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Sample records for acceptor site mutation

  1. A Novel SLC27A4 Splice Acceptor Site Mutation in Great Danes with Ichthyosis

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Julia; Wöhlke, Anne; Mischke, Reinhard; Hoffmann, Annalena; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Küch, Eva-Maria; Naim, Hassan Y.; Distl, Ottmar

    2015-01-01

    Ichthyoses are a group of various different types of hereditary disorders affecting skin cornification. They are characterized by hyperkeratoses of different severity levels and are associated with a dry and scaling skin. Genome-wide association analysis of nine affected and 13 unaffected Great Danes revealed a genome-wide significant peak on chromosome 9 at 57–58 Mb in the region of SLC27A4. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA of SLC27A4 revealed the non-synonymous SNV SLC27A4:g.8684G>A in perfect association with ichthyosis-affection in Great Danes. The mutant transcript of SLC27A4 showed an in-frame loss of 54 base pairs in exon 8 probably induced by a new splice acceptor site motif created by the mutated A- allele of the SNV. Genotyping 413 controls from 35 different breeds of dogs and seven wolves revealed that this mutation could not be found in other populations except in Great Danes. Affected dogs revealed high amounts of mutant transcript but only low levels of the wild type transcript. Targeted analyses of SLC27A4 protein from skin tissues of three affected and two unaffected Great Danes indicated a markedly reduced or not detectable wild type and truncated protein levels in affected dogs but a high expression of wild type SLC27A4 protein in unaffected controls. Our data provide evidence of a new splice acceptor site creating SNV that results in a reduction or loss of intact SLC27A4 protein and probably explains the severe skin phenotype in Great Danes. Genetic testing will allow selective breeding to prevent ichthyosis-affected puppies in the future. PMID:26506231

  2. Splice-acceptor site mutation in p53 gene of hu888 zebrafish line.

    PubMed

    Piasecka, Alicja; Brzuzan, Paweł; Woźny, Maciej; Ciesielski, Sławomir; Kaczmarczyk, Dariusz

    2015-02-01

    The p53 transcription factor is a key tumor suppressor and a central regulator of the stress response, which has been a subject of intense research for over 30 years. Recently, a zebrafish line which carries splice site mutation (G>T) in intron 8 of p53 gene (p53 (hu888) ), encoding the p53 paralogue, was developed (The Zebrafish Mutation Project). To uncover molecular effects of the mutation, we raised hu888 zebrafish line to adulthood and analyzed DNA, mRNA data, and protein levels of p53 to assess their potential contribution in molecular mechanisms of the mutant fish. To obtain zebrafish individuals homozygous for the point mutation, p53 (hu888) carriers were repeatedly incrossed but only heterozygous mutants (p53 (hu888/+) ) or p53-wild type hu888 zebrafish (p53 (+/+) ) were identified in their progeny. By evaluation of p53 expression changes in the liver of mutant and wild type hu888 zebrafish as well as of Tübingen reference strain, we demonstrated that two types of splicing occurred in each case: a classical one and the alternative splicing which involves the activation of cryptic splice-acceptor site in the exon 9 of zebrafish p53 pre-mRNA. The alternative splicing event results in a deletion 12 nucleotides in the mature mRNA, and produces a shortened variant of p53 protein. Interestingly, expression of p53 protein in liver of both heterozygous and wild type hu888 zebrafish was highly reduced compared to that in the reference strain. PMID:25183022

  3. An ENU Mutagenesis Screen in Zebrafish for Visual System Mutants Identifies a Novel Splice-Acceptor Site Mutation in patched2 that Results in Colobomas

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jiwoon; Cox, Ben D.; Daly, Christina M. S.; Lee, Chanjae; Nuckels, Richard J.; Tittle, Rachel K.; Uribe, Rosa A.; Gross, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To identify recessive mutations affecting development and/or maintenance of the zebrafish visual system. Methods. A three-generation ENU (N-Nitroso-N-ethylurea)-based forward genetic screen was performed. F3 embryos were screened visually from 1 to 5 days postfertilization (dpf) for ocular abnormalities, and 5 dpf embryos were fixed and processed for cryosectioning, after which eye sections were screened for defects in cellular organization within the retina, lens, and cornea. A combination of PCR and DNA sequencing, in situ hybridization, and pharmacological treatments were used to clone and characterize a coloboma mutant. Results. A total of 126 F2 families were screened, and, from these, 18 recessive mutations were identified that affected eye development. Phenotypes included lens malformations and cataracts, photoreceptor defects, oculocutaneous albinism, microphthalmia, and colobomas. Analysis of one such coloboma mutant, uta1, identified a splice-acceptor mutation in the patched2 gene that resulted in an in-frame deletion of 19 amino acids that are predicted to contribute to the first extracellular loop of Patched2. ptch2uta1 mutants possessed elevated Hedgehog (Hh) pathway activity, and blocking the Hh pathway with cyclopamine prevented colobomas in ptch2uta1 mutant embryos. Conclusions. We have identified 18 recessive mutations affecting development of the zebrafish visual system and we have characterized a novel splice-acceptor site mutation in patched2 that results in enhanced Hh pathway activity and colobomas. PMID:23150614

  4. A{sup -2} {yields} G transition at the 3{prime} acceptor splice site of IVS17 characterizes the COL2A1 gene mutation in the original Stickler syndrome kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.J.; Ganguly, A.; Considine, E.

    1996-06-14

    Hereditary progressive arthro-ophthalmopathy, or {open_quotes}Stickler syndrome,{close_quotes} is an autosomal dominant osteochondrodysplasia characterized by a variety of ocular and skeletal anomalies which frequently lead to retinal detachment and precocious osteoarthritis. A variety of mutations in the COL2A1 gene have been identified in {open_quotes}Stickler{close_quotes} families; in most cases studied thus far, the consequence of mutation is the premature generation of a stop codon. We report here the characterization of a COL2A1 gene mutation in the original kindred described by Stickler et al. Conformational sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE) was used to screen for mutations in the entire COL2A1 gene in an affected member from the kindred. A prominent heteroduplex species was noted in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product from a region of the gene including exons 17 to 20. Direct sequencing of PCR-amplified genomic DNA resulted in the identification of a base substitution at the A{sup -2} position of the 3{prime} splice acceptor site of IVS17. Sequencing of DNA from affected and unaffected family members confirmed that the mutation segregated with the disease phenotype. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis of poly A+ RNA demonstrated that the mutant allele utilized a cryptic splice site in exon 18 of the gene, eliminating 16 bp at the start of exon 18. This frameshift eventually results in a premature termination codon. These findings are the first report of a splice site mutation in classical Stickler syndrome and they provide a satisfying historical context in which to view COL2A1 mutations in this dysplasia. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Glycosylation of closely spaced acceptor sites in human glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Shrimal, Shiteshu; Gilmore, Reid

    2013-01-01

    Summary Asparagine-linked glycosylation of proteins by the oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) occurs when acceptor sites or sequons (N-x≠P-T/S) on nascent polypeptides enter the lumen of the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Metazoan organisms assemble two isoforms of the OST that have different catalytic subunits (STT3A or STT3B) and partially non-overlapping cellular roles. Potential glycosylation sites move past the STT3A complex, which is associated with the translocation channel, at the protein synthesis elongation rate. Here, we investigated whether close spacing between acceptor sites in a nascent protein promotes site skipping by the STT3A complex. Biosynthetic analysis of four human glycoproteins revealed that closely spaced sites are efficiently glycosylated by an STT3B-independent process unless the sequons contain non-optimal sequence features, including extreme close spacing between sequons (e.g. NxTNxT) or the presence of paired NxS sequons (e.g. NxSANxS). Many, but not all, glycosylation sites that are skipped by the STT3A complex can be glycosylated by the STT3B complex. Analysis of a murine glycoprotein database revealed that closely spaced sequons are surprisingly common, and are enriched for paired NxT sites when the gap between sequons is less than three residues. PMID:24105266

  6. Engineered oligosaccharyltransferases with greatly relaxed acceptor site specificity

    PubMed Central

    Ollis, Anne A.; Zhang, Sheng; Fisher, Adam C.; DeLisa, Matthew P.

    2015-01-01

    The Campylobacter jejuni protein glycosylation locus (pgl) encodes machinery for asparagine-linked (N-linked) glycosylation and serves as the archetype for bacterial N-glycosylation. This machinery has been functionally transferred into Escherichia coli, thereby enabling convenient mechanistic dissection of the N-glycosylation process in this genetically tractable host. Here, we sought to identify sequence determinants in the oligosaccharyltransferase PglB that restrict its specificity to only those glycan acceptor sites containing a negatively charged residue at the −2 position relative to asparagine. This involved creation of a genetic assay named glycoSNAP (glycosylation of secreted N-linked acceptor proteins) that facilitates high-throughput screening of glycophenotypes in E. coli. Using this assay, we isolated several C. jejuni PglB variants that were capable of glycosylating an array of noncanonical acceptor sequences including one in a eukaryotic N-glycoprotein. Collectively, these results underscore the utility of glycoSNAP for shedding light on poorly understood aspects of N-glycosylation and for engineering designer N-glycosylation biocatalysts. PMID:25129029

  7. Engineered oligosaccharyltransferases with greatly relaxed acceptor-site specificity.

    PubMed

    Ollis, Anne A; Zhang, Sheng; Fisher, Adam C; DeLisa, Matthew P

    2014-10-01

    The Campylobacter jejuni protein glycosylation locus (pgl) encodes machinery for asparagine-linked (N-linked) glycosylation and serves as the archetype for bacterial N-linked glycosylation. This machinery has been functionally transferred into Escherichia coli, enabling convenient mechanistic dissection of the N-linked glycosylation process in this genetically tractable host. Here we sought to identify sequence determinants in the oligosaccharyltransferase PglB that restrict its specificity to only those glycan acceptor sites containing a negatively charged residue at the -2 position relative to asparagine. This involved creation of a genetic assay, glycosylation of secreted N-linked acceptor proteins (glycoSNAP), that facilitates high-throughput screening of glycophenotypes in E. coli. Using this assay, we isolated several C. jejuni PglB variants that could glycosylate an array of noncanonical acceptor sequences, including one in a eukaryotic N-glycoprotein. These results underscore the utility of glycoSNAP for shedding light on poorly understood aspects of N-linked glycosylation and for engineering designer N-linked glycosylation biocatalysts. PMID:25129029

  8. Tuning of Stepwise Neutral-Ionic Transitions by Acceptor Site Doping in Alternating Donor/Acceptor Chains.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Keita; Nishio, Masaki; Miyasaka, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    The stepwise neutral-ionic (N-I) phase transition found in the alternating donor/acceptor (DA) chain [Ru2(2,3,5,6-F4PhCO2)4(DMDCNQI)]·2(p-xylene) (0; 2,3,5,6-F4PhCO2(-) = 2,3,5,6-tetrafluorobenzoate; DMDCNQI = 2,5-dimethyl-N,N'-dicyanoquinonediimine) was tuned by partly substituting the acceptor DMDCNQI with 2,5-dimethoxy-N,N'-dicyanoquinonediimine (DMeODCNQI), which displays a poorer electron affinity in an isostructural series. The site-doped series comprised [Ru2(2,3,5,6-F4PhCO2)4(DMDCNQI)1-x(DMeODCNQI)x]·2(p-xylene) for doping rates (x) = 0.05 (0.05-MeO), 0.10 (0.10-MeO), 0.15 (0.15-MeO), and 0.20 (0.20-MeO). The neutral chain [Ru2(2,3,5,6-F4PhCO2)4(DMeODCNQI)]·4(p-xylene) (1), which only contained DMeODCNQI, was also characterized. All site-doped compounds were isostructural to 0 except 1 despite their identical DA chain motif. Except at an x value of 0.20, they displayed a two-step N-I transition involving an intermediate phase. This transition occurred at high temperatures in 0 but shifted to lower temperatures in a parallel manner with increasing doping rate. Simultaneously, each transition broadened with increasing doping rate, leading to a convergence of two transitions at an x value approximating 0.2. Donor/acceptor-site-doping techniques present somewhat different impacts in terms of interchain Coulomb effects. PMID:26878151

  9. Splicing defects in the COL3A1 gene: marked preference for 5' (donor) spice-site mutations in patients with exon-skipping mutations and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV.

    PubMed Central

    Schwarze, U; Goldstein, J A; Byers, P H

    1997-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV results from mutations in the COL3A1 gene, which encodes the constituent chains of type III procollagen. We have identified, in 33 unrelated individuals or families with EDS type IV, mutations that affect splicing, of which 30 are point mutations at splice junctions and 3 are small deletions that remove splice-junction sequences and partial exon sequences. Except for one point mutation at a donor site, which leads to partial intron inclusion, and a single base-pair substitution at an acceptor site, which gives rise to inclusion of the complete upstream intron into the mature mRNA, all mutations result in deletion of a single exon as the only splice alteration. Of the exon-skipping mutations that are due to single base substitutions, which we have identified in 28 separate individuals, only two affect the splice-acceptor site. The underrepresentation of splice acceptor-site mutations suggests that the favored consequence of 3' mutations is the use of an alternative acceptor site that creates a null allele with a premature-termination codon. The phenotypes of those mutations may differ, with respect to either their severity or their symptomatic range, from the usual presentation of EDS type IV and thus have been excluded from analysis. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:9399899

  10. Rhodopsin mutations in a Scottish retinitis pigmentosa population, including a novel splice site mutation in intron four.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, C; Converse, C A; Hammer, H M; Osborne, A; Haites, N E

    1994-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the name given to a group of disorders, both clinically and genetically heterogeneous, that primarily affect the photoreceptor function of the eye. Mutations in the genes encoding for rhodopsin, RDS-peripherin, or the beta subunit of the cGMP phosphodiesterase enzyme can be responsible for the phenotype. In this study the rhodopsin gene has been screened for mutations in a panel of RP individuals and five different sequence changes have been detected to date in three dominantly inherited and two unclassified families. One of these, a base substitution in the 3'UTR, has not yet been confirmed as disease specific, while three missense substitutions have previously been reported and are likely to be responsible for the phenotype. The fifth change, a base substitution at the intron 4 acceptor splice site, represents a novel mutation and is assumed to be the causative mutation. Images PMID:7819178

  11. cis-Acting sequences in addition to donor and acceptor sites are required for template switching during synthesis of plus-strand DNA for duck hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Havert, M B; Loeb, D D

    1997-01-01

    A characteristic of all hepadnaviruses is the relaxed-circular conformation of the DNA genome within an infectious virion. Synthesis of the relaxed-circular genome by reverse transcription requires three template switches. These template switches, as for the template switches or strand transfers of other reverse-transcribing genetic elements, require repeated sequences (the donor and acceptor sites) between which a complementary strand of nucleic acid is transferred. The mechanism for each of the template switches in hepadnaviruses is poorly understood. To determine whether sequences other than the donor and acceptor sites are involved in the template switches of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), a series of molecular clones which express viral genomes bearing deletion mutations were analyzed. We found that three regions of the DHBV genome, which are distinct from the donor and acceptor sites, are required for the synthesis of relaxed-circular DNA. One region, located near the 3' end of the minus-strand template, is required for the template switch that circularizes the genome. The other two regions, located in the middle of the genome and near DR2, appear to be required for plus-strand primer translocation. We speculate that these cis-acting sequences may play a role in the organization of the minus-strand DNA template within the capsid particle so that it supports efficient template switching during plus-strand DNA synthesis. PMID:9188603

  12. Asymmetric electron transfer in cyanobacterial Photosystem I: charge separation and secondary electron transfer dynamics of mutations near the primary electron acceptor A0.

    PubMed

    Dashdorj, Naranbaatar; Xu, Wu; Cohen, Rachel O; Golbeck, John H; Savikhin, Sergei

    2005-02-01

    Point mutations were introduced near the primary electron acceptor sites assigned to A0 in both the PsaA and PsaB branches of Photosystem I in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The residues Met688PsaA and Met668PsaB, which provide the axial ligands to the Mg2+ of the eC-A3 and eC-B3 chlorophylls, were changed to leucine and asparagine (chlorophyll notation follows Jordan et al., 2001). The removal of the ligand is expected to alter the midpoint potential of the A0/A0- redox pair and result in a change in the intrinsic charge separation rate and secondary electron transfer kinetics from A0- to A1. The dynamics of primary charge separation and secondary electron transfer were studied at 690 nm and 390 nm in these mutants by ultrafast optical pump-probe spectroscopy. The data reveal that mutations in the PsaB branch do not alter electron transfer dynamics, whereas mutations in the PsaA branch have a distinct effect on electron transfer, slowing down both the primary charge separation and the secondary electron transfer step (the latter by a factor of 3-10). These results suggest that electron transfer in cyanobacterial Photosystem I is asymmetric and occurs primarily along the PsaA branch of cofactors. PMID:15542554

  13. Human GC-AG alternative intron isoforms with weak donor sites show enhanced consensus at acceptor exon positions

    PubMed Central

    Thanaraj, T. A.; Clark, Francis

    2001-01-01

    It has been previously observed that the intrinsically weak variant GC donor sites, in order to be recognized by the U2-type spliceosome, possess strong consensus sequences maximized for base pair formation with U1 and U5/U6 snRNAs. However, variability in signal strength is a fundamental mechanism for splice site selection in alternative splicing. Here we report human alternative GC-AG introns (for the first time from any species), and show that while constitutive GC-AG introns do possess strong signals at their donor sites, a large subset of alternative GC-AG introns possess weak consensus sequences at their donor sites. Surprisingly, this subset of alternative isoforms shows strong consensus at acceptor exon positions 1 and 2. The improved consensus at the acceptor exon can facilitate a strong interaction with U5 snRNA, which tethers the two exons for ligation during the second step of splicing. Further, these isoforms nearly always possess alternative acceptor sites and exhibit particularly weak polypyrimidine tracts characteristic of AG-dependent introns. The acceptor exon nucleotides are part of the consensus required for the U2AF35-mediated recognition of AG in such introns. Such improved consensus at acceptor exons is not found in either normal or alternative GT-AG introns having weak donor sites or weak polypyrimidine tracts. The changes probably reflect mechanisms that allow GC-AG alternative intron isoforms to cope with two conflicting requirements, namely an apparent need for differential splice strength to direct the choice of alternative sites and a need for improved donor signals to compensate for the central mismatch base pair (C-A) in the RNA duplex of U1 snRNA and the pre-mRNA. The other important findings include (i) one in every twenty alternative introns is a GC-AG intron, and (ii) three of every five observed GC-AG introns are alternative isoforms. PMID:11410667

  14. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Novel PHEX Splice Site Mutations in Patients with Hypophosphatemic Rickets

    PubMed Central

    Gillies, Christopher; Sampson, Matthew G.; Kher, Vijay; Sethi, Sidharth K.; Otto, Edgar A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hypophosphatemic rickets (HR) is a heterogeneous genetic phosphate wasting disorder. The disease is most commonly caused by mutations in the PHEX gene located on the X-chromosome or by mutations in CLCN5, DMP1, ENPP1, FGF23, and SLC34A3. The aims of this study were to perform molecular diagnostics for four patients with HR of Indian origin (two independent families) and to describe their clinical features. Methods We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) for the affected mother of two boys who also displayed the typical features of HR, including bone malformations and phosphate wasting. B-lymphoblast cell lines were established by EBV transformation and subsequent RT-PCR to investigate an uncommon splice site variant found by WES. An in silico analysis was done to obtain accurate nucleotide frequency occurrences of consensus splice positions other than the canonical sites of all human exons. Additionally, we applied direct Sanger sequencing for all exons and exon/intron boundaries of the PHEX gene for an affected girl from an independent second Indian family. Results WES revealed a novel PHEX splice acceptor mutation in intron 9 (c.1080-3C>A) in a family with 3 affected individuals with HR. The effect on splicing of this mutation was further investigated by RT-PCR using RNA obtained from a patient’s EBV-transformed lymphoblast cell line. RT-PCR revealed an aberrant splice transcript skipping exons 10-14 which was not observed in control samples, confirming the diagnosis of X-linked dominant hypophosphatemia (XLH). The in silico analysis of all human splice sites adjacent to all 327,293 exons across 81,814 transcripts among 20,345 human genes revealed that cytosine is, with 64.3%, the most frequent nucleobase at the minus 3 splice acceptor position, followed by thymidine with 28.7%, adenine with 6.3%, and guanine with 0.8%. We generated frequency tables and pictograms for the extended donor and acceptor splice consensus regions by analyzing all human

  15. A Novel Splice-Site Mutation in the GJB2 Gene Causing Mild Postlingual Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Gandía, Marta; del Castillo, Francisco J.; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Francisco J.; Garrido, Gema; Villamar, Manuela; Calderón, Manuela; Moreno-Pelayo, Miguel A.; Moreno, Felipe; del Castillo, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    The DFNB1 subtype of autosomal recessive, nonsyndromic hearing impairment, caused by mutations affecting the GJB2 (connection-26) gene, is highly prevalent in most populations worldwide. DFNB1 hearing impairment is mostly severe or profound and usually appears before the acquisition of speech (prelingual onset), though a small number of hypomorphic missense mutations result in mild or moderate deafness of postlingual onset. We identified a novel GJB2 splice-site mutation, c. -22-2A>C, in three siblings with mild postlingual hearing impairment that were compound heterozygous for c. -22-2A>C and c.35delG. Reverse transcriptase-PCR experiments performed on total RNA extracted from saliva samples from one of these siblings confirmed that c. -22-2A>C abolished the acceptor splice site of the single GJB2 intron, resulting in the absence of normally processed transcripts from this allele. However, we did isolate transcripts from the c. -22-2A>C allele that keep an intact GJB2 coding region and that were generated by use of an alternative acceptor splice site previously unknown. The residual expression of wild-type connection-26 encoded by these transcripts probably underlies the mild severity and late onset of the hearing impairment of these subjects. PMID:24039984

  16. Characterization of the Functional Roles of Amino Acid Residues in Acceptor-binding Subsite +1 in the Active Site of the Glucansucrase GTF180 from Lactobacillus reuteri 180.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangfeng; Pijning, Tjaard; Dobruchowska, Justyna M; Gerwig, Gerrit J; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2015-12-11

    α-Glucans produced by glucansucrase enzymes hold strong potential for industrial applications. The exact determinants of the linkage specificity of glucansucrase enzymes have remained largely unknown, even with the recent elucidation of glucansucrase crystal structures. Guided by the crystal structure of glucansucrase GTF180-ΔN from Lactobacillus reuteri 180 in complex with the acceptor substrate maltose, we identified several residues (Asp-1028 and Asn-1029 from domain A, as well as Leu-938, Ala-978, and Leu-981 from domain B) near subsite +1 that may be critical for linkage specificity determination, and we investigated these by random site-directed mutagenesis. First, mutants of Ala-978 (to Leu, Pro, Phe, or Tyr) and Asp-1028 (to Tyr or Trp) with larger side chains showed reduced degrees of branching, likely due to the steric hindrance by these bulky residues. Second, Leu-938 mutants (except L938F) and Asp-1028 mutants showed altered linkage specificity, mostly with increased (α1 → 6) linkage synthesis. Third, mutation of Leu-981 and Asn-1029 significantly affected the transglycosylation reaction, indicating their essential roles in acceptor substrate binding. In conclusion, glucansucrase product specificity is determined by an interplay of domain A and B residues surrounding the acceptor substrate binding groove. Residues surrounding the +1 subsite thus are critical for activity and specificity of the GTF180 enzyme and play different roles in the enzyme functions. This study provides novel insights into the structure-function relationships of glucansucrase enzymes and clearly shows the potential of enzyme engineering to produce tailor-made α-glucans. PMID:26507662

  17. Structure-guided redesign of D-fructose-6-phosphate aldolase from E. coli: remarkable activity and selectivity towards acceptor substrates by two-point mutation.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Mariana; Parella, Teodor; Joglar, Jesús; Bujons, Jordi; Clapés, Pere

    2011-05-28

    Structure-guided re-design of the acceptor binding site of D-fructose-6-phosphate aldolase from E. coli leads to the construction of FSA A129S/A165G double mutant with an activity between 5- to >900-fold higher than that of wild-type towards N-Cbz-aminoaldehyde derivatives. PMID:21499643

  18. Revealing the function of a novel splice-site mutation of CHD7 in CHARGE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeonghyeon; Duz, Mehmet Bugrahan; Sagong, Borum; Koparir, Asuman; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Choi, Jae Young; Seven, Mehmet; Yuksel, Adnan; Kim, Un-Kyung; Ozen, Mustafa

    2016-02-01

    Most cases of CHARGE syndrome are sporadic and autosomal dominant. CHD7 is a major causative gene of CHARGE syndrome. In this study, we screened CHD7 in two Turkish patients demonstrating symptoms of CHARGE syndrome such as coloboma, heart defect, choanal atresia, retarded growth, genital abnomalities and ear anomalies. Two mutations of CHD7 were identified including a novel splice-site mutation (c.2443-2A>G) and a previously known frameshift mutation (c.2504_2508delATCTT). We performed exon trapping analysis to determine the effect of the c.2443-2A>G mutation at the transcriptional level, and found that it caused a complete skip of exon 7 and splicing at a cryptic splice acceptor site. Our current study is the second study demonstrating an exon 7 deficit in CHD7. Results of previous studies suggest that the c.2443-2A>G mutation affects the formation of nasal tissues and the neural retina during early development, resulting in choanal atresia and coloboma, respectively. The findings of the present study will improve our understanding of the genetic causes of CHARGE syndrome. PMID:26551301

  19. Tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium Derivatives with Multiple Viologen Acceptors: Quadratic Dependence of Photocatalytic H2 Evolution Rate on the Local Concentration of the Acceptor Site.

    PubMed

    Kitamoto, Kyoji; Sakai, Ken

    2016-08-22

    Three Ru(bpy)3 (2+) derivatives tethered to multiple viologen acceptors, [Ru(bpy)2 (4,4'-MV2)](6+) , [Ru(bpy)2 (4,4'-MV4)](10+) , and [Ru(bpy)(4,4'-MV4)2 ](18+) [bpy=2,2'-bipyridine, 4,4'-MV2=4-ethoxycarbonyl-4'-(N-G1 -carbamoyl)-2,2'-bipyridine, and 4,4'-MV4=4,4'-bis(N-G1 -carbamoyl)-2,2'-bipyridine, where G1 =Asp(NHG2 )-NHG2 and G2 =-(CH2 )2 -N(+) C5 H4 -C5 H4 N(+) -CH3 ] were prepared as "photo-charge separators (PCSs)". Photoirradiation of these complexes in the presence of a sacrificial electron donor (EDTA) results in storage of electrons per PCS values of 1.3, 2.7, and 4.6, respectively. Their applications in the photochemical H2 evolution from water in the presence of a colloidal Pt H2 -evolving catalyst were investigated, and are discussed along with those reported for [Ru(bpy)2 (5,5'-MV4)](10+) , [Ru(4,4'-MV4)3 ](26+) , and [Ru(5,5'-MV4)3 ](26+) (Inorg. Chem. Front. 2016, 3, 671-680). The PCSs with high dimerization constants (Kd =10(5) -10(6)  m(-1) ) are superior in driving H2 evolution at pH 5.0, whereas those with lower Kd values (10(3) -10(4)  m(-1) ) are superior at pH 7.0, where Kd =[(MV(+) )2 ]/[MV(+) (.) ](2) . The (MV(+) )2 site can drive H2 evolution only at pH 5.0 as a result of its 0.15 eV lower driving force for H2 evolution relative to MV(+) (.) , whereas the PCSs with lower Kd values exhibit higher performance at pH 7.0 owing to the higher population of free MV(+) (.) . Importantly, the rate of electron charging over the PCSs is linear to the apparent H2 evolution rate, and shows an intriguing quadratic dependence on the number of MV(2+) units per PCS. PMID:27434613

  20. Splice-site mutations identified in PDE6A responsible for retinitis pigmentosa in consanguineous Pakistani families

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahid Y.; Ali, Shahbaz; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Khan, Shaheen N.; Husnain, Tayyab; Butt, Nadeem H.; Qazi, Zaheeruddin A.; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ayyagari, Radha; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to localize and identify causal mutations associated with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in consanguineous familial cases of Pakistani origin. Methods Ophthalmic examinations that included funduscopy and electroretinography (ERG) were performed to confirm the affectation status. Blood samples were collected from all participating individuals, and genomic DNA was extracted. A genome-wide scan was performed, and two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated. Sanger sequencing was performed to identify the causative variants. Subsequently, we performed whole exome sequencing to rule out the possibility of a second causal variant within the linkage interval. Sequence conservation was performed with alignment analyses of PDE6A orthologs, and in silico splicing analysis was completed with Human Splicing Finder version 2.4.1. Results A large multigenerational consanguineous family diagnosed with early-onset RP was ascertained. An ophthalmic clinical examination consisting of fundus photography and electroretinography confirmed the diagnosis of RP. A genome-wide scan was performed, and suggestive two-point LOD scores were observed with markers on chromosome 5q. Haplotype analyses identified the region; however, the region did not segregate with the disease phenotype in the family. Subsequently, we performed a second genome-wide scan that excluded the entire genome except the chromosome 5q region harboring PDE6A. Next-generation whole exome sequencing identified a splice acceptor site mutation in intron 16: c.2028–1G>A, which was completely conserved in PDE6A orthologs and was absent in ethnically matched 350 control chromosomes, the 1000 Genomes database, and the NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project. Subsequently, we investigated our entire cohort of RP familial cases and identified a second family who harbored a splice acceptor site mutation in intron 10: c.1408–2A>G. In silico analysis suggested that these

  1. A three-dimensional model of mammalian tyrosinase active site accounting for loss of function mutations.

    PubMed

    Schweikardt, Thorsten; Olivares, Concepción; Solano, Francisco; Jaenicke, Elmar; García-Borrón, José Carlos; Decker, Heinz

    2007-10-01

    Tyrosinases are the first and rate-limiting enzymes in the synthesis of melanin pigments responsible for colouring hair, skin and eyes. Mutation of tyrosinases often decreases melanin production resulting in albinism, but the effects are not always understood at the molecular level. Homology modelling of mouse tyrosinase based on recently published crystal structures of non-mammalian tyrosinases provides an active site model accounting for loss-of-function mutations. According to the model, the copper-binding histidines are located in a helix bundle comprising four densely packed helices. A loop containing residues M374, S375 and V377 connects the CuA and CuB centres, with the peptide oxygens of M374 and V377 serving as hydrogen acceptors for the NH-groups of the imidazole rings of the copper-binding His367 and His180. Therefore, this loop is essential for the stability of the active site architecture. A double substitution (374)MS(375) --> (374)GG(375) or a single M374G mutation lead to a local perturbation of the protein matrix at the active site affecting the orientation of the H367 side chain, that may be unable to bind CuB reliably, resulting in loss of activity. The model also accounts for loss of function in two naturally occurring albino mutations, S380P and V393F. The hydroxyl group in S380 contributes to the correct orientation of M374, and the substitution of V393 for a bulkier phenylalanine sterically impedes correct side chain packing at the active site. Therefore, our model explains the mechanistic necessity for conservation of not only active site histidines but also adjacent amino acids in tyrosinase. PMID:17850513

  2. Glycosylation of Phenolic Compounds by the Site-Mutated β-Galactosidase from Lactobacillus bulgaricus L3

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lili; Xu, Lijuan; Guo, Yuchuan; Zhang, Dayu; Qi, Tingting; Jin, Lan; Gu, Guofeng; Xu, Li; Xiao, Min

    2015-01-01

    β-Galactosidases can transfer the galactosyl from lactose or galactoside donors to various acceptors and thus are especially useful for the synthesis of important glycosides. However, these enzymes have limitations in the glycosylation of phenolic compounds that have many physiological functions. In this work, the β-galactosidase from Lactobacillus bulgaricus L3 was subjected to site-saturation mutagenesis at the W980 residue. The recombinant pET-21b plasmid carrying the enzyme gene was used as the template for mutation. The mutant plasmids were transformed into Escherichia coli cells for screening. One recombinant mutant, W980F, exhibited increased yield of glycoside when using hydroquinone as the screening acceptor. The enzyme was purified and the effects of the mutation on enzyme properties were determined in detail. It showed improved transglycosylation activity on novel phenolic acceptors besides hydroquinone. The yields of the glycosides produced from phenol, hydroquinone, and catechol were increased by 7.6% to 53.1%. Moreover, it generated 32.3% glycosides from the pyrogallol that could not be glycosylated by the wild-type enzyme. Chemical structures of these glycoside products were further determined by MS and NMR analysis. Thus, a series of novel phenolic galactosides were achieved by β-galactosidase for the first time. This was a breakthrough in the enzymatic galactosylation of the challenging phenolic compounds of great values. PMID:25803778

  3. Mutation profiling of adenoid cystic carcinomas from multiple anatomical sites identifies mutations in the RAS pathway, but no KIT mutations

    PubMed Central

    Wetterskog, Daniel; Wilkerson, Paul M; Rodrigues, Daniel N; Lambros, Maryou B; Fritchie, Karen; Andersson, Mattias K; Natrajan, Rachael; Gauthier, Arnaud; Di Palma, Silvana; Shousha, Sami; Gatalica, Zoran; Töpfer, Chantal; Vukovic, Vesna; A’Hern, Roger; Weigelt, Britta; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Stenman, Göran; Rubin, Brian P; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2016-01-01

    Aims The majority of adenoid cystic carcinomas (AdCCs), regardless of anatomical site, harbour the MYB–NFIB fusion gene. The aim of this study was to characterize the repertoire of somatic genetic events affecting known cancer genes in AdCCs. Methods and results DNA was extracted from 13 microdissected breast AdCCs, and subjected to a mutation survey using the Sequenom OncoCarta Panel v1.0. Genes found to be mutated in any of the breast AdCCs and genes related to the same canonical molecular pathways, as well as KIT, a proto-oncogene whose protein product is expressed in AdCCs, were sequenced in an additional 68 AdCCs from various anatomical sites by Sanger sequencing. Using the Sequenom MassARRAY platform and Sanger sequencing, mutations in BRAF and HRAS were identified in three and one cases, respectively (breast, and head and neck). KIT, which has previously been reported to be mutated in AdCCs, was also investigated, but no mutations were identified. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that mutations in genes pertaining to the canonical RAS pathway are found in a minority of AdCCs, and that activating KIT mutations are either absent or remarkably rare in these cancers, and unlikely to constitute a driver and therapeutic target for patients with AdCC. PMID:23398044

  4. Global transcriptional start site mapping in Geobacter sulfurreducens during growth with two different electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    González, Getzabeth; Labastida, Aurora; Jímenez-Jacinto, Verónica; Vega-Alvarado, Leticia; Olvera, Maricela; Morett, Enrique; Juárez, Katy

    2016-09-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens is an anaerobic soil bacterium that is involved in biogeochemical cycles of elements such as Fe and Mn. Although significant progress has been made in the understanding of the electron transfer processes in G. sulfurreducens, little is known about the regulatory mechanisms involved in their control. To expand the study of gene regulation in G. sulfurreducens, we carried out a genome-wide identification of transcription start sites (TSS) by 5'RACE and by deep RNA sequencing of primary mRNAs in two growth conditions. TSSs were identified along G. sulfurreducens genome and over 50% of them were located in the upstream region of the associated gene, and in some cases we detected genes with more than one TSS. Our global mapping of TSSs contributes with valuable information, which is needed for the study of transcript structure and transcription regulation signals and can ultimately contribute to the understanding of transcription initiation phenomena in G. sulfurreducens. PMID:27488344

  5. Splice-site mutation of the p53 gene in a family with hereditary breast-ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Jolly, K W; Malkin, D; Douglass, E C; Brown, T F; Sinclair, A E; Look, A T

    1994-01-01

    Germline mutations within evolutionary conserved exons of the p53 gene predispose to tumor development in several familial cancer syndromes. We now report identification of a novel p53 mutation affecting the splice acceptor site of exon 6 in the germline DNA of a family with hereditary breast-ovarian cancer. This splice-site mutation, which results in omission of exon 6 and creates a frame-shift and premature stop codon in transcripts from the mutant allele, was found in seven family members--four of whom have developed breast, ovarian or choroid plexus tumors before age 35. Our finding suggests the need to examine the entire p53 gene for splice-site, frame-shift, and nonsense (as well as missense) mutations in families with early-onset hereditary breast and breast-ovarian cancers not linked to the BRCA1 gene on chromosome 17q. We propose that the term 'p53 familial cancer syndrome' be applied to clusters of tumors in families with documented germline p53 mutations, regardless of the histopathologic findings or pattern of tumor development. PMID:8302608

  6. Genome-wide meta-analysis reveals common splice site acceptor variant in CHRNA4 associated with nicotine dependence.

    PubMed

    Hancock, D B; Reginsson, G W; Gaddis, N C; Chen, X; Saccone, N L; Lutz, S M; Qaiser, B; Sherva, R; Steinberg, S; Zink, F; Stacey, S N; Glasheen, C; Chen, J; Gu, F; Frederiksen, B N; Loukola, A; Gudbjartsson, D F; Brüske, I; Landi, M T; Bickeböller, H; Madden, P; Farrer, L; Kaprio, J; Kranzler, H R; Gelernter, J; Baker, T B; Kraft, P; Amos, C I; Caporaso, N E; Hokanson, J E; Bierut, L J; Thorgeirsson, T E; Johnson, E O; Stefansson, K

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a 1000 Genomes-imputed genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis for nicotine dependence, defined by the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence in 17 074 ever smokers from five European-ancestry samples. We followed up novel variants in 7469 ever smokers from five independent European-ancestry samples. We identified genome-wide significant association in the alpha-4 nicotinic receptor subunit (CHRNA4) gene on chromosome 20q13: lowest P=8.0 × 10(-9) across all the samples for rs2273500-C (frequency=0.15; odds ratio=1.12 and 95% confidence interval=1.08-1.17 for severe vs mild dependence). rs2273500-C, a splice site acceptor variant resulting in an alternate CHRNA4 transcript predicted to be targeted for nonsense-mediated decay, was associated with decreased CHRNA4 expression in physiologically normal human brains (lowest P=7.3 × 10(-4)). Importantly, rs2273500-C was associated with increased lung cancer risk (N=28 998, odds ratio=1.06 and 95% confidence interval=1.00-1.12), likely through its effect on smoking, as rs2273500-C was no longer associated with lung cancer after adjustment for smoking. Using criteria for smoking behavior that encompass more than the single 'cigarettes per day' item, we identified a common CHRNA4 variant with important regulatory properties that contributes to nicotine dependence and smoking-related consequences. PMID:26440539

  7. Neurocognitive Profiles in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Gene Mutation Site

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Maria Grazia; Lorusso, Maria Luisa; Civati, Federica; Comi, Giacomo Pietro; Magri, Francesca; Del Bo, Roberto; Guglieri, Michela; Molteni, Massimo; Turconi, Anna Carla; Bresolin, Nereo

    2011-01-01

    The presence of nonprogressive cognitive impairment is recognized as a common feature in a substantial proportion of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To investigate the possible role of mutations along the dystrophin gene affecting different brain dystrophin isoforms and specific cognitive profiles, 42 school-age children affected with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, subdivided according to sites of mutations along the dystrophin gene, underwent a battery of tests tapping a wide range of intellectual, linguistic, and neuropsychologic functions. Full-scale intelligence quotient was approximately 1 S.D. below the population average in the whole group of dystrophic children. Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mutations located in the distal portion of the dystrophin gene (involving the 140-kDa brain protein isoform, called Dp140) were generally more severely affected and expressed different patterns of strengths and impairments, compared with patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mutations located in the proximal portion of the dystrophin gene (not involving Dp140). Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and distal mutations demonstrated specific impairments in visuospatial functions and visual memory (which seemed intact in proximally mutated patients) and greater impairment in syntactic processing. PMID:22000308

  8. Functional impact of HIV coreceptor-binding site mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Biscone, Mark J.; Miamidian, John L.; Muchiri, John M.; Baik, Sarah S.W.; Lee, Fang-Hua; Doms, Robert W. . E-mail: doms@mail.med.upenn.edu; Reeves, Jacqueline D. . E-mail: jreeves@MonogramBio.com

    2006-07-20

    The bridging sheet region of the gp120 subunit of the HIV-1 Env protein interacts with the major virus coreceptors, CCR5 and CXCR4. We examined the impact of mutations in and adjacent to the bridging sheet region of an X4 tropic HIV-1 on membrane fusion and entry inhibitor susceptibility. When the V3-loop of this Env was changed so that CCR5 was used, the effects of these same mutations on CCR5 use were assayed as well. We found that coreceptor-binding site mutations had greater effects on CXCR4-mediated fusion and infection than when CCR5 was used as a coreceptor, perhaps related to differences in coreceptor affinity. The mutations also reduced use of the alternative coreceptors CCR3 and CCR8 to varying degrees, indicating that the bridging sheet region is important for the efficient utilization of both major and minor HIV coreceptors. As seen before with a primary R5 virus strain, bridging sheet mutations increased susceptibility to the CCR5 inhibitor TAK-779, which correlated with CCR5 binding efficiency. Bridging sheet mutations also conferred increased susceptibility to the CXCR4 ligand AMD-3100 in the context of the X4 tropic Env. However, these mutations had little effect on the rate of membrane fusion and little effect on susceptibility to enfuvirtide, a membrane fusion inhibitor whose activity is dependent in part on the rate of Env-mediated membrane fusion. Thus, mutations that reduce coreceptor binding and enhance susceptibility to coreceptor inhibitors can affect fusion and enfuvirtide susceptibility in an Env context-dependent manner.

  9. Genome-wide meta-analysis reveals common splice site acceptor variant in CHRNA4 associated with nicotine dependence

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, D B; Reginsson, G W; Gaddis, N C; Chen, X; Saccone, N L; Lutz, S M; Qaiser, B; Sherva, R; Steinberg, S; Zink, F; Stacey, S N; Glasheen, C; Chen, J; Gu, F; Frederiksen, B N; Loukola, A; Gudbjartsson, D F; Brüske, I; Landi, M T; Bickeböller, H; Madden, P; Farrer, L; Kaprio, J; Kranzler, H R; Gelernter, J; Baker, T B; Kraft, P; Amos, C I; Caporaso, N E; Hokanson, J E; Bierut, L J; Thorgeirsson, T E; Johnson, E O; Stefansson, K

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a 1000 Genomes–imputed genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis for nicotine dependence, defined by the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence in 17 074 ever smokers from five European-ancestry samples. We followed up novel variants in 7469 ever smokers from five independent European-ancestry samples. We identified genome-wide significant association in the alpha-4 nicotinic receptor subunit (CHRNA4) gene on chromosome 20q13: lowest P=8.0 × 10−9 across all the samples for rs2273500-C (frequency=0.15; odds ratio=1.12 and 95% confidence interval=1.08–1.17 for severe vs mild dependence). rs2273500-C, a splice site acceptor variant resulting in an alternate CHRNA4 transcript predicted to be targeted for nonsense-mediated decay, was associated with decreased CHRNA4 expression in physiologically normal human brains (lowest P=7.3 × 10−4). Importantly, rs2273500-C was associated with increased lung cancer risk (N=28 998, odds ratio=1.06 and 95% confidence interval=1.00–1.12), likely through its effect on smoking, as rs2273500-C was no longer associated with lung cancer after adjustment for smoking. Using criteria for smoking behavior that encompass more than the single ‘cigarettes per day' item, we identified a common CHRNA4 variant with important regulatory properties that contributes to nicotine dependence and smoking-related consequences. PMID:26440539

  10. Characterization of an Additional Splice Acceptor Site Introduced into CYP4B1 in Hominoidae during Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, Oliver T.; Roellecke, Katharina; Freund, Marcel; Gombert, Michael; Lottmann, Nadine; Steward, Charles A.; Kramm, Christof M.; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Rettie, Allan E.; Hanenberg, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    CYP4B1 belongs to the cytochrome P450 family 4, one of the oldest P450 families whose members have been highly conserved throughout evolution. The CYP4 monooxygenases typically oxidize fatty acids to both inactive and active lipid mediators, although the endogenous ligand(s) is largely unknown. During evolution, at the transition of great apes to humanoids, the CYP4B1 protein acquired a serine instead of a proline at the canonical position 427 in the meander region. Although this alteration impairs P450 function related to the processing of naturally occurring lung toxins, a study in transgenic mice suggested that an additional serine insertion at position 207 in human CYP4B1 can rescue the enzyme stability and activity. Here, we report that the genomic insertion of a CAG triplet at the intron 5–exon 6 boundary in human CYP4B1 introduced an additional splice acceptor site in frame. During evolution, this change occurred presumably at the stage of Hominoidae and leads to two major isoforms of the CYP4B1 enzymes of humans and great apes, either with or without a serine 207 insertion (insSer207). We further demonstrated that the CYP4B1 enzyme with insSer207 is the dominant isoform (76%) in humans. Importantly, this amino acid insertion did not affect the 4-ipomeanol metabolizing activities or stabilities of the native rabbit or human CYP4B1 enzymes, when introduced as transgenes in human primary cells and cell lines. In our 3D modeling, this functional neutrality of insSer207 is compatible with its predicted location on the exterior surface of CYP4B1 in a flexible side chain. Therefore, the Ser207 insertion does not rescue the P450 functional activity of human CYP4B1 that has been lost during evolution. PMID:26355749

  11. A novel splice site mutation in EYA4 causes DFNA10 hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Michael S; Coman, David; Yang, Tao; Gardner, R J McKinlay; Rose, Elizabeth; Smith, Richard J H; Bahlo, Melanie; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M

    2007-07-15

    Nonsyndromic autosomal dominant sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) at the DFNA10 locus was described in two families in 2001. Causative mutations that affect the EyaHR domain of the 'Eyes absent 4' (EYA4) protein were identified. We report on the clinical and genetic analyses of an Australian family with nonsyndromic SNHL. Screening of the EYA4 gene showed the novel polypyrimidine tract variation ca. 1,282-12T > A that introduces a new 3' splice acceptor site. This is the first report of a point mutation in EYA4 that is hypothesized to lead to aberrant pre-mRNA splicing and human disease. The DFNA10 family described is only the fourth to be identified. One individual presented with apparently the same phenotype as other affected members of the family. However, genotyping illustrated that he did not share the DFNA10 disease haplotype. Detailed clinical investigation showed differences in the onset and severity of his hearing loss and thus he is presumed to represent a phenocopy, perhaps resulting from long-term exposure to loud noise. PMID:17568404

  12. Differences in gene expression of human xylosyltransferases and determination of acceptor specificities for various proteoglycans

    SciTech Connect

    Roch, Christina; Kuhn, Joachim; Kleesiek, Knut; Goetting, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The xylosyltransferase (XT) isoforms XT-I and XT-II initiate the posttranslational glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis. Here, we determined the relative expression of both isoforms in 33 human cell lines. The majority of tested cell lines showed dominant XYLT2 gene expression, while only in 23132/87, JAR, NCI-H510A and THP-1 was the XT-I mRNA expression higher. Nearly equal expression levels were detected in six cell lines. Additionally, to shed light on putative differences in acceptor specificities the acceptor properties of potential acceptor sequences were determined. Peptides were expressed as glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins containing putative or known GAG attachment sites of in vivo proteoglycans. Kinetic analysis showed that K{sub m} and V{sub max} values for XT-I mediated xylosylation were slightly higher than those for XT-II, and that XT-I showed a lesser stringency concerning the acceptor sequence. Mutagenesis of the bikunin peptide sequence in the G-S-G attachment site and flanking regions generated potential acceptor molecules. Here, mutations on the N-terminal side and the attachment site were found to be more susceptible to a loss of acceptor function than mutations in the C-terminus. Altogether the known consensus sequence a-a-a-a-G-S-G-a-a/G-a ('a' representing Asp or Glu) for XT-I mediated xylosylation could be approved and additionally extended to apply to XT-II as well.

  13. Mutational Biases Drive Elevated Rates of Substitution at Regulatory Sites across Cancer Types.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Vera B; Taylor, Martin S; Semple, Colin A

    2016-08-01

    Disruption of gene regulation is known to play major roles in carcinogenesis and tumour progression. Here, we comprehensively characterize the mutational profiles of diverse transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) across 1,574 completely sequenced cancer genomes encompassing 11 tumour types. We assess the relative rates and impact of the mutational burden at the binding sites of 81 transcription factors (TFs), by comparing the abundance and patterns of single base substitutions within putatively functional binding sites to control sites with matched sequence composition. There is a strong (1.43-fold) and significant excess of mutations at functional binding sites across TFs, and the mutations that accumulate in cancers are typically more disruptive than variants tolerated in extant human populations at the same sites. CTCF binding sites suffer an exceptionally high mutational load in cancer (3.31-fold excess) relative to control sites, and we demonstrate for the first time that this effect is seen in essentially all cancer types with sufficient data. The sub-set of CTCF sites involved in higher order chromatin structures has the highest mutational burden, suggesting a widespread breakdown of chromatin organization. However, we find no evidence for selection driving these distinctive patterns of mutation. The mutational load at CTCF-binding sites is substantially determined by replication timing and the mutational signature of the tumor in question, suggesting that selectively neutral processes underlie the unusual mutation patterns. Pervasive hyper-mutation within transcription factor binding sites rewires the regulatory landscape of the cancer genome, but it is dominated by mutational processes rather than selection. PMID:27490693

  14. Mutational Biases Drive Elevated Rates of Substitution at Regulatory Sites across Cancer Types

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Colin A.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of gene regulation is known to play major roles in carcinogenesis and tumour progression. Here, we comprehensively characterize the mutational profiles of diverse transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) across 1,574 completely sequenced cancer genomes encompassing 11 tumour types. We assess the relative rates and impact of the mutational burden at the binding sites of 81 transcription factors (TFs), by comparing the abundance and patterns of single base substitutions within putatively functional binding sites to control sites with matched sequence composition. There is a strong (1.43-fold) and significant excess of mutations at functional binding sites across TFs, and the mutations that accumulate in cancers are typically more disruptive than variants tolerated in extant human populations at the same sites. CTCF binding sites suffer an exceptionally high mutational load in cancer (3.31-fold excess) relative to control sites, and we demonstrate for the first time that this effect is seen in essentially all cancer types with sufficient data. The sub-set of CTCF sites involved in higher order chromatin structures has the highest mutational burden, suggesting a widespread breakdown of chromatin organization. However, we find no evidence for selection driving these distinctive patterns of mutation. The mutational load at CTCF-binding sites is substantially determined by replication timing and the mutational signature of the tumor in question, suggesting that selectively neutral processes underlie the unusual mutation patterns. Pervasive hyper-mutation within transcription factor binding sites rewires the regulatory landscape of the cancer genome, but it is dominated by mutational processes rather than selection. PMID:27490693

  15. Single-site copper(II) water oxidation electrocatalysis: rate enhancements with HPO₄²⁻ as a proton acceptor at pH 8.

    PubMed

    Coggins, Michael K; Zhang, Ming-Tian; Chen, Zuofeng; Song, Na; Meyer, Thomas J

    2014-11-01

    The complex Cu(II)(Py3P) (1) is an electrocatalyst for water oxidation to dioxygen in H2PO4(-)/HPO4(2-) buffered aqueous solutions. Controlled potential electrolysis experiments with 1 at pH 8.0 at an applied potential of 1.40 V versus the normal hydrogen electrode resulted in the formation of dioxygen (84% Faradaic yield) through multiple catalyst turnovers with minimal catalyst deactivation. The results of an electrochemical kinetics study point to a single-site mechanism for water oxidation catalysis with involvement of phosphate buffer anions either through atom-proton transfer in a rate-limiting O-O bond-forming step with HPO4(2-) as the acceptor base or by concerted electron-proton transfer with electron transfer to the electrode and proton transfer to the HPO4(2-) base. PMID:25243584

  16. Evaluation of selected benzoquinones, naphthoquinones, and anthraquinones as replacements for phylloquinone in the A sub 1 acceptor site of the photosystem I reaction center

    SciTech Connect

    Biggins, J. )

    1990-08-07

    Selected substituted 1,4-benzoquinones, 1,4-naphthoquinones, and 9,10-anthraquinones were investigated as possible replacement quinones in spinach photosystem I (PSI) preparations that had been depleted of endogenous phylloquinone by extraction with hexane/methanol. As a criterion for successful biochemical reconstitution, the restoration of electron transfer was determined by measuring P-430 turnover at room temperature from flash-induced absorbance transients. Restoration of complete electron transfer between A{sub 0}{sup {minus}} and P-430 (terminal iron-sulfur centers, F{sub A}F{sub B}) was demonstrated by using phylloquinone, 2-methyl-3-decyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2-methyl-3-(isoprenyl){sub 2}-1,4-naphthoquinone, and 2-methyl-3-(isoprenyl){sub 4}-1,4-naphthoquinone. All other quinones tested did not restore P-430 turnover but acted as electron acceptors and oxidized A{sub 0}{sup {minus}}. It is concluded that the specificity of the replacement quinone for interaction with the primary acceptor, A{sub 0}{sup {minus}}, is low but additional structural constraints are required for the quinone occupying the A{sub 1} site to donate to the iron-sulfur center, F{sub x}. It is suggested that the 3-phytyl side chain of phylloquinone and the 3-alkyl tails of the three naphthoquinones that restored P-430 turnover may be required for interaction with a hydrophobic domain of the A{sub 1} site in the PSI core to promote electron transfer to F{sub x} and then to F{sub A}F{sub B}.

  17. Oxygen as Acceptor.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Vitaliy B; Verkhovsky, Michael I

    2015-01-01

    Like most bacteria, Escherichia coli has a flexible and branched respiratory chain that enables the prokaryote to live under a variety of environmental conditions, from highly aerobic to completely anaerobic. In general, the bacterial respiratory chain is composed of dehydrogenases, a quinone pool, and reductases. Substrate-specific dehydrogenases transfer reducing equivalents from various donor substrates (NADH, succinate, glycerophosphate, formate, hydrogen, pyruvate, and lactate) to a quinone pool (menaquinone, ubiquinone, and dimethylmenoquinone). Then electrons from reduced quinones (quinols) are transferred by terminal reductases to different electron acceptors. Under aerobic growth conditions, the terminal electron acceptor is molecular oxygen. A transfer of electrons from quinol to O₂ is served by two major oxidoreductases (oxidases), cytochrome bo₃ encoded by cyoABCDE and cytochrome bd encoded by cydABX. Terminal oxidases of aerobic respiratory chains of bacteria, which use O₂ as the final electron acceptor, can oxidize one of two alternative electron donors, either cytochrome c or quinol. This review compares the effects of different inhibitors on the respiratory activities of cytochrome bo₃ and cytochrome bd in E. coli. It also presents a discussion on the genetics and the prosthetic groups of cytochrome bo₃ and cytochrome bd. The E. coli membrane contains three types of quinones that all have an octaprenyl side chain (C₄₀). It has been proposed that the bo₃ oxidase can have two ubiquinone-binding sites with different affinities. "WHAT'S NEW" IN THE REVISED ARTICLE: The revised article comprises additional information about subunit composition of cytochrome bd and its role in bacterial resistance to nitrosative and oxidative stresses. Also, we present the novel data on the electrogenic function of appBCX-encoded cytochrome bd-II, a second bd-type oxidase that had been thought not to contribute to generation of a proton motive force in E

  18. Mutations Closer to the Active Site Improve the Promiscuous Aldolase Activity of 4-Oxalocrotonate Tautomerase More Effectively than Distant Mutations.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Mehran; van der Meer, Jan-Ytzen; Geertsema, Edzard M; Poddar, Harshwardhan; Baas, Bert-Jan; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2016-07-01

    The enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), which catalyzes enol-keto tautomerization as part of a degradative pathway for aromatic hydrocarbons, promiscuously catalyzes various carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions. These include the aldol condensation of acetaldehyde with benzaldehyde to yield cinnamaldehyde. Here, we demonstrate that 4-OT can be engineered into a more efficient aldolase for this condensation reaction, with a >5000-fold improvement in catalytic efficiency (kcat /Km ) and a >10(7) -fold change in reaction specificity, by exploring small libraries in which only "hotspots" are varied. The hotspots were identified by systematic mutagenesis (covering each residue), followed by a screen for single mutations that give a strong improvement in the desired aldolase activity. All beneficial mutations were near the active site of 4-OT, thus underpinning the notion that new catalytic activities of a promiscuous enzyme are more effectively enhanced by mutations close to the active site. PMID:27238293

  19. Associative Memory Acceptors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Card, Roger

    The properties of an associative memory are examined in this paper from the viewpoint of automata theory. A device called an associative memory acceptor is studied under real-time operation. The family "L" of languages accepted by real-time associative memory acceptors is shown to properly contain the family of languages accepted by one-tape,…

  20. Space environment induced mutations prefer to occur at polymorphic sites of rice genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Liu, M.; Cheng, Z.; Sun, Y.

    To explore the genomic characteristics of rice mutants induced by space environment, space-induced mutants 971-5, 972-4, and R955, which acquired new traits after space flight such as increased yield, reduced resistance to rice blast, and semi-dwarfism compared with their on-ground controls, 971ck, 972ck, and Bing95-503, respectively, together with other 8 japonica and 3 indica rice varieties, 17 in total, were analyzed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) method. We chose 16 AFLP primer-pairs which generated a total of 1251 sites, of which 745 (59.6%) were polymorphic over all the genotypes. With the 16 pairs of primer combinations, 54 space-induced mutation sites were observed in 971-5, 86 in 972-4, and 5 in R955 compared to their controls, and the mutation rates were 4.3%, 6.9% and 0.4%, respectively. Interestingly, 75.9%, 84.9% and 100% of the mutation sites identified in 971-5, 972-4, and R955 occurred in polymorphic sites. This result suggests that the space environment preferentially induced mutations at polymorphic sites in rice genomes and might share a common mechanism with other types of mutagens. It also implies that polymorphic sites in genomes are potential "hotspots" for mutations induced by the space environment.

  1. Analysis of a splice-site mutation in the sap-precursor gene of a patient with metachromatic leukodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Henseler, M.; Klein, A.; Reber, M.

    1996-01-01

    Sphingolipid activator proteins (SAPs) are small, nonenzymatic glycoproteins required for the lysosomal degradation of various sphingolipids with a short oligosaccharide chain by their exohydrolases. Four of the five known activator proteins (sap-A-sap-D), also called {open_quotes}saposins,{close_quotes} are derived from a common precursor by proteolytic processing. sap-B stimulates hydrolysis of sulfatides by arylsulfatase A in vivo. Its recessively inherited deficiency results in a metabolic disorder similar to classical metachromatic leukodystrophy, which is caused by a defect of arylsulfatase A. Here we report on a patient with sap-B deficiency. Reverse-transcription-PCR studies on the patient`s mRNA revealed the occurrence of two distinct mutant species: one with an in-frame deletion of the first 21 bases of exon 6, the other with a complete in-frame deletion of this exon. The patient was homozygous for the underlying mutation, which was found to be a G-{yields}T transversion within the acceptor splice site between intron e and exon 6, abolishing normal RNA splicing. Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization revealed that the parents and both grandfathers of the patient were carriers of this mutation. In order to analyze the fate of the mutant precursor proteins, both abnormal cDNAs were stably expressed in baby hamster kidney cells. Pulse-chase experiments showed that the deletion of 21 bp had no effect on the transport and the maturation of the encoded precursor. All sap forms except sap-B were detectable by immunochemical methods. The cDNA bearing a complete deletion of exon 6 encoded a shortened precursor of only 60 kD, and no mature SAPs were detectable. The carbohydrate chains of this polypeptide were of the high-mannose and hybrid type, indicating no transport of the mutant precursor beyond early Golgi apparatus. An endoplasmic-reticulum localization of this polypeptide was supported by indirect immunofluorescence analysis. 31 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Characterization of a novel TYMP splice site mutation associated with mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE).

    PubMed

    Taanman, Jan-Willem; Daras, Mariza; Albrecht, Juliane; Davie, Charles A; Mallam, Elizabeth A; Muddle, John R; Weatherall, Mark; Warner, Thomas T; Schapira, Anthony H V; Ginsberg, Lionel

    2009-02-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the thymidine phosphorylase gene (TYMP). We report here a patient compound heterozygous for two TYMP mutations: a novel g.4009G>A transition affecting the consensus splice donor site of intron 9, and a previously reported g.675G>C splice site mutation. The novel mutation causes exon 9 skipping but leaves the reading frame intact; however, TYMP protein was not detected by immunoblot analysis, suggesting that neither mutant allele is expressed as protein. The patient's fibroblasts showed gradual loss of the mitochondrial DNA-encoded subunit I of cytochrome-c oxidase, suggesting a progressive mitochondrial DNA defect in culture. PMID:19056268

  3. Association of Carney Complex with an Intronic Splice Site Mutation in the PRKAR1A Gene.

    PubMed

    Guo, H; Xiong, H; Li, Z; Xu, J; Zhang, H; Chen, X; Hu, S

    2016-06-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the clinical features and mutations in the PRKAR1A gene of a multigenerational kindred including 17 individuals at risk for Carney complex. Eight patients were diagnosed with Carney complex among the 17 individuals (47.1%). Among the 8 affected patients, 4 had cardiac myxomas, 8 had skin pigmentation, and 3 had diabetes. Genomic DNA sequencing in 14 surviving patients showed 6 had the same germline mutation in the sixth intron and affected the splice site. cDNA sequencing and DNAMAN software showed 159 bases were absent, resulting in the absence of the amino acids 249 to 301 from the protein. All 6 patients with this PRKAR1A gene mutation had skin pigmentation. In conclusion, the present study reported for the first time an intronic splice site mutation in the PRKAR1A gene of a Chinese family with Carney complex, which probably caused skin pigmentation observed in affected family members. PMID:26788925

  4. BRAF mutations in cutaneous melanoma are independently associated with age, anatomic site of the primary tumor and the degree of solar elastosis at the primary tumor site

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Jürgen; Büttner, Petra; Murali, Rajmohan; Okamoto, Ichiro; Kolaitis, Nicholas A; Landi, Maria Teresa; Scolyer, Richard A.; Bastian, Boris C.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Oncogenic BRAF mutations are more frequent in cutaneous melanoma from sites with little or moderate sun-induced damage than from sites with severe cumulative solar ultraviolet (UV) damage. We studied cutaneous melanomas from geographic regions with different levels of ambient UV radiation to delineate the relative effects of cumulative UV damage, age and anatomic site on the frequency of BRAF mutations. We show that BRAF-mutated melanomas occur in a younger age group on skin without marked solar elastosis, and less frequently affect the head and neck area, compared to melanomas without BRAF mutations. The findings indicate that BRAF-mutated melanomas arise early in life at low cumulative UV doses, whereas melanomas without BRAF mutations require accumulation of high UV doses over time. The effect of anatomic site on the mutation spectrum further suggests regional differences among cutaneous melanocytes. PMID:21324100

  5. Site-specific somatic mitochondrial DNA point mutations in patients with thymidine phosphorylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nishigaki, Yutaka; Martí, Ramon; Copeland, William C; Hirano, Michio

    2003-06-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding thymidine phosphorylase (TP). This deficiency of TP leads to increased circulating levels of thymidine (deoxythymidine, dThd) and deoxyuridine (dUrd) and has been associated with multiple deletions and depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Here we describe 36 point mutations in mtDNA of tissues and cultured cells from MNGIE patients. Thirty-one mtDNA point mutations (86%) were T-to-C transitions, and of these, 25 were preceded by 5'-AA sequences. In addition, we identified a single base-pair mtDNA deletion and a TT-to-AA mutation. Next-nucleotide effects and dislocation mutagenesis may contribute to the formation of these mutations. These results provide the first demonstration that alterations of nucleoside metabolism can induce multiple sequence-specific point mutations in humans. We hypothesize that, in patients with TP deficiency, increased levels of dThd and dUrd cause mitochondrial nucleotide pool imbalances, which, in turn, lead to mtDNA abnormalities including site-specific point mutations. PMID:12813027

  6. Site-specific somatic mitochondrial DNA point mutations in patients with thymidine phosphorylase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Nishigaki, Yutaka; Martí, Ramon; Copeland, William C.; Hirano, Michio

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding thymidine phosphorylase (TP). This deficiency of TP leads to increased circulating levels of thymidine (deoxythymidine, dThd) and deoxyuridine (dUrd) and has been associated with multiple deletions and depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Here we describe 36 point mutations in mtDNA of tissues and cultured cells from MNGIE patients. Thirty-one mtDNA point mutations (86%) were T-to-C transitions, and of these, 25 were preceded by 5′-AA sequences. In addition, we identified a single base-pair mtDNA deletion and a TT-to-AA mutation. Next-nucleotide effects and dislocation mutagenesis may contribute to the formation of these mutations. These results provide the first demonstration that alterations of nucleoside metabolism can induce multiple sequence-specific point mutations in humans. We hypothesize that, in patients with TP deficiency, increased levels of dThd and dUrd cause mitochondrial nucleotide pool imbalances, which, in turn, lead to mtDNA abnormalities including site-specific point mutations. PMID:12813027

  7. Splicing defects in the ataxia-telangiectasia gene, ATM: underlying mutations and consequences.

    PubMed Central

    Teraoka, S N; Telatar, M; Becker-Catania, S; Liang, T; Onengüt, S; Tolun, A; Chessa, L; Sanal, O; Bernatowska, E; Gatti, R A; Concannon, P

    1999-01-01

    Mutations resulting in defective splicing constitute a significant proportion (30/62 [48%]) of a new series of mutations in the ATM gene in patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) that were detected by the protein-truncation assay followed by sequence analysis of genomic DNA. Fewer than half of the splicing mutations involved the canonical AG splice-acceptor site or GT splice-donor site. A higher percentage of mutations occurred at less stringently conserved sites, including silent mutations of the last nucleotide of exons, mutations in nucleotides other than the conserved AG and GT in the consensus splice sites, and creation of splice-acceptor or splice-donor sites in either introns or exons. These splicing mutations led to a variety of consequences, including exon skipping and, to a lesser degree, intron retention, activation of cryptic splice sites, or creation of new splice sites. In addition, 5 of 12 nonsense mutations and 1 missense mutation were associated with deletion in the cDNA of the exons in which the mutations occurred. No ATM protein was detected by western blotting in any AT cell line in which splicing mutations were identified. Several cases of exon skipping in both normal controls and patients for whom no underlying defect could be found in genomic DNA were also observed, suggesting caution in the interpretation of exon deletions observed in ATM cDNA when there is no accompanying identification of genomic mutations. PMID:10330348

  8. Predicting the Mutating Distribution at Antigenic Sites of the Influenza Virus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongyang; Yang, Yiyan; Wang, Shuning; Zhu, Ruixin; Qiu, Tianyi; Qiu, Jingxuan; Zhang, Qingchen; Jin, Li; He, Yungang; Tang, Kailin; Cao, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the influenza virus lead to antigenic changes that cause recurrent epidemics and vaccine resistance. Preventive measures would benefit greatly from the ability to predict the potential distribution of new antigenic sites in future strains. By leveraging the extensive historical records of HA sequences for 90 years, we designed a computational model to simulate the dynamic evolution of antigenic sites in A/H1N1. With templates of antigenic sequences, the model can effectively predict the potential distribution of future antigenic mutants. Validation on 10932 HA sequences from the last 16 years showing that the mutated antigenic sites of over 94% of reported strains fell in our predicted profile. Meanwhile, our model can successfully capture 96% of antigenic sites in those dominant epitopes. Similar results are observed on the complete set of H3N2 historical data, supporting the general applicability of our model to multiple sub-types of influenza. Our results suggest that the mutational profile of future antigenic sites can be predicted based on historical evolutionary traces despite the widespread, random mutations in influenza. Coupled with closely monitored sequence data from influenza surveillance networks, our method can help to forecast changes in viral antigenicity for seasonal flu and inform public health interventions. PMID:26837263

  9. Protein stability: a single recorded mutation aids in predicting the effects of other mutations in the same amino acid site

    PubMed Central

    Wainreb, Gilad; Wolf, Lior; Ashkenazy, Haim; Dehouck, Yves; Ben-Tal, Nir

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Accurate prediction of protein stability is important for understanding the molecular underpinnings of diseases and for the design of new proteins. We introduce a novel approach for the prediction of changes in protein stability that arise from a single-site amino acid substitution; the approach uses available data on mutations occurring in the same position and in other positions. Our algorithm, named Pro-Maya (Protein Mutant stAbilitY Analyzer), combines a collaborative filtering baseline model, Random Forests regression and a diverse set of features. Pro-Maya predicts the stability free energy difference of mutant versus wild type, denoted as ΔΔG. Results: We evaluated our algorithm extensively using cross-validation on two previously utilized datasets of single amino acid mutations and a (third) validation set. The results indicate that using known ΔΔG values of mutations at the query position improves the accuracy of ΔΔG predictions for other mutations in that position. The accuracy of our predictions in such cases significantly surpasses that of similar methods, achieving, e.g. a Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.79 and a root mean square error of 0.96 on the validation set. Because Pro-Maya uses a diverse set of features, including predictions using two other methods, it also performs slightly better than other methods in the absence of additional experimental data on the query positions. Availability: Pro-Maya is freely available via web server at http://bental.tau.ac.il/ProMaya. Contact: nirb@tauex.tau.ac.il; wolf@cs.tau.ac.il Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:21998155

  10. Stability junction at a common mutation site in the collagenous domain of the mannose binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Mohs, Angela; Li, Yingjie; Doss-Pepe, Ellen; Baum, Jean; Brodsky, Barbara

    2005-02-15

    Missense mutations in the collagen triple-helix that replace one of the required Gly residues in the (Gly-Xaa-Yaa)(n)() repeating sequence have been implicated in various disorders. Although most hereditary collagen disorders are rare, a common occurrence of a Gly replacement mutation is found in the collagenous domain of mannose binding lectin (MBL). A Gly --> Asp mutation at position 54 in MBL is found at a frequency as high as 30% in certain populations and leads to increased susceptibility to infections. The structural and energetic consequences of this mutation are investigated by comparing a triple-helical peptide containing the N-terminal Gly-X-Y units of MBL with the homologous peptide containing the Gly to Asp replacement. The mutation leads to a loss of triple-helix content but only a small decrease in the stability of the triple-helix (DeltaT(m) approximately 2 degrees C) and no change in the calorimetric enthalpy. NMR studies on specifically labeled residues indicate the portion of the peptide C-terminal to residue 54 is in a highly ordered triple-helix in both peptides, while residues N-terminal to the mutation site have a weak triple-helical signal in the parent peptide and are completely disordered in the mutant peptide. These results suggest that the N-terminal triplet residues are contributing little to the stability of this peptide, a hypothesis confirmed by the stability and enthalpy of shorter peptides containing only the region C-terminal to the mutation site. The Gly to Asp replacement at position 54 in MBL occurs at the boundary of a highly stable triple-helix region and a very unstable sequence. The junctional position of this mutation minimizes its destabilizing effect, in contrast with the significant destabilization seen for Gly replacements in peptides modeling collagen diseases. PMID:15697204

  11. Analysis of cleavage site mutations between the NC and PR Gag domains of Rous sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Schatz, G; Pichova, I; Vogt, V M

    1997-01-01

    In retroviruses, the viral protease (PR) is released as a mature protein by cleavage of Gag, Gag-Pro, or Gag-Pro-Pol precursor polypeptides. In avian sarcoma and leukemia viruses (ASLV), PR forms the C-terminal domain of Gag. Based on the properties of a mutation (cs22) in the cleavage site between the upstream NC domain and the PR domain, the proteolytic liberation of PR previously was inferred to be essential for processing of Gag and Pol proteins. To study this process in more detail, we have analyzed the effects that several mutations at the NC-PR cleavage site have on proteolytic processing in virus-like particles expressed in COS and quail cells. Mutant Gag proteins carrying the same mutations also were synthesized in vitro and tested for processing with purified PR. In both types of studies, N-terminal sequencing of the liberated PR domain was carried out to exactly identify the site of cleavage. Finally, synthetic peptides corresponding to the mutant proteins were assessed for the ability to act as substrates for PR. The results were all consistent and led to the following conclusions. (i) In vivo, if normal processing between NC and PR is prevented by mutations, limited cleavage occurs at a previously unrecognized alternative site three amino acids downstream, i.e., in PR. This N-terminally truncated PR is inactive as an enzyme, as inferred from the global processing defect in cs22 and a similar mutant. (ii) In Gag proteins translated in vitro, purified PR cleaves this alternative site as rapidly as it does the wild-type site. (iii) Contrary to previously accepted rules describing retroviral cleavage sites, an isoleucine residue placed at the P1 position of the NC-PR cleavage site does not hinder normal processing. (iv) A proline residue placed at the P2 position in this cleavage site blocks normal processing. PMID:8985369

  12. Molecular characterization of novel splice site mutation causing protein C deficiency.

    PubMed

    Al-Hamed, Mohamed H; AlBatniji, Fatma; AlDakheel, Ghadah A; El-Faraidi, Huda; Al-Zahrani, Azzah; Al-Abbass, Fahed; Imtiaz, Faiqa

    2016-07-01

    Congenital protein C deficiency is an inherited coagulation disorder associated with an elevated risk of venous thromboembolism. A Saudi Arabian male from a consanguineous family was admitted to neonatal intensive care unit in his first days of life because of transient tachypnea and hematuria. Laboratory investigations determined low platelet and protein C deficiency. Direct sequencing of PROC gene and RNA analysis were performed. Analysis of factor V Leiden (G1691A) and factor II (G20210A) mutations was also done. Novel homozygous splice site mutation c.796+3A>T was detected in the index case and segregation was confirmed in the family. RNA analysis revealed the pathogenicity of the mutation by skipping exon 8 of PROC gene and changing the donor splice site of the exon. Detection of the molecular cause of protein C deficiency reduces life threatening and facilitates inductive carrier testing, prenatal and preimplantation genetic diagnosis for families. PMID:26656900

  13. A mutational analysis of the acetylcholine receptor channel transmitter binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Akk, G; Zhou, M; Auerbach, A

    1999-01-01

    Mutagenesis and single-channel kinetic analysis were used to investigate the roles of four acetylcholine receptor channel (AChR) residues that are candidates for interacting directly with the agonist. The EC50 of the ACh dose-response curve was increased following alpha-subunit mutations Y93F and Y198F and epsilon-subunit mutations D175N and E184Q. Single-channel kinetic modeling indicates that the increase was caused mainly by a reduced gating equilibrium constant (Theta) in alphaY198F and epsilonD175N, by an increase in the equilibrium dissociation constant for ACh (KD) and a reduction in Theta in alphaY93F, and only by a reduction in KD in epsilonE184Q. This mutation altered the affinity of only one of the two binding sites and was the only mutation that reduced competition by extracellular K+. Additional mutations of epsilonE184 showed that K+ competition was unaltered in epsilonE184D and was virtually eliminated in epsilonE184K, but that neither of these mutations altered the intrinsic affinity for ACh. Thus there is an apparent electrostatic interaction between the epsilonE184 side chain and K+ ( approximately 1.7kBT), but not ACh+. The results are discussed in terms of multisite and induced-fit models of ligand binding to the AChR. PMID:9876135

  14. DNA fingerprinting reveals elevated mutation rates in herring gulls inhabiting a genotoxically contaminated site

    SciTech Connect

    Yauk, C.L.; Quinn, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    The authors used multi-locus DNA fingerprinting to examine families of herring gulls (Larus argentatus) from a genotoxically contaminated site (Hamilton Harbour) and from a pristine location (Kent Island, Bay of Fundy) to show significant differences in mutation rates between the locations. Overall the authors identified 17 mutant bands from 15 individuals of the 35 examined from Hamilton Harbour, and 7 mutant fragments from 7 individuals, of the 43 examined from Kent Island; a mutation frequency of 0.429 per nestling for Hamilton Harbour and 0.163 for Kent Island. The total number of individuals with mutant bands was significantly higher at Hamilton Harbour than at Kent Island (X{sup 2}=6.734; df = 1; P < 0.01). Ongoing analysis of other less contaminated sites also reveals lower mutation rates than those seen in Hamilton Harbour. With multi-locus DNA fingerprinting many regions of the genome can be surveyed simultaneously. The tandemly repeated arrays of nucleotides examined with DNA fingerprinting are known to have elevated rates of mutation. Furthermore, the mutations seen with DNA fingerprinting are predominantly heritable. Other biomarkers currently used in situ are not able to monitor direct and heritable DNA mutation, or measure biological endpoints that frequently result in spontaneous abortion creating difficulty in observing significantly elevated levels in viable offspring. The authors suggest that multilocus DNA fingerprinting can be used as a biomarker to identify potentially heritable risks before the onset of other types of ecological damage. This approach provides a direct measure of mutation in situ and in vivo in a vertebrate species under ambient conditions.

  15. Mutations Outside the Anisomycin-Binding Site Can Make Ribosomes Drug-Resistant

    SciTech Connect

    Blaha,G.; Gurel, G.; Schroeder, S.; Moore, P.; Steitz, T.

    2008-01-01

    Eleven mutations that make Haloarcula marismortui resistant to anisomycin, an antibiotic that competes with the amino acid side chains of aminoacyl tRNAs for binding to the A-site cleft of the large ribosomal unit, have been identified in 23S rRNA. The correlation observed between the sensitivity of H. marismortui to anisomycin and the affinity of its large ribosomal subunits for the drug indicates that its response to anisomycin is determined primarily by the binding of the drug to its large ribosomal subunit. The structures of large ribosomal subunits containing resistance mutations show that these mutations can be divided into two classes: (1) those that interfere with specific drug-ribosome interactions and (2) those that stabilize the apo conformation of the A-site cleft of the ribosome relative to its drug-bound conformation. The conformational effects of some mutations of the second kind propagate through the ribosome for considerable distances and are reversed when A-site substrates bind to the ribosome.

  16. Mutation-Induced Changes in the Protein Environment and Site Energies in the (M)L214G Mutant of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides Bacterial Reaction Center.

    PubMed

    Jankowiak, Ryszard; Rancova, Olga; Chen, Jinhai; Kell, Adam; Saer, Rafael G; Beatty, J Thomas; Abramavicius, Darius

    2016-08-18

    This work focuses on the low-temperature (5 K) photochemical (transient) hole-burned (HB) spectra within the P870 absorption band, and their theoretical analysis, for the (M)L214G mutant of the photosynthetic Rhodobacter sphaeroides bacterial reaction center (bRC). To provide insight into system-bath interactions of the bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) special pair, i.e., P870, in the mutated bRC, the optical line shape function for the P870 band is calculated numerically. On the basis of the modeling studies, we demonstrate that (M)L214G mutation leads to a heterogeneous population of bRCs with modified (increased) total electron-phonon coupling strength of the special pair BChl a and larger inhomogeneous broadening. Specifically, we show that after mutation in the (M)L214G bRC a large fraction (∼50%) of the bacteriopheophytin (HA) chromophores shifts red and the 800 nm absorption band broadens, while the remaining fraction of HA cofactors retains nearly the same site energy as HA in the wild-type bRC. Modeling using these two subpopulations allowed for fits of the absorption and nonresonant (transient) HB spectra of the mutant bRC in the charge neutral, oxidized, and charge-separated states using the Frenkel exciton Hamiltonian, providing new insight into the mutant's complex electronic structure. Although the average (M)L214G mutant quantum efficiency of P(+)QA(-) state formation seems to be altered in comparison with the wild-type bRC, the average electron transfer time (measured via resonant transient HB spectra within the P870 band) was not affected. Thus, mutation in the vicinity of the electron acceptor (HA) does not tune the charge separation dynamics. Finally, quenching of the (M)L214G mutant excited states by P(+) is addressed by persistent HB spectra burned within the B band in chemically oxidized samples. PMID:27458891

  17. Alternansucrase acceptor products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The regioselectivity of alternansucrase (EC 2.4.1.140) differs from dextransucrase (EC 2.4.1.5) in ways that can be useful for the synthesis of novel oligosaccharide structures. For example, it has been recently shown that the major oligosaccharides produced when maltose is the acceptor include one...

  18. Mutation status concordance between primary lesions and metastatic sites of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer and the impact of mutation testing methodologies: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, James; Dearden, Simon; Ratcliffe, Marianne; Walker, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Increased understanding of the genetic aetiology of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (aNSCLC) has facilitated personalised therapies that target specific molecular aberrations associated with the disease. Biopsy samples for mutation testing may be taken from primary or metastatic sites, depending on which sample is most accessible, and upon differing diagnostic practices between territories. However, the mutation status concordance between primary tumours and corresponding metastases is the subject of debate. This review aims to ascertain whether molecular diagnostic testing of either the primary or metastatic tumours is equally suitable to determine patient eligibility for targeted therapies. A literature search was performed to identify articles reporting studies of mutations in matched primary and metastatic aNSCLC tumour samples. Clinical results of mutation status concordance between matched primary and metastatic tumour samples from patients with aNSCLC were collated. Articles included in this review (N =26) all reported mutation status data from matched primary and metastatic tumour samples obtained from adult patients with aNSCLC. Generally, substantial concordance was observed between primary and metastatic tumours in terms of EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, p16 and p53 mutations. However, some level of discordance was seen in most studies; mutation testing methodologies appeared to play a key role in this, along with underlying tumour heterogeneity. Substantial concordance in mutation status observed between primary and metastatic tumour sites suggests that diagnostic testing of either tumour type may be suitable to determine a patient's eligibility for personalised therapies. As with all diagnostic testing, highly sensitive and appropriately validated mutation analysis methodologies are desirable to ensure accuracy. Additional work is also required to define how much discordance is clinically significant given natural tumour heterogeneity. The ability of both

  19. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of human septin 1 with site-directed mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Hao; Yu, Wen-bo; Li, Shu-xing; Ding, Xiang-ming; Yu, Long; Bi, Ru-Chang

    2006-02-01

    The homogeneity of septin 1 has been improved by site-directed mutation of serine residues and only a small alteration in the secondary structure is observed to arise from the mutations. Crystals of the septin 1 mutant were grown and diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. Septin 1 is a member of an evolutionarily conserved family of GTP-binding and filament-forming proteins named septins, which function in diverse processes including cytokinasis, vesicle trafficking, apoptosis, remodelling of the cytoskeleton, infection, neurodegeneration and neoplasia. Human septin 1 has been expressed and purified, but suffers from severe aggregation. Studies have shown that septin 1 with site-directed mutations of five serine residues (Ser19, Ser206, Ser307, Ser312 and Ser315) has a much lower degree of aggregation and better structural homogeneity and that the mutations cause only slight perturbations in the secondary structure of septin 1. This septin 1 mutant was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. The space group is P422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 106.028, c = 137.852 Å.

  20. Congenital contractural arachnodactyly due to a novel splice site mutation in the FBN2 gene

    PubMed Central

    Mehar, Virendra; Yadav, Dinesh; Kumar, Ravindra; Yadav, Summi; Singh, Kuldeep; Callewaert, Bert; Pathan, Shahnawaz; De Paepe, Anne; Coucke, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital contractural arachnodactyly is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by crumpled ears, congenital contractures, arachnodactyly and scoliosis. Only few cases have been described to date. Here we report a newborn with congenital contractures, crumpled ears and scoliosis. Molecular analysis revealed a novel fibrillin-2 mutation at the donor splice site of intron 28. We discuss the differential diagnosis of neonates with congenital contractures and review the current knowledge on congenital contractural arachnodactyly.

  1. Novel splice site mutation in the growth hormone receptor gene in Turkish patients with Laron-type dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Arman, Ahmet; Ozon, Alev; Isguven, Pinar S; Coker, Ajda; Peker, Ismail; Yordam, Nursen

    2008-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is involved in growth, and fat and carbohydrate metabolism. Interaction of GH with the GH receptor (GHR) is necessary for systemic and local production of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) which mediates GH actions. Mutations in the GHR cause severe postnatal growth failure; the disorder is an autosomal recessive genetic disease resulting in GH insensitivity, called Laron syndrome. It is characterized by dwarfism with elevated serum GH and low levels of IGF-I. We analyzed the GHR gene for mutations and polymorphisms in eight patients with Laron-type dwarfism from six families. We found three missense mutations (S40L, V125A, I526L), one nonsense mutation (W157X), and one splice site mutation in the extracellular domain of GHR. Furthermore, G168G and exon 3 deletion polymorphisms were detected in patients with Laron syndrome. The splice site mutation, which is a novel mutation, was located at the donor splice site of exon 2/ intron 2 within GHR. Although this mutation changed the highly conserved donor splice site consensus sequence GT to GGT by insertion of a G residue, the intron splicing between exon 2 and exon 3 was detected in the patient. These results imply that the splicing occurs arthe GT site in intron 2, leaving the extra inserted G residue at the end of exon 2, thus changing the open reading frame of GHR resulting in a premature termination codon in exon 3. PMID:18404972

  2. Estimation of the spontaneous mutation rate per nucleotide site in a Drosophila melanogaster full-sib family.

    PubMed

    Keightley, Peter D; Ness, Rob W; Halligan, Daniel L; Haddrill, Penelope R

    2014-01-01

    We employed deep genome sequencing of two parents and 12 of their offspring to estimate the mutation rate per site per generation in a full-sib family of Drosophila melanogaster recently sampled from a natural population. Sites that were homozygous for the same allele in the parents and heterozygous in one or more offspring were categorized as candidate mutations and subjected to detailed analysis. In 1.23 × 10(9) callable sites from 12 individuals, we confirmed six single nucleotide mutations. We estimated the false negative rate in the experiment by generating synthetic mutations using the empirical distributions of numbers of nonreference bases at heterozygous sites in the offspring. The proportion of synthetic mutations at callable sites that we failed to detect was <1%, implying that the false negative rate was extremely low. Our estimate of the point mutation rate is 2.8 × 10(-9) (95% confidence interval = 1.0 × 10(-9) - 6.1 × 10(-9)) per site per generation, which is at the low end of the range of previous estimates, and suggests an effective population size for the species of ∼1.4 × 10(6). At one site, point mutations were present in two individuals, indicating that there had been a premeiotic mutation cluster, although surprisingly one individual had a G→A transition and the other a G→T transversion, possibly associated with error-prone mismatch repair. We also detected three short deletion mutations and no insertions, giving a deletion mutation rate of 1.2 × 10(-9) (95% confidence interval = 0.7 × 10(-9) - 11 × 10(-9)). PMID:24214343

  3. Estimation of the Spontaneous Mutation Rate per Nucleotide Site in a Drosophila melanogaster Full-Sib Family

    PubMed Central

    Keightley, Peter D.; Ness, Rob W.; Halligan, Daniel L.; Haddrill, Penelope R.

    2014-01-01

    We employed deep genome sequencing of two parents and 12 of their offspring to estimate the mutation rate per site per generation in a full-sib family of Drosophila melanogaster recently sampled from a natural population. Sites that were homozygous for the same allele in the parents and heterozygous in one or more offspring were categorized as candidate mutations and subjected to detailed analysis. In 1.23 × 109 callable sites from 12 individuals, we confirmed six single nucleotide mutations. We estimated the false negative rate in the experiment by generating synthetic mutations using the empirical distributions of numbers of nonreference bases at heterozygous sites in the offspring. The proportion of synthetic mutations at callable sites that we failed to detect was <1%, implying that the false negative rate was extremely low. Our estimate of the point mutation rate is 2.8 × 10−9 (95% confidence interval = 1.0 × 10−9 − 6.1 × 10−9) per site per generation, which is at the low end of the range of previous estimates, and suggests an effective population size for the species of ∼1.4 × 106. At one site, point mutations were present in two individuals, indicating that there had been a premeiotic mutation cluster, although surprisingly one individual had a G→A transition and the other a G→T transversion, possibly associated with error-prone mismatch repair. We also detected three short deletion mutations and no insertions, giving a deletion mutation rate of 1.2 × 10−9 (95% confidence interval = 0.7 × 10−9 − 11 × 10−9). PMID:24214343

  4. Alteration of the Donor/Acceptor Spectrum of the (S)-Amine Transaminase from Vibrio fluvialis.

    PubMed

    Genz, Maika; Vickers, Clare; van den Bergh, Tom; Joosten, Henk-Jan; Dörr, Mark; Höhne, Matthias; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2015-01-01

    To alter the amine donor/acceptor spectrum of an (S)-selective amine transaminase (ATA), a library based on the Vibrio fluvialis ATA targeting four residues close to the active site (L56, W57, R415 and L417) was created. A 3DM-derived alignment comprising fold class I pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes allowed identification of positions, which were assumed to determine substrate specificity. These positions were targeted for mutagenesis with a focused alphabet of hydrophobic amino acids to convert an amine:α-keto acid transferase into an amine:aldehyde transferase. Screening of 1200 variants revealed three hits, which showed a shifted amine donor/acceptor spectrum towards aliphatic aldehydes (mainly pentanal), as well as an altered pH profile. Interestingly, all three hits, although found independently, contained the same mutation R415L and additional W57F and L417V substitutions. PMID:26569229

  5. Alteration of the Donor/Acceptor Spectrum of the (S)-Amine Transaminase from Vibrio fluvialis

    PubMed Central

    Genz, Maika; Vickers, Clare; van den Bergh, Tom; Joosten, Henk-Jan; Dörr, Mark; Höhne, Matthias; Bornscheuer, Uwe T.

    2015-01-01

    To alter the amine donor/acceptor spectrum of an (S)-selective amine transaminase (ATA), a library based on the Vibrio fluvialis ATA targeting four residues close to the active site (L56, W57, R415 and L417) was created. A 3DM-derived alignment comprising fold class I pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes allowed identification of positions, which were assumed to determine substrate specificity. These positions were targeted for mutagenesis with a focused alphabet of hydrophobic amino acids to convert an amine:α-keto acid transferase into an amine:aldehyde transferase. Screening of 1200 variants revealed three hits, which showed a shifted amine donor/acceptor spectrum towards aliphatic aldehydes (mainly pentanal), as well as an altered pH profile. Interestingly, all three hits, although found independently, contained the same mutation R415L and additional W57F and L417V substitutions. PMID:26569229

  6. Structural Characterization of Human 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase Variants Bearing Active Site Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Radom,C.; Banerjee, A.; Verdine, G.

    2007-01-01

    The human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) protein is responsible for initiating base excision DNA repair of the endogenous mutagen 8-oxoguanine. Like nearly all DNA glycosylases, hOGG1 extrudes its substrate from the DNA helix and inserts it into an extrahelical enzyme active site pocket lined with residues that participate in lesion recognition and catalysis. Structural analysis has been performed on mutant versions of hOGG1 having changes in catalytic residues but not on variants having altered 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (oxoG) contact residues. Here we report high resolution structural analysis of such recognition variants. We found that Ala substitution at residues that contact the phosphate 5 to the lesion (H270A mutation) and its Watson-Crick face (Q315A mutation) simply removed key functionality from the contact interface but otherwise had no effect on structure. Ala substitution at the only residue making an oxoG-specific contact (G42A mutation) introduced torsional stress into the DNA contact surface of hOGG1, but this was overcome by local interactions within the folded protein, indicating that this oxoG recognition motif is 'hardwired'. Introduction of a side chain intended to sterically obstruct the active site pocket (Q315F mutation) led to two different structures, one of which (Q315F{sup *149}) has the oxoG lesion in an exosite flanking the active site and the other of which (Q315F{sup *292}) has the oxoG inserted nearly completely into the lesion recognition pocket. The latter structure offers a view of the latest stage in the base extrusion pathway yet observed, and its lack of catalytic activity demonstrates that the transition state for displacement of the lesion base is geometrically demanding.

  7. MUTATION SPECTRA OF GLU-P-1 IN SALMONELLA: INDUCTION OF HOTSPOT FRAMESHIFTS AND SITE-SPECIFIC BASE SUBSTITUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mutations induced in approximately 2,000 mutants of Salmonella by the heterocyclic@ amine Glu-P-1 were determined by colony probe hybridization and PCR/DNA sequence analysis. ll of the mutations were at sites containing guanine, which is the base at which Glu-P-1 forms DNA ad...

  8. Mutation-selection models of coding sequence evolution with site-heterogeneous amino acid fitness profiles.

    PubMed

    Rodrigue, Nicolas; Philippe, Hervé; Lartillot, Nicolas

    2010-03-01

    Modeling the interplay between mutation and selection at the molecular level is key to evolutionary studies. To this end, codon-based evolutionary models have been proposed as pertinent means of studying long-range evolutionary patterns and are widely used. However, these approaches have not yet consolidated results from amino acid level phylogenetic studies showing that selection acting on proteins displays strong site-specific effects, which translate into heterogeneous amino acid propensities across the columns of alignments; related codon-level studies have instead focused on either modeling a single selective context for all codon columns, or a separate selective context for each codon column, with the former strategy deemed too simplistic and the latter deemed overparameterized. Here, we integrate recent developments in nonparametric statistical approaches to propose a probabilistic model that accounts for the heterogeneity of amino acid fitness profiles across the coding positions of a gene. We apply the model to a dozen real protein-coding gene alignments and find it to produce biologically plausible inferences, for instance, as pertaining to site-specific amino acid constraints, as well as distributions of scaled selection coefficients. In their account of mutational features as well as the heterogeneous regimes of selection at the amino acid level, the modeling approaches studied here can form a backdrop for several extensions, accounting for other selective features, for variable population size, or for subtleties of mutational features, all with parameterizations couched within population-genetic theory. PMID:20176949

  9. Upregulation of RNase E activity by mutation of a site that uncompetitively interferes with RNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Minho; Shin, Eunkyoung; Jeon, Che Ok; Cha, Chang-Jun; Han, Seung Hyun; Kim, Su-Jin; Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Younghoon; Ha, Nam-Chul

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli RNase E contains a site that selectively binds to RNAs containing 5′-monophosphate termini, increasing the efficiency of endonucleolytic cleavage of these RNAs. Random mutagenesis of N-Rne, the N-terminal catalytic region of RNase E, identified a hyperactive variant that remains preferentially responsive to phosphorylation at 5′ termini. Biochemical analyses showed that the mutation (Q36R), which replaces glutamine with arginine at a position distant from the catalytic site, increases formation of stable RNA-protein complexes without detectably affecting the enzyme's secondary or tertiary structure. Studies of cleavage of fluorogenic substrate and EMSA experiments indicated that the Q36R mutation increases catalytic activity and RNA binding. however, UV crosslinking and mass spectrometry studies suggested that the mutant enzyme lacks an RNA binding site present in its wild-type counterpart. Two substrate-bound tryptic peptides, 65HGFLPLK71—which includes amino acids previously implicated in substrate binding and catalysis—and 24LYDLDIESPGHEQK37—which includes the Q36 locus—were identified in wild-type enzyme complexes, whereas only the shorter peptide was observed for complexes containing Q36R. Our results identify a novel RNase E locus that disparately affects the number of substrate binding sites and catalytic activity of the enzyme. We propose a model that may account for these surprising effects. PMID:22186084

  10. A Ty1 Reverse Transcriptase Active-Site Aspartate Mutation Blocks Transposition but Not Polymerization†

    PubMed Central

    Uzun, Ozcan; Gabriel, Abram

    2001-01-01

    Reverse transcriptases (RTs) are found in a wide variety of mobile genetic elements including viruses, retrotransposons, and infectious organellar introns. An invariant triad of aspartates is thought to be required for the catalytic function of RTs. We generated RT mutants in the yeast retrotransposon Ty1, changing each of these active-site aspartates to asparagine or glutamate. All but one of the mutants lacked detectable polymerase activity. The novel exception, D211N, retained near wild-type in vitro polymerase activity within virus-like particles but failed to carry out in vivo transposition. For this mutant, minus-strand synthesis is impaired and formation of the plus-strand strong-stop intermediate is eliminated. Intragenic second-site suppressor mutations of the transposition defect map to the RNase H domain of the enzyme. Our results demonstrate that one of the three active-site aspartates in a retrotransposon RT is not catalytically critical. This implies a basic difference in the polymerase active-site geometry of Ty1 and human immunodeficiency virus RT and shows that subtle mutations in one domain can cause dramatic functional effects on a distant domain of the same enzyme. PMID:11413300

  11. A syndrome of microcephaly, short stature, polysyndactyly, and dental anomalies caused by a homozygous KATNB1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Yigit, Gökhan; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Bögershausen, Nina; Beleggia, Filippo; Möller-Hartmann, Claudia; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Wollnik, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous acceptor splice-site mutation in intron 6 of the KATNB1 gene in a patient from a consanguineous Turkish family who presented with congenital microcephaly, lissencephaly, short stature, polysyndactyly, and dental abnormalities. cDNA analysis revealed complete loss of the natural acceptor splice-site resulting either in the usage of an alternative, exonic acceptor splice-site inducing a frame-shift and premature protein truncation or, to a minor extent, in complete skipping of exon 7. Both effects most likely lead to complete loss of KATNB1 function. Homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations in KATNB1 have very recently been described as a cause of microcephaly with brain malformations and seizures. We extend the KATNB1 associated phenotype by describing a syndrome characterized by primordial dwarfism, lissencephaly, polysyndactyly, and dental anomalies, which is caused by a homozygous truncating KATNB1 mutation. PMID:26640080

  12. A case of mild CHARGE syndrome associated with a splice site mutation in CHD7.

    PubMed

    Wells, Constance; Loundon, Natalie; Garabedian, Noël; Wiener-Vacher, Sylvette; Cordier-Bouvier, Marie-Dominique; Goudeffroye, Géraldine; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Marlin, Sandrine

    2016-04-01

    CHARGE syndrome (MIM#214800) (Coloboma, Heart defect, Atresia of choanae, Retarded growth and development, Genital hypoplasia, Ear abnormalities/deafness) is caused by heterozygous mutation of CHD7 transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner. In this report, we describe a patient with bilateral hearing impairment, unusually-shaped ears, no intellectual disability and a patent ductus arteriosus. Further investigation showed abnormal semicircular canals and the presence of olfactory bulbs. He does not fulfill the Blake or the Verloes criteria for CHARGE. A de novo mutation at the donor splice site of intron 33 was identified (c.7164 + 1G > A). It is of importance to diagnose mildly affected patients for appropriate genetic counselling and to better understand the mild end of the phenotypic spectrum of CHARGE syndrome. PMID:26921530

  13. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of human septin 1 with site-directed mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hao; Yu, Wen-bo; Li, Shu-xing; Ding, Xiang-ming; Yu, Long; Bi, Ru-Chang

    2006-01-01

    Septin 1 is a member of an evolutionarily conserved family of GTP-binding and filament-forming proteins named septins, which function in diverse processes including cytokinasis, vesicle trafficking, apoptosis, remodelling of the cytoskeleton, infection, neurodegeneration and neoplasia. Human septin 1 has been expressed and purified, but suffers from severe aggregation. Studies have shown that septin 1 with site-directed mutations of five serine residues (Ser19, Ser206, Ser307, Ser312 and Ser315) has a much lower degree of aggregation and better structural homogeneity and that the mutations cause only slight perturbations in the secondary structure of septin 1. This septin 1 mutant was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. The space group is P422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 106.028, c = 137.852 Å. PMID:16511282

  14. Structural Mutations that Probe the Interactions between the Catalytic and Dianion Activation Sites at Triosephosphate Isomerase‡

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Xiang; Amyes, Tina L.; Wierenga, Rik K.; Loria, J. Patrick; Richard, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) catalyzes the isomerization of dihydroxyacetone phosphate to form D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. The effects of two structural mutations at TIM on the kinetic parameters for catalysis of the reaction of the truncated substrate glycolaldehyde (GA) and the activation of this reaction by phosphite dianion are reported. The P168A mutation results in similar 50-fold and 80-fold decreases, respectively, in (kcat/Km)E and (kcat/Km)E•HPi for deprotonation of GA catalyzed by free TIM and by the TIM•HPO32− complex. The mutation has little effect on the observed and intrinsic phosphite dianion binding energy, or on the magnitude of phosphite dianion activation of TIM for catalysis of deprotonation of GA. A loop 7 replacement mutant (L7RM) of TIM from chicken muscle was prepared by substitution of the archaeal sequence 208-TGAG for 208-YGGS. The L7RM exhibits a 25-fold decrease in (kcat/Km)E and a larger 170-fold decrease in (kcat/Km)E•HPi for reactions of GA. The mutation has little effect on the observed and intrinsic phosphodianion binding energy, and only a modest effect on phosphite dianion activation of TIM. The observation that both the P168A and loop 7 replacement mutations affect mainly the kinetic parameters for TIM-catalyzed deprotonation, but result in much smaller changes in the parameters for enzyme activation by phosphite dianion provide support for the conclusion that catalysis of proton transfer and dianion activation of TIM take place at separate, weakly interacting, sites in the protein catalyst. PMID:23909928

  15. A novel donor splice-site mutation of major intrinsic protein gene associated with congenital cataract in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lu; Liu, Wenqiang; Feng, Wenguo; Wang, Xing; Dang, Hui; Gao, Luna; Yao, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To identify the disease-causing gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant congenital cataract. Methods Clinical and ophthalmologic examinations were performed on all members of a Chinese family with congenital cataract. Nine genes associated with congenital cataract were screened using direct DNA sequencing. Mutations were confirmed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. The mutated major intrinsic protein (MIP) minigene, which carries the disease-causing splice-site mutation, and the wild-type (WT) MIP minigene were constructed using the pcDNA3.1 expression vector. Wild-type and mutant MIP minigene constructs were transiently transfected into HeLa cells. After 48 h of incubation at 37 °C, total RNA isolation and reverse transcription (RT)–PCR analysis were performed, and PCR products were separated and confirmed with sequencing. Results Direct DNA sequence analysis identified a novel splice-site mutation in intron 3 (c.606+1 G>A) of the MIP gene. To investigate the manner in which the splice donor mutation could affect mRNA splicing, WT and mutant MIP minigenes were inserted in the pcDNA3.1 (+) vector. Constructs were transfected into HeLa cells. RT–PCR analysis showed that the donor splice site mutation led to deletion of exon 3 in the mRNA encoded by the MIP gene. Conclusions The present study identified a novel donor splice-site mutation (c.606+1G>A) in the MIP gene in a Chinese family with congenital cataract. In vitro RT–PCR analysis showed that this splice-site mutation resulted in the deletion of exon 3 from mRNA encoded by the MIP gene. This is the first report to show that donor splice-site mutation in MIP gene can cause autosomal dominant congenital cataract. PMID:24319327

  16. PRKN, DJ-1, and PINK1 screening identifies novel splice site mutation in PRKN and two novel DJ-1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Ghazavi, Farzaneh; Fazlali, Zeinab; Banihosseini, Setareh Sadat; Hosseini, Sayed-Rzgar; Kazemi, Mohammad Hossein; Shojaee, Seyedmehdi; Parsa, Khosro; Sadeghi, Homa; Sina, Farzad; Rohani, Mohammad; Shahidi, Gholam-Ali; Ghaemi, Nasser; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Elahi, Elahe

    2011-01-01

    We present results of mutation screening of PRKN gene in 93 Iranian Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with average age at onset (AAO) of 42.2 years. The gene was screened by direct sequencing and by a semi-quantitative PCR protocol for detection of sequence rearrangements. Heterozygous rearrangements were tested by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Nine different PRKN mutations were found. One of these, IVS9+1G>A, affects splicing and is novel. Two mutated PRKN alleles were observed in each of 6 patients whose average AAO was 25.7 years. Only 1 patient carried a single mutated allele and his AAO was 41 years. Among patients with AAO of <30 years, 31.3% had two mutated alleles, while only 2.6% with AAO of >30 years carried a PRKN mutation. Analysis of PRKN by RT-PCR led to identification of a novel exon expressed in leukocytes of control and PD individuals. The alternatively spliced transcript if translated would code a protein without a RING Finger 2 domain. Its functional relevance remains to be shown. DJ-I and PINK1 were also screened. Two novel DJ-1 mutations, c.91-2A>G affecting splicing and c.319G>C causing Ala107Pro, were observed among patients with AAO of <31 years, suggesting that PD in a high fraction (>12%) of this group of Iranian patients may be due to mutations in DJ-1. Mutations in PINK1 were not observed. Our results complement previous findings on LRRK2 mutations among Iranian PD patients. PMID:21322020

  17. Mutation of Gly721 Alters DNA Topoisomerase I Active Site Architecture and Sensitivity to Camptothecin*

    PubMed Central

    van der Merwe, Marie; Bjornsti, Mary-Ann

    2015-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase I (Top1p) catalyzes the relaxation of supercoiled DNA via a concerted mechanism of DNA strand cleavage and religation. Top1p is the cellular target of the anticancer drug camptothecin (CPT), which reversibly stabilizes a covalent enzyme-DNA intermediate. Top1p clamps around duplex DNA, wherein the core and C-terminal domains are connected by extended α-helices (linker domain), which position the active site Tyr of the C-terminal domain within the catalytic pocket. The physical connection of the linker with the Top1p clamp as well as linker flexibility affect enzyme sensitivity to CPT. Crystallographic data reveal that a conserved Gly residue (located at the juncture between the linker and C-terminal domains) is at one end of a short α-helix, which extends to the active site Tyr covalently linked to the DNA. In the presence of drug, the linker is rigid and this α-helix extends to include Gly and the preceding Leu. We report that mutation of this conserved Gly in yeast Top1p alters enzyme sensitivity to CPT. Mutating Gly to Asp, Glu, Asn, Gln, Leu, or Ala enhanced enzyme CPT sensitivity, with the acidic residues inducing the greatest increase in drug sensitivity in vivo and in vitro. By contrast, Val or Phe substituents rendered the enzyme CPT-resistant. Mutation-induced alterations in enzyme architecture preceding the active site Tyr suggest these structural transitions modulate enzyme sensitivity to CPT, while enhancing the rate of DNA cleavage. We postulate that this conserved Gly residue provides a flexible hinge within the Top1p catalytic pocket to facilitate linker dynamics and the structural alterations that accompany drug binding of the covalent enzyme-DNA intermediate. PMID:18056711

  18. Structural and functional effects of hereditary hemolytic anemia-associated point mutations in the alpha spectrin tetramer site

    PubMed Central

    Gaetani, Massimiliano; Mootien, Sara; Harper, Sandra; Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2008-01-01

    The most common hereditary elliptocytosis (HE) and hereditary pyropoikilocytosis (HPP) mutations are α-spectrin missense mutations in the dimer-tetramer self-association site. In this study, we systematically compared structural and functional properties of the 14 known HE/HPP mutations located in the α-spectrin tetramer binding site. All mutant α-spectrin recombinant peptides were well folded, stable structures, with only the R34W mutant exhibiting a slight structural destabilization. In contrast, binding affinities measured by isothermal titration calorimetry were greatly variable, ranging from no detectable binding observed for I24S, R28C, R28H, R28S, and R45S to approximately wild-type binding for R34W and K48R. Binding affinities for the other 7 mutants were reduced by approximately 10- to 100-fold relative to wild-type binding. Some sites, such as R28, were hot spots that were very sensitive to even relatively conservative substitutions, whereas other sites were only moderately perturbed by nonconservative substitutions. The R34W and K48R mutations were particularly intriguing mutations that apparently either destabilize tetramers through mechanisms not probed by the univalent tetramer binding assay or represent polymorphisms rather than the pathogenic mutations responsible for observed clinical symptoms. All α0 HE/HPP mutations studied here appear to exert their destabilizing effects through molecular recognition rather than structural mechanisms. PMID:18218854

  19. A 3' splice site mutation in the thyroglobulin gene responsible for congenital goiter with hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Ieiri, T; Cochaux, P; Targovnik, H M; Suzuki, M; Shimoda, S; Perret, J; Vassart, G

    1991-12-01

    A case of congenital goiter with defective thyroglobulin synthesis has been studied in molecular terms. The patient is the fifth of a kindred of six, three of which have a goiter. The parents are first cousins. Segregation of thyroglobulin alleles in the family was studied by Southern blotting with a probe revealing a diallelic restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The results demonstrated that the three affected siblings were homozygous for the RFLP. Northern blotting analysis of the goiter RNA with a thyroglobulin probe suggested that thyroglobulin mRNA size was slightly reduced. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of the 8.5-kb thyroglobulin mRNA as overlapping cDNA fragments demonstrated that a 200-bp segment was missing from the 5' region of the goiter mRNA. Subcloning and sequencing of the cDNA fragments, and of the patient genomic DNA amplified from this region, revealed that exon 4 is missing from the major thyroglobulin transcript in the goiter, and that this aberrant splicing is due to a C to G transversion at position minus 3 in the acceptor splice site of intron 3. The presence in exon 4 of a putative donor tyrosine residue (Tyrosine nr 130) involved in thyroid hormone formation provides a coherent explanation to the hypothyroid status of the patient. PMID:1752952

  20. A mutation abolishing the ZMPSTE24 cleavage site in prelamin A causes a progeroid disorder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexia; Lichter-Konecki, Uta; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame; Shaw, Jessica E; Lu, Jonathan T; Östlund, Cecilia; Shin, Ji-Yeon; Clark, Lorraine N; Gundersen, Gregg G; Nagy, Peter L; Worman, Howard J

    2016-05-15

    In 1994 in the Journal of Cell Science, Hennekes and Nigg reported that changing valine to arginine at the endoproteolytic cleavage site in chicken prelamin A abolishes its conversion to lamin A. The consequences of this mutation in an organism have remained unknown. We now report that the corresponding mutation in a human subject leads to accumulation of prelamin A and causes a progeroid disorder. Next generation sequencing of the subject and her parents' exomes identified a de novo mutation in the lamin A/C gene (LMNA) that resulted in a leucine to arginine amino acid substitution at residue 647 in prelamin A. The subject's fibroblasts accumulated prelamin A, a farnesylated protein, which led to an increased percentage of cultured cells with morphologically abnormal nuclei. Treatment with a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor improved abnormal nuclear morphology. This case demonstrates that accumulation of prelamin A, independent of the loss of function of ZMPSTE24 metallopeptidase that catalyzes processing of prelamin A, can cause a progeroid disorder and that a cell biology assay could be used in precision medicine to identify a potential therapy. PMID:27034136

  1. Allelic mutations in noncoding genomic sequences construct novel transcription factor binding sites that promote gene overexpression.

    PubMed

    Tian, Erming; Børset, Magne; Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Brede, Gaute; Våtsveen, Thea K; Hov, Håkon; Waage, Anders; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D; Epstein, Joshua; Sundan, Anders

    2015-11-01

    The growth and survival factor hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is expressed at high levels in multiple myeloma (MM) cells. We report here that elevated HGF transcription in MM was traced to DNA mutations in the promoter alleles of HGF. Sequence analysis revealed a previously undiscovered single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and crucial single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the promoters of myeloma cells that produce large amounts of HGF. The allele-specific mutations functionally reassembled wild-type sequences into the motifs that affiliate with endogenous transcription factors NFKB (nuclear factor kappa-B), MZF1 (myeloid zinc finger 1), and NRF-2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2). In vitro, a mutant allele that gained novel NFKB-binding sites directly responded to transcriptional signaling induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) to promote high levels of luciferase reporter. Given the recent discovery by genome-wide sequencing (GWS) of numerous non-coding mutations in myeloma genomes, our data provide evidence that heterogeneous SNVs in the gene regulatory regions may frequently transform wild-type alleles into novel transcription factor binding properties to aberrantly interact with dysregulated transcriptional signals in MM and other cancer cells. PMID:26220195

  2. Quantitation of normal CFTR mRNA in CF patients with splice-site mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Z.; Olsen, J.C.; Silverman, L.M.

    1994-09-01

    Previously we identified two mutations in introns of the CFTR gene associated with partially active splice sites and unusual clinical phenotypes. One mutation in intron 19 (3849+10 kb C to T) is common in CF patients with normal sweat chloride values; an 84 bp sequence from intron 19, which contains a stop codon, is inserted between exon 19 and exon 20 in most nasal CFTR transcripts. The other mutation in intron 14B (2789+5 G to A) is associated with elevated sweat chloride levels, but mild pulmonary disease; exon 14B (38 bp) is spliced out of most nasal CFTR transcipts. The remaining CFTR cDNA sequences, other than the 84 bp insertion of exon 14B deletion, are identical to the published sequence. To correlate genotype and phenotype, we used quantitative RT-PCR to determine the levels of normally-spliced CFTR mRNA in nasal epithelia from these patients. CFTR cDNA was amplified (25 cycles) by using primers specific for normally-spliced species, {gamma}-actin cDNA was amplified as a standard.

  3. A novel splice donor site mutation in EPHA2 caused congenital cataract in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Juan; He, Sijie; Wang, Lejin; Li, Jiankang; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Xiuqing

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital cataract is a rare disorder characterized by crystallin denaturation, which becomes a major cause of childhood blindness. Although more than fifty pathogenic genes for congenital cataract have been reported, the genetic causes of many cataract patients remain unknown. In this study, the aim is to identify the genetic cause of a five-generation Chinese autosomal dominant congenital cataract family. Methods: Whole exome sequencing (WES) was performed on three affected and one unaffected member of the family, known causative genes were scanned first. Sanger sequencing was used to validate co-segregation of the candidate variant in the family. The impact on the transcript and amino acid sequences of the variant was further analyzed. Results: We identified a novel splice donor site mutation c. 2825+1G >A in EPHA2 that was absent in public and in-house databases and showed co-segregation in the family. This variant resulted in an altered splice that led to protein truncation. Conclusions: The mutation we identified was responsible for congenital cataract in our studied family. Our findings broaden the spectrum of causative mutations in EPHA2 gene for congenital cataract and suggest that WES is an efficient strategy to scan variants in known causative genes for genetically heterogeneous diseases. PMID:27380975

  4. Identification of factor-binding sites in the duck hepatitis B virus enhancer and in vivo effects of enhancer mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, C; Mason, W S; Burch, J B

    1994-01-01

    Hepatitis B viruses (hepadnaviruses) can cause chronic, productive infections of hepatocytes. Analyses of the enhancers and promoters of these viruses in cell lines have suggested a requirement of these elements for liver-enriched transcription factors. In this study, a minimum of seven factor-binding sites on the duck hepatitis B virus enhancer were detected by DNase I footprinting using duck liver nuclear extracts. Among the sites that were tentatively identified were one C/EBP-, one HNF1-, and two HNF3-binding sites. Mutations of the HNF1- and HNF3-like sites, which eliminated factor binding, as assessed by both DNase I footprinting and competitive gel shift assays, were evaluated for their effects on enhancer activity. Using a construct in which human growth hormone was expressed from the viral enhancer and core gene promoter, we found that all of the mutations, either alone or in combination, reduced expression two- to fourfold in LMH chicken hepatoma cells. The mutations in the HNF1 site and one of the HNF3 sites, when inserted into the intact viral genome, also suppressed virus RNA synthesis in primary hepatocyte cultures. Virus carrying the latter HNF3 mutation was also examined for its ability to infect and replicate in ducks. No significant inhibition of virus replication was observed in a short-term assay; however, virus with the HNF3 mutation was apparently unable to grow in the pancreas, a second site of duck hepatitis B virus replication in the duck. Images PMID:8139013

  5. The missing puzzle piece: splicing mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowska, Marzena A

    2013-01-01

    Proper gene splicing is highly dependent on the correct recognition of exons. Among the elements allowing this process are the “cis” (conserved sequences) and “trans” (snRNP, splicing factors) elements. Splicing mutations are related with a number of genetic disorders and usually induce exon skipping, form new exon/intron boundaries or activate new cryptic exons as a result of alterations at donor/acceptor sites. They constitute more than 9% of the currently published mutations, but this value is highly underestimated as many of the potential mutations are located in the “cis” elements and should be confirmed experimentally. The most commonly detected splicing mutations are located at donor (5’) and acceptor (3’) sites. Mutations at the branch point are rare (only over a dozen are known to date), and are mostly searched and detected when no alteration has been detected in the sequenced exons and UTRs. Polypyrimidine tract mutations are equally rare. High throughput technologies, as well as traditional Sanger sequencing, allow detection of many changes in intronic sequences and intron/exon boundaries. However, the assessment whether a mutation affects exon recognition and results in a genetic disorder has to be conducted using molecular biology methods: in vitro transcription of the sequence of interest cloned into a plasmid, with and without alterations, or mutation analysis via a hybrid minigene system. Even though microarrays and new generation sequencing methods pose difficulties in detecting novel branch point mutations, these tools seem appropriate to expand the mutation detection panel especially for diagnostic purposes. PMID:24294354

  6. An Insertion Mutation That Distorts Antibody Binding Site Architecture Enhances Function of a Human Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Jens C.; Ekiert, Damian C.; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Smith, Patricia B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Crowe, Jr., James E.

    2011-09-02

    The structural and functional significance of somatic insertions and deletions in antibody chains is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a naturally occurring three-amino-acid insertion within the influenza virus-specific human monoclonal antibody 2D1 heavy-chain variable region reconfigures the antibody-combining site and contributes to its high potency against the 1918 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses. The insertion arose through a series of events, including a somatic point mutation in a predicted hot-spot motif, introduction of a new hot-spot motif, a molecular duplication due to polymerase slippage, a deletion due to misalignment, and additional somatic point mutations. Atomic resolution structures of the wild-type antibody and a variant in which the insertion was removed revealed that the three-amino-acid insertion near the base of heavy-chain complementarity-determining region (CDR) H2 resulted in a bulge in that loop. This enlarged CDR H2 loop impinges on adjacent regions, causing distortion of the CDR H1 architecture and its displacement away from the antigen-combining site. Removal of the insertion restores the canonical structure of CDR H1 and CDR H2, but binding, neutralization activity, and in vivo activity were reduced markedly because of steric conflict of CDR H1 with the hemagglutinin antigen.

  7. Ultrafast fluorescence dynamics of FMN-binding protein from Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Miyazaki F) and its site-directed mutated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chosrowjan, Haik; Taniguchi, Seiji; Mataga, Noboru; Tanaka, Fumio; Todoroki, Daisuke; Kitamura, Masaya

    2008-09-01

    Ultrafast fluorescence dynamics of FMN in FMN-binding protein (FMN-bp), and its mutated proteins, W32Y and W32A, were investigated by the fluorescence up-conversion method. Fluorescence lifetimes were 167 fs (96%) and 1.5 ps (4%) in wild-type FMN-bp (WT), and 3.4 ps (23%), 18.2 ps (74%), and 96 ps (3%) at 530 nm in W32Y, and 30.1 ps in W32A. The fluorescence lifetime of W32A, in which Trp-32 was absent, was about 140 times longer than that of WT. Tyr-32 in W32Y was not so effective quencher as Trp-32 in WT. This was explained in terms of different ionization potentials of quenchers and average donor-acceptor distances in the protein.

  8. Target site insensitivity mutations in the AChE enzyme confer resistance to organophosphorous insecticides in Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say).

    PubMed

    Malekmohammadi, M; Galehdari, H

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we demonstrated the use and optimization of the tetra-primer ARMS-PCR procedure to detect and analyze the frequency of the R30K and I392T mutations in resistant field populations of CPB. The R30K mutation was detected in 72%, 84%, 52% and 64% of Bahar, Dehpiaz, Aliabad and Yengijeh populations, respectively. Overall frequencies of the I392T mutation were 12%, 8% and 16% of Bahar, Aliabad and Yengijeh populations, respectively. No I392T point mutation was found among samples from Dehpiaz field population. Moreover, only 31% and 2% of samples from the resistant field populations were homozygous for R30K and I392T mutations, respectively. No individual simultaneously had both I392T and S291G/R30K point mutations. The incidence of individuals with both S291G and R30K point mutations in the samples from Bahar, Dehpiaz, Aliabad, and Yengijeh populations were 31.5%, 44.7%, 41.6%, and 27.3% respectively. Genotypes determined by the tetra-primer ARMS-PCR method were consistent with those determined by PCR sequencing. There was no significant correlation between the mutation frequencies and resistance levels in the resistant populations, indicating that other mutations may contribute to this variation. Polymorphism in the partial L. decemlineata cDNA AChE gene Ldace2 of four field populations was identified by direct sequencing of PCR-amplified fragments. Among 45 novel mutations detected in this study, T29P mutation was found across all four field populations that likely contribute to the AChE insensitivity. Site-directed mutagenesis and protein expression experiments are needed for a more complete evaluation. PMID:26778439

  9. Identification of a Tumor Specific, Active-Site Mutation in Casein Kinase 1α by Chemical Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Okerberg, Eric S.; Hainley, Anna; Brown, Heidi; Aban, Arwin; Alemayehu, Senait; Shih, Ann; Wu, Jane; Patricelli, Matthew P.; Kozarich, John W.; Nomanbhoy, Tyzoon; Rosenblum, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the identification of a novel, tumor-specific missense mutation in the active site of casein kinase 1α (CSNK1A1) using activity-based proteomics. Matched normal and tumor colon samples were analyzed using an ATP acyl phosphate probe in a kinase-targeted LC-MS2 platform. An anomaly in the active-site peptide from CSNK1A1 was observed in a tumor sample that was consistent with an altered catalytic aspartic acid. Expression and analysis of the suspected mutant verified the presence of asparagine in the probe-labeled, active-site peptide for CSNK1A1. Genomic sequencing of the colon tumor samples confirmed the presence of a missense mutation in the catalytic aspartic acid of CSNK1A1 (GAC→AAC). To our knowledge, the D163N mutation in CSNK1A1 is a newly defined mutation to the conserved, catalytic aspartic acid of a protein kinase and the first missense mutation identified using activity-based proteomics. The tumorigenic potential of this mutation remains to be determined. PMID:27031502

  10. Mutation in spike protein cleavage site and pathogenesis of feline coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Licitra, Beth N; Millet, Jean K; Regan, Andrew D; Hamilton, Brian S; Rinaldi, Vera D; Duhamel, Gerald E; Whittaker, Gary R

    2013-07-01

    Feline coronaviruses (FCoV) exist as 2 biotypes: feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) and feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV). FECV causes subclinical infections; FIPV causes feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), a systemic and fatal disease. It is thought that mutations in FECV enable infection of macrophages, causing FIP. However, the molecular basis for this biotype switch is unknown. We examined a furin cleavage site in the region between receptor-binding (S1) and fusion (S2) domains of the spike of serotype 1 FCoV. FECV sequences were compared with FIPV sequences. All FECVs had a conserved furin cleavage motif. For FIPV, there was a correlation with the disease and >1 substitution in the S1/S2 motif. Fluorogenic peptide assays confirmed that the substitutions modulate furin cleavage. We document a functionally relevant S1/S2 mutation that arises when FIP develops in a cat. These insights into FIP pathogenesis may be useful in development of diagnostic, prevention, and treatment measures against coronaviruses. PMID:23763835

  11. CpG mutations in the reactive site of human C1 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Skriver, K; Radziejewska, E; Silbermann, J A; Donaldson, V H; Bock, S C

    1989-02-25

    C1 inhibitor plays an important role in the regulation of vascular permeability through its ability to inactivate enzymes which release polypeptide kinins. Dysfunctional C1 inhibitor molecules are present in the plasma of affected members of the Da and Ri hereditary angioneurotic edema kindreds. We constructed genomic libraries from Da and Ri patient DNAs which had been cleaved with BclI to generate a fragment containing 21 kilobases of the C1 inhibitor locus. C1 inhibitor gene-containing recombinants originating from mutant Da and Ri alleles were differentiated from those derived from normal alleles by linkage analysis using the intragenic HgiAI restriction fragment length polymorphism. Nucleotide sequencing of the complete protein-coding regions of the mutant alleles identified two different mutations in a CpG dinucleotide corresponding to the first two bases of arginine codon 444. These single base mutations changed the identity of the functionally critical P1 reactive site residue from arginine to cysteine (Da) or histidine (Ri). The additional cysteine residue in C1 inhibitor Da suggests how it is covalently bound to albumin in plasma. The presence of CpG dinucleotides in the codons specifying the P1 arginines of C1 inhibitor and antithrombin III explains the high incidence of histidine and cysteine substitutions observed among dysfunctional mutants of these serine protease inhibitors. PMID:2563376

  12. Adventitious match probability for autosomal profiles when primer binding site mutation is possible.

    PubMed

    Pope, Susan; Evett, Ian; Puch-Solis, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    This paper considers the situation where two DNA systems with differing primers have been used to produce DNA profiles for loading and searching of a DNA Database. With any profiling system there exists the possibility of a "primer binding site mutation" (PBSM). When such a mutation occurs at one of the loci in a profile, it has the effect that the associated allele is not visible in the profile. In the case where a person has two different alleles at a given locus (heterozygous) the effect of a PBSM would be that the profile would appear to be that of an individual with only one allele at that locus (homozygous). The paper investigates the potential for an adventitious match as a result of a PBSM when, for example, a crime profile and person profile that have originated from two different individuals are found to be the same as a result of a PBSM in one of the profiles. It is demonstrated, both by theory and using simulations, that the effect of PBSMs is to slightly decrease the adventitious match probability from what it would had the same DNA system been used. PMID:27420391

  13. Mutation in Spike Protein Cleavage Site and Pathogenesis of Feline Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Licitra, Beth N.; Millet, Jean K.; Regan, Andrew D.; Hamilton, Brian S.; Rinaldi, Vera D.; Duhamel, Gerald E.

    2013-01-01

    Feline coronaviruses (FCoV) exist as 2 biotypes: feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) and feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV). FECV causes subclinical infections; FIPV causes feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), a systemic and fatal disease. It is thought that mutations in FECV enable infection of macrophages, causing FIP. However, the molecular basis for this biotype switch is unknown. We examined a furin cleavage site in the region between receptor-binding (S1) and fusion (S2) domains of the spike of serotype 1 FCoV. FECV sequences were compared with FIPV sequences. All FECVs had a conserved furin cleavage motif. For FIPV, there was a correlation with the disease and >1 substitution in the S1/S2 motif. Fluorogenic peptide assays confirmed that the substitutions modulate furin cleavage. We document a functionally relevant S1/S2 mutation that arises when FIP develops in a cat. These insights into FIP pathogenesis may be useful in development of diagnostic, prevention, and treatment measures against coronaviruses. PMID:23763835

  14. MNGIE with lack of skeletal muscle involvement and a novel TP splice site mutation.

    PubMed

    Szigeti, K; Wong, L-J C; Perng, C-L; Saifi, G M; Eldin, K; Adesina, A M; Cass, D L; Hirano, M; Lupski, J R; Scaglia, F

    2004-02-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder caused by thymidine phosphorylase (TP) deficiency, resulting in severe gastrointestinal dysmotility and skeletal muscle abnormalities. A patient is reported with a classical MNGIE clinical presentation but without skeletal muscle involvement at morphological, enzymatic, or mitochondrial DNA level, though gastrointestinal myopathy was present. MNGIE was diagnosed by markedly raised plasma thymidine and reduced thymidine phosphorylase activity. Molecular genetic analysis showed a homozygous novel splice site mutation in TP. On immunohistochemical studies there was marked TP expression in the CNS, in contrast to what has been observed in rodents. It is important to examine the most significantly affected tissue and to measure TP activity and plasma thymidine in order to arrive at an accurate diagnosis in this condition. PMID:14757860

  15. His166 Is the Schiff Base Proton Acceptor in Attractant Phototaxis Receptor Sensory Rhodopsin I

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Photoactivation of attractant phototaxis receptor sensory rhodopsin I (SRI) in Halobacterium salinarum entails transfer of a proton from the retinylidene chromophore’s Schiff base (SB) to an unidentified acceptor residue on the cytoplasmic half-channel, in sharp contrast to other microbial rhodopsins, including the closely related repellent phototaxis receptor SRII and the outward proton pump bacteriorhodopsin, in which the SB proton acceptor is an aspartate residue salt-bridged to the SB in the extracellular (EC) half-channel. His166 on the cytoplasmic side of the SB in SRI has been implicated in the SB proton transfer reaction by mutation studies, and mutants of His166 result in an inverted SB proton release to the EC as well as inversion of the protein’s normally attractant phototaxis signal to repellent. Here we found by difference Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy the appearance of Fermi-resonant X–H stretch modes in light-minus-dark difference spectra; their assignment with 15N labeling and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrates that His166 is the SB proton acceptor during the photochemical reaction cycle of the wild-type SRI–HtrI complex. PMID:25162914

  16. Mutational Studies on Resurrected Ancestral Proteins Reveal Conservation of Site-Specific Amino Acid Preferences throughout Evolutionary History

    PubMed Central

    Risso, Valeria A.; Manssour-Triedo, Fadia; Delgado-Delgado, Asunción; Arco, Rocio; Barroso-delJesus, Alicia; Ingles-Prieto, Alvaro; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Gavira, Jose A.; Gaucher, Eric A.; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Local protein interactions (“molecular context” effects) dictate amino acid replacements and can be described in terms of site-specific, energetic preferences for any different amino acid. It has been recently debated whether these preferences remain approximately constant during evolution or whether, due to coevolution of sites, they change strongly. Such research highlights an unresolved and fundamental issue with far-reaching implications for phylogenetic analysis and molecular evolution modeling. Here, we take advantage of the recent availability of phenotypically supported laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins and β-lactamases to experimentally address the change of site-specific amino acid preferences over long geological timescales. Extensive mutational analyses support the notion that evolutionary adjustment to a new amino acid may occur, but to a large extent this is insufficient to erase the primitive preference for amino acid replacements. Generally, site-specific amino acid preferences appear to remain conserved throughout evolutionary history despite local sequence divergence. We show such preference conservation to be readily understandable in molecular terms and we provide crystallographic evidence for an intriguing structural-switch mechanism: Energetic preference for an ancestral amino acid in a modern protein can be linked to reorganization upon mutation to the ancestral local structure around the mutated site. Finally, we point out that site-specific preference conservation naturally leads to one plausible evolutionary explanation for the existence of intragenic global suppressor mutations. PMID:25392342

  17. Mutational studies on resurrected ancestral proteins reveal conservation of site-specific amino acid preferences throughout evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Risso, Valeria A; Manssour-Triedo, Fadia; Delgado-Delgado, Asunción; Arco, Rocio; Barroso-delJesus, Alicia; Ingles-Prieto, Alvaro; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Gavira, Jose A; Gaucher, Eric A; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2015-02-01

    Local protein interactions ("molecular context" effects) dictate amino acid replacements and can be described in terms of site-specific, energetic preferences for any different amino acid. It has been recently debated whether these preferences remain approximately constant during evolution or whether, due to coevolution of sites, they change strongly. Such research highlights an unresolved and fundamental issue with far-reaching implications for phylogenetic analysis and molecular evolution modeling. Here, we take advantage of the recent availability of phenotypically supported laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins and β-lactamases to experimentally address the change of site-specific amino acid preferences over long geological timescales. Extensive mutational analyses support the notion that evolutionary adjustment to a new amino acid may occur, but to a large extent this is insufficient to erase the primitive preference for amino acid replacements. Generally, site-specific amino acid preferences appear to remain conserved throughout evolutionary history despite local sequence divergence. We show such preference conservation to be readily understandable in molecular terms and we provide crystallographic evidence for an intriguing structural-switch mechanism: Energetic preference for an ancestral amino acid in a modern protein can be linked to reorganization upon mutation to the ancestral local structure around the mutated site. Finally, we point out that site-specific preference conservation naturally leads to one plausible evolutionary explanation for the existence of intragenic global suppressor mutations. PMID:25392342

  18. Second-site suppressors of HIV-1 capsid mutations: restoration of intracellular activities without correction of intrinsic capsid stability defects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Disassembly of the viral capsid following penetration into the cytoplasm, or uncoating, is a poorly understood stage of retrovirus infection. Based on previous studies of HIV-1 CA mutants exhibiting altered capsid stability, we concluded that formation of a capsid of optimal intrinsic stability is crucial for HIV-1 infection. Results To further examine the connection between HIV-1 capsid stability and infectivity, we isolated second-site suppressors of HIV-1 mutants exhibiting unstable (P38A) or hyperstable (E45A) capsids. We identified the respective suppressor mutations, T216I and R132T, which restored virus replication in a human T cell line and markedly enhanced the fitness of the original mutants as revealed in single-cycle infection assays. Analysis of the corresponding purified N-terminal domain CA proteins by NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that the E45A and R132T mutations induced structural changes that are localized to the regions of the mutations, while the P38A mutation resulted in changes extending to neighboring regions in space. Unexpectedly, neither suppressor mutation corrected the intrinsic viral capsid stability defect associated with the respective original mutation. Nonetheless, the R132T mutation rescued the selective infectivity impairment exhibited by the E45A mutant in aphidicolin-arrested cells, and the double mutant regained sensitivity to the small molecule inhibitor PF74. The T216I mutation rescued the impaired ability of the P38A mutant virus to abrogate restriction by TRIMCyp and TRIM5α. Conclusions The second-site suppressor mutations in CA that we have identified rescue virus infection without correcting the intrinsic capsid stability defects associated with the P38A and E45A mutations. The suppressors also restored wild type virus function in several cell-based assays. We propose that while proper HIV-1 uncoating in target cells is dependent on the intrinsic stability of the viral capsid, the effects of stability

  19. A novel splice site mutation in SMARCAL1 results in aberrant exon definition in a child with schimke immunoosseous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Clinton; Hunley, Tracy E; Guo, Yan; Cortez, David

    2015-10-01

    Schimke Immunoosseous Dysplasia (SIOD) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder of childhood characterized by spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and renal failure, T-cell immunodeficiency, and cancer in certain instances. Approximately half of patients with SIOD are reported to have biallelic mutations in SMARCAL1 (SWI/SNF-related matrix-associated actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a-like 1), which encodes a DNA translocase that localizes to sites of DNA replication and repairs damaged replication forks. We present a novel mutation (NM_014140.3:c.2070+2insT) that results in defective SMARCAL1 mRNA splicing in a child with SIOD. This mutation, within the donor site of intron 12, results in the skipping of exon 12, which encodes part of a critical hinge region connecting the two lobes of the ATPase domain. This mutation was not recognized as deleterious by diagnostic SMARCAL1 sequencing, but discovered through next generation sequencing and found to result in absent SMARCAL1 expression in patient-derived lymphoblasts. The splicing defect caused by this mutation supports the concept of exon definition. Furthermore, it illustrates the need to broaden the search for SMARCAL1 mutations in patients with SIOD lacking coding sequence variants. PMID:25943327

  20. CR2 is the primary acceptor site for C3 during alternative pathway activation of complement on human peripheral B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Marquart, H V; Svehag, S E; Leslie, R G

    1994-07-01

    Human cells infected with certain viruses acquire the ability to activate the alternative pathway (AP) of complement. Complement receptor 2 on EBV-infected lymphoblastoid cell lines has been reported to act as the covalent binding site for C3b during AP activation. Using flow cytometry, we investigated the ability of normal human peripheral blood leukocytes to activate the AP in homologous serum. Deposition of C3 fragments was determined as a measurement of complement activation on each of the subpopulations of the blood cells. Incubating human peripheral blood leukocytes with homologous or autologous serum resulted in C3 deposition on B cells and, to a lesser extent, on monocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Complement activation in the presence of Mg2+ ions and EGTA revealed major involvement of the AP in the case of B cells, and to a lesser extent for other leukocyte populations examined. Preincubation of the leukocytes with polyclonal anti-complement receptor 2 Ab markedly decreased the C3 fragment deposition, as a result of in vitro AP activation, on B cells, indicating that on normal human B cells this receptor may be involved in AP activation. Freshly isolated, normal human B cells also bear low but significant amounts of C3d,g fragments on their membranes, indicating that this AP activation also occurs in vivo. AP activation was partially decreased in the presence of autologous erythrocytes (RBC) suggesting that complement regulatory proteins on RBC play a role in limiting the AP activation in vivo. PMID:7515925

  1. In Silico and In Vitro Investigations of the Mutability of Disease-Causing Missense Mutation Sites in Spermine Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Norris, Joy; Schwartz, Charles; Alexov, Emil

    2011-01-01

    Background Spermine synthase (SMS) is a key enzyme controlling the concentration of spermidine and spermine in the cell. The importance of SMS is manifested by the fact that single missense mutations were found to cause Snyder-Robinson Syndrome (SRS). At the same time, currently there are no non-synonymous single nucleoside polymorphisms, nsSNPs (harmless mutations), found in SMS, which may imply that the SMS does not tolerate amino acid substitutions, i.e. is not mutable. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate the mutability of the SMS, we carried out in silico analysis and in vitro experiments of the effects of amino acid substitutions at the missense mutation sites (G56, V132 and I150) that have been shown to cause SRS. Our investigation showed that the mutation sites have different degree of mutability depending on their structural micro-environment and involvement in the function and structural integrity of the SMS. It was found that the I150 site does not tolerate any mutation, while V132, despite its key position at the interface of SMS dimer, is quite mutable. The G56 site is in the middle of the spectra, but still quite sensitive to charge residue replacement. Conclusions/Significance The performed analysis showed that mutability depends on the detail of the structural and functional factors and cannot be predicted based on conservation of wild type properties alone. Also, harmless nsSNPs can be expected to occur even at sites at which missense mutations were found to cause diseases. PMID:21647366

  2. Osteogenesis Imperfecta Missense Mutations in Collagen: Structural consequences of a glycine to alanine replacement at a highly charged site

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianxi; Cheng, Haiming; Silva, Teresita; Baum, Jean; Brodsky, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Glycine is required as every third residue in the collagen triple-helix, and a missense mutation leading to the replacement of even one Gly in the repeating (Gly-Xaa-Yaa)n sequence by a larger residue leads to a pathological condition. Gly to Ala missense mutations are highly underrepresented in osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and other collagen diseases, suggesting that the smallest replacement residue Ala might cause the least structural perturbation and mildest clinical consequences. The relatively small number of Gly to Ala mutation sites that do lead to OI must have some unusual features, such as greater structural disruption due to local sequence environment or location at a biologically important site. Here, peptides are used to model a severe OI case where a Gly to Ala mutation is found within a highly stabilizing Lys-Gly-Asp sequence environment. NMR, CD and DSC studies indicate this Gly to Ala replacement leads to a substantial loss in triple-helix stability and non-equivalence of the Ala residues in the three chains such that only one of the three Ala residues is capable of form a good backbone hydrogen bond. Examination of reported OI Gly to Ala mutations suggests preferential location at known collagen binding sites, and we propose that structural defects due to Ala replacements may lead to pathology when interfering with interactions. PMID:22054507

  3. Rescue of Enzymatic Function for Disease-associated RPE65 Proteins Containing Various Missense Mutations in Non-active Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Songhua; Izumi, Tadahide; Hu, Jane; Jin, Heather H.; Siddiqui, Ahmed-Abdul A.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Bok, Dean; Jin, Minghao

    2014-01-01

    Over 70 different missense mutations, including a dominant mutation, in RPE65 retinoid isomerase are associated with distinct forms of retinal degeneration; however, the disease mechanisms for most of these mutations have not been studied. Although some mutations have been shown to abolish enzyme activity, the molecular mechanisms leading to the loss of enzymatic function and retinal degeneration remain poorly understood. Here we show that the 26 S proteasome non-ATPase regulatory subunit 13 (PSMD13), a newly identified negative regulator of RPE65, plays a critical role in regulating pathogenicity of three mutations (L22P, T101I, and L408P) by mediating rapid degradation of mutated RPE65s via a ubiquitination- and proteasome-dependent non-lysosomal pathway. These mutant RPE65s were misfolded and formed aggregates or high molecular complexes via disulfide bonds. Interaction of PSMD13 with mutant RPE65s promoted degradation of misfolded but not properly folded mutant RPE65s. Many mutations, including L22P, T101I, and L408P, were mapped on non-active sites. Although their activities were very low, these mutant RPE65s were catalytically active and could be significantly rescued at low temperature, whereas mutant RPE65s with a distinct active site mutation could not be rescued under the same conditions. Sodium 4-phenylbutyrate and glycerol displayed a significant synergistic effect on the low temperature rescue of the mutant RPE65s by promoting proper folding, reducing aggregation, and increasing membrane association. Our results suggest that a low temperature eye mask and sodium 4-phenylbutyrate, a United States Food and Drug Administration-approved oral medicine, may provide a promising “protein repair therapy” that can enhance the efficacy of gene therapy by reducing the cytotoxic effect of misfolded mutant RPE65s. PMID:24849605

  4. The USH1C 216G-->A splice-site mutation results in a 35-base-pair deletion.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Jennifer; Savas, Sevtap; Ng, San-San; Athas, Grace; Deininger, Prescott; Keats, Bronya

    2005-02-01

    Usher syndrome is characterized by profound hearing loss and retinal degeneration. A splice-site mutation, 216G-->A, in exon 3 of USH1C is associated with Acadian Usher type IC. This mutation was reported to create an in-frame deletion of 39 base pairs (bp), resulting in an unstable transcript. By RT-PCR analysis of 216A and 216G constructs transfected into HeLa cells and also of patient cell lines, we have demonstrated a frame-shift deletion of 35 bp, not 39 bp. Thus, the instability of the USH1C mRNA is explained by the 216G-->A out-of-frame splice site mutation. PMID:15578223

  5. Compound heterozygous DUOX2 gene mutations (c.2335-1G>C/c.3264_3267delCAGC) associated with congenital hypothyroidism. Characterization of complex cryptic splice sites by minigene analysis.

    PubMed

    Belforte, Fiorella S; Citterio, Cintia E; Testa, Graciela; Olcese, María Cecilia; Sobrero, Gabriela; Miras, Mirta B; Targovnik, Héctor M; Rivolta, Carina M

    2016-01-01

    Iodide Organification defects (IOD) represent 10% of cases of congenital hypothyroidism (CH) being the main genes affected that of TPO (thyroid peroxidase) and DUOX2 (dual oxidasa 2). From a patient with clinical and biochemical criteria suggestive with CH associated with IOD, TPO and DUOX2 genes were analyzed by means of PCR-Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism analysis and sequencing. A novel heterozygous compound to the mutations c.2335-1G>C (paternal mutation, intron 17) and c.3264_3267delCAGC (maternal mutation, exon 24) was identified in the DUOX2 gene. Ex-vivo splicing assays and subsequent RT-PCR and sequencing analyses were performed on mRNA isolated from the HeLa cells transfected with wild-type and mutant pSPL3 expression vectors. The wild-type and c.2335-1G>C mutant alleles result in the complete inclusion or exclusion of exon 18, or in the activation of an exonic cryptic 5' ss with the consequent deletion of 169 bp at the end of this exon. However, we observed only a band of the expected size in normal thyroid tissue by RT-PCR. Additionally, the c.2335-1G>C mutation activates an unusual cryptic donor splice site in intron 17, located at position -14 of the authentic intron 17/exon 18 junction site, with an insertion of the last 14 nucleotides of the intron 17 in mutant transcripts with complete and partial inclusion of exon 18. The theoretical consequences of splice site mutation, predicted with the bioinformatics NNSplice, Fsplice, SPL, SPLM and MaxEntScan programs were investigated and evaluated in relation with the experimental evidence. These analyses confirm that c.2335-1G>C mutant allele would result in the abolition of the authentic splice acceptor site. The results suggest the coexistence in our patient of four putative truncated proteins of 786, 805, 806 and 1105 amino acids, with conservation of peroxidase-like domain and loss of gp91(phox)/NOX2-like domain. In conclusion a novel heterozygous compound was identified being responsible of

  6. Analyses of disease-related GNPTAB mutations define a novel GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase interaction domain and an alternative site-1 protease cleavage site

    PubMed Central

    Velho, Renata Voltolini; De Pace, Raffaella; Klünder, Sarah; Sperb-Ludwig, Fernanda; Lourenço, Charles Marques; Schwartz, Ida V. D.; Braulke, Thomas; Pohl, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Mucolipidosis II (MLII) and III alpha/beta are autosomal-recessive diseases of childhood caused by mutations in GNPTAB encoding the α/β-subunit precursor protein of the GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase complex. This enzyme modifies lysosomal hydrolases with mannose 6-phosphate targeting signals. Upon arrival in the Golgi apparatus, the newly synthesized α/β-subunit precursor is catalytically activated by site-1 protease (S1P). Here we performed comprehensive expression studies of GNPTAB mutations, including two novel mutations T644M and T1223del, identified in Brazilian MLII/MLIII alpha/beta patients. We show that the frameshift E757KfsX1 and the non-sense R587X mutations result in the retention of enzymatically inactive truncated precursor proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) due to loss of cytosolic ER exit motifs consistent with a severe clinical phenotype in homozygosity. The luminal missense mutations, C505Y, G575R and T644M, partially impaired ER exit and proteolytic activation in accordance with less severe MLIII alpha/beta disease symptoms. Analogous to the previously characterized S399F mutant, we found that the missense mutation I403T led to retention in the ER and loss of catalytic activity. Substitution of further conserved residues in stealth domain 2 (I346 and W357) revealed similar biochemical properties and allowed us to define a putative binding site for accessory proteins required for ER exit of α/β-subunit precursors. Interestingly, the analysis of the Y937_M972del mutant revealed partial Golgi localization and formation of abnormal inactive β-subunits generated by S1P which correlate with a clinical MLII phenotype. Expression analyses of mutations identified in patients underline genotype–phenotype correlations in MLII/MLIII alpha/beta and provide novel insights into structural requirements of proper GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase activity. PMID:25788519

  7. A new class of mutations reveals a novel function for the original phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase binding site

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Y. Kate; Mikami, Aki; Schaffhausen, Brian; Jun, Toni; Roberts, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the specificity of Src homology 2 (SH2) and phosphotyrosine-binding domain interactions are mediated by phosphorylated tyrosines and their neighboring amino acids. Two of the first phosphotyrosine-based binding sites were found on middle T antigen of polyoma virus. Tyr-250 acts as a binding site for ShcA, whereas Tyr-315 forms a binding site for the SH2 domain of the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. However, genetic analysis of a given phosphotyrosine's role in signaling can be complicated when it serves as a binding site for multiple proteins. The situation is particularly difficult when the phosphotyrosine serves as a secondary binding site for a protein with primary binding determinates elsewhere. Mutation of a tyrosine residue to phenylalanine blocks association of all bound proteins. Here we show that the mutation of the amino acids following the phosphorylated tyrosine to alanine can reveal phosphotyrosine function as a secondary binding site, while abrogating the phosphotyrosine motif's role as a primary binding site for SH2 domains. We tested this methodology by using middle T antigen. Our results suggest that Tyr-250 is a secondary binding site for phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, whereas Tyr-315 is a secondary binding site for a yet-to-be-identified protein, which is critical for transformation. PMID:12881485

  8. Site-directed point mutations in embryonic stem cells: a gene-targeting tag-and-exchange strategy.

    PubMed Central

    Askew, G R; Doetschman, T; Lingrel, J B

    1993-01-01

    Sequential gene targeting was used to introduce point mutations into one alpha 2 isoform Na,K-ATPase homolog in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. In the first round of targeted replacement, the gene was tagged with selectable markers by insertion of a Neor/HSV-tk gene cassette, and this event was selected for by gain of neomycin (G418) resistance. In the second targeted replacement event, the tagged genomic sequence was exchanged with a vector consisting of homologous genomic sequences carrying five site-directed nucleotide substitutions. Embryonic stem cell clones modified by exchange with the mutation vector were selected for loss of the HSV-tk gene by resistance to ganciclovir. Candidate clones were further screened and identified by polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot analysis. By this strategy, the endogenous alpha 2 isoform Na,K-ATPase gene was altered to encode two other amino acids so that the enzyme is resistant to inhibition by cardiac glycosides while maintaining its transmembrane ion-pumping function. Since the initial tagging event and the subsequent mutation-exchange event are independent of one another, a tagged cell line can be used to generate a variety of mutant lines by exchange with various mutation vectors at the tagged locus. This method should be useful for testing specific mutations introduced into the genomes of tissue culture cells and animals and for developing animal models encompassing the mutational variability of known genetic disorders. Images PMID:8391633

  9. A novel splice site mutation in the GNPTAB gene in an Iranian patient with mucolipidosis II α/β.

    PubMed

    Hashemi-Gorji, Feyzollah; Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh; Salehpour, Shadab; Yassaee, Vahid Reza; Miryounesi, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    Mucolipidosis type II α/β (ML II α/β) and mucolipidosis type III α/β (ML III α/β) have been shown to be caused by an absence or reduced level of uridine diphosphate (UDP)-N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase enzyme (EC 2.7.8.17) activity, respectively. Both disorders are caused by mutations in the GNPTAB gene and are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Here we report a 2-year-old female patient being diagnosed as a case of ML II α/β due to coarse face, severe developmental delay, multiple dysostosis, noticeable increase of multiple lysosomal enzymes activity in plasma and normal acid mucopolysaccharides in urine. Mutational analysis of the GNPTAB gene has revealed a novel homozygous mutation in the patient (c.3250-2A>G) with both parents being heterozygote. Transcript analyses showed that this novel splice site mutation leads to exon 17 skipping and a frameshift afterwards (p.P1084_R1112del F1113Vfs*1). Consequently, we confirmed the association of this mutation with ML II α/β. Our finding expands the number of reported cases of this rare metabolic disorder and adds to the GNPTAB mutation database. PMID:27180337

  10. Active RNAP pre-initiation sites are highly mutated by cytidine deaminases in yeast, with AID targeting small RNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Benjamin JM; Wu, Yee Ling; Rada, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Cytidine deaminases are single stranded DNA mutators diversifying antibodies and restricting viral infection. Improper access to the genome leads to translocations and mutations in B cells and contributes to the mutation landscape in cancer, such as kataegis. It remains unclear how deaminases access double stranded genomes and whether off-target mutations favor certain loci, although transcription and opportunistic access during DNA repair are thought to play a role. In yeast, AID and the catalytic domain of APOBEC3G preferentially mutate transcriptionally active genes within narrow regions, 110 base pairs in width, fixed at RNA polymerase initiation sites. Unlike APOBEC3G, AID shows enhanced mutational preference for small RNA genes (tRNAs, snoRNAs and snRNAs) suggesting a putative role for RNA in its recruitment. We uncover the high affinity of the deaminases for the single stranded DNA exposed by initiating RNA polymerases (a DNA configuration reproduced at stalled polymerases) without a requirement for specific cofactors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03553.001 PMID:25237741

  11. Interplay of the Bacterial Ribosomal A-Site, S12 Protein Mutations and Paromomycin Binding: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Panecka, Joanna; Mura, Cameron; Trylska, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    The conformational properties of the aminoacyl-tRNA binding site (A-site), and its surroundings in the Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit, are of great relevance in designing antibacterial agents. The 30S subunit A-site is near ribosomal protein S12, which neighbors helices h27 and H69; this latter helix, of the 50S subunit, is a functionally important component of an intersubunit bridge. Experimental work has shown that specific point mutations in S12 (K42A, R53A) yield hyper-accurate ribosomes, which in turn confers resistance to the antibiotic ‘paromomycin’ (even when this aminoglycoside is bound to the A-site). Suspecting that these effects can be elucidated in terms of the local atomic interactions and detailed dynamics of this region of the bacterial ribosome, we have used molecular dynamics simulations to explore the motion of a fragment of the E. coli ribosome, including the A-site. We found that the ribosomal regions surrounding the A-site modify the conformational space of the flexible A-site adenines 1492/93. Specifically, we found that A-site mobility is affected by stacking interactions between adenines A1493 and A1913, and by contacts between A1492 and a flexible side-chain (K43) from the S12 protein. In addition, our simulations reveal possible indirect pathways by which the R53A and K42A mutations in S12 are coupled to the dynamical properties of the A-site. Our work extends what is known about the atomistic dynamics of the A-site, and suggests possible links between the biological effects of hyper-accurate mutations in the S12 protein and conformational properties of the ribosome; the implications for S12 dynamics help elucidate how the miscoding effects of paromomycin may be evaded in antibiotic-resistant mutants of the bacterial ribosome. PMID:25379961

  12. Mutations in the Dimer Interface of Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase Promote Site-specific Oxidative Damages in Yeast and Human Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Vaubel, Rachael A.; Rustin, Pierre; Isaya, Grazia

    2011-01-01

    Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD) is a multifunctional protein well characterized as the E3 component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes. Previously, conditions predicted to destabilize the DLD dimer revealed that DLD could also function as a diaphorase and serine protease. However, the relevance of these cryptic activities remained undefined. We analyzed human DLD mutations linked to strikingly different clinical phenotypes, including E340K, D444V, R447G, and R460G in the dimer interface domain that are responsible for severe multisystem disorders of infancy and G194C in the NAD+-binding domain that is typically associated with milder presentations. In vitro, all of these mutations decreased to various degrees dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase activity, whereas dimer interface mutations also enhanced proteolytic and/or diaphorase activity. Human DLD proteins carrying each individual mutation complemented fully the respiratory-deficient phenotype of yeast cells lacking endogenous DLD even when residual dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase activity was as low as 21% of controls. However, under elevated oxidative stress, expression of DLD proteins with dimer interface mutations greatly accelerated the loss of respiratory function, resulting from enhanced oxidative damage to the lipoic acid cofactor of pyruvate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and other mitochondrial targets. This effect was not observed with the G194C mutation or a mutation that disrupts the proteolytic active site of DLD. As in yeast, lipoic acid cofactor was damaged in human D444V-homozygous fibroblasts after exposure to oxidative stress. We conclude that the cryptic activities of DLD promote oxidative damage to neighboring molecules and thus contribute to the clinical severity of DLD mutations. PMID:21930696

  13. Structured Regions of Alpha-synuclein Fibrils Include the Early Onset Parkinson's Disease Mutation Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Comellas Canal, Gemma; Lemkau, Luisel R.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Kloepper, Kathryn D.; Ladror, Daniel T.; Ebisu, Reika; Woods, Wendy S.; Lipton, Andrew S.; George, Julia M.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2011-08-26

    Alpha-Synuclein (AS) fibrils constitute the major proteinaceous component of Lewy bodies (LBs), the pathological hallmark of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and other neurodegenerative diseases. Three single point mutations in the AS gene, as well as multiplication of the wild-type (WT) AS allele, have been previously identified in families with early-onset PD. Although AS fibrils have been the subject of intense study, critical details about their structure including the precise location of the B-strands and the extent of the core, the three-dimensional structure and the effects of the mutations—remain unknown. Here, we have used magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy to present a detailed characterization of the full-length WT AS fibrils. With improved sample preparations, isotopic labeling patterns and NMR experiments, we have confidently assigned more than 90% of the 13C and 15N backbone and sidechain chemical shifts of the detected residues from residue 39 to 97, and quantified the conformational dynamics throughout this region. Our results demonstrate that the core of AS fibrils extends with a repeated motif and that residues 30, 46 and 53-the early-onset PD mutant sites-are located in structured regions of AS fibrils.

  14. Mutational analysis of the active site of indoleglycerol phosphate synthase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Darimont, B.; Stehlin, C.; Szadkowski, H.; Kirschner, K.

    1998-01-01

    Indoleglycerol phosphate synthase catalyzes the ring closure of 1-(2-carboxyphenylamino)-1-deoxyribulose 5'-phosphate to indoleglycerol phosphate, the fifth step in the pathway of tryptophan biosynthesis from chorismate. Because chemical synthesis of indole derivatives from arylamino ketones requires drastic solvent conditions, it is interesting by what mechanism the enzyme catalyzes the same condensation reaction. Seven invariant polar residues in the active site of the enzyme from Escherichia coli have been mutated directly or randomly, to identify the catalytically essential ones. A strain of E. coli suitable for selecting and classifying active mutants by functional complementation was constructed by precise deletion of the trpC gene from the genome. Judged by growth rates of transformants on selective media, mutants with either S58 or S60 replaced by alanine were indistinguishable from the wild-type, but R186 replaced by alanine was still partially active. Saturation random mutagenesis of individual codons showed that E53 was partially replaceable by aspartate and cysteine, whereas K114, E163, and N184 could not be replaced by any other residue. Partially active mutant proteins were purified and their steady-state kinetic and inhibitor binding constants determined. Their relative catalytic efficiencies paralleled their relative complementation efficiencies. These results are compatible with the location of the essential residues in the active site of the enzyme and support a chemically plausible catalytic mechanism. It involves two enzyme-bound intermediates and general acid-base catalysis by K114 and E163 with the support of E53 and N184. PMID:9605328

  15. A novel biallelic splice site mutation of TECTA causes moderate to severe hearing impairment in an Algerian family.

    PubMed

    Behlouli, Asma; Bonnet, Crystel; Abdi, Samia; Hasbellaoui, Mokhtar; Boudjenah, Farid; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Louha, Malek; Makrelouf, Mohamed; Ammar-Khodja, Fatima; Zenati, Akila; Petit, Christine

    2016-08-01

    Congenital deafness is certainly one of the most common monogenic diseases in humans, but it is also one of the most genetically heterogeneous, which makes molecular diagnosis challenging in most cases. Whole-exome sequencing in two out of three Algerian siblings affected by recessively-inherited, moderate to severe sensorineural deafness allowed us to identify a novel splice donor site mutation (c.5272+1G > A) in the gene encoding α-tectorin, a major component of the cochlear tectorial membrane. The mutation was present at the homozygous state in the three affected siblings, and at the heterozygous state in their unaffected, consanguineous parents. To our knowledge, this is the first reported TECTA mutation leading to the DFNB21 form of hearing impairment among Maghrebian individuals suffering from congenital hearing impairment, which further illustrates the diversity of the genes involved in congenital deafness in the Maghreb. PMID:27368438

  16. Mutagenesis by site-specific arylamine adducts in plasmid DNA: Enhancing replication of the adducted strand alters mutation frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, T.M.; Lee, Meisie; King, C.M. )

    1990-07-03

    Site specifically modified plasmids were used to determine the mutagenic effects of single arylamine adducts in bacterial cells. A synthetic heptadecamer bearing a single N-(guanin-8-yl)-2-aminofluorene (AF) or N-(guanin-8-yl)-2-(acetylamino)fluorene (AAF) adduct was used to introduce the adducts into a specific site in plasmid DNA that contained a 17-base single-stranded region complementary to the modified oligonucleotide. Following transformation of bacterial cells with the adduct-bearing DNA, putative mutants were detected by colony hybridization techniques that allowed unbiased detection of all mutations at or near the site of the adduct. The site-specific AF or AAF adducts were also placed into plasmid DNA that contained uracil residues on the strand opposite that bearing the lesions. The presence of uracil in one strand of the DNA decreases the ability of the bacterial replication system to use the uracil-containing strand, thereby favoring the use of the strand bearing the adducts. In a comparison of the results obtained with site specifically modified DNA, either with or without uracil, the presence of the uracil increased the mutation frequencies of the AF adduct by >7-fold to 2.9% and of the AAF adduct by >12-fold to 0.75%. The AF adduct produced primarily single-base deletions in the absence of uracil but only base substitutions in the uracil-containing constructs. The AAF adduct produced mutations only in the uracil-containing DNA, which included both frame shifts and base substitutions. Mutations produced by both adducts were SOS dependent.

  17. Triazole resistance mediated by mutations of a conserved active site tyrosine in fungal lanosterol 14α-demethylase.

    PubMed

    Sagatova, Alia A; Keniya, Mikhail V; Wilson, Rajni K; Sabherwal, Manya; Tyndall, Joel D A; Monk, Brian C

    2016-01-01

    Emergence of fungal strains showing resistance to triazole drugs can make treatment of fungal disease problematic. Triazole resistance can arise due to single mutations in the drug target lanosterol 14α-demethylase (Erg11p/CYP51). We have determined how commonly occurring single site mutations in pathogenic fungi affect triazole binding using Saccharomyces cerevisiae Erg11p (ScErg11p) as a target surrogate. The mutations Y140F/H were introduced into full-length hexahistidine-tagged ScErg11p. Phenotypes and high-resolution X-ray crystal structures were determined for the mutant enzymes complexed with short-tailed (fluconazole and voriconazole) or long-tailed (itraconazole and posaconazole) triazoles and wild type enzyme complexed with voriconazole. The mutations disrupted a water-mediated hydrogen bond network involved in binding of short-tailed triazoles, which contain a tertiary hydroxyl not present in long-tailed triazoles. This appears to be the mechanism by which resistance to these short chain azoles occurs. Understanding how these mutations affect drug affinity will aid the design of azoles that overcome resistance. PMID:27188873

  18. Triazole resistance mediated by mutations of a conserved active site tyrosine in fungal lanosterol 14α-demethylase

    PubMed Central

    Sagatova, Alia A.; Keniya, Mikhail V.; Wilson, Rajni K.; Sabherwal, Manya; Tyndall, Joel D. A.; Monk, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    Emergence of fungal strains showing resistance to triazole drugs can make treatment of fungal disease problematic. Triazole resistance can arise due to single mutations in the drug target lanosterol 14α-demethylase (Erg11p/CYP51). We have determined how commonly occurring single site mutations in pathogenic fungi affect triazole binding using Saccharomyces cerevisiae Erg11p (ScErg11p) as a target surrogate. The mutations Y140F/H were introduced into full-length hexahistidine-tagged ScErg11p. Phenotypes and high-resolution X-ray crystal structures were determined for the mutant enzymes complexed with short-tailed (fluconazole and voriconazole) or long-tailed (itraconazole and posaconazole) triazoles and wild type enzyme complexed with voriconazole. The mutations disrupted a water-mediated hydrogen bond network involved in binding of short-tailed triazoles, which contain a tertiary hydroxyl not present in long-tailed triazoles. This appears to be the mechanism by which resistance to these short chain azoles occurs. Understanding how these mutations affect drug affinity will aid the design of azoles that overcome resistance. PMID:27188873

  19. Acceptors in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    McCluskey, Matthew D. Corolewski, Caleb D.; Lv, Jinpeng; Tarun, Marianne C.; Teklemichael, Samuel T.; Walter, Eric D.; Norton, M. Grant; Harrison, Kale W.; Ha, Su

    2015-03-21

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) has potential for a range of applications in the area of optoelectronics. The quest for p-type ZnO has focused much attention on acceptors. In this paper, Cu, N, and Li acceptor impurities are discussed. Experimental evidence indicates these point defects have acceptor levels 3.2, 1.4, and 0.8 eV above the valence-band maximum, respectively. The levels are deep because the ZnO valence band is quite low compared to conventional, non-oxide semiconductors. Using MoO{sub 2} contacts, the electrical resistivity of ZnO:Li was measured and showed behavior consistent with bulk hole conduction for temperatures above 400 K. A photoluminescence peak in ZnO nanocrystals is attributed to an acceptor, which may involve a Zn vacancy. High field (W-band) electron paramagnetic resonance measurements on the nanocrystals revealed an axial center with g{sub ⊥} = 2.0015 and g{sub //} = 2.0056, along with an isotropic center at g = 2.0035.

  20. Acceptors in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Mccluskey, Matthew D.; Corolewski, Caleb; Lv, Jinpeng; Tarun, Marianne C.; Teklemichael, Samuel T.; Walter, Eric D.; Norton, M. G.; Harrison, Kale W.; Ha, Su Y.

    2015-03-21

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) has potential for a range of applications in the area of optoelectronics. The quest for p-type ZnO has focused much attention on acceptors. In this paper, Cu, N, and Li acceptor impurities are discussed. Experimental evidence shows that these point defects have acceptor levels 3.2, 1.5, and 0.8 eV above the valence-band maximum, respectively. The levels are deep because the ZnO valence band is quite low compared to conventional, non-oxide semiconductors. Using MoO2 contacts, the electrical resistivity of ZnO:Li was measured and showed behavior consistent with bulk hole conduction for temperatures above 400 K. A photoluminescence peak in ZnO nanocrystals has been attributed to an acceptor, which may involve a zinc vacancy. High field (W-band) electron paramagnetic resonance measurements on the nanocrystals revealed an axial center with g = 2.0033 and g = 2.0075, along with an isotropic center at g = 2.0053.

  1. Late-onset spastic paraplegia: Aberrant SPG11 transcripts generated by a novel splice site donor mutation.

    PubMed

    Kawarai, Toshitaka; Miyamoto, Ryosuke; Mori, Atsuko; Oki, Ryosuke; Tsukamoto-Miyashiro, Ai; Matsui, Naoko; Miyazaki, Yoshimichi; Orlacchio, Antonio; Izumi, Yuishin; Nishida, Yoshihiko; Kaji, Ryuji

    2015-12-15

    We identified a novel homozygous mutation in the splice site donor (SSD) of intron 30 (c.5866+1G>A) in consanguineous Japanese SPG11 siblings showing late-onset spastic paraplegia using the whole-exome sequencing. Phenotypic variability was observed, including age-at-onset, dysarthria and pes cavus. Coding DNA sequencing revealed that the mutation affected the recognition of the constitutive SSD of intron 30, splicing upstream onto a nearby cryptic SSD in exon 30. The use of constitutive splice sites of intron 29 was confirmed by sequencing. The mutant transcripts are mostly subject to degradation by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay system. SPG11 transcripts, escaping from the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway, would generate a truncated protein (p.Tyr1900Phefs5X) containing the first 1899 amino acids and followed by 4 aberrant amino acids. This study showed a successful clinical application of whole-exome sequencing in spastic paraplegia and demonstrated a further evidence of allelic heterogeneity in SPG11. The confirmation of aberrant transcript by splice site mutation is a prerequisite for a more precise molecular diagnosis. PMID:26671123

  2. Functional consequences of site-directed mutation of conserved histidyl residues of the bacterial luciferase alpha subunit.

    PubMed

    Xin, X; Xi, L; Tu, S C

    1991-11-26

    The available sequences for the different bacterial luciferases reveal five conserved histidyl residues at positions 44, 45, 82, 224, and 285 of the alpha subunit. Ten variants of Vibrio harveyi luciferase were obtained by selective site-directed mutations of these five histidines. The essentiality of alpha His44 and alpha His45 was indicated by 4-7 orders of magnitude of bioluminescence activity reductions resulting from the substitution of either histidine by alanine (alpha H44A or alpha H45A), aspartate (alpha H44D or alpha H45D), or lysine (alpha H45K). Moreover, alpha H44A and alpha H45A were distinct from the native luciferase in thermal stabilities. Mutations at the other three positions also resulted in activity reductions ranging from a fewfold to 3 orders of magnitude. Despite these widely different bioluminescence light outputs, mutated luciferases exhibited, in nonturnover in vitro assays, light emission decay rates mostly similar to that of the native luciferase using octanal, decanal, or dodecanal as a substrate. This is attributed to a similarity in the catalytic rate constants of the light-emitting pathway for the native and mutated luciferases, but various mutated luciferases suffer in different degrees from competing dark reaction(s). In accord with this interpretation, the bioluminescence activities of mutated luciferases showed a general parallel with the relative stabilities of their 4a-hydroperoxyflavin intermediate species. Furthermore, the drastically reduced bioluminescence activities for luciferases with the alpha His44 or alpha His45 substituted by aspartate, alanine, or lysine were accompanied by little or no activities for consuming the aldehyde substrate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1958663

  3. Do founder mutations characteristic of some cancer sites also predispose to pancreatic cancer?

    PubMed

    Lener, Marcin R; Scott, Rodney J; Kluźniak, Wojciech; Baszuk, Piotr; Cybulski, Cezary; Wiechowska-Kozłowska, Anna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Kładny, Józef; Pietrzak, Sandra; Soluch, Agnieszka; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Understanding of the etiology and risk of pancreatic cancer (PaCa) is still poorly understood. This study evaluated the prevalence of 10 Polish founder mutations in four genes among PaCa patients and assessed their possible association with the risk of disease in Poland. In the study 383 PaCa patients and 4,000 control subjects were genotyped for founder mutations in: BRCA1 (5382insC, 4153delA, C61G), CHEK2 (1100delC, IVS2 + 1G > A, del5395, I157T), NBS1 (657del5) and PALB2 (509_510delGA, 172_175delTTGT). A statistically significant association between the 657del5 mutation and an increased risk of pancreatic cancer was observed for NBS1 gene. The Slavic NBS1 gene mutation (657delACAAA) was detected in 8 of 383 (2.09%) unselected cases compared with 22 of 4,000 (0.55%) controls (OR: 3.80, p = 0.002). The PALB2 509_510delGA and 172_175delTTGT mutations combined were seen in 2 (0.52%) unselected cases of PaCa and in 8 (0.20%) of 4,000 controls (OR: 2.61, p = 0.49). For BRCA1, the three mutations combined were detected in 4 of 383 (1.04%) PaCa patients and in 17 of 4,000 (0.42%) controls (OR: 2.46, p = 0.20). CHEK2 mutations were not associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer (OR: 1.11, p = 0.72). The founder mutation in NBS1 (657del5) was associated with an increased risk of PaCa in heterozygous carriers, indicating that this mutation appears to predispose to cancer of the pancreas. By identifying pancreatic cancer risk groups, founder mutation testing in Poland should be considered for people at risk for PaCa. PMID:27038244

  4. Mutations to the cardiotonic steroid binding site of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase are associated with high level of resistance to gamabufotalin in a natricine snake.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Shabnam; Brodie, Edmund D; Neuman-Lee, Lorin A; Savitzky, Alan H

    2016-05-01

    Although toads are defended by bufadienolide toxins, some snakes have evolved resistance to bufadienolides and feed heavily on toads. We compared resistance in Nerodia rhombifer, which possesses mutations that confer target-site resistance, to Pituophis catenifer, which lacks those mutations. Even at the highest dosage tested, Nerodia showed no effects, whereas the lowest dose was lethal to Pituophis. Our results demonstrate a striking level of resistance to bufadienolides in a species possessing the mutations for resistance. PMID:26905927

  5. The incidence of PAX6 mutation in patients with simple aniridia: an evaluation of mutation detection in 12 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Axton, R; Hanson, I; Danes, S; Sellar, G; van Heyningen, V; Prosser, J

    1997-01-01

    Twelve aniridia patients, five with a family history and seven presumed to be sporadic, were exhaustively screened in order to test what proportion of people with aniridia, uncomplicated by associated anomalies, carry mutations in the human PAX6 gene. Mutations were detected in 90% of the cases. Three mutation detection techniques were used to determine if one method was superior for this gene. The protein truncation test (PTT) was used on RT-PCR products, SSCP on genomic PCR amplifications, and chemical cleavage of mismatch on both RT-PCR and genomic amplifications. For RT-PCR products, only the translated portion of the gene was screened. On genomic products exons 1 to 13 (including 740 bp of the 3' untranslated sequence and all intron/exon boundaries) were screened, as was a neuroretina specific enhancer in intron 4. Ten of the possible 12 mutations in the five familial cases and five of the sporadic patients were found, all of which conformed to a functional outcome of haploinsufficiency. Five were splice site mutations (one in the donor site of intron 4, two in the donor site of intron 6, one in each of the acceptor sites of introns 8 and 9) and five were nonsense mutations in exons 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12. SSCP analysis of individually amplified exons, with which nine of the 10 mutations were seen, was the most useful detection method for PAX6. Images PMID:9138149

  6. Effect of internal cleavage site mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 capsid protein on its structure and function.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Ferenc; Kádas, János; Mótyán, János András; Tőzsér, József

    2016-08-01

    The capsid protein of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 has been found to be a substrate of the retroviral protease in vitro, and its processing was predicted to be strongly dependent on a pH-induced conformational change. Several protease cleavage sites have been identified within the capsid protein, but the importance of its cleavage by the viral protease at the early phase of infection is controversial. To confirm the relevance of this process, we aimed to design, produce, and characterize mutant capsid proteins, in which the protein susceptibility toward HIV-1 protease is altered without affecting other steps of the viral life cycle. Our results indicate that while the introduced mutations changed the cleavage rate at the mutated sites of the capsid protein by HIV-1 protease, some of them caused only negligible or moderate structural changes (A78V, L189F, and L189I). However, the effects of other mutations (W23A, A77P, and L189P) were dramatic, as assessed by secondary structure determination or cyclophilin A-binding assay. Based on our observations, the L189F mutant capsid remains structurally and functionally unchanged and may therefore be the best candidate for use in studies aimed at better understanding the role of the protease in the early postentry events of viral infection or retrovirus-mediated gene transduction. PMID:27516963

  7. The structure and bonding of iron-acceptor pairs in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, S.; Assali, L.V.C.; Kimerling, L.C.

    1995-08-01

    The highly mobile interstitial iron and Group III impurities (B, Al, Ga, In) form iron-acceptor pairs in silicon. Based on the migration kinetics and taking host silicon as a dielectric medium, we have simulated the pairing process in a static silicon lattice. Different from the conventional point charge ionic model, our phenomenological calculations include (1) a correction that takes into account valence electron cloud polarization which adds a short range, attractive interaction in the iron-acceptor pair bonding; and (2) silicon lattice relaxation due to the atomic size difference which causes a local strain field. Our model explains qualitatively (1) trends among the iron-acceptor pairs revealing an increase of the electronic state hole emission energy with increasing principal quantum number of acceptor and decreasing pair separation distance; and (2) the stable and metastable sites and configurational symmetries of the iron-acceptor pairs. The iron-acceptor pairing and bonding mechanism is also discussed.

  8. Probing the donor and acceptor substrate specificity of the γ-glutamyl transpeptidase.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin; Legler, Patricia M; Khavrutskii, Ilja; Scorpio, Angelo; Compton, Jaimee R; Robertson, Kelly L; Friedlander, Arthur M; Wallqvist, Anders

    2012-02-14

    γ-Glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) is a two-substrate enzyme that plays a central role in glutathione metabolism and is a potential target for drug design. GGT catalyzes the cleavage of γ-glutamyl donor substrates and the transfer of the γ-glutamyl moiety to an amine of an acceptor substrate or water. Although structures of bacterial GGT have revealed details of the protein-ligand interactions at the donor site, the acceptor substrate site is relatively undefined. The recent identification of a species-specific acceptor site inhibitor, OU749, suggests that these inhibitors may be less toxic than glutamine analogues. Here we investigated the donor and acceptor substrate preferences of Bacillus anthracis GGT (CapD) and applied computational approaches in combination with kinetics to probe the structural basis of the enzyme's substrate and inhibitor binding specificities and compare them with human GGT. Site-directed mutagenesis studies showed that the R432A and R520S variants exhibited 6- and 95-fold decreases in hydrolase activity, respectively, and that their activity was not stimulated by the addition of the l-Cys acceptor substrate, suggesting an additional role in acceptor binding and/or catalysis of transpeptidation. Rat GGT (and presumably HuGGT) has strict stereospecificity for L-amino acid acceptor substrates, while CapD can utilize both L- and D-acceptor substrates comparably. Modeling and kinetic analysis suggest that R520 and R432 allow two alternate acceptor substrate binding modes for L- and D-acceptors. R432 is conserved in Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis, Burkholderia mallei, Helicobacter pylori and Escherichia coli, but not in human GGT. Docking and MD simulations point toward key residues that contribute to inhibitor and acceptor substrate binding, providing a guide to designing novel and specific GGT inhibitors. PMID:22257032

  9. Amyloid precursor protein mutation E682K at the alternative β-secretase cleavage β′-site increases Aβ generation†

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lujia; Brouwers, Nathalie; Benilova, Iryna; Vandersteen, Annelies; Mercken, Marc; Van Laere, Koen; Van Damme, Philip; Demedts, David; Van Leuven, Fred; Sleegers, Kristel; Broersen, Kerensa; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Vandenberghe, Rik; De Strooper, Bart

    2011-01-01

    BACE1 cleaves the amyloid precursor protein (APP) at the β-cleavage site (Met671–Asp672) to initiate the generation of amyloid peptide Aβ. BACE1 is also known to cleave APP at a much less well-characterized β′-cleavage site (Tyr681–Glu682). We describe here the identification of a novel APP mutation E682K located at this β′-site in an early onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) case. Functional analysis revealed that this E682K mutation blocked the β′-site and shifted cleavage of APP to the β-site, causing increased Aβ production. This work demonstrates the functional importance of APP processing at the β′-site and shows how disruption of the balance between β- and β′-site cleavage may enhance the amyloidogenic processing and consequentially risk for AD. Increasing exon- and exome-based sequencing efforts will identify many more putative pathogenic mutations without conclusive segregation-based evidence in a single family. Our study shows how functional analysis of such mutations allows to determine the potential pathogenic nature of these mutations. We propose to classify the E682K mutation as probable pathogenic awaiting further independent confirmation of its association with AD in other patients. PMID:21500352

  10. A novel BTK gene mutation creates a de-novo splice site in an X-linked agammaglobulinemia patient.

    PubMed

    Chear, Chai Teng; Ripen, Adiratna Mat; Mohamed, Sharifah Adlena Syed; Dhaliwal, Jasbir Singh

    2015-04-15

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), encoded by the BTK gene, is a cytoplasmic protein critical in B cell development. Mutations in the BTK gene cause X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA), a primary immunodeficiency with characteristically low or absent B cells and antibodies. This report describes a five year-old boy who presented with otitis externa, arthritis, reduced immunoglobulins and no B cells. Flow cytometry showed undetectable monocyte BTK expression. Sequencing revealed a novel mutation at exon 13 of the BTK gene which created a de novo splice site with a proximal 5 nucleotide loss resulting in a truncated BTK protein. The patient still suffered from ear infection despite intravenous immunoglobulin replacement therapy. In this study, mosaicism was seen only in the mother's genomic DNA. These results suggest that a combination of flow cytometry and BTK gene analysis is important for XLA diagnosis and carrier screening. PMID:25680287

  11. Dominant Splice Site Mutations in PIK3R1 Cause Hyper IgM Syndrome, Lymphadenopathy and Short Stature.

    PubMed

    Petrovski, Slavé; Parrott, Roberta E; Roberts, Joseph L; Huang, Hongxiang; Yang, Jialong; Gorentla, Balachandra; Mousallem, Talal; Wang, Endi; Armstrong, Martin; McHale, Duncan; MacIver, Nancie J; Goldstein, David B; Zhong, Xiao-Ping; Buckley, Rebecca H

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this research was to use next generation sequencing to identify mutations in patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases whose pathogenic gene mutations had not been identified. Remarkably, four unrelated patients were found by next generation sequencing to have the same heterozygous mutation in an essential donor splice site of PIK3R1 (NM_181523.2:c.1425 + 1G > A) found in three prior reports. All four had the Hyper IgM syndrome, lymphadenopathy and short stature, and one also had SHORT syndrome. They were investigated with in vitro immune studies, RT-PCR, and immunoblotting studies of the mutation's effect on mTOR pathway signaling. All patients had very low percentages of memory B cells and class-switched memory B cells and reduced numbers of naïve CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. RT-PCR confirmed the presence of both an abnormal 273 base-pair (bp) size and a normal 399 bp size band in the patient and only the normal band was present in the parents. Following anti-CD40 stimulation, patient's EBV-B cells displayed higher levels of S6 phosphorylation (mTOR complex 1 dependent event), Akt phosphorylation at serine 473 (mTOR complex 2 dependent event), and Akt phosphorylation at threonine 308 (PI3K/PDK1 dependent event) than controls, suggesting elevated mTOR signaling downstream of CD40. These observations suggest that amino acids 435-474 in PIK3R1 are important for its stability and also its ability to restrain PI3K activity. Deletion of Exon 11 leads to constitutive activation of PI3K signaling. This is the first report of this mutation and immunologic abnormalities in SHORT syndrome. PMID:27076228

  12. Mutation of a Single Envelope N-Linked Glycosylation Site Enhances the Pathogenicity of Bovine Leukemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bouzar, Amel Baya; Jacques, Jean-Rock; Cosse, Jean-Philippe; Gillet, Nicolas; Callebaut, Isabelle; Reichert, Michal

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses have coevolved with their host to ensure efficient replication and transmission without inducing excessive pathogenicity that would indirectly impair their persistence. This is exemplified by the bovine leukemia virus (BLV) system in which lymphoproliferative disorders develop in ruminants after latency periods of several years. In principle, the equilibrium reached between the virus and its host could be disrupted by emergence of more pathogenic strains. Intriguingly but fortunately, such a hyperpathogenic BLV strain was never observed in the field or designed in vitro. In this study, we sought to understand the role of envelope N-linked glycosylation with the hypothesis that this posttranslational modification could either favor BLV infection by allowing viral entry or allow immune escape by using glycans as a shield. Using reverse genetics of an infectious molecular provirus, we identified a N-linked envelope glycosylation site (N230) that limits viral replication and pathogenicity. Indeed, mutation N230E unexpectedly leads to enhanced fusogenicity and protein stability. IMPORTANCE Infection by retroviruses requires the interaction of the viral envelope protein (SU) with a membrane-associated receptor allowing fusion and release of the viral genomic RNA into the cell. We show that N-linked glycosylation of the bovine leukemia virus (BLV) SU protein is, as expected, essential for cell infection in vitro. Consistently, mutation of all glycosylation sites of a BLV provirus destroys infectivity in vivo. However, single mutations do not significantly modify replication in vivo. Instead, a particular mutation at SU codon 230 increases replication and accelerates pathogenesis. This unexpected observation has important consequences in terms of disease control and managing. PMID:26085161

  13. Characterization of sulfonylurea-resistant Schoenoplectus juncoides having a target-site Asp(376)Glu mutation in the acetolactate synthase.

    PubMed

    Sada, Yoshinao; Ikeda, Hajime; Yamato, Seiji; Kizawa, Satoru

    2013-09-01

    Schoenoplectus juncoides, a noxious weed for paddy rice, is known to become resistant to sulfonylurea (SU) herbicides by a target-site mutation in either of the two acetolactate synthase (ALS) genes (ALS1 and ALS2). SU-resistant S. juncoides plants having an Asp376Glu mutation in ALS2 were found from a paddy rice field in Japan, but their resistance profile has not been quantitatively investigated. In this study, dose-response of the SU-resistant accession was compared with that of a SU-susceptible accession at in vivo whole-plant level as well as at in vitro enzymatic level. In whole-plant tests, resistance factors (RFs) based on 50% growth reduction (GR50) for imazosulfuron (ISF), bensulfuron-methyl (BSM), metsulfuron-methyl (MSM), bispyribac-sodium (BPS), and imazaquin (IMQ) were 176, 40, 14, 5.2 and 1.5, respectively. Thus, the accession having an Asp376Glu mutation in ALS2 was highly resistant to the three SU herbicides and moderately resistant to BPS, but was not substantially resistant to IMQ. This is slightly different from the earlier results reported from other weeds with an Asp376Glu mutation, in which the mutation confers resistance to broadly all the chemical classes of ALS-inhibiting herbicides. In enzymatic tests, ALS2 of S. juncoides was expressed in E. coli; the resultant ALS2 was subjected to an in vitro assay. RFs of the mutated ALS2 based on 50% enzymatic inhibition (I50) for ISF, BSM, MSM, BPS, and IMQ were 3699, 2438, 322, 80, and 4.8, respectively. The RFs of ALS2 were highly correlated with those of the whole-plant; this suggests that the Asp376Glu mutation in ALS2 is a molecular basis for the whole-plant resistance. The presence of two ALS genes in S. juncoides can at least partially explain why the whole-plant RFs were less than those of the expressed ALS2 enzymes. PMID:25149243

  14. Impact of Nucleotide Mutations at the HNF3- and HNF4-Binding Sites in Enhancer 1 on Viral Replication in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun-young; Kim, Hyung-jin; Park, Channy; So, Hong-seob; Park, Rae Kil

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims The hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome contains binding sites for hepatocyte nuclear factors (HNF) 3 and 4 in the core domain of enhancer 1 (Enh1), and mutations in this domain have a strong impact on virus replication. We aimed to identify frequent base-mutation sites in the core domain of Enh1 and to examine the impact of these mutations on viral replication. Methods We studied virological characteristics and genetic sequences in 387 patients with chronic hepatitis B. We evaluated functional differences associated with specific mutations within the core domain of Enh1. Results Mutations in the core domain were found with significant frequency in C1126 (122/387 [31.5%], the binding site for HNF3) and in C1134 (106/387 [27.4%], the binding site for HNF4). A single mutation at nt 1126 (C1126) was identified in 17/123 (13.8%), and 105/123 (85.4%) had double mutations (C1126/1134). The level of HBV DNA (log10 copies/mL) was lower in single mutants (C1126, 5.81±1.25) than in wild (6.80±1.65) and double mutants (C1126/1134, 6.81±1.54). Similarly, the relative luciferase activity of C1126 and C1126/C1134 was 0.18 and 1.12 times that of the wild-type virus, respectively. Conclusions Mutations in the HNF3 binding site inhibit viral replication, whereas mutations at the HNF4 binding site restore viral replication. PMID:24073315

  15. Reductive half-reaction of nitroalkane oxidase: effect of mutation of the active site aspartate to glutamate.

    PubMed

    Valley, Michael P; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2003-05-20

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of primary and secondary nitroalkanes to the respective aldehydes or ketones, releasing nitrite. The enzyme has recently been identified as being homologous to the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family of enzymes [Daubner, S. C., Gadda, G., Valley, M. P., and Fitzpatrick, P. F. (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 2702-2707]. The glutamate which acts as an active site base in that family of enzymes aligns with Asp402 of nitroalkane oxidase. To evaluate the identification of Asp402 as an active site base, the effect of mutation of Asp402 to glutamate on the rate of cleavage of the nitroalkane C-H bond has been determined. Deuterium kinetic isotope effects on steady state kinetic parameters and direct measurement of the rate of flavin reduction establish that the mutation increases the DeltaG(++) for C-H bond cleavage by 1.6-1.9 kcal/mol. There is no effect on the rate of reaction of the reduced enzyme with oxygen. These results support the assignment of Asp402 as the active site base in nitroalkane oxidase. PMID:12741843

  16. Familial Parkinson Disease-associated Mutations Alter the Site-specific Microenvironment and Dynamics of α-Synuclein*

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Shruti; Ghosh, Dhiman; Dwivedi, Saumya; Anoop, Arunagiri; Mohite, Ganesh Maruti; Kombrabail, Mamata; Krishnamoorthy, Guruswamy; Maji, Samir K.

    2015-01-01

    Human α-synuclein (α-Syn) is a natively unstructured protein whose aggregation into amyloid fibrils is associated with Parkinson disease (PD) pathogenesis. Mutations of α-Syn, E46K, A53T, and A30P, have been linked to the familial form of PD. In vitro aggregation studies suggest that increased propensity to form non-fibrillar oligomers is the shared property of these familial PD-associated mutants. However, the structural basis of the altered aggregation propensities of these PD-associated mutants is not yet clear. To understand this, we studied the site-specific structural dynamics of wild type (WT) α-Syn and its three PD mutants (A53T, E46K, and A30P). Tryptophan (Trp) was substituted at the N terminus, central hydrophobic region, and C terminus of all α-Syns. Using various biophysical techniques including time-resolved fluorescence studies, we show that irrespective of similar secondary structure and early oligomerization propensities, familial PD-associated mutations alter the site-specific microenvironment, solvent exposure, and conformational flexibility of the protein. Our results further show that the common structural feature of the three PD-associated mutants is more compact and rigid sites at their N and C termini compared with WT α-Syn that may facilitate the formation of a partially folded intermediate that eventually leads to their increased oligomerization propensities. PMID:25635052

  17. RNA Polymerase II Mutations Conferring Defects in Poly(A) Site Cleavage and Termination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kubicek, Charles E.; Chisholm, Robert D.; Takayama, Sachiko; Hawley, Diane K.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription termination by RNA polymerase (Pol) II is an essential but poorly understood process. In eukaryotic nuclei, the 3′ ends of mRNAs are generated by cleavage and polyadenylation, and the same sequence elements that specify that process are required for downstream release of the polymerase from the DNA. Although Pol II is known to bind proteins required for both events, few studies have focused on Pol II mutations as a means to uncover the mechanisms that couple polyadenylation and termination. We performed a genetic screen in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to isolate mutations in the N-terminal half of Rpb2, the second largest Pol II subunit, that conferred either a decreased or increased response to a well-characterized poly(A) site. Most of the mutant alleles encoded substitutions affecting either surface residues or conserved active site amino acids at positions important for termination by other RNA polymerases. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction experiments revealed that transcript cleavage at the poly(A) site was impaired in both classes of increased readthrough mutants. Transcription into downstream sequences beyond where termination normally occurs was also probed. Although most of the tested readthrough mutants showed a reduction in termination concomitant with the reduced poly(A) usage, these processes were uncoupled in at least one mutant strain. Several rpb2 alleles were found to be similar or identical to published mutants associated with defective TFIIF function. Tests of these and additional mutations known to impair Rpb2−TFIIF interactions revealed similar decreased readthrough phenotypes, suggesting that TFIIF may have a role in 3′ end formation and termination. PMID:23390594

  18. Genome-Wide Estimates of Mutation Rates and Spectrum in Schizosaccharomyces pombe Indicate CpG Sites are Highly Mutagenic Despite the Absence of DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Behringer, Megan G.; Hall, David W.

    2015-01-01

    We accumulated mutations for 1952 generations in 79 initially identical, haploid lines of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and then performed whole-genome sequencing to determine the mutation rates and spectrum. We captured 696 spontaneous mutations across the 79 mutation accumulation (MA) lines. We compared the mutation spectrum and rate to a recently published equivalent experiment on the same species, and to another model ascomycetous yeast, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. While the two species are approximately 600 million years diverged from each other, they share similar life histories, genome size and genomic G/C content. We found that Sc. pombe and S. cerevisiae have similar mutation rates, but Sc. pombe exhibits a stronger insertion bias. Intriguingly, we observed an increased mutation rate at cytosine nucleotides, specifically CpG nucleotides, which is also seen in S. cerevisiae. However, the absence of methylation in Sc. pombe and the pattern of mutation at these sites, primarily C → A as opposed to C → T, strongly suggest that the increased mutation rate is not caused by deamination of methylated cytosines. This result implies that the high mutability of CpG dinucleotides in other species may be caused in part by a methylation-independent mechanism. Many of our findings mirror those seen in the recent study, despite the use of different passaging conditions, indicating that MA is a reliable method for estimating mutation rates and spectra. PMID:26564949

  19. Identification of novel splice site mutation IVS9 + 1(G > A) and novel complex allele G355R/R359X in Type 1 Gaucher patients heterozygous for mutation N370S.

    PubMed

    Hoitsema, Kourtnee; Amato, Dominick; Khan, Aneal; Sirrs, Sandra; Choy, Francis Y M

    2016-09-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from deficient glucocerebrosidase activity. More than 350 mutations that cause Gaucher disease have been described to date. Novel mutations can potentially provide insight into the glucocerebrosidase structure-function relationship and biochemical basis of the disease. Here, we report the identification of two novel mutations in two unrelated patients with type I (non-neuronopathic) Gaucher disease: 1) a splice site mutation IVS9 + 1G > A; and (2) a complex allele (cis) G355R/R359X. Both patients have a common N370S mutation in the other allele. The splice site mutation results from an intronic base substitution (G to A, c.1328 + 1, g.5005) at the donor splice site of exon and intron 9. The complex allele results from two point mutations in exon 8 of glucocerebrosidase (G to C at c.1180, g.4396, and T to C at c. 1192, g.4408) substituting glycine by arginine (G355R) and arginine by a premature termination (R359X), respectively. In order to demonstrate that G355R/R359X are in cis arrangement, PCR-amplified glucocerebrosidase exon 8 genomic DNA from the patient was cloned into the vector pJET1.2 in Escherichia coli TOP10® strain. Out of the 15 clones that were sequence analyzed, 10 contained the normal allele sequence and 5 contained the complex allele G355R/R359X sequence showing both mutations in cis arrangement. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis using Hph1 restriction endonuclease digest was established for the IVS9 + 1G > A mutation for confirmation and efficient identification of this mutation in future patients. Past literature suggests that mutations affecting splicing patterns of the glucocerebrosidase transcript as well as mutations in Gaucher complex alleles are detrimental to enzyme activity. However, compound heterozygosity with N370S, a mild mutation, will lead to a mild phenotype. The cases reported here support these past findings. PMID:27222815

  20. Identification of novel splice site mutation IVS9 + 1(G > A) and novel complex allele G355R/R359X in Type 1 Gaucher patients heterozygous for mutation N370S☆

    PubMed Central

    Hoitsema, Kourtnee; Amato, Dominick; Khan, Aneal; Sirrs, Sandra; Choy, Francis Y.M.

    2016-01-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from deficient glucocerebrosidase activity. More than 350 mutations that cause Gaucher disease have been described to date. Novel mutations can potentially provide insight into the glucocerebrosidase structure–function relationship and biochemical basis of the disease. Here, we report the identification of two novel mutations in two unrelated patients with type I (non-neuronopathic) Gaucher disease: 1) a splice site mutation IVS9 + 1G > A; and (2) a complex allele (cis) G355R/R359X. Both patients have a common N370S mutation in the other allele. The splice site mutation results from an intronic base substitution (G to A, c.1328 + 1, g.5005) at the donor splice site of exon and intron 9. The complex allele results from two point mutations in exon 8 of glucocerebrosidase (G to C at c.1180, g.4396, and T to C at c. 1192, g.4408) substituting glycine by arginine (G355R) and arginine by a premature termination (R359X), respectively. In order to demonstrate that G355R/R359X are in cis arrangement, PCR-amplified glucocerebrosidase exon 8 genomic DNA from the patient was cloned into the vector pJET1.2 in Escherichia coli TOP10® strain. Out of the 15 clones that were sequence analyzed, 10 contained the normal allele sequence and 5 contained the complex allele G355R/R359X sequence showing both mutations in cis arrangement. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis using Hph1 restriction endonuclease digest was established for the IVS9 + 1G > A mutation for confirmation and efficient identification of this mutation in future patients. Past literature suggests that mutations affecting splicing patterns of the glucocerebrosidase transcript as well as mutations in Gaucher complex alleles are detrimental to enzyme activity. However, compound heterozygosity with N370S, a mild mutation, will lead to a mild phenotype. The cases reported here support these past findings. PMID:27222815

  1. Site-directed gene mutation at mixed sequence targets by psoralen-conjugated pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Nielsen, Peter E; Glazer, Peter M

    2007-01-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding molecules such as triple helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) provide a means for inducing site-specific mutagenesis and recombination at chromosomal sites in mammalian cells. However, the utility of TFOs is limited by the requirement for homopurine stretches in the target duplex DNA. Here, we report the use of pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acids (pcPNAs) for intracellular gene targeting at mixed sequence sites. Due to steric hindrance, pcPNAs are unable to form pcPNA-pcPNA duplexes but can bind to complementary DNA sequences by Watson-Crick pairing via double duplex-invasion complex formation. We show that psoralen-conjugated pcPNAs can deliver site-specific photoadducts and mediate targeted gene modification within both episomal and chromosomal DNA in mammalian cells without detectable off-target effects. Most of the induced psoralen-pcPNA mutations were single-base substitutions and deletions at the predicted pcPNA-binding sites. The pcPNA-directed mutagenesis was found to be dependent on PNA concentration and UVA dose and required matched pairs of pcPNAs. Neither of the individual pcPNAs alone had any effect nor did complementary PNA pairs of the same sequence. These results identify pcPNAs as new tools for site-specific gene modification in mammalian cells without purine sequence restriction, thereby providing a general strategy for designing gene targeting molecules. PMID:17977869

  2. Mutation analysis of the gene involved in adrenoleukodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Oost, B.A. van; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Kemp, S.; Bolhuis, P.A.

    1994-09-01

    A gene responsible for the X-linked genetic disorder adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) that is characterized by demyelination of the nervous system and adrenocortical insufficiency has been identified by positional cloning. The gene encodes an ATP-binding transporter which is located in the peroxisomal membrane. Deficiency of the gene leads to accumulation of unsaturated very long chain fatty acids due to impaired peroxisomal {beta}-oxidation. A systematic analysis of the open reading frame of the ALD gene unraveled the mutations in 28 different families using reverse transcriptase-PCR followed by direct sequencing. No entire gene deletions or drastic promoter mutations have been detected. Only in one family did the mutation involved multiple exons. The remaining mutations were subtle alterations leading to missense (about 50%) or nonsense mutations, frameshifts or splice acceptor site defects. In one patient a single codon was missing. Mutations affecting a single amino acid were concentrated in the region between the third and fourth putative membrane spanning fragments and in the ATP-binding domain. This overview of mutations aids in the determination of structural and functional important regions and facilitates the screening for mutations in other ALD patients. The detection of mutations in virtually all ALD families tested indicates that the isolated gene is the only gene responsible for ALD located in Xq28.

  3. Neurologic syndrome associated with homozygous mutation at MAG sialic acid binding site.

    PubMed

    Roda, Ricardo H; FitzGibbon, Edmond J; Boucekkine, Houda; Schindler, Alice B; Blackstone, Craig

    2016-08-01

    The MAG gene encodes myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), an abundant protein involved in axon-glial interactions and myelination during nerve regeneration. Several members of a consanguineous family with a clinical syndrome reminiscent of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease and demyelinating leukodystrophy on brain MRI were recently found to harbor a homozygous missense p.Ser133Arg MAG mutation. Here, we report two brothers from a nonconsanguineous family afflicted with progressive cognitive impairment, neuropathy, ataxia, nystagmus, and gait disorder. Exome sequencing revealed the homozygous missense mutation p.Arg118His in MAG. This Arg118 residue in immunoglobulin domain 1 is critical for sialic acid binding, providing a compelling mechanistic basis for disease pathogenesis. PMID:27606346

  4. Mutations of cellulose synthase (CESA1) phosphorylation sites modulate anisotropic cell expansion and bidirectional mobility of cellulose synthase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaolin; Ehrhardt, David W.; Somerville, Chris R.

    2010-01-01

    The CESA1 component of cellulose synthase is phosphorylated at sites clustered in two hypervariable regions of the protein. Mutations of the phosphorylated residues to Ala (A) or Glu (E) alter anisotropic cell expansion and cellulose synthesis in rapidly expanding roots and hypocotyls. Expression of T166E, S686E, or S688E mutants of CESA1 fully rescued the temperature sensitive cesA1-1 allele (rsw1) at a restrictive temperature whereas mutations to A at these positions caused defects in anisotropic cell expansion. However, mutations to E at residues surrounding T166 (i.e., S162, T165, and S167) caused opposite effects. Live-cell imaging of fluorescently labeled CESA showed close correlations between tissue or cell morphology and patterns of bidirectional motility of CESA complexes in the plasma membrane. In the WT, CESA complexes moved at similar velocities in both directions along microtubule tracks. By contrast, the rate of movement of CESA particles was directionally asymmetric in mutant lines that exhibited abnormal tissue or cell expansion, and the asymmetry was removed upon depolymerizing microtubules with oryzalin. This suggests that phosphorylation of CESA differentially affects a polar interaction with microtubules that may regulate the length or quantity of a subset of cellulose microfibrils and that this, in turn, alters microfibril structure in the primary cell wall resulting in or contributing to the observed defect in anisotropic cell expansion. PMID:20855602

  5. An Effective Molecular Target Site in Hepatitis B Virus S Gene for Cas9 Cleavage and Mutational Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Sheng, Chunyu; Liu, Hongbo; Liu, Guangze; Du, Xinying; Du, Juan; Zhan, Linsheng; Li, Peng; Yang, Chaojie; Qi, Lihua; Wang, Jian; Yang, Xiaoxia; Jia, Leili; Xie, Jing; Wang, Ligui; Hao, Rongzhang; Xu, Dongping; Tong, Yigang; Zhou, Yusen; Zhou, Jianjun; Sun, Yansong; Li, Qiao; Qiu, Shaofu; Song, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B infection remains incurable because HBV cccDNA can persist indefinitely in patients recovering from acute HBV infection. Given the incidence of HBV infection and the shortcomings of current therapeutic options, a novel antiviral strategy is urgently needed. To inactivate HBV replication and destroy the HBV genome, we employed genome editing tool CRISPR/Cas9. Specifically, we found a CRISPR/Cas9 system (gRNA-S4) that effectively targeted the HBsAg region and could suppress efficiently viral replication with minimal off-target effects and impact on cell viability. The mutation mediated by CRISPR/Cas9 in HBV DNA both in a stable HBV-producing cell line and in HBV transgenic mice had been confirmed and evaluated using deep sequencing. In addition, we demonstrated the reduction of HBV replication was caused by the mutation of S4 site through three S4 region-mutated monoclonal cells. Besides, the gRNA-S4 system could also reduce serum surface-antigen levels by 99.91 ± 0.05% and lowered serum HBV DNA level below the negative threshold in the HBV hydrodynamics mouse model. Together, these findings indicate that the S4 region may be an ideal target for the development of innovative therapies against HBV infection using CRISPR/Cas9. PMID:27570484

  6. An Effective Molecular Target Site in Hepatitis B Virus S Gene for Cas9 Cleavage and Mutational Inactivation.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Sheng, Chunyu; Liu, Hongbo; Liu, Guangze; Du, Xinying; Du, Juan; Zhan, Linsheng; Li, Peng; Yang, Chaojie; Qi, Lihua; Wang, Jian; Yang, Xiaoxia; Jia, Leili; Xie, Jing; Wang, Ligui; Hao, Rongzhang; Xu, Dongping; Tong, Yigang; Zhou, Yusen; Zhou, Jianjun; Sun, Yansong; Li, Qiao; Qiu, Shaofu; Song, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B infection remains incurable because HBV cccDNA can persist indefinitely in patients recovering from acute HBV infection. Given the incidence of HBV infection and the shortcomings of current therapeutic options, a novel antiviral strategy is urgently needed. To inactivate HBV replication and destroy the HBV genome, we employed genome editing tool CRISPR/Cas9. Specifically, we found a CRISPR/Cas9 system (gRNA-S4) that effectively targeted the HBsAg region and could suppress efficiently viral replication with minimal off-target effects and impact on cell viability. The mutation mediated by CRISPR/Cas9 in HBV DNA both in a stable HBV-producing cell line and in HBV transgenic mice had been confirmed and evaluated using deep sequencing. In addition, we demonstrated the reduction of HBV replication was caused by the mutation of S4 site through three S4 region-mutated monoclonal cells. Besides, the gRNA-S4 system could also reduce serum surface-antigen levels by 99.91 ± 0.05% and lowered serum HBV DNA level below the negative threshold in the HBV hydrodynamics mouse model. Together, these findings indicate that the S4 region may be an ideal target for the development of innovative therapies against HBV infection using CRISPR/Cas9. PMID:27570484

  7. Omenn syndrome associated with a functional reversion due to a somatic second-site mutation in CARD11 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Pannicke, Ulrich; Lorenz, Myriam R.; Fisch, Paul; Jeelall, Yogesh; Rohr, Jan; Speckmann, Carsten; Vraetz, Thomas; Farmand, Susan; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Krüger, Marcus; Strahm, Brigitte; Henneke, Philipp; Enders, Anselm; Horikawa, Keisuke; Goodnow, Christopher; Schwarz, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Omenn syndrome (OS) is a severe immunodeficiency associated with erythroderma, lymphoproliferation, elevated IgE, and hyperactive oligoclonal T cells. A restricted T-cell repertoire caused by defective thymic T-cell development and selection, lymphopenia with homeostatic proliferation, and lack of regulatory T cells are considered key factors in OS pathogenesis. We report 2 siblings presenting with cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Pneumocystis jirovecii infections and recurrent sepsis; one developed all clinical features of OS. Both carried homozygous germline mutations in CARD11 (p.Cys150*), impairing NF-κB signaling and IL-2 production. A somatic second-site mutation reverting the stop codon to a missense mutation (p.Cys150Leu) was detected in tissue-infiltrating T cells of the OS patient. Expression of p.Cys150Leu in CARD11-deficient T cells largely reconstituted NF-κB signaling. The reversion likely occurred in a prethymic T-cell precursor, leading to a chimeric T-cell repertoire. We speculate that in our patient the functional advantage of the revertant T cells in the context of persistent CMV infection, combined with lack of regulatory T cells, may have been sufficient to favor OS. This first observation of OS in a patient with a T-cell activation defect suggests that severely defective T-cell development or homeostatic proliferation in a lymphopenic environment are not required for this severe immunopathology. PMID:26289640

  8. Omenn syndrome associated with a functional reversion due to a somatic second-site mutation in CARD11 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Pannicke, Ulrich; Lorenz, Myriam R; Fisch, Paul; Jeelall, Yogesh; Rohr, Jan; Speckmann, Carsten; Vraetz, Thomas; Farmand, Susan; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Krüger, Marcus; Strahm, Brigitte; Henneke, Philipp; Enders, Anselm; Horikawa, Keisuke; Goodnow, Christopher; Schwarz, Klaus; Ehl, Stephan

    2015-10-01

    Omenn syndrome (OS) is a severe immunodeficiency associated with erythroderma, lymphoproliferation, elevated IgE, and hyperactive oligoclonal T cells. A restricted T-cell repertoire caused by defective thymic T-cell development and selection, lymphopenia with homeostatic proliferation, and lack of regulatory T cells are considered key factors in OS pathogenesis. We report 2 siblings presenting with cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Pneumocystis jirovecii infections and recurrent sepsis; one developed all clinical features of OS. Both carried homozygous germline mutations in CARD11 (p.Cys150*), impairing NF-κB signaling and IL-2 production. A somatic second-site mutation reverting the stop codon to a missense mutation (p.Cys150Leu) was detected in tissue-infiltrating T cells of the OS patient. Expression of p.Cys150Leu in CARD11-deficient T cells largely reconstituted NF-κB signaling. The reversion likely occurred in a prethymic T-cell precursor, leading to a chimeric T-cell repertoire. We speculate that in our patient the functional advantage of the revertant T cells in the context of persistent CMV infection, combined with lack of regulatory T cells, may have been sufficient to favor OS. This first observation of OS in a patient with a T-cell activation defect suggests that severely defective T-cell development or homeostatic proliferation in a lymphopenic environment are not required for this severe immunopathology. PMID:26289640

  9. Mutation of potential phosphorylation sites in the recombinant R domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator has significant effects on domain conformation.

    PubMed

    Dulhanty, A M; Chang, X B; Riordan, J R

    1995-01-01

    Mutation of potential cAMP dependent protein kinase sites in the R domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator has significant effects on protein function. Mutation of the potential phosphorylation sites from serine to alanine, to abolish the site, reduced sensitivity to activation, or to glutamic acid, to mimic phosphorylation, caused some constitutive activity. To explore the structural effects of these mutations, recombinant R domain peptides were studied: the wild type, a mutant with nine serine residues changed to alanine, and a mutant with eight serine residues changed to glutamic acid. As assessed by C.D. spectroscopy, the mutants have substantially different secondary structure than the wild type, in agreement with the predictive algorithm of Gascuel and Golmard. The results show that mutagenesis of residues alters the polypeptide structurally as well as preventing it from serving as a phosphorylation substrate. Hence, the functional consequences of the mutations may not be entirely due to effects on phosphorylation. PMID:7529497

  10. Clinical and genetic studies in a family with a new splice-site mutation in the choroideremia gene

    PubMed Central

    Piane, Maria; Cascone, Nikhil C.; Pasquale, Nadia; Ciarnella, Angela; Recupero, Santi M.; Chessa, Luciana

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical and molecular findings of an Italian family with a new mutation in the choroideremia (CHM) gene. Methods We performed a comprehensive ophthalmologic examination, fundus photography, macular optical coherence tomography, perimetry, electroretinography, and fluorescein angiography in an Italian family. The clinical diagnosis was supported by western blot analysis of lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients with CHM and carriers, using a monoclonal antibody against the 415 C-terminal amino acids of Rab escort protein-1 (REP-1). Sequencing of the CHM gene was undertaken on genomic DNA from affected men and carriers; the RNA transcript was analyzed with reverse transcriptase-PCR. Results The affected men showed a variability in the rate of visual change and in the degree of clinical and functional ophthalmologic involvement, mainly age-related, while the women displayed aspecific areas of chorioretinal degeneration. Western blot did not show a detectable amount of normal REP-1 protein in affected men who were hemizygous for a novel mutation, c.819+2T>A at the donor splicing site of intron 6 of the CHM gene; the mutation was confirmed in heterozygosity in the carriers. Conclusions Western blot of the REP-1 protein confirmed the clinical diagnosis, and molecular analysis showed the new in-frame mutation, c.819+2T>A, leading to loss of function of the REP-1 protein. These results emphasize the value of a diagnostic approach that correlates genetic and ophthalmologic data for identifying carriers in families with CHM. An early diagnosis might be crucial for genetic counseling of this type of progressive and still untreatable disease. PMID:24672218

  11. Mutational analysis of a higher plant antenna protein provides identification of chromophores bound into multiple sites

    PubMed Central

    Bassi, Roberto; Croce, Roberta; Cugini, Daniela; Sandonà, Dorianna

    1999-01-01

    The chromophore-binding properties of the higher plant light-harvesting protein CP29 have been studied by using site-directed mutagenesis of pigment-binding residues. Overexpression of the apoproteins in bacteria was followed by reconstitution in vitro with purified pigments, thus obtaining a family of mutant CP29 proteins lacking individual chromophore-binding sites. Biochemical characterization allowed identification of the eight porphyrins and two xanthophyll-binding sites. It is shown that the four porphyrin-binding sites (A1, A2, A4, and A5) situated in the central, twofold-symmetrical domain of the protein are selective for Chl-a, whereas the four peripheral sites (A3, B3, B5, and B6) have mixed Chl-a–Chl-b specificity. Within a site, porphyrin coordination by glutamine increases affinity for Chl-b as compared with glutamate. Xanthophyll site L1 is occupied by lutein, whereas site L2 can bind violaxanthin or neoxanthin. The protein is relatively stable when site L2 site is empty, suggesting that xanthophylls can be exchanged during operation of xanthophyll cycle-dependent photoprotection mechanism. Differential absorption spectroscopy allowed determination of transition energy levels for individual chromophores, thus opening the way to calculation of energy-transfer rates between Chl in higher plant antenna proteins. PMID:10468561

  12. Requirement for Host RNA-Silencing Components and the Virus-Silencing Suppressor when Second-Site Mutations Compensate for Structural Defects in the 3′ Untranslated Region

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Maitreyi; Stupina, Vera A.; Gao, Feng; Szarko, Christine R.; Kuhlmann, Micki M.; Yuan, Xuefeng; Shi, Kerong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) contains a structured 3′ region with hairpins and pseudoknots that form a complex network of noncanonical RNA:RNA interactions supporting higher-order structure critical for translation and replication. We investigated several second-site mutations in the p38 coat protein open reading frame (ORF) that arose in response to a mutation in the asymmetric loop of a critical 3′ untranslated region (UTR) hairpin that disrupts local higher-order structure. All tested second-site mutations improved accumulation of TCV in conjunction with a partial reversion of the primary mutation (TCV-rev1) but had neutral or a negative effect on wild-type (wt) TCV or TCV with the primary mutation. SHAPE (selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension) structure probing indicated that these second-site mutations reside in an RNA domain that includes most of p38 (domain 2), and evidence for RNA:RNA interactions between domain 2 and 3′UTR-containing domain 1 was found. However, second-site mutations were not compensatory in the absence of p38, which is also the TCV silencing suppressor, or in dcl-2/dcl4 or ago1/ago2 backgrounds. One second-site mutation reduced silencing suppressor activity of p38 by altering one of two GW motifs that are required for p38 binding to double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) and interaction with RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC)-associated AGO1/AGO2. Another second-site mutation substantially reduced accumulation of TCV-rev1 in the absence of p38 or DCL2/DCL4. We suggest that the second-site mutations in the p38 ORF exert positive effects through a similar downstream mechanism, either by enhancing accumulation of beneficial DCL-produced viral small RNAs that positively regulate the accumulation of TCV-rev1 or by affecting the susceptibility of TCV-rev1 to RISC loaded with viral small RNAs. IMPORTANCE Genomes of positive-strand RNA viruses fold into high-order RNA structures. Viruses with mutations in regions

  13. Asymmetric mutations in the tetrameric R67 dihydrofolate reductase reveal high tolerance to active-site substitutions

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Maximilian C C J C; Morley, Krista L; Volpato, Jordan P; Schmitzer, Andreea R; Pelletier, Joelle N

    2015-01-01

    Type II R67 dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is a bacterial plasmid-encoded enzyme that is intrinsically resistant to the widely-administered antibiotic trimethoprim. R67 DHFR is genetically and structurally unrelated to E. coli chromosomal DHFR and has an unusual architecture, in that four identical protomers form a single symmetrical active site tunnel that allows only one substrate binding/catalytic event at any given time. As a result, substitution of an active-site residue has as many as four distinct consequences on catalysis, constituting an atypical model of enzyme evolution. Although we previously demonstrated that no single residue of the native active site is indispensable for function, library selection here revealed a strong bias toward maintenance of two native protomers per mutated tetramer. A variety of such “half-native” tetramers were shown to procure native-like catalytic activity, with similar KM values but kcat values 5- to 33-fold lower, illustrating a high tolerance for active-site substitutions. The selected variants showed a reduced thermal stability (Tm ∼12°C lower), which appears to result from looser association of the protomers, but generally showed a marked increase in resilience to heat denaturation, recovering activity to a significantly greater extent than the variant with no active-site substitutions. Our results suggest that the presence of two native protomers in the R67 DHFR tetramer is sufficient to provide native-like catalytic rate and thus ensure cellular proliferation. PMID:25401264

  14. The piggyBac transposon displays local and distant reintegration preferences and can cause mutations at noncanonical integration sites.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng Amy; Pettitt, Stephen J; Eckert, Sabine; Ning, Zemin; Rice, Stephen; Cadiñanos, Juan; Yusa, Kosuke; Conte, Nathalie; Bradley, Allan

    2013-04-01

    The DNA transposon piggyBac is widely used as a tool in mammalian experimental systems for transgenesis, mutagenesis, and genome engineering. We have characterized genome-wide insertion site preferences of piggyBac by sequencing a large set of integration sites arising from transposition from two separate genomic loci and a plasmid donor in mouse embryonic stem cells. We found that piggyBac preferentially integrates locally to the excision site when mobilized from a chromosomal location and identified other nonlocal regions of the genome with elevated insertion frequencies. piggyBac insertions were associated with expressed genes and markers of open chromatin structure and were excluded from heterochromatin. At the nucleotide level, piggyBac prefers to insert into TA-rich regions within a broader GC-rich context. We also found that piggyBac can insert into sites other than its known TTAA insertion site at a low frequency (2%). Such insertions introduce mismatches that are repaired with signatures of host cell repair pathways. Transposons could be mobilized from plasmids with the observed noncanonical flanking regions, indicating that piggyBac could generate point mutations in the genome. PMID:23358416

  15. The piggyBac Transposon Displays Local and Distant Reintegration Preferences and Can Cause Mutations at Noncanonical Integration Sites

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng Amy; Pettitt, Stephen J.; Eckert, Sabine; Ning, Zemin; Rice, Stephen; Cadiñanos, Juan; Yusa, Kosuke; Conte, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    The DNA transposon piggyBac is widely used as a tool in mammalian experimental systems for transgenesis, mutagenesis, and genome engineering. We have characterized genome-wide insertion site preferences of piggyBac by sequencing a large set of integration sites arising from transposition from two separate genomic loci and a plasmid donor in mouse embryonic stem cells. We found that piggyBac preferentially integrates locally to the excision site when mobilized from a chromosomal location and identified other nonlocal regions of the genome with elevated insertion frequencies. piggyBac insertions were associated with expressed genes and markers of open chromatin structure and were excluded from heterochromatin. At the nucleotide level, piggyBac prefers to insert into TA-rich regions within a broader GC-rich context. We also found that piggyBac can insert into sites other than its known TTAA insertion site at a low frequency (2%). Such insertions introduce mismatches that are repaired with signatures of host cell repair pathways. Transposons could be mobilized from plasmids with the observed noncanonical flanking regions, indicating that piggyBac could generate point mutations in the genome. PMID:23358416

  16. Mutational analysis of the L1 binding site of 23S rRNA in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Said, B; Cole, J R; Nomura, M

    1988-01-01

    The L11 ribosomal protein operon of Escherichia coli contains the genes for L11 and L1 and is feedback regulated by the translational repressor L1. Both the L1 binding site on 23S rRNA and the L1 repressor target site on L11 operon mRNA share similar proposed secondary structures and contain some primary sequence identity. Several site-directed mutations in the binding region of 23S rRNA were constructed and their effects on binding were examined. For in vitro analysis, a filter binding method was used. For in vivo analysis, a conditional expression system was used to overproduce a 23S rRNA fragment containing the L1 binding region, which leads to specific derepression of the synthesis of L11 and L1. Changes in the shared region of the 23S rRNA L1 binding site produced effects on L1 binding similar to those found previously in analysis of corresponding changes in the L11 operon mRNA target site. The results support the hypothesis that r-protein L1 interacts with both 23S rRNA and L11 operon mRNA by recognizing similar features on both RNAs. Images PMID:3060846

  17. Changed membrane integration and catalytic site conformation are two mechanisms behind the increased Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio by presenilin 1 familial Alzheimer-linked mutations.

    PubMed

    Wanngren, Johanna; Lara, Patricia; Ojemalm, Karin; Maioli, Silvia; Moradi, Nasim; Chen, Lu; Tjernberg, Lars O; Lundkvist, Johan; Nilsson, IngMarie; Karlström, Helena

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme complex γ-secretase generates amyloid β-peptide (Aβ), a 37-43-residue peptide associated with Alzheimer disease (AD). Mutations in presenilin 1 (PS1), the catalytical subunit of γ-secretase, result in familial AD (FAD). A unifying theme among FAD mutations is an alteration in the ratio Aβ species produced (the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio), but the molecular mechanisms responsible remain elusive. In this report we have studied the impact of several different PS1 FAD mutations on the integration of selected PS1 transmembrane domains and on PS1 active site conformation, and whether any effects translate to a particular amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing phenotype. Most mutations studied caused an increase in the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio, but via different mechanisms. The mutations that caused a particular large increase in the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio did also display an impaired APP intracellular domain (AICD) formation and a lower total Aβ production. Interestingly, seven mutations close to the catalytic site caused a severely impaired integration of proximal transmembrane/hydrophobic sequences into the membrane. This structural defect did not correlate to a particular APP processing phenotype. Six selected FAD mutations, all of which exhibited different APP processing profiles and impact on PS1 transmembrane domain integration, were found to display an altered active site conformation. Combined, our data suggest that FAD mutations affect the PS1 structure and active site differently, resulting in several complex APP processing phenotypes, where the most aggressive mutations in terms of increased Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio are associated with a decrease in total γ-secretase activity. PMID:24918054

  18. Aberrant 5′ splice sites in human disease genes: mutation pattern, nucleotide structure and comparison of computational tools that predict their utilization

    PubMed Central

    Buratti, Emanuele; Chivers, Martin; Královičová, Jana; Romano, Maurizio; Baralle, Marco; Krainer, Adrian R.; Vořechovský, Igor

    2007-01-01

    Despite a growing number of splicing mutations found in hereditary diseases, utilization of aberrant splice sites and their effects on gene expression remain challenging to predict. We compiled sequences of 346 aberrant 5′splice sites (5′ss) that were activated by mutations in 166 human disease genes. Mutations within the 5′ss consensus accounted for 254 cryptic 5′ss and mutations elsewhere activated 92 de novo 5′ss. Point mutations leading to cryptic 5′ss activation were most common in the first intron nucleotide, followed by the fifth nucleotide. Substitutions at position +5 were exclusively G>A transitions, which was largely attributable to high mutability rates of C/G>T/A. However, the frequency of point mutations at position +5 was significantly higher than that observed in the Human Gene Mutation Database, suggesting that alterations of this position are particularly prone to aberrant splicing, possibly due to a requirement for sequential interactions with U1 and U6 snRNAs. Cryptic 5′ss were best predicted by computational algorithms that accommodate nucleotide dependencies and not by weight-matrix models. Discrimination of intronic 5′ss from their authentic counterparts was less effective than for exonic sites, as the former were intrinsically stronger than the latter. Computational prediction of exonic de novo 5′ss was poor, suggesting that their activation critically depends on exonic splicing enhancers or silencers. The authentic counterparts of aberrant 5′ss were significantly weaker than the average human 5′ss. The development of an online database of aberrant 5′ss will be useful for studying basic mechanisms of splice-site selection, identifying splicing mutations and optimizing splice-site prediction algorithms. PMID:17576681

  19. The Role of Distant Mutations and Allosteric Regulation on LovD Active Site Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Osuna, Sílvia; Gao, Xue; Sawaya, Michael R.; Gilson, Lynne; Collier, Steven J.; Huisman, Gjalt W.; Yeates, Todd O.; Tang, Yi; Houk, K. N.

    2014-01-01

    Natural enzymes have evolved to perform their cellular functions under complex selective pressures, which often require their catalytic activities to be regulated by other proteins. We contrasted a natural enzyme, LovD, which acts on a protein-bound (LovF) acyl substrate, with a laboratory-generated variant that was transformed by directed evolution to accept instead a small free acyl thioester, and no longer requires the acyl carrier protein. The resulting 29-mutant variant is 1000-fold more efficient in the synthesis of the drug simvastatin than the wild-type LovD. This is the first non-patent report of the enzyme currently used for the manufacture of simvastatin, as well as the intermediate evolved variants. Crystal structures and microsecond molecular dynamics simulations revealed the mechanism by which the laboratory-generated mutations free LovD from dependence on protein-protein interactions. Mutations dramatically altered conformational dynamics of the catalytic residues, obviating the need for allosteric modulation by the acyl carrier LovF. PMID:24727900

  20. Mutations in the GM1 Binding Site of Simian Virus 40 VP1 Alter Receptor Usage and Cell Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Magaldi, Thomas G.; Buch, Michael H. C.; Murata, Haruhiko; Erickson, Kimberly D.; Neu, Ursula; Garcea, Robert L.; Peden, Keith; Stehle, Thilo

    2012-01-01

    Polyomaviruses are nonenveloped viruses with capsids composed primarily of 72 pentamers of the viral VP1 protein, which forms the outer shell of the capsid and binds to cell surface oligosaccharide receptors. Highly conserved VP1 proteins from closely related polyomaviruses recognize different oligosaccharides. To determine whether amino acid changes restricted to the oligosaccharide binding site are sufficient to determine receptor specificity and how changes in receptor usage affect tropism, we studied the primate polyomavirus simian virus 40 (SV40), which uses the ganglioside GM1 as a receptor that mediates cell binding and entry. Here, we used two sequential genetic screens to isolate and characterize viable SV40 mutants with mutations in the VP1 GM1 binding site. Two of these mutants were completely resistant to GM1 neutralization, were no longer stimulated by incorporation of GM1 into cell membranes, and were unable to bind to GM1 on the cell surface. In addition, these mutant viruses displayed an infection defect in monkey cells with high levels of cell surface GM1. Interestingly, one mutant infected cells with low cell surface GM1 more efficiently than wild-type virus, apparently by utilizing a different ganglioside receptor. Our results indicate that a small number of mutations in the GM1 binding site are sufficient to alter ganglioside usage and change tropism, and they suggest that VP1 divergence is driven primarily by a requirement to accommodate specific receptors. In addition, our results suggest that GM1 binding is required for vacuole formation in permissive monkey CV-1 cells. Further study of these mutants will provide new insight into polyomavirus entry, pathogenesis, and evolution. PMID:22514351

  1. Synergistic and compensatory effects of two point mutations conferring target-site resistance to fipronil in the insect GABA receptor RDL

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yixi; Meng, Xiangkun; Yang, Yuanxue; Li, Hong; Wang, Xin; Yang, Baojun; Zhang, Jianhua; Li, Chunrui; Millar, Neil S.; Liu, Zewen

    2016-01-01

    Insecticide resistance can arise from a variety of mechanisms, including changes to the target site, but is often associated with substantial fitness costs to insects. Here we describe two resistance-associated target-site mutations that have synergistic and compensatory effects that combine to produce high and persistent levels of resistance to fipronil, an insecticide targeting on γ-aminobytyric acid (GABA) receptors. In Nilaparvata lugens, a major pest of rice crops in many parts of Asia, we have identified a single point mutation (A302S) in the GABA receptor RDL that has been identified previously in other species and which confers low levels of resistance to fipronil (23-fold) in N. lugans. In addition, we have identified a second resistance-associated RDL mutation (R300Q) that, in combination with A302S, is associated with much higher levels of resistance (237-fold). The R300Q mutation has not been detected in the absence of A302S in either laboratory-selected or field populations, presumably due to the high fitness cost associated with this mutation. Significantly, it appears that the A302S mutation is able to compensate for deleterious effects of R300Q mutation on fitness cost. These findings identify a novel resistance mechanism and may have important implications for the spread of insecticide resistance. PMID:27557781

  2. Synergistic and compensatory effects of two point mutations conferring target-site resistance to fipronil in the insect GABA receptor RDL.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yixi; Meng, Xiangkun; Yang, Yuanxue; Li, Hong; Wang, Xin; Yang, Baojun; Zhang, Jianhua; Li, Chunrui; Millar, Neil S; Liu, Zewen

    2016-01-01

    Insecticide resistance can arise from a variety of mechanisms, including changes to the target site, but is often associated with substantial fitness costs to insects. Here we describe two resistance-associated target-site mutations that have synergistic and compensatory effects that combine to produce high and persistent levels of resistance to fipronil, an insecticide targeting on γ-aminobytyric acid (GABA) receptors. In Nilaparvata lugens, a major pest of rice crops in many parts of Asia, we have identified a single point mutation (A302S) in the GABA receptor RDL that has been identified previously in other species and which confers low levels of resistance to fipronil (23-fold) in N. lugans. In addition, we have identified a second resistance-associated RDL mutation (R300Q) that, in combination with A302S, is associated with much higher levels of resistance (237-fold). The R300Q mutation has not been detected in the absence of A302S in either laboratory-selected or field populations, presumably due to the high fitness cost associated with this mutation. Significantly, it appears that the A302S mutation is able to compensate for deleterious effects of R300Q mutation on fitness cost. These findings identify a novel resistance mechanism and may have important implications for the spread of insecticide resistance. PMID:27557781

  3. Dominant Mutations in S. cerevisiae PMS1 Identify the Mlh1-Pms1 Endonuclease Active Site and an Exonuclease 1-Independent Mismatch Repair Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Catherine E.; Mendillo, Marc L.; Bowen, Nikki; Hombauer, Hans; Campbell, Christopher S.; Desai, Arshad; Putnam, Christopher D.; Kolodner, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolypsis colorectal cancer or HNPCC) is a common cancer predisposition syndrome. Predisposition to cancer in this syndrome results from increased accumulation of mutations due to defective mismatch repair (MMR) caused by a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2/scPMS1. To better understand the function of Mlh1-Pms1 in MMR, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify six pms1 mutations (pms1-G683E, pms1-C817R, pms1-C848S, pms1-H850R, pms1-H703A and pms1-E707A) that were weakly dominant in wild-type cells, which surprisingly caused a strong MMR defect when present on low copy plasmids in an exo1Δ mutant. Molecular modeling showed these mutations caused amino acid substitutions in the metal coordination pocket of the Pms1 endonuclease active site and biochemical studies showed that they inactivated the endonuclease activity. This model of Mlh1-Pms1 suggested that the Mlh1-FERC motif contributes to the endonuclease active site. Consistent with this, the mlh1-E767stp mutation caused both MMR and endonuclease defects similar to those caused by the dominant pms1 mutations whereas mutations affecting the predicted metal coordinating residue Mlh1-C769 had no effect. These studies establish that the Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease is required for MMR in a previously uncharacterized Exo1-independent MMR pathway. PMID:24204293

  4. A nicotinic acetylcholine receptor mutation conferring target-site resistance to imidacloprid in Nilaparvata lugens (brown planthopper).

    PubMed

    Liu, Zewen; Williamson, Martin S; Lansdell, Stuart J; Denholm, Ian; Han, Zhaojun; Millar, Neil S

    2005-06-14

    Neonicotinoids, such as imidacloprid, are nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists with potent insecticidal activity. Since its introduction in the early 1990s, imidacloprid has become one of the most extensively used insecticides for both crop protection and animal health applications. As with other classes of insecticides, resistance to neonicotinoids is a significant threat and has been identified in several pest species, including the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, a major rice pest in many parts of Asia. In this study, radioligand binding experiments have been conducted with whole-body membranes prepared from imidacloprid-susceptible and imidacloprid-resistant strains of N. lugens. The results reveal a much higher level of [3H]imidacloprid-specific binding to the susceptible strain than to the resistant strain (16.7 +/- 1.0 and 0.34 +/- 0.21 fmol/mg of protein, respectively). With the aim of understanding the molecular basis of imidacloprid resistance, five nAChR subunits (Nlalpha1-Nlalpha4 and Nlbeta1) have been cloned from N. lugens.A comparison of nAChR subunit genes from imidacloprid-sensitive and imidacloprid-resistant populations has identified a single point mutation at a conserved position (Y151S) in two nAChR subunits, Nlalpha1 and Nlalpha3. A strong correlation between the frequency of the Y151S point mutation and the level of resistance to imidacloprid has been demonstrated by allele-specific PCR. By expression of hybrid nAChRs containing N. lugens alpha and rat beta2 subunits, evidence was obtained that demonstrates that mutation Y151S is responsible for a substantial reduction in specific [3H]imidacloprid binding. This study provides direct evidence for the occurrence of target-site resistance to a neonicotinoid insecticide. PMID:15937112

  5. Mutational analysis of the transcription start site of the yeast tRNA(Leu3) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Fruscoloni, P; Zamboni, M; Panetta, G; De Paolis, A; Tocchini-Valentini, G P

    1995-01-01

    In addition to the well-known internal promoter elements of tRNA genes, 5' flanking sequences can also influence the efficiency of transcription by Saccharomyces cerevisiae extracts in vitro. A consensus sequence of yeast tRNA genes in the vicinity of the transcriptional start site can be derived. To determine whether the activity of this region can be attributed to particular sequence features we studied in vitro mutants of the start site region. We found that the start site can be shifted, but only to a limited extent, by moving the conserved sequence element. We found that both a pyrimidine-purine motif (with transcription initiating at the purine) and a small T:A base pair block upstream are important for efficient transcription in vitro. Thus the sequence surrounding the start site of transcription of the yeast tRNA(Leu3) gene does play a role in determining transcription efficiency and fixing the precise site of initiation by RNA polymerase III. Images PMID:7659514

  6. Response to MET inhibitors in patients with stage IV lung adenocarcinomas harboring MET mutations causing exon 14 skipping

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Paul K.; Drilon, Alexander; Fan, Pang-Dian; Yu, Helena; Rekhtman, Natasha; Ginsberg, Michelle S.; Borsu, Laetitia; Schultz, Nikolaus; Berger, Michael F.; Rudin, Charles M.; Ladanyi, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the MET exon 14 RNA splice acceptor and donor sites, which lead to exon skipping, deletion of the juxtamembrane domain containing the Cbl E3-ubiquitin ligase binding site, and decreased turnover of the resultant aberrant MET protein, were previously reported to be oncogenic in preclinical models. We now report responses to the MET inhibitors crizotinib and cabozantinib in four patients with stage IV lung adenocarcinomas harboring mutations leading to MET exon 14 skipping, highlighting a new therapeutic strategy for the 4% of lung adenocarcinoma patients whose tumors harbor this previously underappreciated genetic alteration. PMID:25971939

  7. Inhibition of methylation at two internal N6-methyladenosine sites caused by GAC to GAU mutations.

    PubMed

    Kane, S E; Beemon, K

    1987-03-01

    We previously have mapped N6-methyladenosine (m6A) sites within the genomic RNA of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV). The results of that study and of experiments using inhibitors of methylation suggest that m6A might be involved in mRNA processing events. We describe an approach for directly analyzing the function of m6A in RNA and for studying the sequence specificity of the m6A methylase. Two sites of methylation in RSV (nucleotides 7414 and 7424) were altered by oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. The highly conserved GAC consensus sequence at those sites was changed to GAU. The new sequences were no longer methylated in the RSV genomic RNA; the GAC sequence was required for efficient base modification at those two adenosines. The altered m6A pattern did not affect viral RNA processing or the viral life cycle within infected cells. PMID:3029112

  8. Mutation in the primer binding site of the type 1 human immunodeficiency virus genome affects virus production and infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Nagashunmugam, T; Velpandi, A; Goldsmith, C S; Zaki, S R; Kalyanaraman, V S; Srinivasan, A

    1992-01-01

    In an effort to understand the contribution of the primer-binding site (PBS) region to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication, we have constructed a mutant HIV proviral DNA with an alteration in the 5' end of the PBS. The PBS mutant proviral DNA was characterized by transfection of the viral DNA into CD4+ and non-CD4+ target cells. The results indicate that mutation in the PBS reduced the level of viral particles released into the medium of transfected cells in comparison to wild-type proviral DNA. The viral particles were noninfectious upon transmission to established CD4+ cell lines and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes. Electron microscopic analysis of the transfected cells revealed no abnormalities in the structure of the virion directed by the mutant proviral DNA. Also, the protein and RNA contents of the mutant virions were similar to the wild type. The quantitation of intracellular viral structural protein in the transfected cells, however, indicated that the PBS mutation may have an effect on the assembly of viral particles in addition to completely abolishing reverse transcription of viral RNA into DNA. These results provide evidence that the PBS region of the viral genome has multiple functions in HIV-1 replication. Images PMID:1373895

  9. A Splice-Site Mutation in a Retina-Specific Exon of BBS8 Causes Nonsyndromic Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Riazuddin, S. Amer; Iqbal, Muhammad; Wang, Yue; Masuda, Tomohiro; Chen, Yuhng; Bowne, Sara; Sullivan, Lori S.; Waseem, Naushin H.; Bhattacharya, Shomi; Daiger, Stephen P.; Zhang, Kang; Khan, Shaheen N.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding; Sieving, Paul A.; Zack, Donald J.; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Tissue-specific alternative splicing is an important mechanism for providing spatiotemporal protein diversity. Here we show that an in-frame splice mutation in BBS8, one of the genes involved in pleiotropic Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS), is sufficient to cause nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa (RP). A genome-wide scan of a consanguineous RP pedigree mapped the trait to a 5.6 Mb region; subsequent systematic sequencing of candidate transcripts identified a homozygous splice-site mutation in a previously unknown BBS8 exon. The allele segregated with the disorder, was absent from controls, was completely invariant across evolution, and was predicted to lead to the elimination of a 10 amino acid sequence from the protein. Subsequent studies showed the exon to be expressed exclusively in the retina and enriched significantly in the photoreceptor layer. Importantly, we found this exon to represent the major BBS8 mRNA species in the mammalian photoreceptor, suggesting that the encoded 10 amino acids play a pivotal role in the function of BBS8 in this organ. Understanding the role of this additional sequence might therefore inform the mechanism of retinal degeneration in patients with syndromic BBS or other related ciliopathies. PMID:20451172

  10. DONOR-ACCEPTOR INTERACTIONS OF NITROGEN*

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, J. E.; Szent-Györgyi, A.

    1969-01-01

    The nitrogen atoms of organic molecules readily enter into donor-acceptor interactions, giving off an electron from their lone pair. Under favorable conditions the acceptor can form free radicals. S and O atoms behave likewise but less intensely. PMID:4306047

  11. Anaerobic electron acceptor chemotaxis in Shewanella putrefaciens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Moser, D. P.; Saffarini, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 can grow either aerobically or anaerobically at the expense of many different electron acceptors and is often found in abundance at redox interfaces in nature. Such redox interfaces are often characterized by very strong gradients of electron acceptors resulting from rapid microbial metabolism. The coincidence of S. putrefaciens abundance with environmental gradients prompted an examination of the ability of MR-1 to sense and respond to electron acceptor gradients in the laboratory. In these experiments, taxis to the majority of the electron acceptors that S. putrefaciens utilizes for anaerobic growth was seen. All anaerobic electron acceptor taxis was eliminated by the presence of oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, elemental sulfur, or dimethyl sulfoxide, even though taxis to the latter was very weak and nitrate and nitrite respiration was normal in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies with respiratory mutants of MR-1 revealed that several electron acceptors that could not be used for anaerobic growth nevertheless elicited normal anaerobic taxis. Mutant M56, which was unable to respire nitrite, showed normal taxis to nitrite, as well as the inhibition of taxis to other electron acceptors by nitrite. These results indicate that electron acceptor taxis in S. putrefaciens does not conform to the paradigm established for Escherichia coli and several other bacteria. Carbon chemo-taxis was also unusual in this organism: of all carbon compounds tested, the only positive response observed was to formate under anaerobic conditions.

  12. Glucansucrase acceptor reactions with D-mannose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The main acceptor product of glucansucrases with D-mannose has not previously been identified. We used glucansucrases that form water-insoluble a-D-glucans to produce increased yields of acceptor products from D-mannose, and identified the major product as 6-O-a-D-glucopyranosyl-D-mannose. Glucansuc...

  13. Inactivation of nitroalkane oxidase upon mutation of the active site base and rescue with a deprotonated substrate.

    PubMed

    Valley, Michael P; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2003-07-23

    Mutation of Asp402 in nitroalkane oxidase to Asn or Ala inactivates the enzyme with neutral nitroethane as substrate, but the activity can be rescued with the nitroethane anion. The V/K values of the D402N and D402A enzymes with the nitroethane anion are independent of pH, whereas the V/K values of the wild-type and D402E enzymes are pH dependent with both the protonated and the deprotonated forms of nitroethane. Moreover, although the V/K value of the D402E enzyme with neutral nitroethane is 20-fold less than that of the wild-type enzyme, there is only a 2-fold difference in the V/K values with the nitroethane anion. These results are fully consistent with a primary role for Asp402 as the active site base in nitroalkane oxidase which abstracts the substrate alpha-proton. PMID:12862464

  14. Proposal for a unified nomenclature for target-site mutations associated with resistance to fungicides.

    PubMed

    Mair, Wesley; Lopez-Ruiz, Francisco; Stammler, Gerd; Clark, William; Burnett, Fiona; Hollomon, Derek; Ishii, Hideo; Thind, Tarlochan S; Brown, James Km; Fraaije, Bart; Cools, Hans; Shaw, Michael; Fillinger, Sabine; Walker, Anne-Sophie; Mellado, Emilia; Schnabel, Guido; Mehl, Andreas; Oliver, Richard P

    2016-08-01

    Evolved resistance to fungicides is a major problem limiting our ability to control agricultural, medical and veterinary pathogens and is frequently associated with substitutions in the amino acid sequence of the target protein. The convention for describing amino acid substitutions is to cite the wild-type amino acid, the codon number and the new amino acid, using the one-letter amino acid code. It has frequently been observed that orthologous amino acid mutations have been selected in different species by fungicides from the same mode of action class, but the amino acids have different numbers. These differences in numbering arise from the different lengths of the proteins in each species. The purpose of the present paper is to propose a system for unifying the labelling of amino acids in fungicide target proteins. To do this we have produced alignments between fungicide target proteins of relevant species fitted to a well-studied 'archetype' species. Orthologous amino acids in all species are then assigned numerical 'labels' based on the position of the amino acid in the archetype protein. © 2016 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:27148866

  15. Probing the pigment binding sites in LHCII with resonance Raman spectroscopy: The effect of mutations at S123.

    PubMed

    Kish, Elizabeth; Wang, Ke; Llansola-Portoles, Manuel J; Ilioaia, Cristian; Pascal, Andrew A; Robert, Bruno; Yang, Chunhong

    2016-09-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy was used to evaluate the structure of light-harvesting chlorophyll (Chl) a/b complexes of photosystem II (LHCII), reconstituted from wild-type (WT) and mutant apoproteins over-expressed in Escherichia coli. The point mutations involved residue S123, exchanged for either P (S123P) or G (S123G). In all reconstituted proteins, lutein 2 displayed a distorted conformation, as it does in purified LHCII trimers. Reconstituted WT and S123G also exhibited a conformation of bound neoxanthin (Nx) molecules identical to the native protein, while the S123P mutation was found to induce a change in Nx conformation. This structural change of neoxanthin is accompanied by a blue shift of the absorption of this carotenoid molecule. The interactions assumed by (and thus the structure of the binding sites of) the bound Chls b were found identical in all the reconstituted proteins, and only marginally perturbed as compared to purified LHCII. The interactions assumed by bound Chls a were also identical in purified LHCII and the reconstituted WT. However, the keto carbonyl group of one Chl a, originally free-from-interactions in WT LHCII, becomes involved in a strong H-bond with its environment in LHCII reconstituted from the S123P apoprotein. As the absorption in the Qy region of this protein is identical to that of the LHCII reconstituted from the WT apoprotein, we conclude that the interaction state of the keto carbonyl of Chl a does not play a significant role in tuning the binding site energy of these molecules. PMID:27267584

  16. A splice site mutation in HERC1 leads to syndromic intellectual disability with macrocephaly and facial dysmorphism: Further delineation of the phenotypic spectrum.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Shagun; Bhowmik, Aneek Das; Ramprasad, Vedam L; Murugan, Sakthivel; Dalal, Ashwin

    2016-07-01

    We report on a sib pair of Indian origin presenting with intellectual disability, dysmorphism, and macrocephaly. Exome sequencing revealed a homozygous splice site HERC1 mutation in both probands. Functional analysis revealed use of an alternate splice site resulting in formation of a downstream stop codon and nonsense mediated decay. In the light of recent reports of HERC1 mutations in two families with a similar phenotypic presentation, this report reiterates the pathogenic nature and clinical consequences of HERC1 disruption. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27108999

  17. Arabidopsis AtADF1 is functionally affected by mutations on actin binding sites.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chun-Hai; Tang, Wei-Ping; Liu, Jia-Yao

    2013-03-01

    The plant actin depolymerizing factor (ADF) binds to both monomeric and filamentous actin, and is directly involved in the depolymerization of actin filaments. To better understand the actin binding sites of the Arabidopsis thaliana L. AtADF1, we generated mutants of AtADF1 and investigated their functions in vitro and in vivo. Analysis of mutants harboring amino acid substitutions revealed that charged residues (Arg98 and Lys100) located at the α-helix 3 and forming an actin binding site together with the N-terminus are essential for both G- and F-actin binding. The basic residues on the β-strand 5 (K82/A) and the α-helix 4 (R135/A, R137/A) form another actin binding site that is important for F-actin binding. Using transient expression of CFP-tagged AtADF1 mutant proteins in onion (Allium cepa) peel epidermal cells and transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana L. plants overexpressing these mutants, we analyzed how these mutant proteins regulate actin organization and affect seedling growth. Our results show that the ADF mutants with a lower affinity for actin filament binding can still be functional, unless the affinity for actin monomers is also affected. The G-actin binding activity of the ADF plays an essential role in actin binding, depolymerization of actin polymers, and therefore in the control of actin organization. PMID:23190411

  18. Mutation of conserved active-site threonine residues in creatine kinase affects autophosphorylation and enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Stolz, Martin; Hornemann, Thorsten; Schlattner, Uwe; Wallimann, Theo

    2002-01-01

    Muscle-type creatine kinase (MM-CK) is a member of an isoenzyme family with key functions in cellular energetics. It has become a matter of debate whether the enzyme is autophosphorylated, as reported earlier [Hemmer, Furter-Graves, Frank, Wallimann and Furter (1995) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1251, 81-90], or exclusively nucleotidylated. In the present paper, we demonstrate unambiguously that CK is indeed autophosphorylated. However, this autophosphorylation is not solely responsible for the observed microheterogeneity of MM-CK on two-dimensional isoelectric focusing gels. Using phosphoamino-acid analysis of (32)P-labelled CK isoforms, phosphothreonine (P-Thr) residues were identified as the only product of autophosphorylation for all CK isoenzymes. The phosphorylated residues in chicken MM-CK were allocated to a region in the vicinity of the active site, where five putative phosphorylation sites were identified. Site-directed threonine-valine-replacement mutants reveal that autophosphorylation is not specific for one particular residue but occurs at all examined threonine residues. The enzyme kinetic parameters indicate that the autophosphorylation of CK exerts a modulatory effect on substrate binding and the equilibrium constant, rather than on the catalytic mechanism itself. PMID:11964180

  19. Instability of buried hydration sites increases protein subdomains fluctuations in the human prion protein by the pathogenic mutation T188R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomobe, Katsufumi; Yamamoto, Eiji; Akimoto, Takuma; Yasui, Masato; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    The conformational change from the cellular prion protein (PrPc) to scrapie prion protein (PrPsc) is a key process in prion diseases. The prion protein has buried water molecules which significantly contribute to the stability of the protein; however, there has been no report investigating the influence on the buried hydration sites by a pathogenic mutation not adjacent to the buried hydration sites. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of wild type (WT) PrPc and pathogenic point mutant T188R to investigate conformational changes and the buried hydration sites. In WT-PrPc, four buried hydration sites are identified by residence time and rotational relaxation analysis. However, there are no stable buried hydration sites in one of T188R simulations, which indicates that T188R sometimes makes the buried hydration sites fragile. We also find that fluctuations of subdomains S1-H1-S2 and H1-H2 increase in T188R when the buried hydration sites become unstable. Since the side chain of arginine which is replaced from threonine in T188R is larger than of threonine, the side chain cannot be embedded in the protein, which is one of the causes of the instability of subdomains. These results show correlations between the buried hydration sites and the mutation which is far from them, and provide a possible explanation for the instability by mutation.

  20. Bright Solid-State Emission of Disilane-Bridged Donor-Acceptor-Donor and Acceptor-Donor-Acceptor Chromophores.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Masaki; Tsuchiya, Mizuho; Sakamoto, Ryota; Yamanoi, Yoshinori; Nishibori, Eiji; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The development of disilane-bridged donor-acceptor-donor (D-Si-Si-A-Si-Si-D) and acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-Si-Si-D-Si-Si-A) compounds is described. Both types of compound showed strong emission (λem =ca. 500 and ca. 400 nm, respectively) in the solid state with high quantum yields (Φ: up to 0.85). Compound 4 exhibited aggregation-induced emission enhancement in solution. X-ray diffraction revealed that the crystal structures of 2, 4, and 12 had no intermolecular π-π interactions to suppress the nonradiative transition in the solid state. PMID:26822564

  1. Investigating the Role of Loop C Hydrophilic Residue ‘T244’ in the Binding Site of ρ1 GABAC Receptors via Site Mutation and Partial Agonism

    PubMed Central

    Naffaa, Moawiah M.; Absalom, Nathan; Solomon, V. Raja; Chebib, Mary; Hibbs, David E.; Hanrahan, Jane R.

    2016-01-01

    The loop C hydrophilic residue, threonine 244 lines the orthosteric binding site of ρ1 GABAC receptors was studied by point mutation into serine, alanine and cysteine, and tested with GABA, some representative partial agonists and antagonists. Thr244 has a hydroxyl group essential for GABA activity that is constrained by the threonine methyl group, orienting it toward the binding site. Significant decreases in activation effects of the studied ligands at ρ1 T244S mutant receptors, suggests a critical role for this residue. Results of aliphatic and heteroaromatic partial agonists demonstrate different pharmacological effects at ρ1 T244S mutant receptors when co-applied with GABA EC50 responses. ρ1 T244A and ρ1 T244C mutant receptors have minimal sensitivity to GABA at high mM concentrations, whereas, the ρ1 WT partial agonists, β-alanine and MTSEA demonstrate more efficacy and potency, respectively, than GABA at these mutant receptors. This study explores the role of Thr244 in the binding of agonists as an initial step during channel gating by moving loop C towards the ligand. PMID:27244450

  2. The dark matter of the cancer genome: aberrations in regulatory elements, untranslated regions, splice sites, non-coding RNA and synonymous mutations.

    PubMed

    Diederichs, Sven; Bartsch, Lorenz; Berkmann, Julia C; Fröse, Karin; Heitmann, Jana; Hoppe, Caroline; Iggena, Deetje; Jazmati, Danny; Karschnia, Philipp; Linsenmeier, Miriam; Maulhardt, Thomas; Möhrmann, Lino; Morstein, Johannes; Paffenholz, Stella V; Röpenack, Paula; Rückert, Timo; Sandig, Ludger; Schell, Maximilian; Steinmann, Anna; Voss, Gjendine; Wasmuth, Jacqueline; Weinberger, Maria E; Wullenkord, Ramona

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a disease of the genome caused by oncogene activation and tumor suppressor gene inhibition. Deep sequencing studies including large consortia such as TCGA and ICGC identified numerous tumor-specific mutations not only in protein-coding sequences but also in non-coding sequences. Although 98% of the genome is not translated into proteins, most studies have neglected the information hidden in this "dark matter" of the genome. Malignancy-driving mutations can occur in all genetic elements outside the coding region, namely in enhancer, silencer, insulator, and promoter as well as in 5'-UTR and 3'-UTR Intron or splice site mutations can alter the splicing pattern. Moreover, cancer genomes contain mutations within non-coding RNA, such as microRNA, lncRNA, and lincRNA A synonymous mutation changes the coding region in the DNA and RNA but not the protein sequence. Importantly, oncogenes such as TERT or miR-21 as well as tumor suppressor genes such as TP53/p53, APC, BRCA1, or RB1 can be affected by these alterations. In summary, coding-independent mutations can affect gene regulation from transcription, splicing, mRNA stability to translation, and hence, this largely neglected area needs functional studies to elucidate the mechanisms underlying tumorigenesis. This review will focus on the important role and novel mechanisms of these non-coding or allegedly silent mutations in tumorigenesis. PMID:26992833

  3. A novel de novo point mutation of the OCT-binding site in the IGF2/H19-imprinting control region in a Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome patient.

    PubMed

    Higashimoto, K; Jozaki, K; Kosho, T; Matsubara, K; Fuke, T; Yamada, D; Yatsuki, H; Maeda, T; Ohtsuka, Y; Nishioka, K; Joh, K; Koseki, H; Ogata, T; Soejima, H

    2014-12-01

    The IGF2/H19-imprinting control region (ICR1) functions as an insulator to methylation-sensitive binding of CTCF protein, and regulates imprinted expression of IGF2 and H19 in a parental origin-specific manner. ICR1 methylation defects cause abnormal expression of imprinted genes, leading to Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) or Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS). Not only ICR1 microdeletions involving the CTCF-binding site, but also point mutations and a small deletion of the OCT-binding site have been shown to trigger methylation defects in BWS. Here, mutational analysis of ICR1 in 11 BWS and 12 SRS patients with ICR1 methylation defects revealed a novel de novo point mutation of the OCT-binding site on the maternal allele in one BWS patient. In BWS, all reported mutations and the small deletion of the OCT-binding site, including our case, have occurred within repeat A2. These findings indicate that the OCT-binding site is important for maintaining an unmethylated status of maternal ICR1 in early embryogenesis. PMID:24299031

  4. Inferring primary tumor sites from mutation spectra: a meta-analysis of histology-specific aberrations in cancer-derived cell lines.

    PubMed

    Dietlein, Felix; Eschner, Wolfgang

    2014-03-15

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have led to profound characterization of mutation spectra for several cancer types. Hence, we sought to systematically compare genomic aberrations between primary tumors and cancer lines. For this, we compiled publically available sequencing data of 1651 genes across 905 cell lines. We used them to characterize 23 distinct primary tumor sites by a novel approach that is based on Bayesian spam-filtering techniques. Thereby, we confirmed the strong overall similarity of alterations between patient samples and cell culture. However, we also identified several suspicious mutations, which had not been associated with their cancer types before. Based on these characterizations, we developed the inferring cancer origins from mutation spectra (ICOMS) tool. On our cell line collection, the algorithm reached a prediction specificity rate of 79%, which strongly variegated between primary cancer sites. On an independent validation cohort of 431 primary tumor samples, we observed a similar accuracy of 71%. Additionally, we found that ICOMS could be employed to deduce further attributes from mutation spectra, including sub-histology and compound sensitivity. Thus, thorough classification of site-specific mutation spectra for cell lines may decipher further genome-phenotype associations in cancer. PMID:24163242

  5. Hemophilia A due to mutations that create new N-glycosylation sites.

    PubMed Central

    Aly, A M; Higuchi, M; Kasper, C K; Kazazian, H H; Antonarakis, S E; Hoyer, L W

    1992-01-01

    In studying the molecular defects responsible for cross-reacting material-positive hemophilia A, we have identified two patients in whom the nonfunctional factor VIII-like protein has abnormal, slower-moving heavy or light chains on SDS/PAGE. Both patients have severe hemophilia A (less than 1% of normal factor VIII activity) with a normal plasma level of factor VIII antigen. The molecular defects were identified by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis screening of PCR-amplified products of the factor VIII-coding DNA sequence followed by nucleotide sequencing of the abnormal PCR products. In patient ARC-21, a methionine-to-threonine substitution at position 1772 in the factor VIII light chain creates a potential new N-glycosylation site at asparagine-1770. In patient ARC-22, an isoleucine-to-threonine substitution at position 566 creates a potential new N-glycosylation site at asparagine-564 in the A2 domain of the factor VIII heavy chain. The mobility of these chains on SDS/PAGE was normal after N-Glycanase digestion and procoagulant activity was generated--to a maximum of 23% and 45% of control normal plasma. Abnormal N-glycosylation, blocking factor VIII procoagulant activity, represents a newly recognized mechanism for the pathogenesis of severe hemophilia A. Images PMID:1594597

  6. Securin can have a separase cleavage site by substitution mutations in the domain required for stabilization and inhibition of separase.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Koji; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2006-03-01

    Securin-separase complex is required for sister chromatid separation. Securin degrades in an APC/cyclosome dependent manner. Separase is activated on the destruction of securin and cleaves cohesin. Fission yeast securin/Cut2 required for proper separase localization has the motifs for destruction and separase-binding at the N- and C-termini, respectively. We report here the third essential domain, which becomes toxic when the 76-amino acid fragment (81-156) in the middle is overproduced. The fragment inhibits separase, while separase is recruited normally and securin is destroyed. It may interfere with separase activation after destruction of securin. If the 127DIE129 stretch is substituted for AIA, the fragment toxicity and the full-length function are abolished. Interestingly, Cut2 is cleaved in a separase dependent manner if the cleavage consensus is introduced following the DIE sequence. This finding is consistent with the proposed model that the DIE region may mimic the cleavage site of separase and inhibit the activation of separase. Evidence for physical interaction between the fragment and separase is provided. A temperature sensitive mutation cut1-K73 isolated by its specific resistance to the fragment toxicity resides in the superhelical region of separase, suggesting that the catalytic site and the helical region in separase may cooperate for activation. PMID:16483313

  7. Active site mutants of Escherichia coli dethiobiotin synthetase: effects of mutations on enzyme catalytic and structural properties.

    PubMed

    Yang, G; Sandalova, T; Lohman, K; Lindqvist, Y; Rendina, A R

    1997-04-22

    Five active site residues, Thr11, Glu12, Lys15, Lys37, and Ser41, implicated by the protein crystal structure studies of Escherichia coli DTBS, were mutated to determine their function in catalysis and substrate binding. Nine mutant enzymes, T11V, E12A, E12D, K15Q, K37L, K37Q, K37R, S41A, and S41C, were overproduced in an E. coli strain lacking a functional endogenous DTBS gene and purified to homogeneity. Replacement of Thr11 with valine resulted in a 24,000-fold increase in the Km(ATP) with little or no change in the Kd(ATP), KM(DAPA) and DTBS k(cat), suggesting an essential role for this residue in the steady-state affinity for ATP. The two Glu12 mutants showed essentially wild-type DTBS activity (slightly elevated k(cat)'s). Unlike wild-type DTBS, E12A had the same apparent KM(DAPA) at subsaturating and saturating ATP concentrations, indicating a possible role for Glu12 in the binding synergy between DAPA and ATP. The mutations in Lys15 and Lys37 resulted in loss of catalytic activity (0.01% and <0.9% of wild-type DTBS k(cat) for K15Q and the Lys37 mutant enzymes, respectively) and higher KM's for both DAPA (40-fold and >100-fold higher than wild-type for the K15Q and Lys37 mutant enzymes, respectively) and ATP (1800-fold and >10-fold higher than wild-type for K15Q and the K37 mutant enzymes, respectively). These results strongly suggest that Lys15 and Lys37 are crucial to both catalysis and substrate binding. S41A and S41C had essentially the same k(cat) as wild-type and had moderate increases in the DAPA and ATP KM and Kd (ATP) values. Replacement of Ser41 with cysteine resulted in larger effects than replacement with alanine. These data suggest that the H-bond between N7 of DAPA and the Ser41 side chain is not very important for catalysis. The catalytic behavior of these mutant enzymes was also studied by pulse-chase experiments which produced results consistent with the steady-state kinetic analyses. X-ray crystallographic studies of four mutant enzymes, S

  8. Identification of 31 novel mutations in the F8 gene in Spanish hemophilia A patients: structural analysis of 20 missense mutations suggests new intermolecular binding sites.

    PubMed

    Venceslá, Adoración; Corral-Rodríguez, María Angeles; Baena, Manel; Cornet, Mónica; Domènech, Montserrat; Baiget, Montserrat; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Tizzano, Eduardo F

    2008-04-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) is an X-linked bleeding disorder caused by a wide variety of mutations in the factor 8 (F8) gene, leading to absent or deficient factor VIII (FVIII). We analyzed the F8 gene of 267 unrelated Spanish patients with HA. After excluding patients with the common intron-1 and intron-22 inversions and large deletions, we detected 137 individuals with small mutations, 31 of which had not been reported previously. Eleven of these were nonsense, frameshift, and splicing mutations, whereas 20 were missense changes. We assessed the impact of the 20 substitutions based on currently available information about FV and FVIII structure and function relationship, including previously reported results of replacements at these and topologically equivalent positions. Although most changes are likely to cause gross structural perturbations and concomitant cofactor instability, p.Ala375Ser is predicted to affect cofactor activation. Finally, 3 further mutations (p.Pro64Arg, p.Gly494Val, and p.Asp2267Gly) appear to affect cofactor interactions with its carrier protein, von Willebrand factor, with the scavenger receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP), and/or with the substrate of the FVIIIapi*FIXa (Xase) complex, factor X. Characterization of these novel mutations is important for adequate genetic counseling in HA families, but also contributes to a better understanding of FVIII structure-function relationship. PMID:18184865

  9. Identification of 31 novel mutations in the F8 gene in Spanish hemophilia A patients: structural analysis of 20 missense mutations suggests new intermolecular binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Venceslá, Adoración; Corral-Rodríguez, María Ángeles; Baena, Manel; Cornet, Mónica; Domènech, Montserrat; Baiget, Montserrat; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo

    2008-01-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) is an X-linked bleeding disorder caused by a wide variety of mutations in the factor 8 (F8) gene, leading to absent or deficient factor VIII (FVIII). We analyzed the F8 gene of 267 unrelated Spanish patients with HA. After excluding patients with the common intron-1 and intron-22 inversions and large deletions, we detected 137 individuals with small mutations, 31 of which had not been reported previously. Eleven of these were nonsense, frameshift, and splicing mutations, whereas 20 were missense changes. We assessed the impact of the 20 substitutions based on currently available information about FV and FVIII structure and function relationship, including previously reported results of replacements at these and topologically equivalent positions. Although most changes are likely to cause gross structural perturbations and concomitant cofactor instability, p.Ala375Ser is predicted to affect cofactor activation. Finally, 3 further mutations (p.Pro64Arg, p.Gly494Val, and p.Asp2267Gly) appear to affect cofactor interactions with its carrier protein, von Willebrand factor, with the scavenger receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein (LRP), and/or with the substrate of the FVIIIapi•FIXa (Xase) complex, factor X. Characterization of these novel mutations is important for adequate genetic counseling in HA families, but also contributes to a better understanding of FVIII structure-function relationship. PMID:18184865

  10. Structural Characterization of Mutations at the Oxygen Activation Site in Monomeric Sarcosine Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Schuman Jorns, Marilyn; Chen, Zhi-wei; Mathews, F. Scott

    2010-04-30

    Oxygen reduction and sarcosine oxidation in monomeric sarcosine oxidase (MSOX) occur at separate sites above the si- and re-faces, respectively, of the flavin ring. Mutagenesis studies implicate Lys265 as the oxygen activation site. Substitution of Lys265 with a neutral (Met, Gln, or Ala) or basic (Arg) residue results in an {approx}10{sup 4}- or 250-fold decrease, respectively, in the reaction rate. The overall structure of MSOX and residue conformation in the sarcosine binding cavity are unaffected by replacement of Lys265 with Met or Arg. The side chain of Met265 exhibits the same configuration in each molecule of Lys265Met crystals and is nearly congruent with Lys265 in wild-type MSOX. The side chain of Arg265 is, however, dramatically shifted (4-5 {angstrom}) compared with Lys265, points in the opposite direction, and exhibits significant conformational variability between molecules of the same crystal. The major species in solutions of Lys265Arg is likely to contain a 'flipped-out' Arg265 and exhibit negligible oxygen activation, similar to Lys265Met. The 400-fold higher oxygen reactivity observed with Lys265Arg is attributed to a minor (<1%) 'flipped-in' Arg265 conformer whose oxygen reactivity is similar to that of wild-type MSOX. A structural water (WAT1), found above the si-face of the flavin ring in all previously determined MSOX structures, is part of an apparent proton relay system that extends from FAD N(5) to bulk solvent. WAT1 is strikingly absent in Lys265Met and Lys265Arg, a feature that may account for the apparent kinetic stabilization of a reductive half-reaction intermediate that is detectable with the mutants but not wild-type MSOX.

  11. Methylated Cytosines Mutate to Transcription Factor Binding Sites that Drive Tetrapod Evolution

    PubMed Central

    He, Ximiao; Tillo, Desiree; Vierstra, Jeff; Syed, Khund-Sayeed; Deng, Callie; Ray, G. Jordan; Stamatoyannopoulos, John; FitzGerald, Peter C.; Vinson, Charles

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, the cytosine in CG dinucleotides is typically methylated producing 5-methylcytosine (5mC), a chemically less stable form of cytosine that can spontaneously deaminate to thymidine resulting in a T•G mismatched base pair. Unlike other eukaryotes that efficiently repair this mismatched base pair back to C•G, in mammals, 5mCG deamination is mutagenic, sometimes producing TG dinucleotides, explaining the depletion of CG dinucleotides in mammalian genomes. It was suggested that new TG dinucleotides generate genetic diversity that may be critical for evolutionary change. We tested this conjecture by examining the DNA sequence properties of regulatory sequences identified by DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) in human and mouse genomes. We hypothesized that the new TG dinucleotides generate transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) that become tissue-specific DHSs (TS-DHSs). We find that 8-mers containing the CG dinucleotide are enriched in DHSs in both species. However, 8-mers containing a TG and no CG dinucleotide are preferentially enriched in TS-DHSs when compared with 8-mers with neither a TG nor a CG dinucleotide. The most enriched 8-mer with a TG and no CG dinucleotide in tissue-specific regulatory regions in both genomes is the AP-1 motif (TGAC/GTCAN), and we find evidence that TG dinucleotides in the AP-1 motif arose from CG dinucleotides. Additional TS-DHS-enriched TFBS containing the TG/CA dinucleotide are the E-Box motif (GCAGCTGC), the NF-1 motif (GGCA—TGCC), and the GR (glucocorticoid receptor) motif (G-ACA—TGT-C). Our results support the suggestion that cytosine methylation is mutagenic in tetrapods producing TG dinucleotides that create TFBS that drive evolution. PMID:26507798

  12. Methylated Cytosines Mutate to Transcription Factor Binding Sites that Drive Tetrapod Evolution.

    PubMed

    He, Ximiao; Tillo, Desiree; Vierstra, Jeff; Syed, Khund-Sayeed; Deng, Callie; Ray, G Jordan; Stamatoyannopoulos, John; FitzGerald, Peter C; Vinson, Charles

    2015-11-01

    In mammals, the cytosine in CG dinucleotides is typically methylated producing 5-methylcytosine (5mC), a chemically less stable form of cytosine that can spontaneously deaminate to thymidine resulting in a T•G mismatched base pair. Unlike other eukaryotes that efficiently repair this mismatched base pair back to C•G, in mammals, 5mCG deamination is mutagenic, sometimes producing TG dinucleotides, explaining the depletion of CG dinucleotides in mammalian genomes. It was suggested that new TG dinucleotides generate genetic diversity that may be critical for evolutionary change. We tested this conjecture by examining the DNA sequence properties of regulatory sequences identified by DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) in human and mouse genomes. We hypothesized that the new TG dinucleotides generate transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) that become tissue-specific DHSs (TS-DHSs). We find that 8-mers containing the CG dinucleotide are enriched in DHSs in both species. However, 8-mers containing a TG and no CG dinucleotide are preferentially enriched in TS-DHSs when compared with 8-mers with neither a TG nor a CG dinucleotide. The most enriched 8-mer with a TG and no CG dinucleotide in tissue-specific regulatory regions in both genomes is the AP-1 motif ( TG: A(C)/GT CA: N), and we find evidence that TG dinucleotides in the AP-1 motif arose from CG dinucleotides. Additional TS-DHS-enriched TFBS containing the TG/CA dinucleotide are the E-Box motif (G CA: GC TG: C), the NF-1 motif (GG CATG: CC), and the GR (glucocorticoid receptor) motif (G-A CATG: T-C). Our results support the suggestion that cytosine methylation is mutagenic in tetrapods producing TG dinucleotides that create TFBS that drive evolution. PMID:26507798

  13. Effect of Mutations on the Binding of Kanamycin-B to RNA Hairpins Derived from the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ribosomal A-Site.

    PubMed

    Truitt, Amber R; Choi, Bok-Eum; Li, Jenny; Soto, Ana Maria

    2015-12-29

    Kanamycin is an aminoglycoside antibiotic used in the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis. Mutations at the rRNA A-site have been associated with kanamycin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates. Understanding the effect of these mutations on the conformation of the M. tuberculosis A-site is critical for understanding the mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in M. tuberculosis. In this work, we have studied RNA hairpins derived from the M. tuberculosis A-site, the wild type and three mutants at the following positions (M. tuberculosis/Escherichia coli numbering): A1400/1408 → G, C1401/1409 → U, and the double mutant G1483/1491 C1401/1409 → UA. Specifically, we used circular dichroism, ultraviolet spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy to characterize the conformation, stability, and binding affinity of kanamycin-B and other aminoglycoside antibiotics for these RNA hairpins. Our results show that the mutations affect the conformation of the decoding site, with the mutations at position 1401/1409 resulting in significant destabilizations. Interestingly, the mutants bind paromomycin with weaker affinity than the wild type, but they bind kanamycin-B with similar affinity than the wild type. The results suggest that the presence of mutations does not prevent kanamycin-B from binding. Instead, kanamycin may promote different interactions with a third partner in the mutants compared to the wild type. Furthermore, our results with longer and shorter hairpins suggest that the region of the A-site that varies among organisms may have modulating effects on the binding and interactions of the A-site. PMID:26560864

  14. Two novel splicing mutations in the SLC45A2 gene cause Oculocutaneous Albinism Type IV by unmasking cryptic splice sites.

    PubMed

    Straniero, Letizia; Rimoldi, Valeria; Soldà, Giulia; Mauri, Lucia; Manfredini, Emanuela; Andreucci, Elena; Bargiacchi, Sara; Penco, Silvana; Gesu, Giovanni P; Del Longo, Alessandra; Piozzi, Elena; Asselta, Rosanna; Primignani, Paola

    2015-09-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is characterized by hypopigmentation of the skin, hair and eye, and by ophthalmologic abnormalities caused by a deficiency in melanin biosynthesis. OCA type IV (OCA4) is one of the four commonly recognized forms of albinism, and is determined by mutation in the SLC45A2 gene. Here, we investigated the genetic basis of OCA4 in an Italian child. The mutational screening of the SLC45A2 gene identified two novel potentially pathogenic splicing mutations: a synonymous transition (c.888G>A) involving the last nucleotide of exon 3 and a single-nucleotide insertion (c.1156+2dupT) within the consensus sequence of the donor splice site of intron 5. As computer-assisted analysis for mutant splice-site prediction was not conclusive, we investigated the effects on pre-mRNA splicing of these two variants by using an in vitro minigene approach. Production of mutant transcripts in HeLa cells demonstrated that both mutations cause the almost complete abolishment of the physiologic donor splice site, with the concomitant unmasking of cryptic donor splice sites. To our knowledge, this work represents the first in-depth molecular characterization of splicing defects in a OCA4 patient. PMID:26016411

  15. Accurate detection for a wide range of mutation and editing sites of microRNAs from small RNA high-throughput sequencing profiles.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yun; Ji, Bo; Song, Renhua; Wang, Shengpeng; Li, Ting; Zhang, Xiaotuo; Chen, Kun; Li, Tianqing; Li, Jinyan

    2016-08-19

    Various types of mutation and editing (M/E) events in microRNAs (miRNAs) can change the stabilities of pre-miRNAs and/or complementarities between miRNAs and their targets. Small RNA (sRNA) high-throughput sequencing (HTS) profiles can contain many mutated and edited miRNAs. Systematic detection of miRNA mutation and editing sites from the huge volume of sRNA HTS profiles is computationally difficult, as high sensitivity and low false positive rate (FPR) are both required. We propose a novel method (named MiRME) for an accurate and fast detection of miRNA M/E sites using a progressive sequence alignment approach which refines sensitivity and improves FPR step-by-step. From 70 sRNA HTS profiles with over 1.3 billion reads, MiRME has detected thousands of statistically significant M/E sites, including 3'-editing sites, 57 A-to-I editing sites (of which 32 are novel), as well as some putative non-canonical editing sites. We demonstrated that a few non-canonical editing sites were not resulted from mutations in genome by integrating the analysis of genome HTS profiles of two human cell lines, suggesting the existence of new editing types to further diversify the functions of miRNAs. Compared with six existing studies or methods, MiRME has shown much superior performance for the identification and visualization of the M/E sites of miRNAs from the ever-increasing sRNA HTS profiles. PMID:27229138

  16. Mutations at sites involved in Suc1 binding inactivate Cdc2.

    PubMed Central

    Ducommun, B; Brambilla, P; Draetta, G

    1991-01-01

    suc1+ encodes an essential cell cycle regulator of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Its product, a 13-kDa protein, interacts with the Cdc2 protein kinase. Both positive and negative effects on cell cycle progression have been attributed to Suc1. To date, the exact mechanisms and the physiological role of the interaction between Suc1 and Cdc2 remain unclear. Here we have studied the molecular basis of this association. We show that Cdc2 can bind Suc1 or its mammalian homolog directly in the absence of any additional protein component. Using an alanine scanning mutagenesis method, we analyzed the interaction between Cdc2 and Suc1. We show that the integrity of several domains on the Cdc2 protein, including sites directly involved in catalytic activity, is required for binding to Suc1. Furthermore, Cdc2 mutant proteins unable to bind Suc1 (but able to bind cyclins) are nonfunctional when overexpressed in S. pombe, indicating that a specific interaction with Suc1 is required for Cdc2 function. Images PMID:1944283

  17. The actin binding site of thymosin beta 4 mapped by mutational analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Van Troys, M; Dewitte, D; Goethals, M; Carlier, M F; Vandekerckhove, J; Ampe, C

    1996-01-01

    We characterized in detail the actin binding site of the small actin-sequestering protein thymosin beta 4 (T beta 4) using chemically synthesized full-length T beta 4 variants. The N-terminal part (residues 1-16) and a hexapeptide motif (residues 17-22) form separate structural entities. In both, we identified charged and hydrophobic residues that participate in the actin interaction using chemical cross-linking, complex formation in native gels and actin-sequestering experiments. Quantitative data on the activity of the variants and circular dichroism experiments allow to present a model in which the N-terminal part needs to adopt an alpha-helix for actin binding and interacts through a patch of hydrophobic residues (6M-I-F12) on one side of this helix. Also, electrostatic contacts between actin and lysine residues 18, in the motif, and 14, in the N-terminal alpha-helix, appear important for binding. The residues critical for contacting actin are conserved throughout the beta-thymosin family and in addition to this we identify a similar pattern in the C-terminal headpiece of villin and dematin. Images PMID:8617195

  18. Acceptor Products of Alternansucrase with Gentiobiose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the presence of suitable acceptor molecules, dextransucrase makes a homologous series of oligosaccharides in which the isomers differ by a single glucosyl unit, whereas alternansucrase synthesizes one trisaccharide, two tetrasaccharides, etc. Previously, we showed that alternansucrase only forms...

  19. Synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor

    DOEpatents

    Lancet, Michael S.; Curran, George P.

    1981-08-18

    A synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor consisting essentially of at least one compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate supported in a refractory carrier matrix, the carrier having the general formula Ca.sub.5 (SiO.sub.4).sub.2 CO.sub.3. A method for producing the synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor is also disclosed.

  20. CO2 phase mutation by fluctuating water table in the vadose zone over a CCS site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joun, W.; Ha, S. W.; Kim, H. H.; Kim, T. W.; Lee, S. S.; Lee, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    Geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) is one of the feasible plans to control greenhouse gas emissions. In order to be more perfect, the plan has to prove that the injected CO2 gas will not be leaking. Even if CO2 leaking happens, we should possess a technique which provides information on specific aquifer system before critical effect to ground and subsurface environments. Many parameters have been utilized for early detection before risk to environments by sensing CO2 gas concentration, electric conductivity, pH, and ion analysis. However, these are not enough to all CCS sites for leakage detection. For example, the importance of gas leaking path is emphasized because finding the dominant gas flow path can reduce risk and provide a quick estimation. Herein, we investigate dissolved solute degassing and vertical flow from saturated zone to unsaturated zone in shallow depth aquifer. Especially we focused on the water table fluctuation effect. Based on field data and basic parameters, we perform a pilot scale gas injection test and calculate gas flow saturation with STOMP simulator. The CO2 gas concentrations at different depth levels according to amount of injected CO2 infused water, CO2 gas saturation in vadose zone have different concentration values. If we estimate this phenomenon in vadose zone by using CO2 gas detection method, we could presume that the CO2 dissolved in shallow groundwater is degassing and flow upward into vadose zone. However, the concentration level and change patterns are not same and will be changed according to the pattern of water table fluctuation. This study could be usefully applied to strategic CCS environmental monitoring of CO2 leakage.Acknowledgement: Financial support was provided by the "R&D Project on Environmental Management of Geologic CO2 Storage" from the KEITI (Project Number: 2014001810003).

  1. A Pseudo-Full Mutation Identified in Fragile X Assay Reveals a Novel Base Change Abolishing an EcoRI Restriction Site

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shujian; Bass, Harold N.; Gao, Hanlin; Astbury, Caroline; Jamehdor, Mehdi R.; Qu, Yong

    2008-01-01

    Diagnostic testing for the fragile X syndrome is designed to detect the most common mutation, a CGG expansion in the 5′-untranslated region of the fragile X mental retardation (FMRI) gene. PCR can determine the number of CGG repeats less than 100, whereas Southern analysis can detect large premutations, full mutations, and their methylation status. Bands larger than 5.8 kb observed via Southern analysis are usually considered a methylated full mutation, causing fragile X syndrome in males and varied clinical presentations in females. We observed a 10.9-kb band on a Southern blot assay from an autistic girl with language delay. Further investigation identified a novel G-to-A transition at an EcoRI cleavage site, upstream of the CGG repeat region of the FMRI gene. This base change abolished the EcoRI restriction site, resulting in a 10.9-kb pseudo-full mutation. This G-to-A base change has not been previously reported and was not identified in a subsequent analysis of 105 male and 30 female patient samples. The clear 10.9-kb band detected on a Southern blot assay for fragile X syndrome mimics a large, methylated full mutation, which could result in a misdiagnosis without the benefit of family studies and further testing. PMID:18687789

  2. Mutations in Human Tubulin Proximal to the Kinesin-Binding Site Alter Dynamic Instability at Microtubule Plus- and Minus-Ends.

    PubMed

    Ti, Shih-Chieh; Pamula, Melissa C; Howes, Stuart C; Duellberg, Christian; Cade, Nicholas I; Kleiner, Ralph E; Forth, Scott; Surrey, Thomas; Nogales, Eva; Kapoor, Tarun M

    2016-04-01

    The assembly of microtubule-based cellular structures depends on regulated tubulin polymerization and directional transport. Here, we purify and characterize tubulin heterodimers that have human β-tubulin isotype III (TUBB3), as well as heterodimers with one of two β-tubulin mutations (D417H or R262H). Both point mutations are proximal to the kinesin-binding site and have been linked to an ocular motility disorder in humans. Compared to wild-type, microtubules with these mutations have decreased catastrophe frequencies and increased average lifetimes of plus- and minus-end-stabilizing caps. Importantly, the D417H mutation does not alter microtubule lattice structure or Mal3 binding to growing filaments. Instead, this mutation reduces the affinity of tubulin for TOG domains and colchicine, suggesting that the distribution of tubulin heterodimer conformations is changed. Together, our findings reveal how residues on the surface of microtubules, distal from the GTP-hydrolysis site and inter-subunit contacts, can alter polymerization dynamics at the plus- and minus-ends of microtubules. PMID:27046833

  3. The binding site for channel blockers that rescue misprocessed human long QT syndrome type 2 ether-a-gogo-related gene (HERG) mutations.

    PubMed

    Ficker, Eckhard; Obejero-Paz, Carlos A; Zhao, Shuxia; Brown, Arthur M

    2002-02-15

    Mutations in the human ether-a-gogo-related gene (HERG) K(+) channel gene cause chromosome 7-linked long QT syndrome type 2 (LQT2), which is characterized by a prolonged QT interval in the electrocardiogram and an increased susceptibility to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. LQT2 mutations produce loss-of-function phenotypes and reduce I(Kr) currents either by the heteromeric assembly of non- or malfunctioning channel subunits with wild type subunits at the cell surface or by retention of misprocessed mutant HERG channels in the endoplasmic reticulum. Misprocessed mutations often encode for channel proteins that are functional upon incorporation into the plasma membrane. As a result the pharmacological correction of folding defects and restoration of protein function are of considerable interest. Here we report that the trafficking-deficient pore mutation HERG G601S was rescued by a series of HERG channel blockers that increased cell surface expression. Rescue by these pharmacological chaperones varied directly with their blocking potency. We used structure-activity relationships and site-directed mutagenesis to define the binding site of the pharmacological chaperones. We found that binding occurred in the inner cavity and correlated with hydrophobicity and cationic charge. Rescue was domain-restricted because the trafficking of two misprocessed mutations in the C terminus, HERG F805C and HERG R823W, was not restored by channel blockers. Our findings represent a first step toward the design of pharmacological chaperones that will rescue HERG K(+) channels without block. PMID:11741928

  4. Exome Sequencing Identifies SLCO2A1 Mutations as a Cause of Primary Hypertrophic Osteoarthropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenlin; Xia, Weibo; He, Jinwei; Zhang, Zeng; Ke, Yaohua; Yue, Hua; Wang, Chun; Zhang, Hao; Gu, Jiemei; Hu, Weiwei; Fu, Wenzhen; Hu, Yunqiu; Li, Miao; Liu, Yujuan

    2012-01-01

    By using whole-exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous guanine-to-adenine transition at the invariant −1 position of the acceptor site of intron 1 (c.97−1G>A) in solute carrier organic anion transporter family member 2A1 (SLCO2A1), which encodes a prostaglandin transporter protein, as the causative mutation in a single individual with primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (PHO) from a consanguineous family. In two other affected individuals with PHO from two unrelated nonconsanguineous families, we identified two different compound heterozygous mutations by using Sanger sequencing. These findings confirm that SLCO2A1 mutations inactivate prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) transport, and they indicate that mutations in SLCO2A1 are the pathogenic cause of PHO. Moreover, this study might also help to explain the cause of secondary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy. PMID:22197487

  5. Mechanisms of electron acceptor utilization: Implications for simulating anaerobic biodegradation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schreiber, M.E.; Carey, G.R.; Feinstein, D.T.; Bahr, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Simulation of biodegradation reactions within a reactive transport framework requires information on mechanisms of terminal electron acceptor processes (TEAPs). In initial modeling efforts, TEAPs were approximated as occurring sequentially, with the highest energy-yielding electron acceptors (e.g. oxygen) consumed before those that yield less energy (e.g., sulfate). Within this framework in a steady state plume, sequential electron acceptor utilization would theoretically produce methane at an organic-rich source and Fe(II) further downgradient, resulting in a limited zone of Fe(II) and methane overlap. However, contaminant plumes often display much more extensive zones of overlapping Fe(II) and methane. The extensive overlap could be caused by several abiotic and biotic processes including vertical mixing of byproducts in long-screened monitoring wells, adsorption of Fe(II) onto aquifer solids, or microscale heterogeneity in Fe(III) concentrations. Alternatively, the overlap could be due to simultaneous utilization of terminal electron acceptors. Because biodegradation rates are controlled by TEAPs, evaluating the mechanisms of electron acceptor utilization is critical for improving prediction of contaminant mass losses due to biodegradation. Using BioRedox-MT3DMS, a three-dimensional, multi-species reactive transport code, we simulated the current configurations of a BTEX plume and TEAP zones at a petroleum- contaminated field site in Wisconsin. Simulation results suggest that BTEX mass loss due to biodegradation is greatest under oxygen-reducing conditions, with smaller but similar contributions to mass loss from biodegradation under Fe(III)-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Results of sensitivity calculations document that BTEX losses due to biodegradation are most sensitive to the age of the plume, while the shape of the BTEX plume is most sensitive to effective porosity and rate constants for biodegradation under Fe(III)-reducing and

  6. Mechanisms of electron acceptor utilization: implications for simulating anaerobic biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, M E; Carey, G R; Feinstein, D T; Bahr, J M

    2004-09-01

    Simulation of biodegradation reactions within a reactive transport framework requires information on mechanisms of terminal electron acceptor processes (TEAPs). In initial modeling efforts, TEAPs were approximated as occurring sequentially, with the highest energy-yielding electron acceptors (e.g. oxygen) consumed before those that yield less energy (e.g., sulfate). Within this framework in a steady state plume, sequential electron acceptor utilization would theoretically produce methane at an organic-rich source and Fe(II) further downgradient, resulting in a limited zone of Fe(II) and methane overlap. However, contaminant plumes often display much more extensive zones of overlapping Fe(II) and methane. The extensive overlap could be caused by several abiotic and biotic processes including vertical mixing of byproducts in long-screened monitoring wells, adsorption of Fe(II) onto aquifer solids, or microscale heterogeneity in Fe(III) concentrations. Alternatively, the overlap could be due to simultaneous utilization of terminal electron acceptors. Because biodegradation rates are controlled by TEAPs, evaluating the mechanisms of electron acceptor utilization is critical for improving prediction of contaminant mass losses due to biodegradation. Using BioRedox-MT3DMS, a three-dimensional, multi-species reactive transport code, we simulated the current configurations of a BTEX plume and TEAP zones at a petroleum-contaminated field site in Wisconsin. Simulation results suggest that BTEX mass loss due to biodegradation is greatest under oxygen-reducing conditions, with smaller but similar contributions to mass loss from biodegradation under Fe(III)-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Results of sensitivity calculations document that BTEX losses due to biodegradation are most sensitive to the age of the plume, while the shape of the BTEX plume is most sensitive to effective porosity and rate constants for biodegradation under Fe(III)-reducing and

  7. Fryns Syndrome Associated with Recessive Mutations in PIGN in two Separate Families.

    PubMed

    McInerney-Leo, Aideen M; Harris, Jessica E; Gattas, Michael; Peach, Elizabeth E; Sinnott, Stephen; Dudding-Byth, Tracy; Rajagopalan, Sulekha; Barnett, Christopher P; Anderson, Lisa K; Wheeler, Lawrie; Brown, Matthew A; Leo, Paul J; Wicking, Carol; Duncan, Emma L

    2016-07-01

    Fryns syndrome is an autosomal recessive condition characterized by congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), dysmorphic facial features, distal digital hypoplasia, and other associated malformations, and is the most common syndromic form of CDH. No gene has been associated with this condition. Whole-exome sequence data from two siblings and three unrelated individuals with Fryns syndrome were filtered for rare, good quality, coding mutations fitting a recessive inheritance model. Compound heterozygous mutations in PIGN were identified in the siblings, with appropriate parental segregation: a novel STOP mutation (c.1966C>T: p.Glu656X) and a rare (minor allele frequency <0.001) donor splice site mutation (c.1674+1G>C) causing skipping of exon 18 and utilization of a cryptic acceptor site in exon 19. A further novel homozygous STOP mutation in PIGN (c.694A>T: p.Lys232X) was detected in one unrelated case. All three variants affected highly conserved bases. The two remaining cases were negative for PIGN mutations. Mutations in PIGN have been reported in cases with multiple congenital anomalies, including one case with syndromic CDH. Fryns syndrome can be caused by recessive mutations in PIGN. Whether PIGN affects other syndromic and non-syndromic forms of CDH warrants investigation. PMID:27038415

  8. Identification of Promotor and Exonic Variations, and Functional Characterization of a Splice Site Mutation in Indian Patients with Unconjugated Hyperbilirubinemia

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Anjana; Munjal, Sachin Dev; Sarangi, Aditya N.; Dalal, Ashwin; Aggarwal, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Background Mild unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia (UH), due to reduced activity of the enzyme uridine diphosphoglucuronate-glucuronosyltransferase family, polypeptide 1 (UGT1A1), is a common clinical condition. Most cases are caused by presence in homozygous form of an A(TA)7TAA nucleotide sequence instead of the usual A(TA)6TAA sequence in promoter region of the UGT1A1 gene. In some cases, other genetic variations have been identified which differ between populations. There is need for more data on such genetic variations from India. Methods DNA from subjects with unexplained persistent or recurrent UH was tested for the presence of TA promoter insertions. In addition, all five exons and splicing site regions of UGT1A1 gene were sequenced. Several bioinformatics tools were used to determine the biological significance of the observed genetic changes. Functional analysis was done to look for effect of a splice site mutation in UGT1A1. Results Of 71 subjects with UH (68 male; median age [range], 26 [16–63] years; serum bilirubin 56 [26–219] μM/L, predominantly unconjugated) studied, 65 (91.5%) subjects were homozygous for A(TA)7TAA allele, five (7.0%) were heterozygous, and one (1.4%) lacked this change. Fifteen subjects with UH had missense exonic single nucleotide changes (14 heterozygous, 1 homozygous), including one subject with a novel nucleotide change (p.Thr205Asn). Bioinformatics tools predicted some of these variations (p.Arg108Cys, p.Ile159Thr and p.Glu463Val) to be deleterious. Functional characterization of an exonic variation (c.1084G>A) located at a splice site revealed that it results in frameshift deletion of 31 nucleotides and premature truncation of the protein. Conclusion Our study revealed several single nucleotide variations in UGT1A1 gene in Indian subjects with UH. Functional characterization of a splice site variation indicated that it leads to disordered splicing. These variations may explain UH in subjects who lacked homozygous A(TA)7TAA

  9. Replication of avian leukosis viruses with mutations at the primer binding site: use of alternative tRNAs as primers.

    PubMed Central

    Whitcomb, J M; Ortiz-Conde, B A; Hughes, S H

    1995-01-01

    We have tested whether avian leukosis viruses (ALVs) can use tRNAs other than tRNATrp to initiate reverse transcription. The primer binding site (PBS) of a wild-type ALV provirus, which is complementary to the 3' end of tRNA(Trp), was replaced with sequences homologous to the 3' ends of six different chicken tRNAs (tRN(APro), tRNA(Lys), tRNA(Met), tRNA(Ile), tRNA(Phe), and tRNA(Ser)). Transfection of these proviruses into chicken embryo fibroblasts resulted in the production of infectious viruses, all of which apparently used the tRNA specified by the mutated PBS to replicate. However, growth of these viruses resulted in reversion to the wild-type (tRNA(Trp)) PBS. Some of the viruses revert quite quickly, while others are more stable. The relative stability of a given PBS correlated with the concentration of the corresponding tRNA in the virion. We determined the percentage of viral RNA that had a tRNA bound to the PBS and found that the occupancy rate is lower in the mutants than in the wild-type virus. We conclude that many different tRNAs can be used as primers to initiate reverse transcription in ALV. However, ALVs that use tRNA(Trp) have a growth advantage over ALVs that use other tRNAs. PMID:7545245

  10. HotSpot Wizard 2.0: automated design of site-specific mutations and smart libraries in protein engineering

    PubMed Central

    Bendl, Jaroslav; Stourac, Jan; Sebestova, Eva; Vavra, Ondrej; Musil, Milos; Brezovsky, Jan; Damborsky, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    HotSpot Wizard 2.0 is a web server for automated identification of hot spots and design of smart libraries for engineering proteins’ stability, catalytic activity, substrate specificity and enantioselectivity. The server integrates sequence, structural and evolutionary information obtained from 3 databases and 20 computational tools. Users are guided through the processes of selecting hot spots using four different protein engineering strategies and optimizing the resulting library's size by narrowing down a set of substitutions at individual randomized positions. The only required input is a query protein structure. The results of the calculations are mapped onto the protein's structure and visualized with a JSmol applet. HotSpot Wizard lists annotated residues suitable for mutagenesis and can automatically design appropriate codons for each implemented strategy. Overall, HotSpot Wizard provides comprehensive annotations of protein structures and assists protein engineers with the rational design of site-specific mutations and focused libraries. It is freely available at http://loschmidt.chemi.muni.cz/hotspotwizard. PMID:27174934

  11. HotSpot Wizard 2.0: automated design of site-specific mutations and smart libraries in protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Bendl, Jaroslav; Stourac, Jan; Sebestova, Eva; Vavra, Ondrej; Musil, Milos; Brezovsky, Jan; Damborsky, Jiri

    2016-07-01

    HotSpot Wizard 2.0 is a web server for automated identification of hot spots and design of smart libraries for engineering proteins' stability, catalytic activity, substrate specificity and enantioselectivity. The server integrates sequence, structural and evolutionary information obtained from 3 databases and 20 computational tools. Users are guided through the processes of selecting hot spots using four different protein engineering strategies and optimizing the resulting library's size by narrowing down a set of substitutions at individual randomized positions. The only required input is a query protein structure. The results of the calculations are mapped onto the protein's structure and visualized with a JSmol applet. HotSpot Wizard lists annotated residues suitable for mutagenesis and can automatically design appropriate codons for each implemented strategy. Overall, HotSpot Wizard provides comprehensive annotations of protein structures and assists protein engineers with the rational design of site-specific mutations and focused libraries. It is freely available at http://loschmidt.chemi.muni.cz/hotspotwizard. PMID:27174934

  12. Mutation of light-dependent phosphorylation sites of the Drosophila transient receptor potential-like (TRPL) ion channel affects its subcellular localization and stability.

    PubMed

    Cerny, Alexander C; Oberacker, Tina; Pfannstiel, Jens; Weigold, Sebastian; Will, Carina; Huber, Armin

    2013-05-31

    The Drosophila phototransduction cascade terminates in the opening of the ion channel transient receptor potential (TRP) and TRP-like (TRPL). Contrary to TRP, TRPL undergoes light-dependent subcellular trafficking between rhabdomeric photoreceptor membranes and an intracellular storage compartment, resulting in long term light adaptation. Here, we identified in vivo phosphorylation sites of TRPL that affect TRPL stability and localization. Quantitative mass spectrometry revealed a light-dependent change in the TRPL phosphorylation pattern. Mutation of eight C-terminal phosphorylation sites neither affected multimerization of the channels nor the electrophysiological response of flies expressing the mutated channels. However, these mutations resulted in mislocalization and enhanced degradation of TRPL after prolonged dark-adaptation. Mutation of subsets of the eight C-terminal phosphorylation sites also led to a reduction of TRPL content and partial mislocalization in the dark. This suggests that a light-dependent switch in the phosphorylation pattern of the TRPL channel mediates stable expression of TRPL in the rhabdomeres upon prolonged dark-adaptation. PMID:23592784

  13. Mutation of Light-dependent Phosphorylation Sites of the Drosophila Transient Receptor Potential-like (TRPL) Ion Channel Affects Its Subcellular Localization and Stability*

    PubMed Central

    Cerny, Alexander C.; Oberacker, Tina; Pfannstiel, Jens; Weigold, Sebastian; Will, Carina; Huber, Armin

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila phototransduction cascade terminates in the opening of the ion channel transient receptor potential (TRP) and TRP-like (TRPL). Contrary to TRP, TRPL undergoes light-dependent subcellular trafficking between rhabdomeric photoreceptor membranes and an intracellular storage compartment, resulting in long term light adaptation. Here, we identified in vivo phosphorylation sites of TRPL that affect TRPL stability and localization. Quantitative mass spectrometry revealed a light-dependent change in the TRPL phosphorylation pattern. Mutation of eight C-terminal phosphorylation sites neither affected multimerization of the channels nor the electrophysiological response of flies expressing the mutated channels. However, these mutations resulted in mislocalization and enhanced degradation of TRPL after prolonged dark-adaptation. Mutation of subsets of the eight C-terminal phosphorylation sites also led to a reduction of TRPL content and partial mislocalization in the dark. This suggests that a light-dependent switch in the phosphorylation pattern of the TRPL channel mediates stable expression of TRPL in the rhabdomeres upon prolonged dark-adaptation. PMID:23592784

  14. Novel splice site mutation in the caveolin-3 gene leading to autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Müller, Juliane S; Piko, Henriett; Schoser, Benedikt G H; Schlotter-Weigel, Beate; Reilich, Peter; Gürster, Stefanie; Born, Christine; Karcagi, Veronika; Pongratz, Dieter; Lochmüller, Hanns; Walter, Maggie C

    2006-07-01

    Mutations in CAV3 gene encoding the protein caveolin-3 are associated with autosomal dominant limb girdle muscular dystrophy 1C, rippling muscle disease, hyperCKemia, distal myopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and rare autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy phenotypes. In a 57-year-old patient with asymmetric limb girdle weakness, we detected a novel homozygous intronic mutation (IVS1 + 2T > C) of the CAV3 gene. This is the first splicing mutation reported for CAV3. These findings add to the clinical and genetic variability of CAV3 mutations. PMID:16730439

  15. Virtual screening of electron acceptor materials for organic photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halls, Mathew D.; Djurovich, Peter J.; Giesen, David J.; Goldberg, Alexander; Sommer, Jonathan; McAnally, Eric; Thompson, Mark E.

    2013-10-01

    Virtual screening involves the generation of structure libraries, automated analysis to predict properties related to application performance and subsequent screening to identify lead systems and estimate critical structure-property limits across a targeted chemical design space. This approach holds great promise for informing experimental discovery and development efforts for next-generation materials, such as organic semiconductors. In this work, the virtual screening approach is illustrated for nitrogen-substituted pentacene molecules to identify systems for development as electron acceptor materials for use in organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. A structure library of tetra-azapentacenes (TAPs) was generated by substituting four nitrogens for CH at 12 sites on the pentacene molecular framework. Molecular properties (e.g. ELUMO, Eg and μ) were computed for each candidate structure using hybrid DFT at the B3LYP/6-311G** level of theory. The resulting TAPs library was then analyzed with respect to intrinsic properties associated with OPV acceptor performance. Marcus reorganization energies for charge transport for the most favorable TAP candidates were then calculated to further determine suitability as OPV electron acceptors. The synthesis, characterization and OPV device testing of TAP materials is underway, guided by these results.

  16. A comparative study of drug resistance mechanism associated with active site and non-active site mutations: I388N and D425G mutants of acetyl-coenzyme-A carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2012-03-01

    A major concern in the development of acetyl-CoA carboxylase-inhibiting (ACCase; EC 6.4.1.2) herbicides is the emergence of resistance as a result of the selection of distinct mutations within the CT domain. Mutations associated with resistance have been demonstrated to include both active sites and non-active sites, including Ile-1781-Leu, Trp- 2027-Cys, Ile-2041-Asn, Asp-2078-Gly, and Gly-2096-Ala (numbered according to the Alopecurus myosuroides plastid ACCase). In the present study, extensive computational simulations, including molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) calculations, were carried out to compare the molecular mechanisms of active site mutation (I388N) and non-active site mutation (D425G) in Alopecurus myosuroides resistance to some commercial herbicides targeting ACCase, including haloxyfop (HF), diclofop (DF) and fenoxaprop (FR). All of the computational model and energetic results indicated that both I388N and D425G mutations have effects on the conformational change of the binding pocket. The π-π interaction between ligand and Phe377 and Tyr161' residues, which make an important contribution to the binding affinity, was decreased after mutation. As a result, the mutant-type ACCase has a lower affinity for the inhibitor than the wild-type enzyme, which accounts for the molecular basis of herbicidal resistance. The structural and mechanistic insights obtained from the present study will deepen our understanding of the interactions between ACCase and herbicides, which provides a molecular basis for the future design of a promising inhibitor with low resistance risk. PMID:22242795

  17. TET2 Mutations Affect Non-CpG Island DNA Methylation at Enhancers and Transcription Factor-Binding Sites in Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Jumpei; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Lu, Yue; Cesaroni, Matteo; Madzo, Jozef; Neumann, Frank; He, Rong; Taby, Rodolphe; Vasanthakumar, Aparna; Macrae, Trisha; Ostler, Kelly R; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Liang, Shoudan; Estecio, Marcos R; Godley, Lucy A; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2015-07-15

    TET2 enzymatically converts 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine as well as other covalently modified cytosines and its mutations are common in myeloid leukemia. However, the exact mechanism and the extent to which TET2 mutations affect DNA methylation remain in question. Here, we report on DNA methylomes in TET2 wild-type (TET2-WT) and mutant (TET2-MT) cases of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). We analyzed 85,134 CpG sites [28,114 sites in CpG islands (CGI) and 57,020 in non-CpG islands (NCGI)]. TET2 mutations do not explain genome-wide differences in DNA methylation in CMML, and we found few and inconsistent differences at CGIs between TET2-WT and TET2-MT cases. In contrast, we identified 409 (0.71%) TET2-specific differentially methylated CpGs (tet2-DMCs) in NCGIs, 86% of which were hypermethylated in TET2-MT cases, suggesting a strikingly different biology of the effects of TET2 mutations at CGIs and NCGIs. DNA methylation of tet2-DMCs at promoters and nonpromoters repressed gene expression. Tet2-DMCs showed significant enrichment at hematopoietic-specific enhancers marked by H3K4me1 and at binding sites for the transcription factor p300. Tet2-DMCs showed significantly lower 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in TET2-MT cases. We conclude that leukemia-associated TET2 mutations affect DNA methylation at NCGI regions containing hematopoietic-specific enhancers and transcription factor-binding sites. PMID:25972343

  18. First Report of CTNS Mutations in a Chinese Family with Infantile Cystinosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong-jia; Hu, Yuan; Zhao, Rui; He, Xinyu; Zhao, Liu; Tu, Ming; Zhou, Lijun; Guo, Jihong; Wu, Linqian; Zhao, Tantai; Zhu, Yi-min

    2015-01-01

    Infantile cystinosis (IC) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a defect in the lysosomal-membrane transport protein, cystinosin. It serves as a prototype for lysosomal transport disorders. To date, several CTNS mutations have been identified as the cause of the prototypic disease across different ethnic populations worldwide. However, in Asia, the CTNS mutation is very rarely reported. For the Chinese population, no literature on CTNS mutation screening for IC is available to date. In this paper, by using the whole exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing, we identified two novel CTNS splicing deletions in a Chinese IC family, one at the donor site of exon 6 of CTNS (IVS6+1, del G) and the other at the acceptor site of exon 8 (IVS8-1, del GT). These data give information for the genetic counseling of the IC that occurred in Chinese population. PMID:25866837

  19. De Novo Truncating FUS Gene Mutation as a Cause of Sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Kocerha, Jannet; Finch, NiCole; Crook, Richard; Baker, Matt; Desaro, Pamela; Johnston, Amelia; Rutherford, Nicola; Wojtas, Aleksandra; Kennelly, Kathleen; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Graff-Radford, Neill; Boylan, Kevin; Rademakers, Rosa

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding fused in sarcoma (FUS) were recently identified as a novel cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), emphasizing the genetic heterogeneity of ALS. We sequenced the genes encoding superoxide dismutase (SOD1), TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TARDBP) and FUS in 99 sporadic and 17 familial ALS patients ascertained at Mayo Clinic. We identified two novel mutations in FUS in two out of 99 (2.0%) sporadic ALS patients and established the de novo occurrence of one FUS mutation. In familial patients, we identified three (17.6%) SOD1 mutations, while FUS and TARDBP mutations were excluded. The de novo FUS mutation (g.10747A>G; IVS13-2A>G) affects the splice-acceptor site of FUS intron 13 and was shown to induce skipping of FUS exon 14 leading to the C-terminal truncation of FUS (p.G466VfsX14). Subcellular localization studies showed a dramatic increase in the cytoplasmic localization of FUS and a reduction of normal nuclear expression in cells transfected with truncated compared to wild-type FUS. We further identified a novel in-frame insertion/deletion mutation in FUS exon 12 (p.S402 P411delinsGGGG) which is predicted to expand a conserved poly-glycine motif. Our findings extend the mutation spectrum in FUS leading to ALS and describe the first de novo mutation in FUS. PMID:20232451

  20. Site-specific deletion in cauliflower mosaic virus DNA: possible involvement of RNA splicing and reverse transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hirochika, Hirohiko; Takatsuji, Hiroshi; Ubasawa, Aiko; Ikeda, Joh-E

    1985-01-01

    A frequent site-specific deletion was observed in the life cycle of cauliflower mosaic virus (S strain). Analysis of the sequence around the deletion site and the parental sequence implied that the deletion was promoted at sequences similar to the donor and acceptor consensus sequences of RNA splicing, designated as the deletion donor and acceptor sequences, respectively. To elucidate the mechanism of this site-specific deletion, point mutations were introduced into the deletion donor sequence (GT to GG or GA transversion). Deletion at the original deletion donor site did not occur in these mutants, instead, new (cryptic) donor sites were activated. All of these activated cryptic sites had sequences similar to the splicing consensus sequence. In all cases except one, the original deletion acceptor site was used. These results can be most readily explained by postulating that the site-specific deletion occurs by reverse transcription of spliced viral RNA. This frequent site-specific deletion was not observed in other strains. For a virus which replicates by reverse transcription, a mechanism to regulate the rate of splicing is required to ensure the intactness of the viral genome. We discuss the possibility that the S strain has a mutation in this regulatory mechanism. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 3.Fig. 5.Fig. 7. PMID:16453624

  1. Novel mutations of APOB cause ApoB truncations undetectable in plasma and familial hypobetalipoproteinemia.

    PubMed

    Yue, Pin; Yuan, Bo; Gerhard, Daniela S; Neuman, Rosalind J; Isley, William L; Harris, William S; Schonfeld, Gustav

    2002-08-01

    Familial hypobetalipoproteinemia (FHBL) is a genetic disorder characterized by low levels of apoB-100 and LDL cholesterol. Truncation-producing mutations of apoB (chromosome 2) are among several potential causes of FHBL in patients. Ten new families with FHBL linked to chromosome 2 were identified. In Family 8, a 4432delT in exon 26 produces a frame-shift and a premature stop codon predicted to produce a truncated apoB-30.9. Even though this truncation is just 10 amino acid shorter than the well-documented apoB-31, which is readily detectable in plasma, apoB-30.9 is undetectable. Most truncations shorter than apoB-30 are not detectable in plasma. In Family 34, an acceptor splicing mutation at position -1 of exon 14 changes the acceptor splice site AG to AA. Two families (Family 50 and 52) had mutations (apoB-9 and apoB-29) reported previously. In Family 98, a novel point mutation in exon 26 (11163T>G) causes a premature stop codon, and produces a truncated apoB-80.5 readily detectable in plasma. Sequencing of the ApoB gene in families 1, 5, 18, 58, and 59 did not reveal mutations. PMID:12124991

  2. A 3'-UTR mutation creates a microRNA target site in the GFPT1 gene of patients with congenital myasthenic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dusl, Marina; Senderek, Jan; Müller, Juliane S; Vogel, Johannes G; Pertl, Anja; Stucka, Rolf; Lochmüller, Hanns; David, Robert; Abicht, Angela

    2015-06-15

    Mutations in the gene encoding glutamine-fructose-6-phosphate transaminase 1 (GFPT1) cause the neuromuscular disorder limb-girdle congenital myasthenic syndrome (LG-CMS). One recurrent GFPT1 mutation detected in LG-CMS patients is a c.*22C>A transversion in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR). Because this variant does not alter the GFPT1 open reading frame, its pathogenic relevance has not yet been established. We found that GFPT1 protein levels were reduced in myoblast cells of the patients carrying this variant. In silico algorithms predicted that the mutation creates a microRNA target site for miR-206*. Investigation of the expression of this so far unrecognized microRNA confirmed that miR-206* (like its counterpart miR-206) is abundant in skeletal muscle. MiR-206* efficiently reduced the expression of reporter constructs containing the mutated 3'-UTR while no such effect was observed with reporter constructs containing the wild-type 3'-UTR or when a specific anti-miR-206* inhibitor was added. Moreover, anti-miR-206* inhibitor treatment substantially rescued GFPT1 expression levels in patient-derived myoblasts. Our data demonstrate that the c.*22C>A mutation in the GFPT1 gene leads to illegitimate binding of microRNA resulting in reduced protein expression. We confirm that c.*22C>A is a causative mutation and suggest that formation of microRNA target sites might be a relevant pathomechanism in Mendelian disorders. Variants in the 3'-UTRs should be considered in genetic diagnostic procedures. PMID:25765662

  3. Mutations in the PCNA-binding site of CDKN1C inhibit cell proliferation by impairing the entry into S phase.

    PubMed

    Borges, Kleiton S; Arboleda, Valerie A; Vilain, Eric

    2015-01-01

    CDKN1C (also known as P57 (kip2) ) is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor that functions as a negative regulator of cell proliferation through G1 phase cell cycle arrest. Recently, our group described gain-of-function mutations in the PCNA-binding site of CDKN1C that result in an undergrowth syndrome called IMAGe Syndrome (Intrauterine Growth Restriction, Metaphyseal dysplasia, Adrenal hypoplasia, and Genital anomalies), with life-threatening consequences. Loss-of-function mutations in CDKN1C have been identified in 5-10% of individuals with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), an overgrowth disorder with features that are the opposite of IMAGe syndrome. Here, we investigate the effects of IMAGe-associated mutations on protein stability, cell cycle progression and cell proliferation. Mutations in the PCNA-binding site of CDKN1C significantly increase CDKN1C protein stability and prevent cell cycle progression into the S phase. Overexpression of either wild-type or BWS-mutant CDKN1C inhibited cell proliferation. However, the IMAGe-mutant CDKN1C protein decreased cell growth significantly more than both the wild-type or BWS protein. These findings bring new insights into the molecular events underlying IMAGe syndrome. PMID:25861374

  4. Founder Effect of a c.828+3A>T Splice Site Mutation in Peripherin 2 (PRPH2) Causing Autosomal Dominant Retinal Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Suma P.; Birch, David G.; Ruiz, Richard S.; Hughbanks-Wheaton, Dianna K.; Sullivan, Lori S.; Bowne, Sara J.; Stone, Edwin M.; Daiger, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Screening for splice site mutation c.828+3A>T in the peripherin 2 (PRPH2) gene should be a high priority in families with highly variable retinal dystrophies. The correction of missplicing is a potential therapeutic target. Objective To determine the prevalence, genetic origin, and molecular mechanism of a donor c.828+3A>T mutation in the PRPH2 (peripherin 2, retinal degeneration slow) gene in individuals with retinal dystrophies. Design, Setting, and Participants Case-control study that took place at the University of Texas Health Science Center, the University of Iowa, and the Retina Foundation of the Southwest, from January 1, 1987, to August 1, 2014, including affected individuals from 200 families with a diagnosis of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa, 35 families with unspecified macular dystrophies, and 116 families with pattern dystrophy. Participants were screened for the c.828+3A>T mutation by restriction-enzyme digest, single-strand conformational polymorphism screening, or bidirectional sequencing. Haplotypes of polymorphic markers flanking the PRPH2 locus and sequence variants within the gene were determined by denaturing gel electrophoresis or automated capillary-based cycle sequencing. The effect of the splice site mutation on the PRPH2 transcript was analyzed using NetGene2, a splice prediction program and by the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction of illegitimate transcripts from peripheral white blood cells. Main Outcomes and Measures Results of testing for splice site mutation, haplotypes, and alternate transcripts. Results The PRPH2 mutation was found in 97 individuals of 19 independently ascertained families with a clinical diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa, macular dystrophy, and/or pattern dystrophy. All affected individuals also shared a rare haplotype of approximately 644 kilobase pairs containing the c.828+3A>T mutation, which extends from the short tandem repeat polymorphism D6S282 to c.1013G>A (rs434102, a

  5. Mutations that alter RNA splicing of the human HPRT gene: a review of the spectrum.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, J P; Rogan, P K; Cariello, N; Nicklas, J A

    1998-11-01

    The human HPRT gene contains spans approximately 42,000 base pairs in genomic DNA, has a mRNA of approximately 900 bases and a protein coding sequence of 657 bases (initiation codon AUG to termination codon UAA). This coding sequence is distributed into 9 exons ranging from 18 (exon 5) to 184 (exon 3) base pairs. Intron sizes range from 170 (intron 7) to 13,075 (intron 1) base pairs. In a database of human HPRT mutations, 277 of 2224 (12.5%) mutations result in alterations in splicing of the mRNA as analyzed by both reverse transcriptase mediated production of a cDNA followed by PCR amplification and cDNA sequencing and by genomic DNA PCR amplification and sequencing. Mutations have been found in all eight 5' (donor) and 3' (acceptor) splice sequences. Mutations in the 5' splice sequences of introns 1 and 5 result in intron inclusion in the cDNA due to the use of cryptic donor splice sequences within the introns; mutations in the other six 5' sites result in simple exon exclusion. Mutations in the 3' splice sequences of introns 1, 3, 7 and 8 result in partial exon exclusion due to the use of cryptic acceptor splice sequences within the exons; mutations in the other four 3' sites result in simple exon exclusion. A base substitution in exon 3 (209G-->T) creates a new 5' (donor) splice site which results in the exclusion of 110 bases of exon 3 from the cDNA. Two base substitutions in intron 8 (IVS8-16G-->A and IVS8-3T-->G) result in the inclusion of intron 8 sequences in the cDNA due to the creation of new 3' (acceptor) splice sites. Base substitution within exons 1, 3, 4, 6 and 8 also result in splice alterations in cDNA. Those in exons 1 and 6 are at the 3' end of the exon and may directly affect splicing. Those within exons 3 and 4 may be the result of the creation of nonsense codons, while those in exon 8 cannot be explained by this mechanism. Lastly, many mutations that affect splicing of the HPRT mRNA have pleiotropic effects in that multiple cDNA products are

  6. Fibromatosis of the Sigmoid Colon With CTNNB1 (β-Catenin) Gene Mutation, Arising at the Site of Ileocolic Anastomosis for Resection of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor.

    PubMed

    Thway, Khin; Abou Sherif, Sara; Riddell, Angela M; Mudan, Satvinder

    2016-05-01

    We describe a case of intra-abdominal fibromatosis, which occurred in a 44-year-old woman who had a previous history of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) of the sigmoid mesocolon, which was treated with imatinib and resection. A mass was detected at the site of ileocolic anastomosis of the previous small bowel resection and sigmoid colectomy, nearly 3 years later. Clinically, this was suspected to represent recurrent GIST and was excised, but histology and mutational analysis showed desmoid-type fibromatosis with a mutation in codon 41 of exon 3 of the CTNNB1 (β-catenin) gene. The occurrence of fibromatosis at the site of excision of GIST is very rare, but its recognition is important as the treatment of the two neoplasms differs significantly. As imaging cannot reliably distinguish between these 2 entities, histological diagnosis is crucial for correct clinical management. PMID:26721303

  7. Comparative ex vivo, in vitro and in silico analyses of a CFTR splicing mutation: Importance of functional studies to establish disease liability of mutations.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, Anabela S; Clarke, Luka A; Sousa, Marisa; Felicio, Verónica; Barreto, Celeste; Lopes, Carlos; Amaral, Margarida D

    2016-01-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis p.Ile1234Val missense mutation actually creates a new dual splicing site possibly used either as a new acceptor or donor. Here, we aimed to test the accuracy of in silico predictions by comparing them with in vitro and ex vivo functional analyses of this mutation for an accurate CF diagnosis/prognosis. To this end, we applied a new in vitro strategy using a CFTR mini-gene which includes the complete CFTR coding sequence plus intron 22 (short version) which allows the assessment of alternatively spliced mRNA levels as well as the properties of the resulting abnormal CFTR protein regarding processing, intracellular localization and function. Our data demonstrate that p.Ile1234Val leads to usage of the alternative splicing donor (but not acceptor) resulting in alternative CFTR transcripts lacking 18 nts of exon 22 which produce a truncated CFTR protein with residual Cl- channel function. These results recapitulate data from native tissues of a CF patient. In conclusion, the existing in silico prediction models have limited application and ex vivo functional assessment of mutation effects should be made. Alternatively the in vitro strategy adopted here can be applied to assess the disease liability of mutations for an accurate CF diagnosis/prognosis. PMID:25735457

  8. Mutation of the PAX6 gene in patients with autosomal dominant keratitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mirzayans, F; Pearce, W G; MacDonald, I M; Walter, M A

    1995-01-01

    Autosomal dominant keratitis (ADK) is an eye disorder chiefly characterized by corneal opacification and vascularization and by foveal hypoplasia. Aniridia (shown recently to result from mutations in the PAX6 gene) has overlapping clinical findings and a similar pattern of inheritance with ADK. On the basis of these similarities, we used a candidate-gene approach to investigate whether mutations in the PAX6 gene also result in ADK. Significant linkage was found between two polymorphic loci in the PAX6 region and ADK in a family with 15 affected members in four generations (peak LOD score = 4.45; theta = .00 with D11S914), consistent with PAX6 mutations being responsible for ADK. SSCP analysis and direct sequencing revealed a mutation in the PAX6 exon 11 splice-acceptor site. The predicted consequent incorrect splicing results in truncation of the PAX6 proline-serine-threonine activation domain. The SeyNeu mouse results from a mutation in the Pax-6 exon 10 splice-donor site that produces a PAX6 protein truncated from the same point as occurs in our family with ADK. Therefore, the SeyNeu mouse is an excellent animal model of ADK. The finding that mutations in PAX6 underlie ADK, along with a recent report that mutations in PAX6 also underlie Peters anomaly, implicates PAX6 broadly in human anterior segment malformations. Images Figure 2 Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:7668281

  9. Binding-site mutations in the alpha1 subunit of the inhibitory glycine receptor convert the inhibitory metal ion Cu2+ into a positive modulator.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Tanja; Grudzinska, Joanna; Kuzmin, Dmitry; Betz, Heinrich; Laube, Bodo

    2009-01-01

    The divalent cation copper (Cu2+) has been shown to inhibit chloride currents mediated by the inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR). Here, we analyzed Cu2+ inhibition of homo- and hetero-oligomeric GlyRs expressed in Xenopus oocytes. No significant differences in Cu2+ inhibitory potency were found between alpha1, alpha2 and alpha3 GlyRs as well as heteromeric alpha1beta receptors. Furthermore, GlyR alpha1 mutations known to reduce inhibition or potentiation of GlyR currents by Zn2+ had no effect on Cu2+ inhibition. However, Cu2+ was found to competitively antagonize glycine binding, suggesting that Cu2+ binds at the agonist-binding site. Mutations within the glycine-binding site of the GlyR alpha1 subunit reduced the inhibitory potency of Cu2+ and led to an up to 4-fold potentiation of glycine-elicited currents by Cu2+. Molecular dynamics simulation suggests this to be due to increased Cu2+ binding energies. Our data show that GlyR binding-site mutations can convert inhibitors of agonist binding into highly effective positive modulators. PMID:18793654

  10. Mutations of the functional ARH1 allele in tumors from ARH1 heterozygous mice and cells affect ARH1 catalytic activity, cell proliferation and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kato, J; Vekhter, D; Heath, J; Zhu, J; Barbieri, J T; Moss, J

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation results from transfer of the ADP-ribose moiety of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) to an acceptor with ADP-ribose-acceptor content determined by the activities of ADP-ribosyltransferases, which modify the acceptor, and ADP-ribose-acceptor hydrolase (ARH), which cleave the ADP-ribose-acceptor bond. ARH1 was discovered as an ADP-ribose(arginine)protein hydrolase. Previously, we showed that ARH1-knockout and ARH1 heterozygous mice spontaneously developed tumors. Further, ARH1-knockout and ARH1 heterozygous mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) produced tumors when injected into nude mice. In tumors arising in ARH1 heterozygous mice and MEFs, we found both loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the ARH1 gene and ARH1 gene mutations. In the present report, we found that these mutant ARH1 genes encode proteins with reduced ARH1 enzymatic activity. Moreover, MEFs transformed with ARH1 mutant genes exhibiting different levels of ARH1 activity showed altered rates of proliferation, anchorage-independent colony growth in soft agar, and tumorigenesis in nude mice. MEFs transformed with the wild-type (WT) gene, but expressing low levels of hydrolase activity were also tumorigenic. However, transformation with the WT gene was less likely to yield tumors than transformation with a mutant gene exhibiting similar hydrolase activity. Thus, control of protein-ADP-ribosylation by ARH1 is critical for tumorigenesis. In the human cancer database, LOH and mutations of the ARH1 gene were observed. Further, ARH1 gene mutations were located in exons 3 and 4, comparable to exons 2 and 3 of the murine ARH1 gene, which comprise the catalytic site. Thus, human ARH1 gene mutations similar to their murine counterparts may be involved in human cancers. PMID:26029825

  11. Mutations Proximal to Sites of Autoproteolysis and the α-Helix That Co-evolve under Drug Pressure Modulate the Autoprocessing and Vitality of HIV-1 Protease.

    PubMed

    Louis, John M; Deshmukh, Lalit; Sayer, Jane M; Aniana, Annie; Clore, G Marius

    2015-09-01

    N-Terminal self-cleavage (autoprocessing) of the HIV-1 protease precursor is crucial for liberating the active dimer. Under drug pressure, evolving mutations are predicted to modulate autoprocessing, and the reduced catalytic activity of the mature protease (PR) is likely compensated by enhanced conformational/dimer stability and reduced susceptibility to self-degradation (autoproteolysis). One such highly evolved, multidrug resistant protease, PR20, bears 19 mutations contiguous to sites of autoproteolysis in retroviral proteases, namely clusters 1-3 comprising residues 30-37, 60-67, and 88-95, respectively, accounting for 11 of the 19 mutations. By systematically replacing corresponding clusters in PR with those of PR20, and vice versa, we assess their influence on the properties mentioned above and observe no strict correlation. A 10-35-fold decrease in the cleavage efficiency of peptide substrates by PR20, relative to PR, is reflected by an only ∼4-fold decrease in the rate of Gag processing with no change in cleavage order. Importantly, optimal N-terminal autoprocessing requires all 19 PR20 mutations as evaluated in vitro using the model precursor TFR-PR20 in which PR is flanked by the transframe region. Substituting PR20 cluster 3 into TFR-PR (TFR-PR(PR20-3)) requires the presence of PR20 cluster 1 and/or 2 for autoprocessing. In accordance, substituting PR clusters 1 and 2 into TFR-PR20 affects the rate of autoprocessing more drastically (>300-fold) compared to that of TFR-PR(PR20-3) because of the cumulative effect of eight noncluster mutations present in TFR-PR20(PR-12). Overall, these studies imply that drug resistance involves a complex synchronized selection of mutations modulating all of the properties mentioned above governing PR regulation and function. PMID:26266692

  12. Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2002-08-16

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions was held at Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island, 8/11-16/02. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  13. Cytochrome P450 active site plasticity: attenuation of imidazole binding in cytochrome P450(cam) by an L244A mutation.

    PubMed

    Verras, Andreas; Alian, Akram; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2006-11-01

    We have identified a P450(cam) mutation, L244A, that mitigates the affinity for imidazole and substituted imidazoles while maintaining a high affinity for the natural substrate camphor. The P450(cam) L244A crystal structure solved in the absence of any ligand reveals that the I-helix is displaced inwards by over 1 A in response to the cavity created by the change from leucine to alanine. Furthermore, the crystal structures of imidazole-bound P450(cam) and the 1-methylimidazole-bound P450(cam) L244A mutant reveal that the ligands have distinct binding modes in the two proteins. Whereas in wild-type P450(cam) the imidazole coordinates to the iron in an orientation roughly perpendicular to the plane of the heme, in the L244A mutant the rearranged I helix, and specifically residue Val247, forces the imidazole into an orientation almost parallel to the heme that impairs its ability to coordinate to the heme iron. As a result, the imidazole is much more weakly bound to the mutant than it is to the wild-type enzyme. Despite the constriction of the active site by the mutation, previous work with the L244A mutant has shown that it oxidizes larger substrates than the wild-type enzyme. This paradoxical situation, in which a mutation that nominally increases the active site cavity appears to decrease it, suggests that the mutation actually increases the active site maleability, allowing it to better expand to oxidize larger substrates. PMID:16943206

  14. CHEMICAL SELECTIVITY OF NUCLEOBASE ADDUCTION RELATIVE TO IN VIVO MUTATION SITES ON EXON 7 FRAGMENT OF P53 TUMOR SUPPRESSOR GENE

    PubMed Central

    Malla, Spundana; Kadimisetty, Karteek; Fu, You-Jun; Choudhary, Dharamainder; Jansson, Ingela; Schenkman, John B.; Rusling, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Damage to p53 tumor suppressor gene is found in half of all human cancers. Databases integrating studies of large numbers of tumors and cancer cell cultures show that mutation sites of specific p53 codons are correlated with specific types of cancers. If the most frequently damaged p53 codons in vivo correlate with the most frequent chemical damage sites in vitro, predictions of organ-specific cancer risks might result. Herein, we describe LC-MS/MS methodology to reveal codons with metabolite-adducted nucleobases by LC-MS/MS for oligonucleotides longer than 20 base pairs. Specifically, we used a known carcinogen, benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE) to determine the most frequently adducted nucleobases within codons. We used a known sequence of 32 base pairs (bp) representing part of p53 exon 7 with 5 possible reactive hot spots. This is the first nucleobase reactivity study of a double stranded DNA p53 fragment featuring more than 20 base pairs with multiple reactive sites. We reacted the 32 bp fragment with benzo[a]pyrene metabolite BPDE that undergoes nucleophilic substitution by DNA bases. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used for sequencing of oligonucleotide products from the reacted 32 bp fragment after fragmentation by a restriction endonuclease. Analysis of the adducted p53 fragment compared with unreacted fragment revealed guanines of codons 248 and 244 as most frequently targeted, which are also mutated with high frequency in human tumors. Codon 248 is mutated in non-small cell and small cell lung, head and neck, colorectal and skin cancer, while codon 244 is mutated in small cell lung cancer, all of which involve possible BDPE exposure. Results suggest the utility of this approach for screening of adducted p53 gene by drugs and environmental chemicals to predict risks for organ specific cancers. PMID:26417421

  15. A recurrent synonymous KAT6B mutation causes Say-Barber-Biesecker/Young-Simpson syndrome by inducing aberrant splicing.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Rüstem; Beleza-Meireles, Ana; Price, Susan; Oliveira, Renata; Kubisch, Christian; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Szakszon, Katalin; Borck, Guntram

    2015-12-01

    Mutations of the histone acetyltransferase-encoding KAT6B gene cause the Say-Barber-Biesecker/Young-Simpson (SBBYS) type of blepharophimosis-"mental retardation" syndromes and the more severe genitopatellar syndrome. The SBBYS syndrome-causing mutations are clustered in the large exon 18 of KAT6B and almost exclusively lead to predicted protein truncation. An atypical KAT6B mutation, a de novo synonymous variant located in exon 16 (c.3147G>A, p.(Pro1049Pro)) was previously identified in three unrelated patients. This exonic mutation was predicted in silico to cause protein truncation through aberrant splicing. Here, we report three additional unrelated children with typical SBBYS syndrome and the KAT6B c.3147G>A mutation. We show on RNA derived from patient blood that the mutation indeed induces aberrant splicing through the use of a cryptic exonic splice acceptor site created by the sequence variant. Our results thus identify the synonymous variant c.3147G>A as a splice site mutation and a mutational hot spot in SBBYS syndrome. PMID:26334766

  16. A de novo mosaic mutation of PHEX in a boy with hypophosphatemic rickets.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chen; Chen, Jiao; Sun, Li; Zhou, Zhong-Wei; Feng, Xue; Sun, Jun-Hui; Lu, Ling-Ping; Yu, Ping; Qi, Ming

    2016-03-01

    X-linked dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (XLHR), is characterized mainly by renal phosphate wasting with hypophosphatemia, short stature and abnormal bone mineralization. PHEX, located at Xp22.1-p22.2, is the gene causing XLHR. We aim to characterize the pathogenesis of a Chinese boy who is apparently 'heterozygous' in PHEX gene. Direct sequencing showed two peaks: one was a wild-type 'G' and the other was one base substitution to 'A', though the patient was a male. TA clone assay clearly showed each sequences and the ratios. The mutation effect was predicted via bioinformatics and validated by exon-trapping assay. Real-time PCR was applied to determine the copy number of PHEX. TA clone assay showed the frequency of normal (G) to mutant allele (A) as 19:13. Normal karyotype and real-time PCR results indicate the normal copy number of PHEX. This splice site mutation leads to 4 bp of exon 18 skipping out causing frame shift p.Gly590Glufs*28 that ends up with a loss of active site and Zn(2+)-binding site of PHEX, which probably interfere with renal phosphate reabsorption and bone mineralization. In conclusion, mutation at conserved splice acceptor site resulted in aberrant splicing, ending up with a damaged protein product. This novel mutation is de novo in mosaic pattern that may be induced during early postzygotic period. Taking mosaic somatic mutation of PHEX into consideration is strongly suggested in genetic counseling and etiology research for XLHR. PMID:26559751

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae-Based Mutational Analysis of the bc1 Complex Qo Site Residue 279 To Study the Trade-Off between Atovaquone Resistance and Function

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zehua; Clain, Jérôme; Iorga, Bogdan I.; Yi, Zhou; Fisher, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    The bc1 complex is central to mitochondrial bioenergetics and the target of the antimalarial drug atovaquone that binds in the quinol oxidation (Qo) site of the complex. Structural analysis has shown that the Qo site residue Y279 (Y268 in Plasmodium falciparum) is key for atovaquone binding. Consequently, atovaquone resistance can be acquired by mutation of that residue. In addition to the probability of amino acid substitution, the level of atovaquone resistance and the loss of bc1 complex activity that are associated with the novel amino acid would restrict the nature of resistance-driven mutations occurring on atovaquone exposure in native parasite populations. Using the yeast model, we characterized the effect of all the amino acid replacements resulting from a single nucleotide substitution at codon 279: Y279C, Y279D, Y279F, Y279H, Y279N, and Y279S (Y279C, D, F, H, N, and S). Two residue changes that required a double nucleotide substitution, Y279A and W, were added to the series. We found that mutations Y279A, C, and S conferred high atovaquone resistance but decreased the catalytic activity. Y279F had wild-type enzymatic activity and sensitivity to atovaquone, while the other substitutions caused a dramatic respiratory defect. The results obtained with the yeast model were examined in regard to atomic structure and compared to the reported data on the evolution of acquired atovaquone resistance in P. falciparum. PMID:25918152

  18. Founding BRCA1 mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in southern Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Johannsson, O.; Hakansson, S.; Johannson, U.

    1996-03-01

    Nine different germ-line mutations in the BRCA1 breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene were identified in 15 of 47 kindreds from southern Sweden, by use of SSCP and heteroduplex analysis of all exons and flanking intron region and by a protein-truncation test for exon 11, followed by direct sequencing. All but one of the mutations are predicted to give rise to premature translation termination and include seven frameshift insertions or deletions, a nonsense mutation, and a splice acceptor site mutation. The remaining mutation is a missense mutation (Cys61Gly) in the zinc-binding motif. Four novel Swedish founding mutations were identified: the nucleotide 2595 deletion A was found in five families, the C 1806 T nonsense mutation in three families, the 3166 insertion TGAGA in three families, and the nucleotide 1201 deletion 11 in two families. Analysis of the intragenic polymorphism D17S855 supports common origins of the mutations. Eleven of the 15 kindreds manifesting BRCA1 mutations were breast-ovarian cancer families, several of them with a predominant ovarian cancer phenotype. The set of 32 families in which no BRCA1 alterations were detected included 1 breast-ovarian cancer kindred manifesting clear linkage to the BRCA1 region and loss of the wild-type chromosome in associated tumors. Other tumor types found in BRCA1 mutation/haplotype carriers included prostatic, pancreas, skin, and lung cancer, a malignant melanoma, an oligodendroglioma, and a carcinosarcoma. In all, 12 of 16 kindreds manifesting BRCA1 mutation or linkage contained ovarian cancer, as compared with only 6 of the remaining 31 families (P < .001). The present study confirms the involvement of BRCA1 in disease predisposition for a subset of hereditary breast cancer families often characterized by ovarian cancers. 28 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. A splicing mutation of proteolipid protein 1 in Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease.

    PubMed

    Omata, Taku; Nagai, Jun-Ichi; Shimbo, Hiroko; Koizume, Shiro; Miyagi, Yohei; Kurosawa, Kenji; Yamashita, Sumimasa; Osaka, Hitoshi; Inoue, Ken

    2016-06-01

    A patient with an unusually mild form of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease was studied. Clinically, mild developmental delay with acquisition of assisted walking at 16months and mild spastic tetraplegia were evident, but no nystagmus, cerebellar, or extra-pyramidal signs were present. PLP1 mutation analysis revealed a nucleotide substitution adjacent to the acceptor site of intron 3, NM_000533.4:c.454-9T>G. Expression analysis using the patient's leukocytes demonstrated an additional abnormal transcript including the last 118bp of intron 3. In silico prediction analysis suggested the reduction of wild-type acceptor activity, which presumably evokes the cryptic splicing variant. Putative cryptic transcript results in premature termination, which may explain the mild clinical phenotype observed in this patient. PMID:26725305

  20. Correction of a splice-site mutation in the beta-globin gene stimulated by triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Chin, Joanna Y; Kuan, Jean Y; Lonkar, Pallavi S; Krause, Diane S; Seidman, Michael M; Peterson, Kenneth R; Nielsen, Peter E; Kole, Ryszard; Glazer, Peter M

    2008-09-01

    Splice-site mutations in the beta-globin gene can lead to aberrant transcripts and decreased functional beta-globin, causing beta-thalassemia. Triplex-forming DNA oligonucleotides (TFOs) and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have been shown to stimulate recombination in reporter gene loci in mammalian cells via site-specific binding and creation of altered helical structures that provoke DNA repair. We have designed a series of triplex-forming PNAs that can specifically bind to sequences in the human beta-globin gene. We demonstrate here that these PNAs, when cotransfected with recombinatory donor DNA fragments, can promote single base-pair modification at the start of the second intron of the beta-globin gene, the site of a common thalassemia-associated mutation. This single base pair change was detected by the restoration of proper splicing of transcripts produced from a green fluorescent protein-beta-globin fusion gene. The ability of these PNAs to induce recombination was dependent on dose, sequence, cell-cycle stage, and the presence of a homologous donor DNA molecule. Enhanced recombination, with frequencies up to 0.4%, was observed with use of the lysomotropic agent chloroquine. Finally, we demonstrate that these PNAs were effective in stimulating the modification of the endogenous beta-globin locus in human cells, including primary hematopoietic progenitor cells. This work suggests that PNAs can be effective tools to induce heritable, site-specific modification of disease-related genes in human cells. PMID:18757759

  1. Mutations Conferring Resistance to SCH6, a Novel Hepatitis C Virus NS3/4A Protease Inhibitor: Reduced DNA Replication Fitness and Partial Rescue by Second-Site Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, MinKyung; Tong, Xiao; Skelton, Angela; Chase, Robert; Chen, Tong; Prongay, Andrew; Bogen, Stephane L.; Saksena, Anil K.; Njoroge, F. George; Veselenak, Ronald L.; Pyles, Richard B.; Bourne, Nigel; Malcolm, Bruce A.; Lemon, Stanley M.

    2008-06-30

    Drug resistance is a major issue in the development and use of specific antiviral therapies. Here we report the isolation and characterization of hepatitis C virus RNA replicons resistant to a novel ketoamide inhibitor of the NS3/4A protease, SCH6 (originally SCH446211). Resistant replicon RNAs were generated by G418 selection in the presence of SCH6 in a dose-dependent fashion, with the emergence of resistance reduced at higher SCH6 concentrations. Sequencing demonstrated remarkable consistency in the mutations conferring SCH6 resistance in genotype 1b replicons derived from two different strains of hepatitis C virus, A156T/A156V and R109K. R109K, a novel mutation not reported previously to cause resistance to NS3/4A inhibitors, conferred moderate resistance only to SCH6. Structural analysis indicated that this reflects unique interactions of SCH6 with P{prime}-side residues in the protease active site. In contrast, A156T conferred high level resistance to SCH6 and a related ketoamide, SCH503034, as well as BILN 2061 and VX-950. Unlike R109K, which had minimal impact on NS3/4A enzymatic function, A156T significantly reduced NS3/4A catalytic efficiency, polyprotein processing, and replicon fitness. However, three separate second-site mutations, P89L, Q86R, and G162R, were capable of partially reversing A156T-associated defects in polyprotein processing and/or replicon fitness, without significantly reducing resistance to the protease inhibitor.

  2. Computational simulations of structural role of the active-site W374C mutation of acetyl-coenzyme-A carboxylase: multi-drug resistance mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Wen-Chao; Yu, Ning-Xi; Yang, Sheng-Gang; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2011-03-01

    Herbicides targeting grass plastidic acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase, EC 6.4.1.2) are selectively effective against graminicides. The intensive worldwide use of this herbicide family has selected for resistance genes in a number of grass weed species. Recently, the active-site W374C mutation was found to confer multi-drug resistance toward haloxyfop (HF), fenoxaprop (FR), Diclofop (DF), and clodinafop (CF) in A. myosuroides. In order to uncover the resistance mechanism due to W374C mutation, the binding of above-mentioned four herbicides to both wild-type and the mutant-type ACCase was investigated in the current work by molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The binding free energies were calculated by molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) method. The calculated binding free energy values for four herbicides were qualitatively consistent with the experimental order of IC(50) values. All the computational model and energetic results indicated that the W374C mutation has great effects on the conformational change of the binding pocket and the ligand-protein interactions. The most significant conformational change was found to be associated with the aromatic amino acid residues, such as Phe377, Tyr161' and Trp346. As a result, the π-π interaction between the ligand and the residue of Phe377 and Tyr161', which make important contributions to the binding affinity, was decreased after mutation and the binding affinity for the inhibitors to the mutant-type ACCase was less than that to the wild-type enzyme, which accounts for the molecular basis of herbicidal resistance. The structural role and mechanistic insights obtained from computational simulations will provide a new starting point for the rational design of novel inhibitors to overcome drug resistance associated with W374C mutation. PMID:20499260

  3. Concerted action of target-site mutations and high EPSPS activity in glyphosate-resistant junglerice (Echinochloa colona) from California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glyphosate is the most widely used non-selective herbicide and Echinochloa colona is an annual weed affecting field crops and orchards in California. A population carrying a glyphosate-resistance-endowing mutation in the EPSPS gene was found in the Northern Sacramento Valley. We used selfed lines ...

  4. Functional Analysis of A Novel Splicing Mutation in The Mutase Gene of Two Unrelated Pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Miryounesi, Mohammad; Pasalar, Parvin; Keramatipour, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective Methylmalonic acidura (MMA) is a rare autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism. In this study we present a novel nucleotide change in the mutase (MUT) gene of two unrelated Iranian pedigrees and introduce the methods used for its functional analysis. Materials and Methods Two probands with definite diagnosis of MMA and a common novel variant in the MUT were included in a descriptive study. Bioinformatic prediction of the splicing variant was done with different prediction servers. Reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was done for splicing analysis and the products were analyzed by sequencing. Results The included index patients showed elevated levels of propionylcarnitine (C3). Urine organic acid analysis confirmed the diagnosis of MMA, and screening for mutations in the MUT revealed a novel C to G variation at the 3´ splice acceptor site in intron 12. In silico analysis suggested the change as a mutation in a conserved sequence. The splicing analysis showed that the C to G nucleotide change at position -3 in the acceptor splice site can lead to retention of the intron 12 sequence. Conclusion This is the first report of a mutation at the position -3 in the MUT intron 12 (c.2125-3C>G). The results suggest that the identified variation can be associated with the typical clinical manifestations of MMA. PMID:27602322

  5. Acyl acceptor recognition by Enterococcus faecium L,D-transpeptidase Ldtfm.

    PubMed

    Triboulet, Sébastien; Bougault, Catherine M; Laguri, Cédric; Hugonnet, Jean-Emmanuel; Arthur, Michel; Simorre, Jean-Pierre

    2015-10-01

    In Mycobacterium tuberculosis and ampicillin-resistant mutants of Enterococcus faecium, the classical target of β-lactam antibiotics is bypassed by L,D-transpeptidases that form unusual 3 → 3 peptidoglycan cross-links. β-lactams of the carbapenem class, such as ertapenem, are mimics of the acyl donor substrate and inactivate l,d-transpeptidases by acylation of their catalytic cysteine. We have blocked the acyl donor site of E. faecium L,D-transpeptidase Ldt(fm) by ertapenem and identified the acyl acceptor site based on analyses of chemical shift perturbations induced by binding of peptidoglycan fragments to the resulting acylenzyme. An nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-driven docking structure of the complex revealed key hydrogen interactions between the acyl acceptor and Ldt(fm) that were evaluated by site-directed mutagenesis and development of a cross-linking assay. Three residues are reported as critical for stabilisation of the acceptor in the Ldt(fm) active site and proper orientation of the nucleophilic nitrogen for the attack of the acylenzyme carbonyl. Identification of the catalytic pocket dedicated to the acceptor substrate opens new perspectives for the design of inhibitors with an original mode of action that could act alone or in synergy with β-lactams. PMID:26101813

  6. Mutations in the CLCN1 gene leading to myotonia congenita Thomsen and generalized myotonia Becker

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, M.C.; Meyer-Kline, C.; Otto, M.

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant inherited myotonia congenita Thomsen (MC) and autosomal recessive generalized myotonia Becker (GM) are non-dystropic muscle disorders in which the symptom myotonia is based on an increased excitability of the muscle fiber membrane due to a reduced sarcolemmal chloride conductance. Affected individuals exhibit myotonic muscle stiffness in all skeletal muscles and a transient muscle weakness is particularly pronounced in the arms and hands of probands with the disorder GM. Recently we have shown linkage of the disorders MC and GM to the gene CLCN1 coding for the skeletal muscle chloride channel on chromosome 7 in German families. In addition we presented data supporting the hypothesis that GM is a genetically homogeneous disorder. Data are presented about an extended screen for mutations in the CLCN1 gene for our MC and GM population. We identified mainly missense mutations leading to altered amino acid codons. The previously described F413C mutation is by far the most common mutation for GM and is found in one family only (P480L, G482R, R496S). In addition we found 5{prime} donor and 3{prime} acceptor splice site mutations at various intron-exon boundaries, as well as a deletion mutation of 14 bp in exon 13. This deletion mutation is the second most common mutation in the GM population with a frequency of 8%. So far we have not determined sites of predominance of mutations in the CLCN1 gene, which could give us more insight into the regions critical for the function of the channel and the fact that the mutations in the gene may lead to dominant and recessive inheritance.

  7. Functional characterization of two novel splicing mutations in the OCA2 gene associated with oculocutaneous albinism type II.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Valeria; Straniero, Letizia; Asselta, Rosanna; Mauri, Lucia; Manfredini, Emanuela; Penco, Silvana; Gesu, Giovanni P; Del Longo, Alessandra; Piozzi, Elena; Soldà, Giulia; Primignani, Paola

    2014-03-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is characterized by hypopigmentation of the skin, hair and eye, and by ophthalmologic abnormalities caused by a deficiency in melanin biosynthesis. OCA type II (OCA2) is one of the four commonly-recognized forms of albinism, and is determined by mutation in the OCA2 gene. In the present study, we investigated the molecular basis of OCA2 in two siblings and one unrelated patient. The mutational screening of the OCA2 gene identified two hitherto-unknown putative splicing mutations. The first one (c.1503+5G>A), identified in an Italian proband and her affected sibling, lies in the consensus sequence of the donor splice site of OCA2 intron 14 (IVS14+5G>A), in compound heterozygosity with a frameshift mutation, c.1450_1451insCTGCCCTGACA, which is predicted to determine the premature termination of the polypeptide chain (p.I484Tfs*19). In-silico prediction of the effect of the IVS14+5G>A mutation on splicing showed a score reduction for the mutant splice site and indicated the possible activation of a newly-created deep-intronic acceptor splice site. The second mutation is a synonymous transition (c.2139G>A, p.K713K) involving the last nucleotide of exon 20. This mutation was found in a young African albino patient in compound heterozygosity with a previously-reported OCA2 missense mutation (p.T404M). In-silico analysis predicted that the mutant c.2139G>A allele would result in the abolition of the splice donor site. The effects on splicing of these two novel mutations were investigated using an in-vitro hybrid-minigene approach that led to the demonstration of the causal role of the two mutations and to the identification of aberrant transcript variants. PMID:24361966

  8. Mutation of the PAX6 gene in patients with autosomal dominant keratitis

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzayans, F.; Pearce, W.G.; MacDonald, I.M.; Walter, M.A.

    1995-09-01

    Autosomal dominant keratitis (ADK) is an eye disorder chiefly characterized by corneal opacification and vascularization and by foveal hypoplasia. Aniridia (shown recently to result from mutations in the PAX6 gene) has overlapping clinical findings and a similar pattern of inheritance with ADK. On the basis of these similarities, we used a candidate-gene approach to investigate whether mutations in the PAX6 gene also result in ADK. Significant linkage was found between two polymorphic loci in the PAX6 region and ADK in a family with 15 affected members in four generations (peak LOD score = 4.45; {theta} = .00 with D11S914), consistent with PAX6 mutations being responsible for ADK. SSCP analysis and direct sequencing revealed a mutation in the PAX6 exon 11 splice-acceptor site. The predicted consequent incorrect splicing results in truncation of the PAX6 proline-serine-threonine activation domain. The Sey{sup Neu} mouse results from a mutation in the Pax-6 exon 10 splice-donor site that produces a PAX6 protein truncated from the same point as occurs in our family with ADK. Therefore, the Sey{sup Neu} mouse is an excellent animal model of ADK. The finding that mutations in PAX6 also underlie Peters anomaly implicates PAX6 broadly in human anterior segment malformations. 42 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Effect of an uncE ribosome-binding site mutation on the synthesis and assembly of the Escherichia coli proton-translocating ATPase.

    PubMed

    Solomon, K A; Brusilow, W S

    1988-04-15

    Plasmid pRPG54, which carries the genes for the eight subunits of the proton-translocating ATPase of Escherichia coli, has been found to carry a single base change of a G to an A in the ribosome-binding site for uncE, the gene which codes for the N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide-binding subunit c of the Fo. This noncoding region mutation both lowers expression of uncE by a factor of 2-3 and affects the function of the ATPase, specifically of the Fo sector. The presence of the mutation results in a decrease in the proton permeability of the Fo or of the entire F1Fo-ATPase complex when either is synthesized from genes on a multicopy plasmid. Expression of uncE from an F1Fo plasmid carrying the wild type ribosome binding site results in increased membrane proton permeability and decreased ability of the resultant ATPase to couple a transmembrane proton gradient to ATP synthesis both in vitro and in vivo. Also, although an Fo plasmid carrying the correct ribosome-binding site causes harmful, F1-dependent proton permeability in unc+ cells (Brusilow, W. S. S. (1987) J. Bacteriol. 169, 4984-4990), an identical plasmid carrying the mutation does not, even though it still codes for a functional reconstitutable Fo. The results show a relationship between the relative level of expression of uncE from a multicopy plasmid and the assembly pathway, proton permeability, and energy-coupling characteristics of the ATPase. PMID:2895768

  10. Mutations within the agonist-binding site convert the homomeric alpha1 glycine receptor into a Zn2+-activated chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Grudzinska, Joanna; Schumann, Tanja; Schemm, Rudolf; Betz, Heinrich; Laube, Bodo

    2008-01-01

    The divalent cation Zn2+ has been shown to regulate inhibitory neurotransmission in the mammalian CNS by affecting the activation of the strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor (GlyR). In spinal neurons and cells expressing recombinant GlyRs, low micromolar (<10 microM) concentrations of Zn2+ enhance glycine currents, whereas higher concentrations (>10 microM) have an inhibitory effect. Mutational studies have localized the Zn2+ binding sites mediating allosteric potentiation and inhibition of GlyRs in distinct regions of the N-terminal extracellular domain of the GlyR alpha-subunits. Here, we examined the Zn2+ sensitivity of different mutations within the agonist binding site of the homomeric alpha(1)-subunit GlyR upon heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes. This revealed that six substitutions within the ligand-binding pocket result in a total loss of Zn2+ inhibition. Furthermore, substitution of the positively charged residues arginine 65 and arginine 131 by alanine (alpha(1)(R65A), alpha(1)(R131A), or of the aromatic residue phenylalanine 207 by histidine (alpha(1)(F207H)), converted the alpha(1) GlyR into a chloride channel that was activated by Zn2+ alone. Dose-response analysis of the alpha(1)(F207H) GlyR disclosed an EC(50) value of 1.2 microM for Zn2+ activation; concomitantly the apparent glycine affinity was 1000-fold reduced. Thus, single point mutations within the agonist-binding site of the alpha(1) subunit convert the inhibitory GlyR from a glycine-gated into a selectively Zn2+-activated chloride channel. This might be exploited for the design of metal-specific biosensors by modeling-assisted mutagenesis. PMID:18690053

  11. Observation of selective plasmon-exciton coupling in nonradiative energy transfer: donor-selective versus acceptor-selective plexcitons.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Tuncay; Hernandez-Martinez, Pedro Ludwig; Mutlugun, Evren; Akin, Onur; Nizamoglu, Sedat; Ozel, Ilkem Ozge; Zhang, Qing; Xiong, Qihua; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2013-07-10

    We report selectively plasmon-mediated nonradiative energy transfer between quantum dot (QD) emitters interacting with each other via Förster-type resonance energy transfer (FRET) under controlled plasmon coupling either to only the donor QDs (i.e., donor-selective) or to only the acceptor QDs (i.e., acceptor-selective). Using layer-by-layer assembled colloidal QD nanocrystal solids with metal nanoparticles integrated at carefully designed spacing, we demonstrate the ability to enable/disable the coupled plasmon-exciton (plexciton) formation distinctly at the donor (exciton departing) site or at the acceptor (exciton feeding) site of our choice, while not hindering the donor exciton-acceptor exciton interaction but refraining from simultaneous coupling to both sites of the donor and the acceptor in the FRET process. In the case of donor-selective plexciton, we observed a substantial shortening in the donor QD lifetime from 1.33 to 0.29 ns as a result of plasmon-coupling to the donors and the FRET-assisted exciton transfer from the donors to the acceptors, both of which shorten the donor lifetime. This consequently enhanced the acceptor emission by a factor of 1.93. On the other hand, in the complementary case of acceptor-selective plexciton we observed a 2.70-fold emission enhancement in the acceptor QDs, larger than the acceptor emission enhancement of the donor-selective plexciton, as a result of the combined effects of the acceptor plasmon coupling and the FRET-assisted exciton feeding. Here we present the comparative results of theoretical modeling of the donor- and acceptor-selective plexcitons of nonradiative energy transfer developed here for the first time, which are in excellent agreement with the systematic experimental characterization. Such an ability to modify and control energy transfer through mastering plexcitons is of fundamental importance, opening up new applications for quantum dot embedded plexciton devices along with the development of new

  12. Structured regions of α-synuclein fibrils include the early-onset Parkinson’s disease mutation sites

    PubMed Central

    Comellas, Gemma; Lemkau, Luisel R.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Kloepper, Kathryn D.; Ladror, Daniel T.; Ebisu, Reika; Woods, Wendy S.; Lipton, Andrew S.; George, Julia M.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2011-01-01

    α-Synuclein (AS) fibrils are the major component of Lewy bodies, the pathological hallmark of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Here, we use results from an extensive investigation employing solid-state NMR to present a detailed structural characterization and conformational dynamics quantification of full-length AS fibrils. Our results show that the core extends with a repeated structural motif. This result disagrees with the previously proposed fold of AS fibrils obtained with limited solid-state NMR data. Additionally, our results demonstrate that the three single point mutations associated with early-onset PD—A30P, E46K and A53T—are located in structured regions. We find that E46K and A53T mutations, located in rigid β-strands of the wild-type fibrils, are associated with major and minor structural perturbations, respectively. PMID:21718702

  13. Identification of a novel exonic mutation at -13 from 5' splice site causing exon skipping in a girl with mitochondrial acetoacetyl-coenzyme A thiolase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Fukao, T; Yamaguchi, S; Wakazono, A; Orii, T; Hoganson, G; Hashimoto, T

    1994-01-01

    We identified a novel exonic mutation which causes exon skipping in the mitochondrial acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase (T2) gene from a girl with T2 deficiency (GK07). GK07 is a compound heterozygote; the maternal allele has a novel G to T transversion at position 1136 causing Gly379 to Val substitution (G379V) of the T2 precursor. In case of in vivo expression analysis, cells transfected with this mutant cDNA showed no evidence of restored T2 activity. The paternal allele was associated with exon 8 skipping at the cDNA level. At the gene level, a C to T transition causing Gln272 to termination codon (Q272STOP) was identified within exon 8, 13 bp from the 5' splice site of intron 8 in the paternal allele. The mRNA with Q272STOP could not be detected in GK07 fibroblasts, presumably because pre-mRNA with Q272STOP was unstable because of the premature termination. In vivo splicing experiments revealed that the exonic mutation caused partial skipping of exon 8. This substitution was thought to alter the secondary structure of T2 pre-mRNA around exon 8 and thus impede normal splicing. The role of exon sequences in the splicing mechanism is indicated by the exon skipping which occurred with an exonic mutation. Images PMID:7907600

  14. Understanding the drug resistance mechanism of hepatitis C virus NS5B to PF-00868554 due to mutations of the 423 site: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Pingzu; Xue, Weiwei; Shen, Yulin; Jin, Nengzhi; Liu, Huanxiang

    2014-04-01

    NS5B, a hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) that plays a key role in viral replication, is an important target in the discovery of antiviral agents. PF-00868554 is a potent non-nucleoside inhibitor (NNI) that binds to the Thumb II allosteric pocket of NS5B polymerase and has shown significant promise in phase II clinical trials. Unfortunately, several PF-00868554 resistant mutants have been identified. M423 variants were the most common NS5B mutations that occurred after PF-00868554 monotherapy. In this study, we used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, binding free energy calculations and free energy decomposition to explore the drug resistance mechanism of HCV to PF-00868554 resulting from three representative mutations (M423T/V/I) in NS5B polymerase. Free energy decomposition analysis reveals that the loss of binding affinity mainly comes from the reduction of both van der Waals (ΔE(vdw)) and electrostatic interaction contributions in the gas phase (ΔE(ele)). Further structural analysis indicates that the location of PF-00868554 and the binding mode changed due to mutation of the residue at the 423 site of NS5B polymerase from methionine to threonine, isoleucine or valine, which further resulted in the loss of binding ability of PF-00868554 to NS5B polymerase. The obtained computational results will have important value for the rational design of novel non-nucleoside inhibitors targeting HCV NS5B polymerase. PMID:24452008

  15. Mutation of the fiber shaft heparan sulphate binding site of a 5/3 chimeric adenovirus reduces liver tropism.

    PubMed

    Koski, Anniina; Karli, Eerika; Kipar, Anja; Escutenaire, Sophie; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2013-01-01

    Natural tropism to the liver is a major obstacle in systemic delivery of adenoviruses in cancer gene therapy. Adenovirus binding to soluble coagulation factors and to cellular heparan sulphate proteoglycans via the fiber shaft KKTK domain are suggested to cause liver tropism. Serotype 5 adenovirus constructs with mutated KKTK regions exhibit liver detargeting, but they also transduce tumors less efficiently, possibly due to altered fiber conformation. We constructed Ad5/3lucS*, a 5/3 chimeric adenovirus with a mutated KKTK region. The fiber knob swap was hypothesized to facilitate tumor transduction. This construct was studied with or without additional coagulation factor ablation. Ad5/3lucS* exhibited significantly reduced transduction of human hepatic cells in vitro and mouse livers in vivo. Combination of coagulation factor ablation by warfarinization to Ad5/3lucS* seemed to further enhance liver detargeting. Cancer cell transduction by Ad5/3lucS* was retained in vitro. In vivo, viral particle accumulation in M4A4-LM3 xenograft tumors was comparable to controls, but Ad5/3lucS* transgene expression was nearly abolished. Coagulation factor ablation did not affect tumor transduction. These studies set the stage for further investigations into the effects of the KKTK mutation and coagulation factor ablation in the context of 5/3 serotype chimerism. Of note, the putative disconnect between tumor transduction and transgene expression could prove useful in further understanding of adenovirus biology. PMID:23585829

  16. Mutation of the Fiber Shaft Heparan Sulphate Binding Site of a 5/3 Chimeric Adenovirus Reduces Liver Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Koski, Anniina; Karli, Eerika; Kipar, Anja; Escutenaire, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Natural tropism to the liver is a major obstacle in systemic delivery of adenoviruses in cancer gene therapy. Adenovirus binding to soluble coagulation factors and to cellular heparan sulphate proteoglycans via the fiber shaft KKTK domain are suggested to cause liver tropism. Serotype 5 adenovirus constructs with mutated KKTK regions exhibit liver detargeting, but they also transduce tumors less efficiently, possibly due to altered fiber conformation. We constructed Ad5/3lucS*, a 5/3 chimeric adenovirus with a mutated KKTK region. The fiber knob swap was hypothesized to facilitate tumor transduction. This construct was studied with or without additional coagulation factor ablation. Ad5/3lucS* exhibited significantly reduced transduction of human hepatic cells in vitro and mouse livers in vivo. Combination of coagulation factor ablation by warfarinization to Ad5/3lucS* seemed to further enhance liver detargeting. Cancer cell transduction by Ad5/3lucS* was retained in vitro. In vivo, viral particle accumulation in M4A4-LM3 xenograft tumors was comparable to controls, but Ad5/3lucS* transgene expression was nearly abolished. Coagulation factor ablation did not affect tumor transduction. These studies set the stage for further investigations into the effects of the KKTK mutation and coagulation factor ablation in the context of 5/3 serotype chimerism. Of note, the putative disconnect between tumor transduction and transgene expression could prove useful in further understanding of adenovirus biology. PMID:23585829

  17. Novel mutations in EVC cause aberrant splicing in Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lisong; Luo, Chunyan; Ahmed, Mairaj K; Attaie, Ali B; Ye, Xiaoqian

    2016-04-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by disproportionate chondrodysplasia, postaxial polydactyly, nail dystrophy, dental abnormalities and in a proportion of patients, congenital cardiac malformations. Weyers acrofacial dysostosis (Weyers) is another dominantly inherited disorder allelic to EvC syndrome but with milder phenotypes. Both disorders can result from loss-of-function mutations in either EVC or EVC2 gene, and phenotypes associated with the two gene mutations are clinically indistinguishable. We present here a clinical and molecular analysis of a Chinese family manifested specific features of EvC syndrome. Sequencing of both EVC and EVC2 identified two novel heterozygous splice site mutations c.384+5G>C in intron 3 and c.1465-1G>A in intron 10 in EVC, which were inherited from mother and father, respectively. In vitro minigene expression assay, RT-PCR and sequencing analysis demonstrated that c.384+5G>C mutation abolished normal splice site and created a new cryptic acceptor site within exon 4, whereas c.1465-1G>A mutation affected consensus splice junction site and resulted in full exon 11 skipping. These two aberrant pre-mRNA splicing processes both produced in-frame abnormal transcripts that possibly led to abolishment of important functional domains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of EVC mutations that cause EvC syndrome in Chinese population. Our data revealed that EVC splice site mutations altered splicing pattern and helped elucidate the pathogenesis of EvC syndrome. PMID:26621368

  18. Mutations increasing exposure of a receptor binding site epitope in the soluble and oligomeric forms of the caprine arthritis-encephalitis lentivirus envelope glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Hötzel, Isidro; Cheevers, William P

    2005-09-01

    The caprine arthritis-encephalitis (CAEV) and ovine maedi-visna (MVV) viruses are resistant to antibody neutralization, a feature shared with all other lentiviruses. Whether the CAEV gp135 receptor binding site(s) (RBS) in the functional surface envelope glycoprotein (Env) is protected from antibody binding, allowing the virus to resist neutralization, is not known. Two CAEV gp135 regions were identified by extrapolating a gp135 structural model that could affect binding of antibodies to the RBS: the V1 region and a short sequence analogous in position to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 loop B postulated to be located between two major domains of CAEV gp135. Mutation of isoleucine-166 to alanine in the putative loop B of gp135 increased the affinity of soluble gp135 for the CAEV receptor(s) and goat monoclonal antibody (Mab) F7-299 which recognizes an epitope overlapping the gp135 RBS. The I166A mutation also stabilized or exposed the F7-299 epitope in anionic detergent buffers, indicating that the I166A mutation induces conformational changes and stabilizes the RBS of soluble gp135 and enhances Mab F7-299 binding. In contrast, the affinity of a V1 deletion mutant of gp135 for the receptor and Mab F7-299 and its structural stability did not differ from that of the wild-type gp135. However, both the I166A mutation and the V1 deletion of gp135 increased cell-to-cell fusion activity and binding of Mab F7-299 to the oligomeric Env. Therefore, the CAEV gp135 RBS is protected from antibody binding by mechanisms both dependent and independent of Env oligomerization which are disrupted by the V1 deletion and the I166A mutation, respectively. In addition, we found a correlation between side-chain beta-branching at amino acid position 166 and binding of Mab F7-299 to oligomeric Env and cell-to-cell fusion, suggesting local secondary structure constraints in the region around isoleucine-166 as one determinant of gp135 RBS exposure and antibody binding. PMID

  19. Molecular modelling and experimental studies of mutation and cell-adhesion sites in the fibronectin type III and whey acidic protein domains of human anosmin-1.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, A; MacColl, G S; Nash, J A; Boehm, M K; Perkins, S J; Bouloux, P M

    2001-01-01

    Anosmin-1, the gene product of the KAL gene, is implicated in the pathogenesis of X-linked Kallmann's syndrome. Anosmin-1 protein expression is restricted to the basement membrane and interstitial matrix of tissues affected in this syndrome during development. The anosmin-1 sequence indicates an N-terminal cysteine-rich domain, a whey acidic protein (WAP) domain, four fibronectin type III (FnIII) domains and a C-terminal histidine-rich region, and shows similarity with cell-adhesion molecules, such as neural cell-adhesion molecule, TAG-1 and L1. We investigated the structural and functional significance of three loss-of-function missense mutations of anosmin-1 using comparative modelling of the four FnIII and the WAP domains based on known NMR and crystal structures. Three missense mutation-encoded amino acid substitutions, N267K, E514K and F517L, were mapped to structurally defined positions on the GFCC' beta-sheet face of the first and third FnIII domains. Electrostatic maps demonstrated large basic surfaces containing clusters of conserved predicted heparan sulphate-binding residues adjacent to these mutation sites. To examine these modelling results anosmin-1 was expressed in insect cells. The incorporation of the three mutations into recombinant anosmin-1 had no effect on its secretion. The removal of two dibasic motifs that may constitute potential physiological cleavage sites for anosmin-1 had no effect on cleavage. Peptides based on the anosmin-1 sequences R254--K285 and P504--K527 were then synthesized in order to assess the effect of the three mutations on cellular adhesion, using cell lines that represented potential functional targets of anosmin-1. Peptides (10 microg/ml) incorporating the N267K and E514K substitutions promoted enhanced adhesion to 13.S.1.24 rat olfactory epithelial cells and canine MDCK1 kidney epithelial cells (P<0.01) compared with the wild-type peptides. This result was attributed to the introduction of a lysine residue adjacent to

  20. Mutations increasing exposure of a receptor binding site epitope in the soluble and oligomeric forms of the caprine arthritis-encephalitis lentivirus envelope glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Hoetzel, Isidro . E-mail: ihotzel@gene.com; Cheevers, William P.

    2005-09-01

    The caprine arthritis-encephalitis (CAEV) and ovine maedi-visna (MVV) viruses are resistant to antibody neutralization, a feature shared with all other lentiviruses. Whether the CAEV gp135 receptor binding site(s) (RBS) in the functional surface envelope glycoprotein (Env) is protected from antibody binding, allowing the virus to resist neutralization, is not known. Two CAEV gp135 regions were identified by extrapolating a gp135 structural model that could affect binding of antibodies to the RBS: the V1 region and a short sequence analogous in position to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 loop B postulated to be located between two major domains of CAEV gp135. Mutation of isoleucine-166 to alanine in the putative loop B of gp135 increased the affinity of soluble gp135 for the CAEV receptor(s) and goat monoclonal antibody (Mab) F7-299 which recognizes an epitope overlapping the gp135 RBS. The I166A mutation also stabilized or exposed the F7-299 epitope in anionic detergent buffers, indicating that the I166A mutation induces conformational changes and stabilizes the RBS of soluble gp135 and enhances Mab F7-299 binding. In contrast, the affinity of a V1 deletion mutant of gp135 for the receptor and Mab F7-299 and its structural stability did not differ from that of the wild-type gp135. However, both the I166A mutation and the V1 deletion of gp135 increased cell-to-cell fusion activity and binding of Mab F7-299 to the oligomeric Env. Therefore, the CAEV gp135 RBS is protected from antibody binding by mechanisms both dependent and independent of Env oligomerization which are disrupted by the V1 deletion and the I166A mutation, respectively. In addition, we found a correlation between side-chain {beta}-branching at amino acid position 166 and binding of Mab F7-299 to oligomeric Env and cell-to-cell fusion, suggesting local secondary structure constraints in the region around isoleucine-166 as one determinant of gp135 RBS exposure and antibody binding.

  1. Autosomal Dominant Retinal Dystrophies Caused by a Founder Splice Site Mutation, c.828+3A>T, in PRPH2 and Protein Haplotypes in trans as Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Suma P.; Hughbanks-Wheaton, Dianna K.; Birch, David G.; Sullivan, Lori S.; Conneely, Karen N.; Bowne, Sara J.; Stone, Edwin M.; Daiger, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We determined the phenotypic variation, disease progression, and potential modifiers of autosomal dominant retinal dystrophies caused by a splice site founder mutation, c.828+3A>T, in the PRPH2 gene. Methods A total of 62 individuals (19 families) harboring the PRPH2 c.828+3A>T mutation, had phenotype analysis by fundus appearance, electrophysiology, and visual fields. The PRPH2 haplotypes in trans were sequenced for potential modifying variants and generalized estimating equations (GEE) used for statistical analysis. Results Several distinct phenotypes caused by the PRPH2 c.828+3A>T mutation were observed and fell into two clinical categories: Group I (N = 44) with mild pattern dystrophies (PD) and Group II (N = 18) with more severe cone-rod dystrophy (CRD), retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and central areolar chorioretinal dystrophy (CACD). The PRPH2 Gln304-Lys310-Asp338 protein haplotype in trans was found in Group I only (29.6% vs. 0%), whereas the Glu304-Lys310-Gly338 haplotype was predominant in Group II (94.4% vs. 70.4%). Generalized estimating equations analysis for PD versus the CRD/CACD/RP phenotypes in individuals over 43 years alone with the PRPH2 haplotypes in trans and age as predictors, adjusted for correlation within families, confirmed a significant effect of haplotype on severity (P = 0.03) with an estimated odds ratio of 7.16 (95% confidence interval [CI] = [2.8, 18.4]). Conclusions The PRPH2 c.828+3A>T mutation results in multiple distinct phenotypes likely modified by protein haplotypes in trans; the odds of having the CACD/RP-like phenotype (versus the PD phenotype) are 7.16 times greater with a Glu304-Lys310-Gly338 haplotype in trans. Further functional studies of the modifying haplotypes in trans and PRPH2 splice variants may offer therapeutic targets. PMID:26842753

  2. Reversion of the Arabidopsis rpn12a-1 exon-trap mutation by an intragenic suppressor that weakens the chimeric 5’ splice site

    PubMed Central

    Smalle, Jan A

    2013-01-01

    Background: In the Arabidopsis 26S proteasome mutant rpn12a-1, an exon-trap T-DNA is inserted 531 base pairs downstream of the RPN12a STOP codon. We have previously shown that this insertion activates a STOP codon-associated latent 5' splice site that competes with the polyadenylation signal during processing of the pre-mRNA. As a result of this dual input from splicing and polyadenylation in the rpn12a-1 mutant, two RPN12a transcripts are produced and they encode the wild-type RPN12a and a chimeric RPN12a-NPTII protein. Both proteins form complexes with other proteasome subunits leading to the formation of wild-type and mutant proteasome versions. The net result of this heterogeneity of proteasome particles is a reduction of total cellular proteasome activity. One of the consequences of reduced proteasomal activity is decreased sensitivity to the major plant hormone cytokinin. Methods: We performed ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis of rpn12a-1 and isolated revertants with wild-type cytokinin sensitivity. Results: We describe the isolation and analyses of suppressor of rpn12a-1 ( sor1). The sor1 mutation is intragenic and located at the fifth position of the chimeric intron. This mutation weakens the activated 5' splice site associated with the STOP codon and tilts the processing of the RPN12a mRNA back towards polyadenylation. Conclusions: These results validate our earlier interpretation of the unusual nature of the rpn12a-1 mutation. Furthermore, the data show that optimal 26S proteasome activity requires RPN12a accumulation beyond a critical threshold. Finally, this finding reinforces our previous conclusion that proteasome function is critical for the cytokinin-dependent regulation of plant growth. PMID:24358894

  3. Determination of site selectivity of different carcinogens for preferential mutational hot spots in oligonucleotide fragments by ion-pair reversed-phase nano liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vaneet K; Xiong, Wennan; Glick, James; Vouros, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Ion-pair reversed-phase nano liquid chromatography coupled with nanospray ion trap mass spectrometry was used to investigate site selectivity of the known carcinogens N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene, N-hydroxy-4-aminobiphenyl and (+/-)-anti-benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide with the synthetic double-strand 14-mer long oligonucleotide fragment of the p53 gene containing two mutational hot-spot codons (5'-P-ACC155 CGC156 GTC157 CGC158 GC/5'-GCG CGG ACG CGG GT). The investigation was performed using a monolithic polystyrene divinylbenzene capillary column and triethylammonium bicarbonate as an ion-pair reagent. The exact location of the carcinogen on the modified oligonucleotide backbone was determined using characteristic collision-induced dissociation fragmentation patterns obtained under negative-ion mode ionization. In all these cases, the adducted, isomeric oligonucleotides formed were chromatographically resolved and structural identification was performed without any prior deoxyribonucleic acid cleavage or hydrolysis. The knowledge of the site specificity of a carcinogen, especially at purported mutational hot spots, is of paramount importance (1) in establishing the identity of biomarkers for an early risk assessment of the formed DNA adducts, (2) developing repair mechanisms for the formed carcinogen adducted DNA, and (3) understanding the nature of the covalent bond formed and mapping the frequency of the adduction process. PMID:24881456

  4. Influence of a mutation in the putative nucleotide binding site of the nitrogen regulatory protein NTRC on its positive control function.

    PubMed Central

    Austin, S; Kundrot, C; Dixon, R

    1991-01-01

    A mutation, serine 170 to alanine, in the proposed ATP binding site of the activator protein NTRC prevents transcriptional activation at sigma 54-dependent promoters both in vivo and in vitro. The rate of phosphorylation of the mutant protein by NTRB and the stability of mutant NTRC-phosphate were similar to those of wild-type NTRC. The phosphorylated mutant protein shows only a slight decrease in affinity (around 2-fold) for tandem NTRC binding sites in the Klebsiella pneumoniae nifL promoter suggesting that the mutation primarily influences the positive control function of NTRC. Moreover the mutant protein is trans dominant to the wild-type protein with respect to transcriptional activation at both the glnAp2 and nifL promoters. In vitro footprinting experiments reveal that the mutant protein is unable to catalyse isomerisation of closed promoter complexes between sigma 54-RNA polymerase and the nifL promoter to open promoter complexes. However, the mutant protein retains the ability to increase the occupancy of the -24, -12 region by sigma 54-RNA polymerase, forming closed complexes at the nifL promoter, which are not detectable in the absence of NTRC. These data support a model in which the activator influences the formation of closed complexes at the nifL promoter in addition to its role in catalysing open complex formation. Images PMID:2041769

  5. Mutations in the β-tubulin binding site for peloruside A confer resistance by targeting a cleft significant in side chain binding

    PubMed Central

    Begaye, Adrian; Trostel, Shana; Zhao, Zhiming; Taylor, Richard E; Schriemer, David C

    2011-01-01

    Peloruside A is a microtubule-stabilizing macrolide that binds to β-tubulin at a site distinct from the taxol site. The site was previously identified by H-D exchange mapping and molecular docking as a region close to the outer surface of the microtubule and confined in a cavity surrounded by a continuous loop of protein folded so as to center on Y340. We have isolated a series of peloruside A-resistant lines of the human ovarian carcinoma cell line A2780(1A9) to better characterize this binding site and the consequences of altering residues in it. Four resistant lines (Pel A-D) are described with single-base mutations in class I β-tubulin that result in the following substitutions: R306H, Y340S, N337D and A296S in various combinations. The mutations are localized to peptides previously identified by Hydrogen-Deuterium exchange mapping, and center on a cleft in which the drug side chain appears to dock. The Pel lines are 10–15-fold resistant to peloruside A and show cross resistance to laulimalide but not to any other microtubule stabilizers. They show no cross-sensitivity to any microtubule destabilizers, nor to two drugs with targets unrelated to microtubules. Peloruside A induces G2/M arrest in the Pel cell lines at concentrations 10–15 times that required in the parental line. The cells show notable changes in morphology compared with the parental line. PMID:21926482

  6. Alkyl Chlorides as Hydrogen Bond Acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nadas, Janos I; Vukovic, Sinisa; Hay, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    To gain an understanding of the role of an alkyl chloride as a hydrogen bond acceptor, geometries and interaction energies were calculated at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory for complexes between ethyl chloride and representative hydrogen donor groups. The results establish that these donors, which include hydrogen cyanide, methanol, nitrobenzene, pyrrole, acetamide, and N-methylurea, form X-H {hor_ellipsis} Cl hydrogen bonds (X = C, N, O) of weak to moderate strength, with {Delta}E values ranging from -2.8 to -5.3 kcal/mol.

  7. Mutation at a Strictly-Conserved, Active-Site Tyrosine in the Copper Amine Oxidase Leads to Uncontrolled Oxygenase Activity†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-wei; Datta, Saumen; DuBois, Jennifer L.; Klinman, Judith P.; Mathews, F. Scott

    2010-01-01

    The copper amine oxidases carry out two copper-dependent processes: production of their own redox-active cofactor (2,4,5-trihydroxyphenylalanine quinone, TPQ), and the subsequent oxidative deamination of substrate amines. Because the same active-site pocket must facilitate both reactions, individual active-site residues may serve multiple roles. We have examined the roles of a strictly-conserved active-site tyrosine Y305 in the copper amine oxidase from Hansenula polymorpha kinetically, spetroscopically, and, in the present work, structurally. While the Y305A enzyme is almost identical to the wild-type, a novel, highly oxygenated species replaces TPQ in the Y305F active sites. This new structure not only provides the first direct detection of peroxy-intermediates in cofactor biogenesis, but also indicates the critical control of oxidation chemistry that can be conferred by a single active-site residue. PMID:20684524

  8. Genome Sequencing of Arabidopsis abp1-5 Reveals Second-Site Mutations That May Affect Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Enders, Tara A; Oh, Sookyung; Yang, Zhenbiao; Montgomery, Beronda L; Strader, Lucia C

    2015-07-01

    Auxin regulates numerous aspects of plant growth and development. For many years, investigating roles for AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN1 (ABP1) in auxin response was impeded by the reported embryo lethality of mutants defective in ABP1. However, identification of a viable Arabidopsis thaliana TILLING mutant defective in the ABP1 auxin binding pocket (abp1-5) allowed inroads into understanding ABP1 function. During our own studies with abp1-5, we observed growth phenotypes segregating independently of the ABP1 lesion, leading us to sequence the genome of the abp1-5 line described previously. We found that the abp1-5 line we sequenced contains over 8000 single nucleotide polymorphisms in addition to the ABP1 mutation and that at least some of these mutations may originate from the Arabidopsis Wassilewskija accession. Furthermore, a phyB null allele in the abp1-5 background is likely causative for the long hypocotyl phenotype previously attributed to disrupted ABP1 function. Our findings complicate the interpretation of abp1-5 phenotypes for which no complementation test was conducted. Our findings on abp1-5 also provide a cautionary tale illustrating the need to use multiple alleles or complementation lines when attributing roles to a gene product. PMID:26106149

  9. Activating and deactivating mutations in the receptor interaction site of GDF5 cause symphalangism or brachydactyly type A2.

    PubMed

    Seemann, Petra; Schwappacher, Raphaela; Kjaer, Klaus W; Krakow, Deborah; Lehmann, Katarina; Dawson, Katherine; Stricker, Sigmar; Pohl, Jens; Plöger, Frank; Staub, Eike; Nickel, Joachim; Sebald, Walter; Knaus, Petra; Mundlos, Stefan

    2005-09-01

    Here we describe 2 mutations in growth and differentiation factor 5 (GDF5) that alter receptor-binding affinities. They cause brachydactyly type A2 (L441P) and symphalangism (R438L), conditions previously associated with mutations in the GDF5 receptor bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 1b (BMPR1B) and the BMP antagonist NOGGIN, respectively. We expressed the mutant proteins in limb bud micromass culture and treated ATDC5 and C2C12 cells with recombinant GDF5. Our results indicated that the L441P mutant is almost inactive. The R438L mutant, in contrast, showed increased biological activity when compared with WT GDF5. Biosensor interaction analyses revealed loss of binding to BMPR1A and BMPR1B ectodomains for the L441P mutant, whereas the R438L mutant showed normal binding to BMPR1B but increased binding to BMPR1A, the receptor normally activated by BMP2. The binding to NOGGIN was normal for both mutants. Thus, the brachydactyly type A2 phenotype (L441P) is caused by inhibition of the ligand-receptor interaction, whereas the symphalangism phenotype (R438L) is caused by a loss of receptor-binding specificity, resulting in a gain of function by the acquisition of BMP2-like properties. The presented experiments have identified some of the main determinants of GDF5 receptor-binding specificity in vivo and open new prospects for generating antagonists and superagonists of GDF5. PMID:16127465

  10. Molecular and Functional Effects of a Splice Site Mutation in the MYL2 Gene Associated with Cardioskeletal Myopathy and Early Cardiac Death in Infants.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhiqun; Huang, Wenrui; Liang, Jingsheng; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2016-01-01

    The homozygous appearance of the intronic mutation (IVS6-1) in the MYL2 gene encoding for myosin ventricular/slow-twitch skeletal regulatory light chain (RLC) was recently linked to the development of slow skeletal muscle fiber type I hypotrophy and early cardiac death. The IVS6-1 (c403-1G>C) mutation resulted from a cryptic splice site in MYL2 causing a frameshift and replacement of the last 32 codons by 19 different amino acids in the RLC mutant protein. Infants who were IVS6-1(+∕+)-positive died between 4 and 6 months of age due to cardiomyopathy and heart failure. In this report we have investigated the molecular mechanism and functional consequences associated with the IVS6-1 mutation using recombinant human cardiac IVS6-1 and wild-type (WT) RLC proteins. Recombinant proteins were reconstituted into RLC-depleted porcine cardiac muscle preparations and subjected to enzymatic and functional assays. IVS6-1-RLC showed decreased binding to the myosin heavy chain (MHC) compared with WT, and IVS6-1-reconstituted myosin displayed reduced binding to actin in rigor. The IVS6-1 myosin demonstrated a significantly lower Vmax of the actin-activated myosin ATPase activity compared with WT. In stopped-flow experiments, IVS6-1 myosin showed slower kinetics of the ATP induced dissociation of the acto-myosin complex and a significantly reduced slope of the kobs-[MgATP] relationship compared to WT. In skinned porcine cardiac muscles, RLC-depleted and IVS6-1 reconstituted muscle strips displayed a significant decrease in maximal contractile force and a significantly increased Ca(2+) sensitivity, both hallmarks of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-associated mutations in MYL2. Our results showed that the amino-acid changes in IVS6-1 were sufficient to impose significant conformational alterations in the RLC protein and trigger a series of abnormal protein-protein interactions in the cardiac muscle sarcomere. Notably, the mutation disrupted the RLC-MHC interaction and the steady

  11. Molecular and Functional Effects of a Splice Site Mutation in the MYL2 Gene Associated with Cardioskeletal Myopathy and Early Cardiac Death in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhiqun; Huang, Wenrui; Liang, Jingsheng; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2016-01-01

    The homozygous appearance of the intronic mutation (IVS6-1) in the MYL2 gene encoding for myosin ventricular/slow-twitch skeletal regulatory light chain (RLC) was recently linked to the development of slow skeletal muscle fiber type I hypotrophy and early cardiac death. The IVS6-1 (c403-1G>C) mutation resulted from a cryptic splice site in MYL2 causing a frameshift and replacement of the last 32 codons by 19 different amino acids in the RLC mutant protein. Infants who were IVS6-1+∕+-positive died between 4 and 6 months of age due to cardiomyopathy and heart failure. In this report we have investigated the molecular mechanism and functional consequences associated with the IVS6-1 mutation using recombinant human cardiac IVS6-1 and wild-type (WT) RLC proteins. Recombinant proteins were reconstituted into RLC-depleted porcine cardiac muscle preparations and subjected to enzymatic and functional assays. IVS6-1-RLC showed decreased binding to the myosin heavy chain (MHC) compared with WT, and IVS6-1-reconstituted myosin displayed reduced binding to actin in rigor. The IVS6-1 myosin demonstrated a significantly lower Vmax of the actin-activated myosin ATPase activity compared with WT. In stopped-flow experiments, IVS6-1 myosin showed slower kinetics of the ATP induced dissociation of the acto-myosin complex and a significantly reduced slope of the kobs-[MgATP] relationship compared to WT. In skinned porcine cardiac muscles, RLC-depleted and IVS6-1 reconstituted muscle strips displayed a significant decrease in maximal contractile force and a significantly increased Ca2+ sensitivity, both hallmarks of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-associated mutations in MYL2. Our results showed that the amino-acid changes in IVS6-1 were sufficient to impose significant conformational alterations in the RLC protein and trigger a series of abnormal protein-protein interactions in the cardiac muscle sarcomere. Notably, the mutation disrupted the RLC-MHC interaction and the steady-state and

  12. Molecular insights into the terminal energy acceptor in cyanobacterial phycobilisome.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Wei, Tian-Di; Zhang, Nan; Xie, Bin-Bin; Su, Hai-Nan; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Wang, Zhi-Xin; Wu, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2012-09-01

    The linker protein L(CM) (ApcE) is postulated as the major component of the phycobilisome terminal energy acceptor (TEA) transferring excitation energy from the phycobilisome to photosystem II. L(CM) is the only phycobilin-attached linker protein in the cyanobacterial phycobilisome through auto-chromophorylation. However, the underlying mechanism for the auto-chromophorylation of L(CM) and the detailed molecular architecture of TEA is still unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the N-terminal phycobiliprotein-like domain of L(CM) (Pfam00502, LP502) can specifically recognize phycocyanobilin (PCB) by itself. Biochemical assays indicated that PCB binds into the same pocket in LP502 as that in the allophycocyanin α-subunit and that Ser152 and Asp155 play a vital role in LP502 auto-chromophorylation. By carefully conducting computational simulations, we arrived at a rational model of the PCB-LP502 complex structure that was supported by extensive mutational studies. In the PCB-LP502 complex, PCB binds into a deep pocket of LP502 with a distorted conformation, and Ser152 and Asp155 form several hydrogen bonds to PCB fixing the PCB Ring A and Ring D. Finally, based on our results, the dipoles and dipole-dipole interactions in TEA are analysed and a molecular structure for TEA is proposed, which gives new insights into the energy transformation mechanism of cyanobacterial phycobilisome. PMID:22758351

  13. Impact of Proximal and Distal Pocket Site-Directed Mutations on the Ferric/Ferrous Heme Redox Potential of Yeast Cytochrome-c-Peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Jensen, G M; Goodin, D B

    2011-12-01

    Cytochrome-c-peroxidase (CCP) contains a five-coordinate heme active site. The reduction potential for the ferric to ferrous couple in CCP is anomalously low and pH dependent (Eo = ~-180 mV vs. S.H.E. at pH 7). The contribution of the protein environment to the tuning of the redox potential of this couple is evaluated using site directed mutants of several amino acid residues in the environment of the heme. These include proximal pocket mutation to residues Asp-235, Trp-191, Phe-202 and His-175, distal pocket mutation to residues Trp-51, His-52, and Arg-48; and a heme edge mutation to Ala-147. Where unknown, the structural changes resulting from the amino acid substitution have been studied by X-ray crystallography. In most cases, ostensibly polar or charged residues are replaced by large hydrophobic groups or alternatively by Ala or Gly. These latter have been shown to generate large, solvent filled cavities. Reduction potentials are measured as a function of pH by spectroelectrochemistry. Starting with the X-ray derived structures of CCP and the mutants, or with predicted structures generated by Molecular Dynamics (MD), predictions of redox potential changes are modeled using the Protein Dipoles Langevin Dipoles (PDLD) method. These calculations serve to model an electrostatic assessment of the redox potential change with simplified assumptions about heme iron chemistry, with the balance of the experimentally observed shifts in redox potential being thence attributed to changes in the ligand set and heme coordination chemistry, and/or other changes in the structure not directly evident in the X-ray structures (e.g. ionization states, specific roles played by solvent species, or conformationally flexible portions of the protein). Agreement between theory and experiment is good for all mutant proteins with the exception of the mutation Arg 48 to Ala, and His 52 to Ala. In the former case, the influence of phosphate buffer is adduced to account for the discrepancy

  14. Restoration of domain folding and interdomain assembly by second-site suppressors of the ΔF508 mutation in CFTR

    PubMed Central

    He, Lihua; Aleksandrov, Luba A.; Cui, Liying; Jensen, Timothy J.; Nesbitt, Kenneth L.; Riordan, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Deletion of PHE508 (ΔF508) from the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) of CFTR, which causes most cystic fibrosis, disrupts the folding and assembly of the protein. Although the folding pathways and yield of isolated NBD1 are altered, its global structure is not, and details of the changes in the rest of the protein remain unclear. To gain further insight into how the whole mutant protein is altered, we have determined the influence of known second-site suppressor mutations in NBD1 on the conformation of this domain and key interfaces between domains. We found that the suppressors restored maturation of only those processing mutations located in NBD1, but not in other domains, including those in the C-terminal cytoplasmic loop of the second membrane-spanning domain, which forms an interface with the NBD1 surface. Nevertheless, the suppressors promoted the formation of this interface and others in the absence of F508. The suppressors restored maturation in a ΔF508 construct from which NBD2 was absent but to a lesser extent than in the full-length, indicating that ΔF508 disrupts interactions involving NBD2, as well as other domains. Rescue of ΔF508-CFTR by suppressors required the biosynthesis of the entire full-length protein in continuity, as it did not occur when N- and C-terminal “halves” were coexpressed. Simultaneous with these interdomain perturbations, ΔF508 resulted in suppressor reversed alterations in accessibility of residues both in the F508-containing NBD1 surface loop and in the Q loop within the domain core. Thus, in the context of the full-length protein, ΔF508 mutation causes detectable changes in NBD1 conformation, as well as interdomain interactions.—He, L., Aleksandrov, L. A., Cui, L., Jensen, T. J., Nesbitt, K. L., Riordan, J. R. Restoration of domain folding and interdomain assembly by second-site suppressors of the ΔF508 mutation in CFTR. PMID:20233947

  15. A Remote Mutation Affects the Hydride Transfer by Disrupting Concerted Protein Motions in Thymidylate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Abeysinghe, Thelma; Finer-Moore, Janet S.; Stroud, Robert M.; Kohen, Amnon

    2012-01-01

    The role of protein flexibility in enzyme-catalyzed activation of chemical bonds is an evolving perspective in enzymology. Here we examine the role of protein motions in the hydride transfer reaction catalyzed by thymidylate synthase (TSase). Being remote from the chemical reaction site, the Y209W mutation of E. coli TSase significantly reduces the protein activity, despite the remarkable similarity between the crystal structures of the wild type and mutant enzymes with ligands representing their Michaelis complexes. The most conspicuous difference between those two crystal structures is in the anisotropic B-factors, which indicates disruption of the correlated atomic vibrations of protein residues in the mutant. This dynamically altered mutant allows a variety of small thiols to compete for the reaction intermediate that precedes the hydride transfer, indicating disruption of motions that preorganize the protein environment for this chemical step. Although the mutation causes higher enthalpy of activation of the hydride transfer, it only shows a small effect on the temperature-dependence of the intrinsic KIE, suggesting marginal changes in the geometry and dynamics of the H-donor and acceptor at the tunneling ready state. These observations suggest that that the mutation disrupts the concerted motions that bring the H-donor and acceptor together during the pre- and re-organization of the protein environment. The integrated structural and kinetic data allow us to probe the impact of protein motions on different timescales on the hydride transfer reaction within a complex enzymatic mechanism. PMID:23034004

  16. A Unique Multibasic Proteolytic Cleavage Site and Three Mutations in the HA2 Domain Confer High Virulence of H7N1 Avian Influenza Virus in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Veits, Jutta; Tauscher, Kerstin; Ziller, Mario; Teifke, Jens P.; Stech, Jürgen; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In 1999, after circulation for a few months in poultry in Italy, low-pathogenic (LP) avian influenza (AI) H7N1 virus mutated into a highly pathogenic (HP) form by acquisition of a unique multibasic cleavage site (mCS), PEIPKGSRVRR*GLF (asterisk indicates the cleavage site), in the hemagglutinin (HA) and additional alterations with hitherto unknown biological function. To elucidate these virulence-determining alterations, recombinant H7N1 viruses carrying specific mutations in the HA of LPAI A/chicken/Italy/473/1999 virus (Lp) and HPAI A/chicken/Italy/445/1999 virus (Hp) were generated. Hp with a monobasic CS or carrying the HA of Lp induced only mild or no disease in chickens, thus resembling Lp. Conversely, Lp with the HA of Hp was as virulent and transmissible as Hp. While Lp with a multibasic cleavage site (Lp_CS445) was less virulent than Hp, full virulence was exhibited when HA2 was replaced by that of Hp. In HA2, three amino acid differences consistently detected between LP and HP H7N1 viruses were successively introduced into Lp_CS445. Q450L in the HA2 stem domain increased virulence and transmission but was detrimental to replication in cell culture, probably due to low-pH activation of HA. A436T and/or K536R restored viral replication in vitro and in vivo. Viruses possessing A436T and K536R were observed early in the HPAI outbreak but were later superseded by viruses carrying all three mutations. Together, besides the mCS, stepwise mutations in HA2 increased the fitness of the Italian H7N1 virus in vivo. The shift toward higher virulence in the field was most likely gradual with rapid optimization. IMPORTANCE In 1999, after 9 months of circulation of low-pathogenic (LP) avian influenza virus (AIV), a devastating highly pathogenic (HP) H7N1 AIV emerged in poultry, marking the largest epidemic of AIV reported in a Western country. The HPAIV possessed a unique multibasic cleavage site (mCS) complying with the minimum motif for HPAIV. The main finding

  17. Mutation of aspartic acid residues in the fructosyltransferase of Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975.

    PubMed Central

    Song, D D; Jacques, N A

    1999-01-01

    The site-directed mutated fructosyltransferases (Ftfs) of Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975, D312E, D312S, D312N and D312K were all active at 37 degrees C, indicating that Asp-312 present in the 'sucrose box' was not the nucleophilic Asp residue responsible for the formation of a covalent fructosyl-enzyme intermediate required for enzyme activity. Analysis of the kinetic constants of the purified mutated forms of the enzyme showed that Asp-312 was most likely an essential amino acid involved in determining acceptor recognition and/or stabilizing a beta-turn in the protein. In contrast, when the Asp-397 of the Ftf present in the conserved triplet RDP motif of all 60 bacterial and plant family-32 glycosylhydrolases was mutated to a Ser residue, both sucrose hydrolysis and polymerization ceased. Tryptophan emission spectra confirmed that this mutation did not alter protein structure. Comparison of published data from other site-directed mutated enzymes implicated the Asp residue in the RDP motif as the one that may form a transient covalent fructosyl intermediate during the catalysis of sucrose by the Ftf of S. salivarius. PMID:10548559

  18. Deep intronic GPR143 mutation in a Japanese family with ocular albinism.

    PubMed

    Naruto, Takuya; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Endo, Takao; Hatsukawa, Yoshikazu; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Imoto, Issei

    2015-01-01

    Deep intronic mutations are often ignored as possible causes of human disease. Using whole-exome sequencing, we analysed genomic DNAs of a Japanese family with two male siblings affected by ocular albinism and congenital nystagmus. Although mutations or copy number alterations of coding regions were not identified in candidate genes, the novel intronic mutation c.659-131 T > G within GPR143 intron 5 was identified as hemizygous in affected siblings and as heterozygous in the unaffected mother. This mutation was predicted to create a cryptic splice donor site within intron 5 and activate a cryptic acceptor site at 41nt upstream, causing the insertion into the coding sequence of an out-of-frame 41-bp pseudoexon with a premature stop codon in the aberrant transcript, which was confirmed by minigene experiments. This result expands the mutational spectrum of GPR143 and suggests the utility of next-generation sequencing integrated with in silico and experimental analyses for improving the molecular diagnosis of this disease. PMID:26061757

  19. Deep intronic GPR143 mutation in a Japanese family with ocular albinism

    PubMed Central

    Naruto, Takuya; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Endo, Takao; Hatsukawa, Yoshikazu; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Imoto, Issei

    2015-01-01

    Deep intronic mutations are often ignored as possible causes of human disease. Using whole-exome sequencing, we analysed genomic DNAs of a Japanese family with two male siblings affected by ocular albinism and congenital nystagmus. Although mutations or copy number alterations of coding regions were not identified in candidate genes, the novel intronic mutation c.659-131 T > G within GPR143 intron 5 was identified as hemizygous in affected siblings and as heterozygous in the unaffected mother. This mutation was predicted to create a cryptic splice donor site within intron 5 and activate a cryptic acceptor site at 41nt upstream, causing the insertion into the coding sequence of an out-of-frame 41-bp pseudoexon with a premature stop codon in the aberrant transcript, which was confirmed by minigene experiments. This result expands the mutational spectrum of GPR143 and suggests the utility of next-generation sequencing integrated with in silico and experimental analyses for improving the molecular diagnosis of this disease. PMID:26061757

  20. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies Mutations in Usher Syndrome Genes in Profoundly Deaf Tunisian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Riahi, Zied; Bonnet, Crystel; Zainine, Rim; Lahbib, Saida; Bouyacoub, Yosra; Bechraoui, Rym; Marrakchi, Jihène; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Louha, Malek; Largueche, Leila; Ben Yahia, Salim; Kheirallah, Moncef; Elmatri, Leila; Besbes, Ghazi; Abdelhak, Sonia; Petit, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by combined deafness-blindness. It accounts for about 50% of all hereditary deafness blindness cases. Three clinical subtypes (USH1, USH2, and USH3) are described, of which USH1 is the most severe form, characterized by congenital profound deafness, constant vestibular dysfunction, and a prepubertal onset of retinitis pigmentosa. We performed whole exome sequencing in four unrelated Tunisian patients affected by apparently isolated, congenital profound deafness, with reportedly normal ocular fundus examination. Four biallelic mutations were identified in two USH1 genes: a splice acceptor site mutation, c.2283-1G>T, and a novel missense mutation, c.5434G>A (p.Glu1812Lys), in MYO7A, and two previously unreported mutations in USH1G, i.e. a frameshift mutation, c.1195_1196delAG (p.Leu399Alafs*24), and a nonsense mutation, c.52A>T (p.Lys18*). Another ophthalmological examination including optical coherence tomography actually showed the presence of retinitis pigmentosa in all the patients. Our findings provide evidence that USH is under-diagnosed in Tunisian deaf patients. Yet, early diagnosis of USH is of utmost importance because these patients should undergo cochlear implant surgery in early childhood, in anticipation of the visual loss. PMID:25798947

  1. Towards building artificial light harvesting complexes: enhanced singlet-singlet energy transfer between donor and acceptor pairs bound to albumins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Challa V; Duff, Michael R

    2008-12-01

    Specific donor and acceptor pairs have been assembled in bovine serum albumin (BSA), at neutral pH and room temperature, and these dye-protein complexes indicated efficient donor to acceptor singlet-singlet energy transfer. For example, pyrene-1-butyric acid served as the donor and Coumarin 540A served as the acceptor. Both the donor and the acceptor bind to BSA with affinity constants in excess of 2x10(5) M(-1), as measured in absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectral titrations. Simultaneous binding of both the donor and the acceptor chromophores was supported by CD spectra and one chromophore did not displace the other from the protein host, even when limited concentrations of the host were used. For example, a 1:1:1 complex between the donor, acceptor and the host can be readily formed, and spectral data clearly show that the binding sites are mutually exclusive. The ternary complexes (two different ligands bound to the same protein molecule) provided opportunities to examine singlet-singlet energy transfer between the protein-bound chromophores. Donor emission was quenched by the addition of the acceptor, in the presence of limited amounts of BSA, while no energy transfer was observed in the absence of the protein host, under the same conditions. The excitation spectra of the donor-acceptor-host complexes clearly show the sensitization of acceptor emission by the donor. Protein denaturation, as induced by the addition of urea or increasing the temperature to 360 K, inhibited energy transfer, which indicate that protein structure plays an important role. Sensitization also proceeded at low temperature (77 K) and diffusion of the donor or the acceptor is not required for energy transfer. Stern-Volmer quenching plots show that the quenching constant is (3.1+/-0.2)x10(4) M(-1), at low acceptor concentrations (<35 microM). Other albumins such as human and porcine proteins also served as good hosts for the above experiments. For the first time, non

  2. Restoration of domain folding and interdomain assembly by second-site suppressors of the DeltaF508 mutation in CFTR.

    PubMed

    He, Lihua; Aleksandrov, Luba A; Cui, Liying; Jensen, Timothy J; Nesbitt, Kenneth L; Riordan, John R

    2010-08-01

    Deletion of PHE508 (DeltaF508) from the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) of CFTR, which causes most cystic fibrosis, disrupts the folding and assembly of the protein. Although the folding pathways and yield of isolated NBD1 are altered, its global structure is not, and details of the changes in the rest of the protein remain unclear. To gain further insight into how the whole mutant protein is altered, we have determined the influence of known second-site suppressor mutations in NBD1 on the conformation of this domain and key interfaces between domains. We found that the suppressors restored maturation of only those processing mutations located in NBD1, but not in other domains, including those in the C-terminal cytoplasmic loop of the second membrane-spanning domain, which forms an interface with the NBD1 surface. Nevertheless, the suppressors promoted the formation of this interface and others in the absence of F508. The suppressors restored maturation in a DeltaF508 construct from which NBD2 was absent but to a lesser extent than in the full-length, indicating that DeltaF508 disrupts interactions involving NBD2, as well as other domains. Rescue of DeltaF508-CFTR by suppressors required the biosynthesis of the entire full-length protein in continuity, as it did not occur when N- and C-terminal "halves" were coexpressed. Simultaneous with these interdomain perturbations, DeltaF508 resulted in suppressor reversed alterations in accessibility of residues both in the F508-containing NBD1 surface loop and in the Q loop within the domain core. Thus, in the context of the full-length protein, DeltaF508 mutation causes detectable changes in NBD1 conformation, as well as interdomain interactions. PMID:20233947

  3. Improvement of the Mutation-Discrimination Threshold for Rare Point Mutations by a Separation-Free Ligase Detection Reaction Assay Based on Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer.

    PubMed

    Hagihara, Kenta; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhiko; Nakajima, Chinami; Esaki, Shinsuke; Hashimoto, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    We previously developed a separation-free ligase detection reaction assay based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer from a donor quantum dot to an acceptor fluorescent dye. This assay could successfully detect one cancer mutation among 10 wild-type templates. In the current study, the mutation-discrimination threshold was improved by one order of magnitude by replacing the original acceptor dye (Alexa Fluor 647) with another fluorescent dye (Cyanine 5) that was spectrally similar but more fluorescent. PMID:26960620

  4. UV Signature Mutations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations – deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen – and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the non-transcribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; non-signature mutations induced by UV may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  5. A novel de novo mutation within PHEX gene in a young girl with hypophosphatemic rickets and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hoon Sang; Kim, Su Yung; Kwak, Min Jung; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2014-01-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) is the most common form of familial hypophosphatemic rickets and it is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the PHEX gene. Recently, a wide variety of PHEX gene defects in XLH have been revealed; these include missense mutations, nonsense mutations, splice site mutations, insertions, and deletions. Recently, we encountered a 2-year-9-month-old female with sporadic hypophosphatemic rickets. She underwent osteotomy, dental abscess was evident, and there was severe bowing of the legs. A low serum phosphorus level in combination with elevated serum alkaline phosphatase activity and normal serum calcium is suggestive of hypophosphatemic rickets. PHEX gene analysis revealed a splice acceptor site mutation, c.934-1G>T (IVS8-1G>T), at the intron8 and exon9 junction. To the best of our knowledge, this mutation is novel and has not been reported. The results of this study expand and improve our understanding of the clinical and molecular characteristics and the global pool of patients with sporadic hypophosphatemic rickets. PMID:24926462

  6. Mutations in the MicroRNA Complementarity Site of the INCURVATA4 Gene Perturb Meristem Function and Adaxialize Lateral Organs in Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Ochando, Isabel; Jover-Gil, Sara; Ripoll, Juan José; Candela, Héctor; Vera, Antonio; Ponce, María Rosa; Martínez-Laborda, Antonio; Micol, José Luis

    2006-01-01

    Here, we describe how the semidominant, gain-of-function icu4-1 and icu4-2 alleles of the INCURVATA4 (ICU4) gene alter leaf phyllotaxis and cell organization in the root apical meristem, reduce root length, and cause xylem overgrowth in the stem. The ICU4 gene was positionally cloned and found to encode the ATHB15 transcription factor, a class III homeodomain/leucine zipper family member, recently named CORONA. The icu4-1 and icu4-2 alleles bear the same point mutation that affects the microRNA complementarity site of ICU4 and is identical to those of several semidominant alleles of the class III homeodomain/leucine zipper family members PHABULOSA and PHAVOLUTA. The icu4-1 and icu4-2 mutations significantly increase leaf transcript levels of the ICU4 gene. The null hst-1 allele of the HASTY gene, which encodes a nucleocytoplasmic transporter, synergistically interacts with icu4-1, the double mutant displaying partial adaxialization of rosette leaves and carpels. Our results suggest that the ICU4 gene has an adaxializing function and that it is down-regulated by microRNAs that require the HASTY protein for their biogenesis. PMID:16617092

  7. A Single Mutation in the Glycophorin A Binding Site of Hepatitis A Virus Enhances Virus Clearance from the Blood and Results in a Lower Fitness Variant

    PubMed Central

    Costafreda, M. Isabel; Ribes, Enric; Franch, Àngels; Bosch, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) has previously been reported to bind to human red blood cells through interaction with glycophorin A. Residue K221 of VP1 and the surrounding VP3 residues are involved in such an interaction. This capsid region is specifically recognized by the monoclonal antibody H7C27. A monoclonal antibody-resistant mutant with the mutation G1217D has been isolated. In the present study, the G1217D mutant was characterized physically and biologically in comparison with the parental HM175 43c strain. The G1217D mutant is more sensitive to acid pH and binds more efficiently to human and rat erythrocytes than the parental 43c strain. In a rat model, it is eliminated from serum more rapidly and consequently reaches the liver with a certain delay compared to the parental 43c strain. In competition experiments performed in vivo in the rat model, the G1217D mutant was efficiently outcompeted by the parental 43c strain. Only in the presence of antibodies reacting specifically with the parental 43c strain could the G1217D mutant outcompete the parental 43c strain in serum, although the latter still showed a remarkable ability to reach the liver. Altogether, these results indicate that the G1217D mutation induces a low fitness phenotype which could explain the lack of natural antigenic variants of the glycophorin A binding site. PMID:22593170

  8. TEX11 is mutated in infertile men with azoospermia and regulates genome-wide recombination rates in mouse.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fang; Silber, Sherman; Leu, N Adrian; Oates, Robert D; Marszalek, Janet D; Skaletsky, Helen; Brown, Laura G; Rozen, Steve; Page, David C; Wang, P Jeremy

    2015-09-01

    Genome-wide recombination is essential for genome stability, evolution, and speciation. Mouse Tex11, an X-linked meiosis-specific gene, promotes meiotic recombination and chromosomal synapsis. Here, we report that TEX11 is mutated in infertile men with non-obstructive azoospermia and that an analogous mutation in the mouse impairs meiosis. Genetic screening of a large cohort of idiopathic infertile men reveals that TEX11 mutations, including frameshift and splicing acceptor site mutations, cause infertility in 1% of azoospermic men. Functional evaluation of three analogous human TEX11 missense mutations in transgenic mouse models identified one mutation (V748A) as a potential infertility allele and found two mutations non-causative. In the mouse model, an intronless autosomal Tex11 transgene functionally substitutes for the X-linked Tex11 gene, providing genetic evidence for the X-to-autosomal retrotransposition evolution phenomenon. Furthermore, we find that TEX11 protein levels modulate genome-wide recombination rates in both sexes. These studies indicate that TEX11 alleles affecting expression level or substituting single amino acids may contribute to variations in recombination rates between sexes and among individuals in humans. PMID:26136358

  9. Mutation of a single residue in the ba3 oxidase specifically impairs protonation of the pump site

    PubMed Central

    von Ballmoos, Christoph; Gonska, Nathalie; Lachmann, Peter; Gennis, Robert B.; Ädelroth, Pia; Brzezinski, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The ba3-type cytochrome c oxidase from Thermus thermophilus is a membrane-bound protein complex that couples electron transfer to O2 to proton translocation across the membrane. To elucidate the mechanism of the redox-driven proton pumping, we investigated the kinetics of electron and proton transfer in a structural variant of the ba3 oxidase where a putative “pump site” was modified by replacement of Asp372 by Ile. In this structural variant, proton pumping was uncoupled from internal electron transfer and O2 reduction. The results from our studies show that proton uptake to the pump site (time constant ∼65 μs in the wild-type cytochrome c oxidase) was impaired in the Asp372Ile variant. Furthermore, a reaction step that in the wild-type cytochrome c oxidase is linked to simultaneous proton uptake and release with a time constant of ∼1.2 ms was slowed to ∼8.4 ms, and in Asp372Ile was only associated with proton uptake to the catalytic site. These data identify reaction steps that are associated with protonation and deprotonation of the pump site, and point to the area around Asp372 as the location of this site in the ba3 cytochrome c oxidase. PMID:25733886

  10. Rapid photometric detection of thymine residues partially flipped out of double helix as a method for direct scanning of point mutations and apurinic DNA sites.

    PubMed

    Logvina, N A; Yakubovskaya, M G; Dolinnaya, N G

    2011-02-01

    A spectroscopic assay for detection of extrahelical thymine residues in DNA heteroduplexes under their modification by potassium permanganate has been developed. The assay is based on increase in absorbance at 420 nm due to accumulation of thymidine oxidation intermediates and soluble manganese dioxide. The analysis was carried out using a set of 19-bp DNA duplexes containing unpaired thymidines opposite tetrahydrofuranyl derivatives mimicking a widespread DNA damage (apurinic (AP) sites) and a library of 50-bp DNA duplexes containing all types of base mismatches in different surroundings. The relation between the selectivity of unpaired T oxidation and the thermal stability of DNA double helix was investigated. The method described here was shown to discriminate between DNA duplexes with one or two AP sites and to reveal thymine-containing mismatches and all noncanonical base pairs in AT-surroundings. Comparative results of CCM analysis and the rapid photometric assay for mismatch detection are demonstrated for the first time in the same model system. The chemical reactivity of target thymines was shown to correlate with local disturbance of double helix at the mismatch site. As the spectroscopic assay does not require the DNA cleavage reaction and gel electrophoresis, it can be easily automated and used for primary screening of somatic mutations. PMID:21568858

  11. Quantum computing with acceptor spins in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salfi, Joe; Tong, Mengyang; Rogge, Sven; Culcer, Dimitrie

    2016-06-01

    The states of a boron acceptor near a Si/SiO2 interface, which bind two low-energy Kramers pairs, have exceptional properties for encoding quantum information and, with the aid of strain, both heavy hole and light hole-based spin qubits can be designed. Whereas a light-hole spin qubit was introduced recently (arXiv:1508.04259), here we present analytical and numerical results proving that a heavy-hole spin qubit can be reliably initialised, rotated and entangled by electrical means alone. This is due to strong Rashba-like spin–orbit interaction terms enabled by the interface inversion asymmetry. Single qubit rotations rely on electric-dipole spin resonance (EDSR), which is strongly enhanced by interface-induced spin–orbit terms. Entanglement can be accomplished by Coulomb exchange, coupling to a resonator, or spin–orbit induced dipole–dipole interactions. By analysing the qubit sensitivity to charge noise, we demonstrate that interface-induced spin–orbit terms are responsible for sweet spots in the dephasing time {T}2* as a function of the top gate electric field, which are close to maxima in the EDSR strength, where the EDSR gate has high fidelity. We show that both qubits can be described using the same starting Hamiltonian, and by comparing their properties we show that the complex interplay of bulk and interface-induced spin–orbit terms allows a high degree of electrical control and makes acceptors potential candidates for scalable quantum computation in Si.

  12. Effect of Active-site Mutation at Asn67 on the Proton Transfer Mechanism of Human Carbonic Anhydrase II

    PubMed Central

    Maupin, C. Mark; Zheng, Jiayin; Tu, Chingkuang; McKenna, Robert; Silverman, David N.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    The rate-limiting proton transfer (PT) event in the site-specific mutant N67L of human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) has been examined by kinetic, x-ray, and simulation approaches. The x-ray crystallography, which were previously reported, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that the proton shuttling residue, His64, predominantly resides in the outward orientation with a significant disruption of the ordered water in the active site for the dehydration pathway. While disorder is seen in the active-site water, water cluster analysis indicates that the N67L mutant may form water clusters similar to those seen in the wild-type (WT). For the hydration pathway of the enzyme, the active site water cluster analysis reveals an inability of the N67L mutant to stabilize water clusters when His64 is in the inward orientation, thereby favoring PT when His64 is in the outward orientation. The preference of the N67L mutant to carry out the PT when His64 is in the outward orientation for both the hydration and dehydration pathway is reasoned to be the main cause of the observed reduction in the overall rate. To probe the mechanism of PT, solvent H/D kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) were experimentally studied with catalysis measured by the exchange of 18O between CO2 and water. The values obtained from the KIEs were determined as a function of the deuterium content of solvent, using the proton inventory method. No differences were detected in the overarching mechanism of PT between WT and N67L HCA II, despite changes in the active-site water structure and/or the orientation of His64. PMID:19634894

  13. Effect of the Active Site D25N Mutation on the Structure, Stability and Ligand Binding of the Mature HIV-1 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Sayer, Jane M.; Liu, Fengling; Ishima, Rieko; Weber, Irene T.; Louis, John M.

    2008-09-03

    All aspartic proteases, including retroviral proteases, share the triplet DTG critical for the active site geometry and catalytic function. These residues interact closely in the active, dimeric structure of HIV-1 protease (PR). We have systematically assessed the effect of the D25N mutation on the structure and stability of the mature PR monomer and dimer. The D25N mutation (PR{sub D25N}) increases the equilibrium dimer dissociation constant by a factor >100-fold (1.3 {+-} 0.09 {mu}m) relative to PR. In the absence of inhibitor, NMR studies reveal clear structural differences between PR and PR{sub D25N} in the relatively mobile P1 loop (residues 79-83) and flap regions, and differential scanning calorimetric analyses show that the mutation lowers the stabilities of both the monomer and dimer folds by 5 and 7.3 C, respectively. Only minimal differences are observed in high resolution crystal structures of PR{sub D25N} complexed to darunavir (DRV), a potent clinical inhibitor, or a non-hydrolyzable substrate analogue, Ac-Thr-Ile-Nle-r-Nle-Gln-Arg-NH{sub 2} (RPB), as compared with PR{center_dot}DRV and PR{center_dot}RPB complexes. Although complexation with RPB stabilizes both dimers, the effect on their T{sub m} is smaller for PR{sub D25N} (6.2 C) than for PR (8.7 C). The T{sub m} of PR{sub D25N}{center_dot}DRV increases by only 3 C relative to free PR{sub D25N}, as compared with a 22 C increase for PR{center_dot}DRV, and the mutation increases the ligand dissociation constant of PR{sub D25N}{center_dot}DRV by a factor of {approx}10{sup 6} relative to PR{center_dot}DRV. These results suggest that interactions mediated by the catalytic Asp residues make a major contribution to the tight binding of DRV to PR.

  14. In silico evaluation of miRNA binding site in mutated 3'UTR mRNA of G6PD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmi, Syarifah Anis Wafa Binti Syed Mohd; Noorden, Mohd Shihabudin; Yusof, Nurul Yuziana Mohd; Ismail, Endom

    2015-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non coding RNA sized 21-25 nucleotide. It has the ability to bind to the 3'- untranslated regions (3'UTR) of their target genes. Consequently, the binding of miRNA in the 3'UTR of targeted mRNA will regulate the expression of this gene. Thus, changes in 3'UTR may affect miRNA binding to mRNA of their target gene, leading to aberrations in mRNA regulations or expression and likely contribute to the various phenotypic changes or clinical risk for certain diseases in man. Therefore, the aim of this study is to evaluate candidate miRNAs species involved during the regulation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) mRNA with and without a specific 3'UTR nucleotide change that was previously shown to be responsible for G6PD deficiency in a Negrito sub-group of the Malaysian Orang Asli. We have conducted in silico analysis using TargetScan, PITA, RegRNA 2.0 and miRanda platform. Our results indicate that three potential miRNAs may have a functional role towards the regulated expression of those bearing the 3'UTR mutation. The role of these eleven miRNA can be investigated in future in vitro expression studies in order to verify its miRNA:mRNA relationship.

  15. Mutation of caspase-digestion sites in keratin 18 interferes with filament reorganization, and predisposes to hepatocyte necrosis and loss of membrane integrity

    PubMed Central

    Weerasinghe, Sujith V. W.; Ku, Nam-On; Altshuler, Peter J.; Kwan, Raymond; Omary, M. Bishr

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Keratin 18 (K18 or KRT18) undergoes caspase-mediated cleavage during apoptosis, the significance of which is poorly understood. Here, we mutated the two caspase-cleavage sites (D238E and D397E) in K18 (K18-DE), followed by transgenic overexpression of the resulting mutant. We found that K18-DE mice develop extensive Fas-mediated liver damage compared to wild-type mice overexpressing K18 (K18-WT). Fas-stimulation of K18-WT mice or isolated hepatocytes caused K18 degradation. By contrast, K18-DE livers or hepatocytes maintained intact keratins following Fas-stimulation, but showed hypo-phosphorylation at a major stress-kinase-related keratin 8 (K8) phosphorylation site. Although K18-WT and K18-DE hepatocytes showed similar Fas-mediated caspase activation, K18-DE hepatocytes were more ‘leaky’ after a mild hypoosmotic challenge and were more susceptible to necrosis after Fas-stimulation or severe hypoosmotic stress. K8 hypophosphorylation was not due to the inhibition of kinase binding to the keratin but was due to mutation-induced inaccessibility to the kinase that phosphorylates K8. A stress-modulated keratin phospho-mutant expressed in hepatocytes phenocopied the hepatocyte susceptibility to necrosis but was found to undergo keratin filament reorganization during apoptosis. Therefore, the caspase cleavage of keratins might promote keratin filament reorganization during apoptosis. Interference with keratin caspase cleavage shunts hepatocytes towards necrosis and increases liver injury through the inhibition of keratin phosphorylation. These findings might extend to other intermediate filament proteins that undergo proteolysis during apoptosis. PMID:24463813

  16. Mutations in Nature Conferred a High Affinity Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate-binding Site in Vertebrate Inwardly Rectifying Potassium Channels.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiong-Yao; Larry, Trevor; Hendra, Kalen; Yamamoto, Erica; Bell, Jessica; Cui, Meng; Logothetis, Diomedes E; Boland, Linda M

    2015-07-01

    All vertebrate inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channels are activated by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) (Logothetis, D. E., Petrou, V. I., Zhang, M., Mahajan, R., Meng, X. Y., Adney, S. K., Cui, M., and Baki, L. (2015) Annu. Rev. Physiol. 77, 81-104; Fürst, O., Mondou, B., and D'Avanzo, N. (2014) Front. Physiol. 4, 404-404). Structural components of a PIP2-binding site are conserved in vertebrate Kir channels but not in distantly related animals such as sponges and sea anemones. To expand our understanding of the structure-function relationships of PIP2 regulation of Kir channels, we studied AqKir, which was cloned from the marine sponge Amphimedon queenslandica, an animal that represents the phylogenetically oldest metazoans. A requirement for PIP2 in the maintenance of AqKir activity was examined in intact oocytes by activation of a co-expressed voltage-sensing phosphatase, application of wortmannin (at micromolar concentrations), and activation of a co-expressed muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. All three mechanisms to reduce the availability of PIP2 resulted in inhibition of AqKir current. However, time-dependent rundown of AqKir currents in inside-out patches could not be re-activated by direct application to the inside membrane surface of water-soluble dioctanoyl PIP2, and the current was incompletely re-activated by the more hydrophobic arachidonyl stearyl PIP2. When we introduced mutations to AqKir to restore two positive charges within the vertebrate PIP2-binding site, both forms of PIP2 strongly re-activated the mutant sponge channels in inside-out patches. Molecular dynamics simulations validate the additional hydrogen bonding potential of the sponge channel mutants. Thus, nature's mutations conferred a high affinity activation of vertebrate Kir channels by PIP2, and this is a more recent evolutionary development than the structures that explain ion channel selectivity and inward rectification. PMID:25957411

  17. Mutations within the propeptide, the primary cleavage site or the catalytic site, or deletion of C-terminal sequences, prevents secretion of proPC2 from transfected COS-7 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, N A; Shennan, K I; Cutler, D F; Docherty, K

    1997-01-01

    PC2 is a neuroendocrine endoprotease involved in the processing of prohormones and proneuropeptides. PC2 is synthesized as a proenzyme which undergoes proteolytic maturation within the cellular secretory apparatus. Cleavage occurs at specific sites to remove the N-terminal propeptide. The aim of the present study was to investigate structural requirements for the transfer of proPC2 through the secretory pathway. A series of mutant proPC2 constructs were transfected into COS-7 cells and the fate of the expressed proteins followed by pulse-chase analysis and immunocytochemistry. Human PC2 was secreted relatively slowly, and appeared in the medium primarily as proPC2 (75 kDa), together with much lower amounts of a processed intermediate (71 kDa) and mature PC2 (68 kDa). Mutations within the primary processing site or the catalytic triad caused the protein to accumulate intracellularly, whereas deletion of part of the propeptide, the P-domain or the C-terminal regions also prevented secretion. Immunocytochemistry showed that wild-type hPC2 was localized mainly in the Golgi, whereas two representative mutants showed a distribution typical of proteins resident in the endoplasmic reticulum. The results suggest that proenzyme processing is not essential for secretion of PC2, but peptides containing mutations that affect the ability of the propeptide (and cleavage sites) to fold within the catalytic pocket are not transferred beyond the early stages of the secretory pathway. C-terminal sequences may be involved in stabilizing such conformations. PMID:9020868

  18. Influence of alternative electron acceptors on the anaerobic biodegradability of chlorinated phenols and benzoic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Haeggblom, M.M.; Rivera, M.D.; Young, L.Y. )

    1993-04-01

    Methanogeneic conditions can promote the biodegradation of a number of halogenated aromatic compounds. This study, using sediments from freshwater and estuarine sites, is an evaluation of the anaerobic biodegradability of monochlorinated phenols and benzoic acids coupled to denitrification, sulfidogenesis, and methanogenesis. The results indicate that chlorinated phenols and benzoic acids are biodegradable under at least one set of anaerobic conditions. Metabolism depends both on the electron acceptor available and on the position of the chlorine substituent. Presence of alternative electron acceptors, nitrate, sulfate, and carbonate, can affect degradation rates and substrate specificities. Since contaminated sites usually have mixtures of wastes, bioremediation efforts may need to consider the activities of diverse anaerobic communities to carry out effective treatment of all components. 37 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. A gain-of-function ACTC1 3′UTR mutation that introduces a miR-139-5p target site may be associated with a dominant familial atrial septal defect

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ye; Du, Xinwei; Zhou, Zaiwei; Jiang, Jun; Zhang, Zhen; Ye, Lincai; Hong, Haifa

    2016-01-01

    The ostium secundum atrial septal defect (ASDII) is the most common type of congenital heart disease and is characterized by a left to right shunting of oxygenated blood caused by incomplete closure of the septum secundum. We identified a familial form of isolated ASDII that affects four individuals in a family of five and shows autosomal dominant inheritance. By whole genome sequencing, we discovered a new mutation (c.*1784T > C) in the 3′-untranslated region (3′UTR) of ACTC1, which encodes the predominant actin in the embryonic heart. Further analysis demonstrated that the c.*1784T > C mutation results in a new target site for miRNA-139-5p, a microRNA that is involved in cell migration, invasion, and proliferation. Functional analysis demonstrated that the c.*1784T > C mutation specifically downregulates gene expression in a luciferase assay. Additionally, miR-139-5p mimic causes further decrease, whereas miR-139-5p inhibitor can dramatically rescue the decline in gene expression caused by this mutation. These findings suggest that the familial ASDII may be a result of an ACTC1 3′UTR gain-of-function mutation caused by the introduction of a new miR-139-5p target site. Our results provide the first evidence of a pathogenic mutation in the ACTC1 3′UTR that may be associated with familial isolated ASDII. PMID:27139165

  20. A gain-of-function ACTC1 3'UTR mutation that introduces a miR-139-5p target site may be associated with a dominant familial atrial septal defect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; Du, Xinwei; Zhou, Zaiwei; Jiang, Jun; Zhang, Zhen; Ye, Lincai; Hong, Haifa

    2016-01-01

    The ostium secundum atrial septal defect (ASDII) is the most common type of congenital heart disease and is characterized by a left to right shunting of oxygenated blood caused by incomplete closure of the septum secundum. We identified a familial form of isolated ASDII that affects four individuals in a family of five and shows autosomal dominant inheritance. By whole genome sequencing, we discovered a new mutation (c.*1784T > C) in the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of ACTC1, which encodes the predominant actin in the embryonic heart. Further analysis demonstrated that the c.*1784T > C mutation results in a new target site for miRNA-139-5p, a microRNA that is involved in cell migration, invasion, and proliferation. Functional analysis demonstrated that the c.*1784T > C mutation specifically downregulates gene expression in a luciferase assay. Additionally, miR-139-5p mimic causes further decrease, whereas miR-139-5p inhibitor can dramatically rescue the decline in gene expression caused by this mutation. These findings suggest that the familial ASDII may be a result of an ACTC1 3'UTR gain-of-function mutation caused by the introduction of a new miR-139-5p target site. Our results provide the first evidence of a pathogenic mutation in the ACTC1 3'UTR that may be associated with familial isolated ASDII. PMID:27139165

  1. Four novel cystic fibrosis mutations in splice junction sequences affecting the CFTR nucleotide binding folds

    SciTech Connect

    Doerk, T.; Wulbrand, U.; Tuemmler, B. )

    1993-03-01

    Single cases of the four novel splice site mutations 1525[minus]1 G [r arrow] A (intron 9), 3601[minus]2 A [r arrow] G (intron 18), 3850[minus]3 T [r arrow] G (intron 19), and 4374+1 G [r arrow] T (intron 23) were detected in the CFTR gene of cystic fibrosis patients of Indo-Iranian, Turkish, Polish, and Germany descent. The nucleotide substitutions at the +1, [minus]1, and [minus]2 positions all destroy splice sites and lead to severe disease alleles associated with features typical of gastrointestinal and pulmonary cystic fibrosis disease. The 3850[minus]3 T-to-G change was discovered in a very mildly affected 33-year-old [Delta]F508 compound heterozygote, suggesting that the T-to-G transversion at the less conserved [minus]3 position of the acceptor splice site may retain some wildtype function. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Mutation of the Myxoma virus SERP2 P1-site to prevent proteinase inhibition causes apoptosis in cultured RK-13 cells and attenuates disease in rabbits, but mutation to alter specificity causes apoptosis without reducing virulence.

    PubMed

    MacNeill, Amy L; Turner, Peter C; Moyer, Richard W

    Myxoma virus (MYX) prevents apoptosis in RK-13 cells and forms thick dermal lesions with 100% mortality in rabbits. MYX encodes the virulence factor SERP2, a serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin). SERP2 was mutated to evaluate SERP2 function during MYX infection. MYXDeltaSERP2::lacZ (deleted for SERP2) did not inhibit apoptosis in RK-13 cells; infected rabbits had thin dermal lesions and <10% mortality. MYX-SERP2-D294A, a P1-site aspartate to alanine mutant, inactivated the serpin; infection was indistinguishable from MYXDeltaSERP2::lacZ. SERP2-D294E prevented inhibition of caspase-8, caspase-10 and granzyme-B; and MYX-SERP2-D294E failed to block apoptosis in RK-13 cells, but was fully virulent in rabbits. MYXDeltaSERP2::crmA expressed crmA instead of SERP2 and inhibited apoptosis in cell culture, but caused thin lesions and only 70% mortality in rabbits, hence crmA cannot fully substitute for SERP2. Control of apoptosis in culture does not correlate with virulence in rabbits. Virulence may instead depend on inhibition of proinflammatory proteinases by SERP2. PMID:16959285

  3. UV signature mutations.

    PubMed

    Brash, Douglas E

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations—deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen—and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the nontranscribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; UV's nonsignature mutations may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  4. Aromatic donor-acceptor interactions in non-polar environments.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Giles M; Pascu, Sofia I; Filip, Sorin V; West, Kevin R; Pantoş, G Dan

    2015-05-14

    We have evaluated the strength of aromatic donor-acceptor interactions between dialkyl naphthalenediimide and dialkoxynaphthalene in non-polar environments. (1)H NMR, UV-vis spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry were used to characterise this interaction. We concluded that the strength of donor-acceptor interactions in heptane is sufficient to drive supramolecular assemblies in this and other aliphatic solvents. PMID:25875729

  5. Acceptor impurity activation in III-nitride light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Römer, Friedhard Witzigmann, Bernd

    2015-01-12

    In this work, the role of the acceptor doping and the acceptor activation and its impact on the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of a Gallium Nitride (GaN) based multi-quantum well light emitting diode is studied by microscopic simulation. Acceptor impurities in GaN are subject to a high activation energy which depends on the presence of proximate dopant atoms and the electric field. A combined model for the dopant ionization and activation barrier reduction has been developed and implemented in a semiconductor carrier transport simulator. By model calculations, we demonstrate the impact of the acceptor activation mechanisms on the decay of the IQE at high current densities, which is known as the efficiency droop. A major contributor to the droop is the electron leakage which is largely affected by the acceptor doping.

  6. Rabies virulence: effect on pathogenicity and sequence characterization of rabies virus mutations affecting antigenic site III of the glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Seif, I; Coulon, P; Rollin, P E; Flamand, A

    1985-01-01

    Using four neutralizing monoclonal antibodies which presumably bind to the same antigenic site on the CVS glycoprotein (antigenic site III as defined by cross-neutralization tests), we isolated 58 mutants of the CVS strain of rabies virus. These mutants were highly resistant to the selecting antibodies and grew efficiently in cell cultures. We classified them into five groups on the basis of the pattern of resistance to the four antibodies. We determined pathogenicities of the mutants for adult mice by intracerebral inoculation. Group 2 mutants were nonpathogenic or had attenuated pathogenicity. On the contrary, mutants from the other groups were pathogenic, causing paralysis and death as does CVS. We determined the nucleotide alterations of representative mutants from each group by using the dideoxy method of RNA sequencing. In the glycoproteins of eight nonpathogenic or attenuated mutants, we identified an amino acid substitution at position 333. Arginine 333 was replaced by either glutamine or glycine. In the glycoprotein of eight pathogenic mutants, we identified an amino acid substitution at lysine 330, asparagine 336, or isoleucine 338. Thus, although all substitutions affected neutralization and were located close to each other in the glycoprotein sequence, only substitutions at position 333 affected pathogenicity. Images PMID:2579247

  7. The G115S mutation associated with maturity-onset diabetes of the young impairs hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha activities and introduces a PKA phosphorylation site in its DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Oxombre, Bénédicte; Kouach, Mostafa; Moerman, Ericka; Formstecher, Pierre; Laine, Bernard

    2004-11-01

    HNF4alpha (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha) belongs to a complex transcription factor network that is crucial for the function of hepatocytes and pancreatic beta-cells. In these cells, it activates the expression of a very large number of genes, including genes involved in the transport and metabolism of glucose and lipids. Mutations in the HNF4alpha gene correlate with MODY1 (maturity-onset diabetes of the young 1), a form of type II diabetes characterized by an impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion. The MODY1 G115S (Gly115-->Ser) HNF4alpha mutation is located in the DNA-binding domain of this nuclear receptor. We show here that the G115S mutation failed to affect HNF4alpha-mediated transcription on apolipoprotein promoters in HepG2 cells. Conversely, in pancreatic beta-cell lines, this mutation resulted in strong impairments of HNF4alpha transcriptional activity on the promoters of LPK (liver pyruvate kinase) and HNF1alpha, with this transcription factor playing a key role in endocrine pancreas. We show as well that the G115S mutation creates a PKA (protein kinase A) phosphorylation site, and that PKA-mediated phosphorylation results in a decreased transcriptional activity of the mutant. Moreover, the G115E (Gly115-->Glu) mutation mimicking phosphorylation reduced HNF4alpha DNA-binding and transcriptional activities. Our results may account for the 100% penetrance of diabetes in human carriers of this mutation. In addition, they suggest that introduction of a phosphorylation site in the DNA-binding domain may represent a new mechanism by which a MODY1 mutation leads to loss of HNF4alpha function. PMID:15233628

  8. The G115S mutation associated with maturity-onset diabetes of the young impairs hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α activities and introduces a PKA phosphorylation site in its DNA-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    HNF4α (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α) belongs to a complex transcription factor network that is crucial for the function of hepatocytes and pancreatic β-cells. In these cells, it activates the expression of a very large number of genes, including genes involved in the transport and metabolism of glucose and lipids. Mutations in the HNF4α gene correlate with MODY1 (maturity-onset diabetes of the young 1), a form of type II diabetes characterized by an impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion. The MODY1 G115S (Gly115→Ser) HNF4α mutation is located in the DNA-binding domain of this nuclear receptor. We show here that the G115S mutation failed to affect HNF4α-mediated transcription on apolipoprotein promoters in HepG2 cells. Conversely, in pancreatic β-cell lines, this mutation resulted in strong impairments of HNF4α transcriptional activity on the promoters of LPK (liver pyruvate kinase) and HNF1α, with this transcription factor playing a key role in endocrine pancreas. We show as well that the G115S mutation creates a PKA (protein kinase A) phosphorylation site, and that PKA-mediated phosphorylation results in a decreased transcriptional activity of the mutant. Moreover, the G115E (Gly115→Glu) mutation mimicking phosphorylation reduced HNF4α DNA-binding and transcriptional activities. Our results may account for the 100% penetrance of diabetes in human carriers of this mutation. In addition, they suggest that introduction of a phosphorylation site in the DNA-binding domain may represent a new mechanism by which a MODY1 mutation leads to loss of HNF4α function. PMID:15233628

  9. Effects of vaccinia virus uracil DNA glycosylase catalytic site and deoxyuridine triphosphatase deletion mutations individually and together on replication in active and quiescent cells and pathogenesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, Frank S; Moss, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Background Low levels of uracil in DNA result from misincorporation of dUMP or cytosine deamination. Vaccinia virus (VACV), the prototype poxvirus, encodes two enzymes that can potentially reduce the amount of uracil in DNA. Deoxyuridine triphosphatase (dUTPase) hydrolyzes dUTP, generating dUMP for biosynthesis of thymidine nucleotides while decreasing the availability of dUTP for misincorporation; uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) cleaves uracil N-glycosylic bonds in DNA initiating base excision repair. Studies with actively dividing cells showed that the VACV UNG protein is required for DNA replication but the UNG catalytic site is not, whereas the dUTPase gene can be deleted without impairing virus replication. Recombinant VACV with an UNG catalytic site mutation was attenuated in vivo, while a dUTPase deletion mutant was not. However, the importance of the two enzymes for replication in quiescent cells, their possible synergy and roles in virulence have not been fully assessed. Results VACV mutants lacking the gene encoding dUTPase or with catalytic site mutations in UNG and double UNG/dUTPase mutants were constructed. Replication of UNG and UNG/dUTPase mutants were slightly reduced compared to wild type or the dUTPase mutant in actively dividing cells. Viral DNA replication was reduced about one-third under these conditions. After high multiplicity infection of quiescent fibroblasts, yields of wild type and mutant viruses were decreased by 2-logs with relative differences similar to those observed in active fibroblasts. However, under low multiplicity multi-step growth conditions in quiescent fibroblasts, replication of the dUTPase/UNG mutant was delayed and 5-fold lower than that of either single mutant or parental virus. This difference was exacerbated by 1-day serial passages on quiescent fibroblasts, resulting in 2- to 3-logs lower titer of the double mutant compared to the parental and single mutant viruses. Each mutant was more attenuated than a revertant

  10. Tryptophan mutations at azi-etomidate photo-incorporation sites on alpha1 or beta2 subunits enhance GABAA receptor gating and reduce etomidate modulation.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Deirdre; Desai, Rooma; Cheng, Qi; Liu, Aiping; Forman, Stuart A

    2008-12-01

    The potent general anesthetic etomidate produces its effects by enhancing GABA(A) receptor activation. Its photolabel analog [(3)H]azi-etomidate labels residues within transmembrane domains on alpha and beta subunits: alphaMet236 and betaMet286. We hypothesized that these methionines contribute to etomidate sites formed at alpha-beta subunit interfaces and that increasing side-chain bulk and hydrophobicity at either locus would mimic etomidate binding and block etomidate effects. Channel activity was electrophysiologically quantified in alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2L) receptors with alpha(1)M236W or beta(2)M286W mutations, in both the absence and the presence of etomidate. Measurements included spontaneous activation, GABA EC(50), etomidate agonist potentiation, etomidate direct activation, and rapid macrocurrent kinetics. Both alpha(1)M236W and beta(2)M286W mutations induced spontaneous channel opening, lowered GABA EC(50), increased maximal GABA efficacy, and slowed current deactivation, mimicking effects of etomidate on alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2L) channels. These changes were larger with alpha(1)M236W than with beta(2)M286W. Etomidate (3.2 muM) reduced GABA EC(50) much less in alpha(1)M236Wbeta(2)gamma(2L) receptors (2-fold) than in wild type (23-fold). However, etomidate was more potent and efficacious in directly activating alpha(1)M236Wbeta(2)gamma(2L) compared with wild type. In alpha(1)beta(2)M286Wgamma(2L) receptors, etomidate induced neither agonist-potentiation nor direct channel activation. These results support the hypothesis that alpha(1)Met236 and beta(2)Met286 are within etomidate sites that allosterically link to channel gating. Although alpha(1)M236W produced the larger impact on channel gating, beta(2)M286W produced more profound changes in etomidate sensitivity, suggesting a dominant role in drug binding. Furthermore, quantitative mechanistic analysis demonstrated that wild-type and mutant results are consistent with the presence of only one class of

  11. Human single-chain urokinase is activated by the omptins PgtE of Salmonella enterica and Pla of Yersinia pestis despite mutations of active site residues.

    PubMed

    Järvinen, Hanna M; Laakkonen, Liisa; Haiko, Johanna; Johansson, Tiira; Juuti, Katri; Suomalainen, Marjo; Buchrieser, Carmen; Kalkkinen, Nisse; Korhonen, Timo K

    2013-08-01

    Fibrinolysis is important in cell migration and tightly regulated by specific inhibitors and activators; of the latter, urokinase (uPA) associates with enhancement of cell migration. Active uPA is formed through cleavage of the single-chain uPA (scuPA). The Salmonella enterica strain 14028R cleaved human scuPA at the peptide bond Lys158-Ile159, the site cleaved also by the physiological activator human plasmin. The cleavage led to activation of scuPA, while no cleavage or activation were detected with the mutant strain 14028R lacking the omptin protease PgtE. Complementation and expression studies confirmed the role of PgtE in scuPA activation. Similar cleavage and activation of scuPA were detected with recombinant Escherichia coli expressing the omptin genes pla from Yersinia pestis, ompT and ompP from E. coli, sopA from Shigella flexneri, and leo from Legionella pneumophila. For these omptins the activation of scuPA is the only shared function so far detected. Only poor cleavage and activation of scuPA were seen with YcoA of Y. pestis and YcoB of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis that are considered to be proteolytically inactive omptin variants. Point mutations of active site residues in Pla and PgtE had different effects on the proteolysis of plasminogen and of scuPA, indicating versatility in omptin proteolysis. PMID:23763588

  12. Response to everolimus is seen in TSC-associated SEGAs and angiomyolipomas independent of mutation type and site in TSC1 and TSC2

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowski, David J; Palmer, Michael R; Jozwiak, Sergiusz; Bissler, John; Franz, David; Segal, Scott; Chen, David; Sampson, Julian R

    2015-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is an autosomal dominant disorder that occurs owing to inactivating mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2. Tuberous sclerosis complex-related tumors in the brain, such as subependymal giant cell astrocytoma, and in the kidney, such as angiomyolipoma, can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Recently, randomized clinical trials (EXIST-1 and EXIST-2) of everolimus for each of these tuberous sclerosis complex-associated tumors demonstrated the benefit of this drug, which blocks activated mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1. Here we report on the spectrum of mutations seen in patients treated during these trials and the association between mutation and response. TSC2 mutations were predominant among patients in both trials and were present in nearly all subjects with angiomyolipoma in whom a mutation was identified (97%), whereas TSC1 mutations were rare in those subjects (3%). The spectrum of mutations seen in each gene was similar to those previously reported. In both trials, there was no apparent association between mutation type or location within each gene and response to everolimus. Everolimus responses were also seen at a similar frequency for the 16–18% of patients in each trial in whom no mutation in either gene was identified. These observations confirm the strong association between TSC2 mutation and angiomyolipoma burden seen in previous studies, and they indicate that everolimus response occurs regardless of mutation type or location or when no mutation in TSC1 or TSC2 has been identified. PMID:25782670

  13. Electrochromism of a fused acceptor-donor-acceptor triad covering entire UV-vis and near-infrared regions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Bin; Ye, Xichong; Zhang, Jie; Wan, Xinhua

    2014-10-17

    A novel fused acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) type panchromatically electrochromic compound was synthesized. It exhibited intensive absorption bands covering entire UV-vis and near-infrared regions upon reduction to the radical anionic state, owing to the simultaneous presence of π*-π* transitions and intervalence charge transfer. PMID:25268224

  14. Acceptor and Excitation Density Dependence of the Ultrafast Polaron Absorption Signal in Donor-Acceptor Organic Solar Cell Blends.

    PubMed

    Zarrabi, Nasim; Burn, Paul L; Meredith, Paul; Shaw, Paul E

    2016-07-21

    Transient absorption spectroscopy on organic semiconductor blends for solar cells typically shows efficient charge generation within ∼100 fs, accounting for the majority of the charge carriers. In this Letter, we show using transient absorption spectroscopy on blends containing a broad range of acceptor content (0.01-50% by weight) that the rise of the polaron signal is dependent on the acceptor concentration. For low acceptor content (<10% by weight), the polaron signal rises gradually over ∼1 ps with most polarons generated after 200 fs, while for higher acceptor concentrations (>10%) most polarons are generated within 200 fs. The rise time in blends with low acceptor content was also found to be sensitive to the pump fluence, decreasing with increasing excitation density. These results indicate that the sub-100 fs rise of the polaron signal is a natural consequence of both the high acceptor concentrations in many donor-acceptor blends and the high excitation densities needed for transient absorption spectroscopy, which results in a short average distance between the exciton and the donor-acceptor interface. PMID:27355877

  15. Transition metal-free generation of the acceptor/acceptor-carbene viaα-elimination: synthesis of fluoroacetyl cyclopropanes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongdong; Han, Jing; Chen, Jie; Cao, Weiguo

    2016-05-21

    An efficient transition metal-free approach for the generation of acceptor/acceptor-carbene followed by trapping with alkenes to provide fluoroacetyl cyclopropanes has been described. The resulting cyclopropanes could be further converted into the fluoromethyl dihydrofurans or fluorodihydropyrroles through ring-expansion processes. PMID:27125517

  16. Who is a carrier? Detection of unsuspected mutations in 21-hydroxylase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Witchel, S.S.; Lee, P.A.; Trucco, M.

    1996-01-02

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is a common autosomal-recessive disorder. During our routine genotyping of affected individuals and their relatives using allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization and single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis, we identified two families each segregating three mutations. In both families, a mutation known to be associated with 21-hydroxylase deficiency was identified in healthy individuals but was not detected in the propositus. The propositus in family 1 was shown to be a homozygous carrier for G at nucleotide 655, which alters the splice acceptor site at exon 3. The propositus in family 2 carried the same splicing mutation on the maternal allele and a gene deletion/conversion on the paternal allele. In both families, other clinically unaffected relatives carried the Q318X mutation in exon 8. If molecular diagnostic studies had been limited to the mutation carried by the propositi, relatives would have been misinformed regarding their status as carriers or mildly affected individuals. The findings in these two families emphasize the high frequency of alleles causing 21-hydroxylase deficiency in the population. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Mutations in the PDE6B gene in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Danciger, M.; Blaney, J.; Gao, Y.Q.; Zhao, D.Y.

    1995-11-01

    We have studied 24 small families with presumed autosomal recessive inheritance of retinitis pigmentosa by a combination of haplotype analysis and exon screening. Initial analysis of the families was made with a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism adjacent to the gene for rod cGMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE6B). This was followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and single-strand conformation polymorphism electrophoresis (SSCPE) of the 22 exons and a portion of the 5{prime} untranslated region of the PDE6B gene in the probands of each family in which the PDE6B locus could not be ruled out from segregating with disease. Two probands were found with compound heterozygous mutations: Gly576Asp and His620(1-bp del) mutations were present in one proband, and a Lys706X null mutation and an AG to AT splice acceptor site mutation in intron 2 were present in the other. Only the affecteds of each of the two families carried both corresponding mutations. 29 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Site-Directed Mutations and the Polymorphic Variant Ala160Thr in the Human Thromboxane Receptor Uncover a Structural Role for Transmembrane Helix 4

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Raja; Pydi, Sai Prasad; Gleim, Scott; Dakshinamurti, Shyamala; Hwa, John; Chelikani, Prashen

    2012-01-01

    The human thromboxane A2 receptor (TP), belongs to the prostanoid subfamily of Class A GPCRs and mediates vasoconstriction and promotes thrombosis on binding to thromboxane (TXA2). In Class A GPCRs, transmembrane (TM) helix 4 appears to be a hot spot for non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphic (nsSNP) variants. Interestingly, A160T is a novel nsSNP variant with unknown structure and function. Additionally, within this helix in TP, Ala1604.53 is highly conserved as is Gly1644.57. Here we target Ala1604.53 and Gly1644.57 in the TP for detailed structure-function analysis. Amino acid replacements with smaller residues, A160S and G164A mutants, were tolerated, while bulkier beta-branched replacements, A160T and A160V showed a significant decrease in receptor expression (Bmax). The nsSNP variant A160T displayed significant agonist-independent activity (constitutive activity). Guided by molecular modeling, a series of compensatory mutations were made on TM3, in order to accommodate the bulkier replacements on TM4. The A160V/F115A double mutant showed a moderate increase in expression level compared to either A160V or F115A single mutants. Thermal activity assays showed decrease in receptor stability in the order, wild type>A160S>A160V>A160T>G164A, with G164A being the least stable. Our study reveals that Ala1604.53 and Gly1644.57 in the TP play critical structural roles in packing of TM3 and TM4 helices. Naturally occurring mutations in conjunction with site-directed replacements can serve as powerful tools in assessing the importance of regional helix-helix interactions. PMID:22272267

  19. Site-directed mutations and the polymorphic variant Ala160Thr in the human thromboxane receptor uncover a structural role for transmembrane helix 4.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Raja; Pydi, Sai Prasad; Gleim, Scott; Dakshinamurti, Shyamala; Hwa, John; Chelikani, Prashen

    2012-01-01

    The human thromboxane A2 receptor (TP), belongs to the prostanoid subfamily of Class A GPCRs and mediates vasoconstriction and promotes thrombosis on binding to thromboxane (TXA2). In Class A GPCRs, transmembrane (TM) helix 4 appears to be a hot spot for non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphic (nsSNP) variants. Interestingly, A160T is a novel nsSNP variant with unknown structure and function. Additionally, within this helix in TP, Ala160(4.53) is highly conserved as is Gly164(4.57). Here we target Ala160(4.53) and Gly164(4.57) in the TP for detailed structure-function analysis. Amino acid replacements with smaller residues, A160S and G164A mutants, were tolerated, while bulkier beta-branched replacements, A160T and A160V showed a significant decrease in receptor expression (Bmax). The nsSNP variant A160T displayed significant agonist-independent activity (constitutive activity). Guided by molecular modeling, a series of compensatory mutations were made on TM3, in order to accommodate the bulkier replacements on TM4. The A160V/F115A double mutant showed a moderate increase in expression level compared to either A160V or F115A single mutants. Thermal activity assays showed decrease in receptor stability in the order, wild type>A160S>A160V>A160T>G164A, with G164A being the least stable. Our study reveals that Ala160(4.53) and Gly164(4.57) in the TP play critical structural roles in packing of TM3 and TM4 helices. Naturally occurring mutations in conjunction with site-directed replacements can serve as powerful tools in assessing the importance of regional helix-helix interactions. PMID:22272267

  20. Site-specific mutations of conserved residues in the phosphate-binding loop of the Arabidopsis UMP/CMP kinase alter ATP and UMP binding.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L; Thornburg, R

    1998-10-15

    All eukaryotic UMP/CMP kinases contain a glycine-rich sequence GGPG(S/A)GK at the N-terminus. This sequence is homologous to the conserved sequence GXXGXGK found in other ATP-binding proteins. To study the role of this conserved sequence in Arabidopsis UMP/CMP kinase, five conserved residues were mutated by site-directed mutagenesis to generate seven mutant enzymes: G21A, G22A, G24A, G26A, K27R, K27M, and K27E. The G21A and G26A mutants were degraded during the purification phase and were thus unable to be purified. Kinetic studies on the other mutants, when compared to studies on the wild-type enzyme, revealed that this sequence is important for ATP binding and enzyme catalysis. All mutants had a decreased kcat/KATPm value. The G22A and G24A mutants had about half of the kcat value of wildtype and 3.9-fold and 3.3-fold increases in KATPm values, respectively. The kcat/KATPm values in the K27M and K27E mutants were changed significantly and decreased by 1000-fold and 2600-fold, respectively. The removal of the terminal positive charge of Lys27 in the K27M and K27E mutants resulted in 20% of the kcat value of wildtype. However, both mutants had a remarkable increase in KATPm value by 241-fold and 552-fold, respectively. Therefore, the positive charge of Lys27 plays an important role on both ATP binding and enzyme catalysis. Interestingly, the results also showed that the mutations that affected ATP binding also had an effect on UMP binding. PMID:9784243

  1. Impact of Distal Mutation on Hydrogen Transfer Interface and Substrate Conformation in Soybean Lipoxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Sarah J.; Soudackov, Alexander V.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of distal mutation on the hydrogen transfer interface properties and on the substrate mobility, conformation, and orientation in soybean lipoxygenase-1 (SLO) is examined. SLO catalyzes a hydrogen abstraction reaction that occurs by a proton-coupled electron transfer mechanism. Mutation of isoleucine 553 to less bulky residues has been found experimentally to increase the magnitude and temperature dependence of the kinetic isotope effect for this reaction. This residue borders the linoleic acid substrate but is ~15 Å from the active site iron. In the present study, we model these experimental data with a vibronically nonadiabatic theory and perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations on the complete solvated wild-type and mutant enzymes. Our calculations indicate that the proton transfer equilibrium distance increases and the associated frequency decreases as residue 553 becomes less bulky. The molecular dynamics simulations illustrate that this mutation impacts the mobility, geometrical conformation, and orientation of the linoleic acid within the active site. In turn, these effects alter the proton donor-acceptor equilibrium distance and frequency, leading to the experimentally observed changes in the magnitude and temperature dependence of the kinetic isotope effect. This study provides insight into how the effects of distal mutations may be transmitted in enzymes to ultimately impact the catalytic rates. PMID:20423074

  2. A novel point mutation (G-1 to T) in a 5' splice donor site of intron 13 of the dystrophin gene results in exon skipping and is responsible for Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Hagiwara, Y.; Nishio, H.; Kitoh, Y.; Takeshima, Y.; Narita, N.; Wada, H.; Yokoyama, M.; Nakamura, H.; Matsuo, M.

    1994-01-01

    The mutations in one-third of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients remain unknown, as they do not involve gross rearrangements of the dystrophin gene. We now report a defect in the splicing of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA), resulting from a maternally inherited mutation of the dystrophin gene in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy. This defect results from a G-to-T transversion at the terminal nucleotide of exon 13, within the 5' splice site of intron 13, and causes complete skipping of exon 13 during processing of dystrophin pre-mRNA. The predicted polypeptide encoded by the aberrant mRNA is a truncated dystrophin lacking 40 amino acids from the amino-proximal end of the rod domain. This is the first report of an intraexon point mutation that completely inactivates a 5' splice donor site in dystrophin pre-mRNA. Analysis of the genomic context of the G-1-to-T mutation at the 5' splice site supports the exon-definition model of pre-mRNA splicing and contributes to the understanding of splice-site selection. Images Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:8279470

  3. A novel point mutation (G-1 to T) in a 5' splice donor site of intron 13 of the dystrophin gene results in exon skipping and is responsible for Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Y; Nishio, H; Kitoh, Y; Takeshima, Y; Narita, N; Wada, H; Yokoyama, M; Nakamura, H; Matsuo, M

    1994-01-01

    The mutations in one-third of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients remain unknown, as they do not involve gross rearrangements of the dystrophin gene. We now report a defect in the splicing of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA), resulting from a maternally inherited mutation of the dystrophin gene in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy. This defect results from a G-to-T transversion at the terminal nucleotide of exon 13, within the 5' splice site of intron 13, and causes complete skipping of exon 13 during processing of dystrophin pre-mRNA. The predicted polypeptide encoded by the aberrant mRNA is a truncated dystrophin lacking 40 amino acids from the amino-proximal end of the rod domain. This is the first report of an intraexon point mutation that completely inactivates a 5' splice donor site in dystrophin pre-mRNA. Analysis of the genomic context of the G-1-to-T mutation at the 5' splice site supports the exon-definition model of pre-mRNA splicing and contributes to the understanding of splice-site selection. PMID:8279470

  4. A novel point mutation (G[sup [minus]1] to T) in a 5[prime] splice donor site of intron 13 of the dystrophin gene results in exon skipping and is responsible for Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, Yoko; Nishio, Hisahide; Kitoh, Yoshihiko; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Narita, Naoko; Wada, Hiroko; Yokoyama, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Hajime; Matsuo, Masafumi )

    1994-01-01

    The mutations in one-third of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients remain unknown, as they do not involve gross rearrangements of the dystrophin gene. The authors now report a defect in the splicing of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA), resulting from a maternally inherited mutation of the dystrophin gene in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy. This defect results from a G-to-T transversion at the terminal nucleotide of exon 13, within the 5[prime] splice site of intron 13, and causes complete skipping of exon 13 during processing of dystrophin pre-mRNA. The predicted polypeptide encoded by the aberrant mRNA is a truncated dystrophin lacking 40 amino acids from the amino-proximal end of the rod domain. This is the first report of an intraexon point mutation that completely inactivates a 5[prime] splice donor site in dystrophin pre-mRNA. Analysis of the genomic context of the G[sup [minus]1]-to-T mutation at the 5[prime] splice site supports the exon-definition model of pre-mRNA splicing and contributes to the understanding of splice-site selection. 48 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Functional studies of the gene slr2049 from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 and its site-directed mutation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingjun; Chen, Sili; Zhang, Lei

    2015-06-01

    Phycobiliprotein is a homologous family of light-harvesting chromoproteins existing in cyanobacteria, red algae and cryptophytes. Phycobiliprotein is made up of phycobilin and its corresponding apophycobiliprotein, and they are covalently linked by the thioether bond with the bilin lyase. Using the software BLAST, we have found gene slr2049 in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 homologous to the biliprotein lyase gene cpeS. This paper investigates the protein expressed by gene slr2049 to find the enzymatic activity characteristics. We cloned slr2049 and its related genes cpcB, ho1, and pcyA which are linked with the synthesis of phycocyanin. Special amino acid mutagenesis was performed on slr2049 to construct eight mutants slr2049 (H21S), slr2049 (L23S), slr2049 (A24S), slr2049 (F25S), slr2049 (W72L), slr2049 (G84S), slr2049 (R107S) and slr2049 (Y124S). These mutants were ligated with vectors pEDFDuet-1 and pET-23a to construct pCDF-cpcB-slr2049 wild-type, pCDF-cpcB-slr2049 mutants and pET-ho1-pcyA, for the purpose of protein expression and analysis. The results showed that the wild-type and mutants slr2049 (H21S), slr2049 (L23S), slr2049 (F25S), slr2049 (W72L), slr2049 (G84S), and slr2049 (Y124S) can catalyze CpcB to couple on PCB correctly and the products have unique spectral characteristics. However mutants slr2049 (A24S) and slr2049 (R107S) have no spectral characteristics. Thus, it is suggested that alanine at position 24 and arginine at position 107 are the active sites. PMID:25791490

  6. Three holes bound to a double acceptor - Be(+) in germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haller, E. E.; Mcmurray, R. E., Jr.; Falicov, L. M.; Haegel, N. M.; Hansen, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    A double acceptor binding three holes has been observed for the first time with photoconductive far-infrared spectroscopy in beryllium-doped germanium single crystals. This new center, Be(+), has a hole binding energy of about 5 meV and is only present when free holes are generated by ionization of either neutral shallow acceptors or neutral Be double acceptors. The Be(+) center thermally ionizes above 4 K. It disappears at a uniaxial stress higher than about a billion dyn/sq cm parallel to (111) as a result of the lifting of the valence-band degeneracy.

  7. Intramolecular charge transfer in donor-acceptor molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Slama-Schwok, A.; Blanchard-Desce, M.; Lehn, J.M. )

    1990-05-17

    The photophysical properties of donor-acceptor molecules, push-pull polyenes and carotenoids, have been studied by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The compounds bear various acceptor and donor groups, linked together by chains of different length and structure. The position of the absorption and fluorescence maxima and their variation in solvents of increasing polarity are in agreement with long-distance intramolecular charge-transfer processes, the linker acting as a molecular wire. The effects of the linker length and structure and of the nature of acceptor and donor are presented.

  8. Probing the Effect of the Non-Active-Site Mutation Y229W in New Delhi Metallo-β-lactamase-1 by Site-Directed Mutagenesis, Kinetic Studies, and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yun; Hu, Feng; Lao, Xingzhen; Gao, Xiangdong; Zheng, Heng; Yao, Wenbing

    2013-01-01

    New Delhi metallo-β-lactmase-1 (NDM-1) has attracted extensive attention for its high catalytic activities of hydrolyzing almost all β-lactam antibiotics. NDM-1 shows relatively higher similarity to subclass B1 metallo-β-lactmases (MβLs), but its residue at position 229 is identical to that of B2/B3 MβLs, which is a Tyr instead of a B1-MβL-conserved Trp. To elucidate the possible role of Y229 in the bioactivity of NDM-1, we performed mutagenesis study and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Although residue Y229 is spatially distant from the active site and not contacting directly with the substrate or zinc ions, the Y229W mutant was found to have higher kcat and Km values than those of wild-type NDM-1, resulting in 1∼7 fold increases in kcat/Km values against tested antibiotics. In addition, our MD simulations illustrated the enhanced flexibility of Loop 2 upon Y229W mutation, which could increase the kinetics of both substrate entrance (kon) and product egress (koff). The enhanced flexibility of Loop 2 might allow the enzyme to adjust the geometry of its active site to accommodate substrates with different structures, broadening its substrate spectrum. This study indicated the possible role of the residue at position 229 in the evolution of NDM-1. PMID:24339993

  9. Molecular basis of recessive congenital methemoglobinemia, types I and II: Exon skipping and three novel missense mutations in the NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase (diaphorase 1) gene.

    PubMed

    Kugler, W; Pekrun, A; Laspe, P; Erdlenbruch, B; Lakomek, M

    2001-04-01

    Hereditary methemoglobinemia due to reduced nicotin amide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-cytochrome b5 reductase (b5r) deficiency is classified into an erythrocyte type (I) and a generalized type (II). We investigated the b5r gene of three unrelated patients with types I and II and found four novel mutations. The patient with type I was homozygous for a c.535 G-->A exchange in exon 6 (A179T). The patients with type II were found to be homozygous for a c.757 G-->A transition in exon 9 (V253M) and compound heterozygous for two mutations, respectively. One allele presented a c.379 A-->G transition (M127V). The second allele carried a sequence difference at the invariant 3' splice-acceptor dinucleotide of intron 4 (IVS4-2A-->G) resulting in skipping of exon 5. To characterize a possible effect of this mutation on RNA metabolism, poly(A)(+) RNA was analyzed by RT-PCR and sequencing. The results show that RNA is made from the allele harboring the 3'-splice site mutation. Furthermore, western blot analysis revealed a complete absence of immunologically detectable b5r in skin fibroblasts of this patient. The compound heterozygosity for the splice site and the missense mutations apparently caused hereditary methemoglobinemia type II in this patient. Hum Mutat 17:348, 2001. PMID:11295830

  10. Mutational analysis of the EMCV 2A protein identifies a nuclear localization signal and an eIF4E binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Groppo, Rachel; Brown, Bradley A.; Palmenberg, Ann C.

    2011-02-05

    Cardioviruses have a unique 2A protein (143 aa). During genome translation, the encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) 2A is released through a ribosome skipping event mitigated through C-terminal 2A sequences and by subsequent N-terminal reaction with viral 3C{sup pro}. Although viral replication is cytoplasmic, mature 2A accumulates in nucleoli shortly after infection. Some protein also transiently associates with cytoplasmic 40S ribosomal subunits, an activity contributing to inhibition of cellular cap-dependent translation. Cardiovirus sequences predict an eIF4E binding site (aa 126-134) and a nuclear localization signal (NLS, aa 91-102), within 2A, both of which are functional during EMCV infection. Point mutations preventing eIF4E:2A interactions gave small-plaque phenotype viruses, but still inhibited cellular cap-dependent translation. Deletions within the NLS motif relocalized 2A to the cytoplasm and abrogated the inhibition of cap-dependent translation. A fusion protein linking the 2A NLS to eGFP was sufficient to redirect the reporter to the nucleus but not into nucleoli.

  11. The site of an immune-selected point mutation in the transmembrane protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 does not constitute the neutralization epitope.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, C; Reitz, M S; Aldrich, K; Klasse, P J; Blomberg, J; Gallo, R C; Robert-Guroff, M

    1990-01-01

    We previously reported the in vitro generation of a neutralization-resistant variant of the molecularly cloned isolate of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), HXB2D. The molecular basis for the resistance was shown to be a point mutation in the env gene, causing the substitution of threonine for alanine at position 582 of gp41. Here, we show the variant to be resistant to syncytium inhibition as well as to neutralization by the immune-selecting serum. Moreover, 30% of HIV-positive human sera able to neutralize the parental virus have significantly decreased ability to neutralize the variant. As the A-to-T substitution thus has general relevance to the interaction of HIV-1 with the host immune system, we investigated further the biologic and immunologic bases for the altered properties. Synthetic peptides corresponding to the 582 region failed to compete in infectivity, neutralization, or syncytium inhibition assays and did not elicit neutralizing antibodies. Furthermore, human antibodies, affinity purified on synthetic peptide resins, bound to gp41 and peptides from the 582 region but did not possess neutralizing antibody activity. Some viral constructs in which the AVERY sequence in the 582 region was altered by site-directed mutagenesis were not infectious, indicating that the primary structure in this region is crucial for viral infectivity. Constructs predicted to possess a local secondary structure similar to that of the variant nevertheless behaved like the parental virus and remained neutralization sensitive. These results suggest that the requirements for neutralization resistance in this region are very precise. Our results with synthetic peptides show that the 582 region does not by itself constitute a neutralization epitope. Moreover, the degree of flexibility in amino acid substitution which allows maintenance of neutralization sensitivity suggests that position 582 does not form part of a noncontiguous neutralization epitope. The basis for

  12. Application of Mutated miR-206 Target Sites Enables Skeletal Muscle-specific Silencing of Transgene Expression of Cardiotropic AAV9 Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Anja; Schön, Christian; Größl, Tobias; Pinkert, Sandra; Stein, Elisabeth A; Kurreck, Jens; Vetter, Roland; Fechner, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Insertion of completely complementary microRNA (miR) target sites (miRTS) into a transgene has been shown to be a valuable approach to specifically repress transgene expression in non-targeted tissues. miR-122TS have been successfully used to silence transgene expression in the liver following systemic application of cardiotropic adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9 vectors. For miR-206–mediated skeletal muscle-specific silencing of miR-206TS–bearing AAV9 vectors, however, we found this approach failed due to the expression of another member (miR-1) of the same miR family in heart tissue, the intended target. We introduced single-nucleotide substitutions into the miR-206TS and searched for those which prevented miR-1–mediated cardiac repression. Several mutated miR-206TS (m206TS), in particular m206TS-3G, were resistant to miR-1, but remained fully sensitive to miR-206. All these variants had mismatches in the seed region of the miR/m206TS duplex in common. Furthermore, we found that some m206TS, containing mismatches within the seed region or within the 3′ portion of the miR-206, even enhanced the miR-206– mediated transgene repression. In vivo expression of m206TS-3G– and miR-122TS–containing transgene of systemically applied AAV9 vectors was strongly repressed in both skeletal muscle and the liver but remained high in the heart. Thus, site-directed mutagenesis of miRTS provides a new strategy to differentiate transgene de-targeting of related miRs. PMID:23439498

  13. A single mutation in a tunnel to the active site changes the mechanism and kinetics of product release in haloalkane dehalogenase LinB.

    PubMed

    Biedermannová, Lada; Prokop, Zbyněk; Gora, Artur; Chovancová, Eva; Kovács, Mihály; Damborsky, Jiří; Wade, Rebecca C

    2012-08-17

    Many enzymes have buried active sites. The properties of the tunnels connecting the active site with bulk solvent affect ligand binding and unbinding and also the catalytic properties. Here, we investigate ligand passage in the haloalkane dehalogenase enzyme LinB and the effect of replacing leucine by a bulky tryptophan at a tunnel-lining position. Transient kinetic experiments show that the mutation significantly slows down the rate of product release. Moreover, the mechanism of bromide ion release is changed from a one-step process in the wild type enzyme to a two-step process in the mutant. The rate constant of bromide ion release corresponds to the overall steady-state turnover rate constant, suggesting that product release became the rate-limiting step of catalysis in the mutant. We explain the experimental findings by investigating the molecular details of the process computationally. Analysis of trajectories from molecular dynamics simulations with a tunnel detection software reveals differences in the tunnels available for ligand egress. Corresponding differences are seen in simulations of product egress using a specialized enhanced sampling technique. The differences in the free energy barriers for egress of a bromide ion obtained using potential of mean force calculations are in good agreement with the differences in rates obtained from the transient kinetic experiments. Interactions of the bromide ion with the introduced tryptophan are shown to affect the free energy barrier for its passage. The study demonstrates how the mechanism of an enzymatic catalytic cycle and reaction kinetics can be engineered by modification of protein tunnels. PMID:22745119

  14. A Single Mutation in a Tunnel to the Active Site Changes the Mechanism and Kinetics of Product Release in Haloalkane Dehalogenase LinB*

    PubMed Central

    Biedermannová, Lada; Prokop, Zbyněk; Gora, Artur; Chovancová, Eva; Kovács, Mihály; Damborský, Jiří; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2012-01-01

    Many enzymes have buried active sites. The properties of the tunnels connecting the active site with bulk solvent affect ligand binding and unbinding and also the catalytic properties. Here, we investigate ligand passage in the haloalkane dehalogenase enzyme LinB and the effect of replacing leucine by a bulky tryptophan at a tunnel-lining position. Transient kinetic experiments show that the mutation significantly slows down the rate of product release. Moreover, the mechanism of bromide ion release is changed from a one-step process in the wild type enzyme to a two-step process in the mutant. The rate constant of bromide ion release corresponds to the overall steady-state turnover rate constant, suggesting that product release became the rate-limiting step of catalysis in the mutant. We explain the experimental findings by investigating the molecular details of the process computationally. Analysis of trajectories from molecular dynamics simulations with a tunnel detection software reveals differences in the tunnels available for ligand egress. Corresponding differences are seen in simulations of product egress using a specialized enhanced sampling technique. The differences in the free energy barriers for egress of a bromide ion obtained using potential of mean force calculations are in good agreement with the differences in rates obtained from the transient kinetic experiments. Interactions of the bromide ion with the introduced tryptophan are shown to affect the free energy barrier for its passage. The study demonstrates how the mechanism of an enzymatic catalytic cycle and reaction kinetics can be engineered by modification of protein tunnels. PMID:22745119

  15. A Mutation in S6 of Shaker Potassium Channels Decreases the K+ Affinity of an Ion Binding Site Revealing Ion–Ion Interactions in the Pore

    PubMed Central

    Ogielska, Eva M.; Aldrich, Richard W.

    1998-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, potassium channels are extraordinarily selective for potassium over other ions. However, in the absence of potassium, certain potassium channels can conduct sodium. Sodium flux is blocked by the addition of low concentrations of potassium. Potassium affinity, and therefore the ability to block sodium current, varies among potassium channel subtypes (Korn, S.J., and S.R. Ikeda. 1995. Science. 269:410–412; Starkus, J.G., L. Kuschel, M.D. Rayner, and S.H. Heinemann. 1997. J. Gen. Physiol. 110:539–550). The Shaker potassium channel conducts sodium poorly in the presence of very low (micromolar) potassium due to its high potassium affinity (Starkus, J.G., L. Kuschel, M.D. Rayner, and S.H. Heinemann. 1997. J. Gen. Physiol. 110:539–550; Ogielska, E.M., and R.W. Aldrich. 1997. Biophys. J. 72:A233 [Abstr.]). We show that changing a single residue in S6, A463C, decreases the apparent internal potassium affinity of the Shaker channel pore from the micromolar to the millimolar range, as determined from the ability of potassium to block the sodium currents. Independent evidence that A463C decreases the apparent affinity of a binding site in the pore comes from a study of barium block of potassium currents. The A463C mutation decreases the internal barium affinity of the channel, as expected if barium blocks current by binding to a potassium site in the pore. The decrease in the apparent potassium affinity in A463C channels allows further study of possible ion interactions in the pore. Our results indicate that sodium and potassium can occupy the pore simultaneously and that multiple occupancy results in interactions between ions in the channel pore. PMID:9689030

  16. Nitrogen is a deep acceptor in ZnO

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tarun, M. C.; Iqbal, M. Zafar; McCluskey, M. D.

    2011-04-14

    Zinc oxide is a promising material for blue and UV solid-state lighting devices, among other applications. Nitrogen has been regarded as a potential p-type dopant for ZnO. However, recent calculations indicate that nitrogen is a deep acceptor. This paper presents experimental evidence that nitrogen is, in fact, a deep acceptor and therefore cannot produce p-type ZnO. A broad photoluminescence (PL) emission band near 1.7 eV, with an excitation onset of ~2.2 eV, was observed, in agreement with the deep-acceptor model of the nitrogen defect. Thus the deep-acceptor behavior can be explained by the low energy of the ZnO valence bandmore » relative to the vacuum level.« less

  17. Nitrogen is a deep acceptor in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Tarun, M. C.; Iqbal, M. Zafar; McCluskey, M. D.

    2011-04-14

    Zinc oxide is a promising material for blue and UV solid-state lighting devices, among other applications. Nitrogen has been regarded as a potential p-type dopant for ZnO. However, recent calculations indicate that nitrogen is a deep acceptor. This paper presents experimental evidence that nitrogen is, in fact, a deep acceptor and therefore cannot produce p-type ZnO. A broad photoluminescence (PL) emission band near 1.7 eV, with an excitation onset of ~2.2 eV, was observed, in agreement with the deep-acceptor model of the nitrogen defect. Thus the deep-acceptor behavior can be explained by the low energy of the ZnO valence band relative to the vacuum level.

  18. Donor-acceptor electron transport mediated by solitons.

    PubMed

    Brizhik, L S; Piette, B M A G; Zakrzewski, W J

    2014-11-01

    We study the long-range electron and energy transfer mediated by solitons in a quasi-one-dimensional molecular chain (conjugated polymer, alpha-helical macromolecule, etc.) weakly bound to a donor and an acceptor. We show that for certain sets of parameter values in such systems an electron, initially located at the donor molecule, can tunnel to the molecular chain, where it becomes self-trapped in a soliton state, and propagates to the opposite end of the chain practically without energy dissipation. Upon reaching the end, the electron can either bounce back and move in the opposite direction or, for suitable parameter values of the system, tunnel to the acceptor. We estimate the energy efficiency of the donor-acceptor electron transport depending on the parameter values. Our calculations show that the soliton mechanism works for the parameter values of polypeptide macromolecules and conjugated polymers. We also investigate the donor-acceptor electron transport in thermalized molecular chains. PMID:25493866

  19. Donor-acceptor electron transport mediated by solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brizhik, L. S.; Piette, B. M. A. G.; Zakrzewski, W. J.

    2014-11-01

    We study the long-range electron and energy transfer mediated by solitons in a quasi-one-dimensional molecular chain (conjugated polymer, alpha-helical macromolecule, etc.) weakly bound to a donor and an acceptor. We show that for certain sets of parameter values in such systems an electron, initially located at the donor molecule, can tunnel to the molecular chain, where it becomes self-trapped in a soliton state, and propagates to the opposite end of the chain practically without energy dissipation. Upon reaching the end, the electron can either bounce back and move in the opposite direction or, for suitable parameter values of the system, tunnel to the acceptor. We estimate the energy efficiency of the donor-acceptor electron transport depending on the parameter values. Our calculations show that the soliton mechanism works for the parameter values of polypeptide macromolecules and conjugated polymers. We also investigate the donor-acceptor electron transport in thermalized molecular chains.

  20. Two new Gaucher disease mutations.

    PubMed

    Beutler, E; Gelbart, T

    1994-02-01

    Recently, a mutation at nucleotide 1193 of the glucocerebrosidase gene was described in a patient with type 1 Gaucher disease. This mutation destroys a TaqI site in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified fragment. We used digestion with this enzyme to screen DNA samples from Gaucher disease patients representing 23 previously unidentified alleles and discovered that this site had been destroyed in three samples. However, the mutation that caused this change proved to be a CT substitution at cDNA nucleotide 1192 (Genomic 5408; 359Arg-->End). Fortuitously, another TaqI site was destroyed by a different mutation, a GA mutation at nt 1312 (Genomic 5927; 399AspAsn). Both of these mutations were functionally severe in that they were associated with type 2 (acute neuronopathic) Gaucher disease. PMID:8112750

  1. Synthesis, Properties, and Design Principles of Donor–Acceptor Nanohoops

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have synthesized a series of aza[8]cycloparaphenylenes containing one, two, and three nitrogens to probe the impact of nitrogen doping on optoelectronic properties and solid state packing. Alkylation of these azananohoops afforded the first donor–acceptor nanohoops where the phenylene backbone acts as the donor and the pyridinium units act as the acceptor. The impact on the optoelectronic properties was then studied experimentally and computationally to provide new insight into the effect of functionalization on nanohoops properties. PMID:27162989

  2. Rare Autosomal Recessive Cardiac Valvular Form of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Results from Mutations in the COL1A2 Gene That Activate the Nonsense-Mediated RNA Decay Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Schwarze, Ulrike; Hata, Ryu-Ichiro; McKusick, Victor A.; Shinkai, Hiroshi; Hoyme, H. Eugene; Pyeritz, Reed E.; Byers, Peter H.

    2004-01-01

    Splice site mutations in the COL1A2 gene of type I collagen can give rise to forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) because of partial or complete skipping of exon 6, as well as to mild, moderate, or lethal forms of osteogenesis imperfecta as a consequence of skipping of other exons. We identified three unrelated individuals with a rare recessively inherited form of EDS (characterized by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and cardiac valvular defects); in two of them, COL1A2 messenger RNA (mRNA) instability results from compound heterozygosity for splice site mutations in the COL1A2 gene, and, in the third, it results from homozygosity for a nonsense codon. The splice site mutations led to use of cryptic splice donor sites, creation of a downstream premature termination codon, and extremely unstable mRNA. In the wild-type allele, the two introns (IVS11 and IVS24) in which these mutations occurred were usually spliced slowly in relation to their respective immediate upstream introns. In the mutant alleles, the upstream intron was removed, so that exon skipping could not occur. In the context of the mutation in IVS24, computer-generated folding of a short stretch of mRNA surrounding the mutation site demonstrated realignment of the relationships between the donor and acceptor sites that could facilitate use of a cryptic donor site. These findings suggest that the order of intron removal is an important variable in prediction of mutation outcome at splice sites and that folding of the nascent mRNA could be one element that contributes to determination of order of splicing. The complete absence of proα2(I) chains has the surprising effect of producing cardiac valvular disease without bone involvement. PMID:15077201

  3. Anaerobic growth of Escherichia coli K12 with fumarate as terminal electron acceptor. Genetic studies with menaquinone and fluoroacetate-resistant mutants.

    PubMed

    Guest, J R

    1979-12-01

    Fifteen independent menaquinone biosynthesis mutants (men) of Escherichia coli K12, selected for their inability to use fumarate as terminal electron acceptor, were investigated. Two nutritionally distinct groups were detected. The major group (13 mutants) responded to 1,4-dihydroxy-2-naphthoate (DHN), 2-succinylbenzoate (SB) and its dilactone, whereas the minor group (2 mutants) only responded to DHN. DHN was at least five times more effective than SB but it inhibited growth at concentrations greater than 10 microM. For anaerobic growth on glucose minimal medium the auxotrophs responded to much lower concentrations of DHN and SB and these intermediates could be replaced by uracil. Anaerobic growth tests showed that glycerol, formate and H2 are good substrates for E. coli when fumarate is the ultimate electron acceptor but growth with lactate or with fumarate alone is poor. All 15 men mutations were located between glpT and purF at approximately 49 min in the E. coli linkage map. Cotransduction frequencies with relevant markers were: nalA (21%), glpT (35%) and purF (15%). The presence of at least three genetically distinct classes (menC and menD, SB-requirers; menB, DHN-requirers) was indicated using abortive transduction as a complementation test and three-factor genetic analysis. The relative orientation nalA...menC-(D,B)...purF was indicated. Fluoroacetate-resistant mutants were isolated and four different classes were identified: ack, lacking acetate kinase; pta, lacking phosphotransacetylase; facA, lacking both of these activities; and facB, which retained both of these enzyme activities. Some of the pta mutants and all of the facA mutants failed to grow on media containing fumarate as terminal electron acceptor or anaerobically on glucose minimal medium. All four types had genetic lesions clustered between the men and purF sites. Average cotransduction frequencies with relevant markers were: nalA (4%), men (27 to 35%) and purF (71 to 80%). PMID:393800

  4. Mutations in the su(s) gene affect RNA processing in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Geyer, P K; Chien, A J; Corces, V G; Green, M M

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the effect of mutations in the suppressor of sable [su(s)] gene on P element-induced yellow alleles. Two independent mutations tested, y76d28 and y1#7, contain a 1.1-kilobase (kb) P element inserted in the 5' transcribed untranslated portion of the yellow gene. Sequences responsible for the y1#7 mutation are inserted in the same transcriptional orientation as yellow and cannot be processed by splicing, and this mutation is not suppressed by su(s) mutations. P element sequences are located in a transcriptional orientation opposite to that of the yellow gene in y76d28; these sequences can be spliced from a composite P element-yellow mRNA, resulting in low accumulation of a functional 1.9-kb yellow transcript. The levels of both the putative precursor P element-yellow RNA and the 1.9-kb yellow transcript increase in y76d28 su(s) flies, suggesting that mutations in su(s) do not affect the efficiency of splicing of the P element sequences. Analysis of y76d28 cDNAs isolated from flies carrying a wild-type or mutant su(s) gene demonstrates that the choice of splice junctions to process P element sequences is unchanged in these different backgrounds, suggesting that mutations in su(s) do not affect the selection of donor and acceptor splice sites. We propose that the su(s) protein functions to control the stability of unprocessed RNA during the splicing reaction. Images PMID:1714588

  5. Tuning the Electron Acceptor in Phthalocyanine-Based Electron Donor-Acceptor Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Sekita, Michael; Jiménez, Ángel J; Marcos, M Luisa; Caballero, Esmeralda; Rodríguez-Morgade, M Salomé; Guldi, Dirk M; Torres, Tomás

    2015-12-21

    Zinc phthalocyanines (ZnPc) have been attached to the peri-position of a perylenemonoimide (PMI) and a perylenemonoanhydride (PMA), affording electron donor-acceptor conjugates 1 and 2, respectively. In addition, a perylene-monoimide-monoanhydride (PMIMA) has been connected to a ZnPc through its imido position to yield the ZnPc-PMIMA conjugate 10. The three conjugates have been studied for photoinduced electron transfer. For ZnPc-PMIMA 10, electron transfer occurs upon both ZnPc and PMIMA excitation, giving rise to a long-lived (340 ps) charge-separated state. For ZnPc-PMI 1 and ZnPc-PMA 2, stabilization of the radical ion pair states by using polar media is necessary. In THF, photoexcitation of either ZnPc or PMI/PMA produces charge-separated states with lifetimes of 375 and 163 ps, respectively. PMID:26593778

  6. A positive genotype-phenotype correlation in a large cohort of patients with Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type Ia and Pseudo-pseudohypoparathyroidism and 33 newly identified mutations in the GNAS gene.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Susanne; Werner, Ralf; Grötzinger, Joachim; Brix, Bettina; Staedt, Pia; Struve, Dagmar; Reiz, Benedikt; Farida, Jennane; Hiort, Olaf

    2015-03-01

    Maternally inherited inactivating GNAS mutations are the most common cause of parathyroid hormone (PTH) resistance and Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) leading to pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia (PHPIa) due to Gsα deficiency. Paternally inherited inactivating mutations lead to isolated AHO signs characterizing pseudo-pseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP). Mutations are distributed throughout the Gsα coding exons of GNAS and there is a lack of genotype-phenotype correlation. In this study, we sequenced exon 1-13 of GNAS in a large cohort of PHPIa- and PPHP patients and identified 58 different mutations in 88 patients and 27 relatives. Thirty-three mutations including 15 missense mutations were newly discovered. Furthermore, we found three hot spots: a known hotspot (p.D190MfsX14), a second at codon 166 (p.R166C), and a third at the exon 5 acceptor splice site (c.435 + 1G>A), found in 15, 5, and 4 unrelated patients, respectively. Comparing the clinical features to the molecular genetic data, a significantly higher occurrence of subcutaneous calcifications in patients harboring truncating versus missense mutations was demonstrated. Thus, in the largest cohort of PHPIa patients described to date, we extend the spectrum of known GNAS mutations and hot spots and demonstrate for the first time a correlation between the genetic defects and the expression of a clinical AHO-feature. PMID:25802881

  7. The Impact of Heterogeneity and Dark Acceptor States on FRET: Implications for Using Fluorescent Protein Donors and Acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Steven S.; Nguyen, Tuan A.; van der Meer, B. Wieb; Blank, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy is widely used to study protein interactions in living cells. Typically, spectral variants of the Green Fluorescent Protein (FPs) are incorporated into proteins expressed in cells, and FRET between donor and acceptor FPs is assayed. As appreciable FRET occurs only when donors and acceptors are within 10 nm of each other, the presence of FRET can be indicative of aggregation that may denote association of interacting species. By monitoring the excited-state (fluorescence) decay of the donor in the presence and absence of acceptors, dual-component decay analysis has been used to reveal the fraction of donors that are FRET positive (i.e., in aggregates)._However, control experiments using constructs containing both a donor and an acceptor FP on the same protein repeatedly indicate that a large fraction of these donors are FRET negative, thus rendering the interpretation of dual-component analysis for aggregates between separately donor-containing and acceptor-containing proteins problematic. Using Monte-Carlo simulations and analytical expressions, two possible sources for such anomalous behavior are explored: 1) conformational heterogeneity of the proteins, such that variations in the distance separating donor and acceptor FPs and/or their relative orientations persist on time-scales long in comparison with the excited-state lifetime, and 2) FP dark states. PMID:23152925

  8. Extensive aggregation of α-synuclein and tau in juvenile-onset neuroaxonal dystrophy: an autopsied individual with a novel mutation in the PLA2G6 gene-splicing site

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (INAD) is a rare autosomal-recessive neurodegenerative disorder. Patients with INAD usually show neurological symptoms with infant onset and die in childhood. Recently, it was reported that mutations in the PLA2G6 gene cause INAD, but neuropathological analysis of genetically confirmed individuals with neuroaxonal dystrophy has been limited. Results Here, we report a Japanese individual with neuroaxonal dystrophy associated with compound heterozygous mutations in the PLA2G6 gene. A novel splice-site mutation resulting in skipping and missense mutations (p.R538C) in exon 9 was identified in the patient. This patient initially presented with cerebellar ataxia at the age of 3 years, which was followed by symptoms of mental retardation, extrapyramidal signs, and epileptic seizure. The patient survived until 20 years of age. Neuropathological findings were characterized by numerous axonal spheroids, brain iron deposition, cerebellar neuronal loss, phosphorylated alpha-synuclein-positive Lewy bodies (LBs), and phosphorylated-tau-positive neurofibrillary tangles. In particular, LB pathology exhibited a unique distribution with extremely severe cortical involvement. Conclusions Our results support a genetic clinical view that compound heterozygous mutations with potential residual protein function are associated with a relatively mild phenotype. Moreover, the severe LB pathology suggests that dysfunction of the PLA2G6 gene primarily contributes to LB formation. PMID:24252552

  9. Point mutations of the alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 gamma-aminobutyric acid(A) receptor affecting modulation of the channel by ligands of the benzodiazepine binding site.

    PubMed

    Buhr, A; Baur, R; Malherbe, P; Sigel, E

    1996-06-01

    Clinically relevant benzodiazepines allosterically stimulate neurotransmitter-evoked chloride currents at the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A(GABAA) receptor. Rat wild-type or mutated alpha 1, beta 2, and gamma 2S subunits were coexpressed in Xenopus oocytes and investigated with electrophysiological techniques. Point mutations in two subunits were identified that affect the response of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced currents by benzodiazepines. Mutation of one of three amino acid residues to alanine (alpha Tyr161 and alpha Thr206) or leucine (gamma Phe77) resulted in a approximately 3-fold increase in potentiation by diazepam. The response to zolpidem was increased in two mutant channels containing the mutated alpha subunit but was nearly absent in channels containing the mutated gamma subunit. In the former cases, methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (DMCM) acted as a negative allosteric modulator of the channel, much stronger than in the wild-type channel, whereas there was no significant difference to the wild-type channel in the latter case. Thus, the mutant gamma subunit has different functional consequences for the various types of ligand of the benzodiazepine binding site. All three amino acid residues, alpha Tyr161, alpha Thr206, and gamma Phe77, are close or identical to homologous residues that are implicated in GABA binding. If the residues binding the channel agonist GABA are located at subunit interfaces, the residues influencing the benzodiazepine effects must also be located at subunit interfaces. PMID:8649346

  10. Identification of nitrogen acceptor in Cu2O: First-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    T-Thienprasert, Jiraroj; Limpijumnong, Sukit

    2015-11-01

    The source of p-type carriers observed in nitrogen-doped Cu2O samples [Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 1060 (2003)] was identified by using accurate hybrid density functional calculations. Similar to the case of ZnO, we found that N is a deep acceptor when substituting for O in Cu2O and cannot be the source of the observed p-type carriers. Detailed investigation of other N-related defects in Cu2O reveals that N2 substitution for Cu, i.e., (N2)Cu, is a shallow acceptor and can give hole carriers in N-doped Cu2O samples. (N2)Cu is not only a shallow acceptor but it also has a lower formation energy than NO in some growth conditions. The calculated emission photo luminescence (PL) peak at 1.89 eV associated with (N2)Cu is also in good agreement with the observed N-related PL peak at ˜1.82 eV in N-doped Cu2O sample. To aid future identification by Raman spectroscopy techniques, the vibrational frequencies of N2 on both Cu and O sites were calculated.

  11. Copper Toxicity Affects Photosystem II Electron Transport at the Secondary Quinone Acceptor, QB1

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Narendranath; Vass, Imre; Demeter, Sándor

    1989-01-01

    The nature of Cu2+ inhibition of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry in pea (Pisum sativum L.) thylakoids was investigated monitoring Hill activity and light emission properties of photosystem II. In Cu2+-inhibited thylakoids, diphenyl carbazide addition does not relieve the loss of Hill activity. The maximum yield of fluorescence induction restored by hydroxylamine in Tris-inactivated thylakoids is markedly reduced by Cu2+. This suggests that Cu2+ does not act on the donor side of PSII but on the reaction center of PSII or on components beyond. Thermoluminescence and delayed luminescence studies show that charge recombination between the positively charged intermediate in water oxidation cycle (S2) and negatively charged primary quinone acceptor of pSII (QA−) is largely unaffected by Cu2+. The S2QB− charge recombination, however, is drastically inhibited which parallels the loss of Hill activity. This indicates that Cu2+ inhibits photosystem II photochemistry primarily affecting the function of the secondary quinone electron acceptor, QB. We suggest that Cu2+ does not block electron flow between the primary and secondary quinone acceptor but modifies the QB site in such a way that it becomes unsuitable for further photosystem II photochemistry. PMID:16666731

  12. Point mutations in the tyrosine aminotransferase gene in tyrosinemia type II.

    PubMed Central

    Natt, E; Kida, K; Odievre, M; Di Rocco, M; Scherer, G

    1992-01-01

    Tyrosinemia type II (Richner-Hanhart syndrome, RHS) is a disease of autosomal recessive inheritance characterized by keratitis, palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, mental retardation, and elevated blood tyrosine levels. The disease results from deficiency in hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT; L-tyrosine:2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase, EC 2.6.1.5), a 454-amino acid protein encoded by a gene with 12 exons. To identify the causative mutations in five TAT alleles cloned from three RHS patients, chimeric genes constructed from normal and mutant TAT alleles were tested in directing TAT activity in a transient expression assay. DNA sequence analysis of the regions identified as nonfunctional revealed six different point mutations. Three RHS alleles have nonsense mutations at codons 57, 223, and 417, respectively. One "complex" RHS allele carries a GT----GG splice donor mutation in intron 8 together with a Gly----Val substitution at amino acid 362. A new splice acceptor site in intron 2 of the fifth RHS allele leads to a shift in reading frame. Images PMID:1357662

  13. Contemporary evolution of resistance at the major insecticide target site gene Ace-1 by mutation and copy number variation in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Weetman, David; Mitchell, Sara N; Wilding, Craig S; Birks, Daniel P; Yawson, Alexander E; Essandoh, John; Mawejje, Henry D; Djogbenou, Luc S; Steen, Keith; Rippon, Emily J; Clarkson, Christopher S; Field, Stuart G; Rigden, Daniel J; Donnelly, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Functionally constrained genes are ideal insecticide targets because disruption is often fatal, and resistance mutations are typically costly. Synaptic acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an essential neurotransmission enzyme targeted by insecticides used increasingly in malaria control. In Anopheles and Culex mosquitoes, a glycine–serine substitution at codon 119 of the Ace-1 gene confers both resistance and fitness costs, especially for 119S/S homozygotes. G119S in Anopheles gambiae from Accra (Ghana) is strongly associated with resistance, and, despite expectations of cost, resistant 119S alleles are increasing significantly in frequency. Sequencing of Accra females detected only a single Ace-1 119S haplotype, whereas 119G diversity was high overall but very low at non-synonymous sites, evidence of strong purifying selection driven by functional constraint. Flanking microsatellites showed reduced diversity, elevated linkage disequilibrium and high differentiation of 119S, relative to 119G homozygotes across up to two megabases of the genome. Yet these signals of selection were inconsistent and sometimes weak tens of kilobases from Ace-1. This unexpected finding is attributable to apparently ubiquitous amplification of 119S alleles as part of a large copy number variant (CNV) far exceeding the size of the Ace-1 gene, whereas 119G alleles were unduplicated. Ace-1 CNV was detectable in archived samples collected when the 119S allele was rare in Ghana. Multicopy amplification of resistant alleles has not been observed previously and is likely to underpin the recent increase in 119S frequency. The large CNV compromised localization of the strong selective sweep around Ace-1, emphasizing the need to integrate CNV analysis into genome scans for selection. PMID:25865270

  14. Exome sequencing detection of two untranslated GFPT1 mutations in a family with limb-girdle myasthenia.

    PubMed

    Maselli, R A; Arredondo, J; Nguyen, J; Lara, M; Ng, F; Ngo, M; Pham, J M; Yi, Q; Stajich, J M; McDonald, K; Hauser, M A; Wollmann, R L

    2014-02-01

    The term 'limb-girdle myasthenia' (LGM) was first used to describe three siblings with proximal limb weakness without oculobulbar involvement, but with EMG decrement and responsiveness to anticholinesterase medication. We report here that exome sequencing in the proband of this family revealed several sequence variations in genes linked to proximal limb weakness. However, the only mutations that cosegregated with disease were an intronic IVS7-8A>G mutation and the previously reported 3'-UTR c.*22C>A mutation in GFPT1, a gene linked to LGM. A minigene assay showed that IVS7-8A>G activates an alternative splice acceptor that results in retention of the last seven nucleotides of intron 7 and a frameshift leading to a termination codon 13 nucleotides downstream from the new splice site. An anconeus muscle biopsy revealed mild reduction of the axon terminal size and postsynaptic fold simplification. The amplitudes of miniature endplate potentials and quantal release were also diminished. The DNA of the mildly affected father of the proband showed only the intronic mutation along with sequence variations in other genes potentially relevant to LGM. Thus, this study performed in the family originally described with LGM showed two GFPT1 untranslated mutations, which may cause disease by reducing GFPT1 expression and ultimately impairing protein glycosylation. PMID:23488891

  15. Intronic mutations affecting splicing of MBTPS2 cause ichthyosis follicularis, alopecia and photophobia (IFAP) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oeffner, Frank; Martinez, Francisco; Schaffer, Julie; Salhi, Aïcha; Monfort, Sandra; Oltra, Silvestre; Neidel, Ulrike; Bornholdt, Dorothea; van Bon, Bregje; König, Arne; Happle, Rudolf; Grzeschik, Karl-Heinz

    2011-05-01

    Ichthyosis follicularis, alopecia and photophobia (IFAP) syndrome is an X-linked genodermatosis with congenital atrichia being the most prominent feature. Recently, we have shown that functional deficiency of MBTPS2 (membrane-bound transcription factor protease site 2) - a zinc metalloprotease essential for cholesterol homeostasis and endoplasmic reticulum stress response - causes the disease. Here, we present results obtained by analysing two intronic MBTPS2 mutations, c.671-9T>G and c.225-6T>A, using in silico and cell-based splicing assays. Accordingly, the c.225-6T>A transversion generated a new splice acceptor site, which caused extension of exon 3 by four bases and subsequently introduced a premature stop codon. Both, minigene experiments and RT-PCR analysis with patient-derived mRNA, demonstrated that the c.671-9T>G mutation resulted in skipping of exon 6, most likely because of disruption of the polypyrimidin tract or a putative intronic splicing enhancer (ISE). Our combined biocomputational and experimental analysis strongly suggested that both intronic alterations are disease-causing mutations. PMID:21426410

  16. Electron acceptor-dependent respiratory and physiological stratifications in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yonggang; Xiang, Yinbo; Sun, Guoping; Wu, Wei-Min; Xu, Meiying

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial respiration is an essential driving force in biogeochemical cycling and bioremediation processes. Electron acceptors respired by bacteria often have solid and soluble forms that typically coexist in the environment. It is important to understand how sessile bacteria attached to solid electron acceptors respond to ambient soluble alternative electron acceptors. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) provide a useful tool to investigate this interaction. In MFCs with Shewanella decolorationis, azo dye was used as an alternative electron acceptor in the anode chamber. Different respiration patterns were observed for biofilm and planktonic cells, with planktonic cells preferred to respire with azo dye while biofilm cells respired with both the anode and azo dye. The additional azo respiration dissipated the proton accumulation within the anode biofilm. There was a large redox potential gap between the biofilms and anode surface. Changing cathodic conditions caused immediate effects on the anode potential but not on the biofilm potential. Biofilm viability showed an inverse and respiration-dependent profile when respiring with only the anode or azo dye and was enhanced when respiring with both simultaneously. These results provide new insights into the bacterial respiration strategies in environments containing multiple electron acceptors and support an electron-hopping mechanism within Shewanella electrode-respiring biofilms. PMID:25495895

  17. Structural basis for acceptor-substrate recognition of UDP-glucose: anthocyanidin 3-O-glucosyltransferase from Clitoria ternatea

    PubMed Central

    Hiromoto, Takeshi; Honjo, Eijiro; Noda, Naonobu; Tamada, Taro; Kazuma, Kohei; Suzuki, Masahiko; Blaber, Michael; Kuroki, Ryota

    2015-01-01

    UDP-glucose: anthocyanidin 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UGT78K6) from Clitoria ternatea catalyzes the transfer of glucose from UDP-glucose to anthocyanidins such as delphinidin. After the acylation of the 3-O-glucosyl residue, the 3′- and 5′-hydroxyl groups of the product are further glucosylated by a glucosyltransferase in the biosynthesis of ternatins, which are anthocyanin pigments. To understand the acceptor-recognition scheme of UGT78K6, the crystal structure of UGT78K6 and its complex forms with anthocyanidin delphinidin and petunidin, and flavonol kaempferol were determined to resolutions of 1.85 Å, 2.55 Å, 2.70 Å, and 1.75 Å, respectively. The enzyme recognition of unstable anthocyanidin aglycones was initially observed in this structural determination. The anthocyanidin- and flavonol-acceptor binding details are almost identical in each complex structure, although the glucosylation activities against each acceptor were significantly different. The 3-hydroxyl groups of the acceptor substrates were located at hydrogen-bonding distances to the Nε2 atom of the His17 catalytic residue, supporting a role for glucosyl transfer to the 3-hydroxyl groups of anthocyanidins and flavonols. However, the molecular orientations of these three acceptors are different from those of the known flavonoid glycosyltransferases, VvGT1 and UGT78G1. The acceptor substrates in UGT78K6 are reversely bound to its binding site by a 180° rotation about the O1–O3 axis of the flavonoid backbones observed in VvGT1 and UGT78G1; consequently, the 5- and 7-hydroxyl groups are protected from glucosylation. These substrate recognition schemes are useful to understand the unique reaction mechanism of UGT78K6 for the ternatin biosynthesis, and suggest the potential for controlled synthesis of natural pigments. PMID:25556637

  18. Structural basis for acceptor-substrate recognition of UDP-glucose: anthocyanidin 3-O-glucosyltransferase from Clitoria ternatea.

    PubMed

    Hiromoto, Takeshi; Honjo, Eijiro; Noda, Naonobu; Tamada, Taro; Kazuma, Kohei; Suzuki, Masahiko; Blaber, Michael; Kuroki, Ryota

    2015-03-01

    UDP-glucose: anthocyanidin 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UGT78K6) from Clitoria ternatea catalyzes the transfer of glucose from UDP-glucose to anthocyanidins such as delphinidin. After the acylation of the 3-O-glucosyl residue, the 3'- and 5'-hydroxyl groups of the product are further glucosylated by a glucosyltransferase in the biosynthesis of ternatins, which are anthocyanin pigments. To understand the acceptor-recognition scheme of UGT78K6, the crystal structure of UGT78K6 and its complex forms with anthocyanidin delphinidin and petunidin, and flavonol kaempferol were determined to resolutions of 1.85 Å, 2.55 Å, 2.70 Å, and 1.75 Å, respectively. The enzyme recognition of unstable anthocyanidin aglycones was initially observed in this structural determination. The anthocyanidin- and flavonol-acceptor binding details are almost identical in each complex structure, although the glucosylation activities against each acceptor were significantly different. The 3-hydroxyl groups of the acceptor substrates were located at hydrogen-bonding distances to the Nε2 atom of the His17 catalytic residue, supporting a role for glucosyl transfer to the 3-hydroxyl groups of anthocyanidins and flavonols. However, the molecular orientations of these three acceptors are different from those of the known flavonoid glycosyltransferases, VvGT1 and UGT78G1. The acceptor substrates in UGT78K6 are reversely bound to its binding site by a 180° rotation about the O1-O3 axis of the flavonoid backbones observed in VvGT1 and UGT78G1; consequently, the 5- and 7-hydroxyl groups are protected from glucosylation. These substrate recognition schemes are useful to understand the unique reaction mechanism of UGT78K6 for the ternatin biosynthesis, and suggest the potential for controlled synthesis of natural pigments. PMID:25556637

  19. Functional Studies of p.R132C, p.R149C, p.M283V, p.E431K, and a Novel c.652-2A>G Mutations of the CYP21A2 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Taboas, Melisa; Gómez Acuña, Luciana; Scaia, María Florencia; Bruque, Carlos D.; Buzzalino, Noemí; Stivel, Mirta

    2014-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is the most frequent inborn error of metabolism and accounts for 90–95% of CAH cases. In the present work, we analyzed the functional consequence of four novel previously reported point CYP21A2 mutations -p.R132C, p.R149C, p.M283V, p.E431K- found in Argentinean 21-hydroxylase deficient patients. In addition, we report an acceptor splice site novel point mutation, c.652-2A>G, found in a classical patient in compound heterozygosity with the rare p.R483Q mutation. We performed bioinformatic and functional assays to evaluate the biological implication of the novel mutation. Our analyses revealed that the residual enzymatic activity of the isolated mutants coding for CYP21A2 aminoacidic substitutions was reduced to a lesser than 50% of the wild type with both progesterone and 17-OH progesterone as substrates. Accordingly, all the variants would predict mild non-classical alleles. In one non-classical patient, the p.E431K mutation was found in cis with the p.D322G one. The highest decrease in enzyme activity was obtained when both mutations were assayed in the same construction, with a residual activity most likely related to the simple virilizing form of the disease. For the c.652-2A>G mutation, bioinformatic tools predicted the putative use of two different cryptic splicing sites. Nevertheless, functional analyses revealed the use of only one cryptic splice acceptor site located within exon 6, leading to the appearance of an mRNA with a 16 nt deletion. A severe allele is strongly suggested due to the presence of a premature stop codon in the protein only 12 nt downstream. PMID:24667412

  20. BIOREMEDIATION AT WOOD-PRESERVING SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The removal of organic compounds from ground water during bioremediation at wood-preserving sites is a function of the stoichiometric demand for electron acceptors (oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate) to metabolize the organic contaminants and the supply of the electron acceptors in th...

  1. Transition dynamics for Mu acceptor states in Si{sub 1–x}Ge{sub x} alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jayarathna, G.; Lichti, R. L.; Mengyan, P. W.; Baker, B. B.; Celebi, Y. G.; Carroll, B. R.; Yonenaga, I.

    2014-02-21

    We use the longitudinal field muon spin relaxation technique to observe charge-state and site-change transitions of muonium in Si{sub 1–x}Ge{sub x} alloys. In this project, we examine the temperature and magnetic field dependences of the relaxation rates for Si{sub 1–x}Ge{sub x} samples (x = 0.77, 0.81, and 0.84), in the composition range where the acceptor level lies within the band gap. This study particularly focuses on the relaxation rates for Si{sub 0.19}Ge{sub 0.81} to identify various cyclic charge-state and site-change processes as a function of both temperature and magnetic field. We extract the paramagnetic hyperfine constant and the relevant transition rate parameters for site changes and charge-state transitions involving Mu acceptor states for this sample. At small x, a site change dominates the transition out of the neutral T-site acceptor state, while in higher Ge content alloys hole ionization becomes the dominant transition out of the Mu{sub T}{sup 0}.

  2. Vacancy compensation and related donor-acceptor pair recombination in bulk AlN

    SciTech Connect

    Gaddy, BE; Bryan, Z; Bryan, I; Kirste, R; Xie, JQ; Dalmau, R; Moody, B; Kumagai, Y; Nagashima, T; Kubota, Y; Kinoshita, T; Koukitu, A; Sitar, Z; Collazo, R; Irving, DL

    2013-10-14

    A prominent 2.8 eV emission peak is identified in bulk AlN substrates grown by physical vapor transport. This peak is shown to be related to the carbon concentration in the samples. Density functional theory calculations predict that this emission is caused by a donor-acceptor pair (DAP) recombination between substitutional carbon on the nitrogen site and a nitrogen vacancy. Photoluminescence and photoluminescence-excitation spectroscopy are used to confirm the model and indicate the DAP character of the emission. The interaction between defects provides a pathway to creating ultraviolet-transparent AlN substrates for optoelectronics applications. (C) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  3. Theory of Primary Photoexcitations in Donor-Acceptor Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryanpour, Karan; Dutta, Tirthankar; Huynh, Uyen N. V.; Vardeny, Zeev Valy; Mazumdar, Sumit

    2015-12-01

    We present a generic theory of primary photoexcitations in low band gap donor-acceptor conjugated copolymers. Because of the combined effects of strong electron correlations and broken symmetry, there is considerable mixing between a charge-transfer exciton and an energetically proximate triplet-triplet state with an overall spin singlet. The triplet-triplet state, optically forbidden in homopolymers, is allowed in donor-acceptor copolymers. For an intermediate difference in electron affinities of the donor and the acceptor, the triplet-triplet state can have a stronger oscillator strength than the charge-transfer exciton. We discuss the possibility of intramolecular singlet fission from the triplet-triplet state, and how such fission can be detected experimentally.

  4. Theory of Primary Photoexcitations in Donor-Acceptor Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Aryanpour, Karan; Dutta, Tirthankar; Huynh, Uyen N V; Vardeny, Zeev Valy; Mazumdar, Sumit

    2015-12-31

    We present a generic theory of primary photoexcitations in low band gap donor-acceptor conjugated copolymers. Because of the combined effects of strong electron correlations and broken symmetry, there is considerable mixing between a charge-transfer exciton and an energetically proximate triplet-triplet state with an overall spin singlet. The triplet-triplet state, optically forbidden in homopolymers, is allowed in donor-acceptor copolymers. For an intermediate difference in electron affinities of the donor and the acceptor, the triplet-triplet state can have a stronger oscillator strength than the charge-transfer exciton. We discuss the possibility of intramolecular singlet fission from the triplet-triplet state, and how such fission can be detected experimentally. PMID:26765027

  5. An overview of molecular acceptors for organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudhomme, Piétrick

    2013-07-01

    Organic solar cells (OSCs) have gained serious attention during the last decade and are now considered as one of the future photovoltaic technologies for low-cost power production. The first dream of attaining 10% of power coefficient efficiency has now become a reality thanks to the development of new materials and an impressive work achieved to understand, control and optimize structure and morphology of the device. But most of the effort devoted to the development of new materials concerned the optimization of the donor material, with less attention for acceptors which to date remain dominated by fullerenes and their derivatives. This short review presents the progress in the use of non-fullerene small molecules and fullerene-based acceptors with the aim of evaluating the challenge for the next generation of acceptors in organic photovoltaics.

  6. Hybrid Functional Calculations of Acceptor Doping in Protonic Conductor SrZrO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, Leigh; Janotti, Anderson; Cui, Xiangyuan; Stampfl, Catherine; van de Walle, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Perovskite oxides such as SrZrO3 (SZO), which exhibit high temperature proton conductivity, are promising electrolyte materials for use in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Proton conductivity in SZO is typically achieved via acceptor doping with trivalent cations substituting at the Zr site, where the formation of charge compensating oxygen vacancies facilitates proton solvation. We present a detailed study of Sc and Y dopants in SZO based on first-principles, hybrid density functional calculations. When substituting at the Zr site, both dopants form deep acceptors, where the neutral charge state forms a localized hole polaron state. Under certain growth conditions Sc and Y will form auto-compensating donor species by substituting at the Sr site, which would inhibit proton solubility. Moreover, the proton - dopant association was found to be strong, with proton binding energies of -0.41 eV and -0.31 eV for Sc Zr- and Y Zr- respectively, indicating that proton transport is limited by trapping. These new results will be useful in the development of zirconate based proton conducting electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells.

  7. Donor-acceptor chemistry in the main group.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Eric

    2014-06-21

    This Perspective article summarizes recent progress from our laboratory in the isolation of reactive main group species using a general donor-acceptor protocol. A highlight of this program is the use of carbon-based donors in combination with suitable Lewis acidic acceptors to yield stable complexes of parent Group 14 element hydrides (e.g. GeH2 and H2SiGeH2). It is anticipated that this strategy could be extended to include new synthetic targets from throughout the Periodic Table with possible applications in bottom-up materials synthesis and main group element catalysis envisioned. PMID:24788390

  8. Acceptors in bulk and nanoscale ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCluskey, M. D.

    2012-02-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a semiconductor that emits bright UV light, with little wasted heat. This intrinsic feature makes it a promising material for energy-efficient white lighting, nano-lasers, and other optical applications. For devices to be competitive, however, it is necessary to develop reliable p-type doping. Although substitutional nitrogen has been considered as a potential p-type dopant for ZnO, theoretical and experimental work indicates that nitrogen is a deep acceptor and will not lead to p-type conductivity. This talk will highlight recent experiments on ZnO:N at low temperatures. A red/near-IR photoluminescence (PL) band is correlated with the presence of deep nitrogen acceptors. PL excitation (PLE) measurements show an absorption threshold of 2.26 eV, in good agreement with theory. Magnetic resonance experiments provide further evidence for this assignment. The results of these studies seem to rule out group-V elements as shallow acceptors in ZnO, contradicting numerous reports in the literature. If these acceptors do not work as advertised, is there a viable alternative? Optical studies on ZnO nanocrystals show some intriguing leads. At liquid-helium temperatures, a series of sharp IR absorption peaks arise from an unknown acceptor impurity. The data are consistent with a hydrogenic acceptor 0.46 eV above the valence band edge. While this binding energy is still too deep for many practical applications, it represents a significant improvement over the ˜ 1.3 eV binding energy for nitrogen acceptors. Nanocrystals present another twist. Due to their high surface-to-volume ratio, surface states are especially important. Specifically, electron-hole recombination at the surface give rises to a red luminescence band. From our PL and IR experiments, we have developed a ``unified'' model that attempts to explain acceptor and surface states in ZnO nanocrystals. This model could provide a useful framework for designing future nanoscale ZnO devices.

  9. Sodium acceptor doping of ZnO crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmar, Narendra S.; Joni, I. Made; Lynn, Kelvin G.

    2016-02-01

    ZnO bulk single crystals were doped with sodium by thermal diffusion using sodium dispensers. Secondary-ion mass spectrometry measurement shows the diffusion of sodium with concentration ˜1×1018 cm-3 in near surface region. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements show donor acceptor pair (DAP) emission at 408 nm at room temperature which exhibits a blue-shift to 404 nm at 9 K. DC Hall measurements show the mixed conduction due to low Hall voltage in these samples. PL measurements and variable temperature resistivity measurements suggest that the sodium acceptor activation energy is ˜0.300 eV.

  10. A point mutation in an intronic branch site results in aberrant splicing of COL5A1 and in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II in two British families.

    PubMed

    Burrows, N P; Nicholls, A C; Richards, A J; Luccarini, C; Harrison, J B; Yates, J R; Pope, F M

    1998-08-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a heterogeneous group of connective-tissue disorders characterized by skin fragility, joint laxity, and skeletal deformities. Type V collagen appears to have a causal role in EDS types I and II, which show phenotypic overlap and may sometimes be allelic. Type V collagen can exist as a heterotrimer, [alpha1(V)]2alpha2(V), and it both coassembles with and regulates type I collagen-fibril diameter. Using an intragenic COL5A1 polymorphism, we have demonstrated linkage, at zero recombination, to the same allele in two large British EDS type II families (LOD scores 4.1 and 4.3). Affected members from each family were heterozygous for a point mutation in intron 32 (IVS32:T-25G), causing the 45-bp exon 33 to be lost from the mRNA in approximately 60% of transcripts from the mutant gene. This mutation lies only 2 bp upstream of a highly conserved adenosine in the consensus branch-site sequence, which is required for lariat formation. Although both families shared the same marker allele, we have been unable to identify a common genealogy. This is the first description of a mutation at the lariat branch site, which plays a pivotal role in the splicing mechanism, in a collagen gene. Very probably, the resulting in-frame exon skip has a dominant-negative effect due to incorporation of the mutant proalpha chain into the triple-helical molecule. These findings further confirm the importance of type V collagen in the causation of EDS type II, and the novel collagen mutation indicates the importance of the lariat branch site in splicing. PMID:9683580

  11. Three Redox States of a Diradical Acceptor-Donor-Acceptor Triad: Gating the Magnetic Coupling and the Electron Delocalization.

    PubMed

    Souto, Manuel; Lloveras, Vega; Vela, Sergi; Fumanal, Maria; Ratera, Imma; Veciana, Jaume

    2016-06-16

    The diradical acceptor-donor-acceptor triad 1(••), based on two polychlorotriphenylmethyl (PTM) radicals connected through a tetrathiafulvalene(TTF)-vinylene bridge, has been synthesized. The generation of the mixed-valence radical anion, 1(•-), and triradical cation species, 1(•••+), obtained upon electrochemical reduction and oxidation, respectively, was monitored by optical and ESR spectroscopy. Interestingly, the modification of electron delocalization and magnetic coupling was observed when the charged species were generated and the changes have been rationalized by theoretical calculations. PMID:27231856

  12. Novel splice-site mutation in WDR62 revealed by whole-exome sequencing in a Sudanese family with primary microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Bastaki, Fatma; Mohamed, Madiha; Nair, Pratibha; Saif, Fatima; Tawfiq, Nafisa; Aithala, Gururaj; El-Halik, Majdi; Al-Ali, Mahmoud; Hamzeh, Abdul Rezzak

    2016-05-01

    The WDR62 gene encodes a scaffold protein of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway. It plays a critical role in laying out various cellular layers in the cerebral cortex during embryogenesis, and hence the dramatic clinical features resulting from WDR62 mutations. These mutations are associated with autosomal recessive primary microcephaly 2, with or without cortical malformations (MCPH2). Using whole exome sequencing we uncovered a novel WDR62 variant; c.390G > A, from two Sudanese siblings whose parents are first cousins. The patients suffered MCPH2 with incomplete lissencephaly and developmental delay. The mutation affects the last nucleotide of exon4, and probably leads to aberrant splicing, which may result in a truncated protein lacking all functional domains. PMID:26577670

  13. EXAFS study of dopant ions with different charges in nanocrystalline anatase: evidence for space-charge segregation of acceptor ions.

    PubMed

    Knauth, Philippe; Chadwick, Alan V; Lippens, Pierre E; Auer, Gerhard

    2009-06-01

    Nanocrystalline TiO(2) (anatase) is an essential oxide for environment and energy applications. A combination of EXAFS spectroscopy and DFT calculations on a series of dopants with quite similar ion radius, but increasing ion charge, show boundary space charge segregation of acceptor cations. The picture illustrates the Fourier-transformed EXAFS spectrum for Sn(4+)-doped TiO(2).A series of dopants, including acceptor ions (Zn(2+), Y(3+)), isovalent ions (Zr(4+), Sn(4+)) as well as a donor ion (Nb(5+)), were studied by EXAFS spectroscopy in nanocrystalline TiO(2) anatase powders and nanoceramics. Similar results were found for nanocrystalline powders and nanocrystalline ceramics, made by hot-pressing the powders. Boundary segregation was observed for the acceptor ions yttrium and zinc, whereas tin, zirconium and niobium ions were placed on substitutional bulk sites and did not segregate, whatever their concentration. These results can be interpreted based on defect thermodynamics, in the framework of a space charge segregation model with positive boundary core, due to excess oxide ion vacancies, and negative space charge regions, where ionized acceptors are segregated. PMID:19425035

  14. Interplay between Mn-acceptor state and Dirac surface states in Mn-doped Bi2Se3 topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahani, M. R.; Pertsova, A.; Islam, M. Fhokrul; Canali, C. M.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the properties of a single substitutional Mn impurity and its associated acceptor state on the (111) surface of Bi2Se3 topological insulator. Combining ab initio calculations with microscopic tight-binding modeling, we identify the effects of inversion symmetry and time-reversal-symmetry breaking on the electronic states in the vicinity of the Dirac point. In agreement with experiments, we find evidence that the Mn ion is in the +2 valence state and introduces an acceptor in the bulk band gap. The Mn acceptor has predominantly p character and is localized mainly around the Mn impurity and its nearest-neighbor Se atoms. Its electronic structure and spin-polarization are determined by the hybridization between the Mn d levels and the p levels of surrounding Se atoms, which is strongly affected by electronic correlations at the Mn site. The opening of the gap at the Dirac point depends crucially on the quasiresonant coupling and the strong real-space overlap between the spin-chiral surface states and the midgap spin-polarized Mn-acceptor states.

  15. The site-directed mutation I(L177)H in Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center affects coordination of P(A) and B(B) bacteriochlorophylls.

    PubMed

    Vasilieva, L G; Fufina, T Y; Gabdulkhakov, A G; Leonova, M M; Khatypov, R A; Shuvalov, V A

    2012-08-01

    To explore the influence of the I(L177)H single mutation on the properties of the nearest bacteriochlorophylls (BChls), three reaction centers (RCs) bearing double mutations were constructed in the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, and their properties and pigment content were compared with those of the correspondent single mutant RCs. Each pair of the mutations comprised the amino acid substitution I(L177)H and another mutation altering histidine ligand of BChl P(A) or BChl B(B). Contrary to expectations, the double mutation I(L177)H+H(L173)L does not bring about a heterodimer RC but causes a 46nm blue shift of the long-wavelength P absorbance band. The histidine L177 or a water molecule were suggested as putative ligands for P(A) in the RC I(L177)H+H(L173)L although this would imply a reorientation of the His backbone and additional rearrangements in the primary donor environment or even a repositioning of the BChl dimer. The crystal structure of the mutant I(L177)H reaction center determined to a resolution of 2.9Å shows changes at the interface region between the BChl P(A) and the monomeric BChl B(B). Spectral and pigment analysis provided evidence for β-coordination of the BChl B(B) in the double mutant RC I(L177)H+H(M182)L and for its hexacoordination in the mutant reaction center I(L177)H. Computer modeling suggests involvement of two water molecules in the β-coordination of the BChl B(B). Possible structural consequences of the L177 mutation affecting the coordination of the two BChls P(A) and B(B) are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability: from Natural to Artificial. PMID:22365928

  16. Covalent non-fused tetrathiafulvalene-acceptor systems.

    PubMed

    Pop, Flavia; Avarvari, Narcis

    2016-06-28

    Covalent donor-acceptor (D-A) systems have significantly contributed to the development of many organic materials and to molecular electronics. Tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) represents one of the most widely studied donor precursors and has been incorporated into the structure of many D-A derivatives with the objective of obtaining redox control and modulation of the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), in order to address switchable emissive systems and to take advantage of its propensity to form regular stacks in the solid state. In this review, we focus on the main families of non-fused TTF-acceptors, which are classified according to the nature of the acceptor: nitrogen-containing heterocycles, BODIPY, perylenes and electron poor unsaturated hydrocarbons, as well as radical acceptors. We describe herein the most representative members of each family with a brief mention of their synthesis and a special focus on their D-A characteristics. Special attention is given to ICT and its modulation, fluorescence quenching and switching, photoconductivity, bistability and spin distribution by discussing and comparing spectroscopic and electrochemical features, photophysical properties, solid-state properties and theoretical calculations. PMID:27193500

  17. Fine structure of the Mn acceptor in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainov, I. V.; Debus, J.; Averkiev, N. S.; Dimitriev, G. S.; Sapega, V. F.; Lähderanta, E.

    2016-06-01

    We reveal the electronic level structure of the Mn acceptor, which consists of a valence-band hole bound to an Mn2 + ion, in presence of applied uniaxial stress and an external magnetic field in bulk GaAs. Resonant spin-flip Raman scattering is used to measure the g factor of the AMn0 center in the ground and excited states with the total angular momenta F =1 and F =2 and characterize the optical selection rules of the spin-flip transitions between these Mn-acceptor states. We determine the random stress fields near the Mn acceptor, the constant of the antiferromagnetic exchange interaction between the valence-band holes and the electrons of the inner Mn2 + shell as well as the deformation potential for the exchange energy. The p -d exchange energy, in particular, decreases significantly with increasing compressive stress. By combining the experimental Raman study with the developed theoretical model on the scattering efficiency, in which also the random local and external uniaxial stresses and magnetic field are considered, the fine structure of the Mn acceptor is determined in full detail.

  18. Mutations in the fusion protein cleavage site of avian paramyxovirus serotype 4 confer increased replication and syncytium formation in vitro but not increased replication and pathogenicity in chickens and ducks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin-Hee; Xiao, Sa; Shive, Heather; Collins, Peter L; Samal, Siba K

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the role of the F protein cleavage site in the replication and pathogenicity of avian paramyxoviruses (APMVs), we constructed a reverse genetics system for recovery of infectious recombinant APMV-4 from cloned cDNA. The recovered recombinant APMV-4 resembled the biological virus in growth characteristics in vitro and in pathogenicity in vivo. The F cleavage site sequence of APMV-4 (DIQPR↓F) contains a single basic amino acid, at the -1 position. Six mutant APMV-4 viruses were recovered in which the F protein cleavage site was mutated to contain increased numbers of basic amino acids or to mimic the naturally occurring cleavage sites of several paramyxoviruses, including neurovirulent and avirulent strains of NDV. The presence of a glutamine residue at the -3 position was found to be important for mutant virus recovery. In addition, cleavage sites containing the furin protease motif conferred increased replication and syncytium formation in vitro. However, analysis of viral pathogenicity in 9-day-old embryonated chicken eggs, 1-day-old and 2-week-old chickens, and 3-week-old ducks showed that none the F protein cleavage site mutations altered the replication, tropism, and pathogenicity of APMV-4, and no significant differences were observed among the parental and mutant APMV-4 viruses in vivo. Although parental and mutant viruses replicated somewhat better in ducks than in chickens, they all were highly restricted and avirulent in both species. These results suggested that the cleavage site sequence of the F protein is not a limiting determinant of APMV-4 pathogenicity in chickens and ducks. PMID:23341874

  19. Mutations in the Fusion Protein Cleavage Site of Avian Paramyxovirus Serotype 4 Confer Increased Replication and Syncytium Formation In Vitro but Not Increased Replication and Pathogenicity in Chickens and Ducks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shin-Hee; Xiao, Sa; Shive, Heather; Collins, Peter L.; Samal, Siba K.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the role of the F protein cleavage site in the replication and pathogenicity of avian paramyxoviruses (APMVs), we constructed a reverse genetics system for recovery of infectious recombinant APMV-4 from cloned cDNA. The recovered recombinant APMV-4 resembled the biological virus in growth characteristics in vitro and in pathogenicity in vivo. The F cleavage site sequence of APMV-4 (DIQPR↓F) contains a single basic amino acid, at the -1 position. Six mutant APMV-4 viruses were recovered in which the F protein cleavage site was mutated to contain increased numbers of basic amino acids or to mimic the naturally occurring cleavage sites of several paramyxoviruses, including neurovirulent and avirulent strains of NDV. The presence of a glutamine residue at the -3 position was found to be important for mutant virus recovery. In addition, cleavage sites containing the furin protease motif conferred increased replication and syncytium formation in vitro. However, analysis of viral pathogenicity in 9-day-old embryonated chicken eggs, 1-day-old and 2-week-old chickens, and 3-week-old ducks showed that none the F protein cleavage site mutations altered the replication, tropism, and pathogenicity of APMV-4, and no significant differences were observed among the parental and mutant APMV-4 viruses in vivo. Although parental and mutant viruses replicated somewhat better in ducks than in chickens, they all were highly restricted and avirulent in both species. These results suggested that the cleavage site sequence of the F protein is not a limiting determinant of APMV-4 pathogenicity in chickens and ducks. PMID:23341874

  20. Development of imide- and imidazole-containing electron acceptors for use in donor-acceptor conjugated compounds and polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Duo

    Conjugated organic compounds and polymers have attracted significant attention due to their potential application in electronic devices as semiconducting materials, such as organic solar cells (OSCs). In order to tune band gaps, donor-acceptor (D-A) structure is widely used, which has been proved to be one of the most effective strategies. This thesis consists of three parts: 1) design, syntheses and characterization of new weak acceptors based on imides and the systematic study of the structure-property relationship; (2) introduction of weak and strong acceptors in one polymer to achieve a broad coverage of light absorption and improve the power conversion efficiency (PCE); (3) modification of benzothiadiazole (BT) acceptor in order to increase the electron withdrawing ability. Imide-based electron acceptors, 4-(5-bromothiophen-2-y1)-2-(2-ethylhexyl)-9- phenyl- 1H-benzo[f]isoindole-1,3(2H)-dione (BIDO-1) and 4,9-bis(5-bromothiophen-2-yl)-2-(2-ethylhexyl)-benzo[f]isoindole-1,3-dione (BIDO-2), were designed and synthesized. In this design, naphthalene is selected as its main core to maintain a planar structure, and thienyl groups are able to facilitate the bromination reaction and lower the band gap. BIDO-1 and BIDO-2 were successfully coupled with different donors by both Suzuki cross-coupling and Stille cross-coupling reactions. Based on the energy levels and band gaps of the BIDO-containing compounds and polymers, BIDO-1 and BIDO-2 are proved to be weak electron acceptors. Pyromellitic diimide (PMDI) was also studied and found to be a stronger electron acceptor than BIDO . In order to obtain broad absorption coverage, both weak acceptor ( BIDO-2) and strong acceptor diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) were introduced in the same polymer. The resulting polymers show two absorption bands at 400 and 600 nm and two emission peaks at 500 and 680 nm. The band gaps of the polymers are around 1.6 eV, which is ideal for OSC application. The PCE of 1.17% was achieved. Finally

  1. Anaerobic methanotrophy in tidal wetland: Effects of electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li-Hung; Yu, Zih-Huei; Wang, Pei-Ling

    2016-04-01

    Wetlands have been considered to represent the largest natural source of methane emission, contributing substantially to intensify greenhouse effect. Despite in situ methanogenesis fueled by organic degradation, methanotrophy also plays a vital role in controlling the exact quantity of methane release across the air-sediment interface. As wetlands constantly experience various disturbances of anthropogenic activities, biological burrowing, tidal inundation, and plant development, rapid elemental turnover would enable various electron acceptors available for anaerobic methanotrophy. The effects of electron acceptors on stimulating anaerobic methanotrophy and the population compositions involved in carbon transformation in wetland sediments are poorly explored. In this study, sediments recovered from tidally influenced, mangrove covered wetland in northern Taiwan were incubated under the static conditions to investigate whether anaerobic methanotrophy could be stimulated by the presence of individual electron acceptors. Our results demonstrated that anaerobic methanotrophy was clearly stimulated in incubations amended with no electron acceptor, sulfate, or Fe-oxyhydroxide. No apparent methane consumption was observed in incubations with nitrate, citrate, fumarate or Mn-oxides. Anaerobic methanotrophy in incubations with no exogenous electron acceptor appears to proceed at the greatest rates, being sequentially followed by incubations with sulfate and Fe-oxyhydroxide. The presence of basal salt solution stimulated methane oxidation by a factor of 2 to 3. In addition to the direct impact of electron acceptor and basal salts, incubations with sediments retrieved from low tide period yielded a lower rate of methane oxidation than from high tide period. Overall, this study demonstrates that anaerobic methanotrophy in wetland sediments could proceed under various treatments of electron acceptors. Low sulfate content is not a critical factor in inhibiting methane

  2. KRAS Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Wilbur A.; Haney, Jerry; Sugita, Michio; Bemis, Lynne; Jimeno, Antonio; Messersmith, Wells A.

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of colon carcinoma with the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody Cetuximab is reported to be ineffective in KRAS-mutant tumors. Mutation testing techniques have therefore become an urgent concern. We have compared three methods for detecting KRAS mutations in 59 cases of colon carcinoma: 1) high resolution melting, 2) the amplification refractory mutation system using a bifunctional self-probing primer (ARMS/Scorpion, ARMS/S), and 3) direct sequencing. We also evaluated the effects of the methods of sectioning and coring of paraffin blocks to obtain tumor DNA on assay sensitivity and specificity. The most sensitive and specific combination of block sampling and mutational analysis was ARMS/S performed on DNA derived from 1-mm paraffin cores. This combination of tissue sampling and testing method detected KRAS mutations in 46% of colon tumors. Four samples were positive by ARMS/S, but initially negative by direct sequencing. Cloned DNA samples were retested by direct sequencing, and in all four cases KRAS mutations were identified in the DNA. In six cases, high resolution melting abnormalities could not be confirmed as specific mutations either by ARMS/S or direct sequencing. We conclude that coring of the paraffin blocks and testing by ARMS/S is a sensitive, specific, and efficient method for KRAS testing. PMID:20007845

  3. Point Mutations in Human β Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Have Differential Effects on Sarcomeric Structure and Assembly: An ATP Binding Site Change Disrupts Both Thick and Thin Filaments, Whereas Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Mutations Display Normal Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Becker, K. David; Gottshall, Kim R.; Hickey, Reed; Perriard, Jean-Claude; Chien, Kenneth R.

    1997-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a human heart disease characterized by increased ventricular mass, focal areas of fibrosis, myocyte, and myofibrillar disorganization. This genetically dominant disease can be caused by mutations in any one of several contractile proteins, including β cardiac myosin heavy chain (βMHC). To determine whether point mutations in human βMHC have direct effects on interfering with filament assembly and sarcomeric structure, full-length wild-type and mutant human βMHC cDNAs were cloned and expressed in primary cultures of neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRC) under conditions that promote myofibrillogenesis. A lysine to arginine change at amino acid 184 in the consensus ATP binding sequence of human βMHC resulted in abnormal subcellular localization and disrupted both thick and thin filament structure in transfected NRC. Diffuse βMHC K184R protein appeared to colocalize with actin throughout the myocyte, suggesting a tight interaction of these two proteins. Human βMHC with S472V mutation assembled normally into thick filaments and did not affect sarcomeric structure. Two mutant myosins previously described as causing human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, R249Q and R403Q, were competent to assemble into thick filaments producing myofibrils with well defined I bands, A bands, and H zones. Coexpression and detection of wild-type βMHC and either R249Q or R403Q proteins in the same myocyte showed these proteins are equally able to assemble into the sarcomere and provided no discernible differences in subcellular localization. Thus, human βMHC R249Q and R403Q mutant proteins were readily incorporated into NRC sarcomeres and did not disrupt myofilament formation. This study indicates that the phenotype of myofibrillar disarray seen in HCM patients which harbor either of these two mutations may not be directly due to the failure of the mutant myosin heavy chain protein to assemble and form normal sarcomeres, but may rather be a

  4. Intramolecular electron transfer in fullerene/ferrocene based donor-bridge-acceptor dyads

    SciTech Connect

    Guldi, D.M.; Maggini, M.; Scorrano, G.; Prato, M.

    1997-02-05

    A systematic steady-state fluorescence and time-resolved flash photolytic investigation of a series of covalently linked fullerene/ferrocene based donor-bridge-acceptor dyads is reported as a function of the nature of the spacer between the donor site (ferrocene) and acceptor site (fullerene) and the dielectric constant of the medium. The fluorescence of the investigated dyads 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 in methylcyclohexane at 77 K were substantially quenched, relative to N-methylfulleropyrrolidine 1, indicating intramolecular quenching of the fullerene excited singlet state. Excitation of N-methylfulleropyrrolidine revealed the immediate formation of the excited singlet state, with {lambda}{sub max} around 886 nm. A rapid intersystem crossing ({tau}{sub 1/2} = 1.2 ps ) to the excited triplet state was observed with characteristic absorption around 705 nm. Picosecond resolved photolysis of dyads 2-6 in toluene showed light-induced formation of the excited singlet state which undergoes rapid intramolecular quenching. Nanosecond-resolved photolysis of dyads 3 and 4 in degassed benzonitrile revealed long-lived charge separated states with characteristic fullerene radical-anion bands at {lambda}{sub max} = 1055 nm. 30 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Discovery of candidate disease genes in ENU-induced mouse mutants by large-scale sequencing, including a splice-site mutation in nucleoredoxin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An accurate and precisely annotated genome assembly is a fundamental requirement for functional genomic analysis. Here, the complete DNA sequence and gene annotation of mouse Chromosome 11 was used to test the efficacy of large-scale sequencing for mutation identification. We re-sequenced the 14,000...

  6. Developmental regulation of tau splicing is disrupted in stem cell-derived neurons from frontotemporal dementia patients with the 10 + 16 splice-site mutation in MAPT.

    PubMed

    Sposito, Teresa; Preza, Elisavet; Mahoney, Colin J; Setó-Salvia, Núria; Ryan, Natalie S; Morris, Huw R; Arber, Charles; Devine, Michael J; Houlden, Henry; Warner, Thomas T; Bushell, Trevor J; Zagnoni, Michele; Kunath, Tilo; Livesey, Frederick J; Fox, Nick C; Rossor, Martin N; Hardy, John; Wray, Selina

    2015-09-15

    The alternative splicing of the tau gene, MAPT, generates six protein isoforms in the adult human central nervous system (CNS). Tau splicing is developmentally regulated and dysregulated in disease. Mutations in MAPT that alter tau splicing cause frontotemporal dementia (FTD) with tau pathology, providing evidence for a causal link between altered tau splicing and disease. The use of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons has revolutionized the way we model neurological disease in vitro. However, as most tau mutations are located within or around the alternatively spliced exon 10, it is important that iPSC-neurons splice tau appropriately in order to be used as disease models. To address this issue, we analyzed the expression and splicing of tau in iPSC-derived cortical neurons from control patients and FTD patients with the 10 + 16 intronic mutation in MAPT. We show that control neurons only express the fetal tau isoform (0N3R), even at extended time points of 100 days in vitro. Neurons from FTD patients with the 10 + 16 mutation in MAPT express both 0N3R and 0N4R tau isoforms, demonstrating that this mutation overrides the developmental regulation of exon 10 inclusion in our in vitro model. Further, at extended time points of 365 days in vitro, we observe a switch in tau splicing to include six tau isoforms as seen in the adult human CNS. Our results demonstrate the importance of neuronal maturity for use in in vitro modeling and provide a system that will be important for understanding the functional consequences of altered tau splicing. PMID:26136155

  7. Developmental regulation of tau splicing is disrupted in stem cell-derived neurons from frontotemporal dementia patients with the 10 + 16 splice-site mutation in MAPT

    PubMed Central

    Sposito, Teresa; Preza, Elisavet; Mahoney, Colin J.; Setó-Salvia, Núria; Ryan, Natalie S.; Morris, Huw R.; Arber, Charles; Devine, Michael J.; Houlden, Henry; Warner, Thomas T.; Bushell, Trevor J.; Zagnoni, Michele; Kunath, Tilo; Livesey, Frederick J.; Fox, Nick C.; Rossor, Martin N.; Hardy, John; Wray, Selina

    2015-01-01

    The alternative splicing of the tau gene, MAPT, generates six protein isoforms in the adult human central nervous system (CNS). Tau splicing is developmentally regulated and dysregulated in disease. Mutations in MAPT that alter tau splicing cause frontotemporal dementia (FTD) with tau pathology, providing evidence for a causal link between altered tau splicing and disease. The use of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons has revolutionized the way we model neurological disease in vitro. However, as most tau mutations are located within or around the alternatively spliced exon 10, it is important that iPSC–neurons splice tau appropriately in order to be used as disease models. To address this issue, we analyzed the expression and splicing of tau in iPSC-derived cortical neurons from control patients and FTD patients with the 10 + 16 intronic mutation in MAPT. We show that control neurons only express the fetal tau isoform (0N3R), even at extended time points of 100 days in vitro. Neurons from FTD patients with the 10 + 16 mutation in MAPT express both 0N3R and 0N4R tau isoforms, demonstrating that this mutation overrides the developmental regulation of exon 10 inclusion in our in vitro model. Further, at extended time points of 365 days in vitro, we observe a switch in tau splicing to include six tau isoforms as seen in the adult human CNS. Our results demonstrate the importance of neuronal maturity for use in in vitro modeling and provide a system that will be important for understanding the functional consequences of altered tau splicing. PMID:26136155

  8. The sua8 suppressors of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encode replacements of conserved residues within the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II and affect transcription start site selection similarly to sua7 (TFIIB) mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Berroteran, R W; Ware, D E; Hampsey, M

    1994-01-01

    Mutations in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae sua8 gene were found to be suppressors of an aberrant ATG translation initiation codon in the leader region of the cyc1 gene. Analysis of cyc1 transcripts from sua8 mutants revealed that suppression is a consequence of diminished transcription initiation at the normal start sites in favor of initiation at downstream sites, including a site between the aberrant and normal ATG start codons. This effect is not cyc1 gene specific since initiation at other genes, including ADH1, CYC7, and HIS4, was similarly affected, although initiation at HIS3 and SPT15 was unaffected. The SUA8 gene was cloned and partially sequenced, revealing identity to RPB1, which encodes the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. The sua8 suppressors are the result of single amino acid replacements of highly conserved residues. Three replacements were found either within or immediately preceding homology block D, and a fourth was found adjacent to homology block H, indicating that these regions play a role in defining start sites in vivo. Nearly identical effects on start site selection were observed for sua7 suppressors, which encode altered forms of TFIIB. Synthetic lethality was associated with double sua7 sua8 suppressor mutations, and recessive sua7 mutants failed to fully complement recessive sua8 mutants in heterozygous diploids (nonallelic noncomplementation). These data indicate that the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II and TFIIB are important determinants of transcription start site selection in S. cerevisiae and suggest that this function might be conferred by interaction between these two proteins. Images PMID:8264591

  9. A case report: Autosomal recessive microcephaly caused by a novel mutation in MCPH1 gene.

    PubMed

    Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh; Fardaei, Majid; Gholami, Milad; Miryounesi, Mohammad

    2015-10-15

    Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly (MCPH-MIM 251200) is distinguished by congenital decrease in occipito-frontal head circumference (OFC) of at least 2 standard deviations (SD) below population average in addition to non-progressive mental retardation, without any prominent neurological disorder. Mutations in MCPH1, which encodes the protein microcephalin have been detected in this disorder. Here we report a consanguineous Iranian family with 2 children affected with microcephaly. Despite the severe mental retardation observed in the male patient, the female patient had normal intelligent with no delay in motor milestones or speech. A novel splice-acceptor site homozygous mutation has been detected in intron 4 of MCPH1 gene (c.322-2A>T) which results in an RNA processing defect with a 15-nucleotide deletion in exon 5 of the mRNA transcript (r.322_336del15, p.R108_Q112del5). This novel mutation has resulted in different phenotypes in affected male and female patients of this family. The sex-specific variations in gene regulation during brain development may partially explain such difference in phenotypes probably in addition to other mechanisms such as modifier genes. PMID:26192461

  10. U2AF1 Mutations Alter Sequence Specificity of pre-mRNA Binding and Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Okeyo-Owuor, Theresa; White, Brian S.; Chatrikhi, Rakesh; Mohan, Dipika R.; Kim, Sanghyun; Griffith, Malachi; Ding, Li; Ketkar-Kulkarni, Shamika; Hundal, Jasreet; Laird, Kholiswa M.; Kielkopf, Clara L.; Ley, Timothy J.; Walter, Matthew J.; Graubert, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified missense mutations in the U2AF1 splicing factor affecting codons S34 (S34F and S34Y) or Q157 (Q157R and Q157P) in 11% of patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Although the role of U2AF1 as an accessory factor in the U2 snRNP is well established, it is not yet clear how mutations affect splicing or contribute to MDS pathophysiology. We analyzed splice junctions in RNA-seq data generated from transfected CD34+ hematopoietic cells and found significant differences in the abundance of known and novel junctions in samples expressing mutant U2AF1 (S34F). For selected transcripts, splicing alterations detected by RNA-seq were confirmed by analysis of primary de novo MDS patient samples. These effects were not due to impaired U2AF1 (S34F) localization as it co-localized normally with U2AF2 within nuclear speckles. We further found evidence in the RNA-seq data for decreased affinity of U2AF1 (S34F) for uridine (relative to cytidine) at the e-3 position immediately upstream of the splice acceptor site and corroborated this finding using affinity binding assays. These data suggest that the S34F mutation alters U2AF1 function in the context of specific RNA sequences, leading to aberrant alternative splicing of target genes, some of which may be relevant for MDS pathogenesis. PMID:25311244

  11. Mutations in the unc-52 gene responsible for body wall muscle defects in adult Caenorhabditis elegans are located in alternatively spliced exons

    SciTech Connect

    Rogalski, T.M.; Gilchrist, E.J.; Mullen, G.P.

    1995-01-01

    The unc-52 gene in Caenorhabditis elegans produces several large proteins that function in the basement membrane underlying muscle cells. Mutations in this gene result in defects in myofilament assembly and in the attachment of the myofilament lattice to the muscle cell membrane. The st549 and ut111 alleles of unc-52 produce a lethal (Pat) terminal phenotype whereas the e444, e669, e998, e1012 and e1421 mutations result in viable, paralyzed animals. We have identified the sequence alterations responsible for these mutant phenotypes. The st549 allele has a premature stop codon in exon 7 that should result in the complete elimination of unc-52 gene function, and the ut111 allele has a Tc1 transposon inserted into the second exon of the gene. The five remaining mutations are clustered in a small interval containing three adjacent, alternatively spliced exons (16, 17 and 18). These mutations affect some, but not all of the unc-52-encoded proteins. Thirteen intragenic revertants of the e669, e998, e1012 and e1421 alleles have also been sequenced. The majority of these carry the original mutation plus a G to A transition in the conserved splice acceptor site of the affected exon. This result suggests that reversion of the mutant phenotype in these strains may be the result of exon-skipping. 38 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. WRNIP1 accumulates at laser light irradiated sites rapidly via its ubiquitin-binding zinc finger domain and independently from its ATPase domain

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Hironoshin; Yoshimura, Akari; Edo, Takato; Kanno, Shin-ichiro; Tada, Syusuke; Seki, Masayuki; Yasui, Akira; Enomoto, Takemi

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer WRNIP1 accumulates in laser light irradiated sites very rapidly via UBZ domain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ATPase domain of WRNIP1 is dispensable for its accumulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The accumulation of WRNIP1 seems not to be dependent on the interaction with WRN. -- Abstract: WRNIP1 (Werner helicase-interacting protein 1) was originally identified as a protein that interacts with the Werner syndrome responsible gene product. WRNIP1 contains a ubiquitin-binding zinc-finger (UBZ) domain in the N-terminal region and two leucine zipper motifs in the C-terminal region. In addition, it possesses an ATPase domain in the middle of the molecule and the lysine residues serving as ubiquitin acceptors in the entire of the molecule. Here, we report that WRNIP1 accumulates in laser light irradiated sites very rapidly via its ubiquitin-binding zinc finger domain, which is known to bind polyubiquitin and to be involved in ubiquitination of WRNIP1 itself. The accumulation of WRNIP1 in laser light irradiated sites also required the C-terminal region containing two leucine zippers, which is reportedly involved in the oligomerization of WRNIP1. Mutated WRNIP1 with a deleted ATPase domain or with mutations in lysine residues, which serve as ubiquitin acceptors, accumulated in laser light irradiated sites, suggesting that the ATPase domain of WRNIP1 and ubiquitination of WRNIP1 are dispensable for the accumulation.

  13. Mutation of the dengue virus type 2 envelope protein heparan sulfate binding sites or the domain III lateral ridge blocks replication in Vero cells prior to membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Roehrig, John T.; Butrapet, Siritorn; Liss, Nathan M.; Bennett, Susan L.; Luy, Betty E.; Childers, Thomas; Boroughs, Karen L.; Stovall, Janae L.; Calvert, Amanda E.; Blair, Carol D.; Huang, Claire Y.-H.

    2013-07-05

    Using an infectious cDNA clone we engineered seven mutations in the putative heparan sulfate- and receptor-binding motifs of the envelope protein of dengue virus serotype 2, strain 16681. Four mutant viruses, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, and KKK305/307/310EEE, were recovered following transfection of C6/36 cells. A fifth mutant, KK291/295EE, was recovered from C6/36 cells with a compensatory E295V mutation. All mutants grew in and mediated fusion of virus-infected C6/36 cells, but three of the mutants, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, did not grow in Vero cells without further modification. Two Vero cell lethal mutants, KK291/295EV and KKK307/307/310EEE, failed to replicate in DC-SIGN-transformed Raji cells and did not react with monoclonal antibodies known to block DENV attachment to Vero cells. Additionally, both mutants were unable to initiate negative-strand vRNA synthesis in Vero cells by 72 h post-infection, suggesting that the replication block occurred prior to virus-mediated membrane fusion. - Highlights: • Heparan sulfate- and receptor-binding motifs of DENV2 envelope protein were mutated. • Four mutant viruses were isolated—all could fuse C6/36 cells. • Two of these mutants were lethal in Vero cells without further modification. • Lethal mutations were KK291/295EV and KKK305/307/310EEE. • Cell attachment was implicated as the replication block for both mutants.

  14. The conformationally flexible S9-S10 linker region in the core domain of p53 contains a novel MDM2 binding site whose mutation increases ubiquitination of p53 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Harumi; Burch, Lindsay R; Smith, Amanda J; Dornan, David; Wallace, Maura; Ball, Kathryn L; Hupp, Ted R

    2002-08-01

    Although the N-terminal BOX-I domain of the tumor suppressor protein p53 contains the primary docking site for MDM2, previous studies demonstrated that RNA stabilizes the MDM2.p53 complex using a p53 mutant lacking the BOX-I motif. In vitro assays measuring the specific activity of MDM2 in the ligand-free and RNA-bound state identified a novel MDM2 interaction site in the core domain of p53. As defined using phage-peptide display, the RNA.MDM2 isoform exhibited a notable switch in peptide binding specificity, with enhanced affinity for novel peptide sequences in either p53 or small nuclear ribonucleoprotein-U (snRNP-U) and substantially reduced affinity for the primary p53 binding site in the BOX-I domain. The consensus binding site for the RNA.MDM2 complex within p53 is SGXLLGESXF, which links the S9-S10 beta-sheets flanking the BOX-IV and BOX-V motifs in the core domain and which is a site of reversible conformational flexibility in p53. Mutation of conserved amino acids in the linker at Ser(261) and Leu(264), which bridges the S9-S10 beta-sheets, stimulated p53 activity from reporter templates and increased MDM2-dependent ubiquitination of p53. Furthermore, mutation of the conserved Phe(270) within the S10 beta-sheet resulted in a mutant p53, which binds more stably to RNA.MDM2 complexes in vitro and which is strikingly hyper-ubiquitinated in vivo. Introducing an Ala(19) mutation into the p53(F270A) protein abolished both RNA.MDM2 complex binding and hyper-ubiquitination in vivo, thus indicating that p53(F270A) protein hyper-ubiquitination depends upon MDM2 binding to its primary site in the BOX-I domain. Together, these data identify a novel MDM2 binding interface within the S9-S10 beta-sheet region of p53 that plays a regulatory role in modulating the rate of MDM2-dependent ubiquitination of p53 in cells. PMID:11925449

  15. Glycogenosis type VII (Tarui disease) in a Swedish family: Two novel mutations in muscle phosphofructokinase gene (PFK-M) resulting in intron retentions

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, R.C.; Exelbert, R.; Plotz, P.H.

    1996-07-01

    Phosphofructokinase (PFK) plays a major role in glycolysis. Human PFK is composed of three isoenzyme subunits (muscle [M], liver [L], and platelet [P]), which are encoded by different genes. Deficiency of muscle isoenzyme (PFK-M), glycogenosis type VII (Tarui disease), is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by an exertional myopathy and hemolytic syndrome. Several disease-causing mutations have been identified in the PFK-M gene in Japanese, Ashkenazi Jewish, Italian, French Canadian, and Swiss patients. We describe the genetic defect in a Swedish family with affected individuals in two generations. The patients are compound heterozygotes: two different mutations result in retention of intron 13 or intron 16 sequences into mRNA. A G1127A transition destroys the 5{prime} donor site of intron 13, resulting in a 155-nt retention of the intronic sequence. An a-to-g base change in intron 16 creates a new acceptor splice site, resulting in a 63-nt retention of intronic sequence. Both mutations are predicted to result in premature termination of translation. Some of the transcripts generated from the intron 16 mutated allele also contain intron 10 sequence unspliced. 34 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Microtubule Affinity-regulating Kinase 2 (MARK2) Turns on Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog (PTEN)-induced Kinase 1 (PINK1) at Thr-313, a Mutation Site in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Matenia, Dorthe; Hempp, Cindy; Timm, Thomas; Eikhof, Annika; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria

    2012-01-01

    The kinase MARK2/Par-1 plays key roles in several cell processes, including neurodegeneration such as Alzheimer disease by phosphorylating tau and detaching it from microtubules. In search of interaction partners of MARK2, we identified phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-induced kinase 1 (PINK1), which is important for the survival of neurons and whose mutations are linked to familial Parkinson disease (PD). MARK2 phosphorylated and activated the cleaved form of PINK1 (ΔN-PINK1; amino acids 156–581). Thr-313 was the primary phosphorylation site, a residue mutated to a non-phosphorylatable form (T313M) in a frequent variant of PD. Mutation of Thr-313 to Met or Glu in PINK1 showed toxic effects with abnormal mitochondrial distribution in neurons. MARK2 and PINK1 were found to colocalize with mitochondria and regulate their transport. ΔN-PINK1 promoted anterograde transport and increased the fraction of stationary mitochondria, whereas full-length PINK1 promoted retrograde transport. In both cases, MARK2 enhanced the effects. The results identify MARK2 as an upstream regulator of PINK1 and ΔN-PINK1 and provide insights into the regulation of mitochondrial trafficking in neurons and neurodegeneration in PD. PMID:22238344

  17. A novel donor splice site in intron 11 of the CFTR gene, created by mutation 1811+1.6kbA-->G, produces a new exon: high frequency in Spanish cystic fibrosis chromosomes and association with severe phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Chillón, M; Dörk, T; Casals, T; Giménez, J; Fonknechten, N; Will, K; Ramos, D; Nunes, V; Estivill, X

    1995-01-01

    mRNA analysis of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene in tissues of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients has allowed us to detect a cryptic exon. The new exon involves 49 base pairs between exons 11 and 12 and is due to a point mutation (1811+1.6kbA-->G) that creates a new donor splice site in intron 11. Semiquantitative mRNA analysis showed that 1811+1.6kbA-->G-mRNA was 5-10-fold less abundant than delta F508 mRNA. Mutation 1811+1.6kbA-->G was found in 21 Spanish and 1 German CF chromosomes, making it the fourth-most-frequent mutation (2%) in the Spanish population. Individuals with genotype delta F508/1811+1.6kbA-->G have only 1%-3% of normal CFTR mRNA. This loss of 97% of normal CFTR mRNA must be responsible for the pancreatic insufficiency and for the severe CF phenotype in these patients. Images Figure 3 PMID:7534040

  18. A novel donor splice site in intron 11 of the CFTR gene, created by mutation 1811 + 1.6kbA {yields} G, produces a new exon: High frequency in spanish cystic fibrosis chromosomes and association with severe phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Chillon, M.; Casals, T.; Gimenez, J.; Ramos, D.; Nunes, V.; Estivill, X.; Doerk, T.; Will, K.; Fonknechten, N.

    1995-03-01

    mRNA analysis of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene in tissues of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients has allowed us to detect a cryptic exon. The new exon involves 49 base pairs between exons 11 and 12 and is due to a point mutation (1811+1.6bA{yields}G) that creates a new donor splice site in intron 11. Semiquantitative mRNA analysis showed that 1811+1.6kbA{r_arrow}G-mRNA was 5-10-fold less abundant than {triangle}F508 mRNA. Mutations 1811+1.6kbA{yields}G was found in 21 Spanish and 1 German CF chromosome(s), making it the fourth-most-frequent mutation (2%) in the Spanish population. Individuals with genotype {triangle}F508/1811+1.6kbA{yields}G have only 1%-3% of normal CFTR mRNA. This loss of 97% of normal CFTR mRNA must be responsible for the pancreatic insufficiency and for the severe CF phenotype in these patients. 30 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Autosomal recessive hyponatremia due to isolated salt wasting in sweat associated with a mutation in the active site of Carbonic Anhydrase 12.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Emad; Leventhal, Neta; Parvari, Galit; Hanukoglu, Aaron; Hanukoglu, Israel; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered; Feinstein, Yael; Weinbrand, Jenny; Jacoby, Harel; Manor, Esther; Nagar, Tal; Beck, John C; Sheffield, Val C; Hershkovitz, Eli; Parvari, Ruti

    2011-04-01

    Genetic disorders of excessive salt loss from sweat glands have been observed in pseudohypoaldosteronism type I (PHA) and cystic fibrosis that result from mutations in genes encoding epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) subunits and the transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), respectively. We identified a novel autosomal recessive form of isolated salt wasting in sweat, which leads to severe infantile hyponatremic dehydration. Three affected individuals from a small Bedouin clan presented with failure to thrive, hyponatremic dehydration and hyperkalemia with isolated sweat salt wasting. Using positional cloning, we identified the association of a Glu143Lys mutation in carbonic anhydrase 12 (CA12) with the disease. Carbonic anhydrase is a zinc metalloenzyme that catalyzes the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide to form a bicarbonate anion and a proton. Glu143 in CA12 is essential for zinc coordination in this metalloenzyme and lowering of the protein-metal affinity reduces its catalytic activity. This is the first presentation of an isolated loss of salt from sweat gland mimicking PHA, associated with a mutation in the CA12 gene not previously implicated in human disorders. Our data demonstrate the importance of bicarbonate anion and proton production on salt concentration in sweat and its significance for sodium homeostasis. PMID:21184099

  20. A new strategy to determine the protein mutation site using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization in-source decay: derivatization by ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mengzhe; Zhai, Yixing; Guo, Cheng; Liu, Yaqin; Tang, Daoquan; Pan, Yuanjiang

    2015-03-20

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) can be considered as state of the art in the field of proteins and peptides analysis. In this work, we have designed an ionic liquid derivative strategy to obtain abundant fragment ions in MALDI in-source decay (ISD) and used the analysis of angiogenin with mutation in the fortieth (K40I) as an instance. Firstly, we have synthesized two types of ionic liquids, 3-allyl-4-methyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium and 4-methyl-3-(pent-4-yn-1-yl)-1H-imidazol-3-ium. Then in the light-catalyzed reaction, the alkenyl ionic liquid can open the disulfide bond of K40I protein and add to the thiol. And the derived protein can process in-source decay under the effect of ionic liquid group to produce c-z type ions. Additionally this fragmentation is potentiated to support widely range of fragment ions which can cover the location of mutation. Our results have supplied a new top-down method about how to analyze the mutation or even post-translational modification of proteins in MALDI mass spectrometry. PMID:25732582

  1. Rigid Conjugated Twisted Truxene Dimers and Trimers as Electron Acceptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gang; Lami, Vincent; Rominger, Frank; Vaynzof, Yana; Mastalerz, Michael

    2016-03-14

    A new class of rigid twisted truxenone oligomers with an enlarged π backbone has been established by oxidative dimerization reactions. The resulting extended conjugated systems have large extinction coefficients and low-lying LUMO levels and show good solubility in common organic solvents, thus making them attractive compounds as new electron acceptors in organic electronics. Their suitability as electron acceptors has been demonstrated in bulk-heterojunction organic solar cells with poly({4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl}{3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]thiophenediyl}) (PTB7) as the donor material. PMID:26891096

  2. Probing the spin states of a single acceptor atom.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Joost; Salfi, Joe; Mol, Jan A; Verduijn, Jan; Tettamanzi, Giuseppe C; Hamilton, Alex R; Collaert, Nadine; Rogge, Sven

    2014-03-12

    We demonstrate a single-hole transistor using an individual acceptor dopant embedded in a silicon channel. Magneto-transport spectroscopy reveals that the ground state splits as a function of magnetic field into four states, which is unique for a single hole bound to an acceptor in a bulk semiconductor. The two lowest spin states are heavy (|m(j)| = 3/2) and light (|m(j)| = 1/2) hole-like, a two-level system that can be electrically driven and is characterized by a magnetic field dependent and long relaxation time, which are properties of interest for qubits. Although the bulklike spin splitting of a boron atom is preserved in our nanotransistor, the measured Landé g-factors, |g(hh)| = 0.81 ± 0.06 and |g(lh)| = 0.85 ± 0.21 for heavy and light holes respectively, are lower than the bulk value. PMID:24571637

  3. Interface effects on acceptor qubits in silicon and germanium.

    PubMed

    Abadillo-Uriel, J C; Calderón, M J

    2016-01-15

    Dopant-based quantum computing implementations often require the dopants to be situated close to an interface to facilitate qubit manipulation with local gates. Interfaces not only modify the energies of the bound states but also affect their symmetry. Making use of the successful effective mass theory we study the energy spectra of acceptors in Si or Ge taking into account the quantum confinement, the dielectric mismatch and the central cell effects. The presence of an interface puts constraints to the allowed symmetries and leads to the splitting of the ground state in two Kramers doublets (Mol et al 2015 Appl. Phys. Lett. 106 203110). Inversion symmetry breaking also implies parity mixing which affects the allowed optical transitions. Consequences for acceptor qubits are discussed. PMID:26618443

  4. Defect Donor and Acceptor in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Look, D.C.; Reynolds, D.C.; Hemsky, J.W.; Sizelove, J.R.; Jones, R.L.

    1997-09-01

    High-energy (0.7{endash}1MeV) electron irradiation in GaN grown on sapphire produces shallow donors and deep or shallow acceptors at equal rates, 1{plus_minus}0.2 cm{sup {minus}1}. The data, in conjunction with theory, are consistent only with the shallow donor being the N vacancy, and the acceptor the N interstitial. The N-vacancy donor energy is 64{plus_minus}10 meV, much larger than the value of 18meV found for the residual donor (probably Si) in this material. The Hall-effect measurements also reveal a degenerate n -type layer at the GaN/sapphire interface which must be accounted for to get the proper donor activation energy. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. A new AURKC mutation causing macrozoospermia: implications for human spermatogenesis and clinical diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ben Khelifa, Mariem; Zouari, Raoudha; Harbuz, Radu; Halouani, Lazhar; Arnoult, Christophe; Lunardi, Joël; Ray, Pierre F.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of close to 100% large-headed multi-tailed spermatozoa in the ejaculate has been described as a rare phenotype of male infertility with a very poor prognosis. We demonstrated previously that most cases were caused by a homozygous mutation (c.144delC) in the Aurora Kinase C gene (AURKC) leading to the absence or the production of a nonfunctional protein. AURKC deficiency in these patients blocked meiosis and resulted in the production of tetraploid spermatozoa unsuitable for fertilization. We describe here the study of two brothers presenting with large-headed spermatozoa. Molecular analysis of the AURKC gene was carried out in two brothers presenting with a typical large headed spermatozoa phenotype. Both affected brothers were heterozygous for the c.144delC mutation. After complete sequencing of the gene a new heterozygous variant, c.436-2A>G, was identified in both patients. This mutation is located in the acceptor consensus splice site of exon 5. AURKC transcripts were extracted from one of the patient’s leukocytes and Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) could be realised showing the presence of a truncated transcript indicating that c.436-2A>G leads to the skipping of exon 5. These results indicate that AURKC molecular analysis of patients with large-headed spermatozoa should not be stopped in the absence of a homozygous recurrent mutation on exon 3 but complete sequence analysis should be performed. This diagnosis is important as the identification of AURKC mutations in patients indicates that all spermatozoa will be chromosomally abnormal and that ICSI should not be attempted. PMID:21733974

  6. Functional consequences of transferrin receptor-2 mutations causing hereditary hemochromatosis type 3.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Ricky; Shvartsman, Maya; Morán, Erica; Lois, Sergi; Aranda, Jessica; Barqué, Anna; de la Cruz, Xavier; Bruguera, Miquel; Vagace, José Manuel; Gervasini, Guillermo; Sanz, Cristina; Sánchez, Mayka

    2015-05-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) type 3 is an autosomal recessive disorder of iron metabolism characterized by excessive iron deposition in the liver and caused by mutations in the transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2) gene. Here, we describe three new HH type 3 Spanish families with four TFR2 mutations (p.Gly792Arg, c.1606-8A>G, Gln306*, and Gln672*). The missense variation p.Gly792Arg was found in homozygosity in two adult patients of the same family, and in compound heterozygosity in an adult proband that also carries a novel intronic change (c.1606-8A>G). Two new nonsense TFR2 mutations (Gln306* and Gln672*) were detected in a pediatric case. We examine the functional consequences of two TFR2 variants (p.Gly792Arg and c.1606-8A>G) using molecular and computational methods. Cellular protein localization studies using immunofluorescence demonstrated that the plasma membrane localization of p.Gly792Arg TFR2 is impaired. Splicing studies in vitro and in vivo reveal that the c.1606-8A>G mutation leads to the creation of a new acceptor splice site and an aberrant TFR2 mRNA. The reported mutations caused HH type 3 by protein truncation, altering TFR2 membrane localization or by mRNA splicing defect, producing a nonfunctional TFR2 protein and a defective signaling transduction for hepcidin regulation. TFR2 genotyping should be considered in adult but also in pediatric cases with early-onset of iron overload. PMID:26029709

  7. 2012 ELECTRON DONOR-ACCEPTOR INTERACTIONS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, AUGUST 5-10, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    McCusker, James

    2012-08-10

    The upcoming incarnation of the Gordon Research Conference on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions will feature sessions on classic topics including proton-coupled electron transfer, dye-sensitized solar cells, and biological electron transfer, as well as emerging areas such as quantum coherence effects in donor-acceptor interactions, spintronics, and the application of donor-acceptor interactions in chemical synthesis.

  8. An extended Foerster-Dexter model for correlated donor-acceptor placement in solid state materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotman, S. R.; Hartmann, F. X.

    1987-09-01

    The current theory of donor-acceptor interactions in solid-state materials is based on a random distribution of donors and acceptors through the crystal. In this paper, we present a model to calculate the observable transfer rates for the correlated positioning of donors and acceptors in laser materials. Chemical effects leading to such correlations are discussed.

  9. Free Carrier Generation in Organic Photovoltaic Bulk Heterojunctions of Conjugated Polymers with Molecular Acceptors: Planar versus Spherical Acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nardes, Alexandre M.; Ferguson, Andrew J.; Wolfer, Pascal; Gui, Kurt; Burn, Paul L.; Meredith, Paul; Kopidakis, Nikos

    2014-03-05

    We present a comparative study of the photophysical performance of the prototypical fullerene derivative PC61BM with a planar small-molecule acceptor in an organic photovoltaic device. The small-molecule planar acceptor is 2-[{7-(9,9-di-n-propyl-9H-fluoren-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazol-4-yl}methylene]malononitrile, termed K12. We discuss photoinduced free charge-carrier generation and transport in blends of PC61BM or K12 with poly(3-n-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), surveying literature results for P3HT:PC61BM and presenting new results on P3HT:K12. For both systems we also review previous work on film structure and correlate the structural and photophysical results. In both cases, a disordered mixed phase is formed between P3HT and the acceptor, although the photophysical properties of this mixed phase differ markedly for PC61BM and K12. In the case of PC61BM the mixed phase acts as a free carrier generation region that can efficiently shuttle carriers to the pure polymer and fullerene domains. As a result, the vast majority of excitons quenched in P3HT:PC61BM blends yield free carriers detected by the contactless time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) method. In contrast, approximately 85 % of the excitons quenched in P3HT:K12 do not result in free carriers over the nanosecond timescale of the TRMC experiment. We attribute this to poor electron-transport properties in the mixed P3HT:K12 phase. Here, we propose that the observed differences can be traced to the respective shapes of PC61BM and K12: the three-dimensional nature of the fullerene cage facilitates coupling between PC61BM molecules irrespective of their relative orientation, whereas for K12 strong electronic coupling is only expected for molecules oriented with their π systems parallel to each other. Comparison between the eutectic compositions of the P3HT:PC61BM and P3HT:K12 shows that the former contains enough fullerene to form a percolation pathway for electrons, whereas the latter contains a sub

  10. Quantum confined acceptors and donors in InSe nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Mudd, G. W.; Patanè, A. Makarovsky, O.; Eaves, L.; Kudrynskyi, Z. R.; Kovalyuk, Z. D.; Fay, M. W.; Zólyomi, V.; Falko, V.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the radiative recombination of photo-excited carriers bound at native donors and acceptors in exfoliated nanoflakes of nominally undoped rhombohedral γ-polytype InSe. The binding energies of these states are found to increase with the decrease in flake thickness, L. We model their dependence on L using a two-dimensional hydrogenic model for impurities and show that they are strongly sensitive to the position of the impurities within the nanolayer.

  11. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel LMNA Splice-Site Mutation and Multigenic Heterozygosity of Potential Modifiers in a Family with Sick Sinus Syndrome, Dilated Cardiomyopathy, and Sudden Cardiac Death.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Michael V; Fung, Lianna; Jensen, Ember; Oh, Frances; Cung, Katherine; McCarthy, Linda A; Tran, Christine K; Hoang, Van; Hakim, Simin A; Grosberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The goals are to understand the primary genetic mechanisms that cause Sick Sinus Syndrome and to identify potential modifiers that may result in intrafamilial variability within a multigenerational family. The proband is a 63-year-old male with a family history of individuals (>10) with sinus node dysfunction, ventricular arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and sudden death. We used exome sequencing of a single individual to identify a novel LMNA mutation and demonstrated the importance of Sanger validation and family studies when evaluating candidates. After initial single-gene studies were negative, we conducted exome sequencing for the proband which produced 9 gigabases of sequencing data. Bioinformatics analysis showed 94% of the reads mapped to the reference and identified 128,563 unique variants with 108,795 (85%) located in 16,319 genes of 19,056 target genes. We discovered multiple variants in known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes that may serve as potential modifiers in disease expression. To identify candidate mutations, we focused on ~2,000 variants located in 237 genes of 283 known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes. We filtered the candidates to 41 variants in 33 genes using zygosity, protein impact, database searches, and clinical association. Only 21 of 41 (51%) variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. We selected nine confirmed variants with minor allele frequencies <1% for family studies. The results identified LMNA c.357-2A>G, a novel heterozygous splice-site mutation as the primary mutation with rare or novel variants in HCN4, MYBPC3, PKP4, TMPO, TTN, DMPK and KCNJ10 as potential modifiers and a mechanism consistent with haploinsufficiency. PMID:27182706

  12. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel LMNA Splice-Site Mutation and Multigenic Heterozygosity of Potential Modifiers in a Family with Sick Sinus Syndrome, Dilated Cardiomyopathy, and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Michael V.; Fung, Lianna; Jensen, Ember; Oh, Frances; Cung, Katherine; McCarthy, Linda A.; Tran, Christine K.; Hoang, Van; Hakim, Simin A.; Grosberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The goals are to understand the primary genetic mechanisms that cause Sick Sinus Syndrome and to identify potential modifiers that may result in intrafamilial variability within a multigenerational family. The proband is a 63-year-old male with a family history of individuals (>10) with sinus node dysfunction, ventricular arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and sudden death. We used exome sequencing of a single individual to identify a novel LMNA mutation and demonstrated the importance of Sanger validation and family studies when evaluating candidates. After initial single-gene studies were negative, we conducted exome sequencing for the proband which produced 9 gigabases of sequencing data. Bioinformatics analysis showed 94% of the reads mapped to the reference and identified 128,563 unique variants with 108,795 (85%) located in 16,319 genes of 19,056 target genes. We discovered multiple variants in known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes that may serve as potential modifiers in disease expression. To identify candidate mutations, we focused on ~2,000 variants located in 237 genes of 283 known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes. We filtered the candidates to 41 variants in 33 genes using zygosity, protein impact, database searches, and clinical association. Only 21 of 41 (51%) variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. We selected nine confirmed variants with minor allele frequencies <1% for family studies. The results identified LMNA c.357-2A>G, a novel heterozygous splice-site mutation as the primary mutation with rare or novel variants in HCN4, MYBPC3, PKP4, TMPO, TTN, DMPK and KCNJ10 as potential modifiers and a mechanism consistent with haploinsufficiency. PMID:27182706

  13. Design directed self-assembly of donor-acceptor polymers.

    PubMed

    Marszalek, Tomasz; Li, Mengmeng; Pisula, Wojciech

    2016-09-21

    Donor-acceptor polymers with an alternating array of donor and acceptor moieties have gained particular attention during recent years as active components of organic electronics. By implementation of suitable subunits within the conjugated backbone, these polymers can be made either electron-deficient or -rich. Additionally, their band gap and light absorption can be precisely tuned for improved light-harvesting in solar cells. On the other hand, the polymer design can also be modified to encode the desired supramolecular self-assembly in the solid-state that is essential for an unhindered transport of charge carriers. This review focuses on three major factors playing a role in the assembly of donor-acceptor polymers on surfaces which are (1) nature, geometry and substitution position of solubilizing alkyl side chains, (2) shape of the conjugated polymer defined by the backbone curvature, and (3) molecular weight which determines the conjugation length of the polymer. These factors adjust the fine balance between attractive and repulsive forces and ensure a close polymer packing important for an efficient charge hopping between neighboring chains. On the microscopic scale, an appropriate domain formation with a low density of structural defects in the solution deposited thin film is crucial for the charge transport. The charge carrier transport through such thin films is characterized by field-effect transistors as basic electronic elements. PMID:27440174

  14. Fullerene derivatives as electron acceptors for organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Mi, Dongbo; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Hee Un; Xu, Fei; Hwang, Do-Hoon

    2014-02-01

    Energy is currently one of the most important problems humankind faces. Depletion of traditional energy sources such as coal and oil results in the need to develop new ways to create, transport, and store electricity. In this regard, the sun, which can be considered as a giant nuclear fusion reactor, represents the most powerful source of energy available in our solar system. For photovoltaic cells to gain widespread acceptance as a source of clean and renewable energy, the cost per watt of solar energy must be decreased. Organic photovoltaic cells, developed in the past two decades, have potential as alternatives to traditional inorganic semiconductor photovoltaic cells, which suffer from high environmental pollution and energy consumption during production. Organic photovoltaic cells are composed of a blended film of a conjugated-polymer donor and a soluble fullerene-derivative acceptor sandwiched between a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)-coated indium tin oxide positive electrode and a low-work-function metal negative electrode. Considerable research efforts aim at designing and synthesizing novel fullerene derivatives as electron acceptors with up-raised lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy, better light-harvesting properties, higher electron mobility, and better miscibility with the polymer donor for improving the power conversion efficiency of the organic photovoltaic cells. In this paper, we systematically review novel fullerene acceptors synthesized through chemical modification for enhancing the photovoltaic performance by increasing open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current, and fill factor, which determine the performance of organic photovoltaic cells. PMID:24749413

  15. Spectral, thermal and kinetic studies of charge-transfer complexes formed between the highly effective antibiotic drug metronidazole and two types of acceptors: σ- and π-acceptors.

    PubMed

    Refat, Moamen S; Saad, Hosam A; Adam, Abdel Majid A

    2015-04-15

    Understanding the interaction between drugs and small inorganic or organic molecules is critical in being able to interpret the drug-receptor interactions and acting mechanism of these drugs. A combined solution and solid state study was performed to describe the complexation chemistry of drug metronidazole (MZ) which has a broad-spectrum antibacterial activity with two types of acceptors. The acceptors include, σ-acceptor (i.e., iodine) and π-acceptors (i.e., dichlorodicyanobenzoquinone (DDQ), chloranil (CHL) and picric acid (PA)). The molecular structure, spectroscopic characteristics, the binding modes as well as the thermal stability were deduced from IR, UV-vis, (1)H NMR and thermal studies. The binding ratio of complexation (MZ: acceptor) was determined to be 1:2 for the iodine acceptor and 1:1 for the DDQ, CHL or PA acceptor, according to the CHN elemental analyses and spectrophotometric titrations. It has been found that the complexation with CHL and PA acceptors increases the values of enthalpy and entropy, while the complexation with DDQ and iodine acceptors decreases the values of these parameters compared with the free MZ donor. PMID:25677533

  16. Spectral, thermal and kinetic studies of charge-transfer complexes formed between the highly effective antibiotic drug metronidazole and two types of acceptors: σ- and π-acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Saad, Hosam A.; Adam, Abdel Majid A.

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the interaction between drugs and small inorganic or organic molecules is critical in being able to interpret the drug-receptor interactions and acting mechanism of these drugs. A combined solution and solid state study was performed to describe the complexation chemistry of drug metronidazole (MZ) which has a broad-spectrum antibacterial activity with two types of acceptors. The acceptors include, σ-acceptor (i.e., iodine) and π-acceptors (i.e., dichlorodicyanobenzoquinone (DDQ), chloranil (CHL) and picric acid (PA)). The molecular structure, spectroscopic characteristics, the binding modes as well as the thermal stability were deduced from IR, UV-vis, 1H NMR and thermal studies. The binding ratio of complexation (MZ: acceptor) was determined to be 1:2 for the iodine acceptor and 1:1 for the DDQ, CHL or PA acceptor, according to the CHN elemental analyses and spectrophotometric titrations. It has been found that the complexation with CHL and PA acceptors increases the values of enthalpy and entropy, while the complexation with DDQ and iodine acceptors decreases the values of these parameters compared with the free MZ donor.

  17. Investigation on the Synthesis of Shigella flexneri Specific Oligosaccharides Using Disaccharides as Potential Transglucosylase Acceptor Substrates.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Stéphane; Guerreiro, Catherine; Cambon, Emmanuelle; Hargreaves, Jason M; Tarrat, Nathalie; Remaud-Siméon, Magali; André, Isabelle; Mulard, Laurence A

    2015-11-20

    Chemo-enzymatic strategies hold great potential for the development of stereo- and regioselective syntheses of structurally defined bioactive oligosaccharides. Herein, we illustrate the potential of the appropriate combination of a planned chemo-enzymatic pathway and an engineered biocatalyst for the multistep synthesis of an important decasaccharide for vaccine development. We report the stepwise investigation, which led to an efficient chemical conversion of allyl α-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→3)-2-deoxy-2-trichloroacetamido-β-d-glucopyranoside, the product of site-specific enzymatic α-d-glucosylation of a lightly protected non-natural disaccharide acceptor, into a pentasaccharide building block suitable for chain elongation at both ends. Successful differentiation between hydroxyl groups features the selective acylation of primary alcohols and acetalation of a cis-vicinal diol, followed by a controlled per-O-benzylation step. Moreover, we describe the successful use of the pentasaccharide intermediate in the [5 + 5] synthesis of an aminoethyl aglycon-equipped decasaccharide, corresponding to a dimer of the basic repeating unit from the O-specific polysaccharide of Shigella flexneri 2a, a major cause of bacillary dysentery. Four analogues of the disaccharide acceptor were synthesized and evaluated to reach a larger repertoire of O-glucosylation patterns encountered among S. flexneri type-specific polysaccharides. New insights on the potential and limitations of planned chemo-enzymatic pathways in oligosaccharide synthesis are provided. PMID:26340432

  18. Primary acceptor in bacterial photosynthesis: obligatory role of ubiquinone in photoactive reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas spheroides.

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, M Y; Isaacson, R A; Feher, G

    1975-01-01

    Reaction centers were found to bind two ubiquinones, both of which could be removed by o-phenanthroline and the detergent lauryldimethylamine oxide. One ubiquinone was more easily removed than the other. The low-temperature light-induced optical and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) changes were eliminated and restored upon removal and readdition of ubiquinone and were quantitatively correlated with the amount of tightly bound ubiquinone. We, therefore, conclude that this ubiquinone plays an obligatory role in the primary photochemistry. The easily removed ubiquinone is thought to be the secondary electron acceptor. The low-temperature charge recombination kinetics, as well as the optical and EPR spectra, were the same for untreated reaction centers and for those reconstituted with ubiquinone. This indicates that extraction and reconstitution were accomplished without altering the conformation of the active site. Reaction centers reconstituted with other quinones also showed restored photochemical activity, although they exhibited changes in their low-temperature recombination kinetics and light-induced (g = 1.8) EPR signal is interpreted in terms of a magnetically coupled ubiquinone--Fe2+ acceptor complex. A possible role of iron is to facilitate electron transfer between the primary and secondary ubiquinones. PMID:1081231

  19. Spectrophotometric and electrical studies of charge-transfer complexes of sodium flucloxacillin with π-acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; El-Didamony, Akram M.

    2006-11-01

    The present study is interested to develop a simple, rapid and accurate spectrophotometric method for determination of sodium flucloxacillin (fluc) in pure form and pharmaceutical formulations. The charge-transfer (CT) interactions between sodium flucloxacillin as electron donor and chloranilic acid (CLA), dichloroquinone 4-chloroimide (DCQ), 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano- p-benzoquinone (DDQ) and 7,7,8,8 tetracyano- p-quinodimethane (TCNQ), as π-electron acceptors have been investigated spectrophotometrically. Different variables affecting the reaction were studied and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, linear relationships with good correlation coefficients (0.9979-0.9995) were found between the absorbance and the concentration of the drug in the range 16-880 μg ml -1. The proposed methods were applied successfully to the determination of the examined drug either in pure or pharmaceutical dosage forms with good accuracy and precision. The formation of the CT-complexes and the sites of interaction were confirmed by elemental analysis CHN, UV-vis, IR, 1H NMR and mass spectra techniques. Based on Job's method of continuous variation plots, the obtained results indicate the formation of 1:1 charge-transfer complexes with the general formula [(fluc)(acceptor)]. Statistical analysis of the obtained results showed no significant difference between the proposed method and official method.

  20. Spectrophotometric and electrical studies of charge-transfer complexes of sodium flucloxacillin with pi-acceptors.

    PubMed

    Refat, Moamen S; El-Didamony, Akram M

    2006-11-01

    The present study is interested to develop a simple, rapid and accurate spectrophotometric method for determination of sodium flucloxacillin (fluc) in pure form and pharmaceutical formulations. The charge-transfer (CT) interactions between sodium flucloxacillin as electron donor and chloranilic acid (CLA), dichloroquinone 4-chloroimide (DCQ), 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone (DDQ) and 7,7,8,8 tetracyano-p-quinodimethane (TCNQ), as pi-electron acceptors have been investigated spectrophotometrically. Different variables affecting the reaction were studied and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, linear relationships with good correlation coefficients (0.9979-0.9995) were found between the absorbance and the concentration of the drug in the range 16-880 microg ml(-1). The proposed methods were applied successfully to the determination of the examined drug either in pure or pharmaceutical dosage forms with good accuracy and precision. The formation of the CT-complexes and the sites of interaction were confirmed by elemental analysis CHN, UV-vis, IR, (1)H NMR and mass spectra techniques. Based on Job's method of continuous variation plots, the obtained results indicate the formation of 1:1 charge-transfer complexes with the general formula [(fluc)(acceptor)]. Statistical analysis of the obtained results showed no significant difference between the proposed method and official method. PMID:16527531

  1. Variable intrafamilial expressivity of the rare tumor necrosis factor-receptor associated periodic syndrome-associated mutation I170N that affects the TNFR1A cleavage site

    PubMed Central

    Salzberger, Bernd; Haerle, Peter; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Kastner, Daniel; Schoelmerich, Juergen; Rosenfeld, Stephanie; Mueller-Ladner, Ulf

    2010-01-01

    We report on a 33-year-old female patient with a relatively mild clinical case of TNF-receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) and her 58-year-old father in whom end-stage renal disease due to TRAPS-related AA-amyloidosis has already developed. TRAPS was caused by a I170N mutation that has previously not been associated with amyloidosis. It remains unclear if an only mildly affected patient such as ours would benefit from treatment considering her father’s severe course of disease. The relevant literature on this problem is reviewed. PMID:20169391

  2. A novel mutation of the GATA site in the erythroid cell-specific regulatory element of the ABO gene in a blood donor with the Am B phenotype.

    PubMed

    Oda, A; Isa, K; Ogasawara, K; Kameyama, K; Okuda, K; Hirashima, M; Ishii, H; Kimura, K; Matsukura, H; Hirayama, F; Kawa, K

    2015-05-01

    The Am and Bm phenotypes are characterized by weak expression of the A or B antigens, respectively, by red blood cells with a normal expression by the saliva of secretors. Deletion of the regulatory element in the first intron of the ABO gene and disruption of the GATA motif in the element were found to be responsible. In this study, we identified a novel mutation within the GATA motif (G>C substitution at position c.28 + 5830) in the regulatory element of the A allele that might diminish transcription activity causing the generation of the Am B phenotype. PMID:25557060

  3. Method for producing and regenerating a synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor

    DOEpatents

    Lancet, M. S.; Curran, G. P.; Gorin, E.

    1982-05-18

    A method is described for producing a synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor by feeding a mixture of finely divided silica and at least one finely divided calcium compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate to a fluidized bed; operating the fluidized bed at suitable conditions to produce pellets of synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor and recovering the pellets of synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor from the fluidized bed. Optionally, spent synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor can be charged to the fluidized bed to produce regenerated pellets of synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor. 1 fig.

  4. Method for producing and regenerating a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor

    DOEpatents

    Lancet, Michael S [Pittsburgh, PA; Curran, George P [Pittsburgh, PA; Gorin, Everett [San Rafael, CA

    1982-01-01

    A method for producing a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor by feeding a mixture of finely divided silica and at least one finely divided calcium compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate to a fluidized bed; operating the fluidized bed at suitable conditions to produce pellets of synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor and recovering the pellets of synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor from the fluidized bed. Optionally, spent synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor can be charged to the fluidized bed to produce regenerated pellets of synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor.

  5. Dynamics of iron-acceptor-pair formation in co-doped silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bartel, T.; Gibaja, F.; Graf, O.; Gross, D.; Kaes, M.; Heuer, M.; Kirscht, F.; Möller, C.; Lauer, K.

    2013-11-11

    The pairing dynamics of interstitial iron and dopants in silicon co-doped with phosphorous and several acceptor types are presented. The classical picture of iron-acceptor pairing dynamics is expanded to include the thermalization of iron between different dopants. The thermalization is quantitatively described using Boltzmann statistics and different iron-acceptor binding energies. The proper understanding of the pairing dynamics of iron in co-doped silicon will provide additional information on the electronic properties of iron-acceptor pairs and may become an analytical method to quantify and differentiate acceptors in co-doped silicon.

  6. Novel compound heterozygous Thyroglobulin mutations c.745+1G>A/c.7036+2T>A associated with congenital goiter and hypothyroidism in a Vietnamese family. Identification of a new cryptic 5' splice site in the exon 6.

    PubMed

    Citterio, Cintia E; Morales, Cecilia M; Bouhours-Nouet, Natacha; Machiavelli, Gloria A; Bueno, Elena; Gatelais, Frédérique; Coutant, Regis; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Rivolta, Carina M; Targovnik, Héctor M

    2015-03-15

    Several patients were identified with dyshormonogenesis caused by mutations in the thyroglobulin (TG) gene. These defects are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner and affected individuals are either homozygous or compound heterozygous for the mutations. The aim of the present study was to identify new TG mutations in a patient of Vietnamese origin affected by congenital hypothyroidism, goiter and low levels of serum TG. DNA sequencing identified the presence of compound heterozygous mutations in the TG gene: the maternal mutation consists of a novel c.745+1G>A (g.IVS6 + 1G>A), whereas the hypothetical paternal mutation consists of a novel c.7036+2T>A (g.IVS40 + 2T>A). The father was not available for segregation analysis. Ex-vivo splicing assays and subsequent RT-PCR analyses were performed on mRNA isolated from the eukaryotic-cells transfected with normal and mutant expression vectors. Minigene analysis of the c.745+1G>A mutant showed that the exon 6 is skipped during pre-mRNA splicing or partially included by use of a cryptic 5' splice site located to 55 nucleotides upstream of the authentic exon 6/intron 6 junction site. The functional analysis of c.7036+2T>A mutation showed a complete skipping of exon 40. The theoretical consequences of splice site mutations, predicted with the bioinformatics tool NNSplice, Fsplice, SPL, SPLM and MaxEntScan programs were investigated and evaluated in relation with the experimental evidence. These analyses predicted that both mutant alleles would result in the abolition of the authentic splice donor sites. The c.745+1G>A mutation originates two putative truncated proteins of 200 and 1142 amino acids, whereas c.7036+2T>A mutation results in a putative truncated protein of 2277 amino acids. In conclusion, we show that the c.745+1G>A mutation promotes the activation of a new cryptic donor splice site in the exon 6 of the TG gene. The functional consequences of these mutations could be structural changes in the protein

  7. Lithium related deep and shallow acceptors in Li-doped ZnO nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, C.; Gehlhoff, W.; Wagner, M. R.; Malguth, E.; Callsen, G.; Kirste, R.; Salameh, B.; Hoffmann, A.; Polarz, S.; Aksu, Y.; Driess, M.

    2010-01-01

    We study the existence of Li-related shallow and deep acceptor levels in Li-doped ZnO nanocrystals using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. ZnO nanocrystals with adjustable Li concentrations between 0% and 12% have been prepared using organometallic precursors and show a significant lowering of the Fermi energy upon doping. The deep Li acceptor with an acceptor energy of 800 meV could be identified in both EPR and PL measurements and is responsible for the yellow luminescence at 2.2 eV. Additionally, a shallow acceptor state at 150 meV above the valence band maximum is made responsible for the observed donor-acceptor pair and free electron-acceptor transitions at 3.235 and 3.301 eV, possibly stemming from the formation of Li-related defect complexes acting as acceptors.

  8. Deep intron elements mediate nested splicing events at consecutive AG dinucleotides to regulate alternative 3' splice site choice in vertebrate 4.1 genes.

    PubMed

    Parra, Marilyn K; Gallagher, Thomas L; Amacher, Sharon L; Mohandas, Narla; Conboy, John G

    2012-06-01

    Distal intraexon (iE) regulatory elements in 4.1R pre-mRNA govern 3' splice site choice at exon 2 (E2) via nested splicing events, ultimately modulating expression of N-terminal isoforms of cytoskeletal 4.1R protein. Here we explored intrasplicing in other normal and disease gene contexts and found conservation of intrasplicing through vertebrate evolution. In the paralogous 4.1B gene, we identified ∼120 kb upstream of E2 an ultradistal intraexon, iE(B), that mediates intrasplicing by promoting two intricately coupled splicing events that ensure selection of a weak distal acceptor at E2 (E2dis) by prior excision of the competing proximal acceptor (E2prox). Mutating iE(B) in minigene splicing reporters abrogated intrasplicing, as did blocking endogenous iE(B) function with antisense morpholinos in live mouse and zebrafish animal models. In a human elliptocytosis patient with a mutant 4.1R gene lacking E2 through E4, we showed that aberrant splicing is consistent with iE(R)-mediated intrasplicing at the first available exons downstream of iE(R), namely, alternative E5 and constitutive E6. Finally, analysis of heterologous acceptor contexts revealed a strong preference for nested 3' splice events at consecutive pairs of AG dinucleotides. Distal regulatory elements may control intrasplicing at a subset of alternative 3' splice sites in vertebrate pre-mRNAs to generate proteins with functional diversity. PMID:22473990

  9. Brooke-Spiegler syndrome presenting multiple concurrent cutaneous and parotid gland neoplasms: cytologic findings on fine-needle sample and description of a novel mutation of the CYLD gene.

    PubMed

    Malzone, Maria Gabriella; Campanile, Anna Cipolletta; Losito, Nunzia Simona; Longo, Francesco; Perri, Francesco; Caponigro, Francesco; Schiavone, Concetta; Ionna, Franco; Maiello, Francesco; Martinuzzi, Claudia; Nasti, Sabina; Botti, Gerardo; Fulciniti, Franco

    2015-08-01

    Multiple dermal cylindromas and membranous basal cell adenoma of parotid gland in a 67-year-old woman with Brooke-Spiegler syndrome (BSS) were examined by fine-needle cytology. Histology, immunochemistry, and CYLD germline mutation testing were also performed. Cytomorphology and immunochemistry of the two lesions showed basaloid neoplasms, remarkably similar, composed by proliferating epithelial cells of basal type accompanied by a smaller proportion of myoepithelial cells. CYLD gene showed a novel germline splice acceptor site mutation (c.2042-1G>C) with skipping of the entire exon 15. The occurrence of analogous tumors, dermal cylindromas, and membranous basal cell adenoma of the parotid gland, in the same patient may result from the action of a single gene on ontogenetically similar stem cells. Therefore, patients with BSS should be offered a genetic counselling for an early and correct diagnosis. PMID:25995191

  10. Electron-Donor-Acceptor (EDA) Complexes Of Aromatic Hydrocarbons With Organic Acceptors In Solution And In The Solid State. A Quantitative FT-IR Investigation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruni, Paolo; Giorgini, Elisabetta; Tosi, Giorgio; Zampini, Angela

    1989-12-01

    Liquid phase FT-IR investigation on π-π Electron-Donor-Acceptor (EDA) complexes between arenes and organic acceptors leads to values of formation constants that are in good agreement with the ones from other techniques (UV-Vis and NMR). In addition solid state FT-IR and UV-Vis determinations on the complexes are also reported and discussed.

  11. Effects of strain on carbon donors and acceptors in hexagonal boron nitride monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Yoshitaka; Saito, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    We present first-principles density functional calculations that clarify the electronic properties of carbon defects in hexagonal boron nitride (h -BN) monolayers under biaxially applied strains. We find that strain can control the ionization energies of both donor and acceptor states. Furthermore, we also find that strain can lead to the dramatic change in conduction channel properties of donor states due to the interchange of the conduction-band-minimum state with the nearly-free-electron state. We also report the simulated scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images of carbon defects in h -BN monolayers for experimental identification of those defects. We show that the STM images strongly reflect distinctive spatial distributions of local density of states around carbon defects depending on the substitution sites and thereby they could be identified by using STM experiments.

  12. Chemopreventive Agents from Physalis minima Function as Michael Reaction Acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Men, Ruizhi; Li, Ning; Ding, Chihong; Tang, Yingzhan; Xing, Yachao; Ding, Wanjing; Ma, Zhongjun

    2016-01-01

    Background: The fruits of some varieties of genus Physalis have been used as delicious fruits and functional food in the Northeast of China. Materials and Methods: To reveal the functional material basis, we performed bioactivity-guided phytochemical research and chemopreventive effect assay of the constituents from Physalis minima. Results: It was demonstrated that the ethyl acetate extract of P. minima L. (EEPM) had potential quinone reductase (QR) inducing activity with induction ratio (IR, QR induction activity) value of 1.47 ± 0.24, and glutathione binding property as potential Michael reaction acceptors (with an α, β-unsaturated ketone moiety). Furthermore, bioactivity-guided phytochemical research led eight compounds (1–8), which were elucidated as 3-isopropyl-5-acetoxycyclohexene-2-one-1 (1), isophysalin B (2), physalin G (3), physalin D (4), physalin I (5), physordinose B (6), stigmasterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (7) and 5α-6β-dihydroxyphysalin R (8) on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analyses and HRESIMS. Then, isophysalin B (2) and physordinose B (6) showed significant QR inducing activity with IR value of 2.80 ± 0.19 and 2.38 ± 0.46, respectively. SUMMARY An ultra-performance liquid chromatographic method with glutathione as the substrate was used to detect the Michael reaction acceptors in extracts of Physalis minima (EPM)We investigated the chemical constituents of EPM guided by biological activity methodIsophysalin B (1) and physordinose B (6) showed strong quinone reductase inducing activity with induction ratio values of 2.80 ± 0.19 and 2.38 ± 0.46This study generated useful information for consumers and many encourage researchers to utilize edible fruits from Physalis as a source of phytochemicals Abbreviations used: EPM: Extracts of Physalis minima, EEPM: Ethyl acetate extract of Physalis minima L., GSH: Glutathione, MRAs: Michael reaction acceptors, QR: Quinone reductase. PMID:27279713

  13. Nanostructured donor-acceptor self assembly with improved photoconductivity.

    PubMed

    Saibal, B; Ashar, A Z; Devi, R Nandini; Narayan, K S; Asha, S K

    2014-11-12

    Nanostructured supramolecular donor-acceptor assemblies were formed when an unsymmetrical N-substituted pyridine functionalized perylenebisimide (UPBI-Py) was complexed with oligo(p-phenylenevinylene) (OPVM-OH) complementarily functionalized with hydroxyl unit and polymerizable methacrylamide unit at the two termini. The resulting supramolecular complex [UPBI-Py (OPVM-OH)]1.0 upon polymerization by irradiation in the presence of photoinitiator formed well-defined supramolecular polymeric nanostructures. Self-assembly studies using fluorescence emission from thin film samples showed that subtle structural changes occurred on the OPV donor moiety following polymerization. The 1:1 supramolecular complex showed red-shifted aggregate emission from both OPV (∼500 nm) and PBI (∼640 nm) units, whereas the OPV aggregate emission was replaced by intense monomeric emission (∼430 nm) upon polymerizing the methacrylamide units on the OPVM-OH. The bulk structure was studied using wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WXRD). Complex formation resulted in distinct changes in the cell parameters of OPVM-OH. In contrast, a physical mixture of 1 mol each of OPVM-OH and UPBI-Py prepared by mixing the powdered solid samples together showed only a combination of reflections from both parent molecules. Thin film morphology of the 1:1 molecular complex as well as the supramolecular polymer complex showed uniform lamellar structures in the domain range <10 nm. The donor-acceptor supramolecular complex [UPBI-Py (OPVM-OH)]1.0 exhibited space charge limited current (SCLC) with a bulk mobility estimate of an order of magnitude higher accompanied by a higher photoconductivity yield compared to the pristine UPBI-Py. This is a very versatile method to obtain spatially defined organization of n and p-type semiconductor materials based on suitably functionalized donor and acceptor molecules resulting in improved photocurrent response using self-assembly. PMID:25283356

  14. Carbon and group II acceptor coimplantation in GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, R.; Lau, S.S.; Poker, D.B.; Chu, P.K.; Fung, K.K.; Wang, N.

    1998-11-01

    Coimplantations of carbon and one of the group II acceptors, Mg, Zn, or Cd, were performed and compared to implantations involving only a single element (Mg, Zn, or Cd) or Ga and C coimplanted into GaAs substrates. The group II and C (II/C) coimplantations act to balance the crystal stoichiometry since group II atoms prefer to reside in the Ga sublattice and C prefers to reside in the As sublattice. The electrical characteristics of the various implantations were obtained from sheet and differential Hall measurements. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry was employed to determine the amount of implantation-induced damage which was then correlated to the amount of C activation in the group II/C coimplanted samples. It was found that coimplantation of the heavier group II acceptors, Zn and Cd, resulted in layers with larger peak hole concentrations. This is a result of the large amount of lattice damage created by these elements which is thought to provide the necessary abundance of As vacancies for C activation. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements of the samples after implant activation indicate that C coimplantation significantly reduces the diffusivity of the group II acceptors. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy indicated a unique defect structure (extrinsic dislocation loops) for the cases of group II/C coimplantation. These dislocation loops are located at the diffusion front of the group II element in the samples and therefore have a rather profound influence on the diffusion of the group II elements. A rationalization of the defect structure and the effect it has on the diffusion of group II elements is given. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Assembly and Comparison of Plasma Membrane SNARE Acceptor Complexes.

    PubMed

    Kreutzberger, Alex J B; Liang, Binyong; Kiessling, Volker; Tamm, Lukas K

    2016-05-24

    Neuronal exocytotic membrane fusion occurs on a fast timescale and is dependent on interactions between the vesicle SNARE synaptobrevin-2 and the plasma membrane SNAREs syntaxin-1a and SNAP-25 with a 1:1:1 stoichiometry. Reproducing fast fusion rates as observed in cells by reconstitution in vitro has been hindered by the spontaneous assembly of a 2:1 syntaxin-1a:SNAP-25 complex on target membranes that kinetically alters the binding of synaptobrevin-2. Previously, an artificial SNARE acceptor complex consisting of 1:1:1 syntaxin-1a(residues 183-288):SNAP-25:syb(residues 49-96) was found to greatly accelerate the rates of lipid mixing of reconstituted target and vesicle SNARE proteoliposomes. Here we present two (to our knowledge) new procedures to assemble membrane-bound 1:1 SNARE acceptor complexes that produce fast and efficient fusion without the need of the syb(49-96) peptide. In the first procedure, syntaxin-1a is purified in a strictly monomeric form and subsequently assembled with SNAP-25 in detergent with the correct 1:1 stoichiometry. In the second procedure, monomeric syntaxin-1a and dodecylated (d-)SNAP-25 are separately reconstituted into proteoliposomes and subsequently assembled in the plane of merged target lipid bilayers. Examining single particle fusion between synaptobrevin-2 proteoliposomes and planar-supported bilayers containing the two different SNARE acceptor complexes revealed similar fast rates of fusion. Changing the stoichiometry of syntaxin-1a and d-SNAP-25 in the target bilayer had significant effects on docking, but little effect on the rates of synaptobrevin-2 proteoliposome fusion. PMID:27178662

  16. A Single Site mutation (F429H) Converts the Enzyme CYP 2B4 into a Heme Oxygenase: A QM/MM Study

    PubMed Central

    Usharani, Dandamudi; Zazza, Costantino; Lai, Wenzhen; Chourasia, Mukesh

    2012-01-01

    The intriguing deactivation of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2B4 enzyme induced by a mutation of a single residue, Phe429 to His, is explored by means of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations of the O-OH bond activation of the (Fe3+OOH)− intermediate. It is found that the F429H mutant of CYP 2B4 undergoes homolytic, instead of heterolytic, O-OH bond cleavage. Thus, the mutant acquires the following characteristics of a heme oxygenase (HO) enzyme: (a) The donation by His429 of an additional NH---S H-bond to the cysteine ligand combined with the presence of the substrate retard the heterolytic cleavage and give rise to homolytic O-OH cleavage, and (b) the Thr302/water cluster orients the nascent OH• close to the meso position of the porphyrin, and ensures an efficient meso hydroxylation. PMID:22356576

  17. A Retinoblastoma Allele That Is Mutated at Its Common E2F Interaction Site Inhibits Cell Proliferation in Gene-Targeted Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cecchini, Matthew J.; Thwaites, Michael J.; Talluri, Srikanth; MacDonald, James I.; Passos, Daniel T.; Chong, Jean-Leon; Cantalupo, Paul; Stafford, Paul M.; Sáenz-Robles, M. Teresa; Francis, Sarah M.; Pipas, James M.; Leone, Gustavo; Welch, Ian

    2014-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein (pRB) is best known for regulating cell proliferation through E2F transcription factors. In this report, we investigate the properties of a targeted mutation that disrupts pRB interactions with the transactivation domain of E2Fs. Mice that carry this mutation endogenously (Rb1ΔG) are defective for pRB-dependent repression of E2F target genes. Except for an accelerated entry into S phase in response to serum stimulation, cell cycle regulation in Rb1ΔG/ΔG mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) strongly resembles that of the wild type. In a serum deprivation-induced cell cycle exit, Rb1ΔG/ΔG MEFs display a magnitude of E2F target gene derepression similar to that of Rb1−/− cells, even though Rb1ΔG/ΔG cells exit the cell cycle normally. Interestingly, cell cycle arrest in Rb1ΔG/ΔG MEFs is responsive to p16 expression and gamma irradiation, indicating that alternate mechanisms can be activated in G1 to arrest proliferation. Some Rb1ΔG/ΔG mice die neonatally with a muscle degeneration phenotype, while the others live a normal life span with no evidence of spontaneous tumor formation. Most tissues appear histologically normal while being accompanied by derepression of pRB-regulated E2F targets. This suggests that non-E2F-, pRB-dependent pathways may have a more relevant role in proliferative control than previously identified. PMID:24662053

  18. GM1 gangliosidosis and Morquio B disease: expression analysis of missense mutations affecting the catalytic site of acid beta-galactosidase.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Doris; Paul, Karl; Fantur, Katrin; Beck, Michael; Bürger, Friederike; Caillaud, Catherine; Fumic, Ksenija; Ledvinova, Jana; Lugowska, Agnieszka; Michelakakis, Helen; Radeva, Briguita; Ramaswami, Uma; Plecko, Barbara; Paschke, Eduard

    2009-08-01

    Alterations in GLB1, the gene coding for acid beta-D-galactosidase (beta-Gal), can result in GM1 gangliosidosis (GM1), a neurodegenerative disorder, or in Morquio B disease (MBD), a phenotype with dysostosis multiplex and normal central nervous system (CNS) function. While most MBD patients carry a common allele, c.817TG>CT (p.W273L), only few of the >100 mutations known in GM1 can be related to a certain phenotype. In 25 multiethnic patients with GM1 or MBD, 11 missense mutations were found as well as one novel insertion and a transversion causing aberrant gene products. Except c.602G>A (p.R201H) and two novel alleles, c.592G>T (p.D198Y) and c.1189C>G (p.P397A), all mutants resulted in significantly reduced beta-Gal activities (<10% of normal) upon expression in COS-1 cells. Although c.997T>C (p.Y333H) expressed 3% of normal activity, the mutant protein was localized in the lysosomal-endosomal compartment. A homozygous case presented with late infantile GM1, while a heterozygous, juvenile case carried p.Y333H together with p.R201H. This allele, recently found in homozygous MBD, gives rise to rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER)-located beta-Gal precursors. Thus, unlike classical MBD, the phenotype of heterozygotes carrying p.R201H may rather be determined by poorly active, properly transported products of the counter allele than by the mislocalized p.R201H precursors. PMID:19472408

  19. In Vitro Resistance Selections for Plasmodium falciparum Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Inhibitors Give Mutants with Multiple Point Mutations in the Drug-binding Site and Altered Growth*

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Leila S.; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Lafuente-Monasterio, Maria José; Singh, Onkar M. P.; Rowland, Paul; Wiegand, Roger C.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is a preventable and treatable disease; yet half of the world's population lives at risk of infection, and an estimated 660,000 people die of malaria-related causes every year. Rising drug resistance threatens to make malaria untreatable, necessitating both the discovery of new antimalarial agents and the development of strategies to identify and suppress the emergence and spread of drug resistance. We focused on in-development dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) inhibitors. Characterizing resistance pathways for antimalarial agents not yet in clinical use will increase our understanding of the potential for resistance. We identified resistance mechanisms of Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) DHODH inhibitors via in vitro resistance selections. We found 11 point mutations in the PfDHODH target. Target gene amplification and unknown mechanisms also contributed to resistance, albeit to a lesser extent. These mutant parasites were often hypersensitive to other PfDHODH inhibitors, which immediately suggested a novel combination therapy approach to preventing resistance. Indeed, a combination of wild-type and mutant-type selective inhibitors led to resistance far less often than either drug alone. The effects of point mutations in PfDHODH were corroborated with purified recombinant wild-type and mutant-type PfDHODH proteins, which showed the same trends in drug response as the cognate cell lines. Comparative growth assays demonstrated that two mutant parasites grew less robustly than their wild-type parent, and the purified protein of those mutants showed a decrease in catalytic efficiency, thereby suggesting a reason for the diminished growth rate. Co-crystallography of PfDHODH with three inhibitors suggested that hydrophobic interactions are important for drug binding and selectivity. PMID:24782313

  20. A single mutation in the active site swaps the substrate specificity of N-acetyl-L-ornithine transcarbamylase and N-succinyl-L-ornithine transcarbamylase

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Dashuang; Yu, Xiaolin; Cabrera-Luque, Juan; Chen, Tony Y.; Roth, Lauren; Morizono, Hiroki; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel

    2007-01-01

    Transcarbamylases catalyze the transfer of the carbamyl group from carbamyl phosphate (CP) to an amino group of a second substrate such as aspartate, ornithine, or putrescine. Previously, structural determination of a transcarbamylase from Xanthomonas campestris led to the discovery of a novel N-acetylornithine transcarbamylase (AOTCase) that catalyzes the carbamylation of N-acetylornithine. Recently, a novel N-succinylornithine transcarbamylase (SOTCase) from Bacteroides fragilis was identified. Structural comparisons of AOTCase from X. campestris and SOTCase from B. fragilis revealed that residue Glu92 (X. campestris numbering) plays a critical role in distinguishing AOTCase from SOTCase. Enzymatic assays of E92P, E92S, E92V, and E92A mutants of AOTCase demonstrate that each of these mutations converts the AOTCase to an SOTCase. Similarly, the P90E mutation in B. fragilis SOTCase (equivalent to E92 in X. campestris AOTCase) converts the SOTCase to AOTCase. Hence, a single amino acid substitution is sufficient to swap the substrate specificities of AOTCase and SOTCase. X-ray crystal structures of these mutants in complexes with CP and N-acetyl-L-norvaline (an analog of N-acetyl-L-ornithine) or N-succinyl-L-norvaline (an analog of N-succinyl-L-ornithine) substantiate this conversion. In addition to Glu92 (X. campestris numbering), other residues such as Asn185 and Lys30 in AOTCase, which are involved in binding substrates through bridging water molecules, help to define the substrate specificity of AOTCase. These results provide the correct annotation (AOTCase or SOTCase) for a set of the transcarbamylase-like proteins that have been erroneously annotated as ornithine transcarbamylase (OTCase, EC 2.1.3.3). PMID:17600144

  1. Unraveling the Photoswitching Mechanism in Donor-Acceptor Stenhouse Adducts.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Michael M; Wezenberg, Sander J; Szymanski, Wiktor; Feringa, Ben L

    2016-05-25

    Molecular photoswitches have opened up a myriad of opportunities in applications ranging from responsive materials and control of biological function to molecular logics. Here, we show that the photoswitching mechanism of donor-acceptor Stenhouse adducts (DASA), a recently reported class of photoswitches, proceeds by photoinduced Z-E isomerization, followed by a thermal, conrotatory 4π-electrocyclization. The photogenerated intermediate is manifested by a bathochromically shifted band in the visible absorption spectrum of the DASA. The identification of the role of this intermediate reveals a key step in the photoswitching mechanism that is essential to the rational design of switching properties via structural modification. PMID:27152878

  2. Incorporation of Cu Acceptors in ZnO Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Oo, W.M.H.; Mccluskey, Matthew D.; Huso, Jesse; Morrison, J.; Bergman, Leah; Engelhard, Mark H.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.

    2010-09-16

    Doping of semiconductor nanocrystals is an important problem in nanomaterials research. Using infrared (IR) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we have observed Cu acceptor dopants that were intentionally introduced into ZnO nanocrystals. The incorporation of Cu2+ dopants increased as the diameter of the nanocrystals was increased from ~3 to 5 nm. Etching the nanocrystals with acetic acid revealed a core-shell structure, where a 2-nm lightly doped core is surrounded by a heavily doped shell. These observations are consistent with the trapped dopant model, in which dopant atoms stick to the surface of the core and are overgrown by the nanocrystal material.

  3. Identification of mutations in cystatin B, the gene responsible for the Unverricht-Lundborg type of progressive myoclonus epilepsy (EPM1)

    SciTech Connect

    Lalioti, M.D.; Mirotsou, M.; Rossier, C.

    1997-02-01

    Progressive myoclonus epilepsy (EPM1) is an autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by severe, stimulus-sensitive myoclonus and tonic-clonic seizures. The EPM1 locus was mapped to within 0.3 cM from PFKL in chromosome 21q22.3. The gene for the proteinase inhibitor cystatin B was recently localized in the EPM1 critical region, and mutations were identified in two EPM1 families. We have identified six nucleotide changes in the cystatin B gene of non-Finnish EPM1 families from northern Africa and Europe. The 426G{r_arrow}C change in exon 1 results in a Gly4Arg substitution and is the first missense mutation described that is associated with EPM1. Molecular modeling predicts that this substitution severely affects the contact of cystatin B with papain. Mutations in the invariant AG dinucleotides of the acceptor sites of introns 1 and 2 probably result in abnormal splicing. A deletion of two nucleotides in exon 3 produces a frameshift and truncates the protein. Therefore, these four mutations are all predicted to impair the production of functional protein. These mutations were found in 7 of the 29 unrelated EPM1 patients analyzed, in homozygosity in 1, and in heterozygosity in the others. The remaining two sequence changes, 431G{r_arrow}T and 2575A{r_arrow}G, probably represent polymorphic variants. In addition, a tandem repeat in the 5{prime} UTR (CCCCGCCCCGCG) is present two or three times in normal alleles. It is peculiar that in the majority of patients no mutations exist within the exons and splice sites of the cystatin B gene. 23 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Construction of an Artificial Ferrimagnetic Lattice by Lithium Ion Insertion into a Neutral Donor/Acceptor Metal-Organic Framework.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Kouji; Narushima, Keisuke; Mahin, Julien; Kosaka, Wataru; Miyasaka, Hitoshi

    2016-04-18

    Construction of a molecular system in which the magnetic lattice exhibits long-range order is one of the fundamental goals in materials science. In this study, we demonstrate the artificial construction of a ferrimagnetic lattice by doping electrons into acceptor sites of a neutral donor/acceptor metal-organic framework (D/A-MOF). This doping was achieved by the insertion of Li-ions into the D/A-MOF, which was used as the cathode of a Li-ion battery cell. The neutral D/A-MOF is a layered system composed of a carboxylate-bridged paddlewheel-type diruthenium(II,II) complex as the donor and a TCNQ derivative as the acceptor. The ground state of the neutral form was a magnetically disordered paramagnetic state. Upon discharge of the cell, spontaneous magnetization was induced; the transition temperature was variable. The stability of the magnetically ordered lattice depended on the equilibrium electric potential of the D/A-MOF cathode, which reflected the electron-filling level. PMID:26990927

  5. Active Site Mutations as a Suitable Tool Contributing to Explain a Mechanism of Aristolochic Acid I Nitroreduction by Cytochromes P450 1A1, 1A2 and 1B1

    PubMed Central

    Milichovský, Jan; Bárta, František; Schmeiser, Heinz H.; Arlt, Volker M.; Frei, Eva; Stiborová, Marie; Martínek, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Aristolochic acid I (AAI) is a plant drug found in Aristolochia species that causes aristolochic acid nephropathy, Balkan endemic nephropathy and their associated urothelial malignancies. AAI is activated via nitroreduction producing genotoxic N-hydroxyaristolactam, which forms DNA adducts. The major enzymes responsible for the reductive bioactivation of AAI are NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase and cytochromes P450 (CYP) 1A1 and 1A2. Using site-directed mutagenesis we investigated the possible mechanisms of CYP1A1/1A2/1B1-catalyzed AAI nitroreduction. Molecular modelling predicted that the hydroxyl groups of serine122/threonine124 (Ser122/Thr124) amino acids in the CYP1A1/1A2-AAI binary complexes located near to the nitro group of AAI, are mechanistically important as they provide the proton required for the stepwise reduction reaction. In contrast, the closely related CYP1B1 with no hydroxyl group containing residues in its active site is ineffective in catalyzing AAI nitroreduction. In order to construct an experimental model, mutant forms of CYP1A1 and 1A2 were prepared, where Ser122 and Thr124 were replaced by Ala (CYP1A1-S122A) and Val (CYP1A2-T124V), respectively. Similarly, a CYP1B1 mutant was prepared in which Ala133 was replaced by Ser (CYP1B1-A133S). Site-directed mutagenesis was performed using a quickchange approach. Wild and mutated forms of these enzymes were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and isolated enzymes characterized using UV-vis spectroscopy to verify correct protein folding. Their catalytic activity was confirmed with CYP1A1, 1A2 and 1B1 marker substrates. Using 32P-postlabelling we determined the efficiency of wild-type and mutant forms of CYP1A1, 1A2, and 1B1 reconstituted with NADPH:CYP oxidoreductase to bioactivate AAI to reactive intermediates forming covalent DNA adducts. The S122A and T124V mutations in CYP1A1 and 1A2, respectively, abolished the efficiency of CYP1A1 and 1A2 enzymes to generate AAI-DNA adducts. In contrast

  6. Deep Sequencing of Random Mutant Libraries Reveals the Active Site of the Narrow Specificity CphA Metallo-β-Lactamase is Fragile to Mutations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhizeng; Mehta, Shrenik C; Adamski, Carolyn J; Gibbs, Richard A; Palzkill, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    CphA is a Zn(2+)-dependent metallo-β-lactamase that efficiently hydrolyzes only carbapenem antibiotics. To understand the sequence requirements for CphA function, single codon random mutant libraries were constructed for residues in and near the active site and mutants were selected for E. coli growth on increasing concentrations of imipenem, a carbapenem antibiotic. At high concentrations of imipenem that select for phenotypically wild-type mutants, the active-site residues exhibit stringent sequence requirements in that nearly all residues in positions that contact zinc, the substrate, or the catalytic water do not tolerate amino acid substitutions. In addition, at high imipenem concentrations a number of residues that do not directly contact zinc or substrate are also essential and do not tolerate substitutions. Biochemical analysis confirmed that amino acid substitutions at essential positions decreased the stability or catalytic activity of the CphA enzyme. Therefore, the CphA active - site is fragile to substitutions, suggesting active-site residues are optimized for imipenem hydrolysis. These results also suggest that resistance to inhibitors targeted to the CphA active site would be slow to develop because of the strong sequence constraints on function. PMID:27616327

  7. Assessment of structural, optical and conduction properties of ZnO thin films in the presence of acceptor impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plugaru, R.; Plugaru, N.

    2016-06-01

    The structural, optical and electrical conduction properties of (Li/Cu,N):ZnO codoped thin films synthesized by the sol–gel method were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission and absorption, photoluminescence (PL) and I–V measurements in order to bring evidence of the formation of acceptor centers by dual-acceptor codoping processes. The (Li 3%,N 5%):ZnO films consist of crystallites with average size of 15 nm, show 95% transmission in the visible region, and an optical band gap of 3.22 eV. The PL spectra show emission maxima at 3.21 and 2.96 eV which are related to the emission of acceptor centers and the presence of defects, respectively. Li occupies interstitial sites and may form Lii–N(O) defect complexes that act as acceptor centers. The (Cu 3%,N 5%):ZnO films consist of crystallites with average size of 12 nm, and exhibit 90% transmission in the visible region. The PL spectra reveal band edge emission at 3.23 eV and defect related emission at 2.74 eV. In the (Cu,N) codoped films, copper substitutes zinc and adopts mainly the Cu1+ state. A possible defect complex involving Cu and N determines the transition from n- to p-type conductivity. These findings are in agreement with results of electronic structure calculations at the GGA-PBE level.

  8. Assessment of structural, optical and conduction properties of ZnO thin films in the presence of acceptor impurities.

    PubMed

    Plugaru, R; Plugaru, N

    2016-06-01

    The structural, optical and electrical conduction properties of (Li/Cu,N):ZnO codoped thin films synthesized by the sol-gel method were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission and absorption, photoluminescence (PL) and I-V measurements in order to bring evidence of the formation of acceptor centers by dual-acceptor codoping processes. The (Li 3%,N 5%):ZnO films consist of crystallites with average size of 15 nm, show 95% transmission in the visible region, and an optical band gap of 3.22 eV. The PL spectra show emission maxima at 3.21 and 2.96 eV which are related to the emission of acceptor centers and the presence of defects, respectively. Li occupies interstitial sites and may form Lii-N(O) defect complexes that act as acceptor centers. The (Cu 3%,N 5%):ZnO films consist of crystallites with average size of 12 nm, and exhibit 90% transmission in the visible region. The PL spectra reveal band edge emission at 3.23 eV and defect related emission at 2.74 eV. In the (Cu,N) codoped films, copper substitutes zinc and adopts mainly the Cu(1+) state. A possible defect complex involving Cu and N determines the transition from n- to p-type conductivity. These findings are in agreement with results of electronic structure calculations at the GGA-PBE level. PMID:26979467

  9. Mutations in GCD11, the structural gene for eIF-2 gamma in yeast, alter translational regulation of GCN4 and the selection of the start site for protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Dorris, D R; Erickson, F L; Hannig, E M

    1995-01-01

    Translation initiation factor 2 (eIF-2) in eukaryotic organisms is composed of three non-identical subunits, alpha, beta and gamma. In a previous report, we identified GCD11 as an essential gene encoding the gamma subunit of eIF-2 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The predicted amino acid sequence of yeast eIF-2 gamma displays remarkable similarity to bacterial elongation factor Tu, including the presence of sequence elements conserved in all known guanine nucleotide binding proteins. We have identified the molecular defects present in seven unique alleles of GCD11 characterized by a partial loss of function. Three of these mutations result in amino acid substitutions within the putative GTP binding domain of eIF-2 gamma. We show that the gcd11 mutations specifically alter regulation of GCN4 expression at the translational level, without altering the scanning mechanism for protein synthesis initiation. Six of the mutant alleles presumably alter the function of eIF-2 gamma, rather than its abundance. A single allele, gcd11-R510H, suppresses a mutant his4 allele that lacks a functional AUG start codon. The latter result indicates that the gamma subunit of eIF-2 participates in recognition of the start site for protein synthesis, a role previously demonstrated in yeast for eIF-2 alpha and eIF-2 beta. Images PMID:7774582

  10. Identification and Genetic Analysis of a Factor IX Gene Intron 3 Mutation in a Hemophilia B Pedigree in China

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dong-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Li; Mu, Kai; Ma, Xiang-Wei; Sun, Jing-Li; Bai, Xiao-Zhong; Lin, Chang-Kun; Jin, Chun-Lian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Hemophilia B is caused by coagulation defects in the factor IX gene located in Xq27.1 on the X chromosome. A wide range of mutations, showing extensive molecular heterogeneity, have been described in hemophilia B patients. Our study was aimed at genetic analysis and prenatal diagnosis of hemophilia B in order to further elucidate the pathogenesis of the hemophilia B pedigree in China. Materials and Methods: Polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing of all the coding regions was conducted in hemophilia B patients and carriers. Prenatal diagnosis of the proband was conducted at 20 weeks. Results: We identified the novel point mutation 10.389 A>G, located upstream of the intron 3 acceptor site in hemophilia B patients. The fetus of the proband’s cousin was identified as a carrier. Conclusion: Our identification of a novel mutation in the F9 gene associated with hemophilia B provides novel insight into the pathogenesis of this genetically inherited disorder and also represents the basis of prenatal diagnosis. PMID:25330515

  11. The kinetochore protein, CENPF, is mutated in human ciliopathy and microcephaly phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Aoife M; Asfahani, Rowan; Carroll, Paula; Bicknell, Louise; Lescai, Francesco; Bright, Alison; Chanudet, Estelle; Brooks, Anthony; Christou-Savina, Sonja; Osman, Guled; Walsh, Patrick; Bacchelli, Chiara; Chapgier, Ariane; Vernay, Bertrand; Bader, David M; Deshpande, Charu; O’ Sullivan, Mary; Ocaka, Louise; Stanescu, Horia; Stewart, Helen S; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Otto, Edgar; Johnson, Colin A; Szymanska, Katarzyna; Katsanis, Nicholas; Davis, Erica; Kleta, Robert; Hubank, Mike; Doxsey, Stephen; Jackson, Andrew; Stupka, Elia; Winey, Mark; Beales, Philip L

    2015-01-01

    Background Mutations in microtubule-regulating genes are associated with disorders of neuronal migration and microcephaly. Regulation of centriole length has been shown to underlie the pathogenesis of certain ciliopathy phenotypes. Using a next-generation sequencing approach, we identified mutations in a novel centriolar disease gene in a kindred with an embryonic lethal ciliopathy phenotype and in a patient with primary microcephaly. Methods and results Whole exome sequencing data from a non-consanguineous Caucasian kindred exhibiting mid-gestation lethality and ciliopathic malformations revealed two novel non-synonymous variants in CENPF, a microtubule-regulating gene. All four affected fetuses showed segregation for two mutated alleles [IVS5-2A>C, predicted to abolish the consensus splice-acceptor site from exon 6; c.1744G>T, p.E582X]. In a second unrelated patient exhibiting microcephaly, we identified two CENPF mutations [c.1744G>T, p.E582X; c.8692 C>T, p.R2898X] by whole exome sequencing. We found that CENP-F colocalised with Ninein at the subdistal appendages of the mother centriole in mouse inner medullary collecting duct cells. Intraflagellar transport protein-88 (IFT-88) colocalised with CENP-F along the ciliary axonemes of renal epithelial cells in age-matched control human fetuses but did not in truncated cilia of mutant CENPF kidneys. Pairwise co-immunoprecipitation assays of mitotic and serum-starved HEKT293 cells confirmed that IFT88 precipitates with endogenous CENP-F. Conclusions Our data identify CENPF as a new centriolar disease gene implicated in severe human ciliopathy and microcephaly related phenotypes. CENP-F has a novel putative function in ciliogenesis and cortical neurogenesis. PMID:25564561

  12. Donor and acceptor concentrations in degenerate InN

    SciTech Connect

    Look, D.C.; Lu, H.; Schaff, W.J.; Jasinski, J.; Liliental-Weber, Z.

    2002-01-28

    A formalism is presented to determine donor (N{sub D}) and acceptor (N{sub A}) concentrations in wurtzitic InN characterized by degenerate carrier concentration (n) and mobility ({mu}). The theory includes scattering not only by charged point defects and impurities, but also by charged threading dislocations, of concentration N{sub dis}. For an 0.45-{micro}m-thick InN layer grown on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} by molecular beam epitaxy, having N{sub dis} = 5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}, determined by transmission electron microscopy, n(20 K) = 3.5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}, and {mu}(20 K) = 1055 cm{sup 2}/V-s, determined by Hall-effect measurements, the fitted values are N{sub D} = 4.7 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and N{sub A} = 1.2 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}. The identities of the donors and acceptors are not known, although a comparison of N{sub D} with analytical data, and also with calculations of defect formation energies, suggests that a potential candidate for the dominant donor is H.

  13. Nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors for biological sulphide oxidation.

    PubMed

    Munz, G; Mannucci, A; Arreola-Vargas, J; Alatriste-Mondragon, F; Giaccherini, F; Mori, G

    2015-01-01

    Autotrophic denitrification with sulphide using nitrate (R1) and nitrite (R2) as electron acceptor was investigated at bench scale. Different solids retention times (SRT) (5 and 20 d) have been tested in R1 while R2 was operated at SRT=13 d. The results indicated that the process allows complete sulphide removal to be achieved in all tested conditions. Tested sulphide loads were estimated from the H2S produced in a pilot-scale anaerobic digester treating vegetable tannery primary sludge; nitrogen loads originated from the nitrification of the supernatant. Average nitrogen removal efficiencies higher than 80% were observed in all the tested conditions once steady state was reached. A maximum specific nitrate removal rate equal to 0.35 g N-NO3- g VSS(-1) d(-1) was reached in R1. Due to sulphide limitation, incomplete denitrification was observed and nitrite and thiosulphate tend to accumulate especially in the presence of variable environmental conditions in both R1 and R2. Lower SRT caused higher NO2accumulated/NO3reduced ratios (0.22 and 0.24, with SRT of 5 d and 20 d, respectively) using nitrate as electron acceptor in steady-state condition. Temperature decrease caused sudden NO2accumulated/NO3reduced ratio increase in R1 and NO2- removal decrease in R2. PMID:26247758

  14. Mercury removal from waste gases by manganese oxide acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallaro, S.; Bertuccio, N.; Antonucci, P.; Giordano, N.

    1982-02-01

    Removal of mercury vapor from a waste gas has been investigated at atmospheric pressure and at ambient temperature using a series of manganese-based reagents supported on an inert medium. The effect of catalyst composition on activity and the influence of relative humidity of the air stream have been studied. Whereas ..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ has a very low mercury sorption capacity, sorption occurs copiously on impregnated silver- and copper-doped MnO/sub 2/ acceptors but the much higher activity is reduced by the presence of water vapour in the carrier gas. The morphological and microstructural characterization of the (MnO/sub 2/, AgNO/sub 3/) ..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ reagents has shown selective deposition of AgNO/sub 3/ particles on ..beta..-MnO/sub 2/ crystallites which are dispersed on the ..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ matrix. As the adsorption is associated with a sequence of specific colour changes a chemical oxidation mechanism is proposed. Acceptor deactivation is discussed. 9 figures, 3 tables.

  15. Donor-acceptor complexation and dehydrogenation chemistry of aminoboranes.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Adam C; Sabourin, Kyle J; McDonald, Robert; Ferguson, Michael J; Rivard, Eric

    2012-12-01

    A series of formal donor-acceptor adducts of aminoborane (H(2)BNH(2)) and its N-substituted analogues (H(2)BNRR') were prepared: LB-H(2)BNRR'(2)-BH(3) (LB = DMAP, IPr, IPrCH(2) and PCy(3); R and R' = H, Me or tBu; IPr = [(HCNDipp)(2)C:] and Dipp = 2,6-iPr(2)C(6)H(3)). To potentially access complexes of molecular boron nitride, LB-BN-LA (LA = Lewis acid), preliminary dehydrogenation chemistry involving the parent aminoborane adducts LB-H(2)BNH(2)-BH(3) was investigated using [Rh(COD)Cl](2), CuBr, and NiBr(2) as dehydrogenation catalysts. In place of isolating the intended dehydrogenated BN donor-acceptor complexes, the formation of borazine was noted as a major product. Attempts to prepare the fluoroarylborane-capped aminoborane complexes, LB-H(2)BNH(2)-B(C(6)F(5))(3), are also described. PMID:23153209

  16. A single mutation in the hepta-peptide active site of Aspergillus niger PhyA phytase leads to myriad of biochemical changes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The active site motif of proteins belonging to ‘Histidine Acid Phosphatase’ (HAP) contains a hepta-peptide region, RHGXRXP. A close comparison among fungal and yeast HAPs has revealed the fourth residue of the hepta-peptide to be E instead of A, which is the case with A. niger phyA phytase. However,...

  17. Mutation of Glycosylation Sites in BST-2 Leads to Its Accumulation at Intracellular CD63-Positive Vesicles without Affecting Its Antiviral Activity against Multivesicular Body-Targeted HIV-1 and Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zhu; Lv, Mingyu; Shi, Ying; Yu, Jinghua; Niu, Junqi; Yu, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Wenyan

    2016-01-01

    BST-2/tetherin blocks the release of various enveloped viruses including HIV-1 with a “physical tethering” model. The detailed contribution of N-linked glycosylation to this model is controversial. Here, we confirmed that mutation of glycosylation sites exerted an effect of post-translational mis-trafficking, leading to an accumulation of BST-2 at intracellular CD63-positive vesicles. BST-2 with this phenotype potently inhibited the release of multivesicular body-targeted HIV-1 and hepatitis B virus, without affecting the co-localization of BST-2 with EEA1 and LAMP1. These results suggest that N-linked glycosylation of human BST-2 is dispensable for intracellular virion retention and imply that this recently discovered intracellular tethering function may be evolutionarily distinguished from the canonical antiviral function of BST-2 by tethering nascent virions at the cell surface. PMID:26938549

  18. Support for a three-dimensional structure predicting a Cys-Glu-Lys catalytic triad for Pseudomonas aeruginosa amidase comes from site-directed mutagenesis and mutations altering substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Novo, Carlos; Farnaud, Sebastien; Tata, Renée; Clemente, Alda; Brown, Paul R

    2002-08-01

    The aliphatic amidase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa belongs to the nitrilase superfamily, and Cys(166) is the nucleophile of the catalytic mechanism. A model of amidase was built by comparative modelling using the crystal structure of the worm nitrilase-fragile histidine triad fusion protein (NitFhit; Protein Data Bank accession number 1EMS) as a template. The amidase model predicted a catalytic triad (Cys-Glu-Lys) situated at the bottom of a pocket and identical with the presumptive catalytic triad of NitFhit. Three-dimensional models for other amidases belonging to the nitrilase superfamily also predicted Cys-Glu-Lys catalytic triads. Support for the structure for the P. aeruginosa amidase came from site-direct mutagenesis and from the locations of amino acid residues that altered substrate specificity or binding when mutated. PMID:11955282

  19. Support for a three-dimensional structure predicting a Cys-Glu-Lys catalytic triad for Pseudomonas aeruginosa amidase comes from site-directed mutagenesis and mutations altering substrate specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Novo, Carlos; Farnaud, Sebastien; Tata, Renée; Clemente, Alda; Brown, Paul R

    2002-01-01

    The aliphatic amidase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa belongs to the nitrilase superfamily, and Cys(166) is the nucleophile of the catalytic mechanism. A model of amidase was built by comparative modelling using the crystal structure of the worm nitrilase-fragile histidine triad fusion protein (NitFhit; Protein Data Bank accession number 1EMS) as a template. The amidase model predicted a catalytic triad (Cys-Glu-Lys) situated at the bottom of a pocket and identical with the presumptive catalytic triad of NitFhit. Three-dimensional models for other amidases belonging to the nitrilase superfamily also predicted Cys-Glu-Lys catalytic triads. Support for the structure for the P. aeruginosa amidase came from site-direct mutagenesis and from the locations of amino acid residues that altered substrate specificity or binding when mutated. PMID:11955282

  20. Mutations of Cytochrome b559 and PsbJ on and near the QC Site in Photosystem II Influence the Regulation of Short-Term Light Response and Photosynthetic Growth of the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jine-Yung; Chiu, Yi-Fang; Ortega, José M; Wang, Hsing-Ting; Tseng, Tien-Sheng; Ke, Shyue-Chu; Roncel, Mercedes; Chu, Hsiu-An

    2016-04-19

    The characteristic features of two types of short-term light adaptations of the photosynthetic apparatus of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, state transition and blue-green light-induced fluorescence quenching, were compared in wild-type and cytochrome b559 and PsbJ mutant cells with mutations on and near the QC site in photosystem II (PSII). All mutant cells grew photoautotrophically and assembled stable PSII. Thermoluminescence emission experiments showed a decrease in the stability of the S3QB(-)/S2QB(-) charge pairs in the A16FJ, S28Aβ, and V32Fβ mutant cells. When dark-adapted wild-type and mutant cells were illuminated by medium-intensity blue light, the increase in the PSII fluorescence yield (indicating a transition to state 1) was more prominent in mutant than wild-type cells. Strong blue-light conditions induced a quenching of fluorescence corresponding to nonphotochemical fluorescence quenching (NPQ). The extension of NPQ decreased significantly in the mutants, and the kinetics appeared to be affected. When similar measures were repeated on an orange carotenoid protein (OCP)-deficient background, little or no quenching was observed, which confirms that the decrease in fluorescence under strong blue light corresponded to the OCP-dependent NPQ. Immunoblot results showed that the attenuated effect of blue light-induced NPQ in mutant cells was not due to a lack of OCP. Photosynthetic growth and biomass production were greater for A16FJ, S28Aβ, and V32Fβ mutant cells than for wild-type cells under normal growth conditions. Our results suggest that mutations of cytochrome b559 and PsbJ on and near the QC site of PSII may modulate the short-term light response in cyanobacteria. PMID:27026225

  1. Synthesis of dithienosilole-based highly photoluminescent donor-acceptor type compounds.

    PubMed

    Ohshita, Joji; Tominaga, Yuta; Tanaka, Daiki; Ooyama, Yousuke; Mizumo, Tomonobu; Kobayashi, Norifumi; Higashimura, Hideyuki

    2013-03-14

    Highly photoluminescent acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) and donor-acceptor (D-A) type compounds with a dithienosilole unit as the donor and perfluorotolyl or dimesitylboryl group(s) as the acceptor were prepared by the reaction of lithiated dithienosilole derivatives with perfluorotoluene or fluorodimesitylborane, respectively. The resulting A-D-A and D-A type compounds showed red-shifted UV absorption and PL bands compared to those of simple dithienosiloles having no acceptor units, reported previously, and were highly photoluminescent in the solid state as well as in solution. Solvatochromic behaviour that would arise from the intramolecular donor-acceptor interaction were observed for the D-A type compounds with respect to the UV absorption and PL spectra. In addition, it was found that bis(dimesitylboryl)dithienosilole and (dimesitylboryl)(methylthio)dithienosilole responded to coexisting fluoride anions, leading to clear UV absorption and PL spectral changes in solutions. PMID:23295388

  2. Stepwise charge transfer complexation of some pyrimidines with σ-acceptor iodine involving a new unconventional acceptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabie, Usama. M.; Mohamed, Ramadan. A.; Abou-El-Wafa, Moustafa. H.

    2007-11-01

    Interactions of some pyrimidine derivatives, 4-amino-2,6-dimethylpyrimidine, kyanmethin, (4AP), 2-amino-4,6-dimethylpyrimidine (2AP), 2-aminopyrimidine (AP), 2-amino-4-methylpyrimidine (AMP), 2-amino-4-methoxy-6-methylpyrimidine (AMMP), and 4-amino-5-chloro-2,6-dimethylpyrimidine (ACDP) as electron donors, with iodine (I 2), as a typical σ-electron acceptor, have been studied. Electronic absorption spectra of these interactions in several organic solvents of different polarities have performed instant appearance of clear charge transfer (CT) bands. Formation constants ( KCT), molar absorption coefficients ( ɛCT) and thermodynamic properties, Δ H, Δ S, and Δ G, of these interactions have been determined and discussed. Electronic absorption spectra of the solutions of the synthesized pyrimidines-iodine, P-I 2, CT complexes have shown the characteristic bands of the triiodide ion, I 3-. UV/vis spectral tracking of these interactions have shown that by lapse of time the first formed CT complex, P-I 2, is transformed to the corresponding triiodide complex, P +I.I 3-, then, the later interacts as a new unconventional acceptor and it forms a CT complex of the form (P).(P +I.I 3-). Elemental analyses of these solid complexes have indicated the stoichiometric ratio 2:2, or formally 1:1, P:I 2.

  3. Stepwise charge transfer complexation of some pyrimidines with sigma-acceptor iodine involving a new unconventional acceptor.

    PubMed

    Rabie, Usama M; Mohamed, Ramadan A; Abou-El-Wafa, Moustafa H

    2007-11-01

    Interactions of some pyrimidine derivatives, 4-amino-2,6-dimethylpyrimidine, kyanmethin, (4AP), 2-amino-4,6