Science.gov

Sample records for accepting volunteers include

  1. 45 CFR 57.4 - Acceptance and use of volunteer services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Acceptance and use of volunteer services. 57.4 Section 57.4 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION VOLUNTEER SERVICES § 57.4 Acceptance and use of volunteer services. The Secretary, or his designee, shall...

  2. 45 CFR 2544.120 - What personal services from a volunteer may be solicited and accepted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What personal services from a volunteer may be....120 What personal services from a volunteer may be solicited and accepted? A donation in the form of personal services from a volunteer may be solicited and accepted to assist the Corporation in carrying...

  3. 45 CFR 57.4 - Acceptance and use of volunteer services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Acceptance and use of volunteer services. 57.4 Section 57.4 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION VOLUNTEER SERVICES § 57.4 Acceptance and use of volunteer services. The Secretary, or his designee, shall...

  4. 45 CFR 2544.120 - What personal services from a volunteer may be solicited and accepted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What personal services from a volunteer may be....120 What personal services from a volunteer may be solicited and accepted? A donation in the form of personal services from a volunteer may be solicited and accepted to assist the Corporation in carrying...

  5. 45 CFR 2544.120 - What personal services from a volunteer may be solicited and accepted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What personal services from a volunteer may be....120 What personal services from a volunteer may be solicited and accepted? A donation in the form of personal services from a volunteer may be solicited and accepted to assist the Corporation in carrying...

  6. 45 CFR 57.4 - Acceptance and use of volunteer services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Acceptance and use of volunteer services. 57.4 Section 57.4 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION VOLUNTEER SERVICES § 57.4 Acceptance and use of volunteer services. The Secretary, or his designee, shall...

  7. 45 CFR 2544.120 - What personal services from a volunteer may be solicited and accepted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What personal services from a volunteer may be....120 What personal services from a volunteer may be solicited and accepted? A donation in the form of personal services from a volunteer may be solicited and accepted to assist the Corporation in carrying...

  8. 45 CFR 57.4 - Acceptance and use of volunteer services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Acceptance and use of volunteer services. 57.4 Section 57.4 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION VOLUNTEER SERVICES § 57.4 Acceptance and use of volunteer services. The Secretary, or his designee, shall...

  9. 45 CFR 57.4 - Acceptance and use of volunteer services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Acceptance and use of volunteer services. 57.4 Section 57.4 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION VOLUNTEER SERVICES § 57.4 Acceptance and use of volunteer services. The Secretary, or his designee, shall...

  10. 45 CFR 2544.120 - What personal services from a volunteer may be solicited and accepted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What personal services from a volunteer may be....120 What personal services from a volunteer may be solicited and accepted? A donation in the form of personal services from a volunteer may be solicited and accepted to assist the Corporation in carrying...

  11. Should desperate volunteers be included in randomised controlled trials?

    PubMed

    Allmark, P; Mason, S

    2006-09-01

    Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) sometimes recruit participants who are desperate to receive the experimental treatment. This paper defends the practice against three arguments that suggest it is unethical first, desperate volunteers are not in equipoise. Second clinicians, entering patients onto trials are disavowing their therapeutic obligation to deliver the best treatment; they are following trial protocols rather than delivering individualised care. Research is not treatment; its ethical justification is different. Consent is crucial. Third, desperate volunteers do not give proper consent: effectively, they are coerced. This paper responds by advocating a notion of equipoise based on expert knowledge and widely shared values. Where such collective, expert equipoise exists there is a prima facie case for an RCT. Next the paper argues that trial entry does not involve clinicians disavowing their therapeutic obligation; individualised care based on insufficient evidence is not in patients best interest. Finally, it argues that where equipoise exists it is acceptable to limit access to experimental agents; desperate volunteers are not coerced because their desperation does not translate into a right to receive what they desire.

  12. Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder in the University Context: Peer Acceptance Predicts Intention to Volunteer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner, Emily; Iarocci, Grace

    2014-01-01

    With growing numbers of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) entering post-secondary institutions, strategies are needed to facilitate the social integration of these students. The goal of this study was to examine the role of various factors in university students' acceptance of, and intention to volunteer with, a peer with ASD.…

  13. 75 FR 15772 - Feasibility of Including a Volunteer Requirement for Receipt of Federal Education Tax Credits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Feasibility of Including a Volunteer Requirement for Receipt of Federal Education Tax Credits AGENCY..., comments may be mailed to: Volunteer Requirement Comments, Department of the Treasury, 1500...

  14. Feasibility and acceptability of a volunteer-mediated diversional therapy program for older patients with cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Wong Shee, Anna; Phillips, Bev; Hill, Keith; Dodd, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the perceptions of stakeholders is critical for determining acceptability and feasibility of volunteer-mediated programs. This study evaluated the feasibility and acceptability for staff, volunteers, patients and their carers, of a volunteer diversional therapy program for patients with cognitive impairment undergoing inpatient rehabilitation. Post-program structured interviews were conducted with the volunteers (n = 10), patients (n = 30) and their carers (n = 3); and nursing staff (n = 6) participated in a focus group. Thematic analysis identified five themes (values, attitudes, knowledge, purpose, support) in two dimensions (personal, team culture). Overall, patients, carers, staff and volunteers were satisfied with the volunteer program and perceived benefits for quality of care. Recommendations for improvements to the program related to staff engagement with the program and the volunteers' education and training. The volunteer diversional therapy pilot program for patients with cognitive impairment on a sub-acute ward was acceptable and feasible for patients, carers, staff and volunteers.

  15. The Volunteer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Paul C., Ed.

    1973-01-01

    This journal answers several questions concerning the use of volunteers in the classroom. The contents include: "Editor's Page," which discusses the growth of volunteer programs; "An Overview: Volunteer Use in Public Schools," which discusses the general aims of a volunteer program (e.g., to teachers in providing a more individualized approach, to…

  16. 31 CFR 545.410 - Acquisition of instruments including bankers acceptances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acquisition of instruments including bankers acceptances. 545.410 Section 545.410 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TALIBAN...

  17. 43 CFR 2.6 - Will the Department accept written requests, including fax, e-mail, or telephone requests, for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Will the Department accept written requests, including fax, e-mail, or telephone requests, for routinely available information? 2.6 Section 2... Department accept written requests, including fax, e-mail, or telephone requests, for routinely...

  18. 43 CFR 2.6 - Will the Department accept written requests, including fax, e-mail, or telephone requests, for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Will the Department accept written requests, including fax, e-mail, or telephone requests, for routinely available information? 2.6 Section 2... Department accept written requests, including fax, e-mail, or telephone requests, for routinely...

  19. Who is healthy? Aspects to consider when including healthy volunteers in QST--based studies-a consensus statement by the EUROPAIN and NEUROPAIN consortia.

    PubMed

    Gierthmühlen, Janne; Enax-Krumova, Elena K; Attal, Nadine; Bouhassira, Didier; Cruccu, Giorgio; Finnerup, Nanna B; Haanpää, Maija; Hansson, Per; Jensen, Troels S; Freynhagen, Rainer; Kennedy, Jeffrey D; Mainka, Tina; Rice, Andrew S C; Segerdahl, Märta; Sindrup, Søren H; Serra, Jordi; Tölle, Thomas; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Baron, Ralf; Maier, Christoph

    2015-11-01

    Clinical and human experimental pain studies often include so-called "healthy" controls in investigations of sensory abnormalities, using quantitative sensory testing (QST) as an outcome measure. However, the criteria for what is considered "healthy" vary among the different studies and between study centers and investigators, partly explaining the high variability of the results. Therefore, several aspects should be considered during inclusion of healthy volunteers in QST-based trials to have homogenous groups of healthy controls with less variability between human experimental studies, so that results are less likely to be false negative or false positive because of subject-related factors. The EUROPAIN and NEUROPAIN consortia aimed to define factors influencing the variability in selection of healthy subjects in QST-based studies before the start of both projects and to give recommendations how to minimize it based on the current literature and expertise of the participants. The present suggestions for inclusion criteria of healthy volunteers into QST-based trials describe a 2-level approach including standardized questionnaires enabling the collection of relevant information on sociodemographic data, medical history, current health status, coping strategies in dealing with pain, and the motivation of the volunteer to participate in the study. These suggestions are believed to help researchers interpret their results in comparison with others and improve the quality of clinical studies including healthy volunteers as controls or in human experimental pain studies. They aim to reduce any confounding factors. Furthermore, the acquired information will allow post hoc analyses of variance for different potential influencing factors.

  20. Fresh meat packaging: consumer acceptance of modified atmosphere packaging including carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Grebitus, Carola; Jensen, Helen H; Roosen, Jutta; Sebranek, Joseph G

    2013-01-01

    Consumers' perceptions and evaluations of meat quality attributes such as color and shelf life influence purchasing decisions, and these product attributes can be affected by the type of fresh meat packaging system. Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) extends the shelf life of fresh meat and, with the inclusion of carbon monoxide (CO-MAP), achieves significant color stabilization. The objective of this study was to assess whether consumers would accept specific packaging technologies and what value consumers place on ground beef packaged under various atmospheres when their choices involved the attributes of color and shelf life. The study used nonhypothetical consumer choice experiments to determine the premiums that consumers are willing to pay for extended shelf life resulting from MAP and for the "cherry red" color in meat resulting from CO-MAP. The experimental design allowed determination of whether consumers would discount foods with MAP or CO-MAP when (i) they are given more detailed information about the technologies and (ii) they have different levels of individual knowledge and media exposure. The empirical analysis was conducted using multinomial logit models. Results indicate that consumers prefer an extension of shelf life as long as the applied technology is known and understood. Consumers had clear preferences for brighter (aerobic and CO) red color and were willing to pay $0.16/lb ($0.35/kg) for each level of change to the preferred color. More information on MAP for extending the shelf life and on CO-MAP for stabilizing color decreased consumers' willingness to pay. An increase in personal knowledge and media exposure influenced acceptance of CO-MAP negatively. The results provide quantitative measures of how packaging affects consumers' acceptance and willingness to pay for products. Such information can benefit food producers and retailers who make decisions about investing in new packaging methods.

  1. Exposures to conducted electrical weapons (including TASER® devices): how many and for how long are acceptable?

    PubMed

    Jauchem, James R

    2015-01-01

    TASER(®) conducted electrical weapons (CEWs) are an important law-enforcement tool. The purposes of this study are a) to review recent literature regarding potential pathophysiological responses to applications of CEWs, and other related issues and b) to evaluate whether enough data exist to determine the acceptability of longer-duration (or repeated) exposures. This is a narrative review, using a multidisciplinary approach of analyzing reports from physiological, legal-medical, and police-strategy literature sources. In general, short-duration exposures to CEWs result in limited effects. Longer-duration or repeated exposures may be utilized with caution, although there are currently not enough data to determine the acceptability of all types of exposures. Data examined in the literature have inherent limitations. Appropriateness of specific types of CEW usage may be determined by individual police agencies, applying risk/benefit analyses unique to each organization. While more research is recommended, initial concepts of potential future long-duration or repeated CEW applications are presented.

  2. Dietary adherence and acceptability of five different diets, including vegan and vegetarian diets, for weight loss: The New DIETs study.

    PubMed

    Moore, Wendy J; McGrievy, Michael E; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M

    2015-12-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine dietary adherence and acceptability among participants from the New DIETs study who were randomized to one of four plant-based diets (vegan, vegetarian, pesco-vegetarian, semi-vegetarian) or an omnivore diet. Primary outcomes at two- and six months included dietary adherence (24-hour dietary recalls), weight loss and changes in animal product intake (mg cholesterol) by adherence status, Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ), Power of Food Scale (PFS), dietary acceptability (Food Acceptability Questionnaire), and impact of diet preference on adherence. No differences were found in dietary adherence or changes in FAQ, TFEQ, or PFS among the groups. At six months, non-adherent vegan and vegetarian participants (n=16) had a significantly greater decrease in cholesterol intake (-190.2 ± 199.2 mg) than non-adherent pesco-vegetarian/semi-vegetarian (n=15, -2.3 ± 200.3 mg, P=0.02) or omnivore participants (n=7, 17.0 ± 36.0, P=0.04). Non-adherent vegan/vegetarian participants lost significantly more weight at six months (-6.0 ± 6.7%) than non-adherent omnivore participants (-0.4 ± 0.6%, P=0.04). Dietary preference had no impact on adherence at six months. Due to equal rates of adherence and acceptability among the diet groups, instructing participants to follow vegan or vegetarian diets may have a greater impact on weight loss and animal product intake than providing instruction in more moderate approaches even among non-adherent participants.

  3. Dietary adherence and acceptability of five different diets, including vegan and vegetarian diets, for weight loss: The New DIETs study.

    PubMed

    Moore, Wendy J; McGrievy, Michael E; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M

    2015-12-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine dietary adherence and acceptability among participants from the New DIETs study who were randomized to one of four plant-based diets (vegan, vegetarian, pesco-vegetarian, semi-vegetarian) or an omnivore diet. Primary outcomes at two- and six months included dietary adherence (24-hour dietary recalls), weight loss and changes in animal product intake (mg cholesterol) by adherence status, Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ), Power of Food Scale (PFS), dietary acceptability (Food Acceptability Questionnaire), and impact of diet preference on adherence. No differences were found in dietary adherence or changes in FAQ, TFEQ, or PFS among the groups. At six months, non-adherent vegan and vegetarian participants (n=16) had a significantly greater decrease in cholesterol intake (-190.2 ± 199.2 mg) than non-adherent pesco-vegetarian/semi-vegetarian (n=15, -2.3 ± 200.3 mg, P=0.02) or omnivore participants (n=7, 17.0 ± 36.0, P=0.04). Non-adherent vegan/vegetarian participants lost significantly more weight at six months (-6.0 ± 6.7%) than non-adherent omnivore participants (-0.4 ± 0.6%, P=0.04). Dietary preference had no impact on adherence at six months. Due to equal rates of adherence and acceptability among the diet groups, instructing participants to follow vegan or vegetarian diets may have a greater impact on weight loss and animal product intake than providing instruction in more moderate approaches even among non-adherent participants. PMID:26164391

  4. Preparation of Trainers of Volunteer Parent Service Providers (Including Parents) for Vermont's School-Age Learners with Severe Developmental Disabilities. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaver-Reid, Mary Ellen; And Others

    The report describes Volunteers for Families (VFF), a 3-year project to develop a statewide (Vermont) network of trained volunteers to advocate for and to provide and coordinate services to, families of school-age learners (ages 3-21) with severe developmental disabilities. A three-phase process for establishing a VFF program is outlined,…

  5. Absorption and excretion of conjugated flavonols, including quercetin-4'-O-beta-glucoside and isorhamnetin-4'-O-beta-glucoside by human volunteers after the consumption of onions.

    PubMed

    Aziz, A A; Edwards, C A; Lean, M E; Crozier, A

    1998-09-01

    Flavonols are polyphenols found ubiquitously in plants and plant-products. Flavonols, particularly quercetin, are potent antioxidants in vitro and their intake has been associated inversely with the incidence of coronary heart disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the accumulation in plasma and excretion in urine of flavonol glucosides following ingestion of lightly fried onions. Five healthy volunteers followed a low-flavonoid diet for 3 days. On day 4, after an overnight fast, subjects were given 300 g of lightly fried yellow onions which contain conjugates of quercetin and isorhamnetin, including quercetin-3,4 '-diO-beta-glucoside, isorhamnetin-4'-O-beta-glucoside and quercetin-4'-O-beta-glucoside. Blood collection was carried out at 0 min, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 24h after the supplement. In addition, subjects collected all their urine for 24h following the onion supplement. Isorhamnetin-4'-O-beta-glucoside and quercetin-4 '-O-beta-glucoside accumulated in plasma with maximum levels, defined as proportion of intake, of 10.7+/-2.6% and 0.13+/-0.03% respectively. The time of the quercetin-4'glucoside peak plasma concentration was 1.3+/-0.2 h after the ingestion of onions while a value of 1.8+/-0.7 h was obtained for isorhamnetin-4'-glucoside. Excretion in urine, as a proportion of intake, was 17.4+/-8.3% for isorhamnetin-4'-O-beta-glucoside and 0.2+/-0.1% for quercetin-4'-O-beta-glucoside. Possible reasons for the accumulation and excretion of isorhamnetin-4'-glucoside in proportionally much higher amounts than quercetin-4'-glucoside are discussed. It is concluded that flavonols are absorbed into the bloodstream as glucosides and minor structural differences affect markedly both the level of accumulation and the extent to which the conjugates are excreted. PMID:9802557

  6. APPALACHIAN VOLUNTEERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1964

    COLLEGE STUDENT VOLUNTEERS WORKING IN THE ISOLATED AREAS OF EASTERN KENTUCKY HAVE INSTITUTED A PROGRAM DESIGNED TO AID IN THE WAR ON POVERTY. THE APPALACHIAN VOLUNTEERS WERE INITIALLY SUPPORTED BY A GRANT FROM THE AREA REDEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION AND BY CONTRIBUTIONS, FROM PRIVATE CORPORATIONS AND FOUNDATIONS, OF MONEY AND MATERIALS. GROUNDWORK…

  7. KSC volunteers help paint Baxley Manor as part of Days of Caring '99

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KSC volunteers for Days of Caring '99 unfold protective materials before getting ready to paint at Baxley Manor, an apartment building for senior citizens on Merritt Island. Coordinated by the KSC Community Relations Council, Days of Caring provides an opportunity for employees to volunteer their services in projects such as painting, planting flowers, reading to school children, and more. Organizations accepting volunteers include The Embers, Yellow Umbrella, Serene Harbor, Domestic Violence Program, the YMCA of Brevard County, and others.

  8. KSC volunteers help paint Baxley Manor as part of Days of Caring '99

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KSC volunteers with Days of Caring '99 share tasks while getting ready to paint at Baxley Manor, an apartment building for senior citizens on Merritt Island. Coordinated by the KSC Community Relations Council, Days of Caring provides an opportunity for employees to volunteer their services in projects such as painting, planting flowers, reading to school children, and more. Organizations accepting volunteers include The Embers, Yellow Umbrella, Serene Harbor, Domestic Violence Program, the YMCA of Brevard County, and others.

  9. KSC volunteers help paint Baxley Manor as part of Days of Caring '99

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Volunteers for Days of Caring '99 set up the paint trays for painting at Baxley Manor, an apartment building for senior citizens on Merritt Island. Coordinated by the KSC Community Relations Council, Days of Caring provides an opportunity for employees to volunteer their services in projects such as painting, planting flowers, reading to school children, and more. Organizations accepting volunteers include The Embers, Yellow Umbrella, Serene Harbor, Domestic Violence Program, the YMCA of Brevard County, and others.

  10. KSC volunteers help paint Baxley Manor as part of Days of Caring '99

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A volunteer for Days of Caring '99 prepares a light fixture before painting the walls in the hallway at Baxley Manor, an apartment building for senior citizens on Merritt Island. Coordinated by the KSC Community Relations Council, Days of Caring provides an opportunity for employees to volunteer their services in projects such as painting, planting flowers, reading to school children, and more. Organizations accepting volunteers include The Embers, Yellow Umbrella, Serene Harbor, Domestic Violence Program, the YMCA of Brevard County, and others.

  11. Retired RNs: perceptions of volunteering.

    PubMed

    Cocca-Bates, Katherine C; Neal-Boylan, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    A qualitative study was done to explore the perceptions of volunteering among retired registered nurses (RNs) in Kansas. Participants were volunteers in formal nursing roles or were using their nursing knowledge and experience in non-nursing roles, such as church work. Regardless of the type of volunteer position, retired RNs reported that they use what they have learned as nurses when they volunteer. Volunteering benefits include enhanced self-worth, intellectual stimulation, reduced social isolation, and opportunities to help others. Increased paperwork, new technology, difficulty finding nursing-specific volunteer opportunities, resistance from health care organizations, and a lack of respect for what these nurses know are challenges and barriers to volunteering. Retired RNs have accumulated years of clinical nursing experience and can be helpful to employed nurses. Health care organizations should launch targeted efforts to recruit and utilize retired RN volunteers. Health care professionals who care for older adults should recommend volunteering as a healthful endeavor.

  12. Something Wonderful Happens When R.S.V.P. Comes into a School. Guide for R.S.V.P. Directors Interested in Involving Schools in Accepting Retired Senior Volunteers in Local School Systems, Grades K to 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Mildred G.

    RSVP (Retired Senior Volunteer Program) is one program of ACTION--The Agency for Volunteer Service. ACTION, created in 1971, is a Federal agency which administers a number of volunteer programs. Its purpose is to provide a recognized role in the community and a meaningful life in retirement for older adults through significant volunteer service.…

  13. KSC volunteers help Meals on Wheels as part of Days of Caring '99

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KSC volunteers at Miracle City Mall, Titusville, help unload containers for Meals on Wheels delivery as part of their '99 Days of Caring participation. The volunteers will also help deliver the meals. Coordinated by the KSC Community Relations Council, Days of Caring provides an opportunity for employees to volunteer their services in projects such as painting, planting flowers, reading to school children, and more. Organizations accepting volunteers include The Embers, Yellow Umbrella, Serene Harbor, Domestic Violence Program, the YMCA of Brevard County, and others.

  14. Model and Processes of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for Chronic Pain Including a Closer Look at the Self.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin; McCracken, Lance M

    2016-02-01

    Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is one of the so called "third-wave" cognitive behavioral therapies. It has been increasingly applied to chronic pain, and there is accumulating evidence to support its effectiveness. ACT is based on a model of general human functioning called the psychological flexibility (PF) model. Most facets of the PF model have been examined in chronic pain. However, a potential key facet related to "self" appears underappreciated. Indeed, a positive or healthy sense of self seems essential to our well-being, and there have been numerous studies of the self in chronic pain. At the same time, these studies are not currently well organized or easy to summarize. This lack of clarity and integration creates barriers to progress in this area of research. PF with its explicit inclusion of self-related therapeutic processes within a broad, integrative, theoretical model may help. The current review summarizes the PF model in the context of chronic pain with a specific emphasis on the parts of the model that address self-related processes. PMID:26803836

  15. Model and Processes of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for Chronic Pain Including a Closer Look at the Self.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin; McCracken, Lance M

    2016-02-01

    Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is one of the so called "third-wave" cognitive behavioral therapies. It has been increasingly applied to chronic pain, and there is accumulating evidence to support its effectiveness. ACT is based on a model of general human functioning called the psychological flexibility (PF) model. Most facets of the PF model have been examined in chronic pain. However, a potential key facet related to "self" appears underappreciated. Indeed, a positive or healthy sense of self seems essential to our well-being, and there have been numerous studies of the self in chronic pain. At the same time, these studies are not currently well organized or easy to summarize. This lack of clarity and integration creates barriers to progress in this area of research. PF with its explicit inclusion of self-related therapeutic processes within a broad, integrative, theoretical model may help. The current review summarizes the PF model in the context of chronic pain with a specific emphasis on the parts of the model that address self-related processes.

  16. Volunteering among High School Students. Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcelo, Karlo Barrios

    2007-01-01

    This fact sheet explores volunteering among high school students, ages 16-18. Overall, volunteering among high school students was down slightly in 2006 as compared to 2005. Additional information includes types of volunteer organizations and activities, and ways that high school students become involved in these activities. Volunteer rate vary by…

  17. Nothing's Free: Calculating the Cost of Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingle, W. Kyle

    2010-01-01

    Most school district administrators recognize the benefits of using parent and community volunteers, including improved school-community relations. But volunteers are not cost free. At their best, volunteers can be a valuable resource for schools and districts. At their worst, volunteers can consume already limited resources. However, their use…

  18. Volunteer Voice. Volume IX.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volunteer Voice, 1992

    1992-01-01

    This document consists of the three volume IX issues of "Volunteer Voice," a newsletter of the Tacoma Community House Training Project. The first issue consists of one teacher's personal account of English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) teaching and includes the following: an annotated list of ESL text books, a list of activities resources,…

  19. Extending Volunteer Programs in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Henry G.

    Documented here is a project involving three extensions or adaptations for using volunteers in schools. The first adaptation involves a plan for meeting certain major needs of a secondary school with volunteer help. This plan includes components designed to reorganize the secondary school curriculum to allow some of the students to study aspects…

  20. 78 FR 24321 - National Volunteer Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... of America the two hundred and thirty- seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013-09867 Filed 4-23-13... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8960 of April 19, 2013 National Volunteer Week, 2013 By the President of the... accept certain obligations to one another. National Volunteer Week is a time to renew that...

  1. Working with Volunteers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Virginia; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This special section features research concluding that volunteers find the time because they believe they have more time to help (Rowland); an extension program using volunteer master teachers (Feather); use of volunteer marketing professionals (Fromer); retaining volunteers through leadership training (Balliette, Smith); "problem" volunteers and…

  2. Volunteers in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cone, Richard; Johnson, Judith

    The results of nine studies evaluating the effectiveness of volunteer programs in the schools were reviewed in an attempt to answer three questions: What is the value of volunteers to schools? Why do people volunteer to work in classrooms? What is the effect of volunteering on the volunteer? The studies involved were originally intended to…

  3. Why Volunteer? Understanding Motivations for Student Volunteering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdsworth, Clare

    2010-01-01

    The profile of volunteering in English Higher Education (HE) has been enhanced in recent years through various initiatives that have not only funded activities, but have sought to expand the range of volunteering opportunities available to students and recognise the contribution that volunteering can make to students' employability. This expansion…

  4. Volunteering and Volunteers: Benefit-Cost Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handy, Femida; Mook, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the phenomenon of volunteering from a benefit-cost perspective. Both the individual making a decision to volunteer and the organization making a decision to use volunteer labor face benefits and costs of their actions, yet these costs and benefits almost always remain unarticulated, perhaps because the common perception of…

  5. Volunteer Motivations and Rewards: Shaping Future Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClam, Tricia

    Volunteerism is increasing today and helps to fill in the gaps created by funding and staff cutbacks in service-oriented agencies. It is critical not only to recruit new volunteers but to retain volunteers. This study examines hospice volunteers for motivation and rewards. Previous studies have found motivations to include altruism and…

  6. The Motivation to Volunteer: A Systemic Quality of Life Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shye, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    A new approach to volunteer motivation research is developed. Instead of asking what motivates the volunteer (accepting "any" conceptual category), we ask to what extent volunteering rewards the individual with each benefit taken from a complete set of possible benefits. As a "complete set of benefits" we use the 16 human functioning modes…

  7. Challenges and opportunities in healthcare volunteer management: insights from volunteer administrators.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Sean E; Rogers, Carmen M; Boyd, Karen D

    2013-01-01

    Volunteer administrators from 105 hospitals in five states in the northeast and southern United States provided open-ended survey responses about what they perceived to be the most pressing challenges and opportunities facing healthcare volunteer management. Taken together, these 105 hospitals used a total of 39,008 volunteers and 5.3 million volunteer hours during a 12-month period between 2010 and 2011. A qualitative content analysis of administrator responses suggests that primary challenges include volunteer recruitment and retention, administrative issues, and operational difficulties brought about by the current economic crisis. Key opportunities include more explicitly linking the volunteer function to hospital outcomes and community impact, expanding volunteer recruitment pools and roles and jobs, and developing organizational support for volunteers and making the volunteer management function more efficient and effective.

  8. When Volunteers Attack!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Gayle

    2009-01-01

    Working with alumni volunteers shouldn't create horror and suspense. Following a few key steps can help maintain a smooth relationship between alumni volunteers and the alumni relations office staff. In this article, the author discusses how to manage volunteers and keep the alumni volunteer relationship on track.

  9. Retaining volunteers in volunteer computing projects.

    PubMed

    Darch, Peter; Carusi, Annamaria

    2010-09-13

    Volunteer computing projects (VCPs) have been set up by groups of scientists to recruit members of the public who are asked to donate spare capacity on their personal computers to the processing of scientific data or computationally intensive models. VCPs serve two purposes: to acquire significant computing capacity and to educate the public about science. A particular challenge for these scientists is the retention of volunteers as there is a very high drop-out rate. This paper develops recommendations for scientists and software engineers setting up or running VCPs regarding which strategies to pursue in order to improve volunteer retention rates. These recommendations are based on a qualitative study of volunteers in a VCP (climateprediction.net). A typology of volunteers has been developed, and three particularly important classes of volunteers are presented in this paper: for each type of volunteer, the particular benefits they offer to a project are described, and their motivations for continued participation in a VCP are identified and linked to particular strategies. In this way, those setting up a VCP can identify which types of volunteers they should be particularly keen to retain, and can then find recommendations to increase the retention rates of their target volunteers.

  10. Reflections: Volunteering at Home.

    PubMed

    Hu, Amanda

    2016-08-01

    Many young people look forward to volunteering abroad and overlook the ample volunteer opportunities at home. There are several advantages to volunteering at home: you help people in your own community; you can make a long-term commitment; and you have continuity of care for your patients. There are >1200 free clinics in the United States whose main goal is to provide care to the indigent population. These free clinics are always looking for volunteers with specialized medical training. This article reviews the medically related and unrelated volunteer opportunities available in the United States. Volunteering at home is a worthwhile experience, and I encourage the otolaryngology community to explore these opportunities.

  11. Americans Volunteer--1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACTION, Washington, DC.

    The study presents statistics in verbal, graphic, and tabular form based on three different population sets: the population as a whole, the volunteer population during the year ending in April 1974, and the volunteer population during the week of April 7-13, 1974. The most typical volunteer was a married white woman between ages 25 and 44 who held…

  12. Smart Use of Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vissing, Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    Volunteers pose a special area of concern for child care centers. On one hand, they are indispensable as they donate countless hours of time, energy, and resources. On the other hand, there are challenges to coordinating the efforts of volunteering parents. The use of volunteers has incredible potential for benefit from the center, child, and…

  13. Volunteers Help Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Isolde Chapin

    A discussion of ways in which both adult and young Americans are volunteering to aid in the positive development of young people is presented in this booklet. The wide variety of programs that are designed to use volunteers and the need for additional volunteers are described. These programs are discussed under the following topic headings: School…

  14. 45 CFR 57.5 - Services and benefits available to volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Services and benefits available to volunteers. 57... VOLUNTEER SERVICES § 57.5 Services and benefits available to volunteers. (a) The following provisions of law may be applicable to volunteers whose services are offered and accepted under the regulations in...

  15. 45 CFR 57.5 - Services and benefits available to volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Services and benefits available to volunteers. 57... VOLUNTEER SERVICES § 57.5 Services and benefits available to volunteers. (a) The following provisions of law may be applicable to volunteers whose services are offered and accepted under the regulations in...

  16. 45 CFR 57.5 - Services and benefits available to volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Services and benefits available to volunteers. 57... VOLUNTEER SERVICES § 57.5 Services and benefits available to volunteers. (a) The following provisions of law may be applicable to volunteers whose services are offered and accepted under the regulations in...

  17. 45 CFR 57.5 - Services and benefits available to volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Services and benefits available to volunteers. 57... VOLUNTEER SERVICES § 57.5 Services and benefits available to volunteers. (a) The following provisions of law may be applicable to volunteers whose services are offered and accepted under the regulations in...

  18. 45 CFR 57.5 - Services and benefits available to volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Services and benefits available to volunteers. 57... VOLUNTEER SERVICES § 57.5 Services and benefits available to volunteers. (a) The following provisions of law may be applicable to volunteers whose services are offered and accepted under the regulations in...

  19. An Empirical Analysis of Citizens' Acceptance Decisions of Electronic-Government Services: A Modification of the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) Model to Include Trust as a Basis for Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awuah, Lawrence J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding citizens' adoption of electronic-government (e-government) is an important topic, as the use of e-government has become an integral part of governance. Success of such initiatives depends largely on the efficient use of e-government services. The unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) model has provided a…

  20. Purple loosestrife volunteers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, Beth A.

    2004-01-01

    Purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) is a perennial plant native to Eurasia where it grows along streams, rivers, and wet seepage areas (fig. 1). Seeds were inadvertently brought to North American territories in the ballast water of ships. Purple loosestrife was also intentionally planted throughout North America for its ornamental flowers but has since escaped cultivation to spread to wetlands.Some purple loosestrife plants release millions of seeds during the summer season, and these seeds readily disperse to new wetlands via water, animals, and even on people’s shoes. In addition, both its roots and stem fragments can sprout and begin new plants.When purple loosestrife invades a wetland, the species sometimes becomes more dominant than the original native wetland species, such as cattails and sedges. While many people think that purple loosestrife reduces the value of wetlands for wildlife, these claims are disputed. Most people agree, however, that purple loosestrife grows more prolifically in North America than elsewhere, probably because the species has left its native enemies behind in Eurasia and Australia. Although we do not understand how well the species grows in various climates, there is some thought that purple loosetrife may never fully invade the southern United States. Studies looking at the species’ response to temperature and analyses of its growth patterns across latitudes can help us determine its future threat to uninvaded portions of the United States. This is where volunteers come in.Volunteers in North America, Eurasia, and Australia are helping assess purple loosestrife growth in their regions (fig. 2). The program is part of Dr. Beth Middleton’s project to compare the role of purple loosestrife in its native and invasive habitats. Anyone can participate, and volunteers currently include high school and college students, retirees, professionals from all disciplines, agency personnel, and university faculty. Volunteers collect data

  1. The Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ)-further validation including a confirmatory factor analysis and a comparison with the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia.

    PubMed

    Wicksell, Rikard K; Olsson, Gunnar L; Melin, Lennart

    2009-08-01

    Acceptance of pain and distress has lately appeared as an important factor in determining peoples' ability to restore functioning in the presence of chronic pain. Although treatments based on cognitive behaviour therapy are beginning to incorporate acceptance strategies, there is still a lack of reliable and valid instruments to assess relevant processes in such interventions. The Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ) was originally constructed as part of the development of an acceptance oriented treatment approach for pain patients. A revised 20-item version of the instrument with two subscales has shown adequate reliability and validity. In the present study, a Swedish translation of CPAQ was evaluated with 611 participants reporting chronic pain and symptoms of whiplash associated disorders. This study sought to further assess the psychometric properties of the instrument and to investigate its relation to another important measure of pain adjustment, the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia. Due to low intercorrelations with other items, item 16 was excluded. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported the previously suggested two-factor solution. Furthermore, the internal consistencies were good for the subscales (activities engagement and pain willingness) as well as the total scale. Hierarchical regression analyses illustrated strong relations with criteria variables (e.g. disability and life satisfaction). In general, the activities engagement subscale contributed more than pain willingness to the prediction of criteria variables. Furthermore, results illustrated that CPAQ explained more variance than the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia in pain intensity, disability, life satisfaction, and depression.

  2. Student Volunteering in England: A Critical Moment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darwen, Jamie; Rannard, Andrea Grace

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present the current state of student volunteering in English universities, and show how it contributes to some of the core activities of higher education, including teaching and learning, employability, and public engagement. The paper goes on to describe challenges currently faced by student volunteering,…

  3. Sterilization for Large Volunteer Temporary Clinics.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Eve

    2015-12-01

    Large portable clinics staffed by volunteers present many unique challenges, including establishing appropriate instrument processing services. This article explores many of the specific steps an organization can take to ensure a safe care environment for patients and a safe working environment for volunteers.

  4. Volunteers in the Child Development Center Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Development Services Bureau (DHEW/OCD), Washington, DC. Project Head Start.

    Suggestions for expanding and improving the volunteer participation in all local Head Start programs are provided in this manual. The primary aims of the volunteer programs are to: (1) provide additional staff in all areas of the program, thus increasing the effectiveness of the paid staff; (2) give interested local citizens, including parents of…

  5. Oregon Extension Volunteers: Partners in Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braker, Marjorie J.; Leno, Janice R.; Pratt, Clara C.; Grobe, Deana

    2000-01-01

    Survey responses from 969 (of 2,552) Oregon Extension volunteers revealed personal benefits, including gains in knowledge, self-confidence, and interpersonal relationships. Community benefits were noted by more than one third. A few noted economic benefits (increased job skills and useful contacts). The costs of volunteering were perceived as low…

  6. Sterilization for Large Volunteer Temporary Clinics.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Eve

    2015-12-01

    Large portable clinics staffed by volunteers present many unique challenges, including establishing appropriate instrument processing services. This article explores many of the specific steps an organization can take to ensure a safe care environment for patients and a safe working environment for volunteers. PMID:26819989

  7. The Good Friends Volunteer Program Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooper, Richard

    This evaluation report relates data pertaining to the 1975-76 school year. The Good Friends Volunteer Program was established in 1974. During the 1975-76 school year, over 3,000 volunteers in 110 schools participated in the Good Friends program. Duties included giving individual attention to students; enriching programs in such areas as music,…

  8. The impact of volunteering in hospice palliative care.

    PubMed

    Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen; Claxton-Oldfield, Jane

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the impact of hospice palliative care work on volunteers' lives. In-depth interviews were conducted with 23 direct-patient care volunteers. More than half of the volunteers became involved in hospice palliative care because of their own experiences with family members and/or friends who have died. Most of the volunteers reported that they were different now or had changed in some way since they have been volunteering (e.g., they had grown in some way, have learned how to keep things in perspective). In addition, most of the volunteers felt that their outlook on life had changed since they started volunteering (e.g., they were more accepting of death, and they learned the importance of living one day at a time). Volunteers reported doing a number of different things to prevent compassion fatigue or burnout (e.g., reading a book, listening to music, talking to others, and taking time off from volunteering). Most of the volunteers said that they would tell anyone who might be thinking of volunteering in hospice palliative care that it is a very rewarding activity and/or that they should try it. Finally, many of the volunteers offered suggestions for doing things differently in their programs. PMID:17895491

  9. Recruiting Library Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Beth

    2009-01-01

    Parent volunteers can be an important asset to a well-run school library. Parent volunteers are that extra pair of hands and extra eyes. Monotonous and even tedious tasks can be accomplished quickly by people searching for ways to spend a little time with adult conversation while providing a benefit to their children. And eventually they can…

  10. Recruiting Today's Volunteer Corps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paresky, Susan S.

    1994-01-01

    College and university development officers are encouraged to adjust their expectations of volunteers to the current reality of graduates' schedules and commitments. Five barriers to volunteering (economic, time and distance, language and cultural, environmental, and competitive) are identified, and techniques for overcoming them are offered. (MSE)

  11. DYS Volunteer Services Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyles, Al

    This manual provides information for volunteers with the North Carolina Division of Youth Services. It describes the Division's history in developing correctional facilities, its philosophy and goals, and the administration of its training schools and detention centers. It cites examples of volunteer involvement in the areas of administrative and…

  12. Native Son. Vista Volunteer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urvant, Ellen; And Others

    The June issue of the Vista Volunteer is devoted to a presentation of the current plight of the American Indian emphasizing the injustice with which the Indian has been treated. Throughout the 5 articles the achievements and efforts of the Vista volunteers working with various Indian tribes are described. Statements by Indian leaders point up the…

  13. Hispanic American Volunteering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Josue; Safrit, R. Dale

    2001-01-01

    Hispanic Americans in Cleveland, Ohio were interviewed about volunteerism. Six themes were identified: (1) influence of family and friends; (2) importance of volunteering to benefit youth; (3) importance of church and religious beliefs; (4) volunteering as a requirement; (5) connections between volunteerism and the community; and (6) personal…

  14. Committed Sport Event Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Keunsu; Quarterman, Jerome; Strigas, Ethan; Ha, Jaehyun; Lee, Seungbum

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among selected demographic characteristics (income, education and age), motivation and commitment of volunteers at a sporting event. Three-hundred and five questionnaires were collected from volunteers in a marathon event and analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). Based on…

  15. College Students' Volunteering: Factors Related to Current Volunteering, Volunteer Settings, and Motives for Volunteering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Erin W.; Warta, Samantha; Erichsen, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    Research has not explored the types of settings that college students prefer to volunteer for and how these settings might be influenced by personal factors (e.g., demographic, academic major, volunteering motivation, religiosity). Students from a Midwestern university (N = 406, 71.9% female) completed a survey that inquired about their…

  16. Involving Volunteers in Your Advancement Programs. The Best of "CASE Currents."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Virginia Carter, Ed.; Alberger, Patricia LaSalle, Ed.

    A compilation of the best articles from "CASE Currents" on involving volunteers in institutional advancement programs is presented. Overall topics include: management of volunteers, working with trustees (volunteers at the top), benefits of participation for volunteers, and involving volunteers in fund raising, public relations, student…

  17. Holding on to what you have got: keeping hospice palliative care volunteers volunteering.

    PubMed

    Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen; Jones, Richard

    2013-08-01

    In all, 119 hospice palliative care volunteers from 3 community-based hospice programs completed the Volunteer Retention Questionnaire (VRQ), a 33-item survey designed for this study. The VRQ asks volunteers to rate the importance of each item to their decision to continue volunteering. The items that received the highest mean importance ratings included enjoying the work they do, feeling adequately prepared/trained to perform their role, and learning from their patients' experiences/listening to their patients' life stories. Being recognized (eg, pins for years of service or being profiled in the hospice newsletter), receiving phone calls/cards from their volunteer coordinator on special occasions, and being reimbursed for out-of-pocket expenses were among the items that received the lowest mean importance ratings. Suggestions for improving volunteer retention are provided.

  18. Call to volunteer.

    PubMed

    Pati, Anita

    Volunteers can contribute a great deal to people receiving health or social care. Some of the quirky activities they offer are contact with owls and the provision of arts and crafts materials. PMID:19323106

  19. Social Work with Religious Volunteers: Activating and Sustaining Community Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garland, Diana R.; Myers, Dennis M.; Wolfer, Terry A.

    2008-01-01

    Social workers in diverse community practice settings recruit and work with volunteers from religious congregations. This article reports findings from two surveys: 7,405 congregants in 35 Protestant congregations, including 2,570 who were actively volunteering, and a follow-up survey of 946 volunteers. It compares characteristics of congregation…

  20. English as a Second Language Volunteer Tutor Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Literacy Council, St. Paul.

    This manual was designed to help prepare volunteer tutors to teach English as a Second Language (ESL). An introductory section outlines the role and responsibilities of the volunteer tutor and provides information on tax deductions for volunteers. Subsequent sections provide practical information on varied aspects of ESL instruction, including:…

  1. Institutional Facilitation in Sustained Volunteering among Older Adult Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Fengyan; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Hong, Songiee

    2009-01-01

    As more nonprofit organizations rely on older adult volunteers to provide services, it is important to retain volunteers for an extended period of time to ensure service quality and the beneficial outcomes of volunteering. Nonprofit organizations are positioned to facilitate older adult volunteers' role performance. Based on an institutional…

  2. Motivations of German Hospice Volunteers: How Do They Compare to Nonhospice Volunteers and US Hospice Volunteers?

    PubMed

    Stelzer, Eva-Maria; Lang, Frieder R

    2016-03-01

    We examined reasons of volunteering for hospice and nonhospice organizations in a study with 125 volunteers (22-93 years) from the United States and Germany. Motives of US and German hospice volunteers revealed similarities and few differences. Hospice volunteers are involved because they seek to help others, seek new learning experiences, seek social contacts, or seek personal growth. The US hospice volunteers reported motives related to altruistic concerns, enhancement, and social influence as more influential, while German hospice volunteers rated career expectations as being more important. Comparison of German hospice with nonhospice volunteers revealed stronger differences: German hospice volunteers scored higher on altruistic motives, while German nonhospice volunteers yielded higher scores on self-serving motives. Findings contribute to improved understanding of volunteering motivation and of activating or retaining hospice volunteers.

  3. Update on donor assessment, resuscitation, and acceptance criteria, including novel techniques--non-heart-beating donor lung retrieval and ex vivo donor lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Cypel, Marcelo; Waddell, Thomas K; van Raemdonck, Dirk; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2009-05-01

    The shortage of adequate organ donors remains a great challenge in clinical lung transplantation. With increasing experience in the medical management and surgical technique of lung transplantation, gradual expansion of the criteria for lung donor selection has occurred with beneficial effects on the donor pool. Interest in donation after cardiac death also is increasing as the gap increases between donors and the needs of listed patients. Successful use of these new sources of lungs depends on the accurate assessment and prediction of transplanted lung function. Promising techniques for lung assessment and diagnostics include investigating key genes associated with graft failure or good graft performance using molecular approaches, and ex vivo evaluation. Further studies are needed to answer remaining questions about the best technique and solution to reperfuse human lungs for several hours without edema formation. As the predictive ability to discern good from injured donor lungs improves, strategies to repair donor lungs become increasingly important. Prolonged normothermic EVLP seems to be a platform on which many reparative strategies can be realized. With these new methods for assessing and resuscitating lungs accurately, it is hoped that inroads will be made toward providing every listed patient a chance for successful lung transplantation. PMID:19662970

  4. Experiences and benefits of volunteering in a community AIDS organization.

    PubMed

    Crook, Joan; Weir, Robin; Willms, Dennis; Egdorf, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the AIDS service organization-volunteer relationship from the volunteer's point of view. Factors that led to a relationship with an AIDS service organization included personal values and individual characteristics and needs. Volunteers reported many rewards from the work itself and the responses of others. Volunteers also encountered challenges that included role demands, role-ability fit, and stress/burnout concerns as well as limited organizational resources and structural obstacles. These results suggest that care must be taken to ensure that the volunteer role meets the needs, skills, and abilities of the individual volunteering. The need to ameliorate challenges is clear for AIDS service organizations seeking to retain volunteers. Some of the preventive strategies include goal-setting and feedback, individual-sensitive role redesign, opportunity to participate in decisions, and increased communication.

  5. Experiences and benefits of volunteering in a community AIDS organization.

    PubMed

    Crook, Joan; Weir, Robin; Willms, Dennis; Egdorf, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the AIDS service organization-volunteer relationship from the volunteer's point of view. Factors that led to a relationship with an AIDS service organization included personal values and individual characteristics and needs. Volunteers reported many rewards from the work itself and the responses of others. Volunteers also encountered challenges that included role demands, role-ability fit, and stress/burnout concerns as well as limited organizational resources and structural obstacles. These results suggest that care must be taken to ensure that the volunteer role meets the needs, skills, and abilities of the individual volunteering. The need to ameliorate challenges is clear for AIDS service organizations seeking to retain volunteers. Some of the preventive strategies include goal-setting and feedback, individual-sensitive role redesign, opportunity to participate in decisions, and increased communication. PMID:16849088

  6. The Volunteer Tutor's Toolbox.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, Beth Ann, Ed.

    Intended for volunteers in community literacy programs, one-on-one tutors, or parents who want to support classroom learning, this book presents tutoring ideas, teaching activities, and evaluation suggestions. The book guides tutors as they teach students to become independent learners and shows tutors how to provide support but not "do" the work…

  7. Volunteer Community Language Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Sigfrid S.; And Others

    Lake Charles, Louisiana established a language bank capable of providing interpreters for 20 foreign languages. All participants are volunteers who offer to help free of charge in case of emergencies arising because of the considerable numbers of foreign visitors in the area. Smooth operation of the language bank depends on the following: (1) an…

  8. The Volunteer Organization Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnot, Marie; And Others

    This handbook is intended to help the volunteer leader become more effective. The first five chapters are designed as self-instruction guides, which will help the leader to lead groups to more effective action. These chapters cover assessing group and community needs; establishing goals and setting priorities; considering alternatives and…

  9. Rural volunteer ombudsman programs.

    PubMed

    Netting, E F; Hinds, H N

    1989-12-01

    We examine benefits and difficulties surrounding the effective implementation of a long-term care volunteer ombudsman program in a rural setting. Discussion focuses on the uniqueness of each rural community and potential strategies that can be mixed and matched to meet individual community needs. We consider implications for the development and implementation of ombudsman programs in rural areas.

  10. Volunteer Services System. Handbook 5: Volunteer Personnel Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Columbus Public Schools, OH.

    This handbook outlines a logical path of activity for utilizing volunteers in schools. The planning phase determines the type and amount of work that could be accomplished by volunteers. The preparation phase involves the processes, procedures, and materials necessary before working with volunteers. The implementation phase discusses volunteer…

  11. Widely Assumed but Thinly Tested: Do Employee Volunteers' Self-Reported Skill Improvements Reflect the Nature of Their Volunteering Experiences?

    PubMed Central

    Jones, David A.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of companies use corporate volunteering programs (CVPs) to support and coordinate their employees' efforts to serve their communities. Among the most frequently touted benefits of such programs to sponsoring companies and employee volunteers alike is the opportunities for employees to develop tangible work-related skills through their volunteering activities. Evidence for skill development through volunteering, however, is mostly limited to the expressed beliefs of corporate leaders and employee volunteers. This study was designed to contribute to this largely anecdotal literature by testing hypotheses about the extent to which employee volunteers' self-reported skill development reflects the characteristics of the volunteers and their volunteering experiences. Study participants were 74 employee volunteers who completed a service apprenticeship managed by a U.S.-based nonprofit called Citizen Schools that partners with middle schools to extend the learning day with a combination of academic support, enrichment, and youth development activities. Data were obtained via the nonprofit's records, and surveys completed by employee volunteers before and after their service experience, including measures used to assess self-reported improvements in each of 10 work-related skills: communicating performance expectations, leadership, mentorship, motivating others, project management, providing performance feedback, public speaking and presenting, speaking clearly, teamwork, and time management. Support was found for several hypothesized effects suggesting that employees who practiced specific skills more often during their volunteering experience reported greater improvements in those skills. Improvements in some skills were higher among employee volunteers who completed a greater number of pre-volunteering preparation courses, and the effects of preparation courses were moderated by the employee volunteers' self-efficacy about improving their work

  12. Widely Assumed but Thinly Tested: Do Employee Volunteers' Self-Reported Skill Improvements Reflect the Nature of Their Volunteering Experiences?

    PubMed

    Jones, David A

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of companies use corporate volunteering programs (CVPs) to support and coordinate their employees' efforts to serve their communities. Among the most frequently touted benefits of such programs to sponsoring companies and employee volunteers alike is the opportunities for employees to develop tangible work-related skills through their volunteering activities. Evidence for skill development through volunteering, however, is mostly limited to the expressed beliefs of corporate leaders and employee volunteers. This study was designed to contribute to this largely anecdotal literature by testing hypotheses about the extent to which employee volunteers' self-reported skill development reflects the characteristics of the volunteers and their volunteering experiences. Study participants were 74 employee volunteers who completed a service apprenticeship managed by a U.S.-based nonprofit called Citizen Schools that partners with middle schools to extend the learning day with a combination of academic support, enrichment, and youth development activities. Data were obtained via the nonprofit's records, and surveys completed by employee volunteers before and after their service experience, including measures used to assess self-reported improvements in each of 10 work-related skills: communicating performance expectations, leadership, mentorship, motivating others, project management, providing performance feedback, public speaking and presenting, speaking clearly, teamwork, and time management. Support was found for several hypothesized effects suggesting that employees who practiced specific skills more often during their volunteering experience reported greater improvements in those skills. Improvements in some skills were higher among employee volunteers who completed a greater number of pre-volunteering preparation courses, and the effects of preparation courses were moderated by the employee volunteers' self-efficacy about improving their work

  13. Enhancing Leadership Skills in Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockett, Landry L.; Boyd, Barry

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how professionals leading volunteers can purposefully work toward developing the "leadership identity" of individual volunteers. These concepts and the application of them are presented in the context of Cooperative Extension volunteer groups. Specific methods of developing the leadership identity and capacity of individual…

  14. Do Classroom Volunteers Benefit Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brent, Brian O.

    2000-01-01

    A study of 575 volunteers in 57 elementary schools discovered that most are women (aged 36-55) supporting classroom and learning activities. Volunteers improve climate, individual student achievement, and school-community relations. Poorer schools lack sufficient volunteers. Benefits outweigh administrative, recruitment, and training costs. (MLH)

  15. Volunteer senior scientists wanted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The American Association for the Advancement of Science plans to establish a nationwide program to involve older scientists as volunteers in public education, business, and government.The Senior Scientists and Engineers (SSE) program was originated by AAAS in response to projected shortages of experienced scientists in many fields, and to draw on the large and rapidly growing population of post-retirement professional scientists. SSE began in 1988 as a pilot program in the Washington D.C. area run in conjunction with the American Association of Retired Persons.

  16. Challenges in volunteering from cancer care volunteers perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kamaludin, Kauthar Mohamad; Muhammad, Mazanah; Wahat, Nor Wahiza Abdul; Ibrahim, Rahimah

    2013-01-01

    The involvement of non-government organizations (NGOs) and support groups has helped strengthen public health services in addressing cancer care burden. Owing to the contribution of volunteers in cancer care, this article documents a qualitative study that examined challenges in attracting and retaining cancer care volunteers as part of the effort to develop a volunteer recruitment model. Data were collected through three focus group discussions involving 19 cancer support group members in Malaysia. Findings of the study revealed that mobility and locality appeared to be significant in Malaysian context, while the need for financial support and time flexibility are challenges faced by cancer support groups to attract and retain volunteers. The findings imply that cancer care initiatives can benefit from more local volunteers but at the same time these volunteers require flexibility and financial support to sustain their engagement.

  17. Volunteered Cloud Computing for Disaster Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. D.; Hao, W.; Chettri, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Disaster management relies increasingly on interpreting earth observations and running numerical models; which require significant computing capacity - usually on short notice and at irregular intervals. Peak computing demand during event detection, hazard assessment, or incident response may exceed agency budgets; however some of it can be met through volunteered computing, which distributes subtasks to participating computers via the Internet. This approach has enabled large projects in mathematics, basic science, and climate research to harness the slack computing capacity of thousands of desktop computers. This capacity is likely to diminish as desktops give way to battery-powered mobile devices (laptops, smartphones, tablets) in the consumer market; but as cloud computing becomes commonplace, it may offer significant slack capacity -- if its users are given an easy, trustworthy mechanism for participating. Such a "volunteered cloud computing" mechanism would also offer several advantages over traditional volunteered computing: tasks distributed within a cloud have fewer bandwidth limitations; granular billing mechanisms allow small slices of "interstitial" computing at no marginal cost; and virtual storage volumes allow in-depth, reversible machine reconfiguration. Volunteered cloud computing is especially suitable for "embarrassingly parallel" tasks, including ones requiring large data volumes: examples in disaster management include near-real-time image interpretation, pattern / trend detection, or large model ensembles. In the context of a major disaster, we estimate that cloud users (if suitably informed) might volunteer hundreds to thousands of CPU cores across a large provider such as Amazon Web Services. To explore this potential, we are building a volunteered cloud computing platform and targeting it to a disaster management context. Using a lightweight, fault-tolerant network protocol, this platform helps cloud users join parallel computing projects

  18. Leaving home: how older adults prepare for intensive volunteering.

    PubMed

    Cheek, Cheryl; Piercy, Kathleen W; Grainger, Sarah

    2015-03-01

    Using the concepts in the Fogg Behavioral Model, 37 volunteers aged 50 and older described their preparation for intensive volunteering with faith-based organizations. Their multistage preparation process included decision points where respondents needed to choose whether to drop out or continue preparation. Ability was a stronger determinant of serving than motivation, particularly in terms of health and finances. This model can facilitate understanding of the barriers to volunteering and aid organizations in tailoring support at crucial points for potential older volunteers in intensive service.

  19. A Handbook for Volunteer ESL Instructors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nationalities Service Center, Philadelphia, PA.

    This handbook is designed as a resource or guide for volunteers teaching English as a Second Language (ESL) to non-English-speaking adults. The first chapter discusses ESL students' needs and goals. Basic characteristics and attitudes of ESL students are noted, including the specific cultural traits of the following language groups common in the…

  20. International Volunteering: Employability, Leadership and More

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothwell, Andrew; Charleston, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the experiences of individuals in transition between education and work during international volunteering expeditions. While it was expected that outcomes might include employability enhancement and skill development, the authors aimed to clarify what the main factors were, examine employability…

  1. Sustaining Members, Volunteers, and Leaders in Community Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culp, Ken, III

    2013-01-01

    Community organizations must be self-sustaining in order to remain active, viable, and strong. The three primary steps involved in sustaining members, volunteers, and leaders include evaluate, recognize, and either retain, redirect, or disengage. A volunteer performance evaluation will determine whether individual and organizational goals are…

  2. Volunteer activity in specialist paediatric palliative care: a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Burbeck, Rachel; Low, Joe; Sampson, Elizabeth L; Scott, Rosalind; Bravery, Ruth; Candy, Bridget

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the involvement of volunteers with direct patient/family contact in UK palliative care services for children and young people. Method Cross-sectional survey using a web-based questionnaire. Setting UK specialist paediatric palliative care services. Participants Volunteer managers/coordinators from all UK hospice providers (n=37) and one National Health Service palliative care service involving volunteers (covering 53 services in total). Main outcomes Service characteristics, number of volunteers, extent of volunteer involvement in care services, use of volunteers’ professional skills and volunteer activities by setting. Results A total of 21 providers covering 31 hospices/palliative care services responded (30 evaluable responses). Referral age limit was 16–19 years in 23 services and 23–35 years in seven services; three services were Hospice at Home or home care only. Per service, there was a median of 25 volunteers with direct patient/family contact. Services providing only home care involved fewer volunteers than hospices with beds. Volunteers entirely ran some services, notably complementary therapy and pastoral/faith-based care. Complementary therapists, school teachers and spiritual care workers most commonly volunteered their professional skills. Volunteers undertook a wide range of activities including emotional support and recreational activities with children and siblings. Conclusions This is the most detailed national survey of volunteer activity in palliative care services for children and young people to date. It highlights the range and depth of volunteers’ contribution to specialist paediatric palliative care services and will help to provide a basis for future research, which could inform expansion of volunteers’ roles. PMID:24644170

  3. Student Volunteer Service Programs: Los Angeles Community College District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dash, Roger

    This study investigated the extent and diversity of student volunteer programs in the Los Angeles Community College District (California) to determine the amount of college support and acceptance accorded them. The junior colleges should take advantage of the great student potential for positive social action and realize that, in the area of…

  4. Project VUE: Volunteers Upholding Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurber, John C.

    This document reports on a project aimed at developing, implementing, and evaluating a plan for using volunteer classroom aides in the Palm Beach County (Florida) schools as a means for meeting various financial, human, and community needs. The desirability of a comprehensive volunteer plan was presented in a 10-point summary by an ad hoc…

  5. Tools for Today's PTA Volunteer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Our Children: The National PTA Magazine, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Becoming a PTA volunteer takes more than a willingness to serve; it takes knowing how to work effectively within the PTA and school community. This article describes what National PTA offers volunteers. When one trains with PTA resources, one has a chance to: (1) Participate in workshops and seminars with family-engagement experts; (2) Network…

  6. Effective management of trust volunteers.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, Carol

    2012-04-01

    A robust, well-managed volunteer programme can help NHS trusts have a better patient experience, engage with local communities, and improve and maintain their reputations. This article looks at the benefits of involving volunteers in trust activities and sets out the requirements to do this effectively, to enable them to achieve these aims.

  7. Keeping 4-H Volunteer Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Keith L.; Bigler, Nancy M.

    1985-01-01

    This study showed that continuing and discontinuing volunteer 4-H Club leaders are significantly different in their geographical location, number of children in family, and number of children in family who have participated in 4-H. These variables may affect the volunteer's decision to continue serving as a 4-H Club leader. (Author/CT)

  8. Managing Library Volunteers, Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driggers, Preston; Dumas, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    Volunteers are essential to a successful library program--and at a time when deep budget cuts are the norm, there are many libraries that depend on the help of dedicated volunteers, who do everything from shelving books to covering the phones. Whether these are friends, trustees, or community members, managing them effectively is the key to…

  9. Acceptance procedures: Microfilm printer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    Acceptance tests were made for a special order automatic additive color microfilm printer. Tests include film capacity, film transport, resolution, illumination uniformity, exposure range checks, and color cuing considerations.

  10. The context of ethical problems in medical volunteer work.

    PubMed

    Wall, Anji

    2011-06-01

    Ethical problems are common in clinical medicine, so medical volunteers who practice clinical medicine in developing countries should expect to encounter them just as they would in their practice in the developed world. However, as this article argues, medical volunteers in developing countries should not expect to encounter the same ethical problems as those that dominate Western biomedicine or to address ethical problems in the same way as they do in their practice in developed countries. For example, poor health and advanced disease increase the risks and decrease the potential benefits of some interventions. Consequently, when medical volunteers intervene too readily, without considering the nutritional and general health status of patients, the results can be devastating. Medical volunteers cannot assume that the outcomes of interventions in developing countries will be comparable to the outcomes of the same interventions in developed countries. Rather, they must realistically consider the complex medical conditions of patients when determining whether or not to intervene. Similarly, medical volunteers may face the question of whether to provide a pharmaceutical or perform an intervention that is below the acceptable standard of care versus the alternative of doing nothing. This article critically explores the contextual features of medical volunteer work in developing countries that differentiate it from medical practice in developed countries, arguing that this context contributes to the creation of unique ethical problems and affects the way in which these problems should be analyzed and resolved.

  11. What do women gain from volunteering? The experience of lay Arab and Jewish women volunteers in the Women for Women's Health programme in Israel.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Nihaya; Shtarkshall, Ronny; Laufer, Neri; Verbov, Gina; Bar-El, Hagar; Abu-Gosh, Nasreen; Mor-Yosef, Shlomo

    2010-03-01

    Ambiguous feelings regarding women engaging in formal volunteering and concerns about their exploitation might explain the dearth of studies regarding the volunteering benefits specifically experienced by low socioeconomic status women. The current study examined benefits of volunteering among women participating in Women for Women's Health (WWH), a lay health volunteers (LHV) programme implemented in Jewish and Arab communities in Israel, and aiming at empowering such women to become active volunteers and promote health activities in their communities. Two years after the introduction of WWH in each community, all 45 Jewish and 25 Arab volunteers were contacted by phone and invited to participate in the focus group discussions. Five focus group discussions were conducted with 25/42 Jewish volunteers in 2003 and four with 20/25 Arab volunteers in 2005. The other volunteers could not attend the scheduled meetings or became inactive for personal reasons. Four benefit categories were identified in both ethnic groups: 1. Personal benefits of having increased knowledge, feeling self-satisfaction, mastering new skills and performing healthy behaviours; 2. Group-social benefits of social support and sense of cohesion; 3. Purposive benefits of achieving the WWH mission and goals; 4. Sociopolitical benefits of learning to accept the other and experiencing increased solidarity. However, the relatively less privileged Arab volunteers enumerated more benefits within the personal and purposive categories. They also identified the unique sociocultural category of improving women's status in the community by creating a legitimate space for women by public sphere involvement, traditionally solely a male domain. We conclude that volunteering in community-based health promotion programmes can be an empowering experience for lay women without being exploitative. Positive volunteering benefits will be even more discernable among underprivileged women who enjoy fewer opportunities in

  12. From the Top Down. The Executive Role in Volunteer Program Success. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Susan J.

    This book outlines issues of concern to top decision makers in a nonprofit organization that involves volunteers, including the role of the executive staff in supporting the volunteer program. The 12 chapters in the book discuss the following topics: developing a vision for volunteer participation; questions of policy; budgeting and other resource…

  13. Volunteer Notes on Reforestation. A Handbook for Volunteers. Appropriate Technologies for Development. Reprint R-45.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seefeldt, Steve, Comp.

    Provided in this document are descriptions of reforestation projects and techniques presented by Peace Corps volunteers from Chad, Ivory Coast, Upper Volta, and Niger. The purpose of the document is to aid individuals in trying to find solutions to the problems facing forestry in the Sahel. These projects include: (1) reforestation of Ronier palm…

  14. Differences and similarities among volunteers who drop out during the first year and volunteers who continue after eight years.

    PubMed

    Vecina Jiménez, María Luisa; Chacón Fuertes, Fernando; Sueiro Abad, Manuel J

    2010-05-01

    Differences and similarities between 130 volunteers who remain for more than eight years in the same non-profit organization and 110 volunteers who quit during the first year were analyzed in this paper. Both groups were chosen from a sample of 851 volunteers that were working as volunteers when we assessed the independent variables (Time 1). After a 12-month follow-up (Time 2), 209 (25%) of them had dropped out and 642 (75%) continued in the same organization. Using the previous time, we formed two groups made up of those who dropped out and had been in the organization less than a year and those who continued and had been in the organization more than 8 years. Results show that differences and similarities between both groups are coherent with the three-stage model of volunteer's duration (Chacón, Vecina, & Dávila, 2007). This model includes the functional approach of volunteers' motivations (Clary & Snyder, 1991), and the role identity approach (Callero, 1985), and indicates that people will remain as volunteers insofar as this satisfies the motivations that are relevant for them at the first stage, they develop organizational commitment at the second stage, and they develop role identity as volunteers at the third stage. More specifically, results show that it is possible to predict 85% of the cases correctly using seven variables. Volunteers who remain after eight years feel a higher level of emotional exhaustion, a higher level of organizational commitment, and a strong role identity as volunteers. They are also highly satisfied with the friendships in the organization and have a stronger intention to remain at the long-term (2 years).

  15. Volunteering among Young People. Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Mark Hugo; Marcelo, Karlo Barrios

    2007-01-01

    This fact sheet presents information on the frequency of volunteering, trends in volunteering, and the organizations for which young people volunteer, utilizing data from multiple sources. Unlike many surveys, it shows that volunteering rates among young people are generally higher than they are among adults 26 and older. Findings of the Civic and…

  16. Volunteering Among Young People. CIRCLE Fact Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Mark Hugo

    2004-01-01

    Volunteering rates among young people are generally higher than they are among adults 26 and older. However, measuring volunteer rates among all adults is a difficult task. In recent years, efforts at measuring volunteering have produced widely different estimates, largely because of the methods employed to measure volunteering. For example, the…

  17. Engaging Older Adult Volunteers in National Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Amanda Moore; Greenfield, Jennifer C.; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Lee, Yung Soo; McCrary, Stacey

    2012-01-01

    Volunteer-based programs are increasingly designed as interventions to affect the volunteers and the beneficiaries of the volunteers' activities. To achieve the intended impacts for both, programs need to leverage the volunteers' engagement by meeting their expectations, retaining them, and maximizing their perceptions of benefits. Programmatic…

  18. Parallel Volunteer Learning during Youth Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesmeister, Marilyn K.; Green, Jeremy; Derby, Amy; Bothum, Candi

    2012-01-01

    Lack of time is a hindrance for volunteers to participate in educational opportunities, yet volunteer success in an organization is tied to the orientation and education they receive. Meeting diverse educational needs of volunteers can be a challenge for program managers. Scheduling a Volunteer Learning Track for chaperones that is parallel to a…

  19. Volunteer Evaluation System 1989-1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council, PA.

    The Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council developed a Volunteer Evaluation System. Its objective was to create a way to gain knowledge of volunteers' skills and place them in appropriate volunteer positions. A five-step system was created to collect information about volunteers at set intervals and pass it along to appropriate staff members. The…

  20. Exploring Volunteering of Committed Young Catholics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a study of volunteer levels of Catholics from various World regions who attended an international youth Catholic festival. Volunteering levels, types of volunteering, reason for volunteering, Catholic group membership and pro-social values are analysed. An online survey was administered five months after the Festival to…

  1. Older Adults and Volunteering: A Symbiotic Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battaglia, Anne Marie; Metzer, Jacques

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 157 older adult volunteers suggests that volunteering provides substantial benefits such as maintaining a sense of identity and self-esteem, meeting the need to belong to a group, and affording opportunities to undertake new learning challenges. Volunteer organizations should attempt to meet these needs as a way to retain volunteers.…

  2. Employee Volunteering: More than Good Feelings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Louise

    2001-01-01

    A study gathered perspectives of business, employee volunteers, and community organizations in New Zealand regarding employee volunteering. Benefits and issues for each group were identified, and the role of volunteer centers in managing successful employee volunteer programs was highlighted. (Contains 19 references.) (SK)

  3. Documenting Volunteer Experience. Volunteer for Minnesota: A Project for Developing Public Private Partnerships in Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Administration, St. Paul. Office on Volunteer Services.

    Documented volunteer experience can be a valuable tool for the individual who volunteers as well as for the organization for which the volunteer works. Current trends point toward the heightened need for validating volunteer experience. Recordkeeping systems can help facilitate effective placement of all volunteers according to their interests,…

  4. North Central Region 4-H Volunteers: Documenting Their Contributions and Volunteer Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nippolt, Pamela Larson; Pleskac, Sue; Schwartz, Vicki; Swanson, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Documenting volunteer contributions strengthens Extension partnerships with volunteers. A team of North Central Region 4-H volunteer specialists collaborated to conduct a study of 4-H volunteer contributions and impacts related to working with youth within the 4-H program. Over three thousand (3,332) 4-H volunteers from throughout the 12-state…

  5. More than Volunteering: Active Citizenship through Youth Volunteering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning and Skills Network (NJ1), 2007

    2007-01-01

    This pack aims to provide materials to help all those involved in youth volunteering and post-16 citizenship education to ensure that there are some citizenship learning outcomes from these valuable experiences. The pack has been produced by the Post-16 Citizenship Support Programme to help the integration of citizenship education into post-16…

  6. The benefits associated with volunteering among seniors: a critical review and recommendations for future research.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Nicole D; Damianakis, Thecla; Kröger, Edeltraut; Wagner, Laura M; Dawson, Deirdre R; Binns, Malcolm A; Bernstein, Syrelle; Caspi, Eilon; Cook, Suzanne L

    2014-11-01

    There is an urgent need to identify lifestyle activities that reduce functional decline and dementia associated with population aging. The goals of this article are to review critically the evidence on the benefits associated with formal volunteering among older adults, propose a theoretical model of how volunteering may reduce functional limitations and dementia risk, and offer recommendations for future research. Database searches identified 113 papers on volunteering benefits in older adults, of which 73 were included. Data from descriptive, cross-sectional, and prospective cohort studies, along with 1 randomized controlled trial, most consistently reveal that volunteering is associated with reduced symptoms of depression, better self-reported health, fewer functional limitations, and lower mortality. The extant evidence provides the basis for a model proposing that volunteering increases social, physical, and cognitive activity (to varying degrees depending on characteristics of the volunteer placement) which, through biological and psychological mechanisms, leads to improved functioning; we further propose that these volunteering-related functional improvements should be associated with reduced dementia risk. Recommendations for future research are that studies (a) include more objective measures of psychosocial, physical, and cognitive functioning; (b) integrate qualitative and quantitative methods in prospective study designs; (c) explore further individual differences in the benefits associated with volunteering; (d) include occupational analyses of volunteers' specific jobs in order to identify their social, physical, and cognitive complexity; (e) investigate the independent versus interactive health benefits associated with volunteering relative to engagement in other forms of activity; and (f) examine the relationship between volunteering and dementia risk.

  7. Evaluating the implementation of community volunteer assessment and referral of sick babies: lessons learned from the Ghana Newhints home visits cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ansah Manu, Alexander; ten Asbroek, Augustinus; Soremekun, Seyi; Gyan, Thomas; Weobong, Benedict; Tawiah-Agyemang, Charlotte; Danso, Samuel; Amenga-Etego, Seeba; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Hill, Zelee; Kirkwood, Betty R

    2014-01-01

    A World Health Organization (WHO)/United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) (2009) joint statement recommended home visits by community-based agents as a strategy to improve newborn survival, based on promising results from Asia. This article presents detailed evaluation of community volunteer assessment and referral implemented within the Ghana Newhints home visits cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT). It highlights the lessons learned to inform implementation/scale-up of this model in similar settings. The evaluation used a conceptual framework adopted for increasing access to care for sick newborns and involves three main steps, each with a specific goal and key requirements to achieving this. These steps are: sick newborns are identified within communities and referred; families comply with referrals and referred babies receive appropriate management at health facilities. Evaluation data included interviews with 4006 recently delivered mothers; records on 759 directly observed volunteer assessments and 52 validation of supervisors’ assessments; newborn care quality assessment in 86 health facilities and in-depth interviews (IDIs) with 55 mothers, 21 volunteers and 15 health professionals. Assessment accuracy of volunteers against supervisors and physician was assessed using Kappa (agreement coefficient). IDIs were analysed by generating and indexing into themes, and exploring relationships between themes and their contextual interpretations. This evaluation demonstrated that identifying, understanding and implementing the key requirements for success in each step of volunteer assessment and referrals was pivotal to success. In Newhints, volunteers (CBSVs) were trusted by families, their visits were acceptable and they engaged mothers/families in decisions, resulting in unprecedented 86% referral compliance and increased (55–77%) care seeking for sick newborns. Poor facility care quality, characterized by poor health worker attitudes, limited the

  8. Volunteered Geographic Information in Wikipedia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Darren

    2010-01-01

    Volunteered geographic information (VGI) refers to the geographic subset of online user-generated content. Through Geobrowsers and online mapping services, which use geovisualization and Web technologies to share and produce VGI, a global digital commons of geographic information has emerged. A notable example is Wikipedia, an online collaborative…

  9. SETI@home, BOINC, and Volunteer Distributed Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korpela, Eric J.

    2012-05-01

    Volunteer computing, also known as public-resource computing, is a form of distributed computing that relies on members of the public donating the processing power, Internet connection, and storage capabilities of their home computers. Projects that utilize this mode of distributed computation can potentially access millions of Internet-attached central processing units (CPUs) that provide PFLOPS (thousands of trillions of floating-point operations per second) of processing power. In addition, these projects can access the talents of the volunteers themselves. Projects span a wide variety of domains including astronomy, biochemistry, climatology, physics, and mathematics. This review provides an introduction to volunteer computing and some of the difficulties involved in its implementation. I describe the dominant infrastructure for volunteer computing in some depth and provide descriptions of a small number of projects as an illustration of the variety of projects that can be undertaken.

  10. Peer support for carers: a qualitative investigation of the experiences of carers and peer volunteers.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Nan; Habibi, Ruth; Mackenzie, Ann; Drennan, Vari; Easton, Nicky

    2013-09-01

    Being a carer of someone with dementia can be rewarding and also challenging. Volunteer peer support schemes for carers are being introduced, little is known about either their impact on carers and volunteers or about volunteers' and carers' experiences. This study investigated peer volunteer and carer recipient experiences of a peer support service. Thematic analysis of 13 in-depth interviews with 9 carers and 4 peer volunteers revealed that peer support helped both carers and peer volunteers through the realization that they were "not alone" in their experiences and emotions. Additional carer benefits included opportunities to talk freely about difficult experiences and learning how others cope. Volunteers found their role rewarding, describing satisfaction from putting their own experiences to good use. These findings highlight the isolation and exclusion experienced by current and former carers of people with dementia and draw attention to the benefits of peer support for both the groups.

  11. 76 FR 29720 - Information Collection: Volunteer Programs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... Farm Service Agency Information Collection: Volunteer Programs AGENCY: Farm Service Agency, USDA... an extension of a currently approved information collection associated with the Volunteer Programs... Desk Officer for Agriculture, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management...

  12. 45 CFR 1306.22 - Volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Volunteers. 1306.22 Section 1306.22 Public Welfare... STAFFING REQUIREMENTS AND PROGRAM OPTIONS Head Start Program Staffing Requirements § 1306.22 Volunteers. (a) Head Start programs must use volunteers to the fullest extent possible. Head Start grantees...

  13. 45 CFR 1306.22 - Volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Volunteers. 1306.22 Section 1306.22 Public Welfare... STAFFING REQUIREMENTS AND PROGRAM OPTIONS Head Start Program Staffing Requirements § 1306.22 Volunteers. (a) Head Start programs must use volunteers to the fullest extent possible. Head Start grantees...

  14. 20 CFR 628.540 - Volunteer program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Volunteer program. 628.540 Section 628.540... Training Partnership Act § 628.540 Volunteer program. Pursuant to sections 204(c)(6) and 264(d)(7) of the... programs under this part to volunteer assistance, in the form of mentoring, tutoring, and other activities....

  15. 20 CFR 628.540 - Volunteer program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Volunteer program. 628.540 Section 628.540... Training Partnership Act § 628.540 Volunteer program. Pursuant to sections 204(c)(6) and 264(d)(7) of the... programs under this part to volunteer assistance, in the form of mentoring, tutoring, and other activities....

  16. 45 CFR 1306.22 - Volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Volunteers. 1306.22 Section 1306.22 Public Welfare... STAFFING REQUIREMENTS AND PROGRAM OPTIONS Head Start Program Staffing Requirements § 1306.22 Volunteers. (a) Head Start programs must use volunteers to the fullest extent possible. Head Start grantees...

  17. 45 CFR 1306.22 - Volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Volunteers. 1306.22 Section 1306.22 Public Welfare... STAFFING REQUIREMENTS AND PROGRAM OPTIONS Head Start Program Staffing Requirements § 1306.22 Volunteers. (a) Head Start programs must use volunteers to the fullest extent possible. Head Start grantees...

  18. 45 CFR 1306.22 - Volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Volunteers. 1306.22 Section 1306.22 Public Welfare... STAFFING REQUIREMENTS AND PROGRAM OPTIONS Head Start Program Staffing Requirements § 1306.22 Volunteers. (a) Head Start programs must use volunteers to the fullest extent possible. Head Start grantees...

  19. Understanding the Value of Volunteer Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Bryan; Harder, Amy; Pracht, Dale

    2011-01-01

    Volunteers can be an important resource of many nonprofit organizations. The ability to meet the mission, goals and objectives of nonprofit organizations often depends upon the effectiveness of volunteer involvement in direct service delivery or indirect program support. Volunteer involvement utilizes financial and non-financial resources of an…

  20. Youth Sport Volunteering: Developing Social Capital?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Tess; Bradbury, Steven

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyses the capacity of youth sport volunteering to contribute to the development of social capital. Following a review of the emergence of social capital as a key theme in UK sport policy, the paper focuses on the ability of a structured sports volunteering programme to equip young people with skills for effective volunteering, and…

  1. Student Volunteering in English Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdsworth, Clare; Quinn, Jocey

    2010-01-01

    Volunteering in English higher education has come under political scrutiny recently, with strong cross-party support for schemes to promote undergraduate volunteering in particular. Recent targeted initiatives and proposals have sought to strengthen both the role of volunteering in higher education and synergies between higher education and…

  2. Student Volunteers; a Manual for Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Friends Service Committee, New York, NY. Metropolitan Regional Office.

    Intended as a guide for those groups who use student volunteers, this manual presents possibilities and pitfalls in using student volunteers and illustrates these with case studies and examples. Ways and means of getting a student volunteer program started are discussed, and techniques for planning and developing the program are described. The…

  3. Volunteers: The Life-Line of Hospice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patchner, Michael A.; Finn, Mark B.

    1988-01-01

    Survey of 68 hospice volunteers found volunteers to be relatively young, well-educated, in good health, motivated by religious beliefs and personal experience, and prepared for jobs after training and some on-the-job experience. Volunteers were most satisfied when working in direct contact with patients and families and in the hospital.…

  4. Substitute or Complement?: Spousal Influence on Volunteering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotolo, Thomas; Wilson, John

    2006-01-01

    Social scientists have documented the influence of family statuses on volunteering, ignoring intrafamily effects. Using newly issued data from the Current Population Survey on the volunteer behavior of 19,626 American couples, we test two competing theories concerning spousal influences on volunteering. Substitution theory predicts that spouses…

  5. Approaches to acceptable risk

    SciTech Connect

    Whipple, C.

    1997-04-30

    Several alternative approaches to address the question {open_quotes}How safe is safe enough?{close_quotes} are reviewed and an attempt is made to apply the reasoning behind these approaches to the issue of acceptability of radiation exposures received in space. The approaches to the issue of the acceptability of technological risk described here are primarily analytical, and are drawn from examples in the management of environmental health risks. These include risk-based approaches, in which specific quantitative risk targets determine the acceptability of an activity, and cost-benefit and decision analysis, which generally focus on the estimation and evaluation of risks, benefits and costs, in a framework that balances these factors against each other. These analytical methods tend by their quantitative nature to emphasize the magnitude of risks, costs and alternatives, and to downplay other factors, especially those that are not easily expressed in quantitative terms, that affect acceptance or rejection of risk. Such other factors include the issues of risk perceptions and how and by whom risk decisions are made.

  6. 45 CFR 2552.72 - Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer? 2552.72 Section 2552.72 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... Placements and Assignments § 2552.72 Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer?...

  7. 45 CFR 2552.72 - Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer? 2552.72 Section 2552.72 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... Placements and Assignments § 2552.72 Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer?...

  8. 45 CFR 2551.72 - Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer? 2551.72 Section 2551.72 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... Placements and Assignments § 2551.72 Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer?...

  9. 45 CFR 2551.72 - Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer? 2551.72 Section 2551.72 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... Placements and Assignments § 2551.72 Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer?...

  10. 45 CFR 2551.72 - Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer? 2551.72 Section 2551.72 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... Placements and Assignments § 2551.72 Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer?...

  11. 45 CFR 2552.72 - Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer? 2552.72 Section 2552.72 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... Placements and Assignments § 2552.72 Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer?...

  12. 45 CFR 2552.72 - Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer? 2552.72 Section 2552.72 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... Placements and Assignments § 2552.72 Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer?...

  13. 45 CFR 2551.72 - Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer? 2551.72 Section 2551.72 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... Placements and Assignments § 2551.72 Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer?...

  14. 45 CFR 2552.72 - Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer? 2552.72 Section 2552.72 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... Placements and Assignments § 2552.72 Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer?...

  15. The Volunteers Speak: A World-Wide Survey of Peace Corps Volunteers. ACTION Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACTION, Washington, DC.

    A survey questionnaire was mailed to all active Peace Corps Volunteers (PCVs) in the summer of 1975. Based on an internal analysis of the 3,479 respondents (a 66% return), the following findings represent the manner in which PCVs perceive their volunteer experience. Perceived volunteer accomplishments and morale are very high. Volunteers believe…

  16. Potential for intensive volunteering to promote the health of older adults in fair health.

    PubMed

    Barron, Jeremy S; Tan, Erwin J; Yu, Qilu; Song, Meilin; McGill, Sylvia; Fried, Linda P

    2009-07-01

    Volunteer service opportunities for older adults may soon be expanded. Although volunteering is thought to provide health benefits for healthier older adults, it is not known whether older adults in less than very good health are suitable candidates for high-intensity volunteering and can derive health benefits. This manuscript presents a prospective analysis of 174 older adult volunteers serving in Experience Corps Baltimore, a high-intensity senior volunteer program in Baltimore, Maryland. Volunteers served > or =15 h per week, for a full school year, in elementary schools helping children with reading and other skills between 1999 and 2002. Volunteers were assessed with standardized questionnaires and performance-based testing including grip strength, walking speed, chair stand speed, and stair-climbing speed prior to school volunteering and at the end of the school year. Results were stratified by health status. Among 174 volunteers, 55% initially reported "good" and 12% "fair" or "poor" health status. At baseline, those in fair health reported higher frequencies of disease and disability than volunteers in excellent or very good health. After volunteering, a majority of volunteers in every baseline health status category described increased strength and energy. Those in fair health were significantly more likely to display improved stair-climbing speed than those in good or excellent/very good health (100.0% vs. 53.4% vs. 37.5%, p = 0.05), and many showed clinically significant increases in walking speed of >0.5 m/s. Satisfaction and retention rates were high for all health status groups. Clinicians should consider whether their patients in fair or good health, as well as those in better health, might benefit from high-intensity volunteer programs. Productive activity such as volunteering may be an effective community-based approach to health promotion for older adults.

  17. The boundaries of care work: a comparative study of professionals and volunteers in Denmark and Australia.

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Charlotte

    2015-07-01

    This paper explores the manner in which two hospices--one located in Denmark and one in Australia--negotiate and determine the boundaries of volunteer workers vis-à-vis paid staff. A comparative case study approach was used to juxtapose organisations with similar activity fields located in different welfare state systems, i.e. a social democratic welfare state and a liberal welfare state. This study involved non-participant observation of volunteers at work and unstructured interviews with volunteers, staff and management in the hospices (n = 41). Data were collected between August 2012 and February 2013. Data were managed using NVivo and analysed thematically. A key finding is that volunteers in the Danish hospice were excluded from all direct care work due to the effective monopoly of the professional care providers, whereas the Australian volunteers participated in the provision of care to the extent that risk could be eliminated or mitigated to an acceptable level. The findings suggest two different models of the roles of volunteers in tension with professional care providers. Both models recognise that volunteers add to the level of care delivered by the organisations and allow for a discussion that moves away from the normative discussions of 'not taking somebody's job', while also recognising that volunteers must be more than just the 'nice extra' if they are to be of any real value to the organisation and to care receivers.

  18. The boundaries of care work: a comparative study of professionals and volunteers in Denmark and Australia.

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Charlotte

    2015-07-01

    This paper explores the manner in which two hospices--one located in Denmark and one in Australia--negotiate and determine the boundaries of volunteer workers vis-à-vis paid staff. A comparative case study approach was used to juxtapose organisations with similar activity fields located in different welfare state systems, i.e. a social democratic welfare state and a liberal welfare state. This study involved non-participant observation of volunteers at work and unstructured interviews with volunteers, staff and management in the hospices (n = 41). Data were collected between August 2012 and February 2013. Data were managed using NVivo and analysed thematically. A key finding is that volunteers in the Danish hospice were excluded from all direct care work due to the effective monopoly of the professional care providers, whereas the Australian volunteers participated in the provision of care to the extent that risk could be eliminated or mitigated to an acceptable level. The findings suggest two different models of the roles of volunteers in tension with professional care providers. Both models recognise that volunteers add to the level of care delivered by the organisations and allow for a discussion that moves away from the normative discussions of 'not taking somebody's job', while also recognising that volunteers must be more than just the 'nice extra' if they are to be of any real value to the organisation and to care receivers. PMID:25442013

  19. Family Living, Including Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forlano, George

    This volume describes and evaluates 21 selected New York City Board of Education Umbrella Programs for the 1974-1975 school year. The programs include: (1) the parent resource center, (2) the teacher self-help program, (3) the East Harlem pre-kindergarten center, (4) the Brooklyn College volunteer tutoring program, (5) the parent education for…

  20. Pharmacokinetics of the antiepileptic drug levetiracetam in healthy Japanese and Caucasian volunteers following intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    Toublanc, Nathalie; Okagaki, Takuya; Boyce, Malcolm; Chan, Robert; Mugitani, Ayumi; Watanabe, Shikiko; Yamamoto, Katsumi; Yoshida, Katsumi; Andreas, Jens-Otto

    2015-12-01

    The intravenous (iv) formulation of levetiracetam has been available in clinical practice worldwide for several years, but not in Japan. Two open-label studies were conducted: Study A evaluated the bioequivalence of iv and oral tablet formulations in healthy Japanese volunteers; and Study B subsequently compared the pharmacokinetics of iv levetiracetam in healthy Japanese and Caucasian volunteers. Study A had a randomised, two-way crossover design; a single 1,500 mg levetiracetam dose was administered as a 15-min iv infusion and as 3 × 500 mg oral tablets to Japanese volunteers. In Study B, 1,500 mg levetiracetam was administered as single and repeated 15-min iv infusions to Japanese and Caucasian volunteers. Overall, 26/27 volunteers completed Study A and 32/32 (16 Japanese; 16 Caucasian) completed Study B. In Study A, the point estimate and 90 % confidence interval (CI) for the geometric least squares mean (LSM) ratio (iv vs oral) were fully included within the acceptance range for bioequivalence (0.85-1.25) for the area under plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to last quantifiable observation (AUClast 0.97 [0.95, 0.99]), but not for the maximum plasma concentration (C max 1.64 [1.47, 1.83]). In Study B, after a single iv infusion, the point estimates (90 % CI) for the geometric LSM ratio (Japanese vs Caucasian) for body weight-normalised C max and AUClast were 1.21 (1.07, 1.36) and 0.97 (0.90, 1.04), respectively. Corresponding values after repeated iv infusions were C max,ss 1.01 (0.91, 1.12) and AUCτ,ss 0.89 (0.83, 0.96). Levetiracetam was well tolerated in both studies. Study A did not demonstrate the bioequivalence of single doses of levetiracetam 1,500 mg administered as an iv infusion and as oral tablets in healthy Japanese adults. Study B, however, showed that pharmacokinetic profiles were generally similar between Japanese and Caucasian adults after single and repeated iv infusions of levetiracetam 1,500 mg.

  1. Cone penetrometer acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Boechler, G.N.

    1996-09-19

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents the results of acceptance test procedure WHC-SD-WM-ATR-151. Included in this report is a summary of the tests, the results and issues, the signature and sign- off ATP pages, and a summarized table of the specification vs. ATP section that satisfied the specification.

  2. Motivation and satisfaction among polyclinic volunteers at the 2002 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games

    PubMed Central

    Reeser, J; Berg, R; Rhea, D; Willick, S

    2005-01-01

    Background: The Olympic and Paralympic Games rely heavily on volunteers to provide many essential services, including medical care of athletes. Objective: This preliminary investigation sought to characterise the motivational influences and factors responsible for the satisfaction of Olympic and Paralympic healthcare volunteers. Methods: The 2002 Winter Games polyclinic healthcare volunteers were asked to complete a questionnaire designed to elicit information about their motives for volunteering and the factors that contributed to their satisfaction with their volunteer experience. Results: There was no significant difference in the motivation or satisfaction summary scores based on event worked. There was a strong positive correlation between motivation and satisfaction. Physician respondents had a lower mean motivation score than did non-physician volunteers. Conclusions: There were no significant motivational differences between Olympic and Paralympic volunteers, but there were several differences noted between physician and non-physician volunteers. The 2002 polyclinic volunteers appear to have been motivated by a complex process best described as "enlightened self interest," and all were generally well satisfied with their experience. These results may assist organisers of future Games in selecting appropriately motivated volunteer personnel and creating rewarding work environments for them. PMID:15793078

  3. The female community health volunteer programme in Nepal: decision makers' perceptions of volunteerism, payment and other incentives.

    PubMed

    Glenton, Claire; Scheel, Inger B; Pradhan, Sabina; Lewin, Simon; Hodgins, Stephen; Shrestha, Vijaya

    2010-06-01

    The Female Community Health Volunteer (FCHV) Programme in Nepal has existed since the late 1980s and includes almost 50,000 volunteers. Although volunteer programmes are widely thought to be characterised by high attrition levels, the FCHV Programme loses fewer than 5% of its volunteers annually. The degree to which decision makers understand community health worker motivations and match these with appropriate incentives is likely to influence programme sustainability. The purpose of this study was to explore the views of stakeholders who have participated in the design and implementation of the Female Community Health Volunteer regarding Volunteer motivation and appropriate incentives, and to compare these views with the views and expectations of Volunteers. Semi-structured interviews were carried out in 2009 with 19 purposively selected non-Volunteer stakeholders, including policy makers and programme managers. Results were compared with data from previous studies of Female Community Health Volunteers and from interviews with four Volunteers and two Volunteer activists. Stakeholders saw Volunteers as motivated primarily by social respect, religious and moral duty. The freedom to deliver services at their leisure was seen as central to the volunteer concept. While stakeholders also saw the need for extrinsic incentives such as micro-credit, regular wages were regarded not only as financially unfeasible, but as a potential threat to the Volunteers' social respect, and thereby to their motivation. These views were reflected in interviews with and previous studies of Female Community Health Volunteers, and appear to be influenced by a tradition of volunteering as moral behaviour, a lack of respect for paid government workers, and the Programme's community embeddedness. Our study suggests that it may not be useful to promote a generic range of incentives, such as wages, to improve community health worker programme sustainability. Instead, programmes should ensure that

  4. Digital detectives and virtual volunteers: Integrating emergent online communities into disaster response operations.

    PubMed

    Griswold, Alisha

    2013-01-01

    The demonstration of altruistic behaviours by disaster survivors, and even those observing emergencies from afar, is well documented. Over the past few decades, government-sponsored crisis planning has evolved to include affiliated volunteer agencies, with a general acknowledgment of the need to plan for unaffiliated or spontaneous volunteers. Just as the understanding of the need for volunteers has grown, so too have the ways in which volunteers are able to donate their time and skills. The popularity of social media networks and online communities provide new ways for the public to get involved in disaster response. Public service agencies should be proactive in investigating these emerging platforms and understanding their impacts during crises. Established methods of integrating on-scene volunteers into post-disaster response operations can be used as templates for creating virtual volunteer programmes. PMID:24113633

  5. Digital detectives and virtual volunteers: Integrating emergent online communities into disaster response operations.

    PubMed

    Griswold, Alisha

    2013-01-01

    The demonstration of altruistic behaviours by disaster survivors, and even those observing emergencies from afar, is well documented. Over the past few decades, government-sponsored crisis planning has evolved to include affiliated volunteer agencies, with a general acknowledgment of the need to plan for unaffiliated or spontaneous volunteers. Just as the understanding of the need for volunteers has grown, so too have the ways in which volunteers are able to donate their time and skills. The popularity of social media networks and online communities provide new ways for the public to get involved in disaster response. Public service agencies should be proactive in investigating these emerging platforms and understanding their impacts during crises. Established methods of integrating on-scene volunteers into post-disaster response operations can be used as templates for creating virtual volunteer programmes.

  6. Volunteering for emergency preparedness. Final report, March 1988-March 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Nehnevajsa, J.

    1989-05-01

    This nation-wide quantitative telephone survey predicts levels of voluntary activity for emergency and disaster preparedness. The study involved a random national phone sample of 1,595 respondents in the 48 contiguous states. Actual voluntary activity performed during or immediately following an emergency or disaster is not explicitly considered in the research. Rather, this study attempts to measure willingness to volunteer and willingness to participate in training programs. Training programs are conceptualized to mean both education and practice. The study also includes rating schedules - poor to excellent - for attitudes toward the self-help concept and perceived effectiveness of local and Federal government emergency and disaster programs. While the self-help concept rating is considered as a variable in its own right, evaluation consists of its relation to the following variables: prior volunteer experience, the expressed willingness to volunteer, and the perceived effectiveness of each local and Federal government programs. Indices are computed for the perceived effectiveness of government programs, and compared with percentages that reflect respondents ratings of the self-help concept, as well as prior and expressed willingness for volunteering and training activities. Patterns of participation in training and volunteering are also examined.

  7. Project HOPE volunteers and the Navy Hospital Ship Mercy.

    PubMed

    Timboe, Harold L; Holt, G Richard

    2006-10-01

    This article describes, from the perspective of Project HOPE volunteers, the precedent-setting, military-civilian partnership in staffing the USNS Mercy as part of the rapid response of the United States to the overwhelming devastation and loss of life resulting from the tsunami off the coast of Indonesia. The article discusses the designation of Project HOPE as the non-governmental organization to be the single source of volunteers for the USNS Mercy mission (providing approximately 100 volunteers for each of two 30-day rotations), some issues facing Project HOPE and the contingent of volunteers in recruiting, orienting, training, and preparing for the mission, steps taken to make this a successful mission despite the ambiguity and uncertainties involved in arriving in the relief area 1 month after the disaster, and some recommendations for similar future missions. The Project HOPE volunteers quickly integrated with the cadre of Navy health professionals to deliver a broad range of high-quality care, including tertiary care, attesting to the professionalism and standards common to military and civilian medicine. The combined success of all organizations involved truly heralds a new era of medical diplomacy and goodwill in which the United States can take great pride.

  8. Improving Wellbeing and Environmental Stewardship Through Volunteering in Nature.

    PubMed

    Molsher, Robyn; Townsend, Mardie

    2016-03-01

    Environmental volunteering (EV) can provide a unique way to optimise the wellbeing of participants while fostering environmental stewardship. However, the potential of EV to create human health benefits remains an under-researched area. This study provides evidence for improved wellbeing and mood state for 32 participants from diverse backgrounds undertaking EV activities. Most participants also reported improved environmental stewardship with a greatly improved understanding of the environment and the need to conserve it. Other benefits included: 31% of those seeking work obtained it; and 50% joined a volunteer group at program completion. EV provides a unique mechanism to enhance the wellbeing of the participants, while conserving the environment.

  9. Improving Wellbeing and Environmental Stewardship Through Volunteering in Nature.

    PubMed

    Molsher, Robyn; Townsend, Mardie

    2016-03-01

    Environmental volunteering (EV) can provide a unique way to optimise the wellbeing of participants while fostering environmental stewardship. However, the potential of EV to create human health benefits remains an under-researched area. This study provides evidence for improved wellbeing and mood state for 32 participants from diverse backgrounds undertaking EV activities. Most participants also reported improved environmental stewardship with a greatly improved understanding of the environment and the need to conserve it. Other benefits included: 31% of those seeking work obtained it; and 50% joined a volunteer group at program completion. EV provides a unique mechanism to enhance the wellbeing of the participants, while conserving the environment. PMID:26678275

  10. National directory of citizen volunteer environmental monitoring programs (third edition)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    Like the volunteer environmental monitoring movement itself, the directory has grown rapidly. The first edition, published in September 1988, listed 43 programs. Just seven months later, the second edition, containing 70 entries, was produced. The expanded, updated, and revised third edition of the directory includes 133 programs. Thirty of these are brand-new programs that started within the year. During that same year many of the older programs have expanded, increasing the number of volunteers involved and the number of sites monitored, and taking on new projects. Most of the entries in this edition contain much more detailed information than in previous editions--information about specific techniques and tests used for monitoring, about funding sources, and about ways that governmental agencies are using citizen volunteer monitoring results.

  11. Sense of Cohesion among Community Activists Engaging in Volunteer Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Drorit; Itzhaky, Haya; Zanbar, Lea; Schwartz, Chaya

    2012-01-01

    The present article attempts to shed light on the direct and indirect contribution of personal resources and community indices to Sense of Cohesion among activists engaging in community volunteer work. The sample comprised 481 activists. Based on social systems theory, three levels of variables were examined: (1) inputs, which included personal…

  12. 76 FR 20243 - Retired and Senior Volunteer Program Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... grant recipients for the Retired and Service Volunteer Program (RSVP), including performance measurement... measurement requirements; (ii) Applying published selection criteria, as stated in the applicable Notice of... What is the purpose of this subpart? 2553.101 What is the purpose of performance measurement?...

  13. Recognizing Volunteer Practitioner-Educators through Intrinsic and Extrinsic Incentives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Diane E.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A project in five pharmacy schools assessed the effectiveness of intrinsic and extrinsic incentives and rewards to enhance volunteer practitioner-educators' perceptions of recognition of their teaching contributions. Benefits used included awards and appointments, access to university facilities, discounts, tangible items, and mechanisms to…

  14. Ideas for the Parent Volunteer: Activities for the Gifted.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Nancy

    The booklet presents suggestions for parents working as volunteers in their gifted children's classrooms. Parents are advised to allow the children to help plan and execute the activities, which are designed to be multidisciplinary, inexpensive, and adaptable. Activities described include explorations of the language, geography, and culture of…

  15. Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    CDIAC provides data management support for the Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program. The VOS project is coordinated by the UNESCO International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project (IOCCP). The international groups from 14 countries have been outfitting research ships and commercial vessels with automated CO2 sampling equipment to analyze the carbon exchange between the ocean and atmosphere. [copied from http://cdiac.ornl.gov/oceans/genInfo.html] CDIAC provides a map interface with the shipping routes of the 14 countries involved marked in different colors. Clicking on the ship's name on that route brings up information about the vessel, the kinds of measurements collected and the timeframe, links to project pages, and, most important, the links to the data files themselves. The 14 countries are: United States, United Kingdom, Japan, France, Germany, Australia, Canada, Spain, Norway, New Zealand, China (including Taiwan), Iceland, and the Netherlands. Both archived and current, underway data can be accessed from the CDIAC VOS page.

  16. Grassroots volunteers in context: rewarding and adverse experiences of local women working on HIV and AIDS in Kilimanjaro, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Corbin, J Hope; Mittelmark, Maurice B; Lie, Gro T

    2016-09-01

    Many nongovernmental organizations in Africa rely on grassroots volunteers to provide critical health services. Considering context and the interplay of individual, organizational, and societal influences on the experience of volunteers, this paper addresses three questions: What do grassroots volunteers contribute? What organizational processes promote volunteer engagement? What are the positive and negative consequences of volunteering? Eighteen members and staff of the Tanzanian HIV and AIDS NGO, KIWAKKUKI, were selected from 6000+ women volunteers to be interviewed. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed for themes. Within KIWAKKUKI, volunteers contributed time and local knowledge, leading to an indigenous educational approach building on local norms and customs. Volunteers' engagement was motivated by the desire to support family members, reverse stigma, and work/socialize with other women. Benefits to volunteers included skills acquisition and community recognition; yet some volunteers also reported negative experiences including burnout, conferred stigma, and domestic violence. Positive organizational processes built on cultural practices such as collective decision-making and singing. The findings point to important considerations about context, including the synergistic effect training can have on local traditions of caring, complications of gender inequity, and how community health planning processes may need to be modified in extremely poor settings. This research also suggests good utility of the research framework (the Bergen Model of Collaborative Functioning) that was used to analyze volunteer engagement for service delivery in sub-Saharan contexts.

  17. THE USE OF INDIGENOUS VOLUNTEERS IN A REHABILITATION LIVING UNIT FOR DISTURBED COLLEGE STUDENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NIEDENTHAL, LINDA K.; SINNETT, E. ROBERT

    THE USE OF INDIGENOUS VOLUNTEERS IN A REHABILITATION LIVING UNIT FOR DISTURBED COLLEGE STUDENTS IS DESCRIBED. VOLUNTEERS ARE OF BOTH SEXES AND INCLUDE LOWER- AND UPPERCLASSMEN WITH A DIVERSITY OF MAJORS. THEY LIVE IN A COEDUCATIONAL REHABILITATION UNIT WITHIN A RESIDENCE HALL WITH A POPULATION (CLIENTS) REFERRED BY COUNSELORS AND THE PSYCHIATRIC…

  18. SERVE: Older Volunteers in Community Service. A New Role and a New Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sainer, Janet S.; Zander, Mary L.

    This document reports on a demonstration project using older volunteers in community service in one area of a large city. Questions for which answers were sought include: (1) What type of activities might older adults be given that would be both meaningful and useful; (2) What kinds of community agencies would use the services of volunteers most…

  19. The Volunteer Team Physician: When Are You Exempt from Civil Liability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todaro, Gerald J.

    1986-01-01

    Only six states have enacted qualified immunity statutes protecting volunteer team physicians from civil liability. A few states have expanded their Good Samaritan laws to include physicians rendering energency care at athletic events. Precautions for medical personnel to take before volunteering their time at school athletic events are suggested.…

  20. The Utilization of High School Students as Volunteers in Special Education. Student Manual. Project Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuyahoga Special Education Service Center, Maple Heights, OH.

    This booklet is intended for Ohio high school volunteers who assist in special education programs and who are members of high school chapters of the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC). The first section considers the decision to become a volunteer and includes two surveys concerning attitudes toward persons with disabilities and attitudes and…

  1. Dream Interpretation Sessions: Who Volunteers, Who Benefits, and What Volunteer Clients View as Most and Least Helpful.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Clara E.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of college students participating in a dream interpretation session found that compared to nonvolunteers, students who volunteered had more positive attitudes towards dreams, recalled dreams more frequently, were more open, were higher in absorption, and were more often female. Helpful aspects of dream interpretations included insights…

  2. The benefits associated with volunteering among seniors: a critical review and recommendations for future research.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Nicole D; Damianakis, Thecla; Kröger, Edeltraut; Wagner, Laura M; Dawson, Deirdre R; Binns, Malcolm A; Bernstein, Syrelle; Caspi, Eilon; Cook, Suzanne L

    2014-11-01

    There is an urgent need to identify lifestyle activities that reduce functional decline and dementia associated with population aging. The goals of this article are to review critically the evidence on the benefits associated with formal volunteering among older adults, propose a theoretical model of how volunteering may reduce functional limitations and dementia risk, and offer recommendations for future research. Database searches identified 113 papers on volunteering benefits in older adults, of which 73 were included. Data from descriptive, cross-sectional, and prospective cohort studies, along with 1 randomized controlled trial, most consistently reveal that volunteering is associated with reduced symptoms of depression, better self-reported health, fewer functional limitations, and lower mortality. The extant evidence provides the basis for a model proposing that volunteering increases social, physical, and cognitive activity (to varying degrees depending on characteristics of the volunteer placement) which, through biological and psychological mechanisms, leads to improved functioning; we further propose that these volunteering-related functional improvements should be associated with reduced dementia risk. Recommendations for future research are that studies (a) include more objective measures of psychosocial, physical, and cognitive functioning; (b) integrate qualitative and quantitative methods in prospective study designs; (c) explore further individual differences in the benefits associated with volunteering; (d) include occupational analyses of volunteers' specific jobs in order to identify their social, physical, and cognitive complexity; (e) investigate the independent versus interactive health benefits associated with volunteering relative to engagement in other forms of activity; and (f) examine the relationship between volunteering and dementia risk. PMID:25150681

  3. A Guide for Co-ordinators of Volunteers and Volunteer Services in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freund, Janet W., Comp.

    This manual for those responsible for matching teacher requests and student needs to volunteer services is applicable to a variety of school volunteer programs but concentrates on the type of volunteer service which evolved from the Winnetka, Illinois, project in which older citizens in the community form a "talent pool" to work to enrich the…

  4. Rewarding Volunteers: A Study of Participant Responses to the Assessment and Accreditation of Volunteer Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Elaine

    2002-01-01

    Four case studies of volunteer training focused on achievement of certification or other qualifications identified complex reasons why volunteers drop out or do not complete assessments: a vocation versus vocationalism view of volunteering, intrinsic versus extrinsic incentives, motivation for learning, and role conflict. (Contains 34 references.)…

  5. Leadership and Management of Volunteer Programs: A Guide for Volunteer Administrators. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, James C.; Cole, Kathleen M.

    Based on the Association for Volunteer Administration (AVA) Certification Competencies, this book describes the knowledge, skills, and abilities required of professional managers to involve volunteers effectively in the work of organizations. Chapter 1 examines the leadership and management roles of volunteer administrators. Chapters 2 and 3 focus…

  6. Self-Organized Volunteers in Rural Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Kun

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports some findings from a longitudinal study of a group of volunteers at an independent school in China. Founded by a committed group of volunteers, Springfield School has been self-sustaining and has provided junior high school education for the past eight years. The author describes the demographic and education background of the…

  7. Senior Volunteers: Helping Hands & Willing Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wessely, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Volunteers and other community-based assistants can relieve some of the financial burden brought on by school-budget cutbacks. This publication describes how enlisting the help of senior volunteers and workers benefits both children and seniors, and it presents some guidelines for implementation of intergeneration programs. The programs provide…

  8. Working with Youth: Approaches for Volunteers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    Based on advice and information from Peace Corps volunteers, staff, and experts, this manual provides creative, innovative ideas for activities for youth that are founded on development principles. Part 1 provides information about these different kinds of youth a volunteer may encounter in the community: in-school, out-of-school, differently…

  9. Training Volunteers for an AIDS Buddy Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojanlatva, Ansa; And Others

    In 1986, the Baton Rouge Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Task Force began to implement an individual volunteer support program to provide support services through a companion, a buddy, whose functions would be either emotional support or assistance in daily activities, or both. In order to have trained volunteers, an education program…

  10. Volunteer map data collection at the USGS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eric, B. Wolf; Poore, Barbara S.; Caro, Holly K.; Matthews, Greg D.

    2011-01-01

    Since 1994, citizen volunteers have helped the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) improve its topographic maps. Through the Earth Science Corps program, citizens were able to "adopt a quad" and collect new information and update existing map features. Until its conclusion in 2001, as many as 300 volunteers annotated paper maps which were incorporated into the USGS topographic-map revision process.

  11. Volunteers and Paraprofessionals in Parole: Current Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latessa, Edward J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Reviews issues surrounding the use of volunteers and paraprofessionals in parole. A survey of 52 parole field supervision agencies showed a wide variety of volunteer and paraprofessional qualifications, functions, and salaries. All jurisdictions reported positive results, with evidence of decreasing use of ex-offenders. (JAC)

  12. School Volunteers: Hidden Benefits and Hidden Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brent, Brian O.

    2001-01-01

    A survey of 68 schools shows that half of all volunteers have college degrees; most support classroom and tutoring activities. Volunteers are beneficial, despite costs associated with program administration, recruitment, interviewing, screening, orientation, training, performance assessment, motivation, recognition, record keeping, reporting,…

  13. 76 FR 20215 - National Volunteer Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... hundred and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-8837 Filed 4-11-11; 8:45 am] Billing code 3195... Week, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation America's story has been... they see a need. During National Volunteer Week, we celebrate the profound impact of volunteers...

  14. Non-Alumni Advisory Board Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagai, Judy; Nehls, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Advisory boards typically offer guidance, support, social, and financial capital to academic units within colleges and universities. They are generally comprised of prominent volunteers from the community and appropriate industries or businesses. The results of this exploratory study found that non-alumni advisory board volunteers developed…

  15. Skill Development for Volunteering in Rural Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilpatrick, Sue; Stirling, Christine; Orpin, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the skills required of volunteers in the voluntary sector organisations that operate in three rural Tasmanian communities. It reports how volunteers acquire those skills and reveals the challenges faced by voluntary sector organisations in rural communities whose industries and, following from this, community members have a…

  16. Motivations of College Student Volunteers: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winniford, Janet C.; Carpenter, D. Stanley; Grider, Clint

    1997-01-01

    Examines the literature on volunteer motivation to provide a conceptual framework for future studies on traits and motivations of college student volunteers. Focuses on the relationship between egoistic and altruistic motivational components, as well as situational factors. Explores motivation constructs, mixed motivation, and results'…

  17. Project LOVE (Let Older Volunteers Educate).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Sally; Weinrich, Martin C.

    The effect of contact with older adult volunteers on the attitudes of elementary school students was investigated by twice administering questionnaires to all first-, third-, and fourth-grade students at Chapin Elementary School, Chapin, South Carolina. Teachers first administered the questionnaire before the older adults began volunteer work in…

  18. Sumatriptan and cerebral perfusion in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Scott, A K; Grimes, S; Ng, K; Critchley, M; Breckenridge, A M; Thomson, C; Pilgrim, A J

    1992-04-01

    1. The effect of sumatriptan on regional cerebral perfusion was studied in healthy volunteers. 2. Intravenous sumatriptan (2 mg) had no detectable effect on regional cerebral perfusion as measured using a SPECT system with 99technetiumm labelled hexemethylpropyleneamineoxime. 3. Sumatriptan had no effect on pulse, blood pressure or ECG indices. 4. All six volunteers experienced minor adverse effects during the intravenous infusion.

  19. Classroom Supervision of Volunteers: Handbook for Instructors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehler, C. Russell

    Designed for Adult Basic Education (ABE) and English as a Second Language (ESL) instructors at Olympic College, this handbook provides information on the college's efforts to train volunteers as classroom assistants in ABE/ESL education, as well as guidelines for working with volunteers. The first section of the handbook provides background on the…

  20. Meaningful Commitment: Finding Meaning in Volunteer Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnell, Tatjana; Hoof, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that volunteer work is associated with various aspects of meaning making by employing a multi-dimensional model of meaning operationalized by the "Sources of Meaning and Meaning in Life Questionnaire" ("SoMe"). An empirical study comparing 168 volunteers with a representative sample of the general population (N =…

  1. Training Shelter Volunteers to Teach Dog Compliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Veronica J.; DiGennaro Reed, Florence D.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the degree to which training procedures influenced the integrity of behaviorally based dog training implemented by volunteers of an animal shelter. Volunteers were taught to implement discrete-trial obedience training to teach 2 skills (sit and wait) to dogs. Procedural integrity during the baseline and written instructions…

  2. Volunteers in Leisure. A Management Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tedrick, Ted; Henderson, Karla

    The first chapter of this monograph presents some major themes and fundamental issues surrounding leisure activities volunteers and their management from a system perspective. Chapter 2 discusses the results of a survey conducted to obtain a status report of selected volunteer system characteristics. The third chapter focuses on dealing with…

  3. Experimental Pain and Opioid Analgesia in Volunteers at High Risk for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Doufas, Anthony G.; Tian, Lu; Padrez, Kevin A.; Suwanprathes, Puntarica; Cardell, James A.; Maecker, Holden T.; Panousis, Periklis

    2013-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by recurrent nocturnal hypoxia and sleep disruption. Sleep fragmentation caused hyperalgesia in volunteers, while nocturnal hypoxemia enhanced morphine analgesic potency in children with OSA. This evidence directly relates to surgical OSA patients who are at risk for airway compromise due to postoperative use of opioids. Using accepted experimental pain models, we characterized pain processing and opioid analgesia in male volunteers recruited based on their risk for OSA. Methods After approval from the Intitutional Review Board and informed consent, we assessed heat and cold pain thresholds and tolerances in volunteers after overnight polysomnography (PSG). Three pro-inflammatory and 3 hypoxia markers were determined in the serum. Pain tests were performed at baseline, placebo, and two effect site concentrations of remifentanil (1 and 2 µg/ml), an μ-opioid agonist. Linear mixed effects regression models were employed to evaluate the association of 3 PSG descriptors [wake after sleep onset, number of sleep stage shifts, and lowest oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO2) during sleep] and all serum markers with pain thresholds and tolerances at baseline, as well as their changes under remifentanil. Results Forty-three volunteers (12 normal and 31 with a PSG-based diagnosis of OSA) were included in the analysis. The lower nadir SaO2 and higher insulin growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) were associated with higher analgesic sensitivity to remifentanil (SaO2, P = 0.0440; IGFBP-1, P = 0.0013). Other pro-inflammatory mediators like interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were associated with an enhanced sensitivity to the opioid analgesic effect (IL-1β, P = 0.0218; TNF-α, P = 0.0276). Conclusions Nocturnal hypoxemia in subjects at high risk for OSA was associated with an increased potency of opioid analgesia. A serum hypoxia marker (IGFBP-1) was associated with hypoalgesia and

  4. Heat loss in exposed volunteers.

    PubMed

    English, M J; Farmer, C; Scott, W A

    1990-04-01

    Hypothermia is a common complication of major surgery and trauma. We studied this problem using Heat Flux Transducers to directly measure heat exchange between seven exposed volunteers and the environment. Heat exchange by radiation and convection was measured from the anterior chest wall and by conduction, between the back and a thermal mattress (CSZ, Blanketrol II). We determined the coefficients for: radiation = 6.6; convection = 8.3 square root of v; combined radiation and convection = 9.7; conductance = 41, all expressed in W/m2.degrees C. The clinical significance of these results is that heat loss, by radiation and convection alone, is 10 W/m2.degrees C. However, heat production under anaesthesia is only 40 W/m2, so a temperature gradient of greater than 4 degrees C between the skin and environment will cause more heat to be lost than is produced. The thermal mattress can supply 41 W/m2.degrees C, effectively doubling heat production.

  5. 45 CFR 1217.6 - Roles of volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Roles of volunteers. 1217.6 Section 1217.6 Public... VISTA VOLUNTEER LEADER § 1217.6 Roles of volunteers. VISTA volunteer leaders may have the following roles: (a) Primary contact with VISTA volunteers on personal and administrative matters. (b) Aid...

  6. 45 CFR 1217.6 - Roles of volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Roles of volunteers. 1217.6 Section 1217.6 Public... VISTA VOLUNTEER LEADER § 1217.6 Roles of volunteers. VISTA volunteer leaders may have the following roles: (a) Primary contact with VISTA volunteers on personal and administrative matters. (b) Aid...

  7. 45 CFR 1217.6 - Roles of volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Roles of volunteers. 1217.6 Section 1217.6 Public... VISTA VOLUNTEER LEADER § 1217.6 Roles of volunteers. VISTA volunteer leaders may have the following roles: (a) Primary contact with VISTA volunteers on personal and administrative matters. (b) Aid...

  8. 45 CFR 1217.6 - Roles of volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Roles of volunteers. 1217.6 Section 1217.6 Public... VISTA VOLUNTEER LEADER § 1217.6 Roles of volunteers. VISTA volunteer leaders may have the following roles: (a) Primary contact with VISTA volunteers on personal and administrative matters. (b) Aid...

  9. Barriers to the Inclusion of Volunteers with Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Kimberly D.; Schleien, Stuart J.; Bedini, Leandra A.

    2003-01-01

    Responses from 214 of 500 volunteer agencies determined that 1.1% of their volunteers have developmental disabilities/mental retardation (DD/MR) and identified barriers and benefits that volunteer coordinators perceive regarding volunteers with DD/MR. There was interest in learning how to accommodate volunteers with disabilities. (Contains 14…

  10. National Retired Senior Volunteer Program Participant Impact Evaluation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booz Allen and Hamilton, Inc., Washington, DC.

    A study examined the long-term effects of participation in the Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) on participants from 20 RSVP projects nationwide. Three rounds of interviews were conducted. In Round 1, 750 volunteers were interviewed: 595 veteran volunteers and 155 new volunteers. In Round 2, 792 volunteers were intereviewed: 175 new…

  11. Organizational Support and Volunteering Benefits for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Fengyan; Choi, Eunhee; Morrow-Howell, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study tested a theoretical model of volunteering benefits and examined the mechanism through which volunteering benefits older adults. Design and Methods: This is a 2-wave study of 253 older adult volunteers serving in 10 volunteer programs. Older volunteers completed the mailed surveys in 2005 and 2006. Structural equation modeling…

  12. Older Adults' Acceptance of Information Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Lin; Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick; Salvendy, Gavriel

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated variables contributing to older adults' information technology acceptance through a survey, which was used to find factors explaining and predicting older adults' information technology acceptance behaviors. Four factors, including needs satisfaction, perceived usability, support availability, and public acceptance, were…

  13. Apollo experience report environmental acceptance testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laubach, C. H. M.

    1976-01-01

    Environmental acceptance testing was used extensively to screen selected spacecraft hardware for workmanship defects and manufacturing flaws. The minimum acceptance levels and durations and methods for their establishment are described. Component selection and test monitoring, as well as test implementation requirements, are included. Apollo spacecraft environmental acceptance test results are summarized, and recommendations for future programs are presented.

  14. Compilation of the Domestic Volunteer Service Act of 1973 as Amended through December 31, 1987. An Information Paper Prepared for Use by the Special Committee on Aging, United States Senate. 100th Congress, 2d Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Special Committee on Aging.

    The Domestic Volunteer Service Act of 1973 authorizes ACTION, an independent agency, to administer six volunteer programs including the three components under Title II, the Older Americans Volunteer Program (OAVP). The programs under OAVP--the Foster Grandparent Program (FGP), the Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP), and the Senior Companion…

  15. Perceptions of the Role of Short-Term Volunteerism in International Development: Views from Volunteers, Local Hosts, and Community Members

    PubMed Central

    Loiseau, Bethina; Sibbald, Rebekah; Raman, Salem A.; Darren, Benedict; Loh, Lawrence C.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Short-term international volunteer trips traditionally involve volunteers from high-income countries travelling to low- and middle-income countries to assist in service-related development activities. Their duration typically ranges from 7 to 90 days. The city of La Romana, Dominican Republic, receives hundreds of short-term international volunteers annually. They participate in activities aimed at improving conditions faced by a marginalized ethnic-Haitian community living in bateyes. Methods. This qualitative analysis examined perceptions of short-term international volunteerism, held by three key stakeholder groups in La Romana: local hosts, international volunteers, and community members. Responses from semistructured interviews were recorded and analysed by thematic analysis. Results. Themes from the 3 groups were broadly categorized into general perceptions of short-term volunteerism and proposed best practices. These were further subdivided into perceptions of value, harms, and motivations associated with volunteer teams for the former and best practices around volunteer composition and selection, partnership, and skill sets and predeparture training for the latter. Conclusion. Notable challenges were associated with short-term volunteering, including an overemphasis on the material benefits from volunteer groups expressed by community member respondents; misalignment of the desired and actual skill sets of volunteers; duplicate and uncoordinated volunteer efforts; and the perpetuation of stereotypes suggesting that international volunteers possess superior knowledge or skills. Addressing these challenges is critical to optimizing the conduct of short-term volunteerism. PMID:27382372

  16. Perceptions of the Role of Short-Term Volunteerism in International Development: Views from Volunteers, Local Hosts, and Community Members.

    PubMed

    Loiseau, Bethina; Sibbald, Rebekah; Raman, Salem A; Darren, Benedict; Loh, Lawrence C; Dimaras, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Short-term international volunteer trips traditionally involve volunteers from high-income countries travelling to low- and middle-income countries to assist in service-related development activities. Their duration typically ranges from 7 to 90 days. The city of La Romana, Dominican Republic, receives hundreds of short-term international volunteers annually. They participate in activities aimed at improving conditions faced by a marginalized ethnic-Haitian community living in bateyes. Methods. This qualitative analysis examined perceptions of short-term international volunteerism, held by three key stakeholder groups in La Romana: local hosts, international volunteers, and community members. Responses from semistructured interviews were recorded and analysed by thematic analysis. Results. Themes from the 3 groups were broadly categorized into general perceptions of short-term volunteerism and proposed best practices. These were further subdivided into perceptions of value, harms, and motivations associated with volunteer teams for the former and best practices around volunteer composition and selection, partnership, and skill sets and predeparture training for the latter. Conclusion. Notable challenges were associated with short-term volunteering, including an overemphasis on the material benefits from volunteer groups expressed by community member respondents; misalignment of the desired and actual skill sets of volunteers; duplicate and uncoordinated volunteer efforts; and the perpetuation of stereotypes suggesting that international volunteers possess superior knowledge or skills. Addressing these challenges is critical to optimizing the conduct of short-term volunteerism.

  17. Perceptions of the Role of Short-Term Volunteerism in International Development: Views from Volunteers, Local Hosts, and Community Members.

    PubMed

    Loiseau, Bethina; Sibbald, Rebekah; Raman, Salem A; Darren, Benedict; Loh, Lawrence C; Dimaras, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Short-term international volunteer trips traditionally involve volunteers from high-income countries travelling to low- and middle-income countries to assist in service-related development activities. Their duration typically ranges from 7 to 90 days. The city of La Romana, Dominican Republic, receives hundreds of short-term international volunteers annually. They participate in activities aimed at improving conditions faced by a marginalized ethnic-Haitian community living in bateyes. Methods. This qualitative analysis examined perceptions of short-term international volunteerism, held by three key stakeholder groups in La Romana: local hosts, international volunteers, and community members. Responses from semistructured interviews were recorded and analysed by thematic analysis. Results. Themes from the 3 groups were broadly categorized into general perceptions of short-term volunteerism and proposed best practices. These were further subdivided into perceptions of value, harms, and motivations associated with volunteer teams for the former and best practices around volunteer composition and selection, partnership, and skill sets and predeparture training for the latter. Conclusion. Notable challenges were associated with short-term volunteering, including an overemphasis on the material benefits from volunteer groups expressed by community member respondents; misalignment of the desired and actual skill sets of volunteers; duplicate and uncoordinated volunteer efforts; and the perpetuation of stereotypes suggesting that international volunteers possess superior knowledge or skills. Addressing these challenges is critical to optimizing the conduct of short-term volunteerism. PMID:27382372

  18. Results of a volunteer program to conduct dietary intervention research for women.

    PubMed

    Bowen, D J; Kuniyuki, A; Shattuck, A; Nixon, D W; Sponzo, R W

    2000-01-01

    The American Cancer Society (ACS) initiated the Breast Cancer Dietary Intervention Project (BCDIP) to involve community volunteers in cancer-related intervention research activities focused on dietary fat reduction in women with breast cancer. This article presents data on the volunteer aspects of the project, with two aims: (a) to describe the volunteer recruitment and intervention designed for the BCDIP, conducted jointly by the American Cancer Society and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and (b) to present baseline characteristics and predictors of retention of the BCDIP volunteers. There were five types of volunteers, called volunteer adjunct researchers or VARs, in the BCDIP. VARs were recruited using a variety of approaches, including electronic media alerts, flyers in oncology clinics, and notices in the newsletters of state nursing and nutritional professional organizations. Over half of all VARs came from two main sources: the media (television, radio, newspapers) and from work-related sources. Over half (58%) of the VARs had professional licenses in nursing or dietetics, and 46% were employed full-time. Several types of motivations for participating in the BCDIP, including altruistic reasons (want to help others, help people with cancer), health concerns (family/friend with breast cancer, have had cancer), and work-related reasons (gain professional skills) were important. Sixty-eight percent of VARs remained with the project for its entirety. Predictors of retention in the VAR program included previous ACS volunteer experience with initial motivations to volunteer and the interaction of employment status and professional nursing training. In future research and community-based projects, better recruitment and volunteer coordination procedures should be used to reduce dropout rates and maintain volunteer commitment and participation.

  19. Volunteer water monitoring: A guide for state managers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    Contents: executive summary; volunteers in water monitoring; planning a volunteer monitoring program; implementing a volunteer monitoring program; providing credible information; costs and funding; and descriptions of five successful programs.

  20. 28 CFR 551.60 - Volunteer community service projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Procedure (see 28 CFR part 542). ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Volunteer community service projects. 551... MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Volunteer Community Service Projects § 551.60 Volunteer community service...

  1. 28 CFR 551.60 - Volunteer community service projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Procedure (see 28 CFR part 542). ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Volunteer community service projects. 551... MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Volunteer Community Service Projects § 551.60 Volunteer community service...

  2. 28 CFR 551.60 - Volunteer community service projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Procedure (see 28 CFR part 542). ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Volunteer community service projects. 551... MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Volunteer Community Service Projects § 551.60 Volunteer community service...

  3. 28 CFR 551.60 - Volunteer community service projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Procedure (see 28 CFR part 542). ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Volunteer community service projects. 551... MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Volunteer Community Service Projects § 551.60 Volunteer community service...

  4. 32 CFR 1627.2 - Registration of volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... VOLUNTEERS FOR INDUCTION § 1627.2 Registration of volunteers. (a) If a person who is required to be registered but who has failed to register volunteers for induction, he shall be registered. (b)...

  5. 32 CFR 1627.3 - Classification of volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... VOLUNTEERS FOR INDUCTION § 1627.3 Classification of volunteers. When a registrant who is eligible to volunteer files an Application for Voluntary Induction, he shall be classified in Class 1-A and processed for induction....

  6. 28 CFR 551.60 - Volunteer community service projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Procedure (see 28 CFR part 542). ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Volunteer community service projects. 551... MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Volunteer Community Service Projects § 551.60 Volunteer community service...

  7. A volunteer-based Hospital Elder Life Program to reduce delirium.

    PubMed

    Sandhaus, Sonia; Zalon, Margarete L; Valenti, Donna; Dzielak, Edward; Smego, Raymond A; Arzamasova, Ulyana

    2010-01-01

    A community hospital with nearly 50% of its admitted patients 70 years or older adapted the well-established Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP). The primary adaptation entailed an enhanced participation of trained volunteers in HELP interventions designed to prevent and reduce delirium. Integral program elements include detailed volunteer training, required demonstration of competencies, and regular evaluation and feedback of volunteers provided by program staff. Nurse satisfaction with HELP increased from 64% to 91% in the second year of implementation, and a survey of patients and families indicated that 95% were satisfied with HELP. This innovative volunteer-assisted model of elder care support was positively embraced by patients, their families, and the nursing staff and supported by nursing administration. The use of volunteers is a cost-effective method of enhancing the nursing care of vulnerable elders during hospitalization. PMID:20436332

  8. Offer/Acceptance Ratio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Mimi

    1997-01-01

    Explores how human resource professionals, with above average offer/acceptance ratios, streamline their recruitment efforts. Profiles company strategies with internships, internal promotion, cooperative education programs, and how to get candidates to accept offers. Also discusses how to use the offer/acceptance ratio as a measure of program…

  9. Volunteer health professionals and emergencies: assessing and transforming the legal environment.

    PubMed

    Hodge, James G; Gable, Lance A; Cálves, Stephanie H

    2005-01-01

    Volunteer health professionals (VHPs) are essential in emergencies to fill surge capacity and provide needed medical expertise. While some VHPs are well-organized and trained, others arrive spontaneously at the site of a disaster. Lacking organization, training, and identification, they may actually impede emergency efforts. Complications involving medical volunteers in New York City after September 11, 2001, led Congress to authorize federal authorities to assist states and territories in developing emergency systems for the advance registration of volunteer health professionals (ESARVHP). Through advance registration, volunteers can be vetted, trained, and mobilized more effectively during emergencies. The use of VHPs, however, raises multiple legal questions: What constitutes an emergency, how is it declared, and what are the consequences? When are volunteers liable for their actions? When may volunteers who are licensed or certified in one state legally practice their profession in another state? Are volunteers entitled to compensation for harms they incur? This article examines the legal framework underlying the registration and use of volunteers during emergencies and offers recommendations for legal reform, including: (1) establish minimum standards to facilitate interjurisdictional emergency response, improve coordination, and enhance reciprocity of licensing and credentialing; (2) develop liability provisions for VHPs that balance their need to respond without significant fear of civil liability with patients' rights to legal recourse for egregious harms; and (3) provide basic levels of protections for VHPs harmed, injured, or killed while responding to emergencies.

  10. From chronic pain patient to peer: benefits and risks of volunteering.

    PubMed

    Arnstein, Paul; Vidal, Michelle; Wells-Federman, Carol; Morgan, Betty; Caudill, Margaret

    2002-09-01

    Peer volunteers have been used as cost-effective adjuncts to professional services in other settings and populations, but not a heterogeneous sample of patients with chronic pain. This study evaluated the transition from "patient" to "peer," identifying possible benefits or harm associated with volunteering. Peers provided descriptive data and questionnaires, including measures of pain, disability, self-efficacy, and depression before and after three periods: as a patient, during training, and while volunteering. Average pain intensity scores declined while participants were patients (7.1 to 4.2), rose slightly (5.8) before training, and dropped again after training and volunteering (4.3 and 3.6, respectively). A similar pattern was noted for disability. Depression scores continued to decline after initially dropping, and self-efficacy scores remained stable after the initial 40% rise as a patient. Two themes, "making a connection" and "a sense of purpose," emerged from the narrative data. Descriptive data provided further support that volunteering benefited both patients and peers. This study supports the viability of using peer volunteers for clinical or research endeavors. Improvements in pain, disability, and depression were reported immediately after training and after volunteering for several months without evidence of harm. Despite encountering challenges, the rewards of this altruistic endeavor outweighed any frustrations experienced by volunteers with chronic pain.

  11. Extending the Technology Acceptance Model: Policy Acceptance Model (PAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Tamra

    There has been extensive research on how new ideas and technologies are accepted in society. This has resulted in the creation of many models that are used to discover and assess the contributing factors. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) is one that is a widely accepted model. This model examines people's acceptance of new technologies based on variables that directly correlate to how the end user views the product. This paper introduces the Policy Acceptance Model (PAM), an expansion of TAM, which is designed for the analysis and evaluation of acceptance of new policy implementation. PAM includes the traditional constructs of TAM and adds the variables of age, ethnicity, and family. The model is demonstrated using a survey of people's attitude toward the upcoming healthcare reform in the United States (US) from 72 survey respondents. The aim is that the theory behind this model can be used as a framework that will be applicable to studies looking at the introduction of any new or modified policies.

  12. Prediction of pain sensitivity in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Ravn, Pernille; Frederiksen, Rune; Skovsen, Anders P; Christrup, Lona L; Werner, Mads U

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The primary objective of the present study was to evaluate predictive parameters of the acute pain score during induction of an inflammatory heat injury. Patients and methods Healthy volunteers (50 females/50 males) were included in the study. The predictive potential of gender, anthropometric (body surface area, body mass index), psychological (anxiety, depression, vulnerability), and psychophysical (quantitative sensory testing, conditioned pain modulation) variables in estimating the pain response to a validated heat injury (47°C, 7 minutes, area 12.5 cm2) were investigated. All assessments were made in duplicate sessions separated by 21 days (median). Results There were three main findings in this study. First, a predictive model of pain sensitivity during the heat injury, including both genders and using multiple regression technique, could account for 28% of the variance (P < 0.0001), but gender-related differences in the final model could not be demonstrated. Second, the results confirmed significant gender-related differences in perception of electrical, pressure, and cold pressor stimuli (P < 0.002). Third, positive correlations between anthropometric data and pain perception during electrical and pressure stimuli were demonstrated (P < 0.001 and P < 0.005, respectively). Conclusion The study demonstrated predictability of acute pain sensitivity, and although gender-related differences in pain perception were demonstrated, no gender-related differences in pain sensitivity could be shown. Interestingly, positive correlations between anthropometric data and pain perception were shown for the first time. PMID:23055774

  13. Add Volunteering to the Mix of Balancing Work and Family: The Findings and Implications for Volunteer Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Janet; Wheeler, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Provides a snapshot of situations that volunteers encounter and offers strategies used to balance the demands of volunteering, family, and work. Explains how situations encountered and strategies relate to volunteer satisfaction. (Contains 36 references.) (JOW)

  14. Title Sheet, National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Northwestern Branch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Title Sheet, National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Northwestern Branch - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Northwestern Branch, 5000 West National Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, WI

  15. Volunteering Internationally: Why, Where and How.

    PubMed

    Frost, David E; Kelly, Nancy A

    2015-12-01

    Oral health volunteers have an important role in addressing oral health care shortages around the world, but to be effective they need to understand and prepare for the challenges of working overseas.

  16. Medical volunteers: guidelines for success and safety.

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, Eddie L.; Cole-Hoover, Gwendolyn; Berry, Paula K.; Hoover, Evan T.; Harris, Betsy; Rageh, Deman; Weaver, W. Lynn

    2005-01-01

    Many African Americans from a variety of medical specialties are interested in satisfying a life-long dream of visiting Africa by volunteering their services to faith-based and private volunteer organizations doing missionary work on the continent. While this can be an extremely rewarding experience in which measurable good can be accomplished, this path can also be strewn with many obstacles that will affect both the success of the mission and the personal well-being of the volunteer. The American Medical Team for Africa is a nonprofit, tax-exempt, volunteer organization that has been doing medical missionary work in Africa since 1993. This manuscript is a compilation of this 10-year experience that has established some very useful guidelines for insuring a successful and safe mission if you are fortunate enough to have this opportunity. PMID:15719877

  17. The training of telephone crisis intervention volunteers.

    PubMed

    Dixon, M C; Burns, J

    1975-06-01

    Telephone crisis intervention services are growing at a very rapid rate. A review of the literature reveals that there are very few references to this new phenomenon and even fewer that deal with evaluating the effectiveness of telephone crisis training. Herein 7 articles are reviewed which deal with volunteer selection and training. These articles demonstrate that no consistent rationale for volunteer selection or training exists. Selection of volunteers typically consists of a gross screening to eliminate any obviously unsuitable persons, with training serving as a further sorting procedure where volunteers who are uncomfortable with the role of a crisis interventionist can be encouraged to drop out. The authors suggest that a training model be built around crisis intervention theory using principles of social learning as the methodology for training.

  18. An Urban Alternative: Making Do with Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraus, Richard

    1977-01-01

    This article describes how three neighborhoods in the city of New York, through vigorous citizen leadership and active volunteers, converted decayed and abandoned slum areas into attractive recreational centers. (JD)

  19. Volunteering Internationally: Why, Where and How.

    PubMed

    Frost, David E; Kelly, Nancy A

    2015-12-01

    Oral health volunteers have an important role in addressing oral health care shortages around the world, but to be effective they need to understand and prepare for the challenges of working overseas. PMID:26819987

  20. A Zen Approach to Volunteer Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Michael L.; Cahill, Gloria

    2002-01-01

    New York University's Zen approach to community service focuses on the principles of mindfulness, awareness, compassion, and engagement in the present moment. It enables a more holistic approach to the measurement of volunteer management objectives. (SK)

  1. Healthy Volunteer 2020: Comparing Peace Corps Volunteers' health metrics with Healthy People 2020 national objectives.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Susan J; Newman, Jeannette; Ferguson, Rennie W; Jung, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Healthy People 2020 (HP2020) provides a set of quantifiable objectives for improving the health and well-being of Americans. This study examines Peace Corps Volunteers' health metrics in comparison with the Leading Health Indicators (LHIs) in order to set baseline measures for Volunteers' health care and align our measurements with Healthy People 2020 standards. Health data from multiple internal Peace Corps datasets were compared with relevant LHIs and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Seventeen (65%) of the 26 LHIs were relevant to Peace Corps Volunteers. Of these, Volunteers' health measures met or were more favorable than the goals of 13 (76%) of the LHIs. There were no data available for 4 (24%) of the LHIs. The entire Volunteer population has full access to primary care, oral health, and reproductive health services. No suicides or homicides were reported among Volunteers during the analyzed time period. Utilizing the LHIs, we have identified high-priority public health issues relevant for the Peace Corps Volunteer population. We discuss the need for quality data to measure and monitor Volunteers' health progress and outcomes over time, and also to standardize our measurements with Healthy People 2020 benchmarks. This framework may foster greater collaboration to engage in health promotion and disease prevention activities driven by evidence-based information, which may, in turn, encourage healthy behavior among Volunteers.

  2. Prediction of Psilocybin Response in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Studerus, Erich; Gamma, Alex; Kometer, Michael; Vollenweider, Franz X.

    2012-01-01

    Responses to hallucinogenic drugs, such as psilocybin, are believed to be critically dependent on the user's personality, current mood state, drug pre-experiences, expectancies, and social and environmental variables. However, little is known about the order of importance of these variables and their effect sizes in comparison to drug dose. Hence, this study investigated the effects of 24 predictor variables, including age, sex, education, personality traits, drug pre-experience, mental state before drug intake, experimental setting, and drug dose on the acute response to psilocybin. The analysis was based on the pooled data of 23 controlled experimental studies involving 409 psilocybin administrations to 261 healthy volunteers. Multiple linear mixed effects models were fitted for each of 15 response variables. Although drug dose was clearly the most important predictor for all measured response variables, several non-pharmacological variables significantly contributed to the effects of psilocybin. Specifically, having a high score in the personality trait of Absorption, being in an emotionally excitable and active state immediately before drug intake, and having experienced few psychological problems in past weeks were most strongly associated with pleasant and mystical-type experiences, whereas high Emotional Excitability, low age, and an experimental setting involving positron emission tomography most strongly predicted unpleasant and/or anxious reactions to psilocybin. The results confirm that non-pharmacological variables play an important role in the effects of psilocybin. PMID:22363492

  3. Prediction of psilocybin response in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Studerus, Erich; Gamma, Alex; Kometer, Michael; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2012-01-01

    Responses to hallucinogenic drugs, such as psilocybin, are believed to be critically dependent on the user's personality, current mood state, drug pre-experiences, expectancies, and social and environmental variables. However, little is known about the order of importance of these variables and their effect sizes in comparison to drug dose. Hence, this study investigated the effects of 24 predictor variables, including age, sex, education, personality traits, drug pre-experience, mental state before drug intake, experimental setting, and drug dose on the acute response to psilocybin. The analysis was based on the pooled data of 23 controlled experimental studies involving 409 psilocybin administrations to 261 healthy volunteers. Multiple linear mixed effects models were fitted for each of 15 response variables. Although drug dose was clearly the most important predictor for all measured response variables, several non-pharmacological variables significantly contributed to the effects of psilocybin. Specifically, having a high score in the personality trait of Absorption, being in an emotionally excitable and active state immediately before drug intake, and having experienced few psychological problems in past weeks were most strongly associated with pleasant and mystical-type experiences, whereas high Emotional Excitability, low age, and an experimental setting involving positron emission tomography most strongly predicted unpleasant and/or anxious reactions to psilocybin. The results confirm that non-pharmacological variables play an important role in the effects of psilocybin.

  4. Euthanasia Acceptance: An Attitudinal Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klopfer, Fredrick J.; Price, William F.

    The study presented was conducted to examine potential relationships between attitudes regarding the dying process, including acceptance of euthanasia, and other attitudinal or demographic attributes. The data of the survey was comprised of responses given by 331 respondents to a door-to-door interview. Results are discussed in terms of preferred…

  5. Estimating the value of volunteer-assisted community-based aging services: a case example.

    PubMed

    Scharlach, Andrew E

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates the use of a social return on investment (SROI) approach in estimating the financial and social value created by volunteer-assisted community-based aging services. An expanded value added statement (EVAS) analysis found that the total value of outputs produced by the Concierge Club of San Diego substantially exceeded the cost of the program, after considering likely secondary and tertiary benefits for a range of affected stakeholders-including elderly service recipients, family members, volunteers, and societal institutions. Additional research is needed regarding the direct and indirect costs and benefits of volunteer support services for vulnerable older adults and their families.

  6. Estimating the value of volunteer-assisted community-based aging services: a case example.

    PubMed

    Scharlach, Andrew E

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates the use of a social return on investment (SROI) approach in estimating the financial and social value created by volunteer-assisted community-based aging services. An expanded value added statement (EVAS) analysis found that the total value of outputs produced by the Concierge Club of San Diego substantially exceeded the cost of the program, after considering likely secondary and tertiary benefits for a range of affected stakeholders-including elderly service recipients, family members, volunteers, and societal institutions. Additional research is needed regarding the direct and indirect costs and benefits of volunteer support services for vulnerable older adults and their families. PMID:25551169

  7. Transformative experiences for Hurricanes Katrina and Rita disaster volunteers.

    PubMed

    Clukey, Lory

    2010-07-01

    The massive destruction caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 provided an opportunity for many volunteers to be involved with disaster relief work. Exposure to devastation and personal trauma can have long-lasting and sometimes detrimental effects on people providing help. This qualitative study explored the experience of volunteer relief workers who provided disaster relief services after the hurricanes. Three major themes emerged: emotional reactions that included feelings of shock, fatigue, anger and grief as well as sleep disturbances; frustration with leadership; and life-changing personal transformation. Stress reactions were noted but appeared to be mitigated by feelings of compassion for the victims and personal satisfaction in being able to provide assistance. Suggestions are provided for further research.

  8. In acceptance we trust? Conceptualising acceptance as a viable approach to NGO security management.

    PubMed

    Fast, Larissa A; Freeman, C Faith; O'Neill, Michael; Rowley, Elizabeth

    2013-04-01

    This paper documents current understanding of acceptance as a security management approach and explores issues and challenges non-governmental organisations (NGOs) confront when implementing an acceptance approach to security management. It argues that the failure of organisations to systematise and clearly articulate acceptance as a distinct security management approach and a lack of organisational policies and procedures concerning acceptance hinder its efficacy as a security management approach. The paper identifies key and cross-cutting components of acceptance that are critical to its effective implementation in order to advance a comprehensive and systematic concept of acceptance. The key components of acceptance illustrate how organisational and staff functions affect positively or negatively an organisation's acceptance, and include: an organisation's principles and mission, communications, negotiation, programming, relationships and networks, stakeholder and context analysis, staffing, and image. The paper contends that acceptance is linked not only to good programming, but also to overall organisational management and structures. PMID:23278470

  9. Volunteers and Voc Ed. Information Series No. 271.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Douglas S.

    This report describes the benefits to vocational educators of involving volunteers in vocational programs and presents a model for planning and implementing a volunteer program. Outlined first are programmatic and nonprogrammatic approaches to designing volunteer programs. Next, in a discussion of the benefits of vocational volunteer programs, the…

  10. 45 CFR 1220.2-1 - Full-time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Full-time volunteers. 1220.2-1 Section 1220.2-1... SERVICE PAYMENT OF VOLUNTEER LEGAL EXPENSES Criminal Proceedings § 1220.2-1 Full-time volunteers. (a)(1) ACTION will pay all reasonable expenses for defense of full-time volunteers up to and...

  11. 42 CFR 418.78 - Conditions of participation-Volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Conditions of participation-Volunteers. 418.78... Non-Core Services § 418.78 Conditions of participation—Volunteers. The hospice must use volunteers to the extent specified in paragraph (e) of this section. These volunteers must be used in defined...

  12. 32 CFR 1627.3 - Classification of volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Classification of volunteers. 1627.3 Section... VOLUNTEERS FOR INDUCTION § 1627.3 Classification of volunteers. When a registrant who is eligible to volunteer files an Application for Voluntary Induction, he shall be classified in Class 1-A and...

  13. 32 CFR 1627.2 - Registration of volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Registration of volunteers. 1627.2 Section 1627... VOLUNTEERS FOR INDUCTION § 1627.2 Registration of volunteers. (a) If a person who is required to be registered but who has failed to register volunteers for induction, he shall be registered. (b)...

  14. 32 CFR 1627.2 - Registration of volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Registration of volunteers. 1627.2 Section 1627... VOLUNTEERS FOR INDUCTION § 1627.2 Registration of volunteers. (a) If a person who is required to be registered but who has failed to register volunteers for induction, he shall be registered. (b)...

  15. 45 CFR 1210.3-10 - Reinstatement of Volunteer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Reinstatement of Volunteer. 1210.3-10 Section 1210... COMMUNITY SERVICE VISTA TRAINEE DESELECTION AND VOLUNTEER EARLY TERMINATION PROCEDURES VISTA Volunteer Early Termination § 1210.3-10 Reinstatement of Volunteer. (a) If the Regional Director or Director of...

  16. 45 CFR 1220.2-2 - Part-time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Part-time volunteers. 1220.2-2 Section 1220.2-2... SERVICE PAYMENT OF VOLUNTEER LEGAL EXPENSES Criminal Proceedings § 1220.2-2 Part-time volunteers. (a) With respect to a part-time volunteer, ACTION will reimburse a sponsor for the reasonable expenses it...

  17. 45 CFR 1220.2-2 - Part-time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Part-time volunteers. 1220.2-2 Section 1220.2-2... SERVICE PAYMENT OF VOLUNTEER LEGAL EXPENSES Criminal Proceedings § 1220.2-2 Part-time volunteers. (a) With respect to a part-time volunteer, ACTION will reimburse a sponsor for the reasonable expenses it...

  18. 42 CFR 432.32 - Training and use of volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Training and use of volunteers. 432.32 Section 432... Volunteer Programs § 432.32 Training and use of volunteers. (a) State plan requirement. A State plan must provide for the training and use of non-paid or partially paid volunteers in accordance with...

  19. 45 CFR 1210.3-10 - Reinstatement of Volunteer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Reinstatement of Volunteer. 1210.3-10 Section 1210... COMMUNITY SERVICE VISTA TRAINEE DESELECTION AND VOLUNTEER EARLY TERMINATION PROCEDURES VISTA Volunteer Early Termination § 1210.3-10 Reinstatement of Volunteer. (a) If the Regional Director or Director of...

  20. 45 CFR 1226.11 - Part time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Part time volunteers. 1226.11 Section 1226.11... SERVICE PROHIBITIONS ON ELECTORAL AND LOBBYING ACTIVITIES Volunteer Activities § 1226.11 Part time volunteers. (a) The provisions in this section are applicable to part time volunteers, as defined in §...

  1. 45 CFR 1210.3-10 - Reinstatement of Volunteer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Reinstatement of Volunteer. 1210.3-10 Section 1210... COMMUNITY SERVICE VISTA TRAINEE DESELECTION AND VOLUNTEER EARLY TERMINATION PROCEDURES VISTA Volunteer Early Termination § 1210.3-10 Reinstatement of Volunteer. (a) If the Regional Director or Director of...

  2. 45 CFR 1220.2-2 - Part-time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Part-time volunteers. 1220.2-2 Section 1220.2-2... SERVICE PAYMENT OF VOLUNTEER LEGAL EXPENSES Criminal Proceedings § 1220.2-2 Part-time volunteers. (a) With respect to a part-time volunteer, ACTION will reimburse a sponsor for the reasonable expenses it...

  3. 45 CFR 1220.3-1 - Full-time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Full-time volunteers. 1220.3-1 Section 1220.3-1... SERVICE PAYMENT OF VOLUNTEER LEGAL EXPENSES Civil and Administrative Proceedings § 1220.3-1 Full-time volunteers. ACTION will pay reasonable expenses incurred in the defense of full-time volunteers in...

  4. 45 CFR 57.3 - Volunteer service programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Volunteer service programs. 57.3 Section 57.3 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION VOLUNTEER SERVICES § 57.3 Volunteer service programs. Programs for the use of volunteer services may be established by the...

  5. 45 CFR 1220.2-1 - Full-time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Full-time volunteers. 1220.2-1 Section 1220.2-1... SERVICE PAYMENT OF VOLUNTEER LEGAL EXPENSES Criminal Proceedings § 1220.2-1 Full-time volunteers. (a)(1) ACTION will pay all reasonable expenses for defense of full-time volunteers up to and...

  6. 45 CFR 1220.3-1 - Full-time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Full-time volunteers. 1220.3-1 Section 1220.3-1... SERVICE PAYMENT OF VOLUNTEER LEGAL EXPENSES Civil and Administrative Proceedings § 1220.3-1 Full-time volunteers. ACTION will pay reasonable expenses incurred in the defense of full-time volunteers in...

  7. 45 CFR 1210.3-10 - Reinstatement of Volunteer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reinstatement of Volunteer. 1210.3-10 Section 1210... COMMUNITY SERVICE VISTA TRAINEE DESELECTION AND VOLUNTEER EARLY TERMINATION PROCEDURES VISTA Volunteer Early Termination § 1210.3-10 Reinstatement of Volunteer. (a) If the Regional Director or Director of...

  8. 45 CFR 1220.3-1 - Full-time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Full-time volunteers. 1220.3-1 Section 1220.3-1... SERVICE PAYMENT OF VOLUNTEER LEGAL EXPENSES Civil and Administrative Proceedings § 1220.3-1 Full-time volunteers. ACTION will pay reasonable expenses incurred in the defense of full-time volunteers in...

  9. 45 CFR 1220.2-2 - Part-time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Part-time volunteers. 1220.2-2 Section 1220.2-2... SERVICE PAYMENT OF VOLUNTEER LEGAL EXPENSES Criminal Proceedings § 1220.2-2 Part-time volunteers. (a) With respect to a part-time volunteer, ACTION will reimburse a sponsor for the reasonable expenses it...

  10. 45 CFR 1220.2-2 - Part-time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Part-time volunteers. 1220.2-2 Section 1220.2-2... SERVICE PAYMENT OF VOLUNTEER LEGAL EXPENSES Criminal Proceedings § 1220.2-2 Part-time volunteers. (a) With respect to a part-time volunteer, ACTION will reimburse a sponsor for the reasonable expenses it...

  11. 45 CFR 1226.11 - Part time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Part time volunteers. 1226.11 Section 1226.11... SERVICE PROHIBITIONS ON ELECTORAL AND LOBBYING ACTIVITIES Volunteer Activities § 1226.11 Part time volunteers. (a) The provisions in this section are applicable to part time volunteers, as defined in §...

  12. 42 CFR 418.78 - Conditions of participation-Volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Conditions of participation-Volunteers. 418.78... Non-Core Services § 418.78 Conditions of participation—Volunteers. The hospice must use volunteers to the extent specified in paragraph (e) of this section. These volunteers must be used in defined...

  13. 32 CFR 1627.3 - Classification of volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Classification of volunteers. 1627.3 Section... VOLUNTEERS FOR INDUCTION § 1627.3 Classification of volunteers. When a registrant who is eligible to volunteer files an Application for Voluntary Induction, he shall be classified in Class 1-A and...

  14. 42 CFR 432.32 - Training and use of volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Training and use of volunteers. 432.32 Section 432... Volunteer Programs § 432.32 Training and use of volunteers. (a) State plan requirement. A State plan must provide for the training and use of non-paid or partially paid volunteers in accordance with...

  15. 45 CFR 57.3 - Volunteer service programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Volunteer service programs. 57.3 Section 57.3 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION VOLUNTEER SERVICES § 57.3 Volunteer service programs. Programs for the use of volunteer services may be established by the...

  16. 42 CFR 418.78 - Conditions of participation-Volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Conditions of participation-Volunteers. 418.78... Services § 418.78 Conditions of participation—Volunteers. The hospice must use volunteers to the extent specified in paragraph (e) of this section. These volunteers must be used in defined roles and under...

  17. 32 CFR 1627.3 - Classification of volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Classification of volunteers. 1627.3 Section... VOLUNTEERS FOR INDUCTION § 1627.3 Classification of volunteers. When a registrant who is eligible to volunteer files an Application for Voluntary Induction, he shall be classified in Class 1-A and...

  18. 42 CFR 418.78 - Conditions of participation-Volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Conditions of participation-Volunteers. 418.78... Non-Core Services § 418.78 Conditions of participation—Volunteers. The hospice must use volunteers to the extent specified in paragraph (e) of this section. These volunteers must be used in defined...

  19. 45 CFR 1210.3-10 - Reinstatement of Volunteer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Reinstatement of Volunteer. 1210.3-10 Section 1210... COMMUNITY SERVICE VISTA TRAINEE DESELECTION AND VOLUNTEER EARLY TERMINATION PROCEDURES VISTA Volunteer Early Termination § 1210.3-10 Reinstatement of Volunteer. (a) If the Regional Director or Director of...

  20. 45 CFR 57.3 - Volunteer service programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Volunteer service programs. 57.3 Section 57.3 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION VOLUNTEER SERVICES § 57.3 Volunteer service programs. Programs for the use of volunteer services may be established by the...

  1. 45 CFR 1220.2-1 - Full-time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Full-time volunteers. 1220.2-1 Section 1220.2-1... SERVICE PAYMENT OF VOLUNTEER LEGAL EXPENSES Criminal Proceedings § 1220.2-1 Full-time volunteers. (a)(1) ACTION will pay all reasonable expenses for defense of full-time volunteers up to and...

  2. 42 CFR 432.32 - Training and use of volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Training and use of volunteers. 432.32 Section 432... Volunteer Programs § 432.32 Training and use of volunteers. (a) State plan requirement. A State plan must provide for the training and use of non-paid or partially paid volunteers in accordance with...

  3. 5 CFR 315.605 - Appointment of former ACTION volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Appointment of former ACTION volunteers... Authorities § 315.605 Appointment of former ACTION volunteers. (a) Agency authority. An agency in the... Director of ACTION certifies as having served satisfactorily as a volunteer or volunteer leader under...

  4. 45 CFR 1226.11 - Part time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Part time volunteers. 1226.11 Section 1226.11... SERVICE PROHIBITIONS ON ELECTORAL AND LOBBYING ACTIVITIES Volunteer Activities § 1226.11 Part time volunteers. (a) The provisions in this section are applicable to part time volunteers, as defined in §...

  5. 32 CFR 1627.2 - Registration of volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Registration of volunteers. 1627.2 Section 1627... VOLUNTEERS FOR INDUCTION § 1627.2 Registration of volunteers. (a) If a person who is required to be registered but who has failed to register volunteers for induction, he shall be registered. (b)...

  6. 45 CFR 1220.2-1 - Full-time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Full-time volunteers. 1220.2-1 Section 1220.2-1... SERVICE PAYMENT OF VOLUNTEER LEGAL EXPENSES Criminal Proceedings § 1220.2-1 Full-time volunteers. (a)(1) ACTION will pay all reasonable expenses for defense of full-time volunteers up to and...

  7. 45 CFR 57.3 - Volunteer service programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Volunteer service programs. 57.3 Section 57.3 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION VOLUNTEER SERVICES § 57.3 Volunteer service programs. Programs for the use of volunteer services may be established by the...

  8. 32 CFR 1627.3 - Classification of volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Classification of volunteers. 1627.3 Section... VOLUNTEERS FOR INDUCTION § 1627.3 Classification of volunteers. When a registrant who is eligible to volunteer files an Application for Voluntary Induction, he shall be classified in Class 1-A and...

  9. 45 CFR 1226.11 - Part time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Part time volunteers. 1226.11 Section 1226.11... SERVICE PROHIBITIONS ON ELECTORAL AND LOBBYING ACTIVITIES Volunteer Activities § 1226.11 Part time volunteers. (a) The provisions in this section are applicable to part time volunteers, as defined in §...

  10. 42 CFR 432.32 - Training and use of volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Training and use of volunteers. 432.32 Section 432... Volunteer Programs § 432.32 Training and use of volunteers. (a) State plan requirement. A State plan must provide for the training and use of non-paid or partially paid volunteers in accordance with...

  11. 45 CFR 1220.3-1 - Full-time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Full-time volunteers. 1220.3-1 Section 1220.3-1... SERVICE PAYMENT OF VOLUNTEER LEGAL EXPENSES Civil and Administrative Proceedings § 1220.3-1 Full-time volunteers. ACTION will pay reasonable expenses incurred in the defense of full-time volunteers in...

  12. 45 CFR 1220.3-1 - Full-time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Full-time volunteers. 1220.3-1 Section 1220.3-1... SERVICE PAYMENT OF VOLUNTEER LEGAL EXPENSES Civil and Administrative Proceedings § 1220.3-1 Full-time volunteers. ACTION will pay reasonable expenses incurred in the defense of full-time volunteers in...

  13. 45 CFR 57.3 - Volunteer service programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Volunteer service programs. 57.3 Section 57.3 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION VOLUNTEER SERVICES § 57.3 Volunteer service programs. Programs for the use of volunteer services may be established by the...

  14. 5 CFR 315.605 - Appointment of former ACTION volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Appointment of former ACTION volunteers... Authorities § 315.605 Appointment of former ACTION volunteers. (a) Agency authority. An agency in the... Director of ACTION certifies as having served satisfactorily as a volunteer or volunteer leader under...

  15. 45 CFR 1226.11 - Part time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Part time volunteers. 1226.11 Section 1226.11... SERVICE PROHIBITIONS ON ELECTORAL AND LOBBYING ACTIVITIES Volunteer Activities § 1226.11 Part time volunteers. (a) The provisions in this section are applicable to part time volunteers, as defined in §...

  16. 5 CFR 315.605 - Appointment of former ACTION volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Appointment of former ACTION volunteers... Authorities § 315.605 Appointment of former ACTION volunteers. (a) Agency authority. An agency in the... Director of ACTION certifies as having served satisfactorily as a volunteer or volunteer leader under...

  17. 32 CFR 1627.2 - Registration of volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Registration of volunteers. 1627.2 Section 1627... VOLUNTEERS FOR INDUCTION § 1627.2 Registration of volunteers. (a) If a person who is required to be registered but who has failed to register volunteers for induction, he shall be registered. (b)...

  18. 42 CFR 432.32 - Training and use of volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Training and use of volunteers. 432.32 Section 432... Volunteer Programs § 432.32 Training and use of volunteers. (a) State plan requirement. A State plan must provide for the training and use of non-paid or partially paid volunteers in accordance with...

  19. Required Volunteers: Community Volunteerism among Students in College Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beehr, Terry A.; LeGro, Kimberly; Porter, Kimberly; Bowling, Nathan A.; Swader, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Volunteering implies free choice, but people in some situations can feel compelled to volunteer. Hypotheses about students' volunteer work focused on self-determination and sufficiency of justification for their behavior. We examined required versus nonrequired volunteerism, internal and external motivation for volunteering, and attitudes of…

  20. VISTA. An Evaluation Report on Volunteers in Service to America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Development Associates, Inc., Arlington, VA.

    The Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA) program was evaluated from the standpoint of its impact on three groups: VISTA volunteers, communities served by VISTA sponsors, and sponsoring organizations to which VISTA volunteers are assigned. Survey questionnaires were sent to 1,250 of the 3,400 VISTA volunteers currently in service, 494 current…

  1. 45 CFR 1217.6 - Roles of volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Roles of volunteers. 1217.6 Section 1217.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE VISTA VOLUNTEER LEADER § 1217.6 Roles of volunteers. VISTA volunteer leaders may have the...

  2. Effect of volunteers on maize gene flow.

    PubMed

    Palaudelmàs, Montserrat; Peñas, Gisela; Melé, Enric; Serra, Joan; Salvia, Jordi; Pla, Maria; Nadal, Anna; Messeguer, Joaquima

    2009-08-01

    Regulatory approvals for deliberate release of GM maize events into the environment have lead to real situations of coexistence between GM and non-GM, with some fields being cultivated with GM and conventional varieties in successive seasons. Given the common presence of volunteer plants in maize fields in temperate areas, we investigated the real impact of GM volunteers on the yield of 12 non-GM agricultural fields. Volunteer density varied from residual to around 10% of plants in the field and was largely reduced using certain cultural practices. Plant vigour was low, they rarely had cobs and produced pollen that cross-fertilized neighbour plants only at low--but variable--levels. In the worst-case scenario, the estimated content of GMO was 0.16%. The influence of GM volunteers was not enough to reach the 0.9% adventitious GM threshold but it could potentially contribute to adventitious GM levels, especially at high initial densities (i.e. above 1,000 volunteers/ha). PMID:19225900

  3. Effect of volunteers on maize gene flow.

    PubMed

    Palaudelmàs, Montserrat; Peñas, Gisela; Melé, Enric; Serra, Joan; Salvia, Jordi; Pla, Maria; Nadal, Anna; Messeguer, Joaquima

    2009-08-01

    Regulatory approvals for deliberate release of GM maize events into the environment have lead to real situations of coexistence between GM and non-GM, with some fields being cultivated with GM and conventional varieties in successive seasons. Given the common presence of volunteer plants in maize fields in temperate areas, we investigated the real impact of GM volunteers on the yield of 12 non-GM agricultural fields. Volunteer density varied from residual to around 10% of plants in the field and was largely reduced using certain cultural practices. Plant vigour was low, they rarely had cobs and produced pollen that cross-fertilized neighbour plants only at low--but variable--levels. In the worst-case scenario, the estimated content of GMO was 0.16%. The influence of GM volunteers was not enough to reach the 0.9% adventitious GM threshold but it could potentially contribute to adventitious GM levels, especially at high initial densities (i.e. above 1,000 volunteers/ha).

  4. Volunteer Services System. Handbook 3: Information System for a Volunteer Services System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Columbus Public Schools, OH.

    This booklet is one of a series of publications designed to present a complete system for planning, organizing, and directing the development and operation of individual volunteer programs, as well as the management of a comprehensive volunteer system consisting of many individual programs. This particular booklet discusses the concepts and…

  5. Volunteer Services System. Handbook 1: Guidebook to a Volunteer Services System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Columbus Public Schools, OH.

    This booklet is one of a series of publications designed to present a complete system for planning, organizing, and directing the development and operation of individual volunteer programs, as well as the management of a comprehensive volunteer system consisting of many individual programs. This particular booklet explains the overall system and…

  6. A New Breed of Volunteer Calls for a New Volunteer Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    PTAs have always faced the challenge of competing for volunteer time. A PTA's primary volunteer base is made up of parents of public school children, and parents are being pulled in many directions, as their children are more engaged than ever in multiple extracurricular activities that may have their own specialized parent groups. Parents with…

  7. Understanding the role of the volunteer in specialist palliative care: a systematic review and thematic synthesis of qualitative studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Volunteers make a major contribution to palliative patient care, and qualitative studies have been undertaken to explore their involvement. With the aim of making connections between existing studies to derive enhanced meanings, we undertook a systematic review of these qualitative studies including synthesising the findings. We sought to uncover how the role of volunteers with direct contact with patients in specialist palliative care is understood by volunteers, patients, their families, and staff. Methods We searched for relevant literature that explored the role of the volunteer including electronic citation databases and reference lists of included studies, and also undertook handsearches of selected journals to find studies which met inclusion criteria. We quality appraised included studies, and synthesised study findings using a novel synthesis method, thematic synthesis. Results We found 12 relevant studies undertaken in both inpatient and home-care settings, with volunteers, volunteer coordinators, patients and families. Studies explored the role of general volunteers as opposed to those offering any professional skills. Three theme clusters were found: the distinctness of the volunteer role, the characteristics of the role, and the volunteer experience of the role. The first answers the question, is there a separate volunteer role? We found that to some extent the role was distinctive. The volunteer may act as a mediator between the patient and the staff. However, we also found some contradictions. Volunteers may take on temporary surrogate family-type relationship roles. They may also take on some of the characteristics of a paid professional. The second cluster helps to describe the essence of the role. Here, we found that the dominant feature was that the role is social in nature. The third helps to explain aspects of the role from the point of view of volunteers themselves. It highlighted that the role is seen by volunteers as flexible

  8. Acceptability of BCG vaccination.

    PubMed

    Mande, R

    1977-01-01

    The acceptability of BCG vaccination varies a great deal according to the country and to the period when the vaccine is given. The incidence of complications has not always a direct influence on this acceptability, which depends, for a very large part, on the risk of tuberculosis in a given country at a given time.

  9. ATLAS ACCEPTANCE TEST

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, J. C. , Jr.; Parker, J. V.; Hinckley, W. B.; Hosack, K. W.; Mills, D.; Parsons, W. M.; Scudder, D. W.; Stokes, J. L.; Tabaka, L. J.; Thompson, M. C.; Wysocki, Frederick Joseph; Campbell, T. N.; Lancaster, D. L.; Tom, C. Y.

    2001-01-01

    The acceptance test program for Atlas, a 23 MJ pulsed power facility for use in the Los Alamos High Energy Density Hydrodynamics program, has been completed. Completion of this program officially releases Atlas from the construction phase and readies it for experiments. Details of the acceptance test program results and of machine capabilities for experiments will be presented.

  10. Motivations for Youth Volunteer Participation: Types and Structure--An Analysis of Interviews with Twenty-Four Young Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luping, Wu

    2011-01-01

    Scholars who study volunteer activities are attaching ever greater importance to the motivations of volunteers who participate in volunteer activities. However, deficiencies are, on the whole, to be found in the empirical studies by scholars in China on the participating volunteers' motivations. To make up for the deficiencies in the research on…

  11. Volunteer Interacting with a Rotating Chair Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Brad McLain for the Space Biology Museum Network spins a volunteer in a rotating chair to illustrate how dependent the human vestibular system is on visual cues. The volunteer's thumbs indicate which way she thinks she is turning. Similar tests are conducted on astronauts to study how they adapt to space and readapt to Earth. The activity was part of the Space Research and You education event held by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research on June 25, 2002, in Arlington, VA, to highlight the research that will be conducted on STS-107.

  12. Volunteer Losing Balance Wearing Inverted Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Brad McLain for the Space Biology Museum Network puts a volunteer back on balance as he tries to adjust to a world inverted by a special pair of glasses. This helps illustrate how dependent the human vestibular system is on visual cues. A volunteer is The activity was part of the Space Research and You education event held by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research on June 25, 2002, in Arlington, VA, to highlight the research that will be conducted on STS-107.

  13. Pulsar discovery by global volunteer computing.

    PubMed

    Knispel, B; Allen, B; Cordes, J M; Deneva, J S; Anderson, D; Aulbert, C; Bhat, N D R; Bock, O; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Champion, D J; Chatterjee, S; Crawford, F; Demorest, P B; Fehrmann, H; Freire, P C C; Gonzalez, M E; Hammer, D; Hessels, J W T; Jenet, F A; Kasian, L; Kaspi, V M; Kramer, M; Lazarus, P; van Leeuwen, J; Lorimer, D R; Lyne, A G; Machenschalk, B; McLaughlin, M A; Messenger, C; Nice, D J; Papa, M A; Pletsch, H J; Prix, R; Ransom, S M; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; Stovall, K; Venkataraman, A

    2010-09-10

    Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 192 countries to mine large data sets. It has now found a 40.8-hertz isolated pulsar in radio survey data from the Arecibo Observatory taken in February 2007. Additional timing observations indicate that this pulsar is likely a disrupted recycled pulsar. PSR J2007+2722's pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period; the pulsar likely has closely aligned magnetic and spin axes. The massive computing power provided by volunteers should enable many more such discoveries.

  14. Volunteers in the earthquake hazard reduction program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, P.L.

    1978-01-01

    With this in mind, I organized a small workshop for approximately 30 people on February 2 and 3, 1978, in Menlo Park, Calif. the purpose of the meeting was to discuss methods of involving volunteers in a meaningful way in earthquake research and in educating the public about earthquake hazards. The emphasis was on earthquake prediction research, but the discussions covered the whole earthquake hazard reduction program. Representatives attended from the earthquake research community, from groups doing socioeconomic research on earthquake matters, and from a wide variety of organizations who might sponsor volunteers

  15. EMAC Volunteers: Liability and Workers’ Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Wilfredo; Kershner, Stacie P.; Penn, Matthew S.

    2015-01-01

    The Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC) provides a mechanism for states to assist each other during natural disasters and other emergencies. Congress ratified EMAC in 1996, and all 50 states and 3 territories have adopted it. EMAC allows a state affected by a disaster to request personnel and materiel from another state. For personnel requests, EMAC provides that the requesting state cover the tort liability and the responding state cover the workers’ compensation liability. This article discusses the limitations of EMAC in deploying volunteers and how the Uniform Emergency Volunteer Health Practitioners Act and other provisions address those limitations. PMID:24041195

  16. Volunteers build Bay St. Louis playground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    More than 650 volunteers - many of them employees at NASA's Stennis Space Center - weathered rain and cold to transform Bay St. Louis' old City Park into a playground Dec. 17. Volunteers assembled and erected a slide, swing set, jungle gym, sand box and planter benches in an eight-hour time frame. The playground was the first new structure built in the town devastated by Hurricane Katrina and the first on the Gulf Coast after the storm. The project was financed and led by nonprofit organization KaBOOM!, whose vision is to create a great place to play within walking distance of every child in America.

  17. Volunteers in Community Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

    This booklet gives detailed accounts of mental health programs in operation around the nation. A total of nine different types of activities is included. "Helping Children" describes a program whereby students from nearby colleges give troubled children, at home, an experience in friendship by serving as big brothers or sisters. "Helping the…

  18. Bioavailability of ranitidine in healthy Mexican volunteers: effect of food.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Olguín, H; Flores, J; Pérez, G; Hernández, G; Flores, C; Guillé, A; Camacho, A; Toledo, A; Carrasco, M; Lares, I

    2002-01-01

    Is well known that food can affect the bioavailability of several drugs, its impact is major for those drugs that have to act near of drug absorption. Documentation about alterations of ranitidine bioavailability by effect of food is poor. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of food over the bioavailability of ranitidine. Twenty healthy Mexican volunteers were included for the study. The study was made in two stages, in the first one the volunteers had 12 hour fast and took a 300 mg of oral dose of ranitidine (without food, WOF) and blood samples were drawn. Two weeks later, the volunteers took a normal diet just before ranitidine intake (with food, WF). The area under the curve (AUC) was 30% greater in WOF, Cmax was 921.5 ng/ml (WF) vs. 1685.2 (WOF), and t1/2 was 2.70 +/- 1.38 (WF) h vs 3.66 +/- 1.34 (WOF). The AUC, Cmax and t1/2 were statistically different. It is evident that there are differences in the drug disposition due to the presence of food, then, it is possible that the efficacy of ranitidine as inhibitor of gastric secretion being limited by food.

  19. The Relationship between Ministry Satisfaction and Spiritual Maturity among Adult Church Volunteers in the Korean Presbyterian Church in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nho, Sung Hyun

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative study examined the relationship between ministry satisfaction and spiritual maturity among adult church volunteers in the Korean Presbyterian church in South Korea (Kosin). It also sought to investigate factors related to volunteers' job satisfaction and their spiritual maturity. Participants included 531 adult small group…

  20. A proposal for a spiritual care assessment toolkit for religious volunteers and volunteer service users.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Jung

    2014-10-01

    Based on the idea that volunteer services in healthcare settings should focus on the service users' best interests and providing holistic care for the body, mind, and spirit, the aim of this study was to propose an assessment toolkit for assessing the effectiveness of religious volunteers and improving their service. By analyzing and categorizing the results of previous studies, we incorporated effective care goals and methods in the proposed religious and spiritual care assessment toolkit. Two versions of the toolkit were created. The service users' version comprises 10 questions grouped into the following five dimensions: "physical care," "psychological and emotional support," "social relationships," "religious and spiritual care," and "hope restoration." Each question could either be answered with "yes" or "no". The volunteers' version contains 14 specific care goals and 31 care methods, in addition to the 10 care dimensions in the residents' version. A small sample of 25 experts was asked to judge the usefulness of each of the toolkit items for evaluating volunteers' effectiveness. Although some experts questioned the volunteer's capacity, however, to improve the spiritual care capacity and effectiveness provided by volunteers is the main purpose of developing this assessment toolkit. The toolkit developed in this study may not be applicable to other countries, and only addressed patients' general spiritual needs. Volunteers should receive special training in caring for people with special needs.

  1. Recruitment and Retention of Volunteers in a Citizen Science Network to Detect Invasive Species on Private Lands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andow, David A.; Borgida, Eugene; Hurley, Terrance M.; Williams, Allison L.

    2016-10-01

    Volunteer citizen monitoring is an increasingly important source of scientific data. We developed a volunteer program for early detection of new invasive species by private landowners on their own land. Early detection of an invasive species, however, subjects the landowner to the potentially costly risk of government intervention to control the invasive species. We hypothesized that an adult experiential learning module could increase recruitment and retention because private landowners could learn more about and understand the social benefits of early detection and more accurately gauge the level of personal risk. The experiential learning module emphasized group discussion and individual reflection of risks and benefits of volunteering and included interactions with experts and regulatory personnel. A population of woodland owners with >2 ha of managed oak woodland in central Minnesota were randomly assigned to recruitment treatments: (a) the experiential learning module or (b) a letter inviting their participation. The recruitment and retention rates and data quality were similar for the two methods. However, volunteers who experienced the learning module were more likely to recruit new volunteers than those who merely received an invitation letter. Thus the module may indirectly affect recruitment of new volunteers. The data collection was complex and required the volunteers to complete timely activities, yet the volunteers provided sufficiently high quality data that was useful to the organizers. Volunteers can collect complex data and are willing to assume personal risk to contribute to early detection of invasive species.

  2. PTSD Symptom Trajectories in Disaster Volunteers: The Role of Self-Efficacy, Social Acknowledgement, and Tasks Carried Out.

    PubMed

    Thormar, Sigridur B; Sijbrandij, Marit; Gersons, Berthold P R; Van de Schoot, Rens; Juen, Barbara; Karlsson, Thorlakur; Olff, Miranda

    2016-02-01

    Millions of volunteers respond after disasters, with a 24% to 46% risk of developing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It is unclear which symptom trajectories develop and how they differ between core (volunteering before the disaster) and noncore volunteers (joining after the disaster) and which factors predict trajectories. Symptoms of PTSD were assessed at 6-, 12-, and 18-months postearthquake in 449 volunteers in Indonesia. Demographics, previous mental health service use, self-efficacy, social acknowledgment, and type of tasks were assessed at 6 months. In both core and noncore volunteers, 2 PTSD symptom trajectories emerged: a resilient trajectory (moderate levels of symptoms with a slow decrease over time; 90.9%) and a chronic trajectory (higher levels of symptoms with an increase over time; 9.1%). In both trajectories, core volunteers had fewer symptoms than noncore volunteers. Core volunteers in the chronic trajectory were characterized by having sought prior mental help, reported lower levels of self-efficacy and social acknowledgment, and were more likely to have provided psychosocial support to beneficiaries (Cramér's V = .17 to .27, partial η(2) = .02 to .06). Aid organizations should identify and follow up chronic PTSD trajectories in volunteers, including the noncore, who may be out of sight to the organization after the acute response phase. PMID:26799823

  3. Recruitment and Retention of Volunteers in a Citizen Science Network to Detect Invasive Species on Private Lands.

    PubMed

    Andow, David A; Borgida, Eugene; Hurley, Terrance M; Williams, Allison L

    2016-10-01

    Volunteer citizen monitoring is an increasingly important source of scientific data. We developed a volunteer program for early detection of new invasive species by private landowners on their own land. Early detection of an invasive species, however, subjects the landowner to the potentially costly risk of government intervention to control the invasive species. We hypothesized that an adult experiential learning module could increase recruitment and retention because private landowners could learn more about and understand the social benefits of early detection and more accurately gauge the level of personal risk. The experiential learning module emphasized group discussion and individual reflection of risks and benefits of volunteering and included interactions with experts and regulatory personnel. A population of woodland owners with >2 ha of managed oak woodland in central Minnesota were randomly assigned to recruitment treatments: (a) the experiential learning module or (b) a letter inviting their participation. The recruitment and retention rates and data quality were similar for the two methods. However, volunteers who experienced the learning module were more likely to recruit new volunteers than those who merely received an invitation letter. Thus the module may indirectly affect recruitment of new volunteers. The data collection was complex and required the volunteers to complete timely activities, yet the volunteers provided sufficiently high quality data that was useful to the organizers. Volunteers can collect complex data and are willing to assume personal risk to contribute to early detection of invasive species.

  4. Recruitment and Retention of Volunteers in a Citizen Science Network to Detect Invasive Species on Private Lands.

    PubMed

    Andow, David A; Borgida, Eugene; Hurley, Terrance M; Williams, Allison L

    2016-10-01

    Volunteer citizen monitoring is an increasingly important source of scientific data. We developed a volunteer program for early detection of new invasive species by private landowners on their own land. Early detection of an invasive species, however, subjects the landowner to the potentially costly risk of government intervention to control the invasive species. We hypothesized that an adult experiential learning module could increase recruitment and retention because private landowners could learn more about and understand the social benefits of early detection and more accurately gauge the level of personal risk. The experiential learning module emphasized group discussion and individual reflection of risks and benefits of volunteering and included interactions with experts and regulatory personnel. A population of woodland owners with >2 ha of managed oak woodland in central Minnesota were randomly assigned to recruitment treatments: (a) the experiential learning module or (b) a letter inviting their participation. The recruitment and retention rates and data quality were similar for the two methods. However, volunteers who experienced the learning module were more likely to recruit new volunteers than those who merely received an invitation letter. Thus the module may indirectly affect recruitment of new volunteers. The data collection was complex and required the volunteers to complete timely activities, yet the volunteers provided sufficiently high quality data that was useful to the organizers. Volunteers can collect complex data and are willing to assume personal risk to contribute to early detection of invasive species. PMID:27539361

  5. Differences in motivations of paid versus nonpaid volunteers.

    PubMed

    Gerstein, Lawrence H; Wilkeson, David A; Anderson, Heather

    2004-02-01

    143 AmeriCorps volunteers (30 men; 113 women) and 127 college student volunteers (43 men; 84 women) completed the Volunteer Functions Inventory to assess whether monetary compensation was associated with choice to volunteer to provide educational services, e.g., tutoring, mentoring. Based on Snyder's 1993 theory of functionalism, motives of paid (AmeriCorps participants) and nonpaid (college students) volunteers were expected to differ. It was also predicted that the motives of female and male volunteers would differ. Multivariate analysis of variance confirmed these assumptions. In general, paid male participants reported perceiving numerous benefits associated with volunteering and reported stronger beliefs about such benefits. Female participants reported motives for volunteering, in contrast, which were not linked with monetary compensation. The women reported recognizing the benefits of volunteering and engaging in this activity for egoistic reasons. Their reported motives had little relation to compensation.

  6. Dynamics of Volunteering in Older Europeans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hank, Karsten; Erlinghagen, Marcel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dynamics of volunteering in the population aged 50 years or older across 11 Continental European countries. Design and Methods: Using longitudinal data from the first 2 waves of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe, we run multivariate regressions on a set of binary-dependent variables indicating…

  7. Parent Volunteer Programs/Reading Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huyer, Diane

    Designed to be an example of how elementary and secondary schools can involve parents in their children's education, this guide is a compilation of letters to parents, memos, newsletters, and general information concerning Parkway (Missouri) School District's Parent Volunteer program, focusing primarily on the reading program. The first of the…

  8. 77 FR 22177 - National Volunteer Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-9017 Filed 4-11-12; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295-F2-P ... April 12, 2012 Part III The President Proclamation 8797--National Volunteer Week, 2012 Proclamation 8798--Pan American Day and Pan American Week, 2012 Proclamation 8799--National Former Prisoner of...

  9. 75 FR 20891 - National Volunteer Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ... United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fourth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-9415 Filed... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8500 of April 16, 2010 National Volunteer Week, 2010 By the President of the... country. This week, we recognize their enduring contributions and encourage more Americans, especially...

  10. Intermediate Dari for Peace Corps Volunteers. Afghanistan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enteser, M. Ehsen

    This more advanced Dari text was designed for Peace Corps Volunteers in Afghanistan who desired to speak the language on higher levels, but it could also be used during the last part of the training programs in the United States. It follows the author's elementary text, "Farsi Reference Manual Basic Course," which has been used in all the Afghan…

  11. BOINC service for volunteer cloud computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høimyr, N.; Blomer, J.; Buncic, P.; Giovannozzi, M.; Gonzalez, A.; Harutyunyan, A.; Jones, P. L.; Karneyeu, A.; Marquina, M. A.; Mcintosh, E.; Segal, B.; Skands, P.; Grey, F.; Lombraña González, D.; Zacharov, I.

    2012-12-01

    Since a couple of years, a team at CERN and partners from the Citizen Cyberscience Centre (CCC) have been working on a project that enables general physics simulation programs to run in a virtual machine on volunteer PCs around the world. The project uses the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) framework. Based on CERNVM and the job management framework Co-Pilot, this project was made available for public beta-testing in August 2011 with Monte Carlo simulations of LHC physics under the name “LHC@home 2.0” and the BOINC project: “Test4Theory”. At the same time, CERN's efforts on Volunteer Computing for LHC machine studies have been intensified; this project has previously been known as LHC@home, and has been running the “Sixtrack” beam dynamics application for the LHC accelerator, using a classic BOINC framework without virtual machines. CERN-IT has set up a BOINC server cluster, and has provided and supported the BOINC infrastructure for both projects. CERN intends to evolve the setup into a generic BOINC application service that will allow scientists and engineers at CERN to profit from volunteer computing. This paper describes the experience with the two different approaches to volunteer computing as well as the status and outlook of a general BOINC service.

  12. Volunteer Fire Departments and Community Mobilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozier, John

    1976-01-01

    Presenting implications for a practical strategy in community development, this article deals with the exchange: within local Volunteer Fire Departments (VFD); between a VFD and its local public; between and among VFD's which compose the fire service; and between the fire service as an organized collectivity and the regional public. (JC)

  13. Inclusive Volunteering: Benefits to Participants and Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Kimberly D.; Schleien, Stuart J.; Rider, Cecilia; Hall, Crystal; Roche, Megan; Worsley, James

    2002-01-01

    Examined the benefits of volunteerism for people with disabilities as well as their non-disabled peers and the agency in which they served. Participants were college students who were matched with adolescents from a local school for students with disabilities. After two semesters of volunteer work for a local museum, benefits were discussed and…

  14. The Benefits of Volunteering for Psychology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromnick, Rachel; Horowitz, Ava; Shepherd, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Within the current economic climate students are seen as needing more than a degree to succeed in securing graduate employment. One way that students chose to enhance their employability is through engaging in voluntary work. In this empirical study, undergraduate psychology students' reasons for volunteering are explored within the context of…

  15. Volunteers in Wikipedia: Why the Community Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baytiyeh, Hoda; Pfaffman, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Wikipedia is a reliable encyclopedia with over seven million articles in several languages all contributed and maintained by volunteers. To learn more about what drives people to devote their time and expertise to building and maintaining this remarkable resource, surveys with Likert-scaled items measuring different types of motivations were…

  16. The Development of An Ecumenical Volunteer Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tissington, Vickie I.; Steber, Linda T.

    In light of federal budget cuts limiting traditional social service agency offerings, Ecumenical Ministries, Inc. developed an ecumenical volunteer program in Baldwin County, Alabama, to enable trained church members to recognize and address some of the unmet needs of the poor. In its first year, the successful program researched community needs…

  17. 20 CFR 628.540 - Volunteer program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Volunteer program. 628.540 Section 628.540 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROGRAMS UNDER TITLE II OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Program Design Requirements for Programs Under Title II of the...

  18. Ethical Issues in Volunteer Management and Accountability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Netting, F. Ellen

    1987-01-01

    Examines the ethical issues surrounding President Reagan's directive to "Go back to the voluntary sector." Discusses trends which currently affect ethical issues of managing volunteer agencies/programs. Recommends proactive steps to be taken in developing the potential of voluntary organizations, identifying organizations' bases of support,…

  19. No Exceptions: Documenting the Abortion Experiences of US Peace Corps Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Foster, Angel M; Arnott, Grady; Parniak, Simone; LaRoche, Kathryn J; Trussell, James

    2015-01-01

    Since 1979, US federal appropriations bills have prohibited the use of federal funds from covering abortion care for Peace Corps volunteers. There are no exceptions; unlike other groups that receive health care through US federal funding streams, including Medicaid recipients, federal employees, and women in federal prisons, abortion care is not covered for volunteers even in cases of life endangerment, rape, or incest. We interviewed 433 returned Peace Corps volunteers to document opinions of, perceptions about, and experiences with obtaining abortion care. Our results regarding the abortion experiences of Peace Corps volunteers, especially those who were raped, bear witness to a profound inequity and show that the time has come to lift the "no exceptions" funding ban on abortion coverage. PMID:25494207

  20. Volunteers in hospital-based case management programs.

    PubMed

    Netting, F E; Williams, F G; Jones-McClintic, S; Warrick, L

    1989-01-01

    This article examines the use of volunteers within hospital-based long-term care case management programs. As hospitals diversify into long-term care, the roles played by volunteers are also diversifying. A brief description of the involvement of volunteers with the frail elderly is followed by a comparison of the roles and relationships of volunteers within existing hospital auxiliaries and long-term care case management programs. Three models for structuring hospital-based volunteer programs that address the needs of the frail elderly within diverse communities are presented. Implications surrounding the involvement of volunteers beyond hospital walls are discussed.

  1. LLRW disposal facility siting approaches: Connecticut`s innovative volunteer approach

    SciTech Connect

    Forcella, D.; Gingerich, R.E.; Holeman, G.R.

    1994-12-31

    The Connecticut Hazardous Waste Management Service (CHWMS) has embarked on a volunteer approach to siting a LLRW disposal facility in Connecticut. This effort comes after an unsuccessful effort to site a facility using a step-wise, criteria-based site screening process that was a classic example of the decide/announce/defend approach. While some of the specific features of the CHWMS` volunteer process reflect the unique challenge presented by the state`s physical characteristics, political structure and recent unsuccessful siting experience, the basic elements of the process are applicable to siting LLRW disposal facilities in many parts of the United States. The CHWMS` volunteer process is structured to reduce the {open_quotes}outrage{close_quotes} dimension of two of the variables that affect the public`s perception of risk. The two variables are the degree to which the risk is taken on voluntarily (voluntary risks are accepted more readily than those that are imposed) and the amount of control one has over the risk (risks under individual control are accepted more readily than those under government control). In the volunteer process, the CHWMS will only consider sites that have been been voluntarily offered by the community in which they are located and the CHWMS will share control over the development and operation of the facility with the community. In addition to these elements which have broad applicability, the CHWMS has tailored the volunteer approach to take advantage of the unique opportunities made possible by the earlier statewide site screening process. Specifically, the approach presents a {open_quotes}win-win{close_quotes} situation for elected officials in many communities if they decide to participate in the process.

  2. 48 CFR 11.103 - Market acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... supported by market research; (4) Include consideration of items supplied satisfactorily under recent or... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Market acceptance. 11.103... DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Selecting and Developing Requirements Documents 11.103 Market acceptance. (a)...

  3. Who will volunteer? Analysing individual and structural factors of volunteering in Swiss sports clubs.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Torsten; Nagel, Siegfried

    2013-01-01

    This article analyses the conditions influencing volunteering in sports clubs. It focuses not only on individual characteristics of volunteers but also on the corresponding structural conditions of sports clubs. It proposes a model of voluntary work in sports clubs based on economic behaviour theory. The influences of both the individual and context levels on the decision to engage in voluntary work are estimated in different multilevel models. Results of these multilevel analyses indicate that volunteering is not just an outcome of individual characteristics such as lower workloads, higher income, children belonging to the sports club, longer club memberships, or a strong commitment to the club. It is also influenced by club-specific structural conditions; volunteering is more probable in rural sports clubs whereas growth-oriented goals in clubs have a destabilising effect.

  4. Bioequivalence of two brands of ciprofloxacin 750 mg tablets (Sarf and Ciprobay) in healthy human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, R M; Alam, S M; Awaad, F M; Dham, R; El-Kersh, A; El-Laithy, A; Shalby, M H; Shihabeddin, M; El-Walily, A F; Yacout, M; Zaman, Q

    2002-04-01

    An open, randomized, two-way crossover study was carried out in 28 healthy volunteers at Gulf Pharmaceutical Industries (Julphar), as a joint venture with Saqr Hospital, Ras Al-Khaimah, UAE. The two commercial brands used were Sarf (Julphar, UAE) as test and Ciprobay (Bayer AG, Germany) as reference product. The drug was administered to each subject with 240 mL of water after an overnight fasting in two treatment days separated by a one-week washout period. After dosing, serial blood samples were collected for a period of 24 hr and serum was separated and analyzed for ciprofloxacin using a sensitive, reproducible, and accurate high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with ultraviolet (UV) detection. Various pharmacokinetic parameters, including AUC0-t, AUC0-infinity, Cmax, Tmax, t1/2, and lambdaz, were determined from ciprofloxacin serum concentration-time profiles for both formulations and found to be in good agreement with reported values. The parameters AUC0-t, AUC0-infinity, and Cmax were tested for bioequivalence after log-transformation of data. No significant difference was found based on analysis of variance (ANOVA); the 90% confidence intervals (95.73-107.62%, 94.98-108.26%, 92.80-103.90% for AUC0-t, AUC0-infinity, Cmax, respectively) for the test/reference ratios of these parameters were within the bioequivalence acceptance range of 80-125%. Based on this data, it is concluded that both formulations are bioequivalent and are interchangeable in medical practice.

  5. The ethics of human volunteer studies involving experimental exposure to pesticides: unanswered dilemmas

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The controversy about the use of data from human volunteer studies involving experimental exposure to pesticides as part of regulatory risk assessment has been widely discussed, but the complex and interrelated scientific and ethical issues remain largely unresolved. This discussion paper, generated by authors who comprised a workgroup of the ICOH Scientific Committee on Rural Health, reviews the use of human experimental studies in regulatory risk assessment for pesticides with a view to advancing the debate as to when, if ever, such studies might be ethically justifiable. The discussion is based on three elements: (a) a review of discussion papers on the topic of human testing of pesticides and the positions adopted by regulatory agencies in developed countries; (b) an analysis of published and unpublished studies involving human testing with pesticides, both in the peer-reviewed literature and in the JMPR database; and (c) application of an ethical analysis to the problem. The paper identifies areas of agreement which include general principles that may provide a starting point on which to base criteria for judgements as to the ethical acceptability of such studies. However, the paper also highlights ongoing unresolved differences of opinion inherent in ethical analysis of contentious issues, which we propose should form a starting point for further debate and the development of guidelines to achieve better resolution of this matter. PMID:20718963

  6. Intimacy, domesticity and pet therapy with the elderly: expectation and experience among nursing home volunteers.

    PubMed

    Savishinsky, J S

    1992-06-01

    A study of volunteers in three nursing homes revealed that their role had several unexpected consequences for institutional residents and for the volunteers themselves. The research, carried out in geriatric facilities in upstate New York, focused on community members and college students working in a pet therapy program, through which they brought companion animals to various institutions on a weekly basis. Visiting people and pets re-created an aura of domesticity for residents who had been cut off from homes and families by age and illness. Consonant with this domestic perception by residents was the self-image that volunteers developed of their role: most came to see themselves as family and friends to patients rather than as visitors, strangers, or adjunct staff. Volunteering, however, was an emotionally demanding experience that some people handled more successfully than others. While certain individuals found the costs of this unexpected intimacy to be too high, others discovered significant rewards in what one person called its 'selfish altruism.' Several factors were found to mediate how volunteers felt about what they did, and whether or not they continued with their work over a long period of time. These variables included: (a) the motives that people had for becoming volunteers, (b) their prior experience doing this kind of work, (c) their career orientations, and current family and living situation, and (d) the image that they had of the elderly in general and nursing homes in particular. PMID:1529370

  7. Stress and Burnout: Concerns for the Hospice Volunteer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, J. Conrad, Jr.; Hastings, Janice L.

    1992-01-01

    Sources of stress for hospice volunteers are environmental, ideological, and personal. Attention to volunteer stress and burnout involves defining job requirements and responsibilities, frequent communication and feedback, stress management techniques, flexibility in assignments, and opportunities to verbalize emotions. (SK)

  8. The gay cousin: learning to accept gay rights.

    PubMed

    Howard-Hassmann, R E

    2001-01-01

    In 1996-97 the author interviewed 73 civic leaders in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, on their attitudes toward gay rights. Twelve respondents opposed gay rights, 40 were moderately favorable to gay rights, and 21 were strongly favorable. Almost all favored basic equality rights (education, housing, employment), and only 10 said they had difficulty with gay sexuality. Twenty-seven volunteered a concern with gay "flaunting," but this did not mean that they necessarily opposed gay rights. Respondents had the most difficulty accepting the rights of gays to marry and to adopt children, although almost all of those who opposed gay marriages agreed with the idea of a legal domestic partnership. Most agreed that children should be taught about homosexuality in schools. These 73 civic leaders reflect the rapidly changing attitudes to gay rights in Canada as a whole. Their more favorable attitudes were often a consequence of learning that someone close to them was gay or lesbian. They also responded to changes in religious teaching. Most respondents, including recent immigrants, were influenced by the dominant Canadian values of equality, respect for privacy, and respect for diversity. In general, the process these civic leaders were undergoing was one of humanizing gays, no longer thinking of them as the Other. In their view, human rights for gays did not mean mere formal equality, but rather concern and respect for gays.

  9. [Features of emotional stability in volunteers of gerontology programs].

    PubMed

    Dolgova, V I

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents an analysis of the characteristics of emotional stability in volunteers of gerontology programs (among the students of the Faculty of Psychology), depending on the structure of their life meaning and values, personal factors and professional important qualities. It is shown that the emotional stability of volunteers determines the main directions to explore the potential of the psyche of volunteers; modeling appropriate professiogram; organization of volunteer work in a particular program. PMID:25306665

  10. The benefits of beneficence: rewards of hospice volunteering.

    PubMed

    Korda, L J

    1995-01-01

    Hospice volunteering can provide many benefits to the volunteer as well as to the hospice program. Identification of these benefits, which may be characterized as being of the body, mind, and spirit, is helpful in the recruitment of new volunteers as well as in the retention of current ones. It is important for hospice programs to find ways to assist volunteers to attain these rewards.

  11. Will Natural Resources Professionals Volunteer to Teach Youth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sanford S.; Finley, James C.; San Julian, Gary J.

    2010-01-01

    A unique approach to volunteer marketing research involved a mail survey with natural resources professionals from across Pennsylvania. Previous work identified this group as a source of potential volunteers for the 4-H youth natural resources program. The results give insights into those most likely to volunteer to teach youth through 4-H…

  12. 11 CFR 100.74 - Uncompensated services by volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Uncompensated services by volunteers. 100.74...) Exceptions to Contributions § 100.74 Uncompensated services by volunteers. The value of services provided without compensation by any individual who volunteers on behalf of a candidate or political committee...

  13. 32 CFR 1627.1 - Who may volunteer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Who may volunteer. 1627.1 Section 1627.1 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM VOLUNTEERS FOR INDUCTION § 1627.1 Who may volunteer. Any registrant who has attained the age of 17 years, who has...

  14. 45 CFR 1220.3-2 - Part-time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Part-time volunteers. 1220.3-2 Section 1220.3-2... SERVICE PAYMENT OF VOLUNTEER LEGAL EXPENSES Civil and Administrative Proceedings § 1220.3-2 Part-time volunteers. ACTION will reimburse sponsors for the reasonable expenses incidental to the defense of...

  15. 11 CFR 100.74 - Uncompensated services by volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Uncompensated services by volunteers. 100.74...) Exceptions to Contributions § 100.74 Uncompensated services by volunteers. The value of services provided without compensation by any individual who volunteers on behalf of a candidate or political committee...

  16. 28 CFR 115.332 - Volunteer and contractor training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Volunteer and contractor training. 115... ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Training and Education § 115.332 Volunteer and contractor training. (a) The agency shall ensure that all volunteers and contractors who...

  17. 11 CFR 100.74 - Uncompensated services by volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Uncompensated services by volunteers. 100.74...) Exceptions to Contributions § 100.74 Uncompensated services by volunteers. The value of services provided without compensation by any individual who volunteers on behalf of a candidate or political committee...

  18. Mentoring as a Formalized Learning Strategy with Community Sports Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Mark; Armour, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to examine formalized mentoring as a learning strategy for volunteer sports coaches and to consider implications for other volunteer groups in the community. Despite the increasingly popular use of mentoring as a learning and support strategy across professional domains, and the sheer scale of volunteer sports coach…

  19. 28 CFR 548.14 - Community involvement (volunteers, contractors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Community involvement (volunteers... Community involvement (volunteers, contractors). (a) The institution's chaplain may contract with... chaplain adheres. (b) The institution's chaplain may secure the services of volunteers to assist inmates...

  20. 28 CFR 548.14 - Community involvement (volunteers, contractors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Community involvement (volunteers... Community involvement (volunteers, contractors). (a) The institution's chaplain may contract with... chaplain adheres. (b) The institution's chaplain may secure the services of volunteers to assist inmates...

  1. 45 CFR 1220.3-2 - Part-time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Part-time volunteers. 1220.3-2 Section 1220.3-2... SERVICE PAYMENT OF VOLUNTEER LEGAL EXPENSES Civil and Administrative Proceedings § 1220.3-2 Part-time volunteers. ACTION will reimburse sponsors for the reasonable expenses incidental to the defense of...

  2. 28 CFR 548.14 - Community involvement (volunteers, contractors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Community involvement (volunteers... Community involvement (volunteers, contractors). (a) The institution's chaplain may contract with... chaplain adheres. (b) The institution's chaplain may secure the services of volunteers to assist inmates...

  3. 45 CFR 1220.3-2 - Part-time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Part-time volunteers. 1220.3-2 Section 1220.3-2... SERVICE PAYMENT OF VOLUNTEER LEGAL EXPENSES Civil and Administrative Proceedings § 1220.3-2 Part-time volunteers. ACTION will reimburse sponsors for the reasonable expenses incidental to the defense of...

  4. 11 CFR 100.74 - Uncompensated services by volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Uncompensated services by volunteers. 100.74...) Exceptions to Contributions § 100.74 Uncompensated services by volunteers. The value of services provided without compensation by any individual who volunteers on behalf of a candidate or political committee...

  5. 45 CFR 1220.3-2 - Part-time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Part-time volunteers. 1220.3-2 Section 1220.3-2... SERVICE PAYMENT OF VOLUNTEER LEGAL EXPENSES Civil and Administrative Proceedings § 1220.3-2 Part-time volunteers. ACTION will reimburse sponsors for the reasonable expenses incidental to the defense of...

  6. 28 CFR 115.332 - Volunteer and contractor training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Volunteer and contractor training. 115... ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Training and Education § 115.332 Volunteer and contractor training. (a) The agency shall ensure that all volunteers and contractors who...

  7. 28 CFR 548.14 - Community involvement (volunteers, contractors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Community involvement (volunteers... Community involvement (volunteers, contractors). (a) The institution's chaplain may contract with... chaplain adheres. (b) The institution's chaplain may secure the services of volunteers to assist inmates...

  8. Promoting volunteer capacity in hospice palliative care: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Pesut, Barbara; Hooper, Brenda; Lehbauer, Suzanne; Dalhuisen, Miranda

    2014-02-01

    Hospice volunteers play an essential role in the primary care network for end of life. The purpose of this review was to examine the evidence on hospice volunteers published between 2002 and July 2012. An electronic search of PubMed, CINAHL and PsychINFO using controlled vocabulary, and a reference scan, yielded 54 studies focusing on hospice volunteers. Studies were primarily descriptive using quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods. Findings from studies were grouped thematically into descriptions of the work of hospice volunteers; recruitment, preparation and retention of hospice volunteers; and perspectives and outcomes of the volunteer role. A substantial body of evidence exists describing the roles, stresses and rewards of hospice volunteering. Less is known about how to adequately recruit, prepare and retain volunteers. A small but intriguing body of evidence exists around volunteers' contributions to family satisfaction and patient longevity. Although the evidence around hospice volunteers continues to grow, there is an urgent need for further research. Findings indicate that volunteers make important contributions to high quality end of life care. However, more focused research attention is required to better understand how to maximize this contribution while providing better support for volunteers.

  9. 32 CFR 1627.1 - Who may volunteer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Who may volunteer. 1627.1 Section 1627.1 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM VOLUNTEERS FOR INDUCTION § 1627.1 Who may volunteer. Any registrant who has attained the age of 17 years, who has...

  10. 28 CFR 115.332 - Volunteer and contractor training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Volunteer and contractor training. 115... ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Training and Education § 115.332 Volunteer and contractor training. (a) The agency shall ensure that all volunteers and contractors who...

  11. 11 CFR 100.74 - Uncompensated services by volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Uncompensated services by volunteers. 100.74...) Exceptions to Contributions § 100.74 Uncompensated services by volunteers. The value of services provided without compensation by any individual who volunteers on behalf of a candidate or political committee...

  12. 32 CFR 1627.1 - Who may volunteer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Who may volunteer. 1627.1 Section 1627.1 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM VOLUNTEERS FOR INDUCTION § 1627.1 Who may volunteer. Any registrant who has attained the age of 17 years, who has...

  13. 32 CFR 1627.1 - Who may volunteer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Who may volunteer. 1627.1 Section 1627.1 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM VOLUNTEERS FOR INDUCTION § 1627.1 Who may volunteer. Any registrant who has attained the age of 17 years, who has...

  14. Securing Volunteers to Fix up the School. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Howard

    2011-01-01

    How can schools secure volunteers to help fix up the building and grounds? There isn't much research on how to secure volunteers to participate in school clean-ups and fix-ups, but some key ideas can be found in anecdotal examples from many communities around the nation. The first recommendation is that securing volunteers is easier when the…

  15. 45 CFR 1220.3-2 - Part-time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Part-time volunteers. 1220.3-2 Section 1220.3-2... SERVICE PAYMENT OF VOLUNTEER LEGAL EXPENSES Civil and Administrative Proceedings § 1220.3-2 Part-time volunteers. ACTION will reimburse sponsors for the reasonable expenses incidental to the defense of...

  16. Managing 4-H Volunteer Staff: A 4-H Intern Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Hope M.

    The 4-H intern report organizes concepts and materials to aid the extension worker in his role as coordinator and trainer of 4-H volunteer staff. A 10-item task analysis of the extension worker--4-H and youth--as volunteer leader coordinator is presented. The importance of managing a volunteer staff is touched upon, and models for job descriptions…

  17. Affecting Community Change: Involving "Pro Bono" Professionals as Extension Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Diane T.; Culp, Ken, III

    2013-01-01

    "Pro bono" volunteers provide an effective means for Extension professionals to expand limited financial and human resources. Volunteers recruited from business settings can provide skills, abilities, expertise, leadership, and resources to Extension programs. Allowing professional volunteers to meet their desired leadership goals while…

  18. The Role of Volunteers in Preventing Rural Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Duane D.; Linden, Rhonda R.

    On a budget of $28,000, Child Protection, Inc. has a paid staff of an executive director, 4 foster grandparents, and 3 VISTA volunteers. But with the help of 157 volunteer servide providers, the organization is able to deliver 828 units of service monthly to rural Western Kentucky. The success of the volunteer program is based on recruiting from…

  19. Development Strategies for Online Volunteer Training Modules: A Team Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robideau, Kari; Vogel, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Volunteers are central to the delivery of 4-H programs, and providing quality, relevant training is key to volunteer success. Online, asynchronous modules are an enhancement to a training delivery menu for adult volunteers, providing consistent, accessible options traditionally delivered primarily face to face. This article describes how Minnesota…

  20. A New Competitive Edge. Volunteers from the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vizza, Cynthia; And Others

    This book provides information on workplace volunteering and how employee volunteering programs operate in specific corporate cultures. Chapter 1 focuses on the rationale upon which corporate volunteer programs are constructed. The rationale's four basic components are discussed in detail: quality of life, worker participation, responding to…

  1. Women Empower Women: Volunteers and Their Clients in Community Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulik, Liat; Megidna, Hofit

    2011-01-01

    The study is aimed at examining the relationship between psychological empowerment of women volunteers and their clients in community volunteer projects in Israel. Based on an ecological approach, the study also aimed at examining whether the variables that explain empowerment of women who volunteer also explain empowerment of their clients. The…

  2. Volunteer Motivations at a National Special Olympics Event

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khoo, Selina; Engelhorn, Rich

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the motivations for people to volunteer with the management and execution of major sporting events is important for the recruitment and retention of the volunteers. This research investigated volunteer motivations at the first National Special Olympics held in Ames, Iowa, USA in July 2006. A total of 289 participants completed the 28…

  3. Motivations of Volunteer Leaders in an Extension Exercise Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washburn, Lisa T.; Cornell, Carol E.; Traywick, LaVona; Felix, Holly C.; Phillips, Martha

    2015-01-01

    This article describes findings from a qualitative study of volunteer leaders in the StrongWomen strength training program in Arkansas. The study explored reasons volunteers initially agreed to serve, perceptions of volunteer role, and motivations for continuing to lead strength training groups long-term. Findings suggest a combination of factors…

  4. Canadian Youth Volunteering Abroad: Rethinking Issues of Power and Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngo, Mai

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of institutions in the ethical engagement of Canadian youth volunteers abroad. In recent years, researchers and practitioners in the international field have questioned the ethics of volunteering as part of development, with scrutiny on who actually benefits from volunteering initiatives. Since the 1960s, over 65,000…

  5. Making the Most of Volunteers. P/PV Briefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Jean Baldwin; Furano, Kathryn

    An examination of hundreds of studies on the use of volunteers in mentoring programs, service programs, and local community change initiatives highlight the importance of screening, training, and volunteer management. Each year, more than 90 million Americans contribute more than 20 billion volunteer hours. Personal benefits of volunteering…

  6. Health Benefits of Volunteering in the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piliavin, Jane Allyn; Siegl, Erica

    2007-01-01

    We investigate positive effects of volunteering on psychological well-being and self-reported health using all four waves of the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study. Confirming previous research, volunteering was positively related to both outcome variables. Both consistency of volunteering over time and diversity of participation are significantly…

  7. An Evaluation of the Use of Volunteers as Parent Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganong, Lawrence H.; Coleman, Marilyn

    1983-01-01

    Assessed the effectiveness of trained volunteers in leading parent education programs. Compared volunteer and professionally led groups in an ongoing extension-sponsored parenting program. Urban/rural comparisons were also made. There were no significant differences between volunteer and professionally led groups on child gains or parent…

  8. A Phenomenological Look at 4-H Volunteer Motives for Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrock, Jessalyn; Kelsey, Kathleen D.

    2013-01-01

    Volunteers play a vital role in 4-H programs. Without their service, many programs would not be possible. Understanding volunteer motives provides Extension educators with tools for finding high-quality volunteers. The research reported here used McClelland's (1985) framework for motivation (affiliation, achievement, and power) and…

  9. Smaller hospitals accept advertising.

    PubMed

    Mackesy, R

    1988-07-01

    Administrators at small- and medium-sized hospitals gradually have accepted the role of marketing in their organizations, albeit at a much slower rate than larger institutions. This update of a 1983 survey tracks the increasing competitiveness, complexity and specialization of providing health care and of advertising a small hospital's services. PMID:10288550

  10. Students Accepted on Probation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorberbaum, Caroline S.

    This report is a justification of the Dalton Junior College admissions policy designed to help students who had had academic and/or social difficulties at other schools. These students were accepted on probation, their problems carefully analyzed, and much effort devoted to those with low academic potential. They received extensive academic and…

  11. Why was Relativity Accepted?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brush, S. G.

    Historians of science have published many studies of the reception of Einstein's special and general theories of relativity. Based on a review of these studies, and my own research on the role of the light-bending prediction in the reception of general relativity, I discuss the role of three kinds of reasons for accepting relativity (1) empirical predictions and explanations; (2) social-psychological factors; and (3) aesthetic-mathematical factors. According to the historical studies, acceptance was a three-stage process. First, a few leading scientists adopted the special theory for aesthetic-mathematical reasons. In the second stage, their enthusiastic advocacy persuaded other scientists to work on the theory and apply it to problems currently of interest in atomic physics. The special theory was accepted by many German physicists by 1910 and had begun to attract some interest in other countries. In the third stage, the confirmation of Einstein's light-bending prediction attracted much public attention and forced all physicists to take the general theory of relativity seriously. In addition to light-bending, the explanation of the advance of Mercury's perihelion was considered strong evidence by theoretical physicists. The American astronomers who conducted successful tests of general relativity became defenders of the theory. There is little evidence that relativity was `socially constructed' but its initial acceptance was facilitated by the prestige and resources of its advocates.

  12. Evaluating data quality collected by volunteers for first-level inspection of hydraulic structures in mountain catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes Arevalo, V. J.; Charrière, M.; Bossi, G.; Frigerio, S.; Schenato, L.; Bogaard, T.; Bianchizza, C.; Pasuto, A.; Sterlacchini, S.

    2014-10-01

    Volunteers have been trained to perform first-level inspections of hydraulic structures within campaigns promoted by civil protection of Friuli Venezia Giulia (Italy). Two inspection forms and a learning session were prepared to standardize data collection on the functional status of bridges and check dams. In all, 11 technicians and 25 volunteers inspected a maximum of six structures in Pontebba, a mountain community within the Fella Basin. Volunteers included civil-protection volunteers, geosciences and social sciences students. Some participants carried out the inspection without attending the learning session. Thus, we used the mode of technicians in the learning group to distinguish accuracy levels between volunteers and technicians. Data quality was assessed by their accuracy, precision and completeness. We assigned ordinal scores to the rating scales in order to get an indication of the structure status. We also considered performance and feedback of participants to identify corrective actions in survey procedures. Results showed that volunteers could perform comparably to technicians, but only with a given range in precision. However, a completeness ratio (question/parameter) was still needed any time volunteers used unspecified options. Then, volunteers' ratings could be considered as preliminary assessments without replacing other procedures. Future research should consider advantages of mobile applications for data-collection methods.

  13. When Teaching and Volunteering Go Together: Exploring Participation Characteristics and Demographic Backgrounds of Senior Volunteer Teachers and Their Teaching Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, D. D. M.

    2016-01-01

    Senior volunteer teachers play important roles in learning programmes for the elderly. These volunteers' level of teaching satisfaction was assumed to influence programmes, their organizational behaviours and outcomes. However, scant research has focused specifically on volunteers' levels of satisfaction with teaching and how their satisfaction is…

  14. A community-oriented program for training and using volunteers.

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, J; Flater, L

    1975-01-01

    Eleven women volunteers from the Arvada, Colorado, community were provided intensive training in communication and other variables related to effective functioning in a community mental health center. Volunteers were then provided various placements within the center. Results indicated that the volunteers' communication effectiveness levels increased significantly from pretest to posttest and as compared to a control group of students going through a mental health program. Volunteers also received favorable evaluation rating from their practicum supervisors. The paper will discuss the procedures, benefits, and considerations involved in developing and utilizing volunteers. PMID:1132223

  15. Developing and validating a measure of community capacity: Why volunteers make the best neighbours.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Sarah A; Gray, Andrew R; Boucher, Sara E

    2015-05-01

    Social support and community connectedness are key determinants of both mental and physical wellbeing. While social capital has been used to indicate the instrumental value of these social relationships, its broad and often competing definitions have hindered practical applications of the concept. Within the health promotion field, the related concept of community capacity, the ability of a group to identify and act on problems, has gained prominence (Labonte and Laverack, 2001). The goal of this study was to develop and validate a scale measuring community capacity including exploring its associations with socio-demographic and civic behaviour variables among the residents of four small (populations 1500-2000) high-deprivation towns in southern New Zealand. The full (41-item) scale was found to have strong internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.89) but a process of reducing the scale resulted in a shorter 26-item instrument with similar internal consistency (alpha 0.88). Subscales of the reduced instrument displayed at least marginally acceptable levels of internal consistency (0.62-0.77). Using linear regression models, differences in community capacity scores were found for selected criterion, namely time spent living in the location, local voting, and volunteering behaviour, although the first of these was no longer statistically significant in an adjusted model with potential confounders including age, sex, ethnicity, education, marital status, employment, household income, and religious beliefs. This provides support for the scale's concurrent validity. Differences were present between the four towns in unadjusted models and remained statistically significant in adjusted models (including variables mentioned above) suggesting, crucially, that even when such factors are accounted for, perceptions of one's community may still depend on place.

  16. Acceptability of human risk.

    PubMed Central

    Kasperson, R E

    1983-01-01

    This paper has three objectives: to explore the nature of the problem implicit in the term "risk acceptability," to examine the possible contributions of scientific information to risk standard-setting, and to argue that societal response is best guided by considerations of process rather than formal methods of analysis. Most technological risks are not accepted but are imposed. There is also little reason to expect consensus among individuals on their tolerance of risk. Moreover, debates about risk levels are often at base debates over the adequacy of the institutions which manage the risks. Scientific information can contribute three broad types of analyses to risk-setting deliberations: contextual analysis, equity assessment, and public preference analysis. More effective risk-setting decisions will involve attention to the process used, particularly in regard to the requirements of procedural justice and democratic responsibility. PMID:6418541

  17. Health benefits of volunteering in the Wisconsin longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Piliavin, Jane Allyn; Siegl, Erica

    2007-12-01

    We investigate positive effects of volunteering on psychological well-being and self-reported health using all four waves of the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study. Confirming previous research, volunteering was positively related to both outcome variables. Both consistency of volunteering over time and diversity of participation are significantly related to well-being and self-reported health. The relationship of volunteering to psychological well-being was moderated by level of social integration, such that those who were less well integrated benefited the most. Mattering appears to mediate the link between volunteering and wellbeing. Controls for other forms of social participation and for the predictors of volunteering are employed in analyses of well-being in 1992. We find volunteering effects on psychological well-being in 2004, controlling for 1992 wellbeing, thus providing strong evidence for a causal effect.

  18. Effect of transdermic acetylsalicylic acid on hemostasis in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Adriana B; Funosas, Esteban; Maestri, Lorella; Lucena, Perla Hermida

    2007-01-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) exerts an antiaggregatory effect on platelets by irreversible inhibition of the enzyme thrombocyte cyclooxigenase when it is administered orally at doses above 80 mg/day. For several years ASA has been available as a solution that can be topically applied on the skin. It is widely used by athletes and individuals with chronic rheumatic disorders. However, it has not been established to date whether the plasma levels that result from these doses of ASA affect hemostasis during odontological procedures that involve bleeding, causing platelet dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether topical application is capable of affecting hemostasis. Three studies were conducted: A, B y C. Each of the 3 groups included 12 healthy volunteers of both sexes. The aim of study A was to evaluate if the formulation for topical application resulted in plasma levels of ASA that resembled those observed for the oral formulation and affect hemostasis. In experiment A, plasma levels of salicylic acid (SA) were assessed for each volunteer at 30 minutes, 60 minutes, 6 hours, 12 hours and 24 hours after oral administration of a dose of 500 mg ASA. Experiment B was identical to experiment A except for the fact that ASA was topically applied employing a commercial preparation Aspirub in a predetermined area at a rate of 2 ml/day over a period of 15 days. Experiment C was designed in the same way as experiment B, for a higher dose and a longer period of time (4 ml/day over a period of 30 days). One of the volunteers exhibited detectable salicylemia that could affect hemostasis as occurs with the oral formulation. The following two studies (C1 and C2) employed doses of Aspirub of 8 and 16 ml/day respectively, over a period of 30 days. We measured biochemical parameters associated to platelet function. The dose of 8 ml/day induced moderate alterations in all the parameters related to platelet function and the daily dose of 16 ml inhibited platelet

  19. Age and Acceptance of Euthanasia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Russell A.

    1980-01-01

    Study explores relationship between age (and sex and race) and acceptance of euthanasia. Women and non-Whites were less accepting because of religiosity. Among older people less acceptance was attributable to their lesser education and greater religiosity. Results suggest that quality of life in old age affects acceptability of euthanasia. (Author)

  20. Mindfulness, Acceptance and Catastrophizing in Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Maaike J.; Steinhagen, Hannemike E.; Versteegen, Gerbrig J.; Struys, Michel M. R. F.; Sanderman, Robbert

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Catastrophizing is often the primary target of the cognitive-behavioral treatment of chronic pain. Recent literature on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) suggests an important role in the pain experience for the concepts mindfulness and acceptance. The aim of this study is to examine the influence of mindfulness and general psychological acceptance on pain-related catastrophizing in patients with chronic pain. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted, including 87 chronic pain patients from an academic outpatient pain center. Results The results show that general psychological acceptance (measured with the AAQ-II) is a strong predictor of pain-related catastrophizing, independent of gender, age and pain intensity. Mindfulness (measured with the MAAS) did not predict levels of pain-related catastrophizing. Discussion Acceptance of psychological experiences outside of pain itself is related to catastrophizing. Thus, acceptance seems to play a role in the pain experience and should be part of the treatment of chronic pain. The focus of the ACT treatment of chronic pain does not necessarily have to be on acceptance of pain per se, but may be aimed at acceptance of unwanted experiences in general. Mindfulness in the sense of “acting with awareness” is however not related to catastrophizing. Based on our research findings in comparisons with those of other authors, we recommend a broader conceptualization of mindfulness and the use of a multifaceted questionnaire for mindfulness instead of the unidimensional MAAS. PMID:24489915

  1. Consumer acceptance of ginseng food products.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hee Sook; Lee, Young-Chul; Rhee, Young Kyung; Lee, Soo-Yeun

    2011-01-01

    Ginseng has been utilized less in food products than in dietary supplements in the United States. Sensory acceptance of ginseng food products by U.S. consumers has not been reported. The objectives of this study were to: (1) determine the sensory acceptance of commercial ginseng food products and (2) assess influence of the addition of sweeteners to ginseng tea and ginseng extract to chocolate on consumer acceptance. Total of 126 consumers participated in 3 sessions for (1) 7 commercial red ginseng food products, (2) 10 ginseng teas varying in levels of sugar or honey, and (3) 10 ginseng milk or dark chocolates varying in levels of ginseng extract. Ginseng candy with vitamin C and ginseng crunchy white chocolate were the most highly accepted, while sliced ginseng root product was the least accepted among the seven commercial products. Sensory acceptance increased in proportion to the content of sugar and honey in ginseng tea, whereas acceptance decreased with increasing content of ginseng extract in milk and dark chocolates. Findings demonstrate that ginseng food product types with which consumers have been already familiar, such as candy and chocolate, will have potential for success in the U.S. market. Chocolate could be suggested as a food matrix into which ginseng can be incorporated, as containing more bioactive compounds than ginseng tea at a similar acceptance level. Future research may include a descriptive analysis with ginseng-based products to identify the key drivers of liking and disliking for successful new product development.

  2. Consumer acceptance of ginseng food products.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hee Sook; Lee, Young-Chul; Rhee, Young Kyung; Lee, Soo-Yeun

    2011-01-01

    Ginseng has been utilized less in food products than in dietary supplements in the United States. Sensory acceptance of ginseng food products by U.S. consumers has not been reported. The objectives of this study were to: (1) determine the sensory acceptance of commercial ginseng food products and (2) assess influence of the addition of sweeteners to ginseng tea and ginseng extract to chocolate on consumer acceptance. Total of 126 consumers participated in 3 sessions for (1) 7 commercial red ginseng food products, (2) 10 ginseng teas varying in levels of sugar or honey, and (3) 10 ginseng milk or dark chocolates varying in levels of ginseng extract. Ginseng candy with vitamin C and ginseng crunchy white chocolate were the most highly accepted, while sliced ginseng root product was the least accepted among the seven commercial products. Sensory acceptance increased in proportion to the content of sugar and honey in ginseng tea, whereas acceptance decreased with increasing content of ginseng extract in milk and dark chocolates. Findings demonstrate that ginseng food product types with which consumers have been already familiar, such as candy and chocolate, will have potential for success in the U.S. market. Chocolate could be suggested as a food matrix into which ginseng can be incorporated, as containing more bioactive compounds than ginseng tea at a similar acceptance level. Future research may include a descriptive analysis with ginseng-based products to identify the key drivers of liking and disliking for successful new product development. PMID:22416723

  3. 45 CFR 2553.62 - What are the responsibilities of a volunteer station?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... undertake the following responsibilities in support of RSVP volunteers: (a) Develop volunteer assignments that impact critical human and social needs, and regularly assess those assignments for continued... volunteers with disabilities; and (f) Provide assigned RSVP volunteers the following support: (1)...

  4. 45 CFR 2553.62 - What are the responsibilities of a volunteer station?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... undertake the following responsibilities in support of RSVP volunteers: (a) Develop volunteer assignments that impact critical human and social needs, and regularly assess those assignments for continued... volunteers with disabilities; and (f) Provide assigned RSVP volunteers the following support: (1)...

  5. Medical reserve corps volunteers in disasters: a survey of their roles, experiences, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Watson, Matthew; Selck, Frederic; Rambhia, Kunal; Morhard, Ryan; Franco, Crystal; Toner, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) was established in the Office of the Surgeon General in response to the spontaneous but disorganized outpouring of medical volunteers following the terrorist attacks of 2001. The mission of the federal MRC office is to provide organizational structure and guidance to the nearly 1,000 locally organized and funded MRC units that have grown up across the country and the more than 200,000 volunteer health professionals that staff these units. Despite the large size of this program and its numerous activations over the past decade, including in the Boston Marathon bombing and Hurricane Sandy, relatively little is known about the MRC, including the make-up of the units, the ways units have been used, and the challenges faced by MRC units and their volunteers. Here we report the results of a mixed-methods investigation of MRC unit organization, activities, and challenges. PMID:24697751

  6. A Community-based Education Project: Intertidal Surveys With Student and Adult Volunteers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller-Parker, G.; Bingham, B. L.

    2004-12-01

    The Fidalgo Learning about the Intertidal Project (FLIP) brought together scientists, educators, students and adult volunteers (20-30 total individuals) to conduct studies of the intertidal zone of a section of Fidalgo Island, Wa. in 2003 and 2004. The project goals were to: 1) obtain basic data on diversity and abundance of intertidal species in different habitats, 2) promote public awareness and appreciation of the intertidal zone, and 3) develop a model program for volunteer participation in scientific surveys. The 2-week program began with 2 days of workshops on local intertidal organisms to teach the FLIP participants how to classify and identify the different organisms and substrates they were likely to encounter in the surveys. We provided general lectures on intertidal habitats and on the importance of the intertidal zone to coastal resources. The FLIP participants worked together on identifying organisms, practicing the use of quadrats and data collection before the surveys began. Following 4 days of field surveys, the participants signed up for workshops that included compilation and analysis of the data, photography, nature writing and algae pressing. The final activity was a public tour of the intertidal day held at a local park. 50-60 people of all ages participated. The goal was to educate the public in plant and animal identification and habitat variability as well as "beach etiquette." Successful model program elements included self-selected volunteers and attention to the composition of each survey team, with one scientist/leader per team and one adult and two students or two adults and one student per team (4-5 teams, each completing one transect per site). Program flexibility was also crucial; FLIP volunteers were not required to attend every single day and post-survey workshops were optional. Volunteers participated to different extents and for different lengths of time depending on their abilities and interests. Project ownership was important

  7. Scientist volunteers: Doing science with children

    SciTech Connect

    Kirwan, G.M.

    1994-12-31

    The number of scientists who are volunteering to visit school classrooms is growing. Unfortunately, scientists have a tendency to cram too much information into their presentation. The result is almost always disastrous. The best thing a scientist can do is provide students with a positive science experience that may cause them to re-evaluate their attitude toward science. One of the best ways to do this is to involve students in a novel hands-on activity that engages and maintains their interest. Guidelines for developing such activities are provided.

  8. Pharmacokinetic parameters of bevantolol in volunteers.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, P; van Brummelen, P

    1986-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of the new beta-adrenoceptor blocking drug bevantolol and some aspects of its beta-blocking effect have been studied in healthy volunteers. Bevantolol had a short serum half-life (86 +/- 33 min) and high systemic availability after oral administration. The observed changes in heart rate, systolic blood pressure during exercise and plasma renin activity were all compatible with beta-adrenoceptor blockade. After 200 mg p.o. in the morning, the effects lasted for less than 24 h.

  9. Developing a workflow to identify inconsistencies in volunteered geographic information: a phenological case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehdipoor, Hamed; Zurita-Milla, Raul; Rosemartin, Alyssa; Gerst, Katharine L.; Weltzin, Jake F.

    2015-01-01

    Recent improvements in online information communication and mobile location-aware technologies have led to the production of large volumes of volunteered geographic information. Widespread, large-scale efforts by volunteers to collect data can inform and drive scientific advances in diverse fields, including ecology and climatology. Traditional workflows to check the quality of such volunteered information can be costly and time consuming as they heavily rely on human interventions. However, identifying factors that can influence data quality, such as inconsistency, is crucial when these data are used in modeling and decision-making frameworks. Recently developed workflows use simple statistical approaches that assume that the majority of the information is consistent. However, this assumption is not generalizable, and ignores underlying geographic and environmental contextual variability that may explain apparent inconsistencies. Here we describe an automated workflow to check inconsistency based on the availability of contextual environmental information for sampling locations. The workflow consists of three steps: (1) dimensionality reduction to facilitate further analysis and interpretation of results, (2) model-based clustering to group observations according to their contextual conditions, and (3) identification of inconsistent observations within each cluster. The workflow was applied to volunteered observations of flowering in common and cloned lilac plants (Syringa vulgaris and Syringa x chinensis) in the United States for the period 1980 to 2013. About 97% of the observations for both common and cloned lilacs were flagged as consistent, indicating that volunteers provided reliable information for this case study. Relative to the original dataset, the exclusion of inconsistent observations changed the apparent rate of change in lilac bloom dates by two days per decade, indicating the importance of inconsistency checking as a key step in data quality

  10. Pilot study of the use of community volunteers to distribute azithromycin for trachoma control in Ghana.

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, A. W.; Akudibillah, J.; Abugri, P.; Hagan, M.; Foster, A.; Bailey, R. L.; Mabey, D. C.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the skills of community health volunteers in diagnosing active trachoma and distributing azithromycin in the Northern Region of Ghana. METHODS: Six community health volunteers from Daboya were trained to diagnose trachoma and to treat the disease using azithromycin. They were also informed of the drug's possible side-effects. Under supervision, each volunteer then examined, and if necessary treated, 15 households. The dose of azithromycin was determined by weight; height was also measured. Tablets were given in preference to suspension when possible. RESULTS: The volunteers' diagnostic sensitivity for active trachoma was 63%; their specificity was 96%. At the household level, their "decision to treat" was correct in 83% of households. In 344 treatment episodes, volunteers planned a dose of azithromycin outside the range 15-30 mg/kg on only seven occasions (2.0% of all planned treatments). The volunteers' drug management skills were good, the response of the community was excellent, and adverse reactions were infrequent. Diagnosis of active trachoma, record-keeping skills, and knowledge of side-effects were found to need greater emphasis in any future education programme. Most people aged four years or older were able to swallow tablets. For those taking tablets, the correlation between the data gathered for height and weight shows that calculating azithromycin doses by height is a valid alternative to calculating it by weight. CONCLUSION: Trained community health volunteers have a potential role in identifying active trachoma and distributing azithromycin. To simplify training and logistics, it may be better to base dosage schedules on height rather than weight for those taking tablets, which included most people aged four years or more in the population studied. PMID:11217675

  11. Experiences and Psychosocial Impact of West Africa Ebola Deployment on US Health Care Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Gershon, Robyn; Dernehl, Liza A.; Nwankwo, Ezinne; Zhi, Qi; Qureshi, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    Background: This qualitative study was designed to assess health care volunteers’ experiences and psychosocial impacts associated with deployment to the West Africa Ebola epidemic. Methods: In 2015, using snowball sampling, 16 US health care volunteers who had recently returned from West Africa were recruited for this study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to collect information associated with each phase of deployment (pre, peri, and post). Results: Participants reported that they were motivated to volunteer because of a sense of responsibility and feelings of empathy and altruism. Immediately prior to deployment, most reported fear of contagion and death, as well as doubts regarding the adequacy of their training. Family members and close friends expressed high levels of concern regarding participants’ decisions to volunteer. During the deployment, participants were fearful of exposure and reported feeling emotionally and physically exhausted. They also reported feeling frustrated by extreme resource limitations, poor management of the mission, lack of clearly defined roles and responsibilities, and inability to provide high quality care. Upon return home, participants felt a sense of isolation, depression, stigmatization, interpersonal difficulties, and extreme stress. Conclusion: Preparedness of volunteers was suboptimal at each stage of deployment. All stakeholders, including volunteers, sponsoring organizations, government agencies, and professional organizations have a shared responsibility in ensuring that volunteers to medical missions are adequately prepared. This is especially critical for high risk deployments. Effective policies and practices need to be developed and implemented in order to protect the health and well-being of health care volunteers to the fullest extent possible. PMID:27803840

  12. 'We couldn't function without volunteers': volunteering with a disability, the perspective of not-for-profit agencies.

    PubMed

    Balandin, Susan; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth; Dew, Angela; Ballin, Liora

    2006-06-01

    Volunteers play an important role in many organisations that deliver services for the public good. Many people within the community choose to volunteer and there is a rich literature on the reasons why people do so, as well as the benefits that accrue to individuals, organisations and the community. However, there are few reports of people with long-standing disability becoming volunteers. The aim of this study was to explore the views of volunteer coordinators in not-for-profit organisations concerning people with long-standing disability as volunteers. Seven coordinators participated in two focus groups. The participants identified opportunities for people with a disability to contribute as volunteers, but were also quick to point out significant barriers. The findings from this exploratory study suggest that if people with long-standing disability are to volunteer, consideration must be given to their individual requirements and overcoming negative community attitudes.

  13. Volunteering as a means to an equal end? The impact of a social justice function on intention to volunteer.

    PubMed

    Jiranek, Patrick; Kals, Elisabeth; Humm, Julia Sophia; Strubel, Isabel Theresia; Wehner, Theo

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we combined components of the theory of planned behavior and the functional approach to predict the social sector volunteering intention of nonvolunteers (N = 513). Moreover, we added a new other-oriented "social justice function" to the Volunteer Functions Inventory of Clary and colleagues (1998), which contains mainly self-oriented functions. We distinguished the social justice function from the other five measured volunteer functions in confirmatory factor analysis, and showed its incremental validity in predicting intention to volunteer beyond established constructs such as self-efficacy, subjective norm, and the five volunteer functions. This study suggests that emphasizing potential social justice improvements by means of volunteering may attract new volunteers.

  14. Volunteering as a means to an equal end? The impact of a social justice function on intention to volunteer.

    PubMed

    Jiranek, Patrick; Kals, Elisabeth; Humm, Julia Sophia; Strubel, Isabel Theresia; Wehner, Theo

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we combined components of the theory of planned behavior and the functional approach to predict the social sector volunteering intention of nonvolunteers (N = 513). Moreover, we added a new other-oriented "social justice function" to the Volunteer Functions Inventory of Clary and colleagues (1998), which contains mainly self-oriented functions. We distinguished the social justice function from the other five measured volunteer functions in confirmatory factor analysis, and showed its incremental validity in predicting intention to volunteer beyond established constructs such as self-efficacy, subjective norm, and the five volunteer functions. This study suggests that emphasizing potential social justice improvements by means of volunteering may attract new volunteers. PMID:24003581

  15. Pharmacokinetics and safety of JTE-522, a novel selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, in healthy male volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Yasuhiko; Umemura, Kazuo; Kondo, Kazunao; Nakashima, Mitsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Takuo; Takahashi, Mitsuru

    2002-01-01

    Aims The pharmacokinetics and safety profile of JTE-522, 4-(4-cyclohexyl-2 methyloxazol-5-yl)-2-fluorobenzensulphonamide, a novel selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor were investigated in healthy male volunteers. Methods Initially, as a pilot study, five groups of two subjects were given oral doses of 3–100 mg of JTE-522. After safety assessment, subjects were given 150 and 200 mg of JTE-522. The effect of food-intake on the pharmacokinetics of JTE-522 at a dose of 150 mg was examined. In the multiple-dose study, subjects were given 150 mg of JTE-522 once a day for 7 days. Concentrations of unchanged JTE-522 in plasma, blood and urine were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (h.p.l.c.). Concentrations of metabolites were estimated with h.p.l.c. chromatograms and calibration curves for quantification of unchanged JTE-522. Results In the course of this study, no serious abnormality attributable to the test drug was observed, suggesting that JTE-522 was well tolerated in healthy subjects. In a single-dose study, the concentrations of JTE-522 in blood were much higher than the corresponding concentrations in plasma. JTE-522 was readily distributed to blood cells and percentage distribution into blood cells was more than 99.0%. However, the values of Cmax in blood at doses of 100, 150, 200 mg JTE-522 were 15241, 20445 ± 3918 (16333–24556), 20965 ± 3260 (17544–24386) ng ml−1, respectively. These findings suggest that JTE-522 has a high affinity for blood cells and the distribution into blood cells is limited at the higher doses of over 100 mg. In a multiple dose study, pharmacokinetic parameters including t1/2 and AUC after the fourth administration were comparable with that of the seventh administration. Thus, these findings suggest the absence of accumulation on the multiple-dosing of JTE-522. Conclusions These results indicate that JTE-522 has an acceptable pharmacokinetic profile for clinical use without any serious adverse events as we

  16. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2005-07-01

    This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal.

  17. Behavioral genetics: scientific and social acceptance.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, David R

    2003-01-01

    Human behavioral genetics can be broadly defined as the attempt to characterize and define the genetic or hereditary basis for human behavior. Examination of the history of these scientific enterprises reveals episodes of controversy, and an apparent distinction between scientific and social acceptance of the genetic nature of such complex behaviors. This essay will review the history and methodology of behavioral genetics research, including a more detailed look at case histories involving behavioral genetic research for aggressive behavior and alcoholism. It includes a discussion of the scientific versus social qualities of the acceptance of behavioral genetics research, as well as the development of a general model for scientific acceptance involving the researchers, the scientific literature, the scientific peer group, the mainstream media, and the public at large. From this model follows a discussion of the means and complications by which behavioral genetics research may be accepted by society, and an analysis of how future studies might be conducted.

  18. Perceptions of short-term medical volunteer work: a qualitative study in Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Green, Tyler; Green, Heidi; Scandlyn, Jean; Kestler, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Background Each year medical providers from wealthy countries participate in short-term medical volunteer work in resource-poor countries. Various authors have raised concern that such work has the potential to be harmful to recipient communities; however, the social science and medical literature contains little research into the perceptions of short-term medical volunteer work from the perspective of members of recipient communities. This exploratory study examines the perception of short-term medical volunteer work in Guatemala among groups of actors affected by or participating in these programs. Methods The researchers conducted in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 72 individuals, including Guatemalan healthcare providers and health authorities, foreign medical providers, non-medical personnel working on health projects, and Guatemalan parents of children treated by a short-term volunteer group. Detailed notes and summaries of these interviews were uploaded, coded and annotated using Atlas.ti (Scientific Software Development GmbH, Berlin) to identify recurrent themes from the interviews. Results Informants commonly identified a need for increased access to medical services in Guatemala, and many believed that short-term medical volunteers are in a position to offer improved access to medical care in the communities where they serve. Informants most frequently cited appropriate patient selection and attention to payment systems as the best means to avoid creating dependence on foreign aid. The most frequent suggestion to improve short-term medical volunteer work was coordination with and respect for local Guatemalan healthcare providers and their communities, as insufficient understanding of the country's existing healthcare resources and needs may result in perceived harm to the recipient community. Conclusion The perceived impact of short-term medical volunteer projects in Guatemala is highly variable and dependent upon the individual project. In this

  19. Uses and biases of volunteer water quality data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loperfido, J.V.; Beyer, P.; Just, C.L.; Schnoor, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    State water quality monitoring has been augmented by volunteer monitoring programs throughout the United States. Although a significant effort has been put forth by volunteers, questions remain as to whether volunteer data are accurate and can be used by regulators. In this study, typical volunteer water quality measurements from laboratory and environmental samples in Iowa were analyzed for error and bias. Volunteer measurements of nitrate+nitrite were significantly lower (about 2-fold) than concentrations determined via standard methods in both laboratory-prepared and environmental samples. Total reactive phosphorus concentrations analyzed by volunteers were similar to measurements determined via standard methods in laboratory-prepared samples and environmental samples, but were statistically lower than the actual concentration in four of the five laboratory-prepared samples. Volunteer water quality measurements were successful in identifying and classifying most of the waters which violate United States Environmental Protection Agency recommended water quality criteria for total nitrogen (66%) and for total phosphorus (52%) with the accuracy improving when accounting for error and biases in the volunteer data. An understanding of the error and bias in volunteer water quality measurements can allow regulators to incorporate volunteer water quality data into total maximum daily load planning or state water quality reporting. ?? 2010 American Chemical Society.

  20. Pharmacokinetics of Oral Taurine in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Ghandforoush-Sattari, Mohammadreza; Mashayekhi, Siminozar; Krishna, Channarayapatna V.; Thompson, John P.; Routledge, Philipp A.

    2010-01-01

    Taurine, a sulfur-containing amino acid, is a normal constituent of the human diet. Little is known of the pharmacokinetics of taurine in man after oral administration. We studied the pharmacokinetics of 4 g taurine in eight healthy male volunteers (median age 27.5, range 22–45) following orally administration in the fasting state in the morning. Blood samples were taken at regular intervals and plasma taurine concentration was measured by a modified HPLC method. Data were subjected to noncompartmental analysis. Maximum plasma taurine concentration (Cmax) was measured at 1.5 ± 0.6 hr after administration as 86.1 ± 19.0 mg/L (0.69 ± 0.15 mmol). Plasma elimination half-life (T1/2) and the ratio of clearance/bioavailability (Cl/F) were 1.0 ± 0.3 hr and 21.1 ± 7.8 L/hr, respectively. Since taurine is occasionally used in therapeutics as a medicine, the pharmacokinetics and effects of oral taurine in healthy volunteers would be useful in the future studies of taurine in pharmacology and nutrition. PMID:22331997

  1. Growing Your Career through Volunteering and Leadership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Riordan, C. A.; Meth, C.

    2007-12-01

    From giving your first paper at a scientific meeting to chairing committees that make multi-million dollar decisions, scientific organizations provide critical opportunities for growing your career. Many organizations support student activities by providing travel grants and fellowships - an important first step towards joining the larger scientific community. Beyond these standard opportunities, organizations also provide opportunities for students interested in gaining leadership experience, a skill not typically acquired in graduate science programs. For example, the Consortium for Leadership's Schlanger Ocean Drilling Fellowship provides research funds to graduate students, but also introduces the fellows to the communication skills needed to become successful members of their scientific community. Beyond student opportunities, volunteering provides mid-career and established scientists further experience in leadership. Opportunities exist in advising government science policy, guiding large-scale research programs, organizing large scientific meetings, and serving on non-profit boards. The variety of volunteer and leadership opportunities that are available give scientists at all stages of their career a chance to expand and diversify their experience, leading to new successes.

  2. Evolutionary Stability in the Asymmetric Volunteer's Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yao-Tang

    2014-01-01

    It is often assumed that in public goods games, contributors are either strong or weak players and each individual has an equal probability of exhibiting cooperation. It is difficult to explain why the public good is produced by strong individuals in some cooperation systems, and by weak individuals in others. Viewing the asymmetric volunteer's dilemma game as an evolutionary game, we find that whether the strong or the weak players produce the public good depends on the initial condition (i.e., phenotype or initial strategy of individuals). These different evolutionarily stable strategies (ESS) associated with different initial conditions, can be interpreted as the production modes of public goods of different cooperation systems. A further analysis revealed that the strong player adopts a pure strategy but mixed strategies for the weak players to produce the public good, and that the probability of volunteering by weak players decreases with increasing group size or decreasing cost-benefit ratio. Our model shows that the defection probability of a “strong” player is greater than the “weak” players in the model of Diekmann (1993). This contradicts Selten's (1980) model that public goods can only be produced by a strong player, is not an evolutionarily stable strategy, and will therefore disappear over evolutionary time. Our public good model with ESS has thus extended previous interpretations that the public good can only be produced by strong players in an asymmetric game. PMID:25111781

  3. Baby-Crying Acceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Tiago; de Magalhães, Sérgio Tenreiro

    The baby's crying is his most important mean of communication. The crying monitoring performed by devices that have been developed doesn't ensure the complete safety of the child. It is necessary to join, to these technological resources, means of communicating the results to the responsible, which would involve the digital processing of information available from crying. The survey carried out, enabled to understand the level of adoption, in the continental territory of Portugal, of a technology that will be able to do such a digital processing. It was used the TAM as the theoretical referential. The statistical analysis showed that there is a good probability of acceptance of such a system.

  4. High acceptance recoil polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    The HARP Collaboration

    1992-12-05

    In order to detect neutrons and protons in the 50 to 600 MeV energy range and measure their polarization, an efficient, low-noise, self-calibrating device is being designed. This detector, known as the High Acceptance Recoil Polarimeter (HARP), is based on the recoil principle of proton detection from np[r arrow]n[prime]p[prime] or pp[r arrow]p[prime]p[prime] scattering (detected particles are underlined) which intrinsically yields polarization information on the incoming particle. HARP will be commissioned to carry out experiments in 1994.

  5. 45 CFR 2551.72 - Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) All Senior Companions performing direct services to individual clients in home settings and individual clients in community-based settings, shall receive a written volunteer assignment plan developed by the... (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE SENIOR COMPANION PROGRAM Senior...

  6. MMPI Comparison of Black Heroin Users Volunteering or Not Volunteering for Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinowitz, R.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Black volunteers differed significantly, scoring higher on the Hypochondriasis, Depression, and Hysteria scales. Such differences add evidence against the addiction-prone personality hypothesis and underscore the need for evaluating the effects of voluntarism and ethnicity in personality research on drug abuse. (Author)

  7. CEBUANO PARA SA MGA PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEERS. (CEBUANO FOR THE PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEERS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAURA, BETTY; AND OTHERS

    THE BASIC VOCABULARY AND STRUCTURE OF CEBUANO VISAYAN ARE PRESENTED HERE THROUGH TWENTY-TWO SHORT DIALOGUES AND ACCOMPANYING PATTERN DRILLS AND CULTURAL NOTES. THE DIALOGUES ARE BASED ON EVERYDAY SITUATIONS AND COMMON USAGE THAT THE PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEER ENCOUNTERS IN THIS AREA OF THE PHILIPPINES. INTRODUCTORY PAGES PRESENT THE STUDENT WITH THE…

  8. Generalized group chain acceptance sampling plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zain, Zakiyah; Mughal, Abdur Razzaque; Aziz, Nazrina

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we proposed an acceptance sampling plan based on generalized group chain truncated life test. The decision on acceptance of a submitted lot can be made by using the cumulative information of the immediately preceding samples. The design parameters of the proposed plan such as the minimum number of groups are found to satisfy the desired quality standard. The benefits of this plan include smaller sample size and reduced overall costs.

  9. Effects of Social Support and Volunteering on Depression Among Grandparents Raising Grandchildren.

    PubMed

    Jang, Heejung; Tang, Fengyan

    2016-10-01

    Guided by a stress-buffering model, this study examined the effect of the caregiver stress on depressive symptoms, specifically the moderating effects of social support and volunteering on the relationship between stress and depressive symptoms among grandparent caregivers. The 2010 Health and Retirement Survey included a sample of 1,973 grandparent caregivers who reported their stress scores. Findings suggest that positive social support and volunteering significantly moderated the relationship between stress and depressive symptoms. In particular, the study revealed that perceived quality of relations may help grandparent caregivers cope with their ongoing stress and enlarged social interaction may buffer the increase of negative stressor outcomes.

  10. Learning through service: student perceptions on volunteering at interprofessional hepatitis B student-run clinics.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Leslie C; Zheng, Patricia; Coelho, Anabelle D; Lin, Lisa D; O'Sullivan, Patricia S; O'Brien, Bridget C; Yu, Albert Y; Lai, Cindy J

    2011-06-01

    Student-run clinics (SRCs) are widespread, but studies on their educational impact are limited. We surveyed preclinical medical, nursing, and pharmacy students about their experiences in a hepatitis B elective which provided opportunities to they could volunteer at hepatitis B screening and vaccination SRCs. Student responses revealed positive perceptions of the volunteer experience. Benefits included interacting with patients, developing clinical skills, providing service to disadvantaged populations, and collaborating with health professional peers. Students who participated in clinic reported enhanced skills compared to those who did not attend. SRCs play a valuable role in instilling positive attitudes and improving skills.

  11. Pulp fiction - The volunteer concept (or how not to site additional LLRW disposal capacity)

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    Experiences of compacts and of individual states throughout the nation indicate that low-level radioactive waste disposal siting processes, based from the beginning upon the volunteer concept are fraught with problems. Most apparent among these problems is that the volunteer concept does not lead to scientifically and technically based siting endeavors. Ten years have passed since the Amendments Act of 1985, and no compact or state has been - successful in providing for new LLRW disposal capacity. That failure can be traced in part to the reliance upon the volunteer concept in siting attempts. If success is to be achieved, the future direction for LLRW management must focus on three areas: first, a comprehensive evaluation of all LLRW management options, including reduction of waste generated and on-site storage; secondly, a comprehensive evaluation of the current as well as projected waste stream, to determine the amount of disposal capacity actually needed; and, finally, sound scientifically and technically based siting processes.

  12. Latinos' community involvement in HIV/AIDS: organizational and individual perspectives on volunteering.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Valles, Jesus; Brown, Amanda Uris

    2003-02-01

    Community involvement (e.g., volunteerism, activism) in HIV/AIDS may be an effective prevention strategy. Through involvement in HIV/AIDS-related organizations, individuals may develop a positive sense of themselves, maintain HIV preventive behaviors, and create community change. In this paper we examine the types of activities, motives, consequences, and deterrents to community involvement among Latino gay men using both community organizations' and Latino gay men's perspectives. Data come from an exploratory study in Chicago. It included telephone interviews with HIV/AIDS organizations (N = 62) and in-depth interviews with Latino gay men (n = 6 volunteers; n = 7 no volunteers). We found that organizations have few Latino volunteers and that the deterrents to involvement are stigma of HIV/AIDS and homosexuality, racism, and apathy. Among the positive consequences, we found an increase in self-esteem, sense of empowerment, and safer sex behaviors.

  13. A randomized controlled trial to promote volunteering in older adults.

    PubMed

    Warner, Lisa M; Wolff, Julia K; Ziegelmann, Jochen P; Wurm, Susanne

    2014-12-01

    Volunteering is presumed to confer health benefits, but interventions to encourage older adults to volunteer are sparse. Therefore, a randomized controlled trial with 280 community-dwelling older German adults was conducted to test the effects of a theory-based social-cognitive intervention against a passive waiting-list control group and an active control intervention designed to motivate physical activity. Self-reports of weekly volunteering minutes were assessed at baseline (5 weeks before the intervention) as well as 2 and 6 weeks after the intervention. Participants in the treatment group increased their weekly volunteering minutes to a greater extent than participants in the control groups 6 weeks after the intervention. We conclude that a single, face-to-face group session can increase volunteering among older community-dwelling adults. However, the effects need some time to unfold because changes in volunteering were not apparent 2 weeks after the intervention.

  14. Does volunteering moderate the relation between functional limitations and mortality?

    PubMed

    Okun, Morris A; August, Kristin J; Rook, Karen S; Newsom, Jason T

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that functional limitations increase, and organizational volunteering decreases, the risk of mortality in later life. However, scant attention has been paid to investigating the joint effect of functional limitations and organizational volunteering on mortality. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that volunteering moderates the relation between functional limitations and risk of mortality. This prospective study used baseline survey data from a representative sample of 916 non-institutionalized adults 65 years old and older who lived in the continental United States. Data on mortality were extracted six years later from the National Death Index. Survival analyses revealed that functional limitations were associated with an increased risk of dying only among participants who never or almost never volunteered, suggesting that volunteering buffers the association between functional limitations and mortality. We conclude that although it may be more difficult for older adults with functional limitations to volunteer, they may receive important benefits from doing so.

  15. The Effect of Coaching on a Faith Community Volunteer's Use of Effective Teaching Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baggerman, Melanie A.; Ault, Melinda Jones; Collins, Belva C.; Spriggs, Amy D.; Slocum, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    An important part of quality of life for people with moderate and severe disabilities (MSDs) is being involved in extracurricular and community activities. However, volunteers, who may not have experience with including people with MSDs, lead most community activities. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the effectiveness of teacher…

  16. Insect Identification Educational Volunteers Created in Train-the-Trainer Workshops in Oregon and Washington

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corp, Mary K.; Rondon, Silivia I.; Van Vleet, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    The "train-the-trainer" model successfully created volunteer educators in insect identification. Intensive training programs prepared 71 individuals during 2 1/2-day (20 hour) training sessions. Trainees included university Extension faculty (13), agricultural professionals (13), and certified Master Gardeners (45). The sessions were…

  17. Volunteers in Public Service. Job Contacts in New York State for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Div. of Teacher Education and Certification.

    This directory is intended to help teaching volunteers find jobs in New York State. The types of programs provided by the agencies listed include adult basic education, bilingual education, migrant education, and ghetto teaching. Information is given about certification and licensing requirements in New York State and New York City, as well as…

  18. Personality Types and Mental Health Experiences of Those Who Volunteer for Helplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, Hannah; Reniers, Renate; Vollm, Birgit

    2009-01-01

    Telephone helplines have long been recognized to provide an effective way to reach individuals in crisis and several advantages of this anonymous form of intervention have been described. Most helplines use volunteers to respond to calls, including those specifically set up for students. Our study investigates differences in the personality traits…

  19. The Peace Corps Volunteer and Achieving Educational Change with New Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comstock, George

    A broad overview of a two-year Peace Corps project designed to implement educational television (ETV) in Colombia is presented in this report. The project is briefly described in an opening section, including discussions of the Peace Corps' goals, Colombia's conditions and need for ETV, the Volunteers, organization of the project, telecasting, the…

  20. 45 CFR 1232.11 - Employment and volunteer selection criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE NONDISCRIMINATION ON BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Employment and Volunteer Service Practices § 1232.11 Employment and...

  1. Volunteers as members of the home healthcare and hospice teams.

    PubMed

    Harris, M D; Olson, J M

    1998-05-01

    A volunteer program has multiple advantages to the patients, their families, their nurses, the hospice, and the volunteers themselves (Harris, 1990). Home care volunteerism make good sense. If properly administered, it is cost-efficient and delivers a quality of care that can be acquired in no other way (Sodano, 1997;764). Given the many changes that continue to take place in home healthcare and hospice regulations and financing, volunteers are a vital component of both programs so that patients and families continue to receive high-quality care. Volunteers are important members of the home healthcare and hospice teams.

  2. Towards a Production Volunteer Computing Infrastructure for HEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høimyr, N.; Marquina, M.; Asp, T.; Jones, P.; Gonzalez, A.; Field, L.

    2015-12-01

    Following the successful inclusion of virtualisation to volunteer computing for theory simulations back in 2011, the use of volunteer computing with BOINC and CernVM has been extended to cover simulations for the LHC experiments ATLAS, CMS and LHCb. This paper describes the status of the BOINC volunteer computing platform at CERN used for LHC@home and how it has been designed to address a heterogeneous environment of different user communities with different computing infrastructure. The aim of the recent developments is to provide a volunteer computing platform that the experiments can build upon to exploit opportunistic resources. Furthermore, new developments of common solutions to span user authentication domains are explained.

  3. The role of volunteer services at cancer centers.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Dawn A

    2013-11-01

    Volunteer services can be effectively used to provide valuable supportive services to patients with cancer and their family. Providing companionship, a sense of self-worth, information, and respite care are among the important services typically provided by volunteers through outpatient, inpatient, and hospice services. Supportive benefits have been linked with reduced symptoms and may even enhance survival. Offering inpatient and outpatient respite services provides needed relief for family caregivers. Complementary therapies may also be provided through volunteer services, with research studies consistently showing benefits from Reiki and animal-assisted therapy offered through volunteer care.

  4. Networking for philanthropy: increasing volunteer behavior via social networking sites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoojung; Lee, Wei-Na

    2014-03-01

    Social networking sites (SNSs) provide a unique social venue to engage the young generation in philanthropy through their networking capabilities. An integrated model that incorporates social capital into the Theory of Reasoned Action is developed to explain volunteer behavior through social networks. As expected, volunteer behavior was predicted by volunteer intention, which was influenced by attitudes and subjective norms. In addition, social capital, an outcome of the extensive use of SNSs, was as an important driver of users' attitude and subjective norms toward volunteering via SNSs. PMID:24102569

  5. The role of volunteer services at cancer centers.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Dawn A

    2013-11-01

    Volunteer services can be effectively used to provide valuable supportive services to patients with cancer and their family. Providing companionship, a sense of self-worth, information, and respite care are among the important services typically provided by volunteers through outpatient, inpatient, and hospice services. Supportive benefits have been linked with reduced symptoms and may even enhance survival. Offering inpatient and outpatient respite services provides needed relief for family caregivers. Complementary therapies may also be provided through volunteer services, with research studies consistently showing benefits from Reiki and animal-assisted therapy offered through volunteer care. PMID:24096385

  6. Networking for philanthropy: increasing volunteer behavior via social networking sites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoojung; Lee, Wei-Na

    2014-03-01

    Social networking sites (SNSs) provide a unique social venue to engage the young generation in philanthropy through their networking capabilities. An integrated model that incorporates social capital into the Theory of Reasoned Action is developed to explain volunteer behavior through social networks. As expected, volunteer behavior was predicted by volunteer intention, which was influenced by attitudes and subjective norms. In addition, social capital, an outcome of the extensive use of SNSs, was as an important driver of users' attitude and subjective norms toward volunteering via SNSs.

  7. Aerosol Inoculator for Exposure of Human Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Gerone, Peter J.; Couch, Robert B.; Knight, Vernon

    1971-01-01

    The performance of an aerosol inoculator for human volunteers is described in tests that used the PR8 strain of type A influenza virus and sodium fluorescein as a physical tracer. Virus recovery from the aerosols was approximately 1% and was unaffected by such variables as prolonged aerosolization, total airflow, relative humidity, or method of sampling. The recovery of sodium fluorescein from the aerosol was approximately 12% and was influenced by total airflow rates and relative humidity. With this apparatus, it should be possible to deliver reasonably predictable and measurable doses of respiratory viruses to human subjects. The design makes it possible to dismantle the inoculator into its component parts to facilitate portability. Images PMID:5132095

  8. Primary immunization of Rh-negative volunteers.

    PubMed

    Gunson, H H; Stratton, F; Cooper, D G; Rawlinson, V I

    1970-03-01

    To determine the best method for the production of high-titre anti-D serum primary immunization was carried out in two groups of Rh-negative male volunteers with washed group O R(2)R(2) cells. The first group of six men were given 5 ml. of packed cells, and the second group of five men were given 0.5 ml. of packed cells, in each instance by intravenous injection. Only one individual in each group failed to develop anti-D following the primary inoculation, and it has been concluded that 0.5 ml. of packed R(2)R(2) cells is probably a satisfactory dose for this purpose.There was a delay of several weeks before anti-D could be shown to have developed. The initial antibodies which appeared in the serum comprised 7S gammaG immunoglobulins, with, in about half the cases, a minor 19S gammaM component.

  9. Urethral pressure variations in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kirkeby, H J; Sørensen, S; Poulsen, E U

    1989-01-01

    Urethral pressures are usually considered to be static and only few authors have emphasized time-related pressure changes. We conducted a study on 10 healthy male volunteers, monitoring the urethral pressures at maximal urethral closure pressure, 2.5 cm proximal (bladder neck) and 2.5 cm distal (pars bulbosa) respectively over 30 min periods. At the bladder neck only sporadic waves were seen. At maximal closure pressure almost permanent oscillations were found, the wavelengths and amplitudes showing big differences. At the pars bulbosa 2 persons showed only sporadic oscillations and in 7 we found permanent pressure variations. The pressure variations are proposed to represent peristaltic activity with the ability of expelling the last drops of urine after micturition and posing a mechanical barrier to ascending microorganisms. PMID:2749948

  10. Communication strategies and volunteer management for the IAU-OAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankatsing Nava, Tibisay

    2015-08-01

    The IAU Office of Astronomy for Development will be developing a new communication strategy to promote its projects in a way that is relevant to stakeholders and the general public. Ideas include a magazine featuring best practices within the field of astronomy for development and setting up a workflow of communication that integrates the different outputs of the office and effectively uses the information collection tools developed by OAD team members.To accomplish these tasks the OAD will also develop a community management strategy with existing tools to effectively harness the skills of OAD volunteers for communication purposes. This talk will discuss the new communication strategy of the OAD as well the expanded community management plans.

  11. Pharmacokinetic study between a bilayer matrix fentalyl patch and a monolayer matrix fentanyl patch: single dose administration in healthy volunteers*

    PubMed Central

    Zecca, Ernesto; Manzoni, Andrea; Centurioni, Fabio; Farina, Alberto; Bonizzoni, Erminio; Seiler, Dan; Perrone, Tania; Caraceni, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Aims Transdermal fentanyl is a well established treatment for cancer pain. The aim of the present study is to assess the relative bioavailability of fentanyl from two different transdermal systems by evaluating plasma drug concentrations after single administration of Fentalgon® (test), a novel bilayer matrix type patch, and Durogesic SMAT (reference), a monolayer matrix type patch. In the Fentalgon patch the upper 6% fentanyl reservoir layer maintains a stable concentration gradient between the lower 4% donor layer and the skin. The system provides a constant drug delivery over 72 h. Methods This was an open label, single centre, randomized, single dose, two period crossover clinical trial, that included 36 healthy male volunteers. The patches were applied to non-irritated and non-irradiated skin on the intraclavicular pectoral area. Blood samples were collected at different time points (from baseline to 120 h post-removal of the devices) and fentanyl concentrations were determined using a validated LC/MS/MS method. Bioequivalence was to be claimed if the 90% confidence interval of AUC(0,t) and Cmax ratios (test: reference) were within the acceptance range of 80–125% and 75–133%, respectively. Results The 90% confidence intervals of the AUC(0,t) ratio (116.3% [109.6, 123.4%]) and Cmax ratio (114.4% [105.8, 123.8%] were well included in the acceptance range and the Cmax ratio also met the narrower bounds of 80–125%. There was no relevant difference in overall safety profiles of the two preparations investigated, which were adequately tolerated, as expected for opioid-naïve subjects. Conclusions The new bilayer matrix type patch, Fentalgon®, is bioequivalent to the monolayer matrix type Durogesic SMAT fentanyl patch with respect to the rate and extent of exposure of fentanyl (Eudra/CT no. 2005-000046-36). PMID:25612845

  12. Hospice Palliative Care Volunteers: A Review of Commonly Encountered Stressors, How They Cope With them, and Implications for Volunteer Training/Management.

    PubMed

    Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    Hospice palliative care volunteer work--being with dying persons and their often distraught family members--has the potential to take an emotional toll on volunteers. The aim of this review article is to examine the types of stressors hospice palliative care volunteers typically experience in their work and how they cope with them. The results of this literature review suggest that hospice palliative care volunteers do not generally perceive their volunteer work as highly stressful. Nonetheless, a number of potential stressors and challenges were identified in the literature, along with some strategies that volunteers commonly employ to cope with them. The implications for volunteers and volunteer training/management are discussed.

  13. Fatigue risk management by volunteer fire-fighters: Use of informal strategies to augment formal policy.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Drew; Mayger, Katherine; Thomas, Matthew J W; Thompson, Kirrilly

    2015-11-01

    An increasing number and intensity of catastrophic fire events in Australia has led to increasing demands on a mainly volunteer fire-fighting workforce. Despite the increasing likelihood of fatigue in the emergency services environment, there is not yet a systematic, unified approach to fatigue management in fire agencies across Australia. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to identify informal strategies used in volunteer fire-fighting and examine how these strategies are transmitted across the workforce. Thirty experienced Australian volunteer fire-fighters were interviewed in August 2010. The study identified informal fatigue-management behaviours at the individual, team and brigade level that have evolved in fire-fighting environments and are regularly implemented. However, their purpose was not explicitly recognized as such. This apparent paradox - that fatigue proofing behaviours exist but that they are not openly understood as such - may well resolve a potential conflict between a culture of indefatigability in the emergency services sector and the frequent need to operate safely while fatigued. However, formal controls require fire-fighters and their organisations to acknowledge and accept their vulnerability. This suggests two important areas in which to improve formal fatigue risk management in the emergency services sector: (1) identifying and formalising tacit or informal fatigue coping strategies as legitimate elements of the fatigue risk management system; and (2) developing culturally appropriate techniques for systematically communicating fatigue levels to self and others. PMID:26322733

  14. Fatigue risk management by volunteer fire-fighters: Use of informal strategies to augment formal policy.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Drew; Mayger, Katherine; Thomas, Matthew J W; Thompson, Kirrilly

    2015-11-01

    An increasing number and intensity of catastrophic fire events in Australia has led to increasing demands on a mainly volunteer fire-fighting workforce. Despite the increasing likelihood of fatigue in the emergency services environment, there is not yet a systematic, unified approach to fatigue management in fire agencies across Australia. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to identify informal strategies used in volunteer fire-fighting and examine how these strategies are transmitted across the workforce. Thirty experienced Australian volunteer fire-fighters were interviewed in August 2010. The study identified informal fatigue-management behaviours at the individual, team and brigade level that have evolved in fire-fighting environments and are regularly implemented. However, their purpose was not explicitly recognized as such. This apparent paradox - that fatigue proofing behaviours exist but that they are not openly understood as such - may well resolve a potential conflict between a culture of indefatigability in the emergency services sector and the frequent need to operate safely while fatigued. However, formal controls require fire-fighters and their organisations to acknowledge and accept their vulnerability. This suggests two important areas in which to improve formal fatigue risk management in the emergency services sector: (1) identifying and formalising tacit or informal fatigue coping strategies as legitimate elements of the fatigue risk management system; and (2) developing culturally appropriate techniques for systematically communicating fatigue levels to self and others.

  15. NASA Controller Acceptability Study 1(CAS-1) Experiment Description and Initial Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, James P.; Consiglio, Maria C.; Comstock, James R., Jr.; Ghatas, Rania W.; Munoz, Cesar

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the Controller Acceptability Study 1 (CAS-1) experiment that was conducted by NASA Langley Research Center personnel from January through March 2014 and presents partial CAS-1 results. CAS-1 employed 14 air traffic controller volunteers as research subjects to assess the viability of simulated future unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) operating alongside manned aircraft in moderate-density, moderate-complexity Class E airspace. These simulated UAS were equipped with a prototype pilot-in-the-loop (PITL) Detect and Avoid (DAA) system, specifically the Self-Separation (SS) function of such a system based on Stratway+ software to replace the see-and-avoid capabilities of manned aircraft pilots. A quantitative CAS-1 objective was to determine horizontal miss distance (HMD) values for SS encounters that were most acceptable to air traffic controllers, specifically HMD values that were assessed as neither unsafely small nor disruptively large. HMD values between 0.5 and 3.0 nautical miles (nmi) were assessed for a wide array of encounter geometries between UAS and manned aircraft. The paper includes brief introductory material about DAA systems and their SS functions, followed by descriptions of the CAS-1 simulation environment, prototype PITL SS capability, and experiment design, and concludes with presentation and discussion of partial CAS-1 data and results.

  16. Feeding and Bleeding: The Institutional Banalization of Risk to Healthy Volunteers in Phase I Pharmaceutical Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jill A.

    2015-01-01

    Phase I clinical trials are the first stage of testing new pharmaceuticals in humans. The majority of these studies are conducted under controlled, inpatient conditions using healthy volunteers who are paid for their participation. This article draws on an ethnographic study of six phase I clinics in the United States, including 268 semistructured interviews with research staff and healthy volunteers. In it, I argue that an institutional banalization of risk structures the perceptions of research staff and healthy volunteers participating in the studies. For research staff, there are three mechanisms by which risk becomes banal: a perceived homogeneity of studies, Fordist work regimes, and data-centric discourse. For healthy volunteers, repeat study participation contributes to the institutional banalization of risk both through the process of desensitization to risk and the formation of trust in the clinics. I argue that the institutional banalization of risk also renders invisible ethical concerns about exploitation of underprivileged groups in pharmaceutical research. PMID:25914430

  17. Sonic boom acceptability studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Kevin P.; Sullivan, Brenda M.; Leatherwood, Jack D.; McCurdy, David A.

    1992-04-01

    The determination of the magnitude of sonic boom exposure which would be acceptable to the general population requires, as a starting point, a method to assess and compare individual sonic booms. There is no consensus within the scientific and regulatory communities regarding an appropriate sonic boom assessment metric. Loudness, being a fundamental and well-understood attribute of human hearing was chosen as a means of comparing sonic booms of differing shapes and amplitudes. The figure illustrates the basic steps which yield a calculated value of loudness. Based upon the aircraft configuration and its operating conditions, the sonic boom pressure signature which reaches the ground is calculated. This pressure-time history is transformed to the frequency domain and converted into a one-third octave band spectrum. The essence of the loudness method is to account for the frequency response and integration characteristics of the auditory system. The result of the calculation procedure is a numerical description (perceived level, dB) which represents the loudness of the sonic boom waveform.

  18. Sonic boom acceptability studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Kevin P.; Sullivan, Brenda M.; Leatherwood, Jack D.; Mccurdy, David A.

    1992-01-01

    The determination of the magnitude of sonic boom exposure which would be acceptable to the general population requires, as a starting point, a method to assess and compare individual sonic booms. There is no consensus within the scientific and regulatory communities regarding an appropriate sonic boom assessment metric. Loudness, being a fundamental and well-understood attribute of human hearing was chosen as a means of comparing sonic booms of differing shapes and amplitudes. The figure illustrates the basic steps which yield a calculated value of loudness. Based upon the aircraft configuration and its operating conditions, the sonic boom pressure signature which reaches the ground is calculated. This pressure-time history is transformed to the frequency domain and converted into a one-third octave band spectrum. The essence of the loudness method is to account for the frequency response and integration characteristics of the auditory system. The result of the calculation procedure is a numerical description (perceived level, dB) which represents the loudness of the sonic boom waveform.

  19. Measuring Acceptance of Sleep Difficulties: The Development of the Sleep Problem Acceptance Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Bothelius, Kristoffer; Jernelöv, Susanna; Fredrikson, Mats; McCracken, Lance M.; Kaldo, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Acceptance may be an important therapeutic process in sleep medicine, but valid psychometric instruments measuring acceptance related to sleep difficulties are lacking. The purpose of this study was to develop a measure of acceptance in insomnia, and to examine its factor structure as well as construct validity. Design: In a cross-sectional design, a principal component analysis for item reduction was conducted on a first sample (A) and a confirmatory factor analysis on a second sample (B). Construct validity was tested on a combined sample (C). Setting: Questionnaire items were derived from a measure of acceptance in chronic pain, and data were gathered through screening or available from pretreatment assessments in four insomnia treatment trials, administered online, via bibliotherapy and in primary care. Participants: Adults with insomnia: 372 in sample A and 215 in sample B. Sample C (n = 820) included sample A and B with another 233 participants added. Measures: Construct validity was assessed through relations with established acceptance and sleep scales. Results: The principal component analysis presented a two-factor solution with eight items, explaining 65.9% of the total variance. The confirmatory factor analysis supported the solution. Acceptance of sleep problems was more closely related to subjective symptoms and consequences of insomnia than to diary description of sleep, or to acceptance of general private events. Conclusions: The Sleep Problem Acceptance Questionnaire (SPAQ), containing the subscales “Activity Engagement” and “Willingness”, is a valid tool to assess acceptance of insomnia. Citation: Bothelius K, Jernelöv S, Fredrikson M, McCracken LM, Kaldo V. Measuring acceptance of sleep difficulties: the development of the sleep problem acceptance questionnaire. SLEEP 2015;38(11):1815–1822. PMID:26085302

  20. 28 CFR 115.131 - Employee and volunteer training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Employee and volunteer training. 115.131 Section 115.131 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Training and Education § 115.131 Employee and volunteer...

  1. 28 CFR 115.131 - Employee and volunteer training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Employee and volunteer training. 115.131 Section 115.131 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Training and Education § 115.131 Employee and volunteer...

  2. 28 CFR 115.131 - Employee and volunteer training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Employee and volunteer training. 115.131 Section 115.131 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Training and Education § 115.131 Employee and volunteer...

  3. 28 CFR 115.32 - Volunteer and contractor training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Volunteer and contractor training. 115.32 Section 115.32 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Adult Prisons and Jails Training and Education § 115.32 Volunteer...

  4. 28 CFR 115.32 - Volunteer and contractor training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Volunteer and contractor training. 115.32 Section 115.32 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Adult Prisons and Jails Training and Education § 115.32 Volunteer...

  5. 28 CFR 115.32 - Volunteer and contractor training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Volunteer and contractor training. 115.32 Section 115.32 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Adult Prisons and Jails Training and Education § 115.32 Volunteer...

  6. Legal Barriers to Volunteer Service: A Community Service Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tufts, Suzanne; And Others

    This booklet is designed to help public and private community service organizations understand the applicability of wage and hour laws to volunteers used in their activities. It considers various legal interpretations of the differences between "volunteers" and "employees," and reviews the provisions of the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA),…

  7. The Impact of Institutional Mission on Student Volunteering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Susan Crawford; Ludden, Alison Bryant; Singleton, Royce A., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined patterns and predictors of volunteering among students at a liberal arts college with an institutional culture that strongly promotes community service. Results showed that predictors varied across four different types of volunteering: community service, social action, religious service, and service to the college. Year in…

  8. Volunteer Drivers: Their Contributions to Older Adults and to Themselves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerschner, Helen; Rousseau, Marie-Helene

    2008-01-01

    In 2004 and 2005 the Beverly Foundation surveyed volunteer drivers in an effort to better understand how and why they support older adults. The sample comprised 714 volunteer drivers from 367 communities, representing 40 states, who responded to the survey. Their responses provided qualitative and quantitative information about who they are, why…

  9. 11 CFR 100.148 - Volunteer activity for candidate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... developed by the candidate. But see 11 CFR 100.24, 104.17(a), and part 300, subparts D and E for exempt... 11 Federal Elections 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Volunteer activity for candidate. 100.148...) Exceptions to Expenditures § 100.148 Volunteer activity for candidate. The payment by a candidate for...

  10. 45 CFR 1232.11 - Employment and volunteer selection criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Employment and volunteer selection criteria. 1232.11 Section 1232.11 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR... FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Employment and Volunteer Service Practices § 1232.11 Employment and...

  11. Environmental Volunteers: Factors Influencing Their Involvement in Environmental Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liarakou, Georgia; Kostelou, Eleni; Gavrilakis, Costas

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the factors that influence volunteers to become involved in environmental action. The research focused on volunteers undertaking action in summer camps organised by an environmental non-governmental organisation (NGO) in Greece. The results suggest that the environmental issues addressed in volunteer…

  12. 11 CFR 100.148 - Volunteer activity for candidate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... developed by the candidate. But see 11 CFR 100.24, 104.17(a), and part 300, subparts D and E for exempt... 11 Federal Elections 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Volunteer activity for candidate. 100.148...) Exceptions to Expenditures § 100.148 Volunteer activity for candidate. The payment by a candidate for...

  13. 11 CFR 100.88 - Volunteer activity for candidates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... developed by the candidate. But see 11 CFR 100.24, 104.17(a), and part 300, subparts D and E for exempt... 11 Federal Elections 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Volunteer activity for candidates. 100.88...) Exceptions to Contributions § 100.88 Volunteer activity for candidates. (a) The payment by a candidate...

  14. 11 CFR 100.88 - Volunteer activity for candidates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... developed by the candidate. But see 11 CFR 100.24, 104.17(a), and part 300, subparts D and E for exempt... 11 Federal Elections 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Volunteer activity for candidates. 100.88...) Exceptions to Contributions § 100.88 Volunteer activity for candidates. (a) The payment by a candidate...

  15. 11 CFR 100.88 - Volunteer activity for candidates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... developed by the candidate. But see 11 CFR 100.24, 104.17(a), and part 300, subparts D and E for exempt... 11 Federal Elections 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Volunteer activity for candidates. 100.88...) Exceptions to Contributions § 100.88 Volunteer activity for candidates. (a) The payment by a candidate...

  16. 45 CFR 1232.11 - Employment and volunteer selection criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Employment and volunteer selection criteria. 1232.11 Section 1232.11 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR... FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Employment and Volunteer Service Practices § 1232.11 Employment and...

  17. 11 CFR 100.148 - Volunteer activity for candidate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... developed by the candidate. But see 11 CFR 100.24, 104.17(a), and part 300, subparts D and E for exempt... 11 Federal Elections 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Volunteer activity for candidate. 100.148...) Exceptions to Expenditures § 100.148 Volunteer activity for candidate. The payment by a candidate for...

  18. Connecting Volunteers and Agents: A Social Constructionist Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillivan, K. D.

    2013-01-01

    Extension volunteers benefit from participation in training activities. Furthermore, Extension personnel are best positioned to provide volunteers with relevant training. However, trainers neglecting relationship building and failing to attend to the communicative process may achieve unsatisfactory results. Social constructionism, a theoretical…

  19. 11 CFR 100.88 - Volunteer activity for candidates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... developed by the candidate. But see 11 CFR 100.24, 104.17(a), and part 300, subparts D and E for exempt... 11 Federal Elections 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Volunteer activity for candidates. 100.88...) Exceptions to Contributions § 100.88 Volunteer activity for candidates. (a) The payment by a candidate...

  20. 45 CFR 1232.11 - Employment and volunteer selection criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Employment and volunteer selection criteria. 1232.11 Section 1232.11 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR... FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Employment and Volunteer Service Practices § 1232.11 Employment and...

  1. 45 CFR 1232.11 - Employment and volunteer selection criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Employment and volunteer selection criteria. 1232.11 Section 1232.11 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR... FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Employment and Volunteer Service Practices § 1232.11 Employment and...

  2. 11 CFR 100.148 - Volunteer activity for candidate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... developed by the candidate. But see 11 CFR 100.24, 104.17(a), and part 300, subparts D and E for exempt... 11 Federal Elections 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Volunteer activity for candidate. 100.148...) Exceptions to Expenditures § 100.148 Volunteer activity for candidate. The payment by a candidate for...

  3. Welcoming Volunteers into Your Classroom: Some Tips for Getting Started

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Babs

    2006-01-01

    Using volunteers has a double benefit. The children get more individualized attention since there are more adults available to help in the classroom. Also, the volunteers see how much effort goes into making a classroom function and come away appreciating the efforts of center personnel. This article discusses the benefits of using community…

  4. Volunteers' Perspective of Effective Interactions with Helpline Callers: Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilat, Itzhak; Rosenau, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    The present study focuses on the effectiveness of interactions with callers to a helpline as perceived by the helpline volunteers. Applying a qualitative methodology, we analysed 12 descriptions of what the volunteers considered to be the most helpful calls they could reconstruct from memory, and the factors they attributed to the successful…

  5. Three Steps to Engage Volunteers in Membership Marketing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossell, Tony

    2011-01-01

    There is a big world out there, and volunteers can make a significant impact in helping one reach out to others and grow his/her PTA membership. In fact, word-of-mouth marketing tied for the top spot as the most effective method of new member recruitment in Marketing General's 2010 Membership Marketing Benchmarking Report. So getting volunteers'…

  6. Perks, Rewards, and Glory: The Care and Feeding of Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullner, Sheryl Kindle

    2004-01-01

    Not all volunteers respond the same way to the same stimuli. The purpose of this article is to suggest several ways to nurture volunteers in a library media center setting. Some might respond best to a printed word of appreciation or recognition in a district newsletter, while others would value a book or pin as a gift. Perks, like allowing…

  7. The Association of Childhood Personality Type with Volunteering during Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, Robert; Hart, Daniel; Donnelly, Thomas M.

    2005-01-01

    Using a longitudinal design, we investigated the relation of childhood personality type to volunteering during adolescence. We hypothesized that participants with more adaptive personality functioning during childhood would be more likely to volunteer during adolescence and that membership in social organizations would mediate the relation of…

  8. Who is the Effective Volunteer: Characteristics of Successful Big Brothers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorelli, Irene M.; Appel, Victor H.

    The demographic characteristics of the typical volunteer, taken from the personnel files of 208 current and previous volunteers of a Big Brothers agency, indicate the following profile. The modal Big Brother is usually Anglo-American, is a young adult aged 18 to 25, is a student or a full-time employed person, has some college education, lives in…

  9. Who Benefits from Volunteering? Variations in Perceived Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Hong, Song-Iee; Tang, Fengyan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to document the benefits of volunteering perceived by older adults and to explain variation in these self-perceived benefits. Design and Methods: This is a quantitative study of 13 volunteer programs and 401 older adults serving in those programs. Program directors completed telephone interviews, and older…

  10. Volunteers as Products of a Zoo Conservation Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bixler, Robert D.; Joseph, Stephanie L.; Searles, Vicki M.

    2014-01-01

    Zoos embrace docents/volunteers as a means of interpreting the threats to wildlife and biodiversity to visitors. To accomplish this, zoos provide docents' education, training, and work experience. Docents themselves also engage in solitary and social wildlife experiences outside of their volunteer obligations. This study examined what…

  11. 32 CFR 1627.1 - Who may volunteer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... INDUCTION § 1627.1 Who may volunteer. Any registrant who has attained the age of 17 years, who has not... Selective Service Act, when inductions are authorized, may volunteer for induction into the Armed Forces... attained the age of 18 years and does not have the consent of his parent or guardian for his induction....

  12. 75 FR 56501 - Information Collection; Land Management Agency Volunteer Surveys

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-16

    ... agency #0;statements of organization and functions are examples of documents #0;appearing in this section...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Information Collection; Land Management Agency Volunteer Surveys... organizations on the new information collection, the Land Management Agency Volunteer Surveys. DATES:...

  13. The Hidden Workforce: Volunteers' Learning in the Olympics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    Comparison of volunteers at the Olympic Games in Lillehammer in 1994 (n=200) and Sydney in 2000 (n=200) showed they were strongly motivated by national pride, social contact, and friendship. Learning was an important motivator for younger volunteers. Increased job and social skills and knowledge were common outcomes. (Contains 22 references.) (SK)

  14. Higher Education and the Older Volunteer: A Place for Everyone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Harriet H.; And Others

    The initiation, implementation, and successes of 13 older adult volunteer programs are traced in these descriptive essays focusing on: (1) the Educational Growth Opportunities project at San Diego State University (CA); (2) the Retired Volunteer Service Corps at the University of Maryland; (3) the Displaced Homemakers Program at Valencia Community…

  15. 28 CFR 548.14 - Community involvement (volunteers, contractors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Community involvement (volunteers... Community involvement (volunteers, contractors). (a) The institution's chaplain may contract with representatives of faith groups in the community to provide specific religious services which the chaplain...

  16. Project RENEW: Development of a Volunteer Respite Care Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Netting, F. Ellen; Kennedy, Ludell N.

    1985-01-01

    Reports on the development and implementation of an in-home respite program using trained volunteers to provide at-home companionship and supervision for frail elderly persons while family members are absent. Project RENEW volunteers and families are described, and a discussion of difficulties and future directions is presented. (Author)

  17. Psychometric Properties of the Volunteer Functions Inventory with Chinese Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Joseph; Lo, T. Wing; Liu, Elaine S. C.

    2009-01-01

    The authors report an evaluation of the psychometric properties of a Chinese version of the Volunteer Functions Inventory on a sample of university student volunteers. Reliabilities were high for four out of the six scales of the Inventory (Values, Career, Social, and Understanding) in terms of internal consistency. Items in these four scales also…

  18. Pharmacogenetics in Central American healthy volunteers: interethnic variability.

    PubMed

    Céspedes-Garro, Carolina; Naranjo, María-Eugenia G; Ramírez, Ronald; Serrano, Víctor; Fariñas, Humberto; Barrantes, Ramiro; LLerena, Adrián

    2015-03-01

    Ethnicity is one of the major factors involved in interindividual variability to drug response. This study aims to describe the frequency of the most relevant pharmacogenetic biomarkers and metabolic phenotypes in Central American healthy volunteers and to determine its interethnic variability. Twenty-six original research articles on allelic, genotypes or metabolic phenotype frequencies were analyzed, in which a total number of 7611 Central American healthy volunteers were included (6118 were analyzed for genotype and 1799 for metabolic phenotype). No reports were available for population from Belize and Honduras. The CYP2D6*4 and *5 frequencies in Amerindian populations from Costa Rica have shown to be among the highest frequencies so far reported in the world. Furthermore, NAT2*5 and *6 presented higher frequencies in admixed populations than in Amerindians, but, inversely, the NAT2*7 was more frequent in Amerindians compared to an admixed population. Likewise, different patterns of distribution have been shown in HLA-A*02, *03 and HLA-B*07 among Native populations from Latin America. Reports on Central American populations were also found for the CYP2C19, LDLR, CYP2E1, MDR1, G6PD, TP53, CYP1A2, CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 biomarkers, but no data were available for the other 91 pharmacogenetic biomarkers revised in Central American populations. Differences in the frequency of some pharmacogenetic biomarkers and metabolic phenotypes were found, showing interethnic variability within Central American and with other Latin American populations. PMID:25490028

  19. 34 CFR 303.15 - Include; including.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Include; including. 303.15 Section 303.15 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS...

  20. Motivations for Deceased Organ Donation Among Volunteers in China: A Qualitative Research Study.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhike; Liu, Shan; Yan, Jin; Liu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND To align with guiding principles on human organ and tissue transplantation published by the World Health Organization (WHO), the Red Cross Society of China (RCSC) launched a new nationwide organ donation program in 2010 to recruit organ donation volunteers. Despite severe shortage of donated organs, there is a very low rate of volunteering for organ donation among the Chinese population (only 0.03 donors per million population) in the national program. Motivating organ donation is the key to the success of organ transplantation in China. MATERIAL AND METHODS Semi-structured 45- to 60-min interviews were conducted among 34 volunteers. Data analysis was performed with Nvivo 8.0 software. RESULTS Six motivations for organ donation were identified: helping others/altruism, fulfilling long-cherished wishes, reducing the burdens, making the best use of everything, giving back to society, and life extension. Factors affecting the motivation of organ donation among volunteers in China included traditional values, personal experiences, role model effect, family support, and problems in the donation system. Possible strategies to improve organ donation included fostering a scientific concept of the body and death, focusing donation promotion efforts on certain groups, and simplifying the process of organ donation. CONCLUSIONS There are multiple reasons for Chinese people to register for organ donation, with helping others as the central motivation. PMID:27279558