enabled a dense point cloud to be extracted from a set of photographs with calibration targets, and a geometrically accurate 3D model produced. A new method based on photometric stereo from a set of images taken in an illumination dome enabled surface normals to be generated for each face of the object and its appearance to be rendered, to a high degree of visual realism, when illuminated by one or more light sources from any angles. The specularity of the reflection from the metal surface was modelled by a modified Lorentzian function.

  7. Free surface modeling in OWC chamber with parabolic side walls using 3D BEM

    SciTech Connect

    Hasanabad, Madjid Ghodsi

    2015-03-10

    In this paper, BEM was used for free surface modeling in OWC chamber and out of it. Linear kinematic and dynamic boundary conditions were used for free surface out of OWC chamber and nonlinear forms were used for free surface in the chamber. These boundary conditions were discretized by finite differences method. Also, some thermodynamics relations were applied for trapped air behavior modeling in OWC chamber. Wave specifications in Chabahar region were used in modeling because these waves have an acceptable power for electricity generation. The results show a good agreement with results of other researches.

  8. Laser Induced Aluminum Surface Breakdown Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yen-Sen; Liu, Jiwen; Zhang, Sijun; Wnag, Ten-See (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Laser powered propulsion systems involve complex fluid dynamics, thermodynamics and radiative transfer processes. Based on an unstructured grid., pressure-based computational aerothermodynamics, platform, several sub-nio"'dels describing such underlying physics as laser ray tracing and focusing, thermal non-equilibrium, plasma radiation and air spark ignition have been developed. This proposed work shall extend the numerical platform and existing sub-models to include the aluminum wall surface Inverse Bremsstrahlung (113) effect from which surface ablation and free-electron generation can be initiated without relying on the air spark ignition sub-model. The following tasks will be performed to accomplish the research objectives.

  9. Functional Risk Modeling for Lunar Surface Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, Fraser; Mathias, Donovan; Go, Susie; Nejad, Hamed

    2010-01-01

    We introduce an approach to risk modeling that we call functional modeling , which we have developed to estimate the capabilities of a lunar base. The functional model tracks the availability of functions provided by systems, in addition to the operational state of those systems constituent strings. By tracking functions, we are able to identify cases where identical functions are provided by elements (rovers, habitats, etc.) that are connected together on the lunar surface. We credit functional diversity in those cases, and in doing so compute more realistic estimates of operational mode availabilities. The functional modeling approach yields more realistic estimates of the availability of the various operational modes provided to astronauts by the ensemble of surface elements included in a lunar base architecture. By tracking functional availability the effects of diverse backup, which often exists when two or more independent elements are connected together, is properly accounted for.

  10. Quantitative Modeling of Earth Surface Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelletier, Jon D.

    This textbook describes some of the most effective and straightforward quantitative techniques for modeling Earth surface processes. By emphasizing a core set of equations and solution techniques, the book presents state-of-the-art models currently employed in Earth surface process research, as well as a set of simple but practical research tools. Detailed case studies demonstrate application of the methods to a wide variety of processes including hillslope, fluvial, aeolian, glacial, tectonic, and climatic systems. Exercises at the end of each chapter begin with simple calculations and then progress to more sophisticated problems that require computer programming. All the necessary computer codes are available online at www.cambridge.org/9780521855976. Assuming some knowledge of calculus and basic programming experience, this quantitative textbook is designed for advanced geomorphology courses and as a reference book for professional researchers in Earth and planetary science looking for a quantitative approach to Earth surface processes.

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  12. Modeling surface roughness scattering in metallic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Moors, Kristof; Sorée, Bart; Magnus, Wim

    2015-09-28

    Ando's model provides a rigorous quantum-mechanical framework for electron-surface roughness scattering, based on the detailed roughness structure. We apply this method to metallic nanowires and improve the model introducing surface roughness distribution functions on a finite domain with analytical expressions for the average surface roughness matrix elements. This approach is valid for any roughness size and extends beyond the commonly used Prange-Nee approximation. The resistivity scaling is obtained from the self-consistent relaxation time solution of the Boltzmann transport equation and is compared to Prange-Nee's approach and other known methods. The results show that a substantial drop in resistivity can be obtained for certain diameters by achieving a large momentum gap between Fermi level states with positive and negative momentum in the transport direction.

  13. Constraining Numerical Geodynamo Modeling with Surface Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia; Tangborn, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Numerical dynamo solutions have traditionally been generated entirely by a set of self-consistent differential equations that govern the spatial-temporal variation of the magnetic field, velocity field and other fields related to dynamo processes. In particular, those solutions are obtained with parameters very different from those appropriate for the Earth s core. Geophysical application of the numerical results therefore depends on correct understanding of the differences (errors) between the model outputs and the true states (truth) in the outer core. Part of the truth can be observed at the surface in the form of poloidal magnetic field. To understand these differences, or errors, we generate new initial model state (analysis) by assimilating sequentially the model outputs with the surface geomagnetic observations using an optimal interpolation scheme. The time evolution of the core state is then controlled by our MoSST core dynamics model. The final outputs (forecasts) are then compared with the surface observations as a means to test the success of the assimilation. We use the surface geomagnetic data back to year 1900 for our studies, with 5-year forecast and 20-year analysis periods. We intend to use the result; to understand time variation of the errors with the assimilation sequences, and the impact of the assimilation on other unobservable quantities, such as the toroidal field and the fluid velocity in the core.

  14. The Impact of Subjective Norm and Facilitating Conditions on Pre-Service Teachers' Attitude toward Computer Use: A Structural Equation Modeling of an Extended Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teo, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    This study examined pre-service teachers' self-report on their attitude toward computer use. Participants were 285 pre-service teachers at a teacher training institution in Singapore. They completed a survey questionnaire measuring their responses to five constructs which formed a research model using the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) as a…

  15. Global modelling of Cryptosporidium in surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeulen, Lucie; Hofstra, Nynke

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Waterborne pathogens that cause diarrhoea, such as Cryptosporidium, pose a health risk all over the world. In many regions quantitative information on pathogens in surface water is unavailable. Our main objective is to model Cryptosporidium concentrations in surface waters worldwide. We present the GloWPa-Crypto model and use the model in a scenario analysis. A first exploration of global Cryptosporidium emissions to surface waters has been published by Hofstra et al. (2013). Further work has focused on modelling emissions of Cryptosporidium and Rotavirus to surface waters from human sources (Vermeulen et al 2015, Kiulia et al 2015). A global waterborne pathogen model can provide valuable insights by (1) providing quantitative information on pathogen levels in data-sparse regions, (2) identifying pathogen hotspots, (3) enabling future projections under global change scenarios and (4) supporting decision making. Material and Methods GloWPa-Crypto runs on a monthly time step and represents conditions for approximately the year 2010. The spatial resolution is a 0.5 x 0.5 degree latitude x longitude grid for the world. We use livestock maps (http://livestock.geo-wiki.org/) combined with literature estimates to calculate spatially explicit livestock Cryptosporidium emissions. For human Cryptosporidium emissions, we use UN population estimates, the WHO/UNICEF JMP sanitation country data and literature estimates of wastewater treatment. We combine our emissions model with a river routing model and data from the VIC hydrological model (http://vic.readthedocs.org/en/master/) to calculate concentrations in surface water. Cryptosporidium survival during transport depends on UV radiation and water temperature. We explore pathogen emissions and concentrations in 2050 with the new Shared Socio-economic Pathways (SSPs) 1 and 3. These scenarios describe plausible future trends in demographics, economic development and the degree of global integration. Results and

  16. Modeling aspects of the surface reconstruction problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Charles K.; Melykuti, Gabor

    1994-08-01

    The ultimate goal of digital photogrammetry is to automatically produce digital maps which may in turn form the basis of GIS. Virtually all work in surface reconstruction deals with various kinds of approximations and constraints that are applied. In this paper we extend these concepts in various ways. For one, matching is performed in object space. Thus, matching and densification (modeling) is performed in the same reference system. Another extension concerns the solution of the second sub-problem. Rather than simply densifying (interpolating) the surface, we propose to model it. This combined top-down and bottom-up approach is performed in scale space, whereby the model is refined until compatibility between the data and expectations is reached. The paper focuses on the modeling aspects of the surface reconstruction problem. Obviously, the top-down and bottom-up model descriptions ought to be in a form which allows the generation and verification of hypotheses. Another crucial question is the degree of a priori scene knowledge necessary to constrain the solution space.

  17. Work Functions for Models of Scandate Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Wolfgang

    1997-01-01

    The electronic structure, surface dipole properties, and work functions of scandate surfaces have been investigated using the fully relativistic scattered-wave cluster approach. Three different types of model surfaces are considered: (1) a monolayer of Ba-Sc-O on W(100), (2) Ba or BaO adsorbed on Sc2O3 + W, and (3) BaO on SC2O3 + WO3. Changes in the work function due to Ba or BaO adsorption on the different surfaces are calculated by employing the depolarization model of interacting surface dipoles. The largest work function change and the lowest work function of 1.54 eV are obtained for Ba adsorbed on the Sc-O monolayer on W(100). The adsorption of Ba on Sc2O3 + W does not lead to a low work function, but the adsorption of BaO results in a work function of about 1.6-1.9 eV. BaO adsorbed on Sc2O3 + WO3, or scandium tungstates, may also lead to low work functions.

  18. RF models for plasma-surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas; Smithe, David; Lin, Ming-Chieh; Kruger, Scott; Stoltz, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Computational models for DC and oscillatory (RF-driven) sheath potentials, arising at metal or dielectric-coated surfaces in contact with plasma, are developed within the VSim code and applied in parameter regimes characteristic of fusion plasma experiments and plasma processing scenarios. Results from initial studies quantifying the effects of various dielectric wall coating materials and thicknesses on these sheath potentials, as well as on the ensuing flux of plasma particles to the wall, are presented. As well, the developed models are used to model plasma-facing ICRF antenna structures in the ITER device; we present initial assessments of the efficacy of dielectric-coated antenna surfaces in reducing sputtering-induced high-Z impurity contamination of the fusion reaction. Funded by U.S. DoE via a Phase I SBIR grant, award DE-SC0009501.

  19. A random rule model of surface growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mello, Bernardo A.

    2015-02-01

    Stochastic models of surface growth are usually based on randomly choosing a substrate site to perform iterative steps, as in the etching model, Mello et al. (2001) [5]. In this paper I modify the etching model to perform sequential, instead of random, substrate scan. The randomicity is introduced not in the site selection but in the choice of the rule to be followed in each site. The change positively affects the study of dynamic and asymptotic properties, by reducing the finite size effect and the short-time anomaly and by increasing the saturation time. It also has computational benefits: better use of the cache memory and the possibility of parallel implementation.

  20. Cleaning level acceptance criteria and a high pressure liquid chromatography procedure for the assay of Meclizine Hydrochloride residue in swabs collected from pharmaceutical manufacturing equipment surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mirza, T; Lunn, M J; Keeley, F J; George, R C; Bodenmiller, J R

    1999-04-01

    A method using pharmacologically based and visual limit of detection criteria to determine the acceptable residue level for Meclizine Hydrochloride (MH) on pharmaceutical manufacturing equipment surfaces after cleaning is described. A formula was used in order to determine the pharmacologically safe cleaning level for MH. This level was termed as specific residual cleaning Level (SRCL) and calculated to be 50 microg 100 cm(-2). The visual limit of detection (VLOD) was determined by spiking different levels of MH on stainless steel plates and having the plates examined by a group of observers. The lowest level that could be visually detected by the majority of the observers, 62.5 microg 100 cm(-2), was considered as the VLOD for MH. The lower of the SRCL and VLOD values, i.e. 50 microg 100 cm(-2), was therefore chosen as the cleaning acceptance criterion. A sensitive reversed-phase HPLC method was developed and validated for the assay of MH in swabs used to test equipment surfaces. Using this method, the mean recoveries of MH from spiked swabs and '180-Grit' stainless steel plates were 87.0 and 89.5% with relative standard deviations (RSD) of +/- 3.3 and +/- 2.4%, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the assay of actual swab samples collected from the equipment surfaces. The stability of MH on stainless steel plates, on cleaning swabs and in the extraction solution was investigated. PMID:10698538

  21. Global modeling of fresh surface water temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierkens, M. F.; Eikelboom, T.; van Vliet, M. T.; Van Beek, L. P.

    2011-12-01

    Temperature determines a range of water physical properties, the solubility of oxygen and other gases and acts as a strong control on fresh water biogeochemistry, influencing chemical reaction rates, phytoplankton and zooplankton composition and the presence or absence of pathogens. Thus, in freshwater ecosystems the thermal regime affects the geographical distribution of aquatic species through their growth and metabolism, tolerance to parasites, diseases and pollution and life history. Compared to statistical approaches, physically-based models of surface water temperature have the advantage that they are robust in light of changes in flow regime, river morphology, radiation balance and upstream hydrology. Such models are therefore better suited for projecting the effects of global change on water temperature. Till now, physically-based models have only been applied to well-defined fresh water bodies of limited size (e.g., lakes or stream segments), where the numerous parameters can be measured or otherwise established, whereas attempts to model water temperature over larger scales has thus far been limited to regression type of models. Here, we present a first attempt to apply a physically-based model of global fresh surface water temperature. The model adds a surface water energy balance to river discharge modelled by the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB. In addition to advection of energy from direct precipitation, runoff and lateral exchange along the drainage network, energy is exchanged between the water body and the atmosphere by short and long-wave radiation and sensible and latent heat fluxes. Also included are ice-formation and its effect on heat storage and river hydraulics. We used the coupled surface water and energy balance model to simulate global fresh surface water temperature at daily time steps on a 0.5x0.5 degree grid for the period 1970-2000. Meteorological forcing was obtained from the CRU data set, downscaled to daily values with ECMWF

  1. Discrete Modal Decomposition for surface appearance modelling and rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitard, Gilles; Le Goïc, Gaëtan; Favrelière, Hugues; Samper, Serge; Desage, Simon-Frédéric; Pillet, Maurice

    2015-05-01

    Controlling surface appearance has become essential in the supplier/customer relationship. In this context, many industries have implemented new methods to improve the sensory inspection, particularly in terms of variability. A trend is to develop both hardware and methods for moving towards the automation of appearance inspection and analysis. If devices inspired from dimensional control solutions generally allow to identify defects far apart the expected quality of products, it do not allow to quantify finely appearance anomalies, and decide on their acceptance. To address this issue, new methods devoted to appearance modelling and rendering have been implemented, such as the Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) technique. By varying the illumination positions, the RTI technique aims at enriching the classical information conveyed by images. Thus each pixel is described by a set of values rather than one value classically; each value corresponding to a specific illumination position. This set of values could be interpolated or approximated by a continuous model (function), associated to the reflectance of the pixel, generally based on a second order polynomial (namely, Polynomial Texture Mapping Technique). This paper presents a new approach to evaluate this information from RTI acquisitions. A modal projection based on dynamics (Discrete Modal Decomposition) is used to estimate surface reflectance on each measurement point. After presenting the acquisition device, an application on an industrial surface is proposed in order to validate the approach, and compare it to the more classical polynomial transformation. Results show that the proposed projection basis not only provides closer assessment of surface reflectance (modelling) but also yields to a more realistic rendering.

  2. Modelling Ocean Surface Waves in Polar Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosekova, Lucia; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Coward, Andrew; Bertino, Laurent; Williams, Timothy; Nurser, George A. J.

    2015-04-01

    In the Polar Oceans, the surface ocean waves break up sea ice cover and create the Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ), an area between the sea-ice free ocean and pack ice characterized by highly fragmented ice. This band of sea ice cover is undergoing dramatic changes due to sea ice retreat, with up to a 39% widening in the Arctic Ocean reported over the last three decades and projections predicting a continuing increase. The surface waves, sea ice and ocean interact in the MIZ through multiple complex feedbacks and processes which are not accounted for in any of the present-day climate models. To address this issue, we present a model development which implements surface ocean wave effects in the global Ocean General Circulation Model NEMO, coupled to the CICE sea ice model. Our implementation takes into account a number of physical processes specific to the MIZ dynamics. Incoming surface waves are attenuated due to reflection and energy dissipation induced by the presence of ice cover, which is in turn fragmented in response to external stresses. This process generates a distribution of floe sizes and impacts the dynamics of sea ice by the means of combined rheology that takes into account floe collisions and allows for a more realistic representation of the MIZ. We present results from the NEMO OGCM at 1 degree resolution with a wave-ice interaction module described above. The module introduces two new diagnostics previously unavailable in GCM's: surface wave spectra in sea ice covered areas, and floe size distribution due to wave-induced fragmentation. We discuss the impact of these processes on the ocean and sea ice state, including ocean circulation, mixing, stratification and the role of the MIZ in the ocean variability. The model predictions for the floe sizes in the summer Arctic Ocean range from 60 m in the inner MIZ to a few tens of meters near the open ocean, which agrees with estimates from the satellites. The extent of the MIZ throughout the year is also in

  3. Uncertainty in surface water flood risk modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, J. B.; Martin, D. N.; Roberts, E.; Domuah, R.

    2009-04-01

    Two thirds of the flooding that occurred in the UK during summer 2007 was as a result of surface water (otherwise known as ‘pluvial') rather than river or coastal flooding. In response, the Environment Agency and Interim Pitt Reviews have highlighted the need for surface water risk mapping and warning tools to identify, and prepare for, flooding induced by heavy rainfall events. This need is compounded by the likely increase in rainfall intensities due to climate change. The Association of British Insurers has called for the Environment Agency to commission nationwide flood risk maps showing the relative risk of flooding from all sources. At the wider European scale, the recently-published EC Directive on the assessment and management of flood risks will require Member States to evaluate, map and model flood risk from a variety of sources. As such, there is now a clear and immediate requirement for the development of techniques for assessing and managing surface water flood risk across large areas. This paper describes an approach for integrating rainfall, drainage network and high-resolution topographic data using Flowroute™, a high-resolution flood mapping and modelling platform, to produce deterministic surface water flood risk maps. Information is provided from UK case studies to enable assessment and validation of modelled results using historical flood information and insurance claims data. Flowroute was co-developed with flood scientists at Cambridge University specifically to simulate river dynamics and floodplain inundation in complex, congested urban areas in a highly computationally efficient manner. It utilises high-resolution topographic information to route flows around individual buildings so as to enable the prediction of flood depths, extents, durations and velocities. As such, the model forms an ideal platform for the development of surface water flood risk modelling and mapping capabilities. The 2-dimensional component of Flowroute employs

  4. Liquid surface model for carbon nanotube energetics.

    PubMed

    Solov'yov, Ilia A; Mathew, Maneesh; Solov'yov, Andrey V; Greiner, Walter

    2008-11-01

    In the present paper we developed a model for calculating the energy of single-wall carbon nanotubes of arbitrary chirality. This model, which we call as the liquid surface model, predicts the energy of a nanotube with relative error less than 1% once its chirality and the total number of atoms are known. The parameters of the liquid surface model and its potential applications are discussed. The model has been suggested for open end and capped nanotubes. The influence of the catalytic nanoparticle, atop which nanotubes grow, on the nanotube stability is also discussed. The suggested model gives an important insight in the energetics and stability of nanotubes of different chirality and might be important for the understanding of nanotube growth process. For the computations we use empirical Brenner and Tersoff potentials and discuss their applicability to the study of carbon nanotubes. From the calculated energies we determine the elastic properties of the single-wall carbon nanotubes (Young modulus, curvature constant) and perform a comparison with available experimental measurements and earlier theoretical predictions.

  5. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for weight control: Model, evidence, and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Lillis, Jason; Kendra, Kathleen E.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral weight loss programs achieve substantial short-term weight loss; however attrition and poor weight loss maintenance remain significant problems. Recently, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) has been used in an attempt to improve long-term outcomes. This conceptual article outlines the standard behavioral and ACT approach to weight control, discusses potential benefits and obstacles to combing approaches, briefly reviews current ACT for weight control outcome research, and highlights significant empirical questions that remain. The current evidence suggests that ACT could be useful as an add-on treatment, or in a combined format, for improving long-term weight loss outcomes. Larger studies with longer follow-up are needed as well as studies that aim to identify how best to combine standard treatments and ACT and also who would benefit most from these approaches. PMID:25419510

  6. Soil erosion and surface runoff model SMODERP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavka, P.; Vrana, K.; Dostal, T.

    2012-04-01

    This contribution presents a software tool for calculation and prediction of soil erosion and surface runoff from agricultural lands. There is no universal tool to properly describe the origin and the processes related to the surface runoff and sediment transport in different scales. For a design of any technical erosion control measures, that are used to interrupt the surface runoff, it is necessary to identify basic outflow characteristics (discharge, flow volume). Numerical model SMODERP was developed for determination of these characteristics. The model is being developed at the Department of Irrigation, Drainage and Landscape Engineering , Civil Engineering Faculty, CTU in Prague. SMODERP is physically based one-dimensional episodic model that includes the processes of infiltration, surface retention, surface roughness and vegetation impact on runoff. The model has been substantially upgraded and tested in last few years. Especially runoff parameters, time and spatial discretisation were recalibrated and validated. Runoff parameters were recalibrated on the set of forty measurements performed on the laboratory rainfall simulator on five soil types. The parameters were designed for five soil types categories according to content of particles with size up to 0.01 mm (Novak soil classification). The precipitation episodes can be chosen from the attached catalogue or can be designed by a user. We also present how the input data can be obtained based on available resources (soil maps and data, land use, terrain models, field research, etc.) and how can be used in the assessment erosion risk and in designing of erosion control measures. The model is meant to be used not only for the research purposes, but mainly for the engineering practice. We present the new version of the model that includes a new user friendly graphical interface. The research has been supported by the research grants SGS SGS11/148/OHK1/3T/11 "Experimental Research on Rainfall-runoff and Erosion

  7. Can the KTP laser change the cementum surface of healthy and diseased teeth providing an acceptable root surface for fibroblast attachment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailhot, Jason M.; Garnick, Jerry J.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of our research is to determine the effects of KTP laser on root cementum and fibroblast attachment. Initial work has been completed in testing the effect of different energy levels on root surfaces. From these studies optimal energy levels were determined. In subsequent studies the working distance and exposure time required to obtain significant fibroblast attachment to healthy cementum surfaces were investigated. Results showed that lased cemental surfaces exhibited changes in surface topography which ranged from a melted surface to an apparent slight fusion of the surface of the covering smear layer. When the optimal energy level was used, fibroblasts demonstrate attachment on the specimens, resulting in the presence of a monolayer of cells on the control surfaces as well as on the surfaces lased with this energy level. The present study investigates the treatment of pathological root surfaces and calculus with a KTP laser utilizing these optimal parameters determine previously. Thirty single rooted teeth with advanced periodontal disease and ten healthy teeth were obtained, crowns were sectioned and roots split longitudinally. Forty test specimens were assigned into 1 of 4 groups; pathologic root--not lased, pathologic root--lased, root planed root and health root planed root. Human gingival fibroblasts were seeded on specimens and cultured for 24 hours. Specimens were processed for SEM. The findings suggest that with the KTP laser using a predetermined energy level applied to pathological root surfaces, the lased surfaces provided an unacceptable surface for fibroblast attachment. However, the procedural control using healthy root planed surfaces did demonstrate fibroblast attachment.

  8. Stochastic models for surface diffusion of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, Patrick Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen

    2014-07-28

    We derive a stochastic model for the surface diffusion of molecules, starting from the classical equations of motion for an N-atom molecule on a surface. The equation of motion becomes a generalized Langevin equation for the center of mass of the molecule, with a non-Markovian friction kernel. In the Markov approximation, a standard Langevin equation is recovered, and the effect of the molecular vibrations on the diffusion is seen to lead to an increase in the friction for center of mass motion. This effective friction has a simple form that depends on the curvature of the lowest energy diffusion path in the 3N-dimensional coordinate space. We also find that so long as the intramolecular forces are sufficiently strong, memory effects are usually not significant and the Markov approximation can be employed, resulting in a simple one-dimensional model that can account for the effect of the dynamics of the molecular vibrations on the diffusive motion.

  9. Modeling of ESD events from polymeric surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifer, Kent Bryant

    2014-03-01

    Transient electrostatic discharge (ESD) events are studied to assemble a predictive model of discharge from polymer surfaces. An analog circuit simulation is produced and its response is compared to various literature sources to explore its capabilities and limitations. Results suggest that polymer ESD events can be predicted to within an order of magnitude. These results compare well to empirical findings from other sources having similar reproducibility.

  10. Improved Estimation Model of Lunar Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Lunar surface temperature (LST) is of great scientific interest both uncovering the thermal properties and designing the lunar robotic or manned landing missions. In this paper, we proposed the improved LST estimation model based on the one-dimensional partial differential equation (PDE). The shadow and surface tilts effects were combined into the model. Using the Chang'E (CE-1) DEM data from the Laser Altimeter (LA), the topographic effect can be estimated with an improved effective solar irradiance (ESI) model. In Fig. 1, the highest LST of the global Moon has been estimated with the spatial resolution of 1 degree /pixel, applying the solar albedo data derived from Clementine UV-750nm in solving the PDE function. The topographic effect is significant in the LST map. It can be identified clearly the maria, highland, and craters. The maximum daytime LST presents at the regions with low albedo, i.g. mare Procellarum, mare Serenitatis and mare Imbrium. The results are consistent with the Diviner's measurements of the LRO mission. Fig. 2 shows the temperature variations at the center of the disk in one year, assuming the Moon to be standard spherical. The seasonal variation of LST at the equator is about 10K. The highest LST occurs in early May. Fig.1. Estimated maximum surface temperatures of the global Moon in spatial resolution of 1 degree /pixel

  11. Diurnal ocean surface layer model validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, Jeffrey D.; May, Douglas A.; Abell, Fred, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The diurnal ocean surface layer (DOSL) model at the Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center forecasts the 24-hour change in a global sea surface temperatures (SST). Validating the DOSL model is a difficult task due to the huge areas involved and the lack of in situ measurements. Therefore, this report details the use of satellite infrared multichannel SST imagery to provide day and night SSTs that can be directly compared to DOSL products. This water-vapor-corrected imagery has the advantages of high thermal sensitivity (0.12 C), large synoptic coverage (nearly 3000 km across), and high spatial resolution that enables diurnal heating events to be readily located and mapped. Several case studies in the subtropical North Atlantic readily show that DOSL results during extreme heating periods agree very well with satellite-imagery-derived values in terms of the pattern of diurnal warming. The low wind and cloud-free conditions necessary for these events to occur lend themselves well to observation via infrared imagery. Thus, the normally cloud-limited aspects of satellite imagery do not come into play for these particular environmental conditions. The fact that the DOSL model does well in extreme events is beneficial from the standpoint that these cases can be associated with the destruction of the surface acoustic duct. This so-called afternoon effect happens as the afternoon warming of the mixed layer disrupts the sound channel and the propagation of acoustic energy.

  12. An Empirical Analysis of Citizens' Acceptance Decisions of Electronic-Government Services: A Modification of the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) Model to Include Trust as a Basis for Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awuah, Lawrence J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding citizens' adoption of electronic-government (e-government) is an important topic, as the use of e-government has become an integral part of governance. Success of such initiatives depends largely on the efficient use of e-government services. The unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) model has provided a…

  13. Improvements in Modeling Thruster Plume Erosion Damage to Spacecraft Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soares, Carlos; Olsen, Randy; Steagall, Courtney; Huang, Alvin; Mikatarian, Ron; Myers, Brandon; Koontz, Steven; Worthy, Erica

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft bipropellant thrusters impact spacecraft surfaces with high speed droplets of unburned and partially burned propellant. These impacts can produce erosion damage to optically sensitive hardware and systems (e.g., windows, camera lenses, solar cells and protective coatings). On the International Space Station (ISS), operational constraints are levied on the position and orientation of the solar arrays to mitigate erosion effects during thruster operations. In 2007, the ISS Program requested evaluation of erosion constraint relief to alleviate operational impacts due to an impaired Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ). Boeing Space Environments initiated an activity to identify and remove sources of conservatism in the plume induced erosion model to support an expanded range of acceptable solar array positions ? The original plume erosion model over-predicted plume erosion and was adjusted to better correlate with flight experiment results. This paper discusses findings from flight experiments and the methodology employed in modifying the original plume erosion model for better correlation of predictions with flight experiment data. The updated model has been successful employed in reducing conservatism and allowing for enhanced flexibility in ISS solar array operations.

  14. Surface Segregation in Multicomponent Systems: Modeling of Surface Alloys and Alloy Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John; Noebe, Ronald D.; Good, Brian; Honecy, Frank S.; Abel, Phillip

    1999-01-01

    The study of surface segregation, although of great technological importance, has been largely restricted to experimental work due to limitations associated with theoretical methods. However, recent improvements in both first-particle and semi-empirical methods are opening, the doors to an array of new possibilities for surface scientists. We apply one of these techniques, the Bozzolo, Ferrante and Smith (BFS) method for alloys, which is particularly suitable for complex systems, to several aspects of the computational modeling of surfaces and segregation, including alloy surface segregation, structure and composition of alloy surfaces, and the formation of surface alloys. We conclude with the study of complex NiAl-based binary, ternary and quaternary thin films (with Ti, Cr and Cu additions to NiAl). Differences and similarities between bulk and surface compositions are discussed, illustrated by the results of Monte Carlo simulations. For some binary and ternary cases, the theoretical predictions are compared to experimental results, highlighting the accuracy and value of this developing theoretical tool.

  15. Modeling of surface flashover on spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kushner, Mark J.

    1991-01-01

    A model for predicting the onset of surface flashover discharges (SFDs) in the context of high voltage pulse power modulators was developed and used to investigate mechanisms leading to the onset of SFDs. We demonstrated that it is possible to analyze surface discharges in a manner similar to gas phase discharges using transport coefficients such as the first Townsend coefficient. Our parameterization of various methods to prevent, or at least delay, the onset of SFDs was not particularly successful in that many of the strategies that we investigated do not yield significantly improved performance. The only safe strategy to reduce the occurrence of SFDs is to prevent the dielectric from being charged in the first place. This leads one to consider passive or active schemes which employ the low pressure of attaching gases which flood the surface prior or coincident to pulsing the high voltage apparatus. Our calculations indicate that only small amounts gas (10s Torr effective pressure at substrate) would be sufficient for many of the anticipated applications. If the surface is flooded only when high voltage is applied across the dielectric, the gas consumption would be nominal.

  16. The bootstrapped model--Lessons for the acceptance of intellectual technology.

    PubMed

    Lovie, A D

    1987-09-01

    This paper is intended as a non-technical introduction to a growing aspect of what has been termed 'intellectual technology'. The particular area chosen is the use of simple linear additive models for judgement and decision making purposes. Such models are said to either outperform, or perform at least as well as, the human judges on which they are based, hence they are said to 'bootstrap' such human inputs. Although the paper will provide a fairly comprehensive list of recent applications of such models, from postgraduate selection to judgements of marital happiness, the work will concentrate on the topic of Credit Scoring as an exemplar - that is, the assignment of credit by means of a simple additive rule. The paper will also present a simple system, due to Dawes, of classifying such models according to the form and source of their weights. The paper further discusses the reasons for bootstrapping and that other major phenomenon of such models - that is, the one can rarely distinguish between the prescriptions of such models, however the weights have been arrived at. It is argued that this 'principle of the flat maximum' allows us to develop a technology of judgement. The paper continues with a brief historical survey of the reactions of human experts to such models and their superiority, and suggestions for a better mix of expert and model on human engineering lines. Finally, after a brief comparison between expert systems and linear additive models, the paper concludes with a brief survey of possible future developments. A short Appendix describes two applications of such models.

  17. The surface of Io - A new model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapke, B.

    1989-05-01

    The role of elemental sulfur on Io is evaluated in light of duplications of its spectral properties by combinations of basalt and condensates of SO2 and its S2O and polysulfur oxide (PSO) dissociation products. Elemental sulfur is not seen to be present in spectrally significant amounts. It is instead suggested that Io's exposed surface consists of mafic silicates which have been partially covered by thin deposits of SO2, PSO, and S2O. A model in which most of the spectrally active frost occurs in the form of thin and ephemeral partial coatings on the topmost regolith particles is seen as most consistent with observations. Attention is drawn to similarities with the surface of Europa.

  18. Atmospheric radiation model for water surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E.; Gaskill, D. W.; Lierzer, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    An atmospheric correction model was extended to account for various atmospheric radiation components in remotely sensed data. Components such as the atmospheric path radiance which results from singly scattered sky radiation specularly reflected by the water surface are considered. A component which is referred to as the virtual Sun path radiance, i.e. the singly scattered path radiance which results from the solar radiation which is specularly reflected by the water surface is also considered. These atmospheric radiation components are coded into a computer program for the analysis of multispectral remote sensor data over the Great Lakes of the United States. The user must know certain parameters, such as the visibility or spectral optical thickness of the atmosphere and the geometry of the sensor with respect to the Sun and the target elements under investigation.

  19. Modelled and observed continental surface heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrami, H.; MacDougall, A. H.; Gonzalez-Rouco, F. J.; Stevens, M. B.; Bourlon, E.

    2009-12-01

    Heat fluxes in the continental subsurface were estimated from general circulation model (GCM) simulations of the climate of the last millennium and compared to those obtained from subsurface geothermal data. Since GCMs have bottom boundary conditions (BBCs) that are less than 10 m deep and thus may be thermodynamically restricted in the continental subsurface, we used an idealized land surface model (LSM) with a very deep BBC to estimate the potential for realistic subsurface heat storage in the absence of bottom boundary constraints. Results indicate that there is good agreement between observed fluxes and GCM simulated fluxes for the 1780-1980 period when the GCM simulated temperatures are coupled to the LMS with deep BBC. These results emphasize the importance of placing a deep BBC in GCM soil components for the proper simulation of the overall continental heat budget. In addition, the agreement between the LSM surface fluxes and the borehole temperature reconstructed fluxes lends additional support to the overall quality of the GCM (ECHO-G) paleoclimatic simulations. Simulations to 2100 show a divergence between the LSM simulated subsurface heat content and the heat gain in the ECHO-G soil model, with the placement of the BBCs surpassing the thermodynamical effect of the choice of emission scenario as the most important factor determining heat absorption in the simulated subsurface.

  20. Mesh optimization of vessel surface model for computer-aided simulation of percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Hou, Zeng-Guang; Mi, Shao-Hua; Bian, Gui-Bin; Xie, Xiao-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention is the gold standard to coronary diseases in the past decades due to much less trauma and quick recovery. However, due to the traits of minimal invasiveness, clinicians have to defeat the difficulties in eye-hand coordination during the procedure, which also makes it a non-trivial task in the catheterization lab. The computer-aided surgical simulation is designed to provide a reliable tool for the early stage of the training of the procedure. In this simulation system, the surface model of the vessels contribute the major part in the virtual anatomic environment. On the other hand, heavy interactions between the virtual surgical tools and the model surface occur during the training. In order to achieve acceptable performances, the patient-specific vessel surface model needs further process to adapt to this situation. We proposed in this paper an approach to optimize the meshes that consist the surface model with its application in consideration. The connectivity of the surface model is firstly checked. Next a smooth processing is applied without modifying the geometry of the largest-connected surface. Then the quantities of the polygons consisting the model surface are eliminated both dramatically and appropriately. The resultant surface model is applied in the validation test interacting with the virtual guidewire.

  1. Acceptance of the bodypainting as supportive method to learn the surface locomotor apparatus anatomy of the horse.

    PubMed

    Senos, R; Ribeiro, M S; Martins, K de Souza; Pereira, L V; Mattos, M F; Kfoury Júnior, J R; Rodrigues, M R

    2015-01-01

    Although bodypainting has been reported as a great resource for teaching surface anatomy of humans, its use in veterinary anatomy has not been scientifically reported. In the present study, bodypainting was performed on 4 horses for anatomy teaching purposes of the equine locomotor apparatus. We aimed to use the bodypainting method as an additional tool to classic teaching and to test the relevance of our purpose. Twenty one Brazilian veterinary students were given a 90-min session, which included a presentation of painted horses, with opportunities for the students to ask questions and to palpate anatomic locations on the horses. Based on a questionnaire, there was unanimous student satisfaction with this technique. Furthermore, student scores on practical tests to evaluate the attention retain given immediately before and 1 h after the session were 33.9 ± 19.8% and 69.0 ± 18.4%, respectively (p < 0.001). We concluded that bodypainting has great potential for support the classic lectures of the equine locomotor apparatus.

  2. Precise orbit computation and sea surface modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakker, Karel F.; Ambrosius, B. A. C.; Rummel, R.; Vermaat, E.; Deruijter, W. P. M.; Vandermade, J. W.; Zimmerman, J. T. F.

    1991-01-01

    The research project described below is part of a long-term program at Delft University of Technology aiming at the application of European Remote Sensing satellite (ERS-1) and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter measurements for geophysical purposes. This program started in 1980 with the processing of Seasat laser range and altimeter height measurements and concentrates today on the analysis of Geosat altimeter data. The objectives of the TOPEX/POSEIDON research project are the tracking of the satellite by the Dutch mobile laser tracking system MTLRS-2, the computation of precise TOPEX/POSEIDON orbits, the analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of the orbit errors, the improvement of ERS-1 orbits through the information obtained from the altimeter crossover difference residuals for crossing ERS-1 and TOPEX/POSEIDON tracks, the combination of ERS-1 and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter data into a single high-precision data set, and the application of this data set to model the sea surface. The latter application will focus on the determination of detailed regional mean sea surfaces, sea surface variability, ocean topography, and ocean currents in the North Atlantic, the North Sea, the seas around Indonesia, the West Pacific, and the oceans around South Africa.

  3. Modeling nurses' attitude toward using automated unit-based medication storage and distribution systems: an extension of the technology acceptance model.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Rodríguez, Tomás; Romero-Alonso, María Mercedes

    2013-05-01

    This article analyzes the attitude of nurses toward the use of automated unit-based medication storage and distribution systems and identifies influencing factors. Understanding these factors provides an opportunity to explore actions that might be taken to boost adoption by potential users. The theoretical grounding for this research is the Technology Acceptance Model. The Technology Acceptance Model specifies the causal relationships between perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, attitude toward using, and actual usage behavior. The research model has six constructs, and nine hypotheses were generated from connections between these six constructs. These constructs include perceived risks, experience level, and training. The findings indicate that these three external variables are related to the perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness of automated unit-based medication storage and distribution systems, and therefore, they have a significant influence on attitude toward the use of these systems.

  4. 24 CFR 200.926c - Model code provisions for use in partially accepted code jurisdictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Model code provisions for use in... Portions of the CABO One and Two Family Dwelling Code, 1992 Edition, including the 1993 amendments, with... Chapter 3. (e) Materials standards Chapter 26. (f) Construction components Part III. (g) Glass Chapter...

  5. Improving Technology Acceptance Modeling for Disadvantaged Communities Using a Systems Engineering Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Jordan L.

    2013-01-01

    Developing nations are poised to spend billions on information and communication technology (ICT) innovation in 2020. A study of the historical adoption of ICT in developing nations has indicated that their adoption patterns do not follow typical technology innovation adoption models. This study addressed the weaknesses found in existing…

  6. Bioadhesion to model thermally responsive surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrzejewski, Brett Paul

    This dissertation focuses on the characterization of two surfaces: mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of hexa(ethylene glycol) and alkyl thiolates (mixed SAM) and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm). The synthesis of hexa(ethylene gylcol) alkyl thiol (C11EG 6OH) is presented along with the mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance results. The gold substrates were imaged prior to SAM formation with atomic force micrscopy (AFM). Average surface roughness of the gold substrate was 0.44 nm, 0.67 nm, 1.65 nm for 15, 25 and 60 nm gold thickness, respectively. The height of the mixed SAM was measured by ellipsometry and varied from 13 to 28°A depending on surface mole fraction of C11EG6OH. The surface mole fraction of C11EG6OH for the mixed SAM was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with optimal thermal responsive behavior in the range of 0.4 to 0.6. The mixed SAM surface was confirmed to be thermally responsive by contact angle goniometry, 35° at 28°C and ˜55° at 40°C. In addition, the mixed SAM surfaces were confirmed to be thermally responsive for various aqueous mediums by tensiometry. Factors such as oxygen, age, and surface mole fraction and how they affect the thermal responsive of the mixed SAM are discussed. Lastly, rat fibroblasts were grown on the mixed SAM and imaged by phase contrast microscopy to show inhibition of attachment at temperatures below the molecular transition. Qualitative and quantitative measurements of the fibroblast adhesion data are provided that support the hypothesis of the mixed SAM exhibits a dominantly non-fouling molecular conformation at 25°C whereas it exhibits a dominantly fouling molecular conformation at 40°C. The adhesion of six model proteins: bovine serum albumin, collagen, pyruvate kinase, cholera toxin subunit B, ribonuclease, and lysozyme to the model thermally responsive mixed SAM were examined using AFM. All six proteins possessed adhesion to the pure component alkyl thiol, in

  7. Parental modelling and prompting effects on acceptance of a novel fruit in 2-4-year-old children are dependent on children's food responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Blissett, Jackie; Bennett, Carmel; Fogel, Anna; Harris, Gillian; Higgs, Suzanne

    2016-02-14

    Few children consume the recommended portions of fruit or vegetables. This study examined the effects of parental physical prompting and parental modelling in children's acceptance of a novel fruit (NF) and examined the role of children's food-approach and food-avoidance traits on NF engagement and consumption. A total of 120 caregiver-child dyads (fifty-four girls, sixty-six boys) participated in this study. Dyads were allocated to one of the following three conditions: physical prompting but no modelling, physical prompting and modelling or a modelling only control condition. Dyads ate a standardised meal containing a portion of a fruit new to the child. Parents completed measures of children's food approach and avoidance. Willingness to try the NF was observed, and the amount of the NF consumed was measured. Physical prompting but no modelling resulted in greater physical refusal of the NF. There were main effects of enjoyment of food and food fussiness on acceptance. Food responsiveness interacted with condition such that children who were more food responsive had greater NF acceptance in the prompting and modelling conditions in comparison with the modelling only condition. In contrast, children with low food responsiveness had greater acceptance in the modelling control condition than in the prompting but no modelling condition. Physical prompting in the absence of modelling is likely to be detrimental to NF acceptance. Parental use of physical prompting strategies, in combination with modelling of NF intake, may facilitate acceptance of NF, but only in food-responsive children. Modelling consumption best promotes acceptance in children with low food responsiveness.

  8. Model and Processes of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for Chronic Pain Including a Closer Look at the Self.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin; McCracken, Lance M

    2016-02-01

    Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is one of the so called "third-wave" cognitive behavioral therapies. It has been increasingly applied to chronic pain, and there is accumulating evidence to support its effectiveness. ACT is based on a model of general human functioning called the psychological flexibility (PF) model. Most facets of the PF model have been examined in chronic pain. However, a potential key facet related to "self" appears underappreciated. Indeed, a positive or healthy sense of self seems essential to our well-being, and there have been numerous studies of the self in chronic pain. At the same time, these studies are not currently well organized or easy to summarize. This lack of clarity and integration creates barriers to progress in this area of research. PF with its explicit inclusion of self-related therapeutic processes within a broad, integrative, theoretical model may help. The current review summarizes the PF model in the context of chronic pain with a specific emphasis on the parts of the model that address self-related processes. PMID:26803836

  9. Model and Processes of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for Chronic Pain Including a Closer Look at the Self.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin; McCracken, Lance M

    2016-02-01

    Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is one of the so called "third-wave" cognitive behavioral therapies. It has been increasingly applied to chronic pain, and there is accumulating evidence to support its effectiveness. ACT is based on a model of general human functioning called the psychological flexibility (PF) model. Most facets of the PF model have been examined in chronic pain. However, a potential key facet related to "self" appears underappreciated. Indeed, a positive or healthy sense of self seems essential to our well-being, and there have been numerous studies of the self in chronic pain. At the same time, these studies are not currently well organized or easy to summarize. This lack of clarity and integration creates barriers to progress in this area of research. PF with its explicit inclusion of self-related therapeutic processes within a broad, integrative, theoretical model may help. The current review summarizes the PF model in the context of chronic pain with a specific emphasis on the parts of the model that address self-related processes.

  10. Merging Digital Surface Models Implementing Bayesian Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeq, H.; Drummond, J.; Li, Z.

    2016-06-01

    In this research different DSMs from different sources have been merged. The merging is based on a probabilistic model using a Bayesian Approach. The implemented data have been sourced from very high resolution satellite imagery sensors (e.g. WorldView-1 and Pleiades). It is deemed preferable to use a Bayesian Approach when the data obtained from the sensors are limited and it is difficult to obtain many measurements or it would be very costly, thus the problem of the lack of data can be solved by introducing a priori estimations of data. To infer the prior data, it is assumed that the roofs of the buildings are specified as smooth, and for that purpose local entropy has been implemented. In addition to the a priori estimations, GNSS RTK measurements have been collected in the field which are used as check points to assess the quality of the DSMs and to validate the merging result. The model has been applied in the West-End of Glasgow containing different kinds of buildings, such as flat roofed and hipped roofed buildings. Both quantitative and qualitative methods have been employed to validate the merged DSM. The validation results have shown that the model was successfully able to improve the quality of the DSMs and improving some characteristics such as the roof surfaces, which consequently led to better representations. In addition to that, the developed model has been compared with the well established Maximum Likelihood model and showed similar quantitative statistical results and better qualitative results. Although the proposed model has been applied on DSMs that were derived from satellite imagery, it can be applied to any other sourced DSMs.

  11. Reliability and acceptability of a five-station multiple mini-interview model for residency program recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Fraga, Julian Diaz; Oluwasanjo, Adetokunbo; Wasser, Thomas; Donato, Anthony; Alweis, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Background Standard interviews are used by most residency programs in the United States for assessment of aptitude of the non-cognitive competencies, but variability of interviewer skill, interviewer bias, interviewer leniency or stringency, and context specificity limit reliability. Aim To investigate reliability and acceptability of five-station multiple mini-interview (MMI) model for resident selection into an internal medicine residency program in the United States. Setting One independent academic medical center. Participants Two hundred and thirty-seven applicants and 17 faculty interviewers. Program description Five, 10-min MMI stations with five different interviewers blinded to the candidate's records and one traditional 20-min interview with the program director. Candidates were rated on two items: interpersonal and communication skills, and overall performance. Program evaluation Generalizability data showed that the reliability of our process was high (>0.9). The results of anonymous surveys demonstrated that both applicants and interviewers consider the MMI as a fair and more effective tool to evaluate non-cognitive traits, and prefer the MMI to standard interviews. Discussion The MMI process for residency interviews can generate reliable interview results using only five stations, and it is acceptable and preferred over standard interview modalities by the applicants and faculty members of one US residency program. PMID:24392211

  12. Regulatory acceptance and use of 3R models for pharmaceuticals and chemicals: expert opinions on the state of affairs and the way forward.

    PubMed

    Schiffelers, Marie-Jeanne W A; Blaauboer, Bas J; Bakker, Wieger E; Beken, Sonja; Hendriksen, Coenraad F M; Koëter, Herman B W M; Krul, Cyrille

    2014-06-01

    Pharmaceuticals and chemicals are subjected to regulatory safety testing accounting for approximately 25% of laboratory animal use in Europe. This testing meets various objections and has led to the development of a range of 3R models to Replace, Reduce or Refine the animal models. However, these models must overcome many barriers before being accepted for regulatory risk management purposes. This paper describes the barriers and drivers and options to optimize this acceptance process as identified by two expert panels, one on pharmaceuticals and one on chemicals. To untangle the complex acceptance process, the multilevel perspective on technology transitions is applied. This perspective defines influences at the micro-, meso- and macro level which need alignment to induce regulatory acceptance of a 3R model. This paper displays that there are many similar mechanisms within both sectors that prevent 3R models from becoming accepted for regulatory risk assessment and management. Shared barriers include the uncertainty about the value of the new 3R models (micro level), the lack of harmonization of regulatory requirements and acceptance criteria (meso level) and the high levels of risk aversion (macro level). In optimizing the process commitment, communication, cooperation and coordination are identified as critical drivers.

  13. Modeling surface water critical loads with PROFILE: possibilities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Rapp, L; Bishop, K

    2003-01-01

    The critical load concept has become a valuable tool for policymakers in the European negotiations on emission reductions. Despite the international acceptance, ongoing validation of critical load methodology is of the utmost importance to avoid a situation where the calculation results are difficult to defend. In this paper we explore the potential of using the steady state soil chemistry model PROFILE as an alternative to the Steady State Water Chemistry (SSWC) method for calculating critical loads of acidity. The hypothesis is that the uncertainty in prediction of preindustrial leaching of base cations is reduced when soil properties instead of lake chemistry are used as input data. Paleolimnological reconstructions of preindustrial lake chemistry are used to test PROFILE. As PROFILE requires soil data that are not generally available on a catchment level, we used distributions of crucial parameters from soil survey data within the vicinity of five lakes for which paleoecological pH reconstructions were available. An important concern is the characterization of catchment hydrology. A calibration of the "effective" soil depth, needed to give PROFILE predictions that coincided with paleolimnology, suggested that approximately 0.6 m of the total soil depth was hydrologically active in supplying acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) to runoff through weathering. At present, there is insufficient evidence to either recommend or reject the PROFILE model for surface water critical loads. Before such a judgement can be made, the approach presented here has to be tested for other regions, and the definition of catchment hydrology needs to be investigated further.

  14. Exercise motives and positive body image in physically active college women and men: Exploring an expanded acceptance model of intuitive eating.

    PubMed

    Tylka, Tracy L; Homan, Kristin J

    2015-09-01

    The acceptance model of intuitive eating posits that body acceptance by others facilitates body appreciation and internal body orientation, which contribute to intuitive eating. Two domains of exercise motives (functional and appearance) may also be linked to these variables, and thus were integrated into the model. The model fit the data well for 406 physically active U.S. college students, although some pathways were stronger for women. Body acceptance by others directly contributed to higher functional exercise motives and indirectly contributed to lower appearance exercise motives through higher internal body orientation. Functional exercise motives positively, and appearance exercise motives inversely, contributed to body appreciation. Whereas body appreciation positively, and appearance exercise motives inversely, contributed to intuitive eating for women, only the latter association was evident for men. To benefit positive body image and intuitive eating, efforts should encourage body acceptance by others and emphasize functional and de-emphasize appearance exercise motives. PMID:26281958

  15. Atomistic Method Applied to Computational Modeling of Surface Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Abel, Phillip B.

    2000-01-01

    The formation of surface alloys is a growing research field that, in terms of the surface structure of multicomponent systems, defines the frontier both for experimental and theoretical techniques. Because of the impact that the formation of surface alloys has on surface properties, researchers need reliable methods to predict new surface alloys and to help interpret unknown structures. The structure of surface alloys and when, and even if, they form are largely unpredictable from the known properties of the participating elements. No unified theory or model to date can infer surface alloy structures from the constituents properties or their bulk alloy characteristics. In spite of these severe limitations, a growing catalogue of such systems has been developed during the last decade, and only recently are global theories being advanced to fully understand the phenomenon. None of the methods used in other areas of surface science can properly model even the already known cases. Aware of these limitations, the Computational Materials Group at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field has developed a useful, computationally economical, and physically sound methodology to enable the systematic study of surface alloy formation in metals. This tool has been tested successfully on several known systems for which hard experimental evidence exists and has been used to predict ternary surface alloy formation (results to be published: Garces, J.E.; Bozzolo, G.; and Mosca, H.: Atomistic Modeling of Pd/Cu(100) Surface Alloy Formation. Surf. Sci., 2000 (in press); Mosca, H.; Garces J.E.; and Bozzolo, G.: Surface Ternary Alloys of (Cu,Au)/Ni(110). (Accepted for publication in Surf. Sci., 2000.); and Garces, J.E.; Bozzolo, G.; Mosca, H.; and Abel, P.: A New Approach for Atomistic Modeling of Pd/Cu(110) Surface Alloy Formation. (Submitted to Appl. Surf. Sci.)). Ternary alloy formation is a field yet to be fully explored experimentally. The computational tool, which is based on

  16. 3D-manufactured patient-specific models of congenital heart defects for communication in clinical practice: feasibility and acceptability

    PubMed Central

    Biglino, Giovanni; Capelli, Claudio; Wray, Jo; Schievano, Silvia; Leaver, Lindsay-Kay; Khambadkone, Sachin; Giardini, Alessandro; Derrick, Graham; Jones, Alexander; Taylor, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the communication potential of three-dimensional (3D) patient-specific models of congenital heart defects and their acceptability in clinical practice for cardiology consultations. Design This was a questionnaire-based study in which participants were randomised into two groups: the ‘model group’ received a 3D model of the cardiac lesion(s) being discussed during their appointment, while the ‘control group’ had a routine visit. Setting Outpatient clinic, cardiology follow-up visits. Participants 103 parents of children with congenital heart disease were recruited (parental age: 43±8 years; patient age: 12±6 years). In order to have a 3D model made, patients needed to have a recent cardiac MRI examination; this was the crucial inclusion criterion. Interventions Questionnaires were administered to the participants before and after the visits and an additional questionnaire was administered to the attending cardiologist. Main outcome measures Rating (1–10) for the liking of the 3D model, its usefulness and the clarity of the explanation received were recorded, as well as rating (1–10) of the parental understanding and their engagement according to the cardiologist. Furthermore, parental knowledge was assessed by asking them to mark diagrams, tick keywords and provide free text answers. The duration of consultations was recorded and parent feedback collected. Results Parents and cardiologists both found the models to be very useful and helpful in engaging the parents in discussing congenital heart defects. Parental knowledge was not associated with their level of education (p=0.2) and did not improve following their visit. Consultations involving 3D models lasted on average 5 min longer (p=0.02). Conclusions Patient-specific models can enhance engagement with parents and improve communication between cardiologists and parents, potentially impacting on parent and patient psychological adjustment following treatment. However, in

  17. A surface hydrology model for regional vector borne disease models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tompkins, Adrian; Asare, Ernest; Bomblies, Arne; Amekudzi, Leonard

    2016-04-01

    Small, sun-lit temporary pools that form during the rainy season are important breeding sites for many key mosquito vectors responsible for the transmission of malaria and other diseases. The representation of this surface hydrology in mathematical disease models is challenging, due to their small-scale, dependence on the terrain and the difficulty of setting soil parameters. Here we introduce a model that represents the temporal evolution of the aggregate statistics of breeding sites in a single pond fractional coverage parameter. The model is based on a simple, geometrical assumption concerning the terrain, and accounts for the processes of surface runoff, pond overflow, infiltration and evaporation. Soil moisture, soil properties and large-scale terrain slope are accounted for using a calibration parameter that sets the equivalent catchment fraction. The model is calibrated and then evaluated using in situ pond measurements in Ghana and ultra-high (10m) resolution explicit simulations for a village in Niger. Despite the model's simplicity, it is shown to reproduce the variability and mean of the pond aggregate water coverage well for both locations and validation techniques. Example malaria simulations for Uganda will be shown using this new scheme with a generic calibration setting, evaluated using district malaria case data. Possible methods for implementing regional calibration will be briefly discussed.

  18. Some aerodynamic considerations related to wind tunnel model surface definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloss, B. B.

    1980-01-01

    The aerodynamic considerations related to model surface definition are examined with particular emphasis in areas of fabrication tolerances, model surface finish, and orifice induced pressure errors. The effect of model surface roughness texture on skin friction is also discussed. It is shown that at a given Reynolds number, any roughness will produce no skin friction penalty.

  19. Regulatory acceptance of animal models of disease to support clinical trials of medicines and advanced therapy medicinal products.

    PubMed

    Cavagnaro, Joy; Silva Lima, Beatriz

    2015-07-15

    The utility of animal models of disease for assessing the safety of novel therapeutic modalities has become an increasingly important topic of discussion as research and development efforts focus on improving the predictive value of animal studies to support accelerated clinical development. Medicines are approved for marketing based upon a determination that their benefits outweigh foreseeable risks in specific indications, specific populations, and at specific dosages and regimens. No medicine is 100% safe. A medicine is less safe if the actual risks are greater than the predicted risks. The purpose of preclinical safety assessment is to understand the potential risks to aid clinical decision-making. Ideally preclinical studies should identify potential adverse effects and design clinical studies that will minimize their occurrence. Most regulatory documents delineate the utilization of conventional "normal" animal species to evaluate the safety risk of new medicines (i.e., new chemical entities and new biological entities). Animal models of human disease are commonly utilized to gain insight into the pathogenesis of disease and to evaluate efficacy but less frequently utilized in preclinical safety assessment. An understanding of the limitations of the animal disease models together with a better understanding of the disease and how toxicity may be impacted by the disease condition should allow for a better prediction of risk in the intended patient population. Importantly, regulatory authorities are becoming more willing to accept and even recommend data from experimental animal disease models that combine efficacy and safety to support clinical development.

  20. Regulatory acceptance of animal models of disease to support clinical trials of medicines and advanced therapy medicinal products.

    PubMed

    Cavagnaro, Joy; Silva Lima, Beatriz

    2015-07-15

    The utility of animal models of disease for assessing the safety of novel therapeutic modalities has become an increasingly important topic of discussion as research and development efforts focus on improving the predictive value of animal studies to support accelerated clinical development. Medicines are approved for marketing based upon a determination that their benefits outweigh foreseeable risks in specific indications, specific populations, and at specific dosages and regimens. No medicine is 100% safe. A medicine is less safe if the actual risks are greater than the predicted risks. The purpose of preclinical safety assessment is to understand the potential risks to aid clinical decision-making. Ideally preclinical studies should identify potential adverse effects and design clinical studies that will minimize their occurrence. Most regulatory documents delineate the utilization of conventional "normal" animal species to evaluate the safety risk of new medicines (i.e., new chemical entities and new biological entities). Animal models of human disease are commonly utilized to gain insight into the pathogenesis of disease and to evaluate efficacy but less frequently utilized in preclinical safety assessment. An understanding of the limitations of the animal disease models together with a better understanding of the disease and how toxicity may be impacted by the disease condition should allow for a better prediction of risk in the intended patient population. Importantly, regulatory authorities are becoming more willing to accept and even recommend data from experimental animal disease models that combine efficacy and safety to support clinical development. PMID:25814257

  1. Examining the Intention to Use Technology among Pre-Service Teachers: An Integration of the Technology Acceptance Model and Theory of Planned Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teo, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    This study examined pre-service teachers' self-reported intention to use technology. One hundred fifty-seven participants completed a survey questionnaire measuring their responses to six constructs from a research model that integrated the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) and Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). Structural equation modeling was…

  2. Particle-Surface Interaction Model and Method of Determining Particle-Surface Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, David W. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method and model of predicting particle-surface interactions with a surface, such as the surface of a spacecraft. The method includes the steps of: determining a trajectory path of a plurality of moving particles; predicting whether any of the moving particles will intersect a surface; predicting whether any of the particles will be captured by the surface and/or; predicting a reflected trajectory and velocity of particles reflected from the surface.

  3. Modeling nanoparticle optics and surface enhanced emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuford, Kevin L.

    2014-03-01

    This account focuses on using classical electrodynamics methods to model the optical properties of metal nanoparticles as well as the excitation dynamics of molecules interacting with them. We begin by reviewing several approaches being utilized currently to predict and interpret optical spectra and plasmonic phenomena. Results for various nanoparticles are presented to emphasize general concepts, extract trends, and correlate spectral features to specific plasmon modes. Next we show how coupling a molecule to a nanostructure can drastically alter the fluorescence. As an example, we present the emission characteristics of a molecule placed in the gap of a nanoparticle dimer. In contrast to the single nanosphere-molecule system, we find that the emission intensity undergoes a quenching effect only when the inter-nanoparticle gap distance of the dimer is very small, meaning that strong coupling prevails over energy engaged in the heating process unless the molecule is extremely close to the metal surface. These examples highlight the importance of accurately modeling the nanoparticle and understanding the interplay between system components in plasmonic applications.

  4. Factors That Influence the Acceptance of Telemetry by Emergency Medical Technicians in Ambulances: An Application of the Extended Technology Acceptance Model

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ji Young; Kim, Ki Young

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of the study was to verify the effects of patient factors perceived by emergency medical technicians (EMTs) as well as their social and organizational factors on prehospital telemetry use intention based on the technology use intention and elaboration likelihood models. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective empirical study. Questionnaires were developed on the basis of clinical factors of 72,907 patients assessed by prehospital telemetry from January 1, 2009 to April 30, 2012 by reviewing their prehospital medical care records and in-hospital medical records. Questionnaires regarding the social and organizational factors of EMTs were created on the basis of a literature review. To verify which factors affect the utilization of telemetry, we developed a partial least-squares route model on the basis of each characteristic. In total, 136 EMTs who had experience in using prehospital telemetry were surveyed from April 1 to April 7, 2013. Reliability, validity, hypotheses, and the model goodness of fit of the study tools were tested. Results: The clinical factors of the patients (path coefficient=−0.12; t=2.38), subjective norm (path coefficient=0.18; t=2.63), and job fit (path coefficient=0.45; t=5.29) positively affected the perceived usefulness (p<0.010). Meanwhile, the clinical factors of the patients (path coefficients=−0.19; t=4.46), subjective norm (path coefficient=0.08; t=1.97), loyalty incentives (path coefficient=−0.17; t=3.83), job fit (path coefficient=−0.32; t=7.06), organizational facilitations (path coefficient=0.08; t=1.99), and technical factors (i.e., usefulness and ease of use) positively affected attitudes (path coefficient=0.10, 0.58; t=2.62, 5.81; p<0.010). Attitudes and perceived usefulness significantly positively affected use intention. Conclusions: Factors that influence the use of telemetry by EMTs in ambulances included patients' clinical factors, as well as complex organizational and

  5. Analysis of the technology acceptance model in examining hospital nurses' behavioral intentions toward the use of bar code medication administration.

    PubMed

    Song, Lunar; Park, Byeonghwa; Oh, Kyeung Mi

    2015-04-01

    Serious medication errors continue to exist in hospitals, even though there is technology that could potentially eliminate them such as bar code medication administration. Little is known about the degree to which the culture of patient safety is associated with behavioral intention to use bar code medication administration. Based on the Technology Acceptance Model, this study evaluated the relationships among patient safety culture and perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, and behavioral intention to use bar code medication administration technology among nurses in hospitals. Cross-sectional surveys with a convenience sample of 163 nurses using bar code medication administration were conducted. Feedback and communication about errors had a positive impact in predicting perceived usefulness (β=.26, P<.01) and perceived ease of use (β=.22, P<.05). In a multiple regression model predicting for behavioral intention, age had a negative impact (β=-.17, P<.05); however, teamwork within hospital units (β=.20, P<.05) and perceived usefulness (β=.35, P<.01) both had a positive impact on behavioral intention. The overall bar code medication administration behavioral intention model explained 24% (P<.001) of the variance. Identified factors influencing bar code medication administration behavioral intention can help inform hospitals to develop tailored interventions for RNs to reduce medication administration errors and increase patient safety by using this technology.

  6. Inverse modeling of hydrologic parameters using surface flux and runoff observations in the Community Land Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Hou, Z.; Huang, M.; Tian, F.; Leung, L. R.

    2013-04-01

    This study demonstrates the possibility of inverting hydrologic parameters using surface flux and runoff observations in version 4 of the Community Land Model (CLM4). Previous studies showed that surface flux and runoff calculations are sensitive to major hydrologic parameters in CLM4 over different watersheds, and illustrated the necessity and possibility of parameter calibration. Two inversion strategies, the deterministic least-square fitting and stochastic Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) Bayesian inversion approaches, are evaluated by applying them to CLM4 at selected sites. The unknowns to be estimated include surface and subsurface runoff generation parameters and vadose zone soil water parameters. We find that using model parameters calibrated by the least-square fitting provides little improvements in the model simulations but the sampling-based stochastic inversion approaches are consistent - as more information comes in, the predictive intervals of the calibrated parameters become narrower and the misfits between the calculated and observed responses decrease. In general, parameters that are identified to be significant through sensitivity analyses and statistical tests are better calibrated than those with weak or nonlinear impacts on flux or runoff observations. Temporal resolution of observations has larger impacts on the results of inverse modeling using heat flux data than runoff data. Soil and vegetation cover have important impacts on parameter sensitivities, leading to different patterns of posterior distributions of parameters at different sites. Overall, the MCMC-Bayesian inversion approach effectively and reliably improves the simulation of CLM under different climates and environmental conditions. Bayesian model averaging of the posterior estimates with different reference acceptance probabilities can smooth the posterior distribution and provide more reliable parameter estimates, but at the expense of wider uncertainty bounds.

  7. A NEW LAND-SURFACE MODEL IN MM5

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has recently been a general realization that more sophisticated modeling of land-surface processes can be important for mesoscale meteorology models. Land-surface models (LSMs) have long been important components in global-scale climate models because of their more compl...

  8. Eigenstress model for electrochemistry of solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongxin; Xiong, Xilin; Gao, Panpan; Li, Xi; Yan, Yu; Volinsky, Alex A; Su, Yanjing

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamic analysis and molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to systematically study the size-dependent electrochemical response of solids. By combining the generalized Young-Laplace equation with the popular Butler-Volmer formulation, the direct influence of surface stress on solid film electrochemical reactions was isolated. A series of thermodynamic formulas were developed to describe the size-dependent electrochemical properties of the solid surface. These formulas include intrinsic surface elastic parameters, such as surface eigenstress and surface elastic modulus. Metallic films of Au, Pt, Ni, Cu and Fe were studied as examples. The anodic current density of the metal film increased, while the equilibrium potential decreased with increasing solid film thickness.

  9. Understanding Surface Adhesion in Nature: A Peeling Model

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhen; Li, Siheng; Zhang, Feilong

    2016-01-01

    Nature often exhibits various interesting and unique adhesive surfaces. The attempt to understand the natural adhesion phenomena can continuously guide the design of artificial adhesive surfaces by proposing simplified models of surface adhesion. Among those models, a peeling model can often effectively reflect the adhesive property between two surfaces during their attachment and detachment processes. In the context, this review summarizes the recent advances about the peeling model in understanding unique adhesive properties on natural and artificial surfaces. It mainly includes four parts: a brief introduction to natural surface adhesion, the theoretical basis and progress of the peeling model, application of the peeling model, and finally, conclusions. It is believed that this review is helpful to various fields, such as surface engineering, biomedicine, microelectronics, and so on. PMID:27812476

  10. Health research access to personal confidential data in England and Wales: assessing any gap in public attitude between preferable and acceptable models of consent.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark J; Taylor, Natasha

    2014-12-01

    England and Wales are moving toward a model of 'opt out' for use of personal confidential data in health research. Existing research does not make clear how acceptable this move is to the public. While people are typically supportive of health research, when asked to describe the ideal level of control there is a marked lack of consensus over the preferred model of consent (e.g. explicit consent, opt out etc.). This study sought to investigate a relatively unexplored difference between the consent model that people prefer and that which they are willing to accept. It also sought to explore any reasons for such acceptance.A mixed methods approach was used to gather data, incorporating a structured questionnaire and in-depth focus group discussions led by an external facilitator. The sampling strategy was designed to recruit people with different involvement in the NHS but typically with experience of NHS services. Three separate focus groups were carried out over three consecutive days.The central finding is that people are typically willing to accept models of consent other than that which they would prefer. Such acceptance is typically conditional upon a number of factors, including: security and confidentiality, no inappropriate commercialisation or detrimental use, transparency, independent overview, the ability to object to any processing considered to be inappropriate or particularly sensitive.This study suggests that most people would find research use without the possibility of objection to be unacceptable. However, the study also suggests that people who would prefer to be asked explicitly before data were used for purposes beyond direct care may be willing to accept an opt out model of consent if the reasons for not seeking explicit consent are accessible to them and they trust that data is only going to be used under conditions, and with safeguards, that they would consider to be acceptable even if not preferable.

  11. Testing a model for parental acceptance of human papillomavirus vaccine in 9- to 18-year-old girls: a theory-guided study.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Diane; O'Connell, Kathleen A

    2012-12-01

    Gardasil is the first vaccine developed to prevent cervical cancer and other diseases caused by certain types of genital human papillomavirus in females, but little is known about parental acceptance of this vaccine. The purpose of this study was to test a model that predicts intention to vaccinate that includes constructs from the health belief model and the theory of reasoned action.

  12. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Deposition on Model Environmental Surfaces

    EPA Science Inventory

    Deposition of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) on model environmental surfaces was investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Deposition behaviors of MWNTs on positively and negatively charged surfaces were in good agreement with Der...

  13. An interval model updating strategy using interval response surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Sheng-En; Zhang, Qiu-Hu; Ren, Wei-Xin

    2015-08-01

    Stochastic model updating provides an effective way of handling uncertainties existing in real-world structures. In general, probabilistic theories, fuzzy mathematics or interval analyses are involved in the solution of inverse problems. However in practice, probability distributions or membership functions of structural parameters are often unavailable due to insufficient information of a structure. At this moment an interval model updating procedure shows its superiority in the aspect of problem simplification since only the upper and lower bounds of parameters and responses are sought. To this end, this study develops a new concept of interval response surface models for the purpose of efficiently implementing the interval model updating procedure. The frequent interval overestimation due to the use of interval arithmetic can be maximally avoided leading to accurate estimation of parameter intervals. Meanwhile, the establishment of an interval inverse problem is highly simplified, accompanied by a saving of computational costs. By this means a relatively simple and cost-efficient interval updating process can be achieved. Lastly, the feasibility and reliability of the developed method have been verified against a numerical mass-spring system and also against a set of experimentally tested steel plates.

  14. Eigenstress model for electrochemistry of solid surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongxin; Xiong, Xilin; Gao, Panpan; Li, Xi; Yan, Yu; Volinsky, Alex A.; Su, Yanjing

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamic analysis and molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to systematically study the size-dependent electrochemical response of solids. By combining the generalized Young-Laplace equation with the popular Butler-Volmer formulation, the direct influence of surface stress on solid film electrochemical reactions was isolated. A series of thermodynamic formulas were developed to describe the size-dependent electrochemical properties of the solid surface. These formulas include intrinsic surface elastic parameters, such as surface eigenstress and surface elastic modulus. Metallic films of Au, Pt, Ni, Cu and Fe were studied as examples. The anodic current density of the metal film increased, while the equilibrium potential decreased with increasing solid film thickness. PMID:27256492

  15. Simulation of surface mine hydrology with the finite element storm hydrograph model

    SciTech Connect

    Smolen, M.D.; Younos, T.M.

    1980-12-01

    Use of a spatially responsive finite element model is demonstrated for simulating the hydrologic response of a reclaimed mountaintop removal operation near Beckley, West Virginia. The use of the Finite Element Storm Hydrograph Model (FESHM), developed at Virginia Tech, provides a means of incorporating spatially distributed characteristics of the watershed, thus preserving the natural configuration of overland and channel flow. The research consisted of a series of calibration studies using runoff plot data to estimate values for model parameters and reclaimed mine surface. The model verification consisted of a comparison of simulated and observed runoff characteristics using an ungaged concept. The model was found to predict runoff volume with acceptable accuracy. Peak runoff rate was generally under predicted. Poor performance of the model was noted for long duration, low intensity storm events. Use of the model to evaluate the effect of cover management for modification of hydrologic response was demonstrated.

  16. Acceptance and commitment therapy and contextual behavioral science: examining the progress of a distinctive model of behavioral and cognitive therapy.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Steven C; Levin, Michael E; Plumb-Vilardaga, Jennifer; Villatte, Jennifer L; Pistorello, Jacqueline

    2013-06-01

    A number of recent authors have compared acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and traditional cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). The present article describes ACT as a distinct and unified model of behavior change, linked to a specific strategy of scientific development, which we term "contextual behavioral science." We outline the empirical progress of ACT and describe its distinctive development strategy. A contextual behavioral science approach is an inductive attempt to build more adequate psychological systems based on philosophical clarity; the development of basic principles and theories; the development of applied theories linked to basic ones; techniques and components linked to these processes and principles; measurement of theoretically key processes; an emphasis on mediation and moderation in the analysis of applied impact; an interest in effectiveness, dissemination, and training; empirical testing of the research program across a broad range of areas and levels of analysis; and the creation of a more effective scientific and clinical community. We argue that this is a reasonable approach, focused on long-term progress, and that in broad terms it seems to be working. ACT is not hostile to traditional CBT, and is not directly buoyed by whatever weaknesses traditional CBT may have. ACT should be measured at least in part against its own goals as specified by its own developmental strategy.

  17. A study on solid modelling with surface trimming method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Ching-Yun; Chang, San-Cheng

    1993-07-01

    This paper proposes a Surface Trimming Method based on the intersection curves between free-form surfaces so that a complex solid model with several primitive surfaces can be constructed. These solid models will not only be used by the mechanical engineering industry to design and analyze conventional mechanical parts, but will also be used by the civil engineers to design and analyze structures of irregular shape. The scope of solid modelling application is thus enhanced.

  18. Assessing the ability of mechanistic volatilization models to simulate soil surface conditions: a study with the Volt'Air model.

    PubMed

    Garcia, L; Bedos, C; Génermont, S; Braud, I; Cellier, P

    2011-09-01

    Ammonia and pesticide volatilization in the field is a surface phenomenon involving physical and chemical processes that depend on the soil surface temperature and water content. The water transfer, heat transfer and energy budget sub models of volatilization models are adapted from the most commonly accepted formalisms and parameterizations. They are less detailed than the dedicated models describing water and heat transfers and surface status. The aim of this work was to assess the ability of one of the available mechanistic volatilization models, Volt'Air, to accurately describe the pedo-climatic conditions of a soil surface at the required time and space resolution. The assessment involves: (i) a sensitivity analysis, (ii) an evaluation of Volt'Air outputs in the light of outputs from a reference Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer model (SiSPAT) and three experimental datasets, and (iii) the study of three tests based on modifications of SiSPAT to establish the potential impact of the simplifying assumptions used in Volt'Air. The analysis confirmed that a 5 mm surface layer was well suited, and that Volt'Air surface temperature correlated well with the experimental measurements as well as with SiSPAT outputs. In terms of liquid water transfers, Volt'Air was overall consistent with SiSPAT, with discrepancies only during major rainfall events and dry weather conditions. The tests enabled us to identify the main source of the discrepancies between Volt'Air and SiSPAT: the lack of gaseous water transfer description in Volt'Air. They also helped to explain why neither Volt'Air nor SiSPAT was able to represent lower values of surface water content: current classical water retention and hydraulic conductivity models are not yet adapted to cases of very dry conditions. Given the outcomes of this study, we discuss to what extent the volatilization models can be improved and the questions they pose for current research in water transfer modeling and parameterization.

  19. Perceptions of a Specific Family Communication Application among Grandparents and Grandchildren: An Extension of the Technology Acceptance Model.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsai-Hsuan; Chang, Hsien-Tsung; Ho, Yi-Lun

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have noted that the use of social networks sites (SNSs) can enhance social interaction among the elderly and that the motivation for the elderly to use SNSs is to keep in contact with remote friends and family or the younger generation. Memotree is designed to promote intergenerational family communication. The system incorporates the Family Tree design concept and provides family communication mechanisms based on the Family Communication Scale. In addition, the system optimizes hardware and interface use to conform to the specific needs of older and substantially younger individuals. Regarding the impact of variables on SNS with respect to the interaction of usability variables in the construction of a cross-generational communication platform, we adopted the TAM model and Chung et al.'s suggestions to promote user acceptance of the proposed Memotree system. A total of 39 grandchildren and 39 grandparents met the criteria and were included in the study. The elderly and young respondents revealed substantial willingness to use and/or satisfaction with using the Memotree system. Empirical results indicate that technology affordances and perceived ease of use have a positive impact on perceived usefulness, while perceived ease of use is affected by technology affordances. Internet self-efficacy and perceived usefulness have a positive impact on the user's behavioral intention toward the system. In addition, this study investigated age as a moderating variable in the model. The results indicate that grandchildren have a larger significant effect on the path between perceived usefulness and behavioral intention than grandparents. This study proposes a more complete framework for investigating the user's behavioral intention and provides a more appropriate explanation of related services for cross-generational interaction with SNS services. PMID:27270915

  20. Perceptions of a Specific Family Communication Application among Grandparents and Grandchildren: An Extension of the Technology Acceptance Model

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsai-Hsuan; Chang, Hsien-Tsung; Ho, Yi-Lun

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have noted that the use of social networks sites (SNSs) can enhance social interaction among the elderly and that the motivation for the elderly to use SNSs is to keep in contact with remote friends and family or the younger generation. Memotree is designed to promote intergenerational family communication. The system incorporates the Family Tree design concept and provides family communication mechanisms based on the Family Communication Scale. In addition, the system optimizes hardware and interface use to conform to the specific needs of older and substantially younger individuals. Regarding the impact of variables on SNS with respect to the interaction of usability variables in the construction of a cross-generational communication platform, we adopted the TAM model and Chung et al.’s suggestions to promote user acceptance of the proposed Memotree system. A total of 39 grandchildren and 39 grandparents met the criteria and were included in the study. The elderly and young respondents revealed substantial willingness to use and/or satisfaction with using the Memotree system. Empirical results indicate that technology affordances and perceived ease of use have a positive impact on perceived usefulness, while perceived ease of use is affected by technology affordances. Internet self-efficacy and perceived usefulness have a positive impact on the user’s behavioral intention toward the system. In addition, this study investigated age as a moderating variable in the model. The results indicate that grandchildren have a larger significant effect on the path between perceived usefulness and behavioral intention than grandparents. This study proposes a more complete framework for investigating the user’s behavioral intention and provides a more appropriate explanation of related services for cross-generational interaction with SNS services. PMID:27270915

  1. Perceptions of a Specific Family Communication Application among Grandparents and Grandchildren: An Extension of the Technology Acceptance Model.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsai-Hsuan; Chang, Hsien-Tsung; Ho, Yi-Lun

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have noted that the use of social networks sites (SNSs) can enhance social interaction among the elderly and that the motivation for the elderly to use SNSs is to keep in contact with remote friends and family or the younger generation. Memotree is designed to promote intergenerational family communication. The system incorporates the Family Tree design concept and provides family communication mechanisms based on the Family Communication Scale. In addition, the system optimizes hardware and interface use to conform to the specific needs of older and substantially younger individuals. Regarding the impact of variables on SNS with respect to the interaction of usability variables in the construction of a cross-generational communication platform, we adopted the TAM model and Chung et al.'s suggestions to promote user acceptance of the proposed Memotree system. A total of 39 grandchildren and 39 grandparents met the criteria and were included in the study. The elderly and young respondents revealed substantial willingness to use and/or satisfaction with using the Memotree system. Empirical results indicate that technology affordances and perceived ease of use have a positive impact on perceived usefulness, while perceived ease of use is affected by technology affordances. Internet self-efficacy and perceived usefulness have a positive impact on the user's behavioral intention toward the system. In addition, this study investigated age as a moderating variable in the model. The results indicate that grandchildren have a larger significant effect on the path between perceived usefulness and behavioral intention than grandparents. This study proposes a more complete framework for investigating the user's behavioral intention and provides a more appropriate explanation of related services for cross-generational interaction with SNS services.

  2. Model-dependent electronic structure of the Si(111)2×1 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-Hoon; Kang, Myung-Ho

    1996-07-01

    We have used the pseudopotential density-functional total-energy scheme to study the atomic and electronic structure of the Si(111)2×1 surface: we examine and compare in detail both the standard Pandey's π-bonded chain (PC) model and the alternative three-bond scission (TBS) model including their variations. We find that while the PC model is acceptable both in energetics and in spectroscopic examination, the TBS model is energetically unfavored (0.25 eV/surface-atom higher in energy than the PC model) and does not agree in band structure with experiments. This differs from the result of the recent Hartree-Fock cluster calculations where the TBS model produces the experimental band structure. We also find that the reverse-buckled PC model is as favored in energetics as the PC model, and its band structure is also compared well with experiments. The physical relevance of the reverse-buckled PC model and the TBS model is discussed in connection with some unresolved questions concerning this surface.

  3. Modeling stray light from rough surfaces and subsurface scatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, James E.; Goshy, John J.; Pfisterer, Richard N.

    2014-09-01

    Over the years we have developed an adequate theory and understanding of surface scatter from smooth optical surfaces (Rayleigh-Rice), moderately rough surfaces with paraxial incident and scattered angles (Beckmann- Kirchhoff) and even for moderately rough surfaces with arbitrary incident and scattered angles where a linear systems formulation requiring a two-parameter family of surface transfer functions is required to characterize the surface scatter process (generalized Harvey-Shack). However, there is always some new material or surface manufacturing process that provides non-intuitive scatter behavior. The linear systems formulation of surface scatter is potentially useful even for these situations. In this paper we will present empirical models of several classes of rough surfaces or materials (subsurface scatter) that allow us to accurately model the scattering behavior at any incident angle from limited measured scatter data. In particular, scattered radiance appears to continue being the natural quantity that exhibits simple, elegant behavior only in direction cosine space.

  4. Modeling of migrating grains on asteroid's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Baoyin, Hexi

    2015-01-01

    We present a numerical method based on the polyhedral data of asteroid shape for simulation of individual grain's dynamics around the asteroid surface, with application to migration of regolith material on specific asteroid. Surface gravitational attraction and potential are computed using polyhedral method with a correction on possible singularities; asteroid surface is approximated with continuous quartic Bézier patches based on the division of polyhedral mesh, which provides sufficient geometrical information for the simulation. Orbital motion and surface motion are processed separately by checking if the particle touches or leaves the surface. Collisions are treated as instantaneous point-contact events with the local quartic curved surface. The subpoint is recorded throughout the process to track the ID of the particle. We provide full description of this method including very detailed treatments in numeric. Several basic tests are conducted to examine the performance of this method, and the potential application of this method is also discussed. The test results of seismic regolith migration on crater walls show consistent conclusions with former investigation.

  5. Multiwalled carbon nanotube deposition on model environmental surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiaojun; Bouchard, Dermont C

    2013-09-17

    Deposition of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) on model environmental surfaces was investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Deposition behaviors of MWNTs on positively and negatively charged surfaces were in good agreement with Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, although hydrophobic interactions dominated MWNTs deposition on a hydrophobic polystyrene surface. Initial deposition rates (rf) and deposition attachment efficiencies (αD) depended on solution ionic strengths (IS) and surface electrostatic properties. Identical rf and αD values at constant IS on similar surfaces suggested that deposition was insensitive to surface morphology (i.e., bare crystal surface vs coated surface). The dissipation unit (D) was used with frequency (f) to investigate nanoparticle deposition: |ΔD/Δf| values varied for deposition on different surfaces, indicating that the nature of MWNT association with surfaces varied despite constant rf and αD values.

  6. Revisit of the Global Surface Energy Balance Using the MEP Model of Surface Heat Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Y.; Wang, J.; Park, T. W.; Ming, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The recently proposed model of surface heat fluxes, based on the theory of maximum entropy production (MEP), was used to estimate the global evapotranspiration (ET) and heat fluxes. Compared to bulk transfer models, the MEP model has several remote-sensing-friendly features including fewer input variables, automatic closure of surface energy budget, being independent of bulk gradients of temperature and water vapor, not using wind speed and surface roughness as model parameters, and being less sensitive to uncertainties of input variables and model parameters. The MEP model is formulated for the entire range of soil moisture from dryness to saturation over the land surfaces and has even more advantages over water-snow-ice surfaces compared to traditional methods due to its independence of surface humidity data. The MEP model provides the first global maps of water heat fluxes at ocean surfaces as well as conductive heat fluxes at snow/ice covered polar regions. Ten years of Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) earth surface radiation fluxes, surface temperature data products supplemented (when needed) by the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) surface specific humidity data are used to test the MEP model by comparing the MEP based global annual ET and heat fluxes with existing products. The MEP based fluxes over land surfaces agree closely with previous studies. Over the oceans, the MEP modeled ET tends to be lower than previous estimates while those of sensible heat fluxes are in close agreement with previous studies. A counterpart, "off-line" analysis is also carried out using the NOAA GFDL climate model output from a control experiment and a "warming" experiment. Substantial differences in the warming-related changes of ET and Bowen ratio are found over regions such as North Africa and the southwestern U.S. The implications of these differences for understanding trends and variability in regional energy and

  7. Modelling Catalyst Surfaces Using DFT Cluster Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Czekaj, Izabela; Wambach, Jörg; Kröcher, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    We review our recent theoretical DFT cluster studies of a variety of industrially relevant catalysts such as TiO2, γ-Al2O3, V2O5-WO3-TiO2 and Ni/Al2O3. Aspects of the metal oxide surface structure and the stability and structure of metal clusters on the support are discussed as well as the reactivity of surfaces, including their behaviour upon poisoning. It is exemplarily demonstrated how such theoretical considerations can be combined with DRIFT and XPS results from experimental studies. PMID:20057947

  8. Modelling catalyst surfaces using DFT cluster calculations.

    PubMed

    Czekaj, Izabela; Wambach, Jörg; Kröcher, Oliver

    2009-11-20

    We review our recent theoretical DFT cluster studies of a variety of industrially relevant catalysts such as TiO(2), gamma-Al(2)O(3), V(2)O(5)-WO(3)-TiO(2) and Ni/Al(2)O(3). Aspects of the metal oxide surface structure and the stability and structure of metal clusters on the support are discussed as well as the reactivity of surfaces, including their behaviour upon poisoning. It is exemplarily demonstrated how such theoretical considerations can be combined with DRIFT and XPS results from experimental studies.

  9. Estimating long-term surface hydrological components by coupling remote sensing observation with surface flux model.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.; Wesely, M. L.

    2002-05-02

    A model framework for parameterized subgrid-scale surface fluxes (PASS) has been applied to use satellite data, models, and routine surface observations to infer root-zone available moisture content and evapotranspiration rate with moderate spatial resolution within Walnut River Watershed in Kansas. Biweekly composite normalized difference vegetative index (NDVI) data are derived from observations by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites. Local surface observations provide data on downwelling solar irradiance, air temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed. Surface parameters including roughness length, albedo, surface water conductance, and the ratio of soil heat flux to net radiation are estimated; pixel-specific near-surface meteorological conditions such as air temperature, vapor pressure, and wind speed are adjusted according to local surface forcing. The PASS modeling system makes effective use of satellite data and can be run for large areas for which flux data do not exist and surface meteorological data are available from only a limited number of ground stations. The long-term surface hydrological budget is evaluated using radar-derived precipitation estimates, surface meteorological observations, and satellite data. The modeled hydrological components in the Walnut River Watershed compare well with stream gauge data and observed surface fluxes during 1999.

  10. Digital Elevation Models of the Lunar Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, A. C.; Robinson, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    Several digital elevation models (DEMs) have been produced at a scale of 1km/pixel and covering approximately one-fifth of the lunar surface. These were produced mostly by semiautomatically matching the stereo available between Clementine UV/VIS images, although some localized DEMs have been produced by applying this technique to Apollo Metric stereo pairs, or by digitizing an existing Apollo Metric contour map. The DEMS that result from Clementine UV/VIS images, although Of Poorer height accuracy (1300-600 in for a single matched point) than the Clementine laser altimeter point measurements (<+/-100 m), do provide considerably higher spatial resolution (e.g., every kilometer vs. every tens of kilometers) and allow topography in the polar regions to be determined. Nadir-pointing Clementine UV-VIS stereo pairs are automatically stereo matched using a patch-based matcher and fed through A stereo intersection camera model to yield a digital terrain model (DTM) of longitude, latitude, and height points. The DTM for each stereo pair is then replotted and interpolated to form map-projected DEM tiles. The DEM files can then be fitted to absolute height laser altimeter points, or iteratively to each other, to form a DEM mosaic. Uncertainties in UV-VIS camera pointing and the need to accumulate a sufficiently good topographic S/N ratio necessitates the use of 1 km pixels for the UV-VIS derived DEMs. For Apollo Metric stereo, an internal camera geometry correction and a full photogrammetric block adjustment must be performed using ground- control points to derive a DEM. The image scale of Apollo Metric, as well as the stereo angle, allow for a DEM with 100 m pixels and a height accuracy of +/- 25m. Apollo Metric imagery had previously been used to derive contour maps for much of the lunar equatorial regions; however, to recover this information in digital form these maps must be digitized. Most of the mare areas mapped contain noticeable topographic noise. This results from

  11. Towards a Revised Monte Carlo Neutral Particle Surface Interaction Model

    SciTech Connect

    D.P. Stotler

    2005-06-09

    The components of the neutral- and plasma-surface interaction model used in the Monte Carlo neutral transport code DEGAS 2 are reviewed. The idealized surfaces and processes handled by that model are inadequate for accurately simulating neutral transport behavior in present day and future fusion devices. We identify some of the physical processes missing from the model, such as mixed materials and implanted hydrogen, and make some suggestions for improving the model.

  12. A Path Analysis of Pre-Service Teachers' Attitudes to Computer Use: Applying and Extending the Technology Acceptance Model in an Educational Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teo, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine pre-service teachers' attitudes to computers. This study extends the technology acceptance model (TAM) framework by adding subjective norm, facilitating conditions, and technological complexity as external variables. Results show that the TAM and subjective norm, facilitating conditions, and technological…

  13. Analysis of Utility and Use of a Web-Based Tool for Digital Signal Processing Teaching by Means of a Technological Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toral, S. L.; Barrero, F.; Martinez-Torres, M. R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an exploratory study about the development of a structural and measurement model for the technological acceptance (TAM) of a web-based educational tool. The aim consists of measuring not only the use of this tool, but also the external variables with a significant influence in its use for planning future improvements. The tool,…

  14. Modeling the Interrelationships among Pre-Service Science Teachers' Understanding and Acceptance of Evolution, Their Views on Nature of Science and Self-Efficacy Beliefs regarding Teaching Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akyol, Gulsum; Tekkaya, Ceren; Sungur, Semra; Traynor, Anne

    2012-01-01

    This study proposed a path model of relationships among understanding and acceptance of evolution, views on nature of science, and self-efficacy beliefs regarding teaching evolution. A total of 415 pre-service science teachers completed a series of self-report instruments for the specified purpose. After the estimation of scale scores using…

  15. Assessing the Intention to Use Technology among Pre-Service Teachers in Singapore and Malaysia: A Multigroup Invariance Analysis of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teo, Timothy; Lee, Chwee Beng; Chai, Ching Sing; Wong, Su Luan

    2009-01-01

    This study assesses the pre-service teachers' self-reported future intentions to use technology in Singapore and Malaysia. A survey was employed to validate items from past research. Using the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) as a research framework, 495 pre-service teachers from Singapore and Malaysia responded to an 11-item questionnaires…

  16. Exploring Attitudes towards Computer Use among Pre-Service Teachers from Singapore and the UK: A Multi-Group Invariance Test of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teo, Timothy; Noyes, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to compare the pre-service teachers from Singapore and the UK on their self-reported attitude towards computer use (ATCU) by employing the technology acceptance model (TAM) as the research framework. Design/methodology/approach: In total, 395 pre-service teachers completed a survey questionnaire measuring their responses…

  17. Mathematical Modeling of Surface Roughness of Castings Produced Using ZCast Direct Metal Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhabra, M.; Singh, R.

    2015-04-01

    Aim of this investigation is to develop a mathematical model for predicting surface roughness of castings produced using ZCast process by employing Buckingham's π-theorem. A relationship has been proposed between surface roughness of castings and shell wall thickness of the shell moulds fabricated using 3D printer. Based on model, experiments were performed to obtain the surface roughness of aluminium, brass and copper castings produced using ZCast process based on 3D printing technique. Based on experimental data, three best fitted third-degree polynomial equations have been established for predicting the surface roughness of castings. The predicted surface roughness values were then calculated using established best fitted equations. An error analysis was performed to compare the experimental and predicted data. The average prediction errors obtained for aluminium, brass and copper castings are 10.6, 2.43 and 3.12 % respectively. The obtained average surface roughness (experimental and predicted) values of castings produced are acceptable with the sand cast surface roughness values range (6.25-25 µm).

  18. Surface Flux Modeling for Air Quality Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    For many gasses and aerosols, dry deposition is an important sink of atmospheric mass. Dry deposition fluxes are also important sources of pollutants to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The surface fluxes of some gases, such as ammonia, mercury, and certain volatile organic c...

  19. A Revised Force Restore Model for Land Surface Modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Diandong; Xue, Ming

    2004-11-01

    To clarify the definition of the equation for the temperature toward which the soil skin temperature is restored, the prediction equations in the commonly used force restore model for soil temperature are rederived from the heat conduction equation. The derivation led to a deep-layer temperature, commonly denoted T2, that is defined as the soil temperature at depth πd plus a transient term, where d is the e-folding damping depth of soil temperature diurnal oscillations. The corresponding prediction equation for T2 has the same form as the commonly used one except for an additional term involving the lapse rate of the “seasonal mean” soil temperature and the damping depth d. A term involving the same also appears in the skin temperature prediction equation, which also includes a transient term. In the literature, T2 was initially defined as the short-term (over several days) mean of the skin temperature, but in practice it is often used as the deep-layer temperature. Such inconsistent use can lead to drift in T2 prediction over a several-day period, as is documented in this paper. When T2 is properly defined and initialized, large drift in T2 prediction is avoided and the surface temperature prediction is usually improved. This is confirmed by four sets of experiments, each for a period during each season of 2000, that are initialized using and verified against measurements of the Oklahoma Atmospheric Surface-Layer Instrumentation System (OASIS) project.


  20. Extended model of geometrical surface splitting in Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Dubi, A.; Dudziak, D.J.

    1983-04-01

    An analytic expression was derived for the second moment and average time of a model of geometrical splitting. Two limitations (among others) of the analyzed model were that particles were allowed to split only once on each surface and no Russian Roulette was applied on particles crossing a surface ''backward.'' Those serious limitations are removed.

  1. Wind tunnel model surface gauge for measuring roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorburger, T. V.; Gilsinn, D. E.; Teague, E. C.; Giauque, C. H. W.; Scire, F. E.; Cao, L. X.

    1987-01-01

    The optical inspection of surface roughness research has proceeded along two different lines. First, research into a quantitative understanding of light scattering from metal surfaces and into the appropriate models to describe the surfaces themselves. Second, the development of a practical instrument for the measurement of rms roughness of high performance wind tunnel models with smooth finishes. The research is summarized, with emphasis on the second avenue of research.

  2. Modeling Wet Chemical Etching of Surface Flaws on Fused Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M D; Suratwala, T I; Wong, L L; Steele, W A; Miller, P E; Bude, J D

    2009-10-28

    Fluoride-based wet chemical etching of fused silica optical components is useful to open up surface fractures for diagnostic purposes, to create surface topology, and as a possible mitigation technique to remove damaged material. To optimize the usefulness of etching , it is important to understand how the morphology of etched features changes as a function of the amount of material removed. In this study, we present two geometric etch models that describe the surface topology evolution as a function of the amount etched. The first model, referred to as the finite-difference etch model, represents the surface as an array of points in space where at each time-step the points move normal to the local surface. The second model, referred to as the surface area-volume model, more globally describes the surface evolution relating the volume of material removed to the exposed surface area. These etch models predict growth and coalescence of surface fractures such as those observed on scratches and ground surfaces. For typical surface fractures, simulations show that the transverse growth of the cracks at long etch times scales with the square root of etch time or the net material removed in agreement with experiment. The finite-difference etch model has also been applied to more complex structures such as the etching of a CO{sub 2} laser-mitigated laser damage site. The results indicate that etching has little effect on the initial morphology of this site implying little change in downstream scatter and modulation characteristics upon exposure to subsequent high fluence laser light. In the second part of the study, the geometric etch model is expanded to include fluid dynamics and mass transport. This later model serves as a foundation for understanding related processes such as the possibility of redeposition of etch reaction products during the etching, rinsing or drying processes.

  3. Wetland methane modelling over the Scandinavian Arctic: Performance of current land-surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayman, Garry; Quiquet, Aurélien; Gedney, Nicola; Clark, Douglas; Friend, Andrew; George, Charles; Prigent, Catherine

    2014-05-01

    Wetlands are generally accepted as being the largest, but least well quantified, single natural source of CH4, with global emission estimates ranging from 100-231 Tg yr-1 [1] and for which the Boreal and Arctic regions make a significant contribution [2, 3]. The recent review by Melton et al. [4] has provided a summary of the current state of knowledge on the modelling of wetlands and the outcome of the WETCHIMP model intercomparison exercise. Melton et al. found a large variation in the wetland areas and associated methane emissions from the participating models and varying responses to climate change. In this paper, we report results from offline runs of two land surface models over Scandinavia (JULES, the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator [5, 6] and HYBRID8 [7]), using the same driving meteorological dataset (CRU-NCEP) for the period from January 1980 to December 2010. Although the two land surface models are very different, both models have used a TOPMODEL approach to derive the wetland area and have similar parameterisations of the methane wetland emissions. We find that both models give broadly similar results. They underestimate the wetland areas over Northern Scandinavia, compared to remote sensing and map-based datasets of wetlands [8]. This leads to lower predicted methane emissions compared to those observed on the ground and from aircraft [9]. We will present these findings and identify possible reasons for the underprediction. We will show the sensitivity to using the observed wetland areas to improve the methane emission estimates. References [1] Denman, K., et al.,: Couplings Between Changes in the Climate System and Biogeochemistry, In Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis, Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Cambridge University Press, United Kingdom, 2007; [2] Smith, L. C., et al.: Siberian peatlands a net carbon sink and global methane source since the early

  4. Microcavity-array superhydrophobic surfaces: Limits of the model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvadori, M. C.; Oliveira, M. R. S.; Spirin, R.; Teixeira, F. S.; Cattani, M.; Brown, I. G.

    2013-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces formed of microcavities can be designed with specific desired advancing and receding contact angles using a new model described by us in prior work. Here, we discuss the limits of validity of the model, and explore the application of the model to surfaces fabricated with small cavities of radius 250 nm and with large cavities of radius 40 μm. The Wenzel model is discussed and used to calculate the advancing and receding contact angles for samples for which our model cannot be applied. We also consider the case of immersion of a sample containing microcavities in pressurized water. A consideration that then arises is that the air inside the cavities can be dissolved in the water, leading to complete water invasion into the cavities and compromising the superhydrophobic character of the surface. Here, we show that this effect does not destroy the surface hydrophobia when the surface is subsequently removed from the water.

  5. Predictive model for ice formation on superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bahadur, Vaibhav; Mishchenko, Lidiya; Hatton, Benjamin; Taylor, J Ashley; Aizenberg, Joanna; Krupenkin, Tom

    2011-12-01

    The prevention and control of ice accumulation has important applications in aviation, building construction, and energy conversion devices. One area of active research concerns the use of superhydrophobic surfaces for preventing ice formation. The present work develops a physics-based modeling framework to predict ice formation on cooled superhydrophobic surfaces resulting from the impact of supercooled water droplets. This modeling approach analyzes the multiple phenomena influencing ice formation on superhydrophobic surfaces through the development of submodels describing droplet impact dynamics, heat transfer, and heterogeneous ice nucleation. These models are then integrated together to achieve a comprehensive understanding of ice formation upon impact of liquid droplets at freezing conditions. The accuracy of this model is validated by its successful prediction of the experimental findings that demonstrate that superhydrophobic surfaces can fully prevent the freezing of impacting water droplets down to surface temperatures of as low as -20 to -25 °C. The model can be used to study the influence of surface morphology, surface chemistry, and fluid and thermal properties on dynamic ice formation and identify parameters critical to achieving icephobic surfaces. The framework of the present work is the first detailed modeling tool developed for the design and analysis of surfaces for various ice prevention/reduction strategies. PMID:21899285

  6. Field calibration of surface: a model of agricultural chemicals in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, D I

    1990-10-01

    Agricultural chemicals sporadically occur at detectable levels in the surface waters of intensively farmed watersheds. HSPF, a previously released model of agricultural chemicals in surface water, had been used to predict concentrations which were much higher (10 X) than those actually observed during monitoring studies. A new model, SURFACE, is described here which is much simpler than HSPF and gives better predictions of surface water concentrations. SURFACE uses PRZM, an EPA model, to calculate edge-of-field runoff losses and simple hydraulic routing algorithms to determine concentrations at the bottom of large river basins. In water systems sampled during 1985 and 1986, SURFACE predictions of annualized mean concentrations for alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine and metolachlor were within 0.09 ppb half of the time.

  7. Re-examining the role of attitude in information system acceptance: a model from the satisfaction-dissatisfaction perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bin; Zhou, Shasha

    2016-05-01

    This study attempts to re-examine the role of attitude in voluntary information system (IS) acceptance and usage, which has often been discounted in the previous technology acceptance research. We extend the unidimensional view of attitude into a bidimensional one, because of the simultaneous existence of both positive and negative evaluation towards IS in technology acceptance behaviour. In doing so, attitude construct is divided into two components: satisfaction as the positive attitudinal component and dissatisfaction as the negative attitudinal component. We argue that satisfaction and dissatisfaction will interactively affect technology usage intention. Besides, we explore the predictors of satisfaction and dissatisfaction based on the disconfirmation theory. Empirical results from a longitudinal study on bulletin board system (BBS) usage confirm the interaction effect of satisfaction and dissatisfaction on usage intention. Moreover, perceived task-related value has a significant effect on satisfaction, while perceived personal value has a significant effect on dissatisfaction. We also discuss the theoretical and managerial implications of our findings.

  8. A statistical model for landfill surface emissions.

    PubMed

    Héroux, Martin; Guy, Christophe; Millette, Denis

    2010-02-01

    Landfill operators require a rapid, simple, low-cost, and accurate method for estimation of landfill methane surface emissions over time. Several methods have been developed to obtain instantaneous field measurements of landfill methane surface emissions. This paper provides a methodology for interpolating instantaneous measurements over time, taking variations in meteorological conditions into account. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of three factors on landfill methane surface emissions: air temperature, pressure gradient between waste and atmosphere, and soil moisture content of the cover material. On the basis of a statistical three-factor and two-level full factorial design, field measurements of methane emissions were conducted at the City of Montreal landfill site during the summer of 2004. Three areas were measured: test area 1 (4800 m2), test area 2 (1400 m2), and test area 3 (1000 m2). Analyses of variance were performed on the data. They showed a significant statistical effect of the three factors and the interaction between temperature and soil moisture content on methane emissions. Analysis also led to the development of a multifactor correlation, which can be explained by the underlying processes of diffusive and advective flow and biological oxidation. This correlation was used to estimate total emissions of the three test areas for July and August 2004. The approach was validated using a second dataset for another area adjacent to the landfill. PMID:20222535

  9. A statistical model for landfill surface emissions.

    PubMed

    Héroux, Martin; Guy, Christophe; Millette, Denis

    2010-02-01

    Landfill operators require a rapid, simple, low-cost, and accurate method for estimation of landfill methane surface emissions over time. Several methods have been developed to obtain instantaneous field measurements of landfill methane surface emissions. This paper provides a methodology for interpolating instantaneous measurements over time, taking variations in meteorological conditions into account. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of three factors on landfill methane surface emissions: air temperature, pressure gradient between waste and atmosphere, and soil moisture content of the cover material. On the basis of a statistical three-factor and two-level full factorial design, field measurements of methane emissions were conducted at the City of Montreal landfill site during the summer of 2004. Three areas were measured: test area 1 (4800 m2), test area 2 (1400 m2), and test area 3 (1000 m2). Analyses of variance were performed on the data. They showed a significant statistical effect of the three factors and the interaction between temperature and soil moisture content on methane emissions. Analysis also led to the development of a multifactor correlation, which can be explained by the underlying processes of diffusive and advective flow and biological oxidation. This correlation was used to estimate total emissions of the three test areas for July and August 2004. The approach was validated using a second dataset for another area adjacent to the landfill.

  10. Application of a simple cerebellar model to geologic surface mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagens, A.; Doveton, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    Neurophysiological research into the structure and function of the cerebellum has inspired computational models that simulate information processing associated with coordination and motor movement. The cerebellar model arithmetic computer (CMAC) has a design structure which makes it readily applicable as an automated mapping device that "senses" a surface, based on a sample of discrete observations of surface elevation. The model operates as an iterative learning process, where cell weights are continuously modified by feedback to improve surface representation. The storage requirements are substantially less than those of a conventional memory allocation, and the model is extended easily to mapping in multidimensional space, where the memory savings are even greater. ?? 1991.

  11. BML model on non-orientable surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cámpora, Daniel; de la Torre, Jaime; García Vázquez, Juan Carlos; Caparrini, Fernando Sancho

    2010-08-01

    Two-dimensional Biham-Middleton-Levine traffic model on a N×N square lattice embedded on a Klein bottle and a projective plane is investigated by computer simulations. The behavior of the model with these boundary conditions is compared with the model under toroidal boundary conditions. Our numerical results show that the phase diagram depends strongly on the underlying topology. We also investigate the influence of the ratio between the number of red and blue particles has over the speed of the system and conclude that the projective plane case differs considerably from the other cases reviewed here.

  12. Accuracy of functional surfaces on comparatively modeled protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jieling; Dundas, Joe; Kachalo, Sema; Ouyang, Zheng; Liang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Identification and characterization of protein functional surfaces are important for predicting protein function, understanding enzyme mechanism, and docking small compounds to proteins. As the rapid speed of accumulation of protein sequence information far exceeds that of structures, constructing accurate models of protein functional surfaces and identify their key elements become increasingly important. A promising approach is to build comparative models from sequences using known structural templates such as those obtained from structural genome projects. Here we assess how well this approach works in modeling binding surfaces. By systematically building three-dimensional comparative models of proteins using Modeller, we determine how well functional surfaces can be accurately reproduced. We use an alpha shape based pocket algorithm to compute all pockets on the modeled structures, and conduct a large-scale computation of similarity measurements (pocket RMSD and fraction of functional atoms captured) for 26,590 modeled enzyme protein structures. Overall, we find that when the sequence fragment of the binding surfaces has more than 45% identity to that of the tempalte protein, the modeled surfaces have on average an RMSD of 0.5 Å, and contain 48% or more of the binding surface atoms, with nearly all of the important atoms in the signatures of binding pockets captured. PMID:21541664

  13. On comparison of modeled surface flux variations to aircraft observations.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.; Wesely, M. L.; Environmental Research; Northern Illinois Univ.

    2003-07-30

    Evaluation of models of air-surface exchange is facilitated by an accurate match of areas simulated with those seen by micrometeorological flux measurements. Here, spatial variations in fluxes estimated with the parameterized subgrid-scale surface (PASS) flux model were compared to flux variations seen aboard aircraft above the Walnut River Watershed (WRW) in Kansas. Despite interference by atmospheric eddies, the areas where the modeled sensible and latent heat fluxes were most highly correlated with the aircraft flux estimates were upwind of the flight segments. To assess whether applying a footprint function to the surface values would improve the model evaluation, a two-dimensional correlation distribution was used to identify the locations and relative importance of contributing modeled surface pixels upwind of each segment of the flight path. The agreement between modeled surface fluxes and aircraft measurements was improved when upwind fluxes were weighted with an optimized footprint parameter {var_phi}, which can be estimated from wind profiler data and surface eddy covariance. Variations of the flight-observed flux were consistently greater than those modeled at the surface, perhaps because of the smoothing effect of using 1 km pixels in the model. In addition, limited flight legs prevented sufficient filtering of the effects of atmospheric convection, possibly accounting for some of the more prominent changes in fluxes measured along the flight paths.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF A LAND-SURFACE MODEL PART I: APPLICATION IN A MESOSCALE METEOROLOGY MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Parameterization of land-surface processes and consideration of surface inhomogeneities are very important to mesoscale meteorological modeling applications, especially those that provide information for air quality modeling. To provide crucial, reliable information on the diurn...

  15. Learner Differences in Perceived Satisfaction of an Online Learning: An Extension to the Technology Acceptance Model in an Arabic Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Azawei, Ahmed; Lundqvist, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Online learning constitutes the most popular distance-learning method, with flexibility, accessibility, visibility, manageability and availability as its core features. However, current research indicates that its efficacy is not consistent across all learners. This study aimed to modify and extend the factors of the Technology Acceptance Model…

  16. Personal Learning Environments Acceptance Model: The Role of Need for Cognition, e-Learning Satisfaction and Students' Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    del Barrio-García, Salvador; Arquero, José L.; Romero-Frías, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    As long as students use Web 2.0 tools extensively for social purposes, there is an opportunity to improve students' engagement in Higher Education by using these tools for academic purposes under a Personal Learning Environment approach (PLE 2.0). The success of these attempts depends upon the reactions and acceptance of users towards e-learning…

  17. A Model of Acceptance of Web 2.0 in Learning in Higher Education: A Case Study of Two Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usoro, Abel; Echeng, Razep; Majewski, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Though a few empirical studies on acceptance of Web 2.0 as a social networking tool in teaching and learning exist, apparently none consider students' and faculties' views from different cultures, which is the focus of this study. This article reports on a pilot study that begins to fill this gap by investigating the perceptions,…

  18. E-Learning and the University of Huelva: A Study of WebCT and the Technological Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, R. Arteaga; Hueros, A. Duarte; Ordaz, M. Garcia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors that determine the acceptance of the WebCT learning system among students of the faculties of Business and Education Sciences at the University of Huelva, and to verify the direct and indirect effects of these factors. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 226 students at the…

  19. Software Surface Modeling and Grid Generation Steering Committee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert E. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    It is a NASA objective to promote improvements in the capability and efficiency of computational fluid dynamics. Grid generation, the creation of a discrete representation of the solution domain, is an essential part of computational fluid dynamics. However, grid generation about complex boundaries requires sophisticated surface-model descriptions of the boundaries. The surface modeling and the associated computation of surface grids consume an extremely large percentage of the total time required for volume grid generation. Efficient and user friendly software systems for surface modeling and grid generation are critical for computational fluid dynamics to reach its potential. The papers presented here represent the state-of-the-art in software systems for surface modeling and grid generation. Several papers describe improved techniques for grid generation.

  20. Digital terrain modelling and industrial surface metrology - Converging crafts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pike, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    Quantitative characterisation of surface form, increasingly from digital 3-D height data, is cross-disciplinary and can be applied at any scale. Thus, separation of industrial-surface metrology from its Earth-science counterpart, (digital) terrain modelling, is artificial. Their growing convergence presents an opportunity to develop in surface morphometry a unified approach to surface representation. This paper introduces terrain modelling and compares it with metrology, noting their differences and similarities. Examples of potential redundancy among parameters illustrate one of the many issues common to both disciplines. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. ULTRASONIC MEASUREMENT MODELS FOR SURFACE WAVE AND PLATE WAVE INSPECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerr, Lester W. Jr.; Sedov, Alexander

    2010-02-22

    A complete ultrasonic measurement model for surface and plate wave inspections is obtained, where all the electrical, electromechanical, and acoustic/elastic elements are explicitly described. Reciprocity principles are used to describe the acoustic/elastic elements specifically in terms of an integral of the incident and scattered wave fields over the surface of the flaw. As with the case of bulk waves, if one assumes the incident surface waves or plate waves are locally planar at the flaw surface, the overall measurement model reduces to a very modular form where the far-field scattering amplitude of the flaw appears explicitly.

  2. Digital terrain modeling and industrial surface metrology: Converging realms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pike, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    Digital terrain modeling has a micro-and nanoscale counterpart in surface metrology, the numerical characterization of industrial surfaces. Instrumentation in semiconductor manufacturing and other high-technology fields can now contour surface irregularities down to the atomic scale. Surface metrology has been revolutionized by its ability to manipulate square-grid height matrices that are analogous to the digital elevation models (DEMs) used in physical geography. Because the shaping of industrial surfaces is a spatial process, the same concepts of analytical cartography that represent ground-surface form in geography evolved independently in metrology: The surface topography of manufactured components, exemplified here by automobile-engine cylinders, is routinely modeled by variogram analysis, relief shading, and most other techniques of parameterization and visualization familiar to geography. This article introduces industrial surface-metrology, examines the field in the context of terrain modeling and geomorphology and notes their similarities and differences, and raises theoretical issues to be addressed in progressing toward a unified practice of surface morphometry.

  3. Water-balance uncertainty in Honduras: a limits-of-acceptability approach to model evaluation using a time-variant rating curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerberg, I.; Guerrero, J.-L.; Beven, K.; Seibert, J.; Halldin, S.; Lundin, L.-C.; Xu, C.-Y.

    2009-04-01

    The climate of Central America is highly variable both spatially and temporally; extreme events like floods and droughts are recurrent phenomena posing great challenges to regional water-resources management. Scarce and low-quality hydro-meteorological data complicate hydrological modelling and few previous studies have addressed the water-balance in Honduras. In the alluvial Choluteca River, the river bed changes over time as fill and scour occur in the channel, leading to a fast-changing relation between stage and discharge and difficulties in deriving consistent rating curves. In this application of a four-parameter water-balance model, a limits-of-acceptability approach to model evaluation was used within the General Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) framework. The limits of acceptability were determined for discharge alone for each time step, and ideally a simulated result should always be contained within the limits. A moving-window weighted fuzzy regression of the ratings, based on estimated uncertainties in the rating-curve data, was used to derive the limits. This provided an objective way to determine the limits of acceptability and handle the non-stationarity of the rating curves. The model was then applied within GLUE and evaluated using the derived limits. Preliminary results show that the best simulations are within the limits 75-80% of the time, indicating that precipitation data and other uncertainties like model structure also have a significant effect on predictability.

  4. Land Surface Microwave Emissivity Dynamics: Observations, Analysis and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Yudong; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Harrison, Kenneth W.; Kumar, Sujay; Ringerud, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Land surface microwave emissivity affects remote sensing of both the atmosphere and the land surface. The dynamical behavior of microwave emissivity over a very diverse sample of land surface types is studied. With seven years of satellite measurements from AMSR-E, we identified various dynamical regimes of the land surface emission. In addition, we used two radiative transfer models (RTMs), the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) and the Community Microwave Emission Modeling Platform (CMEM), to simulate land surface emissivity dynamics. With both CRTM and CMEM coupled to NASA's Land Information System, global-scale land surface microwave emissivities were simulated for five years, and evaluated against AMSR-E observations. It is found that both models have successes and failures over various types of land surfaces. Among them, the desert shows the most consistent underestimates (by approx. 70-80%), due to limitations of the physical models used, and requires a revision in both systems. Other snow-free surface types exhibit various degrees of success and it is expected that parameter tuning can improve their performances.

  5. Real Time Land-Surface Hydrologic Modeling Over Continental US

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houser, Paul R.

    1998-01-01

    The land surface component of the hydrological cycle is fundamental to the overall functioning of the atmospheric and climate processes. Spatially and temporally variable rainfall and available energy, combined with land surface heterogeneity cause complex variations in all processes related to surface hydrology. The characterization of the spatial and temporal variability of water and energy cycles are critical to improve our understanding of land surface-atmosphere interaction and the impact of land surface processes on climate extremes. Because the accurate knowledge of these processes and their variability is important for climate predictions, most Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) centers have incorporated land surface schemes in their models. However, errors in the NWP forcing accumulate in the surface and energy stores, leading to incorrect surface water and energy partitioning and related processes. This has motivated the NWP to impose ad hoc corrections to the land surface states to prevent this drift. A proposed methodology is to develop Land Data Assimilation schemes (LDAS), which are uncoupled models forced with observations, and not affected by NWP forcing biases. The proposed research is being implemented as a real time operation using an existing Surface Vegetation Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (SVATS) model at a 40 km degree resolution across the United States to evaluate these critical science questions. The model will be forced with real time output from numerical prediction models, satellite data, and radar precipitation measurements. Model parameters will be derived from the existing GIS vegetation and soil coverages. The model results will be aggregated to various scales to assess water and energy balances and these will be validated with various in-situ observations.

  6. Modeling Surface Roughness to Estimate Surface Moisture Using Radarsat-2 Quad Polarimetric SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurtyawan, R.; Saepuloh, A.; Budiharto, A.; Wikantika, K.

    2016-08-01

    Microwave backscattering from the earth's surface depends on several parameters such as surface roughness and dielectric constant of surface materials. The two parameters related to water content and porosity are crucial for estimating soil moisture. The soil moisture is an important parameter for ecological study and also a factor to maintain energy balance of land surface and atmosphere. Direct roughness measurements to a large area require extra time and cost. Heterogeneity roughness scale for some applications such as hydrology, climate, and ecology is a problem which could lead to inaccuracies of modeling. In this study, we modeled surface roughness using Radasat-2 quad Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR) data. The statistical approaches to field roughness measurements were used to generate an appropriate roughness model. This modeling uses a physical SAR approach to predicts radar backscattering coefficient in the parameter of radar configuration (wavelength, polarization, and incidence angle) and soil parameters (surface roughness and dielectric constant). Surface roughness value is calculated using a modified Campbell and Shepard model in 1996. The modification was applied by incorporating the backscattering coefficient (σ°) of quad polarization HH, HV and VV. To obtain empirical surface roughness model from SAR backscattering intensity, we used forty-five sample points from field roughness measurements. We selected paddy field in Indramayu district, West Java, Indonesia as the study area. This area was selected due to intensive decreasing of rice productivity in the Northern Coast region of West Java. Third degree polynomial is the most suitable data fitting with coefficient of determination R2 and RMSE are about 0.82 and 1.18 cm, respectively. Therefore, this model is used as basis to generate the map of surface roughness.

  7. Improved simulation of groundwater - surface water interaction in catchment models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    teklesadik, aklilu; van Griensven, Ann; Anibas, Christian; Huysmans, Marijke

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater storage can have a significant contribution to stream flow, therefore a thorough understanding of the groundwater surface water interaction is of prime important when doing catchment modeling. The aim of this study is to improve the simulation of groundwater - surface water interaction in a catchment model of the upper Zenne River basin located in Belgium. To achieve this objective we used the "Groundwater-Surface water Flow" (GSFLOW) modeling software, which is an integration of the surface water modeling tool "Precipitation and Runoff Modeling system" (PRMS) and the groundwater modeling tool MODFLOW. For this case study, the PRMS model and MODFLOW model were built and calibrated independently. The PRMS upper Zenne River basin model is divided into 84 hydrological response units (HRUs) and is calibrated with flow data at the Tubize gauging station. The spatial discretization of the MODFLOW upper Zenne groundwater flow model consists of 100m grids. Natural groundwater divides and the Brussels-Charleroi canal are used as boundary conditions for the MODFLOW model. The model is calibrated using piezometric data. The GSFLOW results were evaluated against a SWAT model application and field observations of groundwater-surface water interactions along a cross section of the Zenne River and riparian zone. The field observations confirm that there is no exchange of groundwater beyond the Brussel-Charleroi canal and that the interaction at the river bed is relatively low. The results show that there is a significant difference in the groundwater simulations when using GSFLOW versus SWAT. This indicates that the groundwater component representation in the SWAT model could be improved and that a more realistic implementation of the interactions between groundwater and surface water is advisable. This could be achieved by integrating SWAT and MODFLOW.

  8. A coarse grain model for protein-surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shuai; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2013-09-01

    The interaction of proteins with surfaces is important in numerous applications in many fields—such as biotechnology, proteomics, sensors, and medicine—but fundamental understanding of how protein stability and structure are affected by surfaces remains incomplete. Over the last several years, molecular simulation using coarse grain models has yielded significant insights, but the formalisms used to represent the surface interactions have been rudimentary. We present a new model for protein surface interactions that incorporates the chemical specificity of both the surface and the residues comprising the protein in the context of a one-bead-per-residue, coarse grain approach that maintains computational efficiency. The model is parameterized against experimental adsorption energies for multiple model peptides on different types of surfaces. The validity of the model is established by its ability to quantitatively and qualitatively predict the free energy of adsorption and structural changes for multiple biologically-relevant proteins on different surfaces. The validation, done with proteins not used in parameterization, shows that the model produces remarkable agreement between simulation and experiment.

  9. Photopolarimetry of scattering surfaces and their interpretation by computer model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, M.

    1979-01-01

    Wolff's computer model of a rough planetary surface was simplified and revised. Close adherence to the actual geometry of a pitted surface and the inclusion of a function for diffuse light resulted in a quantitative model comparable to observations by planetary satellites and asteroids. A function is also derived to describe diffuse light emitted from a particulate surface. The function is in terms of the indices of refraction of the surface material, particle size, and viewing angles. Computer-generated plots describe the observable and theoretical light components for the Moon, Mercury, Mars and a spectrum of asteroids. Other plots describe the effects of changing surface material properties. Mathematical results are generated to relate the parameters of the negative polarization branch to the properties of surface pitting. An explanation is offered for the polarization of the rings of Saturn, and the average diameter of ring objects is found to be 30 to 40 centimeters.

  10. MODELING THE INTERACTION OF AGROCHEMICALS WITH ENVIRONMENTAL SURFACES: PESTICIDES ON RUTILE AND ORGANO-RUTILE SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Non-bonded interactions between model pesticides and organo-mineral surfaces have been studied using molecular mechanical conformational calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. The minimum energy conformations and relative binding energies for the interaction of atrazine...

  11. Fabrication, surface properties, and origin of superoleophobicity for a model textured surface.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong; Law, Kock-Yee; Sambhy, Varun

    2011-05-17

    Inspired by the superhydrophobic effect displayed in nature, we set out to mimic the interplay between the chemistry and physics in the lotus leaf to see if the same design principle can be applied to control wetting and adhesion between toners and inks on various printing surfaces. Since toners and inks are organic materials, superoleophobicity has become our design target. In this work, we report the design and fabrication of a model superoleophobic surface on silicon wafer. The model surface was created by photolithography, consisting of texture made of arrays of ∼3 μm diameter pillars, ∼7 μm in height with a center-to-center spacing of 6 μm. The surface was then made oleophobic with a fluorosilane coating, FOTS, synthesized by the molecular vapor deposition technique with tridecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrooctyltrichlorosilane. Contact angle measurement shows that the surface exhibits super repellency toward water and oil (hexadecane) with a water and hexadecane contact angles at 156° and 158°, respectively. Since the sliding angles for both liquids are also very small (∼10°), we conclude that the model surface is both superhydrophobic and superoleophobic. By comparing with the contact angle data of the bare silicon surfaces (both smooth and textured), we also conclude that the superoleophobicity is a result of both surface texturing and fluorination. Results from investigations of the effects of surface modification and pillar geometry indicate that both surface oleophobicity and pillar geometry are contributors to the superoleophobicity. More specifically, we found that superoleophobicity can only be attained on our model textured surface when the flat surface coating has a relatively high oleophobicity (i.e., with a hexadecane contact angle of >73°). SEM examination of the pillars with higher magnification reveals that the side wall in each pillar is not smooth; rather it consists of a ∼300 nm wavy structure (due to the Bosch etching process

  12. Fabrication, surface properties, and origin of superoleophobicity for a model textured surface.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong; Law, Kock-Yee; Sambhy, Varun

    2011-05-17

    Inspired by the superhydrophobic effect displayed in nature, we set out to mimic the interplay between the chemistry and physics in the lotus leaf to see if the same design principle can be applied to control wetting and adhesion between toners and inks on various printing surfaces. Since toners and inks are organic materials, superoleophobicity has become our design target. In this work, we report the design and fabrication of a model superoleophobic surface on silicon wafer. The model surface was created by photolithography, consisting of texture made of arrays of ∼3 μm diameter pillars, ∼7 μm in height with a center-to-center spacing of 6 μm. The surface was then made oleophobic with a fluorosilane coating, FOTS, synthesized by the molecular vapor deposition technique with tridecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrooctyltrichlorosilane. Contact angle measurement shows that the surface exhibits super repellency toward water and oil (hexadecane) with a water and hexadecane contact angles at 156° and 158°, respectively. Since the sliding angles for both liquids are also very small (∼10°), we conclude that the model surface is both superhydrophobic and superoleophobic. By comparing with the contact angle data of the bare silicon surfaces (both smooth and textured), we also conclude that the superoleophobicity is a result of both surface texturing and fluorination. Results from investigations of the effects of surface modification and pillar geometry indicate that both surface oleophobicity and pillar geometry are contributors to the superoleophobicity. More specifically, we found that superoleophobicity can only be attained on our model textured surface when the flat surface coating has a relatively high oleophobicity (i.e., with a hexadecane contact angle of >73°). SEM examination of the pillars with higher magnification reveals that the side wall in each pillar is not smooth; rather it consists of a ∼300 nm wavy structure (due to the Bosch etching process

  13. Rough surface scattering based on facet model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khamsi, H. R.; Fung, A. K.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1974-01-01

    A model for the radar return from bare ground was developed to calculate the radar cross section of bare ground and the effect of the frequency averaging on the reduction of the variance of the return. It is shown that, by assuming that the distribution of the slope to be Gaussian and that the distribution of the length of the facet to be in the form of the positive side of a Gaussian distribution, the results are in good agreement with experimental data collected by an 8- to 18-GHz radar spectrometer system. It is also shown that information on the exact correlation length of the small structure on the ground is not necessary; an effective correlation length may be calculated based on the facet model and the wavelength of the incident wave.

  14. Hydration dynamics near a model protein surface

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Daniela; Hura, Greg; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-09-01

    The evolution of water dynamics from dilute to very high concentration solutions of a prototypical hydrophobic amino acid with its polar backbone, N-acetyl-leucine-methylamide (NALMA), is studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation for both the completely deuterated and completely hydrogenated leucine monomer. We observe several unexpected features in the dynamics of these biological solutions under ambient conditions. The NALMA dynamics shows evidence of de Gennes narrowing, an indication of coherent long timescale structural relaxation dynamics. The translational water dynamics are analyzed in a first approximation with a jump diffusion model. At the highest solute concentrations, the hydration water dynamics is significantly suppressed and characterized by a long residential time and a slow diffusion coefficient. The analysis of the more dilute concentration solutions takes into account the results of the 2.0M solution as a model of the first hydration shell. Subtracting the first hydration layer based on the 2.0M spectra, the translational diffusion dynamics is still suppressed, although the rotational relaxation time and residential time are converged to bulk-water values. Molecular dynamics analysis shows spatially heterogeneous dynamics at high concentration that becomes homogeneous at more dilute concentrations. We discuss the hydration dynamics results of this model protein system in the context of glassy systems, protein function, and protein-protein interfaces.

  15. Integrating Surface Modeling into the Engineering Design Graphics Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Nathan W.

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested there is a knowledge base that surrounds the use of 3D modeling within the engineering design process and correspondingly within engineering design graphics education. While solid modeling receives a great deal of attention and discussion relative to curriculum efforts, and rightly so, surface modeling is an equally viable 3D…

  16. Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System and its CSDMS Modeling Tool to couple models and data (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syvitski, J. P.; Csdms Scientific; Software Team

    2010-12-01

    CSDMS is the virtual home for a diverse community who foster and promote the modeling of earth surface processes, with emphasis on the movement of fluids, sediment and solutes through landscapes, seascapes and through their sedimentary basins. CSDMS develops, integrates, disseminates & archives software (> 150 models and 3million+ lines of code) that reflects and predicts earth surface processes over a broad range of time and space scales. CSDMS deals with the Earth's surface—the ever-changing, dynamic interface between lithosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, and atmosphere. CSDMS employs state-of-the-art architectures, interface standards and frameworks that make it possible to convert stand-alone models into flexible, "plug-and-play" components that can be assembled into larger applications. The CSDMS model-coupling environment offers language interoperability, structured and unstructured grids, and serves as a migration pathway for surface dynamics modelers towards High-Performance Computing (HPC). The CSDMS Modeling Tool is a key product of the overall project, as it allows earth scientists with relatively modest computer coding experience to use the CSDMS modules for earth surface dynamics research and education. The CMT Tool is platform independent. CMT can easily couple models that have followed the CSDMS protocols for model contribution: 1) Open-source license; 2) Available; 3) Vetted; 4) Open-source language; 5) Refactored for componentization; 6) Metadata & test files; 7) Clean and documented using keywords.

  17. Casimir energy in a spherical surface within surface impedance approach: The Drude model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Luigi; Trozzo, Lucia

    2016-09-01

    The Casimir Energy of a spherical cavity whose surface is characterized by means of its surface impedance is calculated. The material properties of the boundary are described by means of the Drude model, so that a generalization of a previous result, based on plasma model, is obtained. The limits of the proposed approach are analyzed and a possible solution is suggested. The possibility of modulating the sign of the Casimir force from positive (repulsion) to negative (attraction) is studied.

  18. Local stakeholders' acceptance of model-generated data used as a communication tool in water management: The Rönneå Study.

    PubMed

    Alkan Olsson, Johanna; Berg, Karin

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this study was to increase the knowledge of local stakeholders' acceptance of model-generated data when used as a communication tool in water quality management. The Rönneå catchment in the southwest of Sweden was chosen as the study area. The results indicate the model-generated data served as a uniting factor. Simultaneously, the stakeholders were concerned with presented data, the main problems being sources of pollution, which were not accounted for, lack of trustworthiness when measuring pollution, and the uncertainty of the impact of natural variation and delayed effects. Four clusters of factors were identified as influencing stakeholders' acceptance of the model-generated data: confidence in its practical applications, confidence in the people involved in or providing material for the dialog (such as experts, decision-makers, and media), the social characteristics of the participants (such as age and profession), and the way of communicating the data (such as tone of communication, group composition, duration, and geographical scope of the dialog). The perception of the fairness of the practical application of given model-generated data was also an important factor for acceptance.

  19. The SRFR 5 modeling system for surface irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The SRFR program is a modeling system for surface irrigation. It is a central component of WinSRFR, a software package for the hydraulic analysis of surface irrigation systems. SRFR solves simplified versions of the equations of unsteady open channel flow coupled to a user selected infiltration mod...

  20. Mathematical and computer modeling of component surface shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyashkov, A.

    2016-04-01

    The process of shaping technical surfaces is an interaction of a tool (a shape element) and a component (a formable element or a workpiece) in their relative movements. It was established that the main objects of formation are: 1) a discriminant of a surfaces family, formed by the movement of the shape element relatively the workpiece; 2) an enveloping model of the real component surface obtained after machining, including transition curves and undercut lines; 3) The model of cut-off layers obtained in the process of shaping. When modeling shaping objects there are a lot of insufficiently solved or unsolved issues that make up a single scientific problem - a problem of qualitative shaping of the surface of the tool and then the component surface produced by this tool. The improvement of known metal-cutting tools, intensive development of systems of their computer-aided design requires further improvement of the methods of shaping the mating surfaces. In this regard, an important role is played by the study of the processes of shaping of technical surfaces with the use of the positive aspects of analytical and numerical mathematical methods and techniques associated with the use of mathematical and computer modeling. The author of the paper has posed and has solved the problem of development of mathematical, geometric and algorithmic support of computer-aided design of cutting tools based on computer simulation of the shaping process of surfaces.

  1. Status of surface processes in the LLNL zonally symmetric model

    SciTech Connect

    Gleckler, P.J. )

    1989-09-30

    A surface package has been developed for use in the LLNL zonally symmetric model (ZSM). Surface energy balances are computed for both land and ocean. The ocean is modeled as a well-mixed slab, the land as a single layer with constant thermal conductivity. A land surface moisture budget includes rain, evaporation, sublimation, snowfall, snowmelt and runoff. There is a highly simplified parameterization of surface albedo for freezing oceans and snow covered land. Land and sea air is instantly mixed' by averaging pertinent land and sea surface variables (weighted by their respective areas in each zone) before use in subsequent atmospheric computations. Initial tests have demonstrated that the surface package is working properly. It has been demonstrated that the model produces a reasonable annually averaged' climate. There are some aspects of ZSM which need to be improved, most notably that of cloud cover. The next stage in the development is to test the model in seasonal mode. An improved treatment of surface albedo is currently being coded. When ZSM has been tested in seasonal mode, a sea ice routine will be added to the surface package. There are also plans to implement a method which accounts for the interaction between land and sea air. 5 refs., 15 figs.

  2. Land Surface Verification Toolkit (LVT) - A Generalized Framework for Land Surface Model Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Sujay V.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Santanello, Joseph; Harrison, Ken; Liu, Yuqiong; Shaw, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Model evaluation and verification are key in improving the usage and applicability of simulation models for real-world applications. In this article, the development and capabilities of a formal system for land surface model evaluation called the Land surface Verification Toolkit (LVT) is described. LVT is designed to provide an integrated environment for systematic land model evaluation and facilitates a range of verification approaches and analysis capabilities. LVT operates across multiple temporal and spatial scales and employs a large suite of in-situ, remotely sensed and other model and reanalysis datasets in their native formats. In addition to the traditional accuracy-based measures, LVT also includes uncertainty and ensemble diagnostics, information theory measures, spatial similarity metrics and scale decomposition techniques that provide novel ways for performing diagnostic model evaluations. Though LVT was originally designed to support the land surface modeling and data assimilation framework known as the Land Information System (LIS), it also supports hydrological data products from other, non-LIS environments. In addition, the analysis of diagnostics from various computational subsystems of LIS including data assimilation, optimization and uncertainty estimation are supported within LVT. Together, LIS and LVT provide a robust end-to-end environment for enabling the concepts of model data fusion for hydrological applications. The evolving capabilities of LVT framework are expected to facilitate rapid model evaluation efforts and aid the definition and refinement of formal evaluation procedures for the land surface modeling community.

  3. 2D modeling of the regeneration surface growth on crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, V. G.; Gavryushkin, P. N.; Fursenko, D. A.

    2012-11-01

    A physical model is proposed to describe the growth of regeneration surfaces (flat crystal surfaces that are not parallel to any possible faces). According to this model, the change in the growth rate of a regeneration surface during its evolution and the decrease in the number of subindividuals forming the growth front can be explained by the implementation of two types of geometric selection: within each subindividual (the absorption of rapidly growing faces by slowly growing ones) and between subindividuals (when subindividuals absorb each other). A numerical modeling of the growth of the regeneration surface (30.30.19) of potassium alum crystals showed quantitative agreement between the model proposed and the experimental data.

  4. A surface misfit inversion method for brain deformation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fenghong; Paulsen, Keith D.; Hartov, Alexander; Roberts, David W.

    2007-03-01

    Biomechanical models of brain deformation are useful tools for estimating the shift that occurs during neurosurgical interventions. Incorporation of intra-operative data into the biomechanical model improves the accuracy of the registration between the patient and the image volume. The representer method to solve the adjoint equations (AEM) for data assimilation has been developed. In order to improve the computational efficiency and to process more intraoperative data, we modified the adjoint equation method by changing the way in which intraoperative data is applied. The current formulation is developed around a point-based data-model misfit. Surface based data-model misfit could be a more robust and computationally efficient technique. Our approach is to express the surface misfit as the volume between the measured surface and model predicted surface. An iterative method is used to solve the adjoint equations. The surface misfit criterion is tested in a cortical distension clinical case and compared to the results generated with the prior point-based methodology solved either iteratively or with the representer algorithm. The results show that solving the adjoint equations with an iterative method improves computational efficiency dramatically over the representer approach and that reformulating the minimization criterion in terms of a surface description is even more efficient. Applying intra-operative data in the form of a surface misfit is computationally very efficient and appears promising with respect to its accuracy in estimating brain deformation.

  5. Including Finite Surface Span Effects in Empirical Jet-Surface Interaction Noise Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cliff

    2016-01-01

    The effect of finite span on the jet-surface interaction noise source and the jet mixing noise shielding and reflection effects is considered using recently acquired experimental data. First, the experimental setup and resulting data are presented with particular attention to the role of surface span on far-field noise. These effects are then included in existing empirical models that have previously assumed that all surfaces are semi-infinite. This extended abstract briefly describes the experimental setup and data leaving the empirical modeling aspects for the final paper.

  6. Using combined hydrological variables for extracting functional signatures of catchments to better assess the acceptability of model structures in conceptual catchment modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fovet, O.; Hrachowitz, M.; RUIZ, L.; Gascuel-odoux, C.; Savenije, H.

    2013-12-01

    While most hydrological models reproduce the general flow dynamics of a system, they frequently fail to adequately mimic system internal processes. This is likely to make them inadequate to simulate solutes transport. For example, the hysteresis between storage and discharge, which is often observed in shallow hard-rock aquifers, is rarely well reproduced by models. One main reason is that this hysteresis has little weight in the calibration because objective functions are based on time series of individual variables. This reduces the ability of classical calibration/validation procedures to assess the relevance of the conceptual hypothesis associated with hydrological models. Calibrating models on variables derived from the combination of different individual variables (like stream discharge and groundwater levels) is a way to insure that models will be accepted based on their consistency. Here we therefore test the value of this more systems-like approach to test different hypothesis on the behaviour of a small experimental low-land catchment in French Brittany (ORE AgrHys) where a high hysteresis is observed on the stream flow vs. shallow groundwater level relationship. Several conceptual models were applied to this site, and calibrated using objective functions based on metrics of this hysteresis. The tested model structures differed with respect to the storage function in each reservoir, the storage-discharge function in each reservoir, the deep loss expressions (as constant or variable fraction), the number of reservoirs (from 1 to 4) and their organization (parallel, series). The observed hysteretic groundwater level-discharge relationship was not satisfactorily reproduced by most of the tested models except for the most complex ones. Those were thus more consistent, their underlying hypotheses are probably more realistic even though their performance for simulating observed stream flow was decreased. Selecting models based on such systems-like approach is

  7. Microwave Remote Sensing Modeling of Ocean Surface Salinity and Winds Using an Empirical Sea Surface Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.

    2004-01-01

    Active and passive microwave remote sensing techniques have been investigated for the remote sensing of ocean surface wind and salinity. We revised an ocean surface spectrum using the CMOD-5 geophysical model function (GMF) for the European Remote Sensing (ERS) C-band scatterometer and the Ku-band GMF for the NASA SeaWinds scatterometer. The predictions of microwave brightness temperatures from this model agree well with satellite, aircraft and tower-based microwave radiometer data. This suggests that the impact of surface roughness on microwave brightness temperatures and radar scattering coefficients of sea surfaces can be consistently characterized by a roughness spectrum, providing physical basis for using combined active and passive remote sensing techniques for ocean surface wind and salinity remote sensing.

  8. Developing an Empirical Model for Jet-Surface Interaction Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2014-01-01

    The process of developing an empirical model for jet-surface interaction noise is described and the resulting model evaluated. Jet-surface interaction noise is generated when the high-speed engine exhaust from modern tightly integrated or conventional high-bypass ratio engine aircraft strikes or flows over the airframe surfaces. An empirical model based on an existing experimental database is developed for use in preliminary design system level studies where computation speed and range of configurations is valued over absolute accuracy to select the most promising (or eliminate the worst) possible designs. The model developed assumes that the jet-surface interaction noise spectra can be separated from the jet mixing noise and described as a parabolic function with three coefficients: peak amplitude, spectral width, and peak frequency. These coefficients are fit to functions of surface length and distance from the jet lipline to form a characteristic spectra which is then adjusted for changes in jet velocity and/or observer angle using scaling laws from published theoretical and experimental work. The resulting model is then evaluated for its ability to reproduce the characteristic spectra and then for reproducing spectra measured at other jet velocities and observer angles; successes and limitations are discussed considering the complexity of the jet-surface interaction noise versus the desire for a model that is simple to implement and quick to execute.

  9. Developing an Empirical Model for Jet-Surface Interaction Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clif

    2014-01-01

    The process of developing an empirical model for jet-surface interaction noise is described and the resulting model evaluated. Jet-surface interaction noise is generated when the high-speed engine exhaust from modern tightly integrated or conventional high-bypass ratio engine aircraft strikes or flows over the airframe surfaces. An empirical model based on an existing experimental database is developed for use in preliminary design system level studies where computation speed and range of configurations is valued over absolute accuracy to select the most promising (or eliminate the worst) possible designs. The model developed assumes that the jet-surface interaction noise spectra can be separated from the jet mixing noise and described as a parabolic function with three coefficients: peak amplitude, spectral width, and peak frequency. These coefficients are t to functions of surface length and distance from the jet lipline to form a characteristic spectra which is then adjusted for changes in jet velocity and/or observer angle using scaling laws from published theoretical and experimental work. The resulting model is then evaluated for its ability to reproduce the characteristic spectra and then for reproducing spectra measured at other jet velocities and observer angles; successes and limitations are discussed considering the complexity of the jet-surface interaction noise versus the desire for a model that is simple to implement and quick to execute.

  10. Hybrid Surface Mesh Adaptation for Climate Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed Khamayseh; Valmor de Almeida; Glen Hansen

    2008-10-01

    Solution-driven mesh adaptation is becoming quite popular for spatial error control in the numerical simulation of complex computational physics applications, such as climate modeling. Typically, spatial adaptation is achieved by element subdivision (h adaptation) with a primary goal of resolving the local length scales of interest. A second, less-popular method of spatial adaptivity is called “mesh motion” (r adaptation); the smooth repositioning of mesh node points aimed at resizing existing elements to capture the local length scales. This paper proposes an adaptation method based on a combination of both element subdivision and node point repositioning (rh adaptation). By combining these two methods using the notion of a mobility function, the proposed approach seeks to increase the flexibility and extensibility of mesh motion algorithms while providing a somewhat smoother transition between refined regions than is produced by element subdivision alone. Further, in an attempt to support the requirements of a very general class of climate simulation applications, the proposed method is designed to accommodate unstructured, polygonal mesh topologies in addition to the most popular mesh types.

  11. Hybrid Surface Mesh Adaptation for Climate Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Khamayseh, Ahmed K; de Almeida, Valmor F; Hansen, Glen

    2008-01-01

    Solution-driven mesh adaptation is becoming quite popular for spatial error control in the numerical simulation of complex computational physics applications, such as climate modeling. Typically, spatial adaptation is achieved by element subdivision (h adaptation) with a primary goal of resolving the local length scales of interest. A second, less-popular method of spatial adaptivity is called "mesh motion" (r adaptation); the smooth repositioning of mesh node points aimed at resizing existing elements to capture the local length scales. This paper proposes an adaptation method based on a combination of both element subdivision and node point repositioning (rh adaptation). By combining these two methods using the notion of a mobility function, the proposed approach seeks to increase the flexibility and extensibility of mesh motion algorithms while providing a somewhat smoother transition between refined regions than is produced by element subdivision alone. Further, in an attempt to support the requirements of a very general class of climate simulation applications, the proposed method is designed to accommodate unstructured, polygonal mesh topologies in addition to the most popular mesh types.

  12. Grid generation and surface modeling for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Stuart D.; Sober, Janet S.; Lamson, Scott H.

    1995-01-01

    When computing the flow around complex three dimensional configurations, the generation of the mesh is the most time consuming part of any calculation. With some meshing technologies this can take of the order of a man month or more. The requirement for a number of design iterations coupled with ever decreasing time allocated for design leads to the need for a significant acceleration of this process. Of the two competing approaches, block-structured and unstructured, only the unstructured approach will allow fully automatic mesh generation directly from a CAD model. Using this approach coupled with the techniques described in this paper, it is possible to reduce the mesh generation time from man months to a few hours on a workstation. The desire to closely couple a CFD code with a design or optimization algorithm requires that the changes to the geometry be performed quickly and in a smooth manner. This need for smoothness necessitates the use of Bezier polynomials in place of the more usual NURBS or cubic splines. A two dimensional Bezier polynomial based design system is described.

  13. Gulf Stream model. [which considers surface elevation deviations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Surface elevation deviations in the Gulf Stream region off the eastern coast of the United States between Wallops Island, Virginia and Miami, Florida were investigated. The main causes of surface elevation deviations are geoid perturbations due to the continental shelf and the geostrophic adjustment of the density field due to the Gulf Stream. Quantitative surface elevation profiles were calculated based on geophysical measurements of gravity anomalies and hydrographic data. The results are presented graphically along with contemporaneous weather data. Comparisons are made between the profiles based on hydrographic data and a mean theoretical model. The theory of geostrophic flows including some classical Gulf Stream models is also presented briefly.

  14. Phase-field model for reconstructed stepped surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kanna; Margetis, Dionisios

    2013-07-01

    We formulate a phase-field, or diffuse-interface, model for the evolution of stepped surfaces under surface diffusion in the presence of distinct material parameters across nanoscale terraces. In the sharp-interface limit, our model reduces to a Burton-Cabrera-Frank (BCF)-type theory for the motion of noninteracting steps separating inhomogeneous terraces. This setting aims to capture features of reconstructed semiconductor, e.g., Si surfaces below the roughening transition. Our work forms an extension of the phase-field construction by Hu [Physica DPDNPDT0167-278910.1016/j.physd.2011.09.004 241, 77 (2012)].

  15. Modeling apple surface temperature dynamics based on weather data.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Peters, Troy; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Jingjin; Huang, Danfeng

    2014-01-01

    The exposure of fruit surfaces to direct sunlight during the summer months can result in sunburn damage. Losses due to sunburn damage are a major economic problem when marketing fresh apples. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a model for simulating fruit surface temperature (FST) dynamics based on energy balance and measured weather data. A series of weather data (air temperature, humidity, solar radiation, and wind speed) was recorded for seven hours between 11:00-18:00 for two months at fifteen minute intervals. To validate the model, the FSTs of "Fuji" apples were monitored using an infrared camera in a natural orchard environment. The FST dynamics were measured using a series of thermal images. For the apples that were completely exposed to the sun, the RMSE of the model for estimating FST was less than 2.0 °C. A sensitivity analysis of the emissivity of the apple surface and the conductance of the fruit surface to water vapour showed that accurate estimations of the apple surface emissivity were important for the model. The validation results showed that the model was capable of accurately describing the thermal performances of apples under different solar radiation intensities. Thus, this model could be used to more accurately estimate the FST relative to estimates that only consider the air temperature. In addition, this model provides useful information for sunburn protection management. PMID:25350507

  16. Modeling apple surface temperature dynamics based on weather data.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Peters, Troy; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Jingjin; Huang, Danfeng

    2014-01-01

    The exposure of fruit surfaces to direct sunlight during the summer months can result in sunburn damage. Losses due to sunburn damage are a major economic problem when marketing fresh apples. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a model for simulating fruit surface temperature (FST) dynamics based on energy balance and measured weather data. A series of weather data (air temperature, humidity, solar radiation, and wind speed) was recorded for seven hours between 11:00-18:00 for two months at fifteen minute intervals. To validate the model, the FSTs of "Fuji" apples were monitored using an infrared camera in a natural orchard environment. The FST dynamics were measured using a series of thermal images. For the apples that were completely exposed to the sun, the RMSE of the model for estimating FST was less than 2.0 °C. A sensitivity analysis of the emissivity of the apple surface and the conductance of the fruit surface to water vapour showed that accurate estimations of the apple surface emissivity were important for the model. The validation results showed that the model was capable of accurately describing the thermal performances of apples under different solar radiation intensities. Thus, this model could be used to more accurately estimate the FST relative to estimates that only consider the air temperature. In addition, this model provides useful information for sunburn protection management.

  17. Simple formula for the surface area of the body and a simple model for anthropometry.

    PubMed

    Reading, Bruce D; Freeman, Brian

    2005-03-01

    The body surface area (BSA) of any adult, when derived from the arithmetic mean of the different values calculated from four independent accepted formulae, can be expressed accurately in Systeme International d'Unites (SI) units by the simple equation BSA = 1/6(WH)0.5, where W is body weight in kg, H is body height in m, and BSA is in m2. This formula, which is derived in part by modeling the body as a simple solid of revolution or a prolate spheroid (i.e., a stretched ellipsoid of revolution) gives students, teachers, and clinicians a simple rule for the rapid estimation of surface area using rational units. The formula was tested independently for human subjects by using it to predict body volume and then comparing this prediction against the actual volume measured by Archimedes' principle. PMID:15696524

  18. Influence of surface tension on fractal contact model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, J. M.; Wang, G. F.; Feng, X. Q.; Yu, S. W.

    2014-03-01

    Almost all solid surfaces have roughness on different length scales, from macro, micro to nano. In the conventional fractal contact model, the macroscopic Hertzian contact theory is employed to predict the contact load-area relation for all sizes of contact spots. However, when the contact radius of an asperity shrinks to nanometers, surface tension may greatly alter the contact behavior. In the present paper, we address surface effects on the contact between a rigid sphere and an elastic half space, and we demonstrate that the contact load-area relation is size-dependent, especially for nanosized asperities. Then, the refined contact relation is incorporated into the Majumdar-Bhushan fractal contact model. It is found that the presence of surface tension requires higher load than the conventional fractal contact model to generate the same real contact area.

  19. Contour-Based Surface Reconstruction using MPU Implicit Models.

    PubMed

    Braude, Ilya; Marker, Jeffrey; Museth, Ken; Nissanov, Jonathan; Breen, David

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a technique for creating a smooth, closed surface from a set of 2D contours, which have been extracted from a 3D scan. The technique interprets the pixels that make up the contours as points in ℝ(3) and employs Multi-level Partition of Unity (MPU) implicit models to create a surface that approximately fits to the 3D points. Since MPU implicit models additionally require surface normal information at each point, an algorithm that estimates normals from the contour data is also described. Contour data frequently contains noise from the scanning and delineation process. MPU implicit models provide a superior approach to the problem of contour-based surface reconstruction, especially in the presence of noise, because they are based on adaptive implicit functions that locally approximate the points within a controllable error bound. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our technique with a number of example datasets, providing images and error statistics generated from our results.

  20. Adhesion of perfume-filled microcapsules to model fabric surfaces.

    PubMed

    He, Yanping; Bowen, James; Andrews, James W; Liu, Min; Smets, Johan; Zhang, Zhibing

    2014-01-01

    The retention and adhesion of melamine formaldehyde (MF) microcapsules on a model fabric surface in aqueous solution were investigated using a customised flow chamber technique and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A cellulose film was employed as a model fabric surface. Modification of the cellulose with chitosan was found to increase the retention and adhesion of microcapsules on the model fabric surface. The AFM force-displacement data reveal that bridging forces resulting from the extension of cellulose chains dominate the adhesion between the microcapsule and the unmodified cellulose film, whereas electrostatic attraction helps the microcapsules adhere to the chitosan-modified cellulose film. The correlation between results obtained using these two complementary techniques suggests that the flow chamber device can be potentially used for rapid screening of the effect of chemical modification on the adhesion of microparticles to surfaces, reducing the time required to achieve an optimal formulation.

  1. A physically based model of global freshwater surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beek, Ludovicus P. H.; Eikelboom, Tessa; Vliet, Michelle T. H.; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2012-09-01

    Temperature determines a range of physical properties of water and exerts a strong control on surface water biogeochemistry. Thus, in freshwater ecosystems the thermal regime directly affects the geographical distribution of aquatic species through their growth and metabolism and indirectly through their tolerance to parasites and diseases. Models used to predict surface water temperature range between physically based deterministic models and statistical approaches. Here we present the initial results of a physically based deterministic model of global freshwater surface temperature. The model adds a surface water energy balance to river discharge modeled by the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB. In addition to advection of energy from direct precipitation, runoff, and lateral exchange along the drainage network, energy is exchanged between the water body and the atmosphere by shortwave and longwave radiation and sensible and latent heat fluxes. Also included are ice formation and its effect on heat storage and river hydraulics. We use the coupled surface water and energy balance model to simulate global freshwater surface temperature at daily time steps with a spatial resolution of 0.5° on a regular grid for the period 1976-2000. We opt to parameterize the model with globally available data and apply it without calibration in order to preserve its physical basis with the outlook of evaluating the effects of atmospheric warming on freshwater surface temperature. We validate our simulation results with daily temperature data from rivers and lakes (U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), limited to the USA) and compare mean monthly temperatures with those recorded in the Global Environment Monitoring System (GEMS) data set. Results show that the model is able to capture the mean monthly surface temperature for the majority of the GEMS stations, while the interannual variability as derived from the USGS and NOAA data was captured reasonably well. Results are poorest for

  2. Comparison of Transmission Line Methods for Surface Acoustic Wave Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William; Atkinson, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) technology is low cost, rugged, lightweight, extremely low power and can be used to develop passive wireless sensors. For these reasons, NASA is investigating the use of SAW technology for Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring (IVHM) of aerospace structures. To facilitate rapid prototyping of passive SAW sensors for aerospace applications, SAW models have been developed. This paper reports on the comparison of three methods of modeling SAWs. The three models are the Impulse Response Method (a first order model), and two second order matrix methods; the conventional matrix approach, and a modified matrix approach that is extended to include internal finger reflections. The second order models are based upon matrices that were originally developed for analyzing microwave circuits using transmission line theory. Results from the models are presented with measured data from devices. Keywords: Surface Acoustic Wave, SAW, transmission line models, Impulse Response Method.

  3. "It's all about acceptance": A qualitative study exploring a model of positive body image for people with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Bailey, K Alysse; Gammage, Kimberley L; van Ingen, Cathy; Ditor, David S

    2015-09-01

    Using modified constructivist grounded theory, the purpose of the present study was to explore positive body image experiences in people with spinal cord injury. Nine participants (five women, four men) varying in age (21-63 years), type of injury (C3-T7; complete and incomplete), and years post-injury (4-36 years) were recruited. The following main categories were found: body acceptance, body appreciation and gratitude, social support, functional gains, independence, media literacy, broadly conceptualizing beauty, inner positivity influencing outer demeanour, finding others who have a positive body image, unconditional acceptance from others, religion/spirituality, listening to and taking care of the body, managing secondary complications, minimizing pain, and respect. Interestingly, there was consistency in positive body image characteristics reported in this study with those found in previous research, demonstrating universality of positive body image. However, unique characteristics (e.g., resilience, functional gains, independence) were also reported demonstrating the importance of exploring positive body image in diverse groups. PMID:26002149

  4. "It's all about acceptance": A qualitative study exploring a model of positive body image for people with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Bailey, K Alysse; Gammage, Kimberley L; van Ingen, Cathy; Ditor, David S

    2015-09-01

    Using modified constructivist grounded theory, the purpose of the present study was to explore positive body image experiences in people with spinal cord injury. Nine participants (five women, four men) varying in age (21-63 years), type of injury (C3-T7; complete and incomplete), and years post-injury (4-36 years) were recruited. The following main categories were found: body acceptance, body appreciation and gratitude, social support, functional gains, independence, media literacy, broadly conceptualizing beauty, inner positivity influencing outer demeanour, finding others who have a positive body image, unconditional acceptance from others, religion/spirituality, listening to and taking care of the body, managing secondary complications, minimizing pain, and respect. Interestingly, there was consistency in positive body image characteristics reported in this study with those found in previous research, demonstrating universality of positive body image. However, unique characteristics (e.g., resilience, functional gains, independence) were also reported demonstrating the importance of exploring positive body image in diverse groups.

  5. Kinetics of the monomer-monomer surface reaction model

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.W.; Ray, T.R. )

    1993-02-01

    The two-dimensional monomer-monomer ([ital AB]) surface reaction model without diffusion is considered for infinitesimal, finite, and infinite reaction rates [ital k]. For equal reactant adsorption rates, in all cases, simulations reveal the same form of slow poisoning, associated with clustering of reactants. This behavior is also the same as that found in simulations of the two-dimensional [ital voter] [ital model] studied in interacting-particle systems theory. The voter model can also be obtained from the dimer-dimer or monomer-dimer surface reaction models with infinitesimal reaction rate. We provide a detailed elucidation of the slow poisoning kinetics via an analytic treatment for the [ital k]=0[sup +] [ital AB] reaction and the voter models. This analysis is extended to incorporate the effects of place-exchange diffusion which slows, but does not prevent poisoning. We also show that the [ital k]=0[sup +] [ital AB] reaction with no diffusion is equivalent to the voter model with diffusion at rate 1/2. Identical behavior of the monomer-monomer reaction and the voter model is also found in an epidemic'' analysis, where one considers the evolution of a surface poisoned by one species, except for a small patch. Finally, we apply our findings to elucidate the behavior of the monomer-dimer surface reaction model for small reaction rates.

  6. Alloy Design Workbench-Surface Modeling Package Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, Phillip B.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Good, Brian S.; Daugherty, Elaine S.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center's Computational Materials Group has integrated a graphical user interface with in-house-developed surface modeling capabilities, with the goal of using computationally efficient atomistic simulations to aid the development of advanced aerospace materials, through the modeling of alloy surfaces, surface alloys, and segregation. The software is also ideal for modeling nanomaterials, since surface and interfacial effects can dominate material behavior and properties at this level. Through the combination of an accurate atomistic surface modeling methodology and an efficient computational engine, it is now possible to directly model these types of surface phenomenon and metallic nanostructures without a supercomputer. Fulfilling a High Operating Temperature Propulsion Components (HOTPC) project level-I milestone, a graphical user interface was created for a suite of quantum approximate atomistic materials modeling Fortran programs developed at Glenn. The resulting "Alloy Design Workbench-Surface Modeling Package" (ADW-SMP) is the combination of proven quantum approximate Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) algorithms (refs. 1 and 2) with a productivity-enhancing graphical front end. Written in the portable, platform independent Java programming language, the graphical user interface calls on extensively tested Fortran programs running in the background for the detailed computational tasks. Designed to run on desktop computers, the package has been deployed on PC, Mac, and SGI computer systems. The graphical user interface integrates two modes of computational materials exploration. One mode uses Monte Carlo simulations to determine lowest energy equilibrium configurations. The second approach is an interactive "what if" comparison of atomic configuration energies, designed to provide real-time insight into the underlying drivers of alloying processes.

  7. Superhydrophobic surfaces: A model approach to predict contact angle and surface energy of soil particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirtcliffe, Neil; Hamlett, Christopher; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael; Bachmann, Joerg; Woche, S.

    2010-05-01

    C. Hamlett(a), G. McHALE(a), N. Shirtcliffe(a), M. Newton(a), S.K. Woche(b), and J. BACHMANN(b) aSchool of Science & Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Lane, Nottingham, NG11 8NS, UK and bInstitute of Soil Science, Leibniz University Hannover, Herrenhaeuser Str.2, 30419, Hannover, Germany. Summary Wettability of soil affects a wide variety of processes including infiltration, preferential flow and surface runoff. The problem of determining contact angles and surface energy of powders, such as soil particles, remains unsolved. So far, several theories and approaches have been proposed, but formulation of surface and interfacial free energy, as regards its components, is still a very debatable issue. In the present study, the general problem of the interpretation of contact angles and surface free energy on chemically heterogeneous and rough soil particle surfaces are evaluated by a reformulation of the Cassie-Baxter equation assuming that the particles are attached on to a plane and rigid surface. Compared with common approaches, our model considers a roughness factor which depends on the Young's Law contact angle determined by the surface chemistry. Results of the model are discussed and compared with independent contact angle measurements using the Sessile Drop and the Wilhelmy Plate methods. Based on contact angle data, the critical surface tension of the grains were determined by the method proposed by Zisman. Experiments were made with glass beads and three soil materials ranging from sand to clay. Soil particles were coated with different loadings of dichlorodimethylsilane (DCDMS) to vary the wettability. Varying the solid surface tension using DCDMS treatments provided pure water wetting behaviours ranging from wettable to extremely hydrophobic with contact angles >150°. Results showed that the critical surface energy measured on grains with the highest DCDMS loadings was similar to the surface energy measured independently on ideal DCDMS

  8. Modeling the acid-base surface chemistry of montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Bourg, Ian C; Sposito, Garrison; Bourg, Alain C M

    2007-08-15

    Proton uptake on montmorillonite edge surfaces can control pore water pH, solute adsorption, dissolution kinetics and clay colloid behavior in engineered clay barriers and natural weathering environments. Knowledge of proton uptake reactions, however, is currently limited by strong discrepancies between reported montmorillonite titration data sets and by conflicting estimates of edge structure, reactivity and electrostatics. In the present study, we show that the apparent discrepancy between titration data sets results in large part from the widespread use of an erroneous assumption of zero specific net proton surface charge at the onset of titration. Using a novel simulation scheme involving a surface chemistry model to simulate both pretreatment and titration, we find that montmorillonite edge surface chemistry models that account for the "spillover" of electrostatic potential from basal onto edge surfaces and for the stabilization of deprotonated Al-Si bridging sites through bond-length relaxation at the edge surface can reproduce key features of the best available experimental titration data (the influence of pretreatment conditions on experimental results, the absence of a point of zero salt effect, buffer capacity in the acidic pH range). However, no combination of current models of edge surface structure, reactivity and electrostatics can quantitatively predict, without fitted parameters, the experimental titration data over the entire range of pH (4.5 to 9) and ionic strength (0.001 to 0.5 mol dm(-3)) covered by available data.

  9. Evaluation of air-soil temperature relationships simulated by land surface models during winter across the permafrost region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenli; Rinke, Annette; Moore, John C.; Ji, Duoying; Cui, Xuefeng; Peng, Shushi; Lawrence, David M.; McGuire, A. David; Burke, Eleanor J.; Chen, Xiaodong; Decharme, Bertrand; Koven, Charles; MacDougall, Andrew; Saito, Kazuyuki; Zhang, Wenxin; Alkama, Ramdane; Bohn, Theodore J.; Ciais, Philippe; Delire, Christine; Gouttevin, Isabelle; Hajima, Tomohiro; Krinner, Gerhard; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.; Miller, Paul A.; Smith, Benjamin; Sueyoshi, Tetsuo; Sherstiukov, Artem B.

    2016-08-01

    A realistic simulation of snow cover and its thermal properties are important for accurate modelling of permafrost. We analyse simulated relationships between air and near-surface (20 cm) soil temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere permafrost region during winter, with a particular focus on snow insulation effects in nine land surface models, and compare them with observations from 268 Russian stations. There are large cross-model differences in the simulated differences between near-surface soil and air temperatures (ΔT; 3 to 14 °C), in the sensitivity of soil-to-air temperature (0.13 to 0.96 °C °C-1), and in the relationship between ΔT and snow depth. The observed relationship between ΔT and snow depth can be used as a metric to evaluate the effects of each model's representation of snow insulation, hence guide improvements to the model's conceptual structure and process parameterisations. Models with better performance apply multilayer snow schemes and consider complex snow processes. Some models show poor performance in representing snow insulation due to underestimation of snow depth and/or overestimation of snow conductivity. Generally, models identified as most acceptable with respect to snow insulation simulate reasonable areas of near-surface permafrost (13.19 to 15.77 million km2). However, there is not a simple relationship between the sophistication of the snow insulation in the acceptable models and the simulated area of Northern Hemisphere near-surface permafrost, because several other factors, such as soil depth used in the models, the treatment of soil organic matter content, hydrology and vegetation cover, also affect the simulated permafrost distribution.

  10. Assessing the ability of mechanistic volatilization models to simulate soil surface conditions: a study with the Volt'Air model.

    PubMed

    Garcia, L; Bedos, C; Génermont, S; Braud, I; Cellier, P

    2011-09-01

    Ammonia and pesticide volatilization in the field is a surface phenomenon involving physical and chemical processes that depend on the soil surface temperature and water content. The water transfer, heat transfer and energy budget sub models of volatilization models are adapted from the most commonly accepted formalisms and parameterizations. They are less detailed than the dedicated models describing water and heat transfers and surface status. The aim of this work was to assess the ability of one of the available mechanistic volatilization models, Volt'Air, to accurately describe the pedo-climatic conditions of a soil surface at the required time and space resolution. The assessment involves: (i) a sensitivity analysis, (ii) an evaluation of Volt'Air outputs in the light of outputs from a reference Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer model (SiSPAT) and three experimental datasets, and (iii) the study of three tests based on modifications of SiSPAT to establish the potential impact of the simplifying assumptions used in Volt'Air. The analysis confirmed that a 5 mm surface layer was well suited, and that Volt'Air surface temperature correlated well with the experimental measurements as well as with SiSPAT outputs. In terms of liquid water transfers, Volt'Air was overall consistent with SiSPAT, with discrepancies only during major rainfall events and dry weather conditions. The tests enabled us to identify the main source of the discrepancies between Volt'Air and SiSPAT: the lack of gaseous water transfer description in Volt'Air. They also helped to explain why neither Volt'Air nor SiSPAT was able to represent lower values of surface water content: current classical water retention and hydraulic conductivity models are not yet adapted to cases of very dry conditions. Given the outcomes of this study, we discuss to what extent the volatilization models can be improved and the questions they pose for current research in water transfer modeling and parameterization

  11. An extension of the extended parallel process model (EPPM) in television health news: the influence of health consciousness on individual message processing and acceptance.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyehyun

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the role of health consciousness in processing TV news that contains potential health threats and preventive recommendations. Based on the extended parallel process model (Witte, 1992), relationships among health consciousness, perceived severity, perceived susceptibility, perceived response efficacy, perceived self-efficacy, and message acceptance/rejection were hypothesized. Responses collected from 175 participants after viewing four TV health news stories were analyzed using the bootstrapping analysis (Preacher & Hayes, 2008). Results confirmed three mediators (i.e., perceived severity, response efficacy, self-efficacy) in the influence of health consciousness on message acceptance. A negative association found between health consciousness and perceived susceptibility is discussed in relation to characteristics of health conscious individuals and optimistic bias of health risks. PMID:21416420

  12. Analysis of Surface Heterogeneity Effects with Mesoscale Terrestrial Modeling Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmer, C.

    2015-12-01

    An improved understanding of the full variability in the weather and climate system is crucial for reducing the uncertainty in weather forecasting and climate prediction, and to aid policy makers to develop adaptation and mitigation strategies. A yet unknown part of uncertainty in the predictions from the numerical models is caused by the negligence of non-resolved land surface heterogeneity and the sub-surface dynamics and their potential impact on the state of the atmosphere. At the same time, mesoscale numerical models using finer horizontal grid resolution [O(1)km] can suffer from inconsistencies and neglected scale-dependencies in ABL parameterizations and non-resolved effects of integrated surface-subsurface lateral flow at this scale. Our present knowledge suggests large-eddy-simulation (LES) as an eventual solution to overcome the inadequacy of the physical parameterizations in the atmosphere in this transition scale, yet we are constrained by the computational resources, memory management, big-data, when using LES for regional domains. For the present, there is a need for scale-aware parameterizations not only in the atmosphere but also in the land surface and subsurface model components. In this study, we use the recently developed Terrestrial Systems Modeling Platform (TerrSysMP) as a numerical tool to analyze the uncertainty in the simulation of surface exchange fluxes and boundary layer circulations at grid resolutions of the order of 1km, and explore the sensitivity of the atmospheric boundary layer evolution and convective rainfall processes on land surface heterogeneity.

  13. The Dissociated Amorphous Silica Surface: Model Development and Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hassanali, Ali A; Zhang, Hui; Knight, Chris; Shin, Yun Kyung; Singer, Sherwin J

    2010-11-01

    At pH 7, amorphous silica has a characteristic negative charge due to the deprotonation of silanol groups on the surface. Electrokinetic phenomena and transport of biomolecules in devices depend sensitively on the surface morphology, distribution of ions and solvent, and adsorption properties of solutes close to the surface in the electrical double layer region. Hence, simulation of these phenomena requires detailed atomistic models of the double layer region. In this Article, we extend our undissociated silica surface model [J. Phys. Chem. B 2007, 111, 11181-11193] to include dissociated Si-O(-) groups, which interact with both water and salt (Na(+) and Cl(-)). We have also conducted ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations of a smaller system consisting of a hydrated silica slab. The radial distribution functions predicted by the empirical model are in qualitative agreement with those from the AIMD simulations. The hydrophobic and hydrophilic nature of silanol-poor and silanol-rich regions of the amorphous silica surface observed in our empirical model is reproduced in the AIMD simulations of the smaller slab. In the initial stages of our AIMD simulations, we observe various chemical processes that represent different hydroxylation mechanisms of the surface.

  14. Using water isotopes in the evaluation of land surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmo, Francesca; Risi, Camille; Ottlé, Catherine; Bastrikov, Vladislav; Valdayskikh, Victor; Cattani, Olivier; Jouzel, Jean; Gribanov, Konstantin; Nekrasova, Olga; Zacharov, Vyacheslav; Ogée, Jérôme; Wingate, Lisa; Raz-Yaseef, Naama

    2013-04-01

    Several studies show that uncertainties in the representation of land surface processes contribute significantly to the spread in projections for the hydrological cycle. Improvements in the evaluation of land surface models would therefore translate into more reliable predictions of future changes. The isotopic composition of water is affected by phase transitions and, for this reason, is a good tracer for the hydrological cycle. Particularly relevant for the assessment of land surface processes is the fact that bare soil evaporation and transpiration bear different isotopic signatures. Water isotopic measurement could thus be employed in the evaluation of the land surface hydrological budget. With this objective, isotopes have been implemented in the most recent version of the land surface model ORCHIDEE. This model has undergone considerable development in the past few years. In particular, a newly discretised (11 layers) hydrology aims at a more realistic representation of the soil water budget. In addition, biogeophysical processes, as, for instance, the dynamics of permafrost and of its interaction with snow and vegetation, have been included. This model version will allow us to better resolve vertical profiles of soil water isotopic composition and to more realistically simulate the land surface hydrological and isotopic budget in a broader range of climate zones. Model results have been evaluated against temperature profiles and isotopes measurements in soil and stem water at sites located in semi-arid (Yatir), temperate (Le Bray) and boreal (Labytnangi) regions. Seasonal cycles are reasonably well reproduced. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis investigates to what extent water isotopic measurements in soil water can help constrain the representation of land surface processes, with a focus on the partitioning between evaporation and transpiration. In turn, improvements in the description of this partitioning may help reduce the uncertainties in the land

  15. SSM - SOLID SURFACE MODELER, VERSION 6.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goza, S. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Solid Surface Modeler (SSM) is an interactive graphics software application for solid-shaded and wireframe three- dimensional geometric modeling. It enables the user to construct models of real-world objects as simple as boxes or as complex as Space Station Freedom. The program has a versatile user interface that, in many cases, allows mouse input for intuitive operation or keyboard input when accuracy is critical. SSM can be used as a stand-alone model generation and display program and offers high-fidelity still image rendering. Models created in SSM can also be loaded into other software for animation or engineering simulation. (See the information below for the availability of SSM with the Object Orientation Manipulator program, OOM, a graphics software application for three-dimensional rendering and animation.) Models are constructed within SSM using functions of the Create Menu to create, combine, and manipulate basic geometric building blocks called primitives. Among the simpler primitives are boxes, spheres, ellipsoids, cylinders, and plates; among the more complex primitives are tubes, skinned-surface models and surfaces of revolution. SSM also provides several methods for duplicating models. Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) is one of the most powerful model manipulation tools provided by SSM. The CSG operations implemented in SSM are union, subtraction and intersection. SSM allows the user to transform primitives with respect to each axis, transform the camera (the user's viewpoint) about its origin, apply texture maps and bump maps to model surfaces, and define color properties; to select and combine surface-fill attributes, including wireframe, constant, and smooth; and to specify models' points of origin (the positions about which they rotate). SSM uses Euler angle transformations for calculating the results of translation and rotation operations. The user has complete control over the modeling environment from within the system. A variety of file

  16. Modeling Urban Surface-Atmosphere Sensible Heat Exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, S. M.; Oke, T.; Lemonsu, A.; Grimmond, C.; Jackson, P.

    2003-12-01

    Understanding the nature of energy partitioning at the surface of cities is prerequisite to gaining proper insight and ability to model their climatic environment and impacts. Of particular relevance in the urban setting is the surface-atmosphere exchange of sensible heat. The combined conductive-convective exchange of turbulent sensible heat flux (QH) and net storage heat flux (Δ QS) has been shown to account for over 90% of the daytime net radiation at highly urbanized sites. This relation depends on surface structure, materials and the degree of surface-atmosphere coupling and its understanding is required in many applications; for example, to assess building climates, and to model evapo-transpiration, the urban heat island, and boundary layer growth. Observational studies, while allowing for general awareness of urban surface-atmosphere energetic interactions, are often limited in their applicability to other urban sites and/or processes. To overcome this, numerical models which aim to simulate urban climates have been developed. The Town Energy Balance (TEB) model of Masson (2000) couples the micro- and meso- scales and accurately represents the urban energy budget in meso-scale atmospheric models. TEB uses local canyon geometry together with surface and substrate radiative, thermal, moisture and roughness properties to simulate the effects produced by the presence of buildings. The urban system is simulated by calculating individual energy balances for walls, roads, and roofs, which are then integrated to resolve the local-scale surface energy balance. The model has been independently evaluated using measured fluxes from three dry sites - central Mexico City, a light industrial site in Vancouver (Masson et al., 2002) and the city center of Marseille, France (Lemonsu et al., 2003). At these sites, TEB simulated net radiation to within less than 10 W m-2 and its partitioning into turbulent and storage heat fluxes to within a few tens of W -2. TEB's good

  17. Nanofaceted platinum surfaces: a new model system for nanoparticle catalysts.

    PubMed

    Komanicky, Vladimir; Menzel, Andreas; Chang, Kee-Chul; You, Hoydoo

    2005-12-15

    We present a novel model system for nanoparticle electrocatalysts. A surface consisting of alternating (100) and (111) facets, several nanometers across and nearly 1 microm long, were self-assembled by annealing Pt single crystal surfaces initially cut at the midpoint between [111] and [100] directions, i.e., Pt(1+ square root of 3 1 1). The formation of these self-assembled arrays of nanofacets was monitored by in-situ surface X-ray scattering. These surfaces were further characterized with scanning probe microscopy and cyclic voltammetry. We found that the Pt(1+ square root of 3 1 1) surface is flat with less than 1 nm rms roughness when it was annealed in argon/hydrogen atmosphere. Then the surface forms nanofacets when it is annealed in pure air. This nanofaceting transition was completely reversible and reproducible. We investigated effects of CO adsorption on the voltammetric characteristics of both hydrogen-annealed and air-annealed surfaces. We found that CO-adsorption/desorption cycles in CO containing electrolyte solution result in considerable modification of blank cyclic voltammograms for the both surfaces. We attributed these differences to the electrochemical annealing of surface defects due to the increased mobility during the cycles.

  18. Surface differentiation by parametric modeling of infrared intensity scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aytac, Tayfun; Barshan, Billur

    2005-06-01

    We differentiate surfaces with different properties with simple low-cost IR emitters and detectors in a location-invariant manner. The intensity readings obtained with such sensors are highly dependent on the location and properties of the surface, which complicates the differentiation and localization process. Our approach, which models IR intensity scans parametrically, can distinguish different surfaces independent of their positions. Once the surface type is identified, its position (r,θ) can also be estimated. The method is verified experimentally with wood; Styrofoam packaging material; white painted matte wall; white and black cloth; and white, brown, and violet paper. A correct differentiation rate of 100% is achieved for six surfaces, and the surfaces are localized within absolute range and azimuth errors of 0.2 cm and 1.1 deg, respectively. The differentiation rate decreases to 86% for seven surfaces and to 73% for eight surfaces. The method demonstrated shows that simple IR sensors, when coupled with appropriate signal processing, can be used to recognize different types of surfaces in a location-invariant manner.

  19. Assessment of Response Surface Models using Independent Confirmation Point Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLoach, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This paper highlights various advantages that confirmation-point residuals have over conventional model design-point residuals in assessing the adequacy of a response surface model fitted by regression techniques to a sample of experimental data. Particular advantages are highlighted for the case of design matrices that may be ill-conditioned for a given sample of data. The impact of both aleatory and epistemological uncertainty in response model adequacy assessments is considered.

  20. Self Acceptance and the Selection of a Marital Partner - An Assessment of the SVR Model of Murstein.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Zahava

    1986-01-01

    Mate selection is often explained by either the homogenity or the complementary need model. The Stimulus-Value-Response (SVR) model for integration of the two models was assessed in the present study. The sample included 48 engaged Israeli couples. Results support the SVR model and confirm earlier research in this area. Conceptual and…

  1. Modeling graphene based surface plasmon waveguides and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pond, J.; Duque-Gomez, F.; Alam, A.; Armenta, R.; Niegemann, J.; McGuire, D.; Reid, A.

    2016-02-01

    Graphene is different from most optical materials in that it is a thin material layer with a thickness as small as one atom. Graphene layers can be incorporated into optical simulations using either a surface conductivity material model or a volumetric permittivity material model; however, introducing graphene through a volumetric permittivity is computationally inefficient because it requires very fine discretization grids. We have recently developed a more efficient approach that enables the use of comparatively coarse grids by formulating a discretization of Maxwell's equations (in the time or frequency domains) that combines a surface conductivity description of graphene layers with a volumetric permittivity description of other optical materials. This approach includes the full dispersion characteristics of graphene as specified by the Kubo formula. This paper demonstrates how the combined material description approach can be used to efficiently model state-of-the-art devices that take advantage of the energy confinement provided by surface plasmons. We show how to efficiently model TE and TM polarized surface plasmons, a surface plasmon waveguide switch, and an electro-optical modulator. This last example also includes electrical simulations of graphene and demonstrates how both optical and electrical simulations can be combined to produce a complete model of a graphene based device. For each example, we compare with previously published results, including experimental results.

  2. Modelling cell motility and chemotaxis with evolving surface finite elements

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Charles M.; Stinner, Björn; Venkataraman, Chandrasekhar

    2012-01-01

    We present a mathematical and a computational framework for the modelling of cell motility. The cell membrane is represented by an evolving surface, with the movement of the cell determined by the interaction of various forces that act normal to the surface. We consider external forces such as those that may arise owing to inhomogeneities in the medium and a pressure that constrains the enclosed volume, as well as internal forces that arise from the reaction of the cells' surface to stretching and bending. We also consider a protrusive force associated with a reaction–diffusion system (RDS) posed on the cell membrane, with cell polarization modelled by this surface RDS. The computational method is based on an evolving surface finite-element method. The general method can account for the large deformations that arise in cell motility and allows the simulation of cell migration in three dimensions. We illustrate applications of the proposed modelling framework and numerical method by reporting on numerical simulations of a model for eukaryotic chemotaxis and a model for the persistent movement of keratocytes in two and three space dimensions. Movies of the simulated cells can be obtained from http://homepages.warwick.ac.uk/∼maskae/CV_Warwick/Chemotaxis.html. PMID:22675164

  3. Examining the Influence of Subjective Norm and Facilitating Conditions on the Intention to Use Technology among Pre-Service Teachers: A Structural Equation Modeling of an Extended Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teo, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    This study examined pre-service teachers' self-reported behavioral intentions to use technology. Three hundred and fourteen participants completed a survey questionnaire measuring their responses to six constructs from a research model that extends the technology acceptance model (TAM) by including facilitating conditions and subjective norm.…

  4. Application of the PTT model to axisymmetric free surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merejolli, R.; Paulo, G. S.; Tomé, M. F.

    2013-10-01

    This work is concerned with numerical simulation of axisymmetric viscoelastic free surface flows using the Phan-Thien-Tanner (PTT) constitutive equation. A finite difference technique for solving the governing equations for unsteady incompressible flows written in Cylindrical coordinates on a staggered grid is described. The fluid is modelled by a Marker-and-Cell type method and an accurate representation of the fluid surface is employed. The full free surface stress conditions are applied. The numerical method is verified by comparing numerical predictions of fully developed flow in a pipe with the corresponding analytic solutions. To demonstrate that the numerical method can simulate axisymmetric free surface flows governed by the PTT model, numerical results of the flow evolution of a drop impacting on a rigid dry plate are presented. In these simulations, the rheological effects of the parameters ɛ and ξ are investigated.

  5. Internal Physical Features of a Land Surface Model Employing a Tangent Linear Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Runhua; Cohn, Stephen E.; daSilva, Arlindo; Joiner, Joanna; Houser, Paul R.

    1997-01-01

    The Earth's land surface, including its biomass, is an integral part of the Earth's weather and climate system. Land surface heterogeneity, such as the type and amount of vegetative covering., has a profound effect on local weather variability and therefore on regional variations of the global climate. Surface conditions affect local weather and climate through a number of mechanisms. First, they determine the re-distribution of the net radiative energy received at the surface, through the atmosphere, from the sun. A certain fraction of this energy increases the surface ground temperature, another warms the near-surface atmosphere, and the rest evaporates surface water, which in turn creates clouds and causes precipitation. Second, they determine how much rainfall and snowmelt can be stored in the soil and how much instead runs off into waterways. Finally, surface conditions influence the near-surface concentration and distribution of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide. The processes through which these mechanisms interact with the atmosphere can be modeled mathematically, to within some degree of uncertainty, on the basis of underlying physical principles. Such a land surface model provides predictive capability for surface variables including ground temperature, surface humidity, and soil moisture and temperature. This information is important for agriculture and industry, as well as for addressing fundamental scientific questions concerning global and local climate change. In this study we apply a methodology known as tangent linear modeling to help us understand more deeply, the behavior of the Mosaic land surface model, a model that has been developed over the past several years at NASA/GSFC. This methodology allows us to examine, directly and quantitatively, the dependence of prediction errors in land surface variables upon different vegetation conditions. The work also highlights the importance of accurate soil moisture information. Although surface

  6. Parameterizing Subgrid Orographic Precipitation and Surface Cover in Climate Models

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Lai R.; Ghan, Steven J.

    1998-10-01

    Previous development of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's regional climate model has focused on representing orographic precipitation using a subgrid parameterization where subgrid variations of surface elevation are aggregated to a limited number of elevation classes. An airflow model and a thermodynamic model are used to parameterize the orographic uplift/descent as air parcels cross over mountain barriers or valleys. This paper describes further testing and evaluation of this subgrid parameterization. Building upon this modeling framework, a subgrid vegetation scheme has been developed based on statistical relationships between surface elevation and vegetation. By analyzing high-resolution elevation and vegetation data, a dominant land cover is defined for each elevation band of each model grid cell to account for the subgrid heterogeneity in vegetation. When larger lakes are present, they are distinguished from land within elevation bands and a lake model is used to simulate the thermodynamic properties. The use of the high-resolution vegetation data and the subgrid vegetation scheme has resulted in an improvement in the model's representation of surface cover over the western United States. Simulation using the new vegetation scheme yields a 1 C cooling when compared with a simulation where vegetation was derived from a 30-min global vegetation dataset without subgrid vegetation treatment; this cooling helps to reduce the warm bias previously found in the regional climate model. A 3-yr simulation with the subgrid parameterization in the climate model is compared with observations.

  7. NEFDS contamination model parameter estimation of powder contaminated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, Timothy J.; Messinger, David W.

    2016-05-01

    Hyperspectral signatures of powdered contaminated surfaces are challenging to characterize due to intimate mixing between materials. Most radiometric models have difficulties in recreating these signatures due to non-linear interactions between particles with different physical properties. The Nonconventional Exploitation Factors Data System (NEFDS) Contamination Model is capable of recreating longwave hyperspectral signatures at any contamination mixture amount, but only for a limited selection of materials currently in the database. A method has been developed to invert the NEFDS model and perform parameter estimation on emissivity measurements from a variety of powdered materials on substrates. This model was chosen for its potential to accurately determine contamination coverage density as a parameter in the inverted model. Emissivity data were measured using a Designs and Prototypes fourier transform infrared spectrometer model 102 for different levels of contamination. Temperature emissivity separation was performed to convert data from measure radiance to estimated surface emissivity. Emissivity curves were then input into the inverted model and parameters were estimated for each spectral curve. A comparison of measured data with extrapolated model emissivity curves using estimated parameter values assessed performance of the inverted NEFDS contamination model. This paper will present the initial results of the experimental campaign and the estimated surface coverage parameters.

  8. Modeling surface backgrounds from radon progeny plate-out

    SciTech Connect

    Perumpilly, G.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Snyder, N.

    2013-08-08

    The next generation low-background detectors operating deep underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. The surface deposition and subsequent implantation of radon progeny in detector materials will be a source of energetic background events. We investigate Monte Carlo and model-based simulations to understand the surface implantation profile of radon progeny. Depending on the material and region of interest of a rare event search, these partial energy depositions can be problematic. Motivated by the use of Ge crystals for the detection of neutrinoless double-beta decay, we wish to understand the detector response of surface backgrounds from radon progeny. We look at the simulation of surface decays using a validated implantation distribution based on nuclear recoils and a realistic surface texture. Results of the simulations and measured α spectra are presented.

  9. Modeling of gun barrel surface erosion: Historic perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.

    1996-08-01

    Results and interpretations of numerical simulations of some dominant processes influencing gun barrel propellant combustion and flow-induced erosion are presented. Results include modeled influences of erosion reduction techniques such as solid additives, vapor phase chemical modifications, and alteration of surface solid composition through use of thin coatings. Precedents and historical perspective are provided with predictions from traditional interior ballistics compared to computer simulations. Accelerating reactive combustion flow, multiphase and multicomponent transport, flow-to-surface thermal/momentum/phase change/gas-surface chemical exchanges, surface and micro-depth subsurface heating/stress/composition evolution and their roles in inducing surface cracking, spall, ablation, melting, and vaporization are considered. Recognition is given to cyclic effects of previous firing history on material preconditioning. Current perspective and outlook for future are based on results of a US Army-LLNL erosion research program covering 7 y in late 1970s. This is supplemented by more recent research on hypervelocity electromagnetic projectile launchers.

  10. Modelling of frost formation and growth on microstuctured surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muntaha, Md. Ali; Haider, Md. Mushfique; Rahman, Md. Ashiqur

    2016-07-01

    Frost formation on heat exchangers is an undesirable phenomenon often encountered in different applications where the cold surface with a temperature below freezing point of water is exposed to humid air. The formation of frost on the heat transfer surface results in an increase in pressure drop and reduction in heat transfer, resulting in a reduction of the system efficiency. Many factors, including the temperature and moisture content of air, cold plate temperature, surface wettability etc., are known to affect frost formation and growth. In our present study, a model for frost growth on rectangular, periodic microgroove surfaces for a range of microgroove dimension (ten to hundreds of micron) is presented. The mathematical model is developed analytically by solving the governing heat and mass transfer equations with appropriate boundary conditions using the EES (Engineering Equation Solver) software. For temperature, a convective boundary condition at frost-air interface and a fixed cold plate surface temperature is used. Instead of considering the saturation or super-saturation models, density gradient at the surface is obtained by considering experimentally-found specified heat flux. The effect of surface wettability is incorporated by considering the distribution of condensed water droplets at the early stage of frost formation. Thickness, density and thermal conductivity of frost layer on the micro-grooved surfaces are found to vary with the dimension of the grooves. The variation of density and thickness of the frost layer on these micro-grooved surfaces under natural convection is numerally determined for a range of plate temperature and air temperature conditions and is compared with experimental results found in the open literature.

  11. Adherence of Model Molecules to Silica Surfaces: First Principle Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuñez, Matías; Prado, Miguel Oscar

    The adherence of "model molecules" methylene blue and eosine Y ("positive" and "negatively" charged respectively) to crystal SiO2 surfaces is studied from first principle calculations at the DFT level. Adsorption energies are calculated which follow the experimental threads obtained elsewhere (Rivera et al., 2013). We study the quantum nature of the electronic charge transfer between the surface and the molecules, showing the localized and delocalized patterns associated to the repulsive and attractive case respectively.

  12. Simulating surface-enhanced Raman optical activity using atomistic electrodynamics-quantum mechanical models.

    PubMed

    Chulhai, Dhabih V; Jensen, Lasse

    2014-10-01

    Raman optical activity has proven to be a powerful tool for probing the geometry of small organic and biomolecules. It has therefore been expected that the same mechanisms responsible for surface-enhanced Raman scattering may allow for similar enhancements in surface-enhanced Raman optical activity (SEROA). However, SEROA has proved to be an experimental challenge and mirror-image SEROA spectra of enantiomers have so far not been measured. There exists a handful of theories to simulate SEROA, all of which treat the perturbed molecule as a point-dipole object. To go beyond these approximations, we present two new methods to simulate SEROA: the first is a dressed-tensors model that treats the molecule as a point-dipole and point-quadrupole object; the second method is the discrete interaction model/quantum mechanical (DIM/QM) model, which considers the entire charge density of the molecule. We show that although the first method is acceptable for small molecules, it fails for a medium-sized one such as 2-bromohexahelicene. We also show that the SEROA mode intensities and signs are highly sensitive to the nature of the local electric field and gradient, the orientation of the molecule, and the surface plasmon frequency width. Our findings give some insight into why experimental SEROA, and in particular observing mirror-image SEROA for enantiomers, has been difficult.

  13. Modeling of water outgassing from metal surfaces (III)

    SciTech Connect

    Minxu Li; H. F. Dylla

    1995-06-01

    A model of water adsorption on metal oxide layers and water outgassing from metal surfaces has been developed. The oxide layer is assumed to have porous structure and a pore length (l) distribution of l/l{sup 2}. Numerical evaluation shows that the quantity of water adsorbed is logarithmic with time within a certain time range as experimentally observed. The outgassing rate from surfaces with adsorbed water distributed uniformly on the inner surfaces of individual pores is shown analytically to be inversely proportional to time. This result is consistent with frequently observed pumpdown curves.

  14. Modeling the Surface Temperature of Earth-like Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladilo, Giovanni; Silva, Laura; Murante, Giuseppe; Filippi, Luca; Provenzale, Antonello

    2015-05-01

    We introduce a novel Earth-like planet surface temperature model (ESTM) for habitability studies based on the spatial-temporal distribution of planetary surface temperatures. The ESTM adopts a surface energy balance model (EBM) complemented by: radiative-convective atmospheric column calculations, a set of physically based parameterizations of meridional transport, and descriptions of surface and cloud properties more refined than in standard EBMs. The parameterization is valid for rotating terrestrial planets with shallow atmospheres and moderate values of axis obliquity (ɛ ≲ 45{}^\\circ ). Comparison with a 3D model of atmospheric dynamics from the literature shows that the equator-to-pole temperature differences predicted by the two models agree within ≈ 5 K when the rotation rate, insolation, surface pressure and planet radius are varied in the intervals 0.5≲ {Ω }/{{{Ω }}\\oplus }≲ 2, 0.75≲ S/{{S}\\circ }≲ 1.25, 0.3≲ p/(1 bar)≲ 10, and 0.5≲ R/{{R}\\oplus }≲ 2, respectively. The ESTM has an extremely low computational cost and can be used when the planetary parameters are scarcely known (as for most exoplanets) and/or whenever many runs for different parameter configurations are needed. Model simulations of a test-case exoplanet (Kepler-62e) indicate that an uncertainty in surface pressure within the range expected for terrestrial planets may impact the mean temperature by ˜ 60 K. Within the limits of validity of the ESTM, the impact of surface pressure is larger than that predicted by uncertainties in rotation rate, axis obliquity, and ocean fractions. We discuss the possibility of performing a statistical ranking of planetary habitability taking advantage of the flexibility of the ESTM.

  15. A model of the diurnal variation in lake surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, Jonathan L.

    Satellite measurements of water surface temperature can benefit several environmental applications such as predictions of lake evaporation, meteorological forecasts, and predictions of lake overturning events, among others. However, limitations on the temporal resolution of satellite measurements restrict these improvements. A model of the diurnal variation in lake surface temperature could potentially increase the effective temporal resolution of satellite measurements of surface temperature, thereby enhancing the utility of these measurements in the above applications. Herein, a one-dimensional transient thermal model of a lake is used in combination with surface temperature measurements from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard the Aqua and Terra satellites, along with ambient atmospheric conditions from local weather stations, and bulk temperature measurements to calculate the diurnal surface temperature variation for the five major lakes in the Savannah River Basin in South Carolina: Lakes Jocassee, Keowee, Hartwell, Russell, and Thurmond. The calculated solutions are used to obtain a functional form for the diurnal surface temperature variation of these lakes. Differences in diurnal variation in surface temperature between each of these lakes are identified and potential explanations for these differences are presented.

  16. Regional scale hydrology with a new land surface processes model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laymon, Charles; Crosson, William

    1995-01-01

    Through the CaPE Hydrometeorology Project, we have developed an understanding of some of the unique data quality issues involved in assimilating data of disparate types for regional-scale hydrologic modeling within a GIS framework. Among others, the issues addressed here include the development of adequate validation of the surface water budget, implementation of the STATSGO soil data set, and implementation of a remote sensing-derived landcover data set to account for surface heterogeneity. A model of land surface processes has been developed and used in studies of the sensitivity of surface fluxes and runoff to soil and landcover characterization. Results of these experiments have raised many questions about how to treat the scale-dependence of land surface-atmosphere interactions on spatial and temporal variability. In light of these questions, additional modifications are being considered for the Marshall Land Surface Processes Model. It is anticipated that these techniques can be tested and applied in conjunction with GCIP activities over regional scales.

  17. Photosynthesis sensitivity to climate change in land surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manrique-Sunen, Andrea; Black, Emily; Verhoef, Anne; Balsamo, Gianpaolo

    2016-04-01

    Accurate representation of vegetation processes within land surface models is key to reproducing surface carbon, water and energy fluxes. Photosynthesis determines the amount of CO2 fixated by plants as well as the water lost in transpiration through the stomata. Photosynthesis is calculated in land surface models using empirical equations based on plant physiological research. It is assumed that CO2 assimilation is either CO2 -limited, radiation -limited ; and in some models export-limited (the speed at which the products of photosynthesis are used by the plant) . Increased levels of atmospheric CO2 concentration tend to enhance photosynthetic activity, but the effectiveness of this fertilization effect is regulated by environmental conditions and the limiting factor in the photosynthesis reaction. The photosynthesis schemes at the 'leaf level' used by land surface models JULES and CTESSEL have been evaluated against field photosynthesis observations. Also, the response of photosynthesis to radiation, atmospheric CO2 and temperature has been analysed for each model, as this is key to understanding the vegetation response that climate models using these schemes are able to reproduce. Particular emphasis is put on the limiting factor as conditions vary. It is found that while at present day CO2 concentrations export-limitation is only relevant at low temperatures, as CO2 levels rise it becomes an increasingly important restriction on photosynthesis.

  18. Modeling studies of geothermal systems with a free water surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.

    1983-12-01

    A numerical simulator was developed for the modeling of air-steam-water systems. The simulator was applied to various problems involving injection into or production from a geothermal reservoir in hydraulic communication with a shallow free-surface aquifer. First, a one-dimensional column problem is considered and the water level movement during exploitation is studied using different capillary pressure functions. Second, a two-dimensional radial model is used to study and compare reservoir depletion for cases with and without a free-surface aquifer. Finally, the contamination of a shallow free-surface aquifer due to cold water injection is investigated. The primary aim of these studies is to obtain an understanding of the response of a reservoir in hydraulic communication with a unconfined aquifer during exploitation or injection and to determine under which circumstances conventional modeling techniques (fully saturated systems) can be applied to such systems.

  19. Surface photovoltage measurements and finite element modeling of SAW devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, Christine

    2012-03-01

    Over the course of a Summer 2011 internship with the MEMS department of Sandia National Laboratories, work was completed on two major projects. The first and main project of the summer involved taking surface photovoltage measurements for silicon samples, and using these measurements to determine surface recombination velocities and minority carrier diffusion lengths of the materials. The SPV method was used to fill gaps in the knowledge of material parameters that had not been determined successfully by other characterization methods. The second project involved creating a 2D finite element model of a surface acoustic wave device. A basic form of the model with the expected impedance response curve was completed, and the model is ready to be further developed for analysis of MEMS photonic resonator devices.

  20. Growth exponents in surface models with non-active sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, M.; Figueiredo, W.; Aarão Reis, F. D. A.

    2006-11-01

    In this work, we studied the role played by the inactive sites present on the substrate of a growing surface. In our model, one particle sticks at the surface if the site where it falls is an active site. However, we allow the deposited particle to diffuse along the surface in accordance with some mechanism previously defined. Using Monte Carlo simulations, and some analytical results, we have investigated the model in (1+1) and (2+1) dimensions considering different relaxation mechanisms. We show that the consideration of non-active sites is a crucial point in the model. In fact, we have seen that the saturation regime is not observed for any value of the density of inactive sites. Besides, the growth exponent β turns to be one, at long times, whatever the mechanism of diffusion we consider in one and two dimensions.

  1. Evaluating soil moisture constraints on surface fluxes in land surface models globally

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Phil; Gallego-Elvira, Belen; Taylor, Christopher; Folwell, Sonja; Ghent, Darren; Veal, Karen; Hagemann, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture availability exerts a strong control over land evaporation in many regions. However, global climate models (GCMs) disagree on when and where evaporation is limited by soil moisture. Evaluation of the relevant modelled processes has suffered from a lack of reliable, global observations of land evaporation at the GCM grid box scale. Satellite observations of land surface temperature (LST) offer spatially extensive but indirect information about the surface energy partition and, under certain conditions, about soil moisture availability on evaporation. Specifically, as soil moisture decreases during rain-free dry spells, evaporation may become limited leading to increases in LST and sensible heat flux. We use MODIS Terra and Aqua observations of LST at 1 km from 2000 to 2012 to assess changes in the surface energy partition during dry spells lasting 10 days or longer. The clear-sky LST data are aggregated to a global 0.5° grid before being composited as a function dry spell day across many events in a particular region and season. These composites are then used to calculate a Relative Warming Rate (RWR) between the land surface and near-surface air. This RWR can diagnose the typical strength of short term changes in surface heat fluxes and, by extension, changes in soil moisture limitation on evaporation. Offline land surface model (LSM) simulations offer a relatively inexpensive way to evaluate the surface processes of GCMs. They have the benefits that multiple models, and versions of models, can be compared on a common grid and using unbiased forcing. Here, we use the RWR diagnostic to assess global, offline simulations of several LSMs (e.g., JULES and JSBACH) driven by the WATCH Forcing Data-ERA Interim. Both the observed RWR and the LSMs use the same 0.5° grid, which allows the observed clear-sky sampling inherent in the underlying MODIS LST to be applied to the model outputs directly. This approach avoids some of the difficulties in analysing free

  2. Enhancing the Representation of Subgrid Land Surface Characteristics in Land Surface Models

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Yinghai; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Li, Hongyi

    2013-09-27

    Land surface heterogeneity has long been recognized and increasingly incorporated in the land surface modelling. In most existing land surface models, the spatial variability of surface cover is represented as subgrid composition of multiple surface cover types. In this study, we developed a new subgrid classification method (SGC) that accounts for the topographic variability of the vegetation cover. Each model grid cell was represented with a number of elevation classes and each elevation class was further described by a number of vegetation types. The numbers of elevation classes and vegetation types were variable and optimized for each model grid so that the spatial variability of both elevation and vegetation can be reasonably explained given a pre-determined total number of classes. The subgrid structure of the Community Land Model (CLM) was used as an example to illustrate the newly developed method in this study. With similar computational burden as the current subgrid vegetation representation in CLM, the new method is able to explain at least 80% of the total subgrid PFTs and greatly reduced the variations of elevation within each subgrid class compared to the baseline method where a single elevation class is assigned to each subgrid PFT. The new method was also evaluated against two other subgrid methods (SGC1 and SGC2) that assigned fixed numbers of elevation and vegetation classes for each model grid with different perspectives of surface cover classification. Implemented at five model resolutions (0.1°, 0.25°, 0.5°, 1.0° and 2.0°) with three maximum-allowed total number of classes N_class of 24, 18 and 12 representing different computational burdens over the North America (NA) continent, the new method showed variable performances compared to the SGC1 and SGC2 methods. However, the advantage of the SGC method over the other two methods clearly emerged at coarser model resolutions and with moderate computational intensity (N_class = 18) as it

  3. Modeling electron emission and surface effects from diamond cathodes

    DOE PAGES

    Dimitrov, D. A.; Smithe, D.; Cary, J. R.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Wang, E.

    2015-02-05

    We developed modeling capabilities, within the Vorpal particle-in-cell code, for three-dimensional (3D) simulations of surface effects and electron emission from semiconductor photocathodes. They include calculation of emission probabilities using general, piece-wise continuous, space-time dependent surface potentials, effective mass and band bending field effects. We applied these models, in combination with previously implemented capabilities for modeling charge generation and transport in diamond, to investigate the emission dependence on applied electric field in the range from approximately 2 MV/m to 17 MV/m along the [100] direction. The simulation results were compared to experimental data. For the considered parameter regime, conservation of transversemore » electron momentum (in the plane of the emission surface) allows direct emission from only two (parallel to [100]) of the six equivalent lowest conduction band valleys. When the electron affinity χ is the only parameter varied in the simulations, the value χ = 0.31 eV leads to overall qualitative agreement with the probability of emission deduced from experiments. Including band bending in the simulations improves the agreement with the experimental data, particularly at low applied fields, but not significantly. In this study, using surface potentials with different profiles further allows us to investigate the emission as a function of potential barrier height, width, and vacuum level position. However, adding surface patches with different levels of hydrogenation, modeled with position-dependent electron affinity, leads to the closest agreement with the experimental data.« less

  4. Modeling electron emission and surface effects from diamond cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrov, D. A.; Smithe, D.; Cary, J. R.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Wang, E.

    2015-02-05

    We developed modeling capabilities, within the Vorpal particle-in-cell code, for three-dimensional (3D) simulations of surface effects and electron emission from semiconductor photocathodes. They include calculation of emission probabilities using general, piece-wise continuous, space-time dependent surface potentials, effective mass and band bending field effects. We applied these models, in combination with previously implemented capabilities for modeling charge generation and transport in diamond, to investigate the emission dependence on applied electric field in the range from approximately 2 MV/m to 17 MV/m along the [100] direction. The simulation results were compared to experimental data. For the considered parameter regime, conservation of transverse electron momentum (in the plane of the emission surface) allows direct emission from only two (parallel to [100]) of the six equivalent lowest conduction band valleys. When the electron affinity χ is the only parameter varied in the simulations, the value χ = 0.31 eV leads to overall qualitative agreement with the probability of emission deduced from experiments. Including band bending in the simulations improves the agreement with the experimental data, particularly at low applied fields, but not significantly. In this study, using surface potentials with different profiles further allows us to investigate the emission as a function of potential barrier height, width, and vacuum level position. However, adding surface patches with different levels of hydrogenation, modeled with position-dependent electron affinity, leads to the closest agreement with the experimental data.

  5. Modeling electron emission and surface effects from diamond cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrov, D. A.; Smithe, D.; Cary, J. R.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Wang, E.

    2015-02-07

    We developed modeling capabilities, within the Vorpal particle-in-cell code, for three-dimensional simulations of surface effects and electron emission from semiconductor photocathodes. They include calculation of emission probabilities using general, piece-wise continuous, space-time dependent surface potentials, effective mass, and band bending field effects. We applied these models, in combination with previously implemented capabilities for modeling charge generation and transport in diamond, to investigate the emission dependence on applied electric field in the range from approximately 2 MV/m to 17 MV/m along the [100] direction. The simulation results were compared to experimental data. For the considered parameter regime, conservation of transverse electron momentum (in the plane of the emission surface) allows direct emission from only two (parallel to [100]) of the six equivalent lowest conduction band valleys. When the electron affinity χ is the only parameter varied in the simulations, the value χ = 0.31 eV leads to overall qualitative agreement with the probability of emission deduced from experiments. Including band bending in the simulations improves the agreement with the experimental data, particularly at low applied fields, but not significantly. Using surface potentials with different profiles further allows us to investigate the emission as a function of potential barrier height, width, and vacuum level position. However, adding surface patches with different levels of hydrogenation, modeled with position-dependent electron affinity, leads to the closest agreement with the experimental data.

  6. Surface complexation modeling of americium sorption onto volcanic tuff.

    PubMed

    Ding, M; Kelkar, S; Meijer, A

    2014-10-01

    Results of a surface complexation model (SCM) for americium sorption on volcanic rocks (devitrified and zeolitic tuff) are presented. The model was developed using PHREEQC and based on laboratory data for americium sorption on quartz. Available data for sorption of americium on quartz as a function of pH in dilute groundwater can be modeled with two surface reactions involving an americium sulfate and an americium carbonate complex. It was assumed in applying the model to volcanic rocks from Yucca Mountain, that the surface properties of volcanic rocks can be represented by a quartz surface. Using groundwaters compositionally representative of Yucca Mountain, americium sorption distribution coefficient (Kd, L/Kg) values were calculated as function of pH. These Kd values are close to the experimentally determined Kd values for americium sorption on volcanic rocks, decreasing with increasing pH in the pH range from 7 to 9. The surface complexation constants, derived in this study, allow prediction of sorption of americium in a natural complex system, taking into account the inherent uncertainty associated with geochemical conditions that occur along transport pathways. PMID:24963803

  7. Surface complexation modeling of americium sorption onto volcanic tuff.

    PubMed

    Ding, M; Kelkar, S; Meijer, A

    2014-10-01

    Results of a surface complexation model (SCM) for americium sorption on volcanic rocks (devitrified and zeolitic tuff) are presented. The model was developed using PHREEQC and based on laboratory data for americium sorption on quartz. Available data for sorption of americium on quartz as a function of pH in dilute groundwater can be modeled with two surface reactions involving an americium sulfate and an americium carbonate complex. It was assumed in applying the model to volcanic rocks from Yucca Mountain, that the surface properties of volcanic rocks can be represented by a quartz surface. Using groundwaters compositionally representative of Yucca Mountain, americium sorption distribution coefficient (Kd, L/Kg) values were calculated as function of pH. These Kd values are close to the experimentally determined Kd values for americium sorption on volcanic rocks, decreasing with increasing pH in the pH range from 7 to 9. The surface complexation constants, derived in this study, allow prediction of sorption of americium in a natural complex system, taking into account the inherent uncertainty associated with geochemical conditions that occur along transport pathways.

  8. Modeling the Asteroseismic Surface Term across the HR Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Joseph R.; Basu, Sarbani

    2015-08-01

    Asteroseismology is a powerful tool that can precisely characterize the mass, radius, and other properties of field stars. However, our inability to properly model the near-surface layers of stars creates a frequency-dependent frequency difference between the observed and the modeled frequencies, usually referred to as the “surface term.” This surface term can add significant errors to the derived stellar properties unless removed properly. In this paper, we simulate surface terms across a significant portion of the HR diagram, exploring four different masses (M=0.8,1.0,1.2, and 1.5 {M}⊙ ) at five metallicities ([{Fe}/{{H}}]=0.5,0.0,-0.5,-1.0, and -1.5) from the main sequence to red giants for stars with {T}{eff}\\lt 6500 K and explore how well the most common ways of fitting and removing the surface term actually perform. We find that the two-term model proposed by Ball & Gizon works much better than other models across a large portion of the HR diagram, including the red giants, leading us to recommend its use for future asteroseismic analyses.

  9. Comparison between Utsu's and Vere-Jones' aftershocks model by means of a computer simulation based on the acceptance-rejection sampling of von Neumann

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, J.; Morales-Esteban, A.; González, E.; Martínez-Álvarez, F.

    2016-07-01

    In this research, a new algorithm for generating a stochastic earthquake catalog is presented. The algorithm is based on the acceptance-rejection sampling of von Neumann. The result is a computer simulation of earthquakes based on the calculated statistical properties of each zone. Vere-Jones states that an earthquake sequence can be modeled as a series of random events. This is the model used in the proposed simulation. Contrariwise, Utsu indicates that the mainshocks are special geophysical events. The algorithm has been applied to zones of Chile, China, Spain, Japan, and the USA. This allows classifying the zones according to Vere-Jones' or Utsu's model. The results have been quantified relating the mainshock with the largest aftershock within the next 5 days (which has been named as Bath event). The results show that some zones fit Utsu's model and others Vere-Jones'. Finally, the fraction of seismic events that satisfy certain properties of magnitude and occurrence is analyzed.

  10. Modeling of surface roughness effects on glaze ice accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Yamaguchi, Keiko; Berkowitz, Brian M.; Potapczuk, Mark

    1990-01-01

    A series of experimental investigations focused on studying the cause and effect of roughness on accreting glaze ice surfaces were conducted. Detailed microvideo observations were made of glaze ice accretions on 1 to 4 inch diameter cylinders in three icing wind tunnels (the Data Products of New England six inch test facility, the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel, and the B. F. Goodrich Ice Protection Research Facility). Infrared thermal video recordings were made of accreting ice surfaces in the Goodrich facility. Distinct zones of surface water behavior were observed; a smooth wet zone in the stagnation region with a uniform water film; a rough zone where surface tension effects caused coalescence of surface water into stationary beads; a horn zone where roughness elements grow into horn shapes; a runback zone where surface water ran back as rivulets; and a dry zone where rime feathers formed. The location of the transition from the smooth to the rough zone was found to migrate with time towards the stagnation point. The behavior of the transition appeared to be controlled by boundary layer transition and bead formation mechanisms at the interface between the smooth and rough zones. Regions of wet ice growth and enhanced heat transfer were clearly visible in the infrared video recordings of glaze ice surfaces. A simple multi-zone modification to the current glaze ice accretion model was proposed to include spatial variability in surface roughness.

  11. An operator calculus for surface and volume modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    The mathematical techniques which form the foundation for most of the surface and volume modeling techniques used in practice are briefly described. An outline of what may be termed an operator calculus for the approximation and interpolation of functions of more than one independent variable is presented. By considering the linear operators associated with bivariate and multivariate interpolation/approximation schemes, it is shown how they can be compounded by operator multiplication and Boolean addition to obtain a distributive lattice of approximation operators. It is then demonstrated via specific examples how this operator calculus leads to practical techniques for sculptured surface and volume modeling.

  12. Model of evolution of surface grain structure under ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Knyazeva, Anna G.; Kryukova, Olga N.

    2014-11-14

    Diffusion and chemical reactions in multicomponent systems play an important role in numerous technology applications. For example, surface treatment of materials and coatings by particle beam leads to chemical composition and grain structure change. To investigate the thermal-diffusion and chemical processes affecting the evolution of surface structure, the mathematical modeling is efficient addition to experiment. In this paper two-dimensional model is discussed to describe the evolution of titanium nitride coating on the iron substrate under implantation of boron and carbon. The equation for diffusion fluxes and reaction rate are obtained using Gibbs energy expansion into series with respect to concentration and their gradients.

  13. Exposing earth surface process model simulations to a large audience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overeem, I.; Kettner, A. J.; Borkowski, L.; Russell, E. L.; Peddicord, H.

    2015-12-01

    The Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System (CSDMS) represents a diverse group of >1300 scientists who develop and apply numerical models to better understand the Earth's surface. CSDMS has a mandate to make the public more aware of model capabilities and therefore started sharing state-of-the-art surface process modeling results with large audiences. One platform to reach audiences outside the science community is through museum displays on 'Science on a Sphere' (SOS). Developed by NOAA, SOS is a giant globe, linked with computers and multiple projectors and can display data and animations on a sphere. CSDMS has developed and contributed model simulation datasets for the SOS system since 2014, including hydrological processes, coastal processes, and human interactions with the environment. Model simulations of a hydrological and sediment transport model (WBM-SED) illustrate global river discharge patterns. WAVEWATCH III simulations have been specifically processed to show the impacts of hurricanes on ocean waves, with focus on hurricane Katrina and super storm Sandy. A large world dataset of dams built over the last two centuries gives an impression of the profound influence of humans on water management. Given the exposure of SOS, CSDMS aims to contribute at least 2 model datasets a year, and will soon provide displays of global river sediment fluxes and changes of the sea ice free season along the Arctic coast. Over 100 facilities worldwide show these numerical model displays to an estimated 33 million people every year. Datasets storyboards, and teacher follow-up materials associated with the simulations, are developed to address common core science K-12 standards. CSDMS dataset documentation aims to make people aware of the fact that they look at numerical model results, that underlying models have inherent assumptions and simplifications, and that limitations are known. CSDMS contributions aim to familiarize large audiences with the use of numerical

  14. A finite difference model for free surface gravity drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Couri, F.R.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

    1993-09-01

    The unconfined gravity flow of liquid with a free surface into a well is a classical well test problem which has not been well understood by either hydrologists or petroleum engineers. Paradigms have led many authors to treat an incompressible flow as compressible flow to justify the delayed yield behavior of a time-drawdown test. A finite-difference model has been developed to simulate the free surface gravity flow of an unconfined single phase, infinitely large reservoir into a well. The model was verified with experimental results in sandbox models in the literature and with classical methods applied to observation wells in the Groundwater literature. The simulator response was also compared with analytical Theis (1935) and Ramey et al. (1989) approaches for wellbore pressure at late producing times. The seepage face in the sandface and the delayed yield behavior were reproduced by the model considering a small liquid compressibility and incompressible porous medium. The potential buildup (recovery) simulated by the model evidenced a different- phenomenon from the drawdown, contrary to statements found in the Groundwater literature. Graphs of buildup potential vs time, buildup seepage face length vs time, and free surface head and sand bottom head radial profiles evidenced that the liquid refills the desaturating cone as a flat moving surface. The late time pseudo radial behavior was only approached after exaggerated long times.

  15. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices; Modeling Exhaust Dispersion for Specifying Acceptable Exhaust/Intake Design (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-09-01

    This guide provides general information on specifying acceptable exhaust and intake designs. It also provides various quantitative approaches that can be used to determine expected concentration levels resulting from exhaust system emissions. In addition, the guide describes methodologies that can be employed to operate laboratory exhaust systems in a safe and energy efficient manner by using variable air volume (VAV) technology. The guide, one in a series on best practices for laboratories, was produced by Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21), a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Geared toward architects, engineers, and facility managers, the guides contain information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories. Studies show a direct relationship between indoor air quality and the health and productivity of building occupants. Historically, the study and protection of indoor air quality focused on emission sources emanating from within the building. For example, to ensure that the worker is not exposed to toxic chemicals, 'as manufactured' and 'as installed' containment specifications are required for fume hoods. However, emissions from external sources, which may be re-ingested into the building through closed circuiting between the building's exhaust stacks and air intakes, are an often overlooked aspect of indoor air quality.

  16. Modeling of a Surface Acoustic Wave Strain Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. C.; Atkinson, Gary M.

    2010-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is investigating Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensor technology for harsh environments aimed at aerospace applications. To aid in development of sensors a model of a SAW strain sensor has been developed. The new model extends the modified matrix method to include the response of Orthogonal Frequency Coded (OFC) reflectors and the response of SAW devices to strain. These results show that the model accurately captures the strain response of a SAW sensor on a Langasite substrate. The results of the model of a SAW Strain Sensor on Langasite are presented

  17. Land-surface atmosphere coupling in an earth system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vrese, Philipp; Hagemann, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    The interaction between the atmosphere and the strongly heterogeneous land surface is one of the central scientific topics within Earth system sciences and especially climate research. Many processes, such as vegetation dynamics and the development of spatial patterns in the Subtropics and permafrost regions, take place on scales much below the scale of model resolution. Thus, it is an important scientific challenge to consider the influence of sub-scale heterogeneity on the vertical near-surface fluxes of energy and water. Most climate models do not take into account the actual scale of surface heterogeneities. When coupling a heterogeneous surface to the atmosphere often coupling methods are employed, which include the underlying assumption that the horizontal extent of the individual heterogeneity is so small that the turbulent vertical fluxes stemming from the different surface heterogeneities within one grid-box have mixed horizontally below the lowest model level of the atmosphere. This assumption allows a comparatively simple land-surface-atmosphere coupling with a horizontally homogeneous state of the atmosphere, but it may also be the source of significant errors. In order to access the extent of error introduced we designed an experiment in which the results of three different coupling schemes were compared. The first one is a parameter-aggregation scheme, the second a flux-aggregation scheme based on the assumption of a horizontally homogeneous atmosphere on the lowest atmospheric model level and the third one is a coupling scheme which allows, up to a given height, for the atmosphere to be horizontally heterogeneous within a grid-box. These coupling methods were implemented in the land-surface model JSBACH which was then coupled to the general circulation model ECHAM6, both part of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology's earth system model MPI-ESM. In a first step sensitivity studies are being carried out to gain process understanding and to

  18. Land Surface Temperature Variational Assimilation within the ORCHIDEE Continental Surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, Hector Simon; Ottlé, Catherine; Thiria, Sylvie; Brajard, Julien; Bradan, Fouad; Maugis, Pascal

    2014-05-01

    Variational data assimilation of FLUXNET soil surface temperature is applied to the energy and water budgets modules of the ORCHIDEE land surface model. This part of the model, called SECHIBA, describes the exchanges of water and energy between the surface and the atmosphere. The adjoint semi-generator software YAO is used as a framework to implement 4D-VAR assimilation. First, sensitivity analysis was performed in order to validate the adjoint and to identify the most influential parameters. Following, the results of twin experiments using synthetic observations demonstrate the robustness, consistency and flexibility of the process. Rendundant combinations of parameters and insensitive ones can then be detected, thus allowing to document the most efficient set of parameters to calibrate. However, optimal sets of parameter vary with time of day, season, site and initial state, thus suggesting a calibration strategy based on different time windows and sites to help constrain a larger set of parameter than on a single space-time window. Doing so on two FLUXNET sites and including initial soil water content as a parameter improves the model output. Although it proved difficult to characterize at the same time state variables and fluxes, this study puts forward the potential of land surface temperature variational data assimilation in model calibration and prediction errors reduction.

  19. Simultaneous application of dissolution/precipitation and surface complexation/surface precipitation modeling to contaminant leaching.

    PubMed

    Apul, Defne S; Gardner, Kevin H; Eighmy, T Taylor; Fällman, Ann-Marie; Comans, Rob N J

    2005-08-01

    This paper discusses the modeling of anion and cation leaching from complex matrixes such as weathered steel slag. The novelty of the method is its simultaneous application of the theoretical models for solubility, competitive sorption, and surface precipitation phenomena to a complex system. Selective chemical extractions, pH dependent leaching experiments, and geochemical modeling were used to investigate the thermodynamic equilibrium of 12 ions (As, Ca, Cr, Ba, SO4, Mg, Cd, Cu, Mo, Pb, V, and Zn) with aqueous complexes, soluble solids, and sorptive surfaces in the presence of 12 background analytes (Al, Cl, Co, Fe, K, Mn, Na, Ni, Hg, NO3, CO3, and Ba). Modeling results show that surface complexation and surface precipitation reactions limit the aqueous concentrations of Cd, Zn, and Pb in an environment where Ca, Mg, Si, and CO3 dissolve from soluble solids and compete for sorption sites. The leaching of SO4, Cr, As, Si, Ca, and Mg appears to be controlled by corresponding soluble solids.

  20. Observational & modeling analysis of surface heat and moisture fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.

    1995-09-01

    An observational and modeling study was conducted to help assess how well current GCMs are predicting surface fluxes under the highly variable cloudiness and flow conditions characteristic of the real atmosphere. The observational data base for the study was obtained from a network of surface flux stations operated during the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE). The study included examination of a surface-driven secondary circulation in the boundary layer resulting from a persistent cross-site gradient in soil moisture, to demonstrate the sensitivity of boundary layer dynamics to heterogeneous surface fluxes, The performance of a biosphere model in reproducing the measured surface fluxes was evaluated with and without the use of satellite retrieval of three key canopy variables with RMS uncertainties commensurate with those of the measurements themselves. Four sensible heat flux closure schemes currently being used in GCMs were then evaluated against the FIFE observations. Results indicate that the methods by which closure models are calibrated lead to exceedingly large errors when the schemes are applied to variable boundary layer conditions. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Gender and Acceptance of E-Learning: A Multi-Group Analysis Based on a Structural Equation Model among College Students in Chile and Spain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The scope of this study was to evaluate whether the adoption of e-learning in two universities, and in particular, the relationship between the perception of external control and perceived ease of use, is different because of gender differences. The study was carried out with participating students in two different universities, one in Chile and one in Spain. The Technology Acceptance Model was used as a theoretical framework for the study. A multi-group analysis method in partial least squares was employed to relate differences between groups. The four main conclusions of the study are: (1) a version of the Technology Acceptance Model has been successfully used to explain the process of adoption of e-learning at an undergraduate level of study; (2) the finding of a strong and significant relationship between perception of external control and perception of ease of use of the e-learning platform; (3) a significant relationship between perceived enjoyment and perceived ease of use and between results demonstrability and perceived usefulness is found; (4) the study indicates a few statistically significant differences between males and females when adopting an e-learning platform, according to the tested model. PMID:26465895

  2. Gender and Acceptance of E-Learning: A Multi-Group Analysis Based on a Structural Equation Model among College Students in Chile and Spain.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Correa, Patricio E; Arenas-Gaitán, Jorge; Rondán-Cataluña, F Javier

    2015-01-01

    The scope of this study was to evaluate whether the adoption of e-learning in two universities, and in particular, the relationship between the perception of external control and perceived ease of use, is different because of gender differences. The study was carried out with participating students in two different universities, one in Chile and one in Spain. The Technology Acceptance Model was used as a theoretical framework for the study. A multi-group analysis method in partial least squares was employed to relate differences between groups. The four main conclusions of the study are: (1) a version of the Technology Acceptance Model has been successfully used to explain the process of adoption of e-learning at an undergraduate level of study; (2) the finding of a strong and significant relationship between perception of external control and perception of ease of use of the e-learning platform; (3) a significant relationship between perceived enjoyment and perceived ease of use and between results demonstrability and perceived usefulness is found; (4) the study indicates a few statistically significant differences between males and females when adopting an e-learning platform, according to the tested model.

  3. Gender and Acceptance of E-Learning: A Multi-Group Analysis Based on a Structural Equation Model among College Students in Chile and Spain.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Correa, Patricio E; Arenas-Gaitán, Jorge; Rondán-Cataluña, F Javier

    2015-01-01

    The scope of this study was to evaluate whether the adoption of e-learning in two universities, and in particular, the relationship between the perception of external control and perceived ease of use, is different because of gender differences. The study was carried out with participating students in two different universities, one in Chile and one in Spain. The Technology Acceptance Model was used as a theoretical framework for the study. A multi-group analysis method in partial least squares was employed to relate differences between groups. The four main conclusions of the study are: (1) a version of the Technology Acceptance Model has been successfully used to explain the process of adoption of e-learning at an undergraduate level of study; (2) the finding of a strong and significant relationship between perception of external control and perception of ease of use of the e-learning platform; (3) a significant relationship between perceived enjoyment and perceived ease of use and between results demonstrability and perceived usefulness is found; (4) the study indicates a few statistically significant differences between males and females when adopting an e-learning platform, according to the tested model. PMID:26465895

  4. Incorporating floating surface objects into a fully dispersive surface wave model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzech, Mark D.; Shi, Fengyan; Veeramony, Jayaram; Bateman, Samuel; Calantoni, Joseph; Kirby, James T.

    2016-06-01

    The shock-capturing, non-hydrostatic, three-dimensional (3D) finite-volume model NHWAVE was originally developed to simulate wave propagation and landslide-generated tsunamis in finite water depth (Ma, G., Shi, F., Kirby, J. T., 2012. Ocean Model. 43-44, 22-35). The model is based on the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, in which the z-axis is transformed to a σ-coordinate that tracks the bed and surface. As part of an ongoing effort to simulate waves in polar marginal ice zones (MIZs), the model has now been adapted to allow objects of arbitrary shape and roughness to float on or near its water surface. The shape of the underside of each floating object is mapped onto an upper σ-level slightly below the surface. In areas without floating objects, this σ-level continues to track the surface and bed as before. Along the sides of each floating object, an immersed boundary method is used to interpolate the effects of the object onto the neighboring fluid volume. Provided with the object's shape, location, and velocity over time, NHWAVE determines the fluid fluxes and pressure variations from the corresponding accelerations at neighboring cell boundaries. The system was validated by comparison with analytical solutions and a VOF model for a 2D floating box and with laboratory measurements of wave generation by a vertically oscillating sphere. A steep wave simulation illustrated the high efficiency of NHWAVE relative to a VOF model. In a more realistic MIZ simulation, the adapted model produced qualitatively reasonable results for wave attenuation, diffraction, and scattering.

  5. Surface relief model for photopolymers without cover plating.

    PubMed

    Gallego, S; Márquez, A; Ortuño, M; Francés, J; Marini, S; Beléndez, A; Pascual, I

    2011-05-23

    Relief surface changes provide interesting possibilities for storing diffractive optical elements on photopolymers and are an important source of information to characterize and understand the material behaviour. In this paper we present a 3-dimensional model based on direct measurements of parameters to predict the relief structures generated on the material. This model is successfully applied to different photopolymers with different values of monomer diffusion. The importance of monomer diffusion in depth is also discussed.

  6. Model for surface packing and aeolian transport on sand ripples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louge, M. Y.; Valance, A.; el-Moctar, A. Ould; Ahmedou, D. Ould; Dupont, P.

    2009-06-01

    Measurements indicate that the solid volume fraction on a sand ripple varies from random jammed packing at troughs to the minimum stable packing at crests. By relating variations of the solid volume fraction to those of the surface turbulent shear stress, a collisional model of reptation suggests a qualitative origin for these observations. Although the model overestimates the critical shear velocity at which reptation arises, it predicts the rate of aeolian transport on Earth and Mars.

  7. Computational model of surface ablation from tokamak disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.; Hassanein, A.

    1993-10-01

    Energy transfer to material surfaces is dominated by photon radiation through low temperature plasma vapors if tokamak disruptions are due to low kinetic energy particles ( < 100 eV). Simple models of radiation transport are derived and incorporated into a fast-running computer routine to model this process. The results of simulations are in fair agreement with plasma gun erosion tests on several metal targets.

  8. Mathematical model of the metal mould surface temperature optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynek, Jaroslav; Knobloch, Roman; Srb, Radek

    2015-11-01

    The article is focused on the problem of generating a uniform temperature field on the inner surface of shell metal moulds. Such moulds are used e.g. in the automotive industry for artificial leather production. To produce artificial leather with uniform surface structure and colour shade the temperature on the inner surface of the mould has to be as homogeneous as possible. The heating of the mould is realized by infrared heaters located above the outer mould surface. The conceived mathematical model allows us to optimize the locations of infrared heaters over the mould, so that approximately uniform heat radiation intensity is generated. A version of differential evolution algorithm programmed in Matlab development environment was created by the authors for the optimization process. For temperate calculations software system ANSYS was used. A practical example of optimization of heaters locations and calculation of the temperature of the mould is included at the end of the article.

  9. Mathematical model of the metal mould surface temperature optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Mlynek, Jaroslav Knobloch, Roman; Srb, Radek

    2015-11-30

    The article is focused on the problem of generating a uniform temperature field on the inner surface of shell metal moulds. Such moulds are used e.g. in the automotive industry for artificial leather production. To produce artificial leather with uniform surface structure and colour shade the temperature on the inner surface of the mould has to be as homogeneous as possible. The heating of the mould is realized by infrared heaters located above the outer mould surface. The conceived mathematical model allows us to optimize the locations of infrared heaters over the mould, so that approximately uniform heat radiation intensity is generated. A version of differential evolution algorithm programmed in Matlab development environment was created by the authors for the optimization process. For temperate calculations software system ANSYS was used. A practical example of optimization of heaters locations and calculation of the temperature of the mould is included at the end of the article.

  10. Surface properties of simple metals in a structureless pseudopotential model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiejna, Adam

    1993-03-01

    The structureless pseudopotential model of Perdew, Tran, and Smith [Phys. Rev. B 42, 11 627 (1990)] is applied to determine surface properties of Al, Mg, Pb, Zn, and alkali metals. Results of self-consistent Kohn-Sham calculations of surface energies, work functions, and the location of the image plane both for a flat-metal (uncorrugated) surface and for the exposed single-crystal faces are presented. In contrast to jellium, the calculated distance from the image-plane position to the uniform positive background edge increases with the decreasing mean electron density in the bulk metal. The calculated surface energies show more realistic weaker face dependence compared to the previous perturbational or variational calculations of this type and agree well with those predicted by the second-order pseudopotential perturbation theory.

  11. Wetting and free surface flow modeling for potting and encapsulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Carlton, F.; Brooks, Michael J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Graham, Alan Lyman; Noble, David F. ); Notz, Patrick K.; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mahoney, Leo James; Baer, Thomas A.; Berchtold, Kathryn (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Adolf, Douglas Brian; Wilkes, Edward Dean; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Givler, Richard C.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Cote, Raymond O.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Grillet, Anne Mary; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2007-06-01

    As part of an effort to reduce costs and improve quality control in encapsulation and potting processes the Technology Initiative Project ''Defect Free Manufacturing and Assembly'' has completed a computational modeling study of flows representative of those seen in these processes. Flow solutions are obtained using a coupled, finite-element-based, numerical method based on the GOMA/ARIA suite of Sandia flow solvers. The evolution of the free surface is solved with an advanced level set algorithm. This approach incorporates novel methods for representing surface tension and wetting forces that affect the evolution of the free surface. In addition, two commercially available codes, ProCAST and MOLDFLOW, are also used on geometries representing encapsulation processes at the Kansas City Plant. Visual observations of the flow in several geometries are recorded in the laboratory and compared to the models. Wetting properties for the materials in these experiments are measured using a unique flowthrough goniometer.

  12. A rough-surface thermophysical model for airless planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, John R.

    1990-01-01

    A model for determining diurnal temperatures in spherical-section depressions and which encompasses both subsurface heat-flow and direct and scattered sunlight effects is presently applied to the disk-integrated thermal emission of a rough planetary surface with nonzero thermal inertia. Attention is given to the variation with roughness and thermal inertia of the beaming parameter eta, which characterizes zero-phase thermal emission by comparison with a smooth, nonrotating body and is almost independent of albedo for a given surface roughness. The thermal phase curve of Ceres is noted to be well matched by the model features of (1) prograde rotation, (2) 44-deg rms surface slope, and (3) a thermal inertia that is 30 percent of the lunar value.

  13. Session on coupled land surface/hydrological/atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pielke, Roger

    1993-01-01

    The current model capabilities in the context of land surface interactions with the atmosphere include only one-dimensional characteristics of vegetation and soil surface heat, moisture, momentum, and selected other trace gas fluxes (e.g., CO2). The influence of spatially coherent fluxes that result from landscape heterogeneity were not included. Valuable representations of several aspects of the landscape pattern currently exist. These include digital elevation data and measures of the leaf area index (i.e., Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data). A major deficiency, however, is the lack of an ability to sample spatially representative shallow and (especially) deep soil moisture. Numerous mesoscale modeling and observed studies demonstrated the sensitivity of planetary boundary layer structure and deep convection to the magnitude of the surface moisture flux.

  14. Offer/Acceptance Ratio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Mimi

    1997-01-01

    Explores how human resource professionals, with above average offer/acceptance ratios, streamline their recruitment efforts. Profiles company strategies with internships, internal promotion, cooperative education programs, and how to get candidates to accept offers. Also discusses how to use the offer/acceptance ratio as a measure of program…

  15. A Metacognitive-Motivational Model of Surface Approach to Studying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spada, Marcantonio M.; Moneta, Giovanni B.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we put forward and tested a model of how surface approach to studying during examination preparation is influenced by the trait variables of motivation and metacognition and the state variables of avoidance coping and evaluation anxiety. A sample of 528 university students completed, one week before examinations, the following…

  16. Infrared Analysis Of Enzymes Adsorbed Onto Model Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Story, Gloria M.; Rauch, Deborah S.; Brode, Philip F.; Marcott, Curtis A.

    1989-12-01

    The adsorption of the enzymes, subtilisin BPN' and lysozyme, onto model surfaces was examined using attenuated total reflectance (ATR) infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Using a cylindrical internal reflection (CIRcle) cell with a Germanium (Ge) internal reflection element (IRE), model hydrophilic surfaces were made by plasma cleaning the IRE and model hydrophobic surfaces were made by precoating the IRE with a thin film of polystyrene. Gas chromatography (GC)-IR data collection software was used to monitor adsorption kinetics during the first five minutes after injection of the enzyme into the CIRcle cell. It was found that for both lysozyme and BPN', most of the enzyme that was going to adsorb onto the model surface did so within ten seconds after injection. Nearly an order-of-magnitude more BPN' adsorbed on the hydrophobic Ge surface than the hydrophilic one, while lysozyme adsorbed somewhat more strongly to the hydrophilic Ge surface. Overnight, the lysozyme layer continued to increase in thickness, while BPN' maintained its initial coverage. The appearance of carboxylate bands in some of the adsorbed BPN' spectra suggests the occurrence of peptide bond hydrolysis. A Au/Pd coating on the CIRcle cell o-rings had a significant effect on the adsorption of BPN'. (This coating was applied in an attempt to eliminate interfering Teflon absorption bands.) An apparent electrochemical reaction occurred, involving BPN', Ge, Au/Pd, and the salt solution used to stabilize BPN'. The result of this reaction was enhanced adsorption of the enzyme around the coated o-rings, etching of the Ge IRE at the o-ring site, and some autolysis of the enzyme. No such reaction was observed with lysozyme.

  17. The outstation model of rehabilitation as practiced in Central Australia: the case for its recognition and acceptance.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Gillian; Ray, Tristan; McFarland, Blair

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes and analyzes the model of care provided by the Ilpurla remote outstation rehabilitation program in Australia's Northern Territory. Reflections are offered about the cultural antecedents of the model, and how it addresses the needs of young Indigenous people. Data describing client numbers, length of stay, the underlying approach to rehabilitation, and the practices of the program are presented. The paper aims to promote an understanding of the outstation model of care, highlight difficulties between programs and their funding sources, and encourages recognition of its importance in the response to drug and alcohol use-related problems among Indigenous people.

  18. Surface accuracy measurement sensor test on a 50-meter antenna surface model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, R. B.; Burcher, E. E.; Stump, C. W.; Saunders, C. G.; Brooks, G. F.

    1984-01-01

    The Surface Accuracy Measurement Sensor (SAMS) is a telescope with a focal plane photo electric detector that senses the lateral position of light source targets in its field of view. After extensive laboratory testing the engineering breadboard sensor system was installed and tested on a 30 degree segment of a 50-meter diameter, mesh surface, antenna model. Test results correlated well with the laboratory tests and indicated accuracies of approximately 0.59 arc seconds at 21 meters range. Test results are presented and recommendations given for sensor improvements.

  19. A Comparison of Surface Acoustic Wave Modeling Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. c.; Atkinson, G. M.

    2009-01-01

    Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) technology is low cost, rugged, lightweight, extremely low power and can be used to develop passive wireless sensors. For these reasons, NASA is investigating the use of SAW technology for Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring (IVHM) of aerospace structures. To facilitate rapid prototyping of passive SAW sensors for aerospace applications, SAW models have been developed. This paper reports on the comparison of three methods of modeling SAWs. The three models are the Impulse Response Method a first order model, and two second order matrix methods; the conventional matrix approach, and a modified matrix approach that is extended to include internal finger reflections. The second order models are based upon matrices that were originally developed for analyzing microwave circuits using transmission line theory. Results from the models are presented with measured data from devices.

  20. Studies of the surface charge of amorphous aluminosilicates using surface complexation models.

    PubMed

    Jara, Alejandra A; Goldberg, Sabine; Mora, M L

    2005-12-01

    Synthetic noncrystalline aluminosilicates with variable charge, similar to allophanes present naturally in volcanic soils, were studied. The surface charge behavior was determined by zero point charge (ZPC) measured by electrophoretic mobility (isoelectric points, IEP) and determined by potentiometric titration (point of zero salt effect, PZSE). The ZPC calculated by Parks model (ZPC(c)), compared with IEP values, showed that the aluminosilicate (AlSi) surface was slightly enriched by AlOH (34% Al(2)O(3) and 66% SiO(2)) compared with the bulk composition (29% Al(2)O(3) and 71% SiO(2)). For aluminosilicate coated with iron oxide (AlSiFe) the ZPC(c) (4.4) was lower than the IEP (8.46), showing that the surface composition is formed mainly from iron oxide. The PZSE values for AlSi and AlSiFe were 6.2 and 4.8, respectively. The differences between the IEP and PZSE are attributed to the formation of Si-O-Fe or Si-O-Al bonds; therefore, the reactivity of Fe and Al atoms was modified on the surface. Two mechanistic models, the constant capacitance model (CCM) and the triple layer model (TLM), using the program FITEQL 3.2 were able to describe the surface behavior of both synthetic aluminosilicates. The acidity constants determined using both models for the aluminosilicates showed differences with respect to pure oxide, mainly attributed to the presence of SiOH sites on the internal surfaces. The ionic strength showed a good relation with the parameters obtained using the CCM (pK(int)(a1), pK(int)(a2) and capacitance values) and the TLM (pK(int)(a1), pK(int)(a2), pK(int)(Cl-), pK(int)(K+), and inner capacitance) for both aluminosilicates. However, the TLM was able to describe the acidity and complexation constants better since it considered the formation of the outer sphere complex between the background electrolyte and the surface. Then, the TLM makes it possible to describe real systems.

  1. Comparison of Contamination Model Predictions to LDEF Surface Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Tim; Rantanen, Ray; Pippin, Gary; Finckenor, Miria

    1998-01-01

    Contaminant deposition measurements have been made on species content and depth profiles on three experiments trays from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), Auger, Argon sputtering, Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis. The integrated spacecraft environment model (ISEM) was used to predict the deposition levels of the contaminants measured on the three trays. The details of the modeling and assumptions used are presented along with the predictions for the deposition on select surfaces on the trays. These are compared to the measured results. The trays represent surfaces that have a high atomic oxygen flux, and intermediate oxygen flux, and no oxygen flux. All surfaces received significant solar Ultraviolet flux. It appears that the atomic oxygen was the primary agent that caused significant deposition to occur. Surfaces that saw significant contaminant flux solar UV and no atomic oxygen did not show any appreciable levels of observable deposition. The implications of the atom ic oxygen interaction with contaminant deposits containing silicon contaminant sources is discussed. The primary contaminant sources are DC61104 adhesive and Z306 paint. The results and interpretation of the findings have a potential significant impact on spacecraft surfaces that are exposed to solar UV and atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit.

  2. Approximate model for surface-plasmon generation at slit apertures.

    PubMed

    Lalanne, P; Hugonin, J P; Rodier, J C

    2006-07-01

    We present a semianalytical model that quantitatively predicts the scattering of light by a single subwavelength slit in a thick metal screen. In contrast to previous theoretical works related to the transmission properties of the slit, the analysis emphasizes the generation of surface plasmons at the slit apertures. The model relies on a two-stage scattering mechanism, a purely geometric diffraction problem in the immediate vicinity of the slit aperture followed by the launching of a bounded surface-plasmon wave on the flat interfaces surrounding the aperture. By comparison with a full electromagnetic treatment, the model is shown to provide accurate formulas for the plasmonic generation strength coefficients, even for metals with a low conductivity. Limitations are outlined for large slit widths (>lambda) or oblique incidence (>30 degrees ) when the slit is illuminated by a plane wave. PMID:16783423

  3. Self-Assembled Magnetic Surface Swimmers: Theoretical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranson, Igor; Belkin, Maxim; Snezhko, Alexey

    2009-03-01

    The mechanisms of self-propulsion of living microorganisms are a fascinating phenomenon attracting enormous attention in the physics community. A new type of self-assembled micro-swimmers, magnetic snakes, is an excellent tool to model locomotion in a simple table-top experiment. The snakes self-assemble from a dispersion of magnetic microparticles suspended on the liquid-air interface and subjected to an alternating magnetic field. Formation and dynamics of these swimmers are captured in the framework of theoretical model coupling paradigm equation for the amplitude of surface waves, conservation law for the density of particles, and the Navier-Stokes equation for hydrodynamic flows. The results of continuum modeling are supported by hybrid molecular dynamics simulations of magnetic particles floating on the surface of fluid.

  4. Models of the solvent-accessible surface of biopolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.

    1996-09-01

    Many biopolymers such as proteins, DNA, and RNA have been studied because they have important biomedical roles and may be good targets for therapeutic action in treating diseases. This report describes how plastic models of the solvent-accessible surface of biopolymers were made. Computer files containing sets of triangles were calculated, then used on a stereolithography machine to make the models. Small (2 in.) models were made to test whether the computer calculations were done correctly. Also, files of the type (.stl) required by any ISO 9001 rapid prototyping machine were written onto a CD-ROM for distribution to American companies.

  5. Probing model interstellar grain surfaces with small molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collings, M. P.; Frankland, V. L.; Lasne, J.; Marchione, D.; Rosu-Finsen, A.; McCoustra, M. R. S.

    2015-05-01

    Temperature-programmed desorption and reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy have been used to explore the interaction of oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), carbon monoxide (CO) and water (H2O) with an amorphous silica film as a demonstration of the detailed characterization of the silicate surfaces that might be present in the interstellar medium. The simple diatomic adsorbates are found to wet the silica surface and exhibit first-order desorption kinetics in the regime up to monolayer coverage. Beyond that, they exhibit zero-order kinetics as might be expected for sublimation of bulk solids. Water, in contrast, does not wet the silica surface and exhibits zero-order desorption kinetics at all coverages consistent with the formation of an islanded structure. Kinetic parameters for use in astrophysical modelling were obtained by inversion of the experimental data at sub-monolayer coverages and by comparison with models in the multilayer regime. Spectroscopic studies in the sub-monolayer regime show that the C-O stretching mode is at around 2137 cm-1 (5.43 μm), a position consistent with a linear surface-CO interaction, and is inhomogenously broadened as resulting from the heterogeneity of the surface. These studies also reveal, for the first time, direct evidence for the thermal activation of diffusion, and hence de-wetting, of H2O on the silica surface. Astrophysical implications of these findings could account for a part of the missing oxygen budget in dense interstellar clouds, and suggest that studies of the sub-monolayer adsorption of these simple molecules might be a useful probe of surface chemistry on more complex silicate materials.

  6. Dynamic modeling of contaminant transport with surface runoff and sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Ashraf, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    Non-point source pollution in surface runoff due to agricultural activities presents one of the principal problems in the U.S. Solution to the problem of delivering pollutants is crucial to a non-point abatement program. Mathematical models can serve as tools to relate hydrologic conditions and soil properties to the processes of pollutant transport, and can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of best management practices in reducing non-point source pollutant load in surface waters. In this study, a dynamic model component is developed to simulate transport of non-point source pollutants, mostly agricultural chemicals, with surface runoff and sediment in agricultural watersheds. Algorithms are developed to route chemicals and infiltrating water through different soil increments assuming complete mixing until time of ponding or initiation of runoff. Once runoff starts, the runoff interacts with a mixing soil layer in a non-uniform fashion and exchange of chemicals takes place between runoff and the mixing soil layer. When runoff storage builds up, it is assumed that a relatively stagnant depth of runoff interacts with the mixing soil layer. This stagnant depth is obtained by applying boundary layer theory. Mass balance equations are used to route chemicals associated with runoff and sediment along the slope lengths for overland and channel flow. Model algorithms are coupled with the hydrologic and sediment transport model RUNOFF to simulate transport of contaminants with surface runoff and sediments in agricultural watersheds. The model performance is evaluated with data ranging from controlled laboratory experiments to watershed scale. The concept of non-uniform mixing is tested with a laboratory data set found in the literature. A total of fifteen runs are made, five for each of the chemicals, nitrate, phosphate, and cyanazine. The model results show good agreements with the observed yields of runoff, sediment, orthophosphate, and ammonium.

  7. Modeling of surface cleaning by cavitation bubble dynamics and collapse.

    PubMed

    Chahine, Georges L; Kapahi, Anil; Choi, Jin-Keun; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung

    2016-03-01

    Surface cleaning using cavitation bubble dynamics is investigated numerically through modeling of bubble dynamics, dirt particle motion, and fluid material interaction. Three fluid dynamics models; a potential flow model, a viscous model, and a compressible model, are used to describe the flow field generated by the bubble all showing the strong effects bubble explosive growth and collapse have on a dirt particle and on a layer of material to remove. Bubble deformation and reentrant jet formation are seen to be responsible for generating concentrated pressures, shear, and lift forces on the dirt particle and high impulsive loads on a layer of material to remove. Bubble explosive growth is also an important mechanism for removal of dirt particles, since strong suction forces in addition to shear are generated around the explosively growing bubble and can exert strong forces lifting the particles from the surface to clean and sucking them toward the bubble. To model material failure and removal, a finite element structure code is used and enables simulation of full fluid-structure interaction and investigation of the effects of various parameters. High impulsive pressures are generated during bubble collapse due to the impact of the bubble reentrant jet on the material surface and the subsequent collapse of the resulting toroidal bubble. Pits and material removal develop on the material surface when the impulsive pressure is large enough to result in high equivalent stresses exceeding the material yield stress or its ultimate strain. Cleaning depends on parameters such as the relative size between the bubble at its maximum volume and the particle size, the bubble standoff distance from the particle and from the material wall, and the excitation pressure field driving the bubble dynamics. These effects are discussed in this contribution.

  8. Surface matching for correlation of virtual models: Theory and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caracciolo, Roberto; Fanton, Francesco; Gasparetto, Alessandro

    1994-01-01

    Virtual reality can enable a robot user to off line generate and test in a virtual environment a sequence of operations to be executed by the robot in an assembly cell. Virtual models of objects are to be correlated to the real entities they represent by means of a suitable transformation. A solution to the correlation problem, which is basically a problem of 3-dimensional adjusting, has been found exploiting the surface matching theory. An iterative algorithm has been developed, which matches the geometric surface representing the shape of the virtual model of an object, with a set of points measured on the surface in the real world. A peculiar feature of the algorithm is to work also if there is no one-to-one correspondence between the measured points and those representing the surface model. Furthermore the problem of avoiding convergence to local minima is solved, by defining a starting point of states ensuring convergence to the global minimum. The developed algorithm has been tested by simulation. Finally, this paper proposes a specific application, i.e., correlating a robot cell, equipped for biomedical use with its virtual representation.

  9. A block-based landslide model using smooth surface reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsen, Katharina; Tinti, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    The present work is combining the block-based landslide-model developed by Tinti and Bertolucci (2000) with different smooth surface reconstruction methods. This enables us to directly solve the underlying ODE-system, that is describing the blocks motion, numerically. The numerical model is based on the idea that the sliding mass can be discretized by a certain number of quadrilateral blocks of finite volume, where the movement of the single blocks is described using a Lagrangian approach. Within this approach, the underlying equations of motion require for each time-step the computation of the acceleration of each of the blocks from their position on the sliding surface, where information on its curvature is needed in order to compute the centripetal component. To come up to this, different methods were used to interpolate smooth, two times differentiable, surface reconstructions from a given number of points that are describing the real sliding surface. The numerical solution of the model in time is obtained using higher-order explicit and implicit time-integration methods The results of the simulations are evaluated especially with respect to the arrival times and final velocities of the sliding mass and therefore a possible tsunamigenic impact.

  10. Phase transition and surface sublimation of a mobile Potts model.

    PubMed

    Bailly-Reyre, A; Diep, H T; Kaufman, M

    2015-10-01

    We study in this paper the phase transition in a mobile Potts model by the use of Monte Carlo simulation. The mobile Potts model is related to a diluted Potts model, which is also studied here by a mean-field approximation. We consider a lattice where each site is either vacant or occupied by a q-state Potts spin. The Potts spin can move from one site to a nearby vacant site. In order to study the surface sublimation, we consider a system of Potts spins contained in a recipient with a concentration c defined as the ratio of the number of Potts spins N(s) to the total number of lattice sites N(L)=N(x)×N(y)×N(z). Taking into account the attractive interaction between the nearest-neighboring Potts spins, we study the phase transitions as functions of various physical parameters such as the temperature, the shape of the recipient, and the spin concentration. We show that as the temperature increases, surface spins are detached from the solid phase to form a gas in the empty space. Surface order parameters indicate different behaviors depending on the distance to the surface. At high temperatures, if the concentration is high enough, the interior spins undergo a first-order phase transition to an orientationally disordered phase. The mean-field results are shown as functions of temperature, pressure, and chemical potential, which confirm in particular the first-order character of the transition. PMID:26565221

  11. AMERICAN JOINT COMMITTEE ON CANCER ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA FOR INCLUSION OF RISK MODELS FOR INDIVIDUALIZED PROGNOSIS IN THE PRACTICE OF PRECISION MEDICINE

    PubMed Central

    Kattan, Michael W.; Hess, Kenneth R.; Amin, Mahul; Lu, Ying; Moons, Karel G; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Gimotty, Phyllis A.; Guinney, Justin; Halabi, Susan; Lazar, Alexander J.; Mahar, Alyson L.; Patel, Tushar; Sargent, Daniel J.; Weiser, Martin R.; Compton, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) has increasingly recognized the need for more personalized probabilistic predictions than those delivered by ordinal staging systems, particularly through the use of accurate risk models or calculators. However, judging the quality and acceptability of a risk model is complex. The AJCC Precision Medicine Core conducted a two-day meeting to discuss characteristics necessary for a quality risk model in cancer patients. More specifically, the committee established inclusion and exclusion criteria necessary for a risk model to potentially be endorsed by the AJCC. This committee reviewed and discussed relevant literature before creating a checklist unique to this need of AJCC risk model endorsement. The committee identified 13 inclusion and 3 exclusion criteria for AJCC risk model endorsement in cancer. The emphasis centered on performance metrics, implementation clarity, and clinical relevance. The facilitation of personalized probabilistic predictions for cancer patients holds tremendous promise, and these criteria will hopefully greatly accelerate this process. Moreover, these criteria might be useful for a general audience when trying to judge the potential applicability of a published risk model in any clinical domain. PMID:26784705

  12. ELECTRON AVALANCHE MODEL OF DIELECTRIC-VACUUM SURFACE BREAKDOWN

    SciTech Connect

    Lauer, E J

    2007-02-21

    The model assumes that an 'initiating event' results in positive ions on the surface near the anode and reverses the direction of the normal component of electric field so that electrons in vacuum are attracted to the dielectric locally. A sequence of surface electron avalanches progresses in steps from the anode to the cathode. For 200 kV across 1 cm, the spacing of avalanches is predicted to be about 13 microns. The time for avalanches to step from the anode to the cathode is predicted to be about a ns.

  13. Assimilation of GOES Land Surface Data into a Mesoscale Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapenta, William M.; Suggs, Ron; McNider, Richard T.; Jedlovec, Gary; Dembek, Scott; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A technique has been developed for assimilating Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-derived skin temperature tendencies and insolation into the surface energy budget equation of a mesoscale model so that the simulated rate of temperature change closely agrees with the satellite observations. A critical assumption of the technique is that the availability of moisture (either from the soil or vegetation) is the least known term in the model's surface energy budget. Therefore, the simulated latent heat flux, which is a function of surface moisture availability, is adjusted based upon differences between the modeled and satellite-observed skin temperature tendencies. An advantage of this technique is that satellite temperature tendencies are assimilated in an energetically consistent manner that avoids energy imbalances and surface stability problems that arise from direct assimilation of surface shelter temperatures. The fact that the rate of change of the satellite skin temperature is used rather than the absolute temperature means that sensor calibration is not as critical. The assimilation technique has been applied to the Oklahoma-Kansas region during the spring-summer 2000 time period when dynamic changes in vegetation cover occur. In April, central Oklahoma is characterized by large NDVI associated with winter wheat while surrounding areas are primarily rangeland with lower NDVI. In July the vegetation pattern reverses as the central wheat area changes to low NDVI due to harvesting and the surrounding rangeland is greener than it was in April. The goal of this study is to determine if assimilating satellite land surface data can improve simulation of the complex spatial distribution of surface energy and water fluxes across this region. The PSU/NCAR NM5 V3 system is used in this study. The grid configuration consists of a 36-km CONUS domain and a 12-km nest over the area of interest. Bulk verification statistics (BIAS and RMSE) of surface

  14. Fusion of intraoperative force sensoring, surface reconstruction and biomechanical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röhl, S.; Bodenstedt, S.; Küderle, C.; Suwelack, S.; Kenngott, H.; Müller-Stich, B. P.; Dillmann, R.; Speidel, S.

    2012-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is medically complex and can heavily benefit from computer assistance. One way to help the surgeon is to integrate preoperative planning data into the surgical workflow. This information can be represented as a customized preoperative model of the surgical site. To use it intraoperatively, it has to be updated during the intervention due to the constantly changing environment. Hence, intraoperative sensor data has to be acquired and registered with the preoperative model. Haptic information which could complement the visual sensor data is still not established. In addition, biomechanical modeling of the surgical site can help in reflecting the changes which cannot be captured by intraoperative sensors. We present a setting where a force sensor is integrated into a laparoscopic instrument. In a test scenario using a silicone liver phantom, we register the measured forces with a reconstructed surface model from stereo endoscopic images and a finite element model. The endoscope, the instrument and the liver phantom are tracked with a Polaris optical tracking system. By fusing this information, we can transfer the deformation onto the finite element model. The purpose of this setting is to demonstrate the principles needed and the methods developed for intraoperative sensor data fusion. One emphasis lies on the calibration of the force sensor with the instrument and first experiments with soft tissue. We also present our solution and first results concerning the integration of the force sensor as well as accuracy to the fusion of force measurements, surface reconstruction and biomechanical modeling.

  15. Quantifying near-surface water exchange to assess hydrometeorological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parent, Annie-Claude; Anctil, François; Morais, Anne

    2013-04-01

    Modelling water exchange from the lower atmosphere, crop and soil system using hydrometeorological models allows processing an actual evapotranspiration (ETa) which is a complex but critical value for numerous hydrological purposes e.g. hydrological modelling and crop irrigation. This poster presents a summary of the hydrometeorological research activity conducted by our research group. The first purpose of this research is to quantify ETa and drainage of a rainfed potato crop located in South-Eastern Canada. Then, the outputs of the hydrometeorological models under study are compared with the observed turbulent fluxes. Afterwards, the sensibility of the hydrometeorological models to different inputs is assessed for an environment under a changing climate. ETa was measured from micrometeorological instrumentation (CSAT3, Campbell SCI Inc.; Li7500, LiCor Inc.), and the eddy covariance techniques. Near surface soil heat flux and soil water content at different layers from 10 cm to 100 cm were also measured. Other parameters required by the hydrometeorological models were observed using meteorological standard instrumentation: shortwave and longwave solar radiation, wind speed, air temperature, atmospheric pressure and precipitation. The cumulative ETa during the growth season (123 days) was 331.5 mm, with a daily maximum of 6.5 mm at full coverage; precipitation was 350.6 mm which is rather small compared with the historical mean (563.3 mm). This experimentation allowed calculating crop coefficients that vary among the growth season for a rainfed potato crop. Land surface schemes as CLASS (Canadian Land Surface Scheme) and c-ISBA (a Canadian version of the model Interaction Sol-Biosphère-Atmosphère) are 1-D physical hydrometeorological models that produce turbulent fluxes (including ETa) for a given crop. The schemes performances were assessed for both energy and water balance, based on the resulting turbulent fluxes and the given observations. CLASS showed

  16. Model Investigations Into Bimodal Arctic Surface-Atmosphere Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramler, K.; del Genio, A. D.; Rossow, W. B.

    2003-12-01

    Observations at the SHEBA (Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean) site revealed that the Arctic ocean-surface-atmosphere system displays two stable states of behavior. The state dominant during winter is an atmospherically quiescent one, characterized by the presence of clear skies (or optically thin clouds), by -40 W/m**2 surface net longwave radiation, and by surface temperatures that the ocean's constant upward heat flux anchors near 235K. The secondary mode, one of surface-atmosphere equilibrium, occurs in association with the advection of moisture and temperature from lower latitudes, and is characterized by the presence of optically thick clouds in the lowest few kilometers of the atmosphere, and by surface temperatures near 250K. ARM NSA/AAO (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean) observations exhibit modal behavior similar to that at SHEBA, although with differing magnitude and persistence. In addition, NSA exhibits interannual variability, during which the surface net longwave modes shift by 10 W/m**2, and in some winters NSA has but a single mode in the surface net longwave distribution. The goal of the research presented is to develop a deeper understanding of the physical mechanisms that maintain the Arctic ocean-surface-atmosphere in the two observed states. Preliminary results show that the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Global Climate Model (GCM) exhibits the same discrete surface net longwave modes over the SHEBA ice-covered ocean site as do the observations, while the GCM only exhibits one of the net longwave modes observed at the NSA coastal continental site. The GISS Single Column Model (SCM), derived from the GISS GCM, is used here to determine the conditions required to attain and to maintain these stable modes over sea ice, and to investigate why the GCM was unable to reproduce the behavior observed over land. The SCM is also used to ascertain the conditions required for each

  17. Student Attitudes towards and Use of ICT in Course Study, Work and Social Activity: A Technology Acceptance Model Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmunds, Rob; Thorpe, Mary; Conole, Grainne

    2012-01-01

    The increasing use of information and communication technology (ICT) in higher education has been explored largely in relation to student experience of coursework and university life. Students' lives and experience beyond the university have been largely unexplored. Research into student experience of ICT used a validated model--the technology…

  18. Predicting the Use of Paired Programming: Applying the Attitudes of Application Development Managers through the Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zecca, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    Business managers who look for ways to cut costs face difficult questions about the efficiency and effectiveness of software engineering practices that are used to complete projects on time, on specification, and within budget (Johnson, 1995; Lindstrom & Jeffries, 2004). Theoretical models such as the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) have linked…

  19. A simple hydrologically based model of land surface water and energy fluxes for general circulation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, XU; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.; Wood, Eric F.; Burges, Stephen J.

    1994-01-01

    A generalization of the single soil layer variable infiltration capacity (VIC) land surface hydrological model previously implemented in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) general circulation model (GCM) is described. The new model is comprised of a two-layer characterization of the soil column, and uses an aerodynamic representation of the latent and sensible heat fluxes at the land surface. The infiltration algorithm for the upper layer is essentially the same as for the single layer VIC model, while the lower layer drainage formulation is of the form previously implemented in the Max-Planck-Institut GCM. The model partitions the area of interest (e.g., grid cell) into multiple land surface cover types; for each land cover type the fraction of roots in the upper and lower zone is specified. Evapotranspiration consists of three components: canopy evaporation, evaporation from bare soils, and transpiration, which is represented using a canopy and architectural resistance formulation. Once the latent heat flux has been computed, the surface energy balance is iterated to solve for the land surface temperature at each time step. The model was tested using long-term hydrologic and climatological data for Kings Creek, Kansas to estimate and validate the hydrological parameters, and surface flux data from three First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project Field Experiment (FIFE) intensive field campaigns in the summer-fall of 1987 to validate the surface energy fluxes.

  20. Sialomucin complex at the rat ocular surface: a new model for ocular surface protection.

    PubMed Central

    Price-Schiavi, S A; Meller, D; Jing, X; Merritt, J; Carvajal, M E; Tseng, S C; Carraway, K L

    1998-01-01

    The ocular surface, which is among the most accessible and vulnerable tissues in mammals, is protected by a complex tear film composed of lipid, aqueous and mucin layers. In spite of its importance, the molecular nature of the mucin contribution remains uncertain. Since membrane mucins have been implicated in the protection of other epithelia, we have analysed rat corneal and conjunctival tissues for sialomucin complex (SMC), a membrane mucin found at the apical epithelial cell surfaces in the airway and uterus. Using Northern and Western blot analyses, SMC expression was found in both ocular tissues, being particularly abundant in the cornea. In contrast with the other known membrane mucin, MUC1, SMC was localized more heavily towards the apical surface of the epithelial cells. SMC in ocular surface epithelia was produced in both soluble and membrane forms, the latter being found predominantly in the most superficial cells and at apical surfaces. The soluble form was found loosely adsorbed to apical cell surfaces, particularly of the cornea, as indicated by a mild rinsing protocol. Finally, the tear fluid contained substantial amounts of SMC. From these results, we propose a new model for tear mucin components in which SMC is expressed at the apical ocular surface in both membrane-bound and adsorbed soluble forms to provide a direct protective barrier. SMC secreted into the tear fluid may also participate in maintaining the stability of the preocular tear film by acting with other secreted mucins to determine the physical properties and protective behaviour of the tear film. PMID:9761747

  1. Constraints on surface evapotranspiration: implications for modeling and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentine, P.

    2015-12-01

    The continental hydrological cycle and especially evapotranspiration are constrained by additional factors such as the energy availability and the carbon cycle. As a results trying to understand and predict the surface hydrologic cycle in isolation might be highly unreliable. We present two examples were constraints induced by 1) radiation control through cloud albedo feedback and 2) carbon control on the surface water use efficiency are essential to correctly predict the seasonal hydrologic cycle. In the first example we show that correctly modeling diurnal and seasonal convection and the associated cloud-albedo feedback (through land-atmosphere and convection-large-scale circulation feedbacks) is essential to correctly model the surface hydrologic cycle in the Amazon, and to correct biases observed in all general circulation models. This calls for improved modeling of convection to correctly predict the tropical continental hydrologic cycle.In the second example we show that typical drought index based only on energy want water availability misses vegetation physiological and carbon feedback and cannot correctly represent the seasonal cycle of soil moisture stress. The typical Palmer Drought Stress Index is shown to be incapable of rejecting water stress in the future. This calls for new drought assessment metrics that may include vegetation and carbon feedback.

  2. An Analytic Function of Lunar Surface Temperature for Exospheric Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, Dana M.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Grava, Cesare; Williams, Jean-Pierre; Retherford, Kurt D.; Siegler, Matthew; Greenhagen, Benjamin; Paige, David

    2014-01-01

    We present an analytic expression to represent the lunar surface temperature as a function of Sun-state latitude and local time. The approximation represents neither topographical features nor compositional effects and therefore does not change as a function of selenographic latitude and longitude. The function reproduces the surface temperature measured by Diviner to within +/-10 K at 72% of grid points for dayside solar zenith angles of less than 80, and at 98% of grid points for nightside solar zenith angles greater than 100. The analytic function is least accurate at the terminator, where there is a strong gradient in the temperature, and the polar regions. Topographic features have a larger effect on the actual temperature near the terminator than at other solar zenith angles. For exospheric modeling the effects of topography on the thermal model can be approximated by using an effective longitude for determining the temperature. This effective longitude is randomly redistributed with 1 sigma of 4.5deg. The resulting ''roughened'' analytical model well represents the statistical dispersion in the Diviner data and is expected to be generally useful for future models of lunar surface temperature, especially those implemented within exospheric simulations that address questions of volatile transport.

  3. Modelling boundary layer flow over barnacle-fouled surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadique, Jasim; Yang, Xiang; Meneveau, Charles; Mittal, Rajat

    2014-11-01

    Macro-biofouling is a critical concern for the marine industry. However, there is little data on flow and drag over such surfaces. Accurate modelling of such multi-scale flows remains a big challenge. Such simulations are vital in providing insights into the fundamental flow physics, and they can be used to estimate the timing, need and effectiveness of measures used to counteract bio-fouling. This talk focuses on the use of a sharp-interface immersed boundary method coupled with a wall model and large-eddy simulations to carry out accurate simulations of a turbulent boundary layer flow over macro-fouled surfaces. For the current study, high resolution scans of barnacles were used to create simple geometrical representations. Simulations were then carried out to test how well these simpler geometric models mimic the flow over actual barnacles. Simulations of array of modeled barnacles, with different barnacle densities have also been carried out and we present results on the effect distribution density on the flow physics and drag on the surfaces. This work is funded by ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0582.

  4. Methods for the Update and Verification of Forest Surface Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybansky, M.; Brenova, M.; Zerzan, P.; Simon, J.; Mikita, T.

    2016-06-01

    The digital terrain model (DTM) represents the bare ground earth's surface without any objects like vegetation and buildings. In contrast to a DTM, Digital surface model (DSM) represents the earth's surface including all objects on it. The DTM mostly does not change as frequently as the DSM. The most important changes of the DSM are in the forest areas due to the vegetation growth. Using the LIDAR technology the canopy height model (CHM) is obtained by subtracting the DTM and the corresponding DSM. The DSM is calculated from the first pulse echo and DTM from the last pulse echo data. The main problem of the DSM and CHM data using is the actuality of the airborne laser scanning. This paper describes the method of calculating the CHM and DSM data changes using the relations between the canopy height and age of trees. To get a present basic reference data model of the canopy height, the photogrammetric and trigonometric measurements of single trees were used. Comparing the heights of corresponding trees on the aerial photographs of various ages, the statistical sets of the tree growth rate were obtained. These statistical data and LIDAR data were compared with the growth curve of the spruce forest, which corresponds to a similar natural environment (soil quality, climate characteristics, geographic location, etc.) to get the updating characteristics.

  5. Global scale hydrology - Advances in land surface modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, E.F. )

    1991-01-01

    Research into global scale hydrology is an expanding area that includes researchers from the meteorology, climatology, ecology and hydrology communities. This paper reviews research in this area carried out in the United States during the last IUGG quadrennial period of 1987-1990. The review covers the representation of land-surface hydrologic processes for general circulation models (GCMs), sensitivity analysis of these representations on global hydrologic fields like precipitation, regional studies of climate that have global hydrologic implications, recent field studies and experiments whose aims are the improved understanding of land surface-atmospheric interactions, and the use of remotely sensed data for the further understanding of the spatial variability of surface hydrologic processes that are important at regional and global climate scales. 76 refs.

  6. Triton - Scattering models and surface/atmosphere constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, W. R.

    1989-08-01

    Modeling of Triton's spectrum indicates a bright scattering layer of optical depth tau about 3 overlying an optically deep layer of CH4 with high absorption and little scattering. UV absorption in the spectrum indicates tau about 0.3 of red-yellow haze, although some color may also arise from complex organics partially visible on the surface. An analysis of this and other (spectro)photometric evidence indicates that Triton most likely has a bright surface, which was partially visible in 1977-1980. Geometric albedo p = 0.62 + 0.18 or - 0.12 radius r = 1480 + or - 180 km, and temperature T = 48 + or - 6 K. With scattering optical depths of 0.3-3 and about 1-10 mb of N2, a Mars-like atmospheric density and surface visibility pertain.

  7. Consistent depth video segmentation using adaptive surface models.

    PubMed

    Husain, Farzad; Dellen, Babette; Torras, Carme

    2015-02-01

    We propose a new approach for the segmentation of 3-D point clouds into geometric surfaces using adaptive surface models. Starting from an initial configuration, the algorithm converges to a stable segmentation through a new iterative split-and-merge procedure, which includes an adaptive mechanism for the creation and removal of segments. This allows the segmentation to adjust to changing input data along the movie, leading to stable, temporally coherent, and traceable segments. We tested the method on a large variety of data acquired with different range imaging devices, including a structured-light sensor and a time-of-flight camera, and successfully segmented the videos into surface segments. We further demonstrated the feasibility of the approach using quantitative evaluations based on ground-truth data.

  8. Acceptability of GM foods among Pakistani consumers.

    PubMed

    Ali, Akhter; Rahut, Dil Bahadur; Imtiaz, Muhammad

    2016-04-01

    In Pakistan majority of the consumers do not have information about genetically modified (GM) foods. In developing countries particularly in Pakistan few studies have focused on consumers' acceptability about GM foods. Using comprehensive primary dataset collected from 320 consumers in 2013 from Pakistan, this study analyzes the determinants of consumers' acceptability of GM foods. The data was analyzed by employing the bivariate probit model and censored least absolute deviation (CLAD) models. The empirical results indicated that urban consumers are more aware of GM foods compared to rural consumers. The acceptance of GM foods was more among females' consumers as compared to male consumers. In addition, the older consumers were more willing to accept GM food compared to young consumers. The acceptability of GM foods was also higher among wealthier households. Low price is the key factor leading to the acceptability of GM foods. The acceptability of the GM foods also reduces the risks among Pakistani consumers.

  9. Acceptability of GM foods among Pakistani consumers.

    PubMed

    Ali, Akhter; Rahut, Dil Bahadur; Imtiaz, Muhammad

    2016-04-01

    In Pakistan majority of the consumers do not have information about genetically modified (GM) foods. In developing countries particularly in Pakistan few studies have focused on consumers' acceptability about GM foods. Using comprehensive primary dataset collected from 320 consumers in 2013 from Pakistan, this study analyzes the determinants of consumers' acceptability of GM foods. The data was analyzed by employing the bivariate probit model and censored least absolute deviation (CLAD) models. The empirical results indicated that urban consumers are more aware of GM foods compared to rural consumers. The acceptance of GM foods was more among females' consumers as compared to male consumers. In addition, the older consumers were more willing to accept GM food compared to young consumers. The acceptability of GM foods was also higher among wealthier households. Low price is the key factor leading to the acceptability of GM foods. The acceptability of the GM foods also reduces the risks among Pakistani consumers. PMID:27494790

  10. Establishment and metabolic analysis of a model microbial community for understanding trophic and electron accepting interactions of subsurface anaerobic environments

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Communities of microorganisms control the rates of key biogeochemical cycles, and are important for biotechnology, bioremediation, and industrial microbiological processes. For this reason, we constructed a model microbial community comprised of three species dependent on trophic interactions. The three species microbial community was comprised of Clostridium cellulolyticum, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, and Geobacter sulfurreducens and was grown under continuous culture conditions. Cellobiose served as the carbon and energy source for C. cellulolyticum, whereas D. vulgaris and G. sulfurreducens derived carbon and energy from the metabolic products of cellobiose fermentation and were provided with sulfate and fumarate respectively as electron acceptors. Results qPCR monitoring of the culture revealed C. cellulolyticum to be dominant as expected and confirmed the presence of D. vulgaris and G. sulfurreducens. Proposed metabolic modeling of carbon and electron flow of the three-species community indicated that the growth of C. cellulolyticum and D. vulgaris were electron donor limited whereas G. sulfurreducens was electron acceptor limited. Conclusions The results demonstrate that C. cellulolyticum, D. vulgaris, and G. sulfurreducens can be grown in coculture in a continuous culture system in which D. vulgaris and G. sulfurreducens are dependent upon the metabolic byproducts of C. cellulolyticum for nutrients. This represents a step towards developing a tractable model ecosystem comprised of members representing the functional groups of a trophic network. PMID:20497531

  11. Use of upscaled elevation and surface roughness data in two-dimensional surface water models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, J.D.; Decker, J.D.; Langevin, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present an approach that uses a combination of cell-block- and cell-face-averaging of high-resolution cell elevation and roughness data to upscale hydraulic parameters and accurately simulate surface water flow in relatively low-resolution numerical models. The method developed allows channelized features that preferentially connect large-scale grid cells at cell interfaces to be represented in models where these features are significantly smaller than the selected grid size. The developed upscaling approach has been implemented in a two-dimensional finite difference model that solves a diffusive wave approximation of the depth-integrated shallow surface water equations using preconditioned Newton–Krylov methods. Computational results are presented to show the effectiveness of the mixed cell-block and cell-face averaging upscaling approach in maintaining model accuracy, reducing model run-times, and how decreased grid resolution affects errors. Application examples demonstrate that sub-grid roughness coefficient variations have a larger effect on simulated error than sub-grid elevation variations.

  12. Observations, models, and mechanisms of failure of surface rocks surrounding planetary surface loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, R. A.; Zuber, M. T.

    1994-01-01

    Geophysical models of flexural stresses in an elastic lithosphere due to an axisymmetric surface load typically predict a transition with increased distance from the center of the load of radial thrust faults to strike-slip faults to concentric normal faults. These model predictions are in conflict with the absence of annular zones of strike-slip faults around prominent loads such as lunar maria, Martian volcanoes, and the Martian Tharsis rise. We suggest that this paradox arises from difficulties in relating failure criteria for brittle rocks to the stress models. Indications that model stresses are inappropriate for use in fault-type prediction include (1) tensile principal stresses larger than realistic values of rock tensile strength, and/or (2) stress differences significantly larger than those allowed by rock-strength criteria. Predictions of surface faulting that are consistent with observations can be obtained instead by using tensile and shear failure criteria, along with calculated stress differences and trajectories, with model stress states not greatly in excess of the maximum allowed by rock fracture criteria.

  13. Surface and Flow Field Measurements on the FAITH Hill Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James H.; Heineck, James T.; Zilliac, Gregory; Mehta, Rabindra D.; Long, Kurtis R.

    2012-01-01

    A series of experimental tests, using both qualitative and quantitative techniques, were conducted to characterize both surface and off-surface flow characteristics of an axisymmetric, modified-cosine-shaped, wall-mounted hill named "FAITH" (Fundamental Aero Investigates The Hill). Two separate models were employed: a 6" high, 18" base diameter machined aluminum model that was used for wind tunnel tests and a smaller scale (2" high, 6" base diameter) sintered nylon version that was used in the water channel facility. Wind tunnel and water channel tests were conducted at mean test section speeds of 165 fps (Reynolds Number based on height = 500,000) and 0.1 fps (Reynolds Number of 1000), respectively. The ratio of model height to boundary later height was approximately 3 for both tests. Qualitative techniques that were employed to characterize the complex flow included surface oil flow visualization for the wind tunnel tests, and dye injection for the water channel tests. Quantitative techniques that were employed to characterize the flow included Cobra Probe to determine point-wise steady and unsteady 3D velocities, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to determine 3D velocities and turbulence statistics along specified planes, Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) to determine mean surface pressures, and Fringe Imaging Skin Friction (FISF) to determine surface skin friction (magnitude and direction). This initial report summarizes the experimental set-up, techniques used, data acquired and describes some details of the dataset that is being constructed for use by other researchers, especially the CFD community. Subsequent reports will discuss the data and their interpretation in more detail

  14. Efficient modelling of droplet dynamics on complex surfaces.

    PubMed

    Karapetsas, George; Chamakos, Nikolaos T; Papathanasiou, Athanasios G

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates the dynamics of droplet interaction with smooth or structured solid surfaces using a novel sharp-interface scheme which allows the efficient modelling of multiple dynamic contact lines. The liquid-gas and liquid-solid interfaces are treated in a unified context and the dynamic contact angle emerges simply due to the combined action of the disjoining and capillary pressure, and viscous stresses without the need of an explicit boundary condition or any requirement for the predefinition of the number and position of the contact lines. The latter, as it is shown, renders the model able to handle interfacial flows with topological changes, e.g. in the case of an impinging droplet on a structured surface. Then it is possible to predict, depending on the impact velocity, whether the droplet will fully or partially impregnate the structures of the solid, or will result in a 'fakir', i.e. suspended, state. In the case of a droplet sliding on an inclined substrate, we also demonstrate the built-in capability of our model to provide a prediction for either static or dynamic contact angle hysteresis. We focus our study on hydrophobic surfaces and examine the effect of the geometrical characteristics of the solid surface. It is shown that the presence of air inclusions trapped in the micro-structure of a hydrophobic substrate (Cassie-Baxter state) result in the decrease of contact angle hysteresis and in the increase of the droplet migration velocity in agreement with experimental observations for super-hydrophobic surfaces. Moreover, we perform 3D simulations which are in line with the 2D ones regarding the droplet mobility and also indicate that the contact angle hysteresis may be significantly affected by the directionality of the structures with respect to the droplet motion. PMID:26828706

  15. Surface science studies of ethene containing model interstellar ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puletti, F.; Whelan, M.; Brown, W. A.

    2011-05-01

    The formation of saturated hydrocarbons in the interstellar medium (ISM) is difficult to explain only by taking into account gas phase reactions. This is mostly due to the fact that carbonium ions only react with H_2 to make unsaturated hydrocarbons, and hence no viable route to saturated hydrocarbons has been postulated to date. It is therefore likely that saturation processes occur via surface reactions that take place on interstellar dust grains. One of the species of interest in this family of reactions is C_2H_4 (ethene) which is an intermediate in several molecular formation routes (e.g. C_2H_2 → C_2H_6). To help to understand some of the surface processes involving ethene, a study of ethene deposited on a dust grain analogue surface (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) held under ultra-high vacuum at 20 K has been performed. The adsorption and desorption of ethene has been studied both in water-free and water-dominated model interstellar ices. A combination of temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) have been used to identify the adsorbed and trapped species and to determine the kinetics of the desorption processes. In all cases, ethene is found to physisorb on the carbonaceous surface. As expected water has a very strong influence on the desorption of ethene, as previously observed for other model interstellar ice systems.

  16. Microfriction studies of model self-lubricating surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.; Yust, C.S.

    1993-05-06

    Self-lubricating composites consist of at least one structural (matrix) phase and at least one phase to provide lubrication. Modeling the behavior of such composites involves ascertaining the frictional contributions of each constituent phase under varying conditions of lubricating films coverage. The ORNL friction microprobe (FMP), a specialized microcontact tribometer, was used to investigate the frictional behavior of both matrix and lubricant phases to support the development of self-lubricating, surfaces. Polished CVD-silicon carbide deposits and silicon wafers were used as substrates. The wafers were intended to simulate the thin silica films present on SiC surfaces at elevated temperature. Molybdenum disulfide, in both sputtered and burnished forms, was used as the model lubricant. The effects of CVD-SiC substrate surface roughness and method of lubricant film deposition on the substrate were studied for single passes of a spherical silicon nitride slider (NBD 200 material). In contrast to the smooth sliding exhibit by burnished, films, sputtered MoS{sub 2} surfaces exhibited marked stick-slip behavior, indicating that the frictional behavior of solid lubricating coatings can be quite erratic on a microscale, especially when asperity contacts are elastically compliant.

  17. Modeling marine surface microplastic transport to assess optimal removal locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Peter; van Sebille, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Marine plastic pollution is an ever-increasing problem that demands immediate mitigation and reduction plans. Here, a model based on satellite-tracked buoy observations and scaled to a large data set of observations on microplastic from surface trawls was used to simulate the transport of plastics floating on the ocean surface from 2015 to 2025, with the goal to assess the optimal marine microplastic removal locations for two scenarios: removing the most surface microplastic and reducing the impact on ecosystems, using plankton growth as a proxy. The simulations show that the optimal removal locations are primarily located off the coast of China and in the Indonesian Archipelago for both scenarios. Our estimates show that 31% of the modeled microplastic mass can be removed by 2025 using 29 plastic collectors operating at a 45% capture efficiency from these locations, compared to only 17% when the 29 plastic collectors are moored in the North Pacific garbage patch, between Hawaii and California. The overlap of ocean surface microplastics and phytoplankton growth can be reduced by 46% at our proposed locations, while sinks in the North Pacific can only reduce the overlap by 14%. These results are an indication that oceanic plastic removal might be more effective in removing a greater microplastic mass and in reducing potential harm to marine life when closer to shore than inside the plastic accumulation zones in the centers of the gyres.

  18. Modeling of electrohydrodynamic drying process using response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    Dalvand, Mohammad Jafar; Mohtasebi, Seyed Saeid; Rafiee, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    Energy consumption index is one of the most important criteria for judging about new, and emerging drying technologies. One of such novel and promising alternative of drying process is called electrohydrodynamic (EHD) drying. In this work, a solar energy was used to maintain required energy of EHD drying process. Moreover, response surface methodology (RSM) was used to build a predictive model in order to investigate the combined effects of independent variables such as applied voltage, field strength, number of discharge electrode (needle), and air velocity on moisture ratio, energy efficiency, and energy consumption as responses of EHD drying process. Three-levels and four-factor Box–Behnken design was employed to evaluate the effects of independent variables on system responses. A stepwise approach was followed to build up a model that can map the entire response surface. The interior relationships between parameters were well defined by RSM. PMID:24936289

  19. Restraint of Liquid Jets by Surface Tension in Microgravity Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Tension in Microgravity Modeled Microgravity poses many challenges to the designer of spacecraft tanks. Chief among these are the lack of phase separation and the need to supply vapor-free liquid or liquidfree vapor to the spacecraft processes that require fluid. One of the principal problems of phase separation is the creation of liquid jets. A jet can be created by liquid filling, settling of the fluid to one end of the tank, or even closing a valve to stop the liquid flow. Anyone who has seen a fountain knows that jets occur in normal gravity also. However, in normal gravity, the gravity controls and restricts the jet flow. In microgravity, with gravity largely absent, jets must be contained by surface tension forces. Recent NASA experiments in microgravity (Tank Pressure Control Experiment, TPCE, and Vented Tank Pressure Experiment, VTRE) resulted in a wealth of data about jet behavior in microgravity. VTRE was surprising in that, although it contained a complex geometry of baffles and vanes, the limit on liquid inflow was the emergence of a liquid jet from the top of the vane structure. Clearly understanding the restraint of liquid jets by surface tension is key to managing fluids in low gravity. To model this phenomenon, we need a numerical method that can track the fluid motion and the surface tension forces. The fluid motion is modeled with the Navier-Stokes equation formulated for low-speed incompressible flows. The quantities of velocity and pressure are placed on a staggered grid, with velocity being tracked at cell faces and pressure at cell centers. The free surface is tracked via the introduction of a color function that tracks liquid as 1/2 and gas as -1/2. A phase model developed by Jacqmin is used. This model converts the discrete surface tension force into a barrier function that peaks at the free surface and decays rapidly. Previous attempts at this formulation have been criticized for smearing the interface. However, by sharpening the phase

  20. Can atom-surface potential measurements test atomic structure models?

    PubMed

    Lonij, Vincent P A; Klauss, Catherine E; Holmgren, William F; Cronin, Alexander D

    2011-06-30

    van der Waals (vdW) atom-surface potentials can be excellent benchmarks for atomic structure calculations. This is especially true if measurements are made with two different types of atoms interacting with the same surface sample. Here we show theoretically how ratios of vdW potential strengths (e.g., C₃(K)/C₃(Na)) depend sensitively on the properties of each atom, yet these ratios are relatively insensitive to properties of the surface. We discuss how C₃ ratios depend on atomic core electrons by using a two-oscillator model to represent the contribution from atomic valence electrons and core electrons separately. We explain why certain pairs of atoms are preferable to study for future experimental tests of atomic structure calculations. A well chosen pair of atoms (e.g., K and Na) will have a C₃ ratio that is insensitive to the permittivity of the surface, whereas a poorly chosen pair (e.g., K and He) will have a ratio of C₃ values that depends more strongly on the permittivity of the surface.

  1. Model for outgassing of water from metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Minxu; Dylla, Fred

    1993-06-01

    Numerous measurements of outgassing from metal surfaces show that the outgassing obeys a power law of the form Q=Q{sub 10}t{sup -alpha}, where alpha is typically near unity. For unbaked systems, outgassing is dominated by water. This work demonstrates that alpha is a function of the water vapor exposure during venting of the system, and the physical properties of the passivation oxide layer on the surface. An analytic expression for the outgassing rate is derived based on the assumption that the rate of water diffusing through the passivation oxide layer to the surface governs the rate of its release into the vacuum. The source distribution function for the desorbing water is assumed to be a combination of a Gaussian distribution centered at the interior surface driven by atmospheric exposure, and a uniform concentration throughout the bulk. We have measured the outgassing rate from a clean stainless-steel (type 304) chamber as a function of water exposure to the chamber surface from <1 to 600 monolayers. The measured outgassing rate data show that alpha tends to 0.5 for low H{sub 2}O exposures and tends to 1.5 for high H{sub 2}O exposures as predicted by the model.

  2. Establishment and metabolic analysis of a model microbial community for understanding trophic and electron accepting interactions of subsurface anaerobic environments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Lance D; Mosher, Jennifer J; Venkateswaran, Amudhan; Yang, Zamin Koo; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Podar, Mircea; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Keller, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Communities of microorganisms control the rates of key biogeochemical cycles, and are important for biotechnology, bioremediation, and industrial microbiological processes. For this reason, we constructed a model microbial community comprised of three species dependent on trophic interactions. The three species microbial community was comprised of Clostridium cellulolyticum, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, and Geobacter sulfurreducens and was grown under continuous culture conditions. Cellobiose served as the carbon and energy source for C. cellulolyticum, whereas D. vulgaris and G. sulfurreducens derived carbon and energy from the metabolic products of cellobiose fermentation and were provided with sulfate and fumarate respectively as electron acceptors.

  3. Students Perception towards the Implementation of Computer Graphics Technology in Class via Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binti Shamsuddin, Norsila

    Technology advancement and development in a higher learning institution is a chance for students to be motivated to learn in depth in the information technology areas. Students should take hold of the opportunity to blend their skills towards these technologies as preparation for them when graduating. The curriculum itself can rise up the students' interest and persuade them to be directly involved in the evolvement of the technology. The aim of this study is to see how deep is the students' involvement as well as their acceptance towards the adoption of the technology used in Computer Graphics and Image Processing subjects. The study will be towards the Bachelor students in Faculty of Industrial Information Technology (FIIT), Universiti Industri Selangor (UNISEL); Bac. In Multimedia Industry, BSc. Computer Science and BSc. Computer Science (Software Engineering). This study utilizes the new Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) to further validate the model and enhance our understanding of the adoption of Computer Graphics and Image Processing Technologies. Four (4) out of eight (8) independent factors in UTAUT will be studied towards the dependent factor.

  4. Modelling surface water flood risk using coupled numerical and physical modelling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, D. L.; Pattison, I.; Yu, D.

    2015-12-01

    Surface water (pluvial) flooding occurs due to intense precipitation events where rainfall cannot infiltrate into the sub-surface or drain via storm water systems. The perceived risk appears to have increased in recent years with pluvial flood events seeming more severe and frequent within the UK. Surface water flood risk currently accounts for one third of all UK flood risk, with approximately two million people living in urban areas being at risk of a 1 in 200 year flood event. Surface water flooding research often focuses upon using 1D, 2D or 1D-2D coupled numerical modelling techniques to understand the extent, depth and severity of actual or hypothetical flood scenarios. Although much research has been conducted using numerical modelling, field data available for model calibration and validation is limited due to the complexities associated with data collection in surface water flood conditions. Ultimately, the data which numerical models are based upon is often erroneous and inconclusive. Physical models offer an alternative and innovative environment to collect data within. A controlled, closed system allows independent variables to be altered individually to investigate cause and effect relationships. Despite this, physical modelling approaches are seldom used in surface water flooding research. Scaled laboratory experiments using a 9m2, two-tiered physical model consisting of: (i) a mist nozzle type rainfall simulator able to simulate a range of rainfall intensities similar to those observed within the United Kingdom, and; (ii) a fully interchangeable, scaled plot surface have been conducted to investigate and quantify the influence of factors such as slope, impermeability, building density/configuration and storm dynamics on overland flow and rainfall-runoff patterns within a range of terrestrial surface conditions. Results obtained within the physical modelling environment will be compared with numerical modelling results using FloodMap (Yu & Lane, 2006

  5. A unified bounding surface plasticity model for unsaturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, A. R.; Khalili, N.

    2006-03-01

    A unified constitutive model for unsaturated soils is presented in a critical state framework using the concepts of effective stress and bounding surface plasticity theory. Consideration is given to the effects of unsaturation and particle crushing in the definition of the critical state. A simple isotropic elastic rule is adopted. A loading surface and a bounding surface of the same shape are defined using simple and versatile functions. The bounding surface and elastic rules lead to the existence of a limiting isotropic compression line, towards which the stress trajectories of all isotropic compression load paths approach. A non-associated flow rule of the same general form is assumed for all soil types. Isotropic hardening/softening occurs due to changes in plastic volumetric strains as well as suction for some unsaturated soils, enabling the phenomenon of volumetric collapse upon wetting to be accounted for. The model is used to simulate the stress-strain behaviour observed in unsaturated speswhite kaolin subjected to three triaxial test load paths. The fit between simulation and experiment is improved compared to that of other constitutive models developed using conventional Cam-Clay-based plasticity theory and calibrated using the same set of data. Also, the model is used to simulate to a high degree of accuracy the stress-strain behaviour observed in unsaturated Kurnell sand subjected to two triaxial test load paths and the oedometric compression load path. For oedometric compression theoretical simulations indicate that the suction was not sufficiently large to cause samples to separate from the confining ring.

  6. Chelyabinsk meteorite entry model and damage on the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemieva, N.; Shuvalov, V.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we model an atmospheric entry of the Chelyabinsk meteorite to show that this event represents a typical behaviour of a large chondritic body in the Earth's atmosphere: it was fragmented, ablated, and decelerated to a free-fall velocity. Atmospheric shock waves reached the surface, caused on overpressure of up to 1500 Pa, and damaged on an area of about 50 km*100 km.

  7. Modeling anomalous surface - wave propagation across the Southern Caspian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Priestly, K.F.; Patton, H.J.; Schultz, C.A.

    1998-01-09

    The crust of the south Caspian basin consists of 15-25 km of low velocity, highly attenuating sediment overlying high velocity crystalline crust. The Moho depth beneath the basin is about 30 km as compared to about 50 km in the surrounding region. Preliminary modeling of the phase velocity curves shows that this thick sediments of the south Caspian basin are also under-lain by a 30-35 km thick crystalline crust and not by typical oceanic crust. This analysis also suggest that if the effect of the over-pressuring of the sediments is to reduce Poissons` ratio, the over-pressured sediments observed to approximately 5 km do not persist to great depths. It has been shown since 1960`s that the south Caspian basin blocks the regional phase Lg. Intermediate frequency (0.02-0.04 Hz) fundamental mode Raleigh waves propagating across the basin are also severely attenuated, but the low frequency surface waves are largely unaffected. This attenuation is observed along the both east-to-west and west-to-east great circle paths across the basin, and therefore it cannot be related to a seismograph site effect. We have modeled the response of surface waves in an idealized rendition of the south Caspian basin model using a hybrid normal mode / 2-D finite difference approach. To gain insight into the features of the basin which cause the anomalous surface wave propagation, we have varied parameters of the basin model and computed synthetic record sections to compare with the observed seismograms. We varied the amount of mantel up-warp, the shape of the boundaries, the thickness and shear wave Q of the sediments and mantle, and the depth of the water layer. Of these parameters, the intermediate frequency surface waves are most severely affected by the sediments thickness and shear wave attenuation. fundamental mode Raleigh wave phase velocities measure for paths crossing the basin are extremely low.

  8. Modeling the surface evapotranspiration over the southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect

    Liljegren, J.C.; Doran, J.C.; Hubbe, J.M.; Shaw, W.J.; Zhong, S.; Collatz, G.J.; Cook, D.R.; Hart, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    We have developed a method to apply the Simple Biosphere Model of Sellers et al to calculate the surface fluxes of sensible heat and water vapor at high spatial resolution over the domain of the US DOE`s Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) in Kansas and Oklahoma. The CART, which is within the GCIP area of interest for the Mississippi River Basin, is an extensively instrumented facility operated as part of the DOE`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. Flux values calculated with our method will be used to provide lower boundary conditions for numerical models to study the atmosphere over the CART domain.

  9. Modeling the surface evapotranspiration over the southern Great Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liljegren, J. C.; Doran, J. C.; Hubbe, J. M.; Shaw, W. J.; Zhong, S.; Collatz, G. J.; Cook, D. R.; Hart, R. L.

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a method to apply the Simple Biosphere Model of Sellers et al to calculate the surface fluxes of sensible heat and water vapor at high spatial resolution over the domain of the US DOE's Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) in Kansas and Oklahoma. The CART, which is within the GCIP area of interest for the Mississippi River Basin, is an extensively instrumented facility operated as part of the DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. Flux values calculated with our method will be used to provide lower boundary conditions for numerical models to study the atmosphere over the CART domain.

  10. Numerical modeling of runback water on ice protected aircraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Khalil, Kamel M.; Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Dewitt, Kenneth J.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical simulation for 'running wet' aircraft anti-icing systems is developed. The model includes breakup of the water film, which exists in regions of direct impingement, into individual rivulets. The wetness factor distribution resulting from the film breakup and the rivulet configuration on the surface are predicted in the numerical solution procedure. The solid wall is modeled as a multilayer structure and the anti-icing system used is of the thermal type utilizing hot air and/or electrical heating elements embedded with the layers. Details of the calculation procedure and the methods used are presented.

  11. Novel mixture model for the representation of potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Tien Lam; Kino, Hiori; Terakura, Kiyoyuki; Miyake, Takashi; Dam, Hieu Chi

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate that knowledge of chemical physics on a materials system can be automatically extracted from first-principles calculations using a data mining technique; this information can then be utilized to construct a simple empirical atomic potential model. By using unsupervised learning of the generative Gaussian mixture model, physically meaningful patterns of atomic local chemical environments can be detected automatically. Based on the obtained information regarding these atomic patterns, we propose a chemical-structure-dependent linear mixture model for estimating the atomic potential energy. Our experiments show that the proposed mixture model significantly improves the accuracy of the prediction of the potential energy surface for complex systems that possess a large diversity in their local structures.

  12. Information-Theoretic Benchmarking of Land Surface Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nearing, Grey; Mocko, David; Kumar, Sujay; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Xia, Youlong

    2016-04-01

    Benchmarking is a type of model evaluation that compares model performance against a baseline metric that is derived, typically, from a different existing model. Statistical benchmarking was used to qualitatively show that land surface models do not fully utilize information in boundary conditions [1] several years before Gong et al [2] discovered the particular type of benchmark that makes it possible to *quantify* the amount of information lost by an incorrect or imperfect model structure. This theoretical development laid the foundation for a formal theory of model benchmarking [3]. We here extend that theory to separate uncertainty contributions from the three major components of dynamical systems models [4]: model structures, model parameters, and boundary conditions describe time-dependent details of each prediction scenario. The key to this new development is the use of large-sample [5] data sets that span multiple soil types, climates, and biomes, which allows us to segregate uncertainty due to parameters from the two other sources. The benefit of this approach for uncertainty quantification and segregation is that it does not rely on Bayesian priors (although it is strictly coherent with Bayes' theorem and with probability theory), and therefore the partitioning of uncertainty into different components is *not* dependent on any a priori assumptions. We apply this methodology to assess the information use efficiency of the four land surface models that comprise the North American Land Data Assimilation System (Noah, Mosaic, SAC-SMA, and VIC). Specifically, we looked at the ability of these models to estimate soil moisture and latent heat fluxes. We found that in the case of soil moisture, about 25% of net information loss was from boundary conditions, around 45% was from model parameters, and 30-40% was from the model structures. In the case of latent heat flux, boundary conditions contributed about 50% of net uncertainty, and model structures contributed

  13. Water on hydrophobic surfaces: Mechanistic modeling of hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Hahn, Tobias; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2016-09-23

    Mechanistic models are successfully used for protein purification process development as shown for ion-exchange column chromatography (IEX). Modeling and simulation of hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) in the column mode has been seldom reported. As a combination of these two techniques is often encountered in biopharmaceutical purification steps, accurate modeling of protein adsorption in HIC is a core issue for applying holistic model-based process development, especially in the light of the Quality by Design (QbD) approach. In this work, a new mechanistic isotherm model for HIC is derived by consideration of an equilibrium between well-ordered water molecules and bulk-like ordered water molecules on the hydrophobic surfaces of protein and ligand. The model's capability of describing column chromatography experiments is demonstrated with glucose oxidase, bovine serum albumin (BSA), and lysozyme on Capto™ Phenyl (high sub) as model system. After model calibration from chromatograms of bind-and-elute experiments, results were validated with batch isotherms and prediction of further gradient elution chromatograms. PMID:27575919

  14. Modeling fine-scale soil surface structure using geostatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, H.; Anderson, K.; Brazier, R. E.; Kuhn, N. J.

    2013-04-01

    There is widespread recognition that spatially distributed information on soil surface roughness (SSR) is required for hydrological and geomorphological applications. Such information is necessary to describe variability in soil structure, which is highly heterogeneous in time and space, to parameterize hydrology and erosion models and to understand the temporal evolution of the soil surface in response to rainfall. This paper demonstrates how results from semivariogram analysis can quantify key elements of SSR for such applications. Three soil types (silt, silt loam, and silty clay) were used to show how different types of structural variance in SSR evolve during simulated rainfall events. All three soil types were progressively degraded using artificial rainfall to produce a series of roughness states. A calibrated laser profiling instrument was used to measure SSR over a 10 cm × 10 cm spatial extent, at a 2 mm resolution. These data were geostatistically analyzed in the context of aggregate breakdown and soil crusting. The results show that such processes are represented by a quantifiable decrease in sill variance, from 7.81 (control) to 0.94 (after 60 min of rainfall). Soil surface features such as soil cracks, tillage lines and erosional areas were quantified by local maxima in semivariance at a given length scale. This research demonstrates that semivariogram analysis can retrieve spatiotemporal variations in soil surface condition; in order to provide information on hydrological pathways. Consequently, geostatistically derived SSR shows strong potential for inclusion as spatial information in hydrology and erosion models to represent complex surface processes at different soil structural scales.

  15. Modeling the surface photovoltage of silicon slabs with varying thickness.

    PubMed

    Vazhappilly, Tijo; Kilin, Dmitri S; Micha, David A

    2015-04-10

    The variation with thickness of the energy band gap and photovoltage at the surface of a thin semiconductor film are of great interest in connection with their surface electronic structure and optical properties. In this work, the change of a surface photovoltage (SPV) with the number of layers of a crystalline silicon slab is extracted from models based on their atomic structure. Electronic properties of photoexcited slabs are investigated using generalized gradient and hybrid density functionals, and plane wave basis sets. Si(1 1 1) surfaces have been terminated by hydrogen atoms to compensate for dangling bonds and have been described by large supercells with periodic boundary conditions. Calculations of the SPV of the Si slabs have been done in terms of the reduced density matrix of the photoactive electrons including dissipative effects due to their interaction with medium phonons and excitons. Surface photovoltages have been calculated for model Si slabs with 4-12, and 16 layers, to determine convergence trends versus slab thickness. Band gaps and the inverse of the SPVs have been found to scale nearly linearly with the inverse thickness of the slab, while the electronic density of states increases quadratically with thickness. Our calculations show the same trends as experimental values indicating band gap reduction and absorption enhancement for Si films of increasing thickness. Simple arguments on confined electronic structures have been used to explain the main effects of changes with slab thickness. A procedure involving shifted electron excitation energies is described to improve results from generalized gradient functionals so they can be in better agreement with the more accurate but also more computer intensive values from screened exchange hybrid functionals.

  16. Heterogeneous nucleation of ice on model carbon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinero, V.; Lupi, L.; Hudait, A.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonaceous particles account for 10% of the particulate matter in the atmosphere. The experimental investigation of heterogeneous freezing of water droplets by carbonaceous particles reveals widespread ice freezing temperatures. The origin of the soot and its oxidation and aging modulate its ice nucleation ability, however, it is not known which structural and chemical characteristics of soot account for the variability in ice nucleation efficiency. We find that atomically flat carbon surfaces promote heterogeneous nucleation of ice, while molecularly rough surfaces with the same hydrophobicity do not. We investigate a large set of graphitic surfaces of various dimensions and radii of curvature consistent with those of soot in experiments, and find that variations in nanostructures alone could account for the spread in the freezing temperatures of ice on soot in experiments. A characterization of the nanostructure of soot is needed to predict its ice nucleation efficiency. Atmospheric oxidation and aging of soot modulates its ice nucleation ability. It has been suggested that an increase in the ice nucleation ability of aged soot results from an increase in the hydrophilicity of the surfaces upon oxidation. Oxidation, however, also impacts the nanostructure of soot, making it difficult to assess the separate effects of soot nanostructure and hydrophilicity in experiments. We investigate the effect of changes in hydrophilicity of model graphitic surfaces on the freezing temperature of ice. Our results indicate that the hydrophilicity of the surface is not in general a good predictor of ice nucleation ability. We find a correlation between the ability of a surface to promote nucleation of ice and the layering of liquid water at the surface. The results of this work suggest that ordering of liquid water in contact with the surface plays an important role in the heterogeneous ice nucleation mechanism. References: L. Lupi, A. Hudait and V. Molinero, J. Am. Chem. Soc

  17. Modelling Sea Ice and Surface Wave Interactions in Polar Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosekova, L.; Aksenov, Y.; Coward, A.; Williams, T.; Bertino, L.; Nurser, A. J. G.

    2015-12-01

    In the Polar Oceans, the surface ocean waves break up sea ice cover and create the Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ), an area between the sea-ice free ocean and pack ice characterized by highly fragmented ice. This band of sea ice cover is undergoing dramatic changes due to sea ice retreat, with a widening of up to 39% in the Arctic Ocean reported over the last three decades and projections predicting a continuing increase. The surface waves, sea ice and ocean interact in the MIZ through multiple complex feedbacks and processes which are not accounted for in any of the present-day climate models. To address this issue, we present a model development which implements surface ocean wave effects in the global Ocean General Circulation Model (OGCM) NEMO, coupled to the CICE sea ice model. Our implementation takes into account a number of physical processes specific to the MIZ dynamics. Incoming surface waves are attenuated due to scattering and energy dissipation induced by the presence of ice cover, which is in turn fragmented in response to flexural stresses. This fragmentation modifies the floe size distribution and impacts the sea ice thermodynamics by increasing lateral melting and thus affecting momentum and heat transfer between sea ice and the upper ocean. In addition, the dynamics of the sea ice is modified by a combined rheology that takes into account floe collisions and allows for a more realistic representation of the MIZ. We present results from the NEMO OGCM at 1 and 0.25 degree resolution with a wave-ice interaction module. The module introduces two new diagnostics previously unavailable in OGCM's: surface wave spectra in sea ice covered areas, and floe size distribution (FSD) due to wave-induced fragmentation. We evaluate the sea ice and wave simulations with available observational estimates, and analyze the impact of these MIZ processes on the ocean and sea ice state. We focus on ocean mixing, stratification, circulation and the role of the MIZ in ocean

  18. Correcting Satellite Image Derived Surface Model for Atmospheric Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, William; Baldwin, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    This project was a continuation of the project entitled "Resolution Earth Surface Features from Repeat Moderate Resolution Satellite Imagery". In the previous study, a Bayesian Maximum Posterior Estimate (BMPE) algorithm was used to obtain a composite series of repeat imagery from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). The spatial resolution of the resulting composite was significantly greater than the 1 km resolution of the individual AVHRR images. The BMPE algorithm utilized a simple, no-atmosphere geometrical model for the short-wave radiation budget at the Earth's surface. A necessary assumption of the algorithm is that all non geometrical parameters remain static over the compositing period. This assumption is of course violated by temporal variations in both the surface albedo and the atmospheric medium. The effect of the albedo variations is expected to be minimal since the variations are on a fairly long time scale compared to the compositing period, however, the atmospheric variability occurs on a relatively short time scale and can be expected to cause significant errors in the surface reconstruction. The current project proposed to incorporate an atmospheric correction into the BMPE algorithm for the purpose of investigating the effects of a variable atmosphere on the surface reconstructions. Once the atmospheric effects were determined, the investigation could be extended to include corrections various cloud effects, including short wave radiation through thin cirrus clouds. The original proposal was written for a three year project, funded one year at a time. The first year of the project focused on developing an understanding of atmospheric corrections and choosing an appropriate correction model. Several models were considered and the list was narrowed to the two best suited. These were the 5S and 6S shortwave radiation models developed at NASA/GODDARD and tested extensively with data from the AVHRR instrument. Although the 6S model

  19. Implementing an acceptance and commitment therapy group protocol with veterans using VA's stepped care model of pain management.

    PubMed

    Cosio, David; Schafer, Tracy

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the current study was to replicate and extend previous findings; further demonstrating the effectiveness of an ACT outpatient, group-based treatment for Veterans who suffer from mixed idiopathic, chronic, non-cancer pain. This course of treatment utilized the VA's Stepped Care Model of Pain Management as a framework. A sample of 50 Veterans who participated in an ACT for chronic pain group intervention was evaluated after completing a pain health education program at a Midwestern VA Medical Center between February 16, 2010 and November 9, 2010. All participants completed a standard set of pre- and post-intervention measures. Paired-samples t tests were conducted to evaluate the impact of the manualized intervention on Veterans' scores. The current study found a significant difference in measures of pain interference, illness-focused coping, and global distress upon completion of the intervention. Findings suggest that ACT is an effective treatment for Veterans with chronic pain as a secondary consultative service.

  20. Conceptual Models of the Potentiometric Surface at Yucca Mountain, NV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, M.; Winterle, J.; Farrell, D.; Sims, D.; Bertetti, P.

    2002-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating Yucca Mountain (YM) Nevada, as the potential site for geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW). If approved, the repository would be located approximately 244 to 305 m (800-1,000 ft) above the present water table. Total-system performance assessments that consider both engineered and geologic barrier systems are one method used to evaluate whether the potential repository can meet regulatory requirements. Flow paths interpreted from the potentiometric surface in the saturated zone beneath YM are incorporated into the performance assessment codes. Therefore, it is important that our understanding of the potentiometric surface is sufficient to assess potential repository performance. The addition of new water-level data from the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program (EWDP) has helped constrain the conceptual model of the site-scale potentiometric surface at YM, specifically in the southern portion of the site along U.S. Highway 95. The EWDP was initiated in 1998, with the purpose of identifying the flow paths for contaminants should they egress from the proposed repository into the groundwater system. A revised site-scale potentiometric surface map for YM utilizing the new water-level data obtained from the EWDP is presented. The revised site-scale potentiometric surface map and other existing site-scale potentiometric surface maps interpreted from water-level data, are compared to structural, geophysical, and chemical data to evaluate whether consensus exists among the different data types concerning groundwater flow at YM. This abstract documents work performed in part by the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses under contract No. NRC-02-97-009. The report is an independent product and does not reflect the regulatory position of the NRC.

  1. Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT): the foundation of the therapeutic model and an overview of its contribution to the treatment of patients with chronic physical diseases.

    PubMed

    Prevedini, Anna Bianca; Presti, Giovambattista; Rabitti, Elisa; Miselli, Giovanni; Moderato, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, treatment of chronic illnesses, such as stroke, cancer, chronic heart and respiratory diseases, osteoarthritis, diabetes, and so forth, account for the largest part of expenses in western countries national health systems. Moreover, these diseases are by far the leading causes of mortality in the world, representing 60% of all deaths. Any treatment aimed at targeting them might engage an individual for a large portion of his/her life so that personal and environmental factors can play a crucial role in modulating the person's quality of life and functioning, on top of any medical cure. Anxiety, depression, and distress for examples are not rare in patients with chronic diseases. Therefore, Cognitive and Behavior Therapy research has largely contributed in the last decades in identifying and programming interventions on such aspects as real and perceived social and family support, coping abilities, locus of control, self-efficacy that might help patients living with their chronic disease. More recently, third generation Cognitive-Behavior-Therapies, such as Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT), Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT), Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) and Acceptance, and Commitment Therapy (ACT) focused their attention and research efforts on developing intervention models targeting the needs of patients with a chronic disease. This paper has three aims. First is to briefly introduce ACT epistemological (Functional Contextualism) and theoretical (Relational Frame Theory) foundations as a stand point for understanding the peculiarity of ACT as a modern form of Clinical Behavior Analysis. The second aim is to introduce ACT clinical model and its six core processes (acceptance, defusion, present moment, self as a context, values and committed action) as both accountable, in their continuum, for psychological flexibility and inflexibility. Third, to present a brief overview of studies and outcomes of ACT intervention protocols and

  2. Lithospheric Thickness Modeled from Long Period Surface Wave Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M E

    2008-05-15

    The behavior of surface waves at long periods is indicative of subcrustal velocity structure. Using recently published dispersion models, we invert surface wave group velocities for lithospheric structure, including lithospheric thickness, over much of the Eastern Hemisphere, encompassing Eurasia, Africa, and the Indian Ocean. Thicker lithosphere under Precambrian shields and platforms are clearly observed, not only under the large cratons (West Africa, Congo, Baltic, Russia, Siberia, India), but also under smaller blocks like the Tarim Basin and Yangtze craton. In contrast, it is found that remobilized Precambrian structures like the Saharan Shield and Sino-Korean Paraplatform do not have well-established lithospheric keels. The thinnest lithospheric thickness is found under oceanic and continental rifts, as well as along convergence zones. We compare our results to thermal models of continental lithosphere, lithospheric cooling models of oceanic lithosphere, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) estimates from S-wave receiver functions, and velocity variations of global tomography models. In addition to comparing results for the broad region, we examine in detail the regions of Central Africa, Siberia, and Tibet. While there are clear differences in the various estimates, overall the results are generally consistent. Inconsistencies between the estimates may be due to a variety of reasons including lateral and depth resolution differences and the comparison of what may be different lithospheric features.

  3. A heat balance model for partially vegetated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. Q.; Fang, X. P.; Zhang, H. X.; Yang, W.; Zhu, C. C.

    1997-08-01

    A steady-state thermal balance model has been designed to enable the prediction of the radiative temperature of partially vegetated surfaces. Vegetation is assumed to be a horizontally homogeneous but porous layer partially covering a soil surface. Short-wave and long-wave energy fluxes absorbed within the vegetation are estimated by solving simplified radiation equations. Sensible and latent heat exchange is estimated using a logarithmic and linear wind profile above the vegetation and a modified exponential profile within the vegetation. The stomatal resistance for latent heat flux is estimated from the equation summarizing the effect of solar irradiance, air temperature, and vapor pressure deficit on stomatal conductance. Based on the energy balance and the heat fluxes and water vapor continuity in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere system, the temperature of the foliage elements and the soil underneath is determined. The model has been tested by comparing simulated radiative temperatures with observed data gathered in short grass and a wheat field. The simulated and measured results match reasonably well. In order to examine whether the model responds to the change of a specific weather or material parameter, a sensitivity analysis of the model is considered.

  4. Evaluation of surface ozone simulated by the WRF/CMAQ online modelling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marougianni, Garyfalia; Katragkou, Eleni; Giannaros, Theodoros; Poupkou, Anastasia; Melas, Dimitris; Zanis, Prodromos; Feidas, Haralambos

    2013-04-01

    /CMAQ online model is successful in representing in an acceptable way a key atmospheric pollutant like ozone. Preliminary results indicate that WRF/CMAQ captures relatively well the spatial patterns of surface ozone over Europe. Its results are compared to the extensively tested offline modelling system WRF/CAMx, which runs with similar configuration in an identical domain over the same time slice. The aim is to assess the differences in surface ozone between the off-line and online model and try to find the mechanisms underlying these differences. Conclusively, this study aims in quantifying the differences in the results of the off-line WRF/CAMx and the online WRF/CMAQ modelling systems, in order to decide which can more adequately address the needs of emerging assessment for air quality-climate interactions and provide dynamically consistent predictions, ultimately justifying the choice of online versus off-line approaches.This work has been developed in the framework of the NSRF project: Development of a Geographical Information System for Climate information (Geoclima).

  5. Forward model for the superconducting imaging-surface meg system

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Robert H., Jr.; Matlachov, A. N.; Espy, M. A.; Maharajh, K.; Volegov, P.

    2001-01-01

    We have recently completed a novel whole-head MEG system based on the Superconducting Imaging-Surface (SIS) concept originally proposed by van Hulsteyn, et al.[l]. The SIS concept is generally described as a source near a superconducting surface. The source field induces Meissner currents in the superconductor equivalent to a source image 'behind' the surface. A sensor (SQUIDS in our system) placed on the source-side of the SIS will measure the superposed fields from the real and image sources. A second consequence of the Meissner effect is to shield the SQUIDS sensors near the SIS from external or background fields. The shape of the SIS used in our MEG system is a hemisphere with two cut-outs at the nominal ear-locations. A brim is added around the entire periphery with a smooth 0.5 cm radius transition between brim and hemisphere. Benefits of the SIS concept over existing systems include significantly enhanced signal-to-noise as a consequence of the SIS shielding and inherently generating pseudo-first order gradient fields at the sensors. One of the most significant challenges in realizing this system has been to accurately describe how the SIS system impacts the forward physics of any source model. Two approaches have been examined. The first is a hybrid analytical and empirical model using the analytic formalism to describe the hemisphere [1] and a correction matrix derived from empirical measurements to correct for edge effects. This approach proved overly complex and difficult in practice to obtain sufficient empirical data to derive a well-conditioned correction matrix. The second approach, reported here, was to develop a boundary element model (BEM) description of the SIS using the exact as-built geometry. Each element is described by a uniform magnetization arising from a distribution of Meissner currents in the superconductor such that B{perpendicular} = 0 at the surface. B{sub i} at each element is a superposition of the source field and the fields

  6. A spatially resolved surface kinetic model for forsterite dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Kate; Johnson, Natalie C.; Jackson, Ariel; Lammers, Laura N.; Torchinsky, Abe B.; Weaver, Karrie L.; Bird, Dennis K.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2016-02-01

    The development of complex alteration layers on silicate mineral surfaces undergoing dissolution is a widely observed phenomenon. Given the complexity of these layers, most kinetic models used to predict rates of mineral-fluid interactions do not explicitly consider their formation. As a result, the relationship between the development of the altered layers and the final dissolution rate is poorly understood. To improve our understanding of the relationship between the alteration layer and the dissolution rate, we developed a spatially resolved surface kinetic model for olivine dissolution and applied it to a series of closed-system experiments consisting of three-phases (water (±NaCl), olivine, and supercritical CO2) at conditions relevant to in situ mineral carbonation (i.e. 60 °C, 100 bar CO2). We also measured the corresponding δ26/24Mg of the dissolved Mg during early stages of dissolution. Analysis of the solid reaction products indicates the formation of Mg-depleted layers on the olivine surface as quickly as 2 days after the experiment was started and before the bulk solution reached saturation with respect to amorphous silica. The δ26/24Mg of the dissolved Mg decreased by approximately 0.4‰ in the first stages of the experiment and then approached the value of the initial olivine (-0.35‰) as the steady-state dissolution rate was approached. We attribute the preferential release of 24Mg to a kinetic effect associated with the formation of a Mg-depleted layer that develops as protons exchange for Mg2+. We used experimental data to calibrate a surface kinetic model for olivine dissolution that includes crystalline olivine, a distinct "active layer" from which Mg can be preferentially removed, and secondary amorphous silica precipitation. By coupling the spatial arrangement of ions with the kinetics, this model is able to reproduce both the early and steady-state long-term dissolution rates, and the kinetic isotope fractionation. In the early stages of

  7. Use of shape-preserving interpolation methods in surface modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ftitsch, F. N.

    1984-01-01

    In many large-scale scientific computations, it is necessary to use surface models based on information provided at only a finite number of points (rather than determined everywhere via an analytic formula). As an example, an equation of state (EOS) table may provide values of pressure as a function of temperature and density for a particular material. These values, while known quite accurately, are typically known only on a rectangular (but generally quite nonuniform) mesh in (T,d)-space. Thus interpolation methods are necessary to completely determine the EOS surface. The most primitive EOS interpolation scheme is bilinear interpolation. This has the advantages of depending only on local information, so that changes in data remote from a mesh element have no effect on the surface over the element, and of preserving shape information, such as monotonicity. Most scientific calculations, however, require greater smoothness. Standard higher-order interpolation schemes, such as Coons patches or bicubic splines, while providing the requisite smoothness, tend to produce surfaces that are not physically reasonable. This means that the interpolant may have bumps or wiggles that are not supported by the data. The mathematical quantification of ideas such as physically reasonable and visually pleasing is examined.

  8. Adsorption of glucose, cellobiose, and cellotetraose onto cellulose model surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hoja, Johannes; Maurer, Reinhard J; Sax, Alexander F

    2014-07-31

    Reliable simulation of molecular adsorption onto cellulose surfaces is essential for the design of new cellulose nanocomposite materials. However, the applicability of classical force field methods to such systems remains relatively unexplored. In this study, we present the adsorption of glucose, cellobiose, and cellotetraose on model surfaces of crystalline cellulose Iα and Iβ. The adsorption of the two large carbohydrates was simulated with the GLYCAM06 force field. To validate this approach, quantum theoretical calculations for the adsorption of glucose were performed: Equilibrium geometries were studied with density functional theory (DFT) and dispersion-corrected DFT, whereas the adsorption energies were calculated with two standard density functional approximations and five dispersion-containing DFT approaches. We find that GLYCAM06 gives a good account of geometries and, in most cases, accurate adsorption energies when compared to dispersion-corrected DFT energies. Adsorption onto the (100) surface of cellulose Iα is, in general, stronger than onto the (100) surface of cellulose Iβ. Contrary to intuition, the adsorption energy is not directly correlated with the number of hydrogen bonds; rather, it is dominated by dispersion interactions. Especially for bigger adsorbates, a neglect of these interactions leads to a dramatic underestimation of adsorption energies.

  9. Adsorption of glucose, cellobiose, and cellotetraose onto cellulose model surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hoja, Johannes; Maurer, Reinhard J; Sax, Alexander F

    2014-07-31

    Reliable simulation of molecular adsorption onto cellulose surfaces is essential for the design of new cellulose nanocomposite materials. However, the applicability of classical force field methods to such systems remains relatively unexplored. In this study, we present the adsorption of glucose, cellobiose, and cellotetraose on model surfaces of crystalline cellulose Iα and Iβ. The adsorption of the two large carbohydrates was simulated with the GLYCAM06 force field. To validate this approach, quantum theoretical calculations for the adsorption of glucose were performed: Equilibrium geometries were studied with density functional theory (DFT) and dispersion-corrected DFT, whereas the adsorption energies were calculated with two standard density functional approximations and five dispersion-containing DFT approaches. We find that GLYCAM06 gives a good account of geometries and, in most cases, accurate adsorption energies when compared to dispersion-corrected DFT energies. Adsorption onto the (100) surface of cellulose Iα is, in general, stronger than onto the (100) surface of cellulose Iβ. Contrary to intuition, the adsorption energy is not directly correlated with the number of hydrogen bonds; rather, it is dominated by dispersion interactions. Especially for bigger adsorbates, a neglect of these interactions leads to a dramatic underestimation of adsorption energies. PMID:25036217

  10. Acceptability of BCG vaccination.

    PubMed

    Mande, R

    1977-01-01

    The acceptability of BCG vaccination varies a great deal according to the country and to the period when the vaccine is given. The incidence of complications has not always a direct influence on this acceptability, which depends, for a very large part, on the risk of tuberculosis in a given country at a given time.

  11. ATLAS ACCEPTANCE TEST

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, J. C. , Jr.; Parker, J. V.; Hinckley, W. B.; Hosack, K. W.; Mills, D.; Parsons, W. M.; Scudder, D. W.; Stokes, J. L.; Tabaka, L. J.; Thompson, M. C.; Wysocki, Frederick Joseph; Campbell, T. N.; Lancaster, D. L.; Tom, C. Y.

    2001-01-01

    The acceptance test program for Atlas, a 23 MJ pulsed power facility for use in the Los Alamos High Energy Density Hydrodynamics program, has been completed. Completion of this program officially releases Atlas from the construction phase and readies it for experiments. Details of the acceptance test program results and of machine capabilities for experiments will be presented.

  12. Surface Contaminants Inhibit Osseointegration in a Novel Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Bonsignore, Lindsay A.; Colbrunn, Robb W.; Tatro, Joscelyn M.; Messerschmitt, Patrick J.; Hernandez, Christopher J.; Goldberg, Victor M.; Stewart, Matthew C.; Greenfield, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    Surface contaminants, such as bacterial debris and manufacturing residues, may remain on orthopaedic implants after sterilization procedures and affect osseointegration. The goals of this study were to develop a murine model of osseointegration in order to determine whether removing surface contaminants enhances osseointegration. To develop the murine model, titanium alloy implants were implanted into a unicortical pilot hole in the mid-diaphysis of the femur and osseointegration was measured over a five week time course. Histology, backscatter scanning electron microscopy and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy showed areas of bone in intimate physical contact with the implant, confirming osseointegration. Histomorphometric quantification of bone-to-implant contact and peri-implant bone and biomechanical pullout quantification of ultimate force, stiffness and work to failure increased significantly over time, also demonstrating successful osseointegration. We also found that a rigorous cleaning procedure significantly enhances bone-to-implant contact and biomechanical pullout measures by two-fold compared with implants that were autoclaved, as recommended by the manufacturer. The most likely interpretation of these results is that surface contaminants inhibit osseointegration. The results of this study justify the need for the development of better detection and removal techniques for contaminants on orthopaedic implants and other medical devices. PMID:21801863

  13. A Vs30-derived Near-surface Seismic Velocity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, G. P.; Jordan, T. H.; Small, P.; Maechling, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Shallow material properties, S-wave velocity in particular, strongly influence ground motions, so must be accurately characterized for ground-motion simulations. Available near-surface velocity information generally exceeds that which is accommodated by crustal velocity models, such as current versions of the SCEC Community Velocity Model (CVM-S4) or the Harvard model (CVM-H6). The elevation-referenced CVM-H voxel model introduces rasterization artifacts in the near-surface due to course sample spacing, and sample depth dependence on local topographic elevation. To address these issues, we propose a method to supplement crustal velocity models, in the upper few hundred meters, with a model derived from available maps of Vs30 (the average S-wave velocity down to 30 meters). The method is universally applicable to regions without direct measures of Vs30 by using Vs30 estimates from topographic slope (Wald, et al. 2007). In our current implementation for Southern California, the geology-based Vs30 map of Wills and Clahan (2006) is used within California, and topography-estimated Vs30 is used outside of California. Various formulations for S-wave velocity depth dependence, such as linear spline and polynomial interpolation, are evaluated against the following priorities: (a) capability to represent a wide range of soil and rock velocity profile types; (b) smooth transition to the crustal velocity model; (c) ability to reasonably handle poor spatial correlation of Vs30 and crustal velocity data; (d) simplicity and minimal parameterization; and (e) computational efficiency. The favored model includes cubic and square-root depth dependence, with the model extending to a depth of 350 meters. Model parameters are fit to Boore and Joyner's (1997) generic rock profile as well as CVM-4 soil profiles for the NEHRP soil classification types. P-wave velocity and density are derived from S-wave velocity by the scaling laws of Brocher (2005). Preliminary assessment of the new model

  14. Nonstationary harmonic modeling for ECG removal in surface EMG signals.

    PubMed

    Zivanovic, Miroslav; González-Izal, Miriam

    2012-06-01

    We present a compact approach for mitigating the presence of electrocardiograms (ECG) in surface electromyographic (EMG) signals by means of time-variant harmonic modeling of the cardiac artifact. Heart rate and QRS complex variability, which often account for amplitude and frequency time variations of the ECG, are simultaneously captured by a set of third-order constant-coefficient polynomials modulating a stationary harmonic basis in the analysis window. Such a characterization allows us to significantly suppress ECG from the mixture by preserving most of the EMG signal content at low frequencies (less than 20 Hz). Moreover, the resulting model is linear in parameters and the least-squares solution to the corresponding linear system of equations efficiently provides model parameter estimates. The comparative results suggest that the proposed method outperforms two reference methods in terms of the EMG preservation at low frequencies. PMID:22453600

  15. Fast surface alignment for cardiac spatio-temporal modeling: application to Ischemic cardiac shape modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Heng; Shen, Li; Zhang, Rong; Makedon, Fillia; Hettleman, Bruce; Pearlman, Justin

    2006-03-01

    The visualization and comparison of local deformation from 3D image sequences is of critical importance in understanding the etiology of Ischemic cardiac disease. In this paper we describe a framework to combine our previous fast spherical harmonic surface alignment algorithm with a new local special surface reconstruction method to reconstruct the surface of LV with Ischaemic cardiac disease. Our new surface computational model allows people to extract the valuable ischemic tissues behavior from the dynamic shape. We have demonstrated our approaches by the experiments on cardiac MRI. A brief description of motivation is put forth, as well as an overview of the approaches and some initial results are described.

  16. Surface-effect corrections for the solar model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magic, Z.; Weiss, A.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Solar p-mode oscillations exhibit a systematic offset towards higher frequencies due to shortcomings in the 1D stellar structure models, in particular, the lack of turbulent pressure in the superadiabatic layers just below the optical surface, arising from the convective velocity field. Aims: We study the influence of the turbulent expansion, chemical composition, and magnetic fields on the stratification in the upper layers of the solar models in comparison with solar observations. Furthermore, we test alternative ⟨3D⟩ averages for improved results on the oscillation frequencies. Methods: We appended temporally and spatially averaged ⟨3D⟩ stratifications to 1D models to compute adiabatic oscillation frequencies that we then tested against solar observations. We also developed depth-dependent corrections for the solar 1D model, for which we expanded the geometrical depth to match the pressure stratification of the solar ⟨3D⟩ model, and we reduced the density that is caused by the turbulent pressure. Results: We obtain the same results with our ⟨3D⟩ models as have been reported previously. Our depth-dependent corrected 1D models match the observations to almost a similar extent as the ⟨3D⟩ model. We find that correcting for the expansion of the geometrical depth and the reducing of the density are both equally necessary. Interestingly, the influence of the adiabatic exponent Γ1 is less pronounced than anticipated. The turbulent elevation directly from the ⟨3D⟩ model does not match the observations properly. Considering different reference depth scales for the ⟨3D⟩ averaging leads to very similar frequencies. Solar models with high metal abundances in their initial chemical composition match the low-frequency part much better. We find a linear relation between the p-mode frequency shift and the vertical magnetic field strength with δvnl = 26.21Bz [μHz/kG], which is able to render the solar activity cycles correctly.

  17. Estimation of Land Surface States and Fluxes using a Land Surface Model Considering Different Irrigation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, J. A.; Zaitchik, B. F.; Evans, J. P.; Beaudoing, H. K.

    2012-12-01

    Food security can be improved by increasing the extent of agricultural land or by increasing agricultural productivity, including through intensive management such as irrigation. The objectives of this study were to incorporate practical irrigation schemes into land surface models of the NASA Land Information System (LIS) and to apply the tool to estimate the impact of irrigation on land surface states and fluxes—including evapotranspiration, soil moisture, and runoff—in the Murray-Darling basin in Australia. Here we present results obtained using Noah Land Surface Model v3.2 within LIS without simulated irrigation (IR0) and with three irrigation simulation routines: flood irrigation (IR1), drip irrigation (IR2), and sprinkler irrigation (IR3). Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) vegetation index was used to define crop growing seasons. Simulations were performed for a full year (July 2002 to June 2003) and evaluated against hydrologic flux estimates obtained in previous studies. Irrigation amounts during the growing season (August 2002 to March 2003) were simulated as 104.6, 24.6, and 188.1 GL for IR1, IR2, and IR3, respectively. These preliminary results showed water use efficiency from a drip irrigation scheme would be highest and lowest from a sprinkler irrigation scheme, with a highly optimized version of flood irrigation falling in between. Irrigation water contributed to a combination of increased evapotranspiration, runoff, and soil moisture storage in the irrigation simulations relative to IR0. Implications for water management applications and for further model development will be discussed.

  18. Analysis of surface parametrizations for modern photometric stereo modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecca, Roberto; Rodolà, Emanuele; Cremers, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Tridimensional shape recovery based on Photometric Stereo (PS) recently received a strong improvement due to new mathematical models based on partial differential irradiance equation ratios.1 This modern approach to PS faces more realistic physical effects among which light attenuation and radial light propagation from a point light source. Since the approximation of the surface is performed with single step method, accurate reconstruction is prevented by sensitiveness to noise. In this paper we analyse a well-known parametrization2 of the tridimensional surface extending it on any auxiliary convex projection functions. Experiments on synthetic data show preliminary results where more accurate reconstruction can be achieved using more suitable parametrization specially in case of noisy input images.

  19. A cellular automata approach for modeling surface water runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jozefik, Zoltan; Nanu Frechen, Tobias; Hinz, Christoph; Schmidt, Heiko

    2015-04-01

    This abstract reports the development and application of a two-dimensional cellular automata based model, which couples the dynamics of overland flow, infiltration processes and surface evolution through sediment transport. The natural hill slopes are represented by their topographic elevation and spatially varying soil properties infiltration rates and surface roughness coefficients. This model allows modeling of Hortonian overland flow and infiltration during complex rainfall events. An advantage of the cellular automata approach over the kinematic wave equations is that wet/dry interfaces that often appear with rainfall overland flows can be accurately captured and are not a source of numerical instabilities. An adaptive explicit time stepping scheme allows for rainfall events to be adequately resolved in time, while large time steps are taken during dry periods to provide for simulation run time efficiency. The time step is constrained by the CFL condition and mass conservation considerations. The spatial discretization is shown to be first-order accurate. For validation purposes, hydrographs for non-infiltrating and infiltrating plates are compared to the kinematic wave analytic solutions and data taken from literature [1,2]. Results show that our cellular automata model quantitatively accurately reproduces hydrograph patterns. However, recent works have showed that even through the hydrograph is satisfyingly reproduced, the flow field within the plot might be inaccurate [3]. For a more stringent validation, we compare steady state velocity, water flux, and water depth fields to rainfall simulation experiments conducted in Thies, Senegal [3]. Comparisons show that our model is able to accurately capture these flow properties. Currently, a sediment transport and deposition module is being implemented and tested. [1] M. Rousseau, O. Cerdan, O. Delestre, F. Dupros, F. James, S. Cordier. Overland flow modeling with the Shallow Water Equation using a well balanced

  20. On surface temperature, greenhouse gases, and aerosols: models and observations

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.F.B.; Davis, R.A.; Ingram, W.J.; Senior, C.A.

    1995-10-01

    The effect of changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and sulphate aerosols on near-surface temperature is investigated using a version of the Hadley Centre atmospheric model coupled to a mixed layer ocean. The scattering of sunlight by sulphate aerosols is represented by appropriately enhancing the surface albedo. On doubling atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, the global mean temperature increases by 5.2 K. An integration with a 39% increase in CO{sub 2}, giving the estimated change in radiative heating due to increases in greenhouse gases since 1900, produced an equilibrium warming of 2.3 K, which, even allowing for oceanic inertia, is significantly higher than the observed warming over the same period. Furthermore, the simulation suggests a substantial warming everywhere, whereas the observations indicate isolated regions of cooling, including parts of the northern midlatitude continents. The addition of an estimate of the effect of scattering by current industrial aerosols (uncertain by a factor of at least 3) leads to improved agreement with the observed pattern of changes over the northern continents and reduces the global mean warming by about 30%. Doubling the aerosol forcing produces patterns that are still compatible with the observations, but further increase leads to unrealistically extensive cooling in the midlatitudes. The diurnal range of surface temperature decreases over most of the northern extratropics on increasing CO{sub 2}, in agreement with recent observations. The addition of the current industrial aerosol had little detectable effect on the diurnal range in the model because the direct effect of reduced solar heating at the surface is approximately balanced by the indirect effects of cooling. Thus, the ratio of the reduction in diurnal range to the mean warming is increased, in closer agreement with observations. Results from further sensitivity experiments with larger increases in aerosol and CO{sub 2} are presented.

  1. Transient Catalytic Combustor Model With Detailed Gas and Surface Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Mellish, Benjamin P.; Miller, Fletcher J.; Tien, James S.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, we numerically investigate the transient combustion of a premixed gas mixture in a narrow, perfectly-insulated, catalytic channel which can represent an interior channel of a catalytic monolith. The model assumes a quasi-steady gas-phase and a transient, thermally thin solid phase. The gas phase is one-dimensional, but it does account for heat and mass transfer in a direction perpendicular to the flow via appropriate heat and mass transfer coefficients. The model neglects axial conduction in both the gas and in the solid. The model includes both detailed gas-phase reactions and catalytic surface reactions. The reactants modeled so far include lean mixtures of dry CO and CO/H2 mixtures, with pure oxygen as the oxidizer. The results include transient computations of light-off and system response to inlet condition variations. In some cases, the model predicts two different steady-state solutions depending on whether the channel is initially hot or cold. Additionally, the model suggests that the catalytic ignition of CO/O2 mixtures is extremely sensitive to small variations of inlet equivalence ratios and parts per million levels of H2.

  2. Assessing modeled Greenland surface mass balance in the GISS Model E2 and its sensitivity to surface albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Patrick; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Koenig, Lora S.; Tedesco, Marco; Moustafa, Samiah E.; Ivanoff, Alvaro; Fischer, Robert P.; Fettweis, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The surface mass balance (SMB) of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) plays an important role in global sea level change. Regional Climate Models (RCMs) such as the Modèle Atmosphérique Régionale (MAR) have been employed at high spatial resolution with relatively complex physics to simulate ice sheet SMB. Global climate models (GCMs) incorporate less sophisticated physical schemes and provide outputs at a lower spatial resolution, but have the advantage of modeling the interaction between different components of the earth's oceans, climate, and land surface at a global scale. Improving the ability of GCMs to represent ice sheet SMB is important for making predictions of future changes in global sea level. With the ultimate goal of improving SMB simulated by the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Model E2 GCM, we compare simulated GrIS SMB against the outputs of the MAR model and radar-derived estimates of snow accumulation. In order to reproduce present-day climate variability in the Model E2 simulation, winds are constrained to match the reanalysis datasets used to force MAR at the lateral boundaries. We conduct a preliminary assessment of the sensitivity of the simulated Model E2 SMB to surface albedo, a parameter that is known to strongly influence SMB. Model E2 albedo is set to a fixed value of 0.8 over the entire ice sheet in the initial configuration of the model (control case). We adjust this fixed value in an ensemble of simulations over a range of 0.4 to 0.8 (roughly the range of observed summer GrIS albedo values) to examine the sensitivity of ice-sheet-wide SMB to albedo. We prescribe albedo from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) MCD43A3 v6 to examine the impact of a more realistic spatial and temporal variations in albedo. An age-dependent snow albedo parameterization is applied, and its impact on SMB relative to observations and the RCM is assessed.

  3. Surface and aerosol models for use in radiative transfer codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Quinn J.

    1991-08-01

    Absolute reflectance-based radiometric calibrations of Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) are improved with the inclusion of a method to invert optical-depth measurements to obtain aerosol-particle size distributions, and a non-Lambertian surface reflectance model. The inverted size distributions can predict radiances varying from the previously assumed jungian distributions by as much as 5 percent, though the reduction in the estimated error is less than one percent. Comparison with measured diffuse-to-global ratios show that neither distribution consistently predicts the ratio accurately, and this is shown to be a large contributor to calibration uncertainties. An empirical model for the surface reflectance of White Sands, using a two-degree polynomial fit as a function of scattering angle, was employed. The model reduced estimated errors in radiance predictions by up to one percent. Satellite calibrations dating from October, 1984 were reprocessed using the improved methods and linear estimations of satellite counts per unit radiance versus time since launch were determined which showed a decrease over time for the first four bands.

  4. Improvements to a Response Surface Thermal Model for Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Stephen W.; Walker, William Q.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to determine if a Design of Experiments (DOE)/Response Surface Methodology could be applied to on-orbit thermal analysis and produce a set of Response Surface Equations (RSE) that predict Orion vehicle temperatures within 10 F. The study used the Orion Outer Mold Line model. Five separate factors were identified for study: yaw, pitch, roll, beta angle, and the environmental parameters. Twenty-three external Orion components were selected and their minimum and maximum temperatures captured over a period of two orbits. Thus, there are 46 responses. A DOE case matrix of 145 runs was developed. The data from these cases were analyzed to produce a fifth order RSE for each of the temperature responses. For the 145 cases in the DOE matrix, the agreement between the engineering data and the RSE predictions was encouraging with 40 of the 46 RSEs predicting temperatures within the goal band. However, the verification cases showed most responses did not meet the 10 F goal. After reframing the focus of the study to better align the RSE development with the purposes of the model, a set of RSEs for both the minimum and maximum radiator temperatures was produced which predicted the engineering model output within +/-4 F. Therefore, with the correct application of the DOE/RSE methodology, RSEs can be developed that provide analysts a fast and easy way to screen large numbers of environments and assess proposed changes to the RSE factors.

  5. An Integrated Snow Radiance and Snow Physics Modeling Framework for Cold Land Surface Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward J.; Tedesco, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Recent developments in forward radiative transfer modeling and physical land surface modeling are converging to allow the assembly of an integrated snow/cold lands modeling framework for land surface modeling and data assimilation applications. The key elements of this framework include: a forward radiative transfer model (FRTM) for snow, a snowpack physical model, a land surface water/energy cycle model, and a data assimilation scheme. Together these form a flexible framework for self-consistent remote sensing and water/energy cycle studies. In this paper we will describe the elements and the integration plan. Each element of this framework is modular so the choice of element can be tailored to match the emphasis of a particular study. For example, within our framework, four choices of a FRTM are available to simulate the brightness temperature of snow: Two models are available to model the physical evolution of the snowpack and underlying soil, and two models are available to handle the water/energy balance at the land surface. Since the framework is modular, other models-physical or statistical--can be accommodated, too. All modules will operate within the framework of the Land Information System (LIS), a land surface modeling framework with data assimilation capabilities running on a parallel-node computing cluster at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The advantages of such an integrated modular framework built on the LIS will be described through examples-e.g., studies to analyze snow field experiment observations, and simulations of future satellite missions for snow and cold land processes.

  6. Modeling Tree Shade Effect on Urban Ground Surface Temperature.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Marco; Massetti, Luciano; Brandani, Giada; Petralli, Martina; Orlandini, Simone

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in the role that urban forests can play as urban microclimate modifiers. Tree shade and evapotranspiration affect energy fluxes and mitigate microclimate conditions, with beneficial effects on human health and outdoor comfort. The aim of this study was to investigate surface temperature () variability under the shade of different tree species and to test the capability in predicting of a proposed heat transfer model. Surface temperature data on asphalt and grass under different shading conditions were collected in the Cascine park, Florence, Italy, and were used to test the performance of a one-dimensional heat transfer model integrated with a routine for estimating the effect of plant canopies on surface heat transfer. Shading effects of 10 tree species commonly used in Italian urban settings were determined by considering the infrared radiation and the tree canopy leaf area index (LAI). The results indicate that, on asphalt, was negatively related to the LAI of trees ( reduction ranging from 13.8 to 22.8°C). On grass, this relationship was weaker probably because of the combined effect of shade and grass evapotranspiration on ( reduction ranged from 6.9 to 9.4°C). A sensitivity analysis confirmed that other factors linked to soil water content play an important role in reduction of grassed areas. Our findings suggest that the energy balance model can be effectively used to estimate of the urban pavement under different shading conditions and can be applied to the analysis of microclimate conditions of urban green spaces. PMID:26828170

  7. Computer Modeling of Planetary Surface Temperatures in Introductory Astronomy Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Timothy; Goodman, J.

    2013-01-01

    Barker, T., and Goodman, J. C., Wheaton College, Norton, MA Computer modeling is an essential part of astronomical research, and so it is important that students be exposed to its powers and limitations in the first (and, perhaps, only) astronomy course they take in college. Building on the ideas of Walter Robinson (“Modeling Dynamic Systems,” Springer, 2002) we have found that STELLA software (ISEE Systems) allows introductory astronomy students to do sophisticated modeling by the end of two classes of instruction, with no previous experience in computer programming or calculus. STELLA’s graphical interface allows students to visualize systems in terms of “flows” in and out of “stocks,” avoiding the need to invoke differential equations. Linking flows and stocks allows feedback systems to be constructed. Students begin by building an easily understood system: a leaky bucket. This is a simple negative feedback system in which the volume in the bucket (a “stock”) depends on a fixed inflow rate and an outflow that increases in proportion to the volume in the bucket. Students explore how changing inflow rate and feedback parameters affect the steady-state volume and equilibration time of the system. This model is completed within a 50-minute class meeting. In the next class, students are given an analogous but more sophisticated problem: modeling a planetary surface temperature (“stock”) that depends on the “flow” of energy from the Sun, the planetary albedo, the outgoing flow of infrared radiation from the planet’s surface, and the infrared return from the atmosphere. Students then compare their STELLA model equilibrium temperatures to observed planetary temperatures, which agree with model ones for worlds without atmospheres, but give underestimates for planets with atmospheres, thus introducing students to the concept of greenhouse warming. We find that if we give the students part of this model at the start of a 50-minute class they are

  8. Radiolytic Model for Chemical Composition of Europa's Atmosphere and Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.

    2004-01-01

    The overall objective of the present effort is to produce models for major and selected minor components of Europa s neutral atmosphere in 1-D versus altitude and in 2-D versus altitude and longitude or latitude. A 3-D model versus all three coordinates (alt, long, lat) will be studied but development on this is at present limited by computing facilities available to the investigation team. In this first year we have focused on 1-D modeling with Co-I Valery Shematovich s Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code for water group species (H2O, O2, O, OH) and on 2-D with Co-I Mau Wong's version of a similar code for O2, O, CO, CO2, and Na. Surface source rates of H2O and O2 from sputtering and radiolysis are used in the 1-D model, while observations for CO2 at the Europa surface and Na detected in a neutral cloud ejected from Europa are used, along with the O2 sputtering rate, to constrain source rates in the 2-D version. With these separate approaches we are investigating a range of processes important to eventual implementation of a comprehensive 3-D atmospheric model which could be used to understand present observations and develop science requirements for future observations, e.g. from Earth and in Europa orbit. Within the second year we expect to merge the full water group calculations into the 2-D version of the DSMC code which can then be extended to 3-D, pending availability of computing resources. Another important goal in the second year would be the inclusion of sulk and its more volatile oxides (SO, SO2).

  9. Polymer-supported membranes as models of the cell surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Motomu; Sackmann, Erich

    2005-09-01

    Lipid-bilayer membranes supported on solid substrates are widely used as cell-surface models that connect biological and artificial materials. They can be placed either directly on solids or on ultrathin polymer supports that mimic the generic role of the extracellular matrix. The tools of modern genetic engineering and bioorganic chemistry make it possible to couple many types of biomolecule to supported membranes. This results in sophisticated interfaces that can be used to control, organize and study the properties and function of membranes and membrane-associated proteins. Particularly exciting opportunities arise when these systems are coupled with advanced semiconductor technology.

  10. Numerical modeling and simulation of flow through porous fabric surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zheng; Li, Xiaolin

    We designed a numerical scheme to model the permeability of the fabric surface in an incompressible fluid by coupling the projection method with the Ghost Fluid Method in the front tracking framework. The pressure jump condition is obtained by adding a source term to the Poisson's equation in the projection step without modifications on its coefficients. The numerical results suggest that this approach has the ability to reproduce the relationship between pressure drop and relative velocity observed in the experiments. We use this algorithm to study the effects of porosity on the drag force and stability of parachutes during its inflation and deceleration.

  11. Coastal Digital Surface Model on Low Contrast Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosu, A.-M.; Assenbaum, M.; De la Torre, Y.; Pierrot-Deseilligny, M.

    2015-08-01

    Coastal sandy environments are extremely dynamic and require regular monitoring that can easily be achieved by using an unmanned aerial system (UAS) including a drone and a photo camera. The acquired images have low contrast and homogeneous texture. Using these images and with very few, if any, ground control points (GCPs), it is difficult to obtain a digital surface model (DSM) by classical correlation and automatic interest points determination approach. A possible response to this problem is to work with enhanced, contrast filtered images. To achieve this, we use and tune the free open-source software MicMac.

  12. The roughness of the Martian surface: A scale dependent model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, M. K.; Guinness, E. A.; Arvidson, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    In the coming decade, several lander missions to Mars are planned (e.g., MESUR Pathfinder, MESUR). One of the dangers facing planners of these missions is the rough topography observed at both Viking Lander sites. Both landing sites are ubiquitously covered with meter-scale boulders. Objects of this size pose obvious threats to soft landers, especially at Mars where the distance from Earth causes prohibitive time lags between the transmission of commands and feedback from the spacecraft. An obvious solution is to scout for a 'smooth' site prior to the landing. However, the best resolutions realizable on current and future missions (i.e., Mars Observer) are on the order of several meters. Even at this scale, boulders of 1-2 meters in size are unresolvable. Additionally, the amount of time and spacecraft resources required to search even a small area of the planet are unrealistic given other mission objectives. An alternative is to determine the 'roughness' of the surface at a subpixel scale using bidirectional reflectance observations. Much larger areas of the planet can be searched, and much of the search can easily be automated. The morphology of the martian plains observed by the Viking Landers is physically simple. The surface is covered with a layer (approximately flat lying) of aeolian sediment from which numerous outcrops of bedrock and boulders protrude. This morphology, while simple, will be difficult to characterize from orbit using traditional bidirectional reflectance models for two reasons. First, modeling the surface as facets with Gaussian or exponential slope distributions is not realistic given the morphology described above. Second, the roughness parameter is an 'average' of the roughness at scales ranging from the wavelength of light being scattered to the pixel size of the observation. Thus, there is no definite scale of roughness that can be extracted from the Hapke roughness parameter. Using the concepts of geometric and boolean models

  13. Enhanced Surface Water and Energy Flux Calculation through the Integration of Thermal Remote Sensing Retrievals with Land Surface Models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The treatment of aerodynamic surface temperature in soil–vegetation–atmosphere transfer (SVAT) models can be used to classify approaches into two broad categories. The first category contains models utilizing remote sensing (RS) observations of surface radiometric temperature to estimate aerodynamic...

  14. Modeling and Prediction of Surface Plasmon Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guske, Joshua Travis

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a spectroscopy that measures the response of a surface wave at the interface of a conductor and a dielectric, called the surface plasmon polariton (SPP). In the Kretschmann configuration, a thin film of the conductor is illuminated under total internal reflection via a prism. At the appropriate angle and frequency, an absorption is seen in reflected p-polarized light. This excitation is highly sensitive to the properties of the dielectric medium, the conductor itself, and the substrate material. Theoretical modeling is valuable in SPR, because of the high sensitivity and the large number of experimental variables involved. As the technology advances, increasingly sophisticated modeling techniques become necessary. In addition, with the aid of theoretical modeling, SPR may be used as a materials characterization tool, to study the properties of the conductors themselves. In this dissertation, several plasmonic systems were studied. First, in chapters 2 and 3, films of silver sandwiched between two layers of non-conductive aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) on glass were considered. The films were prepared by reactive pulsed DC magnetron sputtering, and the silver thickness was varied. The films' SPR response was measured in the near-IR in air. Theoretical modeling of Rp/Rs was performed by the multilayer transfer-matrix method, with the aid of a modified Nelder-Mead simplex optimization algorithm. The initial modeling results suggested that both the silver and AZO properties were significantly different from the bulk materials. In particular, the silver had a higher plasma frequency and high-frequency dielectric constant than bulk, and it was hypothesized that the AZO was contributing charge carriers into the silver layer. However, upon review it was determined that a miscalibration of the incident angles could also explain the results. Second, in chapter 4, films of silver sandwiched between two layers of AZO were deposited using

  15. Use of models to map potential capture of surface water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leake, Stanley A.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of ground-water withdrawals on surface-water resources and riparian vegetation have become important considerations in water-availability studies. Ground water withdrawn by a well initially comes from storage around the well, but with time can eventually increase inflow to the aquifer and (or) decrease natural outflow from the aquifer. This increased inflow and decreased outflow is referred to as “capture.” For a given time, capture can be expressed as a fraction of withdrawal rate that is accounted for as increased rates of inflow and decreased rates of outflow. The time frames over which capture might occur at different locations commonly are not well understood by resource managers. A ground-water model, however, can be used to map potential capture for areas and times of interest. The maps can help managers visualize the possible timing of capture over large regions. The first step in the procedure to map potential capture is to run a ground-water model in steady-state mode without withdrawals to establish baseline total flow rates at all sources and sinks. The next step is to select a time frame and appropriate withdrawal rate for computing capture. For regional aquifers, time frames of decades to centuries may be appropriate. The model is then run repeatedly in transient mode, each run with one well in a different model cell in an area of interest. Differences in inflow and outflow rates from the baseline conditions for each model run are computed and saved. The differences in individual components are summed and divided by the withdrawal rate to obtain a single capture fraction for each cell. Values are contoured to depict capture fractions for the time of interest. Considerations in carrying out the analysis include use of realistic physical boundaries in the model, understanding the degree of linearity of the model, selection of an appropriate time frame and withdrawal rate, and minimizing error in the global mass balance of the model.

  16. Qualitative Uncertainty Assessment for Distributed Surface Water Quality Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meixner, T.; Bubb, K.; van Griensven, A.

    2006-12-01

    Water quality models are often used to aid water quality regulators in the United States and around the world make critical decisions about how to improve water quality. Basin scale water quality models generally simplify spatial complexity to some degree. This problem is especially relevant in water quality modeling since the sources of pollution as well as the hydrologic drivers vary spatially across the landscape. The spatial complexity problem also presents specific challenges for estimating model predictive uncertainty. Questions of how to integrate multiple sources of stream water and water quality data at multiple locations are likely to be even more daunting than they are for surface water hydrologic models. At this time, given the complexity of water quality models and the general lack of data available, true statistical techniques of integrating, multiple data sources and calculating uncertainty bounds are probably not reasonable approaches. For this reason, we propose evaluation methods that are not based on statistics in order to evaluate the fit-to- purpose of particular model applications. Within SWAT2005, both a statistical method for uncertainty analysis, ParaSol, and an evaluation method, SUNGLASSES, have been incorporated. Additionally weighted averages of prediction errors are integrated into a global objective function and used to evaluate the reasonableness of model assumptions. This integration occurs across multiple objective functions and multiple locations. These methods have been applied in the context of a hypothetical water quality control problem in the San Jacinto watershed in southern California. The analysis includes an extension of the uncertainty analysis into its economic implications. The economic impact of the uncertainty methods proposed here are compared to more traditional uncertainty methods. The economic implications of uncertainty are shown to be important but only under circumstances where water quality targets are close

  17. A universal surface complexation framework for modeling proton binding onto bacterial surfaces in geologic settings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borrok, D.; Turner, B.F.; Fein, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Adsorption onto bacterial cell walls can significantly affect the speciation and mobility of aqueous metal cations in many geologic settings. However, a unified thermodynamic framework for describing bacterial adsorption reactions does not exist. This problem originates from the numerous approaches that have been chosen for modeling bacterial surface protonation reactions. In this study, we compile all currently available potentiometric titration datasets for individual bacterial species, bacterial consortia, and bacterial cell wall components. Using a consistent, four discrete site, non-electrostatic surface complexation model, we determine total functional group site densities for all suitable datasets, and present an averaged set of 'universal' thermodynamic proton binding and site density parameters for modeling bacterial adsorption reactions in geologic systems. Modeling results demonstrate that the total concentrations of proton-active functional group sites for the 36 bacterial species and consortia tested are remarkably similar, averaging 3.2 ?? 1.0 (1??) ?? 10-4 moles/wet gram. Examination of the uncertainties involved in the development of proton-binding modeling parameters suggests that ignoring factors such as bacterial species, ionic strength, temperature, and growth conditions introduces relatively small error compared to the unavoidable uncertainty associated with the determination of cell abundances in realistic geologic systems. Hence, we propose that reasonable estimates of the extent of bacterial cell wall deprotonation can be made using averaged thermodynamic modeling parameters from all of the experiments that are considered in this study, regardless of bacterial species used, ionic strength, temperature, or growth condition of the experiment. The average site densities for the four discrete sites are 1.1 ?? 0.7 ?? 10-4, 9.1 ?? 3.8 ?? 10-5, 5.3 ?? 2.1 ?? 10-5, and 6.6 ?? 3.0 ?? 10-5 moles/wet gram bacteria for the sites with pKa values of 3

  18. Identifying surface response to drought and heat with a land surface model and NDVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, L. S.; Michaelsen, J.; Funk, C. C.; Carvalho, L. V.; Still, C. J.; McNally, A.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.

    2012-12-01

    Lack of in situ observations makes drought monitoring a challenge in East Africa. Hence an effective means of identifying climate hazards and surface impacts are satellite-based rainfall estimates and vegetation observations. During the 2011 Kenyan drought Rainfall Estimation Algorithm Version 2 (RFE2.0) and expedited Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (eMODIS) NDVI products were used to delineate regional gradients of food insecurity, a critical factor in prompt distribution of aid. Land surface models (LSM) beckon as a means for expanding our understanding of drought. Modeled turbulent surface fluxes may make explicit physical processes responsible for observed plant stress. When sensible heating occurs under low evapotranspiration (AET) conditions, we would expect vegetation stress to increase. In this paper we examine two aspects of temperature-vegetation stress as interpreted by a LSM: (1) To what extent do sensible heating anomalies accompany AET anomalies and (2) how do rainfall and temperature influence energy partitioning? We investigate for the March-May rainy season (2001-12) across Kenya's rangelands at interannual and sub-seasonal timescales. Results highlight landscape characteristics with disproportionate sensitivity to climate. LSM estimates are compared to the vegetation response observed with NDVI. We establish the relationship between sources and use 2009 and 2011 agro-pastoral droughts as criteria for the LSM as a potential monitoring tool. Climate and flux data are from Noah3.2 LSM forced with RFE2.0 rainfall in a custom configuration of the NASA Land Information System. Satellite observations are from eMODIS NDVI.

  19. Modeling RF-induced Plasma-Surface Interactions with VSim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Smithe, David N.; Pankin, Alexei Y.; Roark, Christine M.; Stoltz, Peter H.; Zhou, Sean C.-D.; Kruger, Scott E.

    2014-10-01

    An overview of ongoing enhancements to the Plasma Discharge (PD) module of Tech-X's VSim software tool is presented. A sub-grid kinetic sheath model, developed for the accurate computation of sheath potentials near metal and dielectric-coated walls, enables the physical effects of DC and RF sheath dynamics to be included in macroscopic-scale plasma simulations that need not explicitly resolve sheath scale lengths. Sheath potential evolution, together with particle behavior near the sheath (e.g. sputtering), can thus be simulated in complex, experimentally relevant geometries. Simulations of RF sheath-enhanced impurity production near surfaces of the C-Mod field-aligned ICRF antenna are presented to illustrate the model; impurity mitigation techniques are also explored. Model extensions to capture the physics of secondary electron emission and of multispecies plasmas are summarized, together with a discussion of improved tools for plasma chemistry and IEDF/EEDF visualization and modeling. The latter tools are also highly relevant for commercial plasma processing applications. Ultimately, we aim to establish VSimPD as a robust, efficient computational tool for modeling fusion and industrial plasma processes. Supported by U.S. DoE SBIR Phase I/II Award DE-SC0009501.

  20. Subjective surfaces: a geometric model for boundary completion

    SciTech Connect

    Sarti, Alessandro; Malladi, Ravi; Sethian, J.A.

    2000-06-01

    We present a geometric model and a computational method for segmentation of images with missing boundaries. In many situations, the human visual system fills in missing gaps in edges and boundaries, building and completing information that is not present. Boundary completion presents a considerable challenge in computer vision, since most algorithms attempt to exploit existing data. A large body of work concerns completion models, which postulate how to construct missing data; these models are often trained and specific to particular images. In this paper, we take the following, alternative perspective: we consider a reference point within an image as given, and then develop an algorithm which tries to build missing information on the basis of the given point of view and the available information as boundary data to the algorithm. Starting from this point of view, a surface is constructed. It is then evolved with the mean curvature flow in the metric induced by the image until a piecewise constant solution is reached. We test the computational model on modal completion, amodal completion, texture, photo and medical images. We extend the geometric model and the algorithm to 3D in order to extract shapes from low signal/noise ratio medical volumes. Results in 3D echocardiography and 3D fetal echography are presented.