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Sample records for acceptor peptide bap

  1. Identification of an amyloidogenic peptide from the Bap protein of Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Lembré, Pierre; Vendrely, Charlotte; Martino, Patrick Di

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm associated proteins (Bap) are involved in the biofilm formation process of several bacterial species. The sequence STVTVT is present in Bap proteins expressed by many Staphylococcus species, Acinetobacter baumanii and Salmonella enterica. The peptide STVTVTF derived from the C-repeat of the Bap protein from Staphylococcus epidermidis was selected through the AGGRESCAN, PASTA, and TANGO software prediction of protein aggregation and formation of amyloid fibers. We characterized the self-assembly properties of the peptide STVTVTF by different methods: in the presence of the peptide, we observed an increase in the fluorescence intensity of Thioflavin T; many intermolecular β-sheets and fibers were spontaneously formed in peptide preparations as observed by infrared spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy analyses. In conclusion, a 7 amino acids peptide derived from the C-repeat of the Bap protein was sufficient for the spontaneous formation of amyloid fibers. The possible involvement of this amyloidogenic sequence in protein-protein interactions is discussed.

  2. Enzyme-catalyzed formation of beta-peptides: beta-peptidyl aminopeptidases BapA and DmpA acting as beta-peptide-synthesizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Heck, Tobias; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Limbach, Michael; Flögel, Oliver; Seebach, Dieter; Geueke, Birgit

    2007-09-01

    In recent studies, we discovered that the three beta-peptidyl aminopeptidases, BapA from Sphingosinicella xenopeptidilytica 3-2W4, BapA from S. microcystinivorans Y2, and DmpA from Ochrobactrum anthropi LMG7991, possess the unique feature of cleaving N-terminal beta-amino acid residues from beta- and alpha/beta-peptides. Herein, we investigated the use of the same three enzymes for the reverse reaction catalyzing the oligomerization of beta-amino acids and the synthesis of mixed peptides with N-terminal beta-amino acid residues. As substrates, we employed the beta-homoamino acid derivatives H-beta hGly-pNA, H-beta3 hAla-pNA, H-(R)-beta3 hAla-pNA, H-beta3 hPhe-pNA, H-(R)-beta3 hPhe-pNA, and H-beta3 hLeu-pNA. All three enzymes were capable of coupling the six beta-amino acids to oligomers with chain lengths of up to eight amino acid residues. With the enzyme DmpA as the catalyst, we observed very high conversion rates, which correspond to dimer yields of up to 76%. The beta-dipeptide H-beta3 hAla-beta3 hLeu-OH and the beta/alpha-dipeptide H-beta hGly-His-OH (carnosine) were formed with almost 50% conversion, when a five-fold excess of beta3-homoleucine or histidine was incubated with H-beta3 hAla-pNA and H-beta hGly-pNA, respectively, in the presence of the enzyme BapA from S. microcystinivorans Y2. BapA from S. xenopeptidilytica 3-2W4 turned out to be a versatile catalyst capable of coupling various beta-amino acid residues to the free N-termini of beta- and alpha-amino acids and even to an alpha-tripeptide. Thus, these aminopeptidases might be useful to introduce a beta-amino acid residue as an N-terminal protecting group into a 'natural' alpha-peptide, thereby stabilizing the peptide against degradation by other proteolytic enzymes. PMID:17886858

  3. Enzyme-catalyzed formation of beta-peptides: beta-peptidyl aminopeptidases BapA and DmpA acting as beta-peptide-synthesizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Heck, Tobias; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Limbach, Michael; Flögel, Oliver; Seebach, Dieter; Geueke, Birgit

    2007-09-01

    In recent studies, we discovered that the three beta-peptidyl aminopeptidases, BapA from Sphingosinicella xenopeptidilytica 3-2W4, BapA from S. microcystinivorans Y2, and DmpA from Ochrobactrum anthropi LMG7991, possess the unique feature of cleaving N-terminal beta-amino acid residues from beta- and alpha/beta-peptides. Herein, we investigated the use of the same three enzymes for the reverse reaction catalyzing the oligomerization of beta-amino acids and the synthesis of mixed peptides with N-terminal beta-amino acid residues. As substrates, we employed the beta-homoamino acid derivatives H-beta hGly-pNA, H-beta3 hAla-pNA, H-(R)-beta3 hAla-pNA, H-beta3 hPhe-pNA, H-(R)-beta3 hPhe-pNA, and H-beta3 hLeu-pNA. All three enzymes were capable of coupling the six beta-amino acids to oligomers with chain lengths of up to eight amino acid residues. With the enzyme DmpA as the catalyst, we observed very high conversion rates, which correspond to dimer yields of up to 76%. The beta-dipeptide H-beta3 hAla-beta3 hLeu-OH and the beta/alpha-dipeptide H-beta hGly-His-OH (carnosine) were formed with almost 50% conversion, when a five-fold excess of beta3-homoleucine or histidine was incubated with H-beta3 hAla-pNA and H-beta hGly-pNA, respectively, in the presence of the enzyme BapA from S. microcystinivorans Y2. BapA from S. xenopeptidilytica 3-2W4 turned out to be a versatile catalyst capable of coupling various beta-amino acid residues to the free N-termini of beta- and alpha-amino acids and even to an alpha-tripeptide. Thus, these aminopeptidases might be useful to introduce a beta-amino acid residue as an N-terminal protecting group into a 'natural' alpha-peptide, thereby stabilizing the peptide against degradation by other proteolytic enzymes.

  4. Transition Metal Donor-Peptide-Acceptor Complexes: From Intramolecular Electron Transfer Reactions to the Study of Reactive Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Isied, Stephan S.

    2003-03-11

    The trans-polyproline (PII) oligomers (Figure 1) are unusually rigid peptide structures which have been extensively studied by our group for peptide mediated intramolecular electron transfer (ET) at long distances. We have previously studied ET across a series of metal ion donor (D) acceptor (A) oligoproline peptides with different distances, driving forces and reorganizational energies. The majority of these experiments involve generating the ET intermediate using pulse radiolysis methods, although more recently photochemical methods are also used. Results of these studies showed that ET across peptides can vary by more than twelve orders of magnitude. Using ruthenium bipyridine donors, ET reaction rate constants across several proline residues (n = 4 - 9) occurred in the millisecond (ms) to {micro}s timescale, thus limiting the proline peptide conformational motions to only minor changes (far smaller than the large changes that occur on the ms to sec timescale, such as trans to cis proline isomerization). The present report describes our large data base of experimental results for D-peptide-A complexes in terms of a model where the involvement of both superexchange and hopping (hole and electron) mechanisms account for the long range ET rate constants observed. Our data shows that the change from superexchange to hopping mechanisms occurs at different distances depending on the type of D and A and their interactions with the peptides. Our model is also consistent with generalized models for superexchange and hopping which have been put forward by a number of theoretical groups to account for long range ET phenomena.

  5. Role of donor-acceptor macrocycles in sequence specific peptide recognition and their optoelectronic properties: a detailed computational insight.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Arkamita; Pati, Swapan K

    2016-07-27

    In this study, we have considered an experimentally synthesized organic donor-acceptor (D-A) macrocycle (CPP-TCAQ) and have modified it by incorporating different acceptor groups. We have performed density functional theory and classical molecular dynamics studies on these D-A macrocycles. We have clearly shown that cyclo[10]paraphenylene-2,6-tetracyanoanthraquinodimethanylene (CPP-TCAQ) isomers interact specifically with one particular peptide sequence tyr-leu-ala, over its structural isomer, tyr-ala-leu. However, other functionalized macrocycles bind to the tyr-ala-leu peptide sequence over tyr-leu-ala. Our calculations show that the presence of hydrogen bonds as well as π-π interactions responsible for this specific selection. Interestingly, it is the additional charge transfer induced dipolar interactions that favour binding of the tripeptide with the bulky C-terminal leucine amino acid, tyr-ala-leu. We confirmed that these host-guest complexes are stable in water medium as well as at room temperature. Thus, these hosts can bind effectively to any protein fragment bearing a particular tripeptide. Interestingly, the macrocycle, which recognizes the peptide sequence with a bulky C-terminal amino acid, also shows photophysical properties. The reasons for this happen to be the same (dipolar interactions introduce dipole allowed states for optical absorption as well as attracting the oppositely oriented dipolar groups). Recognition of the peptide sequence with a bulky C-terminal group is carried out for the first time with this functionalised macrocycle, which in addition shows photophysical properties. PMID:27412849

  6. Triazolyl-donor-acceptor chromophore-decorated unnatural amino acids and peptides: FRET events in a β-turn conformation.

    PubMed

    Bag, Subhendu Sekhar; Jana, Subhashis; Yashmeen, Afsana; Senthilkumar, K; Bag, Raghunath

    2014-01-14

    The β-turn conformation and FRET process were established in the designed tripeptide containing fluorescent triazolyl donor and acceptor-decorated unnatural amino acids separated by a natural alanine.

  7. Systematic determination of the peptide acceptor preferences for the human UDP-Gal:glycoprotein-alpha-GalNAc beta 3 galactosyltransferase (T-synthase).

    PubMed

    Perrine, Cynthia; Ju, Tongzhong; Cummings, Richard D; Gerken, Thomas A

    2009-03-01

    Mucin-type protein O-glycosylation is initiated by the addition of alpha-GalNAc to Ser/Thr residues of a polypeptide chain. The addition of beta-Gal to GalNAc by the UDP-Gal:glycoprotein-alpha-GalNAc beta 3 galactosyltransferase (T-synthase), forming the Core 1 structure (beta-Gal(1-3)-alpha-GalNAc-O-Ser/Thr), is a common and biologically significant subsequent step in O-glycan biosynthesis. What dictates the sites of Core 1 glycosylation is poorly understood; however, the peptide sequence and neighboring glycosylation effects have been implicated. To systematically address the role of the peptide sequence on the specificity of T-synthase, we used the oriented random glycopeptide: GAGAXXXX(T-O-GalNAc)XXXXAGAG (where X = G, A, P, V, I, F, Y, S, N, D, E, H, R, and K) as a substrate. The Core 1 glycosylated product was isolated on immobilized PNA (Arachis hypogaea) lectin and its composition determined by Edman amino acid sequencing for comparison with the initial substrate composition, from which transferase preferences were obtained. From these studies, elevated preferences for Gly at the +1 position with moderately high preferences for Phe and Tyr in the +3 position relative to the acceptor Thr-O-GalNAc were found. A number of smaller Pro enhancements were also observed. Basic residues, i.e., Lys, Arg, and His, in any position were disfavored, suggesting electrostatic interactions as an additional important component modulating transferase specificity. This work suggests that there are indeed subtle specific and nonspecific protein-targeting sequence motifs for this transferase.

  8. Comparison of several methods for BAP measurement.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, J; Murata, Y; Sakamoto, M

    2006-01-01

    It has been more important for management of water quality to estimate the amount of bioavailable phosphorus (BAP) in suspended solids (SS) entering lakes and estuaries. AGP test or extraction by 0.1 mol l(-1) NaOH (C-BOD) is widely used. Recently, highly bioavailable phosphorus (HBAP) was introduced to indicate a more easily soluble and bioavailable fraction using successive extraction by 0.1 mol l(-1) HCl and 0.1 mol l(-1) NaOH. New biologically measured BAP (B-BAP) using bacterial respiration activity was introduced in this paper. B-BAP was estimated from oxygen uptake rate (OUR), which was measured by a respiratory meter for BOD measurement using a pressure sensor. B-BAP is useful for a rapid and direct measurement of phosphorus bioavailability. B-BAP, HBAP and C-BAP in river SS were measured and compared with each other. The percentages of HBAP and B-BAP to PP were large in the urban river, while the percentage of NaOH-P or C-BAP was large in the rivers flowing in agricultural areas. By comparison with phosphorus fractions in paddy soil and activated sludge it was suggested that SS in the rivers flowing in agricultural areas mainly consisted of clay, silt or sand, while the SS in the urban river consisted of a large percentage of organic particles as well. Phosphorus in SS was suggested to be more easily bioavailable in the urban river than the rivers in agricultural areas. The ratio of C-BAP/B-BAP was large in the rivers in agricultural areas and small in the urban river. As HBAP contents were almost similar to B-BAP contents in the river SS, HBAP can be a suitable index of phosphorus indicating easily and rapidly the bioavailable fraction in SS.

  9. Synthesis, photophysical properties of triazolyl-donor/acceptor chromophores decorated unnatural amino acids: Incorporation of a pair into Leu-enkephalin peptide and application of triazolylperylene amino acid in sensing BSA.

    PubMed

    Bag, Subhendu Sekhar; Jana, Subhashis; Pradhan, Manoj Kumar

    2016-08-15

    The research in the field of design and synthesis of unnatural amino acids is growing at a fast space for the increasing demand of proteins of potential therapeutics and many other diversified novel functional applications. Thus, we report herein the design and synthesis of microenvironment sensitive fluorescent triazolyl unnatural amino acids (UNAA) decorated with donor and/or acceptor aromatic chromophores via click chemistry. The synthesized fluorescent amino acids show interesting solvatochromic characteristic and/or intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) feature as is revealed from the UV-visible, fluorescence photophysical properties and DFT/TDDFT calculation. HOMO-LUMO distribution shows that the emissive states of some of the amino acids are characterized with more significant electron redistribution between the triazolyl moiety and the aromatic chromophores linked to it leading to modulated emission property. A pair of donor-acceptor amino acid shows interesting photophysical interaction property indicating a FRET quenching event. Furthermore, one of the amino acid, triazolyl-perylene amino acid, has been exploited for studying interaction with BSA and found that it is able to sense BSA with an enhancement of fluorescence intensity. Finally, we incorporated a pair of donor/acceptor amino acids into a Leu-enkephalin analogue pentapeptide which was found to adopt predominantly type II β-turn conformation. We envisage that our investigation is of importance for the development of new fluorescent donor-acceptor unnatural amino acids a pair of which can be exploited for generating fluorescent peptidomimetic probe of interesting photophysical property for applications in studying peptide-protein interaction. PMID:27372839

  10. Synthesis, photophysical properties of triazolyl-donor/acceptor chromophores decorated unnatural amino acids: Incorporation of a pair into Leu-enkephalin peptide and application of triazolylperylene amino acid in sensing BSA.

    PubMed

    Bag, Subhendu Sekhar; Jana, Subhashis; Pradhan, Manoj Kumar

    2016-08-15

    The research in the field of design and synthesis of unnatural amino acids is growing at a fast space for the increasing demand of proteins of potential therapeutics and many other diversified novel functional applications. Thus, we report herein the design and synthesis of microenvironment sensitive fluorescent triazolyl unnatural amino acids (UNAA) decorated with donor and/or acceptor aromatic chromophores via click chemistry. The synthesized fluorescent amino acids show interesting solvatochromic characteristic and/or intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) feature as is revealed from the UV-visible, fluorescence photophysical properties and DFT/TDDFT calculation. HOMO-LUMO distribution shows that the emissive states of some of the amino acids are characterized with more significant electron redistribution between the triazolyl moiety and the aromatic chromophores linked to it leading to modulated emission property. A pair of donor-acceptor amino acid shows interesting photophysical interaction property indicating a FRET quenching event. Furthermore, one of the amino acid, triazolyl-perylene amino acid, has been exploited for studying interaction with BSA and found that it is able to sense BSA with an enhancement of fluorescence intensity. Finally, we incorporated a pair of donor/acceptor amino acids into a Leu-enkephalin analogue pentapeptide which was found to adopt predominantly type II β-turn conformation. We envisage that our investigation is of importance for the development of new fluorescent donor-acceptor unnatural amino acids a pair of which can be exploited for generating fluorescent peptidomimetic probe of interesting photophysical property for applications in studying peptide-protein interaction.

  11. The role of amino acid electron-donor/acceptor atoms in host-cell binding peptides is associated with their 3D structure and HLA-binding capacity in sterile malarial immunity induction

    SciTech Connect

    Patarroyo, Manuel E.; Almonacid, Hannia; Moreno-Vranich, Armando

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fundamental residues located in some HABPs are associated with their 3D structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-donor atoms present in {beta}-turn, random, distorted {alpha}-helix structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-donor atoms bound to HLA-DR53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-acceptor atoms present in regular {alpha}-helix structure bound to HLA-DR52. -- Abstract: Plasmodium falciparum malaria continues being one of the parasitic diseases causing the highest worldwide mortality due to the parasite's multiple evasion mechanisms, such as immunological silence. Membrane and organelle proteins are used during invasion for interactions mediated by high binding ability peptides (HABPs); these have amino acids which establish hydrogen bonds between them in some of their critical binding residues. Immunisation assays in the Aotus model using HABPs whose critical residues had been modified have revealed a conformational change thereby enabling a protection-inducing response. This has improved fitting within HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} molecules where amino acid electron-donor atoms present in {beta}-turn, random or distorted {alpha}-helix structures preferentially bound to HLA-DR53 molecules, whilst HABPs having amino acid electron-acceptor atoms present in regular {alpha}-helix structure bound to HLA-DR52. This data has great implications for vaccine development.

  12. Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Benzo [ a ] pyrene ( BaP ) ; CASRN 50 - 32 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarc

  13. Associative Memory Acceptors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Card, Roger

    The properties of an associative memory are examined in this paper from the viewpoint of automata theory. A device called an associative memory acceptor is studied under real-time operation. The family "L" of languages accepted by real-time associative memory acceptors is shown to properly contain the family of languages accepted by one-tape,…

  14. Mutation of active site serine residue with cysteine displays change in acyl-acceptor preference of β-peptidyl aminopeptidase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Arima, Jiro; Tanaka, Ayumi; Morimoto, Masazumi; Mori, Nobuhiro

    2014-02-01

    A β-peptidyl aminopeptidase, a peptidase belonging to the P1 family, catalyzes aminolysis in accordance with its hydrolytic activity. We specifically examined β-peptidyl aminopeptidase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (BapF) to assess the effects of mutation of catalytic Ser with Cys or Thr on its catalytic ability. Recombinant BapF and its S237C mutant exhibited p-nitroaniline release activity toward β-homo-Gly-p-nitroanilide (βhGly-pNA), but the products of the enzyme reaction differed completely from one another. Wild-type BapF showed βhGly-βhGly-pNA synthetic activity, but the product vanished in a few minutes and converted to free βhGly. In contrast, the product βhGly-βhGly-pNA was synthesized by S237C BapF efficiently without degradation, indicating that because of the mutation, the enzyme came to recognize only the amine group as an acyl acceptor instead of water. Furthermore, a difference in acyl acceptor preference between that of wild type and S237C BapF was observed. When using cysteamine as an acyl acceptor, βhGly-cysteamine was synthesized only in the reaction using S237C BapF. In contrast, S237C BapF was unable to synthesize βhGly-cystamine when using cystamine as an acyl acceptor, although it was synthesized by wild-type BapF. Such a dynamic change in the acyl acceptor by the mutation of catalytic Ser with Cys is regarded as a unique feature of family P1 peptidases.

  15. BAP1 has a survival role in cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raj; Taylor, Michael; Miao, Benchun; Ji, Zhenyu; Njauw, Jenny C-N; Jönsson, Göran; Frederick, Dennie T; Tsao, Hensin

    2015-04-01

    Although the pattern of BAP1 inactivation in ocular melanoma specimens and in the BAP1 cutaneous melanoma (CM)/ocular melanoma predisposition syndrome suggests a tumor suppressor function, the specific role of this gene in the pathogenesis of CM is not fully understood. We thus set out to characterize BAP1 in CM and discovered an unexpected pro-survival effect of this protein. Tissue and cell lines analysis showed that BAP1 expression was maintained, rather than lost, in primary melanomas compared with nevi and normal skin. Genetic depletion of BAP1 in melanoma cells reduced proliferation and colony-forming capability, induced apoptosis, and inhibited melanoma tumor growth in vivo. On the molecular level, suppression of BAP1 led to a concomitant drop in the protein levels of survivin, a member of anti-apoptotic proteins and a known mediator of melanoma survival. Restoration of survivin in melanoma cells partially rescued the growth-retarding effects of BAP1 loss. In contrast to melanoma cells, stable overexpression of BAP1 into immortalized but non-transformed melanocytes did suppress proliferation and reduce survivin. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that BAP1 may have a growth-sustaining role in melanoma cells, but that its impact on ubiquitination underpins a complex physiology, which is context and cell dependent. PMID:25521456

  16. Loss of BAP1 Expression Occurs Frequently in Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Andrici, Juliana; Goeppert, Benjamin; Sioson, Loretta; Clarkson, Adele; Renner, Marcus; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Tayao, Michael; Watson, Nicole; Farzin, Mahtab; Toon, Christopher W.; Smith, Ross C.; Mittal, Anubhav; Samra, Jaswinder S.; Hugh, Thomas J.; Chou, Angela; Lawlor, Rita T.; Weichert, Wilko; Schirmacher, Peter; Sperandio, Nicola; Ruzzenente, Andrea; Scarpa, Aldo; Gill, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract BRCA1-associated protein 1 (BAP1) is a deubiquitinating enzyme that functions as a tumor suppressor gene. Double hit BAP1 inactivation has been reported in a range of tumor types, including intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), sometimes in association with germline mutation. We performed immunohistochemistry for BAP1 on a well-characterized cohort of 211 ICC patients undergoing surgical resection with curative intent at 3 institutions based in 3 different countries. The median age at diagnosis was 65 years (range, 36.5–86) and 108 (51%) were men. Negative staining for BAP1 (defined as completely absent nuclear staining in the presence of positive internal controls in nonneoplastic cells) occurred in 55 ICCs (26%). BAP1 loss predicted a strong trend toward improved median survival of 40.80 months (95% CI, 28.14–53.46) versus 24.87 months (95% CI, 18.73–31.01), P = 0.059). In a multivariate model including age, sex, BAP1 status, tumor stage, tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion, and tumor size, female sex was associated with improved survival (hazard ratio [HR] 0.54; 95% CI, 0.34–0.85), while advanced tumor stage and lymphovascular invasion (HR 1.89; 95% CI, 1.09–3.28) correlated with decreased survival. In a multivariate analysis, high grade tumors were associated with BAP1 loss (odds ratio [OR] 3.32; 95% CI, 1.29–8.55), while lymphatic invasion was inversely associated with BAP1 loss (OR 0.36; 95% CI, 0.13–0.99). In conclusion, we observed a trend toward improved prognosis in ICC associated with absent expression of BAP1 and an association of BAP1 loss with higher histological grade and absent lymphatic invasion. Female sex was associated with improved survival while advanced tumor stage and lymphatic invasion were associated with decreased survival. PMID:26765459

  17. Calcium inhibits bap-dependent multicellular behavior in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Arrizubieta, María Jesús; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Amorena, Beatriz; Penadés, José R; Lasa, Iñigo

    2004-11-01

    Bap (biofilm-associated protein) is a 254-kDa staphylococcal surface protein implicated in formation of biofilms by staphylococci isolated from chronic mastitis infections. The presence of potential EF-hand motifs in the amino acid sequence of Bap prompted us to investigate the effect of calcium on the multicellular behavior of Bap-expressing staphylococci. We found that addition of millimolar amounts of calcium to the growth media inhibited intercellular adhesion of and biofilm formation by Bap-positive strain V329. Addition of manganese, but not addition of magnesium, also inhibited biofilm formation, whereas bacterial aggregation in liquid media was greatly enhanced by metal-chelating agents. In contrast, calcium or chelating agents had virtually no effect on the aggregation of Bap-deficient strain M556. The biofilm elicited by insertion of bap into the chromosome of a biofilm-negative strain exhibited a similar dependence on the calcium concentration, indicating that the observed calcium inhibition was an inherent property of the Bap-mediated biofilms. Site-directed mutagenesis of two of the putative EF-hand domains resulted in a mutant strain that was capable of forming a biofilm but whose biofilm was not inhibited by calcium. Our results indicate that Bap binds Ca2+ with low affinity and that Ca2+ binding renders the protein noncompetent for biofilm formation and for intercellular adhesion. The fact that calcium inhibition of Bap-mediated multicellular behavior takes place in vitro at concentrations similar to those found in milk serum supports the possibility that this inhibition is relevant to the pathogenesis and/or epidemiology of the bacteria in the mastitis process.

  18. Calcium Inhibits Bap-Dependent Multicellular Behavior in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Arrizubieta, María Jesús; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Amorena, Beatriz; Penadés, José R.; Lasa, Iñigo

    2004-01-01

    Bap (biofilm-associated protein) is a 254-kDa staphylococcal surface protein implicated in formation of biofilms by staphylococci isolated from chronic mastitis infections. The presence of potential EF-hand motifs in the amino acid sequence of Bap prompted us to investigate the effect of calcium on the multicellular behavior of Bap-expressing staphylococci. We found that addition of millimolar amounts of calcium to the growth media inhibited intercellular adhesion of and biofilm formation by Bap-positive strain V329. Addition of manganese, but not addition of magnesium, also inhibited biofilm formation, whereas bacterial aggregation in liquid media was greatly enhanced by metal-chelating agents. In contrast, calcium or chelating agents had virtually no effect on the aggregation of Bap-deficient strain M556. The biofilm elicited by insertion of bap into the chromosome of a biofilm-negative strain exhibited a similar dependence on the calcium concentration, indicating that the observed calcium inhibition was an inherent property of the Bap-mediated biofilms. Site-directed mutagenesis of two of the putative EF-hand domains resulted in a mutant strain that was capable of forming a biofilm but whose biofilm was not inhibited by calcium. Our results indicate that Bap binds Ca2+ with low affinity and that Ca2+ binding renders the protein noncompetent for biofilm formation and for intercellular adhesion. The fact that calcium inhibition of Bap-mediated multicellular behavior takes place in vitro at concentrations similar to those found in milk serum supports the possibility that this inhibition is relevant to the pathogenesis and/or epidemiology of the bacteria in the mastitis process. PMID:15516560

  19. Oxygen as Acceptor.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Vitaliy B; Verkhovsky, Michael I

    2015-01-01

    Like most bacteria, Escherichia coli has a flexible and branched respiratory chain that enables the prokaryote to live under a variety of environmental conditions, from highly aerobic to completely anaerobic. In general, the bacterial respiratory chain is composed of dehydrogenases, a quinone pool, and reductases. Substrate-specific dehydrogenases transfer reducing equivalents from various donor substrates (NADH, succinate, glycerophosphate, formate, hydrogen, pyruvate, and lactate) to a quinone pool (menaquinone, ubiquinone, and dimethylmenoquinone). Then electrons from reduced quinones (quinols) are transferred by terminal reductases to different electron acceptors. Under aerobic growth conditions, the terminal electron acceptor is molecular oxygen. A transfer of electrons from quinol to O₂ is served by two major oxidoreductases (oxidases), cytochrome bo₃ encoded by cyoABCDE and cytochrome bd encoded by cydABX. Terminal oxidases of aerobic respiratory chains of bacteria, which use O₂ as the final electron acceptor, can oxidize one of two alternative electron donors, either cytochrome c or quinol. This review compares the effects of different inhibitors on the respiratory activities of cytochrome bo₃ and cytochrome bd in E. coli. It also presents a discussion on the genetics and the prosthetic groups of cytochrome bo₃ and cytochrome bd. The E. coli membrane contains three types of quinones that all have an octaprenyl side chain (C₄₀). It has been proposed that the bo₃ oxidase can have two ubiquinone-binding sites with different affinities. "WHAT'S NEW" IN THE REVISED ARTICLE: The revised article comprises additional information about subunit composition of cytochrome bd and its role in bacterial resistance to nitrosative and oxidative stresses. Also, we present the novel data on the electrogenic function of appBCX-encoded cytochrome bd-II, a second bd-type oxidase that had been thought not to contribute to generation of a proton motive force in E

  20. Oxygen as Acceptor.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Vitaliy B; Verkhovsky, Michael I

    2015-01-01

    Like most bacteria, Escherichia coli has a flexible and branched respiratory chain that enables the prokaryote to live under a variety of environmental conditions, from highly aerobic to completely anaerobic. In general, the bacterial respiratory chain is composed of dehydrogenases, a quinone pool, and reductases. Substrate-specific dehydrogenases transfer reducing equivalents from various donor substrates (NADH, succinate, glycerophosphate, formate, hydrogen, pyruvate, and lactate) to a quinone pool (menaquinone, ubiquinone, and dimethylmenoquinone). Then electrons from reduced quinones (quinols) are transferred by terminal reductases to different electron acceptors. Under aerobic growth conditions, the terminal electron acceptor is molecular oxygen. A transfer of electrons from quinol to O₂ is served by two major oxidoreductases (oxidases), cytochrome bo₃ encoded by cyoABCDE and cytochrome bd encoded by cydABX. Terminal oxidases of aerobic respiratory chains of bacteria, which use O₂ as the final electron acceptor, can oxidize one of two alternative electron donors, either cytochrome c or quinol. This review compares the effects of different inhibitors on the respiratory activities of cytochrome bo₃ and cytochrome bd in E. coli. It also presents a discussion on the genetics and the prosthetic groups of cytochrome bo₃ and cytochrome bd. The E. coli membrane contains three types of quinones that all have an octaprenyl side chain (C₄₀). It has been proposed that the bo₃ oxidase can have two ubiquinone-binding sites with different affinities. "WHAT'S NEW" IN THE REVISED ARTICLE: The revised article comprises additional information about subunit composition of cytochrome bd and its role in bacterial resistance to nitrosative and oxidative stresses. Also, we present the novel data on the electrogenic function of appBCX-encoded cytochrome bd-II, a second bd-type oxidase that had been thought not to contribute to generation of a proton motive force in E

  1. Bap, a Staphylococcus aureus Surface Protein Involved in Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cucarella, Carme; Solano, Cristina; Valle, Jaione; Amorena, Beatriz; Lasa, Íñigo; Penadés, José R.

    2001-01-01

    Identification of new genes involved in biofilm formation is needed to understand the molecular basis of strain variation and the pathogenic mechanisms implicated in chronic staphylococcal infections. A biofilm-producing Staphylococcus aureus isolate was used to generate biofilm-negative transposon (Tn917) insertion mutants. Two mutants were found with a significant decrease in attachment to inert surfaces (early adherence), intercellular adhesion, and biofilm formation. The transposon was inserted at the same locus in both mutants. This locus (bap [for biofilm associated protein]) encodes a novel cell wall associated protein of 2,276 amino acids (Bap), which shows global organizational similarities to surface proteins of gram-negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi) and gram-positive (Enteroccocus faecalis) microorganisms. Bap's core region represents 52% of the protein and consists of 13 successive nearly identical repeats, each containing 86 amino acids. bap was present in a small fraction of bovine mastitis isolates (5% of the 350 S. aureus isolates tested), but it was absent from the 75 clinical human S. aureus isolates analyzed. All staphylococcal isolates harboring bap were highly adherent and strong biofilm producers. In a mouse infection model bap was involved in pathogenesis, causing a persistent infection. PMID:11292810

  2. The bioartificial pancreas (BAP): Biological, chemical and engineering challenges.

    PubMed

    Iacovacci, Veronica; Ricotti, Leonardo; Menciassi, Arianna; Dario, Paolo

    2016-01-15

    The bioartificial pancreas (BAP) represents a viable solution for the treatment of type 1 diabetes (T1D). By encapsulating pancreatic cells in a semipermeable membrane to allow nutrient, insulin and glucose exchange, the side effects produced by islets and whole organ transplantation-related immunosuppressive therapy can be circumvented. Several factors, mainly related to materials properties, capsule morphology and biological environment, play a key role in optimizing BAP systems. The BAP is an extremely complex delivery system for insulin. Despite considerable efforts, in some instances meeting with limited degree of success, a BAP capable of restoring physiological pancreas functions without the need for immunosuppressive drugs and of controlling blood glucose levels especially in large animal models and a few clinical trials, does not exist. The state of the art in terms of materials, fabrication techniques and cell sources, as well as the current status of commercial devices and clinical trials, are described in this overview from an interdisciplinary viewpoint. In addition, challenges to the creation of effective BAP systems are highlighted including future perspectives in terms of component integration from both a biological and an engineering viewpoint.

  3. NeuCode Proteomics Reveals Bap1 Regulation of Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Baughman, Joshua M; Rose, Christopher M; Kolumam, Ganesh; Webster, Joshua D; Wilkerson, Emily M; Merrill, Anna E; Rhoads, Timothy W; Noubade, Rajkumar; Katavolos, Paula; Lesch, Justin; Stapleton, Donald S; Rabaglia, Mary E; Schueler, Kathy L; Asuncion, Raymond; Domeyer, Melanie; Zavala-Solorio, Jose; Reich, Michael; DeVoss, Jason; Keller, Mark P; Attie, Alan D; Hebert, Alexander S; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J; Kirkpatrick, Donald S; Dey, Anwesha

    2016-07-12

    We introduce neutron-encoded (NeuCode) amino acid labeling of mice as a strategy for multiplexed proteomic analysis in vivo. Using NeuCode, we characterize an inducible knockout mouse model of Bap1, a tumor suppressor and deubiquitinase whose in vivo roles outside of cancer are not well established. NeuCode proteomics revealed altered metabolic pathways following Bap1 deletion, including profound elevation of cholesterol biosynthetic machinery coincident with reduced expression of gluconeogenic and lipid homeostasis proteins in liver. Bap1 loss increased pancreatitis biomarkers and reduced expression of mitochondrial proteins. These alterations accompany a metabolic remodeling with hypoglycemia, hypercholesterolemia, hepatic lipid loss, and acinar cell degeneration. Liver-specific Bap1 null mice present with fully penetrant perinatal lethality, severe hypoglycemia, and hepatic lipid deficiency. This work reveals Bap1 as a metabolic regulator in liver and pancreas, and it establishes NeuCode as a reliable proteomic method for deciphering in vivo biology. PMID:27373151

  4. From the Eyes of the Front Line: BCBAs Evaluate BAP.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Mark R; Reed, Derek; Smith, Tristam

    2013-01-01

    Master's-level Board Certified Behavior Analysts(®) were emailed an anonymous webbased survey regarding the journal Behavior Analysis in Practice (BAP). Following a 96-hour response window, 284 completed surveys were obtained. Data revealed that many participants regard the journal as beneficial to their profession, yet considered it too expensive and in need of a sharper focus on practitioner issues. Most supported BAP's emphasis on empirical research, and many recommended additional content areas such as clinical case formulations, objective product information, and a layout that blends the features of an empirical journal and a popular magazine. In summary, this survey indicates that, as a practitioner-oriented journal, BAP has the potential to occupy a valuable niche for master's-level behavior analysts and that journal leaders might enhance its value by modifying its marketing, content, and structure.

  5. Bap: a family of surface proteins involved in biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Lasa, Iñigo; Penadés, José R

    2006-03-01

    A group of surface proteins sharing several structural and functional features is emerging as an important element in the biofilm formation process of diverse bacterial species. The first member of this group of proteins was identified in a Staphylococcus aureus mastitis isolate and was named Bap (biofilm-associated protein). As common structural features, Bap-related proteins: (i) are present on the bacterial surface; (ii) show a high molecular weight; (iii) contain a core domain of tandem repeats; (iv) confer upon bacteria the capacity to form a biofilm; (v) play a relevant role in bacterial infectious processes; and (vi) can occasionally be contained in mobile elements. This review summarizes recent studies that have identified and assigned roles to Bap-related proteins in biofilm biology and virulence.

  6. From the Eyes of the Front Line: BCBAs Evaluate BAP

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Mark R.; Reed, Derek; Smith, Tristam

    2013-01-01

    Master's-level Board Certified Behavior Analysts® were emailed an anonymous webbased survey regarding the journal Behavior Analysis in Practice (BAP). Following a 96-hour response window, 284 completed surveys were obtained. Data revealed that many participants regard the journal as beneficial to their profession, yet considered it too expensive and in need of a sharper focus on practitioner issues. Most supported BAP's emphasis on empirical research, and many recommended additional content areas such as clinical case formulations, objective product information, and a layout that blends the features of an empirical journal and a popular magazine. In summary, this survey indicates that, as a practitioner-oriented journal, BAP has the potential to occupy a valuable niche for master's-level behavior analysts and that journal leaders might enhance its value by modifying its marketing, content, and structure. PMID:25729504

  7. From the Eyes of the Front Line: BCBAs Evaluate BAP.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Mark R; Reed, Derek; Smith, Tristam

    2013-01-01

    Master's-level Board Certified Behavior Analysts(®) were emailed an anonymous webbased survey regarding the journal Behavior Analysis in Practice (BAP). Following a 96-hour response window, 284 completed surveys were obtained. Data revealed that many participants regard the journal as beneficial to their profession, yet considered it too expensive and in need of a sharper focus on practitioner issues. Most supported BAP's emphasis on empirical research, and many recommended additional content areas such as clinical case formulations, objective product information, and a layout that blends the features of an empirical journal and a popular magazine. In summary, this survey indicates that, as a practitioner-oriented journal, BAP has the potential to occupy a valuable niche for master's-level behavior analysts and that journal leaders might enhance its value by modifying its marketing, content, and structure. PMID:25729504

  8. A Tumor-Specific Neo-Antigen Caused by a Frameshift Mutation in BAP1 Is a Potential Personalized Biomarker in Malignant Peritoneal Mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jun; Zhou, Zhan; Tang, Xiao-Jing; Gao, Zhi-Bin; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Shu-Qing

    2016-05-14

    Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive rare malignancy associated with asbestos exposure. A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of MPM will help develop a targeted therapy strategy. Oncogene targeted depth sequencing was performed on a tumor sample and paired peripheral blood DNA from a patient with malignant mesothelioma of the peritoneum. Four somatic base-substitutions in NOTCH2, NSD1, PDE4DIP, and ATP10B and 1 insert frameshift mutation in BAP1 were validated by the Sanger method at the transcriptional level. A 13-amino acids neo-peptide of the truncated Bap1 protein, which was produced as a result of this novel frameshift mutation, was predicted to be presented by this patient's HLA-B protein. The polyclonal antibody of the synthesized 13-mer neo-peptide was produced in rabbits. Western blotting results showed a good antibody-neoantigen specificity, and Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining with the antibody of the neo-peptide clearly differentiated neoplastic cells from normal cells. A search of the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) database also revealed that 53.2% of mutations in BAP1 were frameshift indels with neo-peptide formation. An identified tumor-specific neo-antigen could be the potential molecular biomarker for personalized diagnosis to precisely subtype rare malignancies such as MPM.

  9. A Tumor-Specific Neo-Antigen Caused by a Frameshift Mutation in BAP1 Is a Potential Personalized Biomarker in Malignant Peritoneal Mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jun; Zhou, Zhan; Tang, Xiao-Jing; Gao, Zhi-Bin; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Shu-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive rare malignancy associated with asbestos exposure. A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of MPM will help develop a targeted therapy strategy. Oncogene targeted depth sequencing was performed on a tumor sample and paired peripheral blood DNA from a patient with malignant mesothelioma of the peritoneum. Four somatic base-substitutions in NOTCH2, NSD1, PDE4DIP, and ATP10B and 1 insert frameshift mutation in BAP1 were validated by the Sanger method at the transcriptional level. A 13-amino acids neo-peptide of the truncated Bap1 protein, which was produced as a result of this novel frameshift mutation, was predicted to be presented by this patient’s HLA-B protein. The polyclonal antibody of the synthesized 13-mer neo-peptide was produced in rabbits. Western blotting results showed a good antibody-neoantigen specificity, and Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining with the antibody of the neo-peptide clearly differentiated neoplastic cells from normal cells. A search of the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) database also revealed that 53.2% of mutations in BAP1 were frameshift indels with neo-peptide formation. An identified tumor-specific neo-antigen could be the potential molecular biomarker for personalized diagnosis to precisely subtype rare malignancies such as MPM. PMID:27187383

  10. BAP1 protein is a progression factor in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Arzt, Lisa; Quehenberger, Franz; Halbwedl, Iris; Mairinger, Thomas; Popper, Helmut H

    2014-01-01

    Human malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive cancer due to former asbestos exposure with little knowledge about prognostic factors of outcome and resistance to conventional therapy. BRCA1-associated protein 1 (BAP1) is a tumor suppressor gene that is frequently lost in MPM. Germline mutations of BAP1 predispose to several different tumors including malignant mesothelioma. Our study aimed to clarify if asbestos exposure has an influence on BAP1 expression and if BAP1 expression could be used as a prognostic factor of outcome. An immunohistochemical staining for BAP1 was performed on 123 MPM tissue samples and the expression levels have been correlated with asbestos exposure and overall survival time. BAP1 expression was not associated with asbestos exposure but we detected a significant effect of BAP1 expression on overall survival time--the higher the BAP1 expression (non-mutated BAP1), the shorter the overall survival. BAP1 mutation has been linked to non-asbestos induced familial mesotheliomas, which usually belong to the long survivor group and BAP1 is most probably functioning differently than in sporadic cases. Further investigations need to be performed to characterize the BAP1 mutations and to identify the BAP1 downstream targets in MPM.

  11. Changes in Bone Alkaline Phosphatase and Procollagen Type-1 C-Peptide after Static and Dynamic Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubo, Keitaro; Yuki, Kazuhito; Ikebukuro, Toshihiro

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of two types of nonweight-bearing exercise on changes in bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP) and pro-collagen type 1 C-peptide (P1P). BAP is a specific marker of bone synthesis, whereas P1P reflects synthesis of type 1 collagen in other organs as well as bone. Eight participants performed static and dynamic…

  12. Luminescence in Li2BaP2O7.

    PubMed

    Hatwar, L R; Wankhede, S P; Moharil, S V; Muthal, P L; Dhopte, S M

    2015-09-01

    The photo-, thermo- and optically stimulated luminescence in Li2BaP2O7 activated with Eu(2+) /Cu(+) are reported. Strong thermoluminescence, which is about two times greater than LiF-TLD 100 was observed in the Eu(2+) -activated sample. It also exhibited optically stimulated luminescence sensitivity of ~20% that of commercial Al2O3:C phosphor. PMID:25351563

  13. Dispersal of Bap-mediated Staphylococcus aureus biofilm by proteinase K.

    PubMed

    Kumar Shukla, Sudhir; Rao, Toleti Subba

    2013-02-01

    The dominant role of biofilm-associated protein (Bap) in Staphylococcus aureus biofilm development prompted us to investigate Bap as a potential target for proteinase-mediated biofilm dispersion. Biofilm assay in microtitre plates showed that proteinase K hampered the early adhesion of cells as well as biofilm development. Proteinase K treatment of 24- and 48-h-old biofilms showed enhanced dispersion of bap-positive S. aureus biofilm; however, proteinase K did not affect the bap-negative S. aureus biofilm. When antibiotics were used in combination with proteinase K, significant enhancement in antibiotic action was noticed against bap-positive S. aureus biofilm. This study establishes that antibiotics in combination with proteinase K can be used for controlling S. aureus biofilms in whose development Bap surface protein has a major role. We propose that Bap protein could be a potential target for therapeutic control of S. aureus infections (for example, bovine mastitis).

  14. Acceptors in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Mccluskey, Matthew D.; Corolewski, Caleb; Lv, Jinpeng; Tarun, Marianne C.; Teklemichael, Samuel T.; Walter, Eric D.; Norton, M. G.; Harrison, Kale W.; Ha, Su Y.

    2015-03-21

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) has potential for a range of applications in the area of optoelectronics. The quest for p-type ZnO has focused much attention on acceptors. In this paper, Cu, N, and Li acceptor impurities are discussed. Experimental evidence shows that these point defects have acceptor levels 3.2, 1.5, and 0.8 eV above the valence-band maximum, respectively. The levels are deep because the ZnO valence band is quite low compared to conventional, non-oxide semiconductors. Using MoO2 contacts, the electrical resistivity of ZnO:Li was measured and showed behavior consistent with bulk hole conduction for temperatures above 400 K. A photoluminescence peak in ZnO nanocrystals has been attributed to an acceptor, which may involve a zinc vacancy. High field (W-band) electron paramagnetic resonance measurements on the nanocrystals revealed an axial center with g = 2.0033 and g = 2.0075, along with an isotropic center at g = 2.0053.

  15. Acceptors in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    McCluskey, Matthew D. Corolewski, Caleb D.; Lv, Jinpeng; Tarun, Marianne C.; Teklemichael, Samuel T.; Walter, Eric D.; Norton, M. Grant; Harrison, Kale W.; Ha, Su

    2015-03-21

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) has potential for a range of applications in the area of optoelectronics. The quest for p-type ZnO has focused much attention on acceptors. In this paper, Cu, N, and Li acceptor impurities are discussed. Experimental evidence indicates these point defects have acceptor levels 3.2, 1.4, and 0.8 eV above the valence-band maximum, respectively. The levels are deep because the ZnO valence band is quite low compared to conventional, non-oxide semiconductors. Using MoO{sub 2} contacts, the electrical resistivity of ZnO:Li was measured and showed behavior consistent with bulk hole conduction for temperatures above 400 K. A photoluminescence peak in ZnO nanocrystals is attributed to an acceptor, which may involve a Zn vacancy. High field (W-band) electron paramagnetic resonance measurements on the nanocrystals revealed an axial center with g{sub ⊥} = 2.0015 and g{sub //} = 2.0056, along with an isotropic center at g = 2.0035.

  16. Protection against Acinetobacter baumannii infection via its functional deprivation of biofilm associated protein (Bap).

    PubMed

    Fattahian, Yaser; Rasooli, Iraj; Mousavi Gargari, Seyed Latif; Rahbar, Mohammad Reza; Darvish Alipour Astaneh, Shakiba; Amani, Jafar

    2011-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, a major nosocomial pathogen, has remarkable capacity to acquire antimicrobial resistance attributable to its biofilm formation ability. Biofilm associated protein (Bap), a specific cell surface protein, is directly involved in biofilm formation by A. baumannii and plays a major role in bacterial infectious processes. In the present study we cloned, expressed and purified a 371 amino acid subunit of Bap. Mice were immunized using recombinant Bap subunit. They were then challenged with A. baumannii to evaluate the immunogenicity and protectivity of Bap subunit. Humoral immune response to Bap was determined by ELISA. Injection of Bap subunit resulted in high antibody titers. Decrease in bacterial cell counts of the immunized mice was evident 18 h after challenge. Reaction of antibodies against Bap with several strains suggests that not only immunodominant regions of Bap in A. baumannii strains are conserved but also have the same epitope presenting pattern in different strains. Immunodominant region of Bap possesses target sites for a protective humoral immune response to A. baumannii. This seems to be a conserved region erecting efficacy of Bap as an appropriate vaccine candidate.

  17. BAP18 coactivates androgen receptor action and promotes prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shiying; Zhong, Xinping; Wang, Chunyu; Sun, Hongmiao; Wang, Shengli; Zhou, Tingting; Zou, Renlong; Lin, Lin; Sun, Ning; Sun, Ge; Wu, Yi; Wang, Botao; Song, Xiaoyu; Cao, Liu; Zhao, Yue

    2016-01-01

    BPTF associated protein of 18 kDa (BAP18) has been reported as a component of MLL1-WDR5 complex. However, BAP18 is an uncharacterized protein. The detailed biological functions of BAP18 and underlying mechanisms have not been defined. Androgen receptor (AR), a member of transcription factor, plays an essential role in prostate cancer (PCa) and castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) progression. Here, we demonstrate that BAP18 is identified as a coactivator of AR in Drosophilar experimental system and mammalian cells. BAP18 facilitates the recruitment of MLL1 subcomplex and AR to androgen-response element (ARE) of AR target genes, subsequently increasing histone H3K4 trimethylation and H4K16 acetylation. Knockdown of BAP18 attenuates cell growth and proliferation of PCa cells. Moreover, BAP18 depletion results in inhibition of xenograft tumor growth in mice even under androgen-depletion conditions. In addition, our data show that BAP18 expression in clinical PCa samples is higher than that in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Our data suggest that BAP18 as an epigenetic modifier regulates AR-induced transactivation and the function of BAP18 might be targeted in human PCa to promote tumor growth and progression to castration-resistance. PMID:27226492

  18. A novel BAP1 mutation is associated with melanocytic neoplasms and thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Kevin J; Gallanis, Gregory T; Heller, Kathleen A; Melas, Marilena; Idos, Gregory E; Culver, Julie O; Martin, Sue-Ellen; Peng, David H; Gruber, Stephen B

    2016-03-01

    Germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene, BRCA-1 associated protein (BAP1), underlie a tumor predisposition syndrome characterized by increased risk for numerous cancers including uveal melanoma, melanocytic tumors and mesothelioma, among others. In the present study we report the identification of a novel germline BAP1 mutation, c.1777C>T, which produces a truncated BAP1 protein product and segregates with cancer. Family members with this mutation demonstrated a primary clinical phenotype of autosomal dominant, early-onset melanocytic neoplasms with immunohistochemistry (IHC) of these tumors demonstrating lack of BAP1 protein expression. In addition, family members harboring the BAP1 c.1777C>T germline mutation developed other neoplastic disease including thyroid cancer. IHC analysis of the thyroid cancer, as well, demonstrated loss of BAP1 protein expression. Our investigation identifies a new BAP1 mutation, further highlights the relevance of BAP1 as a clinically important tumor suppressor gene, and broadens the range of cancers associated with BAP1 inactivation. Further study will be required to understand the full scope of BAP1-associated neoplastic disease.

  19. BAP1 facilitates diagnostic objectivity, classification, and prognostication in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Stephanie M; Dunning, Ryan; Hyjek, Elizabeth; Vigneswaran, Wickii; Husain, Aliya N; Krausz, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    BRCA-associated protein 1 (BAP1) has emerged as a promising biomarker for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Loss of BAP1 expression can occur by a variety of mechanisms, but reports on incidence are variable and the clinical significance is unclear. In order to investigate the diagnostic and prognostic significance of BAP1, we constructed a tissue microarray consisting of 111 MPM cases and performed BAP1 immunohistochemistry. BAP1 was lost in 77% of epithelioid cases (n=58) but was retained in all sarcomatoid cases (n=10); 49% of biphasic cases showed loss (n=43), and BAP1-negative cases demonstrated loss of staining in both the epithelioid and sarcomatoid components. All non-neoplastic mesothelial tissues (n=20) retained BAP1, resulting in a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 61%, 100%, 100%, and 32%, respectively. Moreover, BAP1 expression in spindled mesothelium enabled discrimination of reactive and malignant cells, thus providing a more objective means of distinguishing epithelioid from biphasic morphology compared to histology alone. Nonetheless, BAP1 staining was patchy in some benign mesothelial neoplasms, which raises concern for using BAP1 in small biopsies. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated a significant improvement in overall survival with BAP1 loss, but this did not reach significance in multivariate analysis accounting for histologic subtype. When only epithelioid cases were analyzed there was a trend toward increased survival, but it did not reach significance. We conclude that BAP1 loss is frequent in epithelioid MPM, which is in turn associated with improved survival, and that it can have additional clinical significance by facilitating histologic classification.

  20. SarA positively controls bap-dependent biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Trotonda, María Pilar; Manna, Adhar C; Cheung, Ambrose L; Lasa, Iñigo; Penadés, José R

    2005-08-01

    The biofilm-associated protein Bap is a staphylococcal surface protein involved in biofilm formation. We investigated the influence of the global regulatory locus sarA on bap expression and Bap-dependent biofilm formation in three unrelated Staphylococcus aureus strains. The results showed that Bap-dependent biofilm formation was diminished in the sarA mutants by an agr-independent mechanism. Complementation studies using a sarA clone confirmed that the defect in biofilm formation was due to the sarA mutation. As expected, the diminished capacity to form biofilms in the sarA mutants correlated with the decreased presence of Bap in the bacterial surface. Using transcriptional fusion and Northern analysis data, we demonstrated that the sarA gene product acts as an activator of bap expression. Finally, the bap promoter was characterized and the transcriptional start point was mapped by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends technique. As expected, we showed that purified SarA protein binds specifically to the bap promoter, as determined by gel shift and DNase I footprinting assays. Based on the previous studies of others as well as our work demonstrating the role for SarA in icaADBC and bap expression, we propose that SarA is an essential regulator controlling biofilm formation in S. aureus.

  1. Phase-variable expression of the biofilm-associated protein (Bap) in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Tormo, M Angeles; Ubeda, Carles; Martí, Miguel; Maiques, Elisa; Cucarella, Carme; Valle, Jaione; Foster, Timothy J; Lasa, Iñigo; Penadés, José R

    2007-06-01

    A process of phase variation is described that affects the expression of Bap (biofilm-associated protein) in Staphylococcus aureus. Upon subculture of the Bap-positive S. aureus strain V329 on Congo red agar, spontaneous smooth biofilm-negative colonies appeared at a low frequency (5 x 10(-4)). Northern blot analysis of these variants with a bap-specific gene probe showed that transcription of the bap gene did not occur. However, DNA typing, Southern blot hybridization and DNA sequencing did not show any differences between the parent V329 strain and the biofilm-negative variants. The biofilm-negative phenotype reverted to wild-type at a similar frequency upon subculture of Bap-negative variants in liquid media. Experimental infection of ovine mammary glands with Bap-negative variants showed that phase variation occurred in vivo, because Bap-expressing, biofilm-positive revertants were isolated from infected mammary glands. The absence of Bap correlated with increased adherence to fibrinogen and fibronectin. It is possible that S. aureus can detach from a biofilm by switching to a Bap-negative state.

  2. Bap-dependent biofilm formation by pathogenic species of Staphylococcus: evidence of horizontal gene transfer?

    PubMed

    Tormo, M Angeles; Knecht, Erwin; Götz, Friedrich; Lasa, Iñigo; Penadés, José R

    2005-07-01

    The biofilm-associated protein (Bap) is a surface protein implicated in biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus isolated from chronic mastitis infections. The bap gene is carried in a putative composite transposon inserted in SaPIbov2, a mobile staphylococcal pathogenicity island. In this study, bap orthologue genes from several staphylococcal species, including Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus chromogenes, Staphylococcus xylosus, Staphylococcus simulans and Staphylococcus hyicus, were identified, cloned and sequenced. Sequence analysis comparison of the bap gene from these species revealed a very high sequence similarity, suggesting the horizontal gene transfer of SaPIbov2 amongst them. However, sequence analyses of the flanking region revealed that the bap gene of these species was not contained in the SaPIbov2 pathogenicity island. Although they did not contain the icaADBC operon, all the coagulase-negative staphylococcal isolates harbouring bap were strong biofilm producers. Disruption of the bap gene in S. epidermidis abolished its capacity to form a biofilm, whereas heterologous complementation of a biofilm-negative strain of S. aureus with the Bap protein from S. epidermidis bestowed the capacity to form a biofilm on a polystyrene surface. Altogether, these results demonstrate that Bap orthologues from coagulase-negative staphylococci induce an alternative mechanism of biofilm formation that is independent of the PIA/PNAG exopolysaccharide.

  3. Interaction between human BAP31 and respiratory syncytial virus small hydrophobic (SH) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan; Jain, Neeraj; Limpanawat, Suweeraya; To, Janet; Quistgaard, Esben M.; Nordlund, Par; Thanabalu, Thirumaran; Torres, Jaume

    2015-08-15

    The small hydrophobic (SH) protein is a short channel-forming polypeptide encoded by the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Deletion of SH protein leads to the viral attenuation in mice and primates, and delayed apoptosis in infected cells. We have used a membrane-based yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) and a library from human lung cDNA to detect proteins that bind SH protein. This led to the identification of a membrane protein, B-cell associated protein 31 (BAP31). Transfected SH protein co-localizes with transfected BAP31 in cells, and pulls down endogenous BAP31. Titration of purified C-terminal endodomain of BAP31 against isotopically labeled SH protein in detergent micelles suggests direct interaction between the two proteins. Given the key role of BAP31 in protein trafficking and its critical involvement in pro- and anti-apoptotic pathways, this novel interaction may constitute a potential drug target. - Highlights: • A yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) detected BAP31 as a binder of RSV SH protein. • Transfected SH and BAP31 co-localize in lung epithelial cells. • Endogenous BAP31 is pulled down by RSV SH protein. • BAP31 endodomain interacts with the N-terminal α-helix of SH protein in micelles. • This interaction is proposed to be a potential drug target.

  4. Metabolism and DNA binding of BaP in the presence of complex organic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, D.L.; Dankovic, D.A.; Thomas, B.L.; Hopkins, K.L.; Bean, R.E.; Mahlum, D.D.

    1986-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that the mutagenic, carcinogenic and DNA binding activities of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) were decreased when BaP was coadministered with complex organic mixtures. We have continued these studies to identify the components of the mixture that were responsible for this effect. For this study a high-boiling coal liquid was separated into aliphatic, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), nitrogen-containing polycyclic aromatic compounds (NPAC) and oxygen containing PAH fractions (HPAH); these were spiked with /sup 3/H-BaP, administered dermally to mice and DNA isolated twenty-four hours later. Binding of BaP, as estimated by radioactivity associated the DNA, decreased to 47, 55 and 66% of that for the same dose of BaP alone for the PAH, NPAC and HPAH fractions, respectively. In vitro studies with Aroclor-induced rat liver S9 demonstrated that the rate of metabolism of BaP decreased when it was coadministered with the mixtures but that the BaP metabolite profiles were similar for BaP alone and in the presence of the mixture. These data suggest that the differences in mutagenic, and presumable carcinogenic activities, for BaP, when administered with the complex mixture, were due to decreased rates of conversion of BaP to reactive metabolites. 15 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Loss of BAP1 function leads to EZH2-dependent transformation

    PubMed Central

    LaFave, Lindsay M.; Béguelin, Wendy; Koche, Richard; Teater, Matt; Spitzer, Barbara; Chramiec, Alan; Papalexi, Efthymia; Keller, Matthew D.; Hricik, Todd; Konstantinoff, Katerina; Micol, Jean-Baptiste; Durham, Benjamin; Knutson, Sarah K.; Campbell, John E.; Blum, Gil; Shi, Xinxu; Doud, Emma H.; Krivtsov, Andrei V.; Chung, Young Rock; Khodos, Inna; de Stanchina, Elisa; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Adusumilli, Prasad S.; Thomas, Paul M.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Luo, Minkui; Keilhack, Heike; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Melnick, Ari; Armstrong, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Introductory Paragraph BAP1 and ASXL1 interact to form a polycomb deubiquitinase complex that removes monoubiquitin from histone H2A lysine 119 (H2AK119Ub). However, BAP1 and ASXL1 are mutated in distinct cancer types, consistent with independent roles in regulating epigenetic state and malignant transformation. Here we demonstrate that Bap1 loss results in increased trimethylated histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3), elevated Ezh2 expression, and enhanced repression of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) targets. These findings contrast with the reduction in H3K27me3 seen with Asxl1 loss. Conditional deletion of Bap1 and Ezh2 in vivo abrogates the myeloid progenitor expansion induced by Bap1 loss alone. Loss of Bap1 results in a marked decrease in H4K20 monomethylation (H4K20me1). Consistent with a role for H4K20me1 in EZH2 transcriptional regulation, expression of SETD8, the H4K20me1 methyltransferase, reduces EZH2 expression and abrogates the proliferation of BAP1-mutant cells. Further, mesothelioma cells that lack BAP1 are sensitive to EZH2 pharmacologic inhibition, suggesting a novel therapeutic approach for BAP1-mutant malignancies. PMID:26437366

  6. Differences in gene expression of human xylosyltransferases and determination of acceptor specificities for various proteoglycans

    SciTech Connect

    Roch, Christina; Kuhn, Joachim; Kleesiek, Knut; Goetting, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The xylosyltransferase (XT) isoforms XT-I and XT-II initiate the posttranslational glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis. Here, we determined the relative expression of both isoforms in 33 human cell lines. The majority of tested cell lines showed dominant XYLT2 gene expression, while only in 23132/87, JAR, NCI-H510A and THP-1 was the XT-I mRNA expression higher. Nearly equal expression levels were detected in six cell lines. Additionally, to shed light on putative differences in acceptor specificities the acceptor properties of potential acceptor sequences were determined. Peptides were expressed as glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins containing putative or known GAG attachment sites of in vivo proteoglycans. Kinetic analysis showed that K{sub m} and V{sub max} values for XT-I mediated xylosylation were slightly higher than those for XT-II, and that XT-I showed a lesser stringency concerning the acceptor sequence. Mutagenesis of the bikunin peptide sequence in the G-S-G attachment site and flanking regions generated potential acceptor molecules. Here, mutations on the N-terminal side and the attachment site were found to be more susceptible to a loss of acceptor function than mutations in the C-terminus. Altogether the known consensus sequence a-a-a-a-G-S-G-a-a/G-a ('a' representing Asp or Glu) for XT-I mediated xylosylation could be approved and additionally extended to apply to XT-II as well.

  7. High Incidence of Somatic BAP1 Alterations in Sporadic Malignant Mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Nasu, Masaki; Emi, Mitsuru; Pastorino, Sandra; Tanji, Mika; Powers, Amy; Luk, Hugh; Baumann, Francine; Zhang, Yu-an; Gazdar, Adi; Kanodia, Shreya; Tiirikainen, Maarit; Flores, Erin; Gaudino, Giovanni; Becich, Michael J.; Pass, Harvey I.; Yang, Haining; Carbone, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Background BAP1 is a nuclear deubiquitinase that regulates gene expression, transcription, DNA repair, and more. Several findings underscore the apparent “driver” role of BAP1 in malignant mesothelioma (MM). However the reported frequency of somatic BAP1 mutations in MM varies considerably, a discrepancy that appeared related to either methodological or ethnical differences across various studies. Methods To address this discrepancy, we carried out comprehensive genomic and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses to detect somatic BAP1 gene alterations in 22 frozen MM biopsies from US MM patients. Results By combining Sanger sequencing, Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification, copy number analysis and cDNA sequencing, we found alteration of BAP1 in 14/22 biopsies (63.6%). No changes in methylation were observed. IHC revealed normal nuclear BAP1 staining in the 8 MM containing wild-type BAP1, while no nuclear staining was detected in the 14 MM biopsies containing tumor cells with mutated BAP1. Thus, IHC results were in agreement with those obtained by genomic analyses. We then extended IHC analysis to an independent cohort of 70 MM biopsies, of which there was insufficient material to perform molecular studies. IHC revealed loss of BAP1 nuclear staining in 47 out of these 70 MM biopsies (67.1%). Conclusions Our findings conclusively establish BAP1 as the most commonly mutated gene in MM, regardless of ethnic background or other clinical characteristics. Our data point to IHC as the most accessible and reliable technique to detect BAP1 status in MM biopsies. PMID:25658628

  8. Role of biofilm-associated protein bap in the pathogenesis of bovine Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Cucarella, Carme; Tormo, M Angeles; Ubeda, Carles; Trotonda, M Pilar; Monzón, Marta; Peris, Critòfol; Amorena, Beatriz; Lasa, Iñigo; Penadés, José R

    2004-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of intramammary infections, which frequently become chronic, associated with the ability of the bacteria to produce biofilm. Here, we report a relationship between the ability to produce chronic bovine mastitis and biofilm formation. We have classified bovine mastitis S. aureus isolates into three groups based on the presence of particular genetic elements required for biofilm formation: group 1 (ica(+) bap(+)), group 2 (ica(+), bap negative), and group 3 (ica negative, bap negative). Overall, animals naturally infected with group 1 and 2 isolates had a lower milk somatic cell count than those infected with isolates of group 3. In addition, Bap-positive isolates were significantly more able to colonize and persist in the bovine mammary gland in vivo and were less susceptible to antibiotic treatments when forming biofilms in vitro. Analysis of the structural bap gene revealed the existence of alternate forms of expression of the Bap protein in S. aureus isolates obtained under field conditions throughout the animal's life. The presence of anti-Bap antibodies in serum samples taken from animals with confirmed S. aureus infections indicated the production of Bap during infection. Furthermore, disruption of the ica operon in a bap-positive strain had no effect on in vitro biofilm formation, a finding which strongly suggested that Bap could compensate for the deficiency of the PIA/PNAG product (a biofilm matrix polysaccharide). Altogether, these results demonstrate that, in the bovine intramammary gland, the presence of Bap may facilitate a biofilm formation connected with the persistence of S. aureus.

  9. Benzo(A)pyrene (BaP) treatment results in complete infertility in female pigeons

    SciTech Connect

    Hough, J.L.; Darrow, D.; Eaton, J.; Baird, M.B. )

    1991-03-11

    BaP is a carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and a common environmental pollutant. Show Racer and White Carneau female pigeons injected weekly with BaP for 3 for 5 months were completely infertile, with ovaries appearing necrotic or oxidized. Fertility in benzo(e)pyrene (BeP, a noncarcinogenic PAH) treated birds was the same as for corn oil treated controls, as was embryo development. Thus, infertility in BaP treated birds appears to be related to its structure-carcinogenic potential. There was no readily apparent affect of BaP treatment on testes from male birds. In order to determine whether BaP metabolites covalently bind to DNA in the ovaries of these birds, pigeons were injected with BaP or BeP, controls were injected with corn oil. Animals were sacrificed 24h later, the ovaries or testes removed, and the DNA isolated and analyzed for PAH-DNA adducts by {sup 32}P-post labeling assay. One major and one minor PAH-DNA adduct was found in ovaries and testes from BaP treated birds. However, no PAH adducts were found in BeP treated or control animals. Thus, problems with fertility may arise because of the alteration in DNA by BaP metabolite binding in ovaries where rapid cell growth occurs during egg production.

  10. Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) metabolites and 1-hydroxypyrene as urinary biomarkers for human environmental exposure to BaP

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, T.J.

    1991-01-01

    Environmental exposures to benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) through inhalation and ingestion pathways and the corresponding elimination of BaP metabolites in the urine were evaluated through regression and mass balance models. Personal air sampling (24-h) yielded BaP inhalation dose estimates of 11.0 and 2.3 ng/d for winter and late summer, respectively, while duplicate plate sampling yielded an ingested dose estimate of 176 ng/d. The daily inhalation dose was exceeded by the ingested dose by median factors of 6 and 122 for the respective study phases. Using the reverse metabolism method of analysis, median urinary BaP metabolite elimination rates were 121 and 129 ng/d for Phase 2 and 3, respectively. BaP dose (inhalation and ingestion) and urinary BaP metabolite elimination variables were related using multiple linear regression. When the difference between week 1 and 2 in dose and metabolite elimination was considered, and when body weight was included, a statistically significant model was determined (r = 0.620, p = 0.015, n = 25) with most of the variation in urine elimination being explained by ingested dose. A separate controlled exposure study was conducted among five nonsmoking males to define the time-course of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHPY) elimination associated with ingestion of foods containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This investigation showed that a 100-250 fold increase in the dietary BaP does paralleled to 4 to 12 fold increase in the elimination of 1-OHPY. A biexponential model was fitted to the 1-OHPY elimination rate data yielding an average half-life estimate of 4.4 h and an average time of maximal rate of elimination of 6.3 h after the ingested dose.

  11. Anaerobic electron acceptor chemotaxis in Shewanella putrefaciens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Moser, D. P.; Saffarini, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 can grow either aerobically or anaerobically at the expense of many different electron acceptors and is often found in abundance at redox interfaces in nature. Such redox interfaces are often characterized by very strong gradients of electron acceptors resulting from rapid microbial metabolism. The coincidence of S. putrefaciens abundance with environmental gradients prompted an examination of the ability of MR-1 to sense and respond to electron acceptor gradients in the laboratory. In these experiments, taxis to the majority of the electron acceptors that S. putrefaciens utilizes for anaerobic growth was seen. All anaerobic electron acceptor taxis was eliminated by the presence of oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, elemental sulfur, or dimethyl sulfoxide, even though taxis to the latter was very weak and nitrate and nitrite respiration was normal in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies with respiratory mutants of MR-1 revealed that several electron acceptors that could not be used for anaerobic growth nevertheless elicited normal anaerobic taxis. Mutant M56, which was unable to respire nitrite, showed normal taxis to nitrite, as well as the inhibition of taxis to other electron acceptors by nitrite. These results indicate that electron acceptor taxis in S. putrefaciens does not conform to the paradigm established for Escherichia coli and several other bacteria. Carbon chemo-taxis was also unusual in this organism: of all carbon compounds tested, the only positive response observed was to formate under anaerobic conditions.

  12. Electron transfer in peptides.

    PubMed

    Shah, Afzal; Adhikari, Bimalendu; Martic, Sanela; Munir, Azeema; Shahzad, Suniya; Ahmad, Khurshid; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard

    2015-02-21

    In this review, we discuss the factors that influence electron transfer in peptides. We summarize experimental results from solution and surface studies and highlight the ongoing debate on the mechanistic aspects of this fundamental reaction. Here, we provide a balanced approach that remains unbiased and does not favor one mechanistic view over another. Support for a putative hopping mechanism in which an electron transfers in a stepwise manner is contrasted with experimental results that support electron tunneling or even some form of ballistic transfer or a pathway transfer for an electron between donor and acceptor sites. In some cases, experimental evidence suggests that a change in the electron transfer mechanism occurs as a result of donor-acceptor separation. However, this common understanding of the switch between tunneling and hopping as a function of chain length is not sufficient for explaining electron transfer in peptides. Apart from chain length, several other factors such as the extent of the secondary structure, backbone conformation, dipole orientation, the presence of special amino acids, hydrogen bonding, and the dynamic properties of a peptide also influence the rate and mode of electron transfer in peptides. Electron transfer plays a key role in physical, chemical and biological systems, so its control is a fundamental task in bioelectrochemical systems, the design of peptide based sensors and molecular junctions. Therefore, this topic is at the heart of a number of biological and technological processes and thus remains of vital interest.

  13. BAP1 suppresses lung cancer progression and is inhibited by miR-31

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueliang; Liao, Zhicong; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Yanqing; Wang, Yanbo; Hong, Yeting; Zhou, Xinyan; Yan, Xin; Yu, Min; Ma, Miao; Zhang, Weijie; Guo, Baoliang; Zhang, Jianguo; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Qipeng; Chen, Xi

    2016-01-01

    BRCA1-associated protein-1 (BAP1) is an important nuclear-localized deubiquitinating enzyme that serves as a tumor suppressor in lung cancer; however, its function and its regulation are largely unknown. In this study, we found that BAP1 protein levels were dramatically diminished in lung cancer tissues while its mRNA levels did not differ significantly, suggesting that a post-transcriptional mechanism was involved in BAP1 regulation. Because microRNAs (miRNAs) are powerful post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, we used bioinformatic analyses to search for miRNAs that could potentially bind BAP1. We predicted and experimentally validated miR-31 as a direct regulator of BAP1. Moreover, we showed that miR-31 promoted proliferation and suppressed apoptosis in lung cancer cells and accelerated the development of tumor growth in xenograft mice by inhibiting BAP1. Taken together, this study highlights an important role for miR-31 in the suppression of BAP1 in lung cancer cells and may provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of lung carcinogenesis. PMID:26885612

  14. A Novel Germline Mutation in BAP1 Predisposes to Familial Clear-Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mester, Jessica L.; Pena-Llopis, Samuel; Pavia-Jimenez, Andrea; Christie, Alana; Vocke, Cathy D.; Ricketts, Christopher J.; Peterson, James; Middelton, Lindsay; Kinch, Lisa; Grishin, Nick; Merino, Maria J.; Metwalli, Adam R.; Xing, Chao; Xie, Xian-Jin; Dahia, Patricia L.M.; Eng, Charis

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) clusters in some families. Familial RCC arises from mutations in several genes, including VHL, which is also mutated in sporadic RCC. However, a significant percentage of familial RCC remains unexplained. Recently, we discovered that the BAP1 gene is mutated in sporadic RCC. BAP1, which encodes a nuclear deubiquitinase, is a two-hit tumor suppressor gene. Somatic BAP1 mutations are associated with high-grade ccRCC and poor patient outcomes. To determine whether BAP1 predisposes to familial RCC, we sequenced the BAP1 gene in 83 unrelated probands with unexplained familial RCC. We identified a novel variant (c.41T>A; p.L14H), which cosegregated with the RCC phenotype. The p.L14H variant disrupts a highly conserved residue in the catalytic domain, a domain frequently targeted by missense mutations. The family with the BAP1 variant was characterized by early-onset clear cell RCC, occasionally of high Fuhrman grade, and lacked other features that characterize von Hippel-Lindau syndrome. These findings suggest that BAP1 is a familial RCC predisposing gene. PMID:23709298

  15. Through-Solvent Tunneling in Donor-Bridge-Acceptor Molecules Containing a Molecular Cleft.

    PubMed

    Graff, B M; Lamont, D N; Parker, M F L; Bloom, B P; Schafmeister, C E; Waldeck, D H

    2016-08-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer is used to investigate the solvent-mediated electron tunneling between electron donor and acceptor groups in polar solvents. Bis-peptide scaffolds are used to control the spatial positioning of electron donor and acceptor groups and create a molecular cleft. The photoinduced electron transfer is studied for two different cleft sizes, and the electronic coupling is found to be controlled by the nature of the solvent and the ability of the molecular cleft to accommodate it, as well as interact directly with it. These studies demonstrate the importance of electron tunneling through nonbonded contacts and reveal a strategy for examining such tunneling pathways in polar solvents. PMID:27401503

  16. Bright Solid-State Emission of Disilane-Bridged Donor-Acceptor-Donor and Acceptor-Donor-Acceptor Chromophores.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Masaki; Tsuchiya, Mizuho; Sakamoto, Ryota; Yamanoi, Yoshinori; Nishibori, Eiji; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2016-02-24

    The development of disilane-bridged donor-acceptor-donor (D-Si-Si-A-Si-Si-D) and acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-Si-Si-D-Si-Si-A) compounds is described. Both types of compound showed strong emission (λem =ca. 500 and ca. 400 nm, respectively) in the solid state with high quantum yields (Φ: up to 0.85). Compound 4 exhibited aggregation-induced emission enhancement in solution. X-ray diffraction revealed that the crystal structures of 2, 4, and 12 had no intermolecular π-π interactions to suppress the nonradiative transition in the solid state.

  17. Germline BAP1 Mutational Landscape of Asbestos-Exposed Malignant Mesothelioma Patients with Family History of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ohar, Jill A; Cheung, Mitchell; Talarchek, Jacqueline; Howard, Suzanne E; Howard, Timothy D; Hesdorffer, Mary; Peng, Hongzhuang; Rauscher, Frank J; Testa, Joseph R

    2016-01-15

    Heritable mutations in the BAP1 tumor suppressor gene predispose individuals to mesothelioma and other cancers. However, a large-scale assessment of germline BAP1 mutation incidence and associated clinical features in mesothelioma patients with a family history of cancer has not been reported. Therefore, we examined the germline BAP1 mutation status of 150 mesothelioma patients with a family history of cancer, 50 asbestos-exposed control individuals with a family history of cancers other than mesothelioma, and 153 asbestos-exposed individuals without familial cancer. No BAP1 alterations were found in control cohorts, but were identified in nine of 150 mesothelioma cases (6%) with a family history of cancer. Alterations among these cases were characterized by both missense and frameshift mutations, and enzymatic activity of BAP1 missense mutants was decreased compared with wild-type BAP1. Furthermore, BAP1 mutation carriers developed mesothelioma at an earlier age that was more often peritoneal than pleural (five of nine) and exhibited improved long-term survival compared to mesothelioma patients without BAP1 mutations. Moreover, many tumors harboring BAP1 germline mutations were associated with BAP1 syndrome, including mesothelioma and ocular/cutaneous melanomas, as well as renal, breast, lung, gastric, and basal cell carcinomas. Collectively, these findings suggest that mesothelioma patients presenting with a family history of cancer should be considered for BAP1 genetic testing to identify those individuals who might benefit from further screening and routine monitoring for the purpose of early detection and intervention. PMID:26719535

  18. Mesothelioma patients with germline BAP1 mutations have 7-fold improved long-term survival.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Francine; Flores, Erin; Napolitano, Andrea; Kanodia, Shreya; Taioli, Emanuela; Pass, Harvey; Yang, Haining; Carbone, Michele

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1-associated protein-1 (BAP1) mutations cause a new cancer syndrome, with a high rate of malignant mesothelioma (MM). Here, we tested the hypothesis that MM associated with germline BAP1 mutations has a better prognosis compared with sporadic MM. We compared survival among germline BAP1 mutation MM patients with that of all MM (N = 10 556) recorded in the United States Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data from 1973 to 2010. We identified 23 MM patients--11 alive--with germline BAP1 mutations and available data on survival. Ten patients had peritoneal MM, ten pleural MM and three MM in both locations. Thirteen patients had one or more malignancies in addition to MM. Actuarial median survival for the MM patients with germline BAP1 mutations was 5 years, as compared with <1 year for the median survival in the United States SEER MM group. Five-year survival was 47%, 95% confidence interval (24-67%), as compared with 6.7% (6.2-7.3%) in the control SEER group. Analysis of the pooled cohort of germline BAP1 mutation MM showed that patients with peritoneal MM (median survival of 10 years, P = 0.0571), or with a second malignancy in addition to MM (median survival of 10 years, P = 0.0716), survived for a longer time compared with patients who only had pleural MM, or MM patients without a second malignancy, respectively. In conclusion, we found that MM patients with germline BAP1 mutations have an overall 7-fold increased long-term survival, independently of sex and age. Appropriate genetic counseling and clinical management should be considered for MM patients who are also BAP1 mutation carriers.

  19. Staphylococcal Bap Proteins Build Amyloid Scaffold Biofilm Matrices in Response to Environmental Signals.

    PubMed

    Taglialegna, Agustina; Navarro, Susanna; Ventura, Salvador; Garnett, James A; Matthews, Steve; Penades, José R; Lasa, Iñigo; Valle, Jaione

    2016-06-01

    Biofilms are communities of bacteria that grow encased in an extracellular matrix that often contains proteins. The spatial organization and the molecular interactions between matrix scaffold proteins remain in most cases largely unknown. Here, we report that Bap protein of Staphylococcus aureus self-assembles into functional amyloid aggregates to build the biofilm matrix in response to environmental conditions. Specifically, Bap is processed and fragments containing at least the N-terminus of the protein become aggregation-prone and self-assemble into amyloid-like structures under acidic pHs and low concentrations of calcium. The molten globule-like state of Bap fragments is stabilized upon binding of the cation, hindering its self-assembly into amyloid fibers. These findings define a dual function for Bap, first as a sensor and then as a scaffold protein to promote biofilm development under specific environmental conditions. Since the pH-driven multicellular behavior mediated by Bap occurs in coagulase-negative staphylococci and many other bacteria exploit Bap-like proteins to build a biofilm matrix, the mechanism of amyloid-like aggregation described here may be widespread among pathogenic bacteria. PMID:27327765

  20. Staphylococcal Bap Proteins Build Amyloid Scaffold Biofilm Matrices in Response to Environmental Signals

    PubMed Central

    Taglialegna, Agustina; Navarro, Susanna; Ventura, Salvador; Garnett, James A.; Matthews, Steve; Penades, José R.; Lasa, Iñigo; Valle, Jaione

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are communities of bacteria that grow encased in an extracellular matrix that often contains proteins. The spatial organization and the molecular interactions between matrix scaffold proteins remain in most cases largely unknown. Here, we report that Bap protein of Staphylococcus aureus self-assembles into functional amyloid aggregates to build the biofilm matrix in response to environmental conditions. Specifically, Bap is processed and fragments containing at least the N-terminus of the protein become aggregation-prone and self-assemble into amyloid-like structures under acidic pHs and low concentrations of calcium. The molten globule-like state of Bap fragments is stabilized upon binding of the cation, hindering its self-assembly into amyloid fibers. These findings define a dual function for Bap, first as a sensor and then as a scaffold protein to promote biofilm development under specific environmental conditions. Since the pH-driven multicellular behavior mediated by Bap occurs in coagulase-negative staphylococci and many other bacteria exploit Bap-like proteins to build a biofilm matrix, the mechanism of amyloid-like aggregation described here may be widespread among pathogenic bacteria. PMID:27327765

  1. Staphylococcal Bap Proteins Build Amyloid Scaffold Biofilm Matrices in Response to Environmental Signals.

    PubMed

    Taglialegna, Agustina; Navarro, Susanna; Ventura, Salvador; Garnett, James A; Matthews, Steve; Penades, José R; Lasa, Iñigo; Valle, Jaione

    2016-06-01

    Biofilms are communities of bacteria that grow encased in an extracellular matrix that often contains proteins. The spatial organization and the molecular interactions between matrix scaffold proteins remain in most cases largely unknown. Here, we report that Bap protein of Staphylococcus aureus self-assembles into functional amyloid aggregates to build the biofilm matrix in response to environmental conditions. Specifically, Bap is processed and fragments containing at least the N-terminus of the protein become aggregation-prone and self-assemble into amyloid-like structures under acidic pHs and low concentrations of calcium. The molten globule-like state of Bap fragments is stabilized upon binding of the cation, hindering its self-assembly into amyloid fibers. These findings define a dual function for Bap, first as a sensor and then as a scaffold protein to promote biofilm development under specific environmental conditions. Since the pH-driven multicellular behavior mediated by Bap occurs in coagulase-negative staphylococci and many other bacteria exploit Bap-like proteins to build a biofilm matrix, the mechanism of amyloid-like aggregation described here may be widespread among pathogenic bacteria.

  2. [Effects of BaP exposure on ultrastructures of hepatic cells of Boleophthalmus pectinirostris].

    PubMed

    Feng, Tao; Zheng, Weiyun; Ouyang, Gaoliang; Hong, Wanshu

    2003-10-01

    The changes of ultrastructures of hepatic cells of Boleophthalmus pectinirostris were investigated after the fish were exposed under benzo(a) pyrene in different concentrations under experimental condition. The results showed that the organelles in hepatic cells of B. pectinirostris were damaged to different extents after the fish was exposed under lower concentration of BaP (0.5 mg.L-1) for up to 7 d, in which, mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum were the chief organelles affected by BaP exposure. While the fish was exposed under higher concentration of BaP (5 mg.L-1) for 2 h, almost all of the organelles including mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum in hepatic cells of B. pectinirostr were affected by BaP exposure. The structures of liver cells were seriously damaged. It was demonstrated that BaP could produce multiorganalle lesions in hepatic cells of B. pectinirostris, and the severity extent of such lesions was dependent on the concentration level of BaP.

  3. A high-molecular-weight complex of membrane proteins BAP29/BAP31 is involved in the retention of membrane-bound IgD in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Schamel, Wolfgang W A; Kuppig, Stephan; Becker, Bernd; Gimborn, Kerstin; Hauri, Hans-Peter; Reth, Michael

    2003-08-19

    B cell antigen receptors (BCRs) are multimeric transmembrane protein complexes comprising membrane-bound immunoglobulins (mIgs) and Ig-alpha/Ig-beta heterodimers. In most cases, transport of mIgs from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the cell surface requires assembly with the Ig-alpha/Ig-beta subunits. In addition to Ig-alpha/Ig-beta, mIg molecules also bind two ER-resident membrane proteins, BAP29 and BAP31, and the chaperone heavy chain binding protein (BiP). In this article, we show that neither Ig-alpha/Ig-beta nor BAP29/BAP31 nor BiP bind simultaneously to the same mIgD molecule. Blue native PAGE revealed that only a minor fraction of intracellular mIgD is associated with high-molecular-weight BAP29/BAP31 complexes. BAP-binding to mIgs was found to correlate with ER retention of chimeric mIgD molecules. On high-level expression in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells, mIgD molecules were detected on the cell surface in the absence of Ig-alpha/Ig-beta. This aberrant transport was prevented by coexpression of BAP29 and BAP31. Thus, BAP complexes contribute to ER retention of mIg complexes that are not bound to Ig-alpha/Ig-beta. Furthermore, the mechanism of ER retention of both BAP31 and mIgD is not through retrieval from a post-ER compartment, but true ER retention. In conclusion, BAP29 and BAP31 might be the long sought after retention proteins and/or chaperones that act on transmembrane regions of various proteins.

  4. Synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor

    DOEpatents

    Lancet, Michael S.; Curran, George P.

    1981-08-18

    A synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor consisting essentially of at least one compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate supported in a refractory carrier matrix, the carrier having the general formula Ca.sub.5 (SiO.sub.4).sub.2 CO.sub.3. A method for producing the synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor is also disclosed.

  5. Uptake, metabolism and macromolecular binding of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) metabolites in channel catfish

    SciTech Connect

    Elskus, A.A.; McElroy, A.E.

    1995-12-31

    Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), such as BaP, are contaminants with demonstrated carcinogenicity, yet little is known about the fate of PAH metabolites in aquatic organisms. Some invertebrates actively metabolize BaP to hydroxylated and conjugated forms, becoming BaP metabolite-rich prey items for fish. The authors examined the fate of BaP metabolites acquired by fish through diet. Channel catfish, Ictaluruspunctatus, were fed a single dose (2.5 umoles/kg fish) of either {sup 3}H-parent BaP or individual {sup 3}H-BaP metabolites: 3-hydroxy, 9-hydroxy, 9-sulfate or 9-glucuronidated BaP. After 24 hrs fish were killed, and samples of intestinal mucosa, bile, liver and muscle immediately frozen at {minus}80 C. Mean (n = 3--5) percent of dose retained was lowest for conjugated BaP (3.7%), 2--4 times higher for hydroxylated BaP (8.9%), and 5 times higher for parent BaP (18.9%). Differences were also observed between the distributions of individual metabolites in tissues. Radioactivity derived from parent and hydroxylated BaP was several fold higher in intestinal mucosa and bile than in liver or muscle. In contrast, radioactivity derived from conjugated BaP metabolites was more evenly distributed between all four tissues. These data demonstrate that in fish (1) dietary BaP metabolites are absorbed by the intestine, and they or their metabolites are transported to and absorbed by major tissue reservoirs (liver, muscle), (2) conjugated metabolites are less readily absorbed and/or retained than parent or hydroxylated BaP, and (3) some differences in metabolic fate exist between metabolites from the same class. DNA, RNA and protein adducts, as well as metabolite profiles, are being determined in liver and intestine.

  6. Oligosaccharide synthesis by dextransucrase: new unconventional acceptors.

    PubMed

    Demuth, Kristin; Jördening, Hans Joachim; Buchholz, Klaus

    2002-11-01

    The acceptor reactions of dextransucrase offer the potential for a targeted synthesis of a wide range of di-, tri- and higher oligosaccharides by the transfer of a glucosyl group from sucrose to the acceptor. We here report on results which show that the synthetic potential of this enzyme is not restricted to 'normal' saccharides. Additionally functionalized saccharides, such as alditols, aldosuloses, sugar acids, alkyl saccharides, and glycals, and rather unconventional saccharides, such as fructose dianhydride, may also act as acceptors. Some of these acceptors even turned out to be relatively efficient: alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->5)-D-arabinonic acid, alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-D-glucitol, alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->6)-D-glucitol, alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->6)-D-mannitol, alpha-D-fructofuranosyl-beta-D-fructofuranosyl-(1,2':2,3')-dianhydride, 1,5-anhydro-2-deoxy-D-arabino-hex-1-enitol ('D-glucal'), and may therefore be of interest for future applications of the dextransucrase acceptor reaction.

  7. Jumping the gun: Smoking constituent BaP causes premature primordial follicle activation and impairs oocyte fusibility through oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Sobinoff, A.P.; Pye, V.; Nixon, B.; Roman, S.D.; McLaughlin, E.A.

    2012-04-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is an ovotoxic constituent of cigarette smoke associated with pre-mature ovarian failure and decreased rates of conception in IVF patients. Although the overall effect of BaP on female fertility has been documented, the exact molecular mechanisms behind its ovotoxicity remain elusive. In this study we examined the effects of BaP exposure on the ovarian transcriptome, and observed the effects of in vivo exposure on oocyte dysfunction. Microarray analysis of BaP cultured neonatal ovaries revealed a complex mechanism of ovotoxicity involving a small cohort of genes associated with follicular growth, cell cycle progression, and cell death. Histomorphological and immunohistochemical analysis supported these results, with BaP exposure causing increased primordial follicle activation and developing follicle atresia in vitro and in vivo. Functional analysis of oocytes obtained from adult Swiss mice treated neonatally revealed significantly increased levels of mitochondrial ROS/lipid peroxidation, and severely reduced sperm-egg binding and fusion in both low (1.5 mg/kg/daily) and high (3 mg/kg/daily) dose treatments. Our results reveal a complex mechanism of BaP induced ovotoxicity involving developing follicle atresia and accelerated primordial follicle activation, and suggest short term neonatal BaP exposure causes mitochondrial leakage resulting in reduced oolemma fluidity and impaired fertilisation in adulthood. This study highlights BaP as a key compound which may be partially responsible for the documented effects of cigarette smoke on follicular development and sub-fertility. -- Highlights: ► BaP exposure up-regulates canonical pathways linked with follicular growth/atresia. ► BaP causes primordial follicle activation and developing follicle atresia. ► BaP causes oocyte mitochondrial ROS and lipid peroxidation, impairing fertilisation. ► Short term neonatal BaP exposure compromises adult oocyte quality.

  8. Interaction between human BAP31 and respiratory syncytial virus small hydrophobic (SH) protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Jain, Neeraj; Limpanawat, Suweeraya; To, Janet; Quistgaard, Esben M; Nordlund, Par; Thanabalu, Thirumaran; Torres, Jaume

    2015-08-01

    The small hydrophobic (SH) protein is a short channel-forming polypeptide encoded by the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Deletion of SH protein leads to the viral attenuation in mice and primates, and delayed apoptosis in infected cells. We have used a membrane-based yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) and a library from human lung cDNA to detect proteins that bind SH protein. This led to the identification of a membrane protein, B-cell associated protein 31 (BAP31). Transfected SH protein co-localizes with transfected BAP31 in cells, and pulls down endogenous BAP31. Titration of purified C-terminal endodomain of BAP31 against isotopically labeled SH protein in detergent micelles suggests direct interaction between the two proteins. Given the key role of BAP31 in protein trafficking and its critical involvement in pro- and anti-apoptotic pathways, this novel interaction may constitute a potential drug target.

  9. Biophotonics determination of 6-benzylaminopurine (6-BAP) plant growth regulator using OFRR biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Gilmo; Kang, Sukwon; Lee, Kangjin; Kim, Giyoung; Son, Jaeryong; Mo, Changyeun

    2010-04-01

    The identification of pesticide and 6-benzylaminopurine (6-BAP) plant growth regulator was carried out using a label-free opto-fluidic ring resonator (OFRR) biosensor. The OFRR sensing platform is a recent advancement in opto-fluidic technology that integrates photonic sensing technology with microfluidics. It features quick detection time, small sample volume, accurate quantitative and kinetic results. The most predominant advantage of the OFRR integrated with microfluidics is that we can potentially realize the multi-channel and portable biosensor that detects numerous analytes simultaneously. Antisera for immunoassay were raised in rabbits against the 6-BAP-BSA conjugate. Using the immunization protocol and unknown cytokinin reacting with same antibody, comparable sensitivity and specificity were obtained. 6-BAP antibody was routinely used for cytokinin analysis. A sensitive and simple OFRR method with a good linear relationship was developed for the determination of 6-BAP. The detection limit was also examined. The biosensor demonstrated excellent reproducibility when periodically exposed to 6-BAP.

  10. BAP1/ASXL1 recruitment and activation for H2A deubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Sahtoe, Danny D.; van Dijk, Willem J.; Ekkebus, Reggy; Ovaa, Huib; Sixma, Titia K.

    2016-01-01

    The deubiquitinating enzyme BAP1 is an important tumor suppressor that has drawn attention in the clinic since its loss leads to a variety of cancers. BAP1 is activated by ASXL1 to deubiquitinate mono-ubiquitinated H2A at K119 in Polycomb gene repression, but the mechanism of this reaction remains poorly defined. Here we show that the BAP1 C-terminal extension is important for H2A deubiquitination by auto-recruiting BAP1 to nucleosomes in a process that does not require the nucleosome acidic patch. This initial encounter-like complex is unproductive and needs to be activated by the DEUBAD domains of ASXL1, ASXL2 or ASXL3 to increase BAP1's affinity for ubiquitin on H2A, to drive the deubiquitination reaction. The reaction is specific for Polycomb modifications of H2A as the complex cannot deubiquitinate the DNA damage-dependent ubiquitination at H2A K13/15. Our results contribute to the molecular understanding of this important tumor suppressor. PMID:26739236

  11. Structural and functional studies of BapC protein of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Muhammad Rizwan; Siddiqi, Abdul Rauf; Bokhari, Habib

    2015-05-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough, attaches to mucosal surface in upper respiratory tract, where it produces a variety of surface associated and secreted autotransporter molecules among others. In this study we have cloned newly identified member of autotransporter family BapC (B. pertussis autotransporter protein C); expressed it in Escherichia coli and characterized it for its different properties. We have also raised antisera to BapC protein; the antisera were used in immunofluorescence assay to determine the surface association of the protein. Results suggest that BapC in B. pertussis Taberman parent is surface exposed when compared with the respective BapC mutant. The neutralizing effect of anti-BapC serum was also evaluated in the presence of active complement proteins and results suggest that antiserum can potentiate the killing of B. pertussis cells in the presence of added source of complement. Structure of the protein was also studied, both α and β domains of the protein were modeled, β domain exhibits typical transmembrane β-barrel porin topology whereas α domain behaves as a characteristic bacterial autotransporter passenger domain.

  12. [Research on the degradation of BaP with potassium ferrate characterized by fluorescence].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Zhe; He, Qiang; Yu, Dan-Ni; Li, Si; Tan, Xue-Mei

    2012-07-01

    The degradation of Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) by potassium ferrate was researched by means of multiple fluorescence spectroscopic methods such as synchronous, time-scan, excitation emission matrix (EEM) and photometry, under the optimal condition. Within the degradation process, the characteristics of the BaP's concentration at different time-intervals, and the kinetics of the degradation of BaP by potassium ferrate were discussed. From the experimental data, both synchronous and EEM spectra's results showed that the concentration of BaP was reduced 90% by potassium ferrate within 20 s after degradation, and the reaction process was very slow after 60 s. The degradation kinetic equation, ln(F0/Ft) = 0.563 2t + 0.171 2, (R2 = 0.994 2), was obtained through a convenient and fast way combining the time-scan fluorescence data and photometry data, and the photometry included the synchronous photometry and emission photometry. According to the kinetic equation, the degradation of BaP by potassium ferrate was in accord with the order of the first order reaction. So this article could provide a very useful conference for the research on the pollutant degradation by potassium ferrate, especially for the degradation process and the degradation mechanisms.

  13. Current management of bipolar affective disorder: is it reflective of the BAP guidelines?

    PubMed

    Farrelly, N; Dibben, C; Hunt, N

    2006-01-01

    In October 2003 the British Association of Psychopharmacology (BAP) published evidence-based guidelines on the management of bipolar disorder. The aim of this study was to assess whether the guidelines could provide the basis for examining clinical decisions and the extent to which practice accords with these guidelines. Case notes of out patients with bipolar disorder were reviewed. Demographic details, and treatment recommendations were determined. The management of affective episodes was evaluated and compared with BAP guidelines. In 84 subjects, 224 affective episodes were identified. Treatment was consistent with BAP guidelines in 72% of episodes. Mania was more likely to be managed in accordance with guidelines than depression or mixed episodes. The use of antidepressant medication was the most likely intervention to deviate from recommendations. Reasons for treatments at odds with the guidelines were identified. Our study demonstrates that clinical practice among a range of psychiatrists broadly reflects the guidelines that have been issued by the British Association of Psychopharmacology (BAP). The BAP guidelines offer a practical and auditable basis for the short- and long-term treatment of bipolar affective disorder.

  14. Donor-acceptor heteroleptic open sandwiches.

    PubMed

    Merino, Gabriel; Beltrán, Hiram I; Vela, Alberto

    2006-02-01

    A series of donor-acceptor heteroleptic open sandwiches with formula CpM-M'Pyl (M = B, Al, Ga; M' = Li, Na; Cp = cyclopentadienyl; Pyl = pentadienyl) has been designed in silico using density functional theory. The most stable complexes are those containing boron as a donor atom. A molecular orbital analysis shows that the s character of the lone pair located at the group 13 element is mainly responsible for the complex stabilization. It is also found that the surrounding medium has a similar effect on these sandwiches such as in the "classical" donor-acceptor complexes, showing a decrement in the group 13 element-alkaline metal bond lengths.

  15. Uptake and translocation of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) in two ornamental plants and dissipation in soil.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuebing; Zhou, Qixing

    2016-02-01

    Pot experiments were conducted to evaluate the phytoremediation of B[a]P contaminated soil using two ornamental plants (Tagetes patula and Mirabilis jalapa). The results showed that the dry biomass of two plants was increased at low B[a]P contaminated soil and then inhibited with increasing B[a]P concentrations. It exhibited a significantly positive linear relationship between B[a]P absorption in roots, stems, leaves and shoots of the tested plants and the concentration of B[a]P in soils (P<0.01). Meanwhile, the contents of B[a]P in different tissues of the plants increased with growing time. After planting T. patula and M. jalapa, plant-promoted biodegradation of B[a]P was account for 79.5-99.8% and 71.1-99.9%, respectively, whereas the amount of B[a]P dissipation enhancement was only 0.2-20.5% and 0.1-28.9%, respectively. Moreover, low bioaccumulation factor (BF) and translocation factor (TF) values indicated that T. patula and M. jalapa took up B[a]P from contaminated soil and transferred them to the aerial parts with low efficiency. The B[a]P removal rates in rhizosphere soils at different growing stages of T. patula and M. jalapa were 2.7-26.8% and 0.4%-33.9%, respectively, higher than those of non-rhizopshere soils. Therefore, the presence of T. patula and M. jalapa roots was effective in promoting the phytoremediation of B[a]P contaminated soils.

  16. Investigations on reducing the benzo(a)pyrene (BAP) content in coal-tar pitch

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinski, J.

    1995-12-31

    Bituminous substances such as coal-tar pitches, when combined with polymers, find a number of interesting applications. During the past few years, however, applications of coal-derived bitumens have been partially limited due to anxieties about the carcinogenic effect of benzo(a)pyrene (BAP) contained in these bitumens. The aims of the investigations were to determine the effect of temperature and polymer choice on the properties of coal-tar pitch and whether its BAP content could be reduced. The results showed that homogeneous compositions of coal-tar pitch and certain polymers can be obtained.

  17. Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2002-08-16

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions was held at Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island, 8/11-16/02. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  18. Bap, a Biofilm Matrix Protein of Staphylococcus aureus Prevents Cellular Internalization through Binding to GP96 Host Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Jaione; Latasa, Cristina; Gil, Carmen; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Solano, Cristina; Penadés, José R.; Lasa, Iñigo

    2012-01-01

    The biofilm matrix, composed of exopolysaccharides, proteins, nucleic acids and lipids, plays a well-known role as a defence structure, protecting bacteria from the host immune system and antimicrobial therapy. However, little is known about its responsibility in the interaction of biofilm cells with host tissues. Staphylococcus aureus, a leading cause of biofilm-associated chronic infections, is able to develop a biofilm built on a proteinaceous Bap-mediated matrix. Here, we used the Bap protein as a model to investigate the role that components of the biofilm matrix play in the interaction of S. aureus with host cells. The results show that Bap promotes the adhesion but prevents the entry of S. aureus into epithelial cells. A broad analysis of potential interaction partners for Bap using ligand overlayer immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation with purified Bap and pull down with intact bacteria, identified a direct binding between Bap and Gp96/GRP94/Hsp90 protein. The interaction of Bap with Gp96 provokes a significant reduction in the capacity of S. aureus to invade epithelial cells by interfering with the fibronectin binding protein invasion pathway. Consistent with these results, Bap deficient bacteria displayed an enhanced capacity to invade mammary gland epithelial cells in a lactating mice mastitis model. Our observations begin to elucidate the mechanisms by which components of the biofilm matrix can facilitate the colonization of host tissues and the establishment of persistent infections. PMID:22876182

  19. Bap, a biofilm matrix protein of Staphylococcus aureus prevents cellular internalization through binding to GP96 host receptor.

    PubMed

    Valle, Jaione; Latasa, Cristina; Gil, Carmen; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Solano, Cristina; Penadés, José R; Lasa, Iñigo

    2012-01-01

    The biofilm matrix, composed of exopolysaccharides, proteins, nucleic acids and lipids, plays a well-known role as a defence structure, protecting bacteria from the host immune system and antimicrobial therapy. However, little is known about its responsibility in the interaction of biofilm cells with host tissues. Staphylococcus aureus, a leading cause of biofilm-associated chronic infections, is able to develop a biofilm built on a proteinaceous Bap-mediated matrix. Here, we used the Bap protein as a model to investigate the role that components of the biofilm matrix play in the interaction of S. aureus with host cells. The results show that Bap promotes the adhesion but prevents the entry of S. aureus into epithelial cells. A broad analysis of potential interaction partners for Bap using ligand overlayer immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation with purified Bap and pull down with intact bacteria, identified a direct binding between Bap and Gp96/GRP94/Hsp90 protein. The interaction of Bap with Gp96 provokes a significant reduction in the capacity of S. aureus to invade epithelial cells by interfering with the fibronectin binding protein invasion pathway. Consistent with these results, Bap deficient bacteria displayed an enhanced capacity to invade mammary gland epithelial cells in a lactating mice mastitis model. Our observations begin to elucidate the mechanisms by which components of the biofilm matrix can facilitate the colonization of host tissues and the establishment of persistent infections.

  20. Evaluation of the presence of the bap gene in Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered from human and animals species.

    PubMed

    Vautor, E; Abadie, G; Pont, A; Thiery, R

    2008-03-18

    The implication of biofilm in chronic bacterial infection in many species has triggered an increasing interest in the characterization of genes involved in biofilm formation. The bap gene is a newly identified gene that encodes the biofilm-associated protein, BAP, which is involved in biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus. So far the bap gene has only been found in a small proportion of S. aureus strains from bovine mastitis in Spain. In order to study the presence of the bap gene in S. aureus isolates obtained from other species and various locations, a collection of 262 isolates was tested by PCR, using published primers and dot-blot. The results indicated that none of the isolates carried the bap gene suggesting that the prevalence of this gene among S. aureus isolates should be very low.

  1. Stabilization and targeting of INO80 to replication forks by BAP1 during normal DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han-Sae; Lee, Shin-Ai; Hur, Shin-Kyoung; Seo, Jeong-Wook; Kwon, Jongbum

    2014-10-06

    The INO80 chromatin-remodelling complex has been implicated in DNA replication during stress in yeast. However, its role in normal DNA replication and its underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we show that INO80 binds to replication forks and promotes fork progression in human cells under unperturbed, normal conditions. We find that Ino80, which encodes the catalytic ATPase of INO80, is essential for mouse embryonic DNA replication and development. Ino80 is recruited to replication forks through interaction with ubiquitinated H2A--aided by BRCA1-associated protein-1 (BAP1), a tumour suppressor and nuclear de-ubiquitinating enzyme that also functions to stabilize Ino80. Importantly, Ino80 is downregulated in BAP1-defective cancer cells due to the lack of an Ino80 stabilization mechanism via BAP1. Our results establish a role for INO80 in normal DNA replication and uncover a mechanism by which this remodeler is targeted to replication forks, suggesting a molecular basis for the tumour-suppressing function of BAP1.

  2. CDKN2A and BAP1 germline mutations predispose to melanoma and mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Betti, M; Aspesi, A; Biasi, A; Casalone, E; Ferrante, D; Ogliara, P; Gironi, L C; Giorgione, R; Farinelli, P; Grosso, F; Libener, R; Rosato, S; Turchetti, D; Maffè, A; Casadio, C; Ascoli, V; Dianzani, C; Colombo, E; Piccolini, E; Pavesi, M; Miccoli, S; Mirabelli, D; Bracco, C; Righi, L; Boldorini, R; Papotti, M; Matullo, G; Magnani, C; Pasini, B; Dianzani, I

    2016-08-10

    BAP1 germline mutations predispose to a cancer predisposition syndrome that includes mesothelioma, cutaneous melanoma, uveal melanoma and other cancers. This co-occurrence suggests that these tumors share a common carcinogenic pathway. To evaluate this hypothesis, we studied 40 Italian families with mesothelioma and/or melanoma. The probands were sequenced for BAP1 and for the most common melanoma predisposition genes (i.e. CDKN2A, CDK4, TERT, MITF and POT1) to investigate if these genes may also confer susceptibility to mesothelioma. In two out of six families with both mesothelioma and melanoma we identified either a germline nonsense mutation (c.1153C > T, p.Arg385*) in BAP1 or a recurrent pathogenic germline mutation (c.301G > T, p.Gly101Trp) in CDKN2A. Our study suggests that CDKN2A, in addition to BAP1, could be involved in the melanoma and mesothelioma susceptibility, leading to the rare familial cancer syndromes. It also suggests that these tumors share key steps that drive carcinogenesis and that other genes may be involved in inherited predisposition to malignant mesothelioma and melanoma.

  3. The gene bap, involved in biofilm production, is present in Staphylococcus spp. strains from nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Potter, Amina; Ceotto, Hilana; Giambiagi-Demarval, Marcia; dos Santos, Kátia Regina Netto; Nes, Ingolf F; Bastos, Maria do Carmo de Freire

    2009-06-01

    This study analyzed ten strains of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) involved in nosocomial infections in three Brazilian hospitals. Their antibiotic susceptibility profile showed that most strains exhibited multiple antibiotic resistance and possessed the mecA gene. The ability of these strains to adhere to polystyrene microtiter plates was also tested and nine of them proved to be biofilm producers at least in one of the three conditions tested: growth in TSB, in TSB supplemented with NaCl, or in TSB supplemented with glucose. The presence of the bap gene, which codes for the biofilm-associated protein (Bap), was investigated in all ten strains by PCR. AU strains were bop-positive and DNA sequencing experiments confirmed that the fragments amplified were indeed part of a bap gene. The presence of the icaA gene, one of the genes involved in polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) formation, was also detected by PCR in eight of the ten strains tested. The two icaA-negative strains were either weak biofilm producer or no biofilm producer, although they were bop-positive. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the presence of the bap gene in nosocomial isolates of CNS, being also the first report on the presence of this gene in Staphylococcus haemolyticus and S. cohnii.

  4. [Study on continued degradation of BaP and its metabolites].

    PubMed

    Zang, Shu-yan; Li, Pei-Jun; Zhou, Qi-xing; Wang, Xin; Lin, Gui-feng; Wang, Juan

    2006-12-01

    Two metabolites, cis-BP4, 5-dihydrodiol and cis-BP7, 8-dihydrodiol, were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) during the degradation of BaP by Bacillus-07 (BA-07). The two metabolites were hardly further metabolized for their toxicity to microorganism. To promote degradation of BaP and decrease accumulation of cis-BP4, 5-dihydrodiol and cis-BP7, 8-dihydrodiol, two methods (degradation only by BA-07, degradation by coupling the BA-07 and KMnO4) were compared. In addition, parameters of continued degradation of BaP and the two metabolites were optimized under the experiment conditions. The results showed that (1)the method of coupling the chemical oxidation and biodegradation (BA-07 and KMnO4) was better than only biodegradation (BA-07); (2) residue rate of cis-BP4, 5-dihydrodiol was higher than that of cis-BP7, 8-dihydrodiol when the samples were determined in the same time; (3)the effect of continued degradation was the best when the initial concentration of BaP was 40 microg/mL, pH value of the culture was 7.0, co-metabolic substrates was sodium succinate. Meanwhile, it was put forward that the method of coupling the chemical oxidation and biodegradation was effective on continued degradation of persistent organic contaminants in the environment.

  5. The gene bap, involved in biofilm production, is present in Staphylococcus spp. strains from nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Potter, Amina; Ceotto, Hilana; Giambiagi-Demarval, Marcia; dos Santos, Kátia Regina Netto; Nes, Ingolf F; Bastos, Maria do Carmo de Freire

    2009-06-01

    This study analyzed ten strains of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) involved in nosocomial infections in three Brazilian hospitals. Their antibiotic susceptibility profile showed that most strains exhibited multiple antibiotic resistance and possessed the mecA gene. The ability of these strains to adhere to polystyrene microtiter plates was also tested and nine of them proved to be biofilm producers at least in one of the three conditions tested: growth in TSB, in TSB supplemented with NaCl, or in TSB supplemented with glucose. The presence of the bap gene, which codes for the biofilm-associated protein (Bap), was investigated in all ten strains by PCR. AU strains were bop-positive and DNA sequencing experiments confirmed that the fragments amplified were indeed part of a bap gene. The presence of the icaA gene, one of the genes involved in polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) formation, was also detected by PCR in eight of the ten strains tested. The two icaA-negative strains were either weak biofilm producer or no biofilm producer, although they were bop-positive. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the presence of the bap gene in nosocomial isolates of CNS, being also the first report on the presence of this gene in Staphylococcus haemolyticus and S. cohnii. PMID:19557349

  6. Removals of non-analogous OTC and BaP in AMCBR with and without primary substrate.

    PubMed

    Çelebi, Hakan; Gök, Oğuzhan; Sponza, Delia Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic biodegradation of mixed non-analogous two substrates was studied in a binary system with and without the primary substrate using an anaerobic multichamber bed (AMCBR). In the binary mixture, the biodegradation of less-degradable oxytetracycline (OTC) was restarted in the presence of more degradable benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in the initial runs of the AMCBR, but enhanced biodegradation of the more recalcitrant OTC occurs in the later runs of the AMCBR due to enhanced biomass growth on dual substrates without the primary carbon source. The biodegradation yields of the OTC, BaP were discussed with sole-substrate systems and with the dual substrate system in the presence of the primary substrate. The maximum OTC and BaP yields were 93% in Run 3 with the primary substrate, while the maximum BaP and OTC yields were 95%, 98% in Run 3 without the primary substrate. A dual form of the Monod was found to adequately predict the substrate interactions in the binary mixture of OTC and BaP using only the parameters derived from batch experiments. At low BaP (4 mg L(-1)) and OTC (40 mg L(-1)) concentrations, a non-competitive inhibition does not affect the binding of the substrate and so the K(s) were was not affected while the µ(max) was lowered. At high BaP (10 mg L(-1)) and OTC (100 mg L(-1)) concentrations, the BaP and OTC were biodegraded according to competitive inhibition with increased K(s) while µ(max) was not affected. BaP and OTC were biodegraded according to Haldane at high concentrations (>10 mg L(-1) for BaP, 100 mg L(-1) OTC) where they were used as the sole substrate.

  7. Molecular characteristics of bap-positive Staphylococcus aureus strains from dairy cow mastitis.

    PubMed

    Snel, Gustavo G M; Monecke, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf; Piccinini, Renata

    2015-08-01

    The biofilm-associated protein (Bap) of Staphylococcus aureus is a high molecular weight cell-wall-anchored protein involved in biofilm formation, first described in bovine mastitis strains from Spain. So far, studies regarding Bap were mainly based on the Spanish strain V329 and its mutants, but no information on the genetic variability of bap-positive Staph. aureus strains is yet available in the literature. The present study investigated the molecular characteristics of 8 bap-positive Staph. aureus strains from subclinical bovine mastitis, isolated in 5 herds; somatic cell counts (SCC) of milk samples were also registered. Strains were characterised using MLST, SPA typing and microarray and the results were compared with V329. All isolates from this study and V329 were assigned to ST126, t605, but some molecular differences were observed. Only herd A and B strains harboured the genes for β-lactams resistance; the leukocidin D/E gene, a type I site-specific deoxyribonuclease subunit, 3rd locus gene and serin-protease A and B were carried by all strains, but not by V329, while serin-protease E was absent in V329 and in another isolate. Four isolates and V329 harboured the fibronectin-binding protein B gene. SCC showed the highest value in the milk sample affected by the only strain carrying all the virulence factors considered. Potential large variability of virulence was evidenced among V329 and all bap-positive Staph. aureus strains considered: the carriage of fnb could enhance the accumulation of biofilm, but the lack of lukD/E and splA, B or E might decrease the invasiveness of strain.

  8. BAP1 Immunohistochemistry and p16 FISH in the Diagnosis of Sarcomatous and Desmoplastic Mesotheliomas.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Harry C; Pyott, Shawna; Rodriguez, Stephanie; Cindric, Ashlie; Carr, April; Michelsen, Carmen; Thompson, Kim; Tse, Christopher H; Gown, Allen M; Churg, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    The separation of sarcomatous and desmoplastic mesotheliomas from benign organizing pleuritis can be morphologically very difficult. Deletion of p16 (CDKN2A) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) testing appears to be a reliable marker of malignancy in mesothelial proliferations, and more recently it has been reported that, in this setting, loss of BAP1 by immunohistochemistry is only seen in malignant mesotheliomas. To determine how useful these tests are with sarcomatous and desmoplastic mesotheliomas, we examined 20 such tumors. Loss of BAP1 was seen in 3/20 (15%) and deletion of p16 by FISH was seen in 16/20 (80%) cases. Loss of one or the other marker was observed in 17/20 (85%). We also examined 13 sarcomatoid carcinomas, an important differential diagnosis of sarcomatoid mesotheliomas, and found that BAP1 was never lost, but p16 was deleted in 3/11 (27%). We conclude that: (1) BAP1 immunohistochemistry is relatively insensitive in the context of sarcomatous and desmoplastic mesotheliomas, but as a matter of time and cost efficiency may nonetheless be a useful first approach to the problem; (2) deletion of p16 by FISH is considerably more sensitive, but there remain a proportion of cases in which p16 is not deleted; (3) a small improvement in sensitivity can be achieved by using both markers; (4) in the context of a spindle cell malignant tumor in the pleura or peritoneum, which morphologically might be a metastatic sarcomatoid carcinoma or a mesothelioma, the finding of BAP1 loss favors mesothelioma, but p16 FISH cannot be used to separate sarcomatous mesotheliomas from sarcomatoid carcinomas.

  9. Cyanomethylbenzoic acid: an acceptor for donor-π-acceptor chromophores used in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Wanchun; Gupta, Akhil; Kashif, Muhammad Kalim; Duffy, Noel; Bilic, Ante; Evans, Richard A; Spiccia, Leone; Bach, Udo

    2013-02-01

    Sensing the sun: Incorporation of a cyanomethyl benzoic acid electron acceptor into donor-π-acceptor sensitizers for dye-sensitized-solar cell is shown to lead to devices with improved conversion efficiency when compared with more widely used cyanoacetic acid acceptor.

  10. BAP-135, a target for Bruton’s tyrosine kinase in response to B cell receptor engagement

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weiyi; Desiderio, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is essential for B cell activation, but downstream targets of Btk have not been defined. We now describe a protein, BAP-135, that is associated with Btk in B cells and is a substrate for phosphorylation by Btk. BAP-135, which exhibits no detectable homology to known proteins, contains six occurrences of a hitherto undescribed amino acid repeat and two motifs, similar to the Src autophosphorylation site, that represent potential targets for tyrosine phosphorylation. The pleckstrin homology domain of Btk comprises the principal site of BAP-135 binding. Btk-dependent phosphorylation of BAP-135 is abolished by mutations that impair activation of Btk by Src-related kinases. Btk and BAP-135 exist in a complex before B cell antigen receptor (BCR) engagement; in response to BCR crosslinking, BAP-135 is transiently phosphorylated on tyrosine. Taken together, these observations suggest that BAP-135 may reside downstream of Btk in a signaling pathway originating at the BCR. PMID:9012831

  11. Modification of microsomal metabolism of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) by superoxide generated in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Byczkowski, J.Z.; Gessner, T.

    1986-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species may play a role in bioactivation of BaP and its procarcinogenic metabolites. The effect of superoxide (O/sub 2/) and/or other active oxygen species, generated in vitro by xanthine/xanthine oxidase (X/XO) +/- Fe/sup 3 +/, on BaP metabolism by mouse liver microsomes fortified with NADPH and UDP-glucuronic acid was examined. Analysis of the reaction mixtures by reversed-phase high pressure liquid chromatography in methanol-water gradient showed that the peroxidative conditions evoked by X/XO + Fe/sup 3 +/ decreased the overall metabolism of /sup 14/C-BaP by some 40% and decreased glucuronidation of BaP metabolites by about 85%, while protein bound metabolites increased by 80%. Even without added Fe/sup 3 +/, O/sub 2/ increased the production of epoxides by 174%. Addition of superoxide dismutase reversed the decreases in both glucuronidation and overall metabolism of BaP. This indicates that O/sub 2/ switches the BaP metabolism to direct epoxidation and increases the amount of intermediates able to bind protein, while damage to membrane bound enzymes curtails further metabolism of BaP. Thus, it appears that during oxidative burst, such as in inflammatory reactions, there would be a limited mixed function oxidase mediated bioactivation of BaP.

  12. Synergistic effect of BAP and GA3 on in vitro flowering of Guizotia abyssinica Cass.-A multipurpose oil crop.

    PubMed

    Baghel, S; Bansal, Y K

    2014-04-01

    Apical and axillary buds of Guizotia abyssinica Cass., isolated from seedlings raised in vitro, were cultured. High frequency of shoot regeneration was achieved on MS medium with BAP (1 mgl(-1)). Effect of BAP, Kn and GA3 applied successively in culture on shoot regeneration and flower bud formation has been studied. The shoots differentiated in cultures elongated on this medium. These rooted subsequently on half strength MS medium. The shoots flowered in vitro on MS medium with a combination of BAP (0.1mgl(-1)) + GA3 (0.1 mgl(-1)). The plantlets thus formed were successfully hardened with 90 % survival. PMID:24757328

  13. Synergistic effect of BAP and GA3 on in vitro flowering of Guizotia abyssinica Cass.-A multipurpose oil crop.

    PubMed

    Baghel, S; Bansal, Y K

    2014-04-01

    Apical and axillary buds of Guizotia abyssinica Cass., isolated from seedlings raised in vitro, were cultured. High frequency of shoot regeneration was achieved on MS medium with BAP (1 mgl(-1)). Effect of BAP, Kn and GA3 applied successively in culture on shoot regeneration and flower bud formation has been studied. The shoots differentiated in cultures elongated on this medium. These rooted subsequently on half strength MS medium. The shoots flowered in vitro on MS medium with a combination of BAP (0.1mgl(-1)) + GA3 (0.1 mgl(-1)). The plantlets thus formed were successfully hardened with 90 % survival.

  14. Peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hamley, Ian W

    2014-07-01

    The self-assembly of different classes of peptide, including cyclic peptides, amyloid peptides and surfactant-like peptides into nanotube structures is reviewed. The modes of self-assembly are discussed. Additionally, applications in bionanotechnology and synthetic materials science are summarized.

  15. Binomial distribution-based quantitative measurement of multiple-acceptors fluorescence resonance energy transfer by partially photobleaching acceptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lili; Yu, Huaina; Zhang, Jianwei; Chen, Tongsheng

    2014-06-01

    We report that binomial distribution depending on acceptor photobleaching degree can be used to characterize the proportions of various kinds of FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer) constructs resulted from partial acceptor photobleaching of multiple-acceptors FRET system. On this basis, we set up a rigorous quantitation theory for multiple-acceptors FRET construct named as Mb-PbFRET which is not affected by the imaging conditions and fluorophore properties. We experimentally validate Mb-PbFRET with FRET constructs consisted of one donor and two or three acceptors inside living cells on confocal and wide-field microscopes.

  16. Alkyl Chlorides as Hydrogen Bond Acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nadas, Janos I; Vukovic, Sinisa; Hay, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    To gain an understanding of the role of an alkyl chloride as a hydrogen bond acceptor, geometries and interaction energies were calculated at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory for complexes between ethyl chloride and representative hydrogen donor groups. The results establish that these donors, which include hydrogen cyanide, methanol, nitrobenzene, pyrrole, acetamide, and N-methylurea, form X-H {hor_ellipsis} Cl hydrogen bonds (X = C, N, O) of weak to moderate strength, with {Delta}E values ranging from -2.8 to -5.3 kcal/mol.

  17. Immunogenicity of a Promiscuous T Cell Epitope Peptide Based Conjugate Vaccine against Benzo[a]pyrene: Redirecting Antibodies to the Hapten

    PubMed Central

    Schellenberger, Mario T.; Grova, Nathalie; Farinelle, Sophie; Willième, Stéphanie; Revets, Dominique; Muller, Claude P.

    2012-01-01

    The prototype polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) is an environmental pollutant and food contaminant of epidemiological importance. To protect against adverse effects of this ubiquitous carcinogen, we developed an immunoprophylactic strategy based on a B[a]P-protein conjugate vaccine to induce B[a]P specific antibodies (Grova et al., Vaccine. 2009;27:4142–51). Here, we investigated in mice the efficacy of B[a]P-peptide conjugates based on promiscuous T cell epitopes (TCE) into further improve this approach. We showed that B[a]P-peptide conjugates induced very different levels of hapten-specific antibodies with variable functional efficacy, depending on the carrier. In some cases peptide carriers induced a more efficient antibody response against B[a]P than tetanus toxoid as a protein carrier, with the capacity to sequester more B[a]P in the blood. Reducing the carrier size to a single TCE can dramatically shift the antibody bias from the carrier to the B[a]P. Conjugates based on the TCE FIGITEL induced the best anti-hapten response and no antibodies against the carrier peptide. Some peptide conjugates increased the selectivity of the antibodies for the activated metabolite 7,8-diol-B[a]P and B[a]P by one or two orders of magnitude. The antibody efficacy was also demonstrated in their ability to sequester B[a]P in the blood and modulate its faecal excretion (15–56%). We further showed that pre-existing immunity to the carrier from which the TCE was derived did not reduce the immunogenicity of the peptide conjugate. In conclusion, we showed that a vaccination against B[a]P using promiscuous TCEs of tetanus toxin as carriers is feasible even in case of a pre-existing immunity to the toxoid and that some TCE epitopes dramatically redirect the antibody response to the hapten. Further studies to demonstrate a long-term protection of an immunoprophylactic immunisation against B[a]P are warranted. PMID:22666501

  18. BAC-HAPPY mapping (BAP mapping): a new and efficient protocol for physical mapping.

    PubMed

    Vu, Giang T H; Dear, Paul H; Caligari, Peter D S; Wilkinson, Mike J

    2010-02-08

    Physical and linkage mapping underpin efforts to sequence and characterize the genomes of eukaryotic organisms by providing a skeleton framework for whole genome assembly. Hitherto, linkage and physical "contig" maps were generated independently prior to merging. Here, we develop a new and easy method, BAC HAPPY MAPPING (BAP mapping), that utilizes BAC library pools as a HAPPY mapping panel together with an Mbp-sized DNA panel to integrate the linkage and physical mapping efforts into one pipeline. Using Arabidopsis thaliana as an exemplar, a set of 40 Sequence Tagged Site (STS) markers spanning approximately 10% of chromosome 4 were simultaneously assembled onto a BAP map compiled using both a series of BAC pools each comprising 0.7x genome coverage and dilute (0.7x genome) samples of sheared genomic DNA. The resultant BAP map overcomes the need for polymorphic loci to separate genetic loci by recombination and allows physical mapping in segments of suppressed recombination that are difficult to analyze using traditional mapping techniques. Even virtual "BAC-HAPPY-mapping" to convert BAC landing data into BAC linkage contigs is possible.

  19. EROD activity and genotoxicity in the seabob shrimp Xiphopenaeus kroyeri exposed to benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) concentrations.

    PubMed

    da Silva Rocha, Arthur José; Gomes, Vicente; Rocha Passos, Maria José de Arruda Campos; Hasue, Fabio Matsu; Alves Santos, Thaís Cruz; Bícego, Márcia Caruso; Taniguchi, Satie; Van Ngan, Phan

    2012-11-01

    Seabob shrimp Xiphopenaeus kroyeri is a marine species that lives in shallow waters of coastal environments, often impacted by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) pollution. In the present study, seabob shrimp were exposed for 96 h to benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) at the nominal concentrations of 100, 200, 400 and 800 microg-L(-1). Animals of the control groups were exposed either to clean water or to the BaP-carrier (DMSO). At the end of the exposures, muscle tissues were sampled for BaP uptake assessment and hepatopancreas and hemolymph for EROD enzyme activity and hemocytes DNA damage, respectively. EROD activity and DNA damage increased significantly as a function of BaP exposure concentrations. Significant correlations between BaP uptake and both EROD activity and DNA damage suggest that they can be used as suitable tools for integrated levels of study on the biomarkers of PAH exposure.

  20. Preparation of BAP Composite Particles and Their Effects on Rheological Properties of HTPB/B/AP Slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun-Fei, Liu; Yu, Chen; Liang, Shi; Wei-Shang, Yao

    2014-04-01

    Composite particles (BAP) of boron (B) coated with ammonium perchlorate (AP) were prepared by recrystallization and their structures were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and laser particle size analyses. The results indicated that AP was well coated on the boron surface. The effects of different contents of BAP coated with different amounts of AP on the rheological properties of HTPB/B/AP composite slurries were also studied. The results show that addition of BAP distinctly decreased the slurries' viscosities and improved their processing properties, which were more obvious when 9.73% AP was coated on the surface of boron and the amount of BAP was 20%.

  1. Identification of bap and icaA genes involved in biofilm formation in coagulase negative staphylococci isolated from feline conjunctiva.

    PubMed

    Płoneczka-Janeczko, Katarzyna; Lis, Paweł; Bierowiec, Karolina; Rypuła, Krzysztof; Chorbiński, Paweł

    2014-12-01

    Bap and icaA genes are commonly known to be involved in the biofilm formation. The prevalence of bap and icaA genes and biofilm formation was determined in conjunctival isolates of coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS) collected from cats. The study was conducted on 90 archival CNS isolates collected from feline conjunctiva obtained from clinically healthy cats and cats with ocular problems. Biofilm formation was examined using the microtiter plate (MTP) method. The prevalence of icaA and bap genes was determined using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Genetic profiles of the bap-positive isolates were examined using the modified random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method. Of the 90 CNS isolates investigated, 58.9% (53/90) were confirmed to form biofilms on a polystyrene plate after 24 h, and the intensity of the biofilm production varied strongly between positive strains. Among the biofilm-producing isolates, 24.5% (13/53) carried the icaA gene and 3.8% (2/53) carried the bap gene. Among the isolates that did not produce biofilms, the icaA gene and bap gene were detected in 8.1% (3/37) and 2.7% (1/37) of isolates, respectively. This is the first report demonstrating that CNS isolated from feline conjunctiva can potentially be a bap gene reservoir. Preliminary comparison of the genetic profiles of three bap-positive isolates collected from cats showed that each of the isolates has a different genetic background with a high similarity with the human strain of S. epidermidis.

  2. Jumping the gun: smoking constituent BaP causes premature primordial follicle activation and impairs oocyte fusibility through oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sobinoff, A P; Pye, V; Nixon, B; Roman, S D; McLaughlin, E A

    2012-04-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is an ovotoxic constituent of cigarette smoke associated with pre-mature ovarian failure and decreased rates of conception in IVF patients. Although the overall effect of BaP on female fertility has been documented, the exact molecular mechanisms behind its ovotoxicity remain elusive. In this study we examined the effects of BaP exposure on the ovarian transcriptome, and observed the effects of in vivo exposure on oocyte dysfunction. Microarray analysis of BaP cultured neonatal ovaries revealed a complex mechanism of ovotoxicity involving a small cohort of genes associated with follicular growth, cell cycle progression, and cell death. Histomorphological and immunohistochemical analysis supported these results, with BaP exposure causing increased primordial follicle activation and developing follicle atresia in vitro and in vivo. Functional analysis of oocytes obtained from adult Swiss mice treated neonatally revealed significantly increased levels of mitochondrial ROS/lipid peroxidation, and severely reduced sperm-egg binding and fusion in both low (1.5mg/kg/daily) and high (3mg/kg/daily) dose treatments. Our results reveal a complex mechanism of BaP induced ovotoxicity involving developing follicle atresia and accelerated primordial follicle activation, and suggest short term neonatal BaP exposure causes mitochondrial leakage resulting in reduced oolemma fluidity and impaired fertilisation in adulthood. This study highlights BaP as a key compound which may be partially responsible for the documented effects of cigarette smoke on follicular development and sub-fertility.

  3. Identification of bap and icaA genes involved in biofilm formation in coagulase negative staphylococci isolated from feline conjunctiva.

    PubMed

    Płoneczka-Janeczko, Katarzyna; Lis, Paweł; Bierowiec, Karolina; Rypuła, Krzysztof; Chorbiński, Paweł

    2014-12-01

    Bap and icaA genes are commonly known to be involved in the biofilm formation. The prevalence of bap and icaA genes and biofilm formation was determined in conjunctival isolates of coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS) collected from cats. The study was conducted on 90 archival CNS isolates collected from feline conjunctiva obtained from clinically healthy cats and cats with ocular problems. Biofilm formation was examined using the microtiter plate (MTP) method. The prevalence of icaA and bap genes was determined using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Genetic profiles of the bap-positive isolates were examined using the modified random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method. Of the 90 CNS isolates investigated, 58.9% (53/90) were confirmed to form biofilms on a polystyrene plate after 24 h, and the intensity of the biofilm production varied strongly between positive strains. Among the biofilm-producing isolates, 24.5% (13/53) carried the icaA gene and 3.8% (2/53) carried the bap gene. Among the isolates that did not produce biofilms, the icaA gene and bap gene were detected in 8.1% (3/37) and 2.7% (1/37) of isolates, respectively. This is the first report demonstrating that CNS isolated from feline conjunctiva can potentially be a bap gene reservoir. Preliminary comparison of the genetic profiles of three bap-positive isolates collected from cats showed that each of the isolates has a different genetic background with a high similarity with the human strain of S. epidermidis. PMID:25178416

  4. Uptake and biochemical response to B[a]P in the sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Gutierrez, Claudia Mariana; Guerra-Rivas, Graciela

    2010-01-01

    In order to evaluate the effects of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) in the sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima at the biochemical level. NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase and cytochrome P450 were assayed in A. elegantissima under toxicant. One toxicity test was performed with 75 organisms distributed in 5 groups. Animals in groups G1, G2 and G3 were given increasing B[a]P. Two groups named GC and GS were used as controls. GC was treated with seawater and GS was treated with acetone. After 72 h of exposure, enzymatic activities were determined. Microsomes were isolated from the columnar tissue and exposed in vitro to the toxicant in order to explore their ability to incorporate B[a]P. Basal activity for this enzyme was 1.69 +/- 0.18 (Mean +/- standard deviation) nmol cyt C red min(-1) mg(-1) and there was no significant effect in GS organisms compared to GC organisms. Significant increases were observed in NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase in G3 organisms. In this group, the enzyme activity was 3.53 +/- 0.40 nmol cyt C red min(-1) mg(-1). For cytochrome P450 content, a gradual increase was observed in organisms in groups G1 to G3. Basal content was 10.25 +/- 0.49 pmol mg(-1) microsomal protein. For G3 animals, P450 content was 27.51 +/- 0.32 pmol mg(-1) microsomal. For the test in vitro, it was found that microsomes isolated from G2 and G3 had the capacity to incorporate this substance when exposed to B[a]P at a level of 4 mu M in the surrounding medium. Spectrum recorded from 350 to 450 nm after a 40-min exposure for these groups showed significant difference from spectra obtained for microsomes in GC, GS and G1. It was concluded that the capacity to increase NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase activity as well as to increase NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase activity as well as to increase P450 content shows the ability of A. elegantissima to induce a mixed function oxidase activity in the presence of B[a]P. PMID:20390840

  5. Investigation of Somatic GNAQ, GNA11, BAP1 and SF3B1 Mutations in Ophthalmic Melanocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Jasmine H.; Wiesner, Thomas; Milman, Tatyana; Won, Helen H.; Lin, Amy; Lee, Vivian; Albert, Daniel M.; Folberg, Robert; Berger, Michael F.; Char, Devron H.; Marr, Brian; Abramson, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to use massively parallel DNA sequencing to identify GNAQ/11, BAP1 and SF3B1 mutations in ophthalmic melanocytoma. Procedures Six ophthalmic melanocytoma specimens (1 iridociliary and 5 optic nerve) were profiled for genomic alterations in GNAQ/11, BAP1 and SF3B1 using a custom deep sequencing assay. This assay uses solution phase hybridization-based exon capture and deep-coverage massively parallel DNA sequencing to interrogate all protein-coding exons and select introns. Results The only iridociliary melanocytoma showed a mutation in GNAQ but not in BAP1. Of the 2 optic-nerve melanocytomas that developed into melanoma, one had a GNAQ mutation and both a BAP1 mutation and monosomy 3. The remaining 3 optic-nerve melanocytomas did not reveal mutations in GNAQ/11 or BAP1. SF3B1 mutations were not detected in any specimen. Conclusions The presence of GNAQ mutation in some iridociliary and optic-nerve melanocytomas suggests a possible relationship between ophthalmic melanocytoma and other ophthalmic melanocytic neoplasms. BAP1 mutation may accompany the transformation of ophthalmic melanocytoma to melanoma. PMID:27239460

  6. The reaction of choline dehydrogenase with some electron acceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, M C; Dawson, A P

    1975-01-01

    1. The choline dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.99.1) WAS SOLUBILIZED FROM ACETONE-DRIED POWDERS OF RAT LIVER MITOCHONDRIA BY TREATMENT WITH Naja naja venom. 2. The kinetics of the reaction of enzyme with phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as electron acceptors were investigated. 3. With both electron acceptors the reaction mechanism appears to involve a free, modified-enzyme intermediate. 4. With some electron acceptors the maximum velocity of the reaction is independent of the nature of the acceptor. With phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as acceptors the Km value for choline is also independent of the nature of the acceptor molecule. 5. The mechanism of the Triton X-100-solubilized enzyme is apparently the smae as that for the snake venom solubilized enzyme. PMID:1218095

  7. The reaction of choline dehydrogenase with some electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Barrett, M C; Dawson, A P

    1975-12-01

    1. The choline dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.99.1) WAS SOLUBILIZED FROM ACETONE-DRIED POWDERS OF RAT LIVER MITOCHONDRIA BY TREATMENT WITH Naja naja venom. 2. The kinetics of the reaction of enzyme with phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as electron acceptors were investigated. 3. With both electron acceptors the reaction mechanism appears to involve a free, modified-enzyme intermediate. 4. With some electron acceptors the maximum velocity of the reaction is independent of the nature of the acceptor. With phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as acceptors the Km value for choline is also independent of the nature of the acceptor molecule. 5. The mechanism of the Triton X-100-solubilized enzyme is apparently the smae as that for the snake venom solubilized enzyme.

  8. Electronic structure of acceptor-donor complexes in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atoro, E.; Ohama, Y.; Hayafuji, Y.

    2003-10-01

    The electronic structure of trimer acceptor-donor complexes in silicon Si clusters is studied using the ab initio discrete variational-Xα molecular-orbital (MO) method. The trimer complexes In2D (D=phosphorus P, arsenic As, antimony Sb, or bismuth Bi) consist of two indium In acceptor elements and a centered donor element D from the group V elements. Calculations are performed under the assumption that the three atoms are arranged in the nearest neighbor substitutional trimer configuration. Results indicate that the trimer complexes act as shallower acceptors having smaller ionization activation energies than In acceptor. The potential of In2D as an acceptor in Si is then discussed and In2D is proposed as a promising acceptor for the formation of channels and source/drains in ultralarge scaled integration.

  9. tRNA acceptor-stem and anticodon bases embed separate features of amino acid chemistry.

    PubMed

    Carter, Charles W; Wolfenden, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The universal genetic code is a translation table by which nucleic acid sequences can be interpreted as polypeptides with a wide range of biological functions. That information is used by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases to translate the code. Moreover, amino acid properties dictate protein folding. We recently reported that digital correlation techniques could identify patterns in tRNA identity elements that govern recognition by synthetases. Our analysis, and the functionality of truncated synthetases that cannot recognize the tRNA anticodon, support the conclusion that the tRNA acceptor stem houses an independent code for the same 20 amino acids that likely functioned earlier in the emergence of genetics. The acceptor-stem code, related to amino acid size, is distinct from a code in the anticodon that is related to amino acid polarity. Details of the acceptor-stem code suggest that it was useful in preserving key properties of stereochemically-encoded peptides that had developed the capacity to interact catalytically with RNA. The quantitative embedding of the chemical properties of amino acids into tRNA bases has implications for the origins of molecular biology.

  10. tRNA acceptor-stem and anticodon bases embed separate features of amino acid chemistry.

    PubMed

    Carter, Charles W; Wolfenden, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The universal genetic code is a translation table by which nucleic acid sequences can be interpreted as polypeptides with a wide range of biological functions. That information is used by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases to translate the code. Moreover, amino acid properties dictate protein folding. We recently reported that digital correlation techniques could identify patterns in tRNA identity elements that govern recognition by synthetases. Our analysis, and the functionality of truncated synthetases that cannot recognize the tRNA anticodon, support the conclusion that the tRNA acceptor stem houses an independent code for the same 20 amino acids that likely functioned earlier in the emergence of genetics. The acceptor-stem code, related to amino acid size, is distinct from a code in the anticodon that is related to amino acid polarity. Details of the acceptor-stem code suggest that it was useful in preserving key properties of stereochemically-encoded peptides that had developed the capacity to interact catalytically with RNA. The quantitative embedding of the chemical properties of amino acids into tRNA bases has implications for the origins of molecular biology. PMID:26595350

  11. Antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With increasing antibiotics resistance, there is an urgent need for novel infection therapeutics. Since antimicrobial peptides provide opportunities for this, identification and optimization of such peptides have attracted much interest during recent years. Here, a brief overview of antimicrobial peptides is provided, with focus placed on how selected hydrophobic modifications of antimicrobial peptides can be employed to combat also more demanding pathogens, including multi-resistant strains, without conferring unacceptable toxicity. PMID:24758244

  12. Quantum computing with acceptor spins in silicon.

    PubMed

    Salfi, Joe; Tong, Mengyang; Rogge, Sven; Culcer, Dimitrie

    2016-06-17

    The states of a boron acceptor near a Si/SiO2 interface, which bind two low-energy Kramers pairs, have exceptional properties for encoding quantum information and, with the aid of strain, both heavy hole and light hole-based spin qubits can be designed. Whereas a light-hole spin qubit was introduced recently (arXiv:1508.04259), here we present analytical and numerical results proving that a heavy-hole spin qubit can be reliably initialised, rotated and entangled by electrical means alone. This is due to strong Rashba-like spin-orbit interaction terms enabled by the interface inversion asymmetry. Single qubit rotations rely on electric-dipole spin resonance (EDSR), which is strongly enhanced by interface-induced spin-orbit terms. Entanglement can be accomplished by Coulomb exchange, coupling to a resonator, or spin-orbit induced dipole-dipole interactions. By analysing the qubit sensitivity to charge noise, we demonstrate that interface-induced spin-orbit terms are responsible for sweet spots in the dephasing time [Formula: see text] as a function of the top gate electric field, which are close to maxima in the EDSR strength, where the EDSR gate has high fidelity. We show that both qubits can be described using the same starting Hamiltonian, and by comparing their properties we show that the complex interplay of bulk and interface-induced spin-orbit terms allows a high degree of electrical control and makes acceptors potential candidates for scalable quantum computation in Si. PMID:27171901

  13. Quantum computing with acceptor spins in silicon.

    PubMed

    Salfi, Joe; Tong, Mengyang; Rogge, Sven; Culcer, Dimitrie

    2016-06-17

    The states of a boron acceptor near a Si/SiO2 interface, which bind two low-energy Kramers pairs, have exceptional properties for encoding quantum information and, with the aid of strain, both heavy hole and light hole-based spin qubits can be designed. Whereas a light-hole spin qubit was introduced recently (arXiv:1508.04259), here we present analytical and numerical results proving that a heavy-hole spin qubit can be reliably initialised, rotated and entangled by electrical means alone. This is due to strong Rashba-like spin-orbit interaction terms enabled by the interface inversion asymmetry. Single qubit rotations rely on electric-dipole spin resonance (EDSR), which is strongly enhanced by interface-induced spin-orbit terms. Entanglement can be accomplished by Coulomb exchange, coupling to a resonator, or spin-orbit induced dipole-dipole interactions. By analysing the qubit sensitivity to charge noise, we demonstrate that interface-induced spin-orbit terms are responsible for sweet spots in the dephasing time [Formula: see text] as a function of the top gate electric field, which are close to maxima in the EDSR strength, where the EDSR gate has high fidelity. We show that both qubits can be described using the same starting Hamiltonian, and by comparing their properties we show that the complex interplay of bulk and interface-induced spin-orbit terms allows a high degree of electrical control and makes acceptors potential candidates for scalable quantum computation in Si.

  14. Quantum computing with acceptor spins in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salfi, Joe; Tong, Mengyang; Rogge, Sven; Culcer, Dimitrie

    2016-06-01

    The states of a boron acceptor near a Si/SiO2 interface, which bind two low-energy Kramers pairs, have exceptional properties for encoding quantum information and, with the aid of strain, both heavy hole and light hole-based spin qubits can be designed. Whereas a light-hole spin qubit was introduced recently (arXiv:1508.04259), here we present analytical and numerical results proving that a heavy-hole spin qubit can be reliably initialised, rotated and entangled by electrical means alone. This is due to strong Rashba-like spin-orbit interaction terms enabled by the interface inversion asymmetry. Single qubit rotations rely on electric-dipole spin resonance (EDSR), which is strongly enhanced by interface-induced spin-orbit terms. Entanglement can be accomplished by Coulomb exchange, coupling to a resonator, or spin-orbit induced dipole-dipole interactions. By analysing the qubit sensitivity to charge noise, we demonstrate that interface-induced spin-orbit terms are responsible for sweet spots in the dephasing time {T}2* as a function of the top gate electric field, which are close to maxima in the EDSR strength, where the EDSR gate has high fidelity. We show that both qubits can be described using the same starting Hamiltonian, and by comparing their properties we show that the complex interplay of bulk and interface-induced spin-orbit terms allows a high degree of electrical control and makes acceptors potential candidates for scalable quantum computation in Si.

  15. Cleavage and resynthesis of peptide cross bridges in Escherichia coli murein.

    PubMed Central

    Goodell, E W; Schwarz, U

    1983-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, peptide cross bridges in the murein undergo turnover after they are synthesized. Peptide cross bridges formed in the presence of [3H]diaminopimelic acid were found to lose 3H label from their donor peptides after the [3H]diaminopimelic acid was removed from the growth medium. There was a corresponding increase in the amount of 3H label in acceptor peptides so that the total amount of label in the peptide cross bridges remained constant. Our explanation of this observation is that the cross bridges are cleaved by the cell, and the original 3H-labeled donor peptides are incorporated into new cross bridges. Since these 3H-labeled peptides are now only tetrapeptides, they can only be used as acceptors when new cross bridges are formed. PMID:6352673

  16. Serum BAP as the clinically useful marker for predicting BMD reduction in diabetic hemodialysis patients with low PTH.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Misako; Inaba, Masaaki; Okuno, Senji; Maeno, Yoshifumi; Ishimura, Eiji; Yamakawa, Tomoyuki; Nishizawa, Yoshiki

    2005-07-22

    With decrease of serum PTH in hemodialysis (HD) patients, other factors besides parathyroid hormone (PTH) become important in regulating bone metabolism. We investigated which serum bone metabolic marker is the best to predict the bone mineral density (BMD) reduction in HD patients with serum PTH<180 pg/ml. The bone formation markers, bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP), intact osteocalcin (OC), and N-terminal propeptide of type I collagen (PINP), and the bone resorption markers, deoxypyridinoline (DPD), pyridinoline (PYD), and beta-crossLaps (beta-CTx) were measured in serum from 137 HD patients. BMD of all patients was measured twice, approximately 1.5 years before and 1.5 years after measurement of their markers of bone metabolism. In all 137 HD patients, serum BAP was the only marker significantly higher in those with BMD reduction than in those without. In 42 diabetes mellitus (DM) HD patients with serum PTH<180 pg/ml, hypothetically low bone turnover state, serum BAP was again the only marker to discriminate those with BMD reduction from those without. At serum PTH<60 pg/ml, serum BAP retained tendency toward higher value. These findings suggest that serum BAP might be the most sensitive to identify small changes of bone metabolism in low bone turnover state. Retrospective study confirmed the usefulness of serum BAP in clinical practice by significantly higher values in those with bone loss at PTH<180 pg/ml even in under routine sample handling. In conclusion, serum BAP is a clinically useful bone formation marker to predict the BMD reduction in DM HD patients with low level of PTH.

  17. Aza-peptidyl Michael acceptor and epoxide inhibitors--potent and selective inhibitors of Schistosoma mansoni and Ixodes ricinus legumains (asparaginyl endopeptidases).

    PubMed

    Ovat, Asli; Muindi, Fanuel; Fagan, Crystal; Brouner, Michelle; Hansell, Elizabeth; Dvorák, Jan; Sojka, Daniel; Kopácek, Petr; McKerrow, James H; Caffrey, Conor R; Powers, James C

    2009-11-26

    Aza-peptide Michael acceptors and epoxides with the general structure of YCO-Ala-Ala-AAsn-trans-CH horizontal lineCHCOR and YCO-Ala-Ala-AAsn-EP-COR, respectively, are shown to be potent inhibitors of asparaginyl endopeptidases (legumains) from the bloodfluke, Schistosoma mansoni (SmAE), and the hard tick, Ixodes ricinus (IrAE). Structure-activity relationships (SARs) were determined for a set of 41 aza-peptide Michael acceptors and eight aza-peptide epoxides. Both enzymes prefer disubstituted amides to monosubstituted amides in the P1' position, and potency increased as we increased the hydrophobicity of the inhibitor in this position. Extending the inhibitor to P5 resulted in increased potency, especially against IrAE, and both enzymes prefer small over large hydrophobic residues at P2. Aza-peptide Michael acceptor inhibitors are more potent than aza-peptide epoxide inhibitors, and for some of these compounds, second-order inhibiton rate constants are the fastest yet discovered. Given the central functions of these enzymes in both parasites, the data presented here may facilitate the eventual design of selective antiparasitic drugs.

  18. New acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) type copolymers for efficient organic photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghomrasni, S.; Ayachi, S.; Alimi, K.

    2015-01-01

    Three new conjugated systems alternating acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) type copolymers have been investigated by means of Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Time-Dependent DFT (TD-DFT) at the 6-31g (d) level of theory. 4,4‧-Dimethoxy-chalcone, also called the 1,3-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (BMP), has been used as a common acceptor moiety. It forced intra-molecular S⋯O interactions through alternating oligo-thiophene derivatives: 4-AlkylThiophenes (4-ATP), 4-AlkylBithiophenes (4-ABTP) and 4-Thienylene Vinylene (4-TEV) as donor moieties. The band gap, HOMO and LUMO electron distributions as well as optical properties were analyzed for each molecule. The fully optimized resulting copolymers showed low band gaps (2.2-2.8 eV) and deep HOMO energy levels ranging from -4.66 to -4.86 eV. A broad absorption [300-900 nm] covering the solar spectrum and absorption maxima ranges from 486 to 604 nm. In addition, organic photovoltaic cells (OPCs) based on alternating copolymers in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) composites with the 1-(3-methoxycarbonyl) propyl-1-phenyl-[6,6]-C61 (PCBM), as an acceptor, have been optimized. Thus, the band gap decreased to 1.62 eV, the power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) were about 3-5% and the open circuit voltage Voc of the resulting molecules decreased from 1.50 to 1.27 eV.

  19. Aromatic donor-acceptor interactions in non-polar environments.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Giles M; Pascu, Sofia I; Filip, Sorin V; West, Kevin R; Pantoş, G Dan

    2015-05-14

    We have evaluated the strength of aromatic donor-acceptor interactions between dialkyl naphthalenediimide and dialkoxynaphthalene in non-polar environments. (1)H NMR, UV-vis spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry were used to characterise this interaction. We concluded that the strength of donor-acceptor interactions in heptane is sufficient to drive supramolecular assemblies in this and other aliphatic solvents. PMID:25875729

  20. Acceptor impurity activation in III-nitride light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Römer, Friedhard Witzigmann, Bernd

    2015-01-12

    In this work, the role of the acceptor doping and the acceptor activation and its impact on the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of a Gallium Nitride (GaN) based multi-quantum well light emitting diode is studied by microscopic simulation. Acceptor impurities in GaN are subject to a high activation energy which depends on the presence of proximate dopant atoms and the electric field. A combined model for the dopant ionization and activation barrier reduction has been developed and implemented in a semiconductor carrier transport simulator. By model calculations, we demonstrate the impact of the acceptor activation mechanisms on the decay of the IQE at high current densities, which is known as the efficiency droop. A major contributor to the droop is the electron leakage which is largely affected by the acceptor doping.

  1. BaP (PAH) air quality modelling exercise over Zaragoza (Spain) using an adapted version of WRF-CMAQ model.

    PubMed

    San José, Roberto; Pérez, Juan Luis; Callén, María Soledad; López, José Manuel; Mastral, Ana

    2013-12-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is one of the most dangerous PAH due to its high carcinogenic and mutagenic character. Because of this reason, the Directive 2004/107/CE of the European Union establishes a target value of 1 ng/m(3) of BaP in the atmosphere. In this paper, the main aim is to estimate the BaP concentrations in the atmosphere by using last generation of air quality dispersion models with the inclusion of the transport, scavenging and deposition processes for the BaP. The degradation of the particulated BaP by the ozone has been considered. The aerosol-gas partitioning phenomenon in the atmosphere is modelled taking into a count that the concentrations in the gas and the aerosol phases. If the pre-existing organic aerosol concentrations are zero gas/particle equilibrium is established. The model has been validated at local scale with data from a sampling campaign carried out in the area of Zaragoza (Spain) during 12 weeks.

  2. Investigations on critical parameters, growth, structural and spectral studies of beta-alaninium picrate (BAP) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanthi, D.; Selvarajan, P.; Perumal, S.

    2014-12-01

    Beta-alaninium picrate (BAP) salt has been synthesized and the solubility of the synthesized sample in double distilled water was determined at different temperatures. Solution stability was studied by observing the metastable zone width by employing the polythermal method. Induction period values for different supersaturation ratios at room temperature were determined based on the isothermal method. The nucleation parameters such as critical radius, critical free energy change, interfacial tension, and nucleation rate have been estimated for BAP salt on the basis of the classical nucleation theory. The lattice parameters of the grown BAP crystal were determined using the x-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. The reflection planes of the sample were confirmed by the powder XRD study and diffraction peaks were indexed. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Fourier transform-Raman studies were used to confirm the presence of various functional groups in the BAP crystal. The nonlinear optical property of the grown crystal was studied using the Kurtz-Perry powder technique. UV-visible spectral studies were carried out to understand optical transparency and the type of band gap of the grown BAP crystal.

  3. The Ubiquitin Carboxyl Hydrolase BAP1 Forms a Ternary Complex with YY1 and HCF-1 and Is a Critical Regulator of Gene Expression ▿

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Helen; Mashtalir, Nazar; Daou, Salima; Hammond-Martel, Ian; Ross, Julie; Sui, Guangchao; Hart, Gerald W.; Rauscher, Frank J.; Drobetsky, Elliot; Milot, Eric; Shi, Yang; Affar, El Bachir

    2010-01-01

    The candidate tumor suppressor BAP1 is a deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB) involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, although the molecular mechanisms governing its function remain poorly defined. BAP1 was recently shown to interact with and deubiquitinate the transcriptional regulator host cell factor 1 (HCF-1). Here we show that BAP1 assembles multiprotein complexes containing numerous transcription factors and cofactors, including HCF-1 and the transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1). Through its coiled-coil motif, BAP1 directly interacts with the zinc fingers of YY1. Moreover, HCF-1 interacts with the middle region of YY1 encompassing the glycine-lysine-rich domain and is essential for the formation of a ternary complex with YY1 and BAP1 in vivo. BAP1 activates transcription in an enzymatic-activity-dependent manner and regulates the expression of a variety of genes involved in numerous cellular processes. We further show that BAP1 and HCF-1 are recruited by YY1 to the promoter of the cox7c gene, which encodes a mitochondrial protein used here as a model of BAP1-activated gene expression. Our findings (i) establish a direct link between BAP1 and the transcriptional control of genes regulating cell growth and proliferation and (ii) shed light on a novel mechanism of transcription regulation involving ubiquitin signaling. PMID:20805357

  4. Trans-membrane transport of fluoranthene by Rhodococcus sp. BAP-1 and optimization of uptake process.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Wang, Hongqi; Hua, Fei; Su, Mengyuan; Zhao, Yicun

    2014-03-01

    The mechanism of transport of (14)C-fluoranthene by Rhodococcus sp. BAP-1, a Gram-positive bacterium isolated from crude oil-polluted soil, was examined. Our finding demonstrated that the mechanism for fluoranthene travel across the cell membrane in Rhodococcus sp. BAP-1 requires energy. Meanwhile, the transport of fluoranthene involves concurrent catabolism of (14)C, that leading to the generation of significant amount of (14)CO2. Combined with trans-membrane transport dynamic and response surface methodology, a significant influence of temperature, pH and salinity on cellular uptake rate was screened by Plackett-Burman design. Then, Box-Behnken design was employed to optimize and enhanced the trans-membrane transport process. The results predicted by Box-Behnken design indicated that the maximum cellular uptake rate of fluoranthene could be achieve to 0.308μmolmin(-1)mg(-1)·protein (observed) and 0.304μmolmin(-1)mg(-1)·protein (predicted) when the initial temperature, pH and salinity were set at 20°C, 9% and 1%, respectively.

  5. Functional mapping and implications of substrate specificity of the yeast high-affinity leucine permease Bap2.

    PubMed

    Usami, Yuki; Uemura, Satsohi; Mochizuki, Takahiro; Morita, Asami; Shishido, Fumi; Inokuchi, Jin-ichi; Abe, Fumiyoshi

    2014-07-01

    Leucine is a major amino acid in nutrients and proteins and is also an important precursor of higher alcohols during brewing. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, leucine uptake is mediated by multiple amino acid permeases, including the high-affinity leucine permease Bap2. Although BAP2 transcription has been extensively analyzed, the mechanisms by which a substrate is recognized and moves through the permease remain unknown. Recently, we determined 15 amino acid residues required for Tat2-mediated tryptophan import. Here we introduced homologous mutations into Bap2 amino acid residues and showed that 7 residues played a role in leucine import. Residues I109/G110/T111 and E305 were located within the putative α-helix break in TMD1 and TMD6, respectively, according to the structurally homologous Escherichia coli arginine/agmatine antiporter AdiC. Upon leucine binding, these α-helix breaks were assumed to mediate a conformational transition in Bap2 from an outward-open to a substrate-binding occluded state. Residues Y336 (TMD7) and Y181 (TMD3) were located near I109 and E305, respectively. Bap2-mediated leucine import was inhibited by some amino acids according to the following order of severity: phenylalanine, leucine>isoleucine>methionine, tyrosine>valine>tryptophan; histidine and asparagine had no effect. Moreover, this order of severity clearly coincided with the logP values (octanol-water partition coefficients) of all amino acids except tryptophan. This result suggests that the substrate partition efficiency to the buried Bap2 binding pocket is the primary determinant of substrate specificity rather than structural amino acid side chain recognition.

  6. Callus cell proliferation from broccoli leaf slice using IBA and BAP in vitro culture: Its biochemical and antioxidant properties.

    PubMed

    Sharif Hossain, A B M; Haq, Imdadul; Ibrahim, Nasir A; Aleissa, Mohammed Saad

    2016-03-01

    Plant tissue or cell culture keeps a significant role in micro-propagation in the plant production industry. Combination of 6-Benzylaminopurine (BAP) and other plant growth regulators like 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) or Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) or indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) was used in the most of the research in tissue culture. The study was carried out to investigate the optimization of the concentration of IBA and BAP combination (0, 0.25, 0.50, 1.0, 1.50, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0 and 3.5 mg/l) for the root, callus and leaf proliferation from the leaf cutting slice. The highest number (6.75) of root proliferation was observed in the concentration of 2.0 mg/l IBA+0.25 mg/l BAP combination. The callus initiation was found in the concentration of IBA 1.0-3.5 mg/l+BAP 1.0-2.0 mg/l. However, the highest callus weight was observed at the concentration of IBA 1.5 mg/l+BAP 1.0 mg/l combination than other combination of concentrations. Positively leaf initiation and formation was better in the concentration of IBA 1-3.5 mg/l+BAP 1.0-2.0 mg/l combination. In addition, the 2,2-diphenyl-2-picrylhydarzyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging potential was higher (70.1%) in leaves extract than in callus extracts (46.3%) at the concentration of 10 mg/ml though both extracts had lower DPPH free radical scavenging activity compared to the positive control, vitamin C and BHT. Theresults conclude that the optimum concentration was IBA 1.5 mg/l+BAP 1.0 mg/l combination to produce callus cell proliferation and concentration of 2.0 mg/l IBA+0.25 mg/l BAP combination was the optimum for root proliferation of broccoli in vitro.

  7. Three holes bound to a double acceptor - Be(+) in germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haller, E. E.; Mcmurray, R. E., Jr.; Falicov, L. M.; Haegel, N. M.; Hansen, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    A double acceptor binding three holes has been observed for the first time with photoconductive far-infrared spectroscopy in beryllium-doped germanium single crystals. This new center, Be(+), has a hole binding energy of about 5 meV and is only present when free holes are generated by ionization of either neutral shallow acceptors or neutral Be double acceptors. The Be(+) center thermally ionizes above 4 K. It disappears at a uniaxial stress higher than about a billion dyn/sq cm parallel to (111) as a result of the lifting of the valence-band degeneracy.

  8. Immunological evaluation of OMV(PagL)+Bap(1-487aa) and AbOmpA(8-346aa)+Bap(1-487aa) as vaccine candidates against Acinetobacter baumannii sepsis infection.

    PubMed

    Badmasti, Farzad; Ajdary, Soheila; Bouzari, Saeid; Fooladi, Abbas Ali Imani; Shahcheraghi, Fereshteh; Siadat, Seyed Davar

    2015-10-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen that causes a high morbidity and mortality rate in infected patients with sepsis form. The surface exposed virulence proteins and serum resistance factors helping to dissemination of this bacterium to bloodstream are the most promising vaccine candidates against this microorganism. In this project we immunologically evaluated OMV(PagL)+Bap(1-487aa) and AbOmpA (8-346aa)+Bap(1-487aa) as combination forms as well as Bap(1-487aa), AbOmpA(8-346aa) and OMV(PagL) singly, with addition of alum adjuvant as vaccine candidates. The titers of total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2c as well as concentration of IL-4 and IFN-γ and survival rates were measured in a C57BL/6 murine model with disseminated sepsis. The ratio of IgG1/IgG2c and profile of IL-4/IFN-γ in OMV (PagL)+Bap (1-487aa) formulation shows the humoral and cellular immune responses have been induced robustly and have created a full protection against A. baumannii ATCC 19606 and MDR AB-44 strains. We found that the two combination vaccine candidates were protective and induced both Th1 and Th2 responses.

  9. Nitrogen is a deep acceptor in ZnO

    DOE PAGES

    Tarun, M. C.; Iqbal, M. Zafar; McCluskey, M. D.

    2011-04-14

    Zinc oxide is a promising material for blue and UV solid-state lighting devices, among other applications. Nitrogen has been regarded as a potential p-type dopant for ZnO. However, recent calculations indicate that nitrogen is a deep acceptor. This paper presents experimental evidence that nitrogen is, in fact, a deep acceptor and therefore cannot produce p-type ZnO. A broad photoluminescence (PL) emission band near 1.7 eV, with an excitation onset of ~2.2 eV, was observed, in agreement with the deep-acceptor model of the nitrogen defect. Thus the deep-acceptor behavior can be explained by the low energy of the ZnO valence bandmore » relative to the vacuum level.« less

  10. Nitrogen is a deep acceptor in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Tarun, M. C.; Iqbal, M. Zafar; McCluskey, M. D.

    2011-04-14

    Zinc oxide is a promising material for blue and UV solid-state lighting devices, among other applications. Nitrogen has been regarded as a potential p-type dopant for ZnO. However, recent calculations indicate that nitrogen is a deep acceptor. This paper presents experimental evidence that nitrogen is, in fact, a deep acceptor and therefore cannot produce p-type ZnO. A broad photoluminescence (PL) emission band near 1.7 eV, with an excitation onset of ~2.2 eV, was observed, in agreement with the deep-acceptor model of the nitrogen defect. Thus the deep-acceptor behavior can be explained by the low energy of the ZnO valence band relative to the vacuum level.

  11. Electron Transfer Rate Maxima at Large Donor-Acceptor Distances.

    PubMed

    Kuss-Petermann, Martin; Wenger, Oliver S

    2016-02-01

    Because of their low mass, electrons can transfer rapidly over long (>15 Å) distances, but usually reaction rates decrease with increasing donor-acceptor distance. We report here on electron transfer rate maxima at donor-acceptor separations of 30.6 Å, observed for thermal electron transfer between an anthraquinone radical anion and a triarylamine radical cation in three homologous series of rigid-rod-like donor-photosensitizer-acceptor triads with p-xylene bridges. Our experimental observations can be explained by a weak distance dependence of electronic donor-acceptor coupling combined with a strong increase of the (outer-sphere) reorganization energy with increasing distance, as predicted by electron transfer theory more than 30 years ago. The observed effect has important consequences for light-to-chemical energy conversion. PMID:26800279

  12. Synthesis, Properties, and Design Principles of Donor-Acceptor Nanohoops.

    PubMed

    Darzi, Evan R; Hirst, Elizabeth S; Weber, Christopher D; Zakharov, Lev N; Lonergan, Mark C; Jasti, Ramesh

    2015-09-23

    We have synthesized a series of aza[8]cycloparaphenylenes containing one, two, and three nitrogens to probe the impact of nitrogen doping on optoelectronic properties and solid state packing. Alkylation of these azananohoops afforded the first donor-acceptor nanohoops where the phenylene backbone acts as the donor and the pyridinium units act as the acceptor. The impact on the optoelectronic properties was then studied experimentally and computationally to provide new insight into the effect of functionalization on nanohoops properties. PMID:27162989

  13. Synthesis, Properties, and Design Principles of Donor–Acceptor Nanohoops

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have synthesized a series of aza[8]cycloparaphenylenes containing one, two, and three nitrogens to probe the impact of nitrogen doping on optoelectronic properties and solid state packing. Alkylation of these azananohoops afforded the first donor–acceptor nanohoops where the phenylene backbone acts as the donor and the pyridinium units act as the acceptor. The impact on the optoelectronic properties was then studied experimentally and computationally to provide new insight into the effect of functionalization on nanohoops properties. PMID:27162989

  14. Genetic evolution of nevus of Ota reveals clonal heterogeneity acquiring BAP1 and TP53 mutations.

    PubMed

    Vivancos, Ana; Caratú, Ginevra; Matito, Judit; Muñoz, Eva; Ferrer, Berta; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Bodet, Domingo; Pérez-Alea, Mileidys; Cortés, Javier; Garcia-Patos, Vicente; Recio, Juan A

    2016-03-01

    Melanoma presents molecular alterations based on its anatomical location and exposure to environmental factors. Due to its intrinsic genetic heterogeneity, a simple snapshot of a tumor's genetic alterations does not reflect the tumor clonal complexity or specific gene-gene cooperation. Here, we studied the genetic alterations and clonal evolution of a unique patient with a Nevus of Ota that developed into a recurring uveal-like dermal melanoma. The Nevus of Ota and ulterior lesions contained GNAQ mutations were c-KIT positive, and tumors showed an increased RAS pathway activity during progression. Whole-exome sequencing of these lesions revealed the acquisition of BAP1 and TP53 mutations during tumor evolution, thereby unmasking clonal heterogeneity and allowing the identification of cooperating genes within the same tumor. Our results highlight the importance of studying tumor genetic evolution to identify cooperating mechanisms and delineate effective therapies. PMID:26701415

  15. Ozone pollution affects flower numbers and timing in a simulated BAP priority calcareous grassland community.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Felicity; Williamson, Jennifer; Mills, Gina

    2012-04-01

    Mesocosms representing the BAP Priority habitat 'Calcareous Grassland' were exposed to eight ozone profiles for twelve-weeks in two consecutive years. Half of the mesocosms received a reduced watering regime during the exposure periods. Numbers and timing of flowering in the second exposure period were related to ozone concentration and phytotoxic ozone dose (accumulated stomatal flux). For Lotus corniculatus, ozone accelerated the timing of the maximum number of flowers. An increase in mean ozone concentration from 30ppb to 70ppb corresponded with an advance in the timing of maximum flowering by six days. A significant reduction in flower numbers with increasing ozone was found for Campanula rotundifolia and Scabiosa columbaria and the relationship with ozone was stronger for those that were well-watered than for those with reduced watering. These changes in flowering timing and numbers could have large ecological impacts, affecting plant pollination and the food supply of nectar feeding insects.

  16. Promoting the use of BaP as a marker for PAH exposure in UK soils.

    PubMed

    Bull, Sarah; Collins, Chris

    2013-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants that frequently accumulate in soils. There is therefore a requirement to determine their levels in contaminated environments for the purposes of determining impacts on human health. PAHs are a suite of individual chemicals, and there is an ongoing debate as to the most appropriate method for assessing the risk to humans from them. Two methods predominate: the surrogate marker approach and the toxic equivalency factor. The former assumes that all chemicals in a mixture have an equivalent toxicity. The toxic equivalency approach estimates the potency of individual chemicals relative to the usually most toxic Benzo(a)pyrene. The surrogate marker approach is believed to overestimate risk and the toxic equivalency factor to underestimate risk. When analysing the risks from soils, the surrogate marker approach is preferred due to its simplicity, but there are concerns because of the potential diversity of the PAH profile across the range of impacted soils. Using two independent data sets containing soils from 274 sites across a diverse range of locations, statistical analysis was undertaken to determine the differences in the composition of carcinogenic PAH between site locations, for example, rural versus industrial. Following principal components analysis, distinct population differences were not seen between site locations in spite of large differences in the total PAH burden between individual sites. Using all data, highly significant correlations were seen between BaP and other carcinogenic PAH with the majority of r (2) values > 0.8. Correlations with the European Food Standards Agency (EFSA) summed groups, that is, EFSA2, EFSA4 and EFSA8 had even higher correlations (r (2) > 0.95). We therefore conclude that BaP is a suitable surrogate marker to represent mixtures of PAH in soil during risk assessments.

  17. Persistence of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates Harboring blaOXA-23 and bap for 5 Years.

    PubMed

    Sung, Ji Youn; Koo, Sun Hoe; Kim, Semi; Kwon, Gye Cheol

    2016-08-28

    The emergence and dissemination of carbapenemase-producing Acinetobacter baumannii isolates have been reported worldwide, and A. baumannii isolates harboring blaOXA-23 are often resistant to various antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial resistance can be particularly strong for biofilm-forming A. baumannii isolates. We investigated the genetic basis for carbapenem resistance and biofilm-forming ability of multidrug-resistant (MDR) clinical isolates. Ninety-two MDR A. baumannii isolates were collected from one university hospital located in the Chungcheong area of Korea over a 5-year period. Multiplex PCR and DNA sequencing were performed to characterize carbapenemase and bap genes. Clonal characteristics were analyzed using REP-PCR. In addition, imaging and quantification of biofilms were performed using a crystal violet assay. All 92 MDR A. baumannii isolates involved in our study contained the blaOXA-23 and bap genes. The average absorbance of biomass in Bap-producing strains was much greater than that in non-Bap-producing strains. In our study, only three REP-PCR types were found, and the isolates showing type A or type B were found more than 60 times among unique patients during the 5 years of surveillance. These results suggest that the isolates have persisted and colonized for 5 years, and biofilm formation ability has been responsible for their persistence and colonization.

  18. Computer program design specifications for the Balloon-borne Ultraviolet Stellar Spectrometer (BUSS) science data decommutation program (BAPS48)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    The Balloon-Borne Ultraviolet Stellar Spectrometer (BUSS) Science Data Docummutation Program (BAPS48) is a pulse code modulation docummutation program that will format the BUSS science data contained on a one inch PCM tracking tape into a seven track serial bit stream formatted digital tape.

  19. Persistence of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates Harboring blaOXA-23 and bap for 5 Years.

    PubMed

    Sung, Ji Youn; Koo, Sun Hoe; Kim, Semi; Kwon, Gye Cheol

    2016-08-28

    The emergence and dissemination of carbapenemase-producing Acinetobacter baumannii isolates have been reported worldwide, and A. baumannii isolates harboring blaOXA-23 are often resistant to various antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial resistance can be particularly strong for biofilm-forming A. baumannii isolates. We investigated the genetic basis for carbapenem resistance and biofilm-forming ability of multidrug-resistant (MDR) clinical isolates. Ninety-two MDR A. baumannii isolates were collected from one university hospital located in the Chungcheong area of Korea over a 5-year period. Multiplex PCR and DNA sequencing were performed to characterize carbapenemase and bap genes. Clonal characteristics were analyzed using REP-PCR. In addition, imaging and quantification of biofilms were performed using a crystal violet assay. All 92 MDR A. baumannii isolates involved in our study contained the blaOXA-23 and bap genes. The average absorbance of biomass in Bap-producing strains was much greater than that in non-Bap-producing strains. In our study, only three REP-PCR types were found, and the isolates showing type A or type B were found more than 60 times among unique patients during the 5 years of surveillance. These results suggest that the isolates have persisted and colonized for 5 years, and biofilm formation ability has been responsible for their persistence and colonization. PMID:27221112

  20. Biological apatite (BAp) crystallographic orientation and texture as a new index for assessing the microstructure and function of bone regenerated by tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takayoshi; Kaibara, Kazuhiro; Ishimoto, Takuya; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Umakoshi, Yukichi

    2012-10-01

    Recently, there have been remarkable advances in medical techniques for regenerating bone defects. To determine the degree of bone regeneration, it is essential to develop a new method that can analyze microstructure and related mechanical function. Here, quantitative analysis of the orientation distribution of biological apatite (BAp) crystallites by a microbeam X-ray diffractometer system is proposed as a new index of bone quality for the evaluation of regenerated bone microstructure. Preferential alignment of the BAp c-axis in the rabbit ulna and skull bone, regenerated by controlled release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) was investigated. The BAp c-axis orientation was evaluated by the relative intensity between the (002) and (310) diffraction peaks, or the three-dimensional texture for the (002) peak. It was found that new bone in the defects was initially produced without preferential alignment of the BAp c-axis, and subsequently reproduced to recover towards the original alignment. In other words, the BAp density recovered prior to the BAp orientation. Perfect recovery of BAp alignment was not achieved in the ulna and skull defects after 4 weeks and 12 weeks, respectively. Apparent recovery of the macroscopic shape and bio-mineralization of BAp was almost complete in the ulna defect after 4 weeks. However, an additional 2 weeks was required for complete repair of BAp orientation. It is finally concluded that orientation distribution of BAp crystallites offers an effective means of evaluating the degree of microstructural regeneration, and also the related mechanical function, in regenerated hard tissues.

  1. 18F-Labeled Silicon-Based Fluoride Acceptors: Potential Opportunities for Novel Positron Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Bernard-Gauthier, Vadim; Wängler, Carmen; Wängler, Bjoern; Schirrmacher, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Background. Over the recent years, radiopharmaceutical chemistry has experienced a wide variety of innovative pushes towards finding both novel and unconventional radiochemical methods to introduce fluorine-18 into radiotracers for positron emission tomography (PET). These “nonclassical” labeling methodologies based on silicon-, boron-, and aluminium-18F chemistry deviate from commonplace bonding of an [18F]fluorine atom (18F) to either an aliphatic or aromatic carbon atom. One method in particular, the silicon-fluoride-acceptor isotopic exchange (SiFA-IE) approach, invalidates a dogma in radiochemistry that has been widely accepted for many years: the inability to obtain radiopharmaceuticals of high specific activity (SA) via simple IE. Methodology. The most advantageous feature of IE labeling in general is that labeling precursor and labeled radiotracer are chemically identical, eliminating the need to separate the radiotracer from its precursor. SiFA-IE chemistry proceeds in dipolar aprotic solvents at room temperature and below, entirely avoiding the formation of radioactive side products during the IE. Scope of Review. A great plethora of different SiFA species have been reported in the literature ranging from small prosthetic groups and other compounds of low molecular weight to labeled peptides and most recently affibody molecules. Conclusions. The literature over the last years (from 2006 to 2014) shows unambiguously that SiFA-IE and other silicon-based fluoride acceptor strategies relying on 18F− leaving group substitutions have the potential to become a valuable addition to radiochemistry. PMID:25157357

  2. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  3. Synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Francis, M J

    1996-01-01

    Efforts to produce more stable and defined vaccines have concentrated on studying, in detail, the immune response to many infectious diseases in order to identify the antigenic sites on the pathogens that are involved in stimulating protective immumty. Armed with this knowledge, it is possible to mimic such sites by producing short chains of amino acids (peptides) and to use these as the basis for novel vaccines. The earliest documented work on peptide immunization is actually for a plant virus, tobacco mosaic virus. In 1963, Anderer (1) demonstrated that rabbit antibodies to an isolated hexapeptide fragment from the virus-coat protein coupled to bovine serum albumm would neutralize the infectious vn-us in culture. Two years later, he used a synthetically produced copy of the same peptide to confirm this observation. This was pioneering work, and it was over 10 years before the next example of a peptide that elicited antivirus antibody appeared following work by Sela and his colleagues (2) on a virus, MS2 bacteriophage, which infects bacteria. The emergence of more accessible techniques for sequencing proteins in 1977, coupled with the ability to synthesize readily peptides already developed in 1963, heralded a decade of intensive research into experimental peptide vaccines. The first demonstration that peptides could elicit protective immunity in vivo, in addition to neutralizing activity in vitro, was obtained using a peptide from the VP1 coat protein of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in 1982, with the guinea pig as a laboratory animal model (3, 4). PMID:21359696

  4. Electron acceptor-dependent respiratory and physiological stratifications in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yonggang; Xiang, Yinbo; Sun, Guoping; Wu, Wei-Min; Xu, Meiying

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial respiration is an essential driving force in biogeochemical cycling and bioremediation processes. Electron acceptors respired by bacteria often have solid and soluble forms that typically coexist in the environment. It is important to understand how sessile bacteria attached to solid electron acceptors respond to ambient soluble alternative electron acceptors. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) provide a useful tool to investigate this interaction. In MFCs with Shewanella decolorationis, azo dye was used as an alternative electron acceptor in the anode chamber. Different respiration patterns were observed for biofilm and planktonic cells, with planktonic cells preferred to respire with azo dye while biofilm cells respired with both the anode and azo dye. The additional azo respiration dissipated the proton accumulation within the anode biofilm. There was a large redox potential gap between the biofilms and anode surface. Changing cathodic conditions caused immediate effects on the anode potential but not on the biofilm potential. Biofilm viability showed an inverse and respiration-dependent profile when respiring with only the anode or azo dye and was enhanced when respiring with both simultaneously. These results provide new insights into the bacterial respiration strategies in environments containing multiple electron acceptors and support an electron-hopping mechanism within Shewanella electrode-respiring biofilms.

  5. Prediction of calcite morphology from computational and experimental studies of mutations of a de novo-designed peptide.

    PubMed

    Schrier, Sarah B; Sayeg, Marianna K; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2011-09-20

    Many organisms use macromolecules, often proteins or peptides, to control the growth of inorganic crystals into complex materials. The ability to model peptide-mineral interactions accurately could allow for the design of novel peptides to produce materials with desired properties. Here, we tested a computational algorithm developed to predict the structure of peptides on mineral surfaces. Using this algorithm, we analyzed energetic and structural differences between a 16-residue peptide (bap4) designed to interact with a calcite growth plane and single- and double-point mutations of the charged residues. Currently, no experimental method is available to resolve the structures of proteins on solid surfaces, which precludes benchmarking for computational models. Therefore, to test the models, we chemically synthesized each peptide and analyzed its effects on calcite crystal growth. Whereas bap4 affected the crystal growth by producing heavily stepped corners and edges, point mutants had variable influences on morphology. Calculated residue-specific binding energies correlated with experimental observations; point mutations of residues predicted to be crucial to surface interactions produced morphologies most similar to unmodified calcite. These results suggest that peptide conformation plays a role in mineral interactions and that the computational model supplies valid energetic and structural data that can provide information about expected crystal morphology.

  6. BAP, a mammalian BiP-associated protein, is a nucleotide exchange factor that regulates the ATPase activity of BiP.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyung Tae; Shen, Ying; Hendershot, Linda M

    2002-12-01

    We identified a mammalian BiP-associated protein, BAP, using a yeast two-hybrid screen that shared low homology with yeast Sls1p/Sil1p and mammalian HspBP1, both of which regulate the ATPase activity of their Hsp70 partner. BAP encoded an approximately 54-kDa protein with an N-terminal endoplasmic reticulum (ER) targeting sequence, two sites of N-linked glycosylation, and a C-terminal ER retention sequence. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that BAP co-localized with GRP94 in the endoplasmic reticulum. BAP was ubiquitously expressed but showed the highest levels of expression in secretory organ tissues, a pattern similar to that observed with BiP. BAP binding was affected by the conformation of the ATPase domain of BiP based on in vivo binding studies with BiP mutants. BAP stimulated the ATPase activity of BiP when added alone or together with the ER DnaJ protein, ERdj4, by promoting the release of ADP from BiP. Together, these data demonstrate that BAP serves as a nucleotide exchange factor for BiP and provide insights into the mechanisms that control protein folding in the mammalian ER.

  7. Toxic effects of benzo[a]pyrene (Bap) and Aroclor1254 on embryogenesis, larval growth, survival and metamorphosis of the bivalve Meretrix meretrix.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Yang, Hongsheng; Liu, Baozhong; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2012-08-01

    To assess the potential toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls on the early development of Meretrix meretrix, the effects of benzo[a]pyrene (Bap) and Aroclor1254 on embryogenesis and larval development were investigated using static laboratory toxicity tests at nominal concentrations of 6.25-1,600 μg/L. Even at 1,600 μg/L, Bap and Aroclor1254 only caused minor reductions in embryo development rates. The 96 h LC(50) values for D-shaped larvae were 156 μg/L for Bap and 132 μg/L for Aroclor1254, respectively. The most sensitive toxicity endpoint in this study was metamorphosis, with an EC(50) value of 20 μg/L for Bap and 35 μg/L for Aroclor1254. Aroclor1254 was more toxic than Bap to embryos and larvae. Our results indicate that Bap and Aroclor1254 do not show extreme toxicity to M. meretrix embryos and larvae. These data provide information for evaluating the toxicity of Bap and Aroclor1254 on bivalve embryos, especially over the entire larval stages.

  8. Evaluation of anti-cancer and anti-oxidative potential of Syzygium Cumini against benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) induced gastric carcinogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Goyal, P K; Verma, Preeti; Sharma, Priyanka; Parmar, Jyoti; Agarwal, Annapurna

    2010-01-01

    Syzygium cummini extract (SCE) was used in the present study to explore anti-tumor promoting activity in a stomach carcinogenesis model in mice. For this purpose, Swiss albino mice were administered with 1 mg of benzo-a-pyrene (BaP) in 100?l sesame oil by oral gavage twice a week for 4 consecutive weeks. The animals were sacrificed 14 weeks after the last administration of BaP. Oral administration of the extract to pre-treated (i.e. SCE as 25mg/kg b. wt./ day before BaP application for 2 weeks), post-treated (i.e. SCE after BaP application for 8 weeks) and pre-post treated (i.e. SCE for 2 weeks before treatment of BaP followed by the concomitant treatment with SCE and BaP for 4 weeks during and 2 weeks after the last dose of BaP) groups provided a significant reduction in tumor incidence, tumor burden and cumulative number of gastric carcinomas along with a significant elevation of phase II detoxifying enzymes, and inhibition of lipid per oxidation in the stomach. Thus, the present data suggest that the Syzygium cummini extract has anti-tumor and anti-oxidative potential against chemical induced stomach carcinogenesis.

  9. Evaluation of anti-cancer and anti-oxidative potential of Syzygium Cumini against benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) induced gastric carcinogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Goyal, P K; Verma, Preeti; Sharma, Priyanka; Parmar, Jyoti; Agarwal, Annapurna

    2010-01-01

    Syzygium cummini extract (SCE) was used in the present study to explore anti-tumor promoting activity in a stomach carcinogenesis model in mice. For this purpose, Swiss albino mice were administered with 1 mg of benzo-a-pyrene (BaP) in 100?l sesame oil by oral gavage twice a week for 4 consecutive weeks. The animals were sacrificed 14 weeks after the last administration of BaP. Oral administration of the extract to pre-treated (i.e. SCE as 25mg/kg b. wt./ day before BaP application for 2 weeks), post-treated (i.e. SCE after BaP application for 8 weeks) and pre-post treated (i.e. SCE for 2 weeks before treatment of BaP followed by the concomitant treatment with SCE and BaP for 4 weeks during and 2 weeks after the last dose of BaP) groups provided a significant reduction in tumor incidence, tumor burden and cumulative number of gastric carcinomas along with a significant elevation of phase II detoxifying enzymes, and inhibition of lipid per oxidation in the stomach. Thus, the present data suggest that the Syzygium cummini extract has anti-tumor and anti-oxidative potential against chemical induced stomach carcinogenesis. PMID:21039048

  10. Epitope Mapping of Antibodies Suggests the Novel Membrane Topology of B-Cell Receptor Associated Protein 31 on the Cell Surface of Embryonic Stem Cells: The Novel Membrane Topology of BAP31.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Tae; Choi, Hong Seo; Hwang, Hyo Jeong; Jung, Han-Sung; Ryu, Chun Jeih

    2015-01-01

    When located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, B-cell receptor associated protein 31 (BAP31) is involved in the export of secreted proteins from the ER to the plasma membrane. In a previous study, we generated two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), 297-D4 and 144-A8, that bound to surface molecules on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but not to surface molecules on mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Subsequent studies revealed that the mAbs recognized BAP31 on the surface of hESCs. To investigate the membrane topology of BAP31 on the cell surface, we first examined the epitope specificity of 297-D4 and 144-A8, as well as a polyclonal anti-BAP31 antibody (α-BAP31). We generated a series of GST-fused BAP31 mutant proteins in which BAP31 was serially deleted at the C- terminus. GST-fused BAP31 mutant proteins were then screened to identify the epitopes targeted by the antibodies. Both 297-D4 and 144-A8 recognized C-terminal residues 208-217, while α-BAP31 recognized C-terminal residues 165-246, of BAP31 on hESCs, suggesting that the C-terminal domain of BAP31 is exposed on the cell surface. The polyclonal antibody α-BAP31 bound to mESCs, which confirmed that the C-terminal domain of BAP31 is also exposed on the surface of these cells. Our results show for the first time the novel membrane topology of cell surface-expressed BAP31 as the extracellular exposure of the BAP31 C-terminal domain was not predicted from previous studies. PMID:26102500

  11. Organic solar cells based on acceptor-functionalized diketopyrrolopyrrole derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sanjay S.; Serrano, Luis A.; Ebenhoch, Bernd; Rotello, Vincent M.; Cooke, Graeme; Samuel, Ifor D. W.

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of three solution processable diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) derivatives featuring acceptor units attached to the core by alkyne linker units is reported. Cyclic voltammetry and density functional theory calculations indicate that the DPP derivatives possess similar HOMO and LUMO energies. Solar cells were fabricated by blending the synthesized DPP derivatives with [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyrate methyl ester. The influence of donor:acceptor blend ratio, film thickness, annealing temperature, and annealing time on device performance was studied. Differences in device performance were related to atomic force microscopy measurements of the films. The highest power conversion efficiency of 1.76% was achieved for the DPP derivative functionalized with an aldehyde electron-withdrawing group with a 1∶0.7 donor:acceptor ratio when the active layer was annealed for 10 min at 110°C.

  12. Theory of Primary Photoexcitations in Donor-Acceptor Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryanpour, Karan; Dutta, Tirthankar; Huynh, Uyen N. V.; Vardeny, Zeev Valy; Mazumdar, Sumit

    2015-12-01

    We present a generic theory of primary photoexcitations in low band gap donor-acceptor conjugated copolymers. Because of the combined effects of strong electron correlations and broken symmetry, there is considerable mixing between a charge-transfer exciton and an energetically proximate triplet-triplet state with an overall spin singlet. The triplet-triplet state, optically forbidden in homopolymers, is allowed in donor-acceptor copolymers. For an intermediate difference in electron affinities of the donor and the acceptor, the triplet-triplet state can have a stronger oscillator strength than the charge-transfer exciton. We discuss the possibility of intramolecular singlet fission from the triplet-triplet state, and how such fission can be detected experimentally.

  13. Higher excited states of acceptors in cubic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, M.; Kanehisa, M. A.; Balkanski, M.

    1986-02-01

    For the first time, higher excited states of shallow acceptors up to the 3s and 4s states are calculated based on the Balderschi and Lipari theory including the cubic correction. The eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the effective mass Hamiltonian for shallow acceptor states were obtained by the finite element method. The resultant sparse matrix is diagonalized by a newly developed Saad's method based on Arnoldi's algorithm. Comparison with experimental spectra on ZnTe:Li and ZnTe:P gives best valence band parameters for ZnTe; μ = 0.60 and δ = 0.12.

  14. Donor-acceptor chemistry in the main group.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Eric

    2014-06-21

    This Perspective article summarizes recent progress from our laboratory in the isolation of reactive main group species using a general donor-acceptor protocol. A highlight of this program is the use of carbon-based donors in combination with suitable Lewis acidic acceptors to yield stable complexes of parent Group 14 element hydrides (e.g. GeH2 and H2SiGeH2). It is anticipated that this strategy could be extended to include new synthetic targets from throughout the Periodic Table with possible applications in bottom-up materials synthesis and main group element catalysis envisioned. PMID:24788390

  15. Acceptors in bulk and nanoscale ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCluskey, M. D.

    2012-02-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a semiconductor that emits bright UV light, with little wasted heat. This intrinsic feature makes it a promising material for energy-efficient white lighting, nano-lasers, and other optical applications. For devices to be competitive, however, it is necessary to develop reliable p-type doping. Although substitutional nitrogen has been considered as a potential p-type dopant for ZnO, theoretical and experimental work indicates that nitrogen is a deep acceptor and will not lead to p-type conductivity. This talk will highlight recent experiments on ZnO:N at low temperatures. A red/near-IR photoluminescence (PL) band is correlated with the presence of deep nitrogen acceptors. PL excitation (PLE) measurements show an absorption threshold of 2.26 eV, in good agreement with theory. Magnetic resonance experiments provide further evidence for this assignment. The results of these studies seem to rule out group-V elements as shallow acceptors in ZnO, contradicting numerous reports in the literature. If these acceptors do not work as advertised, is there a viable alternative? Optical studies on ZnO nanocrystals show some intriguing leads. At liquid-helium temperatures, a series of sharp IR absorption peaks arise from an unknown acceptor impurity. The data are consistent with a hydrogenic acceptor 0.46 eV above the valence band edge. While this binding energy is still too deep for many practical applications, it represents a significant improvement over the ˜ 1.3 eV binding energy for nitrogen acceptors. Nanocrystals present another twist. Due to their high surface-to-volume ratio, surface states are especially important. Specifically, electron-hole recombination at the surface give rises to a red luminescence band. From our PL and IR experiments, we have developed a ``unified'' model that attempts to explain acceptor and surface states in ZnO nanocrystals. This model could provide a useful framework for designing future nanoscale ZnO devices.

  16. BAP Position Statement: Off-label prescribing of psychotropic medication to children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aditya N; Arango, Celso; Coghill, David; Gringras, Paul; Nutt, David J; Pratt, Peter; Young, Allan H; Hollis, Chris

    2016-05-01

    The off-label use of medicines for children and adolescents remains a common and important issue for prescribing practice across child and adolescent psychiatry, paediatrics and primary care. This editorial focusses on psychotropic drug treatment, which plays an essential part in the comprehensive management of a range of child and adolescent psychiatric disorders. Despite a growing evidence base for drug treatment in child and adolescent psychiatric disorders, much psychotropic medication continues to be prescribed off-label (i.e. outside the limits of the marketing authorisation or product license). The reasons for and implications of off-label prescribing, including the potential clinical benefits/risks and medico-legal implications, are often poorly understood by both patients and prescribers. An important unintended consequence of the uncertainties and confusion surrounding the status of off-label prescribing for children and adolescents may be that effective drug treatments are being withheld or underused. This BAP Position Statement aims to clarify these issues, challenge some of the myths surrounding off-label prescribing for children and adolescents and offer practical guidance for prescribers.

  17. Optical Spectroscopy of Acceptors in Semiconductors: I. Acceptor Complexes in Neutron Transmutation-Doped Silicon. I. Piezospectroscopy of Beryllium Double Acceptors in Germanium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrec, Charles Raymond

    Substitutional group III impurities in group IV elemental semiconductors bind a hole from the valence band and are solid-state analogs of the hydrogen atom; likewise, group II impurities bind two holes and are analogs of the helium atom. In these materials, the electronic transitions from the acceptor s-like ground state to the p-like excited states are infrared active. A high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer, and a liquid-helium cooled germanium bolometer and glass sample cryostat are ideally suited to study these effects. When silicon is exposed to neutron radiation, a fraction of the atoms are converted to phosphorus. After annealing, these impurity atoms occupy substitutional locations and are thus donors. When the initial crystal is p-type and the final phosphorus concentration is less than that of the acceptor, the sample is left p-type but highly compensated. This results in broadening of the transition lines. However, before complete annealing, it is discovered that a new, extremely shallow acceptor is formed, with an ionization energy of 28.24 meV, which is far shallower than any previously known. Neutral Be in Ge is known to be a double acceptor. Under uniaxial stress, the single hole (1s)^2 to (1s)(np) excitation spectrum shows splittings and polarization effects. These piezospectroscopic effects were observed for a compressive force vec F | (111) and vec F | (100). The phenomenological shear deformation potential constants have been deduced for the ground and excited states of the D transition.

  18. Somatic embryo-like structures of strawberry regenerated in vitro on media supplemented with 2,4-D and BAP.

    PubMed

    Omar, Genesia F; Mohamed, Fouad H; Haensch, Klaus-Thomas; Sarg, Sawsan H; Morsey, Mohamed M

    2013-09-01

    Somatic embryo-like structures (SELS) were produced in vitro from leaf disk and petiole explants of two cultivars of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch) on Murashige and Skoog medium with different concentrations and combinations of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) and sucrose to check the embryonic nature of these structures histologically. A large number of SELS could be regenerated in both cultivars on media with 2-4 mg L(-1) 2,4-D in combination with 0.5 -1 mg L(-1) BAP and 50 g x L(-1) sucrose. Histological examination of SELS revealed the absence of a root pole. Therefore these structures cannot be strictly classified as somatic embryos. The SELS formed under the tested culture conditions represent malformed shoot-like and leaf-like structures. The importance of these results for the propagation of strawberries via somatic embryogenesis is discussed. PMID:24377134

  19. The stability of the reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) and biological antioxidant potential (BAP) tests on stored horse blood.

    PubMed

    Celi, P; Sullivan, M; Evans, D

    2010-02-01

    Increasing interest in the role of oxidative stress (OS) in equine medicine has highlighted the need to develop reliable methods to quantify it. In this study we describe the effect of refrigeration (at 4 degrees C) on the stability of the reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) and biological antioxidant potential (BAP) tests carried out on 15 healthy horses. Blood samples, collected from the jugular vein, were immediately placed on ice and analysed using both the d-ROMs and BAP tests. Samples were also refrigerated at 4 degrees C and tested after 3, 7 and 24 h. The average results were similar for up to 24 h and minimal variations were found for each horse. The findings suggest that refrigeration is suitable for preserving equine blood samples for these assays and this approach will provide veterinarians with a technically simple, reliable test to measure OS under field conditions.

  20. Somatic embryo-like structures of strawberry regenerated in vitro on media supplemented with 2,4-D and BAP.

    PubMed

    Omar, Genesia F; Mohamed, Fouad H; Haensch, Klaus-Thomas; Sarg, Sawsan H; Morsey, Mohamed M

    2013-09-01

    Somatic embryo-like structures (SELS) were produced in vitro from leaf disk and petiole explants of two cultivars of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch) on Murashige and Skoog medium with different concentrations and combinations of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) and sucrose to check the embryonic nature of these structures histologically. A large number of SELS could be regenerated in both cultivars on media with 2-4 mg L(-1) 2,4-D in combination with 0.5 -1 mg L(-1) BAP and 50 g x L(-1) sucrose. Histological examination of SELS revealed the absence of a root pole. Therefore these structures cannot be strictly classified as somatic embryos. The SELS formed under the tested culture conditions represent malformed shoot-like and leaf-like structures. The importance of these results for the propagation of strawberries via somatic embryogenesis is discussed.

  1. Tetrathiafulvalene-based mixed-valence acceptor-donor-acceptor triads: a joint theoretical and experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Calbo, Joaquín; Aragó, Juan; Otón, Francisco; Lloveras, Vega; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Vidal-Gancedo, José; Veciana, Jaume; Rovira, Concepció; Ortí, Enrique

    2013-12-01

    This work presents a joint theoretical and experimental characterisation of the structural and electronic properties of two tetrathiafulvalene (TTF)-based acceptor-donor-acceptor triads (BQ-TTF-BQ and BTCNQ-TTF-BTCNQ; BQ is naphthoquinone and BTCNQ is benzotetracyano-p-quinodimethane) in their neutral and reduced states. The study is performed with the use of electrochemical, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and UV/Vis/NIR spectroelectrochemical techniques guided by quantum-chemical calculations. Emphasis is placed on the mixed-valence properties of both triads in their radical anion states. The electrochemical and EPR results reveal that both BQ-TTF-BQ and BTCNQ-TTF-BTCNQ triads in their radical anion states behave as class-II mixed-valence compounds with significant electronic communication between the acceptor moieties. Density functional theory calculations (BLYP35/cc-pVTZ), taking into account the solvent effects, predict charge-localised species (BQ(.-)-TTF-BQ and BTCNQ(.-)-TTF-BTCNQ) as the most stable structures for the radical anion states of both triads. A stronger localisation is found both experimentally and theoretically for the BTCNQ-TTF-BTCNQ anion, in accordance with the more electron-withdrawing character of the BTCNQ acceptor. CASSCF/CASPT2 calculations suggest that the low-energy, broad absorption bands observed experimentally for the BQ-TTF-BQ and BTCNQ-TTF-BTCNQ radical anions are associated with the intervalence charge transfer (IV-CT) electronic transition and two nearby donor-to-acceptor CT excitations. The study highlights the molecular efficiency of the electron-donor TTF unit as a molecular wire connecting two acceptor redox centres.

  2. The no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of baby aloe powder (BAP) for nutraceutical application based upon toxicological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kwack, Seung Jun; Do, Seon-Gil; Kim, Young Woo; Kim, Yeon-Joo; Gwak, Hyo-Min; Park, Hyun Jong; Roh, Taehyun; Shin, Min Kyung; Lim, Seong Kwang; Kim, Hyung Sik; Lee, Byung-Mu

    2014-01-01

    Aloe has been used in versatile herbal medications and nutraceuticals throughout history. Aloe is widely considered to be generally safe for humans and used globally. The effectiveness and pharmacological properties of aloe are dependent upon when the plant is collected. However, little is known about the toxicology of whole-body aloe collected within less than 1 yr. Based upon widespread exposure to aloe, it is important to determine a daily intake level of this chemical to ensure its safety for humans. To determine the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of baby aloe powder (BAP) for clinical application, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were treated orally for 4 wk with 4 different concentrations: 0, 0.125, 0.5, and 2 g/kg body weight (bw). In this study, no significant or dose-dependent toxicological effects of BAP were observed in biochemical or hematological parameters, urinalysis, clinical signs, body weight, and food and water consumption. There were changes in some biomarkers in certain treated groups compared to controls; however, all values were within their reference ranges and not dose-dependent. Based on these results, the NOAEL of BAP was estimated to be greater than 2 g/kg bw in male and 2 g/kg bw in female SD rats. Collectively, these data suggest that BAP used in this study did not produce any marked subacute toxic effects up to a maximum concentration of 2 g/kg bw, and thus use in nutraceuticals and in pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications at a concentration of >2 g/kg is warranted.

  3. Three Redox States of a Diradical Acceptor-Donor-Acceptor Triad: Gating the Magnetic Coupling and the Electron Delocalization.

    PubMed

    Souto, Manuel; Lloveras, Vega; Vela, Sergi; Fumanal, Maria; Ratera, Imma; Veciana, Jaume

    2016-06-16

    The diradical acceptor-donor-acceptor triad 1(••), based on two polychlorotriphenylmethyl (PTM) radicals connected through a tetrathiafulvalene(TTF)-vinylene bridge, has been synthesized. The generation of the mixed-valence radical anion, 1(•-), and triradical cation species, 1(•••+), obtained upon electrochemical reduction and oxidation, respectively, was monitored by optical and ESR spectroscopy. Interestingly, the modification of electron delocalization and magnetic coupling was observed when the charged species were generated and the changes have been rationalized by theoretical calculations.

  4. Hepcidin gene expression induced in the developmental stages of fish upon exposure to Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke-Jian; Bo, Jun; Yang, Ming; Hong, Hua-Sheng; Wang, Xin-Hong; Chen, Fang-Yi; Yuan, Jian-Jun

    2009-04-01

    Hepcidin is known to be expressed in fish with bacterial challenge and iron overload. Here we first report the hepcidin expression induced in the developmental stages from embryo to fry of red sea bream (Pagarus major) and in juvenile black porgy (Acanthopagrus schlegelii B.) upon continuous waterborne exposure to BaP. The gene expression of CYP1A1 and IgL (immunoglobulin light chain) were both measured. Expression of the Pagarus major hepcidin gene (PM-hepc) was increased in post hatch fry at 24 h and 120 h exposure to BaP at concentrations of 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 microg/l, respectively. The gene expression pattern was comparable to that of CYP1A1 but different from that of IgL. In addition, a high number of AS-hepc2 transcripts (Acanthopagrus schlegelii B. hepcidin gene) were detected in the liver upon exposure to 1.0 microg/l BaP. This study demonstrates that hepcidin gene expression is significantly induced in BaP-exposed red sea bream and black porgy.

  5. Effect of ventilation and sediment ingestion on the uptake of HCB and B[a]P in a fish

    SciTech Connect

    Kolok, A.S.; Huckins, J.N.; Petty, J.D.; Groetsch, K.; Oris, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this study was to determine whether sediment ingestion or water ventilation was the primary route of uptake for benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) in the detritivorous fish, gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum). Two experiments were conducted in which fish were exposed to sediments spiked with either 1 {micro}g/g BaP or 1 {micro}g/g HCB. In both experiments, fish were either allowed to feed on the sediment or were prevented from feeding by esophagus ligation. In both experiments, feeding fish created a very turbid environment. Concentrations of BaP-equivalents in the nonligated fish were not significantly different from that in the ligated fish, suggesting that water ventilation was the primary route of uptake for this compound. In contrast, concentrations of HCB found in the feeding fish were significantly greater than those found in the ligated fish. The uptake of BaP and HCB into the tissues of gizzard shad was undoubtedly influenced by a number of factors including compound bioavailability and fugacity. Nevertheless, these studies clearly point out that metabolism of the parent compound will also influence whether ventilation or food ingestion is the primary route of entry for lipophilic organic toxicants into the tissues of fish.

  6. Covalent non-fused tetrathiafulvalene-acceptor systems.

    PubMed

    Pop, Flavia; Avarvari, Narcis

    2016-06-28

    Covalent donor-acceptor (D-A) systems have significantly contributed to the development of many organic materials and to molecular electronics. Tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) represents one of the most widely studied donor precursors and has been incorporated into the structure of many D-A derivatives with the objective of obtaining redox control and modulation of the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), in order to address switchable emissive systems and to take advantage of its propensity to form regular stacks in the solid state. In this review, we focus on the main families of non-fused TTF-acceptors, which are classified according to the nature of the acceptor: nitrogen-containing heterocycles, BODIPY, perylenes and electron poor unsaturated hydrocarbons, as well as radical acceptors. We describe herein the most representative members of each family with a brief mention of their synthesis and a special focus on their D-A characteristics. Special attention is given to ICT and its modulation, fluorescence quenching and switching, photoconductivity, bistability and spin distribution by discussing and comparing spectroscopic and electrochemical features, photophysical properties, solid-state properties and theoretical calculations. PMID:27193500

  7. Fine structure of the Mn acceptor in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainov, I. V.; Debus, J.; Averkiev, N. S.; Dimitriev, G. S.; Sapega, V. F.; Lähderanta, E.

    2016-06-01

    We reveal the electronic level structure of the Mn acceptor, which consists of a valence-band hole bound to an Mn2 + ion, in presence of applied uniaxial stress and an external magnetic field in bulk GaAs. Resonant spin-flip Raman scattering is used to measure the g factor of the AMn0 center in the ground and excited states with the total angular momenta F =1 and F =2 and characterize the optical selection rules of the spin-flip transitions between these Mn-acceptor states. We determine the random stress fields near the Mn acceptor, the constant of the antiferromagnetic exchange interaction between the valence-band holes and the electrons of the inner Mn2 + shell as well as the deformation potential for the exchange energy. The p -d exchange energy, in particular, decreases significantly with increasing compressive stress. By combining the experimental Raman study with the developed theoretical model on the scattering efficiency, in which also the random local and external uniaxial stresses and magnetic field are considered, the fine structure of the Mn acceptor is determined in full detail.

  8. Development of imide- and imidazole-containing electron acceptors for use in donor-acceptor conjugated compounds and polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Duo

    Conjugated organic compounds and polymers have attracted significant attention due to their potential application in electronic devices as semiconducting materials, such as organic solar cells (OSCs). In order to tune band gaps, donor-acceptor (D-A) structure is widely used, which has been proved to be one of the most effective strategies. This thesis consists of three parts: 1) design, syntheses and characterization of new weak acceptors based on imides and the systematic study of the structure-property relationship; (2) introduction of weak and strong acceptors in one polymer to achieve a broad coverage of light absorption and improve the power conversion efficiency (PCE); (3) modification of benzothiadiazole (BT) acceptor in order to increase the electron withdrawing ability. Imide-based electron acceptors, 4-(5-bromothiophen-2-y1)-2-(2-ethylhexyl)-9- phenyl- 1H-benzo[f]isoindole-1,3(2H)-dione (BIDO-1) and 4,9-bis(5-bromothiophen-2-yl)-2-(2-ethylhexyl)-benzo[f]isoindole-1,3-dione (BIDO-2), were designed and synthesized. In this design, naphthalene is selected as its main core to maintain a planar structure, and thienyl groups are able to facilitate the bromination reaction and lower the band gap. BIDO-1 and BIDO-2 were successfully coupled with different donors by both Suzuki cross-coupling and Stille cross-coupling reactions. Based on the energy levels and band gaps of the BIDO-containing compounds and polymers, BIDO-1 and BIDO-2 are proved to be weak electron acceptors. Pyromellitic diimide (PMDI) was also studied and found to be a stronger electron acceptor than BIDO . In order to obtain broad absorption coverage, both weak acceptor ( BIDO-2) and strong acceptor diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) were introduced in the same polymer. The resulting polymers show two absorption bands at 400 and 600 nm and two emission peaks at 500 and 680 nm. The band gaps of the polymers are around 1.6 eV, which is ideal for OSC application. The PCE of 1.17% was achieved. Finally

  9. Anaerobic methanotrophy in tidal wetland: Effects of electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li-Hung; Yu, Zih-Huei; Wang, Pei-Ling

    2016-04-01

    Wetlands have been considered to represent the largest natural source of methane emission, contributing substantially to intensify greenhouse effect. Despite in situ methanogenesis fueled by organic degradation, methanotrophy also plays a vital role in controlling the exact quantity of methane release across the air-sediment interface. As wetlands constantly experience various disturbances of anthropogenic activities, biological burrowing, tidal inundation, and plant development, rapid elemental turnover would enable various electron acceptors available for anaerobic methanotrophy. The effects of electron acceptors on stimulating anaerobic methanotrophy and the population compositions involved in carbon transformation in wetland sediments are poorly explored. In this study, sediments recovered from tidally influenced, mangrove covered wetland in northern Taiwan were incubated under the static conditions to investigate whether anaerobic methanotrophy could be stimulated by the presence of individual electron acceptors. Our results demonstrated that anaerobic methanotrophy was clearly stimulated in incubations amended with no electron acceptor, sulfate, or Fe-oxyhydroxide. No apparent methane consumption was observed in incubations with nitrate, citrate, fumarate or Mn-oxides. Anaerobic methanotrophy in incubations with no exogenous electron acceptor appears to proceed at the greatest rates, being sequentially followed by incubations with sulfate and Fe-oxyhydroxide. The presence of basal salt solution stimulated methane oxidation by a factor of 2 to 3. In addition to the direct impact of electron acceptor and basal salts, incubations with sediments retrieved from low tide period yielded a lower rate of methane oxidation than from high tide period. Overall, this study demonstrates that anaerobic methanotrophy in wetland sediments could proceed under various treatments of electron acceptors. Low sulfate content is not a critical factor in inhibiting methane

  10. Acceptor conductivity in bulk zinc oxide (0001) crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adekore, Bababunmi Tolu

    ZnO is a promising wide bandgap semiconductor. Its renowned and prominent properties as its bandgap of 3.37eV at 4.2K; its very high excitonic binding energy, 60meV; its high melting temperature, 2248K constitute the basis for the recently renewed and sustained scientific interests in the material. In addition to the foregoing, the availability of bulk substrates of industrially relevant sizes provides important opportunities such as homoepitaxial deposition of the material which is a technological asset in the production of efficient optoelectronic and electronic devices. The nemesis of wide bandgap materials cannot be more exemplified than in ZnO. The notorious limitation of asymmetric doping and the haunting plague of electrically active point defects dim the bright future of the material. In this case, the search for reliable and consistent acceptor conductivity in bulk substrates has been hitherto, unsuccessful. In the dissertation that now follows, our efforts have been concerted in the search for a reliable acceptor. We have carefully investigated the science of point defects in the material, especially those responsible for the high donor conductivity. We also investigated and herein report variety of techniques of introducing acceptors into the material. We employ the most relevant and informative characterization techniques in verifying both the intended conductivity and the response of intrinsic crystals to variation in temperature and strain. And finally we explain deviations, where they exist, from ideal acceptor characteristics. Our work on reliable acceptor has been articulated in four papers. The first establishing capacitance based methods of monitoring electrically active donor defects. The second investigates the nature of anion acceptors on the oxygen sublattice. A study similar to the preceding study was conducted for cation acceptors on the zinc sublattice and reported in the third paper. Finally, an analysis of the response of the crystal to

  11. Identification of New Snake Venom Metalloproteinase Inhibitors Using Compound Screening and Rational Peptide Design

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The majority of snakebite envenomations in Central America are caused by the viperid species Bothrops asper, whose venom contains a high proportion of zinc-dependent metalloproteinases that play a relevant role in the pathogenesis of hemorrhage characteristic of these envenomations. Broad metalloproteinase inhibitors, such as the peptidomimetic hydroxamate Batimastat, have been shown to inhibit snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMP). However, the difficulty in having open public access to Batimastat and similar molecules highlights the need to design new inhibitors of SVMPs that could be applied in the treatment of snakebite envenomations. We have chosen the SVMP BaP1 as a model to search for new inhibitors using different strategies, that is, screening of the Prestwick Chemical Library and rational peptide design. Results from these approaches provide clues on the structural requirements for efficient BaP1 inhibition and pave the way for the design of new inhibitors of SVMP. PMID:24900507

  12. Identification of new snake venom metalloproteinase inhibitors using compound screening and rational Peptide design.

    PubMed

    Villalta-Romero, Fabián; Gortat, Anna; Herrera, Andrés E; Arguedas, Rebeca; Quesada, Javier; de Melo, Robson Lopes; Calvete, Juan J; Montero, Mavis; Murillo, Renato; Rucavado, Alexandra; Gutiérrez, José María; Pérez-Payá, Enrique

    2012-07-12

    The majority of snakebite envenomations in Central America are caused by the viperid species Bothrops asper, whose venom contains a high proportion of zinc-dependent metalloproteinases that play a relevant role in the pathogenesis of hemorrhage characteristic of these envenomations. Broad metalloproteinase inhibitors, such as the peptidomimetic hydroxamate Batimastat, have been shown to inhibit snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMP). However, the difficulty in having open public access to Batimastat and similar molecules highlights the need to design new inhibitors of SVMPs that could be applied in the treatment of snakebite envenomations. We have chosen the SVMP BaP1 as a model to search for new inhibitors using different strategies, that is, screening of the Prestwick Chemical Library and rational peptide design. Results from these approaches provide clues on the structural requirements for efficient BaP1 inhibition and pave the way for the design of new inhibitors of SVMP. PMID:24900507

  13. Identification of bapA in Strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Isolated from Wild Animals Kept in Captivity in Sinaloa, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    López-Valenzuela, Martin; Cárcamo-Aréchiga, Nora; Cota-Guajardo, Silvia; López-Salazar, Mayra; Montiel-Vázquez, Edith

    2016-01-01

    bapA, previously named stm2689, encodes the BapA protein, which, along with cellulose and fimbriae, constitutes biofilms. Biofilms are communities of microorganisms that grow in a matrix of exopolysaccharides and may adhere to living tissues or inert surfaces. Biofilm formation is associated with the ability to persist in different environments, which contributes to the pathogenicity of several species. We analyzed the presence of bapA in 83 strains belonging to 17 serovars of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica from wildlife in captivity at Culiacan's Zoo and Mazatlán's Aquarium. Each isolate amplified a product of 667 bp, which corresponds to the expected size of the bapA initiator, with no observed variation between different serovars analyzed. bapA gene was found to be highly conserved in Salmonella and can be targeted for the genus-specific detection of this organism from different sources. Since bapA expression improves bacterial proliferation outside of the host and facilitates resistance to disinfectants and desiccation, the survival of Salmonella in natural habitats may be favored. Thus, the risk of bacterial contamination from these animals is increased. PMID:27379195

  14. Cancer-associated ASXL1 mutations may act as gain-of-function mutations of the ASXL1–BAP1 complex

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramani, Anand; Larjo, Antti; Bassein, Jed A.; Chang, Xing; Hastie, Ryan B.; Togher, Susan M.; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Rao, Anjana

    2015-01-01

    ASXL1 is the obligate regulatory subunit of a deubiquitinase complex whose catalytic subunit is BAP1. Heterozygous mutations of ASXL1 that result in premature truncations are frequent in myeloid leukemias and Bohring–Opitz syndrome. Here we demonstrate that ASXL1 truncations confer enhanced activity on the ASXL1–BAP1 complex. Stable expression of truncated, hyperactive ASXL1–BAP1 complexes in a haematopoietic precursor cell line results in global erasure of H2AK119Ub, striking depletion of H3K27me3, selective upregulation of a subset of genes whose promoters are marked by both H2AK119Ub and H3K4me3, and spontaneous differentiation to the mast cell lineage. These outcomes require the catalytic activity of BAP1, indicating that they are downstream consequences of H2AK119Ub erasure. In bone marrow precursors, expression of truncated ASXL1–BAP1 complex cooperates with TET2 loss-of-function to increase differentiation to the myeloid lineage in vivo. Our data raise the possibility that ASXL1 truncation mutations confer gain-of-function on the ASXL–BAP1 complex. PMID:26095772

  15. Induction of BAP1 by a Moderate Decrease in Temperature Is Mediated by ICE1 in Arabidopsis1[C][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ying; Yang, Huijun; Mang, Hyung-Gon; Hua, Jian

    2011-01-01

    Temperature variations at the nonextreme range modulate various processes of plant growth, development, and physiology, but how plants perceive and transduce these temperature signals is not well understood. Moderate cooling from 28°C to 22°C induces transcription of a number of genes in salicylic acid-dependent and -independent manners. Here, we report the study of the transcriptional control of the BON1-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN1 (BAP1) gene that is responsive to a moderate decrease of temperature as well as to many environmental stimuli. Using reporter genes under the control of series of regions of the BAP1 promoter, we identified a 35-bp fragment that is necessary and sufficient for the BAP1 transcript induction by a moderate cooling. This fragment also confers an induction of BAP1 by cold and reactive oxygen species-generating paraquat. Furthermore, the INDUCER OF CBF EXPRESSION1 (ICE1) protein that is involved in transcriptional control of cold responses is found to bind to a MYC element in this promoter and is required for the cooling induction of BAP1. The ice1 mutant has a low induction of BAP1 and enhanced resistance to a bacterial pathogen. Thus, responses to a moderate decrease in temperature may utilize components in the cold response as well as a potentiating signaling involving salicylic acid. PMID:21098676

  16. Identification of bapA in Strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Isolated from Wild Animals Kept in Captivity in Sinaloa, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Silva-Hidalgo, Gabriela; López-Valenzuela, Martin; Cárcamo-Aréchiga, Nora; Cota-Guajardo, Silvia; López-Salazar, Mayra; Montiel-Vázquez, Edith

    2016-01-01

    bapA, previously named stm2689, encodes the BapA protein, which, along with cellulose and fimbriae, constitutes biofilms. Biofilms are communities of microorganisms that grow in a matrix of exopolysaccharides and may adhere to living tissues or inert surfaces. Biofilm formation is associated with the ability to persist in different environments, which contributes to the pathogenicity of several species. We analyzed the presence of bapA in 83 strains belonging to 17 serovars of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica from wildlife in captivity at Culiacan's Zoo and Mazatlán's Aquarium. Each isolate amplified a product of 667 bp, which corresponds to the expected size of the bapA initiator, with no observed variation between different serovars analyzed. bapA gene was found to be highly conserved in Salmonella and can be targeted for the genus-specific detection of this organism from different sources. Since bapA expression improves bacterial proliferation outside of the host and facilitates resistance to disinfectants and desiccation, the survival of Salmonella in natural habitats may be favored. Thus, the risk of bacterial contamination from these animals is increased. PMID:27379195

  17. Identification of bapA in Strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Isolated from Wild Animals Kept in Captivity in Sinaloa, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Silva-Hidalgo, Gabriela; López-Valenzuela, Martin; Cárcamo-Aréchiga, Nora; Cota-Guajardo, Silvia; López-Salazar, Mayra; Montiel-Vázquez, Edith

    2016-01-01

    bapA, previously named stm2689, encodes the BapA protein, which, along with cellulose and fimbriae, constitutes biofilms. Biofilms are communities of microorganisms that grow in a matrix of exopolysaccharides and may adhere to living tissues or inert surfaces. Biofilm formation is associated with the ability to persist in different environments, which contributes to the pathogenicity of several species. We analyzed the presence of bapA in 83 strains belonging to 17 serovars of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica from wildlife in captivity at Culiacan's Zoo and Mazatlán's Aquarium. Each isolate amplified a product of 667 bp, which corresponds to the expected size of the bapA initiator, with no observed variation between different serovars analyzed. bapA gene was found to be highly conserved in Salmonella and can be targeted for the genus-specific detection of this organism from different sources. Since bapA expression improves bacterial proliferation outside of the host and facilitates resistance to disinfectants and desiccation, the survival of Salmonella in natural habitats may be favored. Thus, the risk of bacterial contamination from these animals is increased.

  18. Occurrence of genes coding for MSCRAMM and biofilm-associated protein Bap in Staphylococcus spp. isolated from bovine subclinical mastitis and relationship with somatic cell counts.

    PubMed

    Zuniga, Eveline; Melville, Priscilla A; Saidenberg, André B S; Laes, Marco A; Gonsales, Fernanda F; Salaberry, Sandra R S; Gregori, Fabio; Brandão, Paulo E; dos Santos, Franklin G B; Lincopan, Nilton E; Benites, Nilson R

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to elucidate aspects of the epidemiology of bovine subclinical mastitis through the assessment of genes encoding MSCRAMM (microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules - a group of adhesins) and protein Bap (implicated in biofilm formation), in coagulase-positive (CPS) and coagulase-negative (CNS) Staphylococcus isolated from subclinical mastitis. Milk samples were collected for microbiological exams, somatic cell count (SCC) and a survey of the genes coding for MSCRAMM (cna, eno, ebpS, fnbA, fnbB and fib) and biofilm-associated protein Bap (bap) in 106 Staphylococcus spp. isolates using PCR. The frequencies of occurrence of eno (82.1%), fnbA (72.6%), fib (71.7%) and bap (56.6%) were higher (P < 0.0001) compared with the other assessed genes (cna, ebpS and fnbB). The higher frequency of occurrence (P < 0.005) of the bap gene in CNS compared with CPS suggests that in these species biofilm formation is an important mechanism for the persistence of the infection. The medians of the SCCs in the samples where eno, fnbA, fib and bap genes were detected were higher compared with Staphylococcus without the assessed genes (P < 0.05) and negative samples (P < 0.01), which indicated that the presence of these MSCRAMM may be related to a higher intensity of the inflammatory process.

  19. Combined Genetic and Genealogic Studies Uncover a Large BAP1 Cancer Syndrome Kindred Tracing Back Nine Generations to a Common Ancestor from the 1700s.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Michele; Flores, Erin G; Emi, Mitsuru; Johnson, Todd A; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Behner, Dusty; Hoffman, Harriet; Hesdorffer, Mary; Nasu, Masaki; Napolitano, Andrea; Powers, Amy; Minaai, Michael; Baumann, Francine; Bryant-Greenwood, Peter; Lauk, Olivia; Kirschner, Michaela B; Weder, Walter; Opitz, Isabelle; Pass, Harvey I; Gaudino, Giovanni; Pastorino, Sandra; Yang, Haining

    2015-12-01

    We recently discovered an inherited cancer syndrome caused by BRCA1-Associated Protein 1 (BAP1) germline mutations, with high incidence of mesothelioma, uveal melanoma and other cancers and very high penetrance by age 55. To identify families with the BAP1 cancer syndrome, we screened patients with family histories of multiple mesotheliomas and melanomas and/or multiple cancers. We identified four families that shared an identical BAP1 mutation: they lived across the US and did not appear to be related. By combining family histories, molecular genetics, and genealogical approaches, we uncovered a BAP1 cancer syndrome kindred of ~80,000 descendants with a core of 106 individuals, whose members descend from a couple born in Germany in the early 1700s who immigrated to North America. Their descendants spread throughout the country with mutation carriers affected by multiple malignancies. Our data show that, once a proband is identified, extended analyses of these kindreds, using genomic and genealogical studies to identify the most recent common ancestor, allow investigators to uncover additional branches of the family that may carry BAP1 mutations. Using this knowledge, we have identified new branches of this family carrying BAP1 mutations. We have also implemented early-detection strategies that help identify cancers at early-stage, when they can be cured (melanomas) or are more susceptible to therapy (MM and other malignancies). PMID:26683624

  20. Antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling-Juan; Gallo, Richard L

    2016-01-11

    Antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) are a diverse class of naturally occurring molecules that are produced as a first line of defense by all multicellular organisms. These proteins can have broad activity to directly kill bacteria, yeasts, fungi, viruses and even cancer cells. Insects and plants primarily deploy AMPs as an antibiotic to protect against potential pathogenic microbes, but microbes also produce AMPs to defend their environmental niche. In higher eukaryotic organisms, AMPs can also be referred to as 'host defense peptides', emphasizing their additional immunomodulatory activities. These activities are diverse, specific to the type of AMP, and include a variety of cytokine and growth factor-like effects that are relevant to normal immune homeostasis. In some instances, the inappropriate expression of AMPs can also induce autoimmune diseases, thus further highlighting the importance of understanding these molecules and their complex activities. This Primer will provide an update of our current understanding of AMPs. PMID:26766224

  1. Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-01-01

    The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill “superbugs” emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes) and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics). PMID:24287494

  2. Antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-11-28

    The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill "superbugs" emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes) and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics).

  3. Mechanisms of electron acceptor utilization: Implications for simulating anaerobic biodegradation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schreiber, M.E.; Carey, G.R.; Feinstein, D.T.; Bahr, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Simulation of biodegradation reactions within a reactive transport framework requires information on mechanisms of terminal electron acceptor processes (TEAPs). In initial modeling efforts, TEAPs were approximated as occurring sequentially, with the highest energy-yielding electron acceptors (e.g. oxygen) consumed before those that yield less energy (e.g., sulfate). Within this framework in a steady state plume, sequential electron acceptor utilization would theoretically produce methane at an organic-rich source and Fe(II) further downgradient, resulting in a limited zone of Fe(II) and methane overlap. However, contaminant plumes often display much more extensive zones of overlapping Fe(II) and methane. The extensive overlap could be caused by several abiotic and biotic processes including vertical mixing of byproducts in long-screened monitoring wells, adsorption of Fe(II) onto aquifer solids, or microscale heterogeneity in Fe(III) concentrations. Alternatively, the overlap could be due to simultaneous utilization of terminal electron acceptors. Because biodegradation rates are controlled by TEAPs, evaluating the mechanisms of electron acceptor utilization is critical for improving prediction of contaminant mass losses due to biodegradation. Using BioRedox-MT3DMS, a three-dimensional, multi-species reactive transport code, we simulated the current configurations of a BTEX plume and TEAP zones at a petroleum- contaminated field site in Wisconsin. Simulation results suggest that BTEX mass loss due to biodegradation is greatest under oxygen-reducing conditions, with smaller but similar contributions to mass loss from biodegradation under Fe(III)-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Results of sensitivity calculations document that BTEX losses due to biodegradation are most sensitive to the age of the plume, while the shape of the BTEX plume is most sensitive to effective porosity and rate constants for biodegradation under Fe(III)-reducing and

  4. Interface effects on acceptor qubits in silicon and germanium.

    PubMed

    Abadillo-Uriel, J C; Calderón, M J

    2016-01-15

    Dopant-based quantum computing implementations often require the dopants to be situated close to an interface to facilitate qubit manipulation with local gates. Interfaces not only modify the energies of the bound states but also affect their symmetry. Making use of the successful effective mass theory we study the energy spectra of acceptors in Si or Ge taking into account the quantum confinement, the dielectric mismatch and the central cell effects. The presence of an interface puts constraints to the allowed symmetries and leads to the splitting of the ground state in two Kramers doublets (Mol et al 2015 Appl. Phys. Lett. 106 203110). Inversion symmetry breaking also implies parity mixing which affects the allowed optical transitions. Consequences for acceptor qubits are discussed. PMID:26618443

  5. Photoconductivity in donor-acceptor heterojunction organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renshaw, C. K.; Zimmerman, J. D.; Lassiter, B. E.; Forrest, S. R.

    2012-08-01

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) differ from ideal inorganic solar cells due to their pronounced voltage dependence under reverse bias. This feature is commonly modeled in an ad hoc fashion by including a parallel junction resistance (Rp) that bypasses the heterojunction energy barrier between donor and acceptor. The existence of a finite Rp has variously been attributed to rough interfaces, pinhole defects, or to the electric field dependence of the dissociation of polaron pairs that are bound at the heterojunction. Here we show that the voltage dependence of the photocurrent can also arise from photoconductivity resulting from exciton generation followed by dissociation into free polarons within the bulk of the donor and acceptor layers. The presence of photoconductivity of the active layers does not result in an increase in power conversion efficiency, and places a constraint on the maximum fill factor that can be achieved in an OPV cell.

  6. Free Carrier Generation in Organic Photovoltaic Bulk Heterojunctions of Conjugated Polymers with Molecular Acceptors: Planar versus Spherical Acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nardes, Alexandre M.; Ferguson, Andrew J.; Wolfer, Pascal; Gui, Kurt; Burn, Paul L.; Meredith, Paul; Kopidakis, Nikos

    2014-03-05

    We present a comparative study of the photophysical performance of the prototypical fullerene derivative PC61BM with a planar small-molecule acceptor in an organic photovoltaic device. The small-molecule planar acceptor is 2-[{7-(9,9-di-n-propyl-9H-fluoren-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazol-4-yl}methylene]malononitrile, termed K12. We discuss photoinduced free charge-carrier generation and transport in blends of PC61BM or K12 with poly(3-n-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), surveying literature results for P3HT:PC61BM and presenting new results on P3HT:K12. For both systems we also review previous work on film structure and correlate the structural and photophysical results. In both cases, a disordered mixed phase is formed between P3HT and the acceptor, although the photophysical properties of this mixed phase differ markedly for PC61BM and K12. In the case of PC61BM the mixed phase acts as a free carrier generation region that can efficiently shuttle carriers to the pure polymer and fullerene domains. As a result, the vast majority of excitons quenched in P3HT:PC61BM blends yield free carriers detected by the contactless time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) method. In contrast, approximately 85 % of the excitons quenched in P3HT:K12 do not result in free carriers over the nanosecond timescale of the TRMC experiment. We attribute this to poor electron-transport properties in the mixed P3HT:K12 phase. Here, we propose that the observed differences can be traced to the respective shapes of PC61BM and K12: the three-dimensional nature of the fullerene cage facilitates coupling between PC61BM molecules irrespective of their relative orientation, whereas for K12 strong electronic coupling is only expected for molecules oriented with their π systems parallel to each other. Comparison between the eutectic compositions of the P3HT:PC61BM and P3HT:K12 shows that the former contains enough fullerene to form a percolation pathway for electrons, whereas the latter contains a sub

  7. Free carrier generation in organic photovoltaic bulk heterojunctions of conjugated polymers with molecular acceptors: planar versus spherical acceptors.

    PubMed

    Nardes, Alexandre M; Ferguson, Andrew J; Wolfer, Pascal; Gui, Kurt; Burn, Paul L; Meredith, Paul; Kopidakis, Nikos

    2014-06-01

    A comparative study of the photophysical performance of the prototypical fullerene derivative PC61BM with a planar small-molecule acceptor in an organic photovoltaic device is presented. The small-molecule planar acceptor is 2-[{7-(9,9-di-n-propyl-9H-fluoren-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazol-4-yl}methylene]malononitrile, termed K12. We discuss photoinduced free charge-carrier generation and transport in blends of PC61BM or K12 with poly(3-n-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), surveying literature results for P3HT:PC61BM and presenting new results on P3HT:K12. For both systems we also review previous work on film structure and correlate the structural and photophysical results. In both cases, a disordered mixed phase is formed between P3HT and the acceptor, although the photophysical properties of this mixed phase differ markedly for PC61BM and K12. In the case of PC61BM the mixed phase acts as a free carrier generation region that can efficiently shuttle carriers to the pure polymer and fullerene domains. As a result, the vast majority of excitons quenched in P3HT:PC61BM blends yield free carriers detected by the contactless time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) method. In contrast, approximately 85% of the excitons quenched in P3HT:K12 do not result in free carriers over the nanosecond timescale of the TRMC experiment. We attribute this to poor electron-transport properties in the mixed P3HT:K12 phase. We propose that the observed differences can be traced to the respective shapes of PC61BM and K12: the three-dimensional nature of the fullerene cage facilitates coupling between PC61BM molecules irrespective of their relative orientation, whereas for K12 strong electronic coupling is only expected for molecules oriented with their π systems parallel to each other. Comparison between the eutectic compositions of the P3HT:PC61BM and P3HT:K12 shows that the former contains enough fullerene to form a percolation pathway for electrons, whereas the latter contains a sub

  8. Free carrier generation in organic photovoltaic bulk heterojunctions of conjugated polymers with molecular acceptors: planar versus spherical acceptors.

    PubMed

    Nardes, Alexandre M; Ferguson, Andrew J; Wolfer, Pascal; Gui, Kurt; Burn, Paul L; Meredith, Paul; Kopidakis, Nikos

    2014-06-01

    A comparative study of the photophysical performance of the prototypical fullerene derivative PC61BM with a planar small-molecule acceptor in an organic photovoltaic device is presented. The small-molecule planar acceptor is 2-[{7-(9,9-di-n-propyl-9H-fluoren-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazol-4-yl}methylene]malononitrile, termed K12. We discuss photoinduced free charge-carrier generation and transport in blends of PC61BM or K12 with poly(3-n-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), surveying literature results for P3HT:PC61BM and presenting new results on P3HT:K12. For both systems we also review previous work on film structure and correlate the structural and photophysical results. In both cases, a disordered mixed phase is formed between P3HT and the acceptor, although the photophysical properties of this mixed phase differ markedly for PC61BM and K12. In the case of PC61BM the mixed phase acts as a free carrier generation region that can efficiently shuttle carriers to the pure polymer and fullerene domains. As a result, the vast majority of excitons quenched in P3HT:PC61BM blends yield free carriers detected by the contactless time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) method. In contrast, approximately 85% of the excitons quenched in P3HT:K12 do not result in free carriers over the nanosecond timescale of the TRMC experiment. We attribute this to poor electron-transport properties in the mixed P3HT:K12 phase. We propose that the observed differences can be traced to the respective shapes of PC61BM and K12: the three-dimensional nature of the fullerene cage facilitates coupling between PC61BM molecules irrespective of their relative orientation, whereas for K12 strong electronic coupling is only expected for molecules oriented with their π systems parallel to each other. Comparison between the eutectic compositions of the P3HT:PC61BM and P3HT:K12 shows that the former contains enough fullerene to form a percolation pathway for electrons, whereas the latter contains a sub

  9. Quantum confined acceptors and donors in InSe nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Mudd, G. W.; Patanè, A. Makarovsky, O.; Eaves, L.; Kudrynskyi, Z. R.; Kovalyuk, Z. D.; Fay, M. W.; Zólyomi, V.; Falko, V.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the radiative recombination of photo-excited carriers bound at native donors and acceptors in exfoliated nanoflakes of nominally undoped rhombohedral γ-polytype InSe. The binding energies of these states are found to increase with the decrease in flake thickness, L. We model their dependence on L using a two-dimensional hydrogenic model for impurities and show that they are strongly sensitive to the position of the impurities within the nanolayer.

  10. 2012 ELECTRON DONOR-ACCEPTOR INTERACTIONS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, AUGUST 5-10, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    McCusker, James

    2012-08-10

    The upcoming incarnation of the Gordon Research Conference on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions will feature sessions on classic topics including proton-coupled electron transfer, dye-sensitized solar cells, and biological electron transfer, as well as emerging areas such as quantum coherence effects in donor-acceptor interactions, spintronics, and the application of donor-acceptor interactions in chemical synthesis.

  11. An extended Foerster-Dexter model for correlated donor-acceptor placement in solid state materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotman, S. R.; Hartmann, F. X.

    1987-09-01

    The current theory of donor-acceptor interactions in solid-state materials is based on a random distribution of donors and acceptors through the crystal. In this paper, we present a model to calculate the observable transfer rates for the correlated positioning of donors and acceptors in laser materials. Chemical effects leading to such correlations are discussed.

  12. PCB126 enhanced the genotoxicity of BaP in HepG2 cells by modulating metabolic enzyme and DNA repair activities.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Ai-Lin; Xie, Shao-Hua; Chen, Xue-Min; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2009-09-10

    Both of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126) are ubiquitous and persistent environmental pollutants. These two chemicals coexist in various environmental media and human samples and thus may have combined effects on human health. However, the toxic effects and related mechanism of co-exposure to BaP and PCB126 remain unknown. In a series of experiments using the HepG2 cells exposed to BaP (50microM) or/and PCB126 (0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10nM), we measured the rate of micronucleus (MN) formation, CYP1A1 activity and expression of nucleotide excision repair (NER) proteins (XPA and XPC). We found that the exposure to BaP or PCB126 alone could effectively increase the CYP1A1 activity and the XPA expression. BaP alone had a profound enhancement of MN formation. Compared with BaP alone, co-exposure to both BaP and PCB126 significantly enhanced the CYP1A1 activity and the formation of MN but reduced the expression of both XPA and XPC. The synergistic effect of PCB126 on BaP-induced MN formation was inhibited by alpha-naphthoflavone (ANF), an inhibitor of CYP1A1. Our findings suggest that PCB126 may enhance BaP-induced DNA damage and genotoxicity by increasing cytochrome P450 1A activity and decreasing the NER capacity.

  13. The combined effects of BDE47 and BaP on oxidatively generated DNA damage in L02 cells and the possible molecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    An, Jing; Yin, Lingling; Shang, Yu; Zhong, Yufang; Zhang, Xinyu; Wu, Minghong; Yu, Zhiqiang; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo; Huang, Yuecheng

    2011-04-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) coexist widely in the environment and have generated adverse effects on the environment and human health. The purpose of this study was to investigate the combined toxic effects of these chemicals and the related mechanism. L02 cells were exposed to BDE47 (5, 10μmol/L) or/and BaP (50μmol/L) in different administration order. The cell growth and survival, DNA strand breaks, oxidative stress index (ROS, SOD, GSH, and MDA), LDH release and the expression level of CYP1 family members were measured. The result showed that BDE47 or/and BaP had no effect on the cell growth and survival under the present conditions. However, compared with the groups treated with BDE47 or BaP alone, the combined-treated groups induced significantly elevated DNA strand breaks, ROS production, and MDA level. Especially, pretreatment with BDE47 followed by BaP led to the strongest effects. Addition of the antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) markedly reduced the ROS level and partly suppressed the DNA strand breaks induced by BDE47 or/and BaP. Meanwhile, the combined treatment groups also markedly increased the SOD activity, GSH content, and LDH release level compared with the control group. The real-time PCR results showed that BaP could significantly induce the expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, however, the pre-treatment with BDE47 appeared to attenuate the BaP-induced CYP1 expression. All of above findings indicated that BDE47 and BaP had a synergistic effect on oxidatively generated DNA damage in L02 cells via regulation on the oxidative stress response and the expression of CYP1 metabolism enzymes.

  14. The Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) model: applicability for investigating the immunosuppressive effects of the aquatic pollutant benzo[a]pyrene (BaP).

    PubMed

    Carlson, E A; Li, Y; Zelikoff, J T

    2002-01-01

    Despite the fact that BaP is a carcinogen, mammalian immunosuppressant, and ubiquitous aquatic pollutant, knowledge regarding the effects of BaP on the immune system of fish is still lacking. To begin to fill this gap, studies were conducted in medaka to examine the effects and mechanisms by which BaP exposure might alter host immunocompetence. Fish, exposed by IP injection of BaP (2-600 microg/g BW), were examined after 48 h for effects upon immune function and CYP1A expression/activity. Benzo[a]pyrene, at a concentration below that which increased levels of CYPIA expression/activity (2 microg BaP/g BW) suppressed lymphocyte proliferation. Concentrations of BaP at 20 and 200 microg/g BW. suppressed antibody-forming cell (AFC) numbers, superoxide production, and host resistance against bacteria. In contrast, exposure to the low affinity aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonist, benzo[e]pyrene (BeP), neither induced CYP1A expression nor altered immune function. Given the lack of immunosuppressive effects produced by BeP, and the fact that exposure to the AhR antagonist (and CYP1A inhibitor) alpha-naphthoflavone (ANF) ameliorated the suppressive effects of BaP upon AFC numbers, the AhR pathway (including CYP1A-mediated production of reactive BaP metabolites) appears important in mediating BaP-induced immunotoxicity in fish, as in mammals. In the past, the medaka has proven a successful model for assessing carcinogenic agents. These studies have demonstrated its utility for also determining the immunosuppressive effects of an important aquatic contaminant.

  15. Toxic effects of male Perna viridis gonad exposed to BaP, DDT and their mixture: A metabolomic and proteomic study of the underlying mechanism.

    PubMed

    Song, Qinqin; Zheng, Pengfei; Qiu, Liguo; Jiang, Xiu; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhou, Hailong; Han, Qian; Diao, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane are typical persistent organic pollutants, and also the widespread environmental estrogens with known toxicity towards green mussels Perna viridis. In this study, the toxicological effects of BaP and DDT and their mixture were assessed in green mussel gonads using proteomic and metabolomic approaches. Metabolomics by NMR spectroscopy revealed that BaP did not show obvious metabolite changes in the gonad of male green mussel. DDT mainly caused some disturbance of osmotic regulation and energy metabolism by changing BCAAs, alanine, threonine, arginine, etc., unknown metabolite (3.53 ppm), glycine, homarine and ATP at different levels. However, the mixture of BaP and DDT mainly caused some disturbance in osmotic regulation and energy metabolism by differentially altering branched chain amino acids, glutamate, alanine, arginine, unknown metabolite (3.53 ppm), glycine, 4-aminobutyrate, dimethylglycine, homarine and ATP. The results suggest that DDT alone may cause most of metabolites changes in the mixture exposed male mussel gonad, and the results also show that the male P. viridis gonad was more sensitive to DDT than BaP exposures. Proteomic study showed that BaP, DDT and their mixture may have different modes of action. Proteomic responses revealed that BaP induced signal transduction, oxidative stress, spermatogenesis, etc. in the male green mussel gonad; whereas DDT exposure altered proteins that were associated with signal transduction, oxidative stress, cytoskeleton and cell structure, cellular organization, energy metabolism, etc. However, the mixture of BaP and DDT affected proteins related to cytoskeleton and cell structure, oxidative stress, cellular organization, etc. This research demonstrated that metabolomic and proteomic approaches could better elucidate the underlying mechanism of environmental pollutants gonad toxicity.

  16. Luminescence characteristics of C5+ ions and 60Co irradiated Li2BaP2O7:Dy3+ phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wani, J. A.; Dhoble, N. S.; Lochab, S. P.; Dhoble, S. J.

    2015-04-01

    In this work a study on some thermoluminescence characteristics of Li2BaP2O7:Dy phosphor is presented. The phosphor was synthesized by solid state diffusion method and characterized for its phase purity by X-ray diffraction (XRD). FT-IR spectrum was also carried out to confirm the presence of phosphate family and vibrations corresponding to P-O-P group. Spectroscopic investigation was approached through photoluminescence (PL) and thermoluminescence (TL). PL emission spectrum of Dy3+ ions corresponding to 4F9/2 → 6H13/2 (483 nm) and 4F9/2 → 6H15/2 (574 nm) transitions is revealed under 351 nm excitation wavelength. This characteristic emission confirms the presence of Dy3+ ions in the Li2BaP2O7 host matrix. To induce TL properties in Li2BaP2O7:Dy phosphor was irradiated with C5+ ion beams and gamma rays (60Co). A nearly simple glow curve was observed for Li2BaP2O7:Dy under two different excitation sources. TL response is almost linear over a wide range. Average absorbed dose (D bar) and mean linear energy transfer (LET ‾) of C5+ ion beams in Li2BaP2O7:Dy have also been calculated. Values of parameters like E and S known as trap depth and frequency factor respectively were obtained by using TLanal computer program. Also SRIM based calculations were performed to study the effect of C5+ ion beams on the samples of Li2BaP2O7:Dy. SRIM calculations show that Ba2+ vacancies are highest in number. Till date no such luminescence information on Li2BaP2O7:Dy phosphor is available.

  17. Income-generating activities for family planning acceptors.

    PubMed

    1989-07-01

    The Income Generating Activities program for Family Planning Acceptors was introduced in Indonesia in 1979. Capital input by the Indonesian National Family Planning Coordination Board and the UN Fund for Population Activities was used to set up small businesses by family planning acceptors. In 2 years, when the businesses become self-sufficient, the loans are repaid, and the money is used to set up new family planning acceptors in business. The program strengthens family planning acceptance, improves the status of women, and enhances community self-reliance. The increase in household income generated by the program raises the standards of child nutrition, encourages reliance on the survival of children, and decreases the value of large families. Approximately 18,000 Family Planning-Income Generating Activities groups are now functioning all over Indonesia, with financial assistance from the central and local governments, the World Bank, the US Agency for International Development, the UN Population Fund, the Government of the Netherlands, and the Government of Australia through the Association of South East Asian Nations.

  18. Virtual screening of electron acceptor materials for organic photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halls, Mathew D.; Djurovich, Peter J.; Giesen, David J.; Goldberg, Alexander; Sommer, Jonathan; McAnally, Eric; Thompson, Mark E.

    2013-10-01

    Virtual screening involves the generation of structure libraries, automated analysis to predict properties related to application performance and subsequent screening to identify lead systems and estimate critical structure-property limits across a targeted chemical design space. This approach holds great promise for informing experimental discovery and development efforts for next-generation materials, such as organic semiconductors. In this work, the virtual screening approach is illustrated for nitrogen-substituted pentacene molecules to identify systems for development as electron acceptor materials for use in organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. A structure library of tetra-azapentacenes (TAPs) was generated by substituting four nitrogens for CH at 12 sites on the pentacene molecular framework. Molecular properties (e.g. ELUMO, Eg and μ) were computed for each candidate structure using hybrid DFT at the B3LYP/6-311G** level of theory. The resulting TAPs library was then analyzed with respect to intrinsic properties associated with OPV acceptor performance. Marcus reorganization energies for charge transport for the most favorable TAP candidates were then calculated to further determine suitability as OPV electron acceptors. The synthesis, characterization and OPV device testing of TAP materials is underway, guided by these results.

  19. Design directed self-assembly of donor-acceptor polymers.

    PubMed

    Marszalek, Tomasz; Li, Mengmeng; Pisula, Wojciech

    2016-09-21

    Donor-acceptor polymers with an alternating array of donor and acceptor moieties have gained particular attention during recent years as active components of organic electronics. By implementation of suitable subunits within the conjugated backbone, these polymers can be made either electron-deficient or -rich. Additionally, their band gap and light absorption can be precisely tuned for improved light-harvesting in solar cells. On the other hand, the polymer design can also be modified to encode the desired supramolecular self-assembly in the solid-state that is essential for an unhindered transport of charge carriers. This review focuses on three major factors playing a role in the assembly of donor-acceptor polymers on surfaces which are (1) nature, geometry and substitution position of solubilizing alkyl side chains, (2) shape of the conjugated polymer defined by the backbone curvature, and (3) molecular weight which determines the conjugation length of the polymer. These factors adjust the fine balance between attractive and repulsive forces and ensure a close polymer packing important for an efficient charge hopping between neighboring chains. On the microscopic scale, an appropriate domain formation with a low density of structural defects in the solution deposited thin film is crucial for the charge transport. The charge carrier transport through such thin films is characterized by field-effect transistors as basic electronic elements. PMID:27440174

  20. Fullerene derivatives as electron acceptors for organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Mi, Dongbo; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Hee Un; Xu, Fei; Hwang, Do-Hoon

    2014-02-01

    Energy is currently one of the most important problems humankind faces. Depletion of traditional energy sources such as coal and oil results in the need to develop new ways to create, transport, and store electricity. In this regard, the sun, which can be considered as a giant nuclear fusion reactor, represents the most powerful source of energy available in our solar system. For photovoltaic cells to gain widespread acceptance as a source of clean and renewable energy, the cost per watt of solar energy must be decreased. Organic photovoltaic cells, developed in the past two decades, have potential as alternatives to traditional inorganic semiconductor photovoltaic cells, which suffer from high environmental pollution and energy consumption during production. Organic photovoltaic cells are composed of a blended film of a conjugated-polymer donor and a soluble fullerene-derivative acceptor sandwiched between a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)-coated indium tin oxide positive electrode and a low-work-function metal negative electrode. Considerable research efforts aim at designing and synthesizing novel fullerene derivatives as electron acceptors with up-raised lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy, better light-harvesting properties, higher electron mobility, and better miscibility with the polymer donor for improving the power conversion efficiency of the organic photovoltaic cells. In this paper, we systematically review novel fullerene acceptors synthesized through chemical modification for enhancing the photovoltaic performance by increasing open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current, and fill factor, which determine the performance of organic photovoltaic cells.

  1. Source apportionment of elevated BaP concentrations in PM10 aerosols in an alpine valley in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Heidi; Puxbaum, Hans; Jankowski, Nicole; Sampaio Cordeiro Wagner, Lylian

    2010-05-01

    INTRODUCTION: In a village situated at 1215 m a.s.l. in a natural preserve in an Austrian alpine valley elevated BaP concentrations have been measured in the last years. A highly frequented highway leading from Italy to Germany passes near the village. Monthly means of particulate BaP concentrations show a clear seasonal trend with values below 1 ng/m³ during the warmer months and with concentrations up to 9 ng/m³ in the cold season. Annual averages in the years 2000 - 2005 ranged between 1.4 and 2.8 ng/m³ - much higher than the EU target value of 1 ng/m³. We used a macrotracer model developed at the Vienna University of Technology to determine the contributions of the sources for BaP emissions, which were mainly space heating with wood and traffic from the highway. EXPERIMENTAL: The macrotracer concept is a nine component model to derive source contribution and explains 80-100% of PM10 aerosols in Austria. The amount of traffic exhaust is derived by using EC as tracer, whereas EC produced by wood burning is subtracted, the amount of wood smoke is derived by the anhydro-sugar levoglucosan and the ratio between the anhydro-sugars levoglucosan and mannosan. For the source apportionment of BaP the applied factors reflect on the one hand the composition of the automotive fleet in Austria and on the other hand the composition of the fire wood in the region. Filter samples collected with a high volume sampler in winter were analyzed for PM10 aerosol mass, total, organic, elemental and carbonate carbon, HULIS, anhydro-sugars, polyols and ions (major ions and organic acids) and PAHs. In the same way emission samples taken at a motor test stand and at a test stand for wood combustion were analyzed (Schmidl et al. 2008). The saccharides were determined using high pH anion exchange and pulsed amperometry (HPAE-PAD). Details of the analytical method are given in Iinuma et al., 2009. Elemental and organic carbon were determined with a thermal-optical instrument (Sunset lab

  2. Spectral, thermal and kinetic studies of charge-transfer complexes formed between the highly effective antibiotic drug metronidazole and two types of acceptors: σ- and π-acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Saad, Hosam A.; Adam, Abdel Majid A.

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the interaction between drugs and small inorganic or organic molecules is critical in being able to interpret the drug-receptor interactions and acting mechanism of these drugs. A combined solution and solid state study was performed to describe the complexation chemistry of drug metronidazole (MZ) which has a broad-spectrum antibacterial activity with two types of acceptors. The acceptors include, σ-acceptor (i.e., iodine) and π-acceptors (i.e., dichlorodicyanobenzoquinone (DDQ), chloranil (CHL) and picric acid (PA)). The molecular structure, spectroscopic characteristics, the binding modes as well as the thermal stability were deduced from IR, UV-vis, 1H NMR and thermal studies. The binding ratio of complexation (MZ: acceptor) was determined to be 1:2 for the iodine acceptor and 1:1 for the DDQ, CHL or PA acceptor, according to the CHN elemental analyses and spectrophotometric titrations. It has been found that the complexation with CHL and PA acceptors increases the values of enthalpy and entropy, while the complexation with DDQ and iodine acceptors decreases the values of these parameters compared with the free MZ donor.

  3. Exome sequencing identifies frequent inactivating mutations in BAP1, ARID1A and PBRM1 in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Selaru, Florin M; Streppel, Mirte M; Lucas, Donald J; Niknafs, Noushin; Guthrie, Violeta Beleva; Maitra, Anirban; Argani, Pedram; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Roa, Juan Carlos; Roberts, Lewis R; Gores, Gregory J; Popescu, Irinel; Alexandrescu, Sorin T; Dima, Simona; Fassan, Matteo; Simbolo, Michele; Mafficini, Andrea; Capelli, Paola; Lawlor, Rita T; Ruzzenente, Andrea; Guglielmi, Alfredo; Tortora, Giampaolo; de Braud, Filippo; Scarpa, Aldo; Jarnagin, William; Klimstra, David; Karchin, Rachel; Velculescu, Victor E; Hruban, Ralph H; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Wood, Laura D

    2014-01-01

    Through exomic sequencing of 32 intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, we discovered frequent inactivating mutations in multiple chromatin-remodeling genes (including BAP1, ARID1A and PBRM1), and mutation in one of these genes occurred in almost half of the carcinomas sequenced. We also identified frequent mutations at previously reported hotspots in the IDH1 and IDH2 genes encoding metabolic enzymes in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas. In contrast, TP53 was the most frequently altered gene in a series of nine gallbladder carcinomas. These discoveries highlight the key role of dysregulated chromatin remodeling in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas. PMID:24185509

  4. Method for producing and regenerating a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor

    DOEpatents

    Lancet, Michael S [Pittsburgh, PA; Curran, George P [Pittsburgh, PA; Gorin, Everett [San Rafael, CA

    1982-01-01

    A method for producing a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor by feeding a mixture of finely divided silica and at least one finely divided calcium compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate to a fluidized bed; operating the fluidized bed at suitable conditions to produce pellets of synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor and recovering the pellets of synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor from the fluidized bed. Optionally, spent synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor can be charged to the fluidized bed to produce regenerated pellets of synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor.

  5. Method for producing and regenerating a synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor

    DOEpatents

    Lancet, M. S.; Curran, G. P.; Gorin, E.

    1982-05-18

    A method is described for producing a synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor by feeding a mixture of finely divided silica and at least one finely divided calcium compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate to a fluidized bed; operating the fluidized bed at suitable conditions to produce pellets of synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor and recovering the pellets of synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor from the fluidized bed. Optionally, spent synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor can be charged to the fluidized bed to produce regenerated pellets of synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor. 1 fig.

  6. Dynamics of iron-acceptor-pair formation in co-doped silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bartel, T.; Gibaja, F.; Graf, O.; Gross, D.; Kaes, M.; Heuer, M.; Kirscht, F.; Möller, C.; Lauer, K.

    2013-11-11

    The pairing dynamics of interstitial iron and dopants in silicon co-doped with phosphorous and several acceptor types are presented. The classical picture of iron-acceptor pairing dynamics is expanded to include the thermalization of iron between different dopants. The thermalization is quantitatively described using Boltzmann statistics and different iron-acceptor binding energies. The proper understanding of the pairing dynamics of iron in co-doped silicon will provide additional information on the electronic properties of iron-acceptor pairs and may become an analytical method to quantify and differentiate acceptors in co-doped silicon.

  7. C-Peptide Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... C-peptide is a useful marker of insulin production. The following are some purposes of C-peptide ... it nearly impossible to directly evaluate endogenous insulin production. In these cases, C-peptide measurement is a ...

  8. P-glycoprotein and CYP1A protein expression patterns in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) tissues after waterborne exposure to benzo(a)pyrene (BaP).

    PubMed

    Costa, Joana; Reis-Henriques, Maria Armanda; Wilson, Jonathan M; Ferreira, Marta

    2013-09-01

    The protein levels and tissue distribution patterns of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and cytochrome P450 (CYP1A) were investigated in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) after waterborne exposure to different benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) concentrations, using immunochemical approaches. The Pgp mammalian monoclonal antibody (mAb) C219 cross reacted with a ∼170kDa protein, almost exclusively localized to the bile canaliculi, while probing with the Pgp mammalian mAb C494, resulted in a positive reaction in liver, gills and intestine of Nile tilapia and covered a wider set of cell types. Levels of Pgp expression were not altered after in vivo exposure to BaP. CYP1A, detected with the mAb C10-7, reacted positively in liver, gills and intestine and followed a BaP dose-dependent fold induction. Taken together, these results indicate that CYP1A is involved in BaP metabolism in liver, gills and intestine, however, further studies are needed to elucidate the possible interaction of the efflux protein Pgp with BaP and/or its metabolites.

  9. Modulation of adult rat benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) metabolism and DNA adduct formation by neonatal diethylstilbestrol (DES) exposure.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Aramandla; Inyang, Frank; Knuckles, Maurice E

    2004-12-01

    This study seeks to elucidate the role of diethylstilbestrol (DES), a synthetic estrogen on benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) metabolism in the male rat reproductive tissues. Offspring of timed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were neonatally treated on days 2, 4, and 6 post-partum with 1.45 micromol/kg of DES. Ten weeks after birth, the adult rats were challenged with radiolabeled benzo(a)pyrene (3H BaP) (10 micromol/kg) and the rats were sacrificed 2 h after BaP exposure. Prostrate, testis, lung, liver, urine and feces samples were collected and extracted using a mixture of H2O, MeOH and CHCl3. The extracts were analyzed by reverse phase HPLC. The concentrations of BaP organic metabolites in DES rats were lower compared to controls (vehicle-treated rats). On the other hand, concentrations of aqueous metabolites were significantly increased in DES treated animals. The toxication to detoxication ratios were significantly decreased in DES rats compared to controls. This trend is also reflected in the decreased concentrations of BaP-DNA adducts in DES rats. Collectively these results suggest that DES is capable of modulating the metabolic pathway of BaP towards detoxification thereby preventing the manifestation of toxicity.

  10. A fluorescence enhancement-based label-free homogeneous immunoassay of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Li, Taihua; Choi, Yo Han; Shin, Yong-Beom; Kim, Hwa-Jung; Kim, Min-Gon

    2016-05-01

    A fluorescence enhancement-based immunoassay has been developed for the detection of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), in aqueous solutions. The results of this study show that BaP, which inefficiently fluoresces in aqueous solution, displays enhanced fluorescence when bound to the anti-BaP antibody (anti-BaP), as part of a label-free immunoassay system. Binding to anti-BaP results in a 3.12-fold increase in the fluorescence intensity of BaP, which emits at 435 nm when excited at 280 nm, due to the hydrophobic interaction and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between antibody and antigen. As result of this phenomenon, the antibody-based fluorescence immunoassay system can be used to detect BaP specifically with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.06 ng mL(-1). Finally, extraction recoveries of BaP from spiked wheat and barley samples were found to be in the range of 80.5-87.0% and 92.9-92.1%, respectively.

  11. Chemopreventive Agents from Physalis minima Function as Michael Reaction Acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Men, Ruizhi; Li, Ning; Ding, Chihong; Tang, Yingzhan; Xing, Yachao; Ding, Wanjing; Ma, Zhongjun

    2016-01-01

    Background: The fruits of some varieties of genus Physalis have been used as delicious fruits and functional food in the Northeast of China. Materials and Methods: To reveal the functional material basis, we performed bioactivity-guided phytochemical research and chemopreventive effect assay of the constituents from Physalis minima. Results: It was demonstrated that the ethyl acetate extract of P. minima L. (EEPM) had potential quinone reductase (QR) inducing activity with induction ratio (IR, QR induction activity) value of 1.47 ± 0.24, and glutathione binding property as potential Michael reaction acceptors (with an α, β-unsaturated ketone moiety). Furthermore, bioactivity-guided phytochemical research led eight compounds (1–8), which were elucidated as 3-isopropyl-5-acetoxycyclohexene-2-one-1 (1), isophysalin B (2), physalin G (3), physalin D (4), physalin I (5), physordinose B (6), stigmasterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (7) and 5α-6β-dihydroxyphysalin R (8) on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analyses and HRESIMS. Then, isophysalin B (2) and physordinose B (6) showed significant QR inducing activity with IR value of 2.80 ± 0.19 and 2.38 ± 0.46, respectively. SUMMARY An ultra-performance liquid chromatographic method with glutathione as the substrate was used to detect the Michael reaction acceptors in extracts of Physalis minima (EPM)We investigated the chemical constituents of EPM guided by biological activity methodIsophysalin B (1) and physordinose B (6) showed strong quinone reductase inducing activity with induction ratio values of 2.80 ± 0.19 and 2.38 ± 0.46This study generated useful information for consumers and many encourage researchers to utilize edible fruits from Physalis as a source of phytochemicals Abbreviations used: EPM: Extracts of Physalis minima, EEPM: Ethyl acetate extract of Physalis minima L., GSH: Glutathione, MRAs: Michael reaction acceptors, QR: Quinone reductase. PMID:27279713

  12. Nanostructured donor-acceptor self assembly with improved photoconductivity.

    PubMed

    Saibal, B; Ashar, A Z; Devi, R Nandini; Narayan, K S; Asha, S K

    2014-11-12

    Nanostructured supramolecular donor-acceptor assemblies were formed when an unsymmetrical N-substituted pyridine functionalized perylenebisimide (UPBI-Py) was complexed with oligo(p-phenylenevinylene) (OPVM-OH) complementarily functionalized with hydroxyl unit and polymerizable methacrylamide unit at the two termini. The resulting supramolecular complex [UPBI-Py (OPVM-OH)]1.0 upon polymerization by irradiation in the presence of photoinitiator formed well-defined supramolecular polymeric nanostructures. Self-assembly studies using fluorescence emission from thin film samples showed that subtle structural changes occurred on the OPV donor moiety following polymerization. The 1:1 supramolecular complex showed red-shifted aggregate emission from both OPV (∼500 nm) and PBI (∼640 nm) units, whereas the OPV aggregate emission was replaced by intense monomeric emission (∼430 nm) upon polymerizing the methacrylamide units on the OPVM-OH. The bulk structure was studied using wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WXRD). Complex formation resulted in distinct changes in the cell parameters of OPVM-OH. In contrast, a physical mixture of 1 mol each of OPVM-OH and UPBI-Py prepared by mixing the powdered solid samples together showed only a combination of reflections from both parent molecules. Thin film morphology of the 1:1 molecular complex as well as the supramolecular polymer complex showed uniform lamellar structures in the domain range <10 nm. The donor-acceptor supramolecular complex [UPBI-Py (OPVM-OH)]1.0 exhibited space charge limited current (SCLC) with a bulk mobility estimate of an order of magnitude higher accompanied by a higher photoconductivity yield compared to the pristine UPBI-Py. This is a very versatile method to obtain spatially defined organization of n and p-type semiconductor materials based on suitably functionalized donor and acceptor molecules resulting in improved photocurrent response using self-assembly.

  13. Nanostructured donor-acceptor self assembly with improved photoconductivity.

    PubMed

    Saibal, B; Ashar, A Z; Devi, R Nandini; Narayan, K S; Asha, S K

    2014-11-12

    Nanostructured supramolecular donor-acceptor assemblies were formed when an unsymmetrical N-substituted pyridine functionalized perylenebisimide (UPBI-Py) was complexed with oligo(p-phenylenevinylene) (OPVM-OH) complementarily functionalized with hydroxyl unit and polymerizable methacrylamide unit at the two termini. The resulting supramolecular complex [UPBI-Py (OPVM-OH)]1.0 upon polymerization by irradiation in the presence of photoinitiator formed well-defined supramolecular polymeric nanostructures. Self-assembly studies using fluorescence emission from thin film samples showed that subtle structural changes occurred on the OPV donor moiety following polymerization. The 1:1 supramolecular complex showed red-shifted aggregate emission from both OPV (∼500 nm) and PBI (∼640 nm) units, whereas the OPV aggregate emission was replaced by intense monomeric emission (∼430 nm) upon polymerizing the methacrylamide units on the OPVM-OH. The bulk structure was studied using wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WXRD). Complex formation resulted in distinct changes in the cell parameters of OPVM-OH. In contrast, a physical mixture of 1 mol each of OPVM-OH and UPBI-Py prepared by mixing the powdered solid samples together showed only a combination of reflections from both parent molecules. Thin film morphology of the 1:1 molecular complex as well as the supramolecular polymer complex showed uniform lamellar structures in the domain range <10 nm. The donor-acceptor supramolecular complex [UPBI-Py (OPVM-OH)]1.0 exhibited space charge limited current (SCLC) with a bulk mobility estimate of an order of magnitude higher accompanied by a higher photoconductivity yield compared to the pristine UPBI-Py. This is a very versatile method to obtain spatially defined organization of n and p-type semiconductor materials based on suitably functionalized donor and acceptor molecules resulting in improved photocurrent response using self-assembly. PMID:25283356

  14. Incorporation of Cu Acceptors in ZnO Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Oo, W.M.H.; Mccluskey, Matthew D.; Huso, Jesse; Morrison, J.; Bergman, Leah; Engelhard, Mark H.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.

    2010-09-16

    Doping of semiconductor nanocrystals is an important problem in nanomaterials research. Using infrared (IR) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we have observed Cu acceptor dopants that were intentionally introduced into ZnO nanocrystals. The incorporation of Cu2+ dopants increased as the diameter of the nanocrystals was increased from ~3 to 5 nm. Etching the nanocrystals with acetic acid revealed a core-shell structure, where a 2-nm lightly doped core is surrounded by a heavily doped shell. These observations are consistent with the trapped dopant model, in which dopant atoms stick to the surface of the core and are overgrown by the nanocrystal material.

  15. Silymarin protects PBMC against B(a)P induced toxicity by replenishing redox status and modulating glutathione metabolizing enzymes-An in vitro study

    SciTech Connect

    Kiruthiga, P.V.; Pandian, S. Karutha; Devi, K. Pandima

    2010-09-01

    PAHs are a ubiquitous class of environmental contaminants that have a large number of hazardous consequences on human health. An important prototype of PAHs, B(a)P, is notable for being the first chemical carcinogen to be discovered and the one classified by EPA as a probable human carcinogen. It undergoes metabolic activation to QD, which generate ROS by redox cycling system in the body and oxidatively damage the macromolecules. Hence, a variety of antioxidants have been tested as possible protectors against B(a)P toxicity. Silymarin is one such compound, which has high human acceptance, used clinically and consumed as dietary supplement around the world for its strong anti-oxidant efficacy. Silymarin was employed as an alternative approach for treating B(a)P induced damage and oxidative stress in PBMC, with an emphasis to provide the molecular basis for the effect of silymarin against B(a)P induced toxicity. PBMC cells exposed to either benzopyrene (1 {mu}M) or silymarin (2.4 mg/ml) or both was monitored for toxicity by assessing LPO, PO, redox status (GSH/GSSG ratio), glutathione metabolizing enzymes GR and GPx and antioxidant enzymes CAT and SOD. This study also investigated the protective effect of silymarin against B(a)P induced biochemical alteration at the molecular level by FT-IR spectroscopy. Our findings were quite striking that silymarin possesses substantial protective effect against B(a)P induced oxidative stress and biochemical changes by restoring redox status, modulating glutathione metabolizing enzymes, hindering the formation of protein oxidation products, inhibiting LPO and further reducing ROS mediated damages by changing the level of antioxidant enzymes. The results suggest that silymarin exhibits multiple protections and it should be considered as a potential protective agent for environmental contaminant induced immunotoxicity.

  16. Protein sequences and redox titrations indicate that the electron acceptors in reaction centers from heliobacteria are similar to Photosystem I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trost, J. T.; Brune, D. C.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers isolated from Heliobacillus mobilis exhibit a single major protein on SDS-PAGE of 47 000 Mr. Attempts to sequence the reaction center polypeptide indicated that the N-terminus is blocked. After enzymatic and chemical cleavage, four peptide fragments were sequenced from the Heliobacillus mobilis apoprotein. Only one of these sequences showed significant specific similarity to any of the protein and deduced protein sequences in the GenBank data base. This fragment is identical with 56% of the residues, including both cysteines, found in highly conserved region that is proposed to bind iron-sulfur center Fx in the Photosystem I reaction center peptide that is the psaB gene product. The similarity to the psaA gene product in this region is 48%. Redox titrations of laser-flash-induced photobleaching with millisecond decay kinetics on isolated reaction centers from Heliobacterium gestii indicate a midpoint potential of -414 mV with n = 2 titration behavior. In membranes, the behavior is intermediate between n = 1 and n = 2, and the apparent midpoint potential is -444 mV. This is compared to the behavior in Photosystem I, where the intermediate electron acceptor A1, thought to be a phylloquinone molecule, has been proposed to undergo a double reduction at low redox potentials in the presence of viologen redox mediators. These results strongly suggest that the acceptor side electron transfer system in reaction centers from heliobacteria is indeed analogous to that found in Photosystem I. The sequence similarities indicate that the divergence of the heliobacteria from the Photosystem I line occurred before the gene duplication and subsequent divergence that lead to the heterodimeric protein core of the Photosystem I reaction center.

  17. Protein sequences and redox titrations indicate that the electron acceptors in reaction centers from heliobacteria are similar to Photosystem I.

    PubMed

    Trost, J T; Brune, D C; Blankenship, R E

    1992-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers isolated from Heliobacillus mobilis exhibit a single major protein on SDS-PAGE of 47 000 Mr. Attempts to sequence the reaction center polypeptide indicated that the N-terminus is blocked. After enzymatic and chemical cleavage, four peptide fragments were sequenced from the Heliobacillus mobilis apoprotein. Only one of these sequences showed significant specific similarity to any of the protein and deduced protein sequences in the GenBank data base. This fragment is identical with 56% of the residues, including both cysteines, found in highly conserved region that is proposed to bind iron-sulfur center Fx in the Photosystem I reaction center peptide that is the psaB gene product. The similarity to the psaA gene product in this region is 48%. Redox titrations of laser-flash-induced photobleaching with millisecond decay kinetics on isolated reaction centers from Heliobacterium gestii indicate a midpoint potential of -414 mV with n = 2 titration behavior. In membranes, the behavior is intermediate between n = 1 and n = 2, and the apparent midpoint potential is -444 mV. This is compared to the behavior in Photosystem I, where the intermediate electron acceptor A1, thought to be a phylloquinone molecule, has been proposed to undergo a double reduction at low redox potentials in the presence of viologen redox mediators. These results strongly suggest that the acceptor side electron transfer system in reaction centers from heliobacteria is indeed analogous to that found in Photosystem I. The sequence similarities indicate that the divergence of the heliobacteria from the Photosystem I line occurred before the gene duplication and subsequent divergence that lead to the heterodimeric protein core of the Photosystem I reaction center.

  18. Dissimilatory reduction of extracellular electron acceptors in anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Richter, Katrin; Schicklberger, Marcus; Gescher, Johannes

    2012-02-01

    An extension of the respiratory chain to the cell surface is necessary to reduce extracellular electron acceptors like ferric iron or manganese oxides. In the past few years, more and more compounds were revealed to be reduced at the surface of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, and the list does not seem to have an end so far. Shewanella as well as Geobacter strains are model organisms to discover the biochemistry that enables the dissimilatory reduction of extracellular electron acceptors. In both cases, c-type cytochromes are essential electron-transferring proteins. They make the journey of respiratory electrons from the cytoplasmic membrane through periplasm and over the outer membrane possible. Outer membrane cytochromes have the ability to catalyze the last step of the respiratory chains. Still, recent discoveries provided evidence that they are accompanied by further factors that allow or at least facilitate extracellular reduction. This review gives a condensed overview of our current knowledge of extracellular respiration, highlights recent discoveries, and discusses critically the influence of different strategies for terminal electron transfer reactions.

  19. Functional analysis of a C. elegans trans-splice acceptor.

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, R; Liou, R F; Blumenthal, T

    1993-01-01

    The rol-6 gene is trans-spliced to the 22 nt leader, SL1, 173 nt downstream of the transcription start. We have analyzed splicing in transformants carrying extrachromosomal arrays of rol-6 with mutations in the trans-splice acceptor site. This site is a close match to the consensus, UUUCAG, that is highly conserved in both trans-splice and intron acceptor sites in C. elegans. When the trans-splice site was inactivated by mutating the perfectly-conserved AG, trans-splicing still occurred, but at a cryptic site 20 nt upstream. We tested the frequency with which splicing switched from the normal site to the cryptic site when the pyrimidines at this site were changed to A's. Since most C. elegans 3' splice sites lack an obvious polypyrimidine tract, we hypothesized that these four pyrimidines might play this role, and indeed mutation of these bases caused splicing to switch to the cryptic site. We also demonstrated that a major reason the downstream site is normally favored is because it occurs at a boundary between A+U rich and non-A+U rich RNA. When the RNA between the two splice sites was made less A+U rich, splicing occurred preferentially at the upstream site. Images PMID:8451190

  20. Dissimilatory Reduction of Extracellular Electron Acceptors in Anaerobic Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Katrin; Schicklberger, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    An extension of the respiratory chain to the cell surface is necessary to reduce extracellular electron acceptors like ferric iron or manganese oxides. In the past few years, more and more compounds were revealed to be reduced at the surface of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, and the list does not seem to have an end so far. Shewanella as well as Geobacter strains are model organisms to discover the biochemistry that enables the dissimilatory reduction of extracellular electron acceptors. In both cases, c-type cytochromes are essential electron-transferring proteins. They make the journey of respiratory electrons from the cytoplasmic membrane through periplasm and over the outer membrane possible. Outer membrane cytochromes have the ability to catalyze the last step of the respiratory chains. Still, recent discoveries provided evidence that they are accompanied by further factors that allow or at least facilitate extracellular reduction. This review gives a condensed overview of our current knowledge of extracellular respiration, highlights recent discoveries, and discusses critically the influence of different strategies for terminal electron transfer reactions. PMID:22179232

  1. Donor-acceptor complexation and dehydrogenation chemistry of aminoboranes.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Adam C; Sabourin, Kyle J; McDonald, Robert; Ferguson, Michael J; Rivard, Eric

    2012-12-01

    A series of formal donor-acceptor adducts of aminoborane (H(2)BNH(2)) and its N-substituted analogues (H(2)BNRR') were prepared: LB-H(2)BNRR'(2)-BH(3) (LB = DMAP, IPr, IPrCH(2) and PCy(3); R and R' = H, Me or tBu; IPr = [(HCNDipp)(2)C:] and Dipp = 2,6-iPr(2)C(6)H(3)). To potentially access complexes of molecular boron nitride, LB-BN-LA (LA = Lewis acid), preliminary dehydrogenation chemistry involving the parent aminoborane adducts LB-H(2)BNH(2)-BH(3) was investigated using [Rh(COD)Cl](2), CuBr, and NiBr(2) as dehydrogenation catalysts. In place of isolating the intended dehydrogenated BN donor-acceptor complexes, the formation of borazine was noted as a major product. Attempts to prepare the fluoroarylborane-capped aminoborane complexes, LB-H(2)BNH(2)-B(C(6)F(5))(3), are also described. PMID:23153209

  2. An investigation of acceptor-doped grain boundaries in ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravikumar, V.; Rodrigues, R. P.; Dravid, V. P.

    1996-07-01

    Grain boundary (GB) doped 0022-3727/29/7/014/img2 exhibits interesting electroceramic phenomena including varistor and barrier layer capacitor behaviour. We present here our investigation of GB acceptor-doped 0022-3727/29/7/014/img2 using analytical electron microscopy including electron holography. Mn was diffused into sintered polycrystalline 0022-3727/29/7/014/img2 to attain GBs which are rich in Mn. The presence and spatial extent of Mn at the GBs were analysed using x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy (PEELS). The valence state of Mn was determined using PEELS to be predominantly +2. Finally, transmission high-energy electron holography was utilized to directly image and quantify the electrostatic potential and associated space-charge across the GBs directly. The holography results reveal a negatively charged GB with positive space-charge, indicating that Mn with a valence of +2 resides as an acceptor dopant on the Ti site at the GB core. The barrier height and local charge density distribution, including the Debye length, of the double Schottky barrier at the GB are derived from these holography results. This investigation demonstrates the usefulness of electron holography as a bulk-sensitive technique to probe the statics and dynamics of electrostatic field distribution and electrical charge across interfaces in technologically useful materials, and the need to employ diverse analytical techniques for such an investigation.

  3. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested.

  4. The structure and bonding of iron-acceptor pairs in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, S.; Assali, L.V.C.; Kimerling, L.C.

    1995-08-01

    The highly mobile interstitial iron and Group III impurities (B, Al, Ga, In) form iron-acceptor pairs in silicon. Based on the migration kinetics and taking host silicon as a dielectric medium, we have simulated the pairing process in a static silicon lattice. Different from the conventional point charge ionic model, our phenomenological calculations include (1) a correction that takes into account valence electron cloud polarization which adds a short range, attractive interaction in the iron-acceptor pair bonding; and (2) silicon lattice relaxation due to the atomic size difference which causes a local strain field. Our model explains qualitatively (1) trends among the iron-acceptor pairs revealing an increase of the electronic state hole emission energy with increasing principal quantum number of acceptor and decreasing pair separation distance; and (2) the stable and metastable sites and configurational symmetries of the iron-acceptor pairs. The iron-acceptor pairing and bonding mechanism is also discussed.

  5. Binding characteristics of homogeneous molecularly imprinted polymers for acyclovir using an (acceptor-donor-donor)-(donor-acceptor-acceptor) hydrogen-bond strategy, and analytical applications for serum samples.

    PubMed

    Wu, Suqin; Tan, Lei; Wang, Ganquan; Peng, Guiming; Kang, Chengcheng; Tang, Youwen

    2013-04-12

    This paper demonstrates a novel approach to assembling homogeneous molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) based on mimicking multiple hydrogen bonds between nucleotide bases by preparing acyclovir (ACV) as a template and using coatings grafted on silica supports. (1)H NMR studies confirmed the AAD-DDA (A for acceptor, D for donor) hydrogen-bond array between template and functional monomer, while the resultant monodisperse molecularly imprinted microspheres (MIMs) were evaluated using a binding experiment, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and solid phase extraction. The Langmuir isothermal model and the Langmuir-Freundlich isothermal model suggest that ACV-MIMs have more homogeneous binding sites than MIPs prepared through normal imprinting. In contrast to previous MIP-HPLC columns, there were no apparent tailings for the ACV peaks, and ACV-MIMs had excellent specific binding properties with a Ka peak of 3.44 × 10(5)M(-1). A complete baseline separation is obtained for ACV and structurally similar compounds. This work also successfully used MIMs as a specific sorbent for capturing ACV from serum samples. The detection limit and mean recovery of ACV was 1.8 ng/mL(-1) and 95.6%, respectively, for molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction coupled with HPLC. To our knowledge, this was the first example of MIPs using AAD-DDA hydrogen bonds.

  6. Donor-Acceptor-Type Semiconducting Polymers Consisting of Benzothiadiazole Derivatives as Electron-Acceptor Units for Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Su; Park, Jong Baek; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Hwang, Do-Hoon

    2015-11-01

    We synthesized two fused pentacyclic donor-acceptor structures, where the two different outer electron rich thiophene (DTPBT) and electron poor benzene (ICTh) moieties are covalently bonded to the central electron-deficient benzothiadiazole core by two nitrogen bridges. These new electron-acceptor DTPBT and ICTh building blocks were copolymerized with fluorene, as the electron donor group, via Suzuki coupling polymerization, to produce two new alternating copolymers, PFDTPBT and PFICTh, respectively. The average molecular weights of the synthesized polymers were determined by GPC. The number-average molecular weights of PFDTPBT and PFICTh were 19,000 (PDI = 2.5) and 20,000 (PDI = 4.0), respectively. The optical bandgap energies of the polymers were measured from their absorption onsets to be 2.15 and 2.55 eV, depending on the polymer structure. The HOMO energy levels of the polymers were determined, by measuring the oxidation onsets of the polymer films by cyclic voltammetry. The measured HOMO energy levels of PFDTPBT and PFICTh were -5.10 and -5.57 eV, respectively. When the polymers were blended with PC71BM, as the active layer for bulk-heterojunction photovoltaic devices, power conversion efficiencies were 2.08% and 0.34%, respectively, under AM 1.5 G (100 mW cm(-2)) conditions.

  7. Generation of Nitrogen Acceptors in ZnO using Pulse Thermal Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jun; Ott, Ronald D; Sabau, Adrian S; Pan, Zhengwei; Xiu, Faxian; Liu, Jilin; Erie, Jean-Marie; Norton, David P

    2008-01-01

    Bipolar doping in wide bandgap semiconductors is difficult to achieve under equilibrium conditions because of the spontaneous formation of compensating defects and unfavorable energetics for dopant substitution. In this work, we explored the use of rapid pulse thermal processing for activating nitrogen dopants into acceptor states in ZnO. Low-temperature photoluminescence spectra revealed both acceptor-bound exciton (A{sup 0}X) and donor-acceptor pair emissions, which present direct evidence for acceptors generated after pulse thermal processing of nitrogen-doped ZnO. This work suggests that pulse thermal processing is potentially an effective method for p-type doping of ZnO.

  8. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles provide protection against polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon BaP and chrysene-induced perturbation of DNA repair machinery: A computational biology approach.

    PubMed

    Dhasmana, Anupam; Jamal, Qazi Mohd Sajid; Gupta, Richa; Siddiqui, Mohd Haris; Kesari, Kavindra Kumar; Wadhwa, Gulshan; Khan, Saif; Haque, Shafiul; Lohani, Mohtashim

    2016-07-01

    We examined the interaction of polycyclic hydrocarbons (PAHs) like benzo-α-pyrene (BaP), chrysene, and their metabolites 7,8-dihydro-7,8-dihydroxybenzo(a)pyrene,9,10-oxide (BPDE) and chrysene 1,2-diol-3,4-epoxide-2 (CDE), with the enzymes involved in DNA repair. We investigated interaction of 120 enzymes with PAHs and screened out 40 probable targets among DNA repair enzymes, on the basis of higher binding energy than positive control. Out of which, 20 enzymes lose their function in the presence of BaP, chrysene, and their metabolites, which may fetter DNA repair pathways resulting in damage accumulation and finally leading to cancer formation. We propose the use of nanoparticles as a guardian against the PAH's induced toxicity. PAHs enter the cell via aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). TiO2 NP showed a much higher docking score with AHR (12,074) as compared with BaP and chrysene with AHR (4,600 and 4,186, respectively), indicating a preferential binding of TiO2 NP with the AHR. Further, docking of BaP and chrysene with the TiO2 NP bound AHR complex revealed their strong adsorption on TiO2 NP itself, and not on their original binding site (at AHR). TiO2 NPs thereby prevent the entry of PAHs into the cell via AHR and hence protect cells against the deleterious effects induced by PAHs.

  9. Burial effects of organic coatings on the heterogeneous reactivity of particle-borne benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) toward ozone.

    PubMed

    Zhou, S; Lee, A K Y; McWhinney, R D; Abbatt, J P D

    2012-07-01

    With an aerosol flow tube coupled to an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), room temperature (296 ± 3 K) kinetics studies have been performed on the reaction of gas-phase ozone with benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) adsorbed in submonolayer amounts to dry ammonium sulfate (AS) particles. Three organic substances, i.e., bis(2-ethylhexyl)sebacate (BES, liquid), phenylsiloxane oil (PSO, liquid), and eicosane (EC, solid), were used to coat BaP-AS particles to investigate the effects of such organic coatings on the heterogeneous reactivity of PAHs toward ozone. All the reactions of particle-borne BaP with excess ozone exhibit pseudo-first-order kinetics in terms of BaP loss, and reactions with a liquid organic coating proceed by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) mechanism. Liquid organic coatings did not significantly affect the kinetics, consistent with the ability of reactants to rapidly diffuse through the organic coating. In contrast, the heterogeneous reactivity of BaP was reduced substantially by a thin (4-8 nm), solid EC coating and entirely suppressed by thick (10-80 nm) coatings, presumably because of slow diffusion through the organic layer. Although the heterogeneous reactivity of surface-bound PAHs is extremely rapid in the atmosphere, this work is the first to experimentally demonstrate a mechanism by which the lifetime of PAHs may be significantly prolonged, permitting them to undergo long-range transport to remote locations.

  10. Significance of measuring oxidative stress in lifestyle-related diseases from the viewpoint of correlation between d-ROMs and BAP in Japanese subjects.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Toshiki; Yamauchi, Kazuhiro; Maruyama, Mie; Yasuda, Tadashi; Kohno, Masakazu; Abe, Youichi

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, oxidative stress has been postulated to be an important factor in the pathogenesis and development of lifestyle-related diseases. In this study, we investigated the association between the derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs), as an index of products of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and biological antioxidant potential (BAP), as an index of antioxidant potential. We also investigated the associations between d-ROMs or BAP and the risk factors for lifestyle-related diseases or metabolic syndrome-associated factors to evaluate their usefulness in preventive medicine. There were 442 subjects who underwent health checkup examination in our facilities. In addition to standard medical checkup items, we analyzed d-ROMs, BAP, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level and visceral fat area (VFA) visualized on a computed tomography scan. The mean d-ROM value in females was significantly higher than that in males. There was a positive correlation between the d-ROM and VFA levels. On correlation analysis, there was a negative correlation between the d-ROM and creatinine levels. As factors that influence d-ROMs, the level of VFA was selected, suggesting the significance of oxidative stress measurement with d-ROMs. In addition, there was a positive correlation between d-ROMs and BAP values. Further research is required to resolve whether increased production of ROS or the antioxidant potential that can compensate for such an increase of ROS is more important in vivo.

  11. Burial effects of organic coatings on the heterogeneous reactivity of particle-borne benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) toward ozone.

    PubMed

    Zhou, S; Lee, A K Y; McWhinney, R D; Abbatt, J P D

    2012-07-01

    With an aerosol flow tube coupled to an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), room temperature (296 ± 3 K) kinetics studies have been performed on the reaction of gas-phase ozone with benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) adsorbed in submonolayer amounts to dry ammonium sulfate (AS) particles. Three organic substances, i.e., bis(2-ethylhexyl)sebacate (BES, liquid), phenylsiloxane oil (PSO, liquid), and eicosane (EC, solid), were used to coat BaP-AS particles to investigate the effects of such organic coatings on the heterogeneous reactivity of PAHs toward ozone. All the reactions of particle-borne BaP with excess ozone exhibit pseudo-first-order kinetics in terms of BaP loss, and reactions with a liquid organic coating proceed by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) mechanism. Liquid organic coatings did not significantly affect the kinetics, consistent with the ability of reactants to rapidly diffuse through the organic coating. In contrast, the heterogeneous reactivity of BaP was reduced substantially by a thin (4-8 nm), solid EC coating and entirely suppressed by thick (10-80 nm) coatings, presumably because of slow diffusion through the organic layer. Although the heterogeneous reactivity of surface-bound PAHs is extremely rapid in the atmosphere, this work is the first to experimentally demonstrate a mechanism by which the lifetime of PAHs may be significantly prolonged, permitting them to undergo long-range transport to remote locations. PMID:22676584

  12. Quantum information processing using acceptors in silicon and phonon entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Susan; Reinke, Charles; McGuinness, Hayden; El-Kady, Ihab

    2014-03-01

    Quantum computing with large numbers of qubits remains challenging due to the decoherence and complexity that arise as more qubits are added to a system. Here I propose a new platform for semiconductor quantum computing which may be robust to common sources of decoherence and may not be difficult to fabricate repeatedly. This system consists of a hole bound to an acceptor in silicon which has been implanted in the center of a mechanical cavity (similar to a photonic crystal cavity) and connected to other cavities by a system of waveguides. I will outline a basic entangling gate and calculations showing the promise of this platform as the ideal qubit. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U. S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Influence of dietary fat type on benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] biotransformation in a B(a)P-induced mouse model of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Diggs, Deacqunita L; Myers, Jeremy N; Banks, Leah D; Niaz, Mohammad S; Hood, Darryl B; Roberts, L Jackson; Ramesh, Aramandla

    2013-12-01

    In the US alone, around 60,000 lives/year are lost due to colon cancer. Diet and environment have been implicated in the development of sporadic colon tumors. The objective of this study was to determine how dietary fat potentiates the development of colon tumors through altered B(a)P biotransformation, using the Adenomatous polyposis coli with Multiple intestinal neoplasia mouse model. Benzo(a)pyrene was administered to mice through tricaprylin, and unsaturated (USF; peanut oil) and saturated (SF; coconut oil) fats at doses of 50 and 100 μg/kg via oral gavage over a 60-day period. Blood, colon, and liver were collected at the end of exposure period. The expression of B(a)P biotransformation enzymes [cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A1, CYP1B1 and glutathione-S-transferase] in liver and colon were assayed at the level of protein, mRNA and activities. Plasma and tissue samples were analyzed by reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography for B(a)P metabolites. Additionally, DNA isolated from colon and liver tissues was analyzed for B(a)P-induced DNA adducts by the (32)P-postlabeling method using a thin-layer chromatography system. Benzo(a)pyrene exposure through dietary fat altered its metabolic fate in a dose-dependent manner, with 100 μg/kg dose group registering an elevated expression of B(a)P biotransformation enzymes, and greater concentration of B(a)P metabolites, compared to the 50 μg/kg dose group (P<.05). This effect was more pronounced for SF group compared to USF group (P<.05). These findings establish that SF causes sustained induction of B(a)P biotransformation enzymes and extensive metabolism of this toxicant. As a consequence, B(a)P metabolites were generated to a greater extent in colon and liver, whose concentrations also registered a dose-dependent increase. These metabolites were found to bind with DNA and form B(a)P-DNA adducts, which may have contributed to colon tumors in a subchronic exposure regimen.

  14. A neutralizing recombinant single chain antibody, scFv, against BaP1, A P-I hemorrhagic metalloproteinase from Bothrops asper snake venom.

    PubMed

    Castro, J M A; Oliveira, T S; Silveira, C R F; Caporrino, M C; Rodriguez, D; Moura-da-Silva, A M; Ramos, O H P; Rucavado, A; Gutiérrez, J M; Magalhães, G S; Faquim-Mauro, E L; Fernandes, I

    2014-09-01

    BaP1 is a P-I class snake venom metalloproteinase (SVMP) relevant in the local tissue damage associated with envenomings by Bothrops asper, a medically important snake species in Central America and parts of South and North America. The main treatment for these accidents is the passive immunotherapy using antibodies raised in horses. In order to obtain more specific and batch-to-batch consistent antivenons, recombinant antibodies are considered a good option compared to animal immunization. We constructed a recombinant single chain variable fragment (scFv) from a monoclonal antibody against BaP1 (MABaP1) formerly secreted by a hybridoma clone. This recombinant antibody was cloned into pMST3 vector in fusion with SUMO protein and contains VH and VL domains linked by a flexible (G4S)3 polypeptide (scFvBaP1). The aim of this work was to produce scFvBaP1 and to evaluate its potential concerning the neutralization of biologically important activities of BaP1. The cytoplasmic expression of this construct was successfully achieved in C43 (DE3) bacteria. Our results showed that scFvBaP1-SUMO fusion protein presented an electrophoretic band of around 43 kDa from which SUMO alone corresponded to 13.6 kDa, and only the scFv was able to recognize BaP1 as well as the whole venom by ELISA. In contrast, neither an irrelevant scFv anti-LDL nor its MoAb partner recognized it. BaP1-induced fibrinolysis was significantly neutralized by scFvBaP1, but not by SUMO, in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, scFvBaP1, as well as MaBaP1, completely neutralized in vivo hemorrhage, muscle necrosis, and inflammation induced by the toxin. Docking analyses revealed possible modes of interaction of the recombinant antibody with BaP1. Our data showed that scFv recognized BaP1 and whole B. asper venom, and neutralized biological effects of this SVMP. This scFv antibody can be used for understanding the molecular mechanisms of neutralization of SVMPs, and for exploring the potential of

  15. Beyond fullerenes: design of nonfullerene acceptors for efficient organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Earmme, Taeshik; Ren, Guoqiang; Saeki, Akinori; Yoshikawa, Saya; Murari, Nishit M; Subramaniyan, Selvam; Crane, Matthew J; Seki, Shu; Jenekhe, Samson A

    2014-10-15

    New electron-acceptor materials are long sought to overcome the small photovoltage, high-cost, poor photochemical stability, and other limitations of fullerene-based organic photovoltaics. However, all known nonfullerene acceptors have so far shown inferior photovoltaic properties compared to fullerene benchmark [6,6]-phenyl-C60-butyric acid methyl ester (PC60BM), and there are as yet no established design principles for realizing improved materials. Herein we report a design strategy that has produced a novel multichromophoric, large size, nonplanar three-dimensional (3D) organic molecule, DBFI-T, whose π-conjugated framework occupies space comparable to an aggregate of 9 [C60]-fullerene molecules. Comparative studies of DBFI-T with its planar monomeric analogue (BFI-P2) and PC60BM in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells, by using a common thiazolothiazole-dithienosilole copolymer donor (PSEHTT), showed that DBFI-T has superior charge photogeneration and photovoltaic properties; PSEHTT:DBFI-T solar cells combined a high short-circuit current (10.14 mA/cm(2)) with a high open-circuit voltage (0.86 V) to give a power conversion efficiency of 5.0%. The external quantum efficiency spectrum of PSEHTT:DBFI-T devices had peaks of 60-65% in the 380-620 nm range, demonstrating that both hole transfer from photoexcited DBFI-T to PSEHTT and electron transfer from photoexcited PSEHTT to DBFI-T contribute substantially to charge photogeneration. The superior charge photogeneration and electron-accepting properties of DBFI-T were further confirmed by independent Xenon-flash time-resolved microwave conductivity measurements, which correctly predict the relative magnitudes of the conversion efficiencies of the BHJ solar cells: PSEHTT:DBFI-T > PSEHTT:PC60BM > PSEHTT:BFI-P2. The results demonstrate that the large size, multichromophoric, nonplanar 3D molecular design is a promising approach to more efficient organic photovoltaic materials.

  16. Recent advances in photoinduced donor/acceptor copolymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jönsson, S.; Viswanathan, K.; Hoyle, C. E.; Clark, S. C.; Miller, C.; Morel, F.; Decker, C.

    1999-05-01

    Photoinitiated free radical polymerization of donor (D)/acceptor (A) type monomers has gained considerable interest due to the possibility to efficiently photopolymerize non-acrylate based systems. Furthermore, this photoinduced alternating copolymerization can be accomplished without the presence of a conventional free radical generating photoinitiator. In the past, we have shown that the structural influences in the direct photolysis of N-Alkyl and N-Arylmaleimides as well as their corresponding ground state charge transfer complexes (CTC) with suitable donors have carefully been investigated. For certain combinations of A and D type monomers, a direct photolysis of the ground state complex or the excitation of the acceptor, followed by the formation of an exciplex, has been shown to initiate the copolymerization. Herein, we show that the main route of initiation is based on inter or intra molecular H-abstraction from an excited state maleimide, whereby no exciplex formation takes place. H-abstraction will predominantly take place in systems where easily abstractable hydrogens are present. Our laser flash photolysis investigation, ESR [1] (A. Hiroshi, I. Takasi, T. Nosi, Macromol. Chem. 190 (1989) 2821) and phosphorescence emissions [2,3] (K.S. Chen, T. Foster, J.K.S. Wan, J. Phys. Chem. 84 (1980) 2473; C.J. Seliskar, S.P. McGlynn, J. Chem. Phys. 55 (1971) 4337) studies show that triplet excited states of N-alkyl substituted maleimides (RMI), which are well known strong precursors for direct H-abstractions from aliphatic ethers and secondary alcohols, are formed upon excitation. Rates of copolymerization and degrees of conversion for copolymerization of maleimide/vinyl ether pairs in air and nitrogen have been measured as a function of hydrogen abstractability of the excited triplet state MI as well as the influence of concentration and hydrogen donating effect of the hydrogen donor.

  17. Ultrafast photoinduced charge transport in Pt(II) donor-acceptor assembly bearing naphthalimide electron acceptor and phenothiazine electron donor.

    PubMed

    Sazanovich, Igor V; Best, Jonathan; Scattergood, Paul A; Towrie, Michael; Tikhomirov, Sergei A; Bouganov, Oleg V; Meijer, Anthony J H M; Weinstein, Julia A

    2014-12-21

    Visible light-induced charge transfer dynamics were investigated in a novel transition metal triad acceptor-chromophore-donor, (NDI-phen)Pt(II)(-C≡C-Ph-CH2-PTZ)2 (1), designed for photoinduced charge separation using a combination of time-resolved infrared (TRIR) and femtosecond electronic transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy. In 1, the electron acceptor is 1,4,5,8-naphthalene diimide (NDI), and the electron donor is phenothiazine (PTZ), and [(phen)Pt(-C≡C-Ph-)], where phen is 1,10-phenanthroline, represents the chromophoric core. The first excited state observed in 1 is a (3)MLCT/LL'CT, with {Pt(II)-acetylide}-to-phen character. Following that, charge transfer from the phen-anion onto the NDI subunit to form NDI(-)-phen-[Pt-(C≡C)2](+)-PTZ2 occurs with a time constant of 2.3 ps. This transition is characterised by appearance of the prominent NDI-anion features in both TRIR and TA spectra. The final step of the charge separation in 1 proceeds with a time constant of ∼15 ps during which the hole migrates from the [Pt-(C≡C)2] subunit to one of the PTZ groups. Charge recombination in 1 then occurs with two distinct time constants of 36 ns and 107 ns, corresponding to the back electron transfer to each of the two donor groups; a rather rare occurrence which manifests that the hole in the final charge-separated state is localised on one of the two donor PTZ groups. The assignment of the nature of the excited states and dynamics in 1 was assisted by TRIR investigations of the analogous previously reported ((COOEt)2bpy)Pt(C≡C-Ph-CH2-PTZ)2 (2), (J. E. McGarrah and R. Eisenberg, Inorg. Chem., 2003, 42, 4355; J. E. McGarrah, J. T. Hupp and S. N. Smirnov, J. Phys. Chem. A, 2009, 113, 6430) as well as (bpy)Pt(C≡C-Ph-C7H15)2, which represent the acceptor-free dyad, and the chromophoric core, respectively. Thus, the step-wise formation of the full charge-separated state on the picosecond time scale and charge recombination via tunnelling have been established; and

  18. Seasonal variation of benzo(a)pyrene in the Spanish airborne PM10. Multivariate linear regression model applied to estimate BaP concentrations.

    PubMed

    Callén, M S; López, J M; Mastral, A M

    2010-08-15

    The estimation of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) concentrations in ambient air is very important from an environmental point of view especially with the introduction of the Directive 2004/107/EC and due to the carcinogenic character of this pollutant. A sampling campaign of particulate matter less or equal than 10 microns (PM10) carried out during 2008-2009 in four locations of Spain was collected to determine experimentally BaP concentrations by gas chromatography mass-spectrometry mass-spectrometry (GC-MS-MS). Multivariate linear regression models (MLRM) were used to predict BaP air concentrations in two sampling places, taking PM10 and meteorological variables as possible predictors. The model obtained with data from two sampling sites (all sites model) (R(2)=0.817, PRESS/SSY=0.183) included the significant variables like PM10, temperature, solar radiation and wind speed and was internally and externally validated. The first validation was performed by cross validation and the last one by BaP concentrations from previous campaigns carried out in Zaragoza from 2001-2004. The proposed model constitutes a first approximation to estimate BaP concentrations in urban atmospheres with very good internal prediction (Q(CV)(2)=0.813, PRESS/SSY=0.187) and with the maximal external prediction for the 2001-2002 campaign (Q(ext)(2)=0.679 and PRESS/SSY=0.321) versus the 2001-2004 campaign (Q(ext)(2)=0.551, PRESS/SSY=0.449).

  19. Noncovalent interactions of a benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide with DNA base pairs: insight into the formation of adducts of (+)-BaP DE-2 with DNA.

    PubMed

    Hargis, Jacqueline C; Schaefer, Henry F; Houk, K N; Wheeler, Steven E

    2010-02-01

    Noncovalent complexes of a tumorigenic benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide with the guanine-cytosine (GC) and adenine-thymine (AT) base pairs have been examined computationally. (+)-BaP DE-2 forms covalent adducts with DNA via nucleophilic attack on the (+)-BaP DE-2 epoxide. Computational results predict five thermodynamically accessible complexes of AT with (+)-BaP DE-2 that are compatible with intact DNA. Among these, two are expected to lead to adenine adducts. In the lowest energy AT...(+)-BaP DE-2 complex, which has a gas-phase interaction energy of -20.9 kcal mol(-1), the exocyclic NH(2) of adenine is positioned for backside epoxide attack and formation of a trans adduct. The most energetically favorable complex leading to formation of a cis ring-opened adduct lies only 0.6 kcal mol(-1) higher in energy. For GC...(+)-BaP DE-2, there are only two thermodynamically accessible complexes. The higher-lying complex, bound in the gas phase by 24.4 kcal mol(-1) relative to separated GC and (+)-BaP DE-2, would lead to a trans ring-opened N(2)-guanine adduct. In the global minimum energy GC...(+)-BaP DE-2 complex, bound by 27.3 kcal mol(-1), the exocyclic NH(2) group of cytosine is positioned for cis epoxide addition. However, adducts of (+)-BaP DE-2 with cytosine are rarely observed experimentally. The paucity of cytosine adducts, despite the predicted thermodynamic stability of this GC...(+)-BaP DE-2 complex, is attributed to the electrostatic destabilization of the benzylic cation intermediate thought to precede cis addition.

  20. Changes in the Metabolome of Picea balfouriana Embryogenic Tissues That Were Linked to Different Levels of 6-BAP by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Q F; Wang, J H; Pulkkinen, P; Kong, L S

    2015-01-01

    Embryogenic cultures of Picea balfouriana, which is an important commercial species for reforestation in Southern China, easily lose their embryogenic ability during long-term culture. Embryogenic tissue that proliferated at lower concentrations (3.6 μM and 2.5 μM) of 6-benzylaminopurine (6-BAP) were more productive, and generated 113 ± 6 and 89 ± 3 mature embryos per 100 mg embryogenic tissue, respectively. A metabolomic approach was used to study the changes in metabolites linked to embryogenic competence related to three different 6-BAP concentrations (2.5 μM, 3.6 μM, and 5 μM). A total of 309 compounds were obtained, among which 123 metabolites mapped to Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and genomes (KEGG) pathways. The levels of 35 metabolites were significantly differentially regulated among the three 6-BAP treatments, and 32 metabolites differed between the 2.5 μM and 5 μM treatments. A total of 17 metabolites appeared only once among the three comparisons. The combination of a score plot and a loading plot showed that in the samples with higher embryogenic ability (3.6 μM and 2.5 μM), up-regulated metabolites were mostly amino acids and down-regulated metabolites were mostly primary carbohydrates (especially sugars). These results suggested that 6-BAP may influence embryogenic competence by nitrogen metabolism, which could cause an increase in amino acid levels and higher amounts of aspartate, isoleucine, and leucine in tissues with higher embryogenic ability. Furthermore, we speculated that 6-BAP may affect the amount of tryptophan in tissues, which would change the indole-3-acetic acid levels and influence the embryogenic ability.

  1. Noncovalent interactions of a benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide with DNA base pairs: insight into the formation of adducts of (+)-BaP DE-2 with DNA.

    PubMed

    Hargis, Jacqueline C; Schaefer, Henry F; Houk, K N; Wheeler, Steven E

    2010-02-01

    Noncovalent complexes of a tumorigenic benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide with the guanine-cytosine (GC) and adenine-thymine (AT) base pairs have been examined computationally. (+)-BaP DE-2 forms covalent adducts with DNA via nucleophilic attack on the (+)-BaP DE-2 epoxide. Computational results predict five thermodynamically accessible complexes of AT with (+)-BaP DE-2 that are compatible with intact DNA. Among these, two are expected to lead to adenine adducts. In the lowest energy AT...(+)-BaP DE-2 complex, which has a gas-phase interaction energy of -20.9 kcal mol(-1), the exocyclic NH(2) of adenine is positioned for backside epoxide attack and formation of a trans adduct. The most energetically favorable complex leading to formation of a cis ring-opened adduct lies only 0.6 kcal mol(-1) higher in energy. For GC...(+)-BaP DE-2, there are only two thermodynamically accessible complexes. The higher-lying complex, bound in the gas phase by 24.4 kcal mol(-1) relative to separated GC and (+)-BaP DE-2, would lead to a trans ring-opened N(2)-guanine adduct. In the global minimum energy GC...(+)-BaP DE-2 complex, bound by 27.3 kcal mol(-1), the exocyclic NH(2) group of cytosine is positioned for cis epoxide addition. However, adducts of (+)-BaP DE-2 with cytosine are rarely observed experimentally. The paucity of cytosine adducts, despite the predicted thermodynamic stability of this GC...(+)-BaP DE-2 complex, is attributed to the electrostatic destabilization of the benzylic cation intermediate thought to precede cis addition. PMID:20063873

  2. Contrasting performance of donor-acceptor copolymer pairs in ternary blend solar cells and two-acceptor copolymers in binary blend solar cells.

    PubMed

    Khlyabich, Petr P; Rudenko, Andrey E; Burkhart, Beate; Thompson, Barry C

    2015-02-01

    Here two contrasting approaches to polymer-fullerene solar cells are compared. In the first approach, two distinct semi-random donor-acceptor copolymers are blended with phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) to form ternary blend solar cells. The two poly(3-hexylthiophene)-based polymers contain either the acceptor thienopyrroledione (TPD) or diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP). In the second approach, semi-random donor-acceptor copolymers containing both TPD and DPP acceptors in the same polymer backbone, termed two-acceptor polymers, are blended with PC61BM to give binary blend solar cells. The two approaches result in bulk heterojunction solar cells that have the same molecular active-layer components but differ in the manner in which these molecular components are mixed, either by physical mixing (ternary blend) or chemical "mixing" in the two-acceptor (binary blend) case. Optical properties and photon-to-electron conversion efficiencies of the binary and ternary blends were found to have similar features and were described as a linear combination of the individual components. At the same time, significant differences were observed in the open-circuit voltage (Voc) behaviors of binary and ternary blend solar cells. While in case of two-acceptor polymers, the Voc was found to be in the range of 0.495-0.552 V, ternary blend solar cells showed behavior inherent to organic alloy formation, displaying an intermediate, composition-dependent and tunable Voc in the range from 0.582 to 0.684 V, significantly exceeding the values achieved in the two-acceptor containing binary blend solar cells. Despite the differences between the physical and chemical mixing approaches, both pathways provided solar cells with similar power conversion efficiencies, highlighting the advantages of both pathways toward highly efficient organic solar cells.

  3. Phosphorylation-induced conformational changes in short peptides probed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer in the 10A domain.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Harekrushna; Nau, Werner M

    2007-03-26

    Phosphorylation-induced conformational changes in short polypeptides were probed by a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) method by employing a short-distance FRET pair (R(0) approximately 10 A) based on tryptophan as natural donor and a 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene-labeled asparagine (Dbo) as synthetic acceptor. Two substrates for kinases, LeuArgArgTrpSerLeuGly-Dbo (peptide I) and TrpLysArgThrLeuArgArg-Dbo (peptide II), were investigated, with serine and threonine, respectively, as phosphorylation sites. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence experiments in H(2)O revealed a decrease in FRET efficiency for peptide I and an increase for peptide II; this suggested that the effective distances between donor and acceptor increased and decreased, respectively. The same trends and similar absolute variations in effective donor-acceptor distances were observed in propylene glycol, a less polar and highly viscous solvent; this suggested that the variations are due to intrinsic structural preferences. Fitting of the time-resolved decay traces according to a distribution function model (Gaussian distribution) provided the mean donor-acceptor distances, which showed an increase upon phosphorylation for peptide I (from 9.7 to 10.5 A) and a decrease for peptide II (from 10.9 to 9.3 A) in H(2)O. The broadness (half-width) of the distributions, which provides a measure of the rigidity of the peptides, remained similar upon phosphorylation of peptide I (3.0 versus 3.1 A), but decreased for peptide II (from 3.1 to 0.73 A in H(2)O); this suggests a more compact, structured conformation upon phosphorylation of the latter peptide. The elongation of the peptide backbone (by ca. 0.7 A) for peptide I is attributed to an increase in steric demand upon phosphorylation, which favors an extended conformation. The contraction (by ca. 1.4 A) and structural rigidification of peptide II is attributed to attractive Coulombic interactions and hydrogen bonding between the

  4. Brain natriutetic peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007509.htm Brain natriuretic peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) test is a blood test that measures ...

  5. Vasoactive intestinal peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003508.htm Vasoactive intestinal peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a test that measures the amount ...

  6. Phthalimides as exceptionally efficient single electron transfer acceptors in reductive coupling reactions promoted by samarium diiodide.

    PubMed

    Vacas, Tatiana; Alvarez, Eleuterio; Chiara, Jose Luis

    2007-12-20

    Experimental and theoretical evidence shows that phthalimides are highly efficient single electron transfer acceptors in reactions promoted by samarium diiodide, affording ketyl radical anion intermediates, which participate in high-yielding inter- and intramolecular reductive coupling processes with different radicophiles including imides, oxime ethers, nitrones, and Michael acceptors.

  7. The effect of intermolecular donor?acceptor energy transfer on emission anisotropy in uniaxially oriented polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadownik, M.; Bojarski, Piotr

    2004-10-01

    Excitation energy transport between donors and acceptors is studied for uniaxially stretched and unstretched poly(vinyl) alcohol films. Donor emission anisotropy courses versus acceptor concentration as well as donor-acceptor emission anisotropy spectra occurred quite different in stretched and unstretched films. Upon donor excitation the total emission anisotropy rapidly decreases when passing from the donor to the acceptor fluorescence band in disordered systems. However, such a pronounced effect has not been found in partly ordered films. Donors and acceptors exhibit highly preferential mutual orientation in strongly ordered films resulting in the preservation of acceptor emission anisotropy.

  8. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested. PMID:27145593

  9. Quantitative analysis of 3-OHB[a]P and (+)-anti-BPDE as biomarkers of B[a]P exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qi; Xiao-Chen, Liu; Bo, Yang; Na, Liu; Min, Shi; Gang, Chen; Hui, Liu; Jie, Zhou; Fa-Sheng, Li

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an analytical method for the determination the levels of metabolites of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), 3-hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene (3-OHB[a]P) and (+)-anti-benzo(a)pyrene diol-epoxide [(+)-anti-BPDE, combined with DNA to form adducts], in rat blood and tissues exposed to B[a]P exposure by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC/FD), and to investigate the usefulness of 3-OHB[a]P and (+)-anti-BPDE as markers of intragastrical exposure to B[a]P in rats. The levels of 3-OH-B[a]P and B[a]P-tetrol I-1 released after acid hydrolysis of (+)-anti-BPDE in the samples were measured by HPLC/FD. The calibration curves were linear (r(2) > 0.9904), and the lower limit of quantification ranged from 0.34 to 0.45 ng/mL for 3-OHB[a]P and from 0.43 to 0.58 ng/mL for (+)-anti-BPDE. The intra- and inter-day stability assay data suggested that the method is accurate and precise. The recoveries of 3-OHB[a]P and (+)-anti-BPDE were in the ranges of 73.6 ± 5.0 to 116.5 ± 6.3% and 73.3 ± 8.5 to 141.2 ± 13.8%, respectively. A positive correlation was found between the concentration of intragastrical B[a]P and the concentrations of 3-OH-B[a]P and (+)-anti-BPDE in the blood and in most of the tissues studied, except for the brain and kidney, which showed no correlation between B[a]P and 3-OHB[a]P and between B[a]P and (+)-anti-BPDE, respectively. A sensitive, reliable and rapid HPLC/FD was developed and validated for analysis of 3-OHB[a]P and (+)-anti-BPDE in rat blood and tissues. There was a positive correlation between the concentration of 3-OHB[a]P or (+)-anti-BPDE in the blood and the concentration of 3-OHB[a]P or (+)-anti-BPDE in the most other tissues examined. The concentration of 3-OHB[a]P or (+)-anti-BPDE in the blood could be used as an indicator of the concentration of 3-OHB[a]P or (+)-anti-BPDE in the other tissues in response to B[a]P exposure. These results demonstrate that 3-OHB[a]P and (+)-anti-BPDE are potential

  10. Physiological and electrochemical effects of different electron acceptors on bacterial anode respiration in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yonggang; Xiang, Yinbo; Xia, Chunyu; Wu, Wei-Min; Sun, Guoping; Xu, Meiying

    2014-07-01

    To understand the interactions between bacterial electrode respiration and the other ambient bacterial electron acceptor reductions, alternative electron acceptors (nitrate, Fe2O3, fumarate, azo dye MB17) were added singly or multiply into Shewanella decolorationis microbial fuel cells (MFCs). All the added electron acceptors were reduced simultaneously with current generation. Adding nitrate or MB17 resulted in more rapid cell growth, higher flavin concentration and higher biofilm metabolic viability, but lower columbic efficiency (CE) and normalized energy recovery (NER) while the CE and NER were enhanced by Fe2O3 or fumarate. The added electron acceptors also significantly influenced the cyclic voltammetry profile of anode biofilm probably via altering the cytochrome c expression. The highest power density was observed in MFCs added with MB17 due to the electron shuttle role of the naphthols from MB17 reduction. The results provided important information for MFCs applied in practical environments where contains various electron acceptors.

  11. Excitation energy transfer in partly ordered polymer films differing in donor and acceptor transition moments orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Synak, A.; Bojarski, P.; Sadownik, M.; Kułak, L.; Gryczynski, I.; Grobelna, B.; Rangełowa-Jankowska, S.; Jankowski, D.; Kubicki, A.

    2016-09-01

    Based on spectroscopic measurements selected properties of nonradiative Förster energy transport are studied in uniaxially stretched polyvinyl alcohol thin films for three systems differing in donor and acceptor transition moments orientation relative to the axis of stretching. In particular, donor - acceptor emission anisotropy spectra yield completely different regularities for these systems in uniaxially stretched films, whereas they are similar in unstretched films. In particular it is shown that acceptor fluorescence can be either strongly polarized after nonradiative energy transfer in stretched films or depolarized depending on the angular distribution of acceptor transition moments in the matrix. Donor and acceptor emission anisotropy decays exhibit similar regularities to those of steady-state measurements. The obtained results are analyzed with the help of Monte Carlo simulations.

  12. Ultrasound-modulated fluorescence based on donor-acceptor-labeled microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Feshitan, Jameel A.; Wei, Ming-Yuan; Borden, Mark A.; Yuan, Baohong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based microbubble contrast agent system was designed to experimentally demonstrate the concept of ultrasound-modulated fluorescence (UMF). Microbubbles were simultaneously labeled with donor and acceptor fluorophores on the surface to minimize self-quenching and maximize FRET. In response to ultrasound, the quenching efficiency was greatly modulated by changing the distance between the donor and acceptor molecules through microbubble size oscillations. Both donors and acceptors exhibited UMF on individual microbubbles. The UMF strength of the donor was more significant compared to that of the acceptor. Furthermore, the UMF of the donor was observed from a microbubble solution in a turbid media. This study exploits the feasibility of donor–acceptor labeled microbubbles as UMF contrast agents. PMID:25789423

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  14. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  15. Regulation of human dihydrodiol dehydrogenase by Michael acceptor xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Ciaccio, P J; Jaiswal, A K; Tew, K D

    1994-06-01

    A human oxidoreductase (H-37) that is overexpressed in ethacrynic acid-resistant HT29 colon cells (Ciaccio, P. J., Stuart, J.E., and Tew, K.D. (1993) Mol. Pharmacol. 43, 845-853) has been identified as a dihydrodiol dehydrogenase. Translated protein from a dihydrodiol dehydrogenase cDNA isolated from a library prepared from ethacrynic acid-resistant HT29 cell poly(A+) RNA was recognized by anti-H-37 IgG and was identical in molecular weight with H-37. The isolated cDNA was identical in both nucleotide and amino acid sequences with the recently cloned liver dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (Stolz, A., Hammond, L., Lou, H., Takikawa, H., Ronk, M., and Shively, J.E. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 10448-10457). Using this cDNA as probe, we have examined its induction by Michael acceptors. The steady state dihydrodiol dehydrogenase mRNA level in the ethacrynic acid-resistant line was increased 30-fold relative to that of wild-type cells. Twenty-four hour treatment of wild-type cells with ethacrynic acid or dimethyl maleate increased mRNA 10-fold and 5-fold, respectively. These changes are accompanied by both increased protein expression and increased NADP-dependent 1-acenaphthenol oxidative activity in cell cytosol. In gel shift assays, compared to wild type controls, increased binding of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase human antioxidant response element (hARE) DNA to redox labile protein complexes present in treated and resistant cell nuclear extract was observed. Ethacrynic acid induced CAT activity 2-fold in Hepa1 cells stably transfected with NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase hARE-tk-CAT chimeric gene construct. Thus, dihydrodiol dehydrogenase protein is inducible by de novo synthesis from mRNA by structurally related monofunctional inducer Michael acceptors. Altered in vitro binding of nuclear protein to the hARE is indirect evidence for the involvement of an element similar to hARE in the regulation of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase by these agents. PMID:7515059

  16. Computational peptide vaccinology.

    PubMed

    Söllner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Immunoinformatics focuses on modeling immune responses for better understanding of the immune system and in many cases for proposing agents able to modify the immune system. The most classical of these agents are vaccines derived from living organisms such as smallpox or polio. More modern vaccines comprise recombinant proteins, protein domains, and in some cases peptides. Generating a vaccine from peptides however requires technologies and concepts very different from classical vaccinology. Immunoinformatics therefore provides the computational tools to propose peptides suitable for formulation into vaccines. This chapter introduces the essential biological concepts affecting design and efficacy of peptide vaccines and discusses current methods and workflows applied to design successful peptide vaccines using computers.

  17. Potassium acceptor doping of ZnO crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Parmar, Narendra S. Lynn, K. G.; Corolewski, Caleb D.; McCluskey, Matthew D.

    2015-05-15

    ZnO bulk single crystals were doped with potassium by diffusion at 950°C. Positron annihilation spectroscopy confirms the filling of zinc vacancies and a different trapping center for positrons. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements show the diffusion of potassium up to 10 μm with concentration ∼1 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3}. IR measurements show a local vibrational mode (LVM) at 3226 cm{sup −1}, at a temperature of 9 K, in a potassium doped sample that was subsequently hydrogenated. The LVM is attributed to an O–H bond-stretching mode adjacent to a potassium acceptor. When deuterium substitutes for hydrogen, a peak is observed at 2378 cm{sup −1}. The O-H peak is much broader than the O-D peak, perhaps due to an unusually low vibrational lifetime. The isotopic frequency ratio is similar to values found in other hydrogen complexes. Potassium doping increases the resistivity up to 3 orders of magnitude at room temperature. The doped sample has a donor level at 0.30 eV.

  18. Molecular insights into the terminal energy acceptor in cyanobacterial phycobilisome.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Wei, Tian-Di; Zhang, Nan; Xie, Bin-Bin; Su, Hai-Nan; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Wang, Zhi-Xin; Wu, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2012-09-01

    The linker protein L(CM) (ApcE) is postulated as the major component of the phycobilisome terminal energy acceptor (TEA) transferring excitation energy from the phycobilisome to photosystem II. L(CM) is the only phycobilin-attached linker protein in the cyanobacterial phycobilisome through auto-chromophorylation. However, the underlying mechanism for the auto-chromophorylation of L(CM) and the detailed molecular architecture of TEA is still unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the N-terminal phycobiliprotein-like domain of L(CM) (Pfam00502, LP502) can specifically recognize phycocyanobilin (PCB) by itself. Biochemical assays indicated that PCB binds into the same pocket in LP502 as that in the allophycocyanin α-subunit and that Ser152 and Asp155 play a vital role in LP502 auto-chromophorylation. By carefully conducting computational simulations, we arrived at a rational model of the PCB-LP502 complex structure that was supported by extensive mutational studies. In the PCB-LP502 complex, PCB binds into a deep pocket of LP502 with a distorted conformation, and Ser152 and Asp155 form several hydrogen bonds to PCB fixing the PCB Ring A and Ring D. Finally, based on our results, the dipoles and dipole-dipole interactions in TEA are analysed and a molecular structure for TEA is proposed, which gives new insights into the energy transformation mechanism of cyanobacterial phycobilisome. PMID:22758351

  19. Swift Electrofluorochromism of Donor-Acceptor Conjugated Polytriphenylamines.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingwei; Liang, Ziqi

    2016-07-20

    Electrofluorochromic (EFC) materials, which exhibit electrochemically controllable fluorescence, hold great promise in optoelectronic devices and biological analysis. Here we design such donor-acceptor (D-A) conjugated polymers-P(TPACO) and P(TCEC)-that contain the same electron-rich and oxidizable polytriphenylamine (PTPA) as π-backbone, yet with different electron-deficient ketone and cyano units as pendant groups, respectively. They both exhibit solvatochromic effects due to intrinsic characteristics of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT). Compared to P(TPACO), P(TCEC) shows stronger ICT, which leads to higher electrochemical oxidation potential and lower ion diffusion coefficient. Moreover, both polymers present simultaneous electrochromic (EC) and EFC behaviors with multistate display and remarkably rapid fluorescence response. The response time of P(TPACO) is as short as 0.19 s, nearly 4-fold faster than that of P(TCEC) (0.92 s). Such rapid response is found to be determined by the ion diffusion coefficient which is associated with the ICT nature. Finally, the EFC display device based on P(TPACO) is successfully demonstrated, which shows green fluorescence ON/OFF switching upon applied potentials. This work has successfully demonstrated that swift EFCs can be achieved by rational modulation of the ICT effect in such D-A conjugated polymers. PMID:27347724

  20. Poly(trifluoromethyl)azulenes: structures and acceptor properties

    SciTech Connect

    Clikeman, Tyler T.; Bukovsky, Eric V.; Kuvychko, Igor V.; San, Long K.; Deng, Shihu; Wang, Xue B.; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Strauss, Steven H.; Boltalina, Olga V.

    2014-07-10

    Azulene is a non-alternant, non-benzenoid aromatic hydrocarbon with an intense blue colour, a dipole moment of 1.0 D,1 positive electron affinity, and an “anomalous” emission from the second excited state in violation of Kasha’s rule.2,3 Azulene’s unique properties have potential uses in molecular switches,4,5 molecular diodes,6 organic photovoltaics,7 and charge transfer complexes.8-12 Introduction of electron-withdrawing groups to the azulenic core, such as CN,8,13,14 halogens,15-19 and CF3,20,21 can enhance certain electrical and photophysical properties. In this work, we report six new trifluoromethyl derivatives of azulene (AZUL), three isomers of AZUL(CF3)3 and three isomers of AZUL(CF3)4, and the first X-ray structure of a π-stacked donor-acceptor complex of a trifluoromethyl azulene with donor pyrene.

  1. Analysis of nonlinear optical properties in donor–acceptor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Paul N.; Pachter, Ruth; Nguyen, Kiet A.

    2014-05-14

    Time-dependent density functional theory has been used to calculate nonlinear optical (NLO) properties, including the first and second hyperpolarizabilities as well as the two-photon absorption cross-section, for the donor-acceptor molecules p-nitroaniline and dimethylamino nitrostilbene, and for respective materials attached to a gold dimer. The CAMB3LYP, B3LYP, PBE0, and PBE exchange-correlation functionals all had fair but variable performance when compared to higher-level theory and to experiment. The CAMB3LYP functional had the best performance on these compounds of the functionals tested. However, our comprehensive analysis has shown that quantitative prediction of hyperpolarizabilities is still a challenge, hampered by inadequate functionals, basis sets, and solvation models, requiring further experimental characterization. Attachment of the Au{sub 2}S group to molecules already known for their relatively large NLO properties was found to further enhance the response. While our calculations show a modest enhancement for the first hyperpolarizability, the enhancement of the second hyperpolarizability is predicted to be more than an order of magnitude.

  2. Rates of primary electron transfer reactions in the photosystem I reaction center reconstituted with different quinones as the secondary acceptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kumazaki, Shigeichi; Kandori, Hideki; Yoshihara, Keitaro ); Iwaki, Masayo; Itoh, Shigeru ); Ikegamu, Isamu )

    1994-10-27

    Rates of sequential electron transfer reactions from the primary electron donor chlorophyll dimer (P700) to the electron acceptor chlorophyll a-686 (A[sub 0]) and to the secondary acceptor quinone (Q[sub [phi

  3. Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis Membrane Protein Expression in Response to Electron Acceptor Availability

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, Carol S.; Khare, Tripti; Verberkmoes, Nathan; O'Loughlin, Ed; Lindberg, Carl; Thompson, Melissa; Hettich, Robert

    2006-04-05

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a gram negative metal-reducing bacterium, can utilize a large number of electron acceptors. In the natural environment, S. oneidensis utilizes insoluble metal oxides as well as soluble terminal electron acceptors. The purpose of this ERSP project is to identify differentially expressed proteins associated with the membranes of S. oneidensis MR-1 cells grown with different electron acceptors, including insoluble metal oxides. We hypothesize that through the use of surface labeling, subcellular fractionation, and a combination of proteome analysis tools, proteins involved in the reduction of different terminal electron acceptors will be elucidated. We are comparing the protein profiles from cells grown with the soluble electron acceptors oxygen and fumarate and with those from cells grown with the insoluble iron oxides goethite, ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite. Comparison of the cell surface proteins isolated from cells grown with oxygen or anaerobically with fumarate revealed an increase in the abundance of over 25 proteins in anaerobic cells, including agglutination protein and flagellin proteins along with the several hypothetical proteins. In addition, the surface protein composition of cells grown with the insoluble iron oxides varies considerably from the protein composition observed with either soluble electron acceptor as well as between the different insoluble acceptors.

  4. Sterilization-CO2-Injection (SCI) BaPS: Establishment of a new method to measure rates of soil respiration and gross nitrification in calcareous agricultural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrads, Hannah; Ingwersen, Joachim; Streck, Thilo

    2013-04-01

    Soil respiration and nitrification are key processes in carbon and nitrogen cycling in soil. An exact measurement of these two processes is a prerequisite for understanding the release of trace gases from soils. During the last decades the Barometric Process Separation (BaPS) method has become a widely used method to measure the turnover rates of these two processes. Its application, however, is currently limited to acidic to slightly acidic soils. In calcareous soils huge amounts of CO2 from soil respiration are dissolved in the soil solution, and the application of the BaPS method is hampered by the exact quantification of this flux. Small errors in this flux may result in huge errors in the calculation of the nitrification and respiration rates. In order to overcome this shortcoming and to extend the applicability of the method to a wider range of soils (especially agricultural soils) we developed a new adaptive method, the Sterilization-CO2-Injection (SCI) method, which aims to determine the CO2 dissolution flux (CO2,aq) experimentally. Therefore, an additional measuring step is introduced in which a sterilized soil subsample is incubated in the BaPS apparatus and known amounts of a pure CO2 gas are injected into the system while CO2 partial pressure is monitored. After each injection peak CO2 partial pressure decreases until a new stable equilibrium concentration is reached. This behavior is used to compute the amount of CO2 transferred to the soil solution applying simple mass balance calculation. The paired information about CO2 and CO2,aq is used to derive a regression equation, which gives CO2,aq as a function of the CO2 partial pressure. This relation is further used within the standard BaPS method. Results of the SCI-BaPS method for gross nitrification rates will be presented and compared to data measured by the 15N pool dilution method (Kirkham and Bartholomew, 1954). Results were obtained with calcareous and acidic agricultural soil samples. It turned

  5. Dynamic Peptide Library for the Discovery of Charge Transfer Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Berdugo, Cristina; Nalluri, Siva Krishna Mohan; Javid, Nadeem; Escuder, Beatriu; Miravet, Juan F; Ulijn, Rein V

    2015-11-25

    Coupling of peptide self-assembly to dynamic sequence exchange provides a useful approach for the discovery of self-assembling materials. In here, we demonstrate the discovery and optimization of aqueous, gel-phase nanostructures based on dynamically exchanging peptide sequences that self-select to maximize charge transfer of n-type semiconducting naphthalenediimide (NDI)-dipeptide bioconjugates with various π-electron-rich donors (dialkoxy/hydroxy/amino-naphthalene or pyrene derivatives). These gel-phase peptide libraries are characterized by spectroscopy (UV-vis and fluorescence), microscopy (TEM), HPLC, and oscillatory rheology and it is found that, of the various peptide sequences explored (tyrosine Y-NDI with tyrosine Y, phenylalanine F, leucine L, valine V, alanine A or glycine G-NH2), the optimum sequence is tyrosine-phenylalanine in each case; however, both its absolute and relative yield amplification is dictated by the properties of the donor component, indicating cooperativity of peptide sequence and donor/acceptor pairs in assembly. The methodology provides an in situ discovery tool for nanostructures that enable dynamic interfacing of supramolecular electronics with aqueous (biological) systems. PMID:26540455

  6. Linking fate model in freshwater and PBPK model to assess human internal dosimetry of B(a)P associated with drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ciffroy, Philippe; Tanaka, T; Johansson, E; Brochot, C

    2011-08-01

    In the present study, we demonstrate an integrated modeling approach for predicting internal tissue concentrations of chemicals by coupling a multimedia environmental model and a generic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. A case study was designed for a region situated on the Seine river watershed, downstream of the Paris megacity, and for benzo(a)pyrene emitted from industrial zones in the region. In this case study, these two models are linked only by water intake from riverine system for the multimedia model into human body for the PBPK model. The limited monitoring data sets of B(a)P concentrations in bottom sediment and in raw river water, obtained at the downstream of Paris, were used to re-construct long-term daily concentrations of B(a)P in river water. The re-construction of long-term series of B(a)P level played a key role for the intermediate model calibration (conducted in multimedia model) and thus for improving model input to PBPK model. In order to take into account the parametric uncertainty in the model inputs, some input parameters relevant for the multimedia model were given by probability density functions (PDFs); some generic PDFs were updated with site-specific measurements by a Bayesian approach. The results of this study showed that the multimedia model fits well with actual annual measurements in sediments over one decade. No accumulation of B(a)P in the organs was observed. In conclusion, this case study demonstrated the feasibility of a full-chain assessment combining multimedia environmental predictions and PBPK modeling, including uncertainty and sensitivity analyses.

  7. Long-term Coexposure to Hexavalent Chromium and B[a]P Causes Tissue-Specific Differential Biological Effects in Liver and Gastrointestinal Tract of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Martín, Francisco Javier; Fan, Yunxia; Carreira, Vinicius; Ovesen, Jerald L.; Vonhandorf, Andrew; Xia, Ying; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Complex mixtures of environmental agents often cause mixture-specific health effects that cannot be accounted for by a single mechanism. To study the biological effects of exposure to a mixture of chromium-VI and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), often found together in the environment, we exposed mice for 60 days to 0, 55, 550, or 5500 ppb Cr(VI) in drinking water followed by 90 days of coexposure to B[a]P at 0, 1.25, 12.5, or 125 mg/kg/day and examined liver and gastrointestinal (GI) tract for exposure effects. In the liver, the mixture caused more significant histopathology than expected from the sum of effects of the individual components, while in the GI tract, Cr(VI) alone caused significant enterocyte hypertrophy and increases in cell proliferation and DNA damage that were also observed in mice coexposed to B[a]P. Expression of genes involved in drug metabolism, tumor suppression, oxidative stress, and inflammation was altered in mixed exposures relative to control and to singly exposed mice. Drug metabolism and oxidative stress genes were upregulated and tumor suppressor and inflammation genes downregulated in the proximal GI tract, whereas most markers were upregulated in the distal GI tract and downregulated in the liver. Oral exposure to Cr(VI) and B[a]P mixtures appears to have tissue-specific differential consequences in liver and GI tract that cannot be predicted from the effects of each individual toxicant. Tissue specificity may be particularly critical in cases of extended exposure to mixtures of these agents, as may happen in the occupational setting or in areas where drinking water contains elevated levels of Cr(VI). PMID:25820237

  8. Pyrimidone-based series of glucokinase activators with alternative donor-acceptor motif.

    PubMed

    Filipski, Kevin J; Guzman-Perez, Angel; Bian, Jianwei; Perreault, Christian; Aspnes, Gary E; Didiuk, Mary T; Dow, Robert L; Hank, Richard F; Jones, Christopher S; Maguire, Robert J; Tu, Meihua; Zeng, Dongxiang; Liu, Shenping; Knafels, John D; Litchfield, John; Atkinson, Karen; Derksen, David R; Bourbonais, Francis; Gajiwala, Ketan S; Hickey, Michael; Johnson, Theodore O; Humphries, Paul S; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A

    2013-08-15

    Glucokinase activators are a class of experimental agents under investigation as a therapy for Type 2 diabetes mellitus. An X-ray crystal structure of a modestly potent agent revealed the potential to substitute the common heterocyclic amide donor-acceptor motif for a pyridone moiety. We have successfully demonstrated that both pyridone and pyrimidone heterocycles can be used as a potent donor-acceptor substituent. Several sub-micromolar analogs that possess the desired partial activator profile were synthesized and characterized. Unfortunately, the most potent activators suffered from sub-optimal pharmacokinetic properties. Nonetheless, these donor-acceptor motifs may find utility in other glucokinase activator series or beyond.

  9. Bacterial manganese reduction and growth with manganese oxide as the sole electron acceptor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Charles R.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    1988-01-01

    Microbes that couple growth to the reduction of manganese could play an important role in the biogeochemistry of certain anaerobic environments. Such a bacterium, Alteromonas putrefaciens MR-1, couples its growth to the reduction of manganese oxides only under anaerobic conditions. The characteristics of this reduction are consistent with a biological, and not an indirect chemical, reduction of manganese, which suggest that this bacterium uses manganic oxide as a terminal electron acceptor. It can also utilize a large number of other compounds as terminal electron acceptors; this versatility could provide a distinct advantage in environments where electron-acceptor concentrations may vary.

  10. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions.

  11. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions. PMID:26374891

  12. A KAP study on MTP acceptors and their contraceptive practice.

    PubMed

    Roy, M; Lahiri, B C; Ghosh, B N

    1978-01-01

    From the point of view of the family planning program, it is necessary to determine whether a medical termination of pregnancy has a learning effect on a woman's subsequent fertility control behavior. In order to determine the knowledge and attitude of medical termination of pregnancy (MTP) acceptors towards abortion and their pre and post abortion contraceptive practices, a study was conducted during January to December 1975 in a family planning clinic in North Calcutta. 300 consecutive cases admitted to the hospital for abortions were the study subjects - the MTP group. They were subjected to repeated interviews in the ward before and after the abortion and were followed up at home within 6-10 months after the discharge from the hospital. 300 women who attended the antenatal clinic of the same hospital during the same period were selected for comparison by systematic sampling. There is no statistically significant difference in the social characteristics of the 2 groups except that the MTP group was from a comparatively poorer economic class. 13.3% of the MTP group had "good" knowledge of physiology of reproduction in contrast to only 5.0% in the comparison group. Only 52% of the MTP group and 63% in the comparison group failed to have even an "average" knowledge of this area. Nearly 55% of the MTP group and 65% of the comparison group had never practiced family planning. Over 55% of the MTP group had poor knowledge about abortion; the most important soruce of their knowledge was their neighbors. 78.7% of the cases considered MTP to be a sinful act. The primary reason for deciding to have an abortion was socioeconomic. Over 27.6% of the cases were using contraceptives to avoid the present pregnancy. The difference is statistically significant suggesting a positive learning effect of MTP on contraceptive behavior of women seeking abortions.

  13. Barium recovery by crystallization in a fluidized-bed reactor: effects of pH, Ba/P molar ratio and seed.

    PubMed

    Su, Chia-Chi; Reano, Resmond L; Dalida, Maria Lourdes P; Lu, Ming-Chun

    2014-06-01

    The effects of process conditions, including upward velocity inside the column, the amount of added seed and seed size, the pH value of the precipitant or the phosphate stream and the Ba/P molar ratio in a fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) were studied with a view to producing BaHPO₄ crystals of significant size and maximize the removal of barium. XRD were used to identify the products that were collected from the FBR. Experimental results show that an upward velocity of 48 cmmin(-1) produced the largest BaHPO₄ crystals with a size of around 0.84-1.0mm. The addition of seed crystals has no effect on barium removal. The use of a seed of a size in the ranges unseeded<0.149-0.29 mm<0.149 mm<0.29-0.42 mm produced increasing amounts of increasingly large crystals. The largest BaHPO₄ crystals were obtained at pH 8.4-8.8 with a Ba/P molar ratio of 1.0. In the homogeneous and heterogeneous processes, around 98% of barium was removed at pH 8.4-8.6 and [Ba]/[P]=1.0. The XRD results show that a significant amount of barium phosphate (Ba₃(PO₄)₂) was obtained at pH 11. The compounds BaHPO₄ and BaO were present at a pH of below 10.

  14. Systemic control of cell division and endoreduplication by NAA and BAP by modulating CDKs in root tip cells of Allium cepa.

    PubMed

    Tank, Jigna G; Thaker, Vrinda S

    2014-01-01

    Molecular mechanism regulated by auxin and cytokinin during endoreduplication, cell division, and elongation process is studied by using Allium cepa roots as a model system. The activity of CDK genes modulated by auxin and cytokinin during cell division, elongation, and endoreduplication process is explained in this research work. To study the significance of auxin and cytokinin in the management of cell division and endoreduplication process in plant meristematic cells at molecular level endoreduplication was developed in root tips of Allium cepa by giving colchicine treatment. There were inhibition of vegetative growth, formation of c-tumor at root tip, and development of endoreduplicated cells after colchicine treatment. This c-tumor was further treated with NAA and BAP to reinitiate vegetative growth in roots. BAP gave positive response in reinitiation of vegetative growth of roots from center of c-tumor. However, NAA gave negative response in reinitiation of vegetative growth of roots from c-tumor. Further, CDKs gene expression analysis from normal, endoreduplicated, and phytohormone (NAA or BAP) treated root tip was done and remarkable changes in transcription level of CDK genes in normal, endoreduplicated, and phytohormones treated cells were observed.

  15. Computational analysis of the mutations in BAP1, PBRM1 and SETD2 genes reveals the impaired molecular processes in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Occhipinti, Giulia; Santoni, Matteo; Massari, Francesco; Sotte, Valeria; Iacovelli, Roberto; Burattini, Luciano; Santini, Daniele; Montironi, Rodolfo; Cascinu, Stefano; Principato, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell Renal Cell Carcinoma (ccRCC) is due to loss of von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) gene and at least one out of three chromatin regulating genes BRCA1-associated protein-1 (BAP1), Polybromo-1 (PBRM1) and Set domain-containing 2 (SETD2). More than 350, 700 and 500 mutations are known respectively for BAP1, PBRM1 and SETD2 genes. Each variation damages these genes with different severity levels. Unfortunately for most of these mutations the molecular effect is unknown, so precluding a severity classification. Moreover, the huge number of these gene mutations does not allow to perform experimental assays for each of them. By bioinformatic tools, we performed predictions of the molecular effects of all mutations lying in BAP1, PBRM1 and SETD2 genes. Our results allow to distinguish whether a mutation alters protein function directly or by splicing pattern destruction and how much severely. This classification could be useful to reveal correlation with patients’ outcome, to guide experiments, to select the variations that are worth to be included in translational/association studies, and to direct gene therapies. PMID:26452128

  16. Prevalence of Germline BAP1, CDKN2A, and CDK4 Mutations in an Australian Population-Based Sample of Cutaneous Melanoma Cases.

    PubMed

    Aoude, Lauren G; Gartside, Michael; Johansson, Peter; Palmer, Jane M; Symmons, Judith; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Hayward, Nicholas K

    2015-04-01

    Mutations in Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A) and Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4 (CDK4) contribute to susceptibility in approximately 40% of high-density cutaneous melanoma (CMM) families and about 2% of unselected CMM cases. BRCA-1 associated protein-1 (BAP1) has been more recently shown to predispose to CMM and uveal melanoma (UMM) in some families; however, its contribution to CMM development in the general population is unreported. We sought to determine the contribution of these genes to CMM susceptibility in a population-based sample of cases from Australia. We genotyped 1,109 probands from Queensland families and found that approximately 1.31% harbored mutations in CDKN2A, including some with novel missense mutations (p.R22W, p.G35R and p.I49F). BAP1 missense variants occurred in 0.63% of cases but no CDK4 variants were observed in the sample. This is the first estimate of the contribution of BAP1 and CDK4 to a population-based sample of CMM and supports the previously reported estimate of CDKN2A germline mutation prevalence.

  17. Prevalence of Germline BAP1, CDKN2A, and CDK4 Mutations in an Australian Population-Based Sample of Cutaneous Melanoma Cases.

    PubMed

    Aoude, Lauren G; Gartside, Michael; Johansson, Peter; Palmer, Jane M; Symmons, Judith; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Hayward, Nicholas K

    2015-04-01

    Mutations in Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A) and Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4 (CDK4) contribute to susceptibility in approximately 40% of high-density cutaneous melanoma (CMM) families and about 2% of unselected CMM cases. BRCA-1 associated protein-1 (BAP1) has been more recently shown to predispose to CMM and uveal melanoma (UMM) in some families; however, its contribution to CMM development in the general population is unreported. We sought to determine the contribution of these genes to CMM susceptibility in a population-based sample of cases from Australia. We genotyped 1,109 probands from Queensland families and found that approximately 1.31% harbored mutations in CDKN2A, including some with novel missense mutations (p.R22W, p.G35R and p.I49F). BAP1 missense variants occurred in 0.63% of cases but no CDK4 variants were observed in the sample. This is the first estimate of the contribution of BAP1 and CDK4 to a population-based sample of CMM and supports the previously reported estimate of CDKN2A germline mutation prevalence. PMID:25787093

  18. Bisubstrate UDP-peptide conjugates as human O-GlcNAc transferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Borodkin, Vladimir S; Schimpl, Marianne; Gundogdu, Mehmet; Rafie, Karim; Dorfmueller, Helge C; Robinson, David A; van Aalten, Daan M F

    2014-02-01

    Inhibitors of OGT (O-GlcNAc transferase) are valuable tools to study the cell biology of protein O-GlcNAcylation. We report OGT bisubstrate-linked inhibitors (goblins) in which the acceptor serine in the peptide VTPVSTA is covalently linked to UDP, eliminating the GlcNAc pyranoside ring. Goblin1 co-crystallizes with OGT, revealing an ordered C₃ linker and retained substrate-binding modes, and binds the enzyme with micromolar affinity, inhibiting glycosyltransfer on to protein and peptide substrates.

  19. Bisubstrate UDP–peptide conjugates as human O-GlcNAc transferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Borodkin, Vladimir S.; Schimpl, Marianne; Gundogdu, Mehmet; Rafie, Karim; Dorfmueller, Helge C.; Robinson, David A.; vanAalten, Daan M. F.

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitors of OGT (O-GlcNAc transferase) are valuable tools to study the cell biology of protein O-GlcNAcylation. We report OGT bisubstrate-linked inhibitors (goblins) in which the acceptor serine in the peptide VTPVSTA is covalently linked to UDP, eliminating the GlcNAc pyranoside ring. Goblin1 co-crystallizes with OGT, revealing an ordered C3 linker and retained substrate-binding modes, and binds the enzyme with micromolar affinity, inhibiting glycosyltransfer on to protein and peptide substrates. PMID:24256146

  20. Modifying the electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes using designed surfactant peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarajeewa, Dinushi R.; Dieckmann, Gregg R.; Nielsen, Steven O.; Musselman, Inga H.

    2012-07-01

    The electronic properties of carbon nanotubes can be altered significantly by modifying the nanotube surface. In this study, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were functionalized noncovalently using designed surfactant peptides, and the resultant SWCNT electronic properties were investigated. These peptides have a common amino acid sequence of X(Valine)5(Lysine)2, where X indicates an aromatic amino acid containing either an electron-donating or electron-withdrawing functional group (i.e. p-amino-phenylalanine or p-cyano-phenylalanine). Circular dichroism spectra showed that the surfactant peptides primarily have random coil structures in an aqueous medium, both alone and in the presence of SWCNTs, simplifying analysis of the peptide/SWCNT interaction. The ability of the surfactant peptides to disperse individual SWCNTs in solution was verified using atomic force microscopy and ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared spectroscopy. The electronic properties of the surfactant peptide/SWCNT composites were examined using the observed nanotube Raman tangential band shifts and the observed additional features near the Fermi level in the scanning tunneling spectroscopy dI/dV spectra. The results revealed that SWCNTs functionalized with surfactant peptides containing electron-donor or electron-acceptor functional groups showed n-doped or p-doped altered electronic properties, respectively. This work unveils a facile and versatile approach to modify the intrinsic electronic properties of SWCNTs using a simple peptide structure, which is easily adaptable to obtain peptide/SWCNT composites for the design of tunable nanoscale electronic devices.The electronic properties of carbon nanotubes can be altered significantly by modifying the nanotube surface. In this study, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were functionalized noncovalently using designed surfactant peptides, and the resultant SWCNT electronic properties were investigated. These peptides have a common amino

  1. Addition of porphyrins to cigarette filters to reduce the levels of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines (TSNAs) in mainstream cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changguo; Dai, Ya; Feng, Guanglin; He, Rong; Yang, Wenmin; Li, Dongliang; Zhou, Xuezheng; Zhu, Lijun; Tan, Lanlan

    2011-07-13

    Tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines (TSNAs) and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) in mainstream cigarette smoke (MSS) cause smoking-related diseases and environmental pollution. Porphyrins were added to cigarette filters to reduce B[a]P (porphyrins A-E) and TSNAs (porphyrin F) in MSS. The porphyrin-B[a]P and porphyrin F-TSNAs (N'-nitrosoanabasine (NAB), N'-nitrosoanatabine (NAT), 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), and N-nitrosonornicotine (NNN)) interactions were investigated by fluorescence quenching and UV-visible spectroscopy. The correlation coefficients were 0.987-0.997 (B[a]P) and 0.994-0.999 (TSNAs), and the binding constants were (1.67-5.02) × 10(5) (B[a]P) and 3.42 × 10(3)-1.40 × 10(4) (TSNAs). Up to 36.72% of B[a]P and 46.67% of the TSNAs were eliminated from MSS, with greater reductions when more porphyrin was included in the filter. With the same mass of porphyrin in the filter, the reduction trend for B[a]P by porphyrins A-E was A > B > C > D > E. The reduction trend for TSNAs by porphyrin F was NNN > NAB > NNK > NAT. The porphyrin mode of action is possibly through strong π-π interactions.

  2. Fluorescence quenching in an organic donor-acceptor dyad: a first principles study.

    PubMed

    Körzdörfer, T; Tretiak, S; Kümmel, S

    2009-07-21

    Perylene bisimide and triphenyl diamine are prototypical organic dyes frequently used in organic solar cells and light emitting devices. Recent Forster-resonant-energy-transfer experiments on a bridged organic dyad consisting of triphenyl diamine as an energy-donor and perylene bisimide as an energy-acceptor revealed a strong fluorescence quenching on the perylene bisimide. This quenching is absent in a solution of free donors and acceptors and thus attributed to the presence of the saturated CH(2)O(CH(2))(12)-bridge. We investigate the cause of the fluorescence quenching as well as the special role of the covalently bound bridge by means of time dependent density functional theory and molecular dynamics. The conformational dynamics of the bridged system leads to a charge transfer process between donor and acceptor that causes the acceptor fluorescence quenching. PMID:19624200

  3. Electron acceptor dependence of electron shuttle secretion and extracellular electron transfer by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Bing-Bing; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Dao-Bo; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-05-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an extensively studied dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a great potential for bioremediation and electricity generation. It secretes flavins as electron shuttles which play an important role in extracellular electron transfer. However, the influence of various environmental factors on the secretion of flavins is largely unknown. Here, the effects of electron acceptors, including fumarate, ferrihydrite, Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), nitrate and trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), on the secretion of flavins were investigated. The level of riboflavin and riboflavin-5'-phosphate (FMN) secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 varied considerably with different electron acceptors. While nitrate and ferrihydrite suppressed the secretion of flavins in relative to fumarate, Fe(III)-NTA and TMAO promoted such a secretion and greatly enhanced ferrihydrite reduction and electricity generation. This work clearly demonstrates that electron acceptors could considerably affect the secretion of flavins and consequent microbial EET. Such impacts of electron acceptors in the environment deserve more attention.

  4. Electron acceptor dependence of electron shuttle secretion and extracellular electron transfer by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Bing-Bing; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Dao-Bo; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-05-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an extensively studied dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a great potential for bioremediation and electricity generation. It secretes flavins as electron shuttles which play an important role in extracellular electron transfer. However, the influence of various environmental factors on the secretion of flavins is largely unknown. Here, the effects of electron acceptors, including fumarate, ferrihydrite, Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), nitrate and trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), on the secretion of flavins were investigated. The level of riboflavin and riboflavin-5'-phosphate (FMN) secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 varied considerably with different electron acceptors. While nitrate and ferrihydrite suppressed the secretion of flavins in relative to fumarate, Fe(III)-NTA and TMAO promoted such a secretion and greatly enhanced ferrihydrite reduction and electricity generation. This work clearly demonstrates that electron acceptors could considerably affect the secretion of flavins and consequent microbial EET. Such impacts of electron acceptors in the environment deserve more attention. PMID:23558182

  5. Interface-induced heavy-hole/light-hole splitting of acceptors in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Mol, J. A.; Salfi, J.; Simmons, M. Y.; Rogge, S.; Rahman, R.; Hsueh, Y.; Klimeck, G.; Miwa, J. A.

    2015-05-18

    The energy spectrum of spin-orbit coupled states of individual sub-surface boron acceptor dopants in silicon have been investigated using scanning tunneling spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures. The spatially resolved tunnel spectra show two resonances, which we ascribe to the heavy- and light-hole Kramers doublets. This type of broken degeneracy has recently been argued to be advantageous for the lifetime of acceptor-based qubits [R. Ruskov and C. Tahan, Phys. Rev. B 88, 064308 (2013)]. The depth dependent energy splitting between the heavy- and light-hole Kramers doublets is consistent with tight binding calculations, and is in excess of 1 meV for all acceptors within the experimentally accessible depth range (<2 nm from the surface). These results will aid the development of tunable acceptor-based qubits in silicon with long coherence times and the possibility for electrical manipulation.

  6. Dinitrogen extrusion from enoldiazo compounds under thermal conditions: synthesis of donor-acceptor cyclopropenes.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yongming; Jing, Changcheng; Doyle, Michael P

    2015-08-21

    Donor-acceptor cyclopropenes are formed quantitatively or in high yield from enoldiazoacetates and enoldiazoacetamides under moderate thermal conditions. They are more versatile than their corresponding enoldiazocarbonyl compounds as carbene precursors.

  7. Preparation and spectroscopic studies on charge-transfer complexes of 2-hydroxypyridine with electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaballa, Akmal S.

    2013-07-01

    The CT-interactions of electron acceptors such as iodine (I2), chloranilic acid (H2CA) and 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone (DDQ) with 2-hydroxypyridine (HPyO) have been investigated in the defined solvent. The data indicate the formation of CT-complexes with the general formula [(HPyO)(acceptor)]. The 1:1 stoichiometry of the (HPyO)-acceptors were based on elemental analysis, IR spectra and thermogravimetric analysis of the solid CT-complexes along with the photometric titration measurements for the reactions. The formation constants (KCT) for the CT-complexes are shown to be strongly dependent on the type and structure of the electron acceptors. Factors affecting the CT-processes are discussed.

  8. Preparation and spectroscopic studies on charge-transfer complexes of famciclovir drug with different electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaballa, Akmal S.; Teleb, Said M.; Nour, El-Metwally

    2012-09-01

    The CT-interaction of electron acceptors such as chloranilic acid (H2CA), 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone (DDQ) and and 7,7',8,8'-tetracyano-p-quinodimethane (TCNQ) with the antiviral drug famciclovir (FCV) have been investigated spectrophotometrically in the defined solvent. The data indicate the formation of CT-complexes with the general formula [(FCV)(acceptor)]. The 1:1 stoichiometry of the (FCV)-acceptors were based on elemental analysis, IR spectra and thermogravimetric analysis of the solid CT-complexes along with the photometric titration measurements for the reactions. The formation constants (KCT) for the CT-complexes are shown to be strongly dependent on the type and structure of the electron acceptor. Factors affecting the CT-processes such as redox potentials and steric hinderance of reactants are discussed.

  9. Computational design of donor-bridge-acceptor systems exhibiting pronounced quantum interference effects.

    PubMed

    Gorczak, Natalie; Renaud, Nicolas; Galan, Elena; Eelkema, Rienk; Siebbeles, Laurens D A; Grozema, Ferdinand C

    2016-03-01

    Quantum interference is a well-known phenomenon that dictates charge transport properties of single molecule junctions. However, reports on quantum interference in donor-bridge-acceptor molecules are scarce. This might be due to the difficulties in meeting the conditions for the presence of quantum interference in a donor-bridge-acceptor system. The electronic coupling between the donor, bridge, and acceptor moieties must be weak in order to ensure localised initial and final states for charge transfer. Yet, it must be strong enough to allow all bridge orbitals to mediate charge transfer. We present the computational route to the design of a donor-bridge-acceptor molecule that features the right balance between these contradicting requirements and exhibits pronounced interference effects.

  10. Quantitative determination of the topological propensities of amyloidogenic peptides.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yuan; Stouten, Pieter F W; Pillalamarri, Nirmala; Barile, Lauren; Rosal, Ramon V; Teichberg, Saul; Bu, Zimei; Callaway, David J E

    2006-03-01

    One of the interesting puzzles of amyloid beta-peptide of Alzheimer's disease (Abeta) is that it appears to polymerize into amyloid fibrils in a parallel beta sheet topology, while smaller subsets of the peptide produce anti-parallel beta sheets. In order to target potential weak points of amyloid fibrils in a rational drug design effort, it would be helpful to understand the forces that drive this change. We have designed two peptides CHQKLVFFAEDYNGKDEAFFVLKQHW and CHQKLVFFAEDYNGKHQKLVFFAEDW that join the significant amyloidogenic Abeta (14-23) sequence HQKLVFFAED in parallel and anti-parallel topologies, respectively. (Here, the word "parallel" refers only to residue sequence and not backbone topology). The N-termini of the hairpins were labeled with the fluorescent dye 5-((((2-iodoacetyl)amino)ethyl)amino)naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (IAEDANS), forming a fluorescence energy transfer donor-acceptor pair with the C-terminus tryptophan. Circular dichroism results show that the anti-parallel hairpin adopts a beta-sheet conformation, while the parallel hairpin is disordered. Fluorescent Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) results show that the distance between the donor and the acceptor is significantly shorter in the anti-parallel topology than in the parallel topology. The fluorescence intensity of anti-parallel hairpin also displays a linear concentration dependence, indicating that the FRET observed in the anti-parallel hairpin is from intra-molecular interactions. The results thus provide a quantitative estimate of the relative topological propensities of amyloidogenic peptides. Our FRET and CD results show that beta sheets involving the essential Abeta (14-23) fragment, strongly prefer the anti-parallel topology. Moreover, we provide a quantitative estimate of the relative preference for these two topologies. Such analysis can be repeated for larger subsets of Abeta to determine quantitatively the relative degree of preference for parallel/anti-parallel topologies

  11. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  12. C-terminal mutations destabilize SIL1/BAP and can cause Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome.

    PubMed

    Howes, Jennifer; Shimizu, Yuichiro; Feige, Matthias J; Hendershot, Linda M

    2012-03-01

    Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome (MSS) is an autosomal recessive, neurodegenerative, multisystem disorder characterized by severe phenotypes developing in infancy. Recently, mutations in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated co-chaperone SIL1/BAP were identified to be the major cause of MSS. SIL1 acts as a nucleotide exchange factor for BiP, the ER Hsp70 orthologue, which plays an essential role in the folding and assembly of nascent polypeptide chains in the ER. SIL1 facilitates the release of BiP from unfolded protein substrates, enabling the subsequent folding and transport of the protein. Although most mutations leading to MSS result in deletion of the majority of the protein, three separate mutations have been identified that disrupt only the last five or six amino acids of the protein, which were assumed to encode a divergent ER retention motif. This study presents an in depth analysis of two of these mutants and reveals that the phenotype in the affected individuals is not likely to be due to depletion of SIL1 from the ER via secretion. Instead, our analyses show that the mutant proteins are particularly unstable and either form large aggregates in the ER or are rapidly degraded via the proteasome. In agreement with our findings, homology modeling suggests that the very C-terminal residues of SIL1 play a role in its structural integrity rather than its localization. These new insights might be a first step toward a possible pharmacological treatment of certain types of MSS by specifically stabilizing the mutant SIL1 protein.

  13. Curved Oligophenylenes as Donors in Shape-Persistent Donor-Acceptor Macrocycles with Solvatofluorochromic Properties.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Takuya; Orii, Jun; Segawa, Yasutomo; Itami, Kenichiro

    2015-08-10

    Many optoelectronic organic materials are based on donor-acceptor (D-A) systems with heteroatom-containing electron donors. Herein, we introduce a new molecular design for all-carbon curved oligoparaphenylenes as donors, which results in the generation of unique shape-persistent D-A macrocycles. Two types of acceptor-inserted cycloparaphenylenes were synthesized. These macrocycles display positive solvatofluorochromic properties owing to their D-A characteristics, which were confirmed by theoretical and electrochemical studies. PMID:26140706

  14. Experiments probing the viability of donor-acceptor norbornenes for (5 + 2)-annulation.

    PubMed

    Walker, Morgan M; Goodman, C Guy; Johnson, Jeffrey S

    2014-10-01

    This Note details experiments that probe the mechanism by which donor-acceptor norbornene systems epimerize. A number of mechanistic studies indicate that epimerization in these systems occurs via a Lewis acid catalyzed retro-Diels-Alder/Diels-Alder sequence, rather than bond rotation in an intimate ion pair. These results suggest that, under the reaction conditions examined, the ring strain present in norbornene is inadequate to induce zwitterion formation analogous to that observed with donor-acceptor cyclopropanes.

  15. New acceptor centers of the background impurities in p-CdZnTe

    SciTech Connect

    Plyatsko, S. V. Rashkovetskyi, L. V.

    2013-07-15

    Low-temperature photoluminescence data are used to study the redistribution of the background impurities and host components of p-CdZnTe single crystals with a resistivity of 1-50 {Omega} cm upon their interaction with infrared laser radiation. The effect of widening of the band gap and the formation of new acceptor centers in response to laser-stimulated changes in the system of intrinsic defects are established. The activation energy of the new acceptor centers is determined.

  16. Process for gasification using a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor

    DOEpatents

    Lancet, Michael S.; Curran, George P.

    1980-01-01

    A gasification process is disclosed using a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor consisting essentially of at least one compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate supported in a refractory carrier matrix, the carrier having the general formula Ca.sub.5 (SiO.sub.4).sub.2 CO.sub.3. A method for producing the synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor is also disclosed.

  17. Fast Carrier Formation from Acceptor Exciton in Low-Gap Organic Photovotalic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonezawa, Kouhei; Kamioka, Hayato; Yasuda, Takeshi; Han, Liyuan; Moritomo, Yutaka

    2012-04-01

    Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) based on a donor (D) polymer and an acceptor (A) fullerene derivative is a promising organic photovoltaic. Here, we investigated the femtosecond charge dynamics after acceptor excitation in poly[[4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b '] dithiophene-2,6-diyl][3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b] thiophenediyl

  18. Effects of size restriction on donor-acceptor recombination in AgBr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodney, Paul J.; Marchetti, Alfred P.; Fauchet, Philippe M.

    2000-08-01

    The behavior of donor-acceptor (DA) recombination luminescence in quantum confined AgBr has been investigated. The DA luminescence decay, after pulsed excitation, became longer lived as the nanocluster size decreased. This result differs from theoretical expectations and from observations with AgI nanoclusters. The DA lifetime increase with decreasing size is due to an increase in yield and lifetime of ``free'' excitons that slowly dissociate into ``close'' donor-acceptor pairs, giving rise to an ``exciton dribbling'' effect.

  19. Benzodipyrrole-based Donor-Acceptor-type Boron Complexes as Tunable Near-infrared-Absorbing Materials.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tomoya; Furukawa, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Eiichi

    2016-07-20

    Benzodipyrrole-based donor-acceptor boron complexes were designed and synthesized as near-infrared-absorbing materials. The electron-rich organic framework combined with the Lewis acidic boron co-ordination enabled us to tune the LUMO energy level and the HOMO-LUMO gap (i.e.,the absorption wavelength) by changing the organic acceptor units, the number of boron atoms, and the substituents on the boron atoms.

  20. Nanosecond intersystem crossing times in fullerene acceptors: implications for organic photovoltaic diodes.

    PubMed

    Chow, Philip C Y; Albert-Seifried, Sebastian; Gélinas, Simon; Friend, Richard H

    2014-07-23

    Triplet-exciton formation through intersystem crossing of photogenerated singlet excitons in fullerene acceptors can compete with charge generation in organic photovoltaic diodes. This article reports the intersystem crossing timescale (τISC ) of the most commonly used fullerene acceptors, PC60 BM and PC70 BM, in solutions and in spin-coated films. These times are on the nanosecond timescale, and are longer than the characteristic times for charge generation (τd ).

  1. Evaluation of thiazole intercalating dyes as acceptors for quantum dot donors in Förster resonance energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Melissa; Algar, W. Russ

    2014-05-01

    Fluorescent probes suitable for the selective detection of DNA sequences are important in genomic research, disease diagnostics, and pathogen detection, among many other applications. The unique optical properties of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have proven to be highly valuable for development of fluorescent probes and biosensors. We describe preliminary work toward combining QDs with monomeric thiazole dyes for the detection of nucleic acid hybridization. BO, TO, BO3, and TO3 dyes, which span the visible spectrum, were synthesized with undecanoic acid linkers to permit bioconjugation and their fluorescent enhancements in response to DNA oligonucleotides was evaluated. Contrast ratios between single-stranded probe oligonucleotide and double-stranded probe/target hybrids were between 2.5 and 7.5. BO3 and TO3 were used to label a polyhistidine-appended peptide that self-assembled to QDs and were found to be suitable acceptor dyes for Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) with QD donors that had their peak emission at 540 nm and 625 nm, respectively. We further conjugated a probe oligonucleotide to a polyhistidineappended peptide at an internal site, and this probe also self-assembled to QDs. Mixing these conjugates with BO3 and either complementary DNA target or non-complementary DNA could induce quenching of the QD emission via FRET, but no FRET-sensitized BO3 emission was observed. Experiments suggested that binding of BO3 to the interface of the QDs was in competition with binding to DNA. Our results provide insight into important criteria (e.g., QD surface chemistry) for designing and optimizing a QD-FRET probe for DNA detection that utilizes the fluorescent properties of monomeric thiazole intercalating dyes.

  2. Transformation-specific cell killing by a cancer-associated galactosyltransferase acceptor and cellular binding

    PubMed Central

    Podolsky, Daniel K.; Isselbacher, Kurt J.

    1982-01-01

    Cancer-associated galactosyltransferase acceptor (CAGA glycoprotein), a small glycoprotein purified from human malignant effusion that selectively kills transformed cells, was tritiated by reductive methylation in the presence of NaB3H4. CAGA-glycoprotein-sensitive cells (baby-hamster kidney cells transformed by polyoma virus and chick-embryo fibroblasts infected with Ts68 temperature-sensitive mutant of Rous sarcoma virus grown at 37°C, the permissive temperature) bound 3–5-fold more 3H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein than did their CAGA-glycoprotein-resistant non-transformed counterparts. The Rous-sarcoma-virus-infected chick-embryo fibroblasts grown at non-permissive temperature (41°C) bound an intermediate amount of 3H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein; however, this intermediate amount appeared to be sufficient to induce inhibition of cell growth when the infected chick-embryo fibroblasts treated at 41°C were switched to 37°C. Binding of 3H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein was time- and temperature-dependent and was not inhibited by monosaccharide. Binding was completely inhibited by the oligosaccharide liberated by endoglucosaminidase H treatment or by exhaustive Pronase digestion of intact CAGA glycoprotein. However, the isolated oligosaccharide failed to demonstrate the growth-inhibition characteristics of the intact glycopeptide. Binding of 3H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein was unaffected by co-incubation with the peptide core released by endoglucosaminidase H treatment. 3H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein bound to intact cells could be removed by trypsin treatment up to 4h after addition of the glycoprotein but not thereafter. This time course paralleled the decreasing reversibility of growth inhibition. However, all 3H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein was found in the supernatant when cells were first disrupted by sonication followed by trypsin treatment for up to 12h. 3H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein linked to Sepharose 4B failed to cause growth inhibition in CAGA

  3. Transformation-specific cell killing by a cancer-associated galactosyltransferase acceptor and cellular binding.

    PubMed

    Podolsky, D K; Isselbacher, K J

    1982-11-15

    Cancer-associated galactosyltransferase acceptor (CAGA glycoprotein), a small glycoprotein purified from human malignant effusion that selectively kills transformed cells, was tritiated by reductive methylation in the presence of NaB(3)H(4). CAGA-glycoprotein-sensitive cells (baby-hamster kidney cells transformed by polyoma virus and chick-embryo fibroblasts infected with Ts68 temperature-sensitive mutant of Rous sarcoma virus grown at 37 degrees C, the permissive temperature) bound 3-5-fold more (3)H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein than did their CAGA-glycoprotein-resistant non-transformed counterparts. The Rous-sarcoma-virus-infected chick-embryo fibroblasts grown at non-permissive temperature (41 degrees C) bound an intermediate amount of (3)H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein; however, this intermediate amount appeared to be sufficient to induce inhibition of cell growth when the infected chick-embryo fibroblasts treated at 41 degrees C were switched to 37 degrees C. Binding of (3)H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein was time- and temperature-dependent and was not inhibited by monosaccharide. Binding was completely inhibited by the oligosaccharide liberated by endoglucosaminidase H treatment or by exhaustive Pronase digestion of intact CAGA glycoprotein. However, the isolated oligosaccharide failed to demonstrate the growth-inhibition characteristics of the intact glycopeptide. Binding of (3)H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein was unaffected by co-incubation with the peptide core released by endoglucosaminidase H treatment. (3)H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein bound to intact cells could be removed by trypsin treatment up to 4h after addition of the glycoprotein but not thereafter. This time course paralleled the decreasing reversibility of growth inhibition. However, all (3)H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein was found in the supernatant when cells were first disrupted by sonication followed by trypsin treatment for up to 12h. (3)H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein linked to Sepharose 4B failed to cause

  4. Molecular helices as electron acceptors in high-performance bulk heterojunction solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yu; Trinh, M. Tuan; Chen, Rongsheng; Purdum, Geoffrey E.; Khlyabich, Petr P.; Sezen, Melda; Oh, Seokjoon; Zhu, Haiming; Fowler, Brandon; Zhang, Boyuan; Wang, Wei; Nam, Chang-Yong; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Black, Charles T.; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Loo, Yueh-Lin; Ng, Fay; Zhu, X.-Y.; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous organic semiconducting materials synthesized for organic photovoltaics in the past decade, fullerenes are widely used as electron acceptors in highly efficient bulk-heterojunction solar cells. None of the non-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells have achieved efficiencies as high as fullerene-based solar cells. Design principles for fullerene-free acceptors remain unclear in the field. Here we report examples of helical molecular semiconductors as electron acceptors that are on par with fullerene derivatives in efficient solar cells. We achieved an 8.3% power conversion efficiency in a solar cell, which is a record high for non-fullerene bulk heterojunctions. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealed both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor−acceptor interfaces. Atomic force microscopy reveals a mesh-like network of acceptors with pores that are tens of nanometres in diameter for efficient exciton separation and charge transport. This study describes a new motif for designing highly efficient acceptors for organic solar cells. PMID:26382113

  5. Beyond Fullerenes: Designing Alternative Molecular Electron Acceptors for Solution-Processable Bulk Heterojunction Organic Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Sauvé, Geneviève; Fernando, Roshan

    2015-09-17

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) are promising candidates for providing a low cost, widespread energy source by converting sunlight into electricity. Solution-processable active layers have predominantly consisted of a conjugated polymer donor blended with a fullerene derivative as the acceptor. Although fullerene derivatives have been the acceptor of choice, they have drawbacks such as weak visible light absorption and poor energy tuning that limit overall efficiencies. This has recently fueled new research to explore alternative acceptors that would overcome those limitations. During this exploration, one question arises: what are the important design principles for developing nonfullerene acceptors? It is generally accepted that acceptors should have high electron affinity, electron mobility, and absorption coefficient in the visible and near-IR region of the spectra. In this Perspective, we argue that alternative molecular acceptors, when blended with a conjugated polymer donor, should also have large nonplanar structures to promote nanoscale phase separation, charge separation and charge transport in blend films. Additionally, new material design should address the low dielectric constant of organic semiconductors that have so far limited their widespread application.

  6. Molecular helices as electron acceptors in high-performance bulk heterojunction solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Yu M. Zhong; Nam, Chang -Yong; Trinh, M. Tuan; Chen, Rongsheng; Purdum, Geoffrey E.; Khlyabich, Petr P.; Sezen, Melda; Oh, Seokjoon; Zhu, Haiming; Fowler, Brandon; et al

    2015-09-18

    Despite numerous organic semiconducting materials synthesized for organic photovoltaics in the past decade, fullerenes are widely used as electron acceptors in highly efficient bulk-heterojunction solar cells. None of the non-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells have achieved efficiencies as high as fullerene-based solar cells. Design principles for fullerene-free acceptors remain unclear in the field. Here we report examples of helical molecular semiconductors as electron acceptors that are on par with fullerene derivatives in efficient solar cells. We achieved an 8.3% power conversion efficiency in a solar cell, which is a record high for non-fullerene bulk heterojunctions. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealedmore » both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor–acceptor interfaces. Atomic force microscopy reveals a mesh-like network of acceptors with pores that are tens of nanometres in diameter for efficient exciton separation and charge transport. As a result, this study describes a new motif for designing highly efficient acceptors for organic solar cells.« less

  7. A new classification of the amino acid side chains based on doublet acceptor energy levels.

    PubMed Central

    Sneddon, S F; Morgan, R S; Brooks, C L

    1988-01-01

    We describe a new classification of the amino acid side chains based on the potential energy level at which each will accept an extra (doublet) electron. The doublet acceptor energy level, and the doublet acceptor orbital were calculated using semiempirical INDO/2-UHF molecular orbital theory. The results of these calculations show that the side chains fall into four groups. We have termed these groups repulsive, insulating, semiconducting, and attractive in accordance with where each lies on the relative energy scale. We use this classification to examine the role of residues between the donor and acceptor in modulating the rate and mechanism of electron transfer in proteins. With the calculated acceptor levels, we construct a potential barrier for those residues between the donor and acceptor. It is the area beneath this barrier that determines the decay of electronic coupling between donor and acceptor, and thus the transfer rate. We have used this schematic approach to characterize the four electron transfer pathways in myoglobin recently studied by Mayo et al. (Mayo, S.L., W.R. Ellis, R.J. Crutchley, and H.B. Gray. 1986. Science [Wash. DC]. 233:948-952). PMID:3342271

  8. Molecular helices as electron acceptors in high-performance bulk heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu M. Zhong; Nam, Chang -Yong; Trinh, M. Tuan; Chen, Rongsheng; Purdum, Geoffrey E.; Khlyabich, Petr P.; Sezen, Melda; Oh, Seokjoon; Zhu, Haiming; Fowler, Brandon; Zhang, Boyuan; Wang, Wei; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Black, Charles T.; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Loo, Yueh -Lin; Ng, Fay; Zhu, X. -Y.; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-09-18

    Despite numerous organic semiconducting materials synthesized for organic photovoltaics in the past decade, fullerenes are widely used as electron acceptors in highly efficient bulk-heterojunction solar cells. None of the non-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells have achieved efficiencies as high as fullerene-based solar cells. Design principles for fullerene-free acceptors remain unclear in the field. Here we report examples of helical molecular semiconductors as electron acceptors that are on par with fullerene derivatives in efficient solar cells. We achieved an 8.3% power conversion efficiency in a solar cell, which is a record high for non-fullerene bulk heterojunctions. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealed both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor–acceptor interfaces. Atomic force microscopy reveals a mesh-like network of acceptors with pores that are tens of nanometres in diameter for efficient exciton separation and charge transport. As a result, this study describes a new motif for designing highly efficient acceptors for organic solar cells.

  9. Molecular helices as electron acceptors in high-performance bulk heterojunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yu; Trinh, M Tuan; Chen, Rongsheng; Purdum, Geoffrey E; Khlyabich, Petr P; Sezen, Melda; Oh, Seokjoon; Zhu, Haiming; Fowler, Brandon; Zhang, Boyuan; Wang, Wei; Nam, Chang-Yong; Sfeir, Matthew Y; Black, Charles T; Steigerwald, Michael L; Loo, Yueh-Lin; Ng, Fay; Zhu, X-Y; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-09-18

    Despite numerous organic semiconducting materials synthesized for organic photovoltaics in the past decade, fullerenes are widely used as electron acceptors in highly efficient bulk-heterojunction solar cells. None of the non-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells have achieved efficiencies as high as fullerene-based solar cells. Design principles for fullerene-free acceptors remain unclear in the field. Here we report examples of helical molecular semiconductors as electron acceptors that are on par with fullerene derivatives in efficient solar cells. We achieved an 8.3% power conversion efficiency in a solar cell, which is a record high for non-fullerene bulk heterojunctions. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealed both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor-acceptor interfaces. Atomic force microscopy reveals a mesh-like network of acceptors with pores that are tens of nanometres in diameter for efficient exciton separation and charge transport. This study describes a new motif for designing highly efficient acceptors for organic solar cells.

  10. Molecular helices as electron acceptors in high-performance bulk heterojunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yu; Trinh, M Tuan; Chen, Rongsheng; Purdum, Geoffrey E; Khlyabich, Petr P; Sezen, Melda; Oh, Seokjoon; Zhu, Haiming; Fowler, Brandon; Zhang, Boyuan; Wang, Wei; Nam, Chang-Yong; Sfeir, Matthew Y; Black, Charles T; Steigerwald, Michael L; Loo, Yueh-Lin; Ng, Fay; Zhu, X-Y; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous organic semiconducting materials synthesized for organic photovoltaics in the past decade, fullerenes are widely used as electron acceptors in highly efficient bulk-heterojunction solar cells. None of the non-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells have achieved efficiencies as high as fullerene-based solar cells. Design principles for fullerene-free acceptors remain unclear in the field. Here we report examples of helical molecular semiconductors as electron acceptors that are on par with fullerene derivatives in efficient solar cells. We achieved an 8.3% power conversion efficiency in a solar cell, which is a record high for non-fullerene bulk heterojunctions. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealed both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor-acceptor interfaces. Atomic force microscopy reveals a mesh-like network of acceptors with pores that are tens of nanometres in diameter for efficient exciton separation and charge transport. This study describes a new motif for designing highly efficient acceptors for organic solar cells. PMID:26382113

  11. Acceptor sites for retroviral integrations map near DNase I-hypersensitive sites in chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Vijaya, S; Steffen, D L; Robinson, H L

    1986-01-01

    Seven cellular loci with acceptor sites for retroviral integrations have been mapped for the presence of DNase I-hypersensitive sites in chromatin. Integrations in three of these loci, chicken c-erbB, rat c-myc, and a rat locus, dsi-1, had been selected for in retrovirus-induced tumors. Of the remaining four, two, designated dsi-3 and dsi-4, harbored acceptor sites for apparently unselected integrations of Moloney murine leukemia virus in a Moloney murine leukemia virus-induced thymoma, and two, designated C and F, harbored unselected acceptor sites for Moloney murine leukemia virus integrations in a rat fibroblast cell line. Each acceptor site mapped to within 500 base pairs of a DNase I-hypersensitive site. In the analyses of the unselected integrations, six hypersensitive sites were observed in 39 kilobases of DNA. The four acceptor sites in this DNA were localized between 0.05 and 0.43 kilobases of a hypersensitive site. The probability of this close association occurring by chance was calculated to be extremely low. Hypersensitive sites were mapped in cells representing the lineage in which integration had occurred as well as in an unrelated lineage. In six of the seven acceptor loci hypersensitive sites could not be detected in the unrelated lineage. Our results indicate that retroviruses preferentially integrate close to DNase I-hypersensitive sites and that many of these sites are expressed in some but not all cells. Images PMID:3490582

  12. Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis clades enriched under cyclic anaerobic and microaerobic conditions simultaneously use different electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Camejo, Pamela Y; Owen, Brian R; Martirano, Joseph; Ma, Juan; Kapoor, Vikram; Santo Domingo, Jorge; McMahon, Katherine D; Noguera, Daniel R

    2016-10-01

    Lab- and pilot-scale simultaneous nitrification, denitrification and phosphorus removal-sequencing batch reactors were operated under cyclic anaerobic and micro-aerobic conditions. The use of oxygen, nitrite, and nitrate as electron acceptors by Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis during the micro-aerobic stage was investigated. A complete clade-level characterization of Accumulibacter in both reactors was performed using newly designed qPCR primers targeting the polyphosphate kinase gene (ppk1). In the lab-scale reactor, limited-oxygen conditions led to an alternated dominance of Clade IID and IC over the other clades. Results from batch tests when Clade IC was dominant (i.e., >92% of Accumulibacter) showed that this clade was capable of using oxygen, nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors for P uptake. A more heterogeneous distribution of clades was found in the pilot-scale system (Clades IIA, IIB, IIC, IID, IA, and IC), and in this reactor, oxygen, nitrite and nitrate were also used as electron acceptors coupled to phosphorus uptake. However, nitrite was not an efficient electron acceptor in either reactor, and nitrate allowed only partial P removal. The results from the Clade IC dominated reactor indicated that either organisms in this clade can simultaneously use multiple electron acceptors under micro-aerobic conditions, or that the use of multiple electron acceptors by Clade IC is due to significant microdiversity within the Accumulibacter clades defined using the ppk1 gene. PMID:27340814

  13. Enhanced natural attenuation of BTEX in the nitrate-reducing environment by different electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongsheng; Qu, Dan; Hou, Zhimin; Zhou, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing natural attenuation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) in groundwater is a potential remediation technology. This study focused on selecting appropriate electron acceptors to promote BTEX degradation in a nitrate-reducing environment. Nitrate-reducing soil was obtained from simulated BTEX-contaminated column. Enhancing experiments were conducted in the microcosm with nitrate-reducing material and simulated BTEX-polluted groundwater to investigate the promoting feasibility of adding dissolved oxygen (DO), nitrate, chelated Fe(III), and sulphate as electron acceptors. The concentrations of BTEX, electron acceptors, and their reducing products were measured. The order of promoting BTEX degradation with four electron acceptors was nitrate>sulphate>chelated Fe(III)>DO, and the first-order decay coefficients were 0.0432, 0.0333, 0.0240, and 0.0155, respectively. Nitrate, sulphate, and chelated Fe(III) enhanced attenuation. Nitrate was the most effective electron acceptor under nitrate-reducing conditions. Selecting proper electron acceptor is significant in promoting BTEX degradation according to the biogeochemical characteristics of local underground environment.

  14. S-peptide as a potent peptidyl linker for protein cross-linking by microbial transglutaminase from Streptomyces mobaraensis.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Noriho; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Takazawa, Takeshi; Takeda, Shuji; Watanabe, Kimitsuna; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2003-01-01

    We have found that ribonuclease S-peptide can work as a novel peptidyl substrate in protein cross-linking reactions catalyzed by microbial transglutaminase (MTG) from Streptomyces mobaraensis. Enhanced green fluorescent protein tethered to S-peptide at its N-terminus (S-tag-EGFP) appeared to be efficiently cross-linked by MTG. As wild-type EGFP was not susceptible to cross-linking, the S-peptide moiety is likely to be responsible for the cross-linking. A site-directed mutation study assigned Gln15 in the S-peptide sequence as the sole acyl donor. Mass spectrometric analysis showed that two Lys residues (Lys5 and Lys11) in the S-peptide sequence functioned as acyl acceptors. We also succeeded in direct monitoring of the cross-linking process by virtue of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between S-tag-EGFP and its blue fluorescent color variant (S-tag-EBFP). The protein cross-linking was tunable by either engineering S-peptide sequence or capping the S-peptide moiety with S-protein, the partner protein of S-peptide for the formation of ribonuclease A. The latter indicates that S-protein can be used as a specific inhibitor of S-peptide-directed protein cross-linking by MTG. The controllable protein cross-linking of S-peptide as a potent substrate of MTG will shed new light on biomolecule conjugation. PMID:12643745

  15. Insulin C-peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    C-peptide ... the test depends on the reason for the C-peptide measurement. Ask your health care provider if ... C-peptide is measured to tell the difference between insulin the body produces and insulin someone injects ...

  16. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  17. Introduction to peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Stawikowski, Maciej; Fields, Gregg B

    2012-08-01

    A number of synthetic peptides are significant commercial or pharmaceutical products, ranging from the dipeptide sugar substitute aspartame to clinically used hormones such as oxytocin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and calcitonin. This unit provides an overview of the field of synthetic peptides and proteins. It discusses selecting the solid support and common coupling reagents. Additional information is provided regarding common side reactions and synthesizing modified residues.

  18. Conduction electrons in acceptor-doped GaAs/GaAlAs heterostructures: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Wlodek; Raymond, Andre; Kubisa, Maciej

    2016-05-01

    We review magneto-optical and magneto-transport effects in GaAs/GaAlAs heterostructures doped in GaAlAs barriers with donors, providing two-dimensional (2D) electron gas (2DEG) in GaAs quantum wells (QWS), and additionally doped with smaller amounts of acceptors (mostly Be atoms) in the vicinity of 2DEG. One may also deal with residual acceptors (mostly C atoms). The behavior of such systems in the presence of a magnetic field differs appreciably from those doped in the vicinity of 2DEG with donors. Three subjects related to the acceptor-doped heterostructures are considered. First is the problem of bound states of conduction electrons confined to the vicinity of negatively charged acceptors by the joint effect of a QW and an external magnetic field parallel to the growth direction. A variational theory of such states is presented, demonstrating that an electron turning around a repulsive center has discrete energies above the corresponding Landau levels. Experimental evidence for the discrete electron energies comes from the work on interband photo-magneto-luminescence, intraband cyclotron resonance and quantum magneto-transport (the Quantum Hall and Shubnikov-de Haas effects). An electron rain-down effect at weak electric fields and a boil-off effect at strong electric fields are introduced. It is demonstrated, both theoretically and experimentally, that a negatively charged acceptor can localize more than one electron. The second subject describes experiment and theory of asymmetric quantized Hall and Shubnikov-de Haas plateaus in acceptor-doped GaAs/GaAlAs heterostructures. It is shown that the main features of the plateau asymmetry can be attributed to asymmetric density of Landau states in the presence of acceptors. However, at high magnetic fields, the rain-down effect is also at work. The third subject deals with the so-called disorder modes (DMs) in the cyclotron resonance of conduction electrons. The DMs originate from random distributions of negatively

  19. Impact of donor-acceptor geometry and metal chelation on photophysical properties and applications of triarylboranes.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Zachary M; Wang, Suning

    2009-10-20

    Three-coordinate organoboron compounds have recently found a wide range of applications in materials chemistry as nonlinear optical materials, chemical sensors, and emitters for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). These compounds are excellent electron acceptors due to the empty p(pi) orbital on the boron center. When accompanied by electron donors such as amines, these molecules possess large electronic dipoles, which promote donor-acceptor charge-transfer upon excitation with light. Because of this, donor-acceptor triarylboranes are often highly luminescent both in the solid state and in solution. In this Account, we describe our research to develop donor-acceptor triarylboranes as efficient blue emitters for OLEDs. Through the use of hole-transporting donor groups such as 1-napthylphenylamines, we have prepared multifunctional triarylboranes that can act as the emissive, electron transport, or hole transport layers in OLEDs. We have also examined donor-acceptor compounds based on 2,2'-dipyridylamine or 7-azaindolyl donors, several of which have fluorescent quantum efficiencies approaching 100%. We are also investigating the chemistry of metal-containing triarylboranes. Our studies show that the electron-deficient boryl group can greatly facilitate metal-to-ligand charge-transfer transitions and phosphorescence. In addition, electronegative linker groups such as 2,2'-bipyridine can act in synergy with metal chelation to greatly improve the electron-accepting ability and Lewis acidity of triarylboranes. Donor-acceptor triarylboranes developed in our laboratory can also serve as a series of "switch-on" sensors for fluoride ions. When the donor and acceptor are linked by rigid naphthyl or nonrigid silane linkers, donor-acceptor conjugation is disrupted and charge transfer occurs primarily through space. The binding of fluoride ions to the boron center disrupts this charge transfer, activating alternative pi --> pi* transitions in the molecule and changing the

  20. Antimicrobial Peptides from Fish

    PubMed Central

    Masso-Silva, Jorge A.; Diamond, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found widely distributed through Nature, and participate in the innate host defense of each species. Fish are a great source of these peptides, as they express all of the major classes of AMPs, including defensins, cathelicidins, hepcidins, histone-derived peptides, and a fish-specific class of the cecropin family, called piscidins. As with other species, the fish peptides exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, killing both fish and human pathogens. They are also immunomodulatory, and their genes are highly responsive to microbes and innate immuno-stimulatory molecules. Recent research has demonstrated that some of the unique properties of fish peptides, including their ability to act even in very high salt concentrations, make them good potential targets for development as therapeutic antimicrobials. Further, the stimulation of their gene expression by exogenous factors could be useful in preventing pathogenic microbes in aquaculture. PMID:24594555

  1. Deglycosylation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan and derived peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, S.C.; Krueger, R.C.; Schwartz, N.B. )

    1990-01-30

    In order to define the domain structure of proteoglycans as well as identify primary amino acid sequences specific for attachment of the various carbohydrate substituents, reliable techniques for deglycosylating proteoglycans are required. In this study, deglycosylation of cartilage chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) with minimal core protein cleavage was accomplished by digestion with chondroitinase ABC and keratanase, followed by treatment with anhydrous HF in pyridine. Nearly complete deglycosylation of secreted proteoglycan was verified within 45 min of HF treatment by loss of incorporated ({sup 3}H)glucosamine label from the proteoglycan as a function of time of treatment, as well as by direct analysis of carbohydrate content and xylosyltransferase acceptor activity of unlabeled core protein preparations. The deglycosylated CSPG preparations were homogeneous and of high molecular weight. Comparison of the intact deglycosylated core protein preparations with newly synthesized unprocessed precursors suggested that extensive proteolytic cleavage of the core protein did not occur during normal intracellular processing. Furthermore, peptide patterns generated after clostripain digestion of core protein precursor and of deglycosylated secreted proteoglycan were comparable. With the use of the clostripain digestion procedure, peptides were produced from unlabeled proteoglycan, and two predominant peptides from the most highly glycosylated regions were isolated, characterized, and deglycosylated. These peptides were found to follow similar kinetics of deglycosylation and to acquire xylose activity comparable to the intact core protein.

  2. Glycolic acid inhibits enzymatic, hemorrhagic and edema-inducing activities of BaP1, a P-I metalloproteinase from Bothrops asper snake venom: insights from docking and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Pereañez, Jaime Andrés; Patiño, Arley Camilo; Rey-Suarez, Paola; Núñez, Vitelbina; Henao Castañeda, Isabel Cristina; Rucavado, Alexandra

    2013-09-01

    Glycolic acid (GA) (2-Hydroxyethanoic acid) is widely used as chemical peeling agent in Dermatology and, more recently, as a therapeutic and cosmetic compound in the field of skin care and disease treatment. In this work we tested the inhibitory ability of glycolic acid on the enzymatic, hemorrhagic and edema-inducing activities of BaP1, a P-I metalloproteinase from Bothrops asper venom, which induces a variety of toxic actions. Glycolic acid inhibited the proteolytic activity of BaP1 on azocasein, with an IC₅₀ of 1.67 mM. The compound was also effective at inhibiting the hemorrhagic activity of BaP1 in skin and muscle in experiments involving preincubation of enzyme and inhibitor prior to injection. When BaP1 was injected i.m. and then, at the same site, different concentrations of glycolic acid were administered at either 0 or 5 min, 7 mM solutions of the inhibitor partially abrogated hemorrhagic activity when administered at 0 min. Moreover, glycolic acid inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, edema-forming activity of BaP1 in the footpad. In order to have insights on the mode of action of glycolic acid, UV-vis and intrinsic fluorescence studies were performed. Results of these assays suggest that glycolic acid interacts directly with BaP1 and chelates the Zn²⁺ ion at the active site. These findings were supported by molecular docking results, which suggested that glycolic acid forms hydrogen bonds with residues Glu143, Arg110 and Ala111 of the enzyme. Additionally, molecular modeling results suggest that the inhibitor chelates Zn²⁺, with a distance of 3.58 Å, and may occupy part of substrate binding cleft of BaP1. Our results suggest that glycolic acid is a candidate for the development of inhibitors to be used in snakebite envenomation.

  3. Development of a reliable assay protocol for identification of diseases (RAPID)-bioactive amplification with probing (BAP) for detection of Newcastle disease virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Young; Hsu, Chia-Jen; Chen, Heng-Ju; Chulu, Julius L C; Liu, Hung-Jen

    2008-07-27

    Due to appearance of new genotypes of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) with no cross-protection and with vaccine strains, some outbreaks have been reported in Taiwan that caused significant damage to the poultry industry. A reliable assay protocol, (RAPID)-bioactive amplification with probing (BAP), for detection of NDV that uses a nested PCR and magnetic bead-based probe to increase sensitivity and specificity, was developed. Primers and probes were designed based on the conserved region of the F protein-encoding gene sequences of all NDV Taiwan isolates. The optimal annealing temperature for nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to amplify the gene was 61 degrees C and optimal hybridization occurred when buffer 1x SSC and 0.5% SDS were used at 50 degrees C. The sensitivity of RAPID-BAP was 1 copy/microl for standard plasmids and 10 copy/mul for transcribed F protein-encoding gene of NDV with comparable linearity (R(2)=0.984 versus R(2)=0.99). This sensitivity was superior to that of other techniques currently used. The assay was also highly specific because the negative controls, including classical swine fever virus, avian influenza virus, avian reovirus, and infectious bursa disease virus could not be detected. Thirty-four field samples were tested using conventional RT-PCR, nested RT-PCR, real-time quantitative RT-PCR, and RAPID-BAP assay and the positive rates were 24%, 30%, 41%, and 53%, respectively. The developed assay allows for rapid, correct, and sensitive detection of NDV and fulfils all of the key requirements for clinical applicability. It could reliably rule out false negative results from antibody-based assays and also facilitate a rapid diagnosis in the early phase of the disease for emergency quarantine that may help prevent large-scale outbreaks.

  4. Engineering cyclic peptide toxins.

    PubMed

    Clark, Richard J; Craik, David J

    2012-01-01

    Peptide-based toxins have attracted much attention in recent years for their exciting potential applications in drug design and development. This interest has arisen because toxins are highly potent and selectively target a range of physiologically important receptors. However, peptides suffer from a number of disadvantages, including poor in vivo stability and poor bioavailability. A number of naturally occurring cyclic peptides have been discovered in plants, animals, and bacteria that have exceptional stability and potentially ameliorate these disadvantages. The lessons learned from studies of the structures, stabilities, and biological activities of these cyclic peptides can be applied to the reengineering of toxins that are not naturally cyclic but are amenable to cyclization. In this chapter, we describe solid-phase chemical synthetic methods for the reengineering of peptide toxins to improve their suitability as therapeutic, diagnostic, or imaging agents. The focus is on small disulfide-rich peptides from the venoms of cone snails and scorpions, but the technology is potentially widely applicable to a number of other peptide-based toxins. PMID:22230565

  5. Non-fullerene electron acceptors for use in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Christian B; Holliday, Sarah; Chen, Hung-Yang; Cryer, Samuel J; McCulloch, Iain

    2015-11-17

    The active layer in a solution processed organic photovoltaic device comprises a light absorbing electron donor semiconductor, typically a polymer, and an electron accepting fullerene acceptor. Although there has been huge effort targeted to optimize the absorbing, energetic, and transport properties of the donor material, fullerenes remain as the exclusive electron acceptor in all high performance devices. Very recently, some new non-fullerene acceptors have been demonstrated to outperform fullerenes in comparative devices. This Account describes this progress, discussing molecular design considerations and the structure-property relationships that are emerging. The motivation to replace fullerene acceptors stems from their synthetic inflexibility, leading to constraints in manipulating frontier energy levels, as well as poor absorption in the solar spectrum range, and an inherent tendency to undergo postfabrication crystallization, resulting in device instability. New acceptors have to address these limitations, providing tunable absorption with high extinction coefficients, thus contributing to device photocurrent. The ability to vary and optimize the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy level for a specific donor polymer is also an important requirement, ensuring minimal energy loss on electron transfer and as high an internal voltage as possible. Initially perylene diimide acceptors were evaluated as promising acceptor materials. These electron deficient aromatic molecules can exhibit good electron transport, facilitated by close packed herringbone crystal motifs, and their energy levels can be synthetically tuned. The principal drawback of this class of materials, their tendency to crystallize on too large a length scale for an optimal heterojunction nanostructure, has been shown to be overcome through introduction of conformation twisting through steric effects. This has been primarily achieved by coupling two units together, forming dimers with

  6. Non-fullerene electron acceptors for use in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Christian B; Holliday, Sarah; Chen, Hung-Yang; Cryer, Samuel J; McCulloch, Iain

    2015-11-17

    The active layer in a solution processed organic photovoltaic device comprises a light absorbing electron donor semiconductor, typically a polymer, and an electron accepting fullerene acceptor. Although there has been huge effort targeted to optimize the absorbing, energetic, and transport properties of the donor material, fullerenes remain as the exclusive electron acceptor in all high performance devices. Very recently, some new non-fullerene acceptors have been demonstrated to outperform fullerenes in comparative devices. This Account describes this progress, discussing molecular design considerations and the structure-property relationships that are emerging. The motivation to replace fullerene acceptors stems from their synthetic inflexibility, leading to constraints in manipulating frontier energy levels, as well as poor absorption in the solar spectrum range, and an inherent tendency to undergo postfabrication crystallization, resulting in device instability. New acceptors have to address these limitations, providing tunable absorption with high extinction coefficients, thus contributing to device photocurrent. The ability to vary and optimize the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy level for a specific donor polymer is also an important requirement, ensuring minimal energy loss on electron transfer and as high an internal voltage as possible. Initially perylene diimide acceptors were evaluated as promising acceptor materials. These electron deficient aromatic molecules can exhibit good electron transport, facilitated by close packed herringbone crystal motifs, and their energy levels can be synthetically tuned. The principal drawback of this class of materials, their tendency to crystallize on too large a length scale for an optimal heterojunction nanostructure, has been shown to be overcome through introduction of conformation twisting through steric effects. This has been primarily achieved by coupling two units together, forming dimers with

  7. Non-Fullerene Electron Acceptors for Use in Organic Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus The active layer in a solution processed organic photovoltaic device comprises a light absorbing electron donor semiconductor, typically a polymer, and an electron accepting fullerene acceptor. Although there has been huge effort targeted to optimize the absorbing, energetic, and transport properties of the donor material, fullerenes remain as the exclusive electron acceptor in all high performance devices. Very recently, some new non-fullerene acceptors have been demonstrated to outperform fullerenes in comparative devices. This Account describes this progress, discussing molecular design considerations and the structure–property relationships that are emerging. The motivation to replace fullerene acceptors stems from their synthetic inflexibility, leading to constraints in manipulating frontier energy levels, as well as poor absorption in the solar spectrum range, and an inherent tendency to undergo postfabrication crystallization, resulting in device instability. New acceptors have to address these limitations, providing tunable absorption with high extinction coefficients, thus contributing to device photocurrent. The ability to vary and optimize the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy level for a specific donor polymer is also an important requirement, ensuring minimal energy loss on electron transfer and as high an internal voltage as possible. Initially perylene diimide acceptors were evaluated as promising acceptor materials. These electron deficient aromatic molecules can exhibit good electron transport, facilitated by close packed herringbone crystal motifs, and their energy levels can be synthetically tuned. The principal drawback of this class of materials, their tendency to crystallize on too large a length scale for an optimal heterojunction nanostructure, has been shown to be overcome through introduction of conformation twisting through steric effects. This has been primarily achieved by coupling two units together

  8. Insights on the design and electron-acceptor properties of conjugated organophosphorus materials.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Thomas

    2014-05-20

    The development of conjugated organic materials has become a rapidly evolving field of research, particularly with a view toward practical applications in so-called organic electronics that encompass a variety of device types, such as OLEDs, OPVs, and OFETs. Almost all of these devices minimally require the presence of electron-donor and -acceptor components that act as p- and n-type semiconductors, respectively. Research over the past two decades has shown that while there is an abundant resource of organic p-type materials, suitable n-type species are few and far between. To overcome this severe bottleneck for the further development of organic electronics, researchers have identified organo-main-group avenues as valuable alternatives toward organic electron-acceptor materials that may ultimately be used as n-type components in practical devices. One particular element of interest in this context is phosphorus, which at first glance may not necessarily suggest such properties. In this Account, I provide detailed insights on the origin of the electron-acceptor properties of organophosphorus-based conjugated materials and include an overview of important molecular species that have been developed by my group and others. To this end, I explain that the electron-acceptor properties of conjugated organophosphorus materials originate from an interaction known as negative hyperconjugation. While this particular interaction creates a simply inductively withdrawing phosphoryl substituent for π-conjugated scaffolds, incorporation of a phosphorus atom as an integral part of a cyclic substructure within a π-conjugated system provides a much more complex, versatile, and consequently highly valuable tool for the tuning of the electron-acceptor properties of the materials. Notably, the degree of negative hyperconjugation can effectively be tailored in various ways via simple substitution at the phosphorus center. This is now well established for phosphole-based molecular

  9. Insights on the design and electron-acceptor properties of conjugated organophosphorus materials.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Thomas

    2014-05-20

    The development of conjugated organic materials has become a rapidly evolving field of research, particularly with a view toward practical applications in so-called organic electronics that encompass a variety of device types, such as OLEDs, OPVs, and OFETs. Almost all of these devices minimally require the presence of electron-donor and -acceptor components that act as p- and n-type semiconductors, respectively. Research over the past two decades has shown that while there is an abundant resource of organic p-type materials, suitable n-type species are few and far between. To overcome this severe bottleneck for the further development of organic electronics, researchers have identified organo-main-group avenues as valuable alternatives toward organic electron-acceptor materials that may ultimately be used as n-type components in practical devices. One particular element of interest in this context is phosphorus, which at first glance may not necessarily suggest such properties. In this Account, I provide detailed insights on the origin of the electron-acceptor properties of organophosphorus-based conjugated materials and include an overview of important molecular species that have been developed by my group and others. To this end, I explain that the electron-acceptor properties of conjugated organophosphorus materials originate from an interaction known as negative hyperconjugation. While this particular interaction creates a simply inductively withdrawing phosphoryl substituent for π-conjugated scaffolds, incorporation of a phosphorus atom as an integral part of a cyclic substructure within a π-conjugated system provides a much more complex, versatile, and consequently highly valuable tool for the tuning of the electron-acceptor properties of the materials. Notably, the degree of negative hyperconjugation can effectively be tailored in various ways via simple substitution at the phosphorus center. This is now well established for phosphole-based molecular

  10. Catalytic reaction of cytokinin dehydrogenase: preference for quinones as electron acceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Frébortová, Jitka; Fraaije, Marco W; Galuszka, Petr; Sebela, Marek; Pec, Pavel; Hrbác, Jan; Novák, Ondrej; Bilyeu, Kristin D; English, James T; Frébort, Ivo

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic reaction of cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (EC 1.5.99.12) was studied in detail using the recombinant flavoenzyme from maize. Determination of the redox potential of the covalently linked flavin cofactor revealed a relatively high potential dictating the type of electron acceptor that can be used by the enzyme. Using 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol, 2,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone or 1,4-naphthoquinone as electron acceptor, turnover rates with N6-(2-isopentenyl)adenine of approx. 150 s(-1) could be obtained. This suggests that the natural electron acceptor of the enzyme is quite probably a p-quinone or similar compound. By using the stopped-flow technique, it was found that the enzyme is rapidly reduced by N6-(2-isopentenyl)adenine (k(red)=950 s(-1)). Re-oxidation of the reduced enzyme by molecular oxygen is too slow to be of physiological relevance, confirming its classification as a dehydrogenase. Furthermore, it was established for the first time that the enzyme is capable of degrading aromatic cytokinins, although at low reaction rates. As a result, the enzyme displays a dual catalytic mode for oxidative degradation of cytokinins: a low-rate and low-substrate specificity reaction with oxygen as the electron acceptor, and high activity and strict specificity for isopentenyladenine and analogous cytokinins with some specific electron acceptors. PMID:14965342

  11. Nature of the attractive interaction between proton acceptors and organic ring systems.

    PubMed

    Arras, Emmanuel; Seitsonen, Ari Paavo; Klappenberger, Florian; Barth, Johannes V

    2012-12-14

    Systematic ab initio calculations are combined with a deconvolution of electrostatic contributions to analyze the interplay between potential hydrogen bond acceptors and organic rings with C(sp(2))-H groups (benzene, pyridine and cyclopentadiene). A distinct anisotropic interaction between the ring systems and the electron lone pairs of cyanide, water and other acceptor species is revealed that favors the in-plane orientation of the proton acceptor group. In the attractive regime this interaction carries a pronounced electrostatic signature. By decomposing the electrostatic contribution into parts attributed to different subunits of the ring systems we demonstrate that a major proportion of the interaction energy gain is originating from the non-adjacent moieties, that are not in close contact with. This behavior holds equally for homocyclic, heterocyclic and non-aromatic rings but contrasts that of the ethyne molecule, taken as reference for a weak hydrogen bond donor clearly exhibiting the expected localized character. The ring interaction requires the presence of π-electron clouds and typically results in an interaction energy gain of 40 to 80 meV. Our findings suggest the proton acceptor-ring interaction as a new category of intermolecular non-covalent interactions.

  12. Experimental investigation of donor-acceptor electron transfer and back transfer in solid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfman, R.C.; Lin, Y.; Fayer, M.D. )

    1989-08-24

    Electron transfer from an optically excited donor (rubrene) to randomly distributed acceptors (duroquinone) followed by electron back transfer in a rigid solution (sucrose octaacetate) has been studied experimentally. The forward electron-transfer process was observed by time-dependent fluorescence quenching measurements, while the electron back transfer from the radical anion to the radical cation was monitored by use of the picosecond transient grating technique. A statistical mechanics theory is used to describe the time-dependent dynamics of the system and to extract the forward- and back-transfer parameters from the data. The theory includes donor-acceptor and acceptor-acceptor excluded volume. It is found that the inclusion of excluded volume is necessary to obtain accurate transfer parameters. These parameters enable a detailed description of the electron transfer and recombination dynamics to be given. The agreement between theory and experiment is excellent. A variety of time-dependent properties of the system are calculated. These include the time-dependent ion populations and the probability that the ith acceptor is an ion as a function of time and distance. In addition, (R(t)) and ({tau}(t)), which are the average ion separation as a function of time and the average ion existence time as a function of ion separation, respectively, are calculated.

  13. Effect of acceptor (Mg) concentration on the electrical resistance at room and high (200 deg. C) temperatures of acceptor (Mg)-doped BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Seok-Hyun; Hong, Min-Hee; Hong, Jeong-Oh; Kim, Young-Tae; Hur, Kang-Heon

    2007-09-01

    The behaviors of the electrical resistance at room and high (200 deg. C) temperatures of acceptor (Mg)-doped BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics with the increase of acceptor concentration were investigated. A series of coarse-grained specimens with different acceptor concentrations that were sintered at various oxygen partial pressures was prepared. The critical acceptor concentrations, beyond which the room temperature resistance increases abruptly, were experimentally evaluated and they were found to increase with a decrease in oxygen partial pressure during sintering. Each defect and electron concentrations at sintering and room temperature as a function of acceptor concentration were theoretically calculated. The results calculated could explain the experimentally observed behavior of the resistance versus acceptor concentration. The high (200 deg. C) temperature resistances under high electric field showed resistance degradation critically depending on acceptor concentration in the very small concentration range below {approx}0.1 mol %, which occurred easily with the increase of acceptor concentration. It was explained that such behavior was caused by the variation of potential barrier of grain boundaries for the migration of oxygen vacancies as a function of acceptor concentration.

  14. Proficiency of acceptor-donor-acceptor organic dye with spiro-MeOTAD HTM on the photovoltaic performance of dye sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramavenkateswari, K.; Venkatachalam, P.

    2016-08-01

    This work investigates the proficiency of acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) organic dye Diisopropyl azodicarboxylate (DIAC) as photosensitizer on the photovoltaic parameters of silver (Ag) doped TiO2 photoanode dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) with quasi-solid state electrolyte/hole transport material (HTM) spiro-MeOTAD. TNSs (TiO2 nanosticks) photoanodes are prepared through sol-gel method and hydrothermal technique. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and BET measurement were used to characterize the structure and morphology of TiO2 nanostructures. The Diisopropyl azodicarboxylate organic dye with TNPs-Ag@TNSs composite photoanode structure and spiro-MeOTAD HTM exhibited better power conversion efficiency (PCE). [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Proficiency of acceptor-donor-acceptor organic dye with spiro-MeOTAD HTM on the photovoltaic performance of dye sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramavenkateswari, K.; Venkatachalam, P.

    2016-09-01

    This work investigates the proficiency of acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) organic dye Diisopropyl azodicarboxylate (DIAC) as photosensitizer on the photovoltaic parameters of silver (Ag) doped TiO2 photoanode dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) with quasi-solid state electrolyte/hole transport material (HTM) spiro-MeOTAD. TNSs (TiO2 nanosticks) photoanodes are prepared through sol-gel method and hydrothermal technique. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and BET measurement were used to characterize the structure and morphology of TiO2 nanostructures. The Diisopropyl azodicarboxylate organic dye with TNPs-Ag@TNSs composite photoanode structure and spiro-MeOTAD HTM exhibited better power conversion efficiency (PCE).

  16. Tumor-Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Teesalu, Tambet; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC), contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor-homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR) motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular “zip code” of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies, and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is present in the

  17. Growth of strain SES-3 with arsenate and other diverse electron acceptors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laverman, A.M.; Blum, J.S.; Schaefer, J.K.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Lovley, D.R.; Oremland, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    The selenate-respiring bacterial strain SES-3 was able to use a variety of inorganic electron acceptors to sustain growth. SES-3 grew with the reduction of arsenate to arsenite, Fe(III) to Fe(II), or thiosulfate to sulfide. It also grew in medium in which elemental sulfur, Mn(IV), nitrite, trimethylamine N-oxide, or fumarate was provided as an electron acceptor. Growth on oxygen was microaerophilic. There was no growth with arsenite or chromate. Washed suspensions of cells grown on selenate or nitrate had a constitutive ability to reduce arsenate but were unable to reduce arsenite. These results suggest that strain SES-3 may occupy a niche as an environmental opportunist by being able to take advantage of a diversity of electron acceptors.

  18. Effect of cathode electron acceptors on simultaneous anaerobic sulfide and nitrate removal in microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Zheng, Ping; Mahmood, Qaisar

    2016-01-01

    The current investigation reports the effect of cathode electron acceptors on simultaneous sulfide and nitrate removal in two-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Potassium permanganate and potassium ferricyanide were common cathode electron acceptors and evaluated for substrate removal and electricity generation. The abiotic MFCs produced electricity through spontaneous electrochemical oxidation of sulfide. In comparison with abiotic MFC, the biotic MFC showed better ability for simultaneous nitrate and sulfide removal along with electricity generation. Keeping external resistance of 1,000 Ω, both MFCs showed good capacities for substrate removal where nitrogen and sulfate were the main end products. The steady voltage with potassium permanganate electrodes was nearly twice that of with potassium ferricyanide. Cyclic voltammetry curves confirmed that the potassium permanganate had higher catalytic activity than potassium ferricyanide. The potassium permanganate may be a suitable choice as cathode electron acceptor for enhanced electricity generation during simultaneous treatment of sulfide and nitrate in MFCs. PMID:26901739

  19. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer between Quantum Dot Donors and Quantum Dot Acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Kenny F.; Dennis, Allison M.

    2015-01-01

    Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer amongst semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is reviewed, with particular interest in biosensing applications. The unique optical properties of QDs provide certain advantages and also specific challenges with regards to sensor design, compared to other FRET systems. The brightness and photostability of QDs make them attractive for highly sensitive sensing and long-term, repetitive imaging applications, respectively, but the overlapping donor and acceptor excitation signals that arise when QDs serve as both the donor and acceptor lead to high background signals from direct excitation of the acceptor. The fundamentals of FRET within a nominally homogeneous QD population as well as energy transfer between two distinct colors of QDs are discussed. Examples of successful sensors are highlighted, as is cascading FRET, which can be used for solar harvesting. PMID:26057041

  20. Photovoltaic enhancement of organic solar cells by a bridged donor-acceptor block copolymer approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Sam-Shajing; Zhang, Cheng; Ledbetter, Abram; Choi, Soobum; Seo, Kang; Bonner, Carl E.; Drees, Martin; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar

    2007-01-01

    The authors show that a photovoltaic device composed of a -donor-bridge-acceptor-bridge- type block copolymer thin film exhibits a significant performance improvement over its corresponding donor/acceptor blend (Voc increased from 0.14to1.10V and Jsc increased from 0.017 to 0.058mA/cm2) under identical conditions, where donor is an alkyl derivatized poly-p-phenylenevinylene (PPV) conjugated block, acceptor is a sulfone-alkyl derivatized PPV conjugated block, and bridge is a nonconjugated and flexible unit. The authors attribute such improvement to the block copolymer intrinsic nanophase separation and molecular self-assembly that results in the reduction of the exciton and carrier losses.

  1. Mg acceptors in GaN: Dependence of the /g-anisotropy on the doping concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Detlev M.; Burkhardt, Wolfgang; Leiter, Frank; Walter von Förster; Alves, Helder; Hofstaetter, Albrecht; Meyer, Bruno K.; Romanov, Nikolai G.; Amano, Hiroshi; Akasaki, Isamu

    1999-12-01

    Mg acceptors in GaN epitaxial layers grown by metal-organic vapour-phase epitaxy were investigated by optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) spectroscopy. The magnetic resonances were detected on the magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) of the acceptor bound exciton (Mg0X) in the near bandgap region, and in the infrared spectral range on the MCD of the hole ionisation transition Mg0+hν→Mg-+hVB. The observed g-values of the Mg0 acceptors range for g|| from 2.102 to 2.065 and for g⊥ from 1.94 to 2.00, respectively. These variations depend on the Mg doping concentration.

  2. Rational design of two-dimensional molecular donor-acceptor nanostructure arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia Lin; Zhong, Shu; Zhong, Jian Qiang; Niu, Tian Chao; Hu, Wen Ping; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen; Chen, Wei

    2015-02-01

    The construction of long-range ordered organic donor-acceptor nanostructure arrays over microscopic areas supported on solid substrates is one of the most challenging tasks towards the realization of molecular nanodevices. They can also be used as ideal model systems to understand light induced charge transfer, charge separation and energy conversion processes and mechanisms at the nanometer scale. The aim of this paper is to highlight recent advances and progress in this topic. Special attention is given to two different strategies for the construction of organic donor-acceptor nanostructure arrays, namely (i) molecular self-assembly on artificially patterned or pre-defined molecular surface nanotemplates and (ii) molecular nanostructure formation steered via directional and selective intermolecular interactions. The interfacial charge transfer and the energy level alignment of these donor-acceptor nanostructures are also discussed.

  3. Spectroscopic studies of charge transfer complexes between colchicine and some π acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Mustafa; Duymus, Hulya

    2007-07-01

    Charge transfer complexes between colchicine as donor and π acceptors such as tetracyanoethylene (TCNE), 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano- p-benzoquinone (DDQ), p-chloranil ( p-CHL) have been studied spectrophotometrically in dichloromethane at 21 °C. The stoichiometry of the complexes was found to be 1:1 ratio by the Job method between donor and acceptors with the maximum absorption band at a wavelength of 535, 585 and 515 nm. The equilibrium constant and thermodynamic parameters of the complexes were determined by Benesi-Hildebrand and van't Hoff equations. Colchicine in pure form and in dosage form was applied in this study. The formation constants for the complexes were shown to be dependent on the structure of the electron acceptors used.

  4. Pyridine as proton acceptor in the concerted proton electron transfer oxidation of phenol.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Julien; Costentin, Cyrille; Robert, Marc; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2011-06-01

    Taking pyridine as a prototypal example of biologically important nitrogen bases involved in proton-coupled electron transfers, it is shown with the example of the photochemically triggered oxidation of phenol by Ru(III)(bpy)(3) that this proton acceptor partakes in a concerted pathway whose kinetic characteristics can be extracted from the overall kinetic response. The treatment of these data, implemented by the results of a parallel study carried out in heavy water, allowed the determination of the intrinsic kinetic characteristics of this proton acceptor. Comparison of the reorganization energies and of the pre-exponential factors previously derived for hydrogen phosphate and water (in water) as proton acceptors suggests that, in the case of pyridine, the proton charge is delocalized over a primary shell of water molecules firmly bound to the pyridinium cation. PMID:21499600

  5. Design of reversible, cysteine-targeted Michael acceptors guided by kinetic and computational analysis.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Shyam; Miller, Rand M; Tian, Boxue; Mullins, R Dyche; Jacobson, Matthew P; Taunton, Jack

    2014-09-10

    Electrophilic probes that covalently modify a cysteine thiol often show enhanced pharmacological potency and selectivity. Although reversible Michael acceptors have been reported, the structural requirements for reversibility are poorly understood. Here, we report a novel class of acrylonitrile-based Michael acceptors, activated by aryl or heteroaryl electron-withdrawing groups. We demonstrate that thiol adducts of these acrylonitriles undergo β-elimination at rates that span more than 3 orders of magnitude. These rates correlate inversely with the computed proton affinity of the corresponding carbanions, enabling the intrinsic reversibility of the thiol-Michael reaction to be tuned in a predictable manner. We apply these principles to the design of new reversible covalent kinase inhibitors with improved properties. A cocrystal structure of one such inhibitor reveals specific noncovalent interactions between the 1,2,4-triazole activating group and the kinase. Our experimental and computational study enables the design of new Michael acceptors, expanding the palette of reversible, cysteine-targeted electrophiles.

  6. Donor-Acceptor Heterojunction Configurations Based on DNA-Multichromophore Arrays.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mitsunobu; Tsuto, Koji; Jomura, Ayumi; Takada, Tadao; Yamana, Kazushige

    2015-08-10

    Multichromophore arrays of bis(2-thienyl)diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) and naphthalenediimide (NDI) with two Zn(II) -cyclens were constructed using thymidine DNA as a scaffold through the binding of the Zn(II) -cyclens with thymine bases. We demonstrate photocurrent generation in a donor-acceptor heterojunction configuration consisting of the DPP (donor) and NDI (acceptor) arrays co-immobilized on an Au electrode. The co-immobilized electrode exhibited good photocurrent responses because of the efficient charge separation between the DPP and NDI arrays. In contrast, an immobilized electrode consisting of randomly assembled DPP-NDI arrays generated no photocurrent response because DPP formed ground-state charge-transfer complexes with NDI in the randomly assembled arrays. Therefore, our approach to generate donor-acceptor heterojunctions based on DNA-multichromophore arrays is a useful method to efficiently generate photocurrent. PMID:26179473

  7. Pyridine as proton acceptor in the concerted proton electron transfer oxidation of phenol.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Julien; Costentin, Cyrille; Robert, Marc; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2011-06-01

    Taking pyridine as a prototypal example of biologically important nitrogen bases involved in proton-coupled electron transfers, it is shown with the example of the photochemically triggered oxidation of phenol by Ru(III)(bpy)(3) that this proton acceptor partakes in a concerted pathway whose kinetic characteristics can be extracted from the overall kinetic response. The treatment of these data, implemented by the results of a parallel study carried out in heavy water, allowed the determination of the intrinsic kinetic characteristics of this proton acceptor. Comparison of the reorganization energies and of the pre-exponential factors previously derived for hydrogen phosphate and water (in water) as proton acceptors suggests that, in the case of pyridine, the proton charge is delocalized over a primary shell of water molecules firmly bound to the pyridinium cation.

  8. Enhanced biodegradation of cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX) under mixed electron-acceptor condition.

    PubMed

    Boopathy, R

    2001-02-01

    The biodegradation of cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine, commonly known as 'high melting explosive' (HMX), under various electron-acceptor conditions was investigated using enrichment cultures developed from the anaerobic digester sludge of Thibodaux sewage treatment plant. The results indicated that the HMX was biodegraded under sulfate reducing, nitrate reducing, fermenting, methanogenic, and mixed electron accepting conditions. However, the rates of degradation varied among the various conditions studied. The fastest removal of HMX (from 22 ppm on day 0 to < 0.05 ppm on day 11) was observed under mixed electron-acceptor conditions, followed in order by sulfate reducing, fermenting, methanogenic, and nitrate reducing conditions. Under aerobic conditions, HMX was not biodegraded, which indicated that HMX degradation takes place under anaerobic conditions via reduction. HMX was converted to methanol and chloroform under mixed electron-acceptor conditions. This study showed evidence for HMX degradation under anaerobic conditions in a mixed microbial population system similar to any contaminated field sites, where a heterogeneous population exists.

  9. Introduction to peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fields, Gregg B

    2002-05-01

    A number of synthetic peptides are significant commercial or pharmaceutical products, ranging from the dipeptide sugar-substitute aspartame to clinically used hormones, such as oxytocin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and calcitonin. This unit provides an overview of the field of synthetic peptides and proteins, including their purification. It discusses selecting the solid support and common coupling reagents. Additional information is provided regarding common side reactions and synthesizing modified residues.

  10. Introduction to peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fields, Gregg B

    2002-02-01

    A number of synthetic peptides are significant commercial or pharmaceutical products, ranging from the dipeptide sugar-substitute aspartame to clinically used hormones, such as oxytocin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and calcitonin. This unit provides an overview of the field of synthetic peptides and proteins, including their purification. It discusses selecting the solid support and common coupling reagents. Additional information is provided regarding common side reactions and synthesizing modified residues.

  11. Hybrid coconut seedlings, scholarships, and discount cards for family planning acceptors.

    PubMed

    Sumarsono

    1989-10-01

    Having learned from failed family planning (FP) incentive schemes in other countries, Indonesia implemented a reward system designed to popularize FP in the community. In order to overcome cultural opposition to FP, many countries in the 1970s opted to give incentives--money, materials, etc.--to new contraceptive acceptors and the FP workers who successfully recruited them. These countries, which oftentimes spent up to 1/4 of their program budget on incentives, saw rapid increases in the number of new acceptors. The results, however, only reflected a superficial acceptance of FP. When the incentives stopped, the number of acceptors dropped considerably. Recognizing this, the Indonesian government set out to increase FP acceptance by making the small family the norm in the community. And one of the approaches for doing so was a reward system. The goals of the reward program were: 1) to raise awareness of the recognition given to individuals or groups that have accepted FP; 2) to create pride among FP workers and new acceptors; and 3) to generate leadership in the community. Villages with high FP acceptance receive rewards such as deep-wells that provide clean water or income generating projects. Individuals also receive rewards that sometimes include hybrid coconut seedlings which, after 3 years, can yield up to 700 coconuts, which can provide a family with a significant supplemental income. The government also gives scholarships to children of FP acceptors. Also, the president of Indonesia publicly recognized family planning acceptors. In 1989, over 800,000 couples received awards for practicing contraception over the past 5-16 years. PMID:12315968

  12. Molecular origin of photovoltaic performance in donor-block-acceptor all-conjugated block copolymers

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, Kendall A.; Lin, Yen -Hao; Mok, Jorge W.; Yager, Kevin G.; Strzalka, Joseph; Nie, Wanyi; Mohite, Aditya D.; Verduzco, Rafael

    2015-11-03

    All-conjugated block copolymers may be an effective route to self-assembled photovoltaic devices, but we lack basic information on the relationship between molecular characteristics and photovoltaic performance. Here, we synthesize a library of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) block poly((9,9-dialkylfluorene)-2,7-diyl-alt-[4,7-bis(alkylthiophen-5-yl)-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole]-2',2''-diyl) (PFTBT) donor-block-acceptor all-conjugated block copolymers and carry out a comprehensive study of processing conditions, crystallinity, domain sizes, and side-chain structure on photovoltaic device performance. We find that all block copolymers studied exhibit an out-of-plane crystal orientation after deposition, and on thermal annealing at high temperatures the crystal orientation flips to an in-plane orientation. By varying processing conditions on polymer photovoltaic devices, we show thatmore » the crystal orientation has only a modest effect (15-20%) on photovoltaic performance. The addition of side-chains to the PFTBT block is found to decrease photovoltaic power conversion efficiencies by at least an order of magnitude. Through grazing-incidence X-ray measurements we find that the addition of side-chains to the PFTBT acceptor block results in weak segregation and small (< 10 nm) block copolymer self-assembled donor and acceptor domains. This work is the most comprehensive to date on all-conjugated block copolymer systems and suggests that photovoltaic performance of block copolymers depends strongly on the miscibility of donor and acceptor blocks, which impacts donor and acceptor domain sizes and purity. Lastly, strategies for improving the device performance of block copolymer photovoltaics should seek to increase segregation between donor and acceptor polymer domains.« less

  13. Hybrid coconut seedlings, scholarships, and discount cards for family planning acceptors.

    PubMed

    Sumarsono

    1989-10-01

    Having learned from failed family planning (FP) incentive schemes in other countries, Indonesia implemented a reward system designed to popularize FP in the community. In order to overcome cultural opposition to FP, many countries in the 1970s opted to give incentives--money, materials, etc.--to new contraceptive acceptors and the FP workers who successfully recruited them. These countries, which oftentimes spent up to 1/4 of their program budget on incentives, saw rapid increases in the number of new acceptors. The results, however, only reflected a superficial acceptance of FP. When the incentives stopped, the number of acceptors dropped considerably. Recognizing this, the Indonesian government set out to increase FP acceptance by making the small family the norm in the community. And one of the approaches for doing so was a reward system. The goals of the reward program were: 1) to raise awareness of the recognition given to individuals or groups that have accepted FP; 2) to create pride among FP workers and new acceptors; and 3) to generate leadership in the community. Villages with high FP acceptance receive rewards such as deep-wells that provide clean water or income generating projects. Individuals also receive rewards that sometimes include hybrid coconut seedlings which, after 3 years, can yield up to 700 coconuts, which can provide a family with a significant supplemental income. The government also gives scholarships to children of FP acceptors. Also, the president of Indonesia publicly recognized family planning acceptors. In 1989, over 800,000 couples received awards for practicing contraception over the past 5-16 years.

  14. Threshold-like complexation of conjugated polymers with small molecule acceptors in solution within the neighbor-effect model.

    PubMed

    Sosorev, Andrey Yu; Parashchuk, Olga D; Zapunidi, Sergey A; Kashtanov, Grigoriy S; Golovnin, Ilya V; Kommanaboyina, Srikanth; Perepichka, Igor F; Paraschuk, Dmitry Yu

    2016-02-14

    In some donor-acceptor blends based on conjugated polymers, a pronounced charge-transfer complex (CTC) forms in the electronic ground state. In contrast to small-molecule donor-acceptor blends, the CTC concentration in polymer:acceptor solution can increase with the acceptor content in a threshold-like way. This threshold-like behavior was earlier attributed to the neighbor effect (NE) in the polymer complexation, i.e., next CTCs are preferentially formed near the existing ones; however, the NE origin is unknown. To address the factors affecting the NE, we record the optical absorption data for blends of the most studied conjugated polymers, poly(2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene) (MEH-PPV) and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), with electron acceptors of fluorene series, 1,8-dinitro-9,10-antraquinone (), and 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane () in different solvents, and then analyze the data within the NE model. We have found that the NE depends on the polymer and acceptor molecular skeletons and solvent, while it does not depend on the acceptor electron affinity and polymer concentration. We conclude that the NE operates within a single macromolecule and stems from planarization of the polymer chain involved in the CTC with an acceptor molecule; as a result, the probability of further complexation with the next acceptor molecules at the adjacent repeat units increases. The steric and electronic microscopic mechanisms of NE are discussed.

  15. Amphiphilic Four-Helix Bundle Peptides Designed for Light-Induced Electron Transfer Across a Soft Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Ye,S.; Discher, B.; Strzalka, J.; Xu, T.; Wu, S.; Noy, D.; Kuzmenko, I.; Gog, T.; Blasie, K.; et al.

    2005-01-01

    A family of four-helix bundle peptides were designed to be amphiphilic, possessing distinct hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains along the length of the bundle's exterior. This facilitates their vectorial insertion across a soft interface between polar and nonpolar media. Their design also now provides for selective incorporation of electron donor and acceptor cofactors within each domain. This allows translation of the designed intramolecular electron transfer along the bundle axis into a macroscopic charge separation across the interface.

  16. Effect of Electronic Acceptor Segments on Photophysical Properties of Low-Band-Gap Ambipolar Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanzuo; Cui, Jingang; Zhao, Jianing; Liu, Jinglin; Song, Peng; Ma, Fengcai

    2013-01-01

    Stimulated by a recent experimental report, charge transfer and photophysical properties of donor-acceptor ambipolar polymer were studied with the quantum chemistry calculation and the developed 3D charge difference density method. The effects of electronic acceptor strength on the structure, energy levels, electron density distribution, ionization potentials, and electron affinities were also obtained to estimate the transporting ability of hole and electron. With the developed 3D charge difference density, one visualizes the charge transfer process, distinguishes the role of molecular units, and finds the relationship between the role of DPP and excitation energy for the three polymers during photo-excitation. PMID:23365549

  17. Modular supramolecular approach for co-crystallization of donors and acceptors into ordered networks

    DOEpatents

    Stupp, Samuel I.; Stoddart, J. Fraser; Shveyd, Alex K.; Tayi, Alok S.; Sue, Andrew C. H.; Narayanan, Ashwin

    2016-09-20

    Organic charge-transfer (CT) co-crystals in a mixed stack system are disclosed, wherein a donor molecule (D) and an acceptor molecule (A) occupy alternating positions (DADADA) along the CT axis. A platform is provided which amplifies the molecular recognition of donors and acceptors and produces co-crystals at ambient conditions, wherein the platform comprises (i) a molecular design of the first constituent (.alpha.-complement), (ii) a molecular design of the second compound (.beta.-complement), and (iii) a solvent system that promotes co-crystallization.

  18. Assessing the regioselectivity of OleD-catalyzed glycosylation with a diverse set of acceptors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Maoquan; Hamza, Adel; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Thorson, Jon S

    2013-02-22

    To explore the acceptor regioselectivity of OleD-catalyzed glucosylation, the products of OleD-catalyzed reactions with six structurally diverse acceptors flavones- (daidzein), isoflavones (flavopiridol), stilbenes (resveratrol), indole alkaloids (10-hydroxycamptothecin), and steroids (2-methoxyestradiol)-were determined. This study highlights the first synthesis of flavopiridol and 2-methoxyestradiol glucosides and confirms the ability of OleD to glucosylate both aromatic and aliphatic nucleophiles. In all cases, molecular dynamics simulations were consistent with the determined product distribution and suggest the potential to develop a virtual screening model to identify additional OleD substrates.

  19. Doping of germanium and silicon crystals with non-hydrogenic acceptors for far infrared lasers

    DOEpatents

    Haller, Eugene E.; Brundermann, Erik

    2000-01-01

    A method for doping semiconductors used for far infrared lasers with non-hydrogenic acceptors having binding energies larger than the energy of the laser photons. Doping of germanium or silicon crystals with beryllium, zinc or copper. A far infrared laser comprising germanium crystals doped with double or triple acceptor dopants permitting the doped laser to be tuned continuously from 1 to 4 terahertz and to operate in continuous mode. A method for operating semiconductor hole population inversion lasers with a closed cycle refrigerator.

  20. Hexachloroiridate IV as an Electron Acceptor for a Plasmalemma Redox System in Maize Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Lüthen, Hartwig; Böttger, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Hexachloroiridate IV, a new artificial electron acceptor for the constitutive plant plasma membrane redox system has been investigated. It appeared not to permeate through biological membranes. Due to its higher redox potential, it is a more powerful electron acceptor than hexacyanoferrate III (ferricyanide) and even micromolar concentrations are rapidly reduced. Hexachloroiridate IV increased H+ efflux over a concentration range of 0.05 to 0.1 millimolar. Lower concentrations slightly inhibited proton extrusion. Calcium stimulated both proton and electron transfer rates. Like hexacyanoferrate III-reduction, irridate reduction was inhibited by auxin. PMID:16666029

  1. Copper-catalyzed asymmetric conjugate addition of organometallic reagents to extended Michael acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Thibault E; Drissi-Amraoui, Sammy; Crévisy, Christophe; Baslé, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Summary The copper-catalyzed asymmetric conjugate addition (ACA) of nucleophiles onto polyenic Michael acceptors represents an attractive and powerful methodology for the synthesis of relevant chiral molecules, as it enables in a straightforward manner the sequential generation of two or more stereogenic centers. In the last decade, various chiral copper-based catalysts were evaluated in combination with different nucleophiles and Michael acceptors, and have unambiguously demonstrated their usefulness in the control of the regio- and enantioselectivity of the addition. The aim of this review is to report recent breakthroughs achieved in this challenging field. PMID:26734090

  2. Copper-catalyzed asymmetric conjugate addition of organometallic reagents to extended Michael acceptors.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Thibault E; Drissi-Amraoui, Sammy; Crévisy, Christophe; Baslé, Olivier; Mauduit, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The copper-catalyzed asymmetric conjugate addition (ACA) of nucleophiles onto polyenic Michael acceptors represents an attractive and powerful methodology for the synthesis of relevant chiral molecules, as it enables in a straightforward manner the sequential generation of two or more stereogenic centers. In the last decade, various chiral copper-based catalysts were evaluated in combination with different nucleophiles and Michael acceptors, and have unambiguously demonstrated their usefulness in the control of the regio- and enantioselectivity of the addition. The aim of this review is to report recent breakthroughs achieved in this challenging field.

  3. Magnetic field effect on the Coulomb interaction of acceptors in semimagnetic quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Kalpana, P.; Merwyn, A.; Nithiananthi, P.; Jayakumar, K.; Reuben, Jasper D.

    2015-06-24

    The Coulomb interaction of holes in a Semimagnetic Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te / CdTe Spherical and Cubical Quantum Dot (SMQD) in a magnetic field is studied using variational approach in the effective mass approximation. Since these holes in QD show a pronounced collective behavior, while distinct single particle phenomena is suppressed, their interaction in confined potential becomes very significant. It has been observed that acceptor-acceptor interaction is more in cubical QD than in spherical QD which can be controlled by the magnetic field. The results are presented and discussed.

  4. Helical-Peptide-Catalyzed Enantioselective Michael Addition Reactions and Their Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Atsushi; Umeno, Tomohiro; Doi, Mitsunobu; Akagawa, Kengo; Kudo, Kazuaki; Tanaka, Masakazu

    2016-08-01

    Helical peptide foldamer catalyzed Michael addition reactions of nitroalkane or dialkyl malonate to α,β-unsaturated ketones are reported along with the mechanistic considerations of the enantio-induction. A wide variety of α,β-unsaturated ketones, including β-aryl, β-alkyl enones, and cyclic enones, were found to be catalyzed by the helical peptide to give Michael adducts with high enantioselectivities (up to 99%). On the basis of X-ray crystallographic analysis and depsipeptide study, the amide protons, N(2)-H and N(3)-H, at the N terminus in the α-helical peptide catalyst were crucial for activating Michael donors, while the N-terminal primary amine activated Michael acceptors through the formation of iminium ion intermediates.

  5. Synthesis and biological properties of amino acids and peptides containing a tetrazolyl moiety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, E. A.; Trifonov, R. E.

    2015-09-01

    Literature data published mainly in the last 15 years on the synthesis and biological properties of amino acid analogues and derivatives containing tetrazolyl moieties are analyzed. Tetrazolyl analogues and derivatives of amino acids and peptides are shown to be promising for medicinal chemistry. Being polynitrogen heterocyclic systems comprising four endocyclic nitrogen atoms, tetrazoles can behave as acids and bases and form strong hydrogen bonds with proton donors (more rarely, with acceptors). They have high metabolic stability and are able to penetrate biological membranes. The review also considers the synthesis and properties of linear and cyclic peptides based on modified amino acids incorporating a tetrazolyl moiety. A special issue is the discussion of the biological properties of tetrazole-containing amino acids and peptides, which exhibit high biological activity and can be used to design new drugs. The bibliography includes 200 references.

  6. Modular, Antibody-free Time-Resolved LRET Kinase Assay Enabled by Quantum Dots and Tb3+-sensitizing Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Wei; Parker, Laurie L.

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescent drug screening assays are essential for tyrosine kinase inhibitor discovery. Here we demonstrate a flexible, antibody-free TR-LRET kinase assay strategy that is enabled by the combination of streptavidin-coated quantum dot (QD) acceptors and biotinylated, Tb3+ sensitizing peptide donors. By exploiting the spectral features of Tb3+ and QD, and the high binding affinity of the streptavidin-biotin interaction, we achieved multiplexed detection of kinase activity in a modular fashion without requiring additional covalent labeling of each peptide substrate. This strategy is compatible with high-throughput screening, and should be adaptable to the rapidly changing workflows and targets involved in kinase inhibitor discovery.

  7. Relating skin sensitizing potency to chemical reactivity: reactive Michael acceptors inhibit NF-κB signaling and are less sensitizing than S(N)Ar- and S(N)2- reactive chemicals.

    PubMed

    Natsch, Andreas; Haupt, Tina; Laue, Heike

    2011-11-21

    The skin sensitization potency of chemicals is partly related to their reactivity to proteins. This can be quantified as the rate constant of the reaction with a model peptide, and a kinetic profiling approach to determine rate constants was previously proposed. A linear relationship between the skin sensitization potency in the local lymph node assay (LLNA) and the rate constant for Michael acceptors was reported, characterized by a relatively flat regression line. Thus, a 10-fold increase of reactivity correlates to an increase of the sensitization potential of only 1.7-fold. Here, we first validate this model by repeating previous data and testing additional Michael acceptors and prove that the model is both reproducible and robust to the addition of new data. Chemicals of different mechanistic applicability domains, namely, S(N)Ar- and S(N)2-reactive sensitizers, were then tested with the same kinetic profiling approach. A linear relationship between sensitization potency in the LLNA and rate constants was also found, yet with a much steeper slope, i.e., for S(N)Ar- and S(N)2-reactive sensitizers, increasing reactivity correlates to a much stronger increase in sensitization potency. On the basis of the well-known inhibitory activity of some Michael acceptors on IKK kinase, it was hypothesized that the difference in the slopes is due to the specific anti-inflammatory potential of Michael acceptor chemicals. Therefore, all chemicals were tested for anti-inflammatory activity in a reporter gene assay for the inhibition of NF-κB activation. Increasingly reactive Michael acceptors have increasing anti-inflammatory potential in this assay, whereas no such biological activity was detected for the S(N)Ar and S(N)2 reactive sensitizers. Thus, the increasing reactivity of Michael acceptors confers both anti-inflammatory and skin sensitizing/pro-inflammatory potential, which may partially neutralize each other. This may be the reason for the relatively weak relationship

  8. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants.

    PubMed

    Tam, James P; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  9. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Tam, James P.; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  10. TERMINAL ELECTRON ACCEPTOR MASS BALANCE: LIGHT NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS AND NATURAL ATTENUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in subsurface systems contain a relatively large amount of biodegradable organic material. During the biochemical oxidation of the organic compounds in the NAPL, electrons are transferred to terminal electron acceptors (TEA) (i.e., O2, NO3-, Mn(I...

  11. Engineering of glucoside acceptors for the regioselective synthesis of beta-(1-->3)-disaccharides with glycosynthases.

    PubMed

    Marton, Zsuzanna; Tran, Vinh; Tellier, Charles; Dion, Michel; Drone, Jullien; Rabiller, Claude

    2008-11-24

    Glycosynthase mutants obtained from Thermotogamaritima were able to catalyze the regioselective synthesis of aryl beta-D-Galp-(1-->3)-beta-D-Glcp and aryl beta-D-Glcp-(1-->3)-beta-D-Glcp in high yields (up to 90 %) using aryl beta-D-glucosides as acceptors. The need for an aglyconic aryl group was rationalized by molecular modeling calculations, which have emphasized a high stabilizing interaction of this group by stacking with W312 of the enzyme. Unfortunately, the deprotection of the aromatic group of the disaccharides was not possible without partial hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond. The replacement of aryl groups by benzyl ones could offer the opportunity to deprotect the anomeric position under very mild conditions. Assuming that benzyl acceptors could preserve the stabilizing stacking, benzyl beta-d-glucoside firstly assayed as acceptor resulted in both poor yields and poor regioselectivity. Thus, we decided to undertake molecular modeling calculations in order to design which suitable substituted benzyl acceptors could be used. This study resulted in the choice of 2-biphenylmethyl beta-D-glucopyranoside. This choice was validated experimentally, since the corresponding beta-(1-->3) disaccharide was obtained in good yields and with a high regioselectivity. At the same time, we have shown that phenyl 1-thio-beta-D-glucopyranoside was also an excellent substrate leading to similar results as those obtained with the O-phenyl analogue. The NBS deprotection of the S-phenyl group afforded the corresponding disaccharide quantitatively.

  12. tRNA acceptor stem and anticodon bases form independent codes related to protein folding.

    PubMed

    Carter, Charles W; Wolfenden, Richard

    2015-06-16

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases recognize tRNA anticodon and 3' acceptor stem bases. Synthetase Urzymes acylate cognate tRNAs even without anticodon-binding domains, in keeping with the possibility that acceptor stem recognition preceded anticodon recognition. Representing tRNA identity elements with two bits per base, we show that the anticodon encodes the hydrophobicity of each amino acid side-chain as represented by its water-to-cyclohexane distribution coefficient, and this relationship holds true over the entire temperature range of liquid water. The acceptor stem codes preferentially for the surface area or size of each side-chain, as represented by its vapor-to-cyclohexane distribution coefficient. These orthogonal experimental properties are both necessary to account satisfactorily for the exposed surface area of amino acids in folded proteins. Moreover, the acceptor stem codes correctly for β-branched and carboxylic acid side-chains, whereas the anticodon codes for a wider range of such properties, but not for size or β-branching. These and other results suggest that genetic coding of 3D protein structures evolved in distinct stages, based initially on the size of the amino acid and later on its compatibility with globular folding in water.

  13. Synthesis of rapeseed biodiesel using short-chained alkyl acetates as acyl acceptor.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Gwi-Taek; Park, Don-Hee

    2010-05-01

    In this study, we conducted experiments using a response surface methodology to determine the optimal reaction conditions for the enzymatic synthesis of biodiesel from rapeseed oil and short-chained alkyl acetates, such as methyl acetate or ethyl acetate, as the acyl acceptor at 40 degrees C. Based on our response surface methodology experiments, the optimal reaction conditions for the synthesis of biodiesel were as follows: methyl acetate as acyl acceptor, catalyst concentration of 16.50%, oil-to-methyl acetate molar ratio of 1:12.44, and reaction time of 19.70 h; ethyl acetate as acyl acceptor, catalyst concentration of 16.95%, oil-to-ethyl acetate molar ratio of 1:12.56, and reaction time of 19.73 h. The fatty acid ester content under the above conditions when methyl acetate and ethyl acetate were used as the acyl acceptor was 58.0% and 62.6%, respectively. The statistical method described in this study can be applied to effectively optimize the enzymatic conditions required for biodiesel production with short-chained alkyl acetates.

  14. Photoluminescence study of Be acceptors in GaInNAs epilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Y.; Barman, B.; Scrace, T.; Petrou, A.; Fukuda, M.; Sellers, I. R.; Leroux, M.; Khalfioui, M. A.

    2014-03-01

    We have studied the photoluminescence (PL) spectra from MBE grown GaInNAs epilayers doped p-type with Beryllium acceptors. The measurements were carried out in the 5 K - 70 K temperature range and in magnetic fields (B) up to 7 tesla. The PL spectra contain two features at T = 5 K: The exciton at 1093 meV and a second broader feature at 1058 meV. The intensity of this feature decreases with increasing temperature and disappears completely by 70K while the excitonic feature persists. The emission at 1058meV is identified as the conduction band to Beryllium acceptor transition. If we take into account the binding energy of the exciton [3] we get a value of 23 meV for the Beryllium acceptor binding energy. The acceptor related transition was studied as a function of magnetic field; the energy of this transition has a linear dependence on B with a slope of 055 meV/T. Research supported by Amethyst Research In. through the State of Oklahoma, ONAP program.

  15. Dominant effects of first monolayer energetics at donor/acceptor interfaces on organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Seiichiro; Nakano, Kyohei; Suzuki, Kaori; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Tajima, Keisuke

    2015-05-20

    Energy levels of the first monolayer are manipulated at donor/acceptor interfaces in planar heterojunction organic photovoltaics by using molecular self-organization. A "cascade" energy landscape allows thermal-activation-free charge generation by photoirradiation, destabilizes the energy of the interfacial charge-transfer state, and suppresses bimolecular charge recombination, resulting in a higher open-circuit voltage and fill factor.

  16. tRNA acceptor stem and anticodon bases form independent codes related to protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Charles W.; Wolfenden, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases recognize tRNA anticodon and 3′ acceptor stem bases. Synthetase Urzymes acylate cognate tRNAs even without anticodon-binding domains, in keeping with the possibility that acceptor stem recognition preceded anticodon recognition. Representing tRNA identity elements with two bits per base, we show that the anticodon encodes the hydrophobicity of each amino acid side-chain as represented by its water-to-cyclohexane distribution coefficient, and this relationship holds true over the entire temperature range of liquid water. The acceptor stem codes preferentially for the surface area or size of each side-chain, as represented by its vapor-to-cyclohexane distribution coefficient. These orthogonal experimental properties are both necessary to account satisfactorily for the exposed surface area of amino acids in folded proteins. Moreover, the acceptor stem codes correctly for β-branched and carboxylic acid side-chains, whereas the anticodon codes for a wider range of such properties, but not for size or β-branching. These and other results suggest that genetic coding of 3D protein structures evolved in distinct stages, based initially on the size of the amino acid and later on its compatibility with globular folding in water. PMID:26034281

  17. Measuring drug saturation solubility in thin polymer films: use of a thin acceptor layer.

    PubMed

    Kunst, Anders; Lee, Geoffrey

    2015-03-15

    The saturation solubility of scopolamine base in two pressure sensitive adhesive DURO-TAKs has been determined using the 5-layer laminate technique. The acceptor layer had a thickness of less than 25 μm to promote a rapid partitioning equilibrium. With DURO-TAK 87-2510 the saturation solubility is 5.2 ± 0.6% w/w when measured after 7 days. With DURO-TAK 87-4098 the saturation solubility is slightly higher, 7.9 ± 0.7% w/w after 7 days. These values remained constant up to approximately 30 days' experimental time. In both cases the acceptor was free of crystalline material at the end of the experiment. This strongly suggests that that equilibrium had been reached between the saturated solution in the acceptor layer and the crystalline drug still present in the donor layer. The addition of light liquid paraffin to the acceptor produced a solubilizing effect with 87-4098 but not 87-2510. We recommend some experimental conditions that we consider to be necessary to achieve a reliable and accurate result with this technique. If performed correctly, it can give a feasible result.

  18. Isotope effect on electron paramagnetic resonance of boron acceptors in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegner, A. R.; Tezuka, H.; Andlauer, T.; Stutzmann, M.; Thewalt, M. L. W.; Brandt, M. S.; Itoh, K. M.

    2010-09-01

    The fourfold degeneracy of the boron acceptor ground state in silicon, which is easily lifted by any symmetry-breaking perturbation, allows for a strong inhomogeneous broadening of the boron-related electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) lines, e.g., by a random distribution of local strains. However, since EPR of boron acceptors in externally unstrained silicon was reported initially, neither the line shape nor the magnitude of the residual broadening observed in samples with high-crystalline purity were compatible with the low concentrations of carbon and oxygen point defects, being the predominant source of random local strain. Adapting a theoretical model which has been applied to understand the acceptor ground-state splitting in the absence of a magnetic field as an effect due to the presence of different silicon isotopes, we show that local fluctuations of the valence-band edge due to different isotopic configurations in the vicinity of the boron acceptors can quantitatively account for all inhomogeneous broadening effects in high-purity Si with a natural isotope composition. Our calculations show that such an isotopic perturbation also leads to a shift in the g value of different boron-related resonances, which we could verify in our experiments. Further, our results provide an independent test and verification of the valence-band offsets between the different Si isotopes determined in previous works.

  19. Nonequilibrium phenomena in charge recombination of excited donor-acceptor complexes and free energy gap law.

    PubMed

    Yudanov, Vladislav V; Mikhailova, Valentina A; Ivanov, Anatoly I

    2010-12-23

    The charge recombination dynamics of excited donor-acceptor complexes in polar solvents has been investigated within the framework of the stochastic approach. The model involves the excited state formation by the pump pulse and accounts for the reorganization of a number of intramolecular high-frequency vibrational modes, for their relaxation as well as for the solvent reorganization following nonexponential relaxation. The hot transitions accelerate the charge recombination in the low exergonic region and suppress it in the region of moderate exothermicity. This straightens the dependence of the logarithm of the charge recombination rate constant on the free energy gap to the form that can be fitted to the experimental data. The free energy dependence of the charge recombination rate constant can be well fitted to the multichannel stochastic model if the donor-acceptor complexes are separated into a few groups with different values of the electronic coupling. The model provides correct description of the nonexponential charge recombination dynamics in excited donor-acceptor complexes, in particular, nearly exponential recombination in perylene-tetracyanoethylene complex in acetonitrile. It appears that majority of the initially excited donor-acceptor complexes recombines in a nonthermal (hot) stage when the nonequilibrium wave packet passes through a number of term crossings corresponding to transitions toward vibrational excited states of the electronic ground state in the area of the low and moderate exothermicity.

  20. Discriminating a deep gallium antisite defect from shallow acceptors in GaAs using supercell calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Peter A.

    2016-03-01

    For the purposes of making reliable first-principles predictions of defect energies in semiconductors, it is crucial to distinguish between effective-mass-like defects, which cannot be treated accurately with existing supercell methods, and deep defects, for which density functional theory calculations can yield reliable predictions of defect energy levels. The gallium antisite defect GaA s is often associated with the 78/203 meV shallow double acceptor in Ga-rich gallium arsenide. Within a conceptual framework of level patterns, analyses of structure and spin stabilization can be used within a supercell approach to distinguish localized deep defect states from shallow acceptors such as BA s. This systematic approach determines that the gallium antisite supercell results has signatures inconsistent with an effective mass state and cannot be the 78/203 shallow double acceptor. The properties of the Ga antisite in GaAs are described, total energy calculations that explicitly map onto asymptotic discrete localized bulk states predict that the Ga antisite is a deep double acceptor and has at least one deep donor state.

  1. Discriminating a deep defect from shallow acceptors in supercell calculations: gallium antisite in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Peter

    To make reliable first principles predictions of defect energies in semiconductors, it is crucial to discriminate between effective-mass-like defects--for which existing supercell methods fail--and deep defects--for which density functional theory calculations can yield reliable predictions of defect energy levels. The gallium antisite GaAs is often associated with the 78/203 meV shallow double acceptor in Ga-rich gallium arsenide. Within a framework of level occupation patterns, analyses of structure and spin stabilization can be used within a supercell approach to distinguish localized deep defect states from shallow acceptors such as BAs. This systematic analysis determines that the gallium antisite is inconsistent with a shallow state, and cannot be the 78/203 shallow double acceptor. The properties of the Ga antisite in GaAs are described, predicting that the Ga antisite is a deep double acceptor and has two donor states, one of which might be accidentally shallow. -- Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Photocurrent generation through electron-exciton interaction at the organic semiconductor donor/acceptor interface.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lijia; Zhang, Qiaoming; Lei, Yanlian; Zhu, Furong; Wu, Bo; Zhang, Ting; Niu, Guoxi; Xiong, Zuhong; Song, Qunliang

    2013-10-21

    In this work, we report our effort to understand the photocurrent generation that is contributed via electron-exciton interaction at the donor/acceptor interface in organic solar cells (OSCs). Donor/acceptor bi-layer heterojunction OSCs, of the indium tin oxide/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/fullerene (C60)/molybdenum oxide/Al type, were employed to study the mechanism of photocurrent generation due to the electron-exciton interaction, where CuPc and C60 are the donor and the acceptor, respectively. It is shown that the electron-exciton interaction and the exciton dissociation processes co-exist at the CuPc/C60 interface in OSCs. Compared to conventional donor/acceptor bi-layer OSCs, the cells with the above configuration enable holes to be extracted at the C60 side while electrons can be collected at the CuPc side, resulting in a photocurrent in the reverse direction. The photocurrent thus observed is contributed to primarily by the charge carriers that are generated by the electron-exciton interaction at the CuPc/C60 interface, while charges derived from the exciton dissociation process also exist at the same interface. The mechanism of photocurrent generation due to electron-exciton interaction in the OSCs is further investigated, and it is manifested by the transient photovoltage characteristics and the external quantum efficiency measurements. PMID:24002235

  3. Femtosecond transient grating studies of electron transfer in porphyrin and chlorophyll donor-acceptor molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederrecht, G.P.; Svec, W.A.; Wasielewski, M.R.

    1994-04-01

    Transient grating studies of electron transfer in artificial photosynthetic systems are described. These systems include simple donor-acceptor molecules where the donor, a chlorophyll or porphyrin, is rigidly attached to an easily reduced species such as napthoquinone or benzoquinone. We have previously synthesized acceptor molecules which have well defined absorption bands upon reduction and are well removed from the excited and cationic states of porphyrins and chlorophylls. They also possess large molar extinction coefficients that dominate the spectra and have well defined polarization characteristics. These traits are ideal for polarization sensitive transient grating experiments which enable accurate determination of the angle of the transition dipole between the initial excitation and the acceptor probe, dynamic solvation effects on the charge separated species, and any time dependent rotation of the chromophores relative to each other. An example of the type of molecule utilized for these experiments is a free base porphyrin (HP) donor and a pyromellitic diimide (PI) acceptor directly bonded to the porphyrin ring.

  4. Quantitative measurements of magnetic polaron binding on acceptors in CdMnTe alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nhung, Tran Hong; Planel, R.

    1983-03-01

    The acceptor binding energy is measured as a function of Temperature and composition in Cd1-x Mnx Te alloys, by time resolved spectroscopy. The Bound magnetic polaron effect is measured and compared with a theory accouting for magnetic saturation and fluctuations.

  5. Synthesis of rapeseed biodiesel using short-chained alkyl acetates as acyl acceptor.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Gwi-Taek; Park, Don-Hee

    2010-05-01

    In this study, we conducted experiments using a response surface methodology to determine the optimal reaction conditions for the enzymatic synthesis of biodiesel from rapeseed oil and short-chained alkyl acetates, such as methyl acetate or ethyl acetate, as the acyl acceptor at 40 degrees C. Based on our response surface methodology experiments, the optimal reaction conditions for the synthesis of biodiesel were as follows: methyl acetate as acyl acceptor, catalyst concentration of 16.50%, oil-to-methyl acetate molar ratio of 1:12.44, and reaction time of 19.70 h; ethyl acetate as acyl acceptor, catalyst concentration of 16.95%, oil-to-ethyl acetate molar ratio of 1:12.56, and reaction time of 19.73 h. The fatty acid ester content under the above conditions when methyl acetate and ethyl acetate were used as the acyl acceptor was 58.0% and 62.6%, respectively. The statistical method described in this study can be applied to effectively optimize the enzymatic conditions required for biodiesel production with short-chained alkyl acetates. PMID:19802734

  6. Discriminating a deep gallium antisite defect from shallow acceptors in GaAs using supercell calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Schultz, Peter A.

    2016-03-01

    For the purposes of making reliable first-principles predictions of defect energies in semiconductors, it is crucial to distinguish between effective-mass-like defects, which cannot be treated accurately with existing supercell methods, and deep defects, for which density functional theory calculations can yield reliable predictions of defect energy levels. The gallium antisite defect GaAs is often associated with the 78/203 meV shallow double acceptor in Ga-rich gallium arsenide. Within a conceptual framework of level patterns, analyses of structure and spin stabilization can be used within a supercell approach to distinguish localized deep defect states from shallow acceptors such as BAs. This systematicmore » approach determines that the gallium antisite supercell results has signatures inconsistent with an effective mass state and cannot be the 78/203 shallow double acceptor. Lastly, the properties of the Ga antisite in GaAs are described, total energy calculations that explicitly map onto asymptotic discrete localized bulk states predict that the Ga antisite is a deep double acceptor and has at least one deep donor state.« less

  7. Limited Cash Flow on Slot Machines: Effects of Prohibition of Note Acceptors on Adolescent Gambling Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Marianne; Rossow, Ingeborg

    2010-01-01

    This study addresses the impact of prohibition of note acceptors on gambling behaviour and gambling problems among Norwegian adolescents. Data comprised school surveys at three time points; 2004 and 2005 (before intervention) and 2006 (after intervention). Net samples comprised 20.000 students aged 13-19 years at each data collection. Identical…

  8. Organic Materials in the Undergraduate Laboratory: Microscale Synthesis and Investigation of a Donor-Acceptor Molecule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappenfus, Ted M.; Schliep, Karl B.; Dissanayake, Anudaththa; Ludden, Trevor; Nieto-Ortega, Belen; Lopez Navarrete, Juan T.; Ruiz Delgado, M. Carmen; Casado, Juan

    2012-01-01

    A series of experiments for undergraduate courses (e.g., organic, physical) have been developed in the area of small molecule organic materials. These experiments focus on understanding the electronic and redox properties of a donor-acceptor molecule that is prepared in a convenient one-step microscale reaction. The resulting intensely colored…

  9. Rhodanine dye-based small molecule acceptors for organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yujeong; Song, Chang Eun; Moon, Sang-Jin; Lim, Eunhee

    2014-08-01

    The solution-processable small molecules based on carbazole or fluorene containing rhodanine dyes at both ends were synthesized and introduced as acceptors in organic photovoltaic cells. The high energy levels of their lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals resulted in a power conversion efficiency of 3.08% and an open circuit voltage of up to 1.03 V.

  10. Time dependence of donor-acceptor electron transfer and back transfer in solid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Dorfman, R. C.; Fayer, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    Electron transfer from an optically excited donor to randomly distributed acceptors followed by electron back transfer is treated theoretically for donors and acceptors in a rigid solution. The forward electron transfer process is described in terms of the excited state population probabilityPex(t) of the donor molecules, while the electron back transfer from the radical anion to the radical cation is characterized by Pct(t), the donor cation state population probability. Exact expressions for the ensemble averages and are derived. Numerical calulations are presented for the cation probabilities, the average cation-anion separation distance , and the average cation existence time <τ(R)>, using parameters which characterize the forward and back transfer distance dependent rates. Relationships among , and the intermolecular interaction parameters provide detailed insights into the distance and time dependence of the flow of electron probability in an ensemble of donors and acceptors. The theoretical expressions can be used to calculate experimental observables. In particular, picosecond transient grating experiments are analyzed, and it is shown that by combining grating experiments (or other ground state recovery experiments) with fluorescence experiments it is possible to obtain the intermolecular interaction parameters for both forward and back transfer and a detailed description of the dynamics. The calculations presented here for rigid solutions are the precursor to the inclusion of diffusive motion of donors and acceptors to describe the dynamics of coupled electron transfer and back transfer in liquid solutions.

  11. Solution-grown organic single-crystalline donor-acceptor heterojunctions for photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Li, Hanying; Fan, Congcheng; Fu, Weifei; Xin, Huolin L; Chen, Hongzheng

    2015-01-12

    Organic single crystals are ideal candidates for high-performance photovoltaics due to their high charge mobility and long exciton diffusion length; however, they have not been largely considered for photovoltaics due to the practical difficulty in making a heterojunction between donor and acceptor single crystals. Here, we demonstrate that extended single-crystalline heterojunctions with a consistent donor-top and acceptor-bottom structure throughout the substrate can be simply obtained from a mixed solution of C60 (acceptor) and 3,6-bis(5-(4-n-butylphenyl)thiophene-2-yl)-2,5-bis(2-ethylhexyl)pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole-1,4-dione (donor). 46 photovoltaic devices were studied with the power conversion efficiency of (0.255±0.095)% under 1 sun, which is significantly higher than the previously reported value for a vapor-grown organic single-crystalline donor-acceptor heterojunction (0.007%). As such, this work opens a practical avenue for the study of organic photovoltaics based on single crystals.

  12. Conformation and geometry of cyclopropane rings having π-acceptor substituents: a theoretical and database study.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Cabeza, Aurora J; Allen, Frank H

    2011-02-01

    The 3e' orbitals of cyclopropane have the correct symmetry to interact with low-lying unoccupied orbitals of π-acceptor substituents and maximum overlap occurs when the two orbital systems are parallel, i.e. when the π-acceptor bisects the ring in projection down the substituent bond. Since the cyclopropyl group is a common component of active pharmaceutical and agrochemical ingredients, it is important that these strong conjugative interactions are well modelled by computational techniques, and clearly represented in experimental crystal structures. Here we show that torsion angle distributions derived from crystal structure data in the Cambridge Structural Database are in excellent correspondence with torsional energy profiles computed using density functional theory (DFT) for a range of substituents: -COOR, -CONR(2), -NO(2), vinyl and phenyl. We also show that crystal structure information is invaluable in modelling conformations of compounds that contain multiply substituted rings, where steric interactions require some substituents to adopt energetically disfavoured conformations. Further, conjugative interactions with π-acceptors lead to significant asymmetry in the cyclopropane ring bond lengths and again the experimental and computational results are in excellent agreement. Such asymmetry effects are additive, and this explains bond-length variations in cyclopropane rings bearing two or more π-acceptor substituents. PMID:21245544

  13. A Dithienosilole-Benzooxadiazole Donor-Acceptor Copolymer for Utility in Organic Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Caputo, Bruno J. A.; Welch, Gregory C.; Kamkar, Daniel A.; Henson, Zachary B.; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen; Bazan, Guillermo C.

    2011-04-20

    A systematic evaluation of a novel conjugated polymer, bearing alkyl side chains on both the donor and acceptor units, is conducted using nanoscale characterization techniques and device fabrication. How to manage the use of solvent additives to achieve power-conversion efficiencies of up to 3.7% is demonstrated.

  14. Three component assemblies by orthogonal H-bonding and donor-acceptor charge-transfer interaction.

    PubMed

    Kar, Haridas; Ghosh, Suhrit

    2014-02-01

    Three component supramolecular assemblies from a mixture of an aromatic donor (D), acceptor (A) and external structure directing agent (ESDA) are achieved by orthogonal noncovalent interactions involving two different types of H-bonding and alternate D-A stacking. An ESDA containing amide or urea produces a charge-transfer gel and sol, respectively, owing to their contrasting morphology. PMID:24309620

  15. 2004 Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions Gordon Conference - August 8-13, 2004

    SciTech Connect

    GUILFORD JONES BOSTON UNIVERSITY PHOTONICS CENTER 8 ST. MARY'S ST BOSTON, MA 02215

    2005-09-14

    The 2004 Gordon Conference on Donor/Acceptor Interactions will take place at Salve Regina University in Newport, Rhode Island on August 8-13, 2004. The conference will be devoted to the consequences of charge interaction and charge motion in molecular and materials systems.

  16. Time-resolved fluorescence study of electron transfer in a model peptide system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donald, Fiona; Hungerford, Graham; Moore, Barry D.; Birch, David J. S.

    1994-08-01

    At present there is a great deal of interest in the study of the transference of energy in biological systems. For example, electron transfer is of major importance in many synthetic and biological processes and in nature is mediated by proteins. Information regarding this process is therefore useful in leading to a greater understanding of phenomena such as photosynthesis and respiration. Previous work on protein systems has shown the electron transfer process to be complex to analyze because of the presence of competing pathways. This has led to the use of model systems to simplify the kinetics. We have synthesized novel model systems using peptides containing both a fluorescent methoxy- naphthalene donor and a dicyanoethylene group as a potential electron acceptor and observed fluorescence quenching for both dipeptide and oligopeptide systems. Biexponential fluorescence decay behavior was observed for all donor acceptor systems, with an increase in the amount of the shorter fluorescence decay component on increasing temperature.

  17. New conjugated molecular scaffolds based on [2,2]paracyclophane as electron acceptors for organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Guanxin; Yu, Chenmin; He, Chang; Wang, Jianguo; Chen, Xin; Yao, Jingjing; Liu, Zitong; Zhang, Deqing

    2014-09-01

    Two conjugated molecules with a [2,2]paracyclophane core were designed as non-fullerene electron acceptors for photovoltaic cells. Using as the donor, a high power conversion efficiency (2.69%) is achieved for the blending thin film of with , which is relatively high for solution-processed OPVs based on small molecular non-fullerene acceptors and as the electron donor.

  18. Signal peptide of cellulase.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shaomin; Wu, Guang

    2014-06-01

    Cellulase is an enzyme playing a crucial role in biotechnology industries ranging from textile to biofuel because of tremendous amount of cellulose produced in plant. In order to improve cellulase productivity, huge resource has been spent in search for good cellulases from microorganism in remote areas and in creation of ideal cellulase by engineering. However, not much attention is given to the secretion of cellulases from cell into extracellular space, where a cellulase plays its enzymatic role. In this minireview, the signal peptides, which lead secreted proteins to specific secretion systems and scatter in literature, are reviewed. The patterns of signal peptides are checked against 4,101 cellulases documented in UniProtKB, the largest protein database in the world, to determine how these cellulases are secreted. Simultaneous review on both literature and cellulases from the database not only provides updated knowledge on signal peptides but also indicates the gap in our research.

  19. Synthetic antibiofilm peptides.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Cardoso, Marlon Henrique; de Souza Cândido, Elizabete; Franco, Octavio Luiz; Hancock, Robert E W

    2016-05-01

    Bacteria predominantly exist as multicellular aggregates known as biofilms that are associated with at least two thirds of all infections and exhibit increased adaptive resistance to conventional antibiotic therapies. Therefore, biofilms are major contributors to the global health problem of antibiotic resistance, and novel approaches to counter them are urgently needed. Small molecules of the innate immune system called host defense peptides (HDPs) have emerged as promising templates for the design of potent, broad-spectrum antibiofilm agents. Here, we review recent developments in the new field of synthetic antibiofilm peptides, including mechanistic insights, synergistic interactions with available antibiotics, and their potential as novel antimicrobials against persistent infections caused by biofilms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert. PMID:26724202

  20. Blinking fluorescence of single donor-acceptor pairs: important role of "dark'' states in resonance energy transfer via singlet levels.

    PubMed

    Osad'ko, I S; Shchukina, A L

    2012-06-01

    The influence of triplet levels on Förster resonance energy transfer via singlet levels in donor-acceptor (D-A) pairs is studied. Four types of D-A pair are considered: (i) two-level donor and two-level acceptor, (ii) three-level donor and two-level acceptor, (iii) two-level donor and three-level acceptor, and (iv) three-level donor and three-level acceptor. If singlet-triplet transitions in a three-level acceptor molecule are ineffective, the energy transfer efficiency E=I_{A}/(I_{A}+I_{D}), where I_{D} and I_{A} are the average intensities of donor and acceptor fluorescence, can be described by the simple theoretical equation E(F)=FT_{D}/(1+FT_{D}). Here F is the rate of energy transfer, and T_{D} is the donor fluorescence lifetime. In accordance with the last equation, 100% of the donor electronic energy can be transferred to an acceptor molecule at FT_{D}≫1. However, if singlet-triplet transitions in a three-level acceptor molecule are effective, the energy transfer efficiency is described by another theoretical equation, E(F)=F[over ¯](F)T_{D}/[1+F[over ¯](F)T_{D}]. Here F[over ¯](F) is a function of F depending on singlet-triplet transitions in both donor and acceptor molecules. Expressions for the functions F[over ¯](F) are derived. In this case the energy transfer efficiency will be far from 100% even at FT_{D}≫1. The character of the intensity fluctuations of donor and acceptor fluorescence indicates which of the two equations for E(F) should be used to find the value of the rate F. Therefore, random time instants of photon emission in both donor and acceptor fluorescence are calculated by the Monte Carlo method for all four types of D-A pair. Theoretical expressions for start-stop correlators (waiting time distributions) in donor and acceptor fluorescence are derived. The probabilities w_{N}^{D}(t) and w_{N}^{A}(t) of finding N photons of donor and acceptor fluorescence in the time interval t are calculated for various values of the energy

  1. Biomimetic peptide nanosensors.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yue; Kim, Sang N; Naik, Rajesh R; McAlpine, Michael C

    2012-05-15

    The development of a miniaturized sensing platform tailored for sensitive and selective detection of a variety of biochemical analytes could offer transformative fundamental and technological opportunities. Due to their high surface-to-volume ratios, nanoscale materials are extremely sensitive sensors. Likewise, peptides represent robust substrates for selective recognition due to the potential for broad chemical diversity within their relatively compact size. Here we explore the possibilities of linking peptides to nanosensors for the selective detection of biochemical targets. Such systems raise a number of interesting fundamental challenges: What are the peptide sequences, and how can rational design be used to derive selective binders? What nanomaterials should be used, and what are some strategies for assembling hybrid nanosensors? What role does molecular modeling play in elucidating response mechanisms? What is the resulting performance of these sensors, in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, and response time? What are some potential applications? This Account will highlight our early attempts to address these research challenges. Specifically, we use natural peptide sequences or sequences identified from phage display as capture elements. The sensors are based on a variety of nanomaterials including nanowires, graphene, and carbon nanotubes. We couple peptides to the nanomaterial surfaces via traditional surface functionalization methods or self-assembly. Molecular modeling provides detailed insights into the hybrid nanostructure, as well as the sensor detection mechanisms. The peptide nanosensors can distinguish chemically camouflaged mixtures of vapors and detect chemical warfare agents with sensitivities as low as parts-per-billion levels. Finally, we anticipate future uses of this technology in biomedicine: for example, devices based on these sensors could detect disease from the molecular components in human breath. Overall, these results provide a

  2. Invertebrate FMRFamide related peptides.

    PubMed

    Krajniak, Kevin G

    2013-06-01

    In 1977 the neuropeptide FMRFamide was isolated from the clam, Macrocallista nimbosa. Since then several hundred FMRFamide-related peptides (FaRPs) have been isolated from invertebrate animals. Precursors to the FaRPs likely arose in the cnidarians. With the transition to a bilateral body plan FaRPs became a fixture in the invertebrate phyla. They have come to play a critical role as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and neurohormones. FaRPs regulate a variety of body functions including, feeding, digestion, circulation, reproduction, movement. The evolution of the molecular form and function of these omnipresent peptides will be considered.

  3. Dicyclopropylmethyl peptide backbone protectant.

    PubMed

    Carpino, Louis A; Nasr, Khaled; Abdel-Maksoud, Adel Ali; El-Faham, Ayman; Ionescu, Dumitru; Henklein, Peter; Wenschuh, Holger; Beyermann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Bienert, Michael

    2009-08-20

    The N-dicyclopropylmethyl (Dcpm) residue, introduced into amino acids via reaction of dicyclopropylmethanimine hydrochloride with an amino acid ester followed by sodium cyanoborohydride or triacetoxyborohydride reduction, can be used as an amide bond protectant for peptide synthesis. Examples which demonstrate the amelioration of aggregation effects include syntheses of the alanine decapeptide and the prion peptide (106-126). Avoidance of cyclization to the aminosuccinimide followed substitution of Fmoc-(Dcpm)Gly-OH for Fmoc-Gly-OH in the assembly of sequences containing the sensitive Asp-Gly unit.

  4. Exquisite 1D Assemblies Arising from Rationally Designed Asymmetric Donor-Acceptor Architectures Exhibiting Aggregation-Induced Emission as a Function of Auxiliary Acceptor Strength.

    PubMed

    Singh, Roop Shikha; Mukhopadhyay, Sujay; Biswas, Arnab; Pandey, Daya Shankar

    2016-01-11

    One-dimensional nanostructures with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) properties have been fabricated to keep the pace with growing demand from optoelectronics applications. The compounds 2-[4-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)benzylidene]malononitrile (PM1), 2-{4-[4-(pyridin-2-yl)piperazin-1-yl]-benzylidene}malononitrile (PM2), and 2-{4-[4-(pyrimidin-2-yl)piperazin-1-yl]benzylidene}malononitrile (PM3) have been designed and synthesized by melding piperazine and dicyanovinylene to investigate AIE in an asymmetric donor-acceptor (D-A) construct of A'-D-π-A- topology. The synthetic route has been simplified by using phenylpiperazine as a weak donor (D), dicyanovinylene as an acceptor (A), and pyridyl/pyrimidyl groups (PM2/PM3) as auxiliary acceptors (A'). It has been established that A' plays a vital role in triggering AIE in these compounds because the same D-A construct led to aggregation-caused quenching upon replacing A' with an electron-donating ethyl group (PM1). Moreover, the effect of restricted intramolecular rotation and twisted intramolecular charge transfer on the mechanism of AIE has also been investigated. Furthermore, it has been clearly shown that the optical disparities of these A'-D-π-A architectures are a direct consequence of comparative A' strength. Single-crystal X-ray analyses provided justification for role of intermolecular interactions in aggregate morphology. Electrochemical and theoretical studies affirmed the effect of the A' strength on the overall properties of the A'-D-π-A system.

  5. Antihypertensive peptides from food proteins.

    PubMed

    Aluko, Rotimi E

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive peptides are encrypted within the primary structure of food proteins where they remain inactive until released by enzymatic hydrolysis. Once released from the parent protein, certain peptides have the ability to modulate the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) because they decrease activities of renin or angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), the two main enzymes that regulate mammalian blood pressure. These antihypertensive peptides can also enhance the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) pathway to increase nitric oxide (NO) levels within vascular walls and promote vasodilation. The peptides can block the interactions between angiotensin II (vasoconstrictor) and angiotensin receptors, which can contribute to reduced blood pressure. This review focuses on the methods that are involved in antihypertensive peptide production from food sources, including fractionation protocols that are used to enrich bioactive peptide content and enhance peptide activity. It also discusses mechanisms that are believed to be involved in the antihypertensive activity of these peptides.

  6. Biofilm production and presence of ica and bap genes in Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from cows with mastitis in the eastern Poland.

    PubMed

    Szweda, Piotr; Schielmann, Marta; Milewski, Sławomir; Frankowska, Aneta; Jakubczak, Antoni

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was phenotypic and genotypic analysis of 132 S. aureus strains isolated from mastitis in eastern Poland in respect to their biofilm formation ability. The analysis of the size polymorphism of fragment X in the gene encoding protein A (spa) revealed high genetic differentiation of the analyzed group of isolates. The ability of biofilm formation by the isolates was tested using two phenotypic methods. The Congo Red plate assay was found to be irreproducible and very subjective. More objective results were obtained using the spectrophotometric, microtiter plate assay. Most of the isolates, namely 76/132 (57.6 %) were classified as biofilm producers depending on the value of absorbance in the microtiter plate test. All of the isolates tested were found to possess both icaA and icaD genes, while the bap gene was absent in all strains.

  7. Enhancement of hypoxia-induced gene expression in fish liver by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand, benzo[a]pyrene (BaP).

    PubMed

    Yu, Richard Man Kit; Ng, Patrick Kwok Shing; Tan, Tianfeng; Chu, Daniel Ling Ho; Wu, Rudolf Shiu Sun; Kong, Richard Yuen Chong

    2008-11-21

    Fish in polluted coastal habitats commonly suffer simultaneous exposure to both hypoxia and xenobiotics. Although the adaptive molecular responses to each stress have been described, little is known about the interaction between the signaling pathways mediating these responses. Previous studies in mammalian hepatoma cell lines have shown that hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)- and/or aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-activated gene expression is suppressed following co-exposure to hypoxia and the hallmark AhR ligand 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, whether similar crosstalk exists in the non-tumor liver tissues of fish and whether other non-TCDD ligands also play the same inhibitory role in this crosstalk remain unknown. Here, the in vivo hepatic mRNA expression profiles of multiple hypoxia- and AhR-responsive genes (later gene expression=mRNA expression of the gene) were examined in the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) upon single and combined exposures to hypoxia and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). Combined exposure enhanced hypoxia-induced gene expression but did not significantly alter BaP-induced gene expression. Protein carbonyl content was markedly elevated in fish subjected to combined exposure, indicating accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Application of diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) to hypoxia-treated grouper liver explants similarly exaggerated hypoxia-induced gene expression as in the combined stress tissues in vivo. These observations suggest that ROS derived from the combined hypoxia and BaP stress have a role in enhancing hypoxia-induced gene expression.

  8. Brain Peptides and Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arehart-Treichel, Joan

    1976-01-01

    Proteins isolated from the brain and used as drugs can improve and apparently even transfer mental states and behavior. Much of the pioneering work and recent research with humans and animals is reviewed and crucial questions that are being posed about the psychologically active peptides are related. (BT)

  9. Peptide and peptide library cyclization via bromomethylbenzene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hacker, David E; Almohaini, Mohammed; Anbazhagan, Aruna; Ma, Zhong; Hartman, Matthew C T

    2015-01-01

    Cyclization confers several advantages to peptides, cumulatively serving to make them more drug-like. In this protocol, cyclic peptides are generated via bis-alkylation of cysteine-containing peptides using α,α'-dibromo-m-xylene. The reactions are robust and high yielding. Multiple reaction platforms for the application of this versatile strategy are described herein: the cyclization of solid-phase-synthesized peptides, both in solution and on resin, as well as the cyclization of in vitro translated mRNA-peptide fusion libraries on oligo(dT) resin.

  10. Peptides and Ageing.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, Vladimir Kh

    2002-01-01

    A technology has been developed for manufacturing of biologically active complex peptide preparations from extracts of different tissues. In particular, the pineal preparation (Epithalamin) augments the in vitro outgrowth of explants from the pineal gland but not from other tissues, the latter being stimulated by peptide preparations from respective tissues. Epithalamin increases melatonin production by the pineal gland of rats, improves immunological parameters in rats and mice, produces anticarcinogenic effects in different experimental models, stimulates antioxidant defenses, and restores the reproductive function in old rats. These effects are combined in the ability of Epithalamin to increase the lifespan in rats, mice, and fruit flies. Many of these effects are reproduced in clinical trials, which have demonstrated the geroprotector activity of Epithalamin in humans. Among the effects of the thymic preparation Thymalin, those related to its ability to stimulate immunity are the most prominent. This ability is associated with anticarcinogenic and geroprotector activities. Clinical trials of the peptide preparations obtained from other organs including the prostate, the cerebral cortex, and the eye retina, have demonstrated beneficial effects reflected by the improvement of the conditions of respective organs. Based on the data about the amino acid compositions of the peptide preparations, novel principles of the design of biologically active short peptides possessing tissue-specific activities has been developed. Dipeptides specific for the thymus and tetrapeptides specific for the heart, liver, brain cortex, and pineal glands stimulate the in vitro outgrowth of explants of respective organs. Interestingly, for eye retina and the pineal gland, a common tetrapeptide Ala-Glu-Asp-Gly (Epitalon) has been designed, probably reflecting the common embryonal origin of these two organs. Epitalon reproduces the effects of Epithalamin including those related to its

  11. Elevated NK sensitivity of Raji cells carrying acceptor-bound C3 fragments.

    PubMed

    Kai, C; Sármay, G; Ramos, O; Yefenof, E; Klein, E

    1988-05-01

    The majority of cell lines derived from Burkitt lymphomas carry CR2 on their plasma membrane cell lines of haematopoietic origin can activate C3 present in human serum through the alternative pathway. However, only the lines that carry CR2 were shown to bind C3 fragments. This bond can be either fixation to acceptor sites or attachment to the CR. Our studies with Raji cells showed that when the possibility for the covalent acceptor bond was eliminated by using methylamine (MA)- or zymosan-treated serum, considerably lower amounts of C3 were bound. In the zymosan-treated serum C3 fragments are present that can bind to receptors but their capacity for acceptor bond is absent. These results indicate that when Raji cell are incubated in human serum some of the generated C3 fragments are bound to acceptors and a lower proportion through the specific interaction with complement receptors. Pretreatment of the CR2 carrying cell lines with human serum elevated their sensitivity to the lytic effect of human blood lymphocytes. We showed in this work that MA-treated serum did not induce this elevation. Zymosan-treated serum under conditions that excluded activation of the residual native C3 molecules, i.e., in the presence of EDTA, did not have the enhancing effect either. These results suggest that the increased lytic efficiency imposed by human serum was due to cleavage of C3 molecules by Raji and fixation of the C3 fragments by acceptor sites. Natural killer cells carry CR3; therefore it is likely that the attached C3 fragments bind also to the effector cells. The C3 molecules could elevate thereby the avidity between the target and the lytic lymphocytes. The observation that C3 fragments are not bound to the surface of CR2 negative lines in spite of their capacity to activate C3 suggests that the receptor molecule is either involved in the activation and/or serves also as an acceptor. PMID:3359489

  12. Peptide vectors for gene delivery: from single peptides to multifunctional peptide nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Raad, Markus de; Teunissen, Erik A; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2014-07-01

    The therapeutic use of nucleic acids relies on the availability of sophisticated delivery systems for targeted and intracellular delivery of these molecules. Such a gene delivery should possess essential characteristics to overcome several extracellular and intracellular barriers. Peptides offer an attractive platform for nonviral gene delivery, as several functional peptide classes exist capable of overcoming these barriers. However, none of these functional peptide classes contain all the essential characteristics required to overcome all of the barriers associated with successful gene delivery. Combining functional peptides into multifunctional peptide vectors will be pivotal for improving peptide-based gene delivery systems. By using combinatorial strategies and high-throughput screening, the identification of multifunctional peptide vectors will accelerate the optimization of peptide-based gene delivery systems.

  13. Three new phosphates with isolated P2O7 units: noncentrosymmetric Cs2Ba3(P2O7)2 and centrosymmetric Cs2BaP2O7 and LiCsBaP2O7.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Han, Shujuan; Lei, Bing-Hua; Wang, Ying; Li, Hongyi; Yang, Zhihua; Pan, Shilie

    2016-03-01

    Three new phosphates, a noncentrosymmetric (NCS) Cs2Ba3(P2O7)2 and centrosymmetric (CS) Cs2BaP2O7 and LiCsBaP2O7, have been synthesized from high-temperature solutions for the first time. Analysis of the structures determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction showed that although the three compounds contained isolated P2O7 units, they yielded different three-dimensional (3D) networks: Cs2Ba3(P2O7)2 crystallized in the NCS Orthorhombic space group P212121, Cs2BaP2O7 in the CS monoclinic space group P21/n, and LiCsBaP2O7, having an identical stoichiometry with Cs2BaP2O7, crystallized in monoclinic space group, P21/c. Structural comparisons suggested the differences between their 3D frameworks to be due to differences between the sizes and coordination environments of the cations. Characterizations including thermal and optical analyses showed Cs2Ba3(P2O7)2 and Cs2BaP2O7 to melt congruently, and Cs2Ba3(P2O7)2 to exhibit a wide transparent region with a cut-off edge below 176 nm. The NLO properties and electronic structures of these compounds were investigated using first-principles calcualtions. PMID:26831497

  14. Antagonistic peptide technology for functional dissection of CLE peptides revisited.

    PubMed

    Czyzewicz, Nathan; Wildhagen, Mari; Cattaneo, Pietro; Stahl, Yvonne; Pinto, Karine Gustavo; Aalen, Reidunn B; Butenko, Melinka A; Simon, Rüdiger; Hardtke, Christian S; De Smet, Ive

    2015-08-01

    In the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, over 1000 putative genes encoding small, presumably secreted, signalling peptides can be recognized. However, a major obstacle in identifying the function of genes encoding small signalling peptides is the limited number of available loss-of-function mutants. To overcome this, a promising new tool, antagonistic peptide technology, was recently developed. Here, this antagonistic peptide technology was tested on selected CLE peptides and the related IDA peptide and its usefulness in the context of studies of peptide function discussed. Based on the analyses, it was concluded that the antagonistic peptide approach is not the ultimate means to overcome redundancy or lack of loss-of-function lines. However, information collected using antagonistic peptide approaches (in the broad sense) can be very useful, but these approaches do not work in all cases and require a deep insight on the interaction between the ligand and its receptor to be successful. This, as well as peptide ligand structure considerations, should be taken into account before ordering a wide range of synthetic peptide variants and/or generating transgenic plants.

  15. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  16. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. PMID:27479451

  17. One pot/two donors/one diol give one differentiated trisaccharide: powerful evidence for reciprocal donor-acceptor selectivity (RDAS).

    PubMed

    Fraser-Reid, Bert; López, J Cristóbal; Radhakrishnan, K V; Nandakumar, M V; Gómez, Ana M; Uriel, Clara

    2002-09-21

    Three component, one-pot reactions involving equimolar amounts of the acceptor diol and both armed and disarmed donors presented simultaneously, produce a single double-differential glycosidation product; this phenomenon provides evidence for Reciprocal Donor Acceptor Selectivity (RDAS).

  18. Performance assessment of a nested-PCR assay (the RAPID BAP-MTB) and the BD ProbeTec ET system for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jann-Yuan; Lee, Li-Na; Chou, Chin-Sheng; Huang, Chung-Yi; Wang, Shu-Kuan; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Luh, Kwen-Tay

    2004-10-01

    The performance of a nested PCR-based assay (the RAPID BAP-MTB; AsiaGen, Taichung, Taiwan) and the BD ProbeTec ET (DTB) system (Becton Dickinson, Sparks, Md.) for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was evaluated with 600 consecutive clinical samples. These samples, including 552 respiratory specimens and 48 nonrespiratory specimens, were collected from 333 patients treated at National Taiwan University Hospital from September to October 2003. The results of both assays were compared to the gold standard of combined culture results and clinical diagnosis. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the RAPID BAP-MTB assay for respiratory specimens were 66.7% and 97.2%, respectively, and for the DTB assay they were 56.7% and 95.3%, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values for the RAPID BAP-MTB were 74.1% and 96.0%, respectively, and for the DTB assay they were 59.6% and 94.7%, respectively. For smear-negative samples, the sensitivity of the RAPID BAP-MTB and DTB assays was 57.1% and 40.5%, respectively. The RAPID BAP-MTB assay produced 14 false-positive results in 14 samples, including one of the six samples yielding Mycobacterium abscessus, one of the six samples yielding Mycobacterium avium intracellulare, one sample from a patient with a history of pulmonary tuberculosis with complete treatment, and three samples from three patients with a previous diagnosis of tuberculosis who were under treatment at the time of specimen collection. Among the 48 nonrespiratory specimens, the RAPID BAP-MTB assay was positive in one biopsy sample from a patient with lumbar tuberculous spondylitis and one pus sample from a patient with tuberculous cervical lymphadenopathy. Our results showed that the RAPID BAP-MTB assay is better than the DTB assay for both respiratory specimens and nonrespiratory specimens. The overall time for processing this assay is only 5 h. In addition, its diagnostic accuracy in smear-negative samples is as high as in smear

  19. Antimicrobial peptides: premises and promises.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K V R; Yedery, R D; Aranha, C

    2004-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an important component of the natural defences of most living organisms against invading pathogens. These are relatively small (< 10kDa), cationic and amphipathic peptides of variable length, sequence and structure. During the past two decades several AMPs have been isolated from a wide variety of animals, both vertebrates and invertebrates, and plants as well as from bacteria and fungi. Most of these peptides are obtained from different sources like macrophages, neutrophils, epithelial cells, haemocytes, fat body, reproductive tract, etc. These peptides exhibit broad-spectrum activity against a wide range of microorganisms including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, protozoa, yeast, fungi and viruses. A few peptides have also been found to be cytotoxic to sperm and tumour cells. AMPs are classified based on the three dimensional structural studies carried out with the help of NMR. The peptides are broadly classified into five major groups namely (a) peptides that form alpha-helical structures, (b) peptides rich in cysteine residues, (c) peptides that form beta-sheet, (d) peptides rich in regular amino acids namely histatin, arginine and proline and (e) peptides composed of rare and modified amino acids. Most of these peptides are believed to act by disrupting the plasma membrane leading to the lysis of the cell. AMPs have been found to be excellent candidates for developing novel antimicrobial agents and a few of these peptides show antimicrobial activity against pathogens causing sexually transmitted infection (STI), including HIV/HSV. Peptides, namely magainin and nisin have been shown to demonstrate contraceptive properties in vitro and in vivo. A few peptides have already entered clinical trials for the treatment of impetigo, diabetic foot ulcers and gastric helicobacter infections. In this review, we discuss the source, structures and mode of action with special reference to therapeutic considerations of various AMPs

  20. A Peptide Filtering Relation Quantifies MHC Class I Peptide Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Leonard D.; Howarth, Mark; Cardelli, Luca; Emmott, Stephen; Elliott, Tim; Werner, Joern M.

    2011-01-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules enable cytotoxic T lymphocytes to destroy virus-infected or cancerous cells, thereby preventing disease progression. MHC class I molecules provide a snapshot of the contents of a cell by binding to protein fragments arising from intracellular protein turnover and presenting these fragments at the cell surface. Competing fragments (peptides) are selected for cell-surface presentation on the basis of their ability to form a stable complex with MHC class I, by a process known as peptide optimization. A better understanding of the optimization process is important for our understanding of immunodominance, the predominance of some T lymphocyte specificities over others, which can determine the efficacy of an immune response, the danger of immune evasion, and the success of vaccination strategies. In this paper we present a dynamical systems model of peptide optimization by MHC class I. We incorporate the chaperone molecule tapasin, which has been shown to enhance peptide optimization to different extents for different MHC class I alleles. Using a combination of published and novel experimental data to parameterize the model, we arrive at a relation of peptide filtering, which quantifies peptide optimization as a function of peptide supply and peptide unbinding rates. From this relation, we find that tapasin enhances peptide unbinding to improve peptide optimization without significantly delaying the transit of MHC to the cell surface, and differences in peptide optimization across MHC class I alleles can be explained by allele-specific differences in peptide binding. Importantly, our filtering relation may be used to dynamically predict the cell surface abundance of any number of competing peptides by MHC class I alleles, providing a quantitative basis to investigate viral infection or disease at the cellular level. We exemplify this by simulating optimization of the distribution of peptides derived from Human

  1. Charge and energy transfer in a bithiophene perylenediimide based donor-acceptor-donor system for use in organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Jan; Dreuw, Andreas; Burghardt, Irene

    2013-07-28

    The elementary charge and excitation energy transfer steps in a novel symmetric donor-acceptor-donor triad first described in Roland et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012, 14, 273, consisting of a central perylenediimide moiety as a potential electron acceptor and two identical electron rich bithiophene compounds, have been investigated using quantum chemical methodology. These elementary processes determine the applicability of such systems in photovoltaic devices. The molecular structure, excited states and the photo-physical properties are investigated using smaller model systems and including solvation effects. The donor and acceptor π-systems are separated by an ethyl bridge such that the molecular orbitals are either located on the donor or acceptor moiety making the identification of locally excited versus charge transfer states straightforward. Using excited state geometry optimizations, the mechanism of photo-initiated charge separation could be identified. Geometry relaxation in the excited donor state leads to a near-degeneracy with the locally excited acceptor state, entailing strong excitonic coupling and resonance energy transfer. This energy transfer process is driven by planarization and bond length alternation of the donor molecule. Geometry relaxation of the locally excited acceptor state in turn reveals a crossing with the energetically lowest charge transfer excited state. The energetic position of the latter depends in a sensitive fashion on the solvent. This provides an explanation of the sequential process observed in the experiment, favoring ultrafast (∼130 fs) formation of the excited acceptor state followed by slower (∼3 ps scale) formation of the charge separated state.

  2. Electron acceptors for energy generation in microbial fuel cells fed with wastewaters: A mini-review.

    PubMed

    He, Chuan-Shu; Mu, Zhe-Xuan; Yang, Hou-Yun; Wang, Ya-Zhou; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have gained tremendous global interest over the last decades as a device that uses bacteria to oxidize organic and inorganic matters in the anode with bioelectricity generation and even for purpose of bioremediation. However, this prospective technology has not yet been carried out in field in particular because of its low power yields and target compounds removal which can be largely influenced by electron acceptors contributing to overcome the potential losses existing on the cathode. This mini review summarizes various electron acceptors used in recent years in the categories of inorganic and organic compounds, identifies their merits and drawbacks, and compares their influences on performance of MFCs, as well as briefly discusses possible future research directions particularly from cathode aspect.

  3. Very low band gap thiadiazoloquinoxaline donor-acceptor polymers as multi-tool conjugated polymers.

    PubMed

    Steckler, Timothy T; Henriksson, Patrik; Mollinger, Sonya; Lundin, Angelica; Salleo, Alberto; Andersson, Mats R

    2014-01-29

    Here we report on the synthesis of two novel very low band gap (VLG) donor-acceptor polymers (Eg ≤ 1 eV) and an oligomer based on the thiadiazoloquinoxaline acceptor. Both polymers demonstrate decent ambipolar mobilities, with P1 showing the best performance of ∼10(-2) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for p- and n-type operation. These polymers are among the lowest band gap polymers (≲0.7 eV) reported, with a neutral λmax = 1476 nm (P2), which is the farthest red-shifted λmax reported to date for a soluble processable polymer. Very little has been done to characterize the electrochromic aspects of VLG polymers; interestingly, these polymers actually show a bleaching of their neutral absorptions in the near-infrared region and have an electrochromic contrast up to 30% at a switching speed of 3 s.

  4. Click and chemically triggered declick reactions through reversible amine and thiol coupling via a conjugate acceptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Katharine L.; Kolesnichenko, Igor V.; Robotham, Scott A.; Bachman, J. Logan; Zhong, Ye; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.; Anslyn, Eric V.

    2016-10-01

    The coupling and decoupling of molecular units is a fundamental undertaking of organic chemistry. Herein we report the use of a very simple conjugate acceptor, derived from Meldrum's acid, for the sequential ‘clicking’ together of an amine and a thiol in aqueous conditions at neutral pH. Subsequently, this linkage can be ‘declicked’ by a chemical trigger to release the original amine and thiol undisturbed. The reactivity differs from that of other crosslinking agents because the selectivity for sequential functionalization derives from an altering of the electrophilicity of the conjugate acceptor on the addition of the amine. We describe the use of the procedure to modify proteins, create multicomponent libraries and synthesize oligomers, all of which can be declicked to their starting components in a controlled fashion when desired. Owing to the mild reaction conditions and ease of use in a variety of applications, the method is predicted to have wide utility.

  5. Alteration of the Donor/Acceptor Spectrum of the (S)-Amine Transaminase from Vibrio fluvialis

    PubMed Central

    Genz, Maika; Vickers, Clare; van den Bergh, Tom; Joosten, Henk-Jan; Dörr, Mark; Höhne, Matthias; Bornscheuer, Uwe T.

    2015-01-01

    To alter the amine donor/acceptor spectrum of an (S)-selective amine transaminase (ATA), a library based on the Vibrio fluvialis ATA targeting four residues close to the active site (L56, W57, R415 and L417) was created. A 3DM-derived alignment comprising fold class I pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes allowed identification of positions, which were assumed to determine substrate specificity. These positions were targeted for mutagenesis with a focused alphabet of hydrophobic amino acids to convert an amine:α-keto acid transferase into an amine:aldehyde transferase. Screening of 1200 variants revealed three hits, which showed a shifted amine donor/acceptor spectrum towards aliphatic aldehydes (mainly pentanal), as well as an altered pH profile. Interestingly, all three hits, although found independently, contained the same mutation R415L and additional W57F and L417V substitutions. PMID:26569229

  6. Alteration of the Donor/Acceptor Spectrum of the (S)-Amine Transaminase from Vibrio fluvialis.

    PubMed

    Genz, Maika; Vickers, Clare; van den Bergh, Tom; Joosten, Henk-Jan; Dörr, Mark; Höhne, Matthias; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2015-01-01

    To alter the amine donor/acceptor spectrum of an (S)-selective amine transaminase (ATA), a library based on the Vibrio fluvialis ATA targeting four residues close to the active site (L56, W57, R415 and L417) was created. A 3DM-derived alignment comprising fold class I pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes allowed identification of positions, which were assumed to determine substrate specificity. These positions were targeted for mutagenesis with a focused alphabet of hydrophobic amino acids to convert an amine:α-keto acid transferase into an amine:aldehyde transferase. Screening of 1200 variants revealed three hits, which showed a shifted amine donor/acceptor spectrum towards aliphatic aldehydes (mainly pentanal), as well as an altered pH profile. Interestingly, all three hits, although found independently, contained the same mutation R415L and additional W57F and L417V substitutions. PMID:26569229

  7. Electrostatic interaction of pi-acidic amides with hydrogen-bond acceptors.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Snyder, Lawrence B; Langley, David R

    2003-10-01

    Interactions between N-methylacetamide (NMA) and N-methylated derivatives of uracil, isocyanurate and barbituric acid have been studied using ab initio methods at the local MP2/6-31G** level of theory. The results were compared to similar interactions between the oxygen atom of NMA and the pi-clouds of perfluorobenzene, quinone and trimethyltriazine. The pi-acidic amides of isocyanurate and barbituric acid were found to interact with a hydrogen bond acceptor primarily through electrostatic attractions. These groups may be used as alternatives of a hydrogen bond donor to complement a hydrogen bond acceptor or an anion in molecular recognition and drug design. Examples of such interactions were identified through a search of the CSD database.

  8. Donor-Acceptor Distance Sampling Enhances the Performance of "Better than Nature" Nicotinamide Coenzyme Biomimetics.

    PubMed

    Geddes, Alexander; Paul, Caroline E; Hay, Sam; Hollmann, Frank; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of enzymatic hydride transfer with nicotinamide coenzyme biomimetics (NCBs) is critical to enhancing the performance of nicotinamide coenzyme-dependent biocatalysts. Here the temperature dependence of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for hydride transfer between "better than nature" NCBs and several ene reductase biocatalysts is used to indicate transfer by quantum mechanical tunneling. A strong correlation between rate constants and temperature dependence of the KIE (ΔΔH(⧧)) for H/D transfer implies that faster reactions with NCBs are associated with enhanced donor-acceptor distance sampling. Our analysis provides the first mechanistic insight into how NCBs can outperform their natural counterparts and emphasizes the need to optimize donor-acceptor distance sampling to obtain high catalytic performance from H-transfer enzymes. PMID:27552302

  9. Cooperative luminescence quenching on many-particle acceptors in disordered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basiev, T. T.; Basieva, I. T.

    2012-06-01

    Many-body cooperative energy transfer is an important process in biology, medicine, photosynthesis, rare-earth-doped laser materials, responsible for up- and down-conversion of energy, optical excitation sensitization and relaxation. We present an analytical solution for long-time asymptotic of static luminescence quenching kinetics due to cooperative energy transfer to ensembles of acceptors comprised of two-, three-, and more particles. For cooperative energy transfer and cooperative luminescence quenching to n-body acceptors we have discovered a new law of power d/(nS-(n-1)d) time dependence (d=1,2,3 is the space dimension, S=6,8,10 is the multipolarty of interaction: dipole-dipole, dipole-quadrupole, or quadrupole-quadrupole). The detailed numerical simulation of cooperative quenching by Monte-Carlo method confirms the theoretical result.

  10. Effects of acceptors on halogenated organic compound biotransformations in a biofilm column

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, G.D.; Bouwer, E.J. )

    1991-06-01

    The transformability of trihalomethanes, carbon tetrachloride, 1,1,1-trichlorethane, 1,2-dibromomethane, tetrachlorethylene, dibromochloropropane, and chlorinated benzenes was evaluated by a biofilm utilizing a mixture of primary electron acceptors (oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate). These compounds at concentrations commonly found in groundwater were continuously administered for 4 years to a biofilm column reactor that resembled polluted groundwater environments. Acetate was the primary substrate to support microbial growth. Sequential biofilm zones or aerobic respiration, denitrification, and sulfate reduction developed within the column. Transformation of the halogenated aliphatic compounds coincided with the onset of sulfate in the column feed decreased the steady-state removals for several of the halogenated aliphatic compounds. These results suggest that sulfate was an important primary electron acceptor. Aerobic transformations of the chlorinated benzenes were incomplete due to the rapid depletion of oxygen and limited aerobic zone at the column inlet.

  11. Acceptor states in heteroepitaxial CdHgTe films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Mynbaev, K. D.; Shilyaev, A. V. Bazhenov, N. L.; Izhnin, A. I.; Izhnin, I. I.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Varavin, V. S.; Dvoretsky, S. A.

    2015-03-15

    The photoluminescence method is used to study acceptor states in CdHgTe heteroepitaxial films (HEFs) grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. A comparison of the photoluminescence spectra of HEFs grown on GaAs substrates (CdHgTe/GaAs) with the spectra of CdHgTe/Si HEFs demonstrates that acceptor states with energy depths of about 18 and 27 meV are specific to CdHgTe/GaAs HEFs. The possible nature of these states and its relation to the HEF synthesis conditions and, in particular, to the vacancy doping occurring under conditions of a mercury deficiency during the course of epitaxy and postgrowth processing are discussed.

  12. Influence of alternative electron acceptors on the anaerobic biodegradability of chlorinated phenols and benzoic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Haeggblom, M.M.; Rivera, M.D.; Young, L.Y. )

    1993-04-01

    Methanogeneic conditions can promote the biodegradation of a number of halogenated aromatic compounds. This study, using sediments from freshwater and estuarine sites, is an evaluation of the anaerobic biodegradability of monochlorinated phenols and benzoic acids coupled to denitrification, sulfidogenesis, and methanogenesis. The results indicate that chlorinated phenols and benzoic acids are biodegradable under at least one set of anaerobic conditions. Metabolism depends both on the electron acceptor available and on the position of the chlorine substituent. Presence of alternative electron acceptors, nitrate, sulfate, and carbonate, can affect degradation rates and substrate specificities. Since contaminated sites usually have mixtures of wastes, bioremediation efforts may need to consider the activities of diverse anaerobic communities to carry out effective treatment of all components. 37 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Evolution of the electron mobility in polymer solar cells with different fullerene acceptors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dong; Djukic, Brandon; Shi, Weiqing; Bridges, Colin R; Kozycz, Lisa M; Seferos, Dwight S

    2013-08-28

    We investigate the evolution of the electron mobility of two different acceptors, [6,6]-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) and indene-C60 bisadduct (ICBA), in a poly(3-hexylthiophene) blend solar cell during a prolonged thermal aging process. High electron mobility does not correlate with the best device performance in our study of the P3HT:PC71BM and P3HT:ICBA systems. Very little changes are observed in the polymer crystallinity as a function of time. The evolution of the acceptor appears to be the dominant factor that leads to long-term changes in the device performance. The electron mobility evolves differently in PC71BM and ICBA systems, which highlights the importance of the fullerene molecular structure. PMID:23845022

  14. Influence of alternative electron acceptors on the anaerobic biodegradability of chlorinated phenols and benzoic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Haeggblom, M.M.; Rivera, M.D.; Young, L.Y.

    1993-01-01

    Nitrate, sulfate, and carbonate were used as electron acceptors to examine the anaerobic biodegradability of chlorinated aromatic compounds in estuarine and freshwater sediments. The respective denitrifying, sulfidogenic, and methanogenic enrichment cultures were established on each of the monochlorinated phenol and monochlorinated benzoic acid isomers, using sediment from the upper (freshwater) and lower (estuarine) Hudson River and the East River (estuarine) as source materials. Utilization of each chlorophenol and chlorobenzoate isomer was observed under at least one reducing condition; however, no single reducing condition permitted the metabolism of all six compounds tested. The anaerobic biodegradation of the chlorophenols and chlorobenzoates depended on the electron acceptor available and on the position of the chlorine substituent. In general, similar activities were observed under the different reducing conditions in both the freshwater and estuarine sediments.

  15. Phanta: A Non-Fluorescent Photochromic Acceptor for pcFRET

    PubMed Central

    Don Paul, Craig; Kiss, Csaba; Traore, Daouda A. K.; Gong, Lan; Wilce, Matthew C. J.; Devenish, Rodney J.; Bradbury, Andrew; Prescott, Mark

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an orange non-fluorescent photochromic protein (quantum yield, 0.003) we call Phanta that is useful as an acceptor in pcFRET applications. Phanta can be repeatedly inter-converted between the two absorbing states by alternate exposure to cyan and violet light. The absorption spectra of Phanta in one absorbing state shows excellent overlap with the emission spectra of a number of donor green fluorescent proteins including the commonly used EGFP. We show that the Phanta-EGFP FRET pair is suitable for monitoring the activation of caspase 3 in live cells using readily available instrumentation and a simple protocol that requires the acquisition of two donor emission images corresponding to Phanta in each of its photoswitched states. This the first report of a genetically encoded non-fluorescent acceptor for pcFRET. PMID:24098733

  16. Optoelectronic properties and charge transfer in donor-acceptor all-conjugated diblock copolymers.

    SciTech Connect

    Botiz, I.; Schaller, R. D.; Verduzco, R.; Darling, S. B.

    2011-05-12

    All-conjugated block copolymers, which can self-assemble into well-ordered morphologies, provide exciting opportunities to rationally design and control the nanoscale organization of electron-donor and electron-acceptor moieties in optoelectronic active layers. Here we report on the steady-state and time-resolved optical characterization of block copolymer films and solutions containing poly(3-hexylthiophene) as the donor block and poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) with and without copolymerization with benzothiadiazole as the acceptor block. Transient absorption measurements suggest rapid charge transfer occurs in both systems, with higher efficiency observed in the latter composition. These results indicate that this class of materials has promise in preparing highly ordered bulk heterojunction all-polymer organic photovoltaic devices.

  17. Construction of an upconversion nanoprobe with few-atom silver nanoclusters as the energy acceptor.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yan; Zeng, Lingyu; Xia, Tian; Wu, Zhengjun; Liu, Zhihong

    2015-04-27

    Herein we report that few-atom silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs) can be effective energy acceptors for upconversion phosphors (UCPs). A luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET) probe for biothiols was constructed by decorating UCPs with dithiol-stabilized Ag NCs. Owing to the unique properties of ultrasmall NCs, properties which bridge the gap between those of small molecules and those of nanoparticles, the use of approximately 1.9 nm Ag NCs as energy acceptors endows the probe with high energy-transfer efficiency, good biocompatibility, and flexibility. The UCP-Ag NC nanoprobe enables rapid and robust target assay in solutions. It was also uploaded into living cells and used to detect intracellular biothiol levels with high discrimination. Moreover, the probe shows transportability in vivo and can be used for tissue imaging. The facile growth of few-atom metal NCs on diverse templates may enable the development of various nanoprobes combining UCPs and metal NCs.

  18. Donor-acceptor-pair emission in fluorescent 4H-SiC grown by PVT method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xi Zhuo, Shi-Yi; Gao, Pan; Huang, Wei; Yan, Cheng-Feng; Shi, Er-Wei

    2015-04-15

    Fluorescent SiC, which contains donor and acceptor impurities with optimum concentrations, can work as a phosphor for visible light emission by donor-acceptor-pair (DAP) recombination. In this work, 3 inch N-B-Al co-doped fluorescent 4H-SiC crystals are prepared by PVT method. The p-type fluorescent 4H-SiC with low aluminum doping concentration can show intensive yellow-green fluorescence at room temperature. N-B DAP peak wavelength shifts from 578nm to 525nm and weak N-Al DAP emission occurred 403/420 nm quenches, when the temperature increases from 4K to 298K. The aluminum doping induces higher defect concentration in the fluorescent crystal and decreases optical transmissivity of the crystal in the visible light range. It triggers more non-radiative recombination and light absorption losses in the crystal.

  19. Synthesis of dithiafulvene-quinone donor-acceptor systems: isolation of a Michael adduct.

    PubMed

    Lissau, Henriette; Jevric, Martyn; Madsen, Anders Østergaard; Nielsen, Mogens Brøndsted

    2015-06-01

    π-Conjugated donor-acceptor systems based on dithiafulvene (DTF) donor units and various acceptor units have attracted attention for their linear and nonlinear optical properties. The reaction between p-benzoquinone and a 1,3-dithiole phosphonium salt, deprotonated by lithium hexamethyldisilazide (LiHMDS), gave a product mixture from which the Michael adduct [systematic name: dimethyl 2-(3-hydroxy-6-oxocyclohexa-2,4-dien-1-ylidene)-2H-1,3-dithiole-4,5-dicarboxylate], C13H10O6S2, was isolated. It is likely that one of the unidentified products obtained previously by others from related reactions could be a similar Michael adduct.

  20. Intramolecular Charge-Transfer Interaction of Donor-Acceptor-Donor Arrays Based on Anthracene Bisimide.

    PubMed

    Iwanaga, Tetsuo; Ogawa, Marina; Yamauchi, Tomokazu; Toyota, Shinji

    2016-05-20

    We designed anthracene bisimide (ABI) derivatives having two triphenylamine (TPA) groups as donor units at the 9,10-positions to form a novel π-conjugated donor-acceptor system. These compounds and their analogues with ethynylene linkers were synthesized by Suzuki-Miyaura and Sonogashira coupling reactions, respectively. In UV-vis spectra, the linker-free derivatives showed broad absorption bands arising from intramolecular charge-transfer interactions. Introducing ethynylene linkers resulted in a considerable red shift of the absorption bands. In fluorescence spectra, the ethynylene derivatives showed intense emission bands at 600-650 nm. Their photophysical and electrochemical properties were compared with those of the corresponding mono TPA derivatives on the basis of theoretical calculations and cyclic voltammetry to evaluate the intramolecular electronic interactions between the donor and acceptor units.

  1. XeF(2) /fluoride acceptors as versatile one-electron oxidants.

    PubMed

    Poleschner, Helmut; Seppelt, Konrad

    2013-12-01

    No phlogiston but xenon is released when XeF2 /F(-) acceptors act as new one-electron oxidants. F(-) acceptors are Lewis acids BF3 , B(C6 F5 )3 , and Al{OC(CF3 )3 }3 , and silyl derivatives TfOSiMe3 , Tf2 NSiMe3 , Me3 Si(+)  B(C6 F5 )4 (-) , and Me3 Si(+)  CHB11 Cl11 (-) . The anions BF4 (-) , TfO(-) , Tf2 N(-) , FB(C6 F5 )3 (-) , FAl{OC(CF3 )3 }3 (-) , B(C6 F5 )4 (-) , or CHB11 Cl11 (-) can be introduced into oxidation products of R2 E2 (E=S, Se, Te), [FeCp2 ], [(FeCpS)4 ], tetrathiafulvalene, thianthrene, and (2,4-Br2 C6 H3 )3 N. PMID:24127390

  2. Identification of peptides using gold nanoparticle-assisted single-drop microextraction coupled with AP-MALDI mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sudhir, Putty-Reddy; Wu, Hui-Fen; Zhou, Zi-Cong

    2005-11-15

    A novel technique, gold nanoparticle-assisted single-drop microextraction (SDME) combined with atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (AP-MALDI-MS) for the identification of peptides has been described. The SDME of peptides from aqueous solution was achieved using gold nanoparticles prepared in toluene as the acceptor phase. A simple phenomenon of isoelectric point (pI) of the peptides has been utilized successfully to extract the peptides into a single drop of nanogold in toluene. After extraction, a single-drop nano gold solution was directly spotted onto the target plate with an equal volume of matrix, proportional, variant-cyanohydroxy cinnamic acid ( proportional, variant-CHCA) and analyzed in AP-MALDI-MS. The parameters, such as solvent selection, extraction time, agitation rate, and pH effect, were optimized for the SDME technique. Using this technique, in aqueous solution, the lowest concentration detected for Met- and Leu-enkephalin peptides was 0.2 and 0.17 microM, respectively. In addition, the application of this technique to obtain the signal for the selected peptides in a mass spectrum in the presence of matrix interferences such as 1% Triton X-100 and 6.5 M urea has been showed. The application was extended to identify the peptides spiked into urine.

  3. Antibody Production with Synthetic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bao-Shiang; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P; Lee, Jenny; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Peptides (usually 10-20 amino acid residues in length) can be used as effectively as proteins in raising antibodies producing both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies routinely with titers higher than 20,000. Peptide antigens do not function as immunogens unless they are conjugated to proteins. Production of high quality antipeptide antibodies is dependent upon peptide sequence selection, the success of peptide synthesis, peptide-carrier protein conjugation, the humoral immune response in the host animal, the adjuvant used, the peptide dose administered, the injection method, and the purification of the antibody. Peptide sequence selection is probably the most critical step in the production of antipeptide antibodies. Although the process for designing peptide antigens is not exact, several guidelines and computational B-cell epitope prediction methods can help maximize the likelihood of producing antipeptide antibodies that recognize the protein. Antibodies raised by peptides have become essential tools in life science research. Virtually all phospho-specific antibodies are now produced using phosphopeptides as antigens. Typically, 5-20 mg of peptide is enough for antipeptide antibody production. It takes 3 months to produce a polyclonal antipeptide antibody in rabbits that yields ~100 mL of serum which corresponds to ~8-10 mg of the specific antibody after affinity purification using a peptide column. PMID:27515072

  4. Fluoroolefins as peptide mimetics: a computational study of structure, charge distribution, hydration, and hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Urban, Joseph J; Tillman, Brendon G; Cronin, William Andrew

    2006-09-28

    The design of peptide mimetic compounds is greatly facilitated by the identification of functionalities that can act as peptide replacements. The fluoroalkene moiety has recently been employed for that purpose. The purpose of this work is to characterize prototypical fluoroalkenes (fluoroethylene and 2-fluoro-2-butene) with respect to key properties of peptides (amides) including structure, charge distribution, hydration, and hydrogen bonding. The results are compared to those obtained for model peptides (formamide, N-methylacetamide). Calculations have been carried out at the MP2 and B3LYP levels of theory with the 6-311++G(2d,p) and 6-311++G(2d,2p) basis sets. The results suggest that the fluoroalkene is similar in steric requirements to a peptide bond but that there is less charge separation. Calculations of the hydration free energies with the PCM bulk continuum solvent model indicate that the fluoroalkene has much smaller hydration free energies than an amide but that the difference in solvation free energy for cis and trans isomers is comparable. In studies of complexes with water molecules, the fluoroalkene is found to engage in interactions that are analogous to backbone hydrogen-bonding interactions that govern many properties of natural peptides and proteins but with smaller interaction energies. In addition, key structural differences are noted when the fluoroalkene is playing the role of hydrogen-bond acceptor which may have implications in binding, aggregation, and conformational preferences in fluoroalkene peptidomimetics. The issue of cooperativity in hydrogen-bonding interactions in complexes with multiple waters has also been investigated. The fluoroalkene is found to exhibit cooperative effects that mirror those of the peptide but are smaller in magnitude. Thus, pairwise addivitity of interactions appears to more adequately describe the fluoroalkenes than the peptides they are intended to mimic.

  5. Influence of different electron donors and acceptors on dehalorespiration of tetrachloroethene by Desulfitobacterium frappieri TCE1

    SciTech Connect

    Gerritse, J.; Drzyzga, O.; Kloetstra, G.; Keijmel, M.; Wiersum, L.P.; Hutson, R.; Collins, M.D.; Gottschal, J.C.

    1999-12-01

    Strain TCE1, a strictly anaerobic bacterium that can grow by reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethane (TCE), was isolated by selective enrichment from a PCE-dechlorinating chemostat mixed culture. Strain TCE1 is a gram-positive, motile, curved rod-shaped organism that is 2 to 4 by 0.6 to 0.8 {micro}m and has approximately six lateral flagella. The pH and temperature optima for growth are 7.2 and 35 C, respectively. On the basis of a comparative 16S rRNA sequence analysis, this bacterium was identified as a new strain of Desulfitobacterium frappieri, because it exhibited 99.7% relatedness to the D. frappieri type strain, strain PCP-1. Growth with H{sub 2}, format, L-lactate, butyrate, crotonate, or ethanol as the electron donor depends on the availability of an external electron acceptor. Pyruvate and serine can also be used fermentatively. Electron donors (except format and H{sub 2}) are oxidized to acetate and CO{sub 2}. when L-lactate is the growth substrate, strain TCE1 can use the following electron acceptors: PCE and TCE (to produce cis-1,2-dichloroethene), sulfite and thiosulfate (to produce sulfide), nitrate (to produce nitrite), and fumarate (to produce succinate). Strain TCE1 is not able to reductively dechlorinate 3-chloro-4-hydroxyphenylacetate. The growth yields of the newly isolated bacterium when PCE is the electron acceptor are similar to those obtained for other dehalorespiring anaerobes (e.g., Desulfitobacterium sp. strain PCE1 and Desulfitobacterium hafniense) and the maximum specific reductive dechlorination rates are 4 to 16 times higher. Dechlorination of PCE and TCE is an inducible process. In PCE-limited chemostat cultures of strain TCE1, dechlorination is strongly inhibited by sulfite but not by other alternative electron acceptors, such as fumate or nitrate.

  6. Spectral engineering in π-conjugated polymers with intramolecular donor-acceptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Beaujuge, Pierre M; Amb, Chad M; Reynolds, John R

    2010-11-16

    With the development of light-harvesting organic materials for solar cell applications and molecular systems with fine-tuned colors for nonemissive electrochromic devices (e.g., smart windows, e-papers), a number of technical challenges remain to be overcome. Over the years, the concept of "spectral engineering" (tailoring the complex interplay between molecular physics and the various optical phenomena occurring across the electromagnetic spectrum) has become increasingly relevant in the field of π-conjugated organic polymers. Within the spectral engineering toolbox, the "donor-acceptor" approach uses alternating electron-rich and electron-deficient moieties along a π-conjugated backbone. This approach has proved especially valuable in the synthesis of dual-band and broadly absorbing chromophores with useful photovoltaic and electrochromic properties. In this Account, we highlight and provide insight into a present controversy surrounding the origin of the dual band of absorption sometimes encountered in semiconducting polymers structured using the "donor-acceptor" approach. Based on empirical evidence, we provide some schematic representations to describe the possible mechanisms governing the evolution of the two-band spectral absorption observed on varying the relative composition of electron-rich and electron-deficient substituents along the π-conjugated backbone. In parallel, we draw attention to the choice of the method employed to estimate and compare the absorption coefficients of polymer chromophores exhibiting distinct repeat unit lengths, and containing various extents of solubilizing side-chains along their backbone. Finally, we discuss the common assumption that "donor-acceptor" systems should have systematically lower absorption coefficients than their "all-donor" counterparts. The proposed models point toward important theoretical parameters which could be further explored at the macromolecular level to help researchers take full advantage of the

  7. Light-induced noncentrosymmetry in acceptor-donor-substituted azobenzene solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiang; Si, Jinhai; Wang, Yougui; Ye, Peixian; Fu, Xingfa; Qiu, Ling; Shen, Yuquan

    1995-10-01

    Light-induced noncentrosymmetry was achieved experimentally in acceptor-donor-substituted azobenzene solutions and observed by phase-matched nondegenerate six-wave mixing. The microscopic origin of the induced noncentrosymmetry was found to be orientational hole burning, which was distinguished directly with net orientation of molecules by experimental observations. The decay time of the induced noncentrosymmetry depended on the rotational orientation time of the sample's molecule, which varied linearly with the viscosity of the solvent.

  8. Neutral nitrogen acceptors in ZnO: The {sup 67}Zn hyperfine interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Golden, E. M.; Giles, N. C.; Evans, S. M.; Halliburton, L. E.

    2014-03-14

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is used to characterize the {sup 67}Zn hyperfine interactions associated with neutral nitrogen acceptors in zinc oxide. Data are obtained from an n-type bulk crystal grown by the seeded chemical vapor transport method. Singly ionized nitrogen acceptors (N{sup −}) initially present in the crystal are converted to their paramagnetic neutral charge state (N{sup 0}) during exposure at low temperature to 442 or 633 nm laser light. The EPR signals from these N{sup 0} acceptors are best observed near 5 K. Nitrogen substitutes for oxygen ions and has four nearest-neighbor cations. The zinc ion along the [0001] direction is referred to as an axial neighbor and the three equivalent zinc ions in the basal plane are referred to as nonaxial neighbors. For axial neighbors, the {sup 67}Zn hyperfine parameters are A{sub ‖} = 37.0 MHz and A{sub ⊥} = 8.4 MHz with the unique direction being [0001]. For nonaxial neighbors, the {sup 67}Zn parameters are A{sub 1} = 14.5 MHz, A{sub 2} = 18.3 MHz, and A{sub 3} = 20.5 MHz with A{sub 3} along a [101{sup ¯}0] direction (i.e., in the basal plane toward the nitrogen) and A{sub 2} along the [0001] direction. These {sup 67}Zn results and the related {sup 14}N hyperfine parameters provide information about the distribution of unpaired spin density at substitutional neutral nitrogen acceptors in ZnO.

  9. Free-Standing Undoped ZnO Microtubes with Rich and Stable Shallow Acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang; Yan, Yinzhou; Zeng, Yong; Lu, Yue; Chen, Liang; Jiang, Yijian

    2016-01-01

    Fabrication of reliable large-sized p-ZnO is a major challenge to realise ZnO-based electronic device applications. Here we report a novel technique to grow high-quality free-standing undoped acceptor-rich ZnO (A-ZnO) microtubes with dimensions of ~100 μm (in diameter) × 5 mm (in length) by optical vapour supersaturated precipitation. The A-ZnO exhibits long lifetimes (>1 year) against compensation/lattice-relaxation and the stable shallow acceptors with binding energy of ~127 meV are confirmed from Zn vacancies. The A-ZnO provides a possibility for a mimetic p-n homojunction diode with n+-ZnO:Sn. The high concentrations of holes in A-ZnO and electrons in n+-ZnO make the dual diffusion possible to form a depletion layer. The diode threshold voltage, turn-on voltage, reverse saturated current and reverse breakdown voltage are 0.72 V, 1.90 V, <10 μA and >15 V, respectively. The A-ZnO also demonstrates quenching-free donor-acceptor-pairs (DAP) emission located in 390–414 nm with temperature of 270–470 K. Combining the temperature-dependent DAP violet emission with native green emission, the visible luminescence of A-ZnO microtube can be modulated in a wide region of colour space across white light. The present work opens up new opportunities to achieve ZnO with rich and stable acceptors instead of p-ZnO for a variety of potential applications. PMID:27263856

  10. Ultra-flexible nonvolatile memory based on donor-acceptor diketopyrrolopyrrole polymer blends

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Yan, Yan; Zhou, Li; Huang, Long-Biao; Zhuang, Jiaqing; Sonar, Prashant; Roy, V. A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Flexible memory cell array based on high mobility donor-acceptor diketopyrrolopyrrole polymer has been demonstrated. The memory cell exhibits low read voltage, high cell-to-cell uniformity and good mechanical flexibility, and has reliable retention and endurance memory performance. The electrical properties of the memory devices are systematically investigated and modeled. Our results suggest that the polymer blends provide an important step towards high-density flexible nonvolatile memory devices. PMID:26029856

  11. Free-Standing Undoped ZnO Microtubes with Rich and Stable Shallow Acceptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Yan, Yinzhou; Zeng, Yong; Lu, Yue; Chen, Liang; Jiang, Yijian

    2016-01-01

    Fabrication of reliable large-sized p-ZnO is a major challenge to realise ZnO-based electronic device applications. Here we report a novel technique to grow high-quality free-standing undoped acceptor-rich ZnO (A-ZnO) microtubes with dimensions of ~100 μm (in diameter) × 5 mm (in length) by optical vapour supersaturated precipitation. The A-ZnO exhibits long lifetimes (>1 year) against compensation/lattice-relaxation and the stable shallow acceptors with binding energy of ~127 meV are confirmed from Zn vacancies. The A-ZnO provides a possibility for a mimetic p-n homojunction diode with n(+)-ZnO:Sn. The high concentrations of holes in A-ZnO and electrons in n(+)-ZnO make the dual diffusion possible to form a depletion layer. The diode threshold voltage, turn-on voltage, reverse saturated current and reverse breakdown voltage are 0.72 V, 1.90 V, <10 μA and >15 V, respectively. The A-ZnO also demonstrates quenching-free donor-acceptor-pairs (DAP) emission located in 390-414 nm with temperature of 270-470 K. Combining the temperature-dependent DAP violet emission with native green emission, the visible luminescence of A-ZnO microtube can be modulated in a wide region of colour space across white light. The present work opens up new opportunities to achieve ZnO with rich and stable acceptors instead of p-ZnO for a variety of potential applications. PMID:27263856

  12. Influence of Different Electron Donors and Acceptors on Dehalorespiration of Tetrachloroethene by Desulfitobacterium frappieri TCE1

    PubMed Central

    Gerritse, Jan; Drzyzga, Oliver; Kloetstra, Geert; Keijmel, Mischa; Wiersum, Luit P.; Hutson, Roger; Collins, Matthew D.; Gottschal, Jan C.

    1999-01-01

    Strain TCE1, a strictly anaerobic bacterium that can grow by reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE), was isolated by selective enrichment from a PCE-dechlorinating chemostat mixed culture. Strain TCE1 is a gram-positive, motile, curved rod-shaped organism that is 2 to 4 by 0.6 to 0.8 μm and has approximately six lateral flagella. The pH and temperature optima for growth are 7.2 and 35°C, respectively. On the basis of a comparative 16S rRNA sequence analysis, this bacterium was identified as a new strain of Desulfitobacterium frappieri, because it exhibited 99.7% relatedness to the D. frappieri type strain, strain PCP-1. Growth with H2, formate, l-lactate, butyrate, crotonate, or ethanol as the electron donor depends on the availability of an external electron acceptor. Pyruvate and serine can also be used fermentatively. Electron donors (except formate and H2) are oxidized to acetate and CO2. When l-lactate is the growth substrate, strain TCE1 can use the following electron acceptors: PCE and TCE (to produce cis-1,2-dichloroethene), sulfite and thiosulfate (to produce sulfide), nitrate (to produce nitrite), and fumarate (to produce succinate). Strain TCE1 is not able to reductively dechlorinate 3-chloro-4-hydroxyphenylacetate. The growth yields of the newly isolated bacterium when PCE is the electron acceptor are similar to those obtained for other dehalorespiring anaerobes (e.g., Desulfitobacterium sp. strain PCE1 and Desulfitobacterium hafniense) and the maximum specific reductive dechlorination rates are 4 to 16 times higher (up to 1.4 μmol of chloride released · min−1 · mg of protein−1). Dechlorination of PCE and TCE is an inducible process. In PCE-limited chemostat cultures of strain TCE1, dechlorination is strongly inhibited by sulfite but not by other alternative electron acceptors, such as fumarate or nitrate. PMID:10583967

  13. Donor-acceptor organo-imido polyoxometalates: high transparency, high activity redox-active NLO chromophores.

    PubMed

    Al-Yasari, Ahmed; Van Steerteghem, Nick; El Moll, Hani; Clays, Koen; Fielden, John

    2016-02-21

    We show that polyoxometalates (POMs) are an excellent redox-active acceptor on which to base high performance 2(nd) order non-linear optical (NLO) chromophores. This is demonstrated through three new organoimido-Lindqvist derivatives with HRS β0-values exceeding those of any dipolar organic system with comparable donor, π-system and absorption profile. Thus, organoimido POMs may provide a new generation of high performance, high transparency, and potentially redox-switchable NLO materials. PMID:26815652

  14. Influence of alternative electron acceptors on the anaerobic biodegradability of chlorinated phenols and benzoic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Haeggblom, M.M.; Rivera, M.D.; Young, L.Y.

    1993-01-01

    Nitrate, sulfate, and carbonate were used as electron acceptors to examine the anaerobic biodegradability of chlorinated aromatic compounds in estuarine and freshwater sediments. The respective denitrifying, sulfidogenic, and methanogenic enrichment cultures were established on each of the monochlorinated phenol and monochlorinated benzoic acid isomers, using sediment from the upper (freshwater) and lower (estuarine) Hudson River and the East River (estuarine) as source materials. (Copyright (c) 1993 American Society for Microbiology.)

  15. Well-defined star-shaped donor-acceptor conjugated molecules for organic resistive memory devices.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hung-Chin; Zhang, Jicheng; Bo, Zhishan; Chen, Wen-Chang

    2015-09-28

    Solution processable star-shaped donor-acceptor (D-A) conjugated molecules (TPA-T-NI and TPA-3T-NI) with an electron-donating triphenylamine (TPA) core, three thienylene or terthienylene spacers, and three 1.8-naphthalimide (NI) electron-withdrawing end-groups are explored for the first time as charge storage materials for resistor-type memory devices owing to the efficient electric charge transfer and trapping.

  16. Free-Standing Undoped ZnO Microtubes with Rich and Stable Shallow Acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Yan, Yinzhou; Zeng, Yong; Lu, Yue; Chen, Liang; Jiang, Yijian

    2016-06-01

    Fabrication of reliable large-sized p-ZnO is a major challenge to realise ZnO-based electronic device applications. Here we report a novel technique to grow high-quality free-standing undoped acceptor-rich ZnO (A-ZnO) microtubes with dimensions of ~100 μm (in diameter) × 5 mm (in length) by optical vapour supersaturated precipitation. The A-ZnO exhibits long lifetimes (>1 year) against compensation/lattice-relaxation and the stable shallow acceptors with binding energy of ~127 meV are confirmed from Zn vacancies. The A-ZnO provides a possibility for a mimetic p-n homojunction diode with n+-ZnO:Sn. The high concentrations of holes in A-ZnO and electrons in n+-ZnO make the dual diffusion possible to form a depletion layer. The diode threshold voltage, turn-on voltage, reverse saturated current and reverse breakdown voltage are 0.72 V, 1.90 V, <10 μA and >15 V, respectively. The A-ZnO also demonstrates quenching-free donor-acceptor-pairs (DAP) emission located in 390–414 nm with temperature of 270–470 K. Combining the temperature-dependent DAP violet emission with native green emission, the visible luminescence of A-ZnO microtube can be modulated in a wide region of colour space across white light. The present work opens up new opportunities to achieve ZnO with rich and stable acceptors instead of p-ZnO for a variety of potential applications.

  17. Free-Standing Undoped ZnO Microtubes with Rich and Stable Shallow Acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Yan, Yinzhou; Zeng, Yong; Lu, Yue; Chen, Liang; Jiang, Yijian

    2016-06-01

    Fabrication of reliable large-sized p-ZnO is a major challenge to realise ZnO-based electronic device applications. Here we report a novel technique to grow high-quality free-standing undoped acceptor-rich ZnO (A-ZnO) microtubes with dimensions of ~100 μm (in diameter) × 5 mm (in length) by optical vapour supersaturated precipitation. The A-ZnO exhibits long lifetimes (>1 year) against compensation/lattice-relaxation and the stable shallow acceptors with binding energy of ~127 meV are confirmed from Zn vacancies. The A-ZnO provides a possibility for a mimetic p-n homojunction diode with n+-ZnO:Sn. The high concentrations of holes in A-ZnO and electrons in n+-ZnO make the dual diffusion possible to form a depletion layer. The diode threshold voltage, turn-on voltage, reverse saturated current and reverse breakdown voltage are 0.72 V, 1.90 V, <10 μA and >15 V, respectively. The A-ZnO also demonstrates quenching-free donor-acceptor-pairs (DAP) emission located in 390-414 nm with temperature of 270-470 K. Combining the temperature-dependent DAP violet emission with native green emission, the visible luminescence of A-ZnO microtube can be modulated in a wide region of colour space across white light. The present work opens up new opportunities to achieve ZnO with rich and stable acceptors instead of p-ZnO for a variety of potential applications.

  18. Well-defined star-shaped donor-acceptor conjugated molecules for organic resistive memory devices.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hung-Chin; Zhang, Jicheng; Bo, Zhishan; Chen, Wen-Chang

    2015-09-28

    Solution processable star-shaped donor-acceptor (D-A) conjugated molecules (TPA-T-NI and TPA-3T-NI) with an electron-donating triphenylamine (TPA) core, three thienylene or terthienylene spacers, and three 1.8-naphthalimide (NI) electron-withdrawing end-groups are explored for the first time as charge storage materials for resistor-type memory devices owing to the efficient electric charge transfer and trapping. PMID:26255879

  19. Ultra-flexible nonvolatile memory based on donor-acceptor diketopyrrolopyrrole polymer blends.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Yan, Yan; Zhou, Li; Huang, Long-Biao; Zhuang, Jiaqing; Sonar, Prashant; Roy, V A L

    2015-01-01

    Flexible memory cell array based on high mobility donor-acceptor diketopyrrolopyrrole polymer has been demonstrated. The memory cell exhibits low read voltage, high cell-to-cell uniformity and good mechanical flexibility, and has reliable retention and endurance memory performance. The electrical properties of the memory devices are systematically investigated and modeled. Our results suggest that the polymer blends provide an important step towards high-density flexible nonvolatile memory devices.

  20. Donor-acceptor organo-imido polyoxometalates: high transparency, high activity redox-active NLO chromophores.

    PubMed

    Al-Yasari, Ahmed; Van Steerteghem, Nick; El Moll, Hani; Clays, Koen; Fielden, John

    2016-02-21

    We show that polyoxometalates (POMs) are an excellent redox-active acceptor on which to base high performance 2(nd) order non-linear optical (NLO) chromophores. This is demonstrated through three new organoimido-Lindqvist derivatives with HRS β0-values exceeding those of any dipolar organic system with comparable donor, π-system and absorption profile. Thus, organoimido POMs may provide a new generation of high performance, high transparency, and potentially redox-switchable NLO materials.

  1. Structure and function of the ARH family of ADP-ribose-acceptor hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Mashimo, Masato; Kato, Jiro; Moss, Joel

    2014-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational protein modification, in which ADP-ribose is transferred from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to specific acceptors, thereby altering their activities. The ADP-ribose transfer reactions are divided into mono- and poly-(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Cellular ADP-ribosylation levels are tightly regulated by enzymes that transfer ADP-ribose to acceptor proteins (e.g. ADP-ribosyltransferases, poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP)) and those that cleave the linkage between ADP-ribose and acceptor (e.g. ADP-ribosyl-acceptor hydrolases (ARH), poly-(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolases (PARG)), thereby constituting an ADP-ribosylation cycle. This review summarizes current findings related to the ARH family of proteins. This family comprises three members (ARH1-3) with similar size (39 kDa) and amino acid sequence. ARH1 catalyzes the hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond of mono-(ADP-ribosyl)ated arginine. ARH3 hydrolyzes poly-(ADP-ribose) (PAR) and O-acetyl-ADP-ribose. The different substrate specificities of ARH1 and ARH3 contribute to their unique roles in the cell. Based on a phenotype analysis of ARH1−/− and ARH3−/− mice, ARH1 is involved in the action by bacterial toxins as well as in tumorigenesis. ARH3 participates in the degradation of PAR that is synthesized by PARP1 in response to oxidative stress-induced DNA damage; this hydrolytic reaction suppresses PAR-mediated cell death, a pathway termed parthanatos. PMID:24746921

  2. Molecular assembly of amino acid interlinked, topologically symmetric, π-complementary donor-acceptor-donor triads.

    PubMed

    Avinash, M B; Sandeepa, K V; Govindaraju, T

    2013-01-01

    Amino acid interlinked pyrene and naphthalenediimide (NDI) based novel donor-acceptor-donor (D-A-D) triads are designed to exploit their topological symmetry and complementary π-character for facile charge-transfer complexation. Consequently, free-floating high-aspect-ratio supercoiled nanofibres and hierarchical helical bundles of triads are realized by modulating the chemical functionality of interlinking amino acids. PMID:23946856

  3. Dynamic combinatorial synthesis of a catenane based on donor–acceptor interactions in water

    PubMed Central

    Au-Yeung, Ho Yu; Pantoş, G. Dan; Sanders, Jeremy K. M.

    2009-01-01

    A new type of neutral donor–acceptor [2]-catenane, containing both complementary units in the same ring was synthesized from a dynamic combinatorial library in water. The yield of the water soluble [2]-catenane is enhanced by increasing either building-block concentrations or ionic strength, or by the addition of an electron-rich template. NMR spectroscopy demonstrates that the template is intercalated between the 2 electron-deficient naphthalenediimide units of the catenane. PMID:19171892

  4. Humic acids as electron acceptors for anaerobic microbial oxidation of vinyl chloride and dichloroethene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Lovley, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of [1,2-14C]vinyl chloride and [1,2- 14C]dichloroethene to 14CO2 under humic acid-reducing conditions was demonstrated. The results indicate that waterborne contaminants can be oxidized by using humic acid compounds as electron acceptors and suggest that natural aquatic systems have a much larger capacity for contaminant oxidation than previously thought.

  5. Influence of defect structure on ferroelectric aging in donor-acceptor hybrid-doped PZT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anil, A.; Vani, K.; Kumar, V.

    2016-06-01

    In the present work, we report the aging effect in manganese (Mn) and niobium (Nb) hybrid-doped PZT composition. Interestingly, it is observed that the ferroelectric aging depends on the acceptor/donor ratio. In hybrid-doped PZT, at high donor dopant concentrations, aging is not observed. The underlying mechanism is correlated with the defect chemistry of the system. It is also observed that tuning the defect chemistry is an effective strategy to realize piezoceramics with enhanced dielectric and piezoelectric characteristics.

  6. Observation of selective plasmon-exciton coupling in nonradiative energy transfer: donor-selective versus acceptor-selective plexcitons.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Tuncay; Hernandez-Martinez, Pedro Ludwig; Mutlugun, Evren; Akin, Onur; Nizamoglu, Sedat; Ozel, Ilkem Ozge; Zhang, Qing; Xiong, Qihua; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2013-07-10

    We report selectively plasmon-mediated nonradiative energy transfer between quantum dot (QD) emitters interacting with each other via Förster-type resonance energy transfer (FRET) under controlled plasmon coupling either to only the donor QDs (i.e., donor-selective) or to only the acceptor QDs (i.e., acceptor-selective). Using layer-by-layer assembled colloidal QD nanocrystal solids with metal nanoparticles integrated at carefully designed spacing, we demonstrate the ability to enable/disable the coupled plasmon-exciton (plexciton) formation distinctly at the donor (exciton departing) site or at the acceptor (exciton feeding) site of our choice, while not hindering the donor exciton-acceptor exciton interaction but refraining from simultaneous coupling to both sites of the donor and the acceptor in the FRET process. In the case of donor-selective plexciton, we observed a substantial shortening in the donor QD lifetime from 1.33 to 0.29 ns as a result of plasmon-coupling to the donors and the FRET-assisted exciton transfer from the donors to the acceptors, both of which shorten the donor lifetime. This consequently enhanced the acceptor emission by a factor of 1.93. On the other hand, in the complementary case of acceptor-selective plexciton we observed a 2.70-fold emission enhancement in the acceptor QDs, larger than the acceptor emission enhancement of the donor-selective plexciton, as a result of the combined effects of the acceptor plasmon coupling and the FRET-assisted exciton feeding. Here we present the comparative results of theoretical modeling of the donor- and acceptor-selective plexcitons of nonradiative energy transfer developed here for the first time, which are in excellent agreement with the systematic experimental characterization. Such an ability to modify and control energy transfer through mastering plexcitons is of fundamental importance, opening up new applications for quantum dot embedded plexciton devices along with the development of new

  7. Observation of selective plasmon-exciton coupling in nonradiative energy transfer: donor-selective versus acceptor-selective plexcitons.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Tuncay; Hernandez-Martinez, Pedro Ludwig; Mutlugun, Evren; Akin, Onur; Nizamoglu, Sedat; Ozel, Ilkem Ozge; Zhang, Qing; Xiong, Qihua; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2013-07-10

    We report selectively plasmon-mediated nonradiative energy transfer between quantum dot (QD) emitters interacting with each other via Förster-type resonance energy transfer (FRET) under controlled plasmon coupling either to only the donor QDs (i.e., donor-selective) or to only the acceptor QDs (i.e., acceptor-selective). Using layer-by-layer assembled colloidal QD nanocrystal solids with metal nanoparticles integrated at carefully designed spacing, we demonstrate the ability to enable/disable the coupled plasmon-exciton (plexciton) formation distinctly at the donor (exciton departing) site or at the acceptor (exciton feeding) site of our choice, while not hindering the donor exciton-acceptor exciton interaction but refraining from simultaneous coupling to both sites of the donor and the acceptor in the FRET process. In the case of donor-selective plexciton, we observed a substantial shortening in the donor QD lifetime from 1.33 to 0.29 ns as a result of plasmon-coupling to the donors and the FRET-assisted exciton transfer from the donors to the acceptors, both of which shorten the donor lifetime. This consequently enhanced the acceptor emission by a factor of 1.93. On the other hand, in the complementary case of acceptor-selective plexciton we observed a 2.70-fold emission enhancement in the acceptor QDs, larger than the acceptor emission enhancement of the donor-selective plexciton, as a result of the combined effects of the acceptor plasmon coupling and the FRET-assisted exciton feeding. Here we present the comparative results of theoretical modeling of the donor- and acceptor-selective plexcitons of nonradiative energy transfer developed here for the first time, which are in excellent agreement with the systematic experimental characterization. Such an ability to modify and control energy transfer through mastering plexcitons is of fundamental importance, opening up new applications for quantum dot embedded plexciton devices along with the development of new

  8. Design of Reversible, Cysteine-Targeted Michael Acceptors Guided by Kinetic and Computational Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Electrophilic probes that covalently modify a cysteine thiol often show enhanced pharmacological potency and selectivity. Although reversible Michael acceptors have been reported, the structural requirements for reversibility are poorly understood. Here, we report a novel class of acrylonitrile-based Michael acceptors, activated by aryl or heteroaryl electron-withdrawing groups. We demonstrate that thiol adducts of these acrylonitriles undergo β-elimination at rates that span more than 3 orders of magnitude. These rates correlate inversely with the computed proton affinity of the corresponding carbanions, enabling the intrinsic reversibility of the thiol-Michael reaction to be tuned in a predictable manner. We apply these principles to the design of new reversible covalent kinase inhibitors with improved properties. A cocrystal structure of one such inhibitor reveals specific noncovalent interactions between the 1,2,4-triazole activating group and the kinase. Our experimental and computational study enables the design of new Michael acceptors, expanding the palette of reversible, cysteine-targeted electrophiles. PMID:25153195

  9. High-Performance Electron Acceptor with Thienyl Side Chains for Organic Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuze; Zhao, Fuwen; He, Qiao; Huo, Lijun; Wu, Yang; Parker, Timothy C; Ma, Wei; Sun, Yanming; Wang, Chunru; Zhu, Daoben; Heeger, Alan J; Marder, Seth R; Zhan, Xiaowei

    2016-04-13

    We develop an efficient fused-ring electron acceptor (ITIC-Th) based on indacenodithieno[3,2-b]thiophene core and thienyl side-chains for organic solar cells (OSCs). Relative to its counterpart with phenyl side-chains (ITIC), ITIC-Th shows lower energy levels (ITIC-Th: HOMO = -5.66 eV, LUMO = -3.93 eV; ITIC: HOMO = -5.48 eV, LUMO = -3.83 eV) due to the σ-inductive effect of thienyl side-chains, which can match with high-performance narrow-band-gap polymer donors and wide-band-gap polymer donors. ITIC-Th has higher electron mobility (6.1 × 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) than ITIC (2.6 × 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) due to enhanced intermolecular interaction induced by sulfur-sulfur interaction. We fabricate OSCs by blending ITIC-Th acceptor with two different low-band-gap and wide-band-gap polymer donors. In one case, a power conversion efficiency of 9.6% was observed, which rivals some of the highest efficiencies for single junction OSCs based on fullerene acceptors.

  10. Field emission analysis of band bending in donor/acceptor heterojunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Yingjie; Li, Shuai; Wang, Guiwei; Zhao, Tianjiao; Zhang, Gengmin

    2016-06-01

    The donor/acceptor heterojunction plays an important role in organic solar cells. An investigation of band bending in the donor/acceptor heterojunction is helpful in analysis of the charge transport behavior and for the improvement of the device performance. In this work, we report an approach for detection of band bending in a donor/acceptor heterojunction that has been prepared on a small and sharp tungsten tip. In situ field emission measurements are performed after the deposition process, and a linear Fowler-Nordheim plot is obtained from the fresh organic film surface. The thickness-dependent work function is then measured in the layer-by-layer deposited heterojunction. Several different types of heterojunction (zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc)/C60, copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic bisbenzimidazole, and CuPc/C60) are fabricated and analyzed. The different charge transfer directions in the heterojunctions are distinguished by field emission measurements. The calculation method used to determine the band bending is then discussed in detail. A triple layer heterojunction (C60/ZnPc/CuPc) is also analyzed using this method. A small amount of band bending is measured in the outer CuPc layer. This method provides an independent reference method for determination of the band bending in an organic heterojunction that will complement photoemission spectroscopy and current-voltage measurement methods.

  11. Examining Forster Energy Transfer for Semiconductor Nanocrystaline Quantum Dot Donors and Acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Curutchet, C.; Franceschetti, A.; Zunger, A.; Scholes, G. D.

    2008-01-01

    Excitation energy transfer involving semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) has received increased attention in recent years because their properties, such as high photostability and size-tunable optical properties, have made QDs attractive as Forster resonant energy transfer (FRET) probes or sensors. An intriguing question in FRET studies involving QDs has been whether the dipole approximation, commonly used to predict the electronic coupling, is sufficiently accurate. Accurate estimates of electronic couplings between two 3.9 nm CdSe QDs and between a QD and a chlorophyll molecule are reported. These calculations are based on transition densities obtained from atomistic semiempirical calculations and time-dependent density functional theory for the QD and the chlorophyll, respectively. In contrast to the case of donor-acceptor molecules, where the dipole approximation breaks down at length scales comparable to the molecular dimensions, we find that the dipole approximation works surprisingly well when donor and/or acceptor is a spherical QD, even at contact donor-acceptor separations. Our conclusions provide support for the use of QDs as FRET probes for accurate distance measurements.

  12. Identification of nitrogen acceptor in Cu2O: First-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    T-Thienprasert, Jiraroj; Limpijumnong, Sukit

    2015-11-01

    The source of p-type carriers observed in nitrogen-doped Cu2O samples [Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 1060 (2003)] was identified by using accurate hybrid density functional calculations. Similar to the case of ZnO, we found that N is a deep acceptor when substituting for O in Cu2O and cannot be the source of the observed p-type carriers. Detailed investigation of other N-related defects in Cu2O reveals that N2 substitution for Cu, i.e., (N2)Cu, is a shallow acceptor and can give hole carriers in N-doped Cu2O samples. (N2)Cu is not only a shallow acceptor but it also has a lower formation energy than NO in some growth conditions. The calculated emission photo luminescence (PL) peak at 1.89 eV associated with (N2)Cu is also in good agreement with the observed N-related PL peak at ˜1.82 eV in N-doped Cu2O sample. To aid future identification by Raman spectroscopy techniques, the vibrational frequencies of N2 on both Cu and O sites were calculated.

  13. Amorphous carbon nanoparticle used as novel resonance energy transfer acceptor for chemiluminescent immunoassay of transferrin.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hongfei; Wang, Wenwen; Wang, Zhenxing; Han, Jing; Fu, Zhifeng

    2014-03-28

    Amorphous carbon nanoparticles (ACNPs) showing highly efficient quenching of chemiluminescence (CL) were prepared from candle soot with a very simple protocol. The prepared ACNP was employed as the novel energy acceptor for a chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET)-based immunoassay. In this work, ACNP was linked with transferrin (TRF), and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was conjugated to TRF antibody (HRP-anti-TRF). The immunoreaction rendered the distance between the ACNP acceptor and the HRP-catalyzed CL emitter to be short enough for CRET occurring. In the presence of TRF, this antigen competed with ACNP-TRF for HRP-anti-TRF, thus led to the decreased occurrence of CRET. A linear range of 20-400 ng mL(-1) and a limit of detection of 20 ng mL(-1) were obtained in this immunoassay. The proposed method was successfully applied for detection of TRF levels in human sera, and the results were in good agreement with ELISA method. Moreover, the ACNPs show higher energy transfer efficiency than other conventional nano-scaled energy acceptors such as graphene oxide in CRET assay. It is anticipated that this approach can be developed for determination of other analytes with low cost, simple manipulation and high specificity. PMID:24636417

  14. Donor-acceptor graphene-based hybrid materials facilitating photo-induced electron-transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Stergiou, Anastasios; Pagona, Georgia; Tagmatarchis, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    Graphene research and in particular the topic of chemical functionalization of graphene has exploded in the last decade. The main aim is to increase the solubility and thereby enhance the processability of the material, which is otherwise insoluble and inapplicable for technological applications when stacked in the form of graphite. To this end, initially, graphite was oxidized under harsh conditions to yield exfoliated graphene oxide sheets that are soluble in aqueous media and amenable to chemical modifications due to the presence of carboxylic acid groups at the edges of the lattice. However, it was obvious that the high-defect framework of graphene oxide cannot be readily utilized in applications that are governed by charge-transfer processes, for example, in solar cells. Alternatively, exfoliated graphene has been applied toward the realization of some donor-acceptor hybrid materials with photo- and/or electro-active components. The main body of research regarding obtaining donor-acceptor hybrid materials based on graphene to facilitate charge-transfer phenomena, which is reviewed here, concerns the incorporation of porphyrins and phthalocyanines onto graphene sheets. Through illustrative schemes, the preparation and most importantly the photophysical properties of such graphene-based ensembles will be described. Important parameters, such as the generation of the charge-separated state upon photoexcitation of the organic electron donor, the lifetimes of the charge-separation and charge-recombination as well as the incident-photon-to-current efficiency value for some donor-acceptor graphene-based hybrids, will be discussed.

  15. Molecular Donor-Bridge-Acceptor Strategies for High-Capacitance Organic Dielectric Materials.

    PubMed

    Heitzer, Henry M; Marks, Tobin J; Ratner, Mark A

    2015-06-10

    Donor-bridge-acceptor (DBA) systems occupy a rich history in molecular electronics and photonics. A key property of DBA materials is their typically large and tunable (hyper)polarizabilities. While traditionally, classical descriptions such as the Clausius-Mossotti formalism have been used to relate molecular polarizabilities to bulk dielectric response, recent work has shown that these classical equations are inadequate for numerous materials classes. Creating high-dielectric organic materials is critically important for utilizing unconventional semiconductors in electronic circuitry. Employing a plane-wave density functional theory formalism, we investigate the dielectric response of highly polarizable DBA molecule-based thin films. Such films are found to have large dielectric response arising from cooperative effects between donor and acceptor units when mediated by a conjugated bridge. Moreover, the dielectric response can be systematically tuned by altering the building block donor, acceptor, or bridge structures and is found to be nonlinearly dependent on electric field strength. The computed dielectric constants are largely independent of the density functional employed, and qualitative trends are readily evident. Remarkably large computed dielectric constants >15.0 and capacitances >6.0 μF/cm(2) are achieved for squaraine monolayers, significantly higher than in traditional organic dielectrics. Such calculations should provide a guide for designing high-capacitance organic dielectrics that should greatly enhance transistor performance.

  16. C-H-Activated Direct Arylation of Strong Benzothiadiazole and Quinoxaline-Based Electron Acceptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junxiang; Parker, Timothy C; Chen, Wayne; Williams, LaRita; Khrustalev, Victor N; Jucov, Evgheni V; Barlow, Stephen; Timofeeva, Tatiana V; Marder, Seth R

    2016-01-15

    Electron acceptors are important components of π-conjugated materials, but the strong electron-withdrawing properties of the required synthetic intermediates often make them poor substrates in synthetic schemes designed around conventional organometallic cross-coupling. Here, strong benzodiimine-based acceptors, including 5,6-difluoro[2,1,3]benzothiadiazole, 5,6-dicyano[2,1,3]benzothiadiazole, 5,6-dicyanobenzo[d][1,2,3]triazole, 6,7-dicyanoquinoxaline, and 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline, are shown to undergo facile palladium-catalyzed C-H direct arylation with a variety of bromoarenes in moderate to high yields. The electrochemical characteristics of di-2-thienyl derivatives synthesized using this methodology are compared and suggest that, in an electron-transfer sense, 5,6-dicyano[2,1,3]benzothiadiazole is a comparably strong acceptor to benzo[1,2-c:4,5-c']bis[1,2,5]thiadiazole. The synthetic results suggest that high electron-withdrawing ability, which has traditionally limited reaction yields and structural variety in organic electronic materials, may be advantageous when employing C-H activated direct arylation in certain circumstances.

  17. Electronic spectra and hyperpolarizabilities of structurally similar donor-acceptor dyes. A density functional theory analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Amrita; Das, Mousumi; Bagchi, Sanjib

    2015-12-01

    Studies with density functional theory (DFT) have been done to reinforce our previous experimental findings involving the solvatochromism and the effect of protonation and for three structurally similar donor-acceptor dyes exhibiting intramolecular charge transfer transition. These dyes have similar donor (indole N/amino N) site and similar carbonyl O as the acceptor centre. The dye with an amino N donor site and indanone O as the acceptor centre has the lowest value of the energy gap between HOMO (highest occupied molecular orbital) and LUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital) and highest percentage of charge transfer from the N to the O centre. Time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has been used to calculate the excitation energy to the lowest singlet excited dipole-allowed states of the dyes. Effect of solvation on excitation energy has been studied by the use of polarisable continuum model (PCM). Computational results indicate that the excitation energy of these dyes is sensitive to solvent polarity and exhibits a red shift as polarity increases. The calculated excitation energies are in good agreement with the values of absorption maximum of these dyes in different solvents obtained in experiment. Studies on protonation of the dyes show that the carbonyl O to be the most favourable site of protonation for all the three dyes. Calculations of linear and first hyperpolarizabilities indicate these dyes to be suitable candidates for possible non-linear optical application.

  18. Influence of petroleum deposit geometry on local gradient of electron acceptors and microbial catabolic potential.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gargi; Pruden, Amy; Widdowson, Mark A

    2012-06-01

    A field survey was conducted following the Deepwater Horizon blowout and it was noted that resulting coastal petroleum deposits possessed distinct geometries, ranging from small tar balls to expansive horizontal oil sheets. A subsequent laboratory study evaluated the effect of oil deposit geometry on localized gradients of electron acceptors and microbial community composition, factors that are critical to accurately estimating biodegradation rates. One-dimensional top-flow sand columns with 12-h simulated tidal cycles compared two contrasting geometries (isolated tar "balls" versus horizontal "sheets") relative to an oil-free control. Significant differences in the effluent dissolved oxygen and sulfate concentrations were noted among the columns, indicating presence of anaerobic zones in the oiled columns, particularly in the sheet condition. Furthermore, quantification of genetic markers of terminal electron acceptor and catabolic processes via quantitative polymerase chain reaction of dsrA (sulfate-reduction), mcrA (methanogenesis), and cat23 (oxygenation of aromatics) genes in column cores suggested more extensive anaerobic conditions induced by the sheet relative to the ball geometry. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis similarly revealed that distinct gradients of bacterial communities established in response to the different geometries. Thus, petroleum deposit geometry impacts local dominant electron acceptor conditions and may be a key factor for advancing attenuation models and prioritizing cleanup. PMID:22574781

  19. Transferase Activity of Lactobacillal and Bifidobacterial β-Galactosidases with Various Sugars as Galactosyl Acceptors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The β-galactosidases from Lactobacillus reuteri L103 (Lreuβgal), Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus DSM 20081 (Lbulβgal), and Bifidobacterium breve DSM 20281 (Bbreβgal-I and Bbreβgal-II) were investigated in detail with respect to their propensity to transfer galactosyl moieties onto lactose, its hydrolysis products d-glucose and d-galactose, and certain sugar acceptors such as N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc), N-acetyl-d-galactosamine (GalNAc), and l-fucose (Fuc) under defined, initial velocity conditions. The rate constants or partitioning ratios (kNu/kwater) determined for these different acceptors (termed nucleophiles, Nu) were used as a measure for the ability of a certain substance to act as a galactosyl acceptor of these β-galactosidases. When using Lbulβgal or Bbreβgal-II, the galactosyl transfer to GlcNAc was 6 and 10 times higher than that to lactose, respectively. With lactose and GlcNAc used in equimolar substrate concentrations, Lbulβgal and Bbreβgal-II catalyzed the formation of N-acetyl-allolactosamine with the highest yields of 41 and 24%, respectively, as calculated from the initial GlcNAc concentration. PMID:26975338

  20. Utility and limitations of a peptide reactivity assay to predict fragrance allergens in vitro.

    PubMed

    Natsch, A; Gfeller, H; Rothaupt, M; Ellis, G

    2007-10-01

    A key step in the skin sensitization process is the formation of a covalent adduct between the skin sensitizer and endogenous proteins and/or peptides in the skin. A published peptide depletion assay was used to relate the in vitro reactivity of fragrance molecules to LLNA data. Using the classical assay, 22 of 28 tested moderate to strong sensitizers were positive. The prediction of weak sensitizers proved to be more difficult with only 50% of weak sensitizers giving a positive response, but for some compounds this could also be due to false-positive results from the LLNA. LC-MS analysis yielded the expected mass of the peptide adducts in several cases, whereas in other cases putative oxidation reactions led to adducts of unexpected molecular weight. Several moderately sensitizing aldehydes were correctly predicted by the depletion assay, but no adducts were found and the depletion appears to be due to an oxidation of the parent peptide catalyzed by the test compound. Finally, alternative test peptides derived from a physiological reactive protein with enhanced sensitivity for weak Michael acceptors were found, further increasing the sensitivity of the assay.

  1. Peptide mass fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Thiede, Bernd; Höhenwarter, Wolfgang; Krah, Alexander; Mattow, Jens; Schmid, Monika; Schmidt, Frank; Jungblut, Peter R

    2005-03-01

    Peptide mass fingerprinting by MALDI-MS and sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry have evolved into the major methods for identification of proteins following separation by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE or liquid chromatography. One main technological goal of proteome analyses beside high sensitivity and automation was the comprehensive analysis of proteins. Therefore, the protein species level with the essential information on co- and post-translational modifications must be achieved. The power of peptide mass fingerprinting for protein identification was described here, as exemplified by the identification of protein species with high molecular masses (spectrin alpha and beta), low molecular masses (elongation factor EF-TU fragments), splice variants (alpha A crystallin), aggregates with disulfide bridges (alkylhydroperoxide reductase), and phosphorylated proteins (heat shock protein 27). Helpful tools for these analyses were the use of the minimal protein identifier concept and the software program MS-Screener to remove mass peaks assignable to contaminants and neighbor spots.

  2. Ratiometric and turn-on monitoring for heavy and transition metal ions in aqueous solution with a fluorescent peptide sensor.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Bishnu Prasad; Park, Junwon; Lee, Wan In; Lee, Keun-Hyeung

    2009-05-15

    A novel fluorescent peptide sensor containing tryptophan (donor) and dansyl fluorophore (acceptor) was synthesized for monitoring heavy and transition metal (HTM) ions on the basis of metal ion binding motif (Cys-X-X-X-Cys). The peptide probe successfully exhibited a turn on and ratiometric response for several heavy metal ions such as Hg(2+), Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Zn(2+), and Ag(+) in aqueous solution. The enhancements of emission intensity were achieved in the presence of the HTM ions by fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) and chelation enhanced fluorescence (CHEF) effects. The detection limits of the sensor for Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Zn(2+), and Ag(+) were lower than the EPA's drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCL). We described the fluorescent enhancement, binding affinity, and detection limit of the peptide probe for HTM ions.

  3. Growth of polythiophene/perylene tetracarboxydiimide donor/acceptor shish-kebab nanostructures by coupled crystal modification.

    PubMed

    Bu, Laju; Pentzer, Emily; Bokel, Felicia A; Emrick, Todd; Hayward, Ryan C

    2012-12-21

    Self-assembled crystalline organic nanostructures containing electron donor and acceptor materials hold promise as building blocks for photovoltaic devices. We show that coupled crystallization of poly(3-hexyl thiophene) (P3HT) and perylene tetracarboxydiimide (PDI) induced by solvent evaporation, wherein both components modify crystallization of the other, gives rise to donor/acceptor "shish-kebabs" with tunable nanostructures. P3HT kinetically stabilizes supersaturated solutions of PDI and modifies the growth of PDI crystals, leading to formation of extended PDI shish nanowires that in turn serve as heterogeneous nucleation sites for fibrillar P3HT kebabs during solvent casting. The dimensions of these nanostructures can be tailored through variations in donor/acceptor ratio or solvent quality, and the method is shown to be general to several other poly(3-alkyl thiophenes) and perylene derivatives, thus providing a simple and robust route to form highly crystalline nanophase separated organic donor/acceptor assemblies.

  4. Role of functionalized acceptors in heteroleptic bipyridyl Cu(I) complexes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaoqing; Shao, Yang; Li, Ke; Zhao, Zigang; Wei, Shuxian; Guo, Wenyue

    2016-09-01

    The intrinsic optoelectronic properties of heteroleptic bipyridyl Cu(I) complexes bearing functionalized acceptor subunits have been investigated by density functional theory and time-dependent DFT. The Cu(I) complexes exhibit distorted trigonal-pyramidal geometries and typical metal-to-ligand electron transfer characteristics at the long wavelength region. Replacing carboxylic acid with cyanoacrylic acid in acceptor subunits stabilizes the LUMO levels, thus lowering the HOMOLUMO energy gaps and facilitating favorable donor-to-acceptor intramolecular electron transfer and charge separation. Introduction of heteroaromatic groups and cyanoacrylic acid significantly improves the light-harvesting capability of the complexes. Our results highlight the effect of functionalized acceptors on the optoelectronic properties of bipyridyl Cu(I) complexes and provide a fresh perspective on screening of efficient sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells.

  5. A Comparison of the Ideological Orientations and Personality Characteristics of Teacher "Acceptors" and "Rejectors" of BSCS Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoy, Wayne K.; Blankenship, Jacob W.

    1972-01-01

    Teachers who accept" the BSCS rationale are generally more humanistic in their pupil control ideology than those who reject" the program. Acceptors" scored higher on personality scales determining the capacity for independent thought and action. (AL)

  6. Theoretical design of solvatochromism switching by photochromic reactions using donor-acceptor disubstituted diarylethene derivatives with oxidized thiophene rings.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Katsuki; Shigeta, Yasuteru; Kishi, Ryohei; Nakano, Masayoshi

    2015-03-01

    We have designed several diarylethene derivatives with oxidized thiophene rings and donor-acceptor substituents, which show the solvatochromism switching by photochromic reactions, using a time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) method using the polarizable continuum model (PCM). It is found that in the UV-vis spectral region examined only the open-ring isomers exhibit the solvatochromism, while the closed-ring isomers do not. The mechanism of the solvatochromism behavior and its switching process are clarified from the viewpoint of the charge-transfer (CT) excitation from the donor to the acceptor substituents. We demonstrate that this CT excitation can be controlled by choosing appropriate pairs of the donor and the acceptor substituents on the basis of the orbital correlation diagram between the diarylethene derivatives and the donor-acceptor substituents, which is constructed from the topologies and the orbital energies of the molecular orbitals primarily contributing to the excitations.

  7. A tetraphenylethylene core-based 3D structure small molecular acceptor enabling efficient non-fullerene organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuhang; Mu, Cheng; Jiang, Kui; Zhao, Jingbo; Li, Yunke; Zhang, Lu; Li, Zhengke; Lai, Joshua Yuk Lin; Hu, Huawei; Ma, Tingxuan; Hu, Rongrong; Yu, Demei; Huang, Xuhui; Tang, Ben Zhong; Yan, He

    2015-02-01

    A tetraphenylethylene core-based small molecular acceptor with a unique 3D molecular structure is developed. Bulk-heterojunction blend films with a small feature size (≈20 nm) are obtained, which lead to non-fullerene organic solar cells (OSCs) with 5.5% power conversion efficiency. The work provides a new molecular design approach to efficient non-fullerene OSCs based on 3D-structured small-molecule acceptors.

  8. Phosphorous doped ZnO nanowires: acceptor-related cathodoluminescence and p-type conducting FET-characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, B. Q.; Lorenz, M.; von Wenckstern, H.; Czekalla, C.; Brandt, M.; Lenzner, J.; Benndorf, G.; Biehne, G.; Grundmann, M.

    2008-02-01

    Phosphorous-doped ZnO (ZnO:P) nanowires were prepared by a high-pressure pulsed laser deposition process. To extend the size range of available wires, μm-thick ZnO:P microwires were grown additionally by a direct carbothermal deposition process. Low-temperature cathodoluminescence of single ZnO:P nanowires grown by both processes exhibit characteristic phosphorus acceptor-related peaks: neutral acceptor-bound exciton emission ((A 0, X), 3.356 eV), free-electron to neutral-acceptor emission ((e, A 0), 3.314 eV), and donor-to-acceptor pair emission (DAP, ~3.24 and ~3.04 eV). This proves that stable phosphorus acceptor levels have been induced into the ZnO:P nano- and microwires. From the quantitative evaluation of the spectroscopic features we deduct an acceptor binding energy of 122 meV. The ZnO:P microwires were used as channels in bottom-gate field effect transistors (FET) built on Si substrates with SiO II gate oxide. The electrical FET-characteristics of several wires show reproducibly clear qualitative indication for p-type conductivity for variation of gate voltage. This behavior is opposite to that of nominally undoped, n-type conducting wires investigated for comparison. The p-type conductivity was found to be stable over more than six months.

  9. Fixation, mounting and sealing with nail polish of cell specimens lead to incorrect FRET measurements using acceptor photobleaching.

    PubMed

    Rodighiero, Simona; Bazzini, Claudia; Ritter, Markus; Fürst, Johannes; Botta, Guido; Meyer, Giuliano; Paulmichl, Markus

    2008-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a technique used for the study of functional interactions between molecules. The intimate vicinity between two fluorescent molecules (FRET-pair; donor and acceptor) allows for an energy transfer, which can be directly calculated as the so called FRET efficiency. This technique is used in fixed as well as living cells. Here we show first, measured by the FRET technique, that the ICln ion channel is transposed from the cytosol towards the cellular membrane in HEK cells after swelling, and second, that the calculation of the FRET efficiency by de-quenching the donor cyan-fluorescent-protein (CFP) emission due to acceptor-photobleaching leads to erroneous estimate of the FRET efficiency in fixed, mounted and sealed specimens. The acceptor photobleaching leads to a modification of the donor cyan-fluorescent-protein, which shows then a strong emission, thus mimicking functional interaction between CFP (donor) and yellow-fluorescent-protein (YFP; acceptor). Moreover, the procedure of acceptor photobleaching masks physiological (non random) interaction between molecules within the fixed, mounted and sealed cell. We show that no artifactual CFP modifications arise when using the acceptor photobleaching technique under in vivo conditions, and we offer strategies to minimize erroneous FRET efficiency calculations if cells need to be fixed. PMID:18453757

  10. Macrocyclization of Unprotected Peptide Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Alexander A; Choo, Zi-Ning; Totaro, Kyle A; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2016-03-18

    A chemistry for the facile two-component macrocyclization of unprotected peptide isocyanates is described. Starting from peptides containing two glutamic acid γ-hydrazide residues, isocyanates can be readily accessed and cyclized with hydrazides of dicarboxylic acids. The choice of a nucleophilic linker allows for the facile modulation of biochemical properties of a macrocyclic peptide. Four cyclic NYAD-1 analogues were synthesized using the described method and displayed a range of biological activities. PMID:26948900

  11. Macrocyclization of Unprotected Peptide Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Alexander A; Choo, Zi-Ning; Totaro, Kyle A; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2016-03-18

    A chemistry for the facile two-component macrocyclization of unprotected peptide isocyanates is described. Starting from peptides containing two glutamic acid γ-hydrazide residues, isocyanates can be readily accessed and cyclized with hydrazides of dicarboxylic acids. The choice of a nucleophilic linker allows for the facile modulation of biochemical properties of a macrocyclic peptide. Four cyclic NYAD-1 analogues were synthesized using the described method and displayed a range of biological activities.

  12. Peptide Aptamers: Development and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Reverdatto, Sergey; Burz, David S.; Shekhtman, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Peptide aptamers are small combinatorial proteins that are selected to bind to specific sites on their target molecules. Peptide aptamers consist of short, 5-20 amino acid residues long sequences, typically embedded as a loop within a stable protein scaffold. Various peptide aptamer scaffolds and in vitro and in vivo selection techniques are reviewed with emphasis on specific biomedical, bioimaging, and bioanalytical applications. PMID:25866267

  13. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology.

  14. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology. PMID:26279082

  15. Peptides that influence membrane topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the mechanism of a range of polypeptides that influence membrane topology, including antimicrobial peptides, cell penetrating peptides, viral fusion peptides, and apoptosis proteins, and show how a combination of geometry, coordination chemistry, and soft matter physics can be used to approach a unified understanding. We will also show how such peptides can impact biomedical problems such as auto-immune diseases (psoriasis, lupus), infectious diseases (viral and bacterial infections), and mitochondrial pathologies (under-regulated apoptosis leads to neurodegenerative diseases whereas over-regulated apoptosis leads to cancer.)

  16. Fragmentation pathways of protonated peptides.

    PubMed

    Paizs, Béla; Suhai, Sándor

    2005-01-01

    The fragmentation pathways of protonated peptides are reviewed in the present paper paying special attention to classification of the known fragmentation channels into a simple hierarchy defined according to the chemistry involved. It is shown that the 'mobile proton' model of peptide fragmentation can be used to understand the MS/MS spectra of protonated peptides only in a qualitative manner rationalizing differences observed for low-energy collision induced dissociation of peptide ions having or lacking a mobile proton. To overcome this limitation, a deeper understanding of the dissociation chemistry of protonated peptides is needed. To this end use of the 'pathways in competition' (PIC) model that involves a detailed energetic and kinetic characterization of the major peptide fragmentation pathways (PFPs) is proposed. The known PFPs are described in detail including all the pre-dissociation, dissociation, and post-dissociation events. It is our hope that studies to further extend PIC will lead to semi-quantative understanding of the MS/MS spectra of protonated peptides which could be used to develop refined bioinformatics algorithms for MS/MS based proteomics. Experimental and computational data on the fragmentation of protonated peptides are reevaluated from the point of view of the PIC model considering the mechanism, energetics, and kinetics of the major PFPs. Evidence proving semi-quantitative predictability of some of the ion intensity relationships (IIRs) of the MS/MS spectra of protonated peptides is presented. PMID:15389847

  17. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  18. Peptides and Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  19. Peptides and food intake.

    PubMed

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  20. Proton Donor/acceptor Propensities of Ammonia: Rotational Studies of its Molecular Complexes with Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliano, Barbara M.; Maris, Assimo; Melandri, Sonia; Favero, Laura B.; Evangelisti, Luca; Caminati, Walther

    2009-06-01

    We studied the rotational spectra of the adducts of ammonia with several organic molecules, namely tert-butanol, glycidol, ethyl alcohol, anisol and 1,4-difluorobenzene. The adducts with glycidol and ethanol have been observed for both conformers of the substrate molecule. Based on the rotational and ^{14}N quadrupole coupling constants of the various complexes, we found a considerably different behaviour of ammonia, with respect to water, in its proton donor/acceptor double role. In the interaction with the three alcohol molecules, NH_{3} acts as a proton acceptor and the OH groups as a proton donor. However, in the case of glycidol-NH_{3}, a secundary N-H\\cdotsO interaction occurrs between ammonia and the ether oxygen. This interaction generates a sizable V_{3} barrier to the internal rotation of the NH_{3} moiety, while NH_{3} undergoes a free rotation in tert-butanol-NH_{3} and in ethanol-NH_{3}. As to the anisole-NH_{3} and 1,4-difluorobenzene-NH_{3} complexes, the NH_{3} group explicits its double proton donor/acceptor role, although through two weak (C_{Me}-H\\cdotsN and N-H\\cdotsπ) H-bonds. There is, however, an important difference between the two complexes, because in the first one NH_{3} lies out of the aromatic plane, while in the second one it is in the plane of the aromatic ring. B. M. Giuliano, M. C. Castrovilli, A. Maris, S. Melandri, W. Caminati and E. A. Cohen, Chem.Phys.Lett., 2008, 463, 330 B. M. Giuliano, S. Melandri, A. Maris, L. B. Favero and W. Caminati, Angew.Chem.Int.Ed., 2009, 48, 1102