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Sample records for acceptor peptide bap

  1. Identification of an amyloidogenic peptide from the Bap protein of Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Lembré, Pierre; Vendrely, Charlotte; Martino, Patrick Di

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm associated proteins (Bap) are involved in the biofilm formation process of several bacterial species. The sequence STVTVT is present in Bap proteins expressed by many Staphylococcus species, Acinetobacter baumanii and Salmonella enterica. The peptide STVTVTF derived from the C-repeat of the Bap protein from Staphylococcus epidermidis was selected through the AGGRESCAN, PASTA, and TANGO software prediction of protein aggregation and formation of amyloid fibers. We characterized the self-assembly properties of the peptide STVTVTF by different methods: in the presence of the peptide, we observed an increase in the fluorescence intensity of Thioflavin T; many intermolecular β-sheets and fibers were spontaneously formed in peptide preparations as observed by infrared spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy analyses. In conclusion, a 7 amino acids peptide derived from the C-repeat of the Bap protein was sufficient for the spontaneous formation of amyloid fibers. The possible involvement of this amyloidogenic sequence in protein-protein interactions is discussed. PMID:24354773

  2. Enzyme-catalyzed formation of beta-peptides: beta-peptidyl aminopeptidases BapA and DmpA acting as beta-peptide-synthesizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Heck, Tobias; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Limbach, Michael; Flögel, Oliver; Seebach, Dieter; Geueke, Birgit

    2007-09-01

    In recent studies, we discovered that the three beta-peptidyl aminopeptidases, BapA from Sphingosinicella xenopeptidilytica 3-2W4, BapA from S. microcystinivorans Y2, and DmpA from Ochrobactrum anthropi LMG7991, possess the unique feature of cleaving N-terminal beta-amino acid residues from beta- and alpha/beta-peptides. Herein, we investigated the use of the same three enzymes for the reverse reaction catalyzing the oligomerization of beta-amino acids and the synthesis of mixed peptides with N-terminal beta-amino acid residues. As substrates, we employed the beta-homoamino acid derivatives H-beta hGly-pNA, H-beta3 hAla-pNA, H-(R)-beta3 hAla-pNA, H-beta3 hPhe-pNA, H-(R)-beta3 hPhe-pNA, and H-beta3 hLeu-pNA. All three enzymes were capable of coupling the six beta-amino acids to oligomers with chain lengths of up to eight amino acid residues. With the enzyme DmpA as the catalyst, we observed very high conversion rates, which correspond to dimer yields of up to 76%. The beta-dipeptide H-beta3 hAla-beta3 hLeu-OH and the beta/alpha-dipeptide H-beta hGly-His-OH (carnosine) were formed with almost 50% conversion, when a five-fold excess of beta3-homoleucine or histidine was incubated with H-beta3 hAla-pNA and H-beta hGly-pNA, respectively, in the presence of the enzyme BapA from S. microcystinivorans Y2. BapA from S. xenopeptidilytica 3-2W4 turned out to be a versatile catalyst capable of coupling various beta-amino acid residues to the free N-termini of beta- and alpha-amino acids and even to an alpha-tripeptide. Thus, these aminopeptidases might be useful to introduce a beta-amino acid residue as an N-terminal protecting group into a 'natural' alpha-peptide, thereby stabilizing the peptide against degradation by other proteolytic enzymes. PMID:17886858

  3. Akirin interacts with Bap60 and 14-3-3 proteins to regulate the expression of antimicrobial peptides in the kuruma shrimp (Marsupenaeus japonicus).

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Wang, Xian-Wei; Sun, Jie-Jie; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2016-02-01

    Akirin is a recently discovered nuclear factor that plays important roles in innate immune responses. Akirin is a positive regulator of the NF-κB factor of the Drosophila immune deficiency (IMD) pathway, which shares extensive similarities with the mammalian tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) signaling pathway. However, some studies found that the NF-κB transcriptional targets were also strongly repressed in akirin2 knockout mice following TLR, IL-1β and TNFα treatment. Therefore, the function of Akirin in the immune response requires further clarification. In this study, an Akirin homolog in the kuruma shrimp (Marsupenaeus japonicus) was identified. It was mainly expressed in hemocytes, heart and intestines. The expression of Akirin was upregulated by challenge with the Gram-negative bacterium Vibrio anguillarum, but was not significantly influenced by challenge with the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. Knockdown of Akirin suppressed the expression of several IMD-Relish target effectors (antimicrobial peptides, AMPs). The limited regulating spectrum of Akirin might be associated with Bap60, a component of the Brahma (SWI/SNF) ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex. In addition, Akirin also interacts with 14-3-3, which inhibited the expression of Akirin-target AMPs. The results suggested that Akirin is involved in the IMD-Relish pathway by interacting with Relish. The interaction of Akirin with Bap60 positively regulated the Akirin-Relish function, and its interaction with 14-3-3 negatively regulated the Akirin-Relish function. PMID:26493016

  4. Transition Metal Donor-Peptide-Acceptor Complexes: From Intramolecular Electron Transfer Reactions to the Study of Reactive Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Isied, Stephan S.

    2003-03-11

    The trans-polyproline (PII) oligomers (Figure 1) are unusually rigid peptide structures which have been extensively studied by our group for peptide mediated intramolecular electron transfer (ET) at long distances. We have previously studied ET across a series of metal ion donor (D) acceptor (A) oligoproline peptides with different distances, driving forces and reorganizational energies. The majority of these experiments involve generating the ET intermediate using pulse radiolysis methods, although more recently photochemical methods are also used. Results of these studies showed that ET across peptides can vary by more than twelve orders of magnitude. Using ruthenium bipyridine donors, ET reaction rate constants across several proline residues (n = 4 - 9) occurred in the millisecond (ms) to {micro}s timescale, thus limiting the proline peptide conformational motions to only minor changes (far smaller than the large changes that occur on the ms to sec timescale, such as trans to cis proline isomerization). The present report describes our large data base of experimental results for D-peptide-A complexes in terms of a model where the involvement of both superexchange and hopping (hole and electron) mechanisms account for the long range ET rate constants observed. Our data shows that the change from superexchange to hopping mechanisms occurs at different distances depending on the type of D and A and their interactions with the peptides. Our model is also consistent with generalized models for superexchange and hopping which have been put forward by a number of theoretical groups to account for long range ET phenomena.

  5. Role of donor-acceptor macrocycles in sequence specific peptide recognition and their optoelectronic properties: a detailed computational insight.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Arkamita; Pati, Swapan K

    2016-07-27

    In this study, we have considered an experimentally synthesized organic donor-acceptor (D-A) macrocycle (CPP-TCAQ) and have modified it by incorporating different acceptor groups. We have performed density functional theory and classical molecular dynamics studies on these D-A macrocycles. We have clearly shown that cyclo[10]paraphenylene-2,6-tetracyanoanthraquinodimethanylene (CPP-TCAQ) isomers interact specifically with one particular peptide sequence tyr-leu-ala, over its structural isomer, tyr-ala-leu. However, other functionalized macrocycles bind to the tyr-ala-leu peptide sequence over tyr-leu-ala. Our calculations show that the presence of hydrogen bonds as well as π-π interactions responsible for this specific selection. Interestingly, it is the additional charge transfer induced dipolar interactions that favour binding of the tripeptide with the bulky C-terminal leucine amino acid, tyr-ala-leu. We confirmed that these host-guest complexes are stable in water medium as well as at room temperature. Thus, these hosts can bind effectively to any protein fragment bearing a particular tripeptide. Interestingly, the macrocycle, which recognizes the peptide sequence with a bulky C-terminal amino acid, also shows photophysical properties. The reasons for this happen to be the same (dipolar interactions introduce dipole allowed states for optical absorption as well as attracting the oppositely oriented dipolar groups). Recognition of the peptide sequence with a bulky C-terminal group is carried out for the first time with this functionalised macrocycle, which in addition shows photophysical properties. PMID:27412849

  6. Gene of the month: BAP1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ami; Papneja, Anjali; Hyrcza, Martin; Al-Habeeb, Ayman; Ghazarian, Danny

    2016-09-01

    The BAP1 gene (BRCA1-associated protein 1) is a tumour suppressor gene that encodes a deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB), regulating key cellular pathways, including cell cycle, cellular differentiation, transcription and DNA damage response. Germline BAP1 mutations cause a novel cancer syndrome characterised by early onset of multiple atypical Spitz tumours and increased risk of uveal and cutaneous melanoma, mesothelioma, renal cell carcinoma and various other malignancies. Recognising the clinicopathological features of specific BAP1-deficient tumours is crucial for early screening/tumour detection, with significant impact on patient outcome. PMID:27235536

  7. The Burkholderia pseudomallei Proteins BapA and BapC Are Secreted TTSS3 Effectors and BapB Levels Modulate Expression of BopE.

    PubMed

    Treerat, Puthayalai; Alwis, Priyangi; D'Cruze, Tanya; Cullinane, Meabh; Vadivelu, Jamunarani; Devenish, Rodney J; Prescott, Mark; Adler, Ben; Boyce, John D

    2015-01-01

    Many Gram-negative pathogens use a type III secretion system (TTSS) for the injection of bacterial effector proteins into host cells. The injected effector proteins play direct roles in modulation of host cell pathways for bacterial benefit. Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, expresses three different TTSSs. One of these systems, the TTSS3, is essential for escape from host endosomes and therefore intracellular survival and replication. Here we have characterized three putative TTSS3 proteins; namely BapA, BapB and BapC. By employing a tetracysteine (TC)-FlAsH™ labelling technique to monitor the secretion of TC-tagged fusion proteins, BapA and BapC were shown to be secreted during in vitro growth in a TTSS3-dependant manner, suggesting a role as TTSS3 effectors. Furthermore, we constructed B. pseudomallei bapA, bapB and bapC mutants and used the well-characterized TTSS3 effector BopE as a marker of secretion to show that BapA, BapB and BapC are not essential for the secretion process. However, BopE transcription and secretion were significantly increased in the bapB mutant, suggesting that BapB levels modulate BopE expression. In a BALB/c mouse model of acute melioidosis, the bapA, bapB and bapC mutants showed a minor reduction of in vivo fitness. Thus, this study defines BapA and BapC as novel TTSS3 effectors, BapB as a regulator of BopE production, and all three as necessary for full B. pseudomallei in vivo fitness. PMID:26624293

  8. The Burkholderia pseudomallei Proteins BapA and BapC Are Secreted TTSS3 Effectors and BapB Levels Modulate Expression of BopE

    PubMed Central

    Treerat, Puthayalai; Alwis, Priyangi; D’Cruze, Tanya; Cullinane, Meabh; Vadivelu, Jamunarani; Devenish, Rodney J.; Prescott, Mark; Adler, Ben; Boyce, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Many Gram-negative pathogens use a type III secretion system (TTSS) for the injection of bacterial effector proteins into host cells. The injected effector proteins play direct roles in modulation of host cell pathways for bacterial benefit. Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, expresses three different TTSSs. One of these systems, the TTSS3, is essential for escape from host endosomes and therefore intracellular survival and replication. Here we have characterized three putative TTSS3 proteins; namely BapA, BapB and BapC. By employing a tetracysteine (TC)-FlAsH™ labelling technique to monitor the secretion of TC-tagged fusion proteins, BapA and BapC were shown to be secreted during in vitro growth in a TTSS3-dependant manner, suggesting a role as TTSS3 effectors. Furthermore, we constructed B. pseudomallei bapA, bapB and bapC mutants and used the well-characterized TTSS3 effector BopE as a marker of secretion to show that BapA, BapB and BapC are not essential for the secretion process. However, BopE transcription and secretion were significantly increased in the bapB mutant, suggesting that BapB levels modulate BopE expression. In a BALB/c mouse model of acute melioidosis, the bapA, bapB and bapC mutants showed a minor reduction of in vivo fitness. Thus, this study defines BapA and BapC as novel TTSS3 effectors, BapB as a regulator of BopE production, and all three as necessary for full B. pseudomallei in vivo fitness. PMID:26624293

  9. Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Benzo [ a ] pyrene ( BaP ) ; CASRN 50 - 32 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarc

  10. Synthesis, photophysical properties of triazolyl-donor/acceptor chromophores decorated unnatural amino acids: Incorporation of a pair into Leu-enkephalin peptide and application of triazolylperylene amino acid in sensing BSA.

    PubMed

    Bag, Subhendu Sekhar; Jana, Subhashis; Pradhan, Manoj Kumar

    2016-08-15

    The research in the field of design and synthesis of unnatural amino acids is growing at a fast space for the increasing demand of proteins of potential therapeutics and many other diversified novel functional applications. Thus, we report herein the design and synthesis of microenvironment sensitive fluorescent triazolyl unnatural amino acids (UNAA) decorated with donor and/or acceptor aromatic chromophores via click chemistry. The synthesized fluorescent amino acids show interesting solvatochromic characteristic and/or intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) feature as is revealed from the UV-visible, fluorescence photophysical properties and DFT/TDDFT calculation. HOMO-LUMO distribution shows that the emissive states of some of the amino acids are characterized with more significant electron redistribution between the triazolyl moiety and the aromatic chromophores linked to it leading to modulated emission property. A pair of donor-acceptor amino acid shows interesting photophysical interaction property indicating a FRET quenching event. Furthermore, one of the amino acid, triazolyl-perylene amino acid, has been exploited for studying interaction with BSA and found that it is able to sense BSA with an enhancement of fluorescence intensity. Finally, we incorporated a pair of donor/acceptor amino acids into a Leu-enkephalin analogue pentapeptide which was found to adopt predominantly type II β-turn conformation. We envisage that our investigation is of importance for the development of new fluorescent donor-acceptor unnatural amino acids a pair of which can be exploited for generating fluorescent peptidomimetic probe of interesting photophysical property for applications in studying peptide-protein interaction. PMID:27372839

  11. The role of amino acid electron-donor/acceptor atoms in host-cell binding peptides is associated with their 3D structure and HLA-binding capacity in sterile malarial immunity induction

    SciTech Connect

    Patarroyo, Manuel E.; Almonacid, Hannia; Moreno-Vranich, Armando

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fundamental residues located in some HABPs are associated with their 3D structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-donor atoms present in {beta}-turn, random, distorted {alpha}-helix structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-donor atoms bound to HLA-DR53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-acceptor atoms present in regular {alpha}-helix structure bound to HLA-DR52. -- Abstract: Plasmodium falciparum malaria continues being one of the parasitic diseases causing the highest worldwide mortality due to the parasite's multiple evasion mechanisms, such as immunological silence. Membrane and organelle proteins are used during invasion for interactions mediated by high binding ability peptides (HABPs); these have amino acids which establish hydrogen bonds between them in some of their critical binding residues. Immunisation assays in the Aotus model using HABPs whose critical residues had been modified have revealed a conformational change thereby enabling a protection-inducing response. This has improved fitting within HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} molecules where amino acid electron-donor atoms present in {beta}-turn, random or distorted {alpha}-helix structures preferentially bound to HLA-DR53 molecules, whilst HABPs having amino acid electron-acceptor atoms present in regular {alpha}-helix structure bound to HLA-DR52. This data has great implications for vaccine development.

  12. Comparing the Prognostic Value of BAP1 Mutation Pattern, Chromosome 3 Status, and BAP1 Immunohistochemistry in Uveal Melanoma.

    PubMed

    van de Nes, Johannes A P; Nelles, Jasmin; Kreis, Stefan; Metz, Claudia H D; Hager, Thomas; Lohmann, Dietmar R; Zeschnigk, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM), a tumor of the eye, can be divided into 2 major classes correlating with patients' prognosis. Gene expression profiles and chromosome 3 status are correlated with tumor classification and prognosis. Somatic BAP1 mutations are another feature largely restricted to metastatic UM. Here we performed thorough BAP1 mutation analysis including sequencing and gene dosage analysis of all BAP1 coding exons as well as methylation analysis of the promoter CpG island in a set of 66 UMs. The results were compared with the BAP1 protein expression as determined by immunohistochemistry and the tumor-related survival of the patients. BAP1 sequencing and gene dosage analysis of BAP1 exons by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification revealed a mutation in 33 (89%) of 37 tumors with monosomy 3 (M3) or isodisomy 3. BAP1 mutations were not detected in any of the 28 tumors with disomy 3 or partial monosomy 3 (partM3). Most of the sequence mutations (21 of 28) were frame-shift, splice-site, or nonsense mutations leading to a premature termination codon. BAP1 protein as determined by immunohistochemistry was absent in all samples with a BAP1 mutation irrespective of the functional type of mutation. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a highly significant association between BAP1 protein staining and patients' survival (P=0.0004). The association between BAP1 mutation status and tumor-related survival was less pronounced but still significant (P=0.0023). We conclude that BAP1 protein staining is favorable over BAP1 mutation screening by Sanger sequencing for prognostic testing of UM patients. PMID:27015033

  13. BAP1 has a survival role in cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raj; Taylor, Michael; Miao, Benchun; Ji, Zhenyu; Njauw, Jenny C-N; Jönsson, Göran; Frederick, Dennie T; Tsao, Hensin

    2015-04-01

    Although the pattern of BAP1 inactivation in ocular melanoma specimens and in the BAP1 cutaneous melanoma (CM)/ocular melanoma predisposition syndrome suggests a tumor suppressor function, the specific role of this gene in the pathogenesis of CM is not fully understood. We thus set out to characterize BAP1 in CM and discovered an unexpected pro-survival effect of this protein. Tissue and cell lines analysis showed that BAP1 expression was maintained, rather than lost, in primary melanomas compared with nevi and normal skin. Genetic depletion of BAP1 in melanoma cells reduced proliferation and colony-forming capability, induced apoptosis, and inhibited melanoma tumor growth in vivo. On the molecular level, suppression of BAP1 led to a concomitant drop in the protein levels of survivin, a member of anti-apoptotic proteins and a known mediator of melanoma survival. Restoration of survivin in melanoma cells partially rescued the growth-retarding effects of BAP1 loss. In contrast to melanoma cells, stable overexpression of BAP1 into immortalized but non-transformed melanocytes did suppress proliferation and reduce survivin. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that BAP1 may have a growth-sustaining role in melanoma cells, but that its impact on ubiquitination underpins a complex physiology, which is context and cell dependent. PMID:25521456

  14. BAP1 PLAYS A SURVIVAL ROLE IN CUTANEOUS MELANOMA

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raj; Taylor, Michael; Miao, Benchun; Ji, Zhenyu; Njauw, Jenny Ching-Ni; Jönsson, Göran; Frederick, Dennie Tompers; Tsao, Hensin

    2014-01-01

    Although the pattern of BAP1 inactivation in ocular melanoma specimens and in the BAP1 cutaneous/ocular melanoma (CM/OM) predisposition syndrome suggests a tumor suppressor function, the specific role of this gene in the pathogenesis of cutaneous melanoma is not fully understood. We thus set out to characterize BAP1 in cutaneous melanoma and discovered an unexpected pro-survival effect of this protein. Tissue and cell lines analysis showed that BAP1 expression was maintained, rather than lost, in primary melanomas compared to nevi and normal skin. Genetic depletion of BAP1 in melanoma cells reduced proliferation and colony forming capability, induced apoptosis and inhibited melanoma tumor growth in vivo. On the molecular level, suppression of BAP1 led to a concomitant drop in the protein levels of survivin a member of anti-apoptotic proteins and a known mediator of melanoma survival. Restoration of survivin in melanoma cells partially rescued the growth-retarding effects of BAP1 loss. In contrast to melanoma cells, stable overexpression of BAP1 into immortalized but non-transformed melanocytes did suppress proliferation and reduce survivin. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that BAP1 may play a growth-sustaining role in melanoma cells, but that its impact on ubiquitination underpins a complex physiology which is context and cell dependent. PMID:25521456

  15. Bap1 Is a Bona Fide Tumor Suppressor: Genetic Evidence from Mouse Models Carrying Heterozygous Germline Bap1 Mutations.

    PubMed

    Kadariya, Yuwaraj; Cheung, Mitchell; Xu, Jinfei; Pei, Jianming; Sementino, Eleonora; Menges, Craig W; Cai, Kathy Q; Rauscher, Frank J; Klein-Szanto, Andres J; Testa, Joseph R

    2016-05-01

    Individuals harboring inherited heterozygous germline mutations in BAP1 are predisposed to a range of benign and malignant tumor types, including malignant mesothelioma, melanoma, and kidney carcinoma. However, evidence to support a tumor-suppressive role for BAP1 in cancer remains contradictory. To test experimentally whether BAP1 behaves as a tumor suppressor, we monitored spontaneous tumor development in three different mouse models with germline heterozygous mutations in Bap1, including two models in which the knock-in mutations are identical to those reported in human BAP1 cancer syndrome families. We observed spontaneous malignant tumors in 54 of 93 Bap1-mutant mice (58%) versus 4 of 43 (9%) wild-type littermates. All three Bap1-mutant models exhibited a high incidence and similar spectrum of neoplasms, including ovarian sex cord stromal tumors, lung and mammary carcinomas, and spindle cell tumors. Notably, we also observed malignant mesotheliomas in two Bap1-mutant mice, but not in any wild-type animals. We further confirmed that the remaining wild-type Bap1 allele was lost in both spontaneous ovarian tumors and mesotheliomas, resulting in the loss of Bap1 expression. Additional studies revealed that asbestos exposure induced a highly significant increase in the incidence of aggressive mesotheliomas in the two mouse models carrying clinically relevant Bap1 mutations compared with asbestos-exposed wild-type littermates. Collectively, these findings provide genetic evidence that Bap1 is a bona fide tumor suppressor gene and offer key insights into the contribution of carcinogen exposure to enhanced cancer susceptibility. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2836-44. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26896281

  16. Loss of BAP1 Expression Occurs Frequently in Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Andrici, Juliana; Goeppert, Benjamin; Sioson, Loretta; Clarkson, Adele; Renner, Marcus; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Tayao, Michael; Watson, Nicole; Farzin, Mahtab; Toon, Christopher W; Smith, Ross C; Mittal, Anubhav; Samra, Jaswinder S; Hugh, Thomas J; Chou, Angela; Lawlor, Rita T; Weichert, Wilko; Schirmacher, Peter; Sperandio, Nicola; Ruzzenente, Andrea; Scarpa, Aldo; Gill, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    BRCA1-associated protein 1 (BAP1) is a deubiquitinating enzyme that functions as a tumor suppressor gene. Double hit BAP1 inactivation has been reported in a range of tumor types, including intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), sometimes in association with germline mutation.We performed immunohistochemistry for BAP1 on a well-characterized cohort of 211 ICC patients undergoing surgical resection with curative intent at 3 institutions based in 3 different countries. The median age at diagnosis was 65 years (range, 36.5-86) and 108 (51%) were men. Negative staining for BAP1 (defined as completely absent nuclear staining in the presence of positive internal controls in nonneoplastic cells) occurred in 55 ICCs (26%). BAP1 loss predicted a strong trend toward improved median survival of 40.80 months (95% CI, 28.14-53.46) versus 24.87 months (95% CI, 18.73-31.01), P = 0.059). In a multivariate model including age, sex, BAP1 status, tumor stage, tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion, and tumor size, female sex was associated with improved survival (hazard ratio [HR] 0.54; 95% CI, 0.34-0.85), while advanced tumor stage and lymphovascular invasion (HR 1.89; 95% CI, 1.09-3.28) correlated with decreased survival. In a multivariate analysis, high grade tumors were associated with BAP1 loss (odds ratio [OR] 3.32; 95% CI, 1.29-8.55), while lymphatic invasion was inversely associated with BAP1 loss (OR 0.36; 95% CI, 0.13-0.99).In conclusion, we observed a trend toward improved prognosis in ICC associated with absent expression of BAP1 and an association of BAP1 loss with higher histological grade and absent lymphatic invasion. Female sex was associated with improved survival while advanced tumor stage and lymphatic invasion were associated with decreased survival. PMID:26765459

  17. Loss of BAP1 Expression Occurs Frequently in Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Andrici, Juliana; Goeppert, Benjamin; Sioson, Loretta; Clarkson, Adele; Renner, Marcus; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Tayao, Michael; Watson, Nicole; Farzin, Mahtab; Toon, Christopher W.; Smith, Ross C.; Mittal, Anubhav; Samra, Jaswinder S.; Hugh, Thomas J.; Chou, Angela; Lawlor, Rita T.; Weichert, Wilko; Schirmacher, Peter; Sperandio, Nicola; Ruzzenente, Andrea; Scarpa, Aldo; Gill, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract BRCA1-associated protein 1 (BAP1) is a deubiquitinating enzyme that functions as a tumor suppressor gene. Double hit BAP1 inactivation has been reported in a range of tumor types, including intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), sometimes in association with germline mutation. We performed immunohistochemistry for BAP1 on a well-characterized cohort of 211 ICC patients undergoing surgical resection with curative intent at 3 institutions based in 3 different countries. The median age at diagnosis was 65 years (range, 36.5–86) and 108 (51%) were men. Negative staining for BAP1 (defined as completely absent nuclear staining in the presence of positive internal controls in nonneoplastic cells) occurred in 55 ICCs (26%). BAP1 loss predicted a strong trend toward improved median survival of 40.80 months (95% CI, 28.14–53.46) versus 24.87 months (95% CI, 18.73–31.01), P = 0.059). In a multivariate model including age, sex, BAP1 status, tumor stage, tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion, and tumor size, female sex was associated with improved survival (hazard ratio [HR] 0.54; 95% CI, 0.34–0.85), while advanced tumor stage and lymphovascular invasion (HR 1.89; 95% CI, 1.09–3.28) correlated with decreased survival. In a multivariate analysis, high grade tumors were associated with BAP1 loss (odds ratio [OR] 3.32; 95% CI, 1.29–8.55), while lymphatic invasion was inversely associated with BAP1 loss (OR 0.36; 95% CI, 0.13–0.99). In conclusion, we observed a trend toward improved prognosis in ICC associated with absent expression of BAP1 and an association of BAP1 loss with higher histological grade and absent lymphatic invasion. Female sex was associated with improved survival while advanced tumor stage and lymphatic invasion were associated with decreased survival. PMID:26765459

  18. Associative Memory Acceptors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Card, Roger

    The properties of an associative memory are examined in this paper from the viewpoint of automata theory. A device called an associative memory acceptor is studied under real-time operation. The family "L" of languages accepted by real-time associative memory acceptors is shown to properly contain the family of languages accepted by one-tape,…

  19. Germline mutations in BAP1 predispose to melanocytic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Thomas; Obenauf, Anna C.; Murali, Rajmohan; Fried, Isabella; Griewank, Klaus G.; Ulz, Peter; Windpassinger, Christian; Wackernagel, Werner; Loy, Shea; Wolf, Ingrid; Viale, Agnes; Lash, Alex E.; Pirun, Mono; Socci, Nicholas D.; Rütten, Arno; Palmedo, Gabriele; Abramson, David; Offit, Kenneth; Ott, Arthur; Becker, Jürgen C.; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Kutzner, Heinz; Bastian, Boris C.; Speicher, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Common acquired melanocytic nevi are benign neoplasms that are composed of small uniform melanocytes and typically present as flat or slightly elevated, pigmented lesions on the skin. We describe two families with a new autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by multiple skin-colored, elevated melanocytic tumors. In contrast to common acquired nevi, the melanocytic neoplasms in affected family members ranged histopathologically from epithelioid nevi to atypical melanocytic proliferations that showed overlapping features with melanoma. Some affected patients developed uveal or cutaneous melanomas. Segregating with this phenotype, we found inactivating germline mutations of the BAP1 gene. The majority of melanocytic neoplasms lost the remaining wild-type allele of BAP1 by various somatic alterations. In addition, we found BAP1 mutations in a subset of sporadic melanocytic neoplasms showing histologic similarities to the familial tumors. These findings suggest that loss of BAP1 is associated with a clinically and morphologically distinct type of melanocytic neoplasm. PMID:21874003

  20. NeuCode Proteomics Reveals Bap1 Regulation of Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Baughman, Joshua M; Rose, Christopher M; Kolumam, Ganesh; Webster, Joshua D; Wilkerson, Emily M; Merrill, Anna E; Rhoads, Timothy W; Noubade, Rajkumar; Katavolos, Paula; Lesch, Justin; Stapleton, Donald S; Rabaglia, Mary E; Schueler, Kathy L; Asuncion, Raymond; Domeyer, Melanie; Zavala-Solorio, Jose; Reich, Michael; DeVoss, Jason; Keller, Mark P; Attie, Alan D; Hebert, Alexander S; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J; Kirkpatrick, Donald S; Dey, Anwesha

    2016-07-12

    We introduce neutron-encoded (NeuCode) amino acid labeling of mice as a strategy for multiplexed proteomic analysis in vivo. Using NeuCode, we characterize an inducible knockout mouse model of Bap1, a tumor suppressor and deubiquitinase whose in vivo roles outside of cancer are not well established. NeuCode proteomics revealed altered metabolic pathways following Bap1 deletion, including profound elevation of cholesterol biosynthetic machinery coincident with reduced expression of gluconeogenic and lipid homeostasis proteins in liver. Bap1 loss increased pancreatitis biomarkers and reduced expression of mitochondrial proteins. These alterations accompany a metabolic remodeling with hypoglycemia, hypercholesterolemia, hepatic lipid loss, and acinar cell degeneration. Liver-specific Bap1 null mice present with fully penetrant perinatal lethality, severe hypoglycemia, and hepatic lipid deficiency. This work reveals Bap1 as a metabolic regulator in liver and pancreas, and it establishes NeuCode as a reliable proteomic method for deciphering in vivo biology. PMID:27373151

  1. Frequent Mutation of BAP1 in Metastasizing Uveal Melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Harbour, J. William; Onken, Michael D.; Roberson, Elisha D.O.; Duan, Shenghui; Cao, Li; Worley, Lori A.; Council, M. Laurin; Matatall, Katie A.; Helms, Cynthia; Bowcock, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    Metastasis is a defining feature of malignant tumors and is the most common cause of cancer-related death, yet the genetics of metastasis are poorly understood. We used massively parallel exome sequencing coupled with Sanger re-sequencing to search for metastasis-related mutations in highly metastatic uveal melanomas of the eye. Inactivating somatic mutations were identified in the gene encoding BRCA1-associated protein 1 (BAP1) on chromosome 3p21.1 in 26 of 31 (84%) metastasizing tumors, including 15 mutations causing premature protein termination, and six affecting its ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase (UCH) domains. One tumor harbored a frameshift mutation that was germline in origin, thus representing a susceptibility allele. These findings implicate loss of BAP1 in uveal melanoma metastasis and suggest the BAP1 pathway as a therapeutic target. PMID:21051595

  2. From the Eyes of the Front Line: BCBAs Evaluate BAP

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Mark R.; Reed, Derek; Smith, Tristam

    2013-01-01

    Master's-level Board Certified Behavior Analysts® were emailed an anonymous webbased survey regarding the journal Behavior Analysis in Practice (BAP). Following a 96-hour response window, 284 completed surveys were obtained. Data revealed that many participants regard the journal as beneficial to their profession, yet considered it too expensive and in need of a sharper focus on practitioner issues. Most supported BAP's emphasis on empirical research, and many recommended additional content areas such as clinical case formulations, objective product information, and a layout that blends the features of an empirical journal and a popular magazine. In summary, this survey indicates that, as a practitioner-oriented journal, BAP has the potential to occupy a valuable niche for master's-level behavior analysts and that journal leaders might enhance its value by modifying its marketing, content, and structure. PMID:25729504

  3. Alternansucrase acceptor products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The regioselectivity of alternansucrase (EC 2.4.1.140) differs from dextransucrase (EC 2.4.1.5) in ways that can be useful for the synthesis of novel oligosaccharide structures. For example, it has been recently shown that the major oligosaccharides produced when maltose is the acceptor include one...

  4. A Tumor-Specific Neo-Antigen Caused by a Frameshift Mutation in BAP1 Is a Potential Personalized Biomarker in Malignant Peritoneal Mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jun; Zhou, Zhan; Tang, Xiao-Jing; Gao, Zhi-Bin; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Shu-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive rare malignancy associated with asbestos exposure. A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of MPM will help develop a targeted therapy strategy. Oncogene targeted depth sequencing was performed on a tumor sample and paired peripheral blood DNA from a patient with malignant mesothelioma of the peritoneum. Four somatic base-substitutions in NOTCH2, NSD1, PDE4DIP, and ATP10B and 1 insert frameshift mutation in BAP1 were validated by the Sanger method at the transcriptional level. A 13-amino acids neo-peptide of the truncated Bap1 protein, which was produced as a result of this novel frameshift mutation, was predicted to be presented by this patient’s HLA-B protein. The polyclonal antibody of the synthesized 13-mer neo-peptide was produced in rabbits. Western blotting results showed a good antibody-neoantigen specificity, and Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining with the antibody of the neo-peptide clearly differentiated neoplastic cells from normal cells. A search of the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) database also revealed that 53.2% of mutations in BAP1 were frameshift indels with neo-peptide formation. An identified tumor-specific neo-antigen could be the potential molecular biomarker for personalized diagnosis to precisely subtype rare malignancies such as MPM. PMID:27187383

  5. A Tumor-Specific Neo-Antigen Caused by a Frameshift Mutation in BAP1 Is a Potential Personalized Biomarker in Malignant Peritoneal Mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jun; Zhou, Zhan; Tang, Xiao-Jing; Gao, Zhi-Bin; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Shu-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive rare malignancy associated with asbestos exposure. A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of MPM will help develop a targeted therapy strategy. Oncogene targeted depth sequencing was performed on a tumor sample and paired peripheral blood DNA from a patient with malignant mesothelioma of the peritoneum. Four somatic base-substitutions in NOTCH2, NSD1, PDE4DIP, and ATP10B and 1 insert frameshift mutation in BAP1 were validated by the Sanger method at the transcriptional level. A 13-amino acids neo-peptide of the truncated Bap1 protein, which was produced as a result of this novel frameshift mutation, was predicted to be presented by this patient's HLA-B protein. The polyclonal antibody of the synthesized 13-mer neo-peptide was produced in rabbits. Western blotting results showed a good antibody-neoantigen specificity, and Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining with the antibody of the neo-peptide clearly differentiated neoplastic cells from normal cells. A search of the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) database also revealed that 53.2% of mutations in BAP1 were frameshift indels with neo-peptide formation. An identified tumor-specific neo-antigen could be the potential molecular biomarker for personalized diagnosis to precisely subtype rare malignancies such as MPM. PMID:27187383

  6. Somatic alteration and depleted nuclear expression of BAP1 in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Takahiro; Sumii, Makiko; Fujishima, Fumiyoshi; Ueno, Kazuko; Emi, Mitsuru; Nagasaki, Masao; Ishioka, Chikashi; Chiba, Natsuko

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1-associated protein 1 (BAP1) is a deubiquitinating enzyme that is involved in the regulation of cell growth. Recently, many somatic and germline mutations of BAP1 have been reported in a broad spectrum of tumors. In this study, we identified a novel somatic non-synonymous BAP1 mutation, a phenylalanine-to-isoleucine substitution at codon 170 (F170I), in 1 of 49 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) of BAP1 gene in this ESCC tumor disclosed monoallelic deletion (LOH), suggesting BAP1 alterations on both alleles in this tumor. The deubiquitinase activity and the auto-deubiquitinase activity of F170I-mutant BAP1 were markedly suppressed compared with wild-type BAP1. In addition, wild-type BAP1 mostly localizes to the nucleus, whereas the F170I mutant preferentially localized in the cytoplasm. Microarray analysis revealed that expression of the F170I mutant drastically altered gene expression profiles compared with expressed wild-type BAP1. Gene-ontology analyses indicated that the F170I mutation altered the expression of genes involved in oncogenic pathways. We found that one candidate, TCEAL7, previously reported as a putative tumor suppressor gene, was significantly induced by wild-type BAP1 as compared to F170I mutant BAP1. Furthermore, we found that the level of BAP1 expression in the nucleus was reduced in 44% of ESCC examined by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Because the nuclear localization of BAP1 is important for its tumor suppressor function, BAP1 may be functionally inactivated in a substantial portion of ESCC. Taken together, BAP1 is likely to function as a tumor suppressor in at least a part of ESCC. PMID:26081045

  7. Luminescence in Li2BaP2O7.

    PubMed

    Hatwar, L R; Wankhede, S P; Moharil, S V; Muthal, P L; Dhopte, S M

    2015-09-01

    The photo-, thermo- and optically stimulated luminescence in Li2BaP2O7 activated with Eu(2+) /Cu(+) are reported. Strong thermoluminescence, which is about two times greater than LiF-TLD 100 was observed in the Eu(2+) -activated sample. It also exhibited optically stimulated luminescence sensitivity of ~20% that of commercial Al2O3:C phosphor. PMID:25351563

  8. Oxygen as Acceptor.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Vitaliy B; Verkhovsky, Michael I

    2015-01-01

    Like most bacteria, Escherichia coli has a flexible and branched respiratory chain that enables the prokaryote to live under a variety of environmental conditions, from highly aerobic to completely anaerobic. In general, the bacterial respiratory chain is composed of dehydrogenases, a quinone pool, and reductases. Substrate-specific dehydrogenases transfer reducing equivalents from various donor substrates (NADH, succinate, glycerophosphate, formate, hydrogen, pyruvate, and lactate) to a quinone pool (menaquinone, ubiquinone, and dimethylmenoquinone). Then electrons from reduced quinones (quinols) are transferred by terminal reductases to different electron acceptors. Under aerobic growth conditions, the terminal electron acceptor is molecular oxygen. A transfer of electrons from quinol to O₂ is served by two major oxidoreductases (oxidases), cytochrome bo₃ encoded by cyoABCDE and cytochrome bd encoded by cydABX. Terminal oxidases of aerobic respiratory chains of bacteria, which use O₂ as the final electron acceptor, can oxidize one of two alternative electron donors, either cytochrome c or quinol. This review compares the effects of different inhibitors on the respiratory activities of cytochrome bo₃ and cytochrome bd in E. coli. It also presents a discussion on the genetics and the prosthetic groups of cytochrome bo₃ and cytochrome bd. The E. coli membrane contains three types of quinones that all have an octaprenyl side chain (C₄₀). It has been proposed that the bo₃ oxidase can have two ubiquinone-binding sites with different affinities. "WHAT'S NEW" IN THE REVISED ARTICLE: The revised article comprises additional information about subunit composition of cytochrome bd and its role in bacterial resistance to nitrosative and oxidative stresses. Also, we present the novel data on the electrogenic function of appBCX-encoded cytochrome bd-II, a second bd-type oxidase that had been thought not to contribute to generation of a proton motive force in E

  9. Stabilization of MCRS1 by BAP1 prevents chromosome instability in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jingtao; Ma, Jian; Li, Weiguo; Mo, Ren; Zhang, Pingzhao; Gao, Kun; Jin, Xiaofeng; Xiao, Jiantao; Wang, Chenji; Fan, Jie

    2015-12-01

    Characterization of the exome and genome of carcinoma (ccRCC) by next-generation sequencing identified numerous genetic alternations. BRCA1-associated protein-1 (BAP1) was identified as one of the most frequently mutated genes in ccRCC, suggesting that BAP1 is a potential key driver for ccRCC cancer initiation and progression. However, how BAP1 mutations contribute to ccRCC remains to be elucidated. BAP1 is a nuclear de-ubiquitinating enzyme and cleaves the ubiquitin chain from the substrates. Here, we identified MCRS1 as a bona fide substrate for BAP1. MCRS1 is a component of the centrosome proteins, and plays an essential role in spindle assembly. BAP1 binds to MCRS1 and stabilizes MCRS1 by de-ubiquitination. BAP1 contributes to chromosome stability partially via MCRS1. A positive correlation was identified between BAP1 and MCRS1 expression in ccRCC tissues. Both BAP1 loss and MCRS1 down-regulation in ccRCC were associated with adverse clinicopathological features. This study revealed a novel mechanism for BAP1 involved in MCRS1 stability regulation, and provided insight in understanding the relationship between BAP1 mutations and chromosome instability in ccRCC. PMID:26300492

  10. Loss of BAP1 function leads to EZH2-dependent transformation

    PubMed Central

    LaFave, Lindsay M.; Béguelin, Wendy; Koche, Richard; Teater, Matt; Spitzer, Barbara; Chramiec, Alan; Papalexi, Efthymia; Keller, Matthew D.; Hricik, Todd; Konstantinoff, Katerina; Micol, Jean-Baptiste; Durham, Benjamin; Knutson, Sarah K.; Campbell, John E.; Blum, Gil; Shi, Xinxu; Doud, Emma H.; Krivtsov, Andrei V.; Chung, Young Rock; Khodos, Inna; de Stanchina, Elisa; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Adusumilli, Prasad S.; Thomas, Paul M.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Luo, Minkui; Keilhack, Heike; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Melnick, Ari; Armstrong, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Introductory Paragraph BAP1 and ASXL1 interact to form a polycomb deubiquitinase complex that removes monoubiquitin from histone H2A lysine 119 (H2AK119Ub). However, BAP1 and ASXL1 are mutated in distinct cancer types, consistent with independent roles in regulating epigenetic state and malignant transformation. Here we demonstrate that Bap1 loss results in increased trimethylated histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3), elevated Ezh2 expression, and enhanced repression of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) targets. These findings contrast with the reduction in H3K27me3 seen with Asxl1 loss. Conditional deletion of Bap1 and Ezh2 in vivo abrogates the myeloid progenitor expansion induced by Bap1 loss alone. Loss of Bap1 results in a marked decrease in H4K20 monomethylation (H4K20me1). Consistent with a role for H4K20me1 in EZH2 transcriptional regulation, expression of SETD8, the H4K20me1 methyltransferase, reduces EZH2 expression and abrogates the proliferation of BAP1-mutant cells. Further, mesothelioma cells that lack BAP1 are sensitive to EZH2 pharmacologic inhibition, suggesting a novel therapeutic approach for BAP1-mutant malignancies. PMID:26437366

  11. Prognostic parameters in uveal melanoma and their association with BAP1 expression

    PubMed Central

    van Essen, T Huibertus; van Pelt, Sake I; Versluis, Mieke; Bronkhorst, Inge HG; van Duinen, Sjoerd G; Marinkovic, Marina; Kroes, Wilma GM; Ruivenkamp, Claudia AL; Shukla, Shruti; de Klein, Annelies; Kiliç, Emine; Harbour, J William; Luyten, Gregorius PM; van der Velden, Pieter A; Verdijk, Rob M; Jager, Martine J

    2016-01-01

    Aim To determine whether BAP1 gene and protein expression associates with different prognostic parameters in uveal melanoma and whether BAP1 expression correctly identifies patients as being at risk for metastases, following enucleation of the primary tumour. Methods Thirty cases of uveal melanoma obtained by enucleation between 1999 and 2004 were analysed for a variety of prognostic markers, including histological characteristics, chromosome aberrations obtained by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis and gene expression profiling. These parameters were compared with BAP1 gene expression and BAP1 immunostaining. Results The presence of monosomy of chromosome 3 as identified by the different chromosome 3 tests showed significantly increased HRs (FISH on isolated nuclei cut-off 30%: HR 11.6, p=0.002; SNP analysis: HR 20.3, p=0.004) for death due to metastasis. The gene expression profile class 2, based on the 15-gene expression profile, similarly provided a significantly increased HR for a poor outcome (HR 8.5, p=0.005). Lower BAP1 gene expression and negative BAP1 immunostaining (50% of 28 tumours were immunonegative) were both associated with these markers for prognostication: FISH cut-off 30% monosomy 3 (BAP1 gene expression: p=0.037; BAP1 immunostaining: p=0.001), SNP-monosomy 3 (BAP1 gene expression: p=0.008; BAP1 immunostaining: p=0.002) and class 2 profile (BAP1 gene expression: p<0.001; BAP1 immunostaining: p=0.001) and were themselves associated with an increased risk of death due to metastasis (BAP1 gene expression dichotomised: HR 8.7, p=0.006; BAP1 immunostaining: HR 4.0, p=0.010). Conclusions Loss of BAP1 expression associated well with all of the methods currently used for prognostication and was itself predictive of death due to metastasis in uveal melanoma after enucleation, thereby emphasising the importance of further research on the role of BAP1 in uveal melanoma. PMID:25147369

  12. An emerging model for BAP1's role in regulating cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Eletr, Ziad M; Wilkinson, Keith D

    2011-06-01

    BRCA1-associated protein-1 (BAP1) is a 729 residue, nuclear-localized deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB) that displays tumor suppressor properties in the BAP1-null NCI-H226 lung carcinoma cell line. Studies that have altered BAP1 cellular levels or enzymatic activity have reported defects in cell cycle progression, notably at the G1/S transition. Recently BAP1 was shown to associate with the transcriptional regulator host cell factor 1 (HCF-1). The BAP1/HCF-1 interaction is mediated by the HCF-1 Kelch domain and an HCF-1 binding motif (HBM) within BAP1. HCF-1 is modified with ubiquitin in vivo, and ectopic studies suggest BAP1 deubiquitinates HCF-1. HCF-1 is a chromatin-associated protein thought to both activate and repress transcription by linking appropriate histone-modifying enzymes to a subset of transcription factors. One known role of HCF-1 is to promote cell cycle progression at the G1/S boundary by recruiting H3K4 histone methyltransferases to the E2F1 transcription factor so that genes required for S-phase can be transcribed. Given the robust associations between BAP1/HCF-1 and HCF-1/E2Fs, it is reasonable to speculate that BAP1 influences cell proliferation at G1/S by co-regulating transcription from HCF-1/E2F-governed promoters. PMID:21484256

  13. Loss of expression of BAP1 is very rare in non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Andrici, Juliana; Parkhill, Thomas R; Jung, Jason; Wardell, Kathryn L; Verdonk, Brandon; Singh, Arjun; Sioson, Loretta; Clarkson, Adele; Watson, Nicole; Sheen, Amy; Farzin, Mahtab; Toon, Christopher W; Gill, Anthony J

    2016-06-01

    Germline mutations of the BAP1 gene have been implicated in a cancer predisposition syndrome which includes mesothelioma, uveal melanoma, cutaneous melanocytic lesions, renal cell carcinoma, and possibly other malignancies. Double hit inactivation of BAP1 with subsequent loss of expression of the BAP1 protein also occurs in approximately 50% of mesotheliomas. The link between BAP1 mutation and lung cancer is yet to be fully explored. We sought to assess BAP1 expression in a large cohort of lung cancers undergoing surgery with curative intent. We searched the Anatomical Pathology database of our institution for lung cancer patients undergoing surgery with curative intent between 2000 and 2010. Immunohistochemistry for BAP1 was then performed in tissue microarray format. Our cohort included 257 lung cancer patients, of which 155 (60%) were adenocarcinomas and 72 (28%) were squamous cell carcinomas, with no other subtype comprising more than 3%. BAP1 loss of expression was found in only one lung cancer. We conclude that BAP1 mutation occurs very infrequently (0.4%) in non-small cell lung cancer. Given that the pathological differential diagnosis between lung carcinoma and mesothelioma may sometimes be difficult, this finding increases the specificity of loss of expression for BAP1 for the diagnosis of mesothelioma. PMID:27114369

  14. BAP1 loss defines a new class of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Llopis, Samuel; Vega-Rubín-de-Celis, Silvia; Liao, Arnold; Leng, Nan; Pavía-Jiménez, Andrea; Wang, Shanshan; Yamasaki, Toshinari; Zhrebker, Leah; Sivanand, Sharanya; Spence, Patrick; Kinch, Lisa; Hambuch, Tina; Jain, Suneer; Lotan, Yair; Margulis, Vitaly; Sagalowsky, Arthur I.; Summerour, Pia Banerji; Kabbani, Wareef; Wong, S. W. Wendy; Grishin, Nick; Laurent, Marc; Xie, Xian-Jin; Haudenschild, Christian D.; Ross, Mark T.; Bentley, David R.; Kapur, Payal; Brugarolas, James

    2012-01-01

    The molecular pathogenesis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is poorly understood. Whole-genome and exome sequencing followed by innovative tumorgraft analyses (to accurately determine mutant allele ratios) identified several putative two-hit tumor suppressor genes including BAP1. BAP1, a nuclear deubiquitinase, is inactivated in 15% of clear-cell RCCs. BAP1 cofractionates with and binds to HCF-1 in tumorgrafts. Mutations disrupting the HCF-1 binding motif impair BAP1-mediated suppression of cell proliferation, but not H2AK119ub1 deubiquitination. BAP1 loss sensitizes RCC cells in vitro to genotoxic stress. Interestingly, BAP1 and PBRM1 mutations anticorrelate in tumors (P=3×10−5), and combined loss of BAP1 and PBRM1 in a few RCCs was associated with rhabdoid features (q=0.0007). BAP1 and PBRM1 regulate seemingly different gene expression programs, and BAP1 loss was associated with high tumor grade (q=0.0005). Our results establish the foundation for an integrated pathological and molecular genetic classification of RCC, paving the way for subtype-specific treatments exploiting genetic vulnerabilities. PMID:22683710

  15. Interaction between human BAP31 and respiratory syncytial virus small hydrophobic (SH) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan; Jain, Neeraj; Limpanawat, Suweeraya; To, Janet; Quistgaard, Esben M.; Nordlund, Par; Thanabalu, Thirumaran; Torres, Jaume

    2015-08-15

    The small hydrophobic (SH) protein is a short channel-forming polypeptide encoded by the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Deletion of SH protein leads to the viral attenuation in mice and primates, and delayed apoptosis in infected cells. We have used a membrane-based yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) and a library from human lung cDNA to detect proteins that bind SH protein. This led to the identification of a membrane protein, B-cell associated protein 31 (BAP31). Transfected SH protein co-localizes with transfected BAP31 in cells, and pulls down endogenous BAP31. Titration of purified C-terminal endodomain of BAP31 against isotopically labeled SH protein in detergent micelles suggests direct interaction between the two proteins. Given the key role of BAP31 in protein trafficking and its critical involvement in pro- and anti-apoptotic pathways, this novel interaction may constitute a potential drug target. - Highlights: • A yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) detected BAP31 as a binder of RSV SH protein. • Transfected SH and BAP31 co-localize in lung epithelial cells. • Endogenous BAP31 is pulled down by RSV SH protein. • BAP31 endodomain interacts with the N-terminal α-helix of SH protein in micelles. • This interaction is proposed to be a potential drug target.

  16. Loss of BAP1 function leads to EZH2-dependent transformation.

    PubMed

    LaFave, Lindsay M; Béguelin, Wendy; Koche, Richard; Teater, Matt; Spitzer, Barbara; Chramiec, Alan; Papalexi, Efthymia; Keller, Matthew D; Hricik, Todd; Konstantinoff, Katerina; Micol, Jean-Baptiste; Durham, Benjamin; Knutson, Sarah K; Campbell, John E; Blum, Gil; Shi, Xinxu; Doud, Emma H; Krivtsov, Andrei V; Chung, Young Rock; Khodos, Inna; de Stanchina, Elisa; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Adusumilli, Prasad S; Thomas, Paul M; Kelleher, Neil L; Luo, Minkui; Keilhack, Heike; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Melnick, Ari; Armstrong, Scott A; Levine, Ross L

    2015-11-01

    The tumor suppressors BAP1 and ASXL1 interact to form a polycomb deubiquitinase complex that removes monoubiquitin from histone H2A lysine 119 (H2AK119Ub). However, BAP1 and ASXL1 are mutated in distinct cancer types, consistent with independent roles in regulating epigenetic state and malignant transformation. Here we demonstrate that Bap1 loss in mice results in increased trimethylated histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3), elevated enhancer of zeste 2 polycomb repressive complex 2 subunit (Ezh2) expression, and enhanced repression of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) targets. These findings contrast with the reduction in H3K27me3 levels seen with Asxl1 loss. Conditional deletion of Bap1 and Ezh2 in vivo abrogates the myeloid progenitor expansion induced by Bap1 loss alone. Loss of BAP1 results in a marked decrease in H4K20 monomethylation (H4K20me1). Consistent with a role for H4K20me1 in the transcriptional regulation of EZH2, expression of SETD8-the H4K20me1 methyltransferase-reduces EZH2 expression and abrogates the proliferation of BAP1-mutant cells. Furthermore, mesothelioma cells that lack BAP1 are sensitive to EZH2 pharmacologic inhibition, suggesting a novel therapeutic approach for BAP1-mutant malignancies. PMID:26437366

  17. Loss of BAP1 Expression Is Very Rare in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Farzin, Mahtab; Clarkson, Adele; Sioson, Loretta; Watson, Nicole; Chua, Terence C; Sztynda, Tamara; Samra, Jaswinder S; Gill, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is both common and highly lethal and therefore new biomarkers or potential targets for treatment are needed. Loss of BRCA associated protein-1 (BAP1) expression has been found in up to a quarter of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas. Given the close anatomical relationship between intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, we therefore sought to investigate the frequency of loss of BAP1 expression in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Methods The records of the department of Anatomical Pathology Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia, were searched for cases of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma diagnosed between 1992 and 2014 with material available in archived formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue blocks. Immunohistochemistry for BAP1 was performed on tissue microarray sections and if staining was equivocal or negative it was confirmed on whole sections. Negative staining for BAP1 was defined as loss of expression in all neoplastic nuclei, with preserved expression in non-neoplastic cells which acted as an internal positive control. Results Loss of BAP1 expression was found in only 1 of 306 (0.33%) pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. This case was confirmed to demonstrate diffuse loss of expression throughout all neoplastic cells in multiple blocks, consistent with BAP1 loss being an early clonal event. All other cases demonstrated positive expression of BAP1. Conclusion We conclude that, in contrast to intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, loss of expression of BAP1 occurs very rarely in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Therefore BAP1 inactivation is unlikely to be a frequent driver abnormality in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:26982343

  18. Changes in Bone Alkaline Phosphatase and Procollagen Type-1 C-Peptide after Static and Dynamic Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubo, Keitaro; Yuki, Kazuhito; Ikebukuro, Toshihiro

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of two types of nonweight-bearing exercise on changes in bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP) and pro-collagen type 1 C-peptide (P1P). BAP is a specific marker of bone synthesis, whereas P1P reflects synthesis of type 1 collagen in other organs as well as bone. Eight participants performed static and dynamic…

  19. Role of Biofilm-Associated Protein Bap in the Pathogenesis of Bovine Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Cucarella, Carme; Tormo, M. Ángeles; Úbeda, Carles; Trotonda, M. Pilar; Monzón, Marta; Peris, Critòfol; Amorena, Beatriz; Lasa, Íñigo; Penadés, José R.

    2004-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of intramammary infections, which frequently become chronic, associated with the ability of the bacteria to produce biofilm. Here, we report a relationship between the ability to produce chronic bovine mastitis and biofilm formation. We have classified bovine mastitis S. aureus isolates into three groups based on the presence of particular genetic elements required for biofilm formation: group 1 (ica+ bap+), group 2 (ica+, bap negative), and group 3 (ica negative, bap negative). Overall, animals naturally infected with group 1 and 2 isolates had a lower milk somatic cell count than those infected with isolates of group 3. In addition, Bap-positive isolates were significantly more able to colonize and persist in the bovine mammary gland in vivo and were less susceptible to antibiotic treatments when forming biofilms in vitro. Analysis of the structural bap gene revealed the existence of alternate forms of expression of the Bap protein in S. aureus isolates obtained under field conditions throughout the animal's life. The presence of anti-Bap antibodies in serum samples taken from animals with confirmed S. aureus infections indicated the production of Bap during infection. Furthermore, disruption of the ica operon in a bap-positive strain had no effect on in vitro biofilm formation, a finding which strongly suggested that Bap could compensate for the deficiency of the PIA/PNAG product (a biofilm matrix polysaccharide). Altogether, these results demonstrate that, in the bovine intramammary gland, the presence of Bap may facilitate a biofilm formation connected with the persistence of S. aureus. PMID:15039341

  20. Identification of short peptide sequences in complex milk protein hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Martina B; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    Numerous low molecular mass bioactive peptides (BAPs) can be generated during the hydrolysis of bovine milk proteins. Low molecular mass BAP sequences are less likely to be broken down by digestive enzymes and are thus more likely to be active in vivo. However, the identification of short peptides remains a challenge during mass spectrometry (MS) analysis due to issues with the transfer and over-fragmentation of low molecular mass ions. A method is described herein using time-of-flight ESI-MS/MS to effectively fragment and identify short peptides. This includes (a) short synthetic peptides, (b) short peptides within a defined hydrolysate sample, i.e. a prolyl endoproteinase hydrolysate of β-casein and (c) short peptides within a complex hydrolysate, i.e. a Corolase PP digest of sodium caseinate. The methodology may find widespread utilisation in the efficient identification of low molecular mass peptide sequences in food protein hydrolysates. PMID:25872436

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A DOSE-RESPONSE MODEL FOR INHALED B[A]P

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report analyzes the tumor data from the hamster inhalation bioassay of B[a]P conducted by Thyssen et al. (1981). etailed data on the incidence of laryngeal and pharyngeal tumors and chamber B[a]P concentration had been obtained by the authors in a previous contract (EPA 68-0...

  2. Benzo(A)pyrene (BaP) treatment results in complete infertility in female pigeons

    SciTech Connect

    Hough, J.L.; Darrow, D.; Eaton, J.; Baird, M.B. )

    1991-03-11

    BaP is a carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and a common environmental pollutant. Show Racer and White Carneau female pigeons injected weekly with BaP for 3 for 5 months were completely infertile, with ovaries appearing necrotic or oxidized. Fertility in benzo(e)pyrene (BeP, a noncarcinogenic PAH) treated birds was the same as for corn oil treated controls, as was embryo development. Thus, infertility in BaP treated birds appears to be related to its structure-carcinogenic potential. There was no readily apparent affect of BaP treatment on testes from male birds. In order to determine whether BaP metabolites covalently bind to DNA in the ovaries of these birds, pigeons were injected with BaP or BeP, controls were injected with corn oil. Animals were sacrificed 24h later, the ovaries or testes removed, and the DNA isolated and analyzed for PAH-DNA adducts by {sup 32}P-post labeling assay. One major and one minor PAH-DNA adduct was found in ovaries and testes from BaP treated birds. However, no PAH adducts were found in BeP treated or control animals. Thus, problems with fertility may arise because of the alteration in DNA by BaP metabolite binding in ovaries where rapid cell growth occurs during egg production.

  3. BAP1 deficiency causes loss of melanocytic cell identity in uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Uveal melanoma is a highly aggressive cancer with a strong propensity for metastasis, yet little is known about the biological mechanisms underlying this metastatic potential. We recently showed that most metastasizing uveal melanomas, which exhibit a class 2 gene expression profile, contain inactivating mutations in the tumor suppressor BAP1. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of BAP1 in uveal melanoma progression. Methods Uveal melanoma cells were studied following RNAi-mediated depletion of BAP1 using proliferation, BrdU incorporation, flow cytometry, migration, invasion, differentiation and clonogenic assays, as well as in vivo tumorigenicity experiments in NOD-SCID-Gamma mice. Results Depletion of BAP1 in uveal melanoma cells resulted in a loss of differentiation and gain of stem-like properties, including expression of stem cell markers, increased capacity for self-replication, and enhanced ability to grow in stem cell conditions. BAP1 depletion did not result in increased proliferation, migration, invasion or tumorigenicity. Conclusions BAP1 appears to function in the uveal melanocyte lineage primarily as a regulator of differentiation, with cells deficient for BAP1 exhibiting stem-like qualities. It will be important to elucidate how this effect of BAP1 loss promotes metastasis and how to reverse this effect therapeutically. PMID:23915344

  4. Germline BAP1 mutations predispose also to multiple basal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    de la Fouchardière, A; Cabaret, O; Savin, L; Combemale, P; Schvartz, H; Penet, C; Bonadona, V; Soufir, N; Bressac-de Paillerets, B

    2015-09-01

    The BRCA1-associated protein 1 (BAP1) gene encodes a nuclear deubiquitin enzyme which acts as a tumour suppressor. Loss of function germline mutations of BAP1 have been associated with an enhanced risk of uveal and cutaneous melanomas, mesothelioma, clear cell renal cancer and atypical cutaneous melanocytic proliferations. In two independent BAP1 families, we noticed an unusual frequency of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). Indeed, 19 BCCs were diagnosed in four patients, either of superficial (13/19) or nodular (6/19) subtype; they were all located in chronic sun-exposed areas (limbs, head or neck). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) identified in the 19 tumours, complete or partial loss of BAP1 protein nuclear expression, restricted to the BCC nests. A control study was conducted in 22 sporadic BCCs in 22 subjects under 65 without known associated BAP1 tumours: no loss of BAP1 expression was found. Overall, our observations suggest that BCCs are part of the BAP1 cancer syndrome, perhaps in relation with chronic sun exposure and melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) variants. In conclusion, cutaneous follow-up of BAP1 carriers should not only aim to detect melanocytic neoplasms but also BCCs. PMID:25080371

  5. Germline BAP1 mutation predisposes to uveal melanoma, lung adenocarcinoma, meningioma, and other cancers

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed H; Pilarski, Robert; Cebulla, Colleen M; Massengill, James B; Christopher, Benjamin N; Boru, Getachew; Hovland, Peter; Davidorf, Frederick H

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the potential contribution of germline sequence alterations in the BAP1 gene in uveal melanoma (UM) patients with possible predisposition to hereditary cancer. Design A total of 53 unrelated UM patients with high risk for hereditary cancer and five additional family members of one proband were studied. Mutational screening was carried out by direct sequencing. Results Of the 53 UM patients studied, a single patient was identified with a germline BAP1 truncating mutation, c. 799 C→T (p.Q267X), which segregated in several family members and was associated with UM and other cancers. Biallelic inactivation of BAP1 and decreased BAP1 expression were identified in the UM, lung adenocarcinoma and meningioma tumours from three family members with this germline BAP1 mutation. Germline BAP1 variants of uncertain significance, likely non-pathogenic, were also identified in two additional UM patients. Conclusion This study reports a novel hereditary cancer syndrome caused by a germline BAP1 mutation that predisposes patients to UM, lung carcinoma, meningioma, and possibly other cancers. The results indicate that BAP1 is the candidate gene in only a small subset of hereditary UM, suggesting the contribution of other candidate genes. PMID:21941004

  6. Export of Cellubrevin from the Endoplasmic Reticulum Is Controlled by BAP31

    PubMed Central

    Annaert, Wim G.; Becker, Bernd; Kistner, Ute; Reth, Michael; Jahn, Reinhard

    1997-01-01

    Cellubrevin is a ubiquitously expressed membrane protein that is localized to endosomes throughout the endocytotic pathway and functions in constitutive exocytosis. We report that cellubrevin binds with high specificity to BAP31, a representative of a highly conserved family of integral membrane proteins that has recently been discovered to be binding proteins of membrane immunoglobulins. The interaction between BAP31 and cellubrevin is sensitive to high ionic strength and appears to require the transmembrane regions of both proteins. No other proteins of liver membrane extracts copurified with BAP31 on immobilized recombinant cellubrevin, demonstrating that the interaction is specific. Synaptobrevin I bound to BAP31 with comparable affinity, whereas only weak binding was detectable with synaptobrevin II. Furthermore, a fraction of BAP31 and cellubrevin was complexed when each of them was quantitatively immunoprecipitated from detergent extracts of fibroblasts (BHK 21 cells). During purification of clathrin-coated vesicles or early endosomes, BAP31 did not cofractionate with cellubrevin. Rather, the protein was enriched in ER-containing fractions. When BHK cells were analyzed by immunocytochemistry, BAP31 did not overlap with cellubrevin, but rather colocalized with resident proteins of the ER. In addition, immunoreactive vesicles were clustered in a paranuclear region close to the microtubule organizing center, but different from the Golgi apparatus. When microtubules were depolymerized with nocodazole, this accumulation disappeared and BAP31 was confined to the ER. Truncation of the cytoplasmic tail of BAP31 prevented export of cellubrevin, but not of the transferrin receptor from the ER. We conclude that BAP31 represents a novel class of sorting proteins that controls anterograde transport of certain membrane proteins from the ER to the Golgi complex. PMID:9396746

  7. Different prognostic roles of tumor suppressor gene BAP1 in cancer: A systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Luchini, Claudio; Veronese, Nicola; Yachida, Shinichi; Cheng, Liang; Nottegar, Alessia; Stubbs, Brendon; Solmi, Marco; Capelli, Paola; Pea, Antonio; Barbareschi, Mattia; Fassan, Matteo; Wood, Laura D; Scarpa, Aldo

    2016-10-01

    Biallelic inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene BRCA1-associated protein 1 (BAP1) has been demonstrated in several cancers, but its prognostic role has not been completely explained. We aimed to investigate the risk associated with loss of BAP1 (BAP1-) for all-cause mortality, cancer-specific mortality and recurrence of disease in subjects with cancer. PubMed and SCOPUS were searched from database inception until 09/15/2015 without language restrictions. Prospective studies reporting data on prognostic parameters in subjects with cancer, comparing participants with presence of BAP1 (BAP1+) vs. BAP1- were included. Data were summarized using risk ratios (RR) for number of deaths/recurrences and hazard ratios (HR) for time-dependent risk related to BAP1- adjusted for potential confounders. From 261 hits, 12 studies (including 13 cohorts) with 3,447 participants (BAP1-: n = 697; BAP1+: n = 2,750), with a median follow-up over 60 months, were meta-analyzed. Compared to BAP1+, BAP1- significantly increased all-cause mortality, cancer-specific mortality and risk of recurrence in all the tumor types analyzed, except for mesothelioma, in which the presence of BAP1 mutations correlates with a better prognosis. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BAP1 mutated colorectal and renal carcinomas are associated with high-tumor grading (P < 0.0001), and that BAP1 mutated is more common in women than in men (P < 0.0001). In conclusion, on the basis of our meta-analysis, we have demonstrated a peculiar role of BAP1 in influencing the prognosis in cancer. Thus, BAP1 could be considered as an important potential target for personalized medicine. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27223342

  8. BAP1 suppresses lung cancer progression and is inhibited by miR-31

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueliang; Liao, Zhicong; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Yanqing; Wang, Yanbo; Hong, Yeting; Zhou, Xinyan; Yan, Xin; Yu, Min; Ma, Miao; Zhang, Weijie; Guo, Baoliang; Zhang, Jianguo; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Qipeng; Chen, Xi

    2016-01-01

    BRCA1-associated protein-1 (BAP1) is an important nuclear-localized deubiquitinating enzyme that serves as a tumor suppressor in lung cancer; however, its function and its regulation are largely unknown. In this study, we found that BAP1 protein levels were dramatically diminished in lung cancer tissues while its mRNA levels did not differ significantly, suggesting that a post-transcriptional mechanism was involved in BAP1 regulation. Because microRNAs (miRNAs) are powerful post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, we used bioinformatic analyses to search for miRNAs that could potentially bind BAP1. We predicted and experimentally validated miR-31 as a direct regulator of BAP1. Moreover, we showed that miR-31 promoted proliferation and suppressed apoptosis in lung cancer cells and accelerated the development of tumor growth in xenograft mice by inhibiting BAP1. Taken together, this study highlights an important role for miR-31 in the suppression of BAP1 in lung cancer cells and may provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of lung carcinogenesis. PMID:26885612

  9. BAP1 promotes breast cancer cell proliferation and metastasis by deubiquitinating KLF5

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Junying; Zhou, Zhongmei; Chen, Wenlin; Wang, Chunyan; Zhang, Hailin; Ge, Guangzhe; Shao, Ming; You, Dingyun; Fan, Zhixiang; Xia, Houjun; Liu, Rong; Chen, Ceshi

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor KLF5 is highly expressed in basal-like breast cancer and promotes breast cancer cell proliferation, survival, migration and tumour growth. Here we show that, in breast cancer cells, KLF5 is stabilized by the deubiquitinase (DUB) BAP1. With a genome-wide siRNA library screen of DUBs, we identify BAP1 as a bona fide KLF5 DUB. BAP1 interacts directly with KLF5 and stabilizes KLF5 via deubiquitination. KLF5 is in the BAP1/HCF-1 complex, and this newly identified complex promotes cell cycle progression partially by inhibiting p27 gene expression. Furthermore, BAP1 knockdown inhibits tumorigenicity and lung metastasis, which can be rescued partially by ectopic expression of KLF5. Collectively, our findings not only identify BAP1 as the DUB for KLF5, but also reveal a critical mechanism that regulates KLF5 expression in breast cancer. Our findings indicate that BAP1 could be a potential therapeutic target for breast and other cancers. PMID:26419610

  10. Early genotoxic effects in gill cells and haemocytes of Dreissena polymorpha exposed to cadmium, B[a]P and a combination of B[a]P and Cd.

    PubMed

    Vincent-Hubert, Françoise; Arini, Adeline; Gourlay-Francé, Catherine

    2011-07-14

    The aim of this study was to assess the genotoxic potential of environmentally relevant concentrations of Cd on the zebra mussel, an important freshwater sentinel organism, and to determine the stability of DNA damage in gill cells and haemocytes. The oxidative DNA damage and the co-genotoxicity of Cd in combination with B[a]P were investigated. We measured DNA damage in haemocytes and gill cells of zebra mussels exposed for 11 days to a constant concentration of Cd (10μg/L), B[a]P (10μg/L) or the two combined chemicals (10μg/L+1μg/L). Enzymatic dissociation of gills with dispase gave the lower percentage DNA in tail, compared with collagenase/dispase or collagenase. Bioaccumulation of cadmium in the soft tissues of mussels exposed to CdCl(2) or CdCl(2)+B[a]P increased in a time-dependent manner indicating that both exposures were effective. Cd (10μg/L) is genotoxic only during the first 3 days of exposure in gill cells, while in haemocytes the genotoxicity of Cd was observed later. B[a]P (10μg/L) induced an early increase of DNA damage in gill cells (after 10h and 1 day), while in both gill cells and haemocytes, B[a]P caused a marked increase of DNA damage after 3 days of exposure. The Cd+B[a]P mixture decreased the DNA-damaging effect of Cd and B[a]P in both cell types. Cd induced an increase of DNA damage in Fpg-treated slides, indicating that Cd contributed to oxidative DNA damage. Cadmium induced a cytogenetic effect in gill cells, assessed by the number of micronuclei, throughout the duration of the exposure, while B[a]P did not induce any cytogenetic effect. B[a]P, Cd and Cd+B[a]P induced a transient increase in the number of bi-nucleated cells. Our data clearly show that gills are more sensitive to Cd and B[a]P, which makes them more suitable for future bio-monitoring studies. PMID:21453782

  11. BAP1 and BRAFV600E expression in benign and malignant melanocytic proliferations.

    PubMed

    Piris, Adriano; Mihm, Martin C; Hoang, Mai P

    2015-02-01

    BAP1 (BRCA1-associated protein 1) is a tumor suppressor gene whose mutations have recently been reported to increase susceptibility for the development of uveal melanoma, cutaneous atypical and epithelioid melanocytic lesions, clear cell renal cell carcinoma, and other tumors. Screening for BAP1 mutation/loss/inactivation and BRAFV600E mutation can be done by immunohistochemistry. We investigated BAP1 and BRAFV600E expression in 193 sporadic melanocytic lesions (11 dermal nevi, 20 congenital nevi, 40 primary and nondesmoplastic melanomas, 40 desmoplastic melanomas, 23 metastatic melanomas, 17 Spitz nevi, 19 atypical Spitz nevi, 8 atypical Spitz tumors, 14 proliferative nodules arising in congenital nevi, 1 nevus during pregnancy) and 30 melanocytic lesions from 3 patients with family history of uveal melanoma and BAP1 germline mutation. Most sporadic melanocytic lesions exhibited positive BAP1 nuclear staining, except for 1 proliferative nodule arising in congenital nevus, 1 desmoplastic, 1 nevoid, and 2 metastatic melanomas. BRAFV600E positivity was demonstrated in 80% of dermal, 5% of congenital, 6% of Spitz, and 5.5% of atypical Spitz nevi; 29% of proliferative nodules arising in congenital nevi; and 24% of primary and nondesmoplastic and 35% of metastatic melanomas. Combined BAP1 loss and BRAFV600E staining was seen in 67% of BAP1 tumor syndrome-associated lesions and in none of the sporadic melanocytic proliferations including Spitz and atypical Spitz nevi and atypical Spitz tumors, with the exception of 1 primary melanoma. The combined BAP1-BRAFV600E+ immunoprofile appears to be a constant feature of BAP1 tumor syndrome-associated melanocytic lesions, and the designation of Spitz nevi or variants thereof appears to be inaccurate for this group of lesions. PMID:25479927

  12. Adaptation of BAp crystal orientation to stress distribution in rat mandible during bone growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, T.; Fujitani, W.; Ishimoto, T.; Umakoshi, Y.

    2009-05-01

    Biological apatite (BAp) c-axis orientation strongly depends on stress distribution in vivo and tends to align along the principal stress direction in bones. Dentulous mandible is subjected to a complicated stress condition in vivo during chewing but few studies have been carried out on the BAp c-axis orientation; so the adaptation of BAp crystal orientation to stress distribution was examined in rat dentulous mandible during bone growth and mastication. Female SD rats 4 to 14 weeks old were prepared, and the bone mineral density (BMD) and BAp crystal orientation were analyzed in a cross-section of mandible across the first molar focusing on two positions: separated from and just under the tooth root on the same cross-section perpendicular to the mesiodistal axis. The degree of BAp orientation was analyzed by a microbeam X-ray diffractometer using Cu-Kα radiation equipped with a detector of curved one-dimensional PSPC and two-dimensional PSPC in the reflection and transmission optics, respectively. BMD quickly increased during bone growth up to 14 weeks, although it was independent of the position from the tooth root. In contrast, BAp crystal orientation strongly depended on the age and the position from the tooth root, even in the same cross-section and direction, especially along the mesiodistal and the biting axes. With increased biting stress during bone growth, the degree of BAp orientation increased along the mesiodistal axis in a position separated from the tooth root more than that near the tooth root. In contrast, BAp preferential alignment clearly appeared along the biting axis near the tooth root. We conclude that BAp orientation rather than BMD sensitively adapts to local stress distribution, especially from the chewing stress in vivo in the mandible.

  13. Acceptors in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    McCluskey, Matthew D. Corolewski, Caleb D.; Lv, Jinpeng; Tarun, Marianne C.; Teklemichael, Samuel T.; Walter, Eric D.; Norton, M. Grant; Harrison, Kale W.; Ha, Su

    2015-03-21

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) has potential for a range of applications in the area of optoelectronics. The quest for p-type ZnO has focused much attention on acceptors. In this paper, Cu, N, and Li acceptor impurities are discussed. Experimental evidence indicates these point defects have acceptor levels 3.2, 1.4, and 0.8 eV above the valence-band maximum, respectively. The levels are deep because the ZnO valence band is quite low compared to conventional, non-oxide semiconductors. Using MoO{sub 2} contacts, the electrical resistivity of ZnO:Li was measured and showed behavior consistent with bulk hole conduction for temperatures above 400 K. A photoluminescence peak in ZnO nanocrystals is attributed to an acceptor, which may involve a Zn vacancy. High field (W-band) electron paramagnetic resonance measurements on the nanocrystals revealed an axial center with g{sub ⊥} = 2.0015 and g{sub //} = 2.0056, along with an isotropic center at g = 2.0035.

  14. Acceptors in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Mccluskey, Matthew D.; Corolewski, Caleb; Lv, Jinpeng; Tarun, Marianne C.; Teklemichael, Samuel T.; Walter, Eric D.; Norton, M. G.; Harrison, Kale W.; Ha, Su Y.

    2015-03-21

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) has potential for a range of applications in the area of optoelectronics. The quest for p-type ZnO has focused much attention on acceptors. In this paper, Cu, N, and Li acceptor impurities are discussed. Experimental evidence shows that these point defects have acceptor levels 3.2, 1.5, and 0.8 eV above the valence-band maximum, respectively. The levels are deep because the ZnO valence band is quite low compared to conventional, non-oxide semiconductors. Using MoO2 contacts, the electrical resistivity of ZnO:Li was measured and showed behavior consistent with bulk hole conduction for temperatures above 400 K. A photoluminescence peak in ZnO nanocrystals has been attributed to an acceptor, which may involve a zinc vacancy. High field (W-band) electron paramagnetic resonance measurements on the nanocrystals revealed an axial center with g = 2.0033 and g = 2.0075, along with an isotropic center at g = 2.0053.

  15. Electromembrane extraction of peptides.

    PubMed

    Balchen, Marte; Reubsaet, Léon; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig

    2008-06-20

    Rapid extraction of eight different peptides using electromembrane extraction (EME) was demonstrated for the first time. During an extraction time of 5 min, the model peptides migrated from a 500 microL aqueous acidic sample solution, through a thin supported liquid membrane (SLM) of an organic liquid sustained in the pores in the wall of a porous hollow fiber, and into a 25 microL aqueous acidic acceptor solution present inside the lumen of the hollow fiber. The driving force of the extraction was a 50 V potential sustained across the SLM, with the positive electrode in the sample and the negative electrode in the acceptor solution. The nature and the composition of the SLM were highly important for the EME process, and a mixture of 1-octanol and 15% di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate was found to work properly. Using 1mM HCl as background electrolyte in the sample and 100 mM HCl in the acceptor solution, and agitation at 1050 rpm, enrichment up to 11 times was achieved. Recoveries were found to be dependent on the structure of the peptide, indicating that the polarity and the number of ionized groups were important parameters affecting the extraction efficiency. The experimental findings suggested that electromembrane extraction of peptides is possible and may be a valuable tool for future extraction of peptides. PMID:18479691

  16. Germline BAP1 Mutational Landscape of Asbestos-Exposed Malignant Mesothelioma Patients with Family History of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ohar, Jill A; Cheung, Mitchell; Talarchek, Jacqueline; Howard, Suzanne E; Howard, Timothy D; Hesdorffer, Mary; Peng, Hongzhuang; Rauscher, Frank J; Testa, Joseph R

    2016-01-15

    Heritable mutations in the BAP1 tumor suppressor gene predispose individuals to mesothelioma and other cancers. However, a large-scale assessment of germline BAP1 mutation incidence and associated clinical features in mesothelioma patients with a family history of cancer has not been reported. Therefore, we examined the germline BAP1 mutation status of 150 mesothelioma patients with a family history of cancer, 50 asbestos-exposed control individuals with a family history of cancers other than mesothelioma, and 153 asbestos-exposed individuals without familial cancer. No BAP1 alterations were found in control cohorts, but were identified in nine of 150 mesothelioma cases (6%) with a family history of cancer. Alterations among these cases were characterized by both missense and frameshift mutations, and enzymatic activity of BAP1 missense mutants was decreased compared with wild-type BAP1. Furthermore, BAP1 mutation carriers developed mesothelioma at an earlier age that was more often peritoneal than pleural (five of nine) and exhibited improved long-term survival compared to mesothelioma patients without BAP1 mutations. Moreover, many tumors harboring BAP1 germline mutations were associated with BAP1 syndrome, including mesothelioma and ocular/cutaneous melanomas, as well as renal, breast, lung, gastric, and basal cell carcinomas. Collectively, these findings suggest that mesothelioma patients presenting with a family history of cancer should be considered for BAP1 genetic testing to identify those individuals who might benefit from further screening and routine monitoring for the purpose of early detection and intervention. PMID:26719535

  17. Staphylococcal Bap Proteins Build Amyloid Scaffold Biofilm Matrices in Response to Environmental Signals

    PubMed Central

    Taglialegna, Agustina; Navarro, Susanna; Ventura, Salvador; Garnett, James A.; Matthews, Steve; Penades, José R.; Lasa, Iñigo; Valle, Jaione

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are communities of bacteria that grow encased in an extracellular matrix that often contains proteins. The spatial organization and the molecular interactions between matrix scaffold proteins remain in most cases largely unknown. Here, we report that Bap protein of Staphylococcus aureus self-assembles into functional amyloid aggregates to build the biofilm matrix in response to environmental conditions. Specifically, Bap is processed and fragments containing at least the N-terminus of the protein become aggregation-prone and self-assemble into amyloid-like structures under acidic pHs and low concentrations of calcium. The molten globule-like state of Bap fragments is stabilized upon binding of the cation, hindering its self-assembly into amyloid fibers. These findings define a dual function for Bap, first as a sensor and then as a scaffold protein to promote biofilm development under specific environmental conditions. Since the pH-driven multicellular behavior mediated by Bap occurs in coagulase-negative staphylococci and many other bacteria exploit Bap-like proteins to build a biofilm matrix, the mechanism of amyloid-like aggregation described here may be widespread among pathogenic bacteria. PMID:27327765

  18. Staphylococcal Bap Proteins Build Amyloid Scaffold Biofilm Matrices in Response to Environmental Signals.

    PubMed

    Taglialegna, Agustina; Navarro, Susanna; Ventura, Salvador; Garnett, James A; Matthews, Steve; Penades, José R; Lasa, Iñigo; Valle, Jaione

    2016-06-01

    Biofilms are communities of bacteria that grow encased in an extracellular matrix that often contains proteins. The spatial organization and the molecular interactions between matrix scaffold proteins remain in most cases largely unknown. Here, we report that Bap protein of Staphylococcus aureus self-assembles into functional amyloid aggregates to build the biofilm matrix in response to environmental conditions. Specifically, Bap is processed and fragments containing at least the N-terminus of the protein become aggregation-prone and self-assemble into amyloid-like structures under acidic pHs and low concentrations of calcium. The molten globule-like state of Bap fragments is stabilized upon binding of the cation, hindering its self-assembly into amyloid fibers. These findings define a dual function for Bap, first as a sensor and then as a scaffold protein to promote biofilm development under specific environmental conditions. Since the pH-driven multicellular behavior mediated by Bap occurs in coagulase-negative staphylococci and many other bacteria exploit Bap-like proteins to build a biofilm matrix, the mechanism of amyloid-like aggregation described here may be widespread among pathogenic bacteria. PMID:27327765

  19. Differences in gene expression of human xylosyltransferases and determination of acceptor specificities for various proteoglycans

    SciTech Connect

    Roch, Christina; Kuhn, Joachim; Kleesiek, Knut; Goetting, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The xylosyltransferase (XT) isoforms XT-I and XT-II initiate the posttranslational glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis. Here, we determined the relative expression of both isoforms in 33 human cell lines. The majority of tested cell lines showed dominant XYLT2 gene expression, while only in 23132/87, JAR, NCI-H510A and THP-1 was the XT-I mRNA expression higher. Nearly equal expression levels were detected in six cell lines. Additionally, to shed light on putative differences in acceptor specificities the acceptor properties of potential acceptor sequences were determined. Peptides were expressed as glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins containing putative or known GAG attachment sites of in vivo proteoglycans. Kinetic analysis showed that K{sub m} and V{sub max} values for XT-I mediated xylosylation were slightly higher than those for XT-II, and that XT-I showed a lesser stringency concerning the acceptor sequence. Mutagenesis of the bikunin peptide sequence in the G-S-G attachment site and flanking regions generated potential acceptor molecules. Here, mutations on the N-terminal side and the attachment site were found to be more susceptible to a loss of acceptor function than mutations in the C-terminus. Altogether the known consensus sequence a-a-a-a-G-S-G-a-a/G-a ('a' representing Asp or Glu) for XT-I mediated xylosylation could be approved and additionally extended to apply to XT-II as well.

  20. BAP1/ASXL1 recruitment and activation for H2A deubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Sahtoe, Danny D; van Dijk, Willem J; Ekkebus, Reggy; Ovaa, Huib; Sixma, Titia K

    2016-01-01

    The deubiquitinating enzyme BAP1 is an important tumor suppressor that has drawn attention in the clinic since its loss leads to a variety of cancers. BAP1 is activated by ASXL1 to deubiquitinate mono-ubiquitinated H2A at K119 in Polycomb gene repression, but the mechanism of this reaction remains poorly defined. Here we show that the BAP1 C-terminal extension is important for H2A deubiquitination by auto-recruiting BAP1 to nucleosomes in a process that does not require the nucleosome acidic patch. This initial encounter-like complex is unproductive and needs to be activated by the DEUBAD domains of ASXL1, ASXL2 or ASXL3 to increase BAP1's affinity for ubiquitin on H2A, to drive the deubiquitination reaction. The reaction is specific for Polycomb modifications of H2A as the complex cannot deubiquitinate the DNA damage-dependent ubiquitination at H2A K13/15. Our results contribute to the molecular understanding of this important tumor suppressor. PMID:26739236

  1. BAP1/ASXL1 recruitment and activation for H2A deubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Sahtoe, Danny D.; van Dijk, Willem J.; Ekkebus, Reggy; Ovaa, Huib; Sixma, Titia K.

    2016-01-01

    The deubiquitinating enzyme BAP1 is an important tumor suppressor that has drawn attention in the clinic since its loss leads to a variety of cancers. BAP1 is activated by ASXL1 to deubiquitinate mono-ubiquitinated H2A at K119 in Polycomb gene repression, but the mechanism of this reaction remains poorly defined. Here we show that the BAP1 C-terminal extension is important for H2A deubiquitination by auto-recruiting BAP1 to nucleosomes in a process that does not require the nucleosome acidic patch. This initial encounter-like complex is unproductive and needs to be activated by the DEUBAD domains of ASXL1, ASXL2 or ASXL3 to increase BAP1's affinity for ubiquitin on H2A, to drive the deubiquitination reaction. The reaction is specific for Polycomb modifications of H2A as the complex cannot deubiquitinate the DNA damage-dependent ubiquitination at H2A K13/15. Our results contribute to the molecular understanding of this important tumor suppressor. PMID:26739236

  2. Carcinogenic effects of MGP-7 and B[a]P on the hamster cheek pouch.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Jimi Lynn; Conti, Claudio J; Goldstein, Lawrence S; DiGiovanni, John; Gimenez-Conti, Irma B

    2009-10-01

    This study was performed to examine the carcinogenic effects of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and manufactured gas plant (MGP) residues on the hamster cheek pouch (HCP). Syrian hamsters were treated topically with a suspension of 2%, 10%, or 20% B[a]P or 50% or 100% MGP-7 (a mixture of residues from 7 MGP sites) in mineral oil for eight (short-term study) and sixteen, twenty, twenty-eight, and thirty-two weeks (long-term study). The short-term study showed that B[a]P induced p53 protein accumulation, indicative of genotoxic damage, as well as increased cell proliferation, hyperplasia, and inflammation, which is usually associated with promotional activity. In contrast, the MGP-7 presented only marginal p53 accumulation and induction of BrdU incorporation. In the long-term experiments, animals treated with 2% and 10% of B[a]P continued to show p53 protein accumulation as well as hyperplasia and increased cell proliferation and inflammation. By thirty weeks, all the animals treated with B[a]P had a 100% incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Animals treated with 50% and 100% MGP-7 showed only weak hyperplasia and a low proliferation rate and accumulation of p53 protein through thirty-two weeks. Benzo[a]pyrene was highly carcinogenic when used at adequate doses. Manufactured gas plant residue, however, was not carcinogenic in this model. PMID:19679887

  3. Jumping the gun: Smoking constituent BaP causes premature primordial follicle activation and impairs oocyte fusibility through oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Sobinoff, A.P.; Pye, V.; Nixon, B.; Roman, S.D.; McLaughlin, E.A.

    2012-04-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is an ovotoxic constituent of cigarette smoke associated with pre-mature ovarian failure and decreased rates of conception in IVF patients. Although the overall effect of BaP on female fertility has been documented, the exact molecular mechanisms behind its ovotoxicity remain elusive. In this study we examined the effects of BaP exposure on the ovarian transcriptome, and observed the effects of in vivo exposure on oocyte dysfunction. Microarray analysis of BaP cultured neonatal ovaries revealed a complex mechanism of ovotoxicity involving a small cohort of genes associated with follicular growth, cell cycle progression, and cell death. Histomorphological and immunohistochemical analysis supported these results, with BaP exposure causing increased primordial follicle activation and developing follicle atresia in vitro and in vivo. Functional analysis of oocytes obtained from adult Swiss mice treated neonatally revealed significantly increased levels of mitochondrial ROS/lipid peroxidation, and severely reduced sperm-egg binding and fusion in both low (1.5 mg/kg/daily) and high (3 mg/kg/daily) dose treatments. Our results reveal a complex mechanism of BaP induced ovotoxicity involving developing follicle atresia and accelerated primordial follicle activation, and suggest short term neonatal BaP exposure causes mitochondrial leakage resulting in reduced oolemma fluidity and impaired fertilisation in adulthood. This study highlights BaP as a key compound which may be partially responsible for the documented effects of cigarette smoke on follicular development and sub-fertility. -- Highlights: ► BaP exposure up-regulates canonical pathways linked with follicular growth/atresia. ► BaP causes primordial follicle activation and developing follicle atresia. ► BaP causes oocyte mitochondrial ROS and lipid peroxidation, impairing fertilisation. ► Short term neonatal BaP exposure compromises adult oocyte quality.

  4. Loss of the deubiquitylase BAP1 alters class I histone deacetylase expression and sensitivity of mesothelioma cells to HDAC inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Joseph J.; Kenyani, Jenna; Butt, Zohra; Carter, Rachel; Chew, Hui Yi; Cheeseman, Liam P.; Darling, Sarah; Denny, Michael; Urbé, Sylvie; Clague, Michael J.; Coulson, Judy M.

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases are important targets for cancer therapeutics, but their regulation is poorly understood. Our data show coordinated transcription of HDAC1 and HDAC2 in lung cancer cell lines, but suggest HDAC2 protein expression is cell-context specific. Through an unbiased siRNA screen we found that BRCA1-associated protein 1 (BAP1) regulates their expression, with HDAC2 reduced and HDAC1 increased in BAP1 depleted cells. BAP1 loss-of-function is increasingly reported in cancers including thoracic malignancies, with frequent mutation in malignant pleural mesothelioma. Endogenous HDAC2 directly correlates with BAP1 across a panel of lung cancer cell lines, and is downregulated in mesothelioma cell lines with genetic BAP1 inactivation. We find that BAP1 regulates HDAC2 by increasing transcript abundance, rather than opposing its ubiquitylation. Importantly, although total cellular HDAC activity is unaffected by transient depletion of HDAC2 or of BAP1 due to HDAC1 compensation, this isoenzyme imbalance sensitizes MSTO-211H cells to HDAC inhibitors. However, other established mesothelioma cell lines with low endogenous HDAC2 have adapted to become more resistant to HDAC inhibition. Our work establishes a mechanism by which BAP1 loss alters sensitivity of cancer cells to HDAC inhibitors. Assessment of BAP1 and HDAC expression may ultimately help identify patients likely to respond to HDAC inhibitors. PMID:25970771

  5. Uptake and translocation of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) in two ornamental plants and dissipation in soil.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuebing; Zhou, Qixing

    2016-02-01

    Pot experiments were conducted to evaluate the phytoremediation of B[a]P contaminated soil using two ornamental plants (Tagetes patula and Mirabilis jalapa). The results showed that the dry biomass of two plants was increased at low B[a]P contaminated soil and then inhibited with increasing B[a]P concentrations. It exhibited a significantly positive linear relationship between B[a]P absorption in roots, stems, leaves and shoots of the tested plants and the concentration of B[a]P in soils (P<0.01). Meanwhile, the contents of B[a]P in different tissues of the plants increased with growing time. After planting T. patula and M. jalapa, plant-promoted biodegradation of B[a]P was account for 79.5-99.8% and 71.1-99.9%, respectively, whereas the amount of B[a]P dissipation enhancement was only 0.2-20.5% and 0.1-28.9%, respectively. Moreover, low bioaccumulation factor (BF) and translocation factor (TF) values indicated that T. patula and M. jalapa took up B[a]P from contaminated soil and transferred them to the aerial parts with low efficiency. The B[a]P removal rates in rhizosphere soils at different growing stages of T. patula and M. jalapa were 2.7-26.8% and 0.4%-33.9%, respectively, higher than those of non-rhizopshere soils. Therefore, the presence of T. patula and M. jalapa roots was effective in promoting the phytoremediation of B[a]P contaminated soils. PMID:26476328

  6. Bap, a Biofilm Matrix Protein of Staphylococcus aureus Prevents Cellular Internalization through Binding to GP96 Host Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Jaione; Latasa, Cristina; Gil, Carmen; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Solano, Cristina; Penadés, José R.; Lasa, Iñigo

    2012-01-01

    The biofilm matrix, composed of exopolysaccharides, proteins, nucleic acids and lipids, plays a well-known role as a defence structure, protecting bacteria from the host immune system and antimicrobial therapy. However, little is known about its responsibility in the interaction of biofilm cells with host tissues. Staphylococcus aureus, a leading cause of biofilm-associated chronic infections, is able to develop a biofilm built on a proteinaceous Bap-mediated matrix. Here, we used the Bap protein as a model to investigate the role that components of the biofilm matrix play in the interaction of S. aureus with host cells. The results show that Bap promotes the adhesion but prevents the entry of S. aureus into epithelial cells. A broad analysis of potential interaction partners for Bap using ligand overlayer immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation with purified Bap and pull down with intact bacteria, identified a direct binding between Bap and Gp96/GRP94/Hsp90 protein. The interaction of Bap with Gp96 provokes a significant reduction in the capacity of S. aureus to invade epithelial cells by interfering with the fibronectin binding protein invasion pathway. Consistent with these results, Bap deficient bacteria displayed an enhanced capacity to invade mammary gland epithelial cells in a lactating mice mastitis model. Our observations begin to elucidate the mechanisms by which components of the biofilm matrix can facilitate the colonization of host tissues and the establishment of persistent infections. PMID:22876182

  7. BAP1 hereditary cancer predisposition syndrome: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Klebe, Sonja; Driml, Jack; Nasu, Masaki; Pastorino, Sandra; Zangiabadi, Amirmasoud; Henderson, Douglas; Carbone, Michele

    2015-01-01

    A 72-year-old woman was diagnosed with uveal melanoma, peritoneal mesothelioma and a primary biliary tract adenocarcinoma. She had a strong family history of mesothelioma as well as other malignancies including renal cell carcinoma. The recently described BAP1 hereditary cancer predisposition syndrome was suspected, but immunohistochemical labeling was not conclusive. Genetic testing confirmed a novel and unusual germline mutation in the ubiquitin hydrolase domain of the BAP1 gene (p.Tyr173Cys) and the patient was diagnosed with the BAP1 hereditary cancer predisposition syndrome. This case demonstrates the importance of clinically recognizing this rare syndrome and its manifestations, some which are still being characterized. It also highlights the importance of genetic testing in cases where there is a high clinical suspicion, even when screening tests, such as immunohistochemistry, in this case, are inconclusive. The diagnosis of a germline BAP1 mutation may have important implications for both the patient and their families with regards to further genetic testing and active surveillance programs. Further research is needed to fully understand the extent and clinical implications of this rare cancer syndrome. PMID:26140217

  8. CDKN2A and BAP1 germline mutations predispose to melanoma and mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Betti, M; Aspesi, A; Biasi, A; Casalone, E; Ferrante, D; Ogliara, P; Gironi, L C; Giorgione, R; Farinelli, P; Grosso, F; Libener, R; Rosato, S; Turchetti, D; Maffè, A; Casadio, C; Ascoli, V; Dianzani, C; Colombo, E; Piccolini, E; Pavesi, M; Miccoli, S; Mirabelli, D; Bracco, C; Righi, L; Boldorini, R; Papotti, M; Matullo, G; Magnani, C; Pasini, B; Dianzani, I

    2016-08-10

    BAP1 germline mutations predispose to a cancer predisposition syndrome that includes mesothelioma, cutaneous melanoma, uveal melanoma and other cancers. This co-occurrence suggests that these tumors share a common carcinogenic pathway. To evaluate this hypothesis, we studied 40 Italian families with mesothelioma and/or melanoma. The probands were sequenced for BAP1 and for the most common melanoma predisposition genes (i.e. CDKN2A, CDK4, TERT, MITF and POT1) to investigate if these genes may also confer susceptibility to mesothelioma. In two out of six families with both mesothelioma and melanoma we identified either a germline nonsense mutation (c.1153C > T, p.Arg385*) in BAP1 or a recurrent pathogenic germline mutation (c.301G > T, p.Gly101Trp) in CDKN2A. Our study suggests that CDKN2A, in addition to BAP1, could be involved in the melanoma and mesothelioma susceptibility, leading to the rare familial cancer syndromes. It also suggests that these tumors share key steps that drive carcinogenesis and that other genes may be involved in inherited predisposition to malignant mesothelioma and melanoma. PMID:27181379

  9. The gene bap, involved in biofilm production, is present in Staphylococcus spp. strains from nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Potter, Amina; Ceotto, Hilana; Giambiagi-Demarval, Marcia; dos Santos, Kátia Regina Netto; Nes, Ingolf F; Bastos, Maria do Carmo de Freire

    2009-06-01

    This study analyzed ten strains of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) involved in nosocomial infections in three Brazilian hospitals. Their antibiotic susceptibility profile showed that most strains exhibited multiple antibiotic resistance and possessed the mecA gene. The ability of these strains to adhere to polystyrene microtiter plates was also tested and nine of them proved to be biofilm producers at least in one of the three conditions tested: growth in TSB, in TSB supplemented with NaCl, or in TSB supplemented with glucose. The presence of the bap gene, which codes for the biofilm-associated protein (Bap), was investigated in all ten strains by PCR. AU strains were bop-positive and DNA sequencing experiments confirmed that the fragments amplified were indeed part of a bap gene. The presence of the icaA gene, one of the genes involved in polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) formation, was also detected by PCR in eight of the ten strains tested. The two icaA-negative strains were either weak biofilm producer or no biofilm producer, although they were bop-positive. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the presence of the bap gene in nosocomial isolates of CNS, being also the first report on the presence of this gene in Staphylococcus haemolyticus and S. cohnii. PMID:19557349

  10. DONOR-ACCEPTOR INTERACTIONS OF NITROGEN*

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, J. E.; Szent-Györgyi, A.

    1969-01-01

    The nitrogen atoms of organic molecules readily enter into donor-acceptor interactions, giving off an electron from their lone pair. Under favorable conditions the acceptor can form free radicals. S and O atoms behave likewise but less intensely. PMID:4306047

  11. Anaerobic electron acceptor chemotaxis in Shewanella putrefaciens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Moser, D. P.; Saffarini, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 can grow either aerobically or anaerobically at the expense of many different electron acceptors and is often found in abundance at redox interfaces in nature. Such redox interfaces are often characterized by very strong gradients of electron acceptors resulting from rapid microbial metabolism. The coincidence of S. putrefaciens abundance with environmental gradients prompted an examination of the ability of MR-1 to sense and respond to electron acceptor gradients in the laboratory. In these experiments, taxis to the majority of the electron acceptors that S. putrefaciens utilizes for anaerobic growth was seen. All anaerobic electron acceptor taxis was eliminated by the presence of oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, elemental sulfur, or dimethyl sulfoxide, even though taxis to the latter was very weak and nitrate and nitrite respiration was normal in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies with respiratory mutants of MR-1 revealed that several electron acceptors that could not be used for anaerobic growth nevertheless elicited normal anaerobic taxis. Mutant M56, which was unable to respire nitrite, showed normal taxis to nitrite, as well as the inhibition of taxis to other electron acceptors by nitrite. These results indicate that electron acceptor taxis in S. putrefaciens does not conform to the paradigm established for Escherichia coli and several other bacteria. Carbon chemo-taxis was also unusual in this organism: of all carbon compounds tested, the only positive response observed was to formate under anaerobic conditions.

  12. Glucansucrase acceptor reactions with D-mannose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The main acceptor product of glucansucrases with D-mannose has not previously been identified. We used glucansucrases that form water-insoluble a-D-glucans to produce increased yields of acceptor products from D-mannose, and identified the major product as 6-O-a-D-glucopyranosyl-D-mannose. Glucansuc...

  13. BRCA1-associated Protein 1 (BAP1) Deubiquitinase Antagonizes the Ubiquitin-mediated Activation of FoxK2 Target Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Okino, Yuki; Machida, Yuka; Frankland-Searby, Sarah; Machida, Yuichi J.

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1-associated protein 1 (BAP1), which is frequently mutated in cancer, functions as a deubiquitinase (DUB) for histone H2A. Although BAP1 interacts with a transcriptional regulator, HCF-1, and transcription factors FoxK1 and FoxK2, how BAP1 controls gene expression remains unclear. This study investigates the importance of BAP1 DUB activity and the interactions with FoxK2 and HCF-1 in the regulation of FoxK2 target genes. We show that FoxK2 recruits BAP1 to the target genes through the forkhead-associated domain, which interacts with Thr(P)-493 on BAP1. BAP1, in turn, recruits HCF-1, thereby forming a ternary complex in which BAP1 bridges FoxK2 and HCF-1. BAP1 represses FoxK2 target genes, and this effect requires BAP1 DUB activity but not interaction with HCF-1. Importantly, BAP1 depletion causes up-regulation of FoxK2 target genes only in the presence of the Ring1B-Bmi1 complex, an E3 ubiquitin ligase for histone H2A, indicating an antagonizing role of BAP1 against Ring1B-Bmi1. Our findings suggest that BAP1 deficiency causes increased expression of target genes in a Ring1B-Bmi1-dependent manner. PMID:25451922

  14. Free energy calculations on snake venom metalloproteinase BaP1.

    PubMed

    Lingott, Torsten; Merfort, Irmgard; Steinbrecher, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    BaP1 is a snake venom metalloproteinase from the venom of Bothrops asper, showing high structural homology with the catalytic domain of human adamalysins and matrix metalloproteinases. It induces the release of cytokines, like interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor alpha. Recently, the high-resolution crystal structure of BaP1 with a bound inhibitor became available, representing an interesting model concerning inhibitor design for medicinally important metalloproteinases such as tumor necrosis factor alpha-converting enzyme and MMP13. We here use computational modeling to gain a better understanding about the binding properties of various ligands to BaP1, with a focus on computing ligand binding free energies. The obtained results should be of general significance for future research on medicinally important metalloproteinases. We have investigated the binding of the original inhibitor in detail and calculated its binding strength using MMP/GBSA free energy calculations. Additionally, the binding strengths of alternative ligands have been computed, and two of them are predicted and experimentally verified to strongly inhibit the enzyme. A suggestion for chemical modifications of BaP1 inhibitors could be made to guide future synthesis efforts. Furthermore, a contribution to the proteolytic reaction mechanism of metzincins is given. The pK value of the catalytically active glutamic acid residue 143 has been found to be significantly raised when compared with a free glutamate side chain. Calculations on other matrix metalloproteinases confirmed that this is not confined to BaP1, but seems to be a common feature of metzincins. PMID:22385614

  15. Molecular characteristics of bap-positive Staphylococcus aureus strains from dairy cow mastitis.

    PubMed

    Snel, Gustavo G M; Monecke, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf; Piccinini, Renata

    2015-08-01

    The biofilm-associated protein (Bap) of Staphylococcus aureus is a high molecular weight cell-wall-anchored protein involved in biofilm formation, first described in bovine mastitis strains from Spain. So far, studies regarding Bap were mainly based on the Spanish strain V329 and its mutants, but no information on the genetic variability of bap-positive Staph. aureus strains is yet available in the literature. The present study investigated the molecular characteristics of 8 bap-positive Staph. aureus strains from subclinical bovine mastitis, isolated in 5 herds; somatic cell counts (SCC) of milk samples were also registered. Strains were characterised using MLST, SPA typing and microarray and the results were compared with V329. All isolates from this study and V329 were assigned to ST126, t605, but some molecular differences were observed. Only herd A and B strains harboured the genes for β-lactams resistance; the leukocidin D/E gene, a type I site-specific deoxyribonuclease subunit, 3rd locus gene and serin-protease A and B were carried by all strains, but not by V329, while serin-protease E was absent in V329 and in another isolate. Four isolates and V329 harboured the fibronectin-binding protein B gene. SCC showed the highest value in the milk sample affected by the only strain carrying all the virulence factors considered. Potential large variability of virulence was evidenced among V329 and all bap-positive Staph. aureus strains considered: the carriage of fnb could enhance the accumulation of biofilm, but the lack of lukD/E and splA, B or E might decrease the invasiveness of strain. PMID:25850658

  16. BAP1 Immunohistochemistry and p16 FISH in the Diagnosis of Sarcomatous and Desmoplastic Mesotheliomas.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Harry C; Pyott, Shawna; Rodriguez, Stephanie; Cindric, Ashlie; Carr, April; Michelsen, Carmen; Thompson, Kim; Tse, Christopher H; Gown, Allen M; Churg, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    The separation of sarcomatous and desmoplastic mesotheliomas from benign organizing pleuritis can be morphologically very difficult. Deletion of p16 (CDKN2A) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) testing appears to be a reliable marker of malignancy in mesothelial proliferations, and more recently it has been reported that, in this setting, loss of BAP1 by immunohistochemistry is only seen in malignant mesotheliomas. To determine how useful these tests are with sarcomatous and desmoplastic mesotheliomas, we examined 20 such tumors. Loss of BAP1 was seen in 3/20 (15%) and deletion of p16 by FISH was seen in 16/20 (80%) cases. Loss of one or the other marker was observed in 17/20 (85%). We also examined 13 sarcomatoid carcinomas, an important differential diagnosis of sarcomatoid mesotheliomas, and found that BAP1 was never lost, but p16 was deleted in 3/11 (27%). We conclude that: (1) BAP1 immunohistochemistry is relatively insensitive in the context of sarcomatous and desmoplastic mesotheliomas, but as a matter of time and cost efficiency may nonetheless be a useful first approach to the problem; (2) deletion of p16 by FISH is considerably more sensitive, but there remain a proportion of cases in which p16 is not deleted; (3) a small improvement in sensitivity can be achieved by using both markers; (4) in the context of a spindle cell malignant tumor in the pleura or peritoneum, which morphologically might be a metastatic sarcomatoid carcinoma or a mesothelioma, the finding of BAP1 loss favors mesothelioma, but p16 FISH cannot be used to separate sarcomatous mesotheliomas from sarcomatoid carcinomas. PMID:26900815

  17. Removals of non-analogous OTC and BaP in AMCBR with and without primary substrate.

    PubMed

    Çelebi, Hakan; Gök, Oğuzhan; Sponza, Delia Teresa

    2016-07-01

    Anaerobic biodegradation of mixed non-analogous two substrates was studied in a binary system with and without the primary substrate using an anaerobic multichamber bed (AMCBR). In the binary mixture, the biodegradation of less-degradable oxytetracycline (OTC) was restarted in the presence of more degradable benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in the initial runs of the AMCBR, but enhanced biodegradation of the more recalcitrant OTC occurs in the later runs of the AMCBR due to enhanced biomass growth on dual substrates without the primary carbon source. The biodegradation yields of the OTC, BaP were discussed with sole-substrate systems and with the dual substrate system in the presence of the primary substrate. The maximum OTC and BaP yields were 93% in Run 3 with the primary substrate, while the maximum BaP and OTC yields were 95%, 98% in Run 3 without the primary substrate. A dual form of the Monod was found to adequately predict the substrate interactions in the binary mixture of OTC and BaP using only the parameters derived from batch experiments. At low BaP (4 mg L(-1)) and OTC (40 mg L(-1)) concentrations, a non-competitive inhibition does not affect the binding of the substrate and so the Ks were was not affected while the µmax was lowered. At high BaP (10 mg L(-1)) and OTC (100 mg L(-1)) concentrations, the BaP and OTC were biodegraded according to competitive inhibition with increased Ks while µmax was not affected. BaP and OTC were biodegraded according to Haldane at high concentrations (>10 mg L(-1) for BaP, 100 mg L(-1) OTC) where they were used as the sole substrate. PMID:26670775

  18. Bright Solid-State Emission of Disilane-Bridged Donor-Acceptor-Donor and Acceptor-Donor-Acceptor Chromophores.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Masaki; Tsuchiya, Mizuho; Sakamoto, Ryota; Yamanoi, Yoshinori; Nishibori, Eiji; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The development of disilane-bridged donor-acceptor-donor (D-Si-Si-A-Si-Si-D) and acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-Si-Si-D-Si-Si-A) compounds is described. Both types of compound showed strong emission (λem =ca. 500 and ca. 400 nm, respectively) in the solid state with high quantum yields (Φ: up to 0.85). Compound 4 exhibited aggregation-induced emission enhancement in solution. X-ray diffraction revealed that the crystal structures of 2, 4, and 12 had no intermolecular π-π interactions to suppress the nonradiative transition in the solid state. PMID:26822564

  19. Minimal asbestos exposure in germline BAP1 heterozygous mice is associated with deregulated inflammatory response and increased risk of mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, A; Pellegrini, L; Dey, A; Larson, D; Tanji, M; Flores, E G; Kendrick, B; Lapid, D; Powers, A; Kanodia, S; Pastorino, S; Pass, H I; Dixit, V; Yang, H; Carbone, M

    2016-04-14

    Germline BAP1 mutations predispose to several cancers, in particular malignant mesothelioma. Mesothelioma is an aggressive malignancy generally associated with professional exposure to asbestos. However, to date, we found that none of the mesothelioma patients carrying germline BAP1 mutations were professionally exposed to asbestos. We hypothesized that germline BAP1 mutations might influence the asbestos-induced inflammatory response that is linked to asbestos carcinogenesis, thereby increasing the risk of developing mesothelioma after minimal exposure. Using a BAP1(+/-) mouse model, we found that, compared with their wild-type littermates, BAP1(+/-) mice exposed to low-dose asbestos fibers showed significant alterations of the peritoneal inflammatory response, including significantly higher levels of pro-tumorigenic alternatively polarized M2 macrophages, and lower levels of several chemokines and cytokines. Consistent with these data, BAP1(+/-) mice had a significantly higher incidence of mesothelioma after exposure to very low doses of asbestos, doses that rarely induced mesothelioma in wild-type mice. Our findings suggest that minimal exposure to carcinogenic fibers may significantly increase the risk of malignant mesothelioma in genetically predisposed individuals carrying germline BAP1 mutations, possibly via alterations of the inflammatory response. PMID:26119930

  20. Acceptor Products of Alternansucrase with Gentiobiose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the presence of suitable acceptor molecules, dextransucrase makes a homologous series of oligosaccharides in which the isomers differ by a single glucosyl unit, whereas alternansucrase synthesizes one trisaccharide, two tetrasaccharides, etc. Previously, we showed that alternansucrase only forms...

  1. Germline BAP1 mutations misreported as somatic based on tumor-only testing.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed H; Rai, Karan; Pilarski, Robert; Davidorf, Frederick H; Cebulla, Colleen M

    2016-04-01

    We present three unrelated patients with germline mutations in BAP1 misreported as somatic mutations. All had strong family histories of cancer. One of these patients presented with an invasive breast cancer with the tumor tissue showing partial loss of the mutant rather than the wild type allele, suggesting that the germline BAP1 mutation didn't contribute to breast cancer development in this patient. This data highlights the importance of sequencing matching germline and tumor DNA for proper assessment of somatic versus germline mutation status. In patients with somatic mutations reported from laboratories carrying out tumor-only genomic testing, the possibility that a variant may be a germline mutation should be considered, especially if the personal and/or family history suggests hereditary cancer predisposition. Since tumor-only testing can reveal germline mutations, ethical issues for patients being tested should be considered including proper consent and genetic counseling. PMID:26748926

  2. Synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor

    DOEpatents

    Lancet, Michael S.; Curran, George P.

    1981-08-18

    A synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor consisting essentially of at least one compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate supported in a refractory carrier matrix, the carrier having the general formula Ca.sub.5 (SiO.sub.4).sub.2 CO.sub.3. A method for producing the synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor is also disclosed.

  3. Assembly and Comparison of Plasma Membrane SNARE Acceptor Complexes.

    PubMed

    Kreutzberger, Alex J B; Liang, Binyong; Kiessling, Volker; Tamm, Lukas K

    2016-05-24

    Neuronal exocytotic membrane fusion occurs on a fast timescale and is dependent on interactions between the vesicle SNARE synaptobrevin-2 and the plasma membrane SNAREs syntaxin-1a and SNAP-25 with a 1:1:1 stoichiometry. Reproducing fast fusion rates as observed in cells by reconstitution in vitro has been hindered by the spontaneous assembly of a 2:1 syntaxin-1a:SNAP-25 complex on target membranes that kinetically alters the binding of synaptobrevin-2. Previously, an artificial SNARE acceptor complex consisting of 1:1:1 syntaxin-1a(residues 183-288):SNAP-25:syb(residues 49-96) was found to greatly accelerate the rates of lipid mixing of reconstituted target and vesicle SNARE proteoliposomes. Here we present two (to our knowledge) new procedures to assemble membrane-bound 1:1 SNARE acceptor complexes that produce fast and efficient fusion without the need of the syb(49-96) peptide. In the first procedure, syntaxin-1a is purified in a strictly monomeric form and subsequently assembled with SNAP-25 in detergent with the correct 1:1 stoichiometry. In the second procedure, monomeric syntaxin-1a and dodecylated (d-)SNAP-25 are separately reconstituted into proteoliposomes and subsequently assembled in the plane of merged target lipid bilayers. Examining single particle fusion between synaptobrevin-2 proteoliposomes and planar-supported bilayers containing the two different SNARE acceptor complexes revealed similar fast rates of fusion. Changing the stoichiometry of syntaxin-1a and d-SNAP-25 in the target bilayer had significant effects on docking, but little effect on the rates of synaptobrevin-2 proteoliposome fusion. PMID:27178662

  4. Immunofluorescence detection and localization of B[a]P and TCDD in earthworm tissues.

    PubMed

    Sforzini, Susanna; Moore, Michael N; Boeri, Marta; Benfenati, Emilio; Colombo, Andrea; Viarengo, Aldo

    2014-07-01

    An immunohistochemical method using antibodies against polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dioxins was developed on frozen tissue sections of the earthworm Eisenia andrei exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) (0.1, 10, 50 ppm) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-dibenzo-para-dioxin (TCDD) (0.01, 0.1, 2 ppb) in spiked standard soils. The concentrations of B[a]P and TCDD in E. andrei exposed to the same conditions were also measured using analytical chemical procedures. The results demonstrated that tissues of worms exposed to even minimal amount of B[a]P and TCDD reacted positively and specifically to anti-PAHs and -dioxins antibody. Immunofluorescence revealed a much more intense staining for the gut compared to the body wall; moreover, positively immunoreactive amoeboid coelomocytes were also observed, i.e. cells in which we have previously demonstrated the occurrence of genotoxic damage. The double immunolabelling with antibodies against B[a]P/TCDD and the lysosomal enzyme cathepsin D demonstrated the lysosomal accumulation of the organic xenobiotic compounds, in particular in the cells of the chloragogenous tissue as well as in coelomocytes, involved into detoxification and protection of animals against toxic chemicals. The method described is timesaving, not expensive and easily applicable. PMID:24412505

  5. EROD activity and genotoxicity in the seabob shrimp Xiphopenaeus kroyeri exposed to benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) concentrations.

    PubMed

    da Silva Rocha, Arthur José; Gomes, Vicente; Rocha Passos, Maria José de Arruda Campos; Hasue, Fabio Matsu; Alves Santos, Thaís Cruz; Bícego, Márcia Caruso; Taniguchi, Satie; Van Ngan, Phan

    2012-11-01

    Seabob shrimp Xiphopenaeus kroyeri is a marine species that lives in shallow waters of coastal environments, often impacted by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) pollution. In the present study, seabob shrimp were exposed for 96 h to benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) at the nominal concentrations of 100, 200, 400 and 800 microg-L(-1). Animals of the control groups were exposed either to clean water or to the BaP-carrier (DMSO). At the end of the exposures, muscle tissues were sampled for BaP uptake assessment and hepatopancreas and hemolymph for EROD enzyme activity and hemocytes DNA damage, respectively. EROD activity and DNA damage increased significantly as a function of BaP exposure concentrations. Significant correlations between BaP uptake and both EROD activity and DNA damage suggest that they can be used as suitable tools for integrated levels of study on the biomarkers of PAH exposure. PMID:22974795

  6. Preparation of BAP Composite Particles and Their Effects on Rheological Properties of HTPB/B/AP Slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun-Fei, Liu; Yu, Chen; Liang, Shi; Wei-Shang, Yao

    2014-04-01

    Composite particles (BAP) of boron (B) coated with ammonium perchlorate (AP) were prepared by recrystallization and their structures were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and laser particle size analyses. The results indicated that AP was well coated on the boron surface. The effects of different contents of BAP coated with different amounts of AP on the rheological properties of HTPB/B/AP composite slurries were also studied. The results show that addition of BAP distinctly decreased the slurries' viscosities and improved their processing properties, which were more obvious when 9.73% AP was coated on the surface of boron and the amount of BAP was 20%.

  7. Immunochemical and biological characterization of monoclonal antibodies against BaP1, a metalloproteinase from Bothrops asper snake venom.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, I; Assumpção, G G; Silveira, C R F; Faquim-Mauro, E L; Tanjoni, I; Carmona, A K; Alves, M F M; Takehara, H A; Rucavado, A; Ramos, O H P; Moura-da-Silva, A M; Gutiérrez, J M

    2010-11-01

    BaP1 is a P-I class of Snake Venom Metalloproteinase (SVMP) relevant in the local tissue damage associated with envenomations by Bothrops asper, a medically-important species in Central America and parts of South America. Six monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) against BaP1 (MABaP1) were produced and characterized regarding their isotype, dissociation constant (K(d)), specificity and ability to neutralize BaP1-induced hemorrhagic and proteolytic activity. Two MABaP1 are IgM, three are IgG1 and one is IgG2b. The K(d)s of IgG MoAbs were in the nM range. All IgG MoAbs recognized conformational epitopes of BaP1 and B. asper venom components but failed to recognize venoms from 27 species of Viperidae, Colubridae and Elapidae families. Clone 7 cross-reacted with three P-I SVMPs tested (moojeni protease, insularinase and neuwiedase). BaP1-induced hemorrhage was totally neutralized by clones 3, 6 and 8 but not by clone 7. Inhibition of BaP1 enzymatic activity on a synthetic substrate by MABaP1 was totally achieved by clones 3 and 6, and partially by clone 8, but not by clone 7. In conclusion, these neutralizing MoAbs against BaP1 may become important tools to understand structure-function relationships of BaP1 and the role of P-I class SVMP in snakebite envenomation. PMID:20674587

  8. The chromatin remodeling factor Bap55 functions through the TIP60 complex to regulate olfactory projection neuron dendrite targeting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Drosophila olfactory system exhibits very precise and stereotyped wiring that is specified predominantly by genetic programming. Dendrites of olfactory projection neurons (PNs) pattern the developing antennal lobe before olfactory receptor neuron axon arrival, indicating an intrinsic wiring mechanism for PN dendrites. These wiring decisions are likely determined through a transcriptional program. Results We find that loss of Brahma associated protein 55 kD (Bap55) results in a highly specific PN mistargeting phenotype. In Bap55 mutants, PNs that normally target to the DL1 glomerulus mistarget to the DA4l glomerulus with 100% penetrance. Loss of Bap55 also causes derepression of a GAL4 whose expression is normally restricted to a small subset of PNs. Bap55 is a member of both the Brahma (BRM) and the Tat interactive protein 60 kD (TIP60) ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes. The Bap55 mutant phenotype is partially recapitulated by Domino and Enhancer of Polycomb mutants, members of the TIP60 complex. However, distinct phenotypes are seen in Brahma and Snf5-related 1 mutants, members of the BRM complex. The Bap55 mutant phenotype can be rescued by postmitotic expression of Bap55, or its human homologs BAF53a and BAF53b. Conclusions Our results suggest that Bap55 functions through the TIP60 chromatin remodeling complex to regulate dendrite wiring specificity in PNs. The specificity of the mutant phenotypes suggests a position for the TIP60 complex at the top of a regulatory hierarchy that orchestrates dendrite targeting decisions. PMID:21284845

  9. A distinct subset of Atypical Spitz Tumors is characterized by BRAF mutation and loss of BAP1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Thomas; Murali, Rajmohan; Fried, Isabella; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Busam, Klaus; Kutzner, Heinz; Bastian, Boris C.

    2012-01-01

    We recently reported that germline mutations in BAP1 cause a familial tumor syndrome characterized by high penetrance for melanocytic tumors with distinct clinical and histologic features. Melanocytic neoplasms in affected individuals harbored BRAF mutations, showed loss of BAP1 expression, and histologically resembled so-called “atypical Spitz tumors” (ASTs). ASTs are an ill-defined and probably heterogenous group of melanocytic tumors that display histologic features seen in both Spitz nevi and melanomas. Their biological behavior cannot be reliably predicted. In view of the histologic similarities of the familial tumors and ASTs, we hypothesized that a subset of ASTs might harbor genetic alterations seen in the familial tumors. To address this hypothesis, we analyzed 32 sporadic ASTs for BRAF mutations and for BAP1 expression. Nine (28%) sporadic ASTs showed loss of BAP1 expression, of which 8 (89%) had concomitant BRAF mutations. Only 1 of the BAP1-positive ASTs (4%) had a BRAF mutation (P<0.0001). BRAF-mutated, BAP1-negative tumors were primarily located in the dermis and were composed entirely or predominantly of epithelioid melanocytes with abundant amphophilic cytoplasm and well-defined cytoplasmic borders. Nuclei were commonly vesicular and exhibited substantial pleomorphism and conspicuous nucleoli. The combination of BRAF mutation and loss of nuclear BAP1 expression thus characterizes a subset of ASTs with distinct histologic features. The typical morphology of these tumors and BAP1 immunohistochemistry provide pathologic clues that will enable accurate identification of this subset. Future studies are necessary to determine whether this subset has a predictable clinical behavior. PMID:22367297

  10. Investigation of Somatic GNAQ, GNA11, BAP1 and SF3B1 Mutations in Ophthalmic Melanocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Jasmine H.; Wiesner, Thomas; Milman, Tatyana; Won, Helen H.; Lin, Amy; Lee, Vivian; Albert, Daniel M.; Folberg, Robert; Berger, Michael F.; Char, Devron H.; Marr, Brian; Abramson, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to use massively parallel DNA sequencing to identify GNAQ/11, BAP1 and SF3B1 mutations in ophthalmic melanocytoma. Procedures Six ophthalmic melanocytoma specimens (1 iridociliary and 5 optic nerve) were profiled for genomic alterations in GNAQ/11, BAP1 and SF3B1 using a custom deep sequencing assay. This assay uses solution phase hybridization-based exon capture and deep-coverage massively parallel DNA sequencing to interrogate all protein-coding exons and select introns. Results The only iridociliary melanocytoma showed a mutation in GNAQ but not in BAP1. Of the 2 optic-nerve melanocytomas that developed into melanoma, one had a GNAQ mutation and both a BAP1 mutation and monosomy 3. The remaining 3 optic-nerve melanocytomas did not reveal mutations in GNAQ/11 or BAP1. SF3B1 mutations were not detected in any specimen. Conclusions The presence of GNAQ mutation in some iridociliary and optic-nerve melanocytomas suggests a possible relationship between ophthalmic melanocytoma and other ophthalmic melanocytic neoplasms. BAP1 mutation may accompany the transformation of ophthalmic melanocytoma to melanoma. PMID:27239460

  11. Induction of BAP1 by a moderate decrease in temperature is mediated by ICE1 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Yang, Huijun; Mang, Hyung-Gon; Hua, Jian

    2011-01-01

    Temperature variations at the nonextreme range modulate various processes of plant growth, development, and physiology, but how plants perceive and transduce these temperature signals is not well understood. Moderate cooling from 28 °C to 22 °C induces transcription of a number of genes in salicylic acid-dependent and -independent manners. Here, we report the study of the transcriptional control of the BON1-associated protein1 (BAP1) gene that is responsive to a moderate decrease of temperature as well as to many environmental stimuli. Using reporter genes under the control of series of regions of the BAP1 promoter, we identified a 35-bp fragment that is necessary and sufficient for the BAP1 transcript induction by a moderate cooling. This fragment also confers an induction of BAP1 by cold and reactive oxygen species-generating paraquat. Furthermore, the inducer of CBF expression1 (ICE1) protein that is involved in transcriptional control of cold responses is found to bind to a MYC element in this promoter and is required for the cooling induction of BAP1. The ice1 mutant has a low induction of BAP1 and enhanced resistance to a bacterial pathogen. Thus, responses to a moderate decrease in temperature may utilize components in the cold response as well as a potentiating signaling involving salicylic acid. PMID:21098676

  12. Cancer associated missense mutations in BAP1 catalytic domain induce amyloidogenic aggregation: A new insight in enzymatic inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Sushmita; Hanpude, Pranita; Maiti, Tushar Kanti

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1 associated protein 1 (BAP1) is a nuclear deubiquitinase that regulates tumor suppressor activity and widely involves many cellular processes ranging from cell cycle regulation to gluconeogenesis. Impairment of enzymatic activity and nuclear localization induce abnormal cell proliferation. It is considered to be an important driver gene, which undergoes frequent mutations in several cancers. However the role of mutation and oncogenic gain of function of BAP1 are poorly understood. Here, we investigated cellular localization, enzymatic activity and structural changes for four missense mutants of the catalytic domain of BAP1, which are prevalent in different types of cancer. These mutations triggered cytoplasmic/perinuclear accumulation in BAP1 deficient cells, which has been observed in proteins that undergo aggregation in cellular condition. Amyloidogenic activity of mutant BAP1 was revealed from its reactivity towards anti oligomeric antibody in HEK293T cells. We have also noted structural destabilization in the catalytic domain mutants, which eventually produced beta amyloid structure as indicated in atomic force microscopy study. The cancer associated mutants up-regulate heat shock response and activates transcription of genes normally co-repressed by BAP1. Overall, our results unambiguously demonstrate that structural destabilization and subsequent aggregation abrogate its cellular mechanism leading to adverse outcome. PMID:26680512

  13. Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2002-08-16

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions was held at Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island, 8/11-16/02. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  14. BaP (PAH) air quality modelling exercise over Zaragoza (Spain) using an adapted version of WRF-CMAQ model.

    PubMed

    San José, Roberto; Pérez, Juan Luis; Callén, María Soledad; López, José Manuel; Mastral, Ana

    2013-12-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is one of the most dangerous PAH due to its high carcinogenic and mutagenic character. Because of this reason, the Directive 2004/107/CE of the European Union establishes a target value of 1 ng/m(3) of BaP in the atmosphere. In this paper, the main aim is to estimate the BaP concentrations in the atmosphere by using last generation of air quality dispersion models with the inclusion of the transport, scavenging and deposition processes for the BaP. The degradation of the particulated BaP by the ozone has been considered. The aerosol-gas partitioning phenomenon in the atmosphere is modelled taking into a count that the concentrations in the gas and the aerosol phases. If the pre-existing organic aerosol concentrations are zero gas/particle equilibrium is established. The model has been validated at local scale with data from a sampling campaign carried out in the area of Zaragoza (Spain) during 12 weeks. PMID:23591205

  15. Synthesis and evaluation of derivatives of the proteasome deubiquitinase inhibitor b-AP15.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; D'Arcy, Pádraig; Caulfield, Thomas R; Paulus, Aneel; Chitta, Kasyapa; Mohanty, Chitralekha; Gullbo, Joachim; Chanan-Khan, Asher; Linder, Stig

    2015-11-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is increasingly recognized as a therapeutic target for the development of anticancer therapies. The success of the 20S proteasome core particle (20S CP) inhibitor bortezomib in the clinical management of multiple myeloma has raised the possibility of identifying other UPS components for therapeutic intervention. We previously identified the small molecule b-AP15 as an inhibitor of 19S proteasome deubiquitinase (DUB) activity. Building upon our previous data, we performed a structure-activity relationship (SAR) study on b-AP15 and identified VLX1570 as an analog with promising properties, including enhanced potency and improved solubility in aqueous solution. In silico modeling was consistent with interaction of VLX1570 with key cysteine residues located at the active sites of the proteasome DUBs USP14 and UCHL5. VLX1570 was found to inhibit proteasome deubiquitinase activity in vitro in a manner consistent with competitive inhibition. Furthermore, using active-site-directed probes, VLX1570 also inhibited proteasome DUB activity in exposed cells. Importantly, VLX1570 did not show inhibitory activity on a panel of recombinant non-proteasome DUBs, on recombinant kinases, or on caspase-3 activity, suggesting that VLX1570 is not an overtly reactive general enzyme inhibitor. Taken together, our data shows the chemical and biological properties of VLX1570 as an optimized proteasome DUB inhibitor. PMID:25854145

  16. Immunogenicity of a Promiscuous T Cell Epitope Peptide Based Conjugate Vaccine against Benzo[a]pyrene: Redirecting Antibodies to the Hapten

    PubMed Central

    Schellenberger, Mario T.; Grova, Nathalie; Farinelle, Sophie; Willième, Stéphanie; Revets, Dominique; Muller, Claude P.

    2012-01-01

    The prototype polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) is an environmental pollutant and food contaminant of epidemiological importance. To protect against adverse effects of this ubiquitous carcinogen, we developed an immunoprophylactic strategy based on a B[a]P-protein conjugate vaccine to induce B[a]P specific antibodies (Grova et al., Vaccine. 2009;27:4142–51). Here, we investigated in mice the efficacy of B[a]P-peptide conjugates based on promiscuous T cell epitopes (TCE) into further improve this approach. We showed that B[a]P-peptide conjugates induced very different levels of hapten-specific antibodies with variable functional efficacy, depending on the carrier. In some cases peptide carriers induced a more efficient antibody response against B[a]P than tetanus toxoid as a protein carrier, with the capacity to sequester more B[a]P in the blood. Reducing the carrier size to a single TCE can dramatically shift the antibody bias from the carrier to the B[a]P. Conjugates based on the TCE FIGITEL induced the best anti-hapten response and no antibodies against the carrier peptide. Some peptide conjugates increased the selectivity of the antibodies for the activated metabolite 7,8-diol-B[a]P and B[a]P by one or two orders of magnitude. The antibody efficacy was also demonstrated in their ability to sequester B[a]P in the blood and modulate its faecal excretion (15–56%). We further showed that pre-existing immunity to the carrier from which the TCE was derived did not reduce the immunogenicity of the peptide conjugate. In conclusion, we showed that a vaccination against B[a]P using promiscuous TCEs of tetanus toxin as carriers is feasible even in case of a pre-existing immunity to the toxoid and that some TCE epitopes dramatically redirect the antibody response to the hapten. Further studies to demonstrate a long-term protection of an immunoprophylactic immunisation against B[a]P are warranted. PMID:22666501

  17. Immunogenicity of a promiscuous T cell epitope peptide based conjugate vaccine against benzo[a]pyrene: redirecting antibodies to the hapten.

    PubMed

    Schellenberger, Mario T; Grova, Nathalie; Farinelle, Sophie; Willième, Stéphanie; Revets, Dominique; Muller, Claude P

    2012-01-01

    The prototype polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) is an environmental pollutant and food contaminant of epidemiological importance. To protect against adverse effects of this ubiquitous carcinogen, we developed an immunoprophylactic strategy based on a B[a]P-protein conjugate vaccine to induce B[a]P specific antibodies (Grova et al., Vaccine. 2009;27:4142-51). Here, we investigated in mice the efficacy of B[a]P-peptide conjugates based on promiscuous T cell epitopes (TCE) into further improve this approach. We showed that B[a]P-peptide conjugates induced very different levels of hapten-specific antibodies with variable functional efficacy, depending on the carrier. In some cases peptide carriers induced a more efficient antibody response against B[a]P than tetanus toxoid as a protein carrier, with the capacity to sequester more B[a]P in the blood. Reducing the carrier size to a single TCE can dramatically shift the antibody bias from the carrier to the B[a]P. Conjugates based on the TCE FIGITEL induced the best anti-hapten response and no antibodies against the carrier peptide. Some peptide conjugates increased the selectivity of the antibodies for the activated metabolite 7,8-diol-B[a]P and B[a]P by one or two orders of magnitude. The antibody efficacy was also demonstrated in their ability to sequester B[a]P in the blood and modulate its faecal excretion (15-56%). We further showed that pre-existing immunity to the carrier from which the TCE was derived did not reduce the immunogenicity of the peptide conjugate. In conclusion, we showed that a vaccination against B[a]P using promiscuous TCEs of tetanus toxin as carriers is feasible even in case of a pre-existing immunity to the toxoid and that some TCE epitopes dramatically redirect the antibody response to the hapten. Further studies to demonstrate a long-term protection of an immunoprophylactic immunisation against B[a]P are warranted. PMID:22666501

  18. Computer program design specifications for the Balloon-borne Ultraviolet Stellar Spectrometer (BUSS) science data decommutation program (BAPS48)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    The Balloon-Borne Ultraviolet Stellar Spectrometer (BUSS) Science Data Docummutation Program (BAPS48) is a pulse code modulation docummutation program that will format the BUSS science data contained on a one inch PCM tracking tape into a seven track serial bit stream formatted digital tape.

  19. SENSITIVITY OF RAT AND MOUSE PERIPHERAL BLOOD LYMPHOCYTES TO B(A)P ADDUCTION AND SCE FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Both mice and rats were injected i.p. with doses of benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] ranging from 10 to 100 mg/kg to compare species sensitivity to SCE induction and DNA adduct formation, as well as the relationship between these endpoints. wenty-four hours after injection, blood was remov...

  20. Alkyl Chlorides as Hydrogen Bond Acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nadas, Janos I; Vukovic, Sinisa; Hay, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    To gain an understanding of the role of an alkyl chloride as a hydrogen bond acceptor, geometries and interaction energies were calculated at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory for complexes between ethyl chloride and representative hydrogen donor groups. The results establish that these donors, which include hydrogen cyanide, methanol, nitrobenzene, pyrrole, acetamide, and N-methylurea, form X-H {hor_ellipsis} Cl hydrogen bonds (X = C, N, O) of weak to moderate strength, with {Delta}E values ranging from -2.8 to -5.3 kcal/mol.

  1. Antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With increasing antibiotics resistance, there is an urgent need for novel infection therapeutics. Since antimicrobial peptides provide opportunities for this, identification and optimization of such peptides have attracted much interest during recent years. Here, a brief overview of antimicrobial peptides is provided, with focus placed on how selected hydrophobic modifications of antimicrobial peptides can be employed to combat also more demanding pathogens, including multi-resistant strains, without conferring unacceptable toxicity. PMID:24758244

  2. tRNA acceptor-stem and anticodon bases embed separate features of amino acid chemistry.

    PubMed

    Carter, Charles W; Wolfenden, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The universal genetic code is a translation table by which nucleic acid sequences can be interpreted as polypeptides with a wide range of biological functions. That information is used by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases to translate the code. Moreover, amino acid properties dictate protein folding. We recently reported that digital correlation techniques could identify patterns in tRNA identity elements that govern recognition by synthetases. Our analysis, and the functionality of truncated synthetases that cannot recognize the tRNA anticodon, support the conclusion that the tRNA acceptor stem houses an independent code for the same 20 amino acids that likely functioned earlier in the emergence of genetics. The acceptor-stem code, related to amino acid size, is distinct from a code in the anticodon that is related to amino acid polarity. Details of the acceptor-stem code suggest that it was useful in preserving key properties of stereochemically-encoded peptides that had developed the capacity to interact catalytically with RNA. The quantitative embedding of the chemical properties of amino acids into tRNA bases has implications for the origins of molecular biology. PMID:26595350

  3. Inference on germline BAP1 mutations and asbestos exposure from the analysis of familial and sporadic mesothelioma in a high-risk area.

    PubMed

    Betti, Marta; Casalone, Elisabetta; Ferrante, Daniela; Romanelli, Antonio; Grosso, Federica; Guarrera, Simonetta; Righi, Luisella; Vatrano, Simona; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Libener, Roberta; Mirabelli, Dario; Boldorini, Renzo; Casadio, Caterina; Papotti, Mauro; Matullo, Giuseppe; Magnani, Corrado; Dianzani, Irma

    2015-01-01

    Inherited loss-of-function mutations in the BAP1 oncosuppressor gene are responsible for an inherited syndrome with predisposition to malignant mesothelioma (MM), uveal and keratinocytic melanoma, and other malignancies. Germline mutations that were inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion were identified in nine families with multiplex MM cases and 25 families with multiple melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and other tumors. Germline mutations were also identified in sporadic MM cases, suggesting that germline mutations in BAP1 occur frequently. In this article, we report the analysis of BAP1 in five multiplex MM families and in 103 sporadic cases of MM. One family carried a new truncating germline mutation. Using immunohistochemistry, we show that BAP1 is not expressed in tumor tissue, which is in accordance with Knudson's two hits hypothesis. Interestingly, whereas the three individuals who were possibly exposed to asbestos developed MM, the individual who was not exposed developed a different tumor type, that is, mucoepidermoid carcinoma. This finding suggests that the type of carcinogen exposure may be important for the cancer type that is developed by mutation carriers. On the contrary, the other families or the 103 sporadic patients did not show germline mutations in BAP1. Our data show that BAP1 mutations are very rare in patients with sporadic MM, and we report a new BAP1 mutation, extend the cancer types associated with these mutations, and suggest the existence of other yet unknown genes in the pathogenesis of familial MM. PMID:25231345

  4. Inflammatory effects of BaP1 a metalloproteinase isolated from Bothrops asper snake venom: leukocyte recruitment and release of cytokines.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Cristina Maria; Zamuner, Stella Regina; Zuliani, Juliana Pavan; Rucavado, Alexandra; Gutiérrez, José Maria; Teixeira, Catarina de Fátima Pereira

    2006-04-01

    The inflammatory events induced by BaP1, a 22.7 kDa metalloproteinase isolated from Bothrops asper snake venom, were studied. BaP1 i.p. injection in mice induced a marked inflammatory cell infiltrate into peritoneal cavity of animals with predominance of neutrophils in the early phase followed by mononuclear cells in the late period. Inhibition of enzymatic activity of BaP1 by chelation with EDTA resulted in a drastic reduction of this effect. In addition, BaP1 induced a significant increase of blood neutrophil numbers before its accumulation in peritoneal cavity, thus suggesting a stimulatory action of BaP1 on mechanisms of cell mobilization from bone marrow reserve compartments. A reduction in the number of neutrophils was observed in the exudate when antibodies against LECAM-1, CD18 and LFA-1 were used, suggesting the involvement of these adhesion molecules in the effects of BaP1. In contrast, there was no effect with antibodies against ICAM-1 and PECAM-1. Moreover, a conspicuous increment in the levels of IL-1 and TNF-alpha, but not of LTB4, was observed in peritoneal washes collected from mice injected with BaP1. It is concluded that BaP1 induces in vivo a marked leukocyte influx, which parallels an increased number of these cells in the blood, and is associated to the expression of specific leukocyte adhesion molecules and release of chemotactic inflammatory cytokines. Since BaP1 is a P-I class metalloproteinase, these results indicate that the proteolytic domain of metalloproteinases per se can trigger specific inflammatory events. PMID:16529786

  5. Malignant Peritoneal Mesothelioma in an Adolescent Male With BAP1 Deletion.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Steve; Carpentieri, David; Williams, James; Acosta, Juan; Southard, Richard

    2015-07-01

    Diffuse malignant peritoneal mesotheliomas in children are uncommon, aggressive tumors with a grave prognosis. We herein report the clinical, radiologic, and pathologic findings of a 16-year-old male. The adolescent presented with a history of abdominal pain, nausea and daily, nonbilious, nonbloody emesis for 3 weeks. Radiographic imaging suggested small bowel obstruction. The diagnostic work-up and differential diagnoses are discussed. Histologically, the tumor was composed of epithelioid cells with a papillary and glandular architectural pattern. A few glands appeared to produce mucinous material. Histochemistry revealed PAS diastase resistant mucin, an inconspicuous finding in diffuse malignant peritoneal mesothelioma. An extensive immunohistochemistry panel (calretinin, WT-1, D2-40, CK 7, CAM 5.2, CK 5/6, CEA, B72.3, CK 20, CD10, CD30, CD15, CD117, PLAP, S100, TFE3, and EMA) confirmed the diagnosis. Of special interest, BAP1 staining was cytoplasmic and consistent with 3p deletion detected by conventional cytogenetics. The ultrastructural analysis demonstrated long microvilli, desmosomes, and intercellular junctions which further supported the diagnosis. PMID:25222065

  6. BAP Position Statement: Off-label prescribing of psychotropic medication to children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aditya N; Arango, Celso; Coghill, David; Gringras, Paul; Nutt, David J; Pratt, Peter; Young, Allan H; Hollis, Chris

    2016-05-01

    The off-label use of medicines for children and adolescents remains a common and important issue for prescribing practice across child and adolescent psychiatry, paediatrics and primary care. This editorial focusses on psychotropic drug treatment, which plays an essential part in the comprehensive management of a range of child and adolescent psychiatric disorders. Despite a growing evidence base for drug treatment in child and adolescent psychiatric disorders, much psychotropic medication continues to be prescribed off-label (i.e. outside the limits of the marketing authorisation or product license). The reasons for and implications of off-label prescribing, including the potential clinical benefits/risks and medico-legal implications, are often poorly understood by both patients and prescribers. An important unintended consequence of the uncertainties and confusion surrounding the status of off-label prescribing for children and adolescents may be that effective drug treatments are being withheld or underused. This BAP Position Statement aims to clarify these issues, challenge some of the myths surrounding off-label prescribing for children and adolescents and offer practical guidance for prescribers. PMID:27098018

  7. Quantum computing with acceptor spins in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salfi, Joe; Tong, Mengyang; Rogge, Sven; Culcer, Dimitrie

    2016-06-01

    The states of a boron acceptor near a Si/SiO2 interface, which bind two low-energy Kramers pairs, have exceptional properties for encoding quantum information and, with the aid of strain, both heavy hole and light hole-based spin qubits can be designed. Whereas a light-hole spin qubit was introduced recently (arXiv:1508.04259), here we present analytical and numerical results proving that a heavy-hole spin qubit can be reliably initialised, rotated and entangled by electrical means alone. This is due to strong Rashba-like spin–orbit interaction terms enabled by the interface inversion asymmetry. Single qubit rotations rely on electric-dipole spin resonance (EDSR), which is strongly enhanced by interface-induced spin–orbit terms. Entanglement can be accomplished by Coulomb exchange, coupling to a resonator, or spin–orbit induced dipole–dipole interactions. By analysing the qubit sensitivity to charge noise, we demonstrate that interface-induced spin–orbit terms are responsible for sweet spots in the dephasing time {T}2* as a function of the top gate electric field, which are close to maxima in the EDSR strength, where the EDSR gate has high fidelity. We show that both qubits can be described using the same starting Hamiltonian, and by comparing their properties we show that the complex interplay of bulk and interface-induced spin–orbit terms allows a high degree of electrical control and makes acceptors potential candidates for scalable quantum computation in Si.

  8. Epitope Mapping of Antibodies Suggests the Novel Membrane Topology of B-Cell Receptor Associated Protein 31 on the Cell Surface of Embryonic Stem Cells: The Novel Membrane Topology of BAP31

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Tae; Choi, Hong Seo; Hwang, Hyo Jeong; Jung, Han-Sung; Ryu, Chun Jeih

    2015-01-01

    When located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, B-cell receptor associated protein 31 (BAP31) is involved in the export of secreted proteins from the ER to the plasma membrane. In a previous study, we generated two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), 297-D4 and 144-A8, that bound to surface molecules on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but not to surface molecules on mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Subsequent studies revealed that the mAbs recognized BAP31 on the surface of hESCs. To investigate the membrane topology of BAP31 on the cell surface, we first examined the epitope specificity of 297-D4 and 144-A8, as well as a polyclonal anti-BAP31 antibody (α-BAP31). We generated a series of GST-fused BAP31 mutant proteins in which BAP31 was serially deleted at the C- terminus. GST-fused BAP31 mutant proteins were then screened to identify the epitopes targeted by the antibodies. Both 297-D4 and 144-A8 recognized C-terminal residues 208–217, while α-BAP31 recognized C-terminal residues 165–246, of BAP31 on hESCs, suggesting that the C-terminal domain of BAP31 is exposed on the cell surface. The polyclonal antibody α-BAP31 bound to mESCs, which confirmed that the C-terminal domain of BAP31 is also exposed on the surface of these cells. Our results show for the first time the novel membrane topology of cell surface-expressed BAP31 as the extracellular exposure of the BAP31 C-terminal domain was not predicted from previous studies. PMID:26102500

  9. Epitope Mapping of Antibodies Suggests the Novel Membrane Topology of B-Cell Receptor Associated Protein 31 on the Cell Surface of Embryonic Stem Cells: The Novel Membrane Topology of BAP31.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Tae; Choi, Hong Seo; Hwang, Hyo Jeong; Jung, Han-Sung; Ryu, Chun Jeih

    2015-01-01

    When located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, B-cell receptor associated protein 31 (BAP31) is involved in the export of secreted proteins from the ER to the plasma membrane. In a previous study, we generated two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), 297-D4 and 144-A8, that bound to surface molecules on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but not to surface molecules on mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Subsequent studies revealed that the mAbs recognized BAP31 on the surface of hESCs. To investigate the membrane topology of BAP31 on the cell surface, we first examined the epitope specificity of 297-D4 and 144-A8, as well as a polyclonal anti-BAP31 antibody (α-BAP31). We generated a series of GST-fused BAP31 mutant proteins in which BAP31 was serially deleted at the C- terminus. GST-fused BAP31 mutant proteins were then screened to identify the epitopes targeted by the antibodies. Both 297-D4 and 144-A8 recognized C-terminal residues 208-217, while α-BAP31 recognized C-terminal residues 165-246, of BAP31 on hESCs, suggesting that the C-terminal domain of BAP31 is exposed on the cell surface. The polyclonal antibody α-BAP31 bound to mESCs, which confirmed that the C-terminal domain of BAP31 is also exposed on the surface of these cells. Our results show for the first time the novel membrane topology of cell surface-expressed BAP31 as the extracellular exposure of the BAP31 C-terminal domain was not predicted from previous studies. PMID:26102500

  10. Using nonfluorescent Förster resonance energy transfer acceptors in protein binding studies.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Qiaoqiao; Skinner, Joseph P; Tetin, Sergey Y

    2009-10-15

    The purpose of this article is to highlight the versatility of nonfluorescent Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) acceptors in determination of protein equilibrium dissociation constants and kinetic rates. Using a nonfluorescent acceptor eliminates the necessity to spectrally isolate the donor fluorescence when performing binding titrations covering a broad range of reagent concentrations. Moreover, random distribution of the donor and acceptor chromophores on the surface of proteins increases the probability of FRET occurring on their interaction. Three high-affinity antibodies are presented in this study as characteristic protein systems. Monoclonal antibody (mAb) 106.3 binds brain natriuretic peptide (BNP)5-13(C10A) and full-length BNP1-32 with the dissociation constants 0.26+/-0.01 and 0.05+/-0.02 nM, respectively, which was confirmed by kinetic measurements. For anti-hCG (human chorionic gonadotropin) mAb 8F11, studied at two incorporation ratios (IRs=1.9 and 3.8) of the nonfluorescent FRET acceptor, K(D) values of 0.04+/-0.02 and 0.059(-0.004)(+0.006) nM, respectively, were obtained. Likewise, the binding of goat anti-hamster immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody was not affected by conjugation and yielded K(D) values of 1.26+/-0.04, 1.25+/-0.05, and 1.14+/-0.04 nM at IRs of 1.7, 4.7, and 8.1, respectively. We conclude that this FRET-based method offers high sensitivity, practical simplicity, and versatility in protein binding studies. PMID:19563765

  11. Electrocatalytic monitoring of peptidic proton-wires.

    PubMed

    Dorčák, V; Kabeláč, M; Kroutil, O; Bednářová, K; Vacek, J

    2016-08-01

    The transfer of protons or proton donor/acceptor abilities is an important phenomenon in many biomolecular systems. One example is the recently proposed peptidic proton-wires (H-wires), but the ability of these His-containing peptides to transfer protons has only been studied at the theoretical level so far. Here, for the first time the proton transfer ability of peptidic H-wires is examined experimentally in an adsorbed state using an approach based on a label-free electrocatalytic reaction. The experimental findings are complemented by theoretical calculations at the ab initio level in a vacuum and in an implicit solvent. Experimental and theoretical results indicated Ala3(His-Ala2)6 to be a high proton-affinity peptidic H-wire model. The methodology presented here could be used for the further investigation of the proton-exchange chemistry of other biologically or technologically important macromolecules. PMID:27353221

  12. Aromatic donor-acceptor interactions in non-polar environments.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Giles M; Pascu, Sofia I; Filip, Sorin V; West, Kevin R; Pantoş, G Dan

    2015-05-14

    We have evaluated the strength of aromatic donor-acceptor interactions between dialkyl naphthalenediimide and dialkoxynaphthalene in non-polar environments. (1)H NMR, UV-vis spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry were used to characterise this interaction. We concluded that the strength of donor-acceptor interactions in heptane is sufficient to drive supramolecular assemblies in this and other aliphatic solvents. PMID:25875729

  13. Acceptor impurity activation in III-nitride light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Römer, Friedhard Witzigmann, Bernd

    2015-01-12

    In this work, the role of the acceptor doping and the acceptor activation and its impact on the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of a Gallium Nitride (GaN) based multi-quantum well light emitting diode is studied by microscopic simulation. Acceptor impurities in GaN are subject to a high activation energy which depends on the presence of proximate dopant atoms and the electric field. A combined model for the dopant ionization and activation barrier reduction has been developed and implemented in a semiconductor carrier transport simulator. By model calculations, we demonstrate the impact of the acceptor activation mechanisms on the decay of the IQE at high current densities, which is known as the efficiency droop. A major contributor to the droop is the electron leakage which is largely affected by the acceptor doping.

  14. Electrochromism of a fused acceptor-donor-acceptor triad covering entire UV-vis and near-infrared regions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Bin; Ye, Xichong; Zhang, Jie; Wan, Xinhua

    2014-10-17

    A novel fused acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) type panchromatically electrochromic compound was synthesized. It exhibited intensive absorption bands covering entire UV-vis and near-infrared regions upon reduction to the radical anionic state, owing to the simultaneous presence of π*-π* transitions and intervalence charge transfer. PMID:25268224

  15. Acceptor and Excitation Density Dependence of the Ultrafast Polaron Absorption Signal in Donor-Acceptor Organic Solar Cell Blends.

    PubMed

    Zarrabi, Nasim; Burn, Paul L; Meredith, Paul; Shaw, Paul E

    2016-07-21

    Transient absorption spectroscopy on organic semiconductor blends for solar cells typically shows efficient charge generation within ∼100 fs, accounting for the majority of the charge carriers. In this Letter, we show using transient absorption spectroscopy on blends containing a broad range of acceptor content (0.01-50% by weight) that the rise of the polaron signal is dependent on the acceptor concentration. For low acceptor content (<10% by weight), the polaron signal rises gradually over ∼1 ps with most polarons generated after 200 fs, while for higher acceptor concentrations (>10%) most polarons are generated within 200 fs. The rise time in blends with low acceptor content was also found to be sensitive to the pump fluence, decreasing with increasing excitation density. These results indicate that the sub-100 fs rise of the polaron signal is a natural consequence of both the high acceptor concentrations in many donor-acceptor blends and the high excitation densities needed for transient absorption spectroscopy, which results in a short average distance between the exciton and the donor-acceptor interface. PMID:27355877

  16. Transition metal-free generation of the acceptor/acceptor-carbene viaα-elimination: synthesis of fluoroacetyl cyclopropanes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongdong; Han, Jing; Chen, Jie; Cao, Weiguo

    2016-05-21

    An efficient transition metal-free approach for the generation of acceptor/acceptor-carbene followed by trapping with alkenes to provide fluoroacetyl cyclopropanes has been described. The resulting cyclopropanes could be further converted into the fluoromethyl dihydrofurans or fluorodihydropyrroles through ring-expansion processes. PMID:27125517

  17. Combined Genetic and Genealogic Studies Uncover a Large BAP1 Cancer Syndrome Kindred Tracing Back Nine Generations to a Common Ancestor from the 1700s

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Todd A.; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Behner, Dusty; Hoffman, Harriet; Hesdorffer, Mary; Nasu, Masaki; Napolitano, Andrea; Powers, Amy; Minaai, Michael; Baumann, Francine; Bryant-Greenwood, Peter; Lauk, Olivia; Kirschner, Michaela B.; Weder, Walter; Opitz, Isabelle; Pass, Harvey I.; Gaudino, Giovanni; Pastorino, Sandra; Yang, Haining

    2015-01-01

    We recently discovered an inherited cancer syndrome caused by BRCA1-Associated Protein 1 (BAP1) germline mutations, with high incidence of mesothelioma, uveal melanoma and other cancers and very high penetrance by age 55. To identify families with the BAP1 cancer syndrome, we screened patients with family histories of multiple mesotheliomas and melanomas and/or multiple cancers. We identified four families that shared an identical BAP1 mutation: they lived across the US and did not appear to be related. By combining family histories, molecular genetics, and genealogical approaches, we uncovered a BAP1 cancer syndrome kindred of ~80,000 descendants with a core of 106 individuals, whose members descend from a couple born in Germany in the early 1700s who immigrated to North America. Their descendants spread throughout the country with mutation carriers affected by multiple malignancies. Our data show that, once a proband is identified, extended analyses of these kindreds, using genomic and genealogical studies to identify the most recent common ancestor, allow investigators to uncover additional branches of the family that may carry BAP1 mutations. Using this knowledge, we have identified new branches of this family carrying BAP1 mutations. We have also implemented early-detection strategies that help identify cancers at early-stage, when they can be cured (melanomas) or are more susceptible to therapy (MM and other malignancies). PMID:26683624

  18. Occurrence of genes coding for MSCRAMM and biofilm-associated protein Bap in Staphylococcus spp. isolated from bovine subclinical mastitis and relationship with somatic cell counts.

    PubMed

    Zuniga, Eveline; Melville, Priscilla A; Saidenberg, André B S; Laes, Marco A; Gonsales, Fernanda F; Salaberry, Sandra R S; Gregori, Fabio; Brandão, Paulo E; dos Santos, Franklin G B; Lincopan, Nilton E; Benites, Nilson R

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to elucidate aspects of the epidemiology of bovine subclinical mastitis through the assessment of genes encoding MSCRAMM (microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules - a group of adhesins) and protein Bap (implicated in biofilm formation), in coagulase-positive (CPS) and coagulase-negative (CNS) Staphylococcus isolated from subclinical mastitis. Milk samples were collected for microbiological exams, somatic cell count (SCC) and a survey of the genes coding for MSCRAMM (cna, eno, ebpS, fnbA, fnbB and fib) and biofilm-associated protein Bap (bap) in 106 Staphylococcus spp. isolates using PCR. The frequencies of occurrence of eno (82.1%), fnbA (72.6%), fib (71.7%) and bap (56.6%) were higher (P < 0.0001) compared with the other assessed genes (cna, ebpS and fnbB). The higher frequency of occurrence (P < 0.005) of the bap gene in CNS compared with CPS suggests that in these species biofilm formation is an important mechanism for the persistence of the infection. The medians of the SCCs in the samples where eno, fnbA, fib and bap genes were detected were higher compared with Staphylococcus without the assessed genes (P < 0.05) and negative samples (P < 0.01), which indicated that the presence of these MSCRAMM may be related to a higher intensity of the inflammatory process. PMID:26318876

  19. Identification of bapA in Strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Isolated from Wild Animals Kept in Captivity in Sinaloa, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    López-Valenzuela, Martin; Cárcamo-Aréchiga, Nora; Cota-Guajardo, Silvia; López-Salazar, Mayra; Montiel-Vázquez, Edith

    2016-01-01

    bapA, previously named stm2689, encodes the BapA protein, which, along with cellulose and fimbriae, constitutes biofilms. Biofilms are communities of microorganisms that grow in a matrix of exopolysaccharides and may adhere to living tissues or inert surfaces. Biofilm formation is associated with the ability to persist in different environments, which contributes to the pathogenicity of several species. We analyzed the presence of bapA in 83 strains belonging to 17 serovars of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica from wildlife in captivity at Culiacan's Zoo and Mazatlán's Aquarium. Each isolate amplified a product of 667 bp, which corresponds to the expected size of the bapA initiator, with no observed variation between different serovars analyzed. bapA gene was found to be highly conserved in Salmonella and can be targeted for the genus-specific detection of this organism from different sources. Since bapA expression improves bacterial proliferation outside of the host and facilitates resistance to disinfectants and desiccation, the survival of Salmonella in natural habitats may be favored. Thus, the risk of bacterial contamination from these animals is increased. PMID:27379195

  20. Identification of bapA in Strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Isolated from Wild Animals Kept in Captivity in Sinaloa, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Silva-Hidalgo, Gabriela; López-Valenzuela, Martin; Cárcamo-Aréchiga, Nora; Cota-Guajardo, Silvia; López-Salazar, Mayra; Montiel-Vázquez, Edith

    2016-01-01

    bapA, previously named stm2689, encodes the BapA protein, which, along with cellulose and fimbriae, constitutes biofilms. Biofilms are communities of microorganisms that grow in a matrix of exopolysaccharides and may adhere to living tissues or inert surfaces. Biofilm formation is associated with the ability to persist in different environments, which contributes to the pathogenicity of several species. We analyzed the presence of bapA in 83 strains belonging to 17 serovars of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica from wildlife in captivity at Culiacan's Zoo and Mazatlán's Aquarium. Each isolate amplified a product of 667 bp, which corresponds to the expected size of the bapA initiator, with no observed variation between different serovars analyzed. bapA gene was found to be highly conserved in Salmonella and can be targeted for the genus-specific detection of this organism from different sources. Since bapA expression improves bacterial proliferation outside of the host and facilitates resistance to disinfectants and desiccation, the survival of Salmonella in natural habitats may be favored. Thus, the risk of bacterial contamination from these animals is increased. PMID:27379195

  1. Cancer-associated ASXL1 mutations may act as gain-of-function mutations of the ASXL1–BAP1 complex

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramani, Anand; Larjo, Antti; Bassein, Jed A.; Chang, Xing; Hastie, Ryan B.; Togher, Susan M.; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Rao, Anjana

    2015-01-01

    ASXL1 is the obligate regulatory subunit of a deubiquitinase complex whose catalytic subunit is BAP1. Heterozygous mutations of ASXL1 that result in premature truncations are frequent in myeloid leukemias and Bohring–Opitz syndrome. Here we demonstrate that ASXL1 truncations confer enhanced activity on the ASXL1–BAP1 complex. Stable expression of truncated, hyperactive ASXL1–BAP1 complexes in a haematopoietic precursor cell line results in global erasure of H2AK119Ub, striking depletion of H3K27me3, selective upregulation of a subset of genes whose promoters are marked by both H2AK119Ub and H3K4me3, and spontaneous differentiation to the mast cell lineage. These outcomes require the catalytic activity of BAP1, indicating that they are downstream consequences of H2AK119Ub erasure. In bone marrow precursors, expression of truncated ASXL1–BAP1 complex cooperates with TET2 loss-of-function to increase differentiation to the myeloid lineage in vivo. Our data raise the possibility that ASXL1 truncation mutations confer gain-of-function on the ASXL–BAP1 complex. PMID:26095772

  2. Combined Genetic and Genealogic Studies Uncover a Large BAP1 Cancer Syndrome Kindred Tracing Back Nine Generations to a Common Ancestor from the 1700s.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Michele; Flores, Erin G; Emi, Mitsuru; Johnson, Todd A; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Behner, Dusty; Hoffman, Harriet; Hesdorffer, Mary; Nasu, Masaki; Napolitano, Andrea; Powers, Amy; Minaai, Michael; Baumann, Francine; Bryant-Greenwood, Peter; Lauk, Olivia; Kirschner, Michaela B; Weder, Walter; Opitz, Isabelle; Pass, Harvey I; Gaudino, Giovanni; Pastorino, Sandra; Yang, Haining

    2015-12-01

    We recently discovered an inherited cancer syndrome caused by BRCA1-Associated Protein 1 (BAP1) germline mutations, with high incidence of mesothelioma, uveal melanoma and other cancers and very high penetrance by age 55. To identify families with the BAP1 cancer syndrome, we screened patients with family histories of multiple mesotheliomas and melanomas and/or multiple cancers. We identified four families that shared an identical BAP1 mutation: they lived across the US and did not appear to be related. By combining family histories, molecular genetics, and genealogical approaches, we uncovered a BAP1 cancer syndrome kindred of ~80,000 descendants with a core of 106 individuals, whose members descend from a couple born in Germany in the early 1700s who immigrated to North America. Their descendants spread throughout the country with mutation carriers affected by multiple malignancies. Our data show that, once a proband is identified, extended analyses of these kindreds, using genomic and genealogical studies to identify the most recent common ancestor, allow investigators to uncover additional branches of the family that may carry BAP1 mutations. Using this knowledge, we have identified new branches of this family carrying BAP1 mutations. We have also implemented early-detection strategies that help identify cancers at early-stage, when they can be cured (melanomas) or are more susceptible to therapy (MM and other malignancies). PMID:26683624

  3. Three holes bound to a double acceptor - Be(+) in germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haller, E. E.; Mcmurray, R. E., Jr.; Falicov, L. M.; Haegel, N. M.; Hansen, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    A double acceptor binding three holes has been observed for the first time with photoconductive far-infrared spectroscopy in beryllium-doped germanium single crystals. This new center, Be(+), has a hole binding energy of about 5 meV and is only present when free holes are generated by ionization of either neutral shallow acceptors or neutral Be double acceptors. The Be(+) center thermally ionizes above 4 K. It disappears at a uniaxial stress higher than about a billion dyn/sq cm parallel to (111) as a result of the lifting of the valence-band degeneracy.

  4. Intramolecular charge transfer in donor-acceptor molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Slama-Schwok, A.; Blanchard-Desce, M.; Lehn, J.M. )

    1990-05-17

    The photophysical properties of donor-acceptor molecules, push-pull polyenes and carotenoids, have been studied by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The compounds bear various acceptor and donor groups, linked together by chains of different length and structure. The position of the absorption and fluorescence maxima and their variation in solvents of increasing polarity are in agreement with long-distance intramolecular charge-transfer processes, the linker acting as a molecular wire. The effects of the linker length and structure and of the nature of acceptor and donor are presented.

  5. Source apportionment of elevated BaP concentrations in PM10 aerosols in an alpine valley in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Heidi; Puxbaum, Hans; Jankowski, Nicole; Sampaio Cordeiro Wagner, Lylian

    2010-05-01

    INTRODUCTION: In a village situated at 1215 m a.s.l. in a natural preserve in an Austrian alpine valley elevated BaP concentrations have been measured in the last years. A highly frequented highway leading from Italy to Germany passes near the village. Monthly means of particulate BaP concentrations show a clear seasonal trend with values below 1 ng/m³ during the warmer months and with concentrations up to 9 ng/m³ in the cold season. Annual averages in the years 2000 - 2005 ranged between 1.4 and 2.8 ng/m³ - much higher than the EU target value of 1 ng/m³. We used a macrotracer model developed at the Vienna University of Technology to determine the contributions of the sources for BaP emissions, which were mainly space heating with wood and traffic from the highway. EXPERIMENTAL: The macrotracer concept is a nine component model to derive source contribution and explains 80-100% of PM10 aerosols in Austria. The amount of traffic exhaust is derived by using EC as tracer, whereas EC produced by wood burning is subtracted, the amount of wood smoke is derived by the anhydro-sugar levoglucosan and the ratio between the anhydro-sugars levoglucosan and mannosan. For the source apportionment of BaP the applied factors reflect on the one hand the composition of the automotive fleet in Austria and on the other hand the composition of the fire wood in the region. Filter samples collected with a high volume sampler in winter were analyzed for PM10 aerosol mass, total, organic, elemental and carbonate carbon, HULIS, anhydro-sugars, polyols and ions (major ions and organic acids) and PAHs. In the same way emission samples taken at a motor test stand and at a test stand for wood combustion were analyzed (Schmidl et al. 2008). The saccharides were determined using high pH anion exchange and pulsed amperometry (HPAE-PAD). Details of the analytical method are given in Iinuma et al., 2009. Elemental and organic carbon were determined with a thermal-optical instrument (Sunset lab

  6. Association of blaOXA-23 and bap with the persistence of Acinetobacter baumannii within a major healthcare system

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ting L.; Rickard, Alexander H.; Srinivasan, Usha; Kaye, Keith S.; Foxman, Betsy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging opportunistic nosocomial pathogen. Two factors that may enhance persistence in healthcare settings are antimicrobial resistance and biofilm-forming ability. The aim of this work was to determine whether A. baumannii isolates that persist in healthcare settings (endemic), can be differentiated from sporadic isolates based upon their ability to resist antibiotics and their biofilm-forming capability. Methods: Two hundred and ninety A. baumannii isolates were isolated over 17 months in the Detroit Medical Center (DMC). The isolates were genotyped using repetitive extragenic palindromic-PCR (REP-PCR). REP-types appearing greater than 10 times during active surveillance were considered endemic. The in vitro biofilm-forming ability and antibiotic resistance profile of each isolate were evaluated. Isolates were tested for the presence of two genetic markers—one implicated in biofilm formation (bap) and the other in antibiotic resistance (blaOXA-23). Results: Of the 290 isolates evaluated, 84% carried bap and 36% carried blaOXA-23. Five unique REP-PCR banding-types were detected >10 times (endemic) and constituted 58% of the 290 isolates. These five endemic REP-PCR types were 5.1 times more likely than sporadic isolates to carry both bap and blaOXA-23. Furthermore, endemic isolates were resistant to 3 more antibiotic classes, on average, than sporadic isolates and four of the five endemic REP-PCR types formed denser biofilms in vitro than sporadic isolates. Conclusions: Endemic A. baumannii isolates are more likely than sporadic isolates to possess factors that increase virulence and enhance survival within a large healthcare system. PMID:25814985

  7. Prediction of calcite morphology from computational and experimental studies of mutations of a de novo-designed peptide.

    PubMed

    Schrier, Sarah B; Sayeg, Marianna K; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2011-09-20

    Many organisms use macromolecules, often proteins or peptides, to control the growth of inorganic crystals into complex materials. The ability to model peptide-mineral interactions accurately could allow for the design of novel peptides to produce materials with desired properties. Here, we tested a computational algorithm developed to predict the structure of peptides on mineral surfaces. Using this algorithm, we analyzed energetic and structural differences between a 16-residue peptide (bap4) designed to interact with a calcite growth plane and single- and double-point mutations of the charged residues. Currently, no experimental method is available to resolve the structures of proteins on solid surfaces, which precludes benchmarking for computational models. Therefore, to test the models, we chemically synthesized each peptide and analyzed its effects on calcite crystal growth. Whereas bap4 affected the crystal growth by producing heavily stepped corners and edges, point mutants had variable influences on morphology. Calculated residue-specific binding energies correlated with experimental observations; point mutations of residues predicted to be crucial to surface interactions produced morphologies most similar to unmodified calcite. These results suggest that peptide conformation plays a role in mineral interactions and that the computational model supplies valid energetic and structural data that can provide information about expected crystal morphology. PMID:21797243

  8. Toxic effects of male Perna viridis gonad exposed to BaP, DDT and their mixture: A metabolomic and proteomic study of the underlying mechanism.

    PubMed

    Song, Qinqin; Zheng, Pengfei; Qiu, Liguo; Jiang, Xiu; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhou, Hailong; Han, Qian; Diao, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane are typical persistent organic pollutants, and also the widespread environmental estrogens with known toxicity towards green mussels Perna viridis. In this study, the toxicological effects of BaP and DDT and their mixture were assessed in green mussel gonads using proteomic and metabolomic approaches. Metabolomics by NMR spectroscopy revealed that BaP did not show obvious metabolite changes in the gonad of male green mussel. DDT mainly caused some disturbance of osmotic regulation and energy metabolism by changing BCAAs, alanine, threonine, arginine, etc., unknown metabolite (3.53 ppm), glycine, homarine and ATP at different levels. However, the mixture of BaP and DDT mainly caused some disturbance in osmotic regulation and energy metabolism by differentially altering branched chain amino acids, glutamate, alanine, arginine, unknown metabolite (3.53 ppm), glycine, 4-aminobutyrate, dimethylglycine, homarine and ATP. The results suggest that DDT alone may cause most of metabolites changes in the mixture exposed male mussel gonad, and the results also show that the male P. viridis gonad was more sensitive to DDT than BaP exposures. Proteomic study showed that BaP, DDT and their mixture may have different modes of action. Proteomic responses revealed that BaP induced signal transduction, oxidative stress, spermatogenesis, etc. in the male green mussel gonad; whereas DDT exposure altered proteins that were associated with signal transduction, oxidative stress, cytoskeleton and cell structure, cellular organization, energy metabolism, etc. However, the mixture of BaP and DDT affected proteins related to cytoskeleton and cell structure, oxidative stress, cellular organization, etc. This research demonstrated that metabolomic and proteomic approaches could better elucidate the underlying mechanism of environmental pollutants gonad toxicity. PMID:26546779

  9. Exome sequencing identifies frequent inactivating mutations in BAP1, ARID1A and PBRM1 in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yuchen; Pawlik, Timothy M; Anders, Robert A; Selaru, Florin M; Streppel, Mirte M; Lucas, Donald J; Niknafs, Noushin; Guthrie, Violeta Beleva; Maitra, Anirban; Argani, Pedram; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Roa, Juan Carlos; Roberts, Lewis R; Gores, Gregory J; Popescu, Irinel; Alexandrescu, Sorin T; Dima, Simona; Fassan, Matteo; Simbolo, Michele; Mafficini, Andrea; Capelli, Paola; Lawlor, Rita T; Ruzzenente, Andrea; Guglielmi, Alfredo; Tortora, Giampaolo; de Braud, Filippo; Scarpa, Aldo; Jarnagin, William; Klimstra, David; Karchin, Rachel; Velculescu, Victor E; Hruban, Ralph H; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Wood, Laura D

    2013-12-01

    Through exomic sequencing of 32 intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, we discovered frequent inactivating mutations in multiple chromatin-remodeling genes (including BAP1, ARID1A and PBRM1), and mutation in one of these genes occurred in almost half of the carcinomas sequenced. We also identified frequent mutations at previously reported hotspots in the IDH1 and IDH2 genes encoding metabolic enzymes in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas. In contrast, TP53 was the most frequently altered gene in a series of nine gallbladder carcinomas. These discoveries highlight the key role of dysregulated chromatin remodeling in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas. PMID:24185509

  10. Exome sequencing identifies frequent inactivating mutations in BAP1, ARID1A and PBRM1 in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Selaru, Florin M; Streppel, Mirte M; Lucas, Donald J; Niknafs, Noushin; Guthrie, Violeta Beleva; Maitra, Anirban; Argani, Pedram; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Roa, Juan Carlos; Roberts, Lewis R; Gores, Gregory J; Popescu, Irinel; Alexandrescu, Sorin T; Dima, Simona; Fassan, Matteo; Simbolo, Michele; Mafficini, Andrea; Capelli, Paola; Lawlor, Rita T; Ruzzenente, Andrea; Guglielmi, Alfredo; Tortora, Giampaolo; de Braud, Filippo; Scarpa, Aldo; Jarnagin, William; Klimstra, David; Karchin, Rachel; Velculescu, Victor E; Hruban, Ralph H; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Wood, Laura D

    2014-01-01

    Through exomic sequencing of 32 intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, we discovered frequent inactivating mutations in multiple chromatin-remodeling genes (including BAP1, ARID1A and PBRM1), and mutation in one of these genes occurred in almost half of the carcinomas sequenced. We also identified frequent mutations at previously reported hotspots in the IDH1 and IDH2 genes encoding metabolic enzymes in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas. In contrast, TP53 was the most frequently altered gene in a series of nine gallbladder carcinomas. These discoveries highlight the key role of dysregulated chromatin remodeling in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas. PMID:24185509

  11. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  12. Nitrogen is a deep acceptor in ZnO

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tarun, M. C.; Iqbal, M. Zafar; McCluskey, M. D.

    2011-04-14

    Zinc oxide is a promising material for blue and UV solid-state lighting devices, among other applications. Nitrogen has been regarded as a potential p-type dopant for ZnO. However, recent calculations indicate that nitrogen is a deep acceptor. This paper presents experimental evidence that nitrogen is, in fact, a deep acceptor and therefore cannot produce p-type ZnO. A broad photoluminescence (PL) emission band near 1.7 eV, with an excitation onset of ~2.2 eV, was observed, in agreement with the deep-acceptor model of the nitrogen defect. Thus the deep-acceptor behavior can be explained by the low energy of the ZnO valence bandmore » relative to the vacuum level.« less

  13. Nitrogen is a deep acceptor in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Tarun, M. C.; Iqbal, M. Zafar; McCluskey, M. D.

    2011-04-14

    Zinc oxide is a promising material for blue and UV solid-state lighting devices, among other applications. Nitrogen has been regarded as a potential p-type dopant for ZnO. However, recent calculations indicate that nitrogen is a deep acceptor. This paper presents experimental evidence that nitrogen is, in fact, a deep acceptor and therefore cannot produce p-type ZnO. A broad photoluminescence (PL) emission band near 1.7 eV, with an excitation onset of ~2.2 eV, was observed, in agreement with the deep-acceptor model of the nitrogen defect. Thus the deep-acceptor behavior can be explained by the low energy of the ZnO valence band relative to the vacuum level.

  14. Donor-acceptor electron transport mediated by solitons.

    PubMed

    Brizhik, L S; Piette, B M A G; Zakrzewski, W J

    2014-11-01

    We study the long-range electron and energy transfer mediated by solitons in a quasi-one-dimensional molecular chain (conjugated polymer, alpha-helical macromolecule, etc.) weakly bound to a donor and an acceptor. We show that for certain sets of parameter values in such systems an electron, initially located at the donor molecule, can tunnel to the molecular chain, where it becomes self-trapped in a soliton state, and propagates to the opposite end of the chain practically without energy dissipation. Upon reaching the end, the electron can either bounce back and move in the opposite direction or, for suitable parameter values of the system, tunnel to the acceptor. We estimate the energy efficiency of the donor-acceptor electron transport depending on the parameter values. Our calculations show that the soliton mechanism works for the parameter values of polypeptide macromolecules and conjugated polymers. We also investigate the donor-acceptor electron transport in thermalized molecular chains. PMID:25493866

  15. Donor-acceptor electron transport mediated by solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brizhik, L. S.; Piette, B. M. A. G.; Zakrzewski, W. J.

    2014-11-01

    We study the long-range electron and energy transfer mediated by solitons in a quasi-one-dimensional molecular chain (conjugated polymer, alpha-helical macromolecule, etc.) weakly bound to a donor and an acceptor. We show that for certain sets of parameter values in such systems an electron, initially located at the donor molecule, can tunnel to the molecular chain, where it becomes self-trapped in a soliton state, and propagates to the opposite end of the chain practically without energy dissipation. Upon reaching the end, the electron can either bounce back and move in the opposite direction or, for suitable parameter values of the system, tunnel to the acceptor. We estimate the energy efficiency of the donor-acceptor electron transport depending on the parameter values. Our calculations show that the soliton mechanism works for the parameter values of polypeptide macromolecules and conjugated polymers. We also investigate the donor-acceptor electron transport in thermalized molecular chains.

  16. Synthesis, Properties, and Design Principles of Donor–Acceptor Nanohoops

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have synthesized a series of aza[8]cycloparaphenylenes containing one, two, and three nitrogens to probe the impact of nitrogen doping on optoelectronic properties and solid state packing. Alkylation of these azananohoops afforded the first donor–acceptor nanohoops where the phenylene backbone acts as the donor and the pyridinium units act as the acceptor. The impact on the optoelectronic properties was then studied experimentally and computationally to provide new insight into the effect of functionalization on nanohoops properties. PMID:27162989

  17. Loss of PBRM1 and BAP1 Expression Is Less Common in Non–Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Than in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Thai H.; Kapur, Payal; Joseph, Richard W.; Serie, Daniel J.; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Parasramka, Mansi; Cheville, John C.; Wu, Kevin J.; Frenkel, Eugene; Rakheja, Dinesh; Stefanius, Karoliina; Brugarolas, James; Parker, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Recurrent mutations in polybromo-1 (PBRM1, ~40%) and BRCA1-associated protein-1 (BAP1, ~10%) occur in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), but their prevalence in non clear cell renal cell carcinoma (non-ccRCC) or renal oncocytoma (RO) is unknown. We evaluated loss of PBRM1 and BAP1 staining in ccRCC, papillary RCC (pRCC), chromophobe RCC (chRCC) and RO tumors using an immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay for which negative staining associates with loss-of-function mutations. Methods We identified 458 patients treated surgically for ccRCC, pRCC, chRCC and RO between 2004 and 2012. We performed IHC assays to evaluate PBRM1 and BAP1 protein expression to classify tumors as PBRM1- or BAP1-negative. We compared loss of staining of these 2 proteins in ccRCC and non-ccRCC using Fisher’s exact test. Results For the total cohort of 458 patients, we successfully stained both PBRM1 and BAP1 in 408 tumor samples. Consistent with the mutation rate, loss of PBRM1 and BAP1 staining occurred in 43% (80/187) and 10% (18/187) of ccRCC respectively. However, loss of PBRM1 staining occurred in only 3% (2/59), 6% (1/17) and 0% (0/34) of pRCC, chRCC and RO tumors, respectively (P<0.0001). BAP1 loss was not observed in any of the pRCC (N=61), chRCC (N=17) or RO (N=34) tumors (P=.00021). Conclusion Our data suggest that biallelic inactivation of PBRM1 or BAP1 is less common in non-ccRCC when compared to ccRCC tumors. These findings suggest that loss of PBRM1 or BAP1 are key events in ccRCC, whereas other pathways may support tumorigenesis in non-ccRCC subtypes. PMID:25465300

  18. 18F-Labeled Silicon-Based Fluoride Acceptors: Potential Opportunities for Novel Positron Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Bernard-Gauthier, Vadim; Wängler, Carmen; Wängler, Bjoern; Schirrmacher, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Background. Over the recent years, radiopharmaceutical chemistry has experienced a wide variety of innovative pushes towards finding both novel and unconventional radiochemical methods to introduce fluorine-18 into radiotracers for positron emission tomography (PET). These “nonclassical” labeling methodologies based on silicon-, boron-, and aluminium-18F chemistry deviate from commonplace bonding of an [18F]fluorine atom (18F) to either an aliphatic or aromatic carbon atom. One method in particular, the silicon-fluoride-acceptor isotopic exchange (SiFA-IE) approach, invalidates a dogma in radiochemistry that has been widely accepted for many years: the inability to obtain radiopharmaceuticals of high specific activity (SA) via simple IE. Methodology. The most advantageous feature of IE labeling in general is that labeling precursor and labeled radiotracer are chemically identical, eliminating the need to separate the radiotracer from its precursor. SiFA-IE chemistry proceeds in dipolar aprotic solvents at room temperature and below, entirely avoiding the formation of radioactive side products during the IE. Scope of Review. A great plethora of different SiFA species have been reported in the literature ranging from small prosthetic groups and other compounds of low molecular weight to labeled peptides and most recently affibody molecules. Conclusions. The literature over the last years (from 2006 to 2014) shows unambiguously that SiFA-IE and other silicon-based fluoride acceptor strategies relying on 18F− leaving group substitutions have the potential to become a valuable addition to radiochemistry. PMID:25157357

  19. Tuning the Electron Acceptor in Phthalocyanine-Based Electron Donor-Acceptor Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Sekita, Michael; Jiménez, Ángel J; Marcos, M Luisa; Caballero, Esmeralda; Rodríguez-Morgade, M Salomé; Guldi, Dirk M; Torres, Tomás

    2015-12-21

    Zinc phthalocyanines (ZnPc) have been attached to the peri-position of a perylenemonoimide (PMI) and a perylenemonoanhydride (PMA), affording electron donor-acceptor conjugates 1 and 2, respectively. In addition, a perylene-monoimide-monoanhydride (PMIMA) has been connected to a ZnPc through its imido position to yield the ZnPc-PMIMA conjugate 10. The three conjugates have been studied for photoinduced electron transfer. For ZnPc-PMIMA 10, electron transfer occurs upon both ZnPc and PMIMA excitation, giving rise to a long-lived (340 ps) charge-separated state. For ZnPc-PMI 1 and ZnPc-PMA 2, stabilization of the radical ion pair states by using polar media is necessary. In THF, photoexcitation of either ZnPc or PMI/PMA produces charge-separated states with lifetimes of 375 and 163 ps, respectively. PMID:26593778

  20. The Impact of Heterogeneity and Dark Acceptor States on FRET: Implications for Using Fluorescent Protein Donors and Acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Steven S.; Nguyen, Tuan A.; van der Meer, B. Wieb; Blank, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy is widely used to study protein interactions in living cells. Typically, spectral variants of the Green Fluorescent Protein (FPs) are incorporated into proteins expressed in cells, and FRET between donor and acceptor FPs is assayed. As appreciable FRET occurs only when donors and acceptors are within 10 nm of each other, the presence of FRET can be indicative of aggregation that may denote association of interacting species. By monitoring the excited-state (fluorescence) decay of the donor in the presence and absence of acceptors, dual-component decay analysis has been used to reveal the fraction of donors that are FRET positive (i.e., in aggregates)._However, control experiments using constructs containing both a donor and an acceptor FP on the same protein repeatedly indicate that a large fraction of these donors are FRET negative, thus rendering the interpretation of dual-component analysis for aggregates between separately donor-containing and acceptor-containing proteins problematic. Using Monte-Carlo simulations and analytical expressions, two possible sources for such anomalous behavior are explored: 1) conformational heterogeneity of the proteins, such that variations in the distance separating donor and acceptor FPs and/or their relative orientations persist on time-scales long in comparison with the excited-state lifetime, and 2) FP dark states. PMID:23152925

  1. The nuclear deubiquitinase BAP1 is commonly inactivated by somatic mutations and 3p21.1 losses in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Bott, Matthew; Brevet, Marie; Taylor, Barry S; Shimizu, Shigeki; Ito, Tatsuo; Wang, Lu; Creaney, Jenette; Lake, Richard A; Zakowski, Maureen F; Reva, Boris; Sander, Chris; Delsite, Robert; Powell, Simon; Zhou, Qin; Shen, Ronglai; Olshen, Adam; Rusch, Valerie; Ladanyi, Marc

    2011-07-01

    Malignant pleural mesotheliomas (MPMs) often show CDKN2A and NF2 inactivation, but other highly recurrent mutations have not been described. To identify additional driver genes, we used an integrated genomic analysis of 53 MPM tumor samples to guide a focused sequencing effort that uncovered somatic inactivating mutations in BAP1 in 23% of MPMs. The BAP1 nuclear deubiquitinase is known to target histones (together with ASXL1 as a Polycomb repressor subunit) and the HCF1 transcriptional co-factor, and we show that BAP1 knockdown in MPM cell lines affects E2F and Polycomb target genes. These findings implicate transcriptional deregulation in the pathogenesis of MPM. PMID:21642991

  2. The nuclear deubiquitinase BAP1 is commonly inactivated by somatic mutations and 3p21.1 losses in malignant pleural mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Bott, Matthew; Brevet, Marie; Taylor, Barry S; Shimizu, Shigeki; Ito, Tatsuo; Wang, Lu; Creaney, Jenette; Lake, Richard A; Zakowski, Maureen F; Reva, Boris; Sander, Chris; Delsite, Robert; Powell, Simon; Zhou, Qin; Shen, Ronglai; Olshen, Adam; Rusch, Valerie; Ladanyi, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesotheliomas (MPMs) often show CDKN2A and NF2 inactivation, but other highly recurrent mutations have not been described. To identify additional driver genes, we used an integrated genomic analysis of 53 MPM tumor samples to guide a focused sequencing effort that uncovered somatic inactivating mutations in BAP1 in 23% of MPMs. The BAP1 nuclear deubiquitinase is known to target histones (together with ASXL1 as a Polycomb repressor subunit) and the HCF1 transcriptional co-factor, and we show that BAP1 knockdown in MPM cell lines affects E2F and Polycomb target genes. These findings implicate transcriptional deregulation in the pathogenesis of MPM. PMID:21642991

  3. Identification of new snake venom metalloproteinase inhibitors using compound screening and rational Peptide design.

    PubMed

    Villalta-Romero, Fabián; Gortat, Anna; Herrera, Andrés E; Arguedas, Rebeca; Quesada, Javier; de Melo, Robson Lopes; Calvete, Juan J; Montero, Mavis; Murillo, Renato; Rucavado, Alexandra; Gutiérrez, José María; Pérez-Payá, Enrique

    2012-07-12

    The majority of snakebite envenomations in Central America are caused by the viperid species Bothrops asper, whose venom contains a high proportion of zinc-dependent metalloproteinases that play a relevant role in the pathogenesis of hemorrhage characteristic of these envenomations. Broad metalloproteinase inhibitors, such as the peptidomimetic hydroxamate Batimastat, have been shown to inhibit snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMP). However, the difficulty in having open public access to Batimastat and similar molecules highlights the need to design new inhibitors of SVMPs that could be applied in the treatment of snakebite envenomations. We have chosen the SVMP BaP1 as a model to search for new inhibitors using different strategies, that is, screening of the Prestwick Chemical Library and rational peptide design. Results from these approaches provide clues on the structural requirements for efficient BaP1 inhibition and pave the way for the design of new inhibitors of SVMP. PMID:24900507

  4. Identification of New Snake Venom Metalloproteinase Inhibitors Using Compound Screening and Rational Peptide Design

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The majority of snakebite envenomations in Central America are caused by the viperid species Bothrops asper, whose venom contains a high proportion of zinc-dependent metalloproteinases that play a relevant role in the pathogenesis of hemorrhage characteristic of these envenomations. Broad metalloproteinase inhibitors, such as the peptidomimetic hydroxamate Batimastat, have been shown to inhibit snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMP). However, the difficulty in having open public access to Batimastat and similar molecules highlights the need to design new inhibitors of SVMPs that could be applied in the treatment of snakebite envenomations. We have chosen the SVMP BaP1 as a model to search for new inhibitors using different strategies, that is, screening of the Prestwick Chemical Library and rational peptide design. Results from these approaches provide clues on the structural requirements for efficient BaP1 inhibition and pave the way for the design of new inhibitors of SVMP. PMID:24900507

  5. Silymarin protects PBMC against B(a)P induced toxicity by replenishing redox status and modulating glutathione metabolizing enzymes-An in vitro study

    SciTech Connect

    Kiruthiga, P.V.; Pandian, S. Karutha; Devi, K. Pandima

    2010-09-01

    PAHs are a ubiquitous class of environmental contaminants that have a large number of hazardous consequences on human health. An important prototype of PAHs, B(a)P, is notable for being the first chemical carcinogen to be discovered and the one classified by EPA as a probable human carcinogen. It undergoes metabolic activation to QD, which generate ROS by redox cycling system in the body and oxidatively damage the macromolecules. Hence, a variety of antioxidants have been tested as possible protectors against B(a)P toxicity. Silymarin is one such compound, which has high human acceptance, used clinically and consumed as dietary supplement around the world for its strong anti-oxidant efficacy. Silymarin was employed as an alternative approach for treating B(a)P induced damage and oxidative stress in PBMC, with an emphasis to provide the molecular basis for the effect of silymarin against B(a)P induced toxicity. PBMC cells exposed to either benzopyrene (1 {mu}M) or silymarin (2.4 mg/ml) or both was monitored for toxicity by assessing LPO, PO, redox status (GSH/GSSG ratio), glutathione metabolizing enzymes GR and GPx and antioxidant enzymes CAT and SOD. This study also investigated the protective effect of silymarin against B(a)P induced biochemical alteration at the molecular level by FT-IR spectroscopy. Our findings were quite striking that silymarin possesses substantial protective effect against B(a)P induced oxidative stress and biochemical changes by restoring redox status, modulating glutathione metabolizing enzymes, hindering the formation of protein oxidation products, inhibiting LPO and further reducing ROS mediated damages by changing the level of antioxidant enzymes. The results suggest that silymarin exhibits multiple protections and it should be considered as a potential protective agent for environmental contaminant induced immunotoxicity.

  6. Electron acceptor-dependent respiratory and physiological stratifications in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yonggang; Xiang, Yinbo; Sun, Guoping; Wu, Wei-Min; Xu, Meiying

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial respiration is an essential driving force in biogeochemical cycling and bioremediation processes. Electron acceptors respired by bacteria often have solid and soluble forms that typically coexist in the environment. It is important to understand how sessile bacteria attached to solid electron acceptors respond to ambient soluble alternative electron acceptors. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) provide a useful tool to investigate this interaction. In MFCs with Shewanella decolorationis, azo dye was used as an alternative electron acceptor in the anode chamber. Different respiration patterns were observed for biofilm and planktonic cells, with planktonic cells preferred to respire with azo dye while biofilm cells respired with both the anode and azo dye. The additional azo respiration dissipated the proton accumulation within the anode biofilm. There was a large redox potential gap between the biofilms and anode surface. Changing cathodic conditions caused immediate effects on the anode potential but not on the biofilm potential. Biofilm viability showed an inverse and respiration-dependent profile when respiring with only the anode or azo dye and was enhanced when respiring with both simultaneously. These results provide new insights into the bacterial respiration strategies in environments containing multiple electron acceptors and support an electron-hopping mechanism within Shewanella electrode-respiring biofilms. PMID:25495895

  7. Theory of Primary Photoexcitations in Donor-Acceptor Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryanpour, Karan; Dutta, Tirthankar; Huynh, Uyen N. V.; Vardeny, Zeev Valy; Mazumdar, Sumit

    2015-12-01

    We present a generic theory of primary photoexcitations in low band gap donor-acceptor conjugated copolymers. Because of the combined effects of strong electron correlations and broken symmetry, there is considerable mixing between a charge-transfer exciton and an energetically proximate triplet-triplet state with an overall spin singlet. The triplet-triplet state, optically forbidden in homopolymers, is allowed in donor-acceptor copolymers. For an intermediate difference in electron affinities of the donor and the acceptor, the triplet-triplet state can have a stronger oscillator strength than the charge-transfer exciton. We discuss the possibility of intramolecular singlet fission from the triplet-triplet state, and how such fission can be detected experimentally.

  8. Theory of Primary Photoexcitations in Donor-Acceptor Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Aryanpour, Karan; Dutta, Tirthankar; Huynh, Uyen N V; Vardeny, Zeev Valy; Mazumdar, Sumit

    2015-12-31

    We present a generic theory of primary photoexcitations in low band gap donor-acceptor conjugated copolymers. Because of the combined effects of strong electron correlations and broken symmetry, there is considerable mixing between a charge-transfer exciton and an energetically proximate triplet-triplet state with an overall spin singlet. The triplet-triplet state, optically forbidden in homopolymers, is allowed in donor-acceptor copolymers. For an intermediate difference in electron affinities of the donor and the acceptor, the triplet-triplet state can have a stronger oscillator strength than the charge-transfer exciton. We discuss the possibility of intramolecular singlet fission from the triplet-triplet state, and how such fission can be detected experimentally. PMID:26765027

  9. An overview of molecular acceptors for organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudhomme, Piétrick

    2013-07-01

    Organic solar cells (OSCs) have gained serious attention during the last decade and are now considered as one of the future photovoltaic technologies for low-cost power production. The first dream of attaining 10% of power coefficient efficiency has now become a reality thanks to the development of new materials and an impressive work achieved to understand, control and optimize structure and morphology of the device. But most of the effort devoted to the development of new materials concerned the optimization of the donor material, with less attention for acceptors which to date remain dominated by fullerenes and their derivatives. This short review presents the progress in the use of non-fullerene small molecules and fullerene-based acceptors with the aim of evaluating the challenge for the next generation of acceptors in organic photovoltaics.

  10. Donor-acceptor chemistry in the main group.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Eric

    2014-06-21

    This Perspective article summarizes recent progress from our laboratory in the isolation of reactive main group species using a general donor-acceptor protocol. A highlight of this program is the use of carbon-based donors in combination with suitable Lewis acidic acceptors to yield stable complexes of parent Group 14 element hydrides (e.g. GeH2 and H2SiGeH2). It is anticipated that this strategy could be extended to include new synthetic targets from throughout the Periodic Table with possible applications in bottom-up materials synthesis and main group element catalysis envisioned. PMID:24788390

  11. Acceptors in bulk and nanoscale ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCluskey, M. D.

    2012-02-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a semiconductor that emits bright UV light, with little wasted heat. This intrinsic feature makes it a promising material for energy-efficient white lighting, nano-lasers, and other optical applications. For devices to be competitive, however, it is necessary to develop reliable p-type doping. Although substitutional nitrogen has been considered as a potential p-type dopant for ZnO, theoretical and experimental work indicates that nitrogen is a deep acceptor and will not lead to p-type conductivity. This talk will highlight recent experiments on ZnO:N at low temperatures. A red/near-IR photoluminescence (PL) band is correlated with the presence of deep nitrogen acceptors. PL excitation (PLE) measurements show an absorption threshold of 2.26 eV, in good agreement with theory. Magnetic resonance experiments provide further evidence for this assignment. The results of these studies seem to rule out group-V elements as shallow acceptors in ZnO, contradicting numerous reports in the literature. If these acceptors do not work as advertised, is there a viable alternative? Optical studies on ZnO nanocrystals show some intriguing leads. At liquid-helium temperatures, a series of sharp IR absorption peaks arise from an unknown acceptor impurity. The data are consistent with a hydrogenic acceptor 0.46 eV above the valence band edge. While this binding energy is still too deep for many practical applications, it represents a significant improvement over the ˜ 1.3 eV binding energy for nitrogen acceptors. Nanocrystals present another twist. Due to their high surface-to-volume ratio, surface states are especially important. Specifically, electron-hole recombination at the surface give rises to a red luminescence band. From our PL and IR experiments, we have developed a ``unified'' model that attempts to explain acceptor and surface states in ZnO nanocrystals. This model could provide a useful framework for designing future nanoscale ZnO devices.

  12. Sodium acceptor doping of ZnO crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmar, Narendra S.; Joni, I. Made; Lynn, Kelvin G.

    2016-02-01

    ZnO bulk single crystals were doped with sodium by thermal diffusion using sodium dispensers. Secondary-ion mass spectrometry measurement shows the diffusion of sodium with concentration ˜1×1018 cm-3 in near surface region. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements show donor acceptor pair (DAP) emission at 408 nm at room temperature which exhibits a blue-shift to 404 nm at 9 K. DC Hall measurements show the mixed conduction due to low Hall voltage in these samples. PL measurements and variable temperature resistivity measurements suggest that the sodium acceptor activation energy is ˜0.300 eV.

  13. Aberrant promoter hypermethylation of PBRM1, BAP1, SETD2, KDM6A and other chromatin-modifying genes is absent or rare in clear cell RCC

    PubMed Central

    Ibragimova, Ilsiya; Maradeo, Marie E.; Dulaimi, Essel; Cairns, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Recent sequencing studies of clear cell (conventional) renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) have identified inactivating point mutations in the chromatin-modifying genes PBRM1, KDM6A/UTX, KDM5C/JARID1C, SETD2, MLL2 and BAP1. To investigate whether aberrant hypermethylation is a mechanism of inactivation of these tumor suppressor genes in ccRCC, we sequenced the promoter region within a bona fide CpG island of PBRM1, KDM6A, SETD2 and BAP1 in bisulfite-modified DNA of a representative series of 50 primary ccRCC, 4 normal renal parenchyma specimens and 5 RCC cell lines. We also interrogated the promoter methylation status of KDM5C and ARID1A in the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) ccRCC Infinium data set. PBRM1, KDM6A, SETD2 and BAP1 were unmethylated in all tumor and normal specimens. KDM5C and ARID1A were unmethylated in the TCGA 219 ccRCC and 119 adjacent normal specimens. Aberrant promoter hypermethylation of PBRM1, BAP1 and the other chromatin-modifying genes examined here is therefore absent or rare in ccRCC. PMID:23644518

  14. Three Redox States of a Diradical Acceptor-Donor-Acceptor Triad: Gating the Magnetic Coupling and the Electron Delocalization.

    PubMed

    Souto, Manuel; Lloveras, Vega; Vela, Sergi; Fumanal, Maria; Ratera, Imma; Veciana, Jaume

    2016-06-16

    The diradical acceptor-donor-acceptor triad 1(••), based on two polychlorotriphenylmethyl (PTM) radicals connected through a tetrathiafulvalene(TTF)-vinylene bridge, has been synthesized. The generation of the mixed-valence radical anion, 1(•-), and triradical cation species, 1(•••+), obtained upon electrochemical reduction and oxidation, respectively, was monitored by optical and ESR spectroscopy. Interestingly, the modification of electron delocalization and magnetic coupling was observed when the charged species were generated and the changes have been rationalized by theoretical calculations. PMID:27231856

  15. Antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling-Juan; Gallo, Richard L

    2016-01-11

    Antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) are a diverse class of naturally occurring molecules that are produced as a first line of defense by all multicellular organisms. These proteins can have broad activity to directly kill bacteria, yeasts, fungi, viruses and even cancer cells. Insects and plants primarily deploy AMPs as an antibiotic to protect against potential pathogenic microbes, but microbes also produce AMPs to defend their environmental niche. In higher eukaryotic organisms, AMPs can also be referred to as 'host defense peptides', emphasizing their additional immunomodulatory activities. These activities are diverse, specific to the type of AMP, and include a variety of cytokine and growth factor-like effects that are relevant to normal immune homeostasis. In some instances, the inappropriate expression of AMPs can also induce autoimmune diseases, thus further highlighting the importance of understanding these molecules and their complex activities. This Primer will provide an update of our current understanding of AMPs. PMID:26766224

  16. A neutralizing recombinant single chain antibody, scFv, against BaP1, A P-I hemorrhagic metalloproteinase from Bothrops asper snake venom.

    PubMed

    Castro, J M A; Oliveira, T S; Silveira, C R F; Caporrino, M C; Rodriguez, D; Moura-da-Silva, A M; Ramos, O H P; Rucavado, A; Gutiérrez, J M; Magalhães, G S; Faquim-Mauro, E L; Fernandes, I

    2014-09-01

    BaP1 is a P-I class snake venom metalloproteinase (SVMP) relevant in the local tissue damage associated with envenomings by Bothrops asper, a medically important snake species in Central America and parts of South and North America. The main treatment for these accidents is the passive immunotherapy using antibodies raised in horses. In order to obtain more specific and batch-to-batch consistent antivenons, recombinant antibodies are considered a good option compared to animal immunization. We constructed a recombinant single chain variable fragment (scFv) from a monoclonal antibody against BaP1 (MABaP1) formerly secreted by a hybridoma clone. This recombinant antibody was cloned into pMST3 vector in fusion with SUMO protein and contains VH and VL domains linked by a flexible (G4S)3 polypeptide (scFvBaP1). The aim of this work was to produce scFvBaP1 and to evaluate its potential concerning the neutralization of biologically important activities of BaP1. The cytoplasmic expression of this construct was successfully achieved in C43 (DE3) bacteria. Our results showed that scFvBaP1-SUMO fusion protein presented an electrophoretic band of around 43 kDa from which SUMO alone corresponded to 13.6 kDa, and only the scFv was able to recognize BaP1 as well as the whole venom by ELISA. In contrast, neither an irrelevant scFv anti-LDL nor its MoAb partner recognized it. BaP1-induced fibrinolysis was significantly neutralized by scFvBaP1, but not by SUMO, in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, scFvBaP1, as well as MaBaP1, completely neutralized in vivo hemorrhage, muscle necrosis, and inflammation induced by the toxin. Docking analyses revealed possible modes of interaction of the recombinant antibody with BaP1. Our data showed that scFv recognized BaP1 and whole B. asper venom, and neutralized biological effects of this SVMP. This scFv antibody can be used for understanding the molecular mechanisms of neutralization of SVMPs, and for exploring the potential of

  17. Covalent non-fused tetrathiafulvalene-acceptor systems.

    PubMed

    Pop, Flavia; Avarvari, Narcis

    2016-06-28

    Covalent donor-acceptor (D-A) systems have significantly contributed to the development of many organic materials and to molecular electronics. Tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) represents one of the most widely studied donor precursors and has been incorporated into the structure of many D-A derivatives with the objective of obtaining redox control and modulation of the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), in order to address switchable emissive systems and to take advantage of its propensity to form regular stacks in the solid state. In this review, we focus on the main families of non-fused TTF-acceptors, which are classified according to the nature of the acceptor: nitrogen-containing heterocycles, BODIPY, perylenes and electron poor unsaturated hydrocarbons, as well as radical acceptors. We describe herein the most representative members of each family with a brief mention of their synthesis and a special focus on their D-A characteristics. Special attention is given to ICT and its modulation, fluorescence quenching and switching, photoconductivity, bistability and spin distribution by discussing and comparing spectroscopic and electrochemical features, photophysical properties, solid-state properties and theoretical calculations. PMID:27193500

  18. Fine structure of the Mn acceptor in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainov, I. V.; Debus, J.; Averkiev, N. S.; Dimitriev, G. S.; Sapega, V. F.; Lähderanta, E.

    2016-06-01

    We reveal the electronic level structure of the Mn acceptor, which consists of a valence-band hole bound to an Mn2 + ion, in presence of applied uniaxial stress and an external magnetic field in bulk GaAs. Resonant spin-flip Raman scattering is used to measure the g factor of the AMn0 center in the ground and excited states with the total angular momenta F =1 and F =2 and characterize the optical selection rules of the spin-flip transitions between these Mn-acceptor states. We determine the random stress fields near the Mn acceptor, the constant of the antiferromagnetic exchange interaction between the valence-band holes and the electrons of the inner Mn2 + shell as well as the deformation potential for the exchange energy. The p -d exchange energy, in particular, decreases significantly with increasing compressive stress. By combining the experimental Raman study with the developed theoretical model on the scattering efficiency, in which also the random local and external uniaxial stresses and magnetic field are considered, the fine structure of the Mn acceptor is determined in full detail.

  19. Development of imide- and imidazole-containing electron acceptors for use in donor-acceptor conjugated compounds and polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Duo

    Conjugated organic compounds and polymers have attracted significant attention due to their potential application in electronic devices as semiconducting materials, such as organic solar cells (OSCs). In order to tune band gaps, donor-acceptor (D-A) structure is widely used, which has been proved to be one of the most effective strategies. This thesis consists of three parts: 1) design, syntheses and characterization of new weak acceptors based on imides and the systematic study of the structure-property relationship; (2) introduction of weak and strong acceptors in one polymer to achieve a broad coverage of light absorption and improve the power conversion efficiency (PCE); (3) modification of benzothiadiazole (BT) acceptor in order to increase the electron withdrawing ability. Imide-based electron acceptors, 4-(5-bromothiophen-2-y1)-2-(2-ethylhexyl)-9- phenyl- 1H-benzo[f]isoindole-1,3(2H)-dione (BIDO-1) and 4,9-bis(5-bromothiophen-2-yl)-2-(2-ethylhexyl)-benzo[f]isoindole-1,3-dione (BIDO-2), were designed and synthesized. In this design, naphthalene is selected as its main core to maintain a planar structure, and thienyl groups are able to facilitate the bromination reaction and lower the band gap. BIDO-1 and BIDO-2 were successfully coupled with different donors by both Suzuki cross-coupling and Stille cross-coupling reactions. Based on the energy levels and band gaps of the BIDO-containing compounds and polymers, BIDO-1 and BIDO-2 are proved to be weak electron acceptors. Pyromellitic diimide (PMDI) was also studied and found to be a stronger electron acceptor than BIDO . In order to obtain broad absorption coverage, both weak acceptor ( BIDO-2) and strong acceptor diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) were introduced in the same polymer. The resulting polymers show two absorption bands at 400 and 600 nm and two emission peaks at 500 and 680 nm. The band gaps of the polymers are around 1.6 eV, which is ideal for OSC application. The PCE of 1.17% was achieved. Finally

  20. Anaerobic methanotrophy in tidal wetland: Effects of electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li-Hung; Yu, Zih-Huei; Wang, Pei-Ling

    2016-04-01

    Wetlands have been considered to represent the largest natural source of methane emission, contributing substantially to intensify greenhouse effect. Despite in situ methanogenesis fueled by organic degradation, methanotrophy also plays a vital role in controlling the exact quantity of methane release across the air-sediment interface. As wetlands constantly experience various disturbances of anthropogenic activities, biological burrowing, tidal inundation, and plant development, rapid elemental turnover would enable various electron acceptors available for anaerobic methanotrophy. The effects of electron acceptors on stimulating anaerobic methanotrophy and the population compositions involved in carbon transformation in wetland sediments are poorly explored. In this study, sediments recovered from tidally influenced, mangrove covered wetland in northern Taiwan were incubated under the static conditions to investigate whether anaerobic methanotrophy could be stimulated by the presence of individual electron acceptors. Our results demonstrated that anaerobic methanotrophy was clearly stimulated in incubations amended with no electron acceptor, sulfate, or Fe-oxyhydroxide. No apparent methane consumption was observed in incubations with nitrate, citrate, fumarate or Mn-oxides. Anaerobic methanotrophy in incubations with no exogenous electron acceptor appears to proceed at the greatest rates, being sequentially followed by incubations with sulfate and Fe-oxyhydroxide. The presence of basal salt solution stimulated methane oxidation by a factor of 2 to 3. In addition to the direct impact of electron acceptor and basal salts, incubations with sediments retrieved from low tide period yielded a lower rate of methane oxidation than from high tide period. Overall, this study demonstrates that anaerobic methanotrophy in wetland sediments could proceed under various treatments of electron acceptors. Low sulfate content is not a critical factor in inhibiting methane

  1. Changes in the Metabolome of Picea balfouriana Embryogenic Tissues That Were Linked to Different Levels of 6-BAP by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Q F; Wang, J H; Pulkkinen, P; Kong, L S

    2015-01-01

    Embryogenic cultures of Picea balfouriana, which is an important commercial species for reforestation in Southern China, easily lose their embryogenic ability during long-term culture. Embryogenic tissue that proliferated at lower concentrations (3.6 μM and 2.5 μM) of 6-benzylaminopurine (6-BAP) were more productive, and generated 113 ± 6 and 89 ± 3 mature embryos per 100 mg embryogenic tissue, respectively. A metabolomic approach was used to study the changes in metabolites linked to embryogenic competence related to three different 6-BAP concentrations (2.5 μM, 3.6 μM, and 5 μM). A total of 309 compounds were obtained, among which 123 metabolites mapped to Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and genomes (KEGG) pathways. The levels of 35 metabolites were significantly differentially regulated among the three 6-BAP treatments, and 32 metabolites differed between the 2.5 μM and 5 μM treatments. A total of 17 metabolites appeared only once among the three comparisons. The combination of a score plot and a loading plot showed that in the samples with higher embryogenic ability (3.6 μM and 2.5 μM), up-regulated metabolites were mostly amino acids and down-regulated metabolites were mostly primary carbohydrates (especially sugars). These results suggested that 6-BAP may influence embryogenic competence by nitrogen metabolism, which could cause an increase in amino acid levels and higher amounts of aspartate, isoleucine, and leucine in tissues with higher embryogenic ability. Furthermore, we speculated that 6-BAP may affect the amount of tryptophan in tissues, which would change the indole-3-acetic acid levels and influence the embryogenic ability. PMID:26517840

  2. Changes in the Metabolome of Picea balfouriana Embryogenic Tissues That Were Linked to Different Levels of 6-BAP by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Approach

    PubMed Central

    Li, Q. F.; Wang, J. H.; Pulkkinen, P.; Kong, L. S.

    2015-01-01

    Embryogenic cultures of Picea balfouriana, which is an important commercial species for reforestation in Southern China, easily lose their embryogenic ability during long-term culture. Embryogenic tissue that proliferated at lower concentrations (3.6 μM and 2.5 μM) of 6-benzylaminopurine (6-BAP) were more productive, and generated 113 ± 6 and 89 ± 3 mature embryos per 100 mg embryogenic tissue, respectively. A metabolomic approach was used to study the changes in metabolites linked to embryogenic competence related to three different 6-BAP concentrations (2.5 μM, 3.6 μM, and 5 μM). A total of 309 compounds were obtained, among which 123 metabolites mapped to Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and genomes (KEGG) pathways. The levels of 35 metabolites were significantly differentially regulated among the three 6-BAP treatments, and 32 metabolites differed between the 2.5 μM and 5 μM treatments. A total of 17 metabolites appeared only once among the three comparisons. The combination of a score plot and a loading plot showed that in the samples with higher embryogenic ability (3.6 μM and 2.5 μM), up-regulated metabolites were mostly amino acids and down-regulated metabolites were mostly primary carbohydrates (especially sugars). These results suggested that 6-BAP may influence embryogenic competence by nitrogen metabolism, which could cause an increase in amino acid levels and higher amounts of aspartate, isoleucine, and leucine in tissues with higher embryogenic ability. Furthermore, we speculated that 6-BAP may affect the amount of tryptophan in tissues, which would change the indole-3-acetic acid levels and influence the embryogenic ability. PMID:26517840

  3. Peptide arrays for screening cancer specific peptides.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sahar; Mathews, Anu Stella; Byeon, Nara; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2010-09-15

    In this paper, we describe a novel method to screen peptides for specific recognition by cancer cells. Seventy peptides were synthesized on a cellulose membrane in an array format, and a direct method to study the peptide-whole cell interaction was developed. The relative binding affinity of the cells for different peptides with respect to a lead 12-mer p160 peptide, identified by phage display, was evaluated using the CyQUANT fluorescence of the bound cells. Screening allowed identification of at least five new peptides that displayed higher affinity (up to 3-fold) for MDA-MB-435 and MCF-7 human cancer cells compared to the p160 peptide. These peptides showed very little binding to the control (noncancerous) human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Three of these peptides were synthesized separately and labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to study their uptake and interaction with the cancer and control cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry. The results confirmed the high and specific affinity of an 11-mer peptide 11 (RGDPAYQGRFL) and a 10-mer peptide 18 (WXEAAYQRFL) for the cancer cells versus HUVECs. Peptide 11 binds different receptors on target cancer cells as its sequence contains multiple recognition motifs, whereas peptide 18 binds mainly to the putative p160 receptor. The peptide array-whole cell binding assay reported here is a complementary method to phage display for further screening and optimization of cancer targeting peptides for cancer therapy and diagnosis. PMID:20799711

  4. RAGE and amyloid-beta peptide neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Yan, S D; Chen, X; Fu, J; Chen, M; Zhu, H; Roher, A; Slattery, T; Zhao, L; Nagashima, M; Morser, J; Migheli, A; Nawroth, P; Stern, D; Schmidt, A M

    1996-08-22

    Amyloid-beta peptide is central to the pathology of Alzheimer's disease, because it is neurotoxic--directly by inducing oxidant stress, and indirectly by activating microglia. A specific cell-surface acceptor site that could focus its effects on target cells has been postulated but not identified. Here we present evidence that the 'receptor for advanced glycation end products' (RAGE) is such a receptor, and that it mediates effects of the peptide on neurons and microglia. Increased expressing of RAGE in Alzheimer's disease brain indicates that it is relevant to the pathogenesis of neuronal dysfunction and death. PMID:8751438

  5. Identification of C3 acceptors responsible for complement activation in Crithidia fasciculata

    SciTech Connect

    Guether, M.L.T.; Travassos, L.R.; Schenkman, S.

    1988-11-01

    Crithidia fasciculata, an insect trypanosomatid is readily lysed by normal human serum at concentrations as low as 3%. Lysis occurs in the presence of Mg+2-EGTA and is antibody independent, indicating that the alternative pathway of complement activation is involved. Analysis of (131I)C3 deposition on C. fasciculata cells using C8-deficient serum, revealed that about 4 x 10(5) C3 molecules bound to each cell. Most of the C3 was bound to cells as C3b, part of it forming high molecular weight complexes, which could be dissociated by methylamine treatment at alkaline pH. To characterize the C3 acceptors on C. fasciculata, surface-iodinated cells were incubated with C8D or heat-inactivated serum, extracted and immunoprecipitated with anti-C3 or anti-arabinogalactan antisera. Analysis of the immunoprecipitated material on SDS gels showed high-molecular weight components, which disappeared after methylamine treatment, giving rise to a component of 200 kDa molecular size. This 200-kDa component corresponded to a purified arabinogalactan complex, which was immunoprecipitated from labeled cell extracts, without incubation with C8D, using anti-arabinogalactan antibodies. These results suggest that the arabinogalactan glycoconjugate is a C3 acceptor in C. fasciculata during complement activation. Purified arabinogalactan complexes were able to inactivate C3 in vitro. Solubilization in KOH to cleave the peptide moiety rendered it unable to inactivate C3. Apparently, the aggregated state of the purified arabinogalactan component at the cell surface is important for C3 deposition and activation.

  6. Exhaustive extraction of peptides by electromembrane extraction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuixiu; Gjelstad, Astrid; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig

    2015-01-01

    This fundamental work illustrates for the first time the possibility of exhaustive extraction of peptides using electromembrane extraction (EME) under low system-current conditions (<50 μA). Bradykinin acetate, angiotensin II antipeptide, angiotensin II acetate, neurotensin, angiotensin I trifluoroacetate, and leu-enkephalin were extracted from 600 μL of 25 mM phosphate buffer (pH 3.5), through a supported liquid membrane (SLM) containing di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phosphate (DEHP) dissolved in an organic solvent, and into 600 μL of an acidified aqueous acceptor solution using a thin flat membrane-based EME device. Mass transfer of peptides across the SLM was enhanced by complex formation with the negatively charged DEHP. The composition of the SLM and the extraction voltage were important factors influencing recoveries and current with the EME system. 1-nonanol diluted with 2-decanone (1:1 v/v) containing 15% (v/v) DEHP was selected as a suitable SLM for exhaustive extraction of peptides under low system-current conditions. Interestingly, increasing the SLM volume from 5 to 10 μL was found to be beneficial for stable and efficient EME. The pH of the sample strongly affected the EME process, and pH 3.5 was found to be optimal. The EME efficiency was also dependent on the acceptor solution composition, and the extraction time was found to be an important element for exhaustive extraction. When EME was carried out for 25 min with an extraction voltage of 15 V, the system-current across the SLM was less than 50 μA, and extraction recoveries for the model peptides were in the range of 77-94%, with RSD values less than 10%. PMID:25467476

  7. Mechanisms of electron acceptor utilization: Implications for simulating anaerobic biodegradation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schreiber, M.E.; Carey, G.R.; Feinstein, D.T.; Bahr, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Simulation of biodegradation reactions within a reactive transport framework requires information on mechanisms of terminal electron acceptor processes (TEAPs). In initial modeling efforts, TEAPs were approximated as occurring sequentially, with the highest energy-yielding electron acceptors (e.g. oxygen) consumed before those that yield less energy (e.g., sulfate). Within this framework in a steady state plume, sequential electron acceptor utilization would theoretically produce methane at an organic-rich source and Fe(II) further downgradient, resulting in a limited zone of Fe(II) and methane overlap. However, contaminant plumes often display much more extensive zones of overlapping Fe(II) and methane. The extensive overlap could be caused by several abiotic and biotic processes including vertical mixing of byproducts in long-screened monitoring wells, adsorption of Fe(II) onto aquifer solids, or microscale heterogeneity in Fe(III) concentrations. Alternatively, the overlap could be due to simultaneous utilization of terminal electron acceptors. Because biodegradation rates are controlled by TEAPs, evaluating the mechanisms of electron acceptor utilization is critical for improving prediction of contaminant mass losses due to biodegradation. Using BioRedox-MT3DMS, a three-dimensional, multi-species reactive transport code, we simulated the current configurations of a BTEX plume and TEAP zones at a petroleum- contaminated field site in Wisconsin. Simulation results suggest that BTEX mass loss due to biodegradation is greatest under oxygen-reducing conditions, with smaller but similar contributions to mass loss from biodegradation under Fe(III)-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Results of sensitivity calculations document that BTEX losses due to biodegradation are most sensitive to the age of the plume, while the shape of the BTEX plume is most sensitive to effective porosity and rate constants for biodegradation under Fe(III)-reducing and

  8. Mechanisms of electron acceptor utilization: implications for simulating anaerobic biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, M E; Carey, G R; Feinstein, D T; Bahr, J M

    2004-09-01

    Simulation of biodegradation reactions within a reactive transport framework requires information on mechanisms of terminal electron acceptor processes (TEAPs). In initial modeling efforts, TEAPs were approximated as occurring sequentially, with the highest energy-yielding electron acceptors (e.g. oxygen) consumed before those that yield less energy (e.g., sulfate). Within this framework in a steady state plume, sequential electron acceptor utilization would theoretically produce methane at an organic-rich source and Fe(II) further downgradient, resulting in a limited zone of Fe(II) and methane overlap. However, contaminant plumes often display much more extensive zones of overlapping Fe(II) and methane. The extensive overlap could be caused by several abiotic and biotic processes including vertical mixing of byproducts in long-screened monitoring wells, adsorption of Fe(II) onto aquifer solids, or microscale heterogeneity in Fe(III) concentrations. Alternatively, the overlap could be due to simultaneous utilization of terminal electron acceptors. Because biodegradation rates are controlled by TEAPs, evaluating the mechanisms of electron acceptor utilization is critical for improving prediction of contaminant mass losses due to biodegradation. Using BioRedox-MT3DMS, a three-dimensional, multi-species reactive transport code, we simulated the current configurations of a BTEX plume and TEAP zones at a petroleum-contaminated field site in Wisconsin. Simulation results suggest that BTEX mass loss due to biodegradation is greatest under oxygen-reducing conditions, with smaller but similar contributions to mass loss from biodegradation under Fe(III)-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Results of sensitivity calculations document that BTEX losses due to biodegradation are most sensitive to the age of the plume, while the shape of the BTEX plume is most sensitive to effective porosity and rate constants for biodegradation under Fe(III)-reducing and

  9. The permease homologue Ssy1p controls the expression of amino acid and peptide transporter genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Didion, T; Regenberg, B; Jørgensen, M U; Kielland-Brandt, M C; Andersen, H A

    1998-02-01

    Amino acid transporters of the yeast plasma membrane (permeases) belong to a family of integral membrane proteins with pronounced structural similarity. We present evidence that a member of this family, encoded by the open reading frame (ORF) YDR160w (SSY1), is required for the expression of a set of transporter genes. Thus, deletion of the SSY1 gene causes loss of leucine-inducible transcription of the amino acid permease genes BAP2, TAT1 and BAP3 (ORF YDR046c) and the peptide transporter, PTR2. D-leucine can generate the signal without entering the cell. We propose that Ssy1p is situated in the plasma membrane and is involved in sensing leucine in the medium. PMID:9489675

  10. C-Peptide Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... C-peptide is a useful marker of insulin production. The following are some purposes of C-peptide ... it nearly impossible to directly evaluate endogenous insulin production. In these cases, C-peptide measurement is a ...

  11. Benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) metabolism and in vitro formation of B(a)P-DNA adducts by hepatic microsomes from rats fed diets containing corn and menhaden oils

    SciTech Connect

    Dharwadkar, S.; Bellow, J.; Ramanathan, R.; Wade, A.

    1986-03-01

    Dietary unsaturated fat is required for maximum induction of hepatic mixed function oxidases responsible for activating carcinogens which may bind covalently to DNA. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of dietary fat type on in vitro B(a)P metabolism and B(a)P-DNA adduct formation. Male rats were starved 2 days and refed diet devoid of fat, or containing 20% corn oil (CO) or 20% menhaden oil (MO) for 4 days. Both dietary fats increased Vmax for B(a)P hydroxylation without affecting Km. Phenobarbital (PB) administration increased Vmax in all animals but Km was increased only in rats fed the fat diets. PB resulted in decreased B(a)P metabolism when conducted at 15 =M only in rats fed the two fat diets even in the presence of increased cytochrome P-450 (P-450). This effect was due to a decrease in B(a)P metabolism at low substrate concentrations in PB treated fat-fed animals. Binding of B(a)P to calf-thymus DNA was increased in animals fed both fats which was enhanced further by PB only in rats fed the CO and MO diets. When the data are calculated as B(a)P metabolized per unit of P-450, PB seems to induce a P-450 in fat-fed animals having lower affinity and capacity for B(a)P metabolism and activation.

  12. Rigid Conjugated Twisted Truxene Dimers and Trimers as Electron Acceptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gang; Lami, Vincent; Rominger, Frank; Vaynzof, Yana; Mastalerz, Michael

    2016-03-14

    A new class of rigid twisted truxenone oligomers with an enlarged π backbone has been established by oxidative dimerization reactions. The resulting extended conjugated systems have large extinction coefficients and low-lying LUMO levels and show good solubility in common organic solvents, thus making them attractive compounds as new electron acceptors in organic electronics. Their suitability as electron acceptors has been demonstrated in bulk-heterojunction organic solar cells with poly({4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl}{3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]thiophenediyl}) (PTB7) as the donor material. PMID:26891096

  13. Probing the spin states of a single acceptor atom.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Joost; Salfi, Joe; Mol, Jan A; Verduijn, Jan; Tettamanzi, Giuseppe C; Hamilton, Alex R; Collaert, Nadine; Rogge, Sven

    2014-03-12

    We demonstrate a single-hole transistor using an individual acceptor dopant embedded in a silicon channel. Magneto-transport spectroscopy reveals that the ground state splits as a function of magnetic field into four states, which is unique for a single hole bound to an acceptor in a bulk semiconductor. The two lowest spin states are heavy (|m(j)| = 3/2) and light (|m(j)| = 1/2) hole-like, a two-level system that can be electrically driven and is characterized by a magnetic field dependent and long relaxation time, which are properties of interest for qubits. Although the bulklike spin splitting of a boron atom is preserved in our nanotransistor, the measured Landé g-factors, |g(hh)| = 0.81 ± 0.06 and |g(lh)| = 0.85 ± 0.21 for heavy and light holes respectively, are lower than the bulk value. PMID:24571637

  14. Interface effects on acceptor qubits in silicon and germanium.

    PubMed

    Abadillo-Uriel, J C; Calderón, M J

    2016-01-15

    Dopant-based quantum computing implementations often require the dopants to be situated close to an interface to facilitate qubit manipulation with local gates. Interfaces not only modify the energies of the bound states but also affect their symmetry. Making use of the successful effective mass theory we study the energy spectra of acceptors in Si or Ge taking into account the quantum confinement, the dielectric mismatch and the central cell effects. The presence of an interface puts constraints to the allowed symmetries and leads to the splitting of the ground state in two Kramers doublets (Mol et al 2015 Appl. Phys. Lett. 106 203110). Inversion symmetry breaking also implies parity mixing which affects the allowed optical transitions. Consequences for acceptor qubits are discussed. PMID:26618443

  15. Defect Donor and Acceptor in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Look, D.C.; Reynolds, D.C.; Hemsky, J.W.; Sizelove, J.R.; Jones, R.L.

    1997-09-01

    High-energy (0.7{endash}1MeV) electron irradiation in GaN grown on sapphire produces shallow donors and deep or shallow acceptors at equal rates, 1{plus_minus}0.2 cm{sup {minus}1}. The data, in conjunction with theory, are consistent only with the shallow donor being the N vacancy, and the acceptor the N interstitial. The N-vacancy donor energy is 64{plus_minus}10 meV, much larger than the value of 18meV found for the residual donor (probably Si) in this material. The Hall-effect measurements also reveal a degenerate n -type layer at the GaN/sapphire interface which must be accounted for to get the proper donor activation energy. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. 2012 ELECTRON DONOR-ACCEPTOR INTERACTIONS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, AUGUST 5-10, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    McCusker, James

    2012-08-10

    The upcoming incarnation of the Gordon Research Conference on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions will feature sessions on classic topics including proton-coupled electron transfer, dye-sensitized solar cells, and biological electron transfer, as well as emerging areas such as quantum coherence effects in donor-acceptor interactions, spintronics, and the application of donor-acceptor interactions in chemical synthesis.

  17. An extended Foerster-Dexter model for correlated donor-acceptor placement in solid state materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotman, S. R.; Hartmann, F. X.

    1987-09-01

    The current theory of donor-acceptor interactions in solid-state materials is based on a random distribution of donors and acceptors through the crystal. In this paper, we present a model to calculate the observable transfer rates for the correlated positioning of donors and acceptors in laser materials. Chemical effects leading to such correlations are discussed.

  18. Free Carrier Generation in Organic Photovoltaic Bulk Heterojunctions of Conjugated Polymers with Molecular Acceptors: Planar versus Spherical Acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nardes, Alexandre M.; Ferguson, Andrew J.; Wolfer, Pascal; Gui, Kurt; Burn, Paul L.; Meredith, Paul; Kopidakis, Nikos

    2014-03-05

    We present a comparative study of the photophysical performance of the prototypical fullerene derivative PC61BM with a planar small-molecule acceptor in an organic photovoltaic device. The small-molecule planar acceptor is 2-[{7-(9,9-di-n-propyl-9H-fluoren-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazol-4-yl}methylene]malononitrile, termed K12. We discuss photoinduced free charge-carrier generation and transport in blends of PC61BM or K12 with poly(3-n-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), surveying literature results for P3HT:PC61BM and presenting new results on P3HT:K12. For both systems we also review previous work on film structure and correlate the structural and photophysical results. In both cases, a disordered mixed phase is formed between P3HT and the acceptor, although the photophysical properties of this mixed phase differ markedly for PC61BM and K12. In the case of PC61BM the mixed phase acts as a free carrier generation region that can efficiently shuttle carriers to the pure polymer and fullerene domains. As a result, the vast majority of excitons quenched in P3HT:PC61BM blends yield free carriers detected by the contactless time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) method. In contrast, approximately 85 % of the excitons quenched in P3HT:K12 do not result in free carriers over the nanosecond timescale of the TRMC experiment. We attribute this to poor electron-transport properties in the mixed P3HT:K12 phase. Here, we propose that the observed differences can be traced to the respective shapes of PC61BM and K12: the three-dimensional nature of the fullerene cage facilitates coupling between PC61BM molecules irrespective of their relative orientation, whereas for K12 strong electronic coupling is only expected for molecules oriented with their π systems parallel to each other. Comparison between the eutectic compositions of the P3HT:PC61BM and P3HT:K12 shows that the former contains enough fullerene to form a percolation pathway for electrons, whereas the latter contains a sub

  19. Quantum confined acceptors and donors in InSe nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Mudd, G. W.; Patanè, A. Makarovsky, O.; Eaves, L.; Kudrynskyi, Z. R.; Kovalyuk, Z. D.; Fay, M. W.; Zólyomi, V.; Falko, V.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the radiative recombination of photo-excited carriers bound at native donors and acceptors in exfoliated nanoflakes of nominally undoped rhombohedral γ-polytype InSe. The binding energies of these states are found to increase with the decrease in flake thickness, L. We model their dependence on L using a two-dimensional hydrogenic model for impurities and show that they are strongly sensitive to the position of the impurities within the nanolayer.

  20. Design directed self-assembly of donor-acceptor polymers.

    PubMed

    Marszalek, Tomasz; Li, Mengmeng; Pisula, Wojciech

    2016-09-21

    Donor-acceptor polymers with an alternating array of donor and acceptor moieties have gained particular attention during recent years as active components of organic electronics. By implementation of suitable subunits within the conjugated backbone, these polymers can be made either electron-deficient or -rich. Additionally, their band gap and light absorption can be precisely tuned for improved light-harvesting in solar cells. On the other hand, the polymer design can also be modified to encode the desired supramolecular self-assembly in the solid-state that is essential for an unhindered transport of charge carriers. This review focuses on three major factors playing a role in the assembly of donor-acceptor polymers on surfaces which are (1) nature, geometry and substitution position of solubilizing alkyl side chains, (2) shape of the conjugated polymer defined by the backbone curvature, and (3) molecular weight which determines the conjugation length of the polymer. These factors adjust the fine balance between attractive and repulsive forces and ensure a close polymer packing important for an efficient charge hopping between neighboring chains. On the microscopic scale, an appropriate domain formation with a low density of structural defects in the solution deposited thin film is crucial for the charge transport. The charge carrier transport through such thin films is characterized by field-effect transistors as basic electronic elements. PMID:27440174

  1. Virtual screening of electron acceptor materials for organic photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halls, Mathew D.; Djurovich, Peter J.; Giesen, David J.; Goldberg, Alexander; Sommer, Jonathan; McAnally, Eric; Thompson, Mark E.

    2013-10-01

    Virtual screening involves the generation of structure libraries, automated analysis to predict properties related to application performance and subsequent screening to identify lead systems and estimate critical structure-property limits across a targeted chemical design space. This approach holds great promise for informing experimental discovery and development efforts for next-generation materials, such as organic semiconductors. In this work, the virtual screening approach is illustrated for nitrogen-substituted pentacene molecules to identify systems for development as electron acceptor materials for use in organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. A structure library of tetra-azapentacenes (TAPs) was generated by substituting four nitrogens for CH at 12 sites on the pentacene molecular framework. Molecular properties (e.g. ELUMO, Eg and μ) were computed for each candidate structure using hybrid DFT at the B3LYP/6-311G** level of theory. The resulting TAPs library was then analyzed with respect to intrinsic properties associated with OPV acceptor performance. Marcus reorganization energies for charge transport for the most favorable TAP candidates were then calculated to further determine suitability as OPV electron acceptors. The synthesis, characterization and OPV device testing of TAP materials is underway, guided by these results.

  2. Engineered oligosaccharyltransferases with greatly relaxed acceptor site specificity

    PubMed Central

    Ollis, Anne A.; Zhang, Sheng; Fisher, Adam C.; DeLisa, Matthew P.

    2015-01-01

    The Campylobacter jejuni protein glycosylation locus (pgl) encodes machinery for asparagine-linked (N-linked) glycosylation and serves as the archetype for bacterial N-glycosylation. This machinery has been functionally transferred into Escherichia coli, thereby enabling convenient mechanistic dissection of the N-glycosylation process in this genetically tractable host. Here, we sought to identify sequence determinants in the oligosaccharyltransferase PglB that restrict its specificity to only those glycan acceptor sites containing a negatively charged residue at the −2 position relative to asparagine. This involved creation of a genetic assay named glycoSNAP (glycosylation of secreted N-linked acceptor proteins) that facilitates high-throughput screening of glycophenotypes in E. coli. Using this assay, we isolated several C. jejuni PglB variants that were capable of glycosylating an array of noncanonical acceptor sequences including one in a eukaryotic N-glycoprotein. Collectively, these results underscore the utility of glycoSNAP for shedding light on poorly understood aspects of N-glycosylation and for engineering designer N-glycosylation biocatalysts. PMID:25129029

  3. Engineered oligosaccharyltransferases with greatly relaxed acceptor-site specificity.

    PubMed

    Ollis, Anne A; Zhang, Sheng; Fisher, Adam C; DeLisa, Matthew P

    2014-10-01

    The Campylobacter jejuni protein glycosylation locus (pgl) encodes machinery for asparagine-linked (N-linked) glycosylation and serves as the archetype for bacterial N-linked glycosylation. This machinery has been functionally transferred into Escherichia coli, enabling convenient mechanistic dissection of the N-linked glycosylation process in this genetically tractable host. Here we sought to identify sequence determinants in the oligosaccharyltransferase PglB that restrict its specificity to only those glycan acceptor sites containing a negatively charged residue at the -2 position relative to asparagine. This involved creation of a genetic assay, glycosylation of secreted N-linked acceptor proteins (glycoSNAP), that facilitates high-throughput screening of glycophenotypes in E. coli. Using this assay, we isolated several C. jejuni PglB variants that could glycosylate an array of noncanonical acceptor sequences, including one in a eukaryotic N-glycoprotein. These results underscore the utility of glycoSNAP for shedding light on poorly understood aspects of N-linked glycosylation and for engineering designer N-linked glycosylation biocatalysts. PMID:25129029

  4. Fullerene derivatives as electron acceptors for organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Mi, Dongbo; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Hee Un; Xu, Fei; Hwang, Do-Hoon

    2014-02-01

    Energy is currently one of the most important problems humankind faces. Depletion of traditional energy sources such as coal and oil results in the need to develop new ways to create, transport, and store electricity. In this regard, the sun, which can be considered as a giant nuclear fusion reactor, represents the most powerful source of energy available in our solar system. For photovoltaic cells to gain widespread acceptance as a source of clean and renewable energy, the cost per watt of solar energy must be decreased. Organic photovoltaic cells, developed in the past two decades, have potential as alternatives to traditional inorganic semiconductor photovoltaic cells, which suffer from high environmental pollution and energy consumption during production. Organic photovoltaic cells are composed of a blended film of a conjugated-polymer donor and a soluble fullerene-derivative acceptor sandwiched between a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)-coated indium tin oxide positive electrode and a low-work-function metal negative electrode. Considerable research efforts aim at designing and synthesizing novel fullerene derivatives as electron acceptors with up-raised lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy, better light-harvesting properties, higher electron mobility, and better miscibility with the polymer donor for improving the power conversion efficiency of the organic photovoltaic cells. In this paper, we systematically review novel fullerene acceptors synthesized through chemical modification for enhancing the photovoltaic performance by increasing open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current, and fill factor, which determine the performance of organic photovoltaic cells. PMID:24749413

  5. Spectral, thermal and kinetic studies of charge-transfer complexes formed between the highly effective antibiotic drug metronidazole and two types of acceptors: σ- and π-acceptors.

    PubMed

    Refat, Moamen S; Saad, Hosam A; Adam, Abdel Majid A

    2015-04-15

    Understanding the interaction between drugs and small inorganic or organic molecules is critical in being able to interpret the drug-receptor interactions and acting mechanism of these drugs. A combined solution and solid state study was performed to describe the complexation chemistry of drug metronidazole (MZ) which has a broad-spectrum antibacterial activity with two types of acceptors. The acceptors include, σ-acceptor (i.e., iodine) and π-acceptors (i.e., dichlorodicyanobenzoquinone (DDQ), chloranil (CHL) and picric acid (PA)). The molecular structure, spectroscopic characteristics, the binding modes as well as the thermal stability were deduced from IR, UV-vis, (1)H NMR and thermal studies. The binding ratio of complexation (MZ: acceptor) was determined to be 1:2 for the iodine acceptor and 1:1 for the DDQ, CHL or PA acceptor, according to the CHN elemental analyses and spectrophotometric titrations. It has been found that the complexation with CHL and PA acceptors increases the values of enthalpy and entropy, while the complexation with DDQ and iodine acceptors decreases the values of these parameters compared with the free MZ donor. PMID:25677533

  6. Spectral, thermal and kinetic studies of charge-transfer complexes formed between the highly effective antibiotic drug metronidazole and two types of acceptors: σ- and π-acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Saad, Hosam A.; Adam, Abdel Majid A.

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the interaction between drugs and small inorganic or organic molecules is critical in being able to interpret the drug-receptor interactions and acting mechanism of these drugs. A combined solution and solid state study was performed to describe the complexation chemistry of drug metronidazole (MZ) which has a broad-spectrum antibacterial activity with two types of acceptors. The acceptors include, σ-acceptor (i.e., iodine) and π-acceptors (i.e., dichlorodicyanobenzoquinone (DDQ), chloranil (CHL) and picric acid (PA)). The molecular structure, spectroscopic characteristics, the binding modes as well as the thermal stability were deduced from IR, UV-vis, 1H NMR and thermal studies. The binding ratio of complexation (MZ: acceptor) was determined to be 1:2 for the iodine acceptor and 1:1 for the DDQ, CHL or PA acceptor, according to the CHN elemental analyses and spectrophotometric titrations. It has been found that the complexation with CHL and PA acceptors increases the values of enthalpy and entropy, while the complexation with DDQ and iodine acceptors decreases the values of these parameters compared with the free MZ donor.

  7. Sterilization-CO2-Injection (SCI) BaPS: Establishment of a new method to measure rates of soil respiration and gross nitrification in calcareous agricultural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrads, Hannah; Ingwersen, Joachim; Streck, Thilo

    2013-04-01

    Soil respiration and nitrification are key processes in carbon and nitrogen cycling in soil. An exact measurement of these two processes is a prerequisite for understanding the release of trace gases from soils. During the last decades the Barometric Process Separation (BaPS) method has become a widely used method to measure the turnover rates of these two processes. Its application, however, is currently limited to acidic to slightly acidic soils. In calcareous soils huge amounts of CO2 from soil respiration are dissolved in the soil solution, and the application of the BaPS method is hampered by the exact quantification of this flux. Small errors in this flux may result in huge errors in the calculation of the nitrification and respiration rates. In order to overcome this shortcoming and to extend the applicability of the method to a wider range of soils (especially agricultural soils) we developed a new adaptive method, the Sterilization-CO2-Injection (SCI) method, which aims to determine the CO2 dissolution flux (CO2,aq) experimentally. Therefore, an additional measuring step is introduced in which a sterilized soil subsample is incubated in the BaPS apparatus and known amounts of a pure CO2 gas are injected into the system while CO2 partial pressure is monitored. After each injection peak CO2 partial pressure decreases until a new stable equilibrium concentration is reached. This behavior is used to compute the amount of CO2 transferred to the soil solution applying simple mass balance calculation. The paired information about CO2 and CO2,aq is used to derive a regression equation, which gives CO2,aq as a function of the CO2 partial pressure. This relation is further used within the standard BaPS method. Results of the SCI-BaPS method for gross nitrification rates will be presented and compared to data measured by the 15N pool dilution method (Kirkham and Bartholomew, 1954). Results were obtained with calcareous and acidic agricultural soil samples. It turned

  8. Long-term Coexposure to Hexavalent Chromium and B[a]P Causes Tissue-Specific Differential Biological Effects in Liver and Gastrointestinal Tract of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Martín, Francisco Javier; Fan, Yunxia; Carreira, Vinicius; Ovesen, Jerald L.; Vonhandorf, Andrew; Xia, Ying; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Complex mixtures of environmental agents often cause mixture-specific health effects that cannot be accounted for by a single mechanism. To study the biological effects of exposure to a mixture of chromium-VI and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), often found together in the environment, we exposed mice for 60 days to 0, 55, 550, or 5500 ppb Cr(VI) in drinking water followed by 90 days of coexposure to B[a]P at 0, 1.25, 12.5, or 125 mg/kg/day and examined liver and gastrointestinal (GI) tract for exposure effects. In the liver, the mixture caused more significant histopathology than expected from the sum of effects of the individual components, while in the GI tract, Cr(VI) alone caused significant enterocyte hypertrophy and increases in cell proliferation and DNA damage that were also observed in mice coexposed to B[a]P. Expression of genes involved in drug metabolism, tumor suppression, oxidative stress, and inflammation was altered in mixed exposures relative to control and to singly exposed mice. Drug metabolism and oxidative stress genes were upregulated and tumor suppressor and inflammation genes downregulated in the proximal GI tract, whereas most markers were upregulated in the distal GI tract and downregulated in the liver. Oral exposure to Cr(VI) and B[a]P mixtures appears to have tissue-specific differential consequences in liver and GI tract that cannot be predicted from the effects of each individual toxicant. Tissue specificity may be particularly critical in cases of extended exposure to mixtures of these agents, as may happen in the occupational setting or in areas where drinking water contains elevated levels of Cr(VI). PMID:25820237

  9. Method for producing and regenerating a synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor

    DOEpatents

    Lancet, M. S.; Curran, G. P.; Gorin, E.

    1982-05-18

    A method is described for producing a synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor by feeding a mixture of finely divided silica and at least one finely divided calcium compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate to a fluidized bed; operating the fluidized bed at suitable conditions to produce pellets of synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor and recovering the pellets of synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor from the fluidized bed. Optionally, spent synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor can be charged to the fluidized bed to produce regenerated pellets of synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor. 1 fig.

  10. Method for producing and regenerating a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor

    DOEpatents

    Lancet, Michael S [Pittsburgh, PA; Curran, George P [Pittsburgh, PA; Gorin, Everett [San Rafael, CA

    1982-01-01

    A method for producing a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor by feeding a mixture of finely divided silica and at least one finely divided calcium compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate to a fluidized bed; operating the fluidized bed at suitable conditions to produce pellets of synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor and recovering the pellets of synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor from the fluidized bed. Optionally, spent synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor can be charged to the fluidized bed to produce regenerated pellets of synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor.

  11. Dynamics of iron-acceptor-pair formation in co-doped silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bartel, T.; Gibaja, F.; Graf, O.; Gross, D.; Kaes, M.; Heuer, M.; Kirscht, F.; Möller, C.; Lauer, K.

    2013-11-11

    The pairing dynamics of interstitial iron and dopants in silicon co-doped with phosphorous and several acceptor types are presented. The classical picture of iron-acceptor pairing dynamics is expanded to include the thermalization of iron between different dopants. The thermalization is quantitatively described using Boltzmann statistics and different iron-acceptor binding energies. The proper understanding of the pairing dynamics of iron in co-doped silicon will provide additional information on the electronic properties of iron-acceptor pairs and may become an analytical method to quantify and differentiate acceptors in co-doped silicon.

  12. Computational analysis of the mutations in BAP1, PBRM1 and SETD2 genes reveals the impaired molecular processes in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Occhipinti, Giulia; Santoni, Matteo; Massari, Francesco; Sotte, Valeria; Iacovelli, Roberto; Burattini, Luciano; Santini, Daniele; Montironi, Rodolfo; Cascinu, Stefano; Principato, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell Renal Cell Carcinoma (ccRCC) is due to loss of von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) gene and at least one out of three chromatin regulating genes BRCA1-associated protein-1 (BAP1), Polybromo-1 (PBRM1) and Set domain-containing 2 (SETD2). More than 350, 700 and 500 mutations are known respectively for BAP1, PBRM1 and SETD2 genes. Each variation damages these genes with different severity levels. Unfortunately for most of these mutations the molecular effect is unknown, so precluding a severity classification. Moreover, the huge number of these gene mutations does not allow to perform experimental assays for each of them. By bioinformatic tools, we performed predictions of the molecular effects of all mutations lying in BAP1, PBRM1 and SETD2 genes. Our results allow to distinguish whether a mutation alters protein function directly or by splicing pattern destruction and how much severely. This classification could be useful to reveal correlation with patients’ outcome, to guide experiments, to select the variations that are worth to be included in translational/association studies, and to direct gene therapies. PMID:26452128

  13. Bcl2 at the endoplasmic reticulum protects against a Bax/Bak-independent paraptosis-like cell death pathway initiated via p20Bap31.

    PubMed

    Heath-Engel, Hannah M; Wang, Bing; Shore, Gordon C

    2012-02-01

    Bap31 is an integral ER membrane protein which functions as an escort factor in the sorting of newly synthesized membrane proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). During apoptosis signaling, Bap31 is subject to early cleavage by initiator caspase-8. The resulting p20Bap31 (p20) fragment has been shown to initiate proapoptotic ER-mitochondria Ca2+ transmission, and to exert dominant negative (DN) effects on ER protein trafficking. We now report that ectopic expression of p20 in E1A/DNp53-transformed baby mouse kidney epithelial cells initiates a non-apoptotic form of cell death with paraptosis-like morphology. This pathway was characterized by an early rise in ER Ca2+ stores and massive dilation of the ER/nuclear envelope, dependent on intact ER Ca2+ stores. Ablation of the Bax/Bak genes had no effect on these ER/nuclear envelope transformations, and delayed but did not prevent cell death. ER-restricted expression of Bcl2 in the absence of Bax/Bak, however, delayed both ER/nuclear envelope dilation and cell death. This prosurvival role of Bcl2 at the ER thus extended beyond inhibition of Bax/Bak, and correlated with its ability to lower ER Ca2+ stores. Furthermore, these results indicate that ER restricted Bcl2 is capable of antagonizing not only apoptosis, but also a non-apoptotic, Bax/Bak independent, paraptosis-like form of cell death. PMID:22197342

  14. Prevalence of Germline BAP1, CDKN2A, and CDK4 Mutations in an Australian Population-Based Sample of Cutaneous Melanoma Cases.

    PubMed

    Aoude, Lauren G; Gartside, Michael; Johansson, Peter; Palmer, Jane M; Symmons, Judith; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Hayward, Nicholas K

    2015-04-01

    Mutations in Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A) and Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4 (CDK4) contribute to susceptibility in approximately 40% of high-density cutaneous melanoma (CMM) families and about 2% of unselected CMM cases. BRCA-1 associated protein-1 (BAP1) has been more recently shown to predispose to CMM and uveal melanoma (UMM) in some families; however, its contribution to CMM development in the general population is unreported. We sought to determine the contribution of these genes to CMM susceptibility in a population-based sample of cases from Australia. We genotyped 1,109 probands from Queensland families and found that approximately 1.31% harbored mutations in CDKN2A, including some with novel missense mutations (p.R22W, p.G35R and p.I49F). BAP1 missense variants occurred in 0.63% of cases but no CDK4 variants were observed in the sample. This is the first estimate of the contribution of BAP1 and CDK4 to a population-based sample of CMM and supports the previously reported estimate of CDKN2A germline mutation prevalence. PMID:25787093

  15. Barium recovery by crystallization in a fluidized-bed reactor: effects of pH, Ba/P molar ratio and seed.

    PubMed

    Su, Chia-Chi; Reano, Resmond L; Dalida, Maria Lourdes P; Lu, Ming-Chun

    2014-06-01

    The effects of process conditions, including upward velocity inside the column, the amount of added seed and seed size, the pH value of the precipitant or the phosphate stream and the Ba/P molar ratio in a fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) were studied with a view to producing BaHPO₄ crystals of significant size and maximize the removal of barium. XRD were used to identify the products that were collected from the FBR. Experimental results show that an upward velocity of 48 cmmin(-1) produced the largest BaHPO₄ crystals with a size of around 0.84-1.0mm. The addition of seed crystals has no effect on barium removal. The use of a seed of a size in the ranges unseeded<0.149-0.29 mm<0.149 mm<0.29-0.42 mm produced increasing amounts of increasingly large crystals. The largest BaHPO₄ crystals were obtained at pH 8.4-8.8 with a Ba/P molar ratio of 1.0. In the homogeneous and heterogeneous processes, around 98% of barium was removed at pH 8.4-8.6 and [Ba]/[P]=1.0. The XRD results show that a significant amount of barium phosphate (Ba₃(PO₄)₂) was obtained at pH 11. The compounds BaHPO₄ and BaO were present at a pH of below 10. PMID:24462085

  16. Lithium related deep and shallow acceptors in Li-doped ZnO nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, C.; Gehlhoff, W.; Wagner, M. R.; Malguth, E.; Callsen, G.; Kirste, R.; Salameh, B.; Hoffmann, A.; Polarz, S.; Aksu, Y.; Driess, M.

    2010-01-01

    We study the existence of Li-related shallow and deep acceptor levels in Li-doped ZnO nanocrystals using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. ZnO nanocrystals with adjustable Li concentrations between 0% and 12% have been prepared using organometallic precursors and show a significant lowering of the Fermi energy upon doping. The deep Li acceptor with an acceptor energy of 800 meV could be identified in both EPR and PL measurements and is responsible for the yellow luminescence at 2.2 eV. Additionally, a shallow acceptor state at 150 meV above the valence band maximum is made responsible for the observed donor-acceptor pair and free electron-acceptor transitions at 3.235 and 3.301 eV, possibly stemming from the formation of Li-related defect complexes acting as acceptors.

  17. beta-Lactamase-catalyzed hydrolysis of acyclic depsipeptides and acyl transfer to specific amino acid acceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, R F; Govardhan, C P

    1984-01-01

    beta-Lactamases from all three classes, A, B, and C, catalyze the hydrolysis of specific acyclic depsipeptide (PhCH2CONHCR1R2CO2CHR3CO2H) analogs of acyl-D-alanyl-D-alanine peptides. The depsipeptides investigated, which are chemically as reactive toward nucleophiles as penicillins, are in general poor substrates, although differences between the classes of beta-lactamases have been observed: the order of effectiveness seems to be C greater than B greater than A. Certain class A and C beta-lactamases also catalyze phenylacetylglycyl transfer between phenylacetylglycyl depsipeptides and specific amino acid acceptors, a type of reaction hitherto identified more closely with D-alanyl-D-alanine transpeptidases than with beta-lactamases. Preliminary indications of an acyl-enzyme intermediate in these reactions have been obtained. These results support the suggestion [Tipper, D.J. and Strominger, J.L. (1965) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 54, 1133-1141] that beta-lactamases are evolutionary descendants of bacterial cell wall D-alanyl-D-alanine transpeptidases. PMID:6424114

  18. Electron-Donor-Acceptor (EDA) Complexes Of Aromatic Hydrocarbons With Organic Acceptors In Solution And In The Solid State. A Quantitative FT-IR Investigation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruni, Paolo; Giorgini, Elisabetta; Tosi, Giorgio; Zampini, Angela

    1989-12-01

    Liquid phase FT-IR investigation on π-π Electron-Donor-Acceptor (EDA) complexes between arenes and organic acceptors leads to values of formation constants that are in good agreement with the ones from other techniques (UV-Vis and NMR). In addition solid state FT-IR and UV-Vis determinations on the complexes are also reported and discussed.

  19. Chemopreventive Agents from Physalis minima Function as Michael Reaction Acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Men, Ruizhi; Li, Ning; Ding, Chihong; Tang, Yingzhan; Xing, Yachao; Ding, Wanjing; Ma, Zhongjun

    2016-01-01

    Background: The fruits of some varieties of genus Physalis have been used as delicious fruits and functional food in the Northeast of China. Materials and Methods: To reveal the functional material basis, we performed bioactivity-guided phytochemical research and chemopreventive effect assay of the constituents from Physalis minima. Results: It was demonstrated that the ethyl acetate extract of P. minima L. (EEPM) had potential quinone reductase (QR) inducing activity with induction ratio (IR, QR induction activity) value of 1.47 ± 0.24, and glutathione binding property as potential Michael reaction acceptors (with an α, β-unsaturated ketone moiety). Furthermore, bioactivity-guided phytochemical research led eight compounds (1–8), which were elucidated as 3-isopropyl-5-acetoxycyclohexene-2-one-1 (1), isophysalin B (2), physalin G (3), physalin D (4), physalin I (5), physordinose B (6), stigmasterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (7) and 5α-6β-dihydroxyphysalin R (8) on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analyses and HRESIMS. Then, isophysalin B (2) and physordinose B (6) showed significant QR inducing activity with IR value of 2.80 ± 0.19 and 2.38 ± 0.46, respectively. SUMMARY An ultra-performance liquid chromatographic method with glutathione as the substrate was used to detect the Michael reaction acceptors in extracts of Physalis minima (EPM)We investigated the chemical constituents of EPM guided by biological activity methodIsophysalin B (1) and physordinose B (6) showed strong quinone reductase inducing activity with induction ratio values of 2.80 ± 0.19 and 2.38 ± 0.46This study generated useful information for consumers and many encourage researchers to utilize edible fruits from Physalis as a source of phytochemicals Abbreviations used: EPM: Extracts of Physalis minima, EEPM: Ethyl acetate extract of Physalis minima L., GSH: Glutathione, MRAs: Michael reaction acceptors, QR: Quinone reductase. PMID:27279713

  20. Nanostructured donor-acceptor self assembly with improved photoconductivity.

    PubMed

    Saibal, B; Ashar, A Z; Devi, R Nandini; Narayan, K S; Asha, S K

    2014-11-12

    Nanostructured supramolecular donor-acceptor assemblies were formed when an unsymmetrical N-substituted pyridine functionalized perylenebisimide (UPBI-Py) was complexed with oligo(p-phenylenevinylene) (OPVM-OH) complementarily functionalized with hydroxyl unit and polymerizable methacrylamide unit at the two termini. The resulting supramolecular complex [UPBI-Py (OPVM-OH)]1.0 upon polymerization by irradiation in the presence of photoinitiator formed well-defined supramolecular polymeric nanostructures. Self-assembly studies using fluorescence emission from thin film samples showed that subtle structural changes occurred on the OPV donor moiety following polymerization. The 1:1 supramolecular complex showed red-shifted aggregate emission from both OPV (∼500 nm) and PBI (∼640 nm) units, whereas the OPV aggregate emission was replaced by intense monomeric emission (∼430 nm) upon polymerizing the methacrylamide units on the OPVM-OH. The bulk structure was studied using wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WXRD). Complex formation resulted in distinct changes in the cell parameters of OPVM-OH. In contrast, a physical mixture of 1 mol each of OPVM-OH and UPBI-Py prepared by mixing the powdered solid samples together showed only a combination of reflections from both parent molecules. Thin film morphology of the 1:1 molecular complex as well as the supramolecular polymer complex showed uniform lamellar structures in the domain range <10 nm. The donor-acceptor supramolecular complex [UPBI-Py (OPVM-OH)]1.0 exhibited space charge limited current (SCLC) with a bulk mobility estimate of an order of magnitude higher accompanied by a higher photoconductivity yield compared to the pristine UPBI-Py. This is a very versatile method to obtain spatially defined organization of n and p-type semiconductor materials based on suitably functionalized donor and acceptor molecules resulting in improved photocurrent response using self-assembly. PMID:25283356

  1. Carbon and group II acceptor coimplantation in GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, R.; Lau, S.S.; Poker, D.B.; Chu, P.K.; Fung, K.K.; Wang, N.

    1998-11-01

    Coimplantations of carbon and one of the group II acceptors, Mg, Zn, or Cd, were performed and compared to implantations involving only a single element (Mg, Zn, or Cd) or Ga and C coimplanted into GaAs substrates. The group II and C (II/C) coimplantations act to balance the crystal stoichiometry since group II atoms prefer to reside in the Ga sublattice and C prefers to reside in the As sublattice. The electrical characteristics of the various implantations were obtained from sheet and differential Hall measurements. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry was employed to determine the amount of implantation-induced damage which was then correlated to the amount of C activation in the group II/C coimplanted samples. It was found that coimplantation of the heavier group II acceptors, Zn and Cd, resulted in layers with larger peak hole concentrations. This is a result of the large amount of lattice damage created by these elements which is thought to provide the necessary abundance of As vacancies for C activation. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements of the samples after implant activation indicate that C coimplantation significantly reduces the diffusivity of the group II acceptors. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy indicated a unique defect structure (extrinsic dislocation loops) for the cases of group II/C coimplantation. These dislocation loops are located at the diffusion front of the group II element in the samples and therefore have a rather profound influence on the diffusion of the group II elements. A rationalization of the defect structure and the effect it has on the diffusion of group II elements is given. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Protein sequences and redox titrations indicate that the electron acceptors in reaction centers from heliobacteria are similar to Photosystem I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trost, J. T.; Brune, D. C.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers isolated from Heliobacillus mobilis exhibit a single major protein on SDS-PAGE of 47 000 Mr. Attempts to sequence the reaction center polypeptide indicated that the N-terminus is blocked. After enzymatic and chemical cleavage, four peptide fragments were sequenced from the Heliobacillus mobilis apoprotein. Only one of these sequences showed significant specific similarity to any of the protein and deduced protein sequences in the GenBank data base. This fragment is identical with 56% of the residues, including both cysteines, found in highly conserved region that is proposed to bind iron-sulfur center Fx in the Photosystem I reaction center peptide that is the psaB gene product. The similarity to the psaA gene product in this region is 48%. Redox titrations of laser-flash-induced photobleaching with millisecond decay kinetics on isolated reaction centers from Heliobacterium gestii indicate a midpoint potential of -414 mV with n = 2 titration behavior. In membranes, the behavior is intermediate between n = 1 and n = 2, and the apparent midpoint potential is -444 mV. This is compared to the behavior in Photosystem I, where the intermediate electron acceptor A1, thought to be a phylloquinone molecule, has been proposed to undergo a double reduction at low redox potentials in the presence of viologen redox mediators. These results strongly suggest that the acceptor side electron transfer system in reaction centers from heliobacteria is indeed analogous to that found in Photosystem I. The sequence similarities indicate that the divergence of the heliobacteria from the Photosystem I line occurred before the gene duplication and subsequent divergence that lead to the heterodimeric protein core of the Photosystem I reaction center.

  3. Unraveling the Photoswitching Mechanism in Donor-Acceptor Stenhouse Adducts.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Michael M; Wezenberg, Sander J; Szymanski, Wiktor; Feringa, Ben L

    2016-05-25

    Molecular photoswitches have opened up a myriad of opportunities in applications ranging from responsive materials and control of biological function to molecular logics. Here, we show that the photoswitching mechanism of donor-acceptor Stenhouse adducts (DASA), a recently reported class of photoswitches, proceeds by photoinduced Z-E isomerization, followed by a thermal, conrotatory 4π-electrocyclization. The photogenerated intermediate is manifested by a bathochromically shifted band in the visible absorption spectrum of the DASA. The identification of the role of this intermediate reveals a key step in the photoswitching mechanism that is essential to the rational design of switching properties via structural modification. PMID:27152878

  4. Incorporation of Cu Acceptors in ZnO Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Oo, W.M.H.; Mccluskey, Matthew D.; Huso, Jesse; Morrison, J.; Bergman, Leah; Engelhard, Mark H.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.

    2010-09-16

    Doping of semiconductor nanocrystals is an important problem in nanomaterials research. Using infrared (IR) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we have observed Cu acceptor dopants that were intentionally introduced into ZnO nanocrystals. The incorporation of Cu2+ dopants increased as the diameter of the nanocrystals was increased from ~3 to 5 nm. Etching the nanocrystals with acetic acid revealed a core-shell structure, where a 2-nm lightly doped core is surrounded by a heavily doped shell. These observations are consistent with the trapped dopant model, in which dopant atoms stick to the surface of the core and are overgrown by the nanocrystal material.

  5. Tuning of Stepwise Neutral-Ionic Transitions by Acceptor Site Doping in Alternating Donor/Acceptor Chains.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Keita; Nishio, Masaki; Miyasaka, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    The stepwise neutral-ionic (N-I) phase transition found in the alternating donor/acceptor (DA) chain [Ru2(2,3,5,6-F4PhCO2)4(DMDCNQI)]·2(p-xylene) (0; 2,3,5,6-F4PhCO2(-) = 2,3,5,6-tetrafluorobenzoate; DMDCNQI = 2,5-dimethyl-N,N'-dicyanoquinonediimine) was tuned by partly substituting the acceptor DMDCNQI with 2,5-dimethoxy-N,N'-dicyanoquinonediimine (DMeODCNQI), which displays a poorer electron affinity in an isostructural series. The site-doped series comprised [Ru2(2,3,5,6-F4PhCO2)4(DMDCNQI)1-x(DMeODCNQI)x]·2(p-xylene) for doping rates (x) = 0.05 (0.05-MeO), 0.10 (0.10-MeO), 0.15 (0.15-MeO), and 0.20 (0.20-MeO). The neutral chain [Ru2(2,3,5,6-F4PhCO2)4(DMeODCNQI)]·4(p-xylene) (1), which only contained DMeODCNQI, was also characterized. All site-doped compounds were isostructural to 0 except 1 despite their identical DA chain motif. Except at an x value of 0.20, they displayed a two-step N-I transition involving an intermediate phase. This transition occurred at high temperatures in 0 but shifted to lower temperatures in a parallel manner with increasing doping rate. Simultaneously, each transition broadened with increasing doping rate, leading to a convergence of two transitions at an x value approximating 0.2. Donor/acceptor-site-doping techniques present somewhat different impacts in terms of interchain Coulomb effects. PMID:26878151

  6. Glycosylation of closely spaced acceptor sites in human glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Shrimal, Shiteshu; Gilmore, Reid

    2013-01-01

    Summary Asparagine-linked glycosylation of proteins by the oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) occurs when acceptor sites or sequons (N-x≠P-T/S) on nascent polypeptides enter the lumen of the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Metazoan organisms assemble two isoforms of the OST that have different catalytic subunits (STT3A or STT3B) and partially non-overlapping cellular roles. Potential glycosylation sites move past the STT3A complex, which is associated with the translocation channel, at the protein synthesis elongation rate. Here, we investigated whether close spacing between acceptor sites in a nascent protein promotes site skipping by the STT3A complex. Biosynthetic analysis of four human glycoproteins revealed that closely spaced sites are efficiently glycosylated by an STT3B-independent process unless the sequons contain non-optimal sequence features, including extreme close spacing between sequons (e.g. NxTNxT) or the presence of paired NxS sequons (e.g. NxSANxS). Many, but not all, glycosylation sites that are skipped by the STT3A complex can be glycosylated by the STT3B complex. Analysis of a murine glycoprotein database revealed that closely spaced sequons are surprisingly common, and are enriched for paired NxT sites when the gap between sequons is less than three residues. PMID:24105266

  7. Donor and acceptor concentrations in degenerate InN

    SciTech Connect

    Look, D.C.; Lu, H.; Schaff, W.J.; Jasinski, J.; Liliental-Weber, Z.

    2002-01-28

    A formalism is presented to determine donor (N{sub D}) and acceptor (N{sub A}) concentrations in wurtzitic InN characterized by degenerate carrier concentration (n) and mobility ({mu}). The theory includes scattering not only by charged point defects and impurities, but also by charged threading dislocations, of concentration N{sub dis}. For an 0.45-{micro}m-thick InN layer grown on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} by molecular beam epitaxy, having N{sub dis} = 5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}, determined by transmission electron microscopy, n(20 K) = 3.5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}, and {mu}(20 K) = 1055 cm{sup 2}/V-s, determined by Hall-effect measurements, the fitted values are N{sub D} = 4.7 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and N{sub A} = 1.2 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}. The identities of the donors and acceptors are not known, although a comparison of N{sub D} with analytical data, and also with calculations of defect formation energies, suggests that a potential candidate for the dominant donor is H.

  8. Nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors for biological sulphide oxidation.

    PubMed

    Munz, G; Mannucci, A; Arreola-Vargas, J; Alatriste-Mondragon, F; Giaccherini, F; Mori, G

    2015-01-01

    Autotrophic denitrification with sulphide using nitrate (R1) and nitrite (R2) as electron acceptor was investigated at bench scale. Different solids retention times (SRT) (5 and 20 d) have been tested in R1 while R2 was operated at SRT=13 d. The results indicated that the process allows complete sulphide removal to be achieved in all tested conditions. Tested sulphide loads were estimated from the H2S produced in a pilot-scale anaerobic digester treating vegetable tannery primary sludge; nitrogen loads originated from the nitrification of the supernatant. Average nitrogen removal efficiencies higher than 80% were observed in all the tested conditions once steady state was reached. A maximum specific nitrate removal rate equal to 0.35 g N-NO3- g VSS(-1) d(-1) was reached in R1. Due to sulphide limitation, incomplete denitrification was observed and nitrite and thiosulphate tend to accumulate especially in the presence of variable environmental conditions in both R1 and R2. Lower SRT caused higher NO2accumulated/NO3reduced ratios (0.22 and 0.24, with SRT of 5 d and 20 d, respectively) using nitrate as electron acceptor in steady-state condition. Temperature decrease caused sudden NO2accumulated/NO3reduced ratio increase in R1 and NO2- removal decrease in R2. PMID:26247758

  9. Mercury removal from waste gases by manganese oxide acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallaro, S.; Bertuccio, N.; Antonucci, P.; Giordano, N.

    1982-02-01

    Removal of mercury vapor from a waste gas has been investigated at atmospheric pressure and at ambient temperature using a series of manganese-based reagents supported on an inert medium. The effect of catalyst composition on activity and the influence of relative humidity of the air stream have been studied. Whereas ..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ has a very low mercury sorption capacity, sorption occurs copiously on impregnated silver- and copper-doped MnO/sub 2/ acceptors but the much higher activity is reduced by the presence of water vapour in the carrier gas. The morphological and microstructural characterization of the (MnO/sub 2/, AgNO/sub 3/) ..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ reagents has shown selective deposition of AgNO/sub 3/ particles on ..beta..-MnO/sub 2/ crystallites which are dispersed on the ..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ matrix. As the adsorption is associated with a sequence of specific colour changes a chemical oxidation mechanism is proposed. Acceptor deactivation is discussed. 9 figures, 3 tables.

  10. Donor-acceptor complexation and dehydrogenation chemistry of aminoboranes.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Adam C; Sabourin, Kyle J; McDonald, Robert; Ferguson, Michael J; Rivard, Eric

    2012-12-01

    A series of formal donor-acceptor adducts of aminoborane (H(2)BNH(2)) and its N-substituted analogues (H(2)BNRR') were prepared: LB-H(2)BNRR'(2)-BH(3) (LB = DMAP, IPr, IPrCH(2) and PCy(3); R and R' = H, Me or tBu; IPr = [(HCNDipp)(2)C:] and Dipp = 2,6-iPr(2)C(6)H(3)). To potentially access complexes of molecular boron nitride, LB-BN-LA (LA = Lewis acid), preliminary dehydrogenation chemistry involving the parent aminoborane adducts LB-H(2)BNH(2)-BH(3) was investigated using [Rh(COD)Cl](2), CuBr, and NiBr(2) as dehydrogenation catalysts. In place of isolating the intended dehydrogenated BN donor-acceptor complexes, the formation of borazine was noted as a major product. Attempts to prepare the fluoroarylborane-capped aminoborane complexes, LB-H(2)BNH(2)-B(C(6)F(5))(3), are also described. PMID:23153209

  11. Synthesis of dithienosilole-based highly photoluminescent donor-acceptor type compounds.

    PubMed

    Ohshita, Joji; Tominaga, Yuta; Tanaka, Daiki; Ooyama, Yousuke; Mizumo, Tomonobu; Kobayashi, Norifumi; Higashimura, Hideyuki

    2013-03-14

    Highly photoluminescent acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) and donor-acceptor (D-A) type compounds with a dithienosilole unit as the donor and perfluorotolyl or dimesitylboryl group(s) as the acceptor were prepared by the reaction of lithiated dithienosilole derivatives with perfluorotoluene or fluorodimesitylborane, respectively. The resulting A-D-A and D-A type compounds showed red-shifted UV absorption and PL bands compared to those of simple dithienosiloles having no acceptor units, reported previously, and were highly photoluminescent in the solid state as well as in solution. Solvatochromic behaviour that would arise from the intramolecular donor-acceptor interaction were observed for the D-A type compounds with respect to the UV absorption and PL spectra. In addition, it was found that bis(dimesitylboryl)dithienosilole and (dimesitylboryl)(methylthio)dithienosilole responded to coexisting fluoride anions, leading to clear UV absorption and PL spectral changes in solutions. PMID:23295388

  12. The structure and bonding of iron-acceptor pairs in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, S.; Assali, L.V.C.; Kimerling, L.C.

    1995-08-01

    The highly mobile interstitial iron and Group III impurities (B, Al, Ga, In) form iron-acceptor pairs in silicon. Based on the migration kinetics and taking host silicon as a dielectric medium, we have simulated the pairing process in a static silicon lattice. Different from the conventional point charge ionic model, our phenomenological calculations include (1) a correction that takes into account valence electron cloud polarization which adds a short range, attractive interaction in the iron-acceptor pair bonding; and (2) silicon lattice relaxation due to the atomic size difference which causes a local strain field. Our model explains qualitatively (1) trends among the iron-acceptor pairs revealing an increase of the electronic state hole emission energy with increasing principal quantum number of acceptor and decreasing pair separation distance; and (2) the stable and metastable sites and configurational symmetries of the iron-acceptor pairs. The iron-acceptor pairing and bonding mechanism is also discussed.

  13. Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides: Chemical feature based pharmacophore generation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanli; Zhang, Saisai; Jin, Hongwei; Wang, Wei; Huo, Jianxin; Zhou, Lishe; Wang, Yongfu; Feng, Fengqin; Zhang, Liangren

    2011-08-01

    A validated 3D pharmacophore model was generated for a series of ACE inhibitory peptides, which consisted of five features (two hydrophobic functions, two hydrogen bond acceptors, and a negative ionizable function). The built model was able to correctly predict the activity of known ACE inhibitors. The model was then used as query to search 3D databases of peptides. Three novel peptides (I, II and III) were synthesized and biologically evaluated in vitro. It appears that the in vitro activity of peptides I, II and III was consistent with their molecular modeling results. Our results provided confidence for the utility of the pharmacophore model to retrieve novel ACE inhibitory peptides with desired biological activity by virtual screening. PMID:21621881

  14. Stepwise charge transfer complexation of some pyrimidines with σ-acceptor iodine involving a new unconventional acceptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabie, Usama. M.; Mohamed, Ramadan. A.; Abou-El-Wafa, Moustafa. H.

    2007-11-01

    Interactions of some pyrimidine derivatives, 4-amino-2,6-dimethylpyrimidine, kyanmethin, (4AP), 2-amino-4,6-dimethylpyrimidine (2AP), 2-aminopyrimidine (AP), 2-amino-4-methylpyrimidine (AMP), 2-amino-4-methoxy-6-methylpyrimidine (AMMP), and 4-amino-5-chloro-2,6-dimethylpyrimidine (ACDP) as electron donors, with iodine (I 2), as a typical σ-electron acceptor, have been studied. Electronic absorption spectra of these interactions in several organic solvents of different polarities have performed instant appearance of clear charge transfer (CT) bands. Formation constants ( KCT), molar absorption coefficients ( ɛCT) and thermodynamic properties, Δ H, Δ S, and Δ G, of these interactions have been determined and discussed. Electronic absorption spectra of the solutions of the synthesized pyrimidines-iodine, P-I 2, CT complexes have shown the characteristic bands of the triiodide ion, I 3-. UV/vis spectral tracking of these interactions have shown that by lapse of time the first formed CT complex, P-I 2, is transformed to the corresponding triiodide complex, P +I.I 3-, then, the later interacts as a new unconventional acceptor and it forms a CT complex of the form (P).(P +I.I 3-). Elemental analyses of these solid complexes have indicated the stoichiometric ratio 2:2, or formally 1:1, P:I 2.

  15. Stepwise charge transfer complexation of some pyrimidines with sigma-acceptor iodine involving a new unconventional acceptor.

    PubMed

    Rabie, Usama M; Mohamed, Ramadan A; Abou-El-Wafa, Moustafa H

    2007-11-01

    Interactions of some pyrimidine derivatives, 4-amino-2,6-dimethylpyrimidine, kyanmethin, (4AP), 2-amino-4,6-dimethylpyrimidine (2AP), 2-aminopyrimidine (AP), 2-amino-4-methylpyrimidine (AMP), 2-amino-4-methoxy-6-methylpyrimidine (AMMP), and 4-amino-5-chloro-2,6-dimethylpyrimidine (ACDP) as electron donors, with iodine (I(2)), as a typical sigma-electron acceptor, have been studied. Electronic absorption spectra of these interactions in several organic solvents of different polarities have performed instant appearance of clear charge transfer (CT) bands. Formation constants (KCT), molar absorption coefficients (epsilonCT) and thermodynamic properties, DeltaH, DeltaS, and DeltaG, of these interactions have been determined and discussed. Electronic absorption spectra of the solutions of the synthesized pyrimidines-iodine, P-I2, CT complexes have shown the characteristic bands of the triiodide ion, I3*. UV/vis spectral tracking of these interactions have shown that by lapse of time the first formed CT complex, P-I2, is transformed to the corresponding triiodide complex, P(+)I.I3*, then, the later interacts as a new unconventional acceptor and it forms a CT complex of the form (P).(P+I.I3*). Elemental analyses of these solid complexes have indicated the stoichiometric ratio 2:2, or formally 1:1, P:I2. PMID:17317281

  16. Donor-Acceptor-Type Semiconducting Polymers Consisting of Benzothiadiazole Derivatives as Electron-Acceptor Units for Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Su; Park, Jong Baek; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Hwang, Do-Hoon

    2015-11-01

    We synthesized two fused pentacyclic donor-acceptor structures, where the two different outer electron rich thiophene (DTPBT) and electron poor benzene (ICTh) moieties are covalently bonded to the central electron-deficient benzothiadiazole core by two nitrogen bridges. These new electron-acceptor DTPBT and ICTh building blocks were copolymerized with fluorene, as the electron donor group, via Suzuki coupling polymerization, to produce two new alternating copolymers, PFDTPBT and PFICTh, respectively. The average molecular weights of the synthesized polymers were determined by GPC. The number-average molecular weights of PFDTPBT and PFICTh were 19,000 (PDI = 2.5) and 20,000 (PDI = 4.0), respectively. The optical bandgap energies of the polymers were measured from their absorption onsets to be 2.15 and 2.55 eV, depending on the polymer structure. The HOMO energy levels of the polymers were determined, by measuring the oxidation onsets of the polymer films by cyclic voltammetry. The measured HOMO energy levels of PFDTPBT and PFICTh were -5.10 and -5.57 eV, respectively. When the polymers were blended with PC71BM, as the active layer for bulk-heterojunction photovoltaic devices, power conversion efficiencies were 2.08% and 0.34%, respectively, under AM 1.5 G (100 mW cm(-2)) conditions. PMID:26726610

  17. The random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assay to determine DNA alterations, repair and transgenerational effects in B(a)P exposed Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Atienzar, Franck A; Jha, Awadhesh N

    2004-08-18

    The random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) is a useful assay for the detection of genotoxin-induced DNA damage and mutations. In this study, we have further evaluated the potential of this assay to measure benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P]-induced DNA changes, and repair (in kinetic experiments) as well as transgenerational effects in the water fleas, Daphnia magna. The organisms, which reproduce parthenogenetically, were exposed to 50 microg L(-1) B(a)P for 3 or 6 days and were allowed to recover in clean medium for 12 or 9 days, respectively. Qualitative and quantitative changes were observed in RAPD profiles generated not only from the B(a)P exposed Daphnia but also from previously treated organisms during the recovery experiments. The fact that some of the RAPD changes disappeared at the end of both recovery experiments suggested that the DNA effects were fully repaired or reversed. In addition, some of the B(a)P-induced RAPD alterations detected in parental D. magna were also observed in the offspring patterns. This suggested that DNA alterations that occurred in germ cells were probably transmitted to the next cohorts. The present study shows that the RAPD method can be useful to qualitatively assess the kinetics of DNA changes, repair and transgenerational effects and such effects could potentially be linked to survival and reproductive success at higher levels of biological organisation. In addition, the water fleas have efficient capabilities to repair or reverse B(a)P-induced DNA effects. Finally, unrepaired or misrepaired genetic damage induced by genotoxins such as B(a)P could be transmitted to next generations in these parthenogenetically reproducing organisms. PMID:15288546

  18. Application of the comet and micronucleus assays to the detection of B[a]P genotoxicity in haemocytes of the green-lipped mussel (Perna viridis).

    PubMed

    Siu, W H L; Cao, J; Jack, R W; Wu, R S S; Richardson, B J; Xu, L; Lam, P K S

    2004-03-10

    Green-lipped mussels (Perna viridis) were exposed to water-borne benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) at nominal concentrations of 0, 0.3, 3 and 30 microg l(-1) for up to 12 days, and both the relative levels of DNA strand breaks (assessed using an alkaline comet assay) and the proportion of micronucleus (MN) formation were monitored in mussel haemocytes at days 0, 1, 3, 6 and 12. The results of the comet assay indicated that an increase in the proportion of strand breaks occurred generally with increasing B[a]P concentration, but a significant decrease in the levels of DNA damage was observed after exposure for 12 days at all concentrations tested, suggesting that the patterns of changes in the levels of DNA strand breakage can be explained by the threshold dependent DNA repair theory. Moreover, the relatively slow development and recovery of the DNA damage response in mussel haemocytes in comparison with previous findings utilizing P. viridis hepatopancreas suggests that the response of DNA alteration upon exposure to B[a]P may be tissue-specific in this species. Monitoring the frequency of micronucleus development in mussel haemocytes indicated both dose- and time-response relationships within the exposure period. Furthermore, the levels of DNA strand breakage correlated well with the levels of micronucleus induction, suggesting a possible cause and effect relationship between the two damage types. We suggest that DNA strand breakage and micronucleus formation in mussel haemocytes can potentially be used as convenient biomarkers of exposure to genotoxicants in the marine environment. PMID:15168946

  19. Generation of Nitrogen Acceptors in ZnO using Pulse Thermal Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jun; Ott, Ronald D; Sabau, Adrian S; Pan, Zhengwei; Xiu, Faxian; Liu, Jilin; Erie, Jean-Marie; Norton, David P

    2008-01-01

    Bipolar doping in wide bandgap semiconductors is difficult to achieve under equilibrium conditions because of the spontaneous formation of compensating defects and unfavorable energetics for dopant substitution. In this work, we explored the use of rapid pulse thermal processing for activating nitrogen dopants into acceptor states in ZnO. Low-temperature photoluminescence spectra revealed both acceptor-bound exciton (A{sup 0}X) and donor-acceptor pair emissions, which present direct evidence for acceptors generated after pulse thermal processing of nitrogen-doped ZnO. This work suggests that pulse thermal processing is potentially an effective method for p-type doping of ZnO.

  20. Brain natriutetic peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007509.htm Brain natriuretic peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) test is a blood test that measures ...

  1. Vasoactive intestinal peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003508.htm Vasoactive intestinal peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a test that measures the amount ...

  2. Glycolic acid inhibits enzymatic, hemorrhagic and edema-inducing activities of BaP1, a P-I metalloproteinase from Bothrops asper snake venom: insights from docking and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Pereañez, Jaime Andrés; Patiño, Arley Camilo; Rey-Suarez, Paola; Núñez, Vitelbina; Henao Castañeda, Isabel Cristina; Rucavado, Alexandra

    2013-09-01

    Glycolic acid (GA) (2-Hydroxyethanoic acid) is widely used as chemical peeling agent in Dermatology and, more recently, as a therapeutic and cosmetic compound in the field of skin care and disease treatment. In this work we tested the inhibitory ability of glycolic acid on the enzymatic, hemorrhagic and edema-inducing activities of BaP1, a P-I metalloproteinase from Bothrops asper venom, which induces a variety of toxic actions. Glycolic acid inhibited the proteolytic activity of BaP1 on azocasein, with an IC₅₀ of 1.67 mM. The compound was also effective at inhibiting the hemorrhagic activity of BaP1 in skin and muscle in experiments involving preincubation of enzyme and inhibitor prior to injection. When BaP1 was injected i.m. and then, at the same site, different concentrations of glycolic acid were administered at either 0 or 5 min, 7 mM solutions of the inhibitor partially abrogated hemorrhagic activity when administered at 0 min. Moreover, glycolic acid inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, edema-forming activity of BaP1 in the footpad. In order to have insights on the mode of action of glycolic acid, UV-vis and intrinsic fluorescence studies were performed. Results of these assays suggest that glycolic acid interacts directly with BaP1 and chelates the Zn²⁺ ion at the active site. These findings were supported by molecular docking results, which suggested that glycolic acid forms hydrogen bonds with residues Glu143, Arg110 and Ala111 of the enzyme. Additionally, molecular modeling results suggest that the inhibitor chelates Zn²⁺, with a distance of 3.58 Å, and may occupy part of substrate binding cleft of BaP1. Our results suggest that glycolic acid is a candidate for the development of inhibitors to be used in snakebite envenomation. PMID:23726855

  3. Steady state protein levels in Geobacter metallireducens grown with Iron (III) citrate or nitrate as terminal electron acceptor.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrendt, A. J.; Tollaksen, S. L.; Lindberg, C.; Zhu, W.; Yates, J. R., III; Nevin, K. P.; Lovley, D.; Giometti, C. S.; Biosciences Division; The Scripps Research Inst.; Univ. of Massachusetts

    2007-01-01

    Geobacter species predominate in aquatic sediments and submerged soils where organic carbon sources are oxidized with the reduction of Fe(III). The natural occurrence of Geobacter in some waste sites suggests this microorganism could be useful for bioremediation if growth and metabolic activity can be regulated. 2-DE was used to monitor the steady state protein levels of Geobacter metallireducens grown with either Fe(III) citrate or nitrate to elucidate metabolic differences in response to different terminal electron acceptors present in natural environments populated by Geobacter. Forty-six protein spots varied significantly in abundance (p<0.05) between the two growth conditions; proteins were identified by tryptic peptide mass and peptide sequence determined by MS/MS. Enzymes involved in pyruvate metabolism and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle were more abundant in cells grown with Fe(III) citrate, while proteins associated with nitrate metabolism and sensing cellular redox status along with several proteins of unknown function were more abundant in cells grown with nitrate. These results indicate a higher level of flux through the TCA cycle in the presence of Fe(III) compared to nitrate. The oxidative stress response observed in previous studies of Geobacter sulfurreducens grown with Fe(III) citrate was not seen in G. metallireducens.

  4. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested. PMID:27145593

  5. Fermi Surface of Donor and Acceptor Graphite Intercalation Compounds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guonan

    The Fermi surfaces and the electronic properties of the donor-type stage-1 C_8K and stage-2 C_{24}K, as well as the acceptor-type stage-2 BiCl_3, stage-3 HgCl_2 and stage-3 SbF _5 graphite intercalation compounds were investigated by means of the de Haas-van Alphen effect. The dHvA spectra of the stage-1 C_8 K exhibit two dHvA frequencies, 3126 T and 4250 T. The corresponding effective masses were 0.86 m _0 and 0.92 m_0, respectively. The angular dependence of the dHvA frequencies for a direction within +/-18^circ of the c-axis showed that there are both three-dimensional and two dimensional parts of the Fermi surfaces in C _8K. The three-dimensional Fermi surface has a cross-sectional area corresponding to the dHvA frequency of 3126 T. The charge transfer per potassium atom measured from the dHvA effect is 0.97. This implies that the potassium is ionized completely. These dHvA experimental results support both the Tatar and Rabii model and the revised Ohno, Nakao and Kamimura model for C_8K. Two dominant dHvA frequencies were obtained in stage-2 C_{24}K. They are 286 T and 2570 T, respectively. The predictions of Blinowski's model are in agreement with the experimental data. The charge transfer per potassium is found to be 0.88. This suggests that the potassium s-band is above the Fermi level in C_{24}K. The dHvA measurements for the acceptor compounds show that the stage-2 BiCl_3 GIC had two dHvA frequencies, 327T and 1012T, and each stage -3 compound had three dominant frequencies. They are 121T, 523T and 664T for HgCl_2, and 172T, 656T and 852T for SbF_5. The cyclotron masses corresponding to the dHvA frequencies for these compounds were measured from the temperature dependence of the dHvA amplitudes. The theoretical predictions of the dHvA frequencies and the cyclotron masses from the Blinowski's band models for stage-2 and stage-3 compounds are in agreement with the experimental results. The angular dependence of the dHvA frequencies show that the Fermi

  6. Verification of the structural alerts for Michael acceptors.

    PubMed

    Schultz, T Wayne; Yarbrough, Jason W; Hunter, Robert S; Aptula, Aynur O

    2007-09-01

    A diverse series of polarized alpha,beta-unsaturated and related compounds were evaluated for reactivity with a spectrophotometric assay using the sulfhydryl group in the form of the cysteine residue of the tripeptide GSH as a model nucleophile. The reactive end point (RC 50) calculations were compared to previously described structural alerts based on conventional organic chemistry. This comparison focused on polarized alpha,beta-unsaturates, including ones containing an aldehyde, ketone, ester, sulfoxide, sulfone, sulfonate, nitro, or cyano moiety as well as ortho- and para-pyridino compounds and ortho- and para-quinones. The alerts were coded by substructure and are available in open-source software ( http://sourceforge.net/projects/chemeval). Comparisons of reactivity between selected analogues revealed that only the polarized alpha,beta-unsaturates were reactive. These results verified the coded structural alerts that define the applicability domain for Michael acceptor electrophiles. PMID:17672510

  7. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  8. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  9. Antimicrobial peptides in 2014.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  10. Mass transfer of electron acceptor aross the capillary fringe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Piepenbrink, M.; Grathwohl, P.

    2005-12-01

    Transverse dispersion has been identified as a potentially limiting parameter controlling the mixing of electron donors and electron acceptors for natural attenuation of plumes originating from continuously emitting sources, however determining reactive transverse dispersion coefficients is not a simple task. The objective of this work is to elaborate the mass transfer of electron acceptor across the capillary fringe. A two-dimensional numerical reactive transport model and a fully controlled tank experiment are set up to investigate the mass transfer across the capillary and reactive fringe, where the oxygen supply is the limiting factor. The tank (77.9 times 14 times 0.8 cm) is made from acrylic-glass and filled with glass beads (0.5-0.75mm). Sodium dithionite, an easily oxidizable compound, is used as a surrogate for contaminants and is continuously injected from the inlets of the tank and reaches a steady state flow. Air circulates on the top of the glass beads. The oxygen concentrations as well as the reactive products (sulfate) are measured at the outlets of the tank with an oxygen sensor and via IC. In addition to that, resazurine, a redox indicator, is added to visualize the redox zones. These two-dimensional experimental results show quantitatively and qualitatively how the oxygen concentrations decrease at the plume fringe. Two dimensional numerical simulations with Min3P predicted oxygen distributions are compared with the experimental results. Acknowledgements: This work was funded by Helmholtz Association and Helmholtz Research Center UFZ; Project: `Virtual Institute for isotope biogeochemistry-biologically mediated processes at geochemical gradients and interfaces in soil - aquifer systems', Contract VH-VI-155.

  11. Acceptor-donor-acceptor-based small molecules with varied crystallinity: processing additive-induced nanofibril in blend film for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao; Chen, Yujin; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Huifang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Yaowen; Yang, Xiaoming; Ma, Changqi; Chen, Liwei; Zhu, Xiulin; Tu, Yingfeng

    2013-09-01

    A series of acceptor-donor-acceptor-based small molecules (SMs) with varied crystallinity were successfully synthesized. The processing additive can induce the SMs to self-organize as nanofibrils with higher crystallinity and controlled scales of nanofibrils, which have significant influence on the photovoltaic performance.A series of acceptor-donor-acceptor-based small molecules (SMs) with varied crystallinity were successfully synthesized. The processing additive can induce the SMs to self-organize as nanofibrils with higher crystallinity and controlled scales of nanofibrils, which have significant influence on the photovoltaic performance. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthetic process and characterizations of SMs; TGA, electrochemical properties, molecular orbital surfaces of SMs; AFM images of SM:PC71BM blend films; EQE curves; optical, electrochemical properties and photovoltaic parameters. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03048b

  12. Probing the donor and acceptor substrate specificity of the γ-glutamyl transpeptidase.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin; Legler, Patricia M; Khavrutskii, Ilja; Scorpio, Angelo; Compton, Jaimee R; Robertson, Kelly L; Friedlander, Arthur M; Wallqvist, Anders

    2012-02-14

    γ-Glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) is a two-substrate enzyme that plays a central role in glutathione metabolism and is a potential target for drug design. GGT catalyzes the cleavage of γ-glutamyl donor substrates and the transfer of the γ-glutamyl moiety to an amine of an acceptor substrate or water. Although structures of bacterial GGT have revealed details of the protein-ligand interactions at the donor site, the acceptor substrate site is relatively undefined. The recent identification of a species-specific acceptor site inhibitor, OU749, suggests that these inhibitors may be less toxic than glutamine analogues. Here we investigated the donor and acceptor substrate preferences of Bacillus anthracis GGT (CapD) and applied computational approaches in combination with kinetics to probe the structural basis of the enzyme's substrate and inhibitor binding specificities and compare them with human GGT. Site-directed mutagenesis studies showed that the R432A and R520S variants exhibited 6- and 95-fold decreases in hydrolase activity, respectively, and that their activity was not stimulated by the addition of the l-Cys acceptor substrate, suggesting an additional role in acceptor binding and/or catalysis of transpeptidation. Rat GGT (and presumably HuGGT) has strict stereospecificity for L-amino acid acceptor substrates, while CapD can utilize both L- and D-acceptor substrates comparably. Modeling and kinetic analysis suggest that R520 and R432 allow two alternate acceptor substrate binding modes for L- and D-acceptors. R432 is conserved in Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis, Burkholderia mallei, Helicobacter pylori and Escherichia coli, but not in human GGT. Docking and MD simulations point toward key residues that contribute to inhibitor and acceptor substrate binding, providing a guide to designing novel and specific GGT inhibitors. PMID:22257032

  13. Differentiation of UK endemic strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport from epidemic North American strains by PCR detection of a truncated bapA chromosomal gene.

    PubMed

    Horton, R A; Card, R; Randall, L P; Teale, C J

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a PCR test to detect chromosomal differences between epidemic multidrug resistant (epi-MDR) strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport (S. Newport) and non-epi-MDR strains of S. Newport that are endemic to the United Kingdom (UK). Sequence analysis of the biofilm-associated protein A gene (bapA) showed that epi-MDR strains of S. Newport from the United States of America (USA) had a deletion of 309 bp, which was not present in non-epi-MDR strains of S. Newport from the UK. A PCR test was developed using primers designed to target this difference and was applied to a panel of S. Newport isolates comprising of strains from the UK (n=20, non-epi-MDR), from the USA (n=10, epi-MDR) and from Canada (n=7). A second panel of isolates (n=73) was used to assess the test specificity, and these isolates consisted of non-Newport Salmonella serovars (n=25), and other epidemic serovars (n=48). Epi-MDR S. Newport isolates produced a characteristic 505 bp amplicon, whereas non-epi-MDR S. Newport isolates produced an 814 bp amplicon. The bapA PCR has potential to discriminate between these S. Newport strains irrespective of their carrying resistance genes. PMID:26850548

  14. Dichotomous Role of Exciting the Donor or the Acceptor on Charge Generation in Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Koen H; Wijpkema, Alexandra S G; van Franeker, Jacobus J; Wienk, Martijn M; Janssen, René A J

    2016-08-10

    In organic solar cells, photoexcitation of the donor or acceptor phase can result in different efficiencies for charge generation. We investigate this difference for four different 2-pyridyl diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) polymer-fullerene solar cells. By comparing the external quantum efficiency spectra of the polymer solar cells fabricated with either [60]PCBM or [70]PCBM fullerene derivatives as acceptor, the efficiency of charge generation via donor excitation and acceptor excitation can both be quantified. Surprisingly, we find that to make charge transfer efficient, the offset in energy between the HOMO levels of donor and acceptor that govern charge transfer after excitation of the acceptor must be larger by ∼0.3 eV than the offset between the corresponding two LUMO levels when the donor is excited. As a consequence, the driving force required for efficient charge generation is significantly higher for excitation of the acceptor than for excitation of the donor. By comparing charge generation for a total of 16 different DPP polymers, we confirm that the minimal driving force, expressed as the photon energy loss, differs by about 0.3 eV for exciting the donor and exciting the acceptor. Marcus theory may explain the dichotomous role of exciting the donor or the acceptor on charge generation in these solar cells. PMID:27452683

  15. Optical activation behavior of ion implanted acceptor species in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Skromme, B.J.; Martinez, G.L.

    2000-07-01

    Ion implantation is used to investigate the spectroscopic properties of Mg, Be, and C acceptors in GaN. Activation of these species is studied using low temperature photoluminescence (PL). Low dose implants into high quality undoped hydride vapor phase epitaxial (HVPE) material are used in conjunction with high temperature (1300 C) rapid thermal anneals to obtain high quality spectra. Dramatic, dose-dependent evidence of Mg acceptor activation is observed without any co-implants, including a strong, sharp neutral Mg acceptor-bound exciton and strong donor-acceptor pair peaks. Variable temperature measurements reveal a band-to-acceptor transition, whose energy yields an optical binding energy of 224 meV. Be and C implants yield only slight evidence of shallow acceptor-related features and produce dose-correlated 2.2 eV PL, attributed to residual implantation damage. Their poor optical activation is tentatively attributed to insufficient vacancy production by these lighter ions. Clear evidence is obtained for donor-Zn acceptor pair and acceptor-bound exciton peaks in Zn-doped HVPE material.

  16. Physiological and electrochemical effects of different electron acceptors on bacterial anode respiration in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yonggang; Xiang, Yinbo; Xia, Chunyu; Wu, Wei-Min; Sun, Guoping; Xu, Meiying

    2014-07-01

    To understand the interactions between bacterial electrode respiration and the other ambient bacterial electron acceptor reductions, alternative electron acceptors (nitrate, Fe2O3, fumarate, azo dye MB17) were added singly or multiply into Shewanella decolorationis microbial fuel cells (MFCs). All the added electron acceptors were reduced simultaneously with current generation. Adding nitrate or MB17 resulted in more rapid cell growth, higher flavin concentration and higher biofilm metabolic viability, but lower columbic efficiency (CE) and normalized energy recovery (NER) while the CE and NER were enhanced by Fe2O3 or fumarate. The added electron acceptors also significantly influenced the cyclic voltammetry profile of anode biofilm probably via altering the cytochrome c expression. The highest power density was observed in MFCs added with MB17 due to the electron shuttle role of the naphthols from MB17 reduction. The results provided important information for MFCs applied in practical environments where contains various electron acceptors. PMID:24862003

  17. Identification of acceptor states in Li-doped p-type ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Y. J.; Ye, Z. Z.; Lu, J. G.; Xu, W. Z.; Zhu, L. P.; Zhao, B. H.; Limpijumnong, Sukit

    2006-07-01

    We investigate photoluminescence from reproducible Li-doped p-type ZnO thin films prepared by dc reactive magnetron sputtering. The LiZn acceptor state, with an energy level located at 150meV above the valence band maximum, is identified from free-to-neutral-acceptor transitions. Another deeper acceptor state located at 250meV emerges with the increased Li concentration. A broad emission centered at 2.96eV is attributed to a donor-acceptor pair recombination involving zinc vacancy. In addition, two chemical bonding states of Li, evident in x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, are probably associated with the two acceptor states observed.

  18. Purification and characterization of a carbohydrate: acceptor oxidoreductase from Paraconiothyrium sp. that produces lactobionic acid efficiently.

    PubMed

    Kiryu, Takaaki; Nakano, Hirofumi; Kiso, Taro; Murakami, Hiromi

    2008-03-01

    A carbohydrate:acceptor oxidoreductase from Paraconiothyrium sp. was purified and characterized. The enzyme efficiently oxidized beta-(1-->4) linked sugars, such as lactose, xylobiose, and cellooligosaccharides. The enzyme also oxidized maltooligosaccharides, D-glucose, D-xylose, D-galactose, L-arabinose, and 6-deoxy-D-glucose. It specifically oxidized the beta-anomer of lactose. Molecular oxygen and 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol were reduced by the enzyme as electron acceptors. The Paraconiothyrium enzyme was identified as a carbohydrate:acceptor oxidoreductase according to its specificity for electron donors and acceptors, and its molecular properties, as well as the N-terminal amino acid sequence. Further comparison of the amino acid sequences of lactose oxidizing enzymes indicated that carbohydrate:acceptor oxidoreductases belong to the same group as glucooligosaccharide oxidase, while they differ from cellobiose dehydrogenases and cellobiose:quinone oxidoreductases. PMID:18323642

  19. [Plant signaling peptides. Cysteine-rich peptides].

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Kowalczyk, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Recent bioinformatic and genetic analyses of several model plant genomes have revealed the existence of a highly abundant group of signaling peptides that are defined as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs). CRPs are usually in size between 50 and 90 amino acid residues, they are positively charged, and they contain 4-16 cysteine residues that are important for the correct conformational folding. Despite the structural differences among CRP classes, members from each class have striking similarities in their molecular properties and function. The present review presents the recent progress in research on signaling peptides from several families including: EPF/EPFL, SP11/SCR, PrsS, RALF, LURE, and some other peptides belonging to CRP group. There is convincing evidence indicating multiple roles for these CRPs as signaling molecules during the plant life cycle, ranging from stomata development and patterning, self-incompatibility, pollen tube growth and guidance, reproductive processes, and nodule formation. PMID:26281357

  20. Cell Penetrating Peptides and Cationic Antibacterial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez Plaza, Jonathan G.; Morales-Nava, Rosmarbel; Diener, Christian; Schreiber, Gabriele; Gonzalez, Zyanya D.; Lara Ortiz, Maria Teresa; Ortega Blake, Ivan; Pantoja, Omar; Volkmer, Rudolf; Klipp, Edda; Herrmann, Andreas; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPP) and cationic antibacterial peptides (CAP) have similar physicochemical properties and yet it is not understood how such similar peptides display different activities. To address this question, we used Iztli peptide 1 (IP-1) because it has both CPP and CAP activities. Combining experimental and computational modeling of the internalization of IP-1, we show it is not internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis, yet it permeates into many different cell types, including fungi and human cells. We also show that IP-1 makes pores in the presence of high electrical potential at the membrane, such as those found in bacteria and mitochondria. These results provide the basis to understand the functional redundancy of CPPs and CAPs. PMID:24706763

  1. Dynamic Peptide Library for the Discovery of Charge Transfer Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Berdugo, Cristina; Nalluri, Siva Krishna Mohan; Javid, Nadeem; Escuder, Beatriu; Miravet, Juan F; Ulijn, Rein V

    2015-11-25

    Coupling of peptide self-assembly to dynamic sequence exchange provides a useful approach for the discovery of self-assembling materials. In here, we demonstrate the discovery and optimization of aqueous, gel-phase nanostructures based on dynamically exchanging peptide sequences that self-select to maximize charge transfer of n-type semiconducting naphthalenediimide (NDI)-dipeptide bioconjugates with various π-electron-rich donors (dialkoxy/hydroxy/amino-naphthalene or pyrene derivatives). These gel-phase peptide libraries are characterized by spectroscopy (UV-vis and fluorescence), microscopy (TEM), HPLC, and oscillatory rheology and it is found that, of the various peptide sequences explored (tyrosine Y-NDI with tyrosine Y, phenylalanine F, leucine L, valine V, alanine A or glycine G-NH2), the optimum sequence is tyrosine-phenylalanine in each case; however, both its absolute and relative yield amplification is dictated by the properties of the donor component, indicating cooperativity of peptide sequence and donor/acceptor pairs in assembly. The methodology provides an in situ discovery tool for nanostructures that enable dynamic interfacing of supramolecular electronics with aqueous (biological) systems. PMID:26540455

  2. Regulation of human dihydrodiol dehydrogenase by Michael acceptor xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Ciaccio, P J; Jaiswal, A K; Tew, K D

    1994-06-01

    A human oxidoreductase (H-37) that is overexpressed in ethacrynic acid-resistant HT29 colon cells (Ciaccio, P. J., Stuart, J.E., and Tew, K.D. (1993) Mol. Pharmacol. 43, 845-853) has been identified as a dihydrodiol dehydrogenase. Translated protein from a dihydrodiol dehydrogenase cDNA isolated from a library prepared from ethacrynic acid-resistant HT29 cell poly(A+) RNA was recognized by anti-H-37 IgG and was identical in molecular weight with H-37. The isolated cDNA was identical in both nucleotide and amino acid sequences with the recently cloned liver dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (Stolz, A., Hammond, L., Lou, H., Takikawa, H., Ronk, M., and Shively, J.E. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 10448-10457). Using this cDNA as probe, we have examined its induction by Michael acceptors. The steady state dihydrodiol dehydrogenase mRNA level in the ethacrynic acid-resistant line was increased 30-fold relative to that of wild-type cells. Twenty-four hour treatment of wild-type cells with ethacrynic acid or dimethyl maleate increased mRNA 10-fold and 5-fold, respectively. These changes are accompanied by both increased protein expression and increased NADP-dependent 1-acenaphthenol oxidative activity in cell cytosol. In gel shift assays, compared to wild type controls, increased binding of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase human antioxidant response element (hARE) DNA to redox labile protein complexes present in treated and resistant cell nuclear extract was observed. Ethacrynic acid induced CAT activity 2-fold in Hepa1 cells stably transfected with NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase hARE-tk-CAT chimeric gene construct. Thus, dihydrodiol dehydrogenase protein is inducible by de novo synthesis from mRNA by structurally related monofunctional inducer Michael acceptors. Altered in vitro binding of nuclear protein to the hARE is indirect evidence for the involvement of an element similar to hARE in the regulation of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase by these agents. PMID:7515059

  3. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions. PMID:26374891

  4. Swift Electrofluorochromism of Donor-Acceptor Conjugated Polytriphenylamines.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingwei; Liang, Ziqi

    2016-07-20

    Electrofluorochromic (EFC) materials, which exhibit electrochemically controllable fluorescence, hold great promise in optoelectronic devices and biological analysis. Here we design such donor-acceptor (D-A) conjugated polymers-P(TPACO) and P(TCEC)-that contain the same electron-rich and oxidizable polytriphenylamine (PTPA) as π-backbone, yet with different electron-deficient ketone and cyano units as pendant groups, respectively. They both exhibit solvatochromic effects due to intrinsic characteristics of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT). Compared to P(TPACO), P(TCEC) shows stronger ICT, which leads to higher electrochemical oxidation potential and lower ion diffusion coefficient. Moreover, both polymers present simultaneous electrochromic (EC) and EFC behaviors with multistate display and remarkably rapid fluorescence response. The response time of P(TPACO) is as short as 0.19 s, nearly 4-fold faster than that of P(TCEC) (0.92 s). Such rapid response is found to be determined by the ion diffusion coefficient which is associated with the ICT nature. Finally, the EFC display device based on P(TPACO) is successfully demonstrated, which shows green fluorescence ON/OFF switching upon applied potentials. This work has successfully demonstrated that swift EFCs can be achieved by rational modulation of the ICT effect in such D-A conjugated polymers. PMID:27347724

  5. Ultrafast Energy Transfer in Ultrathin Organic Donor/Acceptor Blend

    PubMed Central

    Kandada, Ajay Ram Srimath; Grancini, Giulia; Petrozza, Annamaria; Perissinotto, Stefano; Fazzi, Daniele; Raavi, Sai Santosh Kumar; Lanzani, Guglielmo

    2013-01-01

    It is common knowledge that poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)/[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend, a prototype system for bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells, consists of a network of tens of nanometers-large donor-rich and acceptor-rich phases separated by extended finely intermixed border regions where PCBM diffuse into P3HT. Here we specifically address the photo-induced dynamics in a 10 nm thin P3HT/PCBM blend that consists of the intermixed region only. Using the multi-pass transient absorption technique (TrAMP) that enables us to perform ultra high sensitive measurements, we find that the primary process upon photoexcitation is ultrafast energy transfer from P3HT to PCBM. The expected charge separation due to hole transfer from PCBM to P3HT occurs in the 100 ps timescale. The derived picture is much different from the accepted view of ultra-fast electron transfer at the polymer/PCBM interface and provides new directions for the development of efficient devices. PMID:23797845

  6. Poly(trifluoromethyl)azulenes: structures and acceptor properties

    SciTech Connect

    Clikeman, Tyler T.; Bukovsky, Eric V.; Kuvychko, Igor V.; San, Long K.; Deng, Shihu; Wang, Xue B.; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Strauss, Steven H.; Boltalina, Olga V.

    2014-07-10

    Azulene is a non-alternant, non-benzenoid aromatic hydrocarbon with an intense blue colour, a dipole moment of 1.0 D,1 positive electron affinity, and an “anomalous” emission from the second excited state in violation of Kasha’s rule.2,3 Azulene’s unique properties have potential uses in molecular switches,4,5 molecular diodes,6 organic photovoltaics,7 and charge transfer complexes.8-12 Introduction of electron-withdrawing groups to the azulenic core, such as CN,8,13,14 halogens,15-19 and CF3,20,21 can enhance certain electrical and photophysical properties. In this work, we report six new trifluoromethyl derivatives of azulene (AZUL), three isomers of AZUL(CF3)3 and three isomers of AZUL(CF3)4, and the first X-ray structure of a π-stacked donor-acceptor complex of a trifluoromethyl azulene with donor pyrene.

  7. Potassium acceptor doping of ZnO crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Parmar, Narendra S. Lynn, K. G.; Corolewski, Caleb D.; McCluskey, Matthew D.

    2015-05-15

    ZnO bulk single crystals were doped with potassium by diffusion at 950°C. Positron annihilation spectroscopy confirms the filling of zinc vacancies and a different trapping center for positrons. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements show the diffusion of potassium up to 10 μm with concentration ∼1 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3}. IR measurements show a local vibrational mode (LVM) at 3226 cm{sup −1}, at a temperature of 9 K, in a potassium doped sample that was subsequently hydrogenated. The LVM is attributed to an O–H bond-stretching mode adjacent to a potassium acceptor. When deuterium substitutes for hydrogen, a peak is observed at 2378 cm{sup −1}. The O-H peak is much broader than the O-D peak, perhaps due to an unusually low vibrational lifetime. The isotopic frequency ratio is similar to values found in other hydrogen complexes. Potassium doping increases the resistivity up to 3 orders of magnitude at room temperature. The doped sample has a donor level at 0.30 eV.

  8. Molecular insights into the terminal energy acceptor in cyanobacterial phycobilisome.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Wei, Tian-Di; Zhang, Nan; Xie, Bin-Bin; Su, Hai-Nan; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Wang, Zhi-Xin; Wu, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2012-09-01

    The linker protein L(CM) (ApcE) is postulated as the major component of the phycobilisome terminal energy acceptor (TEA) transferring excitation energy from the phycobilisome to photosystem II. L(CM) is the only phycobilin-attached linker protein in the cyanobacterial phycobilisome through auto-chromophorylation. However, the underlying mechanism for the auto-chromophorylation of L(CM) and the detailed molecular architecture of TEA is still unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the N-terminal phycobiliprotein-like domain of L(CM) (Pfam00502, LP502) can specifically recognize phycocyanobilin (PCB) by itself. Biochemical assays indicated that PCB binds into the same pocket in LP502 as that in the allophycocyanin α-subunit and that Ser152 and Asp155 play a vital role in LP502 auto-chromophorylation. By carefully conducting computational simulations, we arrived at a rational model of the PCB-LP502 complex structure that was supported by extensive mutational studies. In the PCB-LP502 complex, PCB binds into a deep pocket of LP502 with a distorted conformation, and Ser152 and Asp155 form several hydrogen bonds to PCB fixing the PCB Ring A and Ring D. Finally, based on our results, the dipoles and dipole-dipole interactions in TEA are analysed and a molecular structure for TEA is proposed, which gives new insights into the energy transformation mechanism of cyanobacterial phycobilisome. PMID:22758351

  9. Analysis of nonlinear optical properties in donor–acceptor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Paul N.; Pachter, Ruth; Nguyen, Kiet A.

    2014-05-14

    Time-dependent density functional theory has been used to calculate nonlinear optical (NLO) properties, including the first and second hyperpolarizabilities as well as the two-photon absorption cross-section, for the donor-acceptor molecules p-nitroaniline and dimethylamino nitrostilbene, and for respective materials attached to a gold dimer. The CAMB3LYP, B3LYP, PBE0, and PBE exchange-correlation functionals all had fair but variable performance when compared to higher-level theory and to experiment. The CAMB3LYP functional had the best performance on these compounds of the functionals tested. However, our comprehensive analysis has shown that quantitative prediction of hyperpolarizabilities is still a challenge, hampered by inadequate functionals, basis sets, and solvation models, requiring further experimental characterization. Attachment of the Au{sub 2}S group to molecules already known for their relatively large NLO properties was found to further enhance the response. While our calculations show a modest enhancement for the first hyperpolarizability, the enhancement of the second hyperpolarizability is predicted to be more than an order of magnitude.

  10. Potassium acceptor doping of ZnO crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmar, Narendra S.; Corolewski, Caleb D.; McCluskey, Matthew D.; Lynn, K. G.

    2015-05-01

    ZnO bulk single crystals were doped with potassium by diffusion at 950°C. Positron annihilation spectroscopy confirms the filling of zinc vacancies and a different trapping center for positrons. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements show the diffusion of potassium up to 10 μm with concentration ˜1 × 1016 cm-3. IR measurements show a local vibrational mode (LVM) at 3226 cm-1, at a temperature of 9 K, in a potassium doped sample that was subsequently hydrogenated. The LVM is attributed to an O-H bond-stretching mode adjacent to a potassium acceptor. When deuterium substitutes for hydrogen, a peak is observed at 2378 cm-1. The O-H peak is much broader than the O-D peak, perhaps due to an unusually low vibrational lifetime. The isotopic frequency ratio is similar to values found in other hydrogen complexes. Potassium doping increases the resistivity up to 3 orders of magnitude at room temperature. The doped sample has a donor level at 0.30 eV.

  11. Ultrafast Energy Transfer in Ultrathin Organic Donor/Acceptor Blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandada, Ajay Ram Srimath; Grancini, Giulia; Petrozza, Annamaria; Perissinotto, Stefano; Fazzi, Daniele; Raavi, Sai Santosh Kumar; Lanzani, Guglielmo

    2013-06-01

    It is common knowledge that poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)/[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend, a prototype system for bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells, consists of a network of tens of nanometers-large donor-rich and acceptor-rich phases separated by extended finely intermixed border regions where PCBM diffuse into P3HT. Here we specifically address the photo-induced dynamics in a 10 nm thin P3HT/PCBM blend that consists of the intermixed region only. Using the multi-pass transient absorption technique (TrAMP) that enables us to perform ultra high sensitive measurements, we find that the primary process upon photoexcitation is ultrafast energy transfer from P3HT to PCBM. The expected charge separation due to hole transfer from PCBM to P3HT occurs in the 100 ps timescale. The derived picture is much different from the accepted view of ultra-fast electron transfer at the polymer/PCBM interface and provides new directions for the development of efficient devices.

  12. Rates of primary electron transfer reactions in the photosystem I reaction center reconstituted with different quinones as the secondary acceptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kumazaki, Shigeichi; Kandori, Hideki; Yoshihara, Keitaro ); Iwaki, Masayo; Itoh, Shigeru ); Ikegamu, Isamu )

    1994-10-27

    Rates of sequential electron transfer reactions from the primary electron donor chlorophyll dimer (P700) to the electron acceptor chlorophyll a-686 (A[sub 0]) and to the secondary acceptor quinone (Q[sub [phi

  13. Modifying the electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes using designed surfactant peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarajeewa, Dinushi R.; Dieckmann, Gregg R.; Nielsen, Steven O.; Musselman, Inga H.

    2012-07-01

    The electronic properties of carbon nanotubes can be altered significantly by modifying the nanotube surface. In this study, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were functionalized noncovalently using designed surfactant peptides, and the resultant SWCNT electronic properties were investigated. These peptides have a common amino acid sequence of X(Valine)5(Lysine)2, where X indicates an aromatic amino acid containing either an electron-donating or electron-withdrawing functional group (i.e. p-amino-phenylalanine or p-cyano-phenylalanine). Circular dichroism spectra showed that the surfactant peptides primarily have random coil structures in an aqueous medium, both alone and in the presence of SWCNTs, simplifying analysis of the peptide/SWCNT interaction. The ability of the surfactant peptides to disperse individual SWCNTs in solution was verified using atomic force microscopy and ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared spectroscopy. The electronic properties of the surfactant peptide/SWCNT composites were examined using the observed nanotube Raman tangential band shifts and the observed additional features near the Fermi level in the scanning tunneling spectroscopy dI/dV spectra. The results revealed that SWCNTs functionalized with surfactant peptides containing electron-donor or electron-acceptor functional groups showed n-doped or p-doped altered electronic properties, respectively. This work unveils a facile and versatile approach to modify the intrinsic electronic properties of SWCNTs using a simple peptide structure, which is easily adaptable to obtain peptide/SWCNT composites for the design of tunable nanoscale electronic devices.The electronic properties of carbon nanotubes can be altered significantly by modifying the nanotube surface. In this study, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were functionalized noncovalently using designed surfactant peptides, and the resultant SWCNT electronic properties were investigated. These peptides have a common amino

  14. Antihypertensive peptides from curd

    PubMed Central

    Dabarera, Melani Chathurika; Athiththan, Lohini V.; Perera, Rasika P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Curd (Dadhi) peptides reduce hypertension by inhibiting angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and serum cholesterol. Peptides vary with bacterial species and milk type used during fermentation. Aim: To isolate and assay the antihypertensive peptides, before and after digestion, in two commercially available curd brands in Sri Lanka. Materials and Methods: Whey (Dadhi Mastu) separated by high-speed centrifugation was isolated using reverse-phase-high- performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Eluted fractions were analyzed for ACE inhibitory activity using modified Cushman and Cheung method. Curd samples were subjected to enzymatic digestion with pepsin, trypsin, and carboxypeptidase-A at their optimum pH and temperature. Peptides isolated using reverse-phase-HPLC was assayed for ACE inhibitory activity. Results: Whey peptides of both brands gave similar patterns (seven major and five minor peaks) in HPLC elution profile. Smaller peptides concentration was higher in brand 1 and penta-octapeptides in brand 2. Pentapeptide had the highest ACE inhibitory activity (brand 2–90% and brand 1–73%). After digestion, di and tri peptides with similar inhibitory patterns were obtained in both which were higher than before digestion. Thirteen fractions were obtained, where nine fractions showed more than 70% inhibition in both brands with 96% ACE inhibition for a di-peptide. Conclusion: Curd has ACE inhibitory peptides and activity increases after digestion. PMID:27011726

  15. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  16. Polycyclic peptide therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Baeriswyl, Vanessa; Heinis, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Owing to their excellent binding properties, high stability, and low off-target toxicity, polycyclic peptides are an attractive molecule format for the development of therapeutics. Currently, only a handful of polycyclic peptides are used in the clinic; examples include the antibiotic vancomycin, the anticancer drugs actinomycin D and romidepsin, and the analgesic agent ziconotide. All clinically used polycyclic peptide drugs are derived from natural sources, such as soil bacteria in the case of vancomycin, actinomycin D and romidepsin, or the venom of a fish-hunting coil snail in the case of ziconotide. Unfortunately, nature provides peptide macrocyclic ligands for only a small fraction of therapeutic targets. For the generation of ligands of targets of choice, researchers have inserted artificial binding sites into natural polycyclic peptide scaffolds, such as cystine knot proteins, using rational design or directed evolution approaches. More recently, large combinatorial libraries of genetically encoded bicyclic peptides have been generated de novo and screened by phage display. In this Minireview, the properties of existing polycyclic peptide drugs are discussed and related to their interesting molecular architectures. Furthermore, technologies that allow the development of unnatural polycyclic peptide ligands are discussed. Recent application of these technologies has generated promising results, suggesting that polycyclic peptide therapeutics could potentially be developed for a broad range of diseases. PMID:23355488

  17. Peptide folding simulations.

    PubMed

    Gnanakaran, S; Nymeyer, Hugh; Portman, John; Sanbonmatsu, Kevin Y; García, Angel E

    2003-04-01

    Developments in the design of small peptides that mimic proteins in complexity, recent advances in nanosecond time-resolved spectroscopy methods to study peptides and the development of modern, highly parallel simulation algorithms have come together to give us a detailed picture of peptide folding dynamics. Two newly implemented simulation techniques, parallel replica dynamics and replica exchange molecular dynamics, can now describe directly from simulations the kinetics and thermodynamics of peptide formation, respectively. Given these developments, the simulation community now has the tools to verify and validate simulation protocols and models (forcefields). PMID:12727509

  18. New organic donor-acceptor-π-acceptor sensitizers for efficient dye-sensitized solar cells and photocatalytic hydrogen evolution under visible-light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing; Cui, Shicong; Wang, Dan; Zhou, Ying; Zhou, Hao; Hu, Yue; Liu, Jin-Gang; Long, Yitao; Wu, Wenjun; Hua, Jianli; Tian, He

    2014-10-01

    Two organic donor-acceptor-π-acceptor (D-A-π-A) sensitizers (AQ and AP), containing quinoxaline/pyrido[3,4-b]pyrazine as the auxiliary acceptor, have been. Through fine-tuning of the auxiliary acceptor, a higher designed and synthesized photoelectric conversion efficiency of 6.02% for the AQ-based dye-sensitized solar cells under standard global AM1.5 solar conditions was achieved. Also, it was found that AQ-Pt/TiO2 photocatalysts displayed a better rate of H2 evolution under visible-light irradiation (420 nm<λ<780 nm) because of the stability of the oxidized states and the lower rates of electron recombination. Importantly, sensitizers AQ and AP-Pt/TiO2 showed strong photocatalytic activity during continuous light soaking for 10 h with methanol as the sacrificial electron donor. Additionally, the processes of their intermolecular electron transfer were further investigated theoretically by using time-dependent DFT. The calculated results indicate that the auxiliary acceptor plays the role of an electron trap and results in broad spectral responses. PMID:25154958

  19. Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis Membrane Protein Expression in Response to Electron Acceptor Availability

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, Carol S.; Khare, Tripti; Verberkmoes, Nathan; O'Loughlin, Ed; Lindberg, Carl; Thompson, Melissa; Hettich, Robert

    2006-04-05

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a gram negative metal-reducing bacterium, can utilize a large number of electron acceptors. In the natural environment, S. oneidensis utilizes insoluble metal oxides as well as soluble terminal electron acceptors. The purpose of this ERSP project is to identify differentially expressed proteins associated with the membranes of S. oneidensis MR-1 cells grown with different electron acceptors, including insoluble metal oxides. We hypothesize that through the use of surface labeling, subcellular fractionation, and a combination of proteome analysis tools, proteins involved in the reduction of different terminal electron acceptors will be elucidated. We are comparing the protein profiles from cells grown with the soluble electron acceptors oxygen and fumarate and with those from cells grown with the insoluble iron oxides goethite, ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite. Comparison of the cell surface proteins isolated from cells grown with oxygen or anaerobically with fumarate revealed an increase in the abundance of over 25 proteins in anaerobic cells, including agglutination protein and flagellin proteins along with the several hypothetical proteins. In addition, the surface protein composition of cells grown with the insoluble iron oxides varies considerably from the protein composition observed with either soluble electron acceptor as well as between the different insoluble acceptors.

  20. Diversity of sugar acceptor of glycosyltransferase 1 from Bacillus cereus and its application for glucoside synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hsi-Ho; Shen, Mo-Yuan; Liu, Yuan-Ting; Fu, Yu-Lieh; Chiu, Yu-An; Chen, Ya-Huei; Huang, Chin-Ping; Li, Yaw-Kuen

    2016-05-01

    Glycosyltransferase 1 from Bacillus cereus (BcGT1) catalyzes the transfer of a glucosyl moiety from uridine diphosphate glucose (UDP-glucose) to various acceptors; it was expressed and characterized. The specificity of acceptors was found to be broad: more than 20 compounds classified into O-, S-, and N-linkage glucosides can be prepared with BcGT1 catalysis. Based on this work, we conclude that the corresponding acceptors of these compounds must possess the following features: (1) the acceptors must contain at least one aromatic or fused-aromatic or heteroaromatic ring; (2) the reactive hydroxyl or sulfhydryl or amino group can attach either on the aromatic ring or on its aliphatic side chain; and (3) the acceptors can be a primary, secondary, or even a tertiary amine. Four representative acceptors-fluorescein methyl ester, 17-β-estradiol, 7-mercapto-4-methylcoumarin, and 6-benzylaminopurine-were chosen as a candidate acceptor for O-, S-, and N-glucosidation, respectively. These enzymatic products were purified and the structures were confirmed with mass and NMR spectra. As all isolated glucosides are β-anomers, BcGT1 is confirmed to be an inverting enzyme. This study not only demonstrates the substrate promiscuity of BcGT1 but also showed the great application prospect of this enzyme in bioconversion of valuable bioactive molecules. PMID:26795959

  1. Ist2 in the Yeast Cortical Endoplasmic Reticulum Promotes Trafficking of the Amino Acid Transporter Bap2 to the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Wendelin; Meese, Klaus; Seedorf, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The equipment of the plasma membrane in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with specific nutrient transporters is highly regulated by transcription, translation and protein trafficking allowing growth in changing environments. The activity of these transporters depends on a H+ gradient across the plasma membrane generated by the H+-ATPase Pma1. We found that the polytopic membrane protein Ist2 in the cortical endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is required for efficient leucine uptake during the transition from fermentation to respiration. Experiments employing tandem fluorescence timer protein tag showed that Ist2 was necessary for efficient trafficking of newly synthesized leucine transporter Bap2 from the ER to the plasma membrane. This finding explains the growth defect of ist2Δ mutants during nutritional challenges and illustrates the important role of physical coupling between cortical ER and plasma membrane. PMID:24416406

  2. Bacterial manganese reduction and growth with manganese oxide as the sole electron acceptor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Charles R.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    1988-01-01

    Microbes that couple growth to the reduction of manganese could play an important role in the biogeochemistry of certain anaerobic environments. Such a bacterium, Alteromonas putrefaciens MR-1, couples its growth to the reduction of manganese oxides only under anaerobic conditions. The characteristics of this reduction are consistent with a biological, and not an indirect chemical, reduction of manganese, which suggest that this bacterium uses manganic oxide as a terminal electron acceptor. It can also utilize a large number of other compounds as terminal electron acceptors; this versatility could provide a distinct advantage in environments where electron-acceptor concentrations may vary.

  3. Determination of Na acceptor level in Na+ ion-implanted ZnO single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheng; Liu, Huibin; He, Haiping; Huang, Jingyun; Chen, Lingxiang; Ye, Zhizhen

    2015-03-01

    Ion implantation was used to dope Na acceptor into ZnO single crystals. With three mixed implantation energies, uniform depth distribution of Na ion in the surface region (~300 nm) of ZnO bulk crystals is achieved. Via post-implantation annealing, a donor-acceptor pair recombination band is identified in the low-temperature photoluminescence spectra, from which the energy level of Na-related acceptor in single crystalline ZnO is estimated to be 300 meV. A p-n junction based on this ZnO-Na layer shows rectifying characteristics, confirming the p-type conductivity.

  4. Long-term insulinotropic activity of glucagon-like peptide-1/polymer conjugate on islet microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungwon; Bae, You Han

    2004-01-01

    The biohybrid artificial pancreas (BAP), a promising therapy for type 1 diabetes, faces several obstacles such as the need for a large implantation volume of encapsulated islets because of low functionality. To address such problems, in this study we examined long-term insulinotropic activity of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)/polymer conjugate [VAPG: poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone-co-acrylic acid-g-PEG) (VAP)-GLP-1] as well as GLP-1/Zn(2+) crystal by coencapsulation with islets. Microcapsules with VAPG or crystal produced round-shaped beads whereas free GLP-1 showed poor capsule morphology. A perfusion experiment suggested that VAPG showed higher bioactivity than did microcapsules with GLP-1/Zn(2+). In long-term culture (200 mg of glucose/dL [G]), VAPG also enhanced insulinotropic activity over 5 weeks compared with the crystal form of GLP-1. However, maintenance of the high bioactivity of VAPG suddenly declined after week 5, possibly because of degradation, metabolism, and overstimulation. Basal (50 G) and glucose-stimulated (300 G) levels of insulin secretion confirmed a see-saw pattern in which the VAPG gradually decreased insulin secretion from encapsulated islets and then fell below the insulin level secreted from microcapsules containing GLP-1/Zn(2+) crystal. Viability of the microcapsulated islets of each group was not significantly different. Consequently, the coencapsulation of VAPG or GLP-1/Zn(2+) crystal can be a potential approach to reducing BAP volume with further optimization of activity duration. PMID:15684669

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase from Escherichia coli in complex with the acceptor-TΨC domain of tRNA

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kosuke; Qi, Hao; Shimizu, Yoshihiro; Murakami, Ryo; Miura, Kin-ichiro; Ueda, Takuya; Uchiumi, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    Peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase (Pth) cleaves the ester bond between the peptide and the tRNA of peptidyl-tRNA molecules, which are the product of aborted translation. In the present work, Pth from Escherichia coli was crystallized with the acceptor-TΨC domain of tRNA using 1,4-butanediol as a precipitant. The crystals belonged to the hexagonal space group P61, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 55.1, c = 413.1 Å, and diffracted X-rays beyond 2.4 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit is expected to contain two complexes of Pth and the acceptor-TΨC domain of tRNA (V M = 2.8 Å3 Da−1), with a solvent content of 60.8%. The structure is being solved by molecular replacement. PMID:22139168

  6. High performance weak donor-acceptor polymers in thin film transistors: effect of the acceptor on electronic properties, ambipolar conductivity, mobility, and thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Jonathan D; Fan, Jian; Seifter, Jason; Lim, Bogyu; Hufschmid, Ryan; Heeger, Alan J; Wudl, Fred

    2011-12-28

    We have studied the electronic, physical, and transistor properties of a family of donor-acceptor polymers consisting of diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) coupled with different accepting companion units in order to determine the effects of donor-acceptor interaction. Using the electronically neutral benzene (B), the weakly accepting benzothiadiazole (BT), and the strongly accepting benzobisthiadiazole (BBT), the accepting strength of the companion unit was systematically modulated. All polymers exhibited excellent transistor performance, with mobilities above 0.1 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1), even exceeding 1 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1) for one of the BBT-containing polymers. We find that the BBT is the strongest acceptor, enabling the BBT-containing polymers to be strongly ambipolar. The BBT moiety also strengthens interchain interactions, which provides higher thermal stability and performance for transistors with BBT-containing polymers as the active layer. PMID:22043809

  7. Insulin C-peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    C-peptide ... the test depends on the reason for the C-peptide measurement. Ask your health care provider if ... C-peptide is measured to tell the difference between insulin produced by the body and insulin injected ...

  8. Molecular Engineering of Pyrido[3,4-b]pyrazine-Based Donor-Acceptor-π-Acceptor Organic Sensitizers: Effect of Auxiliary Acceptor in Cobalt- and Iodine-Based Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Giordano, Fabrizio; Pei, Kai; Decoppet, Jean-David; Zhu, Wei-Hong; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Grätzel, Michael

    2015-12-14

    Due to the ease of tuning its redox potential, the cobalt-based redox couple has been extensively applied for highly efficient dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) with extraordinarily high photovoltages. However, a cobalt electrolyte needs particular structural changes in the organic dye components to obtain such high photovoltages. To achieve high device performance, specific requirements in the molecular tailoring of organic sensitizers still need to be met. Besides the need for large electron donors, studies of the auxiliary acceptor segment of donor-acceptor-π-acceptor (D-A-π-A) organic sensitizers are still rare in molecular optimization in the context of cobalt electrolytes. In this work, two novel organic D-A-π-A-type sensitizers (IQ13 and IQ17) have been developed and exploited in cobalt- and iodine-based redox electrolyte DSSCs, specifically to provide insight into the effect of π-bridge modification in different electrolytes. The investigation has been focused on the additional electron-withdrawing acceptor capability with grafted long alkoxy chains. Optoelectronic transient measurements have indicated that IQ17 containing a pyrido[3,4-b]pyrazine moiety bearing long alkoxyphenyl chains is more suitable for application in cobalt-based DSSCs. PMID:26548926

  9. S-peptide as a potent peptidyl linker for protein cross-linking by microbial transglutaminase from Streptomyces mobaraensis.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Noriho; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Takazawa, Takeshi; Takeda, Shuji; Watanabe, Kimitsuna; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2003-01-01

    We have found that ribonuclease S-peptide can work as a novel peptidyl substrate in protein cross-linking reactions catalyzed by microbial transglutaminase (MTG) from Streptomyces mobaraensis. Enhanced green fluorescent protein tethered to S-peptide at its N-terminus (S-tag-EGFP) appeared to be efficiently cross-linked by MTG. As wild-type EGFP was not susceptible to cross-linking, the S-peptide moiety is likely to be responsible for the cross-linking. A site-directed mutation study assigned Gln15 in the S-peptide sequence as the sole acyl donor. Mass spectrometric analysis showed that two Lys residues (Lys5 and Lys11) in the S-peptide sequence functioned as acyl acceptors. We also succeeded in direct monitoring of the cross-linking process by virtue of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between S-tag-EGFP and its blue fluorescent color variant (S-tag-EBFP). The protein cross-linking was tunable by either engineering S-peptide sequence or capping the S-peptide moiety with S-protein, the partner protein of S-peptide for the formation of ribonuclease A. The latter indicates that S-protein can be used as a specific inhibitor of S-peptide-directed protein cross-linking by MTG. The controllable protein cross-linking of S-peptide as a potent substrate of MTG will shed new light on biomolecule conjugation. PMID:12643745

  10. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  11. Antimicrobial Peptides from Fish

    PubMed Central

    Masso-Silva, Jorge A.; Diamond, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found widely distributed through Nature, and participate in the innate host defense of each species. Fish are a great source of these peptides, as they express all of the major classes of AMPs, including defensins, cathelicidins, hepcidins, histone-derived peptides, and a fish-specific class of the cecropin family, called piscidins. As with other species, the fish peptides exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, killing both fish and human pathogens. They are also immunomodulatory, and their genes are highly responsive to microbes and innate immuno-stimulatory molecules. Recent research has demonstrated that some of the unique properties of fish peptides, including their ability to act even in very high salt concentrations, make them good potential targets for development as therapeutic antimicrobials. Further, the stimulation of their gene expression by exogenous factors could be useful in preventing pathogenic microbes in aquaculture. PMID:24594555

  12. Enzymic methylation of arginyl residues in -gly-arg-gly- peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Y L; Lew, D B; Park, S H; Kim, C W; Paik, W K; Kim, S

    2000-01-01

    N(G)-Methylation of arginine residues in many nucleic-acid-binding proteins are formed post-translationally, catalysed by S-adenosylmethionine:protein-arginine N-methyltransferase in their glycine-rich and arginine-rich motifs. The amino acid sequences of the stimulator of HIV-1 TAR (Tat-responsive element) RNA-binding protein (SRB) and fibronectin also show the presence of the internal -Gly-Arg-Gly- (-GRG-) sequence, which is potentially methylatable by the methyltransferase. To investigate the sequence requirement for methylation of these proteins, several synthetic oligopeptides with different chain lengths and sequences similar to the -GRG- regions of SRB and fibronectin were synthesized. Whereas the heptapeptide AGGRGKG (residues 16-22 in SRB) served as the methyl acceptor for the methyltransferase with a K(m) of 50 microM, the 19-mer peptide (residues 10-28 in SRB) was methylated with a K(m) of 8.3 microM, indicating that a greater peptide chain length yields a better methyl acceptor. Product analysis of the methylated [methyl-(14)C]SRB-peptide by HPLC indicated the formation of N(G)-monomethylarginine and N(G),N(G)-dimethyl(asymmetric)arginine. Synthetic peptides containing the cell attachment sequence [Arg-Gly-Asp ('RGD')] in fibronectin, GRGDSPK, GGRGDSPK and GGGRGDSPK, were also studied; whereas GRGDSPK was a poor methyl acceptor, the longer peptides were better methyl acceptors. To provide an understanding of the effect of methylation on fibronectin peptide, arginine-unmethylated and methylated GGRGDSPK were compared for their effect on the mitogenesis induced by beta-hexosaminidase A and an agonistic antibody (mAb(15)) in bovine tracheal smooth-muscle cells; whereas the former inhibited 35-67% of mitogenesis at a concentration of 5-10 microM, the latter did not block mitogenesis. This lack of inhibition by the insertion of a methyl group on the arginyl residue of the cell attachment sequence might be due to the hindrance of the binding of fibronectin

  13. Three new phosphates with isolated P2O7 units: noncentrosymmetric Cs2Ba3(P2O7)2 and centrosymmetric Cs2BaP2O7 and LiCsBaP2O7.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Han, Shujuan; Lei, Bing-Hua; Wang, Ying; Li, Hongyi; Yang, Zhihua; Pan, Shilie

    2016-03-01

    Three new phosphates, a noncentrosymmetric (NCS) Cs2Ba3(P2O7)2 and centrosymmetric (CS) Cs2BaP2O7 and LiCsBaP2O7, have been synthesized from high-temperature solutions for the first time. Analysis of the structures determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction showed that although the three compounds contained isolated P2O7 units, they yielded different three-dimensional (3D) networks: Cs2Ba3(P2O7)2 crystallized in the NCS Orthorhombic space group P212121, Cs2BaP2O7 in the CS monoclinic space group P21/n, and LiCsBaP2O7, having an identical stoichiometry with Cs2BaP2O7, crystallized in monoclinic space group, P21/c. Structural comparisons suggested the differences between their 3D frameworks to be due to differences between the sizes and coordination environments of the cations. Characterizations including thermal and optical analyses showed Cs2Ba3(P2O7)2 and Cs2BaP2O7 to melt congruently, and Cs2Ba3(P2O7)2 to exhibit a wide transparent region with a cut-off edge below 176 nm. The NLO properties and electronic structures of these compounds were investigated using first-principles calcualtions. PMID:26831497

  14. INFLUENCE OF ALTERNATIVE ELECTRON ACCEPTORS ON THE ANAEROBIC BIODEGRADABILITY OF CHLORINATED PHENOLS AND BENZOIC ACIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrate, sulfate, and carbonate were used as electron acceptors to examine the anaerobic biodegradability of chlorinated aromatic compounds in estuarine and freshwater sediments. he respective denitrifying, sulfidogenic, and methanogenic enrichment cultures were established on ea...

  15. Electron acceptor dependence of electron shuttle secretion and extracellular electron transfer by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Bing-Bing; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Dao-Bo; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-05-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an extensively studied dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a great potential for bioremediation and electricity generation. It secretes flavins as electron shuttles which play an important role in extracellular electron transfer. However, the influence of various environmental factors on the secretion of flavins is largely unknown. Here, the effects of electron acceptors, including fumarate, ferrihydrite, Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), nitrate and trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), on the secretion of flavins were investigated. The level of riboflavin and riboflavin-5'-phosphate (FMN) secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 varied considerably with different electron acceptors. While nitrate and ferrihydrite suppressed the secretion of flavins in relative to fumarate, Fe(III)-NTA and TMAO promoted such a secretion and greatly enhanced ferrihydrite reduction and electricity generation. This work clearly demonstrates that electron acceptors could considerably affect the secretion of flavins and consequent microbial EET. Such impacts of electron acceptors in the environment deserve more attention. PMID:23558182

  16. TIO2 ADVANCED PHOTO-OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY: EFFECT OF ELECTRON ACCEPTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of electron acceptors (additives) such as hydrogen peroxide, ammonium persulphate, potassium bromate and potassium peroxymonosulphate (ozone) on the TiO2 photocatalytic degradation of various organic pollutants were examined at various conditions. he individual and th...

  17. Interface-induced heavy-hole/light-hole splitting of acceptors in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mol, J. A.; Salfi, J.; Rahman, R.; Hsueh, Y.; Miwa, J. A.; Klimeck, G.; Simmons, M. Y.; Rogge, S.

    2015-05-01

    The energy spectrum of spin-orbit coupled states of individual sub-surface boron acceptor dopants in silicon have been investigated using scanning tunneling spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures. The spatially resolved tunnel spectra show two resonances, which we ascribe to the heavy- and light-hole Kramers doublets. This type of broken degeneracy has recently been argued to be advantageous for the lifetime of acceptor-based qubits [R. Ruskov and C. Tahan, Phys. Rev. B 88, 064308 (2013)]. The depth dependent energy splitting between the heavy- and light-hole Kramers doublets is consistent with tight binding calculations, and is in excess of 1 meV for all acceptors within the experimentally accessible depth range (<2 nm from the surface). These results will aid the development of tunable acceptor-based qubits in silicon with long coherence times and the possibility for electrical manipulation.

  18. Photoinduced electron tunneling between randomly dispersed donors and acceptors in frozen glasses and other rigid matrices.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Oliver S

    2013-07-14

    In fluid solution un-tethered donors and acceptors can diffuse freely, and consequently the donor-acceptor distance is usually not fixed on the timescale of an electron transfer event. When attempting to investigate the influence of driving-force changes or donor-acceptor distance variations on electron transfer rates this can be a problem. In rigid matrices diffusion is suppressed, and it becomes possible to investigate fixed-distance electron transfer. This method represents an attractive alternative to investigate rigid rod-like donor-bridge-acceptor molecules which have to be made in elaborate syntheses. This perspective focuses specifically on the distance dependence of photoinduced electron transfer which occurs via tunneling of charge carriers through rigid matrices over distances between 1 and 33 Å. Some key aspects of the theoretical models commonly used for analyzing kinetic data of electron tunneling through rigid matrices are recapitulated. New findings from this rather mature field of research are emphasized. PMID:23722299

  19. Interface-induced heavy-hole/light-hole splitting of acceptors in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Mol, J. A.; Salfi, J.; Simmons, M. Y.; Rogge, S.; Rahman, R.; Hsueh, Y.; Klimeck, G.; Miwa, J. A.

    2015-05-18

    The energy spectrum of spin-orbit coupled states of individual sub-surface boron acceptor dopants in silicon have been investigated using scanning tunneling spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures. The spatially resolved tunnel spectra show two resonances, which we ascribe to the heavy- and light-hole Kramers doublets. This type of broken degeneracy has recently been argued to be advantageous for the lifetime of acceptor-based qubits [R. Ruskov and C. Tahan, Phys. Rev. B 88, 064308 (2013)]. The depth dependent energy splitting between the heavy- and light-hole Kramers doublets is consistent with tight binding calculations, and is in excess of 1 meV for all acceptors within the experimentally accessible depth range (<2 nm from the surface). These results will aid the development of tunable acceptor-based qubits in silicon with long coherence times and the possibility for electrical manipulation.

  20. Computational design of donor-bridge-acceptor systems exhibiting pronounced quantum interference effects.

    PubMed

    Gorczak, Natalie; Renaud, Nicolas; Galan, Elena; Eelkema, Rienk; Siebbeles, Laurens D A; Grozema, Ferdinand C

    2016-03-01

    Quantum interference is a well-known phenomenon that dictates charge transport properties of single molecule junctions. However, reports on quantum interference in donor-bridge-acceptor molecules are scarce. This might be due to the difficulties in meeting the conditions for the presence of quantum interference in a donor-bridge-acceptor system. The electronic coupling between the donor, bridge, and acceptor moieties must be weak in order to ensure localised initial and final states for charge transfer. Yet, it must be strong enough to allow all bridge orbitals to mediate charge transfer. We present the computational route to the design of a donor-bridge-acceptor molecule that features the right balance between these contradicting requirements and exhibits pronounced interference effects. PMID:26878200

  1. Photoelectric covalent organic frameworks: converting open lattices into ordered donor-acceptor heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Furukawa, Ko; Gao, Jia; Nagai, Atsushi; Nakamura, Toshikazu; Dong, Yuping; Jiang, Donglin

    2014-07-16

    Ordered one-dimensional open channels represent the typical porous structure of two-dimensional covalent organic frameworks (COFs). Here we report a general synthetic strategy for converting these open lattice structures into ordered donor-acceptor heterojunctions. A three-component topological design scheme was explored to prepare electron-donating intermediate COFs, which upon click reaction were transformed to photoelectric COFs with segregated donor-acceptor alignments, whereas electron-accepting buckyballs were spatially confined within the nanochannels via covalent anchoring on the channel walls. The donor-acceptor heterojunctions trigger photoinduced electron transfer and allow charge separation with radical species delocalized in the π-arrays, whereas the charge separation efficiency was dependent on the buckyball content. This new donor-acceptor strategy explores both skeletons and pores of COFs for charge separation and photoenergy conversion. PMID:24963896

  2. Benzodipyrrole-based Donor-Acceptor-type Boron Complexes as Tunable Near-infrared-Absorbing Materials.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tomoya; Furukawa, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Eiichi

    2016-07-20

    Benzodipyrrole-based donor-acceptor boron complexes were designed and synthesized as near-infrared-absorbing materials. The electron-rich organic framework combined with the Lewis acidic boron co-ordination enabled us to tune the LUMO energy level and the HOMO-LUMO gap (i.e.,the absorption wavelength) by changing the organic acceptor units, the number of boron atoms, and the substituents on the boron atoms. PMID:27311060

  3. Process for gasification using a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor

    DOEpatents

    Lancet, Michael S.; Curran, George P.

    1980-01-01

    A gasification process is disclosed using a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor consisting essentially of at least one compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate supported in a refractory carrier matrix, the carrier having the general formula Ca.sub.5 (SiO.sub.4).sub.2 CO.sub.3. A method for producing the synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor is also disclosed.

  4. Molecular helices as electron acceptors in high-performance bulk heterojunction solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yu; Trinh, M. Tuan; Chen, Rongsheng; Purdum, Geoffrey E.; Khlyabich, Petr P.; Sezen, Melda; Oh, Seokjoon; Zhu, Haiming; Fowler, Brandon; Zhang, Boyuan; Wang, Wei; Nam, Chang-Yong; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Black, Charles T.; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Loo, Yueh-Lin; Ng, Fay; Zhu, X.-Y.; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous organic semiconducting materials synthesized for organic photovoltaics in the past decade, fullerenes are widely used as electron acceptors in highly efficient bulk-heterojunction solar cells. None of the non-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells have achieved efficiencies as high as fullerene-based solar cells. Design principles for fullerene-free acceptors remain unclear in the field. Here we report examples of helical molecular semiconductors as electron acceptors that are on par with fullerene derivatives in efficient solar cells. We achieved an 8.3% power conversion efficiency in a solar cell, which is a record high for non-fullerene bulk heterojunctions. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealed both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor−acceptor interfaces. Atomic force microscopy reveals a mesh-like network of acceptors with pores that are tens of nanometres in diameter for efficient exciton separation and charge transport. This study describes a new motif for designing highly efficient acceptors for organic solar cells. PMID:26382113

  5. Molecular helices as electron acceptors in high-performance bulk heterojunction solar cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu M. Zhong; Nam, Chang -Yong; Trinh, M. Tuan; Chen, Rongsheng; Purdum, Geoffrey E.; Khlyabich, Petr P.; Sezen, Melda; Oh, Seokjoon; Zhu, Haiming; Fowler, Brandon; et al

    2015-09-18

    Despite numerous organic semiconducting materials synthesized for organic photovoltaics in the past decade, fullerenes are widely used as electron acceptors in highly efficient bulk-heterojunction solar cells. None of the non-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells have achieved efficiencies as high as fullerene-based solar cells. Design principles for fullerene-free acceptors remain unclear in the field. Here we report examples of helical molecular semiconductors as electron acceptors that are on par with fullerene derivatives in efficient solar cells. We achieved an 8.3% power conversion efficiency in a solar cell, which is a record high for non-fullerene bulk heterojunctions. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealedmore » both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor–acceptor interfaces. Atomic force microscopy reveals a mesh-like network of acceptors with pores that are tens of nanometres in diameter for efficient exciton separation and charge transport. As a result, this study describes a new motif for designing highly efficient acceptors for organic solar cells.« less

  6. Non-fullerene acceptors: exciton dissociation with PTCDA versus C60.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Gregory J; Robey, Steven W

    2015-06-28

    Extensive development of new polymer and small molecule donors has helped produce a steady increase in the efficiency of organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. However, OPV technology would also benefit from the introduction of non-fullerene acceptors. Unfortunately, efforts to replace fullerenes have typically led to significantly reduced efficiencies. A number of possible explanations for reduced efficiencies with non-fullerene acceptors compared to fullerene acceptors have been suggested, including the formation of unfavorable morphologies in non-fullerene systems and/or favorable excitation/carrier delocalization in fullerenes. In addition, enhanced exciton dissociation associated with fundamental characteristics of the fullerene molecular electronic states has also been suggested. We used time-resolved two-photon photoemission (TR-2PPE) to directly compare exciton dissociation at interfaces between zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) interfaces and the non-fullerene acceptor, perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) versus dissociation measured at the analogous interface with C60, and thus help discriminate between these potential explanations. Exciton dissociation rates are comparable for phthalocyanine interfaces with both acceptors, allowing us to suggest a hierarchy for the importance of various effects producing higher efficiencies with fullerene acceptors. PMID:26027544

  7. Interface-split Kramers doublets for acceptor-based qubits in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mol, Jan; Salfi, Joseph; Rahman, Rajib; Rogge, Sven

    2013-03-01

    Single dopants in silicon form a particular attractive platform for hosting spin quantum bits (qubits). The effective spin-3/2 states of acceptor-bound holes in silicon can be used to store bits of quantum information for several μs. Strong coupling of spin and momentum in the silicon valence band allows for rapid electrical manipulation of the hole spin. Acceptors in silicon have a four-fold degenerate ground-state, reflecting character of the top of the valence band. Symmetry breaking, by an electric field, strain or confinement, lifts this degeneracy, resulting in two Kramers doublets. The states within these isolated Kramers doublets are protected against decoherence by time reversal symmetry and form the working levels of a hole spin qubit. Here we investigate the effect of the presence of an interface on the ground-state energy splitting of individual sub-surface acceptors, as a function of dopant depth, by means of low temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy. The depth of individual acceptors is determined by probing the Coulomb potential of the ionized acceptor nuclei. Resonant tunneling through the localized acceptor states provides a direct measure of the excited state spectrum of single dopants.

  8. Molecular helices as electron acceptors in high-performance bulk heterojunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yu; Trinh, M Tuan; Chen, Rongsheng; Purdum, Geoffrey E; Khlyabich, Petr P; Sezen, Melda; Oh, Seokjoon; Zhu, Haiming; Fowler, Brandon; Zhang, Boyuan; Wang, Wei; Nam, Chang-Yong; Sfeir, Matthew Y; Black, Charles T; Steigerwald, Michael L; Loo, Yueh-Lin; Ng, Fay; Zhu, X-Y; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous organic semiconducting materials synthesized for organic photovoltaics in the past decade, fullerenes are widely used as electron acceptors in highly efficient bulk-heterojunction solar cells. None of the non-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells have achieved efficiencies as high as fullerene-based solar cells. Design principles for fullerene-free acceptors remain unclear in the field. Here we report examples of helical molecular semiconductors as electron acceptors that are on par with fullerene derivatives in efficient solar cells. We achieved an 8.3% power conversion efficiency in a solar cell, which is a record high for non-fullerene bulk heterojunctions. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealed both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor-acceptor interfaces. Atomic force microscopy reveals a mesh-like network of acceptors with pores that are tens of nanometres in diameter for efficient exciton separation and charge transport. This study describes a new motif for designing highly efficient acceptors for organic solar cells. PMID:26382113

  9. Molecular helices as electron acceptors in high-performance bulk heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu M. Zhong; Nam, Chang -Yong; Trinh, M. Tuan; Chen, Rongsheng; Purdum, Geoffrey E.; Khlyabich, Petr P.; Sezen, Melda; Oh, Seokjoon; Zhu, Haiming; Fowler, Brandon; Zhang, Boyuan; Wang, Wei; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Black, Charles T.; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Loo, Yueh -Lin; Ng, Fay; Zhu, X. -Y.; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-09-18

    Despite numerous organic semiconducting materials synthesized for organic photovoltaics in the past decade, fullerenes are widely used as electron acceptors in highly efficient bulk-heterojunction solar cells. None of the non-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells have achieved efficiencies as high as fullerene-based solar cells. Design principles for fullerene-free acceptors remain unclear in the field. Here we report examples of helical molecular semiconductors as electron acceptors that are on par with fullerene derivatives in efficient solar cells. We achieved an 8.3% power conversion efficiency in a solar cell, which is a record high for non-fullerene bulk heterojunctions. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealed both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor–acceptor interfaces. Atomic force microscopy reveals a mesh-like network of acceptors with pores that are tens of nanometres in diameter for efficient exciton separation and charge transport. As a result, this study describes a new motif for designing highly efficient acceptors for organic solar cells.

  10. Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis clades enriched under cyclic anaerobic and microaerobic conditions simultaneously use different electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Camejo, Pamela Y; Owen, Brian R; Martirano, Joseph; Ma, Juan; Kapoor, Vikram; Santo Domingo, Jorge; McMahon, Katherine D; Noguera, Daniel R

    2016-10-01

    Lab- and pilot-scale simultaneous nitrification, denitrification and phosphorus removal-sequencing batch reactors were operated under cyclic anaerobic and micro-aerobic conditions. The use of oxygen, nitrite, and nitrate as electron acceptors by Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis during the micro-aerobic stage was investigated. A complete clade-level characterization of Accumulibacter in both reactors was performed using newly designed qPCR primers targeting the polyphosphate kinase gene (ppk1). In the lab-scale reactor, limited-oxygen conditions led to an alternated dominance of Clade IID and IC over the other clades. Results from batch tests when Clade IC was dominant (i.e., >92% of Accumulibacter) showed that this clade was capable of using oxygen, nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors for P uptake. A more heterogeneous distribution of clades was found in the pilot-scale system (Clades IIA, IIB, IIC, IID, IA, and IC), and in this reactor, oxygen, nitrite and nitrate were also used as electron acceptors coupled to phosphorus uptake. However, nitrite was not an efficient electron acceptor in either reactor, and nitrate allowed only partial P removal. The results from the Clade IC dominated reactor indicated that either organisms in this clade can simultaneously use multiple electron acceptors under micro-aerobic conditions, or that the use of multiple electron acceptors by Clade IC is due to significant microdiversity within the Accumulibacter clades defined using the ppk1 gene. PMID:27340814

  11. A new classification of the amino acid side chains based on doublet acceptor energy levels.

    PubMed Central

    Sneddon, S F; Morgan, R S; Brooks, C L

    1988-01-01

    We describe a new classification of the amino acid side chains based on the potential energy level at which each will accept an extra (doublet) electron. The doublet acceptor energy level, and the doublet acceptor orbital were calculated using semiempirical INDO/2-UHF molecular orbital theory. The results of these calculations show that the side chains fall into four groups. We have termed these groups repulsive, insulating, semiconducting, and attractive in accordance with where each lies on the relative energy scale. We use this classification to examine the role of residues between the donor and acceptor in modulating the rate and mechanism of electron transfer in proteins. With the calculated acceptor levels, we construct a potential barrier for those residues between the donor and acceptor. It is the area beneath this barrier that determines the decay of electronic coupling between donor and acceptor, and thus the transfer rate. We have used this schematic approach to characterize the four electron transfer pathways in myoglobin recently studied by Mayo et al. (Mayo, S.L., W.R. Ellis, R.J. Crutchley, and H.B. Gray. 1986. Science [Wash. DC]. 233:948-952). PMID:3342271

  12. Melanomas Associated With Blue Nevi or Mimicking Cellular Blue Nevi: Clinical, Pathologic, and Molecular Study of 11 Cases Displaying a High Frequency of GNA11 Mutations, BAP1 Expression Loss, and a Predilection for the Scalp.

    PubMed

    Costa, Sebastian; Byrne, Michelle; Pissaloux, Daniel; Haddad, Veronique; Paindavoine, Sandrine; Thomas, Luc; Aubin, Francois; Lesimple, Thierry; Grange, Florent; Bonniaud, Bertille; Mortier, Laurent; Mateus, Christine; Dreno, Brigitte; Balme, Brigitte; Vergier, Beatrice; de la Fouchardiere, Arnaud

    2016-03-01

    Melanomas associated with blue nevi (MABN) or mimicking cellular blue nevi (MMCBN) represent exceptional variants of malignant cutaneous melanocytic tumors. Uveal and leptomeningeal melanomas frequently have somatic mutations of GNAQ or GNA11, which are believed to be early driver mutations. In uveal melanomas, monosomy 3, linked to the BAP1 gene, is an adverse prognostic factor. We have studied the clinical, histologic, BAP1 expression profile, and molecular data of 11 cases of MABN/MMCBN and 24 cellular blue nevi. Most of the cases of MABN/MMCBN occurred on the scalps of adult patients and presented as rapidly growing nodules, typically >1 cm, often arising at the site of a preexisting melanocytic lesion. The MABN/MMCBN were composed of dense nests of large dermal atypical melanocytes, in some cases lying adjacent to a blue nevus. Four patients developed metastatic disease, and 2 died from their disease. A GNA11 mutation was found in 8/11 cases and a GNAQ mutation in 1 case. Seven of 11 cases showed loss of nuclear BAP1 immunohistochemical (IHC) expression in the malignant component, sparing the adjacent nevus. Array comparative genomic hybridization revealed recurrent deletions of chromosomes 1p, 3p, 4q, 6q, 8p, 16q, and 17q and recurrent gains of chromosomes 6p, 8q, and 21q. The 24 cases of cellular blue nevi frequently occurred on the sacrum, had GNAQ mutations, and showed normal positive IHC staining for BAP1. These results underscore overlapping features in all blue-like malignant melanocytic tumors. Loss of BAP1 IHC expression was restricted to melanomas, including all metastatic cases. PMID:26645730

  13. Conduction electrons in acceptor-doped GaAs/GaAlAs heterostructures: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Wlodek; Raymond, Andre; Kubisa, Maciej

    2016-05-01

    We review magneto-optical and magneto-transport effects in GaAs/GaAlAs heterostructures doped in GaAlAs barriers with donors, providing two-dimensional (2D) electron gas (2DEG) in GaAs quantum wells (QWS), and additionally doped with smaller amounts of acceptors (mostly Be atoms) in the vicinity of 2DEG. One may also deal with residual acceptors (mostly C atoms). The behavior of such systems in the presence of a magnetic field differs appreciably from those doped in the vicinity of 2DEG with donors. Three subjects related to the acceptor-doped heterostructures are considered. First is the problem of bound states of conduction electrons confined to the vicinity of negatively charged acceptors by the joint effect of a QW and an external magnetic field parallel to the growth direction. A variational theory of such states is presented, demonstrating that an electron turning around a repulsive center has discrete energies above the corresponding Landau levels. Experimental evidence for the discrete electron energies comes from the work on interband photo-magneto-luminescence, intraband cyclotron resonance and quantum magneto-transport (the Quantum Hall and Shubnikov-de Haas effects). An electron rain-down effect at weak electric fields and a boil-off effect at strong electric fields are introduced. It is demonstrated, both theoretically and experimentally, that a negatively charged acceptor can localize more than one electron. The second subject describes experiment and theory of asymmetric quantized Hall and Shubnikov-de Haas plateaus in acceptor-doped GaAs/GaAlAs heterostructures. It is shown that the main features of the plateau asymmetry can be attributed to asymmetric density of Landau states in the presence of acceptors. However, at high magnetic fields, the rain-down effect is also at work. The third subject deals with the so-called disorder modes (DMs) in the cyclotron resonance of conduction electrons. The DMs originate from random distributions of negatively

  14. Tumor-Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Teesalu, Tambet; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC), contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor-homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR) motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular “zip code” of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies, and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is present in the

  15. Fundamental Studies on Donor-acceptor Conjugated Polymers Containing 'Heavy' Group 14 and Group 16 Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Gregory Laird

    One advantage of conjugated polymers as organic materials is that their properties may be readily tuned through covalent modifications. This thesis presents studies on the structure-property relationships resulting from single- and double-atom substitutions on an alternating donor-acceptor conjugated polymer. Specifically, single selenium and tellurium atoms have been incorporated into the acceptor monomer in place of sulfur; silicon and germanium atoms have been substituted in place of carbon at the donor monomer bridge position. The carbon-donor/ tellurium-acceptor polymer was synthesized by a post-polymerization reaction sequence and demonstrated the utility of heavy group 16 atoms to red shift a polymer absorption spectrum. Density functional theory calculations point to a new explanation for this result invoking the lower heavy atom ionization energy and reduced aromaticity of acceptor monomers containing selenium and tellurium compared to sulfur. Absorption and emission experiments demonstrate that both silicon and germanium substitutions in the donor slightly blue shift the polymer absorption spectrum. Polymers containing sulfur in the acceptor are the strongest light absorbers of all polymers studied here. Molecular weight and phenyl end capping studies show that molecular weight appears to affect polymer absorption to the greatest degree in a medium molecular weight regime and that these effects have a significant aggregation component. Solar cell devices containing either the silicon- or germanium-donor/selenium-acceptor polymer display improved red light harvesting or hole mobility relative to their structural analogues. Overall, these results clarify the effects of single atom substitution on donor-acceptor polymers and aid in the future design of polymers containing heavy atoms.

  16. [Effect of C/N ratio on nitrous oxide production during denitrification with different electron acceptors].

    PubMed

    Shang, Hui-Lai; Peng, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Jing-Rong; Wang, Shu-Ying

    2009-07-15

    The experiment investigated the nitrous oxide production under different C/N ratios during denitrification, taking nitrate and nitrite as electron acceptor respectively. Ethanol was selected as carbon source. The C/N ratios were 0, 1.2, 2.4, 3.5, 5.0 and 20 when nitrate was taken as electron acceptor and C/N ratios 0, 1.8, 2.4, 3.0, 4.3, 5.2, 6.6, 20.6 when electron acceptor was nitrite. The results indicated that: the optimum C/N ratio was 3.0 taking nitrite as electron acceptor and the N2O production was 0.044 mg x L(-1); the optimum C/N ratio was 5.0 taking nitrate as electron acceptor and the N2O production was 0.135 mg x L(-1) which was 3 times higher than that of nitrite as electron acceptor. Though the electron acceptor changed, the trend of N2O production was similar: when carbon source was badly insufficient, the production of N2O and denitrification rate were both quite small; the N2O production increased with the increasing of the quantity of carbon source; when the carbon source was excessive, the N2O production sharply raised. Consequently, compared to complete nitrification and denitrification, short-cut nitrification and denitrification could save 40% carbon source. Moreover, controlling C/N = 3 could reduce the production of N2O in short-cut nitrification. PMID:19775000

  17. Synthetic antimicrobial peptide design.

    PubMed

    Powell, W A; Catranis, C M; Maynard, C A

    1995-01-01

    To guide the design of potential plant pathogen-resistance genes, synthetic variants of naturally occurring antimicrobial gene products were evaluated. Five 20-amino acid (ESF1, ESF4, ESF5, ESF6, ESF13), one 18-amino acid (ESF12), and one 17-amino acid (ESF17) amphipathic peptide sequences were designed, synthesized, and tested with in vitro bioassays. Positive charges on the hydrophilic side of the peptide were shown to be essential for antifungal activity, yet the number of positive charges could be varied with little or no change in activity. The size could be reduced to 18 amino acids, but at 17 amino acids a significant reduction in activity was observed. ESF1, 5, 6, and 12 peptides were inhibitory to the germination of conidia from Cryphonectria parasitica, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici, and Septoria musiva but did not inhibit the germination of pollen from Castanea mollissima and Salix lucida. ESF12 also had no effect on the germination of Malus sylvestris and Lycopersicon esculentum pollen, but inhibited the growth of the bacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Erwinia amylovora, and Pseudomonas syringae. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of the active ESF peptides were similar to those of the naturally occurring control peptides, magainin II and cecropin B. The significant differential in sensitivity between the microbes and plant cells indicated that the active ESF peptides are potentially useful models for designing plant pathogen-resistance genes. PMID:7579625

  18. Antimitotic peptides and depsipeptides.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Ernest; Covell, David G

    2002-01-01

    Tubulin is the target for an ever increasing number of unusual peptides and depsipeptides that were originally isolated from a wide variety of organisms. Since tubulin is the major component of cellular microtubules, which maintain cell shape in interphase and form the mitotic spindle, most of these compounds are highly toxic to mammalian cells. These peptides and depsipeptides disrupt cellular microtubules and prevent formation of a functional spindle, resulting in the accumulation of cultured cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle through specific inhibition of mitosis. At the biochemical level, the compounds all inhibit the assembly of tubulin into polymer and, in the cases where it has been studied, strongly suppress microtubule dynamics at low concentrations. In most cases the peptides and depsipeptides inhibit the binding of vinblastine and vincristine to tubulin in a noncompetitive manner, inhibit tubulin-dependent GTP hydrolysis, and interfere with nucleotide turnover at the exchangeable GTP site on beta-tubulin. Most of the peptides and depsipeptides induce tubulin to form oligomers of aberrant morphology, including tubulin rings that vary in diameter depending on the (depsi) peptide under study. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the cellular, biochemical, in vivo, and SAR aspects of this group of compounds. We also summarize initial efforts by computer modeling to decipher a pharmacophore among the diverse structures of these peptides and depsipeptides. PMID:12678750

  19. Non-fullerene electron acceptors for use in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Christian B; Holliday, Sarah; Chen, Hung-Yang; Cryer, Samuel J; McCulloch, Iain

    2015-11-17

    The active layer in a solution processed organic photovoltaic device comprises a light absorbing electron donor semiconductor, typically a polymer, and an electron accepting fullerene acceptor. Although there has been huge effort targeted to optimize the absorbing, energetic, and transport properties of the donor material, fullerenes remain as the exclusive electron acceptor in all high performance devices. Very recently, some new non-fullerene acceptors have been demonstrated to outperform fullerenes in comparative devices. This Account describes this progress, discussing molecular design considerations and the structure-property relationships that are emerging. The motivation to replace fullerene acceptors stems from their synthetic inflexibility, leading to constraints in manipulating frontier energy levels, as well as poor absorption in the solar spectrum range, and an inherent tendency to undergo postfabrication crystallization, resulting in device instability. New acceptors have to address these limitations, providing tunable absorption with high extinction coefficients, thus contributing to device photocurrent. The ability to vary and optimize the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy level for a specific donor polymer is also an important requirement, ensuring minimal energy loss on electron transfer and as high an internal voltage as possible. Initially perylene diimide acceptors were evaluated as promising acceptor materials. These electron deficient aromatic molecules can exhibit good electron transport, facilitated by close packed herringbone crystal motifs, and their energy levels can be synthetically tuned. The principal drawback of this class of materials, their tendency to crystallize on too large a length scale for an optimal heterojunction nanostructure, has been shown to be overcome through introduction of conformation twisting through steric effects. This has been primarily achieved by coupling two units together, forming dimers with

  20. Non-Fullerene Electron Acceptors for Use in Organic Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus The active layer in a solution processed organic photovoltaic device comprises a light absorbing electron donor semiconductor, typically a polymer, and an electron accepting fullerene acceptor. Although there has been huge effort targeted to optimize the absorbing, energetic, and transport properties of the donor material, fullerenes remain as the exclusive electron acceptor in all high performance devices. Very recently, some new non-fullerene acceptors have been demonstrated to outperform fullerenes in comparative devices. This Account describes this progress, discussing molecular design considerations and the structure–property relationships that are emerging. The motivation to replace fullerene acceptors stems from their synthetic inflexibility, leading to constraints in manipulating frontier energy levels, as well as poor absorption in the solar spectrum range, and an inherent tendency to undergo postfabrication crystallization, resulting in device instability. New acceptors have to address these limitations, providing tunable absorption with high extinction coefficients, thus contributing to device photocurrent. The ability to vary and optimize the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy level for a specific donor polymer is also an important requirement, ensuring minimal energy loss on electron transfer and as high an internal voltage as possible. Initially perylene diimide acceptors were evaluated as promising acceptor materials. These electron deficient aromatic molecules can exhibit good electron transport, facilitated by close packed herringbone crystal motifs, and their energy levels can be synthetically tuned. The principal drawback of this class of materials, their tendency to crystallize on too large a length scale for an optimal heterojunction nanostructure, has been shown to be overcome through introduction of conformation twisting through steric effects. This has been primarily achieved by coupling two units together

  1. Insights on the design and electron-acceptor properties of conjugated organophosphorus materials.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Thomas

    2014-05-20

    The development of conjugated organic materials has become a rapidly evolving field of research, particularly with a view toward practical applications in so-called organic electronics that encompass a variety of device types, such as OLEDs, OPVs, and OFETs. Almost all of these devices minimally require the presence of electron-donor and -acceptor components that act as p- and n-type semiconductors, respectively. Research over the past two decades has shown that while there is an abundant resource of organic p-type materials, suitable n-type species are few and far between. To overcome this severe bottleneck for the further development of organic electronics, researchers have identified organo-main-group avenues as valuable alternatives toward organic electron-acceptor materials that may ultimately be used as n-type components in practical devices. One particular element of interest in this context is phosphorus, which at first glance may not necessarily suggest such properties. In this Account, I provide detailed insights on the origin of the electron-acceptor properties of organophosphorus-based conjugated materials and include an overview of important molecular species that have been developed by my group and others. To this end, I explain that the electron-acceptor properties of conjugated organophosphorus materials originate from an interaction known as negative hyperconjugation. While this particular interaction creates a simply inductively withdrawing phosphoryl substituent for π-conjugated scaffolds, incorporation of a phosphorus atom as an integral part of a cyclic substructure within a π-conjugated system provides a much more complex, versatile, and consequently highly valuable tool for the tuning of the electron-acceptor properties of the materials. Notably, the degree of negative hyperconjugation can effectively be tailored in various ways via simple substitution at the phosphorus center. This is now well established for phosphole-based molecular

  2. Helical-Peptide-Catalyzed Enantioselective Michael Addition Reactions and Their Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Atsushi; Umeno, Tomohiro; Doi, Mitsunobu; Akagawa, Kengo; Kudo, Kazuaki; Tanaka, Masakazu

    2016-08-01

    Helical peptide foldamer catalyzed Michael addition reactions of nitroalkane or dialkyl malonate to α,β-unsaturated ketones are reported along with the mechanistic considerations of the enantio-induction. A wide variety of α,β-unsaturated ketones, including β-aryl, β-alkyl enones, and cyclic enones, were found to be catalyzed by the helical peptide to give Michael adducts with high enantioselectivities (up to 99%). On the basis of X-ray crystallographic analysis and depsipeptide study, the amide protons, N(2)-H and N(3)-H, at the N terminus in the α-helical peptide catalyst were crucial for activating Michael donors, while the N-terminal primary amine activated Michael acceptors through the formation of iminium ion intermediates. PMID:27384597

  3. Synthesis and biological properties of amino acids and peptides containing a tetrazolyl moiety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, E. A.; Trifonov, R. E.

    2015-09-01

    Literature data published mainly in the last 15 years on the synthesis and biological properties of amino acid analogues and derivatives containing tetrazolyl moieties are analyzed. Tetrazolyl analogues and derivatives of amino acids and peptides are shown to be promising for medicinal chemistry. Being polynitrogen heterocyclic systems comprising four endocyclic nitrogen atoms, tetrazoles can behave as acids and bases and form strong hydrogen bonds with proton donors (more rarely, with acceptors). They have high metabolic stability and are able to penetrate biological membranes. The review also considers the synthesis and properties of linear and cyclic peptides based on modified amino acids incorporating a tetrazolyl moiety. A special issue is the discussion of the biological properties of tetrazole-containing amino acids and peptides, which exhibit high biological activity and can be used to design new drugs. The bibliography includes 200 references.

  4. Catalytic reaction of cytokinin dehydrogenase: preference for quinones as electron acceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Frébortová, Jitka; Fraaije, Marco W; Galuszka, Petr; Sebela, Marek; Pec, Pavel; Hrbác, Jan; Novák, Ondrej; Bilyeu, Kristin D; English, James T; Frébort, Ivo

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic reaction of cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (EC 1.5.99.12) was studied in detail using the recombinant flavoenzyme from maize. Determination of the redox potential of the covalently linked flavin cofactor revealed a relatively high potential dictating the type of electron acceptor that can be used by the enzyme. Using 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol, 2,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone or 1,4-naphthoquinone as electron acceptor, turnover rates with N6-(2-isopentenyl)adenine of approx. 150 s(-1) could be obtained. This suggests that the natural electron acceptor of the enzyme is quite probably a p-quinone or similar compound. By using the stopped-flow technique, it was found that the enzyme is rapidly reduced by N6-(2-isopentenyl)adenine (k(red)=950 s(-1)). Re-oxidation of the reduced enzyme by molecular oxygen is too slow to be of physiological relevance, confirming its classification as a dehydrogenase. Furthermore, it was established for the first time that the enzyme is capable of degrading aromatic cytokinins, although at low reaction rates. As a result, the enzyme displays a dual catalytic mode for oxidative degradation of cytokinins: a low-rate and low-substrate specificity reaction with oxygen as the electron acceptor, and high activity and strict specificity for isopentenyladenine and analogous cytokinins with some specific electron acceptors. PMID:14965342

  5. Donor-acceptor type co-crystals of arylthio-substituted tetrathiafulvalenes and fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaofeng; Sun, Jibin; Zhang, Shangxi; Ma, Longfei; Liu, Lei; Qi, Hui; Shao, Yongliang; Shao, Xiangfeng

    2015-01-01

    A series of donor-acceptor type co-crystals of fullerene (as the acceptor) and arylthio-substituted tetrathiafulvalene derivatives (Ar-S-TTF, as the donor) were prepared and their structural features were thoroughly investigated. The formation of co-crystals relies on the flexibility of Ar-S-TTF and the size matches between Ar-S-TTF and fullerene. Regarding their compositions, the studied co-crystals can be divided into two types, where types I and II have donor:acceptor ratios of 1:1 and 1:2, respectively. Multiple intermolecular interactions are observed between the donor and acceptor, which act to stabilize the structures of the resulting co-crystals. In the type I co-crystals, the fullerene molecule is surrounded by four Ar-S-TTF molecules, that is, two Ar-S-TTF molecules form a sandwich structure with one fullerene molecule and the other two Ar-S-TTF molecules interact with the fullerene molecule along their lateral axes. In the type II co-crystals, one fullerene molecule has the donor-acceptor mode similar to that in type I, whereas the other fullerene molecule is substantially surrounded by the aryl groups on Ar-S-TTF molecules and the solvent molecules. PMID:26199659

  6. Theoretical calculation of the miniband-to-acceptor magnetoluminescence of semiconductor superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latgé, A.; Porras-Montenegro, N.; de Dios-Leyva, M.; Oliveira, L. E.

    1997-05-01

    The acceptor-related photoluminescence of a GaAs-(Ga,Al)As superlattice, under the influence of a magnetic field applied parallel to the interfaces, is theoretically studied following a variational procedure within the effective-mass approximation. Electron and hole magnetic Landau levels and envelope wave functions were obtained by an expansion in terms of sine functions, whereas for the impurity levels the envelope functions were taken as products of sine and hydrogenic-like variational functions. Impurity binding energies and wave functions are obtained for acceptors at a general position in the superlattice and for different in-plane magnetic fields. Theoretical results corresponding to transitions from the conduction subband to states of acceptors (miniband-to-acceptor e-A0 transitions) at the edge and center positions of the GaAs quantum well compare well with available experimental data by Skromme et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 65, 2050 (1990)] on the magnetic-field dependence of the photoluminescence peak position of conduction miniband-to-acceptor transitions for different temperatures and values of the superlattice period.

  7. Electronic structure of sub-surface Boron acceptors in silicon for potential qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Rajib; Mol, Jan; Klimeck, Gerhard; Rogge, Sven

    2013-03-01

    Single acceptors in silicon are investigated as potential qubits. Due to the p-type nature of the valence band (VB), the acceptor states are less susceptible to the hyperfine interaction of the neighboring nuclear spins. The presence of a stronger spin-orbit coupling in the VB also enables the possibility of an all-electric qubit control. Whereas donor qubits exhibit exchange oscillation with separation distance due to conduction band valleys, Boron acceptors are expected to have smoother exchange curves. We investigate the electronic structure of single Boron acceptors in silicon in the presence of electric field, strain, magnetic field, and interfaces. Bulk Boron acceptors have a four-fold degenerate ground state 45 meV above the VB with angular momentum states of 3/2 and 1/2. An interface splits this manifold into Kramer's doublets. Application of E and B fields allow several possibilities for forming a two-level qubit driven by an ac electric field. We compare calculations from atomistic tight-binding theory to scanning tunneling microscope (STM) measurements and k.p calculations. The tight-binding method captures additional wavefunction symmetries due to the crystal that help to explain the STM measurements.

  8. Natural organic matter as electron acceptor: experimental evidence for its important role in anaerobic respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Maximilian Peter; Sander, Michael; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Hupfer, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Microbial respiration is a key driver of element cycling in oxic and anoxic environments. Upon depletion of oxygen as terminal electron acceptor (TEA), a number of anaerobic bacteria can employ alternative TEA for intracellular energy generation. Redox active quinone moieties in dissolved organic matter (DOM) are well known electron acceptors for microbial respiration. However, it remains unclear whether quinones in adsorbed and particulate OM accept electrons in a same way. In our studies we aim to understand the importance of natural organic matter (NOM) as electron acceptors for microbial energy gain and its possible implications for methanogenesis. Using a novel electrochemical approach, mediated electrochemical reduction and -oxidation, we can directly quantify reduced hydroquinone and oxidized quionone moieties in dissolved and particulate NOM samples. In a mesocosm experiment, we rewetted sediment and peat soil and followed electron transfer to the inorganic and organic electron acceptors over time. We found that inorganic and organic electron acceptor pools were depleted over the same timescales. More importantly, we showed that organic, NOM-associated electron accepting moieties represent as much as 21 40% of total TEA inventories. These findings support earlier studies that propose that the reduction of quinone moieties in particulate organic matter competitively suppresses methanogenesis in wetland soils. Our results indicate that electron transfer to organic, particulate TEA in inundated ecosystems has to be accounted for when establishing carbon budgets in and projecting greenhouse gas emissions from these systems.

  9. Effects of NAA and BAP, Double-Layered Media, and Light Distance on In Vitro Regeneration of Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. (Lotus), an Aquatic Edible Plant

    PubMed Central

    Mahmad, Noraini; Mat Taha, Rosna; Othman, Rashidi; Saleh, Azani; Hasbullah, Nor Azlina; Elias, Hashimah

    2014-01-01

    In vitro direct regeneration of Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. was successfully achieved from immature explants (yellow plumule) cultured on a solid MS media supplemented with combinations of 0.5 mg/L BAP and 1.5 mg/L NAA which resulted in 16.00 ± 0.30 number of shoots per explant and exhibited a new characteristic of layered multiple shoots, while normal roots formed on the solid MS basal media. The double-layered media gave the highest number of shoots per explant with a ratio of 2 : 1 (liquid to solid) with a mean number of 16.67 ± 0.23 shoots per explant with the formation of primary and secondary roots from immature explants. In the study involving light distance, the tallest shoot (16.67 ± 0.23 mm) obtained from the immature explants was at a light distance of 200 mm from the source of inflorescent light (1000 lux). The plantlets were successfully acclimatized in clay loam soil after 8 months being maintained under in vitro conditions. PMID:24895660

  10. Germline BAP1 mutation in a family with high incidence of multiple primary cancers and a potential gene-environment interaction.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Mitchell; Kadariya, Yuwaraj; Talarchek, Jacqueline; Pei, Jianming; Ohar, Jill A; Kayaleh, Omar R; Testa, Joseph R

    2015-12-28

    We report a high-risk cancer family with multiple mesotheliomas, cutaneous melanomas, basal cell carcinomas, and meningiomas segregating with a germline nonsense mutation in BAP1 (c.1938T>A; p.Y646X). Notably, most (four of five) mesotheliomas were peritoneal rather than the usually more common pleural form of the disease, and all five mesothelioma patients also developed second or third primary cancers, including two with meningiomas. Another family member developed both cutaneous melanoma and breast cancer. Two family members had basal cell carcinomas, and six others had melanocytic tumors, including four cutaneous melanomas, one uveal melanoma, and one benign melanocytic tumor. The family resides in a subtropical area, and several members had suspected exposure to asbestos either occupationally or in the home. We hypothesize that the concurrence of a genetic predisposing factor and environmental exposure to asbestos and UV irradiation contributed to the high incidence of multiple cancers seen in this family, specifically mesothelioma and various uveal/skin tumors, respectively. PMID:26409435

  11. Modular, Antibody-free Time-Resolved LRET Kinase Assay Enabled by Quantum Dots and Tb3+-sensitizing Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Wei; Parker, Laurie L.

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescent drug screening assays are essential for tyrosine kinase inhibitor discovery. Here we demonstrate a flexible, antibody-free TR-LRET kinase assay strategy that is enabled by the combination of streptavidin-coated quantum dot (QD) acceptors and biotinylated, Tb3+ sensitizing peptide donors. By exploiting the spectral features of Tb3+ and QD, and the high binding affinity of the streptavidin-biotin interaction, we achieved multiplexed detection of kinase activity in a modular fashion without requiring additional covalent labeling of each peptide substrate. This strategy is compatible with high-throughput screening, and should be adaptable to the rapidly changing workflows and targets involved in kinase inhibitor discovery.

  12. Proficiency of acceptor-donor-acceptor organic dye with spiro-MeOTAD HTM on the photovoltaic performance of dye sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramavenkateswari, K.; Venkatachalam, P.

    2016-08-01

    This work investigates the proficiency of acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) organic dye Diisopropyl azodicarboxylate (DIAC) as photosensitizer on the photovoltaic parameters of silver (Ag) doped TiO2 photoanode dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) with quasi-solid state electrolyte/hole transport material (HTM) spiro-MeOTAD. TNSs (TiO2 nanosticks) photoanodes are prepared through sol-gel method and hydrothermal technique. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and BET measurement were used to characterize the structure and morphology of TiO2 nanostructures. The Diisopropyl azodicarboxylate organic dye with TNPs-Ag@TNSs composite photoanode structure and spiro-MeOTAD HTM exhibited better power conversion efficiency (PCE). [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Energy Level Tuning of Non-Fullerene Acceptors in Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Cnops, Kjell; Zango, German; Genoe, Jan; Heremans, Paul; Martinez-Diaz, M Victoria; Torres, Tomas; Cheyns, David

    2015-07-22

    The use of non-fullerene acceptors in organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices could lead to enhanced efficiencies due to increased open-circuit voltage (VOC) and improved absorption of solar light. Here we systematically investigate planar heterojunction devices comprising peripherally substituted subphthalocyanines as acceptors and correlate the device performance with the heterojunction energetics. As a result of a balance between VOC and the photocurrent, tuning of the interface energy gap is necessary to optimize the power conversion efficiency in these devices. In addition, we explore the role of the charge transport layers in the device architecture. It is found that non-fullerene acceptors require adjusted buffer layers with aligned electron transport levels to enable efficient charge extraction, while the insertion of an exciton-blocking layer at the anode interface further boosts photocurrent generation. These adjustments result in a planar-heterojunction OPV device with an efficiency of 6.9% and a VOC above 1 V. PMID:26104833

  14. Influence of the local environment on Mn acceptors in GaAs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Donghun; Gohlke, David; Benjamin, Anne; Gupta, Jay A

    2015-04-22

    As transistors continue to shrink toward nanoscale dimensions, their characteristics are increasingly dependent on the statistical variations of impurities in the semiconductor material. The scanning tunneling microscope (STM) can be used to not only study prototype devices with atomically precise placement of impurity atoms, but can also probe how the properties of these impurities depend on the local environment. Tunneling spectroscopy of Mn acceptors in GaAs indicates that surface-layer Mn act as a deep acceptor, with a hole binding energy that can be tuned by positioning charged defects nearby. Band bending induced by the tip or by these defects can also tune the ionization state of the acceptor complex, evident as a ring-like contrast in STM images. The interplay of these effects is explored over a wide range of defect distances, and understood using iterative simulations of tip-induced band bending. PMID:25782688

  15. Spectroscopic studies of charge transfer complexes between colchicine and some π acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Mustafa; Duymus, Hulya

    2007-07-01

    Charge transfer complexes between colchicine as donor and π acceptors such as tetracyanoethylene (TCNE), 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano- p-benzoquinone (DDQ), p-chloranil ( p-CHL) have been studied spectrophotometrically in dichloromethane at 21 °C. The stoichiometry of the complexes was found to be 1:1 ratio by the Job method between donor and acceptors with the maximum absorption band at a wavelength of 535, 585 and 515 nm. The equilibrium constant and thermodynamic parameters of the complexes were determined by Benesi-Hildebrand and van't Hoff equations. Colchicine in pure form and in dosage form was applied in this study. The formation constants for the complexes were shown to be dependent on the structure of the electron acceptors used.

  16. Donor-Acceptor Heterojunction Configurations Based on DNA-Multichromophore Arrays.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mitsunobu; Tsuto, Koji; Jomura, Ayumi; Takada, Tadao; Yamana, Kazushige

    2015-08-10

    Multichromophore arrays of bis(2-thienyl)diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) and naphthalenediimide (NDI) with two Zn(II) -cyclens were constructed using thymidine DNA as a scaffold through the binding of the Zn(II) -cyclens with thymine bases. We demonstrate photocurrent generation in a donor-acceptor heterojunction configuration consisting of the DPP (donor) and NDI (acceptor) arrays co-immobilized on an Au electrode. The co-immobilized electrode exhibited good photocurrent responses because of the efficient charge separation between the DPP and NDI arrays. In contrast, an immobilized electrode consisting of randomly assembled DPP-NDI arrays generated no photocurrent response because DPP formed ground-state charge-transfer complexes with NDI in the randomly assembled arrays. Therefore, our approach to generate donor-acceptor heterojunctions based on DNA-multichromophore arrays is a useful method to efficiently generate photocurrent. PMID:26179473

  17. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer between Quantum Dot Donors and Quantum Dot Acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Kenny F.; Dennis, Allison M.

    2015-01-01

    Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer amongst semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is reviewed, with particular interest in biosensing applications. The unique optical properties of QDs provide certain advantages and also specific challenges with regards to sensor design, compared to other FRET systems. The brightness and photostability of QDs make them attractive for highly sensitive sensing and long-term, repetitive imaging applications, respectively, but the overlapping donor and acceptor excitation signals that arise when QDs serve as both the donor and acceptor lead to high background signals from direct excitation of the acceptor. The fundamentals of FRET within a nominally homogeneous QD population as well as energy transfer between two distinct colors of QDs are discussed. Examples of successful sensors are highlighted, as is cascading FRET, which can be used for solar harvesting. PMID:26057041

  18. Pyridine as proton acceptor in the concerted proton electron transfer oxidation of phenol.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Julien; Costentin, Cyrille; Robert, Marc; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2011-06-01

    Taking pyridine as a prototypal example of biologically important nitrogen bases involved in proton-coupled electron transfers, it is shown with the example of the photochemically triggered oxidation of phenol by Ru(III)(bpy)(3) that this proton acceptor partakes in a concerted pathway whose kinetic characteristics can be extracted from the overall kinetic response. The treatment of these data, implemented by the results of a parallel study carried out in heavy water, allowed the determination of the intrinsic kinetic characteristics of this proton acceptor. Comparison of the reorganization energies and of the pre-exponential factors previously derived for hydrogen phosphate and water (in water) as proton acceptors suggests that, in the case of pyridine, the proton charge is delocalized over a primary shell of water molecules firmly bound to the pyridinium cation. PMID:21499600

  19. Effect of cathode electron acceptors on simultaneous anaerobic sulfide and nitrate removal in microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Zheng, Ping; Mahmood, Qaisar

    2016-01-01

    The current investigation reports the effect of cathode electron acceptors on simultaneous sulfide and nitrate removal in two-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Potassium permanganate and potassium ferricyanide were common cathode electron acceptors and evaluated for substrate removal and electricity generation. The abiotic MFCs produced electricity through spontaneous electrochemical oxidation of sulfide. In comparison with abiotic MFC, the biotic MFC showed better ability for simultaneous nitrate and sulfide removal along with electricity generation. Keeping external resistance of 1,000 Ω, both MFCs showed good capacities for substrate removal where nitrogen and sulfate were the main end products. The steady voltage with potassium permanganate electrodes was nearly twice that of with potassium ferricyanide. Cyclic voltammetry curves confirmed that the potassium permanganate had higher catalytic activity than potassium ferricyanide. The potassium permanganate may be a suitable choice as cathode electron acceptor for enhanced electricity generation during simultaneous treatment of sulfide and nitrate in MFCs. PMID:26901739

  20. Incorporation of a Michael acceptor enhances the antitumor activity of triterpenoic acids.

    PubMed

    Heller, Lucie; Schwarz, Stefan; Perl, Vincent; Köwitsch, Alexander; Siewert, Bianka; Csuk, René

    2015-08-28

    Finding and developing drugs for the treatment of cancer has been challenging scientists for many decades, and using compounds of natural origin represents one of several strategies. Triterpenoic acids are a very promising class of secondary metabolites being able to induce apoptosis while their cytotoxicity is low. Therefore, derivatizations have to be conducted to improve cytotoxicity while retaining their ability to induce programmed cell death. The incorporation of a Michael acceptor into molecules resulted very often in drugs of improved cytotoxicity. Thus, in this study we synthesized and evaluated several Michael acceptor substituted compounds derived from glycyrrhetinic, ursolic, oleanolic and platanic acid. The influence of the presence of such a functional group onto the cytotoxicity was investigated in colorimetric sulforhodamine B assays employing several human cancer cell lines. EC50 values in the single-digit micromolar range were measured. Thus, the incorporation of a Michael acceptor unit into triterpenoic acids enhances the cytotoxicity of these compounds significantly. PMID:26177446

  1. Growth of strain SES-3 with arsenate and other diverse electron acceptors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laverman, A.M.; Blum, J.S.; Schaefer, J.K.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Lovley, D.R.; Oremland, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    The selenate-respiring bacterial strain SES-3 was able to use a variety of inorganic electron acceptors to sustain growth. SES-3 grew with the reduction of arsenate to arsenite, Fe(III) to Fe(II), or thiosulfate to sulfide. It also grew in medium in which elemental sulfur, Mn(IV), nitrite, trimethylamine N-oxide, or fumarate was provided as an electron acceptor. Growth on oxygen was microaerophilic. There was no growth with arsenite or chromate. Washed suspensions of cells grown on selenate or nitrate had a constitutive ability to reduce arsenate but were unable to reduce arsenite. These results suggest that strain SES-3 may occupy a niche as an environmental opportunist by being able to take advantage of a diversity of electron acceptors.

  2. Rapid Energy Transfer Enabling Control of Emission Polarization in Perylene Bisimide Donor-Acceptor Triads.

    PubMed

    Menelaou, Christopher; ter Schiphorst, Jeroen; Kendhale, Amol M; Parkinson, Patrick; Debije, Michael G; Schenning, Albertus P H J; Herz, Laura M

    2015-04-01

    Materials showing rapid intramolecular energy transfer and polarization switching are of interest for both their fundamental photophysics and potential for use in real-world applications. Here, we report two donor-acceptor-donor triad dyes based on perylene-bisimide subunits, with the long axis of the donors arranged either parallel or perpendicular to that of the central acceptor. We observe rapid energy transfer (<2 ps) and effective polarization control in both dye molecules in solution. A distributed-dipole Förster model predicts the excitation energy transfer rate for the linearly arranged triad but severely underestimates it for the orthogonal case. We show that the rapid energy transfer arises from a combination of through-bond coupling and through-space transfer between donor and acceptor units. As they allow energy cascading to an excited state with controllable polarization, these triad dyes show high potential for use in luminescent solar concentrator devices. PMID:26262968

  3. Changing the acceptor identity of a transfer RNA by altering nucleotides in a "variable pocket".

    PubMed

    McClain, W H; Foss, K

    1988-09-30

    The specificity of tRNA(Arg) (arginine transfer RNA) for aminoacylation (its acceptor identity) were first identified by computer analysis and then examined with amber suppressor tRNAs in Escherichia coli. On replacing two nucleotides in tRNA(Phe) (phenylalanine transfer RNA) with the corresponding nucleotides from tRNA(Arg), the acceptor identity of the resulting tRNA was changed to that of tRNA(Arg). The nucleotides used in the identity transformation occupy a "variable pocket" structure on the surface of the tRNA molecule where two single-stranded loop segments interact. The middle nucleotide in the anticodon also probably contributes to the interaction, since an amber suppressor of tRNA(Arg) had an acceptor identity for lysine as well as arginine. PMID:2459773

  4. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants.

    PubMed

    Tam, James P; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  5. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Tam, James P.; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  6. Easy Access to NO2 -Containing Donor-Acceptor-Acceptor Electron Donors for High Efficiency Small-Molecule Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Ting, Hao-Chun; Yang, Ya-Ting; Chen, Chia-Hsun; Lee, Jiun-Haw; Chang, Jung-Hung; Wu, Chih-I; Chiu, Tien-Lung; Lin, Chi-Feng; Chung, Chin-Lung; Wong, Ken-Tsung

    2016-06-22

    Two donor-acceptor-acceptor (D-A-A)-type molecules incorporating nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBO) as the A-A block and ditolylamine as the D block bridged through a phenylene (PNBO) and a thiophene (TNBO) spacer were synthesized in a one-step coupling reaction. Their electronic, photophysical, and thermal properties; crystallographic analysis; and theoretical calculations were studied to establish a clear structure-property relationship. The results indicate that the quinoidal character of the thiophene bridge strongly governs the structural features and crystal packings (herringbone vs. brickwork) and thus the physical properties of the compounds. PNBO and TNBO were utilized as electron donors combined with C70 as the electron acceptor in the active layer of vacuum-processed bulk heterojunction small-molecule organic solar cells (SMOSCs). The power conversion efficiency of both PNBO- and TNBO-based OSCs exceeded 5 %. The ease of accessibility of PNBO and TNBO demonstrates the potential for simple and economical synthesis of electron donors in vacuum-processed SMOSCs. PMID:27213296

  7. Thiadiazolo[3,4-c]pyridine as an Acceptor toward Fast-Switching Green Donor-Acceptor-Type Electrochromic Polymer with Low Bandgap.

    PubMed

    Ming, Shouli; Zhen, Shijie; Lin, Kaiwen; Zhao, Li; Xu, Jingkun; Lu, Baoyang

    2015-06-01

    Thiadiazolo[3,4-c]pyridine (PT), an important analog of benzothiadiazole (BT), has most recently been explored as a novel electron acceptor. It exhibits more electron-accepting ability and other unique properties and potential advantages over BT, thus inspiring us to investigate PT-based donor-acceptor-type (D-A) conjugated polymer in electrochromics. Herein, PT was employed for the rational design of novel donor-acceptor-type systems to yield a neutral green electrochromic polymer poly(4,7-di(2,3-dihydrothieno[3,4-b][1,4]dioxin-5-yl)-[1,2,5] thiadiazolo[3,4-c]pyridine) (PEPTE). PEPTE revealed a lower bandgap (Eg,ele=0.85 eV, Eg,opt=1.12 eV) than its BT analog and also favorable redox activity and stability. Furthermore, electrochromic kinetic studies demonstrated that PEPTE displayed higher coloration efficiency than BT analog, good optical memory, and very fast switching time (0.3 s at all three wavelengths), indicating that PT would probably be a promising choice for developing novel neutral green electrochromic polymers by matching with various donor units. PMID:25955881

  8. Threshold-like complexation of conjugated polymers with small molecule acceptors in solution within the neighbor-effect model.

    PubMed

    Sosorev, Andrey Yu; Parashchuk, Olga D; Zapunidi, Sergey A; Kashtanov, Grigoriy S; Golovnin, Ilya V; Kommanaboyina, Srikanth; Perepichka, Igor F; Paraschuk, Dmitry Yu

    2016-02-14

    In some donor-acceptor blends based on conjugated polymers, a pronounced charge-transfer complex (CTC) forms in the electronic ground state. In contrast to small-molecule donor-acceptor blends, the CTC concentration in polymer:acceptor solution can increase with the acceptor content in a threshold-like way. This threshold-like behavior was earlier attributed to the neighbor effect (NE) in the polymer complexation, i.e., next CTCs are preferentially formed near the existing ones; however, the NE origin is unknown. To address the factors affecting the NE, we record the optical absorption data for blends of the most studied conjugated polymers, poly(2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene) (MEH-PPV) and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), with electron acceptors of fluorene series, 1,8-dinitro-9,10-antraquinone (), and 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane () in different solvents, and then analyze the data within the NE model. We have found that the NE depends on the polymer and acceptor molecular skeletons and solvent, while it does not depend on the acceptor electron affinity and polymer concentration. We conclude that the NE operates within a single macromolecule and stems from planarization of the polymer chain involved in the CTC with an acceptor molecule; as a result, the probability of further complexation with the next acceptor molecules at the adjacent repeat units increases. The steric and electronic microscopic mechanisms of NE are discussed. PMID:26799407

  9. Molecular origin of photovoltaic performance in donor-block-acceptor all-conjugated block copolymers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smith, Kendall A.; Lin, Yen -Hao; Mok, Jorge W.; Yager, Kevin G.; Strzalka, Joseph; Nie, Wanyi; Mohite, Aditya D.; Verduzco, Rafael

    2015-11-03

    All-conjugated block copolymers may be an effective route to self-assembled photovoltaic devices, but we lack basic information on the relationship between molecular characteristics and photovoltaic performance. Here, we synthesize a library of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) block poly((9,9-dialkylfluorene)-2,7-diyl-alt-[4,7-bis(alkylthiophen-5-yl)-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole]-2',2''-diyl) (PFTBT) donor-block-acceptor all-conjugated block copolymers and carry out a comprehensive study of processing conditions, crystallinity, domain sizes, and side-chain structure on photovoltaic device performance. We find that all block copolymers studied exhibit an out-of-plane crystal orientation after deposition, and on thermal annealing at high temperatures the crystal orientation flips to an in-plane orientation. By varying processing conditions on polymer photovoltaic devices, we show thatmore » the crystal orientation has only a modest effect (15-20%) on photovoltaic performance. The addition of side-chains to the PFTBT block is found to decrease photovoltaic power conversion efficiencies by at least an order of magnitude. Through grazing-incidence X-ray measurements we find that the addition of side-chains to the PFTBT acceptor block results in weak segregation and small (< 10 nm) block copolymer self-assembled donor and acceptor domains. This work is the most comprehensive to date on all-conjugated block copolymer systems and suggests that photovoltaic performance of block copolymers depends strongly on the miscibility of donor and acceptor blocks, which impacts donor and acceptor domain sizes and purity. Lastly, strategies for improving the device performance of block copolymer photovoltaics should seek to increase segregation between donor and acceptor polymer domains.« less

  10. Hybrid coconut seedlings, scholarships, and discount cards for family planning acceptors.

    PubMed

    Sumarsono

    1989-10-01

    Having learned from failed family planning (FP) incentive schemes in other countries, Indonesia implemented a reward system designed to popularize FP in the community. In order to overcome cultural opposition to FP, many countries in the 1970s opted to give incentives--money, materials, etc.--to new contraceptive acceptors and the FP workers who successfully recruited them. These countries, which oftentimes spent up to 1/4 of their program budget on incentives, saw rapid increases in the number of new acceptors. The results, however, only reflected a superficial acceptance of FP. When the incentives stopped, the number of acceptors dropped considerably. Recognizing this, the Indonesian government set out to increase FP acceptance by making the small family the norm in the community. And one of the approaches for doing so was a reward system. The goals of the reward program were: 1) to raise awareness of the recognition given to individuals or groups that have accepted FP; 2) to create pride among FP workers and new acceptors; and 3) to generate leadership in the community. Villages with high FP acceptance receive rewards such as deep-wells that provide clean water or income generating projects. Individuals also receive rewards that sometimes include hybrid coconut seedlings which, after 3 years, can yield up to 700 coconuts, which can provide a family with a significant supplemental income. The government also gives scholarships to children of FP acceptors. Also, the president of Indonesia publicly recognized family planning acceptors. In 1989, over 800,000 couples received awards for practicing contraception over the past 5-16 years. PMID:12315968

  11. Conformational Changes and Association of Membrane-Interacting Peptides in Myelin Membrane Models: A Case of the C-Terminal Peptide of Proteolipid Protein and the Antimicrobial Peptide Melittin.

    PubMed

    Appadu, Ashtina; Jelokhani-Niaraki, Masoud; DeBruin, Lillian

    2015-11-25

    Model membranes composed of various lipid mixtures can segregate into liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) phases. In this study, lipid vesicles composed of mainly Lo or Ld phases as well as complex lipid systems representing the cytosolic leaflet of the myelin membrane were characterized by fluorescence resonance energy transfer with a donor/acceptor pair that preferentially partitioned into Lo or Ld phases, respectively. The fluidity of the lipid systems containing >30% cholesterol was modulated in the presence of the amphipathic peptide melittin. With all the studied lipid systems, melittin attained an α-helical conformation as determined by CD spectroscopy and attained varying degrees of membrane association and penetration as determined by intrinsic Trp fluorescence. The other protein domain utilized was a putative amphipathic helical peptide derived from the cytosolic C-terminal sequence of proteolipid protein (PLP) which is the most abundant protein in the myelin membrane. The C-terminal PLP peptide transitioned from a random coil to an α-helix in the presence of trifluoroethanol. Upon interacting with each of lipid vesicle system, the PLP peptide also folded into a helix; however, at high concentrations of the peptide with fluid lipid systems, associated helices transmuted into a β-sheet conformer. The membrane-associated aggregation of the cytosolic C-termini could be a mechanism by which the transmembrane PLP multimerizes in the myelin membrane. PMID:26561987

  12. Effect of Electronic Acceptor Segments on Photophysical Properties of Low-Band-Gap Ambipolar Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanzuo; Cui, Jingang; Zhao, Jianing; Liu, Jinglin; Song, Peng; Ma, Fengcai

    2013-01-01

    Stimulated by a recent experimental report, charge transfer and photophysical properties of donor-acceptor ambipolar polymer were studied with the quantum chemistry calculation and the developed 3D charge difference density method. The effects of electronic acceptor strength on the structure, energy levels, electron density distribution, ionization potentials, and electron affinities were also obtained to estimate the transporting ability of hole and electron. With the developed 3D charge difference density, one visualizes the charge transfer process, distinguishes the role of molecular units, and finds the relationship between the role of DPP and excitation energy for the three polymers during photo-excitation. PMID:23365549

  13. Doping of germanium and silicon crystals with non-hydrogenic acceptors for far infrared lasers

    DOEpatents

    Haller, Eugene E.; Brundermann, Erik

    2000-01-01

    A method for doping semiconductors used for far infrared lasers with non-hydrogenic acceptors having binding energies larger than the energy of the laser photons. Doping of germanium or silicon crystals with beryllium, zinc or copper. A far infrared laser comprising germanium crystals doped with double or triple acceptor dopants permitting the doped laser to be tuned continuously from 1 to 4 terahertz and to operate in continuous mode. A method for operating semiconductor hole population inversion lasers with a closed cycle refrigerator.

  14. Magnetic field effect on the Coulomb interaction of acceptors in semimagnetic quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Kalpana, P.; Merwyn, A.; Nithiananthi, P.; Jayakumar, K.; Reuben, Jasper D.

    2015-06-24

    The Coulomb interaction of holes in a Semimagnetic Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te / CdTe Spherical and Cubical Quantum Dot (SMQD) in a magnetic field is studied using variational approach in the effective mass approximation. Since these holes in QD show a pronounced collective behavior, while distinct single particle phenomena is suppressed, their interaction in confined potential becomes very significant. It has been observed that acceptor-acceptor interaction is more in cubical QD than in spherical QD which can be controlled by the magnetic field. The results are presented and discussed.

  15. Copper-catalyzed asymmetric conjugate addition of organometallic reagents to extended Michael acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Thibault E; Drissi-Amraoui, Sammy; Crévisy, Christophe; Baslé, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Summary The copper-catalyzed asymmetric conjugate addition (ACA) of nucleophiles onto polyenic Michael acceptors represents an attractive and powerful methodology for the synthesis of relevant chiral molecules, as it enables in a straightforward manner the sequential generation of two or more stereogenic centers. In the last decade, various chiral copper-based catalysts were evaluated in combination with different nucleophiles and Michael acceptors, and have unambiguously demonstrated their usefulness in the control of the regio- and enantioselectivity of the addition. The aim of this review is to report recent breakthroughs achieved in this challenging field. PMID:26734090

  16. Synthesis and Characterization of Organic Dyes Containing Various Donors and Acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tzi-Yi; Tsao, Ming-Hsiu; Chen, Fu-Lin; Su, Shyh-Gang; Chang, Cheng-Wen; Wang, Hong-Paul; Lin, Yuan-Chung; Ou-Yang, Wen-Chung; Sun, I-Wen

    2010-01-01

    New organic dyes comprising carbazole, iminodibenzyl, or phenothiazine moieties, respectively, as the electron donors, and cyanoacetic acid or acrylic acid moieties as the electron acceptors/anchoring groups were synthesized and characterized. The influence of heteroatoms on carbazole, iminodibenzyl and phenothiazine donors, and cyano-substitution on the acid acceptor is evidenced by spectral, electrochemical, photovoltaic experiments, and density functional theory calculations. The phenothiazine dyes show solar-energy-to-electricity conversion efficiency (η) of 3.46–5.53%, whereas carbazole and iminodibenzyl dyes show η of 2.43% and 3.49%, respectively. PMID:20162019

  17. Synthetic antibiofilm peptides.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Cardoso, Marlon Henrique; de Souza Cândido, Elizabete; Franco, Octavio Luiz; Hancock, Robert E W

    2016-05-01

    Bacteria predominantly exist as multicellular aggregates known as biofilms that are associated with at least two thirds of all infections and exhibit increased adaptive resistance to conventional antibiotic therapies. Therefore, biofilms are major contributors to the global health problem of antibiotic resistance, and novel approaches to counter them are urgently needed. Small molecules of the innate immune system called host defense peptides (HDPs) have emerged as promising templates for the design of potent, broad-spectrum antibiofilm agents. Here, we review recent developments in the new field of synthetic antibiofilm peptides, including mechanistic insights, synergistic interactions with available antibiotics, and their potential as novel antimicrobials against persistent infections caused by biofilms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert. PMID:26724202

  18. Signal peptide of cellulase.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shaomin; Wu, Guang

    2014-06-01

    Cellulase is an enzyme playing a crucial role in biotechnology industries ranging from textile to biofuel because of tremendous amount of cellulose produced in plant. In order to improve cellulase productivity, huge resource has been spent in search for good cellulases from microorganism in remote areas and in creation of ideal cellulase by engineering. However, not much attention is given to the secretion of cellulases from cell into extracellular space, where a cellulase plays its enzymatic role. In this minireview, the signal peptides, which lead secreted proteins to specific secretion systems and scatter in literature, are reviewed. The patterns of signal peptides are checked against 4,101 cellulases documented in UniProtKB, the largest protein database in the world, to determine how these cellulases are secreted. Simultaneous review on both literature and cellulases from the database not only provides updated knowledge on signal peptides but also indicates the gap in our research. PMID:24743986

  19. Biomimetic peptide nanosensors.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yue; Kim, Sang N; Naik, Rajesh R; McAlpine, Michael C

    2012-05-15

    The development of a miniaturized sensing platform tailored for sensitive and selective detection of a variety of biochemical analytes could offer transformative fundamental and technological opportunities. Due to their high surface-to-volume ratios, nanoscale materials are extremely sensitive sensors. Likewise, peptides represent robust substrates for selective recognition due to the potential for broad chemical diversity within their relatively compact size. Here we explore the possibilities of linking peptides to nanosensors for the selective detection of biochemical targets. Such systems raise a number of interesting fundamental challenges: What are the peptide sequences, and how can rational design be used to derive selective binders? What nanomaterials should be used, and what are some strategies for assembling hybrid nanosensors? What role does molecular modeling play in elucidating response mechanisms? What is the resulting performance of these sensors, in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, and response time? What are some potential applications? This Account will highlight our early attempts to address these research challenges. Specifically, we use natural peptide sequences or sequences identified from phage display as capture elements. The sensors are based on a variety of nanomaterials including nanowires, graphene, and carbon nanotubes. We couple peptides to the nanomaterial surfaces via traditional surface functionalization methods or self-assembly. Molecular modeling provides detailed insights into the hybrid nanostructure, as well as the sensor detection mechanisms. The peptide nanosensors can distinguish chemically camouflaged mixtures of vapors and detect chemical warfare agents with sensitivities as low as parts-per-billion levels. Finally, we anticipate future uses of this technology in biomedicine: for example, devices based on these sensors could detect disease from the molecular components in human breath. Overall, these results provide a

  20. Multidimensional signatures in antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    Yount, Nannette Y.; Yeaman, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    Conventional analyses distinguish between antimicrobial peptides by differences in amino acid sequence. Yet structural paradigms common to broader classes of these molecules have not been established. The current analyses examined the potential conservation of structural themes in antimicrobial peptides from evolutionarily diverse organisms. Using proteomics, an antimicrobial peptide signature was discovered to integrate stereospecific sequence patterns and a hallmark three-dimensional motif. This striking multidimensional signature is conserved among disulfide-containing antimicrobial peptides spanning biological kingdoms, and it transcends motifs previously limited to defined peptide subclasses. Experimental data validating this model enabled the identification of previously unrecognized antimicrobial activity in peptides of known identity. The multidimensional signature model provides a unifying structural theme in broad classes of antimicrobial peptides, will facilitate discovery of antimicrobial peptides as yet unknown, and offers insights into the evolution of molecular determinants in these and related host defense effector molecules. PMID:15118082

  1. Brain Peptides and Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arehart-Treichel, Joan

    1976-01-01

    Proteins isolated from the brain and used as drugs can improve and apparently even transfer mental states and behavior. Much of the pioneering work and recent research with humans and animals is reviewed and crucial questions that are being posed about the psychologically active peptides are related. (BT)

  2. Photoluminescence study of Be acceptors in GaInNAs epilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Y.; Barman, B.; Scrace, T.; Petrou, A.; Fukuda, M.; Sellers, I. R.; Leroux, M.; Khalfioui, M. A.

    2014-03-01

    We have studied the photoluminescence (PL) spectra from MBE grown GaInNAs epilayers doped p-type with Beryllium acceptors. The measurements were carried out in the 5 K - 70 K temperature range and in magnetic fields (B) up to 7 tesla. The PL spectra contain two features at T = 5 K: The exciton at 1093 meV and a second broader feature at 1058 meV. The intensity of this feature decreases with increasing temperature and disappears completely by 70K while the excitonic feature persists. The emission at 1058meV is identified as the conduction band to Beryllium acceptor transition. If we take into account the binding energy of the exciton [3] we get a value of 23 meV for the Beryllium acceptor binding energy. The acceptor related transition was studied as a function of magnetic field; the energy of this transition has a linear dependence on B with a slope of 055 meV/T. Research supported by Amethyst Research In. through the State of Oklahoma, ONAP program.

  3. Discriminating a deep gallium antisite defect from shallow acceptors in GaAs using supercell calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Peter A.

    2016-03-01

    For the purposes of making reliable first-principles predictions of defect energies in semiconductors, it is crucial to distinguish between effective-mass-like defects, which cannot be treated accurately with existing supercell methods, and deep defects, for which density functional theory calculations can yield reliable predictions of defect energy levels. The gallium antisite defect GaA s is often associated with the 78/203 meV shallow double acceptor in Ga-rich gallium arsenide. Within a conceptual framework of level patterns, analyses of structure and spin stabilization can be used within a supercell approach to distinguish localized deep defect states from shallow acceptors such as BA s. This systematic approach determines that the gallium antisite supercell results has signatures inconsistent with an effective mass state and cannot be the 78/203 shallow double acceptor. The properties of the Ga antisite in GaAs are described, total energy calculations that explicitly map onto asymptotic discrete localized bulk states predict that the Ga antisite is a deep double acceptor and has at least one deep donor state.

  4. Hydrogen bonding at C=Se acceptors in selenoureas, selenoamides and selones.

    PubMed

    Bibelayi, Dikima; Lundemba, Albert S; Allen, Frank H; Galek, Peter T A; Pradon, Juliette; Reilly, Anthony M; Groom, Colin R; Yav, Zéphyrin G

    2016-06-01

    In recent years there has been considerable interest in chalcogen and hydrogen bonding involving Se atoms, but a general understanding of their nature and behaviour has yet to emerge. In the present work, the hydrogen-bonding ability and nature of Se atoms in selenourea derivatives, selenoamides and selones has been explored using analysis of the Cambridge Structural Database and ab initio calculations. In the CSD there are 70 C=Se structures forming hydrogen bonds, all of them selenourea derivatives or selenoamides. Analysis of intramolecular geometries and ab initio partial charges show that this bonding stems from resonance-induced C(δ+)=Se(δ-) dipoles, much like hydrogen bonding to C=S acceptors. C=Se acceptors are in many respects similar to C=S acceptors, with similar vdW-normalized hydrogen-bond lengths and calculated interaction strengths. The similarity between the C=S and C=Se acceptors for hydrogen bonding should inform and guide the use of C=Se in crystal engineering. PMID:27240763

  5. Discriminating a deep gallium antisite defect from shallow acceptors in GaAs using supercell calculations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schultz, Peter A.

    2016-03-01

    For the purposes of making reliable first-principles predictions of defect energies in semiconductors, it is crucial to distinguish between effective-mass-like defects, which cannot be treated accurately with existing supercell methods, and deep defects, for which density functional theory calculations can yield reliable predictions of defect energy levels. The gallium antisite defect GaAs is often associated with the 78/203 meV shallow double acceptor in Ga-rich gallium arsenide. Within a conceptual framework of level patterns, analyses of structure and spin stabilization can be used within a supercell approach to distinguish localized deep defect states from shallow acceptors such as BAs. This systematicmore » approach determines that the gallium antisite supercell results has signatures inconsistent with an effective mass state and cannot be the 78/203 shallow double acceptor. Lastly, the properties of the Ga antisite in GaAs are described, total energy calculations that explicitly map onto asymptotic discrete localized bulk states predict that the Ga antisite is a deep double acceptor and has at least one deep donor state.« less

  6. Photoinduced electron transfer across fixed distances in chlorophyll donor-acceptor molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Wasielewski, M.R.; Johnson, D.G.; Svec, W.A.

    1987-06-01

    The primary events of photosynthesis are a series of rapid, unidirectional electron transfer events between donors and acceptors that are positioned in the reaction center protein at precise spatial orientations and distances relative to one another. Recent work suggests that electron transfer rates depend on distance and free energy of reaction in porphyrin-quinone models in which the distance and orientation of the donor relative to the acceptor is highly restricted. Spacer molecules were developed which were used to link chlorophyll donors with either chlorophyll or quinone acceptors to produce models in which the donor-acceptor distance is well-defined. Recent theoretical studies and photochemical hole-burning experiments have suggested that the actual primary event of photosynthesis is the production of an intramolecular charge transfer state involving the two bacteriochlorophyll molecules of the special pair dimer. This possibility was explored with symmetric, fixed distance chlorophyll dimer. The chlorophyll macrocycles share a common vinyl group at the 2-position. This linkage serves to increase the degree of electronic coupling between the macrocycles. This dimer exhibits a remarkable decrease in fluorescence quantum yield as the dielectric constant of the medium in which it is dissolved increases. This decrease is accompanied by a proportional decrease in the lowest excited singlet state lifetime as measured by picosecond fluorescence and absorption. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  7. tRNA acceptor stem and anticodon bases form independent codes related to protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Charles W.; Wolfenden, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases recognize tRNA anticodon and 3′ acceptor stem bases. Synthetase Urzymes acylate cognate tRNAs even without anticodon-binding domains, in keeping with the possibility that acceptor stem recognition preceded anticodon recognition. Representing tRNA identity elements with two bits per base, we show that the anticodon encodes the hydrophobicity of each amino acid side-chain as represented by its water-to-cyclohexane distribution coefficient, and this relationship holds true over the entire temperature range of liquid water. The acceptor stem codes preferentially for the surface area or size of each side-chain, as represented by its vapor-to-cyclohexane distribution coefficient. These orthogonal experimental properties are both necessary to account satisfactorily for the exposed surface area of amino acids in folded proteins. Moreover, the acceptor stem codes correctly for β-branched and carboxylic acid side-chains, whereas the anticodon codes for a wider range of such properties, but not for size or β-branching. These and other results suggest that genetic coding of 3D protein structures evolved in distinct stages, based initially on the size of the amino acid and later on its compatibility with globular folding in water. PMID:26034281

  8. The Cinnamon-derived Michael Acceptor Cinnamic Aldehyde Impairs Melanoma Cell Proliferation, Invasiveness, and Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Cabello, Christopher M.; Bair, Warner B.; Lamore, Sarah D.; Ley, Stephanie; Bause, Alexandra S.; Azimian, Sara; Wondrak, Georg T.

    2009-01-01

    Redox dysregulation in cancer cells represents a chemical vulnerability that can be targeted by prooxidant redox intervention. Dietary constituents that contain an electrophilic Michael acceptor pharmacophore may therefore display promising chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic anti-cancer activity. Here, we demonstrate that the cinnamon-derived dietary Michael acceptor trans-cinnamic aldehyde (CA) impairs melanoma cell proliferation and tumor growth. Feasibility of therapeutic intervention using high doses of CA (120 mg/kg, p.o., q.d., 10 days) was demonstrated in a human A375 melanoma SCID-mouse xenograft model. Low micromolar concentrations (IC50 < 10 μM) of CA, but not closely related CA-derivatives devoid of Michael acceptor activity, suppressed proliferation of human metastatic melanoma cell lines (A375, G361, LOX) with G1 cell cycle arrest, elevated intracellular ROS, and impaired invasiveness. Expression array analysis revealed that CA induced an oxidative stress response in A375 cells, up-regulating heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1), sulfiredoxin 1 homolog (SRXN1), thioredoxin reductase 1 (TXNRD1), and other genes including the cell cycle regulator and stress-responsive tumor suppressor gene cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A), a key mediator of G1 phase arrest. CA, but not Michael-inactive derivatives, inhibited NFκB transcriptional activity and TNFα-induced IL-8 production in A375 cells. These findings support a previously unrecognized role of CA as a dietary Michael acceptor with potential anticancer activity. PMID:19000754

  9. Organic Materials in the Undergraduate Laboratory: Microscale Synthesis and Investigation of a Donor-Acceptor Molecule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappenfus, Ted M.; Schliep, Karl B.; Dissanayake, Anudaththa; Ludden, Trevor; Nieto-Ortega, Belen; Lopez Navarrete, Juan T.; Ruiz Delgado, M. Carmen; Casado, Juan

    2012-01-01

    A series of experiments for undergraduate courses (e.g., organic, physical) have been developed in the area of small molecule organic materials. These experiments focus on understanding the electronic and redox properties of a donor-acceptor molecule that is prepared in a convenient one-step microscale reaction. The resulting intensely colored…

  10. 2004 Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions Gordon Conference - August 8-13, 2004

    SciTech Connect

    GUILFORD JONES BOSTON UNIVERSITY PHOTONICS CENTER 8 ST. MARY'S ST BOSTON, MA 02215

    2005-09-14

    The 2004 Gordon Conference on Donor/Acceptor Interactions will take place at Salve Regina University in Newport, Rhode Island on August 8-13, 2004. The conference will be devoted to the consequences of charge interaction and charge motion in molecular and materials systems.

  11. Photocurrent generation through electron-exciton interaction at the organic semiconductor donor/acceptor interface.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lijia; Zhang, Qiaoming; Lei, Yanlian; Zhu, Furong; Wu, Bo; Zhang, Ting; Niu, Guoxi; Xiong, Zuhong; Song, Qunliang

    2013-10-21

    In this work, we report our effort to understand the photocurrent generation that is contributed via electron-exciton interaction at the donor/acceptor interface in organic solar cells (OSCs). Donor/acceptor bi-layer heterojunction OSCs, of the indium tin oxide/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/fullerene (C60)/molybdenum oxide/Al type, were employed to study the mechanism of photocurrent generation due to the electron-exciton interaction, where CuPc and C60 are the donor and the acceptor, respectively. It is shown that the electron-exciton interaction and the exciton dissociation processes co-exist at the CuPc/C60 interface in OSCs. Compared to conventional donor/acceptor bi-layer OSCs, the cells with the above configuration enable holes to be extracted at the C60 side while electrons can be collected at the CuPc side, resulting in a photocurrent in the reverse direction. The photocurrent thus observed is contributed to primarily by the charge carriers that are generated by the electron-exciton interaction at the CuPc/C60 interface, while charges derived from the exciton dissociation process also exist at the same interface. The mechanism of photocurrent generation due to electron-exciton interaction in the OSCs is further investigated, and it is manifested by the transient photovoltage characteristics and the external quantum efficiency measurements. PMID:24002235

  12. Efficient Synthesis and Photosensitizer Performance of Nonplanar Organic Donor-Acceptor Molecules.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuping; Michinobu, Tsuyoshi; Satoh, Norifusa; Ashizawa, Minoru; Han, Liyuan

    2015-08-01

    Nonplanar organic donor-acceptor molecules bearing a carboxylic acid group were synthesized by the formal [2+2] cycloaddition-retroelectrocyclization reaction between aniline-substituted alkynes and tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) or 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ). This reaction offers an atom-economic one-step approach to donor-acceptor chromophores in satisfactory high yields. The resulting donor-acceptor molecules were characterized by conventional analytical techniques. In addition, the nonplanarity and intermolecular interactions were investigated by X-ray crystallography. The energy levels and intramolecular charge-transfer (CT), evaluated by UV-Vis-near IR spectroscopy and electrochemistry, suggested that there is a linear correlation between the optical and electrochemical band gaps. Based on these structural and electronic analyses, the photosensitizer performances of the donor-acceptor molecules in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were initially investigated using TiO2 or SnO2 electrodes. Although the power conversion efficiencies were limited, the incident-photon-to-current-conversion efficiency (IPCE) spectra indicated a better photocurrent generation for the devices on SnO2 as compared to those on TiO2. PMID:26369162

  13. Conformation and geometry of cyclopropane rings having π-acceptor substituents: a theoretical and database study.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Cabeza, Aurora J; Allen, Frank H

    2011-02-01

    The 3e' orbitals of cyclopropane have the correct symmetry to interact with low-lying unoccupied orbitals of π-acceptor substituents and maximum overlap occurs when the two orbital systems are parallel, i.e. when the π-acceptor bisects the ring in projection down the substituent bond. Since the cyclopropyl group is a common component of active pharmaceutical and agrochemical ingredients, it is important that these strong conjugative interactions are well modelled by computational techniques, and clearly represented in experimental crystal structures. Here we show that torsion angle distributions derived from crystal structure data in the Cambridge Structural Database are in excellent correspondence with torsional energy profiles computed using density functional theory (DFT) for a range of substituents: -COOR, -CONR(2), -NO(2), vinyl and phenyl. We also show that crystal structure information is invaluable in modelling conformations of compounds that contain multiply substituted rings, where steric interactions require some substituents to adopt energetically disfavoured conformations. Further, conjugative interactions with π-acceptors lead to significant asymmetry in the cyclopropane ring bond lengths and again the experimental and computational results are in excellent agreement. Such asymmetry effects are additive, and this explains bond-length variations in cyclopropane rings bearing two or more π-acceptor substituents. PMID:21245544

  14. Synthesis and characterization of a highly strained donor-acceptor nanohoop.

    PubMed

    Van Raden, J M; Darzi, E R; Zakharov, L N; Jasti, R

    2016-06-15

    A highly-strained, nitrogen-doped cycloparaphenylene (CPP), aza[6]CPP, was synthesized and then converted to a donor-acceptor nanohoop, N-methylaza[6]CPP, via alkylation of the nitrogen center. The energy levels of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) for both molecules were then probed by cyclic voltammetry (CV), which revealed that the donor-acceptor nanohoop had a significantly lower LUMO energy relative to [6]CPP and aza[6]CPP. Density functional theory (DFT) revealed that the donor-acceptor nanohoop underwent a redistribution of the frontier molecular orbital (FMO) density such that a significant portion of the LUMO density resided upon the electron-deficient nitrogen-containing ring. This localization of LUMO density caused a large lowering in the LUMO energy of nearly a full electron volt, while the HOMO energy was less affected due to a large centralization of the FMO on the electron-rich phenylene backbone. This ultimately resulted in a net lowering of the HOMO-LUMO energy gap which was observed both experimentally and computationally. In addition, N-methylaza[6]CPP has a significantly lower energy LUMO than N-methylaza[8]CPP, illustrating that the FMO levels of donor-acceptor nanohoops can be tuned by adjusting the hoop size. PMID:26881906

  15. Discriminating a deep defect from shallow acceptors in supercell calculations: gallium antisite in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Peter

    To make reliable first principles predictions of defect energies in semiconductors, it is crucial to discriminate between effective-mass-like defects--for which existing supercell methods fail--and deep defects--for which density functional theory calculations can yield reliable predictions of defect energy levels. The gallium antisite GaAs is often associated with the 78/203 meV shallow double acceptor in Ga-rich gallium arsenide. Within a framework of level occupation patterns, analyses of structure and spin stabilization can be used within a supercell approach to distinguish localized deep defect states from shallow acceptors such as BAs. This systematic analysis determines that the gallium antisite is inconsistent with a shallow state, and cannot be the 78/203 shallow double acceptor. The properties of the Ga antisite in GaAs are described, predicting that the Ga antisite is a deep double acceptor and has two donor states, one of which might be accidentally shallow. -- Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. How intermolecular geometrical disorder affects the molecular doping of donor-acceptor copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Nuzzo, Daniele; Fontanesi, Claudio; Jones, Rebecca; Allard, Sybille; Dumsch, Ines; Scherf, Ullrich; von Hauff, Elizabeth; Schumacher, Stefan; da Como, Enrico

    2015-03-01

    Molecular doping of conjugated polymers represents an important strategy for improving organic electronic devices. However, the widely reported low efficiency of doping remains a crucial limitation to obtain high performance. Here we investigate how charge transfer between dopant and donor-acceptor copolymers is affected by the spatial arrangement of the dopant molecule with respect to the copolymer repeat unit. We p-dope a donor-acceptor copolymer and probe its charge-sensitive molecular vibrations in films by infrared spectroscopy. We find that, compared with a related homopolymer, a four times higher dopant/polymer molar ratio is needed to observe signatures of charges. By DFT methods, we simulate the vibrational spectra, moving the dopant along the copolymer backbone and finding that efficient charge transfer occurs only when the dopant is close to the donor moiety. Our results show that the donor-acceptor structure poses an obstacle to efficient doping, with the acceptor moiety being inactive for p-type doping.

  17. Acyl acceptor recognition by Enterococcus faecium L,D-transpeptidase Ldtfm.

    PubMed

    Triboulet, Sébastien; Bougault, Catherine M; Laguri, Cédric; Hugonnet, Jean-Emmanuel; Arthur, Michel; Simorre, Jean-Pierre

    2015-10-01

    In Mycobacterium tuberculosis and ampicillin-resistant mutants of Enterococcus faecium, the classical target of β-lactam antibiotics is bypassed by L,D-transpeptidases that form unusual 3 → 3 peptidoglycan cross-links. β-lactams of the carbapenem class, such as ertapenem, are mimics of the acyl donor substrate and inactivate l,d-transpeptidases by acylation of their catalytic cysteine. We have blocked the acyl donor site of E. faecium L,D-transpeptidase Ldt(fm) by ertapenem and identified the acyl acceptor site based on analyses of chemical shift perturbations induced by binding of peptidoglycan fragments to the resulting acylenzyme. An nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-driven docking structure of the complex revealed key hydrogen interactions between the acyl acceptor and Ldt(fm) that were evaluated by site-directed mutagenesis and development of a cross-linking assay. Three residues are reported as critical for stabilisation of the acceptor in the Ldt(fm) active site and proper orientation of the nucleophilic nitrogen for the attack of the acylenzyme carbonyl. Identification of the catalytic pocket dedicated to the acceptor substrate opens new perspectives for the design of inhibitors with an original mode of action that could act alone or in synergy with β-lactams. PMID:26101813

  18. Three component assemblies by orthogonal H-bonding and donor-acceptor charge-transfer interaction.

    PubMed

    Kar, Haridas; Ghosh, Suhrit

    2014-02-01

    Three component supramolecular assemblies from a mixture of an aromatic donor (D), acceptor (A) and external structure directing agent (ESDA) are achieved by orthogonal noncovalent interactions involving two different types of H-bonding and alternate D-A stacking. An ESDA containing amide or urea produces a charge-transfer gel and sol, respectively, owing to their contrasting morphology. PMID:24309620

  19. In vitro fermentation of alternansucrase raffinose acceptor products by human gut bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this work, in vitro fermentation of alternansucrase raffinose acceptor products, previously fractionated according to their degree of polymerization (DP; from DP4 to DP10) was carried out using pH-controlled small scale batch cultures at 37ºC under anaerobic conditions with human faeces. Bifidog...

  20. Engineering of glucoside acceptors for the regioselective synthesis of beta-(1-->3)-disaccharides with glycosynthases.

    PubMed

    Marton, Zsuzanna; Tran, Vinh; Tellier, Charles; Dion, Michel; Drone, Jullien; Rabiller, Claude

    2008-11-24

    Glycosynthase mutants obtained from Thermotogamaritima were able to catalyze the regioselective synthesis of aryl beta-D-Galp-(1-->3)-beta-D-Glcp and aryl beta-D-Glcp-(1-->3)-beta-D-Glcp in high yields (up to 90 %) using aryl beta-D-glucosides as acceptors. The need for an aglyconic aryl group was rationalized by molecular modeling calculations, which have emphasized a high stabilizing interaction of this group by stacking with W312 of the enzyme. Unfortunately, the deprotection of the aromatic group of the disaccharides was not possible without partial hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond. The replacement of aryl groups by benzyl ones could offer the opportunity to deprotect the anomeric position under very mild conditions. Assuming that benzyl acceptors could preserve the stabilizing stacking, benzyl beta-d-glucoside firstly assayed as acceptor resulted in both poor yields and poor regioselectivity. Thus, we decided to undertake molecular modeling calculations in order to design which suitable substituted benzyl acceptors could be used. This study resulted in the choice of 2-biphenylmethyl beta-D-glucopyranoside. This choice was validated experimentally, since the corresponding beta-(1-->3) disaccharide was obtained in good yields and with a high regioselectivity. At the same time, we have shown that phenyl 1-thio-beta-D-glucopyranoside was also an excellent substrate leading to similar results as those obtained with the O-phenyl analogue. The NBS deprotection of the S-phenyl group afforded the corresponding disaccharide quantitatively. PMID:18828996

  1. Limited Cash Flow on Slot Machines: Effects of Prohibition of Note Acceptors on Adolescent Gambling Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Marianne; Rossow, Ingeborg

    2010-01-01

    This study addresses the impact of prohibition of note acceptors on gambling behaviour and gambling problems among Norwegian adolescents. Data comprised school surveys at three time points; 2004 and 2005 (before intervention) and 2006 (after intervention). Net samples comprised 20.000 students aged 13-19 years at each data collection. Identical…

  2. Synthesis and optoelectronic properties of Janus-dendrimer-type multivalent donor-acceptor systems.

    PubMed

    Dengiz, Cagatay; Breiten, Benjamin; Gisselbrecht, Jean-Paul; Boudon, Corinne; Trapp, Nils; Schweizer, W Bernd; Diederich, François

    2015-01-16

    A convergent, multistep protocol was employed for the synthesis of a Janus-type multivalent donor-acceptor system. The synthetic approach is based on a Sonogashira cross-coupling of two differently ferrocene-(Fc) substituted dendrons and a final sixfold [2 + 2] cycloaddition-retroelectrocyclization (CA-RE) reaction with tetracyanoethene, which occurs regioselectively at only one of the rigidly linked dendrons. The structural and optoelectronic properties of the compounds were investigated by X-ray analysis, UV/vis spectroscopy, and electrochemistry. The target Janus-system displays redox-amphoteric behavior. The nonalkynylated Fc end groups in one dendron are readily and reversibly oxidized. The second dendron, in which the terminal Fc-activated alkynes underwent the CA-RE reaction to give tetracyanobuta-1,3-dienes in the final step of the synthesis, undergoes four reversible 3-e(-) reductions in the very narrow potential range of 1 V. A spontaneous intramolecular charge transfer from the donor into the acceptor hemisphere was not observed. Furthermore, the oxidation potential of the Fc donors in one hemisphere is hardly perturbed by the push-pull acceptors in the other, which suggests that electronic communication along the π-system, with several meta-connectivities, is not efficient. Therefore, the charge-transfer bands seen in the Janus-type system originate from the interaction of the Fc donors with the directly connected tetracyanobuta-1,3-diene acceptors in the same hemisphere. PMID:25489964

  3. Antagonistic peptide technology for functional dissection of CLE peptides revisited

    PubMed Central

    Czyzewicz, Nathan; Wildhagen, Mari; Cattaneo, Pietro; Stahl, Yvonne; Pinto, Karine Gustavo; Aalen, Reidunn B.; Butenko, Melinka A.; Simon, Rüdiger; Hardtke, Christian S.; De Smet, Ive

    2015-01-01

    In the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, over 1000 putative genes encoding small, presumably secreted, signalling peptides can be recognized. However, a major obstacle in identifying the function of genes encoding small signalling peptides is the limited number of available loss-of-function mutants. To overcome this, a promising new tool, antagonistic peptide technology, was recently developed. Here, this antagonistic peptide technology was tested on selected CLE peptides and the related IDA peptide and its usefulness in the context of studies of peptide function discussed. Based on the analyses, it was concluded that the antagonistic peptide approach is not the ultimate means to overcome redundancy or lack of loss-of-function lines. However, information collected using antagonistic peptide approaches (in the broad sense) can be very useful, but these approaches do not work in all cases and require a deep insight on the interaction between the ligand and its receptor to be successful. This, as well as peptide ligand structure considerations, should be taken into account before ordering a wide range of synthetic peptide variants and/or generating transgenic plants. PMID:26136270

  4. Antagonistic peptide technology for functional dissection of CLE peptides revisited.

    PubMed

    Czyzewicz, Nathan; Wildhagen, Mari; Cattaneo, Pietro; Stahl, Yvonne; Pinto, Karine Gustavo; Aalen, Reidunn B; Butenko, Melinka A; Simon, Rüdiger; Hardtke, Christian S; De Smet, Ive

    2015-08-01

    In the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, over 1000 putative genes encoding small, presumably secreted, signalling peptides can be recognized. However, a major obstacle in identifying the function of genes encoding small signalling peptides is the limited number of available loss-of-function mutants. To overcome this, a promising new tool, antagonistic peptide technology, was recently developed. Here, this antagonistic peptide technology was tested on selected CLE peptides and the related IDA peptide and its usefulness in the context of studies of peptide function discussed. Based on the analyses, it was concluded that the antagonistic peptide approach is not the ultimate means to overcome redundancy or lack of loss-of-function lines. However, information collected using antagonistic peptide approaches (in the broad sense) can be very useful, but these approaches do not work in all cases and require a deep insight on the interaction between the ligand and its receptor to be successful. This, as well as peptide ligand structure considerations, should be taken into account before ordering a wide range of synthetic peptide variants and/or generating transgenic plants. PMID:26136270

  5. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  6. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. PMID:27479451

  7. Antimicrobial peptides: premises and promises.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K V R; Yedery, R D; Aranha, C

    2004-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an important component of the natural defences of most living organisms against invading pathogens. These are relatively small (< 10kDa), cationic and amphipathic peptides of variable length, sequence and structure. During the past two decades several AMPs have been isolated from a wide variety of animals, both vertebrates and invertebrates, and plants as well as from bacteria and fungi. Most of these peptides are obtained from different sources like macrophages, neutrophils, epithelial cells, haemocytes, fat body, reproductive tract, etc. These peptides exhibit broad-spectrum activity against a wide range of microorganisms including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, protozoa, yeast, fungi and viruses. A few peptides have also been found to be cytotoxic to sperm and tumour cells. AMPs are classified based on the three dimensional structural studies carried out with the help of NMR. The peptides are broadly classified into five major groups namely (a) peptides that form alpha-helical structures, (b) peptides rich in cysteine residues, (c) peptides that form beta-sheet, (d) peptides rich in regular amino acids namely histatin, arginine and proline and (e) peptides composed of rare and modified amino acids. Most of these peptides are believed to act by disrupting the plasma membrane leading to the lysis of the cell. AMPs have been found to be excellent candidates for developing novel antimicrobial agents and a few of these peptides show antimicrobial activity against pathogens causing sexually transmitted infection (STI), including HIV/HSV. Peptides, namely magainin and nisin have been shown to demonstrate contraceptive properties in vitro and in vivo. A few peptides have already entered clinical trials for the treatment of impetigo, diabetic foot ulcers and gastric helicobacter infections. In this review, we discuss the source, structures and mode of action with special reference to therapeutic considerations of various AMPs

  8. Donor-acceptor conjugated polymers based on multifused ladder-type arenes for organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jhong-Sian; Cheng, Sheng-Wen; Cheng, Yen-Ju; Hsu, Chain-Shu

    2015-03-01

    Harvesting solar energy from sunlight to generate electricity is considered as one of the most important technologies to address the future sustainability of humans. Polymer solar cells (PSCs) have attracted tremendous interest and attention over the past two decades due to their potential advantage to be fabricated onto large area and light-weight flexible substrates by solution processing at a lower cost. PSCs based on the concept of bulk heterojunction (BHJ) configuration where an active layer comprises a composite of a p-type (donor) and an n-type (acceptor) material represents the most useful strategy to maximize the internal donor-acceptor interfacial area allowing for efficient charge separation. Fullerene derivatives such as [6,6]-phenyl-C61 or 71-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) are the ideal n-type materials ubiquitously used for BHJ solar cells. The major effort to develop photoactive materials is numerously focused on the p-type conjugated polymers which are generally synthesized by polymerization of electron-rich donor and electron-deficient acceptor monomers. Compared to the development of electron-deficient comonomers (acceptor segments), the development of electron-rich donor materials is considerably flourishing. Forced planarization by covalently fastening adjacent aromatic and heteroaromatic subunits leads to the formation of ladder-type conjugated structures which are capable of elongating effective conjugation, reducing the optical bandgap, promoting intermolecular π-π interactions and enhancing intrinsic charge mobility. In this review, we will summarize the recent progress on the development of various well-defined new ladder-type conjugated materials. These materials serve as the superb donor monomers to prepare a range of donor-acceptor semi-ladder copolymers with sufficient solution-processability for solar cell applications. PMID:25322211

  9. Blinking fluorescence of single donor-acceptor pairs: Important role of ``dark'' states in resonance energy transfer via singlet levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osad'ko, I. S.; Shchukina, A. L.

    2012-06-01

    The influence of triplet levels on Förster resonance energy transfer via singlet levels in donor-acceptor (D-A) pairs is studied. Four types of D-A pair are considered: (i) two-level donor and two-level acceptor, (ii) three-level donor and two-level acceptor, (iii) two-level donor and three-level acceptor, and (iv) three-level donor and three-level acceptor. If singlet-triplet transitions in a three-level acceptor molecule are ineffective, the energy transfer efficiency E=IA/(IA+ID), where ID and IA are the average intensities of donor and acceptor fluorescence, can be described by the simple theoretical equation E(F)=FTD/(1+FTD). Here F is the rate of energy transfer, and TD is the donor fluorescence lifetime. In accordance with the last equation, 100% of the donor electronic energy can be transferred to an acceptor molecule at FTD≫1. However, if singlet-triplet transitions in a three-level acceptor molecule are effective, the energy transfer efficiency is described by another theoretical equation, E(F)=F¯(F)TD/[1+F¯(F)TD]. Here F¯(F) is a function of F depending on singlet-triplet transitions in both donor and acceptor molecules. Expressions for the functions F¯(F) are derived. In this case the energy transfer efficiency will be far from 100% even at FTD≫1. The character of the intensity fluctuations of donor and acceptor fluorescence indicates which of the two equations for E(F) should be used to find the value of the rate F. Therefore, random time instants of photon emission in both donor and acceptor fluorescence are calculated by the Monte Carlo method for all four types of D-A pair. Theoretical expressions for start-stop correlators (waiting time distributions) in donor and acceptor fluorescence are derived. The probabilities wND(t) and wNA(t) of finding N photons of donor and acceptor fluorescence in the time interval t are calculated for various values of the energy transfer rate F and for all four types of D-A pair. Comparison of the calculated D

  10. Phage-displayed peptide libraries

    PubMed Central

    Zwick, Michael B; Shen, Juqun; Scott, Jamie K

    2014-01-01

    Over the past year, significant advances have been achieved through the use of phage-displayed peptide libraries. A wide variety of bioactive molecules, including antibodies, receptors and enzymes, have selected high-affinity and/or highly-specific peptide ligands from a number of different types of peptide library. The demonstrated therapeutic potential of some of these peptides, as well as new insights into protein structure and function that peptide ligands have provided, highlight the progress made within this rapidly-expanding field. PMID:9720267

  11. Exquisite 1D Assemblies Arising from Rationally Designed Asymmetric Donor-Acceptor Architectures Exhibiting Aggregation-Induced Emission as a Function of Auxiliary Acceptor Strength.

    PubMed

    Singh, Roop Shikha; Mukhopadhyay, Sujay; Biswas, Arnab; Pandey, Daya Shankar

    2016-01-11

    One-dimensional nanostructures with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) properties have been fabricated to keep the pace with growing demand from optoelectronics applications. The compounds 2-[4-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)benzylidene]malononitrile (PM1), 2-{4-[4-(pyridin-2-yl)piperazin-1-yl]-benzylidene}malononitrile (PM2), and 2-{4-[4-(pyrimidin-2-yl)piperazin-1-yl]benzylidene}malononitrile (PM3) have been designed and synthesized by melding piperazine and dicyanovinylene to investigate AIE in an asymmetric donor-acceptor (D-A) construct of A'-D-π-A- topology. The synthetic route has been simplified by using phenylpiperazine as a weak donor (D), dicyanovinylene as an acceptor (A), and pyridyl/pyrimidyl groups (PM2/PM3) as auxiliary acceptors (A'). It has been established that A' plays a vital role in triggering AIE in these compounds because the same D-A construct led to aggregation-caused quenching upon replacing A' with an electron-donating ethyl group (PM1). Moreover, the effect of restricted intramolecular rotation and twisted intramolecular charge transfer on the mechanism of AIE has also been investigated. Furthermore, it has been clearly shown that the optical disparities of these A'-D-π-A architectures are a direct consequence of comparative A' strength. Single-crystal X-ray analyses provided justification for role of intermolecular interactions in aggregate morphology. Electrochemical and theoretical studies affirmed the effect of the A' strength on the overall properties of the A'-D-π-A system. PMID:26615814

  12. Antibody Production with Synthetic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bao-Shiang; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P; Lee, Jenny; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Peptides (usually 10-20 amino acid residues in length) can be used as effectively as proteins in raising antibodies producing both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies routinely with titers higher than 20,000. Peptide antigens do not function as immunogens unless they are conjugated to proteins. Production of high quality antipeptide antibodies is dependent upon peptide sequence selection, the success of peptide synthesis, peptide-carrier protein conjugation, the humoral immune response in the host animal, the adjuvant used, the peptide dose administered, the injection method, and the purification of the antibody. Peptide sequence selection is probably the most critical step in the production of antipeptide antibodies. Although the process for designing peptide antigens is not exact, several guidelines and computational B-cell epitope prediction methods can help maximize the likelihood of producing antipeptide antibodies that recognize the protein. Antibodies raised by peptides have become essential tools in life science research. Virtually all phospho-specific antibodies are now produced using phosphopeptides as antigens. Typically, 5-20 mg of peptide is enough for antipeptide antibody production. It takes 3 months to produce a polyclonal antipeptide antibody in rabbits that yields ~100 mL of serum which corresponds to ~8-10 mg of the specific antibody after affinity purification using a peptide column. PMID:27515072

  13. Concepts for Biologically Active Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kastin, Abba J.; Pan, Weihong

    2012-01-01

    Here we review a unique aspect of CNS research on biologically active peptides that started against a background of prevalent dogmas but ended by exerting considerable influence on the field. During the course of refuting some doctrines, we introduced several concepts that were unconventional and paradigm-shifting at the time. We showed that (1) hypothalamic peptides can act ‘up’ on the brain as well as ‘down’ on the pituitary, (2) peripheral peptides can affect the brain, (3) peptides can cross the blood-brain barrier, (4) the actions of peptides can persist longer than their half-lives in blood, (5) perinatal administration of peptides can exert actions persisting into adulthood, (6) a single peptide can have more than one action, (7) dose-response relationships of peptides need not be linear, (8) the brain produces antiopiate as well as opiate peptides, (9) there is a selective high affinity endogenous peptide ligand for the mu-opiate receptor, (10) a peptide’s name does not restrict its effects, and (11) astrocytes assume an active role in response to metabolic disturbance and hyperleptinemia. The evolving questions in our laboratories reflect the diligent effort of the neuropeptide community to identify the roles of peptides in the CNS. The next decade is expected to see greater progress in the following areas: (a) interactions of peptides with other molecules in the CNS; (b) peptide involvement in cell-cell interactions; and (c) peptides in neuropsychiatric, autoimmune, and neurodegenerative diseases. The development of peptidomics and gene silencing approaches will expedite the formation of many new concepts in a new era. PMID:20726835

  14. Natriuretic peptides in fish physiology.

    PubMed

    Loretz, C A; Pollina, C

    2000-02-01

    Natriuretic peptides exist in the fishes as a family of structurally-related isohormones including atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and ventricular natriuretic peptide (VNP); to date, brain natriuretic peptide (or B-type natriuretic peptide, BNP) has not been definitively identified in the fishes. Based on nucleotide and amino acid sequence similarity, the natriuretic peptide family of isohormones may have evolved from a neuromodulatory, CNP-like brain peptide. The primary sites of synthesis for the circulating hormones are the heart and brain; additional extracardiac and extracranial sites, including the intestine, synthesize and release natriuretic peptides locally for paracrine regulation of various physiological functions. Membrane-bound, guanylyl cyclase-coupled natriuretic peptide receptors (A- and B-types) are generally implicated in mediating natriuretic peptide effects via the production of cyclic GMP as the intracellular messenger. C- and D-type natriuretic peptide receptors lacking the guanylyl cyclase domain may influence target cell function through G(i) protein-coupled inhibition of membrane adenylyl cyclase activity, and they likely also act as clearance receptors for circulating hormone. In the few systems examined using homologous or piscine reagents, differential receptor binding and tissue responsiveness to specific natriuretic peptide isohormones is demonstrated. Similar to their acute physiological effects in mammals, natriuretic peptides are vasorelaxant in all fishes examined. In contrast to mammals, where natriuretic peptides act through natriuresis and diuresis to bring about long-term reductions in blood volume and blood pressure, in fishes the primary action appears to be the extrusion of excess salt at the gills and rectal gland, and the limiting of drinking-coupled salt uptake by the alimentary system. In teleosts, both hypernatremia and hypervolemia are effective stimuli for cardiac secretion of

  15. Acetylene-derived strong organic acceptors for planar and nonplanar push-pull chromophores.

    PubMed

    Kivala, Milan; Diederich, François

    2009-02-17

    Though investigated for decades, interest in push-pull chromophores (D-pi-A), strong electron donors (D) connected by pi-conjugating spacers to strong electron acceptors (A), continues to grow. Such chromophores are of substantial interest for optoelectronic devices such as waveguides. Also, strong donors and acceptors form bimolecular charge-transfer (CT) complexes and salts, some of which exhibit electrical conductivity and magnetic behavior. Furthermore, strong organic acceptors are increasingly explored as dopants in the fabrication of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and solar cells. This Account describes systematic efforts pursued over the past decade in our laboratory to generate new families of organic electron acceptors (A) and conjugate them via pi-spacers to electron donors (D) under formation of push-pull systems with intense intramolecular CT interactions and high third-order optical nonlinearities. First, we describe donor-acceptor-substituted tetraethynylethenes (TEEs). In these chromophores, the peripherally attached p-nitrophenyl acceptors and N,N-dimethylanilino donors behave as nearly independent redox centers. Acetylenic scaffolding using TEE building blocks produces large all-carbon sheets, such as perethynylated dehydroannulenes, expanded radialenes, and radiaannulenes with potent electron-acceptor properties. Arylated TEEs act as molecular switches allowing two-way photochemical interconversion that is not perturbed by thermal isomerization pathways. Upon sequential substitution of the acetylene moieties in TEEs, we formed another family of potent acceptors, the cyanoethynylethenes (CEEs). Donor-substituted CEEs are planar CT chromophores with very high third-order optical nonlinearities. Their high environmental stability allows for the formation of thin films by vapor-phase deposition. Through careful analysis of the physicochemical properties of CEEs, we established useful guidelines for evaluating and tuning the optical gap in

  16. Utility and limitations of a peptide reactivity assay to predict fragrance allergens in vitro.

    PubMed

    Natsch, A; Gfeller, H; Rothaupt, M; Ellis, G

    2007-10-01

    A key step in the skin sensitization process is the formation of a covalent adduct between the skin sensitizer and endogenous proteins and/or peptides in the skin. A published peptide depletion assay was used to relate the in vitro reactivity of fragrance molecules to LLNA data. Using the classical assay, 22 of 28 tested moderate to strong sensitizers were positive. The prediction of weak sensitizers proved to be more difficult with only 50% of weak sensitizers giving a positive response, but for some compounds this could also be due to false-positive results from the LLNA. LC-MS analysis yielded the expected mass of the peptide adducts in several cases, whereas in other cases putative oxidation reactions led to adducts of unexpected molecular weight. Several moderately sensitizing aldehydes were correctly predicted by the depletion assay, but no adducts were found and the depletion appears to be due to an oxidation of the parent peptide catalyzed by the test compound. Finally, alternative test peptides derived from a physiological reactive protein with enhanced sensitivity for weak Michael acceptors were found, further increasing the sensitivity of the assay. PMID:17513083

  17. [Brain natriuretic peptide].

    PubMed

    La Villa, G; Lazzeri, C; Fronzaroli, C; Franchi, F; Gentilini, P

    1995-01-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a cardiac hormone with a spectrum of activities quite similar to those of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), including diuretic, natriuretic, hypotensive and smooth muscle relaxant activities. These effects are due to the stimulation of guanylate cyclase-linked natriuretic peptide receptors, leading to an increase in cyclic GMP concentration in target cells. BNP has a lower affinity than ANP for C (clearance) receptors, and is less susceptible to degradation by neutral endopeptidase-24.11, resulting in a longer half-life. In the kidney, BNP increases the glomerular filtration rate and inhibits sodium reabsorption in the distal tubule. It also inhibits the release of renin and aldosterone. Unlike ANP, produced by the atria, BNP is mainly synthesized and released into circulation by the left ventricle and is therefore influenced by stimuli involving this cardiac chamber, such as an increase in arterial pressure, left ventricular hypertrophy and dilation. Plasma BNP levels are very low in healthy subjects, and respond modestly, although significantly to physiological stimuli such as changes in posture or sodium intake. In contrast, plasma BNP concentrations increase in disease states such as cirrhosis with ascites, hypertension, chronic renal failure, acute myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure. In the latter condition, plasma BNP concentration is a reliable prognostic index. Evidence obtained by administering BNP to healthy subjects and hypertensive patients suggests that BNP, at physiological and pathophysiological plasma concentrations, markedly influences cardiovascular homeostasis, mainly due to its effects on sodium excretion and the renin-aldosterone axis. PMID:8718658

  18. Acceptor states in heteroepitaxial CdHgTe films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Mynbaev, K. D.; Shilyaev, A. V. Bazhenov, N. L.; Izhnin, A. I.; Izhnin, I. I.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Varavin, V. S.; Dvoretsky, S. A.

    2015-03-15

    The photoluminescence method is used to study acceptor states in CdHgTe heteroepitaxial films (HEFs) grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. A comparison of the photoluminescence spectra of HEFs grown on GaAs substrates (CdHgTe/GaAs) with the spectra of CdHgTe/Si HEFs demonstrates that acceptor states with energy depths of about 18 and 27 meV are specific to CdHgTe/GaAs HEFs. The possible nature of these states and its relation to the HEF synthesis conditions and, in particular, to the vacancy doping occurring under conditions of a mercury deficiency during the course of epitaxy and postgrowth processing are discussed.

  19. Donor-acceptor-pair emission in fluorescent 4H-SiC grown by PVT method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xi Zhuo, Shi-Yi; Gao, Pan; Huang, Wei; Yan, Cheng-Feng; Shi, Er-Wei

    2015-04-15

    Fluorescent SiC, which contains donor and acceptor impurities with optimum concentrations, can work as a phosphor for visible light emission by donor-acceptor-pair (DAP) recombination. In this work, 3 inch N-B-Al co-doped fluorescent 4H-SiC crystals are prepared by PVT method. The p-type fluorescent 4H-SiC with low aluminum doping concentration can show intensive yellow-green fluorescence at room temperature. N-B DAP peak wavelength shifts from 578nm to 525nm and weak N-Al DAP emission occurred 403/420 nm quenches, when the temperature increases from 4K to 298K. The aluminum doping induces higher defect concentration in the fluorescent crystal and decreases optical transmissivity of the crystal in the visible light range. It triggers more non-radiative recombination and light absorption losses in the crystal.

  20. Optoelectronic properties and charge transfer in donor-acceptor all-conjugated diblock copolymers.

    SciTech Connect

    Botiz, I.; Schaller, R. D.; Verduzco, R.; Darling, S. B.

    2011-05-12

    All-conjugated block copolymers, which can self-assemble into well-ordered morphologies, provide exciting opportunities to rationally design and control the nanoscale organization of electron-donor and electron-acceptor moieties in optoelectronic active layers. Here we report on the steady-state and time-resolved optical characterization of block copolymer films and solutions containing poly(3-hexylthiophene) as the donor block and poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) with and without copolymerization with benzothiadiazole as the acceptor block. Transient absorption measurements suggest rapid charge transfer occurs in both systems, with higher efficiency observed in the latter composition. These results indicate that this class of materials has promise in preparing highly ordered bulk heterojunction all-polymer organic photovoltaic devices.

  1. Influence of alternative electron acceptors on the anaerobic biodegradability of chlorinated phenols and benzoic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Haeggblom, M.M.; Rivera, M.D.; Young, L.Y. )

    1993-04-01

    Methanogeneic conditions can promote the biodegradation of a number of halogenated aromatic compounds. This study, using sediments from freshwater and estuarine sites, is an evaluation of the anaerobic biodegradability of monochlorinated phenols and benzoic acids coupled to denitrification, sulfidogenesis, and methanogenesis. The results indicate that chlorinated phenols and benzoic acids are biodegradable under at least one set of anaerobic conditions. Metabolism depends both on the electron acceptor available and on the position of the chlorine substituent. Presence of alternative electron acceptors, nitrate, sulfate, and carbonate, can affect degradation rates and substrate specificities. Since contaminated sites usually have mixtures of wastes, bioremediation efforts may need to consider the activities of diverse anaerobic communities to carry out effective treatment of all components. 37 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Donor-acceptor-pair emission in fluorescent 4H-SiC grown by PVT method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xi; Zhuo, Shi-Yi; Gao, Pan; Huang, Wei; Yan, Cheng-Feng; Shi, Er-Wei

    2015-04-01

    Fluorescent SiC, which contains donor and acceptor impurities with optimum concentrations, can work as a phosphor for visible light emission by donor-acceptor-pair (DAP) recombination. In this work, 3 inch N-B-Al co-doped fluorescent 4H-SiC crystals are prepared by PVT method. The p-type fluorescent 4H-SiC with low aluminum doping concentration can show intensive yellow-green fluorescence at room temperature. N-B DAP peak wavelength shifts from 578nm to 525nm and weak N-Al DAP emission occurred 403/420 nm quenches, when the temperature increases from 4K to 298K. The aluminum doping induces higher defect concentration in the fluorescent crystal and decreases optical transmissivity of the crystal in the visible light range. It triggers more non-radiative recombination and light absorption losses in the crystal.

  3. Electron acceptors for energy generation in microbial fuel cells fed with wastewaters: A mini-review.

    PubMed

    He, Chuan-Shu; Mu, Zhe-Xuan; Yang, Hou-Yun; Wang, Ya-Zhou; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have gained tremendous global interest over the last decades as a device that uses bacteria to oxidize organic and inorganic matters in the anode with bioelectricity generation and even for purpose of bioremediation. However, this prospective technology has not yet been carried out in field in particular because of its low power yields and target compounds removal which can be largely influenced by electron acceptors contributing to overcome the potential losses existing on the cathode. This mini review summarizes various electron acceptors used in recent years in the categories of inorganic and organic compounds, identifies their merits and drawbacks, and compares their influences on performance of MFCs, as well as briefly discusses possible future research directions particularly from cathode aspect. PMID:25907762

  4. Seeded on-surface supramolecular growth for large area conductive donor-acceptor assembly.

    PubMed

    Goudappagouda; Chithiravel, Sundaresan; Krishnamoorthy, Kothandam; Gosavi, Suresh W; Babu, Sukumaran Santhosh

    2015-07-01

    Charge transport features of organic semiconductor assemblies are of paramount importance. However, large-area extended supramolecular structures of donor-acceptor combinations with controlled self-assembly pathways are hardly accessible. In this context, as a representative example, seeded on-surface supramolecular growth of tetrathiafulvalene and tetracyano-p-quinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) using active termini of solution-formed sheaves has been introduced to form an extended assembly. We demonstrate for the first time, the creation of a large-area donor-acceptor assembly on the surface, which is practically very tedious, using a seeded, evaporation-assisted growth process. The excellent molecular ordering in this assembly is substantiated by its good electrical conductivity (~10⁻² S cm⁻¹). The on-surface assembly via both internally formed and externally added sheaf-like seeds open new pathways in supramolecular chemistry and device applications. PMID:26036616

  5. Variable temperature EPR studies of Illinois No. 6 coal treated with donor and acceptor molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, R.L.; Rothenberger, K.S.; Retcofsky, H.L.

    1996-10-01

    Variable, temperature EPR studies of Illinois No. 6 coal, its pyridine extract, and samples of each after treatment with known donor and acceptor molecules are reported. The purpose of the study was to explore the origin of the EPR signals near g = 2 and to assess the contribution of certain non-bonded interactions in coal. Curie Law behavior is exhibited for each sample indicating that the EPR signals are dominated by doublet state radicals. No evidence for thermally accessible, low-lying triplet states, such as those found in some charge-transfer complexes, was found. Infrared spectroscopy reveals, however, that some electron density is transferred from the coal after treatment with acceptors such as TCNQ and TCNE. EPR studies of chromat graphic fractions of the pyridine extract (approximately five percent of the whole coal), both untreated and treated with TTF and TCNE, indicated some minor contributions of low-lying triplet states.

  6. Influence of alternative electron acceptors on the anaerobic biodegradability of chlorinated phenols and benzoic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Haeggblom, M.M.; Rivera, M.D.; Young, L.Y.

    1993-01-01

    Nitrate, sulfate, and carbonate were used as electron acceptors to examine the anaerobic biodegradability of chlorinated aromatic compounds in estuarine and freshwater sediments. The respective denitrifying, sulfidogenic, and methanogenic enrichment cultures were established on each of the monochlorinated phenol and monochlorinated benzoic acid isomers, using sediment from the upper (freshwater) and lower (estuarine) Hudson River and the East River (estuarine) as source materials. Utilization of each chlorophenol and chlorobenzoate isomer was observed under at least one reducing condition; however, no single reducing condition permitted the metabolism of all six compounds tested. The anaerobic biodegradation of the chlorophenols and chlorobenzoates depended on the electron acceptor available and on the position of the chlorine substituent. In general, similar activities were observed under the different reducing conditions in both the freshwater and estuarine sediments.

  7. Influence of various nitrogenous electron acceptors on the anaerobic sulfide oxidation.

    PubMed

    Jing, Cai; Ping, Zheng; Mahmood, Qaisar

    2010-05-01

    The effect of nitrate and nitrite as electron acceptors on the performance of anaerobic sulfide oxidizing process (ASO process) was investigated. For nitrate-ASO process, the maximum influent nitrogen concentration was lower than that in nitrite-ASO process, but the maximum influent sulfur concentration was higher than that of nitrite-ASO process. The half saturation values for nitrogen and sulfur in both processes were similar. The minimum reaction time taken for nitrite and sulfide was relatively shorter than in nitrite-ASO reactor. As indicated by sensitivity ratio, activated sludge was more tolerant to sulfide, which had no significant differences between two processes; while it was relatively more sensitive to nitrite over nitrate. PCR-DGGE fingerprints, Dice and Shannon similarity indices and sequencing results all suggested that the microbial communities in both reactors were similar. The use of nitrate as an electron acceptor may be preferable over nitrite to treat sulfide-rich wastewaters. PMID:20047830

  8. Alteration of the Donor/Acceptor Spectrum of the (S)-Amine Transaminase from Vibrio fluvialis.

    PubMed

    Genz, Maika; Vickers, Clare; van den Bergh, Tom; Joosten, Henk-Jan; Dörr, Mark; Höhne, Matthias; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2015-01-01

    To alter the amine donor/acceptor spectrum of an (S)-selective amine transaminase (ATA), a library based on the Vibrio fluvialis ATA targeting four residues close to the active site (L56, W57, R415 and L417) was created. A 3DM-derived alignment comprising fold class I pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes allowed identification of positions, which were assumed to determine substrate specificity. These positions were targeted for mutagenesis with a focused alphabet of hydrophobic amino acids to convert an amine:α-keto acid transferase into an amine:aldehyde transferase. Screening of 1200 variants revealed three hits, which showed a shifted amine donor/acceptor spectrum towards aliphatic aldehydes (mainly pentanal), as well as an altered pH profile. Interestingly, all three hits, although found independently, contained the same mutation R415L and additional W57F and L417V substitutions. PMID:26569229

  9. Lipase-mediated conversion of vegetable oils into biodiesel using ethyl acetate as acyl acceptor.

    PubMed

    Modi, Mukesh Kumar; Reddy, J R C; Rao, B V S K; Prasad, R B N

    2007-04-01

    Ethyl acetate was explored as an acyl acceptor for immobilized lipase-catalyzed preparation of biodiesel from the crude oils of Jatropha curcas (jatropha), Pongamia pinnata (karanj) and Helianthus annuus (sunflower). The optimum reaction conditions for interesterification of the oils with ethyl acetate were 10% of Novozym-435 (immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B) based on oil weight, ethyl acetate to oil molar ratio of 11:1 and the reaction period of 12h at 50 degrees C. The maximum yield of ethyl esters was 91.3%, 90% and 92.7% with crude jatropha, karanj and sunflower oils, respectively under the above optimum conditions. Reusability of the lipase over repeated cycles in interesterification and ethanolysis was also investigated under standard reaction conditions. The relative activity of lipase could be well maintained over twelve repeated cycles with ethyl acetate while it reached to zero by 6th cycle when ethanol was used as an acyl acceptor. PMID:16822671

  10. XeF(2) /fluoride acceptors as versatile one-electron oxidants.

    PubMed

    Poleschner, Helmut; Seppelt, Konrad

    2013-12-01

    No phlogiston but xenon is released when XeF2 /F(-) acceptors act as new one-electron oxidants. F(-) acceptors are Lewis acids BF3 , B(C6 F5 )3 , and Al{OC(CF3 )3 }3 , and silyl derivatives TfOSiMe3 , Tf2 NSiMe3 , Me3 Si(+)  B(C6 F5 )4 (-) , and Me3 Si(+)  CHB11 Cl11 (-) . The anions BF4 (-) , TfO(-) , Tf2 N(-) , FB(C6 F5 )3 (-) , FAl{OC(CF3 )3 }3 (-) , B(C6 F5 )4 (-) , or CHB11 Cl11 (-) can be introduced into oxidation products of R2 E2 (E=S, Se, Te), [FeCp2 ], [(FeCpS)4 ], tetrathiafulvalene, thianthrene, and (2,4-Br2 C6 H3 )3 N. PMID:24127390

  11. Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Materials Based on Homoconjugation Effect of Donor-Acceptor Triptycenes.

    PubMed

    Kawasumi, Katsuaki; Wu, Tony; Zhu, Tianyu; Chae, Hyun Sik; Van Voorhis, Troy; Baldo, Marc A; Swager, Timothy M

    2015-09-23

    Donor-acceptor triptycences, TPA-QNX(CN)2 and TPA-PRZ(CN)2, were synthesized and their emissive properties were studied. They exhibited a blue-green fluorescence with emission lifetimes on the order of a microsecond in cyclohexane at room temperature. The long lifetime emission is quenched by O2 and is attributed to thermally activated delayed florescence (TADF). Unimolecular TADF is made possible by the separation and weak coupling due to homoconjugation of the HOMO and LUMO on different arms of the three-dimensional donor-acceptor triptycene. Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) were fabricated using TPA-QNX(CN)2 and TPA-PRZ(CN)2 as emitters which displayed electroluminescence with efficiencies as high as 9.4% EQE. PMID:26367852

  12. Alteration of the Donor/Acceptor Spectrum of the (S)-Amine Transaminase from Vibrio fluvialis

    PubMed Central

    Genz, Maika; Vickers, Clare; van den Bergh, Tom; Joosten, Henk-Jan; Dörr, Mark; Höhne, Matthias; Bornscheuer, Uwe T.

    2015-01-01

    To alter the amine donor/acceptor spectrum of an (S)-selective amine transaminase (ATA), a library based on the Vibrio fluvialis ATA targeting four residues close to the active site (L56, W57, R415 and L417) was created. A 3DM-derived alignment comprising fold class I pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes allowed identification of positions, which were assumed to determine substrate specificity. These positions were targeted for mutagenesis with a focused alphabet of hydrophobic amino acids to convert an amine:α-keto acid transferase into an amine:aldehyde transferase. Screening of 1200 variants revealed three hits, which showed a shifted amine donor/acceptor spectrum towards aliphatic aldehydes (mainly pentanal), as well as an altered pH profile. Interestingly, all three hits, although found independently, contained the same mutation R415L and additional W57F and L417V substitutions. PMID:26569229

  13. Genotoxicity assessment in Eisenia andrei coelomocytes: a study of the induction of DNA damage and micronuclei in earthworms exposed to B[a]P- and TCDD-spiked soils.

    PubMed

    Sforzini, Susanna; Boeri, Marta; Dagnino, Alessandro; Oliveri, Laura; Bolognesi, Claudia; Viarengo, Aldo

    2012-07-01

    Earthworms are useful indicators of soil quality and are widely used as model organisms in terrestrial ecotoxicology. The assessment of genotoxic effects caused by environmental pollutants is of great concern because of their relevance in carcinogenesis. In this work, the earthworm Eisenia andrei was exposed for 10 and 28 days to artificial standard soil contaminated with environmentally relevant concentrations of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) (0.1, 10, 50ppm) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-dibenzo-para-dioxin (TCDD) (1×10(-5), 1×10(-4), 2×10(-3)ppm). Micronucleus (MNi) induction was evaluated in earthworm coelomocytes after DNA staining with the fluorescent dye DAPI. In the same cells, the DNA damage was assessed by means of the alkaline comet assay. Induction of MNi in coelomocytes, identified according to standard criteria, was demonstrated. B[a]P exposure for 10 and 28 days induced a significant increase in MNi frequency. In TCDD-treated earthworms, a significant effect on chromosomal damage was observed at all the concentrations used; surprisingly, greater effects were induced in animals exposed to the lowest concentration (1×10(-5)ppm). The data of the comet assay revealed a significant increase in the level of DNA damage in coelomocytes of earthworms exposed for 10 and 28 days to the different concentrations of B[a]P and TCDD. The results show that the comet and MN assays were able to reveal genotoxic effects in earthworms exposed even to the lowest concentrations of both chemicals tested here. The combined application in E. andrei of the comet assay and the micronucleus test, which reflect different biological mechanisms, may be suggested to identify genotoxic effects induced in these invertebrates by environmental contaminants in terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:22459015

  14. Influence of defect structure on ferroelectric aging in donor-acceptor hybrid-doped PZT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anil, A.; Vani, K.; Kumar, V.

    2016-06-01

    In the present work, we report the aging effect in manganese (Mn) and niobium (Nb) hybrid-doped PZT composition. Interestingly, it is observed that the ferroelectric aging depends on the acceptor/donor ratio. In hybrid-doped PZT, at high donor dopant concentrations, aging is not observed. The underlying mechanism is correlated with the defect chemistry of the system. It is also observed that tuning the defect chemistry is an effective strategy to realize piezoceramics with enhanced dielectric and piezoelectric characteristics.

  15. Free-Standing Undoped ZnO Microtubes with Rich and Stable Shallow Acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Yan, Yinzhou; Zeng, Yong; Lu, Yue; Chen, Liang; Jiang, Yijian

    2016-06-01

    Fabrication of reliable large-sized p-ZnO is a major challenge to realise ZnO-based electronic device applications. Here we report a novel technique to grow high-quality free-standing undoped acceptor-rich ZnO (A-ZnO) microtubes with dimensions of ~100 μm (in diameter) × 5 mm (in length) by optical vapour supersaturated precipitation. The A-ZnO exhibits long lifetimes (>1 year) against compensation/lattice-relaxation and the stable shallow acceptors with binding energy of ~127 meV are confirmed from Zn vacancies. The A-ZnO provides a possibility for a mimetic p-n homojunction diode with n+-ZnO:Sn. The high concentrations of holes in A-ZnO and electrons in n+-ZnO make the dual diffusion possible to form a depletion layer. The diode threshold voltage, turn-on voltage, reverse saturated current and reverse breakdown voltage are 0.72 V, 1.90 V, <10 μA and >15 V, respectively. The A-ZnO also demonstrates quenching-free donor-acceptor-pairs (DAP) emission located in 390–414 nm with temperature of 270–470 K. Combining the temperature-dependent DAP violet emission with native green emission, the visible luminescence of A-ZnO microtube can be modulated in a wide region of colour space across white light. The present work opens up new opportunities to achieve ZnO with rich and stable acceptors instead of p-ZnO for a variety of potential applications.

  16. Synthesis and mesomorphic behavior of a donor-acceptor-type hexaazatriphenylene.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tsu-Hsin; Wu, Bi-Ru; Chiang, Michael Y; Liao, Su-Chih; Ong, Chi Wi; Hsu, Hsiu-Fu; Lin, Shu-Yu

    2005-09-15

    [structure: see text] A new donor-acceptor, 1,4,5,8,9,12-hexaazatriphenylene HATCNOR(n), is described. The synthesis of HATCNOR1 and HATCNOR6 is achieved by the regioselective displacement of 1,4,5,8,9,12-hexaazatriphenylene hexacarbonitrile (HATCN) with an alkoxy group. The X-ray analysis revealed self-assembly of HATCNOR1 in the solid state. HATCNOR6 is the new difunctionalized hexaazatriphenylene discotic liquid crystal. PMID:16146355

  17. Humic acids as electron acceptors for anaerobic microbial oxidation of vinyl chloride and dichloroethene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Lovley, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of [1,2-14C]vinyl chloride and [1,2- 14C]dichloroethene to 14CO2 under humic acid-reducing conditions was demonstrated. The results indicate that waterborne contaminants can be oxidized by using humic acid compounds as electron acceptors and suggest that natural aquatic systems have a much larger capacity for contaminant oxidation than previously thought.

  18. Humic acids as electron acceptors for anaerobic microbial oxidation of vinyl chloride and dichloroethane

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Lovley, D.R.

    1998-08-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of [1,2-{sup 14}C]vinyl chloride and [1,2-{sup 14}C]dichloroethene to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} under humic acid-reducing conditions was demonstrated. The results indicate that waterborne contaminants can be oxidized by using humic acid compounds as electron acceptors and suggest that natural aquatic systems have a much larger capacity for contaminant oxidation than previously thought.

  19. Development of novel 1,4-benzodiazepine-based Michael acceptors as antitrypanosomal agents.

    PubMed

    Ettari, Roberta; Previti, Santo; Cosconati, Sandro; Maiorana, Santina; Schirmeister, Tanja; Grasso, Silvana; Zappalà, Maria

    2016-08-01

    Novel 1,4-benzodiazepines, endowed with a Michael acceptor moiety, were designed taking advantage of a computational prediction of their pharmacokinetic parameters. Among all the synthesized derivatives, we identified a new lead compound (i.e., 4a), bearing a vinyl ketone warhead and endowed with a promising antitrypanosomal activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei (IC50=5.29μM), coupled with a lack of cytotoxicity towards mammalian cells (TC50 >100μM). PMID:27372809

  20. Neutral nitrogen acceptors in ZnO: The {sup 67}Zn hyperfine interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Golden, E. M.; Giles, N. C.; Evans, S. M.; Halliburton, L. E.

    2014-03-14

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is used to characterize the {sup 67}Zn hyperfine interactions associated with neutral nitrogen acceptors in zinc oxide. Data are obtained from an n-type bulk crystal grown by the seeded chemical vapor transport method. Singly ionized nitrogen acceptors (N{sup −}) initially present in the crystal are converted to their paramagnetic neutral charge state (N{sup 0}) during exposure at low temperature to 442 or 633 nm laser light. The EPR signals from these N{sup 0} acceptors are best observed near 5 K. Nitrogen substitutes for oxygen ions and has four nearest-neighbor cations. The zinc ion along the [0001] direction is referred to as an axial neighbor and the three equivalent zinc ions in the basal plane are referred to as nonaxial neighbors. For axial neighbors, the {sup 67}Zn hyperfine parameters are A{sub ‖} = 37.0 MHz and A{sub ⊥} = 8.4 MHz with the unique direction being [0001]. For nonaxial neighbors, the {sup 67}Zn parameters are A{sub 1} = 14.5 MHz, A{sub 2} = 18.3 MHz, and A{sub 3} = 20.5 MHz with A{sub 3} along a [101{sup ¯}0] direction (i.e., in the basal plane toward the nitrogen) and A{sub 2} along the [0001] direction. These {sup 67}Zn results and the related {sup 14}N hyperfine parameters provide information about the distribution of unpaired spin density at substitutional neutral nitrogen acceptors in ZnO.

  1. Rationally designed donor-acceptor scheme based molecules for applications in opto-electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Subash Sundar, T; Sen, R; Johari, P

    2016-04-01

    Several donor (D)-acceptor (A) based molecules are rationally designed by adopting three different schemes in which the conjugation length, strength of the donor and acceptor moieties, and planarity of the molecules are varied. These variations are made by introducing a π-conjugated linkage unit, terminating the ends of the moieties by different electron donating and accepting functional groups, and fusing the donor and acceptor moieties, respectively. Our DFT and TDDFT based calculations reveal that using the above-mentioned design schemes, the electronic and optical properties of the D-A based molecules can be largely tuned. While introduction of a linkage and fusing of moieties enhance the π-π interaction, addition of electron donating groups (-CH3, -OH, and -NH2) and electron accepting groups (-CF3, -CN, -NO2, and -NH3(+)) varies the strength of the donor and acceptor moieties. These factors lead to modulation of the HOMO and LUMO energy levels and facilitate the engineering of the HOMO-LUMO gap and the optical gap over a wide range of ∼0.7-3.7 eV. Moreover, on the basis of calculated ionization potential and reorganization energy, most of the investigated molecules are predicted to be air stable and to exhibit high electron mobility, with the possibility of the presence of ambipolar characteristics in a few of them. The results of our calculations not only demonstrate the examined molecules to be the potential materials for organic opto-electronic devices, but also establish an understanding of the composition-structure-property correlation, which will provide guidelines for designing and synthesizing new materials of choice. PMID:26972386

  2. Glycosyl transferases in chondroitin sulphate biosynthesis. Effect of acceptor structure on activity.

    PubMed Central

    Gundlach, M W; Conrad, H E

    1985-01-01

    The D-glucuronosyl (GlcA)- and N-acetyl-D-galactosaminyl (GalNAc)-transferases involved in chondroitin sulphate biosynthesis were studied in a microsomal preparation from chick-embryo chondrocytes. Transfer of GlcA and GalNAc from their UDP derivatives to 3H-labelled oligosaccharides prepared from chondroitin sulphate and hyaluronic acid was assayed by h.p.l.c. of the reaction mixture. Conditions required for maximal activities of the two enzymes were remarkably similar. Activities were stimulated 3.5-6-fold by neutral detergents. Both enzymes were completely inhibited by EDTA and maximally stimulated by MnCl2 or CoCl2. MgCl2 neither stimulated nor inhibited. The GlcA transferase showed a sharp pH optimum between pH5 and 6, whereas the GalNAc transferase gave a broad optimum from pH 5 to 8. At pH 7 under optimal conditions, the GalNAc transferase gave a velocity that was twice that of the GlcA transferase. Oligosaccharides prepared from chondroitin 4-sulphate and hyaluronic acid were almost inactive as acceptors for both enzymes, whereas oligosaccharides from chondroitin 6-sulphate and chondroitin gave similar rates that were 70-80-fold higher than those observed with the endogenous acceptors. Oligosaccharide acceptors with degrees of polymerization of 6 or higher gave similar Km and Vmax. values, but the smaller oligosaccharides were less effective acceptors. These results are discussed in terms of the implications for regulation of the overall rates of the chain-elongation fractions in chondroitin sulphate synthesis in vivo. PMID:3921015

  3. Free-Standing Undoped ZnO Microtubes with Rich and Stable Shallow Acceptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Yan, Yinzhou; Zeng, Yong; Lu, Yue; Chen, Liang; Jiang, Yijian

    2016-01-01

    Fabrication of reliable large-sized p-ZnO is a major challenge to realise ZnO-based electronic device applications. Here we report a novel technique to grow high-quality free-standing undoped acceptor-rich ZnO (A-ZnO) microtubes with dimensions of ~100 μm (in diameter) × 5 mm (in length) by optical vapour supersaturated precipitation. The A-ZnO exhibits long lifetimes (>1 year) against compensation/lattice-relaxation and the stable shallow acceptors with binding energy of ~127 meV are confirmed from Zn vacancies. The A-ZnO provides a possibility for a mimetic p-n homojunction diode with n(+)-ZnO:Sn. The high concentrations of holes in A-ZnO and electrons in n(+)-ZnO make the dual diffusion possible to form a depletion layer. The diode threshold voltage, turn-on voltage, reverse saturated current and reverse breakdown voltage are 0.72 V, 1.90 V, <10 μA and >15 V, respectively. The A-ZnO also demonstrates quenching-free donor-acceptor-pairs (DAP) emission located in 390-414 nm with temperature of 270-470 K. Combining the temperature-dependent DAP violet emission with native green emission, the visible luminescence of A-ZnO microtube can be modulated in a wide region of colour space across white light. The present work opens up new opportunities to achieve ZnO with rich and stable acceptors instead of p-ZnO for a variety of potential applications. PMID:27263856

  4. Coulomb interaction of acceptors in Cd1-xMnxTe/CdTe quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalpana, P.; Reuben, A. Merwyn Jasper D.; Nithiananthi, P.; Jayakumar, K.

    2014-04-01

    The investigation on the effect of confining potential like isotropic harmonic oscillator type potential on the binding and the Coulomb interaction energy of the double acceptors in the presence of magnetic field in a Cd1-xMnxTe/CdTe Spherical Quantum Dot has been made for the Mn ion composition x=0.3 and compared with the results obtained from the square well type potential using variational procedure in the effective mass approximation.

  5. Free-Standing Undoped ZnO Microtubes with Rich and Stable Shallow Acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang; Yan, Yinzhou; Zeng, Yong; Lu, Yue; Chen, Liang; Jiang, Yijian

    2016-01-01

    Fabrication of reliable large-sized p-ZnO is a major challenge to realise ZnO-based electronic device applications. Here we report a novel technique to grow high-quality free-standing undoped acceptor-rich ZnO (A-ZnO) microtubes with dimensions of ~100 μm (in diameter) × 5 mm (in length) by optical vapour supersaturated precipitation. The A-ZnO exhibits long lifetimes (>1 year) against compensation/lattice-relaxation and the stable shallow acceptors with binding energy of ~127 meV are confirmed from Zn vacancies. The A-ZnO provides a possibility for a mimetic p-n homojunction diode with n+-ZnO:Sn. The high concentrations of holes in A-ZnO and electrons in n+-ZnO make the dual diffusion possible to form a depletion layer. The diode threshold voltage, turn-on voltage, reverse saturated current and reverse breakdown voltage are 0.72 V, 1.90 V, <10 μA and >15 V, respectively. The A-ZnO also demonstrates quenching-free donor-acceptor-pairs (DAP) emission located in 390–414 nm with temperature of 270–470 K. Combining the temperature-dependent DAP violet emission with native green emission, the visible luminescence of A-ZnO microtube can be modulated in a wide region of colour space across white light. The present work opens up new opportunities to achieve ZnO with rich and stable acceptors instead of p-ZnO for a variety of potential applications. PMID:27263856

  6. Influence of alternative electron acceptors on the anaerobic biodegradability of chlorinated phenols and benzoic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Haeggblom, M.M.; Rivera, M.D.; Young, L.Y.

    1993-01-01

    Nitrate, sulfate, and carbonate were used as electron acceptors to examine the anaerobic biodegradability of chlorinated aromatic compounds in estuarine and freshwater sediments. The respective denitrifying, sulfidogenic, and methanogenic enrichment cultures were established on each of the monochlorinated phenol and monochlorinated benzoic acid isomers, using sediment from the upper (freshwater) and lower (estuarine) Hudson River and the East River (estuarine) as source materials. (Copyright (c) 1993 American Society for Microbiology.)

  7. Light-induced noncentrosymmetry in acceptor-donor-substituted azobenzene solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiang; Si, Jinhai; Wang, Yougui; Ye, Peixian; Fu, Xingfa; Qiu, Ling; Shen, Yuquan

    1995-10-01

    Light-induced noncentrosymmetry was achieved experimentally in acceptor-donor-substituted azobenzene solutions and observed by phase-matched nondegenerate six-wave mixing. The microscopic origin of the induced noncentrosymmetry was found to be orientational hole burning, which was distinguished directly with net orientation of molecules by experimental observations. The decay time of the induced noncentrosymmetry depended on the rotational orientation time of the sample's molecule, which varied linearly with the viscosity of the solvent.

  8. Influence of different electron donors and acceptors on dehalorespiration of tetrachloroethene by Desulfitobacterium frappieri TCE1

    SciTech Connect

    Gerritse, J.; Drzyzga, O.; Kloetstra, G.; Keijmel, M.; Wiersum, L.P.; Hutson, R.; Collins, M.D.; Gottschal, J.C.

    1999-12-01

    Strain TCE1, a strictly anaerobic bacterium that can grow by reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethane (TCE), was isolated by selective enrichment from a PCE-dechlorinating chemostat mixed culture. Strain TCE1 is a gram-positive, motile, curved rod-shaped organism that is 2 to 4 by 0.6 to 0.8 {micro}m and has approximately six lateral flagella. The pH and temperature optima for growth are 7.2 and 35 C, respectively. On the basis of a comparative 16S rRNA sequence analysis, this bacterium was identified as a new strain of Desulfitobacterium frappieri, because it exhibited 99.7% relatedness to the D. frappieri type strain, strain PCP-1. Growth with H{sub 2}, format, L-lactate, butyrate, crotonate, or ethanol as the electron donor depends on the availability of an external electron acceptor. Pyruvate and serine can also be used fermentatively. Electron donors (except format and H{sub 2}) are oxidized to acetate and CO{sub 2}. when L-lactate is the growth substrate, strain TCE1 can use the following electron acceptors: PCE and TCE (to produce cis-1,2-dichloroethene), sulfite and thiosulfate (to produce sulfide), nitrate (to produce nitrite), and fumarate (to produce succinate). Strain TCE1 is not able to reductively dechlorinate 3-chloro-4-hydroxyphenylacetate. The growth yields of the newly isolated bacterium when PCE is the electron acceptor are similar to those obtained for other dehalorespiring anaerobes (e.g., Desulfitobacterium sp. strain PCE1 and Desulfitobacterium hafniense) and the maximum specific reductive dechlorination rates are 4 to 16 times higher. Dechlorination of PCE and TCE is an inducible process. In PCE-limited chemostat cultures of strain TCE1, dechlorination is strongly inhibited by sulfite but not by other alternative electron acceptors, such as fumate or nitrate.

  9. Spectral engineering in π-conjugated polymers with intramolecular donor-acceptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Beaujuge, Pierre M; Amb, Chad M; Reynolds, John R

    2010-11-16

    With the development of light-harvesting organic materials for solar cell applications and molecular systems with fine-tuned colors for nonemissive electrochromic devices (e.g., smart windows, e-papers), a number of technical challenges remain to be overcome. Over the years, the concept of "spectral engineering" (tailoring the complex interplay between molecular physics and the various optical phenomena occurring across the electromagnetic spectrum) has become increasingly relevant in the field of π-conjugated organic polymers. Within the spectral engineering toolbox, the "donor-acceptor" approach uses alternating electron-rich and electron-deficient moieties along a π-conjugated backbone. This approach has proved especially valuable in the synthesis of dual-band and broadly absorbing chromophores with useful photovoltaic and electrochromic properties. In this Account, we highlight and provide insight into a present controversy surrounding the origin of the dual band of absorption sometimes encountered in semiconducting polymers structured using the "donor-acceptor" approach. Based on empirical evidence, we provide some schematic representations to describe the possible mechanisms governing the evolution of the two-band spectral absorption observed on varying the relative composition of electron-rich and electron-deficient substituents along the π-conjugated backbone. In parallel, we draw attention to the choice of the method employed to estimate and compare the absorption coefficients of polymer chromophores exhibiting distinct repeat unit lengths, and containing various extents of solubilizing side-chains along their backbone. Finally, we discuss the common assumption that "donor-acceptor" systems should have systematically lower absorption coefficients than their "all-donor" counterparts. The proposed models point toward important theoretical parameters which could be further explored at the macromolecular level to help researchers take full advantage of the

  10. Molecular assembly of amino acid interlinked, topologically symmetric, π-complementary donor-acceptor-donor triads.

    PubMed

    Avinash, M B; Sandeepa, K V; Govindaraju, T

    2013-01-01

    Amino acid interlinked pyrene and naphthalenediimide (NDI) based novel donor-acceptor-donor (D-A-D) triads are designed to exploit their topological symmetry and complementary π-character for facile charge-transfer complexation. Consequently, free-floating high-aspect-ratio supercoiled nanofibres and hierarchical helical bundles of triads are realized by modulating the chemical functionality of interlinking amino acids. PMID:23946856

  11. Dynamic combinatorial synthesis of a catenane based on donor–acceptor interactions in water

    PubMed Central

    Au-Yeung, Ho Yu; Pantoş, G. Dan; Sanders, Jeremy K. M.

    2009-01-01

    A new type of neutral donor–acceptor [2]-catenane, containing both complementary units in the same ring was synthesized from a dynamic combinatorial library in water. The yield of the water soluble [2]-catenane is enhanced by increasing either building-block concentrations or ionic strength, or by the addition of an electron-rich template. NMR spectroscopy demonstrates that the template is intercalated between the 2 electron-deficient naphthalenediimide units of the catenane. PMID:19171892

  12. Electron scattering by acceptor centers in p-Ag{sub 2}Te at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, F. F. Jafarov, M. B.; Askerova, G. Z.; Gojaev, E. M.

    2010-08-15

    Resonant electron scattering in p-Ag{sub 2}Te at acceptor concentrations N{sub a} < 4.2 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} has been observed in the temperature range of 50-80 K. The contribution of the resonant scattering to the temperature dependences of the conductivity {sigma}(T) and thermopower {alpha}{sub 0}(T) has been calculated. It is shown that this contribution exceeds that of charge carrier scattering by acoustic phonons.

  13. Structure and function of the ARH family of ADP-ribose-acceptor hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Mashimo, Masato; Kato, Jiro; Moss, Joel

    2014-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational protein modification, in which ADP-ribose is transferred from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to specific acceptors, thereby altering their activities. The ADP-ribose transfer reactions are divided into mono- and poly-(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Cellular ADP-ribosylation levels are tightly regulated by enzymes that transfer ADP-ribose to acceptor proteins (e.g. ADP-ribosyltransferases, poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP)) and those that cleave the linkage between ADP-ribose and acceptor (e.g. ADP-ribosyl-acceptor hydrolases (ARH), poly-(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolases (PARG)), thereby constituting an ADP-ribosylation cycle. This review summarizes current findings related to the ARH family of proteins. This family comprises three members (ARH1-3) with similar size (39 kDa) and amino acid sequence. ARH1 catalyzes the hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond of mono-(ADP-ribosyl)ated arginine. ARH3 hydrolyzes poly-(ADP-ribose) (PAR) and O-acetyl-ADP-ribose. The different substrate specificities of ARH1 and ARH3 contribute to their unique roles in the cell. Based on a phenotype analysis of ARH1−/− and ARH3−/− mice, ARH1 is involved in the action by bacterial toxins as well as in tumorigenesis. ARH3 participates in the degradation of PAR that is synthesized by PARP1 in response to oxidative stress-induced DNA damage; this hydrolytic reaction suppresses PAR-mediated cell death, a pathway termed parthanatos. PMID:24746921

  14. Donor-acceptor organo-imido polyoxometalates: high transparency, high activity redox-active NLO chromophores.

    PubMed

    Al-Yasari, Ahmed; Van Steerteghem, Nick; El Moll, Hani; Clays, Koen; Fielden, John

    2016-02-21

    We show that polyoxometalates (POMs) are an excellent redox-active acceptor on which to base high performance 2(nd) order non-linear optical (NLO) chromophores. This is demonstrated through three new organoimido-Lindqvist derivatives with HRS β0-values exceeding those of any dipolar organic system with comparable donor, π-system and absorption profile. Thus, organoimido POMs may provide a new generation of high performance, high transparency, and potentially redox-switchable NLO materials. PMID:26815652

  15. Ultra-flexible nonvolatile memory based on donor-acceptor diketopyrrolopyrrole polymer blends

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Yan, Yan; Zhou, Li; Huang, Long-Biao; Zhuang, Jiaqing; Sonar, Prashant; Roy, V. A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Flexible memory cell array based on high mobility donor-acceptor diketopyrrolopyrrole polymer has been demonstrated. The memory cell exhibits low read voltage, high cell-to-cell uniformity and good mechanical flexibility, and has reliable retention and endurance memory performance. The electrical properties of the memory devices are systematically investigated and modeled. Our results suggest that the polymer blends provide an important step towards high-density flexible nonvolatile memory devices. PMID:26029856

  16. Observation of selective plasmon-exciton coupling in nonradiative energy transfer: donor-selective versus acceptor-selective plexcitons.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Tuncay; Hernandez-Martinez, Pedro Ludwig; Mutlugun, Evren; Akin, Onur; Nizamoglu, Sedat; Ozel, Ilkem Ozge; Zhang, Qing; Xiong, Qihua; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2013-07-10

    We report selectively plasmon-mediated nonradiative energy transfer between quantum dot (QD) emitters interacting with each other via Förster-type resonance energy transfer (FRET) under controlled plasmon coupling either to only the donor QDs (i.e., donor-selective) or to only the acceptor QDs (i.e., acceptor-selective). Using layer-by-layer assembled colloidal QD nanocrystal solids with metal nanoparticles integrated at carefully designed spacing, we demonstrate the ability to enable/disable the coupled plasmon-exciton (plexciton) formation distinctly at the donor (exciton departing) site or at the acceptor (exciton feeding) site of our choice, while not hindering the donor exciton-acceptor exciton interaction but refraining from simultaneous coupling to both sites of the donor and the acceptor in the FRET process. In the case of donor-selective plexciton, we observed a substantial shortening in the donor QD lifetime from 1.33 to 0.29 ns as a result of plasmon-coupling to the donors and the FRET-assisted exciton transfer from the donors to the acceptors, both of which shorten the donor lifetime. This consequently enhanced the acceptor emission by a factor of 1.93. On the other hand, in the complementary case of acceptor-selective plexciton we observed a 2.70-fold emission enhancement in the acceptor QDs, larger than the acceptor emission enhancement of the donor-selective plexciton, as a result of the combined effects of the acceptor plasmon coupling and the FRET-assisted exciton feeding. Here we present the comparative results of theoretical modeling of the donor- and acceptor-selective plexcitons of nonradiative energy transfer developed here for the first time, which are in excellent agreement with the systematic experimental characterization. Such an ability to modify and control energy transfer through mastering plexcitons is of fundamental importance, opening up new applications for quantum dot embedded plexciton devices along with the development of new

  17. Towards building artificial light harvesting complexes: enhanced singlet-singlet energy transfer between donor and acceptor pairs bound to albumins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Challa V; Duff, Michael R

    2008-12-01

    Specific donor and acceptor pairs have been assembled in bovine serum albumin (BSA), at neutral pH and room temperature, and these dye-protein complexes indicated efficient donor to acceptor singlet-singlet energy transfer. For example, pyrene-1-butyric acid served as the donor and Coumarin 540A served as the acceptor. Both the donor and the acceptor bind to BSA with affinity constants in excess of 2x10(5) M(-1), as measured in absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectral titrations. Simultaneous binding of both the donor and the acceptor chromophores was supported by CD spectra and one chromophore did not displace the other from the protein host, even when limited concentrations of the host were used. For example, a 1:1:1 complex between the donor, acceptor and the host can be readily formed, and spectral data clearly show that the binding sites are mutually exclusive. The ternary complexes (two different ligands bound to the same protein molecule) provided opportunities to examine singlet-singlet energy transfer between the protein-bound chromophores. Donor emission was quenched by the addition of the acceptor, in the presence of limited amounts of BSA, while no energy transfer was observed in the absence of the protein host, under the same conditions. The excitation spectra of the donor-acceptor-host complexes clearly show the sensitization of acceptor emission by the donor. Protein denaturation, as induced by the addition of urea or increasing the temperature to 360 K, inhibited energy transfer, which indicate that protein structure plays an important role. Sensitization also proceeded at low temperature (77 K) and diffusion of the donor or the acceptor is not required for energy transfer. Stern-Volmer quenching plots show that the quenching constant is (3.1+/-0.2)x10(4) M(-1), at low acceptor concentrations (<35 microM). Other albumins such as human and porcine proteins also served as good hosts for the above experiments. For the first time, non

  18. Designing matrix models for fluorescence energy transfer between moving donors and acceptors.

    PubMed Central

    van der Meer, B W; Raymer, M A; Wagoner, S L; Hackney, R L; Beechem, J M; Gratton, E

    1993-01-01

    A recipe is given for designing theoretical models for donor-acceptor systems in which fluorescence energy transfer and motion takes place simultaneously. This recipe is based on the idea that a system exhibiting both motion and fluorescence energy transfer can be modeled by specifying a number of "states" and the rates of transitions between them. A state in this context is a set of specific coordinates and conditions that describe the system at a certain moment in time. As time goes on, the coordinates and conditions for the system change, and this evolution can be described as a series of transitions from one state to the next. The recipe is applied to a number of example systems in which the donors and/or acceptors undergo either rotational or translational motion. In each example, fluorescence intensities and anisotropies for the donor and acceptor are calculated from solutions of eigensystems. The proposed method allows for analyzing time-resolved fluorescence energy transfer data without restrictive assumptions for motional averaging regimes and the orientation factor. It is shown that the fluorescence quantities depend on the size of the motional step (i.e., on the number of states), only if fluorescence energy transfer occurs. This finding indicates that fluorescence energy transfer studies may reveal whether the dynamics of a system (e.g., a protein) is better described in terms of transitions between a relatively small number of discrete states (jumping) or a large number of dense states (diffusion). PMID:8494980

  19. His166 Is the Schiff Base Proton Acceptor in Attractant Phototaxis Receptor Sensory Rhodopsin I

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Photoactivation of attractant phototaxis receptor sensory rhodopsin I (SRI) in Halobacterium salinarum entails transfer of a proton from the retinylidene chromophore’s Schiff base (SB) to an unidentified acceptor residue on the cytoplasmic half-channel, in sharp contrast to other microbial rhodopsins, including the closely related repellent phototaxis receptor SRII and the outward proton pump bacteriorhodopsin, in which the SB proton acceptor is an aspartate residue salt-bridged to the SB in the extracellular (EC) half-channel. His166 on the cytoplasmic side of the SB in SRI has been implicated in the SB proton transfer reaction by mutation studies, and mutants of His166 result in an inverted SB proton release to the EC as well as inversion of the protein’s normally attractant phototaxis signal to repellent. Here we found by difference Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy the appearance of Fermi-resonant X–H stretch modes in light-minus-dark difference spectra; their assignment with 15N labeling and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrates that His166 is the SB proton acceptor during the photochemical reaction cycle of the wild-type SRI–HtrI complex. PMID:25162914

  20. Identification of nitrogen acceptor in Cu2O: First-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    T-Thienprasert, Jiraroj; Limpijumnong, Sukit

    2015-11-01

    The source of p-type carriers observed in nitrogen-doped Cu2O samples [Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 1060 (2003)] was identified by using accurate hybrid density functional calculations. Similar to the case of ZnO, we found that N is a deep acceptor when substituting for O in Cu2O and cannot be the source of the observed p-type carriers. Detailed investigation of other N-related defects in Cu2O reveals that N2 substitution for Cu, i.e., (N2)Cu, is a shallow acceptor and can give hole carriers in N-doped Cu2O samples. (N2)Cu is not only a shallow acceptor but it also has a lower formation energy than NO in some growth conditions. The calculated emission photo luminescence (PL) peak at 1.89 eV associated with (N2)Cu is also in good agreement with the observed N-related PL peak at ˜1.82 eV in N-doped Cu2O sample. To aid future identification by Raman spectroscopy techniques, the vibrational frequencies of N2 on both Cu and O sites were calculated.

  1. Efficient ambipolar transport properties in alternate stacking donor-acceptor complexes: from experiment to theory.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yunke; Cheng, Changli; Geng, Hua; Wang, Chao; Hu, Wenping; Xu, Wei; Shuai, Zhigang; Zhu, Daoben

    2016-05-18

    Comprehensive investigations of crystal structures, electrical transport properties and theoretical simulations have been performed over a series of sulfur-bridged annulene-based donor-acceptor complexes with an alternate stacking motif. A remarkably high mobility, up to 1.57 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for holes and 0.47 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for electrons, was obtained using organic single crystal field-effect transistor devices, demonstrating the efficient ambipolar transport properties. These ambipolar properties arise from the fact that the electronic couplings for both holes and electrons have the same super-exchange nature along the alternate stacking direction. The magnitude of super-exchange coupling depends not only on the intermolecular stacking distance and pattern, but also the energy level alignments between the adjacent donor-acceptor moieties. The concluded transport mechanism and structure-property relationship from this research will provide an important guideline for the future design of organic semiconductors based on donor-acceptor complexes. PMID:27157854

  2. Transferase Activity of Lactobacillal and Bifidobacterial β-Galactosidases with Various Sugars as Galactosyl Acceptors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The β-galactosidases from Lactobacillus reuteri L103 (Lreuβgal), Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus DSM 20081 (Lbulβgal), and Bifidobacterium breve DSM 20281 (Bbreβgal-I and Bbreβgal-II) were investigated in detail with respect to their propensity to transfer galactosyl moieties onto lactose, its hydrolysis products d-glucose and d-galactose, and certain sugar acceptors such as N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc), N-acetyl-d-galactosamine (GalNAc), and l-fucose (Fuc) under defined, initial velocity conditions. The rate constants or partitioning ratios (kNu/kwater) determined for these different acceptors (termed nucleophiles, Nu) were used as a measure for the ability of a certain substance to act as a galactosyl acceptor of these β-galactosidases. When using Lbulβgal or Bbreβgal-II, the galactosyl transfer to GlcNAc was 6 and 10 times higher than that to lactose, respectively. With lactose and GlcNAc used in equimolar substrate concentrations, Lbulβgal and Bbreβgal-II catalyzed the formation of N-acetyl-allolactosamine with the highest yields of 41 and 24%, respectively, as calculated from the initial GlcNAc concentration. PMID:26975338

  3. Amorphous carbon nanoparticle used as novel resonance energy transfer acceptor for chemiluminescent immunoassay of transferrin.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hongfei; Wang, Wenwen; Wang, Zhenxing; Han, Jing; Fu, Zhifeng

    2014-03-28

    Amorphous carbon nanoparticles (ACNPs) showing highly efficient quenching of chemiluminescence (CL) were prepared from candle soot with a very simple protocol. The prepared ACNP was employed as the novel energy acceptor for a chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET)-based immunoassay. In this work, ACNP was linked with transferrin (TRF), and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was conjugated to TRF antibody (HRP-anti-TRF). The immunoreaction rendered the distance between the ACNP acceptor and the HRP-catalyzed CL emitter to be short enough for CRET occurring. In the presence of TRF, this antigen competed with ACNP-TRF for HRP-anti-TRF, thus led to the decreased occurrence of CRET. A linear range of 20-400 ng mL(-1) and a limit of detection of 20 ng mL(-1) were obtained in this immunoassay. The proposed method was successfully applied for detection of TRF levels in human sera, and the results were in good agreement with ELISA method. Moreover, the ACNPs show higher energy transfer efficiency than other conventional nano-scaled energy acceptors such as graphene oxide in CRET assay. It is anticipated that this approach can be developed for determination of other analytes with low cost, simple manipulation and high specificity. PMID:24636417

  4. High-Performance Electron Acceptor with Thienyl Side Chains for Organic Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuze; Zhao, Fuwen; He, Qiao; Huo, Lijun; Wu, Yang; Parker, Timothy C; Ma, Wei; Sun, Yanming; Wang, Chunru; Zhu, Daoben; Heeger, Alan J; Marder, Seth R; Zhan, Xiaowei

    2016-04-13

    We develop an efficient fused-ring electron acceptor (ITIC-Th) based on indacenodithieno[3,2-b]thiophene core and thienyl side-chains for organic solar cells (OSCs). Relative to its counterpart with phenyl side-chains (ITIC), ITIC-Th shows lower energy levels (ITIC-Th: HOMO = -5.66 eV, LUMO = -3.93 eV; ITIC: HOMO = -5.48 eV, LUMO = -3.83 eV) due to the σ-inductive effect of thienyl side-chains, which can match with high-performance narrow-band-gap polymer donors and wide-band-gap polymer donors. ITIC-Th has higher electron mobility (6.1 × 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) than ITIC (2.6 × 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) due to enhanced intermolecular interaction induced by sulfur-sulfur interaction. We fabricate OSCs by blending ITIC-Th acceptor with two different low-band-gap and wide-band-gap polymer donors. In one case, a power conversion efficiency of 9.6% was observed, which rivals some of the highest efficiencies for single junction OSCs based on fullerene acceptors. PMID:27015115

  5. Theoretical Study of Donor - Spacer - Acceptor Structure Molecule for Molecular Rectifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Kenji, Niimura; Belosludov, Rodion; Farajian, Amir; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2003-03-01

    Recently, the molecular electronics has attracted strong attention as a ``post-silicone technology'' to establish a future nanoscale electronic devices. To realize this molecular device, unimolecular rectifiering function is one of the most important constituents in nanotechnology [C. Majumder, H. Mizuseki, and Y. Kawazoe, Molecular Scale Rectifier: Theoretical Study, J. Phys. Chem. A, 105 (2001) 9454-9459.]. In the present study, the geometric and electronic structure of alkyl derivative C37H50N4O4 (PNX) molecule, (donor - spacer - acceptor), a leading candidate of molecular rectifying device, has been investigated theoretically using ab initio quantum mechanical calculation. The results suggest that in such donor-acceptor molecular complexes, while the lowest unoccupied orbital concentrates on the acceptor subunit, the highest occupied molecular orbital is localized on the donor subunit. The approximate potential differences for optimized PNX molecule have been estimated at the B3PW91/6-311g++(d,p) level of theory, which achieves quite good agreement with experimentally reported results. This study was performed through Special Coordination Funds for Promoting Science and Technology of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of the Japanese Government.

  6. Field emission analysis of band bending in donor/acceptor heterojunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Yingjie; Li, Shuai; Wang, Guiwei; Zhao, Tianjiao; Zhang, Gengmin

    2016-06-01

    The donor/acceptor heterojunction plays an important role in organic solar cells. An investigation of band bending in the donor/acceptor heterojunction is helpful in analysis of the charge transport behavior and for the improvement of the device performance. In this work, we report an approach for detection of band bending in a donor/acceptor heterojunction that has been prepared on a small and sharp tungsten tip. In situ field emission measurements are performed after the deposition process, and a linear Fowler-Nordheim plot is obtained from the fresh organic film surface. The thickness-dependent work function is then measured in the layer-by-layer deposited heterojunction. Several different types of heterojunction (zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc)/C60, copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic bisbenzimidazole, and CuPc/C60) are fabricated and analyzed. The different charge transfer directions in the heterojunctions are distinguished by field emission measurements. The calculation method used to determine the band bending is then discussed in detail. A triple layer heterojunction (C60/ZnPc/CuPc) is also analyzed using this method. A small amount of band bending is measured in the outer CuPc layer. This method provides an independent reference method for determination of the band bending in an organic heterojunction that will complement photoemission spectroscopy and current-voltage measurement methods.

  7. Light-Induced Charge Separation in Densely Packed Donor-Acceptor Coordination Cages.

    PubMed

    Frank, Marina; Ahrens, Jennifer; Bejenke, Isabel; Krick, Marcel; Schwarzer, Dirk; Clever, Guido H

    2016-07-01

    Photon-powered charge separation is achieved in a supramolecular architecture based on the dense packing of functional building blocks. Therefore, self-assembled dimers of interpenetrated coordination cages consisting of redoxactive chromophors were synthesized in a single assembly step starting from easily accessible ligands and Pd(II) cations. Two backbones consisting of electron rich phenothiazine (PTZ) and electron deficient anthraquinone (ANQ) were used to assemble either homo-octameric or mixed-ligand double cages. The electrochemical and spectroscopic properties of the pure cages, mixtures of donor and acceptor cages and the mixed-ligand cages were compared by steady-state UV-vis and transient absorption spectroscopy, supported by cyclic voltammetry and spectroelectrochemistry. Only the mixed-ligand cages, allowing close intra-assembly communication between the donors and acceptors, showed the evolution of characteristic PTZ radical cation and ANQ radical anion features upon excitation in the transient spectra. In contrast, excitation of the mixtures of the homo-octameric donor and acceptor cages in solution did not lead to any signs of electron transfer. Densely packed photo- and redox-functional self-assemblies promise molecular-level control over the morphology of the charge separation layer in future photovoltaic applications. PMID:27258549

  8. Charge-transfer complexes of sulfamethoxazole drug with different classes of acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; El-Korashy, Sabry A.; El-Deen, Ibrahim M.; El-Sayed, Shaima M.

    2010-09-01

    The charge-transfer complexes of the donor sulfamethoxazole (SZ) with iodine (I 2), 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ), p-chloranil (CHL) and picric acid (PA) have been studied spectrophotometrically in chloroform or methanol at room temperature using absorption spectrophotometer. The results indicate that formation of CT-complexes in case of four acceptors. The stoichiometry of the complexes was found to be 1:1 ratio by molar ratio method between donor and acceptor with maximum absorption bands (CT band). The data are discussed in terms of formation constant ( KCT), molar extinction coefficient ( ɛCT), standard free energy (Δ G°), oscillator strength (ƒ), transition dipole moment ( μ), resonance energy ( RN) and ionization potential ( ID). The results indicate that the formation constant ( KCT) for the complexes were shown to be dependent upon the nature of electron acceptor, donor and polarity of solvents which were used. IR, 1H NMR, mass spectra, UV-Vis techniques, elemental analyses (CHN) and TG-DTG investigation were used to characterize the four sulfamethoxazole charge-transfer complexes.

  9. Metals as electron acceptors in single-chamber microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Wu, Yining; Puranik, Sampada; Lei, Yu; Vadas, Timothy; Li, Baikun

    2014-12-01

    Two typical oxidized-status metals (Fe(III) and Cr(VI)) were studied as electron acceptors on cathodes in single chamber microbial fuel cells (SCMFCs) to explore novel sustainable technology for metal treatment. The batch-mode tests indicated that the voltages of SCMFCs steadily increased with Fe(III) concentrations (10, 30, and 50 mg L-1) and Cr(VI) concentrations (1, 3, and 10 mg L-1). The maximum power density was 658 ± 6 mW m-2 at 50 mg L-1 of Fe(III), and 419 ± 4 mW m-2 at 10 mg L-1 Cr(VI). The conversion efficiency of Cr(VI) and Fe(III) were high (>89%), and coulombic efficiency ranged 23-100%. Cr(VI) concentration of 10 mg L-1 started to irreversibly inhibit SCMFCs. The open circuit potentials (OCPs) well reflected the organic substrate removal in anode and metal reduction on cathode. Cathode liner sweep voltammetry (LSV) showed the electrochemical activity increased with metal concentrations, and the cathode of Fe(III) had better LSV performance than Cr(VI). Microbial community analysis of biofilms showed that the DNA band patterns of anode biofilms were similar, while cathode biofilms varied with electron acceptors. This study demonstrated the high power generation of SCMFCs with metals as electron acceptors, and revealed the great potential of expanding MFCs for diverse waste treatment.

  10. Copper Toxicity Affects Photosystem II Electron Transport at the Secondary Quinone Acceptor, QB1

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Narendranath; Vass, Imre; Demeter, Sándor

    1989-01-01

    The nature of Cu2+ inhibition of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry in pea (Pisum sativum L.) thylakoids was investigated monitoring Hill activity and light emission properties of photosystem II. In Cu2+-inhibited thylakoids, diphenyl carbazide addition does not relieve the loss of Hill activity. The maximum yield of fluorescence induction restored by hydroxylamine in Tris-inactivated thylakoids is markedly reduced by Cu2+. This suggests that Cu2+ does not act on the donor side of PSII but on the reaction center of PSII or on components beyond. Thermoluminescence and delayed luminescence studies show that charge recombination between the positively charged intermediate in water oxidation cycle (S2) and negatively charged primary quinone acceptor of pSII (QA−) is largely unaffected by Cu2+. The S2QB− charge recombination, however, is drastically inhibited which parallels the loss of Hill activity. This indicates that Cu2+ inhibits photosystem II photochemistry primarily affecting the function of the secondary quinone electron acceptor, QB. We suggest that Cu2+ does not block electron flow between the primary and secondary quinone acceptor but modifies the QB site in such a way that it becomes unsuitable for further photosystem II photochemistry. PMID:16666731

  11. Charge separation and photovoltaic conversion in polymer composites with internal donor/acceptor heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, G.; Heeger, A.J.

    1995-10-01

    The photosensitivity of semiconducting polymers can be enhanced by blending donor and acceptor polymers to optimize photoinduced charge separation. We describe a novel phase-separated polymer blend (composite) made with poly[2-methoxy-5-(2{prime}-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene], MEH-PPV, as donor and cyano-PPV, CN-PPV, as acceptor. The photoluminescence and electroluminescence of both component polymers are quenched in the blend, indicative of rapid and efficient separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs with electrons on the acceptor and holes on the donor. Diodes made with such a composite semiconducting polymer as the photosensitive medium show promising photovoltaic characteristics with carrier collection efficiency of 5% electrons/photon and energy conversion efficiency of 0.9%, {similar_to}20 times larger than in diodes made with pure MEH-PPV and {similar_to}100 times larger than in diodes made with CN-PPV. The photosensitivity and the quantum yield increase with reverse bias voltage, to 0.3 A/W and 80% electrons/photon respectively at {minus}10 V, comparable to results obtained from photodiodes made with inorganic semiconductors. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  12. Design of Reversible, Cysteine-Targeted Michael Acceptors Guided by Kinetic and Computational Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Electrophilic probes that covalently modify a cysteine thiol often show enhanced pharmacological potency and selectivity. Although reversible Michael acceptors have been reported, the structural requirements for reversibility are poorly understood. Here, we report a novel class of acrylonitrile-based Michael acceptors, activated by aryl or heteroaryl electron-withdrawing groups. We demonstrate that thiol adducts of these acrylonitriles undergo β-elimination at rates that span more than 3 orders of magnitude. These rates correlate inversely with the computed proton affinity of the corresponding carbanions, enabling the intrinsic reversibility of the thiol-Michael reaction to be tuned in a predictable manner. We apply these principles to the design of new reversible covalent kinase inhibitors with improved properties. A cocrystal structure of one such inhibitor reveals specific noncovalent interactions between the 1,2,4-triazole activating group and the kinase. Our experimental and computational study enables the design of new Michael acceptors, expanding the palette of reversible, cysteine-targeted electrophiles. PMID:25153195

  13. Transferase Activity of Lactobacillal and Bifidobacterial β-Galactosidases with Various Sugars as Galactosyl Acceptors.

    PubMed

    Arreola, Sheryl Lozel; Intanon, Montira; Wongputtisin, Pairote; Kosma, Paul; Haltrich, Dietmar; Nguyen, Thu-Ha

    2016-03-30

    The β-galactosidases from Lactobacillus reuteri L103 (Lreuβgal), Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus DSM 20081 (Lbulβgal), and Bifidobacterium breve DSM 20281 (Bbreβgal-I and Bbreβgal-II) were investigated in detail with respect to their propensity to transfer galactosyl moieties onto lactose, its hydrolysis products d-glucose and d-galactose, and certain sugar acceptors such as N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc), N-acetyl-d-galactosamine (GalNAc), and l-fucose (Fuc) under defined, initial velocity conditions. The rate constants or partitioning ratios (kNu/kwater) determined for these different acceptors (termed nucleophiles, Nu) were used as a measure for the ability of a certain substance to act as a galactosyl acceptor of these β-galactosidases. When using Lbulβgal or Bbreβgal-II, the galactosyl transfer to GlcNAc was 6 and 10 times higher than that to lactose, respectively. With lactose and GlcNAc used in equimolar substrate concentrations, Lbulβgal and Bbreβgal-II catalyzed the formation of N-acetyl-allolactosamine with the highest yields of 41 and 24%, respectively, as calculated from the initial GlcNAc concentration. PMID:26975338

  14. Peptide Aptamers: Development and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Reverdatto, Sergey; Burz, David S.; Shekhtman, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Peptide aptamers are small combinatorial proteins that are selected to bind to specific sites on their target molecules. Peptide aptamers consist of short, 5-20 amino acid residues long sequences, typically embedded as a loop within a stable protein scaffold. Various peptide aptamer scaffolds and in vitro and in vivo selection techniques are reviewed with emphasis on specific biomedical, bioimaging, and bioanalytical applications. PMID:25866267

  15. Macrocyclization of Unprotected Peptide Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Alexander A; Choo, Zi-Ning; Totaro, Kyle A; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2016-03-18

    A chemistry for the facile two-component macrocyclization of unprotected peptide isocyanates is described. Starting from peptides containing two glutamic acid γ-hydrazide residues, isocyanates can be readily accessed and cyclized with hydrazides of dicarboxylic acids. The choice of a nucleophilic linker allows for the facile modulation of biochemical properties of a macrocyclic peptide. Four cyclic NYAD-1 analogues were synthesized using the described method and displayed a range of biological activities. PMID:26948900

  16. Effect of organic molecules on hydrolysis of peptide bond: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makshakova, Olga; Ermakova, Elena

    2013-03-01

    The activation and inhibition effects of small organic molecules on peptide hydrolysis have been studied using a model compound dialanine and DFT approach. Solvent-assisted and non-assisted concerted mechanisms were analyzed. Several transition states for the systems: alanine dipeptide-water molecule in complexes with alcohol molecules, acetonitrile, dimethylsulfoxide, propionic, lactic and pyruvic acids and water molecules were localized. The formation of hydrogen bonds between dipeptide, reactive water molecule and molecules of solvents influences the activation energy barrier of the peptide bond hydrolytic reaction. Strong effect of organic acids on the activation energy barrier correlates with their electronegativity. Acetonitrile can act as an inhibitor of reaction. Mechanisms of regulation of the activation energy barrier are discussed in the terms of donor-acceptor interactions.

  17. Spectral, thermal, XRD and SEM studies of charge-transfer complexation of hexamethylenediamine and three types of acceptors: π-, σ- and vacant orbital acceptors that include quinol, picric acid, bromine, iodine, SnCl4 and ZnCl2 acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Abdel Majid A.; Refat, Moamen S.; Saad, Hosam A.

    2013-11-01

    In this work, structural, thermal, morphological and pharmacological characterization was performed on the interactions between a hexamethylenediamine (HMDA) donor and three types of acceptors to understand the complexation behavior of diamines. The three types of acceptors include π-acceptors (i.e., quinol (QL) and picric acid (PA)), σ-acceptors (i.e., bromine and iodine) and vacant orbital acceptors (i.e., tin(IV) tetrachloride (SnCl4) and zinc chloride (ZnCl2)). The characterization of the obtained CT complexes was performed using elemental analysis, infrared (IR), Raman, 1H NMR and electronic absorption spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. Their morphologies were studied using scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX). The biological activities of the obtained CT complexes were tested for their antibacterial activities. The complex containing the QL acceptor exhibited a remarkable electronic spectrum with a strong, broad absorption band, which had an observed λmax that was at a much longer wavelength than those of the free reactants. In addition, this complex exhibited strong antimicrobial activities against various bacterial and fungal strains compared to standard drugs. The complexes containing the PA, iodine, Sn(IV) and Zn(II) acceptors exhibited good thermal stability up to 240, 330, 275 and 295 °C, respectively. The complexes containing bromine, Sn(IV) and Zn(II) acceptors exhibited good crystallinity. In addition to its good crystallinity properties, the complex containing the bromine acceptor exhibits a remarkable morphology feature.

  18. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  19. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology. PMID:26279082

  20. Peptides that influence membrane topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the mechanism of a range of polypeptides that influence membrane topology, including antimicrobial peptides, cell penetrating peptides, viral fusion peptides, and apoptosis proteins, and show how a combination of geometry, coordination chemistry, and soft matter physics can be used to approach a unified understanding. We will also show how such peptides can impact biomedical problems such as auto-immune diseases (psoriasis, lupus), infectious diseases (viral and bacterial infections), and mitochondrial pathologies (under-regulated apoptosis leads to neurodegenerative diseases whereas over-regulated apoptosis leads to cancer.)

  1. Peptides containing glutamine repeats as substrates for transglutaminase-catalyzed cross-linking: Relevance to diseases of the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Kahlem, P.; Terré, C.; Green, H.; Djian, P.

    1996-01-01

    Many proteins contain reiterated glutamine residues, but polyglutamine of excessive length may result in human disease by conferring new properties on the protein containing it. One established property of a glutamine residue, depending on the nature of the flanking residues, is its ability to act as an amine acceptor in a transglutaminase-catalyzed reaction and to make a glutamyl–lysine cross-link with a neighboring polypeptide. To learn whether glutamine repeats can act as amine acceptors, we have made peptides with variable lengths of polyglutamine flanked by the adjacent amino acid residues in the proteins associated with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), Machado–Joseph disease (SCA3), or dentato-rubral pallido-luysian atrophy (DRPLA) or those residues adjacent to the preferred cross-linking site of involucrin, or solely by arginine residues. The polyglutamine was found to confer excellent substrate properties on any soluble peptide; under optimal conditions, virtually all the glutamine residues acted as amine acceptors in the reaction with glycine ethyl-ester, and lengthening the sequence of polyglutamine increased the reactivity of each glutamine residue. In the presence of transglutaminase, peptides containing polyglutamine formed insoluble aggregates with the proteins of brain extracts and these aggregates contained glutamyl–lysine cross-links. Repeated glutamine residues exposed on the surface of a neuronal protein should form cross-linked aggregates in the presence of any transglutaminase activated by the presence of Ca2+. PMID:8962095

  2. Peptides and food intake.

    PubMed

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  3. Peptides and Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  4. A Comparison of the Ideological Orientations and Personality Characteristics of Teacher "Acceptors" and "Rejectors" of BSCS Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoy, Wayne K.; Blankenship, Jacob W.

    1972-01-01

    Teachers who accept" the BSCS rationale are generally more humanistic in their pupil control ideology than those who reject" the program. Acceptors" scored higher on personality scales determining the capacity for independent thought and action. (AL)

  5. Theoretical design of solvatochromism switching by photochromic reactions using donor-acceptor disubstituted diarylethene derivatives with oxidized thiophene rings.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Katsuki; Shigeta, Yasuteru; Kishi, Ryohei; Nakano, Masayoshi

    2015-03-01

    We have designed several diarylethene derivatives with oxidized thiophene rings and donor-acceptor substituents, which show the solvatochromism switching by photochromic reactions, using a time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) method using the polarizable continuum model (PCM). It is found that in the UV-vis spectral region examined only the open-ring isomers exhibit the solvatochromism, while the closed-ring isomers do not. The mechanism of the solvatochromism behavior and its switching process are clarified from the viewpoint of the charge-transfer (CT) excitation from the donor to the acceptor substituents. We demonstrate that this CT excitation can be controlled by choosing appropriate pairs of the donor and the acceptor substituents on the basis of the orbital correlation diagram between the diarylethene derivatives and the donor-acceptor substituents, which is constructed from the topologies and the orbital energies of the molecular orbitals primarily contributing to the excitations. PMID:25655363

  6. Role of functionalized acceptors in heteroleptic bipyridyl Cu(I) complexes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaoqing; Shao, Yang; Li, Ke; Zhao, Zigang; Wei, Shuxian; Guo, Wenyue

    2016-07-01

    The intrinsic optoelectronic properties of heteroleptic bipyridyl Cu(I) complexes bearing functionalized acceptor subunits have been investigated by density functional theory and time-dependent DFT. The Cu(I) complexes exhibit distorted trigonal-pyramidal geometries and typical metal-to-ligand electron transfer characteristics at the long wavelength region. Replacing carboxylic acid with cyanoacrylic acid in acceptor subunits stabilizes the LUMO levels, thus lowering the HOMOLUMO energy gaps and facilitating favorable donor-to-acceptor intramolecular electron transfer and charge separation. Introduction of heteroaromatic groups and cyanoacrylic acid significantly improves the light-harvesting capability of the complexes. Our results highlight the effect of functionalized acceptors on the optoelectronic properties of bipyridyl Cu(I) complexes and provide a fresh perspective on screening of efficient sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells.

  7. Recognition of Bacterial Signal Peptides by Mammalian Formyl Peptide Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bufe, Bernd; Schumann, Timo; Kappl, Reinhard; Bogeski, Ivan; Kummerow, Carsten; Podgórska, Marta; Smola, Sigrun; Hoth, Markus; Zufall, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G-protein-coupled receptors that function as chemoattractant receptors in innate immune responses. Here we perform systematic structure-function analyses of FPRs from six mammalian species using structurally diverse FPR peptide agonists and identify a common set of conserved agonist properties with typical features of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Guided by these results, we discover that bacterial signal peptides, normally used to translocate proteins across cytoplasmic membranes, are a vast family of natural FPR agonists. N-terminally formylated signal peptide fragments with variable sequence and length activate human and mouse FPR1 and FPR2 at low nanomolar concentrations, thus establishing FPR1 and FPR2 as sensitive and broad signal peptide receptors. The vomeronasal receptor mFpr-rs1 and its sequence orthologue hFPR3 also react to signal peptides but are much more narrowly tuned in signal peptide recognition. Furthermore, all signal peptides examined here function as potent activators of the innate immune system. They elicit robust, FPR-dependent calcium mobilization in human and mouse leukocytes and trigger a range of classical innate defense mechanisms, such as the production of reactive oxygen species, metalloprotease release, and chemotaxis. Thus, bacterial signal peptides constitute a novel class of immune activators that are likely to contribute to mammalian immune defense against bacteria. This evolutionarily conserved detection mechanism combines structural promiscuity with high specificity and enables discrimination between bacterial and eukaryotic signal sequences. With at least 175,542 predicted sequences, bacterial signal peptides represent the largest and structurally most heterogeneous class of G-protein-coupled receptor agonists currently known for the innate immune system. PMID:25605714

  8. Phytosulfokine peptide signalling.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Margret

    2015-08-01

    Phytosulfokine (PSK) belongs to the group of plant peptide growth factors. It is a disulfated pentapeptide encoded by precursor genes that are ubiquitously present in higher plants, suggestive of universal functions. Processing of the preproprotein involves sulfonylation by a tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase in the trans-golgi and proteolytic cleavage in the apoplast. The secreted peptide is perceived at the cell surface by a membrane-bound receptor kinase of the leucine-rich repeat family. The PSK receptor PSKR1 from Arabidopsis thaliana is an active kinase and has guanylate cyclase activity resulting in dual-signal outputs. Receptor activity is regulated by calmodulin. While PSK may be an autocrine growth factor, it also acts non-cell autonomously by promoting growth of cells that are receptor-deficient. In planta, PSK has multiple functions. It promotes cell growth, acts in the quiescent centre cells of the root apical meristem, contributes to funicular pollen tube guidance, and differentially alters immune responses depending on the pathogen. It has been suggested that PSK integrates growth and defence signals to balance the competing metabolic costs of these responses. This review summarizes our current understanding of PSK synthesis, signalling, and activity. PMID:25754406

  9. Cascade Reaction of Donor-Acceptor Cyclopropanes: Mechanistic Studies on Cycloadditions with Nitrosoarenes and cis-Diazenes.

    PubMed

    Chidley, Tristan; Vemula, Naresh; Carson, Cheryl A; Kerr, Michael A; Pagenkopf, Brian L

    2016-06-17

    Tandem ring opening, elimination, and cycloaddition of donor-acceptor cyclopropanes were observed in Yb(OTf)3-catalyzed cycloaddition with nitrosoarenes. The reaction results in formation of tetrahydro-1,2-oxazine instead of the normal cycloadduct isoxazolidine via in situ nitrone formation. A similar cascade sequence was observed with cis-diazines. Mechanistic studies on this unique transformation offer an entirely new approach for reaction design with donor-acceptor cyclopropanes. PMID:27267360

  10. Effect of gibberellic acid (GA), indole acetic acid (IAA) and benzylaminopurine (BAP) on the synthesis of essential oils and the isomerization of methyl chavicol and trans-anethole in Ocimum gratissimum L.

    PubMed

    Hazzoumi, Zakaria; Moustakime, Youssef; Amrani Joutei, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Basil (O. gratissimum L) is a aromatic and medicinal plant widely used in traditional medicine in Morocco. The aim of this work was to study the effect of three plant growth regulators gibberellic acid (GA), indole 3-acetic acid (IAA) and benzylaminopurine (BAP) on the content and composition of essential oils of this plant, especially on the main compound (methyl chavicol) and its isomer (the trans-anethole). The results showed a wide variation on yield, content and range of the molecule constituent of oil, with a balance of appearances and/or disappearances of a few molecules. GA caused a slight decrease in the oil yield (0.2%), but it increased the diversity of compounds (17 molecules) with the appearance of four new compounds (naphthalene, camphor, germacrene-D, and ledene) and disappearance of (β cedrene, azulene). This variation also caused a very important decrease in the main compound (methyl chavicol) and increases its isomer (trans-anethole). IAA and BAP caused an increase in the yield of essential oil (0.30% and 0.32% respectively) without much influence on the main compounds, but with some change in the composition such as the appearance of (germacrene-D) and the disappearance of (aristolene). PMID:25045609

  11. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  12. Natriuretic Peptides and Cardiometabolic Health.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepak K; Wang, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides are cardiac-derived hormones with a range of protective functions, including natriuresis, diuresis, vasodilation, lusitropy, lipolysis, weight loss, and improved insulin sensitivity. Their actions are mediated through membrane-bound guanylyl cyclases that lead to production of the intracellular second-messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that genetic and acquired deficiencies of the natriuretic peptide system can promote hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, obesity, diabetes mellitus, the metabolic syndrome, and heart failure. Clinically, natriuretic peptides are robust diagnostic and prognostic markers, and augmenting natriuretic peptides is a target for therapeutic strategies in cardiometabolic disease. This review will summarize current understanding and highlight novel aspects of natriuretic peptide biology. PMID:26103984

  13. Photoinitated charge separation in a hybrid titanium dioxide metalloporphyrin peptide material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, H. Christopher; Liu, Yuzi; Dimitrijevic, Nada M.; Rajh, Tijana

    2014-08-01

    In natural systems, electron flow is mediated by proteins that spatially organize donor and acceptor molecules with great precision. Achieving this guided, directional flow of information is a desirable feature in photovoltaic media. Here, we design self-assembled peptide materials that organize multiple electronic components capable of performing photoinduced charge separation. Two peptides, c16-AHL3K3-CO2H and c16-AHL3K9-CO2H, self-assemble into fibres and provide a scaffold capable of binding a metalloporphyrin via histidine axial ligation and mineralize titanium dioxide (TiO2) on the lysine-rich surface of the resulting fibrous structures. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of this self-assembled material under continuous light excitation demonstrate charge separation induced by excitation of the metalloporphyrin and mediated by the peptide assembly structure. This approach to dye-sensitized semiconducting materials offers a means to spatially control the dye molecule with respect to the semiconducting material through careful, strategic peptide design.

  14. Photoinitiated [corrected] charge separation in a hybrid titanium dioxide metalloporphyrin peptide material.

    PubMed

    Fry, H Christopher; Liu, Yuzi; Dimitrijevic, Nada M; Rajh, Tijana

    2014-01-01

    In natural systems, electron flow is mediated by proteins that spatially organize donor and acceptor molecules with great precision. Achieving this guided, directional flow of information is a desirable feature in photovoltaic media. Here, we design self-assembled peptide materials that organize multiple electronic components capable of performing photoinduced charge separation. Two peptides, c16-AHL3K3-CO2H and c16-AHL3K9-CO2H, self-assemble into fibres and provide a scaffold capable of binding a metalloporphyrin via histidine axial ligation and mineralize titanium dioxide (TiO2) on the lysine-rich surface of the resulting fibrous structures. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of this self-assembled material under continuous light excitation demonstrate charge separation induced by excitation of the metalloporphyrin and mediated by the peptide assembly structure. This approach to dye-sensitized semiconducting materials offers a means to spatially control the dye molecule with respect to the semiconducting material through careful, strategic peptide design. PMID:25132637

  15. Highly Angiogenic Peptide Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vivek A.; Taylor, Nichole L.; Shi, Siyu; Wang, Benjamin K.; Jalan, Abhishek A.; Kang, Marci K.; Wickremasinghe, Navindee C.; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Major limitations of current tissue regeneration approaches using artificial scaffolds are fibrous encapsulation, lack of host cellular infiltration, unwanted immune responses, surface degradation preceding biointegration, and artificial degradation byproducts. Specifically, for scaffolds larger than 200 500 μm, implants must be accompanied by host angiogenesis in order to provide adequate nutrient/waste exchange in the newly forming tissue. In the current work, we design a peptide-based self-assembling nanofibrous hydrogel containing cell-mediated degradation and proangiogenic moieties that specifically address these challenges. This hydrogel can be easily delivered by syringe, is rapidly infiltrated by cells of hematopoietic and mesenchymal origin, and rapidly forms an extremely robust mature vascular network. scaffolds show no signs of fibrous encapsulation and after 3 weeks are resorbed into the native tissue. These supramolecular assemblies may prove a vital paradigm for tissue regeneration and specifically for ischemic tissue disease. PMID:25584521

  16. Electronic spectrum of non-tetrahedral acceptors in CdTe:Cl and CdTe:Bi,Cl single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivobok, V. S.; Nikolaev, S. N.; Bagaev, V. S.; Pruchkina, A. A.; Onishchenko, E. E.; Kolosov, S. A.; Klevkov, Yu. V.; Skorikov, M. L.

    2016-02-01

    The electronic spectra of complex acceptors in compensated CdTe:Cl, CdTe:Ag,Cl, and CdTe:Bi,Cl single crystals are studied using low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurements under both nonresonant and resonant excitation of distant donor-acceptor pairs (DAP). The wavelength modulation of the excitation source combined with the analysis of the differential PL signal is used to enhance narrow spectral features obscured because of inhomogeneous line broadening and/or excitation transfer for selectively excited DAPs. For the well-known tetrahedral (TD) AgCd acceptor, the energies of four excited states are measured, and the values obtained are shown to be in perfect agreement with the previous data. Moreover, splitting between the 2P3/2 (D8) and 2S3/2 (D8) states is clearly observed for AgCd centers located at a short distance (5-7 nm) from a hydrogen-like donor (ClTe). This splitting results from the reduction of the TD symmetry taking place when the acceptor is a member of a donor-acceptor pair. For the Cl-related complex acceptor with an activation energy of ˜121 meV (A-center), the energies of eight excited states are measured. It is shown that this defect produces low-symmetry central-cell correction responsible for the strong splitting of S-like TD shells. The energy spectrum of the Bi-related shallow acceptor with an activation energy of ˜36 meV is measured as well. The spectrum obtained differs drastically from the hydrogen-like set of levels, which indicates the existence of repulsive low-symmetry perturbation of the hydrogen-like Coulomb potential. It is also shown that the spectra of selectively excited PL recorded for a macroscopic ensemble of distant donor-acceptor pairs allow one to detect the low symmetry of acceptors of a given type caused by their complex nature or by the Jahn-Teller distortion. This method does not require any additional (external) field and is applicable to acceptors in diverse zinc-blende compound semiconductors.

  17. Effect of hydrogen on Ca and Mg acceptors in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.W.; Pearton, S.J.; Zolper, J.C.; Stall, R.A.

    1996-05-01

    The influence of minority carrier injection on the reactivation of hydrogen passivated Mg in GaN at 175 C has been investigated in p-n junction diodes. The dissociation of the neutral MgH complexes is greatly enhanced in the presence of minority carrier and the reactivation process follows second order kinetics. Conventional annealing under zero-bias conditions does not produce Mg-H dissociation until temperatures {ge} 450 C. These results provide an explanation for the e-beam induced reactivation of Mg acceptors in hydrogenated GaN. Exposure to a hydrogen plasma at 250 C of p-type GaN (Ca) prepared by either Ca{sup +} or Ca{sup +} plus P{sup +} coimplantation leads to a reduction in sheet carrier density of approximately an order of magnitude (1.6 {times} 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}2} to 1.8 {times} 10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}2}), and an accompanying increase in hole mobility (6 cm{sup 2}/Vs to 18 cm{sup 2}/Vs). The passivation process can be reversed by post-hydrogenation annealing at 400--500 C under a N{sub 2} ambient. This reactivation of the acceptors is characteristic of the formation of neutral (Ca-H) complexes in the GaN. The thermal stability of the passivation is similar to that of Mg-H complexes in material prepared in the same manner (implantation) with similar initial doping levels. Hydrogen passivation of acceptor dopants in GaN appears to be a ubiquitous phenomenon, as it is in other p-type semiconductors.

  18. An inner membrane cytochrome required only for reduction of high redox potential extracellular electron acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Levar, Caleb E.; Chan, Chi Ho; Mehta-Kolte, Misha G.; Bond, Daniel R.

    2014-10-28

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria, such as Geobacter sulfurreducens, transfer electrons beyond their outer membranes to Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, heavy metals, and electrodes in electrochemical devices. In the environment, metal acceptors exist in multiple chelated and insoluble forms that span a range of redox potentials and offer different amounts of available energy. Despite this, metal-reducing bacteria have not been shown to alter their electron transfer strategies to take advantage of these energy differences. Disruption of imcH, encoding an inner membrane c-type cytochrome, eliminated the ability of G. sulfurreducens to reduce Fe(III) citrate, Fe(III)-EDTA, and insoluble Mn(IV) oxides, electron acceptors with potentials greater than 0.1 V versus the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE), but the imcH mutant retained the ability to reduce Fe(III) oxides with potentials of ≤–0.1 V versus SHE. The imcH mutant failed to grow on electrodes poised at +0.24 V versus SHE, but switching electrodes to –0.1 V versus SHE triggered exponential growth. At potentials of ≤–0.1 V versus SHE, both the wild type and the imcH mutant doubled 60% slower than at higher potentials. Electrodes poised even 100 mV higher (0.0 V versus SHE) could not trigger imcH mutant growth. These results demonstrate that G. sulfurreducens possesses multiple respiratory pathways, that some of these pathways are in operation only after exposure to low redox potentials, and that electron flow can be coupled to generation of different amounts of energy for growth. Redox potentials that trigger these behaviors mirror those of metal acceptors common in subsurface environments where Geobacter is found.

  19. Proton Donor/acceptor Propensities of Ammonia: Rotational Studies of its Molecular Complexes with Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliano, Barbara M.; Maris, Assimo; Melandri, Sonia; Favero, Laura B.; Evangelisti, Luca; Caminati, Walther

    2009-06-01

    We studied the rotational spectra of the adducts of ammonia with several organic molecules, namely tert-butanol, glycidol, ethyl alcohol, anisol and 1,4-difluorobenzene. The adducts with glycidol and ethanol have been observed for both conformers of the substrate molecule. Based on the rotational and ^{14}N quadrupole coupling constants of the various complexes, we found a considerably different behaviour of ammonia, with respect to water, in its proton donor/acceptor double role. In the interaction with the three alcohol molecules, NH_{3} acts as a proton acceptor and the OH groups as a proton donor. However, in the case of glycidol-NH_{3}, a secundary N-H\\cdotsO interaction occurrs between ammonia and the ether oxygen. This interaction generates a sizable V_{3} barrier to the internal rotation of the NH_{3} moiety, while NH_{3} undergoes a free rotation in tert-butanol-NH_{3} and in ethanol-NH_{3}. As to the anisole-NH_{3} and 1,4-difluorobenzene-NH_{3} complexes, the NH_{3} group explicits its double proton donor/acceptor role, although through two weak (C_{Me}-H\\cdotsN and N-H\\cdotsπ) H-bonds. There is, however, an important difference between the two complexes, because in the first one NH_{3} lies out of the aromatic plane, while in the second one it is in the plane of the aromatic ring. B. M. Giuliano, M. C. Castrovilli, A. Maris, S. Melandri, W. Caminati and E. A. Cohen, Chem.Phys.Lett., 2008, 463, 330 B. M. Giuliano, S. Melandri, A. Maris, L. B. Favero and W. Caminati, Angew.Chem.Int.Ed., 2009, 48, 1102

  20. Donor-acceptor graphene-based hybrid materials facilitating photo-induced electron-transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Stergiou, Anastasios; Pagona, Georgia; Tagmatarchis, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    Graphene research and in particular the topic of chemical functionalization of graphene has exploded in the last decade. The main aim is to increase the solubility and thereby enhance the processability of the material, which is otherwise insoluble and inapplicable for technological applications when stacked in the form of graphite. To this end, initially, graphite was oxidized under harsh conditions to yield exfoliated graphene oxide sheets that are soluble in aqueous media and amenable to chemical modifications due to the presence of carboxylic acid groups at the edges of the lattice. However, it was obvious that the high-defect framework of graphene oxide cannot be readily utilized in applications that are governed by charge-transfer processes, for example, in solar cells. Alternatively, exfoliated graphene has been applied toward the realization of some donor-acceptor hybrid materials with photo- and/or electro-active components. The main body of research regarding obtaining donor-acceptor hybrid materials based on graphene to facilitate charge-transfer phenomena, which is reviewed here, concerns the incorporation of porphyrins and phthalocyanines onto graphene sheets. Through illustrative schemes, the preparation and most importantly the photophysical properties of such graphene-based ensembles will be described. Important parameters, such as the generation of the charge-separated state upon photoexcitation of the organic electron donor, the lifetimes of the charge-separation and charge-recombination as well as the incident-photon-to-current efficiency value for some donor-acceptor graphene-based hybrids, will be discussed. PMID:25247140

  1. Donor–acceptor graphene-based hybrid materials facilitating photo-induced electron-transfer reactions

    PubMed Central

    Stergiou, Anastasios; Pagona, Georgia

    2014-01-01

    Summary Graphene research and in particular the topic of chemical functionalization of graphene has exploded in the last decade. The main aim is to increase the solubility and thereby enhance the processability of the material, which is otherwise insoluble and inapplicable for technological applications when stacked in the form of graphite. To this end, initially, graphite was oxidized under harsh conditions to yield exfoliated graphene oxide sheets that are soluble in aqueous media and amenable to chemical modifications due to the presence of carboxylic acid groups at the edges of the lattice. However, it was obvious that the high-defect framework of graphene oxide cannot be readily utilized in applications that are governed by charge-transfer processes, for example, in solar cells. Alternatively, exfoliated graphene has been applied toward the realization of some donor–acceptor hybrid materials with photo- and/or electro-active components. The main body of research regarding obtaining donor–acceptor hybrid materials based on graphene to facilitate charge-transfer phenomena, which is reviewed here, concerns the incorporation of porphyrins and phthalocyanines onto graphene sheets. Through illustrative schemes, the preparation and most importantly the photophysical properties of such graphene-based ensembles will be described. Important parameters, such as the generation of the charge-separated state upon photoexcitation of the organic electron donor, the lifetimes of the charge-separation and charge-recombination as well as the incident-photon-to-current efficiency value for some donor–acceptor graphene-based hybrids, will be discussed. PMID:25247140

  2. Design, synthesis and study of supramolecular donor-acceptor systems mimicking natural photosynthesis processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikram, Chandra

    This dissertation investigates the chemical ingenuity into the development of various photoactive supramolecular donor -- acceptor systems to produce clean and carbon free energy for the next generation. The process is inspired by the principles learned from nature's approach where the solar energy is converted into the chemical energy through the natural photosynthesis process. Owing to the importance and complexity of natural photosynthesis process, we have designed ideal donor-acceptor systems to investigate their light energy harvesting properties. This process involves two major steps: the first step is the absorption of light energy by antenna or donor systems to promote them to an excited electronic state. The second step involves, the transfer of excitation energy to the reaction center, which triggers an electron transfer process within the system. Based on this principle, the research is focused into the development of artificial photosynthesis systems to investigate dynamics of photo induced energy and electron transfer events. The derivatives of Porphyrins, Phthalocyanines, BODIPY, and SubPhthalocyanines etc have been widely used as the primary building blocks for designing photoactive and electroactive ensembles in this area because of their excellent and unique photophysical and photochemical properties. Meanwhile, the fullerene, mainly its readily available version C60 is typically used as an electron acceptor component because of its unique redox potential, symmetrical shape and low reorganization energy appropriate for improved charge separation behavior. The primary research motivation of the study is to achieve fast charge separation and slow charge recombination of the system by stabilizing the radical ion pairs which are formed from photo excitation, for maximum utility of solar energy. Besides Fullerene C60, this dissertation has also investigated the potential application of carbon nanomaterials (Carbon nanotubes and graphene) as primary

  3. An inner membrane cytochrome required only for reduction of high redox potential extracellular electron acceptors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Levar, Caleb E.; Chan, Chi Ho; Mehta-Kolte, Misha G.; Bond, Daniel R.

    2014-10-28

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria, such as Geobacter sulfurreducens, transfer electrons beyond their outer membranes to Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, heavy metals, and electrodes in electrochemical devices. In the environment, metal acceptors exist in multiple chelated and insoluble forms that span a range of redox potentials and offer different amounts of available energy. Despite this, metal-reducing bacteria have not been shown to alter their electron transfer strategies to take advantage of these energy differences. Disruption of imcH, encoding an inner membrane c-type cytochrome, eliminated the ability of G. sulfurreducens to reduce Fe(III) citrate, Fe(III)-EDTA, and insoluble Mn(IV) oxides, electron acceptors with potentialsmore » greater than 0.1 V versus the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE), but the imcH mutant retained the ability to reduce Fe(III) oxides with potentials of ≤–0.1 V versus SHE. The imcH mutant failed to grow on electrodes poised at +0.24 V versus SHE, but switching electrodes to –0.1 V versus SHE triggered exponential growth. At potentials of ≤–0.1 V versus SHE, both the wild type and the imcH mutant doubled 60% slower than at higher potentials. Electrodes poised even 100 mV higher (0.0 V versus SHE) could not trigger imcH mutant growth. These results demonstrate that G. sulfurreducens possesses multiple respiratory pathways, that some of these pathways are in operation only after exposure to low redox potentials, and that electron flow can be coupled to generation of different amounts of energy for growth. Redox potentials that trigger these behaviors mirror those of metal acceptors common in subsurface environments where Geobacter is found.« less

  4. Exciton dissociation at organic small molecule donor-acceptor interfaces (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, Steven W.

    2015-08-01

    Exciton dissociation at organic semiconductor donor-acceptor (D-A) heterojunctions is critical for the performance of organic photovoltaic (OPV) structures. Interfacial charge separation and recombination processes control device efficiency. We have investigated these fundamental interfacial issues using time-resolved two-photon photoemission (TR-2PPE), coupled with the formation of well-controlled D-A structures by organic molecular beam epitaxy. The interfacial electronic and molecular structure of these model interfaces was well-characterized using scanning tunneling microscopy and ultraviolet photoemission. Exciton dissociation dynamics were investigated by using a sub-picosecond pump pulse to create Pc π-->π* transitions, producing a population of singlet (S1) Pc excitons. The subsequent decay dynamics of this population was monitored via photoemission with a time-delayed UV pulse. For CuPcC60 interfaces, S1 exciton population decay in the interfacial CuPc layer was much faster than decay in the bulk due to interfacial charge separation. The rate constant for exciton dissociation was found to be ≍ 7 x 10 12 sec-1 (≍ 140 fs). Excitons that lose energy via intersystem crossing (ISC) to triplet levels dissociate approximately 500 to 1000 times slower. The dependence of exciton dissociation on separation was also studied. Exciton dissociation falls of rapidly with distance from the interface. Dissociation from the 2nd, and subsequent, layers of H2Pc is reduced by at least a factor of 10 from that in the interfacial layer. Finally, investigations of the relative efficiency for interfacial exciton dissociation by alternative acceptors based on perylene cores, (perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride, or PTCDA) compared to fullerene-based acceptors such as C60 will also be discussed.

  5. Peptide-formation on cysteine-containing peptide scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, B. C.; Orgel, L. E.

    1999-01-01

    Monomeric cysteine residues attached to cysteine-containing peptides by disulfide bonds can be activated by carbonyldiimidazole. If two monomeric cysteine residues, attached to a 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Glyn-Cys-Glu10, (n = 0, 1, 2, 3) are activated, they react to form the dipeptide Cys-Cys. in 25-65% yield. Similarly, the activation of a cysteine residue attached to the 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Gly-Glu10 in the presence of Arg5 leads to the formation of Cys-Arg5 in 50% yield. The significance of these results for prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  6. Conus venom peptide pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Richard J; Dutertre, Sébastien; Vetter, Irina; Christie, MacDonald J

    2012-04-01

    Conopeptides are a diverse group of recently evolved venom peptides used for prey capture and/or defense. Each species of cone snails produces in excess of 1000 conopeptides, with those pharmacologically characterized (≈ 0.1%) targeting a diverse range of membrane proteins typically with high potency and specificity. The majority of conopeptides inhibit voltage- or ligand-gated ion channels, providing valuable research tools for the dissection of the role played by specific ion channels in excitable cells. It is noteworthy that many of these targets are found to be expressed in pain pathways, with several conopeptides having entered the clinic as potential treatments for pain [e.g., pyroglutamate1-MrIA (Xen2174)] and one now marketed for intrathecal treatment of severe pain [ziconotide (Prialt)]. This review discusses the diversity, pharmacology, structure-activity relationships, and therapeutic potential of cone snail venom peptide families acting at voltage-gated ion channels (ω-, μ-, μO-, δ-, ι-, and κ-conotoxins), ligand-gated ion channels (α-conotoxins, σ-conotoxin, ikot-ikot, and conantokins), G-protein-coupled receptors (ρ-conopeptides, conopressins, and contulakins), and neurotransmitter transporters (χ-conopeptides), with expanded discussion on the clinical potential of sodium and calcium channel inhibitors and α-conotoxins. Expanding the discovery of new bioactives using proteomic/transcriptomic approaches combined with high-throughput platforms and better defining conopeptide structure-activity relationships using relevant membrane protein crystal structures are expected to grow the already significant impact conopeptides have had as both research probes and leads to new therapies. PMID:22407615

  7. Vacancy compensation and related donor-acceptor pair recombination in bulk AlN

    SciTech Connect

    Gaddy, BE; Bryan, Z; Bryan, I; Kirste, R; Xie, JQ; Dalmau, R; Moody, B; Kumagai, Y; Nagashima, T; Kubota, Y; Kinoshita, T; Koukitu, A; Sitar, Z; Collazo, R; Irving, DL

    2013-10-14

    A prominent 2.8 eV emission peak is identified in bulk AlN substrates grown by physical vapor transport. This peak is shown to be related to the carbon concentration in the samples. Density functional theory calculations predict that this emission is caused by a donor-acceptor pair (DAP) recombination between substitutional carbon on the nitrogen site and a nitrogen vacancy. Photoluminescence and photoluminescence-excitation spectroscopy are used to confirm the model and indicate the DAP character of the emission. The interaction between defects provides a pathway to creating ultraviolet-transparent AlN substrates for optoelectronics applications. (C) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  8. Work function increase of transparent conductive electrodes by solution processed electron acceptor molecular monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellani, Mauro; Winkler, Stefanie; Bröker, Benjamin; Baumgarten, Martin; Müllen, Klaus; Koch, Norbert

    2014-02-01

    We show how the work function of transparent conductive oxide surfaces can be increased by more than 1 eV by solution-depositing strong electron acceptor monolayers comprising tetrafluoro-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4TCNQ) or hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile (HATCN). The effects of ambient atmosphere on the work function are investigated by comparing Kelvin probe measurements in air and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy in ultrahigh vacuum. In this way, important technological issues related to the influence of ambient moisture on electrode properties are elucidated.

  9. Optical Properties of 1,3-Bisdicyanovinylindane, an Electro-Acceptor, Attached Bisthienylethene Molecule.

    PubMed

    Lil, Xiaochuan; Han, Yuzhen; Son, Young-A

    2016-02-01

    An electron acceptor, 1,3-bisdicyanovinylindane, was attached to the skeleton of bisthienylethene. Photochromic behavior was investigated in THF. Under exposure of UVNisible light cycles, the solution color can be toggled between colorless and yellow. Good fatigue resistance and photo-/thermal-stability were demonstrated with acceptable degradation. A full-photo mode switch was established. Optimized structure and molecular orbital of ring-open and ring-closed isomers were calculated on the platform of DmoP. The photochromic behavior was further supported by the required distance between photocyclizing atoms in antiparallel conformation. The absorption spectra change derived from calculation was in agreement with the experimental results. PMID:27433664

  10. Solvent-tuned intramolecular charge-recombination rates in a conjugated donor-acceptor molecule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khundkar, Lutfur R.; Stiegman, A. E.; Perry, Joseph W.

    1990-01-01

    The nonradiative charge-recombination rates from the charge-transfer state of a new conjugated donor-acceptor molecule (p-cyano-p-prime-methylthiodiphenylacetylene) can be tuned over almost an order of magnitude by varying the polarity of the solvent. These measurements of intramolecular recombination show a turnover of rates as a function of emission energy, consistent with the 'normal' and 'inverted' behavior of Marcus theory. Steady-state spectra and time-resolved measurements make it possible to quantitatively compare thermal and optical electron-transfer rates as a function of driving force and demonstrate their correspondence.

  11. TiO2 advanced photo-oxidation technology: Effect of electron acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ekabi, H.; Butters, B.; Delany, D.; Powell, T.; Ireland, J.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of electron acceptors (additives) such as hydrogen peroxide, ammonium persulphate, potassium bromate and potassium peroxymonosulphate (oxone) on the TiO2 photocatalytic degradation of various organic pollutants were examined at various conditions. The individual and the collective effects of these additives on the degradation rates of two different concentrations (40 and 200 ppm) of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) were investigated in single-pass and multi-pass operational modes at 3 L/min flow. (Copyright (c) 1993 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V.)

  12. Identification of the double acceptor levels of the mercury vacancies in HgCdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemain, F.; Robin, I. C.; De Vita, M.; Brochen, S.; Lusson, A.

    2011-03-01

    Photoluminescence and temperature-dependent Hall measurements of nonintentionally doped HgCdTe epilayers were compared. These films were grown by liquid phase epitaxy and postannealed under different conditions as follows: a p-type annealing was used to control the mercury vacancy concentration and a n-type annealing under saturated Hg atmosphere was used to fill the mercury vacancies. The comparison of the photoluminescence measurements with Hall effect measurements allows us to identify the two acceptor energy levels of the mercury vacancy and to evidence its "negative-U" property corresponding to a stabilization of the ionized state V- of the mercury vacancy compared to its neutral state V0.

  13. Bioactive diterpenoid containing a reversible "spring-loaded" (E,Z)-dieneone Michael acceptor.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Prasoon; Sharma, Upasana; Schulz, Thomas C; Sherrer, Eric S; McLean, Amanda B; Robins, Allan J; West, Lyndon M

    2011-08-01

    Three new briarane diterpenoids, briareolate esters L-N (1-3), have been isolated from a gorgonian Briareum asbestinum. Briareolate esters L (1) and M (2) are the first natural products possessing a 10-membered macrocyclic ring with a (E,Z)-dieneone and exhibit growth inhibition activity against both human embryonic stem cells (BG02) and a pancreatic cancer cell line (BxPC-3). Briareolate ester L (1) was found to contain a "spring-loaded" (E,Z)-dieneone Michael acceptor group that can form a reversible covalent bond to model sulfur-based nucleophiles. PMID:21749084

  14. Large Spatially Resolved Rectification in a Donor-Acceptor Molecular Heterojunction.

    PubMed

    Smerdon, Joseph A; Giebink, Noel C; Guisinger, Nathan P; Darancet, Pierre; Guest, Jeffrey R

    2016-04-13

    We demonstrate that rectification ratios (RR) of ≳250 (≳1000) at biases of 0.5 V (1.2 V) are achievable at the two-molecule limit for donor-acceptor bilayers of pentacene on C60 on Cu using scanning tunneling spectroscopy and microscopy. Using first-principles calculations, we show that the system behaves as a molecular Schottky diode with a tunneling transport mechanism from semiconducting pentacene to Cu-hybridized metallic C60. Low-bias RRs vary by two orders-of-magnitude at the edge of these molecular heterojunctions due to increased Stark shifts and confinement effects. PMID:26964012

  15. Nitrous Oxide as a Hydrogen Acceptor for the Dehydrogenative Coupling of Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Gianetti, Thomas L; Annen, Samuel P; Santiso-Quinones, Gustavo; Reiher, Markus; Driess, Matthias; Grützmacher, Hansjörg

    2016-01-26

    The oxidation of alcohols with N2O as the hydrogen acceptor was achieved with low catalyst loadings of a rhodium complex that features a cooperative bis(olefin)amido ligand under mild conditions. Two different methods enable the formation of either the corresponding carboxylic acid or the ester. N2 and water are the only by-products. Mechanistic studies supported by DFT calculations suggest that the oxygen atom of N2O is transferred to the metal center by insertion into the Rh-H bond of a rhodium amino hydride species, generating a rhodium hydroxy complex as a key intermediate. PMID:26693955

  16. Unsaturated Phosphonates as Hauser Acceptors for the Synthesis of Phosphonylated Dihydroxynaphthalenes and Naphthoquinones.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Atul Kumar; Rastogi, Namrata

    2016-04-15

    The unsaturated phosphonates were utilized as Hauser acceptors successfully for the first time. The products phosphonylated 1,4-dihydroxynaphthalenes were isolated in good yields in short reaction time and were further oxidized to the corresponding 1,4-naphthoquinones in quantitative yields. The reaction provides an efficient and straightforward approach for the synthesis of pharmacologically privileged disubstituted naphthalene-1,4-diols and naphtha-1,4-diones bearing a phosphonate group at the 2-position and various (het)aryl groups at the 3-position. PMID:27049927

  17. First-principles Study of Hydrogen depassivation of Mg acceptor by Be in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiming; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Chihsiang

    2010-03-01

    The process of hydrogen depassivation of the acceptor by can convert the as-grown high-resistivity -doped into a - conducting material. A first-principles study on the process will be presented. The formation energies of various complex of impurities and point defects have been calculated and compared. The diffusion barriers of the hydrogen atom in the doped GaN have been obtained by the Nudge-Elastic-Band method. The results explain successfully the experimental observation that the hole concentration has been significantly enhanced in a Be-implanted Mg-doped GaN.

  18. Thermally activated delayed fluorescence evidence in non-bonding transition electron donor-acceptor molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marghad, Ikbal; Clochard, M. C.; Ollier, N.; Wade, Travis L.; Aymes-Chodur, C.; Renaud, C.; Zissis, G.

    2015-09-01

    The exhibition of thermally activated delayed fluorescence on triazine derivative by the introduction of a nonbonding part is demonstrated. Two molecules containing triazine core as acceptor and carbazole part as donor has been synthesized and characterized. One of these molecules bears an additional nonbonding part by the means of a phenoxy group. The results indicated that the molecule bearing the nonbonding molecular part (phenoxy) exhibit thermally activated delayed fluorescence while not on molecule free of non-bonding group. The results are supported by, photoluminescence, spectral analysis time-resolved fluorescence and time-dependent density functional estimation

  19. NK cells: tuned by peptide?

    PubMed

    Das, Jayajit; Khakoo, Salim I

    2015-09-01

    Natural killer cells express multiple receptors for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, including the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) and the C-type lectin-like CD94:NKG2 receptors. The KIR locus is extremely polymorphic, paralleling the diversity of its classical MHC class I ligands. Similarly, the conservation of the NKG2 family of receptors parallels the conservation of MHC-E, the ligand for CD94:NKG2A/C/E. Binding of both CD94:NKG2 heterodimers and KIR to their respective MHC class I ligand is peptide dependent, and despite the evolution of these receptors, they have retained the property of peptide selectivity. Such peptide selectivity affects these two systems in different ways. HLA-E binding non-inhibitory peptides augment inhibition at CD94:NKG2A, while HLA-C binding non-inhibitory peptides antagonize inhibition at KIR2DL2/3, implying that KIRs are specialized to respond positively to changes in peptide repertoire. Thus, while specific KIRs, such as KIR2DL3, are associated with beneficial outcomes from viral infections, viral peptides augment inhibition at CD94:NKGA. Conversely, NKG2A-positive NK cells sense MHC class I downregulation more efficiently than KIRs. Thus, these two receptor:ligand systems appear to have complementary functions in recognizing changes in MHC class I. PMID:26284480

  20. Synthesis and photophysical properties of new catenated electron donor-acceptor materials with magnesium and free base porphyrins as donors and C60 as the acceptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirner, Sabrina V.; Guldi, Dirk M.; Megiatto, Jackson D., Jr.; Schuster, David I.

    2014-12-01

    A new series of nanoscale electron donor-acceptor systems with [2]catenane architectures has been synthesized, incorporating magnesium porphyrin (MgP) or free base porphyrin (H2P) as electron donor and C60 as electron acceptor, surrounding a central tetrahedral Cu(i)-1,10-phenanthroline (phen) complex. Model catenated compounds incorporating only one or none of these photoactive moieties were also prepared. The synthesis involved the use of Sauvage's metal template protocol in combination with the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of azides and alkynes (``click chemistry''), as in other recent reports from our laboratories. Ground state electron interactions between the individual constituents was probed using electrochemistry and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, while events occurring following photoexcitation in tetrahydrofuran (under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions) at various wavelengths were followed by means of time-resolved transient absorption and emission spectroscopies on the femtosecond and nanosecond time scales, respectively, complemented by measurements of quantum yields for generation of singlet oxygen. From similar studies with model catenates containing one or neither of the chromophores, the events following photoexcitation could be elucidated. The results were compared with those previously reported for analogous catenates based on zinc porphyrin (ZnP). It was determined that a series of energy transfer (EnT) and electron transfer (ET) processes take place in the present catenates, ultimately generating long-distance charge separated (CS) states involving oxidized porphyrin and reduced C60 moieties, with lifetimes ranging from 400 to 1060 nanoseconds. Shorter lived short-distance CS states possessing oxidized copper complexes and reduced C60, with lifetimes ranging from 15 to 60 ns, were formed en route to the long-distance CS states. The dynamics of the ET processes were analyzed in terms of their thermodynamic driving forces. It was clear that

  1. Mutagenicity of 2-[2-(acetylamino)-4-[bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]-5-methoxyphenyl]-5-amino-7-bromo-4-chloro-2H-benzotriazole (PBTA-6) and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in the gill and hepatopancreas of rpsL transgenic zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Amanuma, Kimiko; Tone, Suguru; Nagaya, Masato; Matsumoto, Michi; Watanabe, Tetsushi; Totsuka, Yukari; Wakabayashi, Keiji; Aoki, Yasunobu

    2008-10-30

    We examined the in vivo mutagenicity of 2-[2-(acetylamino)-4-[bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]-5-methoxyphenyl]-5-amino-7-bromo-4-chloro-2H-benzotriazole (PBTA-6) and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) by using transgenic (Tg) zebrafish carrying the mutational target gene rpsL. PBTA-6 is one of the PBTA-type compounds that were recently identified in highly mutagenic river water in Japan. BaP is a well-known contaminant that is frequently found in polluted water. Both compounds are potent mutagens, as determined by using the Ames test employing S9 mix and Salmonella. Adult rpsL Tg zebrafish were exposed to 0, 7, or 10 mg/L PBTA-6 or 0, 1.5, or 3 mg/L BaP for 96 h in a water bath and the mutations in their gills and hepatopancreata were measured 2-4 weeks later. At 3 weeks after exposure, 3 mg/L BaP significantly increased the rpsL mutant frequency (MF) in the gill and hepatopancreas by 5- and 2.3-fold, respectively, as compared to control fish. Sequence analysis showed that BaP mainly induced G:C to T:A and G:C to C:G transversions, which is consistent with the known mutagenic effects of BaP. In contrast, despite its extremely high mutagenic potency in Salmonella strains, PBTA-6 did not significantly increase the MF in the zebrafish gill or hepatopancreas. Although PBTA-6 is 300 times more mutagenic than BaP in the Ames test [T. Watanabe, H. Nukaya, Y. Terao, Y. Takahashi, A. Tada, T. Takamura, H. Sawanishi, T. Ohe, T. Hirayama, T. Sugimura, K. Wakabayashi, Synthesis of 2-phenylbenzotriazole-type mutagens, PBTA-5 and PBTA-6, and their detection in river water from Japan, Mutat. Res. 498 (2001) 107-115], calculation of the mutagenicity per mole of compound indicated that PBTA-6 was 33- and <3.7-fold less mutagenic in the zebrafish gill and hepatopancreas, respectively, than BaP. PMID:18675378

  2. Efficient photoinduced orthogonal energy and electron transfer reactions via phospholipid membrane-bound donors and acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Clapp, P.J.; Armitage, B.; Roosa, P.; O'Brien, D.F. )

    1994-10-05

    A three component, liposome-bound photochemical molecular device (PMD) consisting of energy and electron transfer reactions is described. Bilayer membrane surface-associated dyes, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(trimethylammonio)-phenyl]-21H,2 3H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate salt and N,N[prime]-bis[(3-trimethylammonio)propyl]thiadicarbocya nine tribromide, are the energy donor and acceptor, respectively, in a blue light stimulated energy transfer reaction along the vesicle surface. The electronically excited cyanine is quenched by electron transfer from the phospholipid membrane bound triphenylbenzyl borate anion, which is located in the lipid bilayer interior. The PMD exhibits sequential reactions following electronic excitation with the novel feature that the steps proceed with orthogonal orientation: energy transfer occurs parallel to the membrane surface, and electron transfer occurs perpendicular to the surface. Photobleaching and fluorescence quenching experiments verify the transfer reactions, and Stern-Volmer analysis was used to estimate the reaction rate constants. At the highest concentrations examined of energy and electron acceptor ca. 60% of the photoexcited porphyrins were quenched by energy transfer to the cyanine. 56 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Photoswitchable semiconductor nanocrystals with self-regulating photochromic Förster resonance energy transfer acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Sebastián A.; Gillanders, Florencia; Jares-Erijman, Elizabeth A.; Jovin, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Photoswitchable molecules and nanoparticles constitute superior biosensors for a wide range of industrial, research and biomedical applications. Rendered reversible by spontaneous or deterministic means, such probes facilitate many of the techniques in fluorescence microscopy that surpass the optical resolution dictated by diffraction. Here we have devised a family of photoswitchable quantum dots (psQDs) in which the semiconductor core functions as a fluorescence donor in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), and multiple photochromic diheteroarylethene groups function as acceptors upon activation by ultraviolet light. The QDs were coated with a polymer bearing photochromic groups attached via linkers of different length. Despite the resulting nominal differences in donor-acceptor separation and anticipated FRET efficiencies, the maximum quenching of all psQD preparations was 38±2%. This result was attributable to the large ultraviolet absorption cross-section of the QDs, leading to preferential cycloreversion of photochromic groups situated closer to the nanoparticle surface and/or with a more favourable orientation.

  4. Controlling the Conformational Changes in Donor–Acceptor [4]-Dendralenes through Intramolecular Charge-Transfer Processes

    PubMed Central

    Kanibolotsky, Alexander L; Forgie, John C; McEntee, Greg J; Talpur, M Munsif A; Skabara, Peter J; Westgate, Thomas DJ; McDouall, Joseph JW; Auinger, Michael; Coles, Simon J; Hursthouse, Michael B

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis of two [4]-dendralene compounds incorporating thiophene-(p-nitrophenyl) donor–acceptor units is presented. The dendralenes adopt two different conformers in solution and solid state and the transformation between the structures can be controlled by light and heat. The electron-donating components of the dendralenes are represented by bromothienyl (in 13) and ethylenedioxythiophene(EDOT)-thienyl (in 15) end-groups. The most facile transformation involves the isomerisation of donor–acceptor conjugated systems (a conformers) into structures in which only the thiophenes are conjugated (b conformers), and this process is driven by ambient light. The structures of the two conformers of compound 13 are confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies and the structural changes in both compounds have been monitored by 1H NMR spectroscopy and absorption studies. The transformations were found to be first-order processes with rate constants of k = 0.0027 s−1 and k = 0.00022 s−1 for 13 and 15, respectively. Density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G∗ level give credence to the proposed mechanism for the a→b conversion, which involves photoinduced intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) as the key step. The EDOT derivative (15) can be polymerised by electrochemical oxidation and a combination of cyclic voltammetry and UV/Vis spectroelectrochemical experiments indicate that the a conformer can be trapped and stabilised in the solid state. PMID:19760710

  5. Fate of microbial metabolites of hydrocarbons in a coastal plain aquifer: The role of electron acceptors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, I.M.; Herman, J.S.; Baedecker, M. Jo

    1995-01-01

    A combined field and laboratory study was undertaken to understand the distribution and geochemical conditions that influence the prevalence of low molecular weight organic acids in groundwater of a shallow aquifer contaminated with gasoline. Aromatic hydrocarbons from gasoline were degraded by microbially mediated oxidation-reduction reactions, including reduction of nitrate, sulfate, and Fe(III). The biogeochemical reactions changed overtime in response to changes in the hydrogeochemical conditions in the aquifer. Aliphatic and aromatic organic acids were associated with hydrocarbon degradation in anoxic zones of the aquifer. Laboratory microcosms demonstrated that the biogeochemical fate of specific organic acids observed in groundwater varied with the structure of the acid and the availability of electron acceptors. Benzoic and phenylacetic acid were degraded by indigenous aquifer microorganisms when nitrate was supplied as an electron acceptor. Aromatic acids with two or more methyl substituants on the benzene ring persisted under nitrate-reducing conditions. Although iron reduction and sulfate reduction were important processes in situ and occurred in the microcosms, these reactions were not coupled to the biological oxidation of aromatic organic acids that were added to the microcosms as electron donors. ?? 1995 American Chemical Society.

  6. [Effects of carbon sources, temperature and electron acceptors on biological phosphorus removal].

    PubMed

    Han, Yun; Xu, Song; Dong, Tao; Wang, Bin-Fan; Wang, Xian-Yao; Peng, Dang-Cong

    2015-02-01

    Effects of carbon sources, temperature and electron acceptors on phosphorus uptake and release were investigated in a pilot-scale oxidation ditch. Phosphorus uptake and release rates were measured with different carbon sources (domestic sewage, sodium acetate, glucose) at 25 degrees C. The results showed that the minimum phosphorus uptake and release rates of glucose were 5.12 mg x (g x h)(-1) and 6.43 mg x (g x h)(-1), respectively, and those of domestic sewage are similar to those of sodium acetate. Phosphorus uptake and release rates increased with the increase of temperature (12, 16, 20 and 25 degrees C) using sodium acetate as carbon sources. Anoxic phosphorus uptake rate decreased with added COD. Electron acceptors (oxygen, nitrate, nitrite) had significant effects on phosphorus uptake rate and their order was in accordance with oxygen > nitrate > nitrite. The mass ratio of anoxic P uptake and N consumption (P(uptake)/N (consumption)) of nitrate and nitrite were 0.96 and 0.65, respectively. PMID:26031087

  7. Hybrid Functional Calculations of Acceptor Doping in Protonic Conductor SrZrO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, Leigh; Janotti, Anderson; Cui, Xiangyuan; Stampfl, Catherine; van de Walle, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Perovskite oxides such as SrZrO3 (SZO), which exhibit high temperature proton conductivity, are promising electrolyte materials for use in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Proton conductivity in SZO is typically achieved via acceptor doping with trivalent cations substituting at the Zr site, where the formation of charge compensating oxygen vacancies facilitates proton solvation. We present a detailed study of Sc and Y dopants in SZO based on first-principles, hybrid density functional calculations. When substituting at the Zr site, both dopants form deep acceptors, where the neutral charge state forms a localized hole polaron state. Under certain growth conditions Sc and Y will form auto-compensating donor species by substituting at the Sr site, which would inhibit proton solubility. Moreover, the proton - dopant association was found to be strong, with proton binding energies of -0.41 eV and -0.31 eV for Sc Zr- and Y Zr- respectively, indicating that proton transport is limited by trapping. These new results will be useful in the development of zirconate based proton conducting electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells.

  8. Electron acceptor redox potential globally regulates transcriptomic profiling in Shewanella decolorationis S12.

    PubMed

    Lian, Yingli; Yang, Yonggang; Guo, Jun; Wang, Yan; Li, Xiaojing; Fang, Yun; Gan, Lixia; Xu, Meiying

    2016-01-01

    Electron acceptor redox potential (EARP) was presumed to be a determining factor for microbial metabolism in many natural and engineered processes. However, little is known about the potentially global effects of EARP on bacteria. In this study, we compared the physiological and transcriptomic properties of Shewanella decolorationis S12 respiring with different EARPs in microbial electrochemical systems to avoid the effects caused by the other physicochemical properties of real electron acceptor. Results showed that the metabolic activities of strain S12 were nonlinear responses to EARP. The tricarboxylic acid cycle for central carbon metabolism was down-regulated while glyoxylate shunt was up-regulated at 0.8 V compared to 0.2 and -0.2 V, which suggested that EARP is an important but not the only determinant for metabolic pathways of strain S12. Moreover, few cytochrome c genes were differentially expressed at different EARPs. The energy intensive flagella assembly and assimilatory sulfur metabolism pathways were significantly enriched at 0.8 V, which suggested strain S12 had stronger electrokinesis behavior and oxidative stress-response at high EARP. This study provides the first global information of EARP regulations on microbial metabolism, which will be helpful for understanding microorganism respiration. PMID:27503002

  9. Electron acceptor redox potential globally regulates transcriptomic profiling in Shewanella decolorationis S12

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Yingli; Yang, Yonggang; Guo, Jun; Wang, Yan; Li, Xiaojing; Fang, Yun; Gan, Lixia; Xu, Meiying

    2016-01-01

    Electron acceptor redox potential (EARP) was presumed to be a determining factor for microbial metabolism in many natural and engineered processes. However, little is known about the potentially global effects of EARP on bacteria. In this study, we compared the physiological and transcriptomic properties of Shewanella decolorationis S12 respiring with different EARPs in microbial electrochemical systems to avoid the effects caused by the other physicochemical properties of real electron acceptor. Results showed that the metabolic activities of strain S12 were nonlinear responses to EARP. The tricarboxylic acid cycle for central carbon metabolism was down-regulated while glyoxylate shunt was up-regulated at 0.8 V compared to 0.2 and −0.2 V, which suggested that EARP is an important but not the only determinant for metabolic pathways of strain S12. Moreover, few cytochrome c genes were differentially expressed at different EARPs. The energy intensive flagella assembly and assimilatory sulfur metabolism pathways were significantly enriched at 0.8 V, which suggested strain S12 had stronger electrokinesis behavior and oxidative stress-response at high EARP. This study provides the first global information of EARP regulations on microbial metabolism, which will be helpful for understanding microorganism respiration. PMID:27503002

  10. Biogenic hydroxysulfate green rust, a potential electron acceptor for SRB activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zegeye, Asfaw; Huguet, Lucie; Abdelmoula, Mustapha; Carteret, Cédric; Mullet, Martine; Jorand, Frédéric

    2007-11-01

    Microbiological reduction of a biogenic sulfated green rust (GR2(SO42-)), was examined using a sulfate reducing bacterium ( Desulfovibrio alaskensis). Experiments investigated whether GR2(SO42-) could serve as a sulfate source for D. alaskensis anaerobic respiration by analyzing mineral transformation. Batch experiments were conducted using lactate as the electron donor and biogenic GR2(SO42-) as the electron acceptor, at circumneutral pH in unbuffered medium. GR2(SO42-) transformation was monitored with time by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission Mössbauer Spectroscopy (TMS), Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The reduction of sulfate anions and the formation of iron sulfur mineral were clearly identified by XPS analyses. TMS showed the formation of additional mineral as green rust (GR) and vivianite. XRD analyses discriminated the type of the newly formed GR as GR1. The formed GR1 was GR1(CO32-) as indicated by DRIFTS analysis. Thus, the results presented in this study indicate that D. alaskensis cells were able to use GR2(SO42-) as an electron acceptor. GR1(CO32-), vivianite and an iron sulfur compound were formed as a result of GR2(SO42-) reduction by D. alaskensis. Hence, in environments where geochemical conditions promote biogenic GR2(SO42-) formation, this mineral could stimulate the anaerobic respiration of sulfate reducing bacteria.

  11. Electron acceptor redox potential globally regulates transcriptomic profiling in Shewanella decolorationis S12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Yingli; Yang, Yonggang; Guo, Jun; Wang, Yan; Li, Xiaojing; Fang, Yun; Gan, Lixia; Xu, Meiying

    2016-08-01

    Electron acceptor redox potential (EARP) was presumed to be a determining factor for microbial metabolism in many natural and engineered processes. However, little is known about the potentially global effects of EARP on bacteria. In this study, we compared the physiological and transcriptomic properties of Shewanella decolorationis S12 respiring with different EARPs in microbial electrochemical systems to avoid the effects caused by the other physicochemical properties of real electron acceptor. Results showed that the metabolic activities of strain S12 were nonlinear responses to EARP. The tricarboxylic acid cycle for central carbon metabolism was down-regulated while glyoxylate shunt was up-regulated at 0.8 V compared to 0.2 and ‑0.2 V, which suggested that EARP is an important but not the only determinant for metabolic pathways of strain S12. Moreover, few cytochrome c genes were differentially expressed at different EARPs. The energy intensive flagella assembly and assimilatory sulfur metabolism pathways were significantly enriched at 0.8 V, which suggested strain S12 had stronger electrokinesis behavior and oxidative stress-response at high EARP. This study provides the first global information of EARP regulations on microbial metabolism, which will be helpful for understanding microorganism respiration.

  12. A charge carrier transport model for donor-acceptor blend layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Janine; Widmer, Johannes; Kleemann, Hans; Tress, Wolfgang; Koerner, Christian; Riede, Moritz; Vandewal, Koen; Leo, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Highly efficient organic solar cells typically comprise donor-acceptor blend layers facilitating effective splitting of excitons. However, the charge carrier mobility in the blends can be substantially smaller than in neat materials, hampering the device performance. Currently, available mobility models do not describe the transport in blend layers entirely. Here, we investigate hole transport in a model blend system consisting of the small molecule donor zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) and the acceptor fullerene C60 in different mixing ratios. The blend layer is sandwiched between p-doped organic injection layers, which prevent minority charge carrier injection and enable exploiting diffusion currents for the characterization of exponential tail states from a thickness variation of the blend layer using numerical drift-diffusion simulations. Trap-assisted recombination must be considered to correctly model the conductivity behavior of the devices, which are influenced by local electron currents in the active layer, even though the active layer is sandwiched in between p-doped contacts. We find that the density of deep tail states is largest in the devices with 1:1 mixing ratio (Et = 0.14 eV, Nt = 1.2 × 1018 cm-3) directing towards lattice disorder as the transport limiting process. A combined field and charge carrier density dependent mobility model are developed for this blend layer.

  13. A charge carrier transport model for donor-acceptor blend layers

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Janine Widmer, Johannes; Koerner, Christian; Vandewal, Koen; Leo, Karl; Kleemann, Hans; Tress, Wolfgang; Riede, Moritz

    2015-01-28

    Highly efficient organic solar cells typically comprise donor-acceptor blend layers facilitating effective splitting of excitons. However, the charge carrier mobility in the blends can be substantially smaller than in neat materials, hampering the device performance. Currently, available mobility models do not describe the transport in blend layers entirely. Here, we investigate hole transport in a model blend system consisting of the small molecule donor zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) and the acceptor fullerene C{sub 60} in different mixing ratios. The blend layer is sandwiched between p-doped organic injection layers, which prevent minority charge carrier injection and enable exploiting diffusion currents for the characterization of exponential tail states from a thickness variation of the blend layer using numerical drift-diffusion simulations. Trap-assisted recombination must be considered to correctly model the conductivity behavior of the devices, which are influenced by local electron currents in the active layer, even though the active layer is sandwiched in between p-doped contacts. We find that the density of deep tail states is largest in the devices with 1:1 mixing ratio (E{sub t} = 0.14 eV, N{sub t} = 1.2 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}) directing towards lattice disorder as the transport limiting process. A combined field and charge carrier density dependent mobility model are developed for this blend layer.

  14. Enhanced Charge Mobility in Polymer Nanocomposites Incorporating Donor-Acceptor Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tameev, Alexey R.; Nikitenko, Vladimir R.; Vannikov, Anatoly V.

    2011-01-01

    Charge carrier transport in donor-acceptor (D-A) composites based on either poly(N-vinyl carbazole) or polyimide derivative incorporating either carbon single-walled nanotubes or nanocrystals of J-aggregated cyanine dyes is shown to exhibit a similar behavior. In the composite films, polymer/nanomaterial interface provides pathways of the high conductivity. Charge-transfer states (CTS) formed at the D-A interface are involved in the transport. The charge transport along the interface is suggested to arise due to the D-A integer charge transfer and strong interaction between adjacent opposite charges located on the donor and acceptor molecules. The approach based on the concept of sequence of charge carrier transfers through charge transfer states describes the increased electron and hole mobility in the composites. The approach predicts enhanced conductivity with reduced activation energy. Moreover, once the density of electron-hole pairs at the interface is rather high, significant part of the charge carriers can avoid hopping transport resulting in conductivity of metal type. The value of two-dimensional conductivity is estimated by numerical modeling.

  15. Magnetic thaw-down and boil-off due to magneto acceptors in 2DEG

    SciTech Connect

    Chaubet, C.; Raymond, A.; Bisotto, I.; Harmand, J. C.; Kubisa, M.; Zawadzki, W.

    2013-12-04

    The Quantum Hall Effect (QHE) and Shubnikov-de Haas effect are investigated experimentally using n type modulation-doped GaAs/GaAlAs quantum wells (QWs) additionally doped in the well with beryllium acceptor atoms. It is presently shown that the localized magneto-acceptor (MA) states which possess discrete energies above the corresponding Landau levels (LLs) lead to two observable effects in magneto-transport: magnetic thaw-down and magnetic boil-off of 2D electrons. Both effects are related to the fact that electrons occupying the localized MA states cannot conduct. Thus in the thaw-down effect the electrons fall down from the MA states to the free Landau states. This leads to a shift of the Hall plateau towards higher magnetic fields as a consequence of an increase of the 2D electron density N{sub S}. In the boil-off effect the electrons are pushed from the free Landau states to the empty MA states under high enough Hall electric field. This process has an avalanche character leading to a dramatic increase of magneto-resistance, consequence of a decrease of N{sub S}.

  16. Optically tunable spin-exchange energy at donor:acceptor interfaces in organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mingxing; Wang, Hongfeng; He, Lei; Zang, Huidong; Xu, Hengxing; Hu, Bin

    2014-07-14

    Spin-exchange energy is a critical parameter in controlling spin-dependent optic, electronic, and magnetic properties in organic materials. This article reports optically tunable spin-exchange energy by studying the line-shape characteristics in magnetic field effect of photocurrent developed from intermolecular charge-transfer states based on donor:acceptor (P3HT:PCBM) system. Specifically, we divide magnetic field effect of photocurrent into hyperfine (at low field < 10 mT) and spin-exchange (at high field > 10 mT) regimes. We observe that increasing photoexcitation intensity can lead to a significant line-shape narrowing in magnetic field effect of photocurrent occurring at the spin-exchange regime. We analyze that the line-shape characteristics is essentially determined by the changing rate of magnetic field-dependent singlet/triplet ratio when a magnetic field perturbs the singlet-triplet transition through spin mixing. Based on our analysis, the line-shape narrowing results indicate that the spin-exchange energy at D:A interfaces can be optically changed by changing photoexcitation intensity through the interactions between intermolecular charge-transfer states. Therefore, our experimental results demonstrate an optical approach to change the spin-exchange energy through the interactions between intermolecular charge-transfer states at donor:acceptor interface in organic materials.

  17. Photophysics and charge transfer in donor-acceptor triblock copolymer photovoltaic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Kyra N.; Jones, David J.; Smith, Trevor A.; Ghiggino, Kenneth P.

    2014-10-01

    Efficient conversion of solar energy to electricity in low-cost organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices requires the complex interplay between multiple processes and components over various length and time scales. Optimizing device morphology to ensure efficient exciton diffusion and charge transport as well as ensuring efficient charge photogeneration is necessary to achieve optimum performance in new materials. The conjugated polymer electron donor PFM (poly(9,9-diocetyluorene-co-bis-N,N-(4-methylphenyl)-bis-N,N-phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine)) and electron acceptor F8BT (poly[(9,9-di-n-octyluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-alt-(benzo[2,1,3]thiadiazol-4,8-diyl)), comprise the novel triblock copolymer PFM-F8BT-PFM. This copolymer is designed to phase separate on the 20-30 nm scale, a domain size ideal for maximizing exciton collection at the donor-acceptor interface. Using steady-state and ultrafast spectroscopic characterization including high repetition rate transient absorption spectroscopy, the dynamics of charge and energy transfer of the component polymers and the triblock co-polymer have been investigated. The results demonstrate that for the homopolymers solvent dependent exciton transport processes dominate, while in the triblock copolymer solutions transient spectroscopy provides evidence for interfacial charge separation.

  18. Effect of electron acceptor structure on stability and efficiency in polymer photovoltaics: a library approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tro, Michael; Oparko, David; Lewis, Emma; Sarabia, Alexis; Giammona, Maxwell; Isaac, Justin; Adalsteinsson, Thorsteinn; McNelis, Brian; Barber, Richard

    2014-03-01

    A commonly studied polymer photovoltaic system is prepared using a mixture of poly[3-hexylthiophene] (P3HT) as the electron donor and [6,6]-Phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) as the electron acceptor. We have prepared a series of PCBM analogs, making a variety of fullerene esters using commercially available primary alcohols. The first studies involved attaching an eight- or eighteen-carbon chain in place of the single carbon in PCBM. Solar cells made from these compounds exhibited improved lifetimes, motivating further exploration in the domain of possible attachments. We have now created a small library of these acceptor compounds and blended them with P3HT to prepare and measure solar cells. We collect current-voltage data over hours or days for each sample under ambient air conditions. These data provide not only the standard figures of merit, but also reveal the time dependence of these values. We have already observed significant differences between fullerene esters that are very similar in structure. Support for this work provided by an SCU Sustainability Research Grant and an SCU IBM Faculty Research Grant

  19. 1,8-Naphthalimide-Based Planar Small Molecular Acceptor for Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jicheng; Zhang, Xuejuan; Xiao, Hongmei; Li, Guangwu; Liu, Yahui; Li, Cuihong; Huang, Hui; Chen, Xuebo; Bo, Zhishan

    2016-03-01

    Four small molecular acceptors (SM1-4) comprising a central benzene core, two thiophene bridges and two 1,8-naphthalimide (NI) terminal groups were designed and synthesized by direct C-H activation. SM1 has a planar chemical structure and forms H-aggregation as films. By attachment of different substituents on the central benzene ring, the dihedral angles between the two NI end groups of SM1-4 gradually increased, leading to a gradual decrease of planarity. SM1-4 all possess a high-lying LUMO level, matching with wide band gap (WBG) polymer donors which usually have a high-lying LUMO level. When used in OSCs, devices based on SM1 and WBG donor PCDTBT-C12 gave higher electron mobility, superior film morphology and better photovoltaic performance. After optimization, a PCE of 2.78% with a V(oc) of 1.04 V was achieved for SM1 based devices, which is among the highest PCEs with a V(oc) higher than 1 V. Our results have demonstrated that NI based planar small molecules are potential acceptors for WBG polymer based OSCs. PMID:26845638

  20. The Tetrathiafulvalene-based Donor-acceptor Diads for Molecular Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perepichka, Dmitrii F.; Bryce, Martin R.; Ho, Gregory; Heath, James R.; Pearson, Christopher; Petty, Michael C.

    2004-03-01

    The challenge of covalent linking a strong electron donor (as tetrathiafulvalene, TTF) to a strong acceptor (as tetracyanoquinodimethane, TCNQ) was laid down by Aviram and Ratner, who proposed that a single donor-sigma-acceptor molecule could rectify an electric current. Although numerous organic compounds have been tested in metal-molecule-metal junctions, they had substantially higher HOMO-LUMO gap (Eg >0.5 eV) and, in most cases, high dipole moment due to conjugated character of the linker. Those molecules re-orient in the electric field limiting the device stability. Recently, we have pioneered the synthesis of DsigmaA molecules with the HOMO-LUMO gap 0.17-0.3 eV, including the original TTF-TCNQ.* We will present the intriguing electronic properties of these compounds, including the conformational control of the Eg and the thermoexcited electron transfer. The compounds form high-quality LB films, suitable for molecular electronics applications. In Si-molecule-Ti junctions, the rectification ratio increases as molecules align perpendicularly to the surface, and the device stability override significantly the related system based on D-pi-A molecules. * Perepichka, et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2003, 42, 4635.