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Sample records for acceptors including nitrate

  1. Enhanced natural attenuation of BTEX in the nitrate-reducing environment by different electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongsheng; Qu, Dan; Hou, Zhimin; Zhou, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing natural attenuation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) in groundwater is a potential remediation technology. This study focused on selecting appropriate electron acceptors to promote BTEX degradation in a nitrate-reducing environment. Nitrate-reducing soil was obtained from simulated BTEX-contaminated column. Enhancing experiments were conducted in the microcosm with nitrate-reducing material and simulated BTEX-polluted groundwater to investigate the promoting feasibility of adding dissolved oxygen (DO), nitrate, chelated Fe(III), and sulphate as electron acceptors. The concentrations of BTEX, electron acceptors, and their reducing products were measured. The order of promoting BTEX degradation with four electron acceptors was nitrate>sulphate>chelated Fe(III)>DO, and the first-order decay coefficients were 0.0432, 0.0333, 0.0240, and 0.0155, respectively. Nitrate, sulphate, and chelated Fe(III) enhanced attenuation. Nitrate was the most effective electron acceptor under nitrate-reducing conditions. Selecting proper electron acceptor is significant in promoting BTEX degradation according to the biogeochemical characteristics of local underground environment.

  2. Effect of cathode electron acceptors on simultaneous anaerobic sulfide and nitrate removal in microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Zheng, Ping; Mahmood, Qaisar

    2016-01-01

    The current investigation reports the effect of cathode electron acceptors on simultaneous sulfide and nitrate removal in two-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Potassium permanganate and potassium ferricyanide were common cathode electron acceptors and evaluated for substrate removal and electricity generation. The abiotic MFCs produced electricity through spontaneous electrochemical oxidation of sulfide. In comparison with abiotic MFC, the biotic MFC showed better ability for simultaneous nitrate and sulfide removal along with electricity generation. Keeping external resistance of 1,000 Ω, both MFCs showed good capacities for substrate removal where nitrogen and sulfate were the main end products. The steady voltage with potassium permanganate electrodes was nearly twice that of with potassium ferricyanide. Cyclic voltammetry curves confirmed that the potassium permanganate had higher catalytic activity than potassium ferricyanide. The potassium permanganate may be a suitable choice as cathode electron acceptor for enhanced electricity generation during simultaneous treatment of sulfide and nitrate in MFCs.

  3. Bioremediation of BTEX, naphthalene, and phenanthrene in aquifer material using mixed oxygen/nitrate electron acceptor conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, L.P.; D`Adamo, P.C.; Bouwer, E.J.

    1997-10-01

    The primary goal of this research is to further present understanding of the effect of mixed oxygen/nitrate electron acceptor conditions on the biodegradation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, naphthalene, and phenanthrene. Specific objectives include: (1) identify subsurface microbial cultures with the ability to biodegrade aromatic hydrocarbons under aerobic and anaerobic denitrifying conditions; (2) quantify the stoichiometry and kinetics of biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons under aerobic, anaerobic denitrifying and microaerophilic conditions; and (3) simulate various field bioremediation schemes using different nutrient/electron acceptor delivery schemes.

  4. Sulfide removal from industrial wastewaters by lithotrophic denitrification using nitrate as an electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Can-Dogan, Esra; Turker, Mustafa; Dagasan, Levent; Arslan, Ayla

    2010-01-01

    Sulfide is present in wastewaters as well as in biogas and can be removed by several physicochemical and biotechnological processes. Nitrate is a potential electron acceptor, readily available in most wastewater treatment plants and it can replace oxygen under anoxic conditions. A lab-scale reactor was operated for treatment of sulfide containing wastewater with nitrate as an electron acceptor and is used to evaluate the effects of volumetric loading rates, hydraulic retention time (HRT) and substrate concentrations on the performance of the lithotrophic denitrification process for treating industrial fermentation wastewaters. Sulfide is removed more than 90% at the loading rates between 0.055 and 2.004 kg S(-2)/m(3) d, when the influent sulfide concentration is kept around 0.163 kg/m(3) and the HRT decreased from 86.4 to 2 h. Nitrogen removal differed between 23 and 99% with different influent NO(3)(-)-N concentration and loading rates of NO(3)(-)/S(-2) ratio. The stoichiometry of sulfide oxidation with nitrate is calculated assuming different end-products based on thermodynamic approach and compared with experimental yield values. The calculated maximum volumetric and specific sulfide oxidation rates reached 0.076 kg S(-2)/m(3) h and 0.11 kg S(-2)/kg VSS h, respectively. The results are obtained at industrially relevant conditions and can be easily adapted to either biogas cleaning process or to sulfide containing effluent streams.

  5. Microbial arsenite oxidation with oxygen, nitrate, or an electrode as the sole electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van Khanh; Tran, Huong T; Park, Younghyun; Yu, Jaecheul; Lee, Taeho

    2017-02-09

    The purpose of this study was to identify bacteria that can perform As(III) oxidation for environmental bioremediation. Two bacterial strains, named JHS3 and JHW3, which can autotrophically oxidize As(III)-As(V) with oxygen as an electron acceptor, were isolated from soil and water samples collected in the vicinity of an arsenic-contaminated site. According to 16S ribosomal RNA sequence analysis, both strains belong to the ɤ-Proteobacteria class and share 99% sequence identity with previously described strains. JHS3 appears to be a new strain of the Acinetobacter genus, whereas JHW3 is likely to be a novel strain of the Klebsiella genus. Both strains possess the aioA gene encoding an arsenite oxidase and are capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth in the presence of As(III) up to 10 mM as a primary electron donor. Cell growth and As(III) oxidation rate of both strains were significantly enhanced during cultivation under heterotrophic conditions. Under anaerobic conditions, only strain JHW3 oxidized As(III) using nitrate or a solid-state electrode of a bioelectrochemical system as a terminal electron acceptor. Kinetic studies of As(III) oxidation under aerobic condition demonstrated a higher V max and K m from strain JHW3 than strain JHS3. This study indicated the potential application of strain JHW3 for remediation of subsurface environments contaminated with arsenic.

  6. Nitrate as electron acceptor in in situ abandoned refinery site bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Battermann, G.; Meier-Loehr, M.

    1995-12-31

    The aquifer beneath an abandoned refinery site is highly polluted with benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). After removal of the free phase by hydraulic measures until 1986, the immobile residual concentration located 6 to 10 m beneath the surface is still present and causes hydrocarbon concentrations from 10 to 100 mg/L in the groundwater. Laboratory tests proved the biodegradability of the hydrocarbon compounds under denitrifying conditions. Based on the results of the pilot study, large-scale bioremediation covering an area of about 20 ha was initiated. About 500 m{sup 3}/h of groundwater were extracted, and 400 m{sup 3}/h were recharged. The large-scale plant has been operating since 1991. Nitrate as an electron acceptor has been used since 1992. About 300 metric tons (MT) of hydrocarbons have been removed to date. The area of groundwater pollution is diminished by a factor of about two. More than 60% of all groundwater observation wells are now free of dissolved hydrocarbons. In addition, the decrease of biological nitrate consumption gives evidence of advanced bioremediation of the soil.

  7. Nitrate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrate ; CASRN 14797 - 55 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  8. BIODEGRADATION OF MONOAROMATIC HYDROCARBONS BY AQUIFER MICROORGANISMS USING OXYGEN, NITRATE, OR NITROUS OXIDE AS THE TERMINAL ELECTRON ACCEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microcosms were prepared from aquifer material, spiked with monoaromatic hydrocarbons, and amended with oxygen, nitrate, and nitrous oxide. Benzene and alkylbenzenes were degraded to concentrations below 5 µg/liter within 7 days under aerobic conditions, whereas only the alkylbe...

  9. Importance of including small-scale drain discharge data in the calibration of a catchment scale nitrate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A.; Refsgaard, J.; Christensen, B. S.; Jensen, K. H.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrate leaching from agricultural areas and the resulting pollution of groundwater and surface waters is one of the largest challenges in water resources management in Denmark. Nitrate can however be naturally degraded under anaerobic conditions and several studies have shown that degradation in the saturated zone removes more than 50% of the nitrate leaching in Danish catchments. For degradation of nitrate to occur in the saturated zone, nitrate must be transported under the redox interface and a correct simulation of the small-scale flow patterns within a catchment is therefore important in nitrate models. The general findings in Danish nitrate modeling studies are that the models perform well at catchment scale, but the predictability of the models decreases at smaller scale. Thus the model predictions are highly uncertain at small scale and the models cannot at present predict areas within a catchment, where the majority of the nitrate is brought under the interface and thus degraded, and areas, where nitrate is transported directly to streams and lakes without any significant reduction. The objective of this study is to test if the small scale performance of a catchment scale nitrate model can be improved by including small scale observation data in the calibration procedure. The study area is the clayey catchment to Lillebæk stream (4.7 km2), located on the island of Funen in Denmark. Due to the presence of clayey top soils subsurface drains are installed and in consequence the stream discharge is highly dominated by drain flow. An integrated transient hydrological model based on the MIKE SHE code has been developed for the study area. The model has been calibrated against hydraulic head measurements and stream discharge measurements from two stations, one covering most of the catchment and the other station approximately half, using the parameter estimator code PEST. Acceptable model performance has been achieved at catchment scale calibrating the model

  10. Electron acceptor dependence of electron shuttle secretion and extracellular electron transfer by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Bing-Bing; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Dao-Bo; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-05-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an extensively studied dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a great potential for bioremediation and electricity generation. It secretes flavins as electron shuttles which play an important role in extracellular electron transfer. However, the influence of various environmental factors on the secretion of flavins is largely unknown. Here, the effects of electron acceptors, including fumarate, ferrihydrite, Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), nitrate and trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), on the secretion of flavins were investigated. The level of riboflavin and riboflavin-5'-phosphate (FMN) secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 varied considerably with different electron acceptors. While nitrate and ferrihydrite suppressed the secretion of flavins in relative to fumarate, Fe(III)-NTA and TMAO promoted such a secretion and greatly enhanced ferrihydrite reduction and electricity generation. This work clearly demonstrates that electron acceptors could considerably affect the secretion of flavins and consequent microbial EET. Such impacts of electron acceptors in the environment deserve more attention.

  11. Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii sp. nov., a novel, arsenite-oxidizing haloalkaliphilic gammaproteobacterium capable of chemoautotrophic or heterotrophic growth with nitrate or oxygen as the electron acceptor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoeft, S.E.; Blum, J.S.; Stolz, J.F.; Tabita, F.R.; Witte, B.; King, G.M.; Santini, J.M.; Oremland, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    A facultative chemoautotrophic bacterium, strain MLHE-1T, was isolated from Mono Lake, an alkaline hypersaline soda lake in California, USA. Cells of strain MLHE-1T were Gram-negative, short motile rods that grew with inorganic electron donors (arsenite, hydrogen, sulfide or thiosulfate) coupled with the reduction of nitrate to nitrite. No aerobic growth was attained with arsenite or sulfide, but hydrogen sustained both aerobic and anaerobic growth. No growth occurred when nitrite or nitrous oxide was substituted for nitrate. Heterotrophic growth was observed under aerobic and anaerobic (nitrate) conditions. Cells of strain MLHE-1T could oxidize but not grow on CO, while CH4 neither supported growth nor was it oxidized. When grown chemoautotrophically, strain MLHE-1T assimilated inorganic carbon via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham reductive pentose phosphate pathway, with the activity of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBisCO) functioning optimally at 0.1 M NaCl and at pH 7.3. Strain MLHE-1T grew over broad ranges of pH (7.3-10.0; optimum, 9.3), salinity (115-190 g l-1; optimum 30 g l-1) and temperature (113-40 ??C; optimum, 30 ??C). Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences placed strain MLHE-1T in the class Gammaproteobacteria (family Ectothiorhodospiraceae) and most closely related to Alkalispirillum mobile (98.5%) and Alkalilimnicola halodurans (98.6%), although none of these three haloalkaliphilic micro-organisms were capable of photoautotrophic growth and only strain MLHE-1T was able to oxidize As(III). On the basis of physiological characteristics and DNA-DNA hybridization data, it is suggested that strain MLHE-1T represents a novel species within the genus Alkalilimnicola for which the name Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is proposed. The type strain is MLHE-1T (=DSM 17681T =ATCC BAA-1101T). Aspects of the annotated full genome of Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii are discussed in the light of its physiology. ?? 2007 IUMS.

  12. Alternansucrase acceptor products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The regioselectivity of alternansucrase (EC 2.4.1.140) differs from dextransucrase (EC 2.4.1.5) in ways that can be useful for the synthesis of novel oligosaccharide structures. For example, it has been recently shown that the major oligosaccharides produced when maltose is the acceptor include one...

  13. Anaerobic electron acceptor chemotaxis in Shewanella putrefaciens.

    PubMed

    Nealson, K H; Moser, D P; Saffarini, D A

    1995-04-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 can grow either aerobically or anaerobically at the expense of many different electron acceptors and is often found in abundance at redox interfaces in nature. Such redox interfaces are often characterized by very strong gradients of electron acceptors resulting from rapid microbial metabolism. The coincidence of S. putrefaciens abundance with environmental gradients prompted an examination of the ability of MR-1 to sense and respond to electron acceptor gradients in the laboratory. In these experiments, taxis to the majority of the electron acceptors that S. putrefaciens utilizes for anaerobic growth was seen. All anaerobic electron acceptor taxis was eliminated by the presence of oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, elemental sulfur, or dimethyl sulfoxide, even though taxis to the latter was very weak and nitrate and nitrite respiration was normal in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies with respiratory mutants of MR-1 revealed that several electron acceptors that could not be used for anaerobic growth nevertheless elicited normal anaerobic taxis. Mutant M56, which was unable to respire nitrite, showed normal taxis to nitrite, as well as the inhibition of taxis to other electron acceptors by nitrite. These results indicate that electron acceptor taxis in S. putrefaciens does not conform to the paradigm established for Escherichia coli and several other bacteria. Carbon chemo-taxis was also unusual in this organism: of all carbon compounds tested, the only positive response observed was to formate under anaerobic conditions.

  14. Anaerobic electron acceptor chemotaxis in Shewanella putrefaciens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Moser, D. P.; Saffarini, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 can grow either aerobically or anaerobically at the expense of many different electron acceptors and is often found in abundance at redox interfaces in nature. Such redox interfaces are often characterized by very strong gradients of electron acceptors resulting from rapid microbial metabolism. The coincidence of S. putrefaciens abundance with environmental gradients prompted an examination of the ability of MR-1 to sense and respond to electron acceptor gradients in the laboratory. In these experiments, taxis to the majority of the electron acceptors that S. putrefaciens utilizes for anaerobic growth was seen. All anaerobic electron acceptor taxis was eliminated by the presence of oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, elemental sulfur, or dimethyl sulfoxide, even though taxis to the latter was very weak and nitrate and nitrite respiration was normal in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies with respiratory mutants of MR-1 revealed that several electron acceptors that could not be used for anaerobic growth nevertheless elicited normal anaerobic taxis. Mutant M56, which was unable to respire nitrite, showed normal taxis to nitrite, as well as the inhibition of taxis to other electron acceptors by nitrite. These results indicate that electron acceptor taxis in S. putrefaciens does not conform to the paradigm established for Escherichia coli and several other bacteria. Carbon chemo-taxis was also unusual in this organism: of all carbon compounds tested, the only positive response observed was to formate under anaerobic conditions.

  15. Purification to homogeneity and partial amino acid sequence of a fragment which includes the methyl acceptor site of the human DNA repair protein for O6-methylguanine.

    PubMed

    Major, G N; Gardner, E J; Carne, A F; Lawley, P D

    1990-03-25

    DNA repair by O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (O6-MT) is accomplished by removal by the enzyme of the methyl group from premutagenic O6-methylguanine-DNA, thereby restoring native guanine in DNA. The methyl group is transferred to an acceptor site cysteine thiol group in the enzyme, which causes the irreversible inactivation of O6-MT. We detected a variety of different forms of the methylated, inactivated enzyme in crude extracts of human spleen of molecular weights higher and lower than the usually observed 21-24kDa for the human O6-MT. Several apparent fragments of the methylated form of the protein were purified to homogeneity following reaction of partially-purified extract enzyme with O6-[3H-CH3]methylguanine-DNA substrate. One of these fragments yielded amino acid sequence information spanning fifteen residues, which was identified as probably belonging to human methyltransferase by virtue of both its significant sequence homology to three procaryote forms of O6-MT encoded by the ada, ogt (both from E. coli) and dat (B. subtilis) genes, and sequence position of the radiolabelled methyl group which matched the position of the conserved procaryote methyl acceptor site cysteine residue. Statistical prediction of secondary structure indicated good homologies between the human fragment and corresponding regions of the constitutive form of O6-MT in procaryotes (ogt and dat gene products), but not with the inducible ada protein, indicating the possibility that we had obtained partial amino acid sequence for a non-inducible form of the human enzyme. The identity of the fragment sequence as belonging to human methyltransferase was more recently confirmed by comparison with cDNA-derived amino acid sequence from the cloned human O6-MT gene from HeLa cells (1). The two sequences compared well, with only three out of fifteen amino acids being different (and two of them by only one nucleotide in each codon).

  16. Effect of nitrate on anaerobic azo dye reduction.

    PubMed

    Cirik, Kevser; Kitiş, Mehmet; Çinar, Özer

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of nitrate on anaerobic color removal efficiencies. For this aim, anaerobic-aerobic sequencing batch reactor (SBR) fed with a simulated textile effluent including Remazol Brilliant Violet 5R azo dye was operated with a total cycle time of 12 h, including anaerobic (6 h) and aerobic cycles (6 h). Microorganism grown under anaerobic phase of the reactor was exposed to different amounts of competitive electron acceptor (nitrate) and performance of the system was determined by monitoring color removal efficiency, nitrate removal, nitrite formation and removal, oxidation reduction potential, color removal rate, chemical oxygen demand (COD), specific anaerobic enzyme (azo reductase) and aerobic enzyme (catechol 1,2 dioxygenase), and formation and removal of aromatic amines. Variations of population dynamics of microorganisms exposed to various amount of nitrate were identified by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). It was found that nitrate has adverse effect on anaerobic color removal efficiency and color removal was achieved after denitrification process was completed. It was found that nitrate stimulates the COD removal efficiency and accelerates the COD removal in the first hour of anaerobic phase. About 90 % total COD removal efficiencies were achieved in which microorganism exposed to increasing amount of nitrate. Population dynamics of microorganisms exposed to various amount of nitrate were changed and diversity was increased.

  17. Metabolic response of Alicycliphilus denitrificans strain BC toward electron acceptor variation.

    PubMed

    Oosterkamp, Margreet J; Boeren, Sjef; Plugge, Caroline M; Schaap, Peter J; Stams, Alfons J M

    2013-10-01

    Alicycliphilus denitrificans is a versatile, ubiquitous, facultative anaerobic bacterium. Alicycliphilus denitrificans strain BC can use chlorate, nitrate, and oxygen as electron acceptor for growth. Cells display a prolonged lag-phase when transferred from nitrate to chlorate and vice versa. Furthermore, cells adapted to aerobic growth do not easily use nitrate or chlorate as electron acceptor. We further investigated these responses of strain BC by differential proteomics, transcript analysis, and enzyme activity assays. In nitrate-adapted cells transferred to chlorate and vice versa, appropriate electron acceptor reduction pathways need to be activated. In oxygen-adapted cells, adaptation to the use of chlorate or nitrate is likely difficult due to the poorly active nitrate reduction pathway and low active chlorate reduction pathway. We deduce that the Nar-type nitrate reductase of strain BC also reduces chlorate, which may result in toxic levels of chlorite if cells are transferred to chlorate. Furthermore, the activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase appear to be not balanced when oxygen-adapted cells are shifted to nitrate as electron acceptor, leading to the production of a toxic amount of nitrite. These data suggest that strain BC encounters metabolic challenges in environments with fluctuations in the availability of electron acceptors. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000258.

  18. Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis clades enriched under cyclic anaerobic and microaerobic conditions simultaneously use different electron acceptors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lab- and pilot-scale simultaneous nitrification, denitrification and phosphorus removal-sequencing batch reactors were operated under cyclic anaerobic and micro-aerobic conditions. The use of oxygen, nitrite, and nitrate as electron acceptors by Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphat...

  19. Electron acceptor taxis and blue light effect on bacterial chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, B L; Miller, J B; Warrick, H M; Koshland, D E

    1979-11-01

    Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli from anaerobic cultures displayed tactic responses to gradients of nitrate, fumarate, and oxygen when the appropriate electron transport pathway was present. Such responses were named "electron acceptor taxis" because they are elicited by terminal electron acceptors. Mutant strains of S. typhimurium and E. coli were used to establish that functioning electron transport pathways to nitrate and fumarate are required for taxis to these compounds. Aerotaxis in S. typhimurium was blocked by 1.0 mM KCN, which inhibited oxygen uptake. Similarly, a functioning electron transport pathway was shown to be essential for the tumbling response of S. typhimurium and E. coli to intense light (290 to 530 nm). Some inhibitors and uncouplers of respiration were repellents of S. typhimurium. We propose that behavioral responses to light or electron acceptors involve electron transport-mediated perturbations of the proton motive force.

  20. Flexible biological arsenite oxidation utilizing NOx and O2 as alternative electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Wan, Junfeng; Wu, Zihao; Li, Hongli; Li, Haisong; Dagot, Christophe; Wang, Yan

    2017-03-18

    The feasibility of flexible microbial arsenite (As(III)) oxidation coupled with the reduction of different electron acceptors was investigated. The results indicated the acclimated microorganisms could oxidize As(III) with oxygen, nitrate and nitrite as the alternative electron acceptors. A series of batch tests were conducted to measure the kinetic parameters of As(III) oxidation and to evaluate the effects of environmental conditions including pH and temperature on the activity of biological As(III) oxidation dependent on different electron acceptors. Kinetic results showed that oxygen-dependent As(III) oxidation had the highest oxidation rate (0.59 mg As g(-1) VSS min(-1)), followed by nitrate- (0.40 mg As g(-1) VSS min(-1)) and nitrite-dependent As(III) oxidation (0.32 mg As g(-1) VSS min(-1)). The kinetic data of aerobic As(III) oxidation were fitted well with the Monod kinetic model, while the Haldane substrate inhibition model was better applicable to describe the inhibition of anoxic As(III) oxidation. Both aerobic and anoxic As(III) oxidation performed the optimal activity at the near neutral pH. Besides, the optimal temperature for oxygen-, nitrate- and nitrite-dependent As(III) oxidation was 30 ± 1 °C, 40 ± 1 °C and 20 ± 1 °C, respectively.

  1. Physiological and electrochemical effects of different electron acceptors on bacterial anode respiration in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yonggang; Xiang, Yinbo; Xia, Chunyu; Wu, Wei-Min; Sun, Guoping; Xu, Meiying

    2014-07-01

    To understand the interactions between bacterial electrode respiration and the other ambient bacterial electron acceptor reductions, alternative electron acceptors (nitrate, Fe2O3, fumarate, azo dye MB17) were added singly or multiply into Shewanella decolorationis microbial fuel cells (MFCs). All the added electron acceptors were reduced simultaneously with current generation. Adding nitrate or MB17 resulted in more rapid cell growth, higher flavin concentration and higher biofilm metabolic viability, but lower columbic efficiency (CE) and normalized energy recovery (NER) while the CE and NER were enhanced by Fe2O3 or fumarate. The added electron acceptors also significantly influenced the cyclic voltammetry profile of anode biofilm probably via altering the cytochrome c expression. The highest power density was observed in MFCs added with MB17 due to the electron shuttle role of the naphthols from MB17 reduction. The results provided important information for MFCs applied in practical environments where contains various electron acceptors.

  2. [Relations between the retinoic acid acceptor and teratogenesis of retinoids].

    PubMed

    Li, Zeng-Gang; Sun, Kai-Lai

    2004-09-01

    Retinoic acid can induce teratogenesis of the fetus of many animals including human, and its biological activities are induced by a serious of different retinoic acid accepters and their ligands. The retinoic acid acceptor RAR plays key roles in the teratogenesis, and the ligands of RAR are strong teratogens. The intensity sequence of the relative teratogenesis is ligandalpha, ligandbeta and ligandgamma. The ligands of the retinoic acid acceptor RXR cannot induce teratogenesis, but they can enhance the teratogenesis of the RAR stimulus. The retinoic acid acceptors can also affect the development of the fetus by adjusting the expression of the other genes. The relations between the gene mutation of the retinoic acid acceptor, various retinoic acid acceptors and their ligands and teratogenesis of retinoic acid are summarized in this article. In addition, the regulations of the retinoic acid acceptors to the other genes are also discussed.

  3. Nitrate reduction

    DOEpatents

    Dziewinski, Jacek J.; Marczak, Stanislaw

    2000-01-01

    Nitrates are reduced to nitrogen gas by contacting the nitrates with a metal to reduce the nitrates to nitrites which are then contacted with an amide to produce nitrogen and carbon dioxide or acid anions which can be released to the atmosphere. Minor amounts of metal catalysts can be useful in the reduction of the nitrates to nitrites. Metal salts which are formed can be treated electrochemically to recover the metals.

  4. Nitrate and periplasmic nitrate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Stolz, John F.; Basu, Partha

    2014-01-01

    The nitrate anion is a simple, abundant and relatively stable species, yet plays a significant role in global cycling of nitrogen, global climate change, and human health. Although it has been known for quite some time that nitrate is an important species environmentally, recent studies have identified potential medical applications. In this respect the nitrate anion remains an enigmatic species that promises to offer exciting science in years to come. Many bacteria readily reduce nitrate to nitrite via nitrate reductases. Classified into three distinct types – periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar) and assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas), they are defined by their cellular location, operon organization and active site structure. Of these, Nap proteins are the focus of this review. Despite similarities in the catalytic and spectroscopic properties Nap from different Proteobacteria are phylogenetically distinct. This review has two major sections: in the first section, nitrate in the nitrogen cycle and human health, taxonomy of nitrate reductases, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, cellular locations of nitrate reductases, structural and redox chemistry are discussed. The second section focuses on the features of periplasmic nitrate reductase where the catalytic subunit of the Nap and its kinetic properties, auxiliary Nap proteins, operon structure and phylogenetic relationships are discussed. PMID:24141308

  5. Nitrate tolerance.

    PubMed

    Parker, J O

    1987-11-16

    The organic nitrates are the most widely used agents in the management of patients with angina pectoris. When initially administered by the oral route, the nitrates produce profound changes in systemic hemodynamics and significant and prolonged improvement in exercise duration. It has been shown that during short periods of regular oral nitrate administration, the hemodynamic, antiischemic and antianginal effects of the nitrates are greatly reduced. Thus, when initially administered, oral isosorbide dinitrate prolongs exercise duration for a period of several hours, but during sustained 4-times-daily therapy, exercise tolerance is improved for only 2 hours after administration. Studies with transdermal preparations of isosorbide dinitrate and nitroglycerin also show improvement during short-term administration for up to 8 hours, but after several days of once-daily therapy, the effects of these agents are similar to placebo. It is apparent that nitrate tolerance is a clinically relevant problem. Although tolerance develops rapidly during nitrate therapy, it is reversed promptly during nitrate-free periods. Oral nitrates maintain their antianginal effects when given 2 or 3 times daily with provision of a nitrate-free period. Studies are currently underway to investigate the effects of intermittent administration schedules with transdermal nitrate preparations.

  6. Effects of nitrate injection on microbial enhanced oil recovery and oilfield reservoir souring.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Marcio Luis Busi; Soares, Hugo Moreira; Furigo, Agenor; Schmidell, Willibaldo; Corseuil, Henry Xavier

    2014-11-01

    Column experiments were utilized to investigate the effects of nitrate injection on sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) inhibition and microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). An indigenous microbial consortium collected from the produced water of a Brazilian offshore field was used as inoculum. The presence of 150 mg/L volatile fatty acids (VFA´s) in the injection water contributed to a high biological electron acceptors demand and the establishment of anaerobic sulfate-reducing conditions. Continuous injection of nitrate (up to 25 mg/L) for 90 days did not inhibit souring. Contrariwise, in nitrogen-limiting conditions, the addition of nitrate stimulated the proliferation of δ-Proteobacteria (including SRB) and the associated sulfide concentration. Denitrification-specific nirK or nirS genes were not detected. A sharp decrease in water interfacial tension (from 20.8 to 14.5 mN/m) observed concomitantly with nitrate consumption and increased oil recovery (4.3 % v/v) demonstrated the benefits of nitrate injection on MEOR. Overall, the results support the notion that the addition of nitrate, at this particular oil reservoir, can benefit MEOR by stimulating the proliferation of fortuitous biosurfactant-producing bacteria. Higher nitrate concentrations exceeding the stoichiometric volatile fatty acid (VFA) biodegradation demands and/or the use of alternative biogenic souring control strategies may be necessary to warrant effective SRB inhibition down gradient from the injection wells.

  7. Elevated nitrate enriches microbial functional genes for potential bioremediation of complexly contaminated sediments

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Meiying; Zhang, Qin; Xia, Chunyu; Zhong, Yuming; Sun, Guoping; Guo, Jun; Yuan, Tong; Zhou, Jizhong; He, Zhili

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate is an important nutrient and electron acceptor for microorganisms, having a key role in nitrogen (N) cycling and electron transfer in anoxic sediments. High-nitrate inputs into sediments could have a significant effect on N cycling and its associated microbial processes. However, few studies have been focused on the effect of nitrate addition on the functional diversity, composition, structure and dynamics of sediment microbial communities in contaminated aquatic ecosystems with persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Here we analyzed sediment microbial communities from a field-scale in situ bioremediation site, a creek in Pearl River Delta containing a variety of contaminants including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), before and after nitrate injection using a comprehensive functional gene array (GeoChip 4.0). Our results showed that the sediment microbial community functional composition and structure were markedly altered, and that functional genes involved in N-, carbon (C)-, sulfur (S)-and phosphorus (P)- cycling processes were highly enriched after nitrate injection, especially those microorganisms with diverse metabolic capabilities, leading to potential in situ bioremediation of the contaminated sediment, such as PBDE and PAH reduction/degradation. This study provides new insights into our understanding of sediment microbial community responses to nitrate addition, suggesting that indigenous microorganisms could be successfully stimulated for in situ bioremediation of POPs in contaminated sediments with nitrate addition. PMID:24671084

  8. 2012 ELECTRON DONOR-ACCEPTOR INTERACTIONS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, AUGUST 5-10, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    McCusker, James

    2012-08-10

    The upcoming incarnation of the Gordon Research Conference on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions will feature sessions on classic topics including proton-coupled electron transfer, dye-sensitized solar cells, and biological electron transfer, as well as emerging areas such as quantum coherence effects in donor-acceptor interactions, spintronics, and the application of donor-acceptor interactions in chemical synthesis.

  9. Simultaneous arsenite oxidation and nitrate reduction at the electrodes of bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van Khanh; Park, Younghyun; Yu, Jaecheul; Lee, Taeho

    2016-10-01

    Arsenic and nitrate contaminations in the soil and groundwater have urged the scientific community to explore suitable technologies for treatment of both contaminants. This study reports, for the first time, a novel application of bioelectrochemical systems for coupling As detoxification at the anode and denitrification at the cathode. A similar As(III) oxidation efficiency was achieved when anode potential was controlled by a potentiostat or a direct current (DC) power supply. However, a slightly lower nitrate reduction rate was obtained in reactors using DC power supply during simultaneous operation of nitrate reduction and As(III) oxidation. Microbial community analysis by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis indicated the presence of some autotrophic As(III)-oxidizing bacteria, including Achromobacter spp., Ensifer spp., and Sinorhizobium spp., that can flexibly switch their original metabolism of using oxygen as sole electron acceptor to a new metabolism mode of using solid-state anode as sole electron acceptor driving for As(III) oxidation under anaerobic conditions. Although further research is required for validating their applicability, bioelectrochemical systems represent a brilliant technology for remediation of groundwater contaminated with nitrate and/or arsenite.

  10. Acceptors in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Mccluskey, Matthew D.; Corolewski, Caleb; Lv, Jinpeng; Tarun, Marianne C.; Teklemichael, Samuel T.; Walter, Eric D.; Norton, M. G.; Harrison, Kale W.; Ha, Su Y.

    2015-03-21

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) has potential for a range of applications in the area of optoelectronics. The quest for p-type ZnO has focused much attention on acceptors. In this paper, Cu, N, and Li acceptor impurities are discussed. Experimental evidence shows that these point defects have acceptor levels 3.2, 1.5, and 0.8 eV above the valence-band maximum, respectively. The levels are deep because the ZnO valence band is quite low compared to conventional, non-oxide semiconductors. Using MoO2 contacts, the electrical resistivity of ZnO:Li was measured and showed behavior consistent with bulk hole conduction for temperatures above 400 K. A photoluminescence peak in ZnO nanocrystals has been attributed to an acceptor, which may involve a zinc vacancy. High field (W-band) electron paramagnetic resonance measurements on the nanocrystals revealed an axial center with g = 2.0033 and g = 2.0075, along with an isotropic center at g = 2.0053.

  11. Acceptors in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    McCluskey, Matthew D. Corolewski, Caleb D.; Lv, Jinpeng; Tarun, Marianne C.; Teklemichael, Samuel T.; Walter, Eric D.; Norton, M. Grant; Harrison, Kale W.; Ha, Su

    2015-03-21

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) has potential for a range of applications in the area of optoelectronics. The quest for p-type ZnO has focused much attention on acceptors. In this paper, Cu, N, and Li acceptor impurities are discussed. Experimental evidence indicates these point defects have acceptor levels 3.2, 1.4, and 0.8 eV above the valence-band maximum, respectively. The levels are deep because the ZnO valence band is quite low compared to conventional, non-oxide semiconductors. Using MoO{sub 2} contacts, the electrical resistivity of ZnO:Li was measured and showed behavior consistent with bulk hole conduction for temperatures above 400 K. A photoluminescence peak in ZnO nanocrystals is attributed to an acceptor, which may involve a Zn vacancy. High field (W-band) electron paramagnetic resonance measurements on the nanocrystals revealed an axial center with g{sub ⊥} = 2.0015 and g{sub //} = 2.0056, along with an isotropic center at g = 2.0035.

  12. Global Transcriptome Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Exposed to Different Terminal Electron Acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Beliaev, Alex S.; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Klappenbach, Joel; Wu, Liyou; Romine, Margaret F.; Tiedje, James M.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2005-10-01

    To gain insight into the complex structure of the energy-generating networks in the dissimilatory metal reducer Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, global mRNA patterns were examined in cells exposed to a wide range of metal and non-metal electron acceptors. Gene expression patterns were similar irrespective of which metal ion was used as electron acceptor, with 60% of the differentially expressed genes showing similar induction or repression relative to fumarate- respiring conditions. Several groups of genes exhibited elevated expression levels in the presence of metals, including those encoding putative multidrug efflux transporters, detoxification proteins, extracytoplasmic sigma factors and PAS-domain regulators. Only one of the 42 predicted c-type cytochromes in MR-1, SO3300, displayed significantly elevated transcript levels across all metal-reducing conditions. Genes encoding decaheme cytochromes MtrC and MtrA that were previously linked to the reduction of different forms of Fe(III) and Mn(IV), exhibited only slight decreases in relative mRNA abundances under metal-reducing conditions. In contrast, specific transcriptome responses were displayed to individual non-metal electron acceptors resulting in the identification of unique groups of nitrate-, thiosulfate- and TMAO-induced genes including previously uncharacterized multi-cytochrome gene clusters. Collectively, the gene expression results reflect the fundamental differences between metal and non-metal respiratory pathways of S. oneidensis MR-1, where the coordinate induction of detoxification and stress response genes play a key role in adaptation of this organism under metal-reducing conditions. Moreover, the relative paucity and/or the constitutive nature of genes involved in electron transfer to metals is likely due to the low-specificity and the opportunistic nature of the metal-reducing electron transport pathways.

  13. Dynamics of iron-acceptor-pair formation in co-doped silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bartel, T.; Gibaja, F.; Graf, O.; Gross, D.; Kaes, M.; Heuer, M.; Kirscht, F.; Möller, C.; Lauer, K.

    2013-11-11

    The pairing dynamics of interstitial iron and dopants in silicon co-doped with phosphorous and several acceptor types are presented. The classical picture of iron-acceptor pairing dynamics is expanded to include the thermalization of iron between different dopants. The thermalization is quantitatively described using Boltzmann statistics and different iron-acceptor binding energies. The proper understanding of the pairing dynamics of iron in co-doped silicon will provide additional information on the electronic properties of iron-acceptor pairs and may become an analytical method to quantify and differentiate acceptors in co-doped silicon.

  14. Modeling the Effect of External Carbon Source Addition under Different Electron Acceptor Conditions in Biological Nutrient Removal Activated Sludge Systems.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiang; Wisniewski, Kamil; Czerwionka, Krzysztof; Zhou, Qi; Xie, Li; Makinia, Jacek

    2016-02-16

    The aim of this study was to expand the International Water Association Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d) to predict the aerobic/anoxic behavior of polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) and "ordinary" heterotrophs in the presence of different external carbon sources and electron acceptors. The following new aspects were considered: (1) a new type of the readily biodegradable substrate, not available for the anaerobic activity of PAOs, (2) nitrite as an electron acceptor, and (3) acclimation of "ordinary" heterotrophs to the new external substrate via enzyme synthesis. The expanded model incorporated 30 new or modified process rate equations. The model was evaluated against data from several, especially designed laboratory experiments which focused on the combined effects of different types of external carbon sources (acetate, ethanol and fusel oil) and electron acceptors (dissolved oxygen, nitrate and nitrite) on the behavior of PAOs and "ordinary" heterotrophs. With the proposed expansions, it was possible to improve some deficiencies of the ASM2d in predicting the behavior of biological nutrient removal (BNR) systems with the addition of external carbon sources, including the effect of acclimation to the new carbon source.

  15. Anoxic nitrate reduction coupled with iron oxidation and attenuation of dissolved arsenic and phosphate in a sand and gravel aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Richard L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Repert, Deborah A.; Böhlke, J. K.

    2017-01-01

    Nitrate has become an increasingly abundant potential electron acceptor for Fe(II) oxidation in groundwater, but this redox couple has not been well characterized within aquifer settings. To investigate this reaction and some of its implications for redox-sensitive groundwater contaminants, we conducted an in situ field study in a wastewater-contaminated aquifer on Cape Cod. Long-term (15 year) geochemical monitoring within the contaminant plume indicated interacting zones with variable nitrate-, Fe(II)-, phosphate-, As(V)-, and As(III)-containing groundwater. Nitrate and phosphate were derived predominantly from wastewater disposal, whereas Fe(II), As(III), and As(V) were mobilized from the aquifer sediments. Multiple natural gradient, anoxic tracer tests were conducted in which nitrate and bromide were injected into nitrate-free, Fe(II)-containing groundwater. Prior to injection, aqueous Fe(II) concentrations were approximately 175 μM, but sorbed Fe(II) accounted for greater than 90% of the total reactive Fe(II) in the aquifer. Nitrate reduction was stimulated within 1 m of transport for 100 μM and 1000 μM nitrate additions, initially producing stoichiometric quantities of nitrous oxide (>300 μM N). In subsequent injections at the same site, nitrate was reduced even more rapidly and produced less nitrous oxide, especially over longer transport distances. Fe(II) and nitrate concentrations decreased together and were accompanied by Fe(III) oxyhydroxide precipitation and decreases in dissolved phosphate, As(III), and As(V) concentrations. Nitrate N and O isotope fractionation effects during nitrate reduction were approximately equal (ε15N/ε18O = 1.11) and were similar to those reported for laboratory studies of biological nitrate reduction, including denitrification, but unlike some reported effects on nitrate by denitrification in aquifers. All constituents affected by the in situ tracer experiments returned to pre-injection levels after several weeks

  16. Anoxic nitrate reduction coupled with iron oxidation and attenuation of dissolved arsenic and phosphate in a sand and gravel aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Richard L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Repert, Deborah A.; Böhlke, J.K.

    2017-01-01

    Nitrate has become an increasingly abundant potential electron acceptor for Fe(II) oxidation in groundwater, but this redox couple has not been well characterized within aquifer settings. To investigate this reaction and some of its implications for redox-sensitive groundwater contaminants, we conducted an in situ field study in a wastewater-contaminated aquifer on Cape Cod. Long-term (15 year) geochemical monitoring within the contaminant plume indicated interacting zones with variable nitrate-, Fe(II)-, phosphate-, As(V)-, and As(III)-containing groundwater. Nitrate and phosphate were derived predominantly from wastewater disposal, whereas Fe(II), As(III), and As(V) were mobilized from the aquifer sediments. Multiple natural gradient, anoxic tracer tests were conducted in which nitrate and bromide were injected into nitrate-free, Fe(II)-containing groundwater. Prior to injection, aqueous Fe(II) concentrations were approximately 175 μM, but sorbed Fe(II) accounted for greater than 90% of the total reactive Fe(II) in the aquifer. Nitrate reduction was stimulated within 1 m of transport for 100 μM and 1000 μM nitrate additions, initially producing stoichiometric quantities of nitrous oxide (>300 μM N). In subsequent injections at the same site, nitrate was reduced even more rapidly and produced less nitrous oxide, especially over longer transport distances. Fe(II) and nitrate concentrations decreased together and were accompanied by Fe(III) oxyhydroxide precipitation and decreases in dissolved phosphate, As(III), and As(V) concentrations. Nitrate N and O isotope fractionation effects during nitrate reduction were approximately equal (ε15N/ε18O = 1.11) and were similar to those reported for laboratory studies of biological nitrate reduction, including denitrification, but unlike some reported effects on nitrate by denitrification in aquifers. All constituents affected by the in situ tracer experiments returned to pre-injection levels after several

  17. Fullerene-bisadduct acceptors for polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfang

    2013-10-01

    Polymer solar cells (PSCs) have drawn great attention in recent years for their simple device structure, light weight, and low-cost fabrication in comparison with inorganic semiconductor solar cells. However, the power-conversion efficiency (PCE) of PSCs needs to be increased for their future application. The key issue for improving the PCE of PSCs is the design and synthesis of high-efficiency conjugated polymer donors and fullerene acceptors for the photovoltaic materials. For the acceptor materials, several fullerene-bisadduct acceptors with high LUMO energy levels have demonstrated excellent photovoltaic performance in PSCs with P3HT as a donor. In this Focus Review, recent progress in high-efficiency fullerene-bisadduct acceptors is discussed, including the bisadduct of PCBM, indene-C60 bisadduct (ICBA), indene-C70 bisadduct (IC70BA), DMPCBA, NCBA, and bisTOQC. The LUMO levels and photovoltaic performance of these bisadduct acceptors with P3HT as a donor are summarized and compared. In addition, the applications of an ICBA acceptor in new device structures and with other conjugated polymer donors than P3HT are also introduced and discussed.

  18. Effect of nitrate on microbial perchlorate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    nitrate, transcripts of perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase were analyzed to determine possible transcriptional regulation from nitrate. During growth transition studies, increase in the level of transcripts necessary for nitrate reduction and perchlorate reduction was observed concomitantly with decrease in the concentration of nitrate and perchlorate respectively suggesting transcriptional regulation was involved in the preferential utilization of nitrate and that nitrate might be a transcriptional inhibitor of perchlorate reduction. Again, using non-growth washed cell suspensions of perchlorate grown D. aromatica, a decrease of transcript level of the perchlorate reductase but not the chlorite dismutase was observed after incubation with nitrate. In conclusion, from physiological and molecular evidence, nitrate negatively regulates transcription of perchlorate reductase thus inhibiting perchlorate reduction. This result is unexpected as it is in contrast to the accepted dogma that microorganisms regulate their metabolisms to utilize electron acceptors in a sequential manner based on thermodynamic optimization which would imply that perchlorate should be used preferentially to nitrate.

  19. Alkyl Chlorides as Hydrogen Bond Acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nadas, Janos I; Vukovic, Sinisa; Hay, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    To gain an understanding of the role of an alkyl chloride as a hydrogen bond acceptor, geometries and interaction energies were calculated at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory for complexes between ethyl chloride and representative hydrogen donor groups. The results establish that these donors, which include hydrogen cyanide, methanol, nitrobenzene, pyrrole, acetamide, and N-methylurea, form X-H {hor_ellipsis} Cl hydrogen bonds (X = C, N, O) of weak to moderate strength, with {Delta}E values ranging from -2.8 to -5.3 kcal/mol.

  20. Anaerobic methanotrophy in tidal wetland: Effects of electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li-Hung; Yu, Zih-Huei; Wang, Pei-Ling

    2016-04-01

    Wetlands have been considered to represent the largest natural source of methane emission, contributing substantially to intensify greenhouse effect. Despite in situ methanogenesis fueled by organic degradation, methanotrophy also plays a vital role in controlling the exact quantity of methane release across the air-sediment interface. As wetlands constantly experience various disturbances of anthropogenic activities, biological burrowing, tidal inundation, and plant development, rapid elemental turnover would enable various electron acceptors available for anaerobic methanotrophy. The effects of electron acceptors on stimulating anaerobic methanotrophy and the population compositions involved in carbon transformation in wetland sediments are poorly explored. In this study, sediments recovered from tidally influenced, mangrove covered wetland in northern Taiwan were incubated under the static conditions to investigate whether anaerobic methanotrophy could be stimulated by the presence of individual electron acceptors. Our results demonstrated that anaerobic methanotrophy was clearly stimulated in incubations amended with no electron acceptor, sulfate, or Fe-oxyhydroxide. No apparent methane consumption was observed in incubations with nitrate, citrate, fumarate or Mn-oxides. Anaerobic methanotrophy in incubations with no exogenous electron acceptor appears to proceed at the greatest rates, being sequentially followed by incubations with sulfate and Fe-oxyhydroxide. The presence of basal salt solution stimulated methane oxidation by a factor of 2 to 3. In addition to the direct impact of electron acceptor and basal salts, incubations with sediments retrieved from low tide period yielded a lower rate of methane oxidation than from high tide period. Overall, this study demonstrates that anaerobic methanotrophy in wetland sediments could proceed under various treatments of electron acceptors. Low sulfate content is not a critical factor in inhibiting methane

  1. Insensitive Ammonium Nitrate.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    is reduced by replacing the ammonium nitrate with a solid solution of potassium nitrate in form III ammonium nitrate wherein the potassium nitrate...constitutes from more than zero to less than 50 weight percent of the solid solution . (Author)

  2. Importance of the Two Dissimilatory (Nar) Nitrate Reductases in the Growth and Nitrate Reduction of the Methylotrophic Marine Bacterium Methylophaga nitratireducenticrescens JAM1

    PubMed Central

    Mauffrey, Florian; Martineau, Christine; Villemur, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Methylophaga nitratireducenticrescens JAM1 is the only reported Methylophaga species capable of growing under anaerobic conditions with nitrate as electron acceptor. Its genome encodes a truncated denitrification pathway, which includes two nitrate reductases, Nar1 and Nar2; two nitric oxide reductases, Nor1 and Nor2; and one nitrous oxide reductase, Nos; but no nitrite reductase (NirK or NirS). The transcriptome of strain JAM1 cultivated with nitrate and methanol under anaerobic conditions showed the genes for these enzymes were all expressed. We investigated the importance of Nar1 and Nar2 by knocking out narG1, narG2 or both genes. Measurement of the specific growth rate and the specific nitrate reduction rate of the knockout mutants JAM1ΔnarG1 (Nar1) and JAM1ΔnarG2 (Nar2) clearly demonstrated that both Nar systems contributed to the growth of strain JAM1 under anaerobic conditions, but at different levels. The JAM1ΔnarG1 mutant exhibited an important decrease in the nitrate reduction rate that consequently impaired its growth under anaerobic conditions. In JAM1ΔnarG2, the mutation induced a 20-h lag period before nitrate reduction occurred at specific rate similar to that of strain JAM1. The disruption of narG1 did not affect the expression of narG2. However, the expression of the Nar1 system was highly downregulated in the presence of oxygen with the JAM1ΔnarG2 mutant. These results indicated that Nar1 is the major nitrate reductase in strain JAM1 but Nar2 appears to regulate the expression of Nar1. PMID:26733997

  3. Nitrate reduction in Haloferax alexandrinus: the case of assimilatory nitrate reductase.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Volkan; Kilic, Gözde Aydoğan; Kutlu, Hatice Mehtap; Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María

    2017-03-21

    Haloferax alexandrinus Strain TM JCM 10717(T) = IFO 16590(T) is an extreme halophilic archaeon able to produce significant amounts of canthaxanthin. Its genome sequence has been analysed in this work using bioinformatics tools available at Expasy in order to look for genes encoding nitrate reductase-like proteins: respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar) and/or assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas). The ability of the cells to reduce nitrate under aerobic conditions was tested. The enzyme in charge of nitrate reduction under aerobic conditions (Nas) has been purified and characterised. It is a monomeric enzyme (72 ± 1.8 kDa) that requires high salt concentration for stability and activity. The optimum pH value for activity was 9.5. Effectiveness of different substrates, electron donors, cofactors and inhibitors was also reported. High nitrite concentrations were detected within the culture media during aerobic/microaerobic cells growth. The main conclusion from the results is that this haloarchaeon reduces nitrate aerobically thanks to Nas and may induce denitrification under anaerobic/microaerobic conditions using nitrate as electron acceptor. The study sheds light on the role played by haloarchaea in the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen, paying special attention to nitrate reduction processes. Besides, it provides useful information for future attempts on microecological and biotechnological implications of haloarchaeal nitrate reductases.

  4. Spectral, thermal and kinetic studies of charge-transfer complexes formed between the highly effective antibiotic drug metronidazole and two types of acceptors: σ- and π-acceptors.

    PubMed

    Refat, Moamen S; Saad, Hosam A; Adam, Abdel Majid A

    2015-04-15

    Understanding the interaction between drugs and small inorganic or organic molecules is critical in being able to interpret the drug-receptor interactions and acting mechanism of these drugs. A combined solution and solid state study was performed to describe the complexation chemistry of drug metronidazole (MZ) which has a broad-spectrum antibacterial activity with two types of acceptors. The acceptors include, σ-acceptor (i.e., iodine) and π-acceptors (i.e., dichlorodicyanobenzoquinone (DDQ), chloranil (CHL) and picric acid (PA)). The molecular structure, spectroscopic characteristics, the binding modes as well as the thermal stability were deduced from IR, UV-vis, (1)H NMR and thermal studies. The binding ratio of complexation (MZ: acceptor) was determined to be 1:2 for the iodine acceptor and 1:1 for the DDQ, CHL or PA acceptor, according to the CHN elemental analyses and spectrophotometric titrations. It has been found that the complexation with CHL and PA acceptors increases the values of enthalpy and entropy, while the complexation with DDQ and iodine acceptors decreases the values of these parameters compared with the free MZ donor.

  5. Spectral, thermal and kinetic studies of charge-transfer complexes formed between the highly effective antibiotic drug metronidazole and two types of acceptors: σ- and π-acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Saad, Hosam A.; Adam, Abdel Majid A.

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the interaction between drugs and small inorganic or organic molecules is critical in being able to interpret the drug-receptor interactions and acting mechanism of these drugs. A combined solution and solid state study was performed to describe the complexation chemistry of drug metronidazole (MZ) which has a broad-spectrum antibacterial activity with two types of acceptors. The acceptors include, σ-acceptor (i.e., iodine) and π-acceptors (i.e., dichlorodicyanobenzoquinone (DDQ), chloranil (CHL) and picric acid (PA)). The molecular structure, spectroscopic characteristics, the binding modes as well as the thermal stability were deduced from IR, UV-vis, 1H NMR and thermal studies. The binding ratio of complexation (MZ: acceptor) was determined to be 1:2 for the iodine acceptor and 1:1 for the DDQ, CHL or PA acceptor, according to the CHN elemental analyses and spectrophotometric titrations. It has been found that the complexation with CHL and PA acceptors increases the values of enthalpy and entropy, while the complexation with DDQ and iodine acceptors decreases the values of these parameters compared with the free MZ donor.

  6. Bioremediation of nitrated organics

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, D.A.; Lappin-Scott, H.; Jass, J.

    1994-12-31

    In the manufacture of nitrated aromatic and heterocyclic compounds intermediates are produced as well as the final products, e.g. TNT (trinitrotoluene), and RDX (cyclotri-methylene trinitramine). The red water produced is a dilute effluent containing TNT and other nitrated intermediates. Many of the intermediates are also to be found in contaminated land areas as well as the primary manufacturing products as contaminants in ground adjacent to production and storage areas. Two intermediates included as by-products are p-nitrophenol and resorcinol; both are hydroxylated aromatics and one (the former) is also nitrated. If these rings can be hydroxylated and oxidized by pure or mixed microbial cultures then the notion of using microbes for the detoxification of a wide range of nitrated aromatics and heterocyclics is possible. It is proposed in the study to accelerate this degradative process in the first instance for p-nitrophenol and resorcinol, and secondly for TNT and RDX. The use of microbes to degrade nitroaromatic compounds such as nitrobenzenes, and mono-nitro phenols, have been described. In order to determine how aromatic degrading bacteria can also degrade substituted and nitrated aromatics several pure and mixed cultures have been utilized to demonstrate enzyme adaptation.

  7. Comment on Egami's concept of the evolution of nitrate respiration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rambler, M.; Margulis, L.

    1976-01-01

    Recent results suggest that the presence of common nitrogen salts (sodium nitrite and nitrate) in the irradiation medium can markedly protect filamentous blue-green algae from potentially lethal ultraviolet irradiation. The present results as well as general biological arguments of Egami support and extend Egami's original view that anaerobic respiratory pathways using nitrite and nitrate as terminal electron acceptors evolved prior to oxygen requiring aerobic respiratory pathways.

  8. The structure and bonding of iron-acceptor pairs in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, S.; Assali, L.V.C.; Kimerling, L.C.

    1995-08-01

    The highly mobile interstitial iron and Group III impurities (B, Al, Ga, In) form iron-acceptor pairs in silicon. Based on the migration kinetics and taking host silicon as a dielectric medium, we have simulated the pairing process in a static silicon lattice. Different from the conventional point charge ionic model, our phenomenological calculations include (1) a correction that takes into account valence electron cloud polarization which adds a short range, attractive interaction in the iron-acceptor pair bonding; and (2) silicon lattice relaxation due to the atomic size difference which causes a local strain field. Our model explains qualitatively (1) trends among the iron-acceptor pairs revealing an increase of the electronic state hole emission energy with increasing principal quantum number of acceptor and decreasing pair separation distance; and (2) the stable and metastable sites and configurational symmetries of the iron-acceptor pairs. The iron-acceptor pairing and bonding mechanism is also discussed.

  9. Behavioral response of dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacteria to different electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yvonne; Gustavson, Ruth L; Ali, Nadia; Weber, Karrie A; Westphal, Lacey L; Coates, John D

    2009-10-01

    The response behavior of three dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacteria to different electron acceptors (nitrate, chlorate, and perchlorate) was investigated with two different assays. The observed response was species-specific, dependent on the prior growth conditions, and was inhibited by oxygen. We observed attraction toward nitrate when Dechloromonas aromatica strain RCB and Azospira suillum strain PS were grown with nitrate. When D. aromatica and Dechloromonas agitata strain CKB were grown with perchlorate, both responded to nitrate, chlorate, and perchlorate. When A. suillum was grown with perchlorate, the organism responded to chlorate and perchlorate but not nitrate. A gene replacement mutant in the perchlorate reductase subunit (pcrA) of D. aromatica resulted in a loss of the attraction response toward perchlorate but had no impact on the nitrate response. Washed-cell suspension studies revealed that the perchlorate grown cells of D. aromatica reduced both perchlorate and nitrate, while A. suillum cells reduced perchlorate only. Based on these observations, energy taxis was proposed as the underlying mechanism for the responses to (per)chlorate by D. aromatica. To the best of our knowledge, this study represents the first investigation of the response behavior of perchlorate-reducing bacteria to environmental stimuli. It clearly demonstrates attraction toward chlorine oxyanions and the unique ability of these organisms to distinguish structurally analogous compounds, nitrate, chlorate, and perchlorate and respond accordingly.

  10. Donor-acceptor chemistry in the main group.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Eric

    2014-06-21

    This Perspective article summarizes recent progress from our laboratory in the isolation of reactive main group species using a general donor-acceptor protocol. A highlight of this program is the use of carbon-based donors in combination with suitable Lewis acidic acceptors to yield stable complexes of parent Group 14 element hydrides (e.g. GeH2 and H2SiGeH2). It is anticipated that this strategy could be extended to include new synthetic targets from throughout the Periodic Table with possible applications in bottom-up materials synthesis and main group element catalysis envisioned.

  11. Insights on alterations to the rumen ecosystem by nitrate and nitrocompounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrate and certain short chain nitrocompounds are being investigated as dietary supplements to reduce economic and environmental costs associated with ruminal methane emissions. Thermodynamically, nitrate is a preferred electron acceptor in the rumen that consumes electrons at the expense of metha...

  12. Problems Caused by Microbes and Treatment Strategies The Effect of Nitrate Injection in Oil Reservoirs - Experience with Nitrate Injection in the Halfdan Oilfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Jan; Skovhus, Torben Lund

    This chapter deals with the use of nitrate injection for reservoir souring mitigation in an oilfield with seawater injection in the Danish sector of the North Sea. Nitrate impacts on the activity of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and biofilm redox potential (Larsen et al., 2007), as a result of which corrosion due to SRB activity will be reduced, souring inhibited and previously formed sulphide removed (Larsen, 2002). One important aspect is that the microbiological reduction of nitrate provides approximately three times more energy to SRB than the reduction of sulphate. Therefore, when both nitrate and sulphate are present, nitrate becomes the preferred electron acceptor and SRB capable of growing on nitrate will dominate. Nitrate provides a competitive advantage to nitrate-utilising bacteria (indicated by the general acronym NUB) during competition for available carbon sources as the NUB are capable of much faster growth than SRB.

  13. NITRATE FOR BIORESTORATION OF AN AQUIFER CONTAMINATED WITH JET FUEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is little information available in the open literature on the performance of bioremediation at field scale. The report documents the rate and extent of treatment of a spill of JP-4 in a drinking-water aquifer, using nitrate as the primary electron acceptor for microbial res...

  14. Growth of Strain SES-3 with Arsenate and Other Diverse Electron Acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Laverman, A. M.; Blum, J. S.; Schaefer, J. K.; Phillips, E.; Lovley, D. R.; Oremland, R. S.

    1995-01-01

    The selenate-respiring bacterial strain SES-3 was able to use a variety of inorganic electron acceptors to sustain growth. SES-3 grew with the reduction of arsenate to arsenite, Fe(III) to Fe(II), or thiosulfate to sulfide. It also grew in medium in which elemental sulfur, Mn(IV), nitrite, trimethylamine N-oxide, or fumarate was provided as an electron acceptor. Growth on oxygen was microaerophilic. There was no growth with arsenite or chromate. Washed suspensions of cells grown on selenate or nitrate had a constitutive ability to reduce arsenate but were unable to reduce arsenite. These results suggest that strain SES-3 may occupy a niche as an environmental opportunist by being able to take advantage of a diversity of electron acceptors. PMID:16535143

  15. Unexpected chemoreceptors mediate energy taxis towards electron acceptors in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Baraquet, Claudine; Théraulaz, Laurence; Iobbi-Nivol, Chantal; Méjean, Vincent; Jourlin-Castelli, Cécile

    2009-07-01

    Shewanella oneidensis uses a wide range of terminal electron acceptors for respiration. In this study, we show that the chemotactic response of S. oneidensis to anaerobic electron acceptors requires functional electron transport systems. Deletion of the genes encoding dimethyl sulphoxide and trimethylamine N-oxide reductases, or inactivation of these molybdoenzymes as well as nitrate reductase by addition of tungstate, abolished electron acceptor taxis. Moreover, addition of nigericin prevented taxis towards trimethylamine N-oxide, dimethyl sulphoxide, nitrite, nitrate and fumarate, showing that this process depends on the DeltapH component of the proton motive force. These data, together with those concerning response to metals (Bencharit and Ward, 2005), support the idea that, in S. oneidensis, taxis towards electron acceptors is governed by an energy taxis mechanism. Surprisingly, energy taxis in S. oneidensis is not mediated by the PAS-containing chemoreceptors but rather by a chemoreceptor (SO2240) containing a Cache domain. Four other chemoreceptors also play a minor role in this process. These results indicate that energy taxis can be mediated by new types of chemoreceptors.

  16. Improvement of biological nitrogen removal with nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation bacterium Aquabacterium parvum B6 in an up-flow bioreactor for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxin; Li, Ang; Szewzyk, Ulrich; Ma, Fang

    2016-11-01

    Aquabacterium parvum strain B6 exhibited efficient nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation ability using nitrate as an electron acceptor. A continuous up-flow bioreactor that included an aerobic and an anoxic section was constructed, and strain B6 was added to the bioreactor as inocula to explore the application of microbial nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidizing (NDFO) efficiency in wastewater treatment. The maximum NRE (anoxic section) and TNRE of 46.9% and 79.7%, respectively, could be obtained at a C/N ratio of 5.3:1 in the influent with HRT of 17. Meanwhile, the taxonomy composition of the reactor was assessed, as well. The NDFO metabolism of strain B6 could be expected because of its relatively dominant position in the anoxic section, whereas potential heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification developed into the prevailing status in the aerobic section after 50days of continuous operation.

  17. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Induced Changes in Bacterial Community Structure under Anoxic Nitrate Reducing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Martirani-Von Abercron, Sophie-Marie; Pacheco, Daniel; Benito-Santano, Patricia; Marín, Patricia; Marqués, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Although bacterial anaerobic degradation of mono-aromatic compounds has been characterized in depth, the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as naphthalene has only started to be understood in sulfate reducing bacteria, and little is known about the anaerobic degradation of PAHs in nitrate reducing bacteria. Starting from a series of environments which had suffered different degrees of hydrocarbon pollution, we used most probable number (MPN) enumeration to detect and quantify the presence of bacterial communities able to degrade several PAHs using nitrate as electron acceptor. We detected the presence of a substantial nitrate reducing community able to degrade naphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene (2MN), and anthracene in some of the sites. With the aim of isolating strains able to degrade PAHs under denitrifying conditions, we set up a series of enrichment cultures with nitrate as terminal electron acceptor and PAHs as the only carbon source and followed the changes in the bacterial communities throughout the process. Results evidenced changes attributable to the imposed nitrate respiration regime, which in several samples were exacerbated in the presence of the PAHs. The presence of naphthalene or 2MN enriched the community in groups of uncultured and poorly characterized organisms, and notably in the Acidobacteria uncultured group iii1-8, which in some cases was only a minor component of the initial samples. Other phylotypes selected by PAHs in these conditions included Bacilli, which were enriched in naphthalene enrichments. Several nitrate reducing strains showing the capacity to grow on PAHs could be isolated on solid media, although the phenotype could not be reproduced in liquid cultures. Analysis of known PAH anaerobic degradation genes in the original samples and enrichment cultures did not reveal the presence of PAH-related nmsA-like sequences but confirmed the presence of bssA-like genes related to anaerobic toluene degradation

  18. Bright Solid-State Emission of Disilane-Bridged Donor-Acceptor-Donor and Acceptor-Donor-Acceptor Chromophores.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Masaki; Tsuchiya, Mizuho; Sakamoto, Ryota; Yamanoi, Yoshinori; Nishibori, Eiji; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2016-02-24

    The development of disilane-bridged donor-acceptor-donor (D-Si-Si-A-Si-Si-D) and acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-Si-Si-D-Si-Si-A) compounds is described. Both types of compound showed strong emission (λem =ca. 500 and ca. 400 nm, respectively) in the solid state with high quantum yields (Φ: up to 0.85). Compound 4 exhibited aggregation-induced emission enhancement in solution. X-ray diffraction revealed that the crystal structures of 2, 4, and 12 had no intermolecular π-π interactions to suppress the nonradiative transition in the solid state.

  19. Independence of nitrate and nitrite inhibition of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and use of nitrite as a substrate for growth.

    PubMed

    Korte, Hannah L; Saini, Avneesh; Trotter, Valentine V; Butland, Gareth P; Arkin, Adam P; Wall, Judy D

    2015-01-20

    Sulfate-reducing microbes, such as Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, cause “souring” of petroleum reservoirs through produced sulfide and precipitate heavy metals, either as sulfides or by alteration of the metal reduction state. Thus, inhibitors of these microbes, including nitrate and nitrite ions, are studied in order to limit their impact. Nitrite is a potent inhibitor of sulfate reducers, and it has been suggested that nitrate does not inhibit these microbes directly but by reduction to nitrite, which serves as the ultimate inhibitor. Here we provide evidence that nitrate inhibition of D. vulgaris can be independent of nitrite production. We also show that D. vulgaris can use nitrite as a nitrogen source or terminal electron acceptor for growth. Moreover, we report that use of nitrite as a terminal electron acceptor requires nitrite reductase (nrfA) as a D. vulgaris nrfA mutant cannot respire nitrite but remains capable of utilizing nitrite as a nitrogen source. These results illuminate previously uncharacterized metabolic abilities of D. vulgaris that may allow niche expansion in low-sulfate environments. Understanding these abilities may lead to better control of sulfate-reducing bacteria in industrial settings and more accurate prediction of their interactions in the environment.

  20. Hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene with Different Acceptor Units for Tuning Optoelectronic Properties.

    PubMed

    Keerthi, Ashok; Hou, Ian Cheng-Yi; Marszalek, Tomasz; Pisula, Wojciech; Baumgarten, Martin; Narita, Akimitsu

    2016-10-06

    Hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene (HBC)-based donor-acceptor dyads were synthesized with three different acceptor units, through two pathways: 1) "pre-functionalization" of monobromo-substituted hexaphenylbenzene prior to the cyclodehydrogenation; and 2) "post-functionalization" of monobromo-substituted HBC after the cyclodehydrogenation. The HBC-acceptor dyads demonstrated varying degrees of intramolecular charge-transfer interactions, depending on the attached acceptor units, which allowed tuning of their photophysical and optoelectronic properties, including the energy gaps. The two synthetic pathways described here can be complementary and potentially be applied for the synthesis of nanographene-acceptor dyads with larger aromatic cores, including one-dimensionally extended graphene nanoribbons.

  1. Density and energy level of a deep-level Mg acceptor in 4H-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Hideharu; Morine, Tatsuya; Nagamachi, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Reliably determining the densities and energy levels of deep-level dominant acceptors in heavily doped wide-band-gap semiconductors has been a topic of recent discussion. In these discussions, the focus is on both Hall scattering factors for holes and distribution functions for acceptors. Mg acceptor levels in 4H-SiC seem to be deep, and so here the electrical properties of Mg-implanted 4H-SiC layers are studied by measuring Hall effects. The obtained Hall scattering factors are not reliable because they drop to less than 0.5 at high measurement temperatures. Moreover, the Fermi-Dirac distribution function is unsuitable for examining Mg acceptors because the obtained acceptor density is much higher than the concentration of implanted Mg atoms. However, by using a distribution function that includes the influence of the excited states of a deep-level acceptor, the density and energy level of Mg acceptors can be reliably determined.

  2. Molten nitrate salt technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carling, R. W.; Kramer, C. M.; Bradshaw, R. W.; Nissen, D. A.; Goods, S. H.; Mar, R. W.; Munford, J. W.; Karnowsky, M. M.; Biefeld, R. N.; Norem, N. J.

    1981-03-01

    Of the fluids proposed for heat transfer and energy storage, molten nitrate salts offer significant economic advantages. The nitrate salt of most interest is a binary mixture of NaNO3 and KNO3. Although nitrate/nitrite mixtures were used for decades as heat transfer and heat treatment fluids the use was at temperatures of about 4500 C and lower. In solar thermal power systems the salts will experience a temperature range of 350 to 6000 C. Because central receiver applications place more rigorous demands and higher temperatures on nitrate salts a comprehensive experimental program was developed to examine what effects, if any, the new demands and temperatures have on the salts. The experiments include corrosion testing, environmental cracking of containment materials, and determinations of physical properties and decomposition mechanisms.

  3. Synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor

    DOEpatents

    Lancet, Michael S.; Curran, George P.

    1981-08-18

    A synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor consisting essentially of at least one compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate supported in a refractory carrier matrix, the carrier having the general formula Ca.sub.5 (SiO.sub.4).sub.2 CO.sub.3. A method for producing the synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor is also disclosed.

  4. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?

    PubMed Central

    Balk, Melike; Laverman, Anniet M.; Keuskamp, Joost A.; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests. The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden by the presence of active nitrite-reducing microorganisms under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils. PMID:25784903

  5. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?

    PubMed

    Balk, Melike; Laverman, Anniet M; Keuskamp, Joost A; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests. The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden by the presence of active nitrite-reducing microorganisms under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.

  6. A Metagenomics-Based Metabolic Model of Nitrate-Dependent Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane by Methanoperedens-Like Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Arslan; Speth, Daan R.; de Graaf, Rob M.; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Welte, Cornelia U.

    2015-01-01

    Methane oxidation is an important process to mitigate the emission of the greenhouse gas methane and further exacerbating of climate forcing. Both aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms have been reported to catalyze methane oxidation with only a few possible electron acceptors. Recently, new microorganisms were identified that could couple the oxidation of methane to nitrate or nitrite reduction. Here we investigated such an enrichment culture at the (meta) genomic level to establish a metabolic model of nitrate-driven anaerobic oxidation of methane (nitrate-AOM). Nitrate-AOM is catalyzed by an archaeon closely related to (reverse) methanogens that belongs to the ANME-2d clade, tentatively named Methanoperedens nitroreducens. Methane may be activated by methyl-CoM reductase and subsequently undergo full oxidation to carbon dioxide via reverse methanogenesis. All enzymes of this pathway were present and expressed in the investigated culture. The genome of the archaeal enrichment culture encoded a variety of enzymes involved in an electron transport chain similar to those found in Methanosarcina species with additional features not previously found in methane-converting archaea. Nitrate reduction to nitrite seems to be located in the pseudoperiplasm and may be catalyzed by an unusual Nar-like protein complex. A small part of the resulting nitrite is reduced to ammonium which may be catalyzed by a Nrf-type nitrite reductase. One of the key questions is how electrons from cytoplasmically located reverse methanogenesis reach the nitrate reductase in the pseudoperiplasm. Electron transport in M. nitroreducens probably involves cofactor F420 in the cytoplasm, quinones in the cytoplasmic membrane and cytochrome c in the pseudoperiplasm. The membrane-bound electron transport chain includes F420H2 dehydrogenase and an unusual Rieske/cytochrome b complex. Based on genome and transcriptome studies a tentative model of how central energy metabolism of nitrate-AOM could work is

  7. Effects of structure of nitrator on nitration reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Shiying, Yin; Benli, Yin

    1995-12-01

    It is well-known that nitration of dinitrotoluene (DNT) proceeds quite slowly. Unsatisfactory structure of nitrator could cause an incomplete nitration in the nitrator, and nitration continues in the separator. This, in turn, increases the temperature difference between nitrator and separator. It was found that the nitration degree of DNT in nitrator could be estimated by this temperature difference. We investigated the relationship between the nitrator`s structure and the above temperature difference, and based on the research results obtained we could make nitration complete in nitrator, improve the quality of trinitrotoluene (TNT), lower the consumption of raw materials, especially sulfuric acid, and increase the safety of production.

  8. 27 CFR 555.220 - Table of separation distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting agents. 555.220 Section 555... ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting agents. Table: Department of Defense... Not over Minimum separation distance of acceptor from donor when barricaded (ft.) Ammonium...

  9. 27 CFR 555.220 - Table of separation distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting agents. 555.220 Section 555... ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting agents. Table: Department of Defense... Not over Minimum separation distance of acceptor from donor when barricaded (ft.) Ammonium...

  10. 27 CFR 555.220 - Table of separation distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting agents. 555.220 Section 555... ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting agents. Table: Department of Defense... Not over Minimum separation distance of acceptor from donor when barricaded (ft.) Ammonium...

  11. 27 CFR 555.220 - Table of separation distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting agents. 555.220 Section 555... ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting agents. Table: Department of Defense... Not over Minimum separation distance of acceptor from donor when barricaded (ft.) Ammonium...

  12. 27 CFR 555.220 - Table of separation distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting agents. 555.220 Section 555... ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting agents. Table: Department of Defense... Not over Minimum separation distance of acceptor from donor when barricaded (ft.) Ammonium...

  13. Denitrification of nitrate and nitrite by 'Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis' clade IC.

    PubMed

    Saad, Sondos A; Welles, Laurens; Abbas, Ben; Lopez-Vazquez, Carlos M; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Brdjanovic, Damir

    2016-11-15

    Phosphate accumulating organisms (PAO) are assumed to use nitrate as external electron acceptor, allowing an efficient integration of simultaneous nitrogen and phosphate removal with minimal organic carbon (COD) requirements. However, contradicting findings appear in literature regarding the denitrification capacities of PAO due to the lack of clade specific highly enriched PAO cultures. Whereas some studies suggest that only PAO clade I may be capable of using nitrate as external electron acceptor for anoxic P-uptake, other studies indicate that PAO clade II may be responsible for anoxic P-removal. In the present study, a highly enriched PAO clade IC culture (>99% according to FISH) was cultivated in an SBR operated under Anaerobic/Oxic conditions and subsequently exposed to Anaerobic/Anoxic/Oxic conditions using nitrate as electron acceptor. Before and after acclimatization to the presence of nitrate, the aerobic and anoxic (nitrate and nitrite) activities of the PAO I culture were assessed through the execution of batch tests using either acetate or propionate as electron donor. In the presence of nitrate, significant P-uptake by PAO I was not observed before or after acclimatization. Using nitrite as electron acceptor, limited nitrite removal rates were observed before acclimatization with lower rates in the acetate fed reactor without P-uptake and slightly higher in the propionate fed reactor with a marginal anoxic P-uptake. Only after acclimatization to nitrate, simultaneous P and nitrite removal was observed. This study suggests that PAO clade IC is not capable of using nitrate as external electron acceptor for anoxic P-removal. The elucidation of the metabolic capacities for individual PAO clades helps in better understanding and optimization of the relation between microbial ecology and process performance in enhanced biological phosphate removal processes.

  14. Alkali metal nitrate purification

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Morgan, Michael J.

    1986-02-04

    A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

  15. Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis Membrane Protein Expression in Response to Electron Acceptor Availability

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, Carol S.; Khare, Tripti; Verberkmoes, Nathan; O'Loughlin, Ed; Lindberg, Carl; Thompson, Melissa; Hettich, Robert

    2006-04-05

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a gram negative metal-reducing bacterium, can utilize a large number of electron acceptors. In the natural environment, S. oneidensis utilizes insoluble metal oxides as well as soluble terminal electron acceptors. The purpose of this ERSP project is to identify differentially expressed proteins associated with the membranes of S. oneidensis MR-1 cells grown with different electron acceptors, including insoluble metal oxides. We hypothesize that through the use of surface labeling, subcellular fractionation, and a combination of proteome analysis tools, proteins involved in the reduction of different terminal electron acceptors will be elucidated. We are comparing the protein profiles from cells grown with the soluble electron acceptors oxygen and fumarate and with those from cells grown with the insoluble iron oxides goethite, ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite. Comparison of the cell surface proteins isolated from cells grown with oxygen or anaerobically with fumarate revealed an increase in the abundance of over 25 proteins in anaerobic cells, including agglutination protein and flagellin proteins along with the several hypothetical proteins. In addition, the surface protein composition of cells grown with the insoluble iron oxides varies considerably from the protein composition observed with either soluble electron acceptor as well as between the different insoluble acceptors.

  16. Effect of Sodium Nitrate and Nitrate Reducing Bacteria on In vitro Methane Production and Fermentation with Buffalo Rumen Liquor.

    PubMed

    Sakthivel, Pillanatham Civalingam; Kamra, Devki Nandan; Agarwal, Neeta; Chaudhary, Lal Chandra

    2012-06-01

    Nitrate can serve as a terminal electron acceptor in place of carbon dioxide and inhibit methane emission in the rumen and nitrate reducing bacteria might help enhance the reduction of nitrate/nitrite, which depends on the type of feed offered to animals. In this study the effects of three levels of sodium nitrate (0, 5, 10 mM) on fermentation of three diets varying in their wheat straw to concentrate ratio (700:300, low concentrate, LC; 500:500, medium concentrate, MC and 300:700, high concentrate, HC diet) were investigated in vitro using buffalo rumen liquor as inoculum. Nitrate reducing bacteria, isolated from the rumen of buffalo were tested as a probiotic to study if it could help in enhancing methane inhibition in vitro. Inclusion of sodium nitrate at 5 or 10 mM reduced (p<0.01) methane production (9.56, 7.93 vs. 21.76 ml/g DM; 12.20, 10.42 vs. 25.76 ml/g DM; 15.49, 12.33 vs. 26.86 ml/g DM) in LC, MC and HC diets, respectively. Inclusion of nitrate at both 5 and 10 mM also reduced (p<0.01) gas production in all the diets, but in vitro true digestibility (IVTD) of feed reduced (p<0.05) only in LC and MC diets. In the medium at 10 mM sodium nitrate level, there was 0.76 to 1.18 mM of residual nitrate and nitrite (p<0.01) also accumulated. In an attempt to eliminate residual nitrate and nitrite in the medium, the nitrate reducing bacteria were isolated from buffalo adapted to nitrate feeding and introduced individually (3 ml containing 1.2 to 2.3×10(6) cfu/ml) into in vitro incubations containing the MC diet with 10 mM sodium nitrate. Addition of live culture of NRBB 57 resulted in complete removal of nitrate and nitrite from the medium with a further reduction in methane and no effect on IVTD compared to the control treatments containing nitrate with autoclaved cultures or nitrate without any culture. The data revealed that nitrate reducing bacteria can be used as probiotic to prevent the accumulation of nitrite when sodium nitrate is used to reduce in vitro

  17. Mechanisms of electron acceptor utilization: Implications for simulating anaerobic biodegradation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schreiber, M.E.; Carey, G.R.; Feinstein, D.T.; Bahr, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Simulation of biodegradation reactions within a reactive transport framework requires information on mechanisms of terminal electron acceptor processes (TEAPs). In initial modeling efforts, TEAPs were approximated as occurring sequentially, with the highest energy-yielding electron acceptors (e.g. oxygen) consumed before those that yield less energy (e.g., sulfate). Within this framework in a steady state plume, sequential electron acceptor utilization would theoretically produce methane at an organic-rich source and Fe(II) further downgradient, resulting in a limited zone of Fe(II) and methane overlap. However, contaminant plumes often display much more extensive zones of overlapping Fe(II) and methane. The extensive overlap could be caused by several abiotic and biotic processes including vertical mixing of byproducts in long-screened monitoring wells, adsorption of Fe(II) onto aquifer solids, or microscale heterogeneity in Fe(III) concentrations. Alternatively, the overlap could be due to simultaneous utilization of terminal electron acceptors. Because biodegradation rates are controlled by TEAPs, evaluating the mechanisms of electron acceptor utilization is critical for improving prediction of contaminant mass losses due to biodegradation. Using BioRedox-MT3DMS, a three-dimensional, multi-species reactive transport code, we simulated the current configurations of a BTEX plume and TEAP zones at a petroleum- contaminated field site in Wisconsin. Simulation results suggest that BTEX mass loss due to biodegradation is greatest under oxygen-reducing conditions, with smaller but similar contributions to mass loss from biodegradation under Fe(III)-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Results of sensitivity calculations document that BTEX losses due to biodegradation are most sensitive to the age of the plume, while the shape of the BTEX plume is most sensitive to effective porosity and rate constants for biodegradation under Fe(III)-reducing and

  18. Functional roles of CymA and NapC in reduction of nitrate and nitrite by Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1

    SciTech Connect

    Beliav, Alex; Qiu, Dongru; Fredrickson, James K.; Wei, Hehong; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Xia, Ming; Zhou, Jizhong; Dai, Jingcheng; Shi, Liang; Tiedje, James M.; Romine, Margaret F.

    2016-06-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1 harbours two periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) gene clusters, NapC-associated nap-alpha (napEDABC) and CymA-dependent nap-beta (napDAGHB), for dissimilatory nitrate respiration. CymA is a member of the NapC/NirT quinol dehydrogenase family and acts as a hub to support different respiratory pathways, including those on iron [Fe(III)] and manganese [Mn(III, IV)] (hydr)oxide, nitrate, nitrite, fumarate and arsenate in Shewanella strains. However, in our analysis it was shown that another NapC/NirT family protein, NapC, was only involved in nitrate reduction, although both CymA and NapC can transfer quinol-derived electrons to a periplasmic terminal reductase or an electron acceptor. Furthermore, our results showed that NapC could only interact specifically with the Nap-alpha nitrate reductase while CymA could interact promiscuously with Nap-alpha, Nap-beta and the NrfA nitrite reductase for nitrate and nitrite reduction. To further explore the difference in specificity, site-directed mutagenesis on both CymA and NapC was conducted and the phenotypic changes in nitrate and nitrite reduction were tested. Our analyses demonstrated that the Lys-91 residue played a key role in nitrate reduction for quinol oxidation and the Asp-166 residue might influence the maturation of CymA. The Asp-97 residue might be one of the key factors that influence the interaction of CymA with the cytochromes NapB and NrfA.

  19. [Effects of nitrate on organic removal and microbial community structure in the sediments].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Deng, Dai-Yong; Sun, Guo-Ping; Liu, Yong-Ding; Xu, Mei-Ying

    2013-07-01

    The strategy promoted pollutant degradation and transformation under the anaerobic circumstance by adding nitrate as an electron acceptor has been widely used in sediment bioremediation. However, few literature reports on organic removal characteristics and microbial community responses in the contaminated river sediment under the nitrate reduction condition. Methods including the polar and non-polar chemical fractionation, relative abundance detection of organic matters by GC-MS were combined and applied to investigate organic removals and PCR-DGGE analysis was used for microbial community structures in sediment incubation systems with or without calcium nitrate addition. The results indicated that the addition of calcium nitrate could significantly enhance removal efficiencies of organic pollutants. The removal efficiency of total organic carbon (TOC) and the total peak area of organic matters in GC-MS were 47.25% and 29.55% which were higher than those of the control. The effect descending order of organic pollutants was: silicon materials > alkanes > polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons > heterocyclic compounds > olefins > benzene homologues > polar compounds > phthalates > aldehydes and ketones > alkyl esters. And removal rates of silicon materials, the persistent organic pollutants, benzene homologues and heterocyclic compounds were 46.73%, 36.25%, 23.19% and 35.92% which were higher than those of the control. The PCR-DGGE profile of bacterial 16S rDNA V3 fragments showed obviously different microbial community structures between the treatment and the control systems. Blastn analysis revealed that sequences of 10 predominant bands from DGGE profile were closely related to Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Clostridia, Chloroflexi, Caldiserica and uncultured bacterium. The research findings provide some helpful scientific information for promoting organic pollutant removal of river sediment by nitrate reduction.

  20. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for use as sources...

  1. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for use as sources...

  2. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33 Section 181.33 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions...

  3. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for use as sources...

  4. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for use as sources...

  5. Modeling the long-term fate of agricultural nitrate in groundwater in the San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, Francis H.; Campbell, Bruce G.; Widdowson, Mark A.; Landon, Mathew K.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrate contamination of groundwater systems used for human water supplies is a major environmental problem in many parts of the world. Fertilizers containing a variety of reduced nitrogen compounds are commonly added to soils to increase agricultural yields. But the amount of nitrogen added during fertilization typically exceeds the amount of nitrogen taken up by crops. Oxidation of reduced nitrogen compounds present in residual fertilizers can produce substantial amounts of nitrate which can be transported to the underlying water table. Because nitrate concentrations exceeding 10 mg/L in drinking water can have a variety of deleterious effects for humans, agriculturally derived nitrate contamination of groundwater can be a serious public health issue. The Central Valley aquifer of California accounts for 13 percent of all the groundwater withdrawals in the United States. The Central Valley, which includes the San Joaquin Valley, is one of the most productive agricultural areas in the world and much of this groundwater is used for crop irrigation. However, rapid urbanization has led to increasing groundwater withdrawals for municipal public water supplies. That, in turn, has led to concern about how contaminants associated with agricultural practices will affect the chemical quality of groundwater in the San Joaquin Valley. Crop fertilization with various forms of nitrogen-containing compounds can greatly increase agricultural yields. However, leaching of nitrate from soils due to irrigation has led to substantial nitrate contamination of shallow groundwater. That shallow nitrate-contaminated groundwater has been moving deeper into the Central Valley aquifer since the 1960s. Denitrification can be an important process limiting the mobility of nitrate in groundwater systems. However, substantial denitrification requires adequate sources of electron donors in order to drive the process. In many cases, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon

  6. [Effects of carbon sources, temperature and electron acceptors on biological phosphorus removal].

    PubMed

    Han, Yun; Xu, Song; Dong, Tao; Wang, Bin-Fan; Wang, Xian-Yao; Peng, Dang-Cong

    2015-02-01

    Effects of carbon sources, temperature and electron acceptors on phosphorus uptake and release were investigated in a pilot-scale oxidation ditch. Phosphorus uptake and release rates were measured with different carbon sources (domestic sewage, sodium acetate, glucose) at 25 degrees C. The results showed that the minimum phosphorus uptake and release rates of glucose were 5.12 mg x (g x h)(-1) and 6.43 mg x (g x h)(-1), respectively, and those of domestic sewage are similar to those of sodium acetate. Phosphorus uptake and release rates increased with the increase of temperature (12, 16, 20 and 25 degrees C) using sodium acetate as carbon sources. Anoxic phosphorus uptake rate decreased with added COD. Electron acceptors (oxygen, nitrate, nitrite) had significant effects on phosphorus uptake rate and their order was in accordance with oxygen > nitrate > nitrite. The mass ratio of anoxic P uptake and N consumption (P(uptake)/N (consumption)) of nitrate and nitrite were 0.96 and 0.65, respectively.

  7. Rates and potential mechanism of anaerobic nitrate-dependent microbial pyrite oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Julian; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2012-12-01

    Pyrite (FeS2) is a major iron- and sulfur-containing mineral phase in the environment. Oxidation of pyrite by aerobic micro-organisms has been well investigated. However, the reactivity of pyrite under anoxic conditions is still an open question. In the present paper, we summarize field and laboratory data on this chemolithotrophic respiration process with nitrate as terminal electron acceptor. Geochemical and stable isotope field data indicate that this process is occurring. Laboratory studies are more ambiguous, but recent positive results provide evidence that anaerobic microbial pyrite oxidation can, in fact, occur with nitrate as electron acceptor.

  8. Electric coupling between distant nitrate reduction and sulfide oxidation in marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Marzocchi, Ugo; Trojan, Daniela; Larsen, Steffen; Meyer, Rikke Louise; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils

    2014-08-01

    Filamentous bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family can conduct electrons over centimeter-long distances thereby coupling oxygen reduction at the surface of marine sediment to sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers. The ability of these cable bacteria to use alternative electron acceptors is currently unknown. Here we show that these organisms can use also nitrate or nitrite as an electron acceptor thereby coupling the reduction of nitrate to distant oxidation of sulfide. Sulfidic marine sediment was incubated with overlying nitrate-amended anoxic seawater. Within 2 months, electric coupling of spatially segregated nitrate reduction and sulfide oxidation was evident from: (1) the formation of a 4-6-mm-deep zone separating sulfide oxidation from the associated nitrate reduction, and (2) the presence of pH signatures consistent with proton consumption by cathodic nitrate reduction, and proton production by anodic sulfide oxidation. Filamentous Desulfobulbaceae with the longitudinal structures characteristic of cable bacteria were detected in anoxic, nitrate-amended incubations but not in anoxic, nitrate-free controls. Nitrate reduction by cable bacteria using long-distance electron transport to get privileged access to distant electron donors is a hitherto unknown mechanism in nitrogen and sulfur transformations, and the quantitative importance for elements cycling remains to be addressed.

  9. Nitrate Enhanced Microbial Cr(VI) Reduction-Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Stolz

    2011-06-15

    A major challenge for the bioremediation of radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium) and metals (i.e., Cr(VI), Hg) is the co-occurrence of nitrate as it can inhibit metal transformation. Denitrification (nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas) is considered the most important ecological process. For many metal and metalloid reducing bacteria, however, ammonia is the end product through respiratory nitrate reduction (RNRA). The focus of this work was to determine how RNRA impacts Cr(VI) transformation. The goal was to elucidate the specific mechanism(s) that limits Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of nitrate and to use this information to develop strategies that enhance Cr(VI) reduction (and thus detoxification). Our central hypothesis is that nitrate impacts the biotransformation of metals and metalloids in three ways 1) as a competitive alternative electron acceptor (inhibiting transformation), 2) as a co-metabolite (i.e., concomitant reduction, stimulating transformation), and 3) as an inducer of specific proteins and pathways involved in oxidation/reduction reactions (stimulating transformation). We have identified three model organisms, Geobacter metallireducens (mechanism 1), Sulfurospirillum barnesii, (mechasism 2), and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (mechanisms 3). Our specific aims were to 1) investigate the role of Cr(VI) concentration on the kinetics of both growth and reduction of nitrate, nitrite, and Cr(VI) in these three organisms; 2) develop a profile of bacterial enzymes involved in nitrate transformation (e.g., oxidoreductases) using a proteomic approach; 3) investigate the function of periplasmic nitrite reductase (Nrf) as a chromate reductase; and 4) develop a strategy to maximize microbial chromium reduction in the presence of nitrate. We found that growth on nitrate by G. metallireducens was inhibited by Cr(VI). Over 240 proteins were identified by LC/MS-MS. Redox active proteins, outer membrane heavy metal efflux proteins, and chemotaxis sensory

  10. Engineered oligosaccharyltransferases with greatly relaxed acceptor site specificity

    PubMed Central

    Ollis, Anne A.; Zhang, Sheng; Fisher, Adam C.; DeLisa, Matthew P.

    2015-01-01

    The Campylobacter jejuni protein glycosylation locus (pgl) encodes machinery for asparagine-linked (N-linked) glycosylation and serves as the archetype for bacterial N-glycosylation. This machinery has been functionally transferred into Escherichia coli, thereby enabling convenient mechanistic dissection of the N-glycosylation process in this genetically tractable host. Here, we sought to identify sequence determinants in the oligosaccharyltransferase PglB that restrict its specificity to only those glycan acceptor sites containing a negatively charged residue at the −2 position relative to asparagine. This involved creation of a genetic assay named glycoSNAP (glycosylation of secreted N-linked acceptor proteins) that facilitates high-throughput screening of glycophenotypes in E. coli. Using this assay, we isolated several C. jejuni PglB variants that were capable of glycosylating an array of noncanonical acceptor sequences including one in a eukaryotic N-glycoprotein. Collectively, these results underscore the utility of glycoSNAP for shedding light on poorly understood aspects of N-glycosylation and for engineering designer N-glycosylation biocatalysts. PMID:25129029

  11. Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2002-08-16

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions was held at Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island, 8/11-16/02. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  12. Influence of different electron donors and acceptors on dehalorespiration of tetrachloroethene by Desulfitobacterium frappieri TCE1

    SciTech Connect

    Gerritse, J.; Drzyzga, O.; Kloetstra, G.; Keijmel, M.; Wiersum, L.P.; Hutson, R.; Collins, M.D.; Gottschal, J.C.

    1999-12-01

    Strain TCE1, a strictly anaerobic bacterium that can grow by reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethane (TCE), was isolated by selective enrichment from a PCE-dechlorinating chemostat mixed culture. Strain TCE1 is a gram-positive, motile, curved rod-shaped organism that is 2 to 4 by 0.6 to 0.8 {micro}m and has approximately six lateral flagella. The pH and temperature optima for growth are 7.2 and 35 C, respectively. On the basis of a comparative 16S rRNA sequence analysis, this bacterium was identified as a new strain of Desulfitobacterium frappieri, because it exhibited 99.7% relatedness to the D. frappieri type strain, strain PCP-1. Growth with H{sub 2}, format, L-lactate, butyrate, crotonate, or ethanol as the electron donor depends on the availability of an external electron acceptor. Pyruvate and serine can also be used fermentatively. Electron donors (except format and H{sub 2}) are oxidized to acetate and CO{sub 2}. when L-lactate is the growth substrate, strain TCE1 can use the following electron acceptors: PCE and TCE (to produce cis-1,2-dichloroethene), sulfite and thiosulfate (to produce sulfide), nitrate (to produce nitrite), and fumarate (to produce succinate). Strain TCE1 is not able to reductively dechlorinate 3-chloro-4-hydroxyphenylacetate. The growth yields of the newly isolated bacterium when PCE is the electron acceptor are similar to those obtained for other dehalorespiring anaerobes (e.g., Desulfitobacterium sp. strain PCE1 and Desulfitobacterium hafniense) and the maximum specific reductive dechlorination rates are 4 to 16 times higher. Dechlorination of PCE and TCE is an inducible process. In PCE-limited chemostat cultures of strain TCE1, dechlorination is strongly inhibited by sulfite but not by other alternative electron acceptors, such as fumate or nitrate.

  13. Dietary nitrate and cardiovascular health

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahluwalia, A.; Gladwin, M.T.; Harman, Jane L.; Ward, M.H.; Nolan, Bernard T.

    2014-01-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened this workshop to discuss the results of recent research on the effects of inorganic nitrate and nitrite on the cardiovascular system, possible long term effects of these compounds in the diet and drinking water, and future research needs including population-wide effects examined through epidemiological studies.

  14. Dietary nitrates, nitrites, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Hord, Norman G

    2011-12-01

    Dietary nitrate (NO(3)), nitrite (NO(2)), and arginine can serve as sources for production of NO(x) (a diverse group of metabolites including nitric oxide, nitrosothiols, and nitroalkenes) via ultraviolet light exposure to skin, mammalian nitrate/nitrite reductases in tissues, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, respectively. NO(x) are responsible for the hypotensive, antiplatelet, and cytoprotective effects of dietary nitrates and nitrites. Current regulatory limits on nitrate intakes, based on concerns regarding potential risk of carcinogenicity and methemoglobinemia, are exceeded by normal daily intakes of single foods, such as soya milk and spinach, as well as by some recommended dietary patterns such as the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet. This review includes a call for regulatory bodies to consider all available data on the beneficial physiologic roles of nitrate and nitrite in order to derive rational bases for dietary recommendations.

  15. Cylodextrin Polymer Nitrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosowski, Bernard; Ruebner, Anja; Statton, Gary; Robitelle, Danielle; Meyers, Curtis

    2000-01-01

    The development of the use of cyclodextrin nitrates as possible components of insensitive, high-energy energetics is outlined over a time period of 12 years. Four different types of cyclodextrin polymers were synthesized, nitrated, and evaluated regarding their potential use for the military and aerospace community. The synthesis of these novel cyclodextrin polymers and different nitration techniques are shown and the potential of these new materials is discussed.

  16. Thermochemical nitrate destruction

    DOEpatents

    Cox, John L.; Hallen, Richard T.; Lilga, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrates present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C., and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

  17. High Performance Magazine Acceptor Threshold Criteria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    detonation transition (DDT). To account for unknown mechanisms the term XDT is also used. Development of a design procedure to prevent SD requires...propagation walls are used to prevent sympathetic detonation between munitions stored in adjacent cells. Design of the walls, and their mitigation...effects, requires sympathetic detonation threshold criteria for acceptor munitions. This paper outlines the procedures being used to develop SD threshold

  18. Nitrate Leaching Index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Nitrate Leaching Index is a rapid assessment tool that evaluates nitrate (NO3) leaching potential based on basic soil and climate information. It is the basis for many nutrient management planning efforts, but it has considerable limitations because of : 1) an oversimplification of the processes...

  19. Photoionization in micelles: Addition of charged electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenland, Chris; Kevan, Larry

    The relative photoyield of the electron donor N, N, N', N'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), solubilized in sodium and lithium dodecyl sulfate micelles with added charged electron acceptors was investigated. It was attempted to control the acceptor distance from a charged micellar interface by differently charged acceptors, cationic dimethyl viologen and anionic ferricyanide. However, back electron transfer from both cationic and anionic acceptors was found to be efficient. Thus simple electrostatic arguments for control of the photoyield do not seem applicable. Salt effects associated with the added ionic acceptors which partially neutralize the ionic micellar interface are suggested to be an important factor.

  20. Binomial distribution-based quantitative measurement of multiple-acceptors fluorescence resonance energy transfer by partially photobleaching acceptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lili; Yu, Huaina; Zhang, Jianwei; Chen, Tongsheng

    2014-06-01

    We report that binomial distribution depending on acceptor photobleaching degree can be used to characterize the proportions of various kinds of FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer) constructs resulted from partial acceptor photobleaching of multiple-acceptors FRET system. On this basis, we set up a rigorous quantitation theory for multiple-acceptors FRET construct named as Mb-PbFRET which is not affected by the imaging conditions and fluorophore properties. We experimentally validate Mb-PbFRET with FRET constructs consisted of one donor and two or three acceptors inside living cells on confocal and wide-field microscopes.

  1. Photodegradation of Paracetamol in Nitrate Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Cui; Qu, Ruijuan; Liang, Jinyan; Yang, Xi

    2010-11-01

    The photodegradation of paracetamol in nitrate solution under simulated solar irradiation has been investigated. The degradation rates were compared by varying environmental parameters including concentrations of nitrate ion, humic substance and pH values. The quantifications of paracetamol were conducted by HPLC method. The results demonstrate that the photodegradation of paracetamol followed first-order kinetics. The photoproducts and intermediates of paracetamol in the presence of nitrate ions were identified by extensive GC-MS method. The photodegradation pathways involving. OH radicals as reactive species were proposed.

  2. Photodegradation of Paracetamol in Nitrate Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Meng Cui; Qu Ruijuan; Liang Jinyan; Yang Xi

    2010-11-24

    The photodegradation of paracetamol in nitrate solution under simulated solar irradiation has been investigated. The degradation rates were compared by varying environmental parameters including concentrations of nitrate ion, humic substance and pH values. The quantifications of paracetamol were conducted by HPLC method. The results demonstrate that the photodegradation of paracetamol followed first-order kinetics. The photoproducts and intermediates of paracetamol in the presence of nitrate ions were identified by extensive GC-MS method. The photodegradation pathways involving. OH radicals as reactive species were proposed.

  3. Anaerobic growth and potential for amino acid production by nitrate respiration in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Takeno, Seiki; Ohnishi, Junko; Komatsu, Tomoha; Masaki, Tatsuya; Sen, Kikuo; Ikeda, Masato

    2007-07-01

    Oxygen limitation is a crucial problem in amino acid fermentation by Corynebacterium glutamicum. Toward this subject, our study was initiated by analysis of the oxygen-requiring properties of C. glutamicum, generally regarded as a strict aerobe. This organism formed colonies on agar plates up to relatively low oxygen concentrations (0.5% O(2)), while no visible colonies were formed in the absence of O(2). However, in the presence of nitrate (NO3-), the organism exhibited limited growth anaerobically with production of nitrite (NO2-), indicating that C. glutamicum can use nitrate as a final electron acceptor. Assays of cell extracts from aerobic and hypoxic cultures yielded comparable nitrate reductase activities, irrespective of nitrate levels. Genome analysis revealed a narK2GHJI cluster potentially relevant to nitrate reductase and transport. Disruptions of narG and narJ abolished the nitrate-dependent anaerobic growth with the loss of nitrate reductase activity. Disruption of the putative nitrate/nitrite antiporter gene narK2 did not affect the enzyme activity but impaired the anaerobic growth. These indicate that this locus is responsible for nitrate respiration. Agar piece assays using L-lysine- and L-arginine-producing strains showed that production of both amino acids occurred anaerobically by nitrate respiration, indicating the potential of C. glutamicum for anaerobic amino acid production.

  4. High performance ammonium nitrate propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, F. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A high performance propellant having greatly reduced hydrogen chloride emission is presented. It is comprised of: (1) a minor amount of hydrocarbon binder (10-15%), (2) at least 85% solids including ammonium nitrate as the primary oxidizer (about 40% to 70%), (3) a significant amount (5-25%) powdered metal fuel, such as aluminum, (4) a small amount (5-25%) of ammonium perchlorate as a supplementary oxidizer, and (5) optionally a small amount (0-20%) of a nitramine.

  5. Genetic basis for nitrate resistance in Desulfovibrio strains

    PubMed Central

    Korte, Hannah L.; Fels, Samuel R.; Christensen, Geoff A.; Price, Morgan N.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Zane, Grant M.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.; Wall, Judy D.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate is an inhibitor of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). In petroleum production sites, amendments of nitrate and nitrite are used to prevent SRB production of sulfide that causes souring of oil wells. A better understanding of nitrate stress responses in the model SRB, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20, will strengthen predictions of environmental outcomes of nitrate application. Nitrate inhibition of SRB has historically been considered to result from the generation of small amounts of nitrite, to which SRB are quite sensitive. Here we explored the possibility that nitrate might inhibit SRB by a mechanism other than through nitrite inhibition. We found that nitrate-stressed D. vulgaris cultures grown in lactate-sulfate conditions eventually grew in the presence of high concentrations of nitrate, and their resistance continued through several subcultures. Nitrate consumption was not detected over the course of the experiment, suggesting adaptation to nitrate. With high-throughput genetic approaches employing TnLE-seq for D. vulgaris and a pooled mutant library of D. alaskensis, we determined the fitness of many transposon mutants of both organisms in nitrate stress conditions. We found that several mutants, including homologs present in both strains, had a greatly increased ability to grow in the presence of nitrate but not nitrite. The mutated genes conferring nitrate resistance included the gene encoding the putative Rex transcriptional regulator (DVU0916/Dde_2702), as well as a cluster of genes (DVU0251-DVU0245/Dde_0597-Dde_0605) that is poorly annotated. Follow-up studies with individual D. vulgaris transposon and deletion mutants confirmed high-throughput results. We conclude that, in D. vulgaris and D. alaskensis, nitrate resistance in wild-type cultures is likely conferred by spontaneous mutations. Furthermore, the mechanisms that confer nitrate resistance may be different from those that confer nitrite resistance

  6. Effect of Nitrate Injection on the Microbial Community in an Oil Field as Monitored by Reverse Sample Genome Probing

    PubMed Central

    Telang, A. J.; Ebert, S.; Foght, J. M.; Westlake, D.; Jenneman, G. E.; Gevertz, D.; Voordouw, G.

    1997-01-01

    The reverse sample genome probe (RSGP) method, developed for monitoring the microbial community in oil fields with a moderate subsurface temperature, has been improved by (i) isolation of a variety of heterotrophic bacteria and inclusion of their genomes on the oil field master filter and (ii) use of phosphorimaging technology for the rapid quantitation of hybridization signals. The new master filter contains the genomes of 30 sulfate-reducing, 1 sulfide-oxidizing, and 16 heterotrophic bacteria. Most have been identified by partial 16S rRNA sequencing. Use of improved RSGP in monitoring the effect of nitrate injection in an oil field indicated that the sulfide-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing isolate CVO (a Campylobacter sp.) becomes the dominant community component immediately after injection. No significant enhancement of other community members, including the sulfate-reducing bacteria, was observed. The elevated level of CVO decayed at most sampling sites within 30 days after nitrate injection was terminated. Chemical analyses indicated a corresponding decrease and subsequent increase in sulfide concentrations. Thus, transient injection of a higher potential electron acceptor into an anaerobic subsurface system can have desirable effects (i.e., reduction of sulfide levels) without a permanent adverse influence on the resident microbial community. PMID:16535595

  7. The Chilean nitrate deposits.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ericksen, G.E.

    1983-01-01

    The nitrate deposits in the arid Atacama desert of northern Chile consist of saline-cemented surficial material, apparently formed in and near a playa lake that formerly covered the area. Many features of their distribution and chemical composition are unique. The author believes the principal sources of the saline constituents were the volcanic rocks of late Tertiary and Quaternary age in the Andes and that the nitrate is of organic origin. Possible sources of the nitrate, iodate, perchlorate and chromate are discussed. -J.J.Robertson

  8. Thermochemical nitrate destruction

    DOEpatents

    Cox, J.L.; Hallen, R.T.; Lilga, M.A.

    1992-06-02

    A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrites present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200 C to about 600 C, and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

  9. Metabolic response of Geobacter sulfurreducens towards electron donor/acceptor variation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Geobacter sulfurreducens is capable of coupling the complete oxidation of organic compounds to iron reduction. The metabolic response of G. sulfurreducens towards variations in electron donors (acetate, hydrogen) and acceptors (Fe(III), fumarate) was investigated via 13C-based metabolic flux analysis. We examined the 13C-labeling patterns of proteinogenic amino acids obtained from G. sulfurreducens cultured with 13C-acetate. Results Using 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, we observed that donor and acceptor variations gave rise to differences in gluconeogenetic initiation, tricarboxylic acid cycle activity, and amino acid biosynthesis pathways. Culturing G. sulfurreducens cells with Fe(III) as the electron acceptor and acetate as the electron donor resulted in pyruvate as the primary carbon source for gluconeogenesis. When fumarate was provided as the electron acceptor and acetate as the electron donor, the flux analysis suggested that fumarate served as both an electron acceptor and, in conjunction with acetate, a carbon source. Growth on fumarate and acetate resulted in the initiation of gluconeogenesis by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and a slightly elevated flux through the oxidative tricarboxylic acid cycle as compared to growth with Fe(III) as the electron acceptor. In addition, the direction of net flux between acetyl-CoA and pyruvate was reversed during growth on fumarate relative to Fe(III), while growth in the presence of Fe(III) and acetate which provided hydrogen as an electron donor, resulted in decreased flux through the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Conclusions We gained detailed insight into the metabolism of G. sulfurreducens cells under various electron donor/acceptor conditions using 13C-based metabolic flux analysis. Our results can be used for the development of G. sulfurreducens as a chassis for a variety of applications including bioremediation and renewable biofuel production. PMID:21092215

  10. CARBON-BASED REACTIVE BARRIER FOR NITRATE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Nitrate (NO3-) is a common ground water contaminant related to agricultural activity, waste water disposal, leachate from landfills, septic systems, and industrial processes. This study reports on the performance of a carbon-based permeable reactive barrier (PRB) that was constructed for in-situ bioremediation of a ground water nitrate plume caused by leakage from a swine CAFO (concentrated animal feeding operation) lagoon. The swine CAFO, located in Logan County, Oklahoma, was in operation from 1992-1999. The overall site remediation strategy includes an ammonia recovery trench to intercept ammonia-contaminated ground water and a hay straw PRB which is used to intercept a nitrate plume caused by nitrification of sorbed ammonia. The PRB extends approximately 260 m to intercept the nitrate plume. The depth of the trench averages 6 m and corresponds to the thickness of the surficial saturated zone; the width of the trench is 1.2 m. Detailed quarterly monitoring of the PRB began in March, 2004, about 1 year after construction activities ended. Nitrate concentrations hydraulically upgradient of the PRB have ranged from 23 to 77 mg/L N, from 0 to 3.2 mg/L N in the PRB, and from 0 to 65 mg/L N hydraulically downgradient of the PRB. Nitrate concentrations have generally decreased in downgradient locations with successive monitoring events. Mass balance considerations indicate that nitrate attenuation is dominantly from denitrification but with some component of

  11. Simultaneous reduction of nitrate and selenate by cell suspensions of selenium-respiring bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Blum, J.S.; Bindi, A.B.; Dowdle, P.R.; Herbel, M.; Stolz, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    Washed-cell suspensions of Sulfurospirillum barnesii reduced selenate [Se(VI)] when cells were cultured with nitrate, thiosulfate, arsenate, or fumarate as the electron acceptor. When the concentration of the electron donor was limiting, Se(VI) reduction in whole cells was approximately fourfold greater in Se(VI)-grown cells than was observed in nitrate-grown cells; correspondingly, nitrate reduction was ~11-fold higher in nitrate-grown cells than in Se(VI)-grown cells. However, a simultaneous reduction of nitrate and Se(VI) was observed in both cases. At nonlimiting electron donor concentrations, nitrate- grown cells suspended with equimolar nitrate and selenate achieved a complete reductive removal of nitrogen and selenium oxyanions, with the bulk of nitrate reduction preceding that of selenate reduction. Chloramphenicol did not inhibit these reductions. The Se(VI)-respiring haloalkaliphile Bacillus arsenicoselenatis gave similar results, but its Se(VI) reductase was not constitutive in nitrate-grown cells. No reduction of Se(VI) was noted for Bacillus selenitireducens, which respires selenite. The results of kinetic experiments with cell membrane preparations of S. barnesii suggest the presence of constitutive selenate and nitrate reduction, as well as an inducible, high- affinity nitrate reductase in nitrate-grown cells which also has a low affinity for selenate. The simultaneous reduction of micromolar Se(VI) in the presence of millimolar nitrate indicates that these organisms may have a functional use in bioremediating nitrate-rich, seleniferous agricultural wastewaters. Results with 75Se-selenate tracer show that these organisms can lower ambient Se(VI) concentrations to levels in compliance with new regulations proposed for release of selenium oxyanions into the environment.

  12. Purification and properties of a dissimilatory nitrate reductase from Haloferax denitrificans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Lang, F.

    1991-01-01

    A membrane-bound nitrate reductase (nitrite:(acceptor) oxidoreductase, EC 1.7.99.4) from the extremely halophilic bacterium Haloferax denitrificans was solubilized by incubating membranes in buffer lacking NaCl and purified by DEAE, hydroxylapatite, and Sepharose 6B gel filtration chromatography. The purified nitrate reductase reduced chlorate and was inhibited by azide and cyanide. Preincubating the enzyme with cyanide increased the extent of inhibition which in turn was intensified when dithionite was present. Although cyanide was a noncompetitive inhibitor with respect to nitrate, nitrate protected against inhibition. The enzyme, as isolated, was composed of two subunits (Mr 116,000 and 60,000) and behaved as a dimer during gel filtration (Mr 380,000). Unlike other halobacterial enzymes, this nitrate reductase was most active, as well as stable, in the absence of salt.

  13. The environmental controls that govern the end product of bacterial nitrate respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Kraft, Beate; Tegetmeyer, Halina E.; Sharma, Ritin; Klotz, Martin G.; Ferdelman, Timothy G.; Hettich, Robert L.; Geelhoed, Jeanine S.; Strous, Marc

    2014-08-08

    In the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle, microbial respiration processes compete for nitrate as an electron acceptor. Denitrification converts nitrate into nitrogenous gas and thus removes fixed nitrogen from the biosphere, whereas ammonification converts nitrate into ammonium, which is directly reusable by primary producers. In this paper, we combined multiple parallel long-term incubations of marine microbial nitrate-respiring communities with isotope labeling and metagenomics to unravel how specific environmental conditions select for either process. Microbial generation time, supply of nitrite relative to nitrate, and the carbon/nitrogen ratio were identified as key environmental controls that determine whether nitrite will be reduced to nitrogenous gas or ammonium. Finally, our results define the microbial ecophysiology of a biogeochemical feedback loop that is key to global change, eutrophication, and wastewater treatment.

  14. The environmental controls that govern the end product of bacterial nitrate respiration

    DOE PAGES

    Kraft, Beate; Tegetmeyer, Halina E.; Sharma, Ritin; ...

    2014-08-08

    In the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle, microbial respiration processes compete for nitrate as an electron acceptor. Denitrification converts nitrate into nitrogenous gas and thus removes fixed nitrogen from the biosphere, whereas ammonification converts nitrate into ammonium, which is directly reusable by primary producers. In this paper, we combined multiple parallel long-term incubations of marine microbial nitrate-respiring communities with isotope labeling and metagenomics to unravel how specific environmental conditions select for either process. Microbial generation time, supply of nitrite relative to nitrate, and the carbon/nitrogen ratio were identified as key environmental controls that determine whether nitrite will be reduced to nitrogenous gasmore » or ammonium. Finally, our results define the microbial ecophysiology of a biogeochemical feedback loop that is key to global change, eutrophication, and wastewater treatment.« less

  15. Glutathione Adduct Patterns of Michael-Acceptor Carbonyls.

    PubMed

    Slawik, Christian; Rickmeyer, Christiane; Brehm, Martin; Böhme, Alexander; Schüürmann, Gerrit

    2017-02-22

    Glutathione (GSH) has so far been considered to facilitate detoxification of soft organic electrophiles through covalent binding at its cysteine (Cys) thiol group, followed by stepwise catalyzed degradation and eventual elimination along the mercapturic acid pathway. Here we show that in contrast to expectation from HSAB theory, Michael-acceptor ketones, aldehydes and esters may form also single, double and triple adducts with GSH involving β-carbon attack at the much harder N-terminus of the γ-glutamyl (Glu) unit of GSH. In particular, formation of the GSH-N single adduct contradicts the traditional view that S alkylation always forms the initial reaction of GSH with Michael-acceptor carbonyls. To this end, chemoassay analyses of the adduct formation of GSH with nine α,β-unsaturated carbonyls employing high performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry have been performed. Besides enriching the GSH adductome and potential biomarker applications, electrophilic N-terminus functio-nalization is likely to impair GSH homeostasis substantially through blocking the γ-glutamyl transferase catalysis of the first breakdown step of modified GSH, and thus its timely reconstitution. The discussion includes a comparison with cyclic adducts of GSH and furan metabolites as reported in literature, and quantum chemically calculated thermodynamics of hard-hard, hard-soft and soft-soft adducts.

  16. Bioactivation of organic nitrates and the mechanism of nitrate tolerance.

    PubMed

    Klemenska, Emila; Beresewicz, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Organic nitrates, such as nitroglycerin, are commonly used in the therapy of cardiovascular disease. Long-term therapy with these drugs, however, results in the rapid development of nitrate tolerance, limiting their hemodynamic and anti-ischemic efficacy. In addition, nitrate tolerance is associated with the expression of potentially deleterious modifications such as increased oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, and sympathetic activation. In this review we discuss current concepts regarding the mechanisms of organic nitrate bioactivation, nitrate tolerance, and nitrate-mediated oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. We also examine how hydralazine may prevent nitrate tolerance and related endothelial dysfunction.

  17. Reactivity of Metal Nitrates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-20

    amines, where nitration would not be a competing process. Acetanilide . Despite the complexity encountered with aniline, the corresponding amide... acetanilide , though having an N-hydrogen atom, was nitrated without tar formation, although this was not accomplished efficiently. After reaction for 24 h... acetanilide , in the absence of a N-hydrogen atom. However, the reverse proved to be the case, for after one day at room temperature nearly 60% of starting

  18. Anaerobic respiratory growth of Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio fischeri and Photobacterium leiognathi with trimethylamine N-oxide, nitrate and fumarate: ecological implications.

    PubMed

    Proctor, L M; Gunsalus, R P

    2000-08-01

    Two symbiotic species, Photobacterium leiognathi and Vibrio fischeri, and one non-symbiotic species, Vibrio harveyi, of the Vibrionaceae were tested for their ability to grow by anaerobic respiration on various electron acceptors, including trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) and dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO), compounds common in the marine environment. Each species was able to grow anaerobically with TMAO, nitrate or fumarate, but not with DMSO, as an electron acceptor. Cell growth under microaerophilic growth conditions resulted in elevated levels of TMAO reductase, nitrate reductase and fumarate reductase activity in each strain, whereas growth in the presence of the respective substrate for each enzyme further elevated enzyme activity. TMAO reductase specific activity was the highest of all the reductases. Interestingly, the bacteria-colonized light organs from the two squids, Euprymna scolopes and Euprymna morsei, and the light organ of the ponyfish, Leiognathus equus, also had high levels of TMAO reductase enzyme activity, in contrast to non-symbiotic tissues. The ability of these bacterial symbionts to support cell growth by respiration with TMAO may conceivably eliminate the competition for oxygen needed for both bioluminescence and metabolism.

  19. The reaction of choline dehydrogenase with some electron acceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, M C; Dawson, A P

    1975-01-01

    1. The choline dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.99.1) WAS SOLUBILIZED FROM ACETONE-DRIED POWDERS OF RAT LIVER MITOCHONDRIA BY TREATMENT WITH Naja naja venom. 2. The kinetics of the reaction of enzyme with phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as electron acceptors were investigated. 3. With both electron acceptors the reaction mechanism appears to involve a free, modified-enzyme intermediate. 4. With some electron acceptors the maximum velocity of the reaction is independent of the nature of the acceptor. With phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as acceptors the Km value for choline is also independent of the nature of the acceptor molecule. 5. The mechanism of the Triton X-100-solubilized enzyme is apparently the smae as that for the snake venom solubilized enzyme. PMID:1218095

  20. The reaction of choline dehydrogenase with some electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Barrett, M C; Dawson, A P

    1975-12-01

    1. The choline dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.99.1) WAS SOLUBILIZED FROM ACETONE-DRIED POWDERS OF RAT LIVER MITOCHONDRIA BY TREATMENT WITH Naja naja venom. 2. The kinetics of the reaction of enzyme with phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as electron acceptors were investigated. 3. With both electron acceptors the reaction mechanism appears to involve a free, modified-enzyme intermediate. 4. With some electron acceptors the maximum velocity of the reaction is independent of the nature of the acceptor. With phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as acceptors the Km value for choline is also independent of the nature of the acceptor molecule. 5. The mechanism of the Triton X-100-solubilized enzyme is apparently the smae as that for the snake venom solubilized enzyme.

  1. Protein Nitration in Placenta – Functional Significance

    PubMed Central

    Webster, RP; Roberts, VHJ; Myatt, L

    2009-01-01

    Crucial roles of the placenta are disrupted in early and mid-trimester pregnancy loss, preeclampsia, eclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction. The pathophysiology of these disorders includes a relative hypoxia of the placenta, ischemia/reperfusion injury, an inflammatory response and oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species including nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide and superoxide have been shown to participate in trophoblast invasion, regulation of placental vascular reactivity and other events. Superoxide, which regulates expression of redox sensitive genes, has been implicated in up-regulation of transcription factors, antioxidant production, angiogenesis, proliferation and matrix remodeling. When superoxide and nitric oxide are present in abundance, their interaction yields peroxynitrite a potent pro-oxidant, but also alters levels of nitric oxide, which in turn affect physiological functions. The peroxynitrite anion is extremely unstable thus evidence of its formation in vivo has been indirect via the occurrence of nitrated moieties including nitrated lipids and nitrotyrosine residues in proteins. Formation of 3-nitrotyrosine (protein nitration) is a “molecular fingerprint” of peroxynitrite formation. Protein nitration has been widely reported in a number of pathological states associated with inflammation but is reported to occur in normal physiology and is thought of as a prevalent, functionally relevant post-translational modification of proteins. Nitration of proteins can give either no effect, a gain or a loss of function. Nitration of a range of placental proteins is found in normal pregnancy but increased in pathologic pregnancies. Evidence is presented for nitration of placental signal transduction enzymes and transporters. The targets and extent of nitration of enzymes, receptors, transporters and structural proteins may markedly influence placental cellular function in both physiologic and pathologic settings. PMID:18851882

  2. Thermochemical nitrate reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, J.L.; Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

    1992-09-01

    A series of preliminary experiments was conducted directed at thermochemically converting nitrate to nitrogen and water. Nitrates are a major constituent of the waste stored in the underground tanks on the Hanford Site, and the characteristics and effects of nitrate compounds on stabilization techniques must be considered before permanent disposal operations begin. For the thermochemical reduction experiments, six reducing agents (ammonia, formate, urea, glucose, methane, and hydrogen) were mixed separately with {approximately}3 wt% NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} solutions in a buffered aqueous solution at high pH (13); ammonia and formate were also mixed at low pH (4). Reactions were conducted in an aqueous solution in a batch reactor at temperatures of 200{degrees}C to 350{degrees}C and pressures of 600 to 2800 psig. Both gas and liquid samples were analyzed. The specific components analyzed were nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and ammonia. Results of experimental runs showed the following order of nitrate reduction of the six reducing agents in basic solution: formate > glucose > urea > hydrogen > ammonia {approx} methane. Airnmonia was more effective under acidic conditions than basic conditions. Formate was also effective under acidic conditions. A more thorough, fundamental study appears warranted to provide additional data on the mechanism of nitrate reduction. Furthermore, an expanded data base and engineering feasibility study could be used to evaluate conversion conditions for promising reducing agents in more detail and identify new reducing agents with improved performance characteristics.

  3. Electrochemical cell having an alkali-metal-nitrate electrode

    DOEpatents

    Roche, M.F.; Preto, S.K.

    1982-06-04

    A power-producing secondary electrochemical cell includes a molten alkali metal as the negative-electrode material and a molten-nitrate salt as the positive-electrode material. The molten material in the respective electrodes are separated by a solid barrier of alkali-metal-ion conducting material. A typical cell includes active materials of molten sodium separated from molten sodium nitrate and other nitrates in mixture by a layer of sodium ..beta..'' alumina.

  4. Insights on the design and electron-acceptor properties of conjugated organophosphorus materials.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Thomas

    2014-05-20

    The development of conjugated organic materials has become a rapidly evolving field of research, particularly with a view toward practical applications in so-called organic electronics that encompass a variety of device types, such as OLEDs, OPVs, and OFETs. Almost all of these devices minimally require the presence of electron-donor and -acceptor components that act as p- and n-type semiconductors, respectively. Research over the past two decades has shown that while there is an abundant resource of organic p-type materials, suitable n-type species are few and far between. To overcome this severe bottleneck for the further development of organic electronics, researchers have identified organo-main-group avenues as valuable alternatives toward organic electron-acceptor materials that may ultimately be used as n-type components in practical devices. One particular element of interest in this context is phosphorus, which at first glance may not necessarily suggest such properties. In this Account, I provide detailed insights on the origin of the electron-acceptor properties of organophosphorus-based conjugated materials and include an overview of important molecular species that have been developed by my group and others. To this end, I explain that the electron-acceptor properties of conjugated organophosphorus materials originate from an interaction known as negative hyperconjugation. While this particular interaction creates a simply inductively withdrawing phosphoryl substituent for π-conjugated scaffolds, incorporation of a phosphorus atom as an integral part of a cyclic substructure within a π-conjugated system provides a much more complex, versatile, and consequently highly valuable tool for the tuning of the electron-acceptor properties of the materials. Notably, the degree of negative hyperconjugation can effectively be tailored in various ways via simple substitution at the phosphorus center. This is now well established for phosphole-based molecular

  5. Non-Fullerene Electron Acceptors for Use in Organic Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    , forming dimers with a large intramolecular twist, which suppresses both nucleation and crystal growth. The generic design concept of rotationally symmetrical aromatic small molecules with extended π orbital delocalization, including polyaromatic hydrocarbons, phthalocyanines, etc., has also provided some excellent small molecule acceptors. In most cases, additional electron withdrawing functionality, such as imide or ester groups, can be incorporated to stabilize the LUMO and improve properties. New calamitic acceptors have been developed, where molecular orbital hybridization of electron rich and poor segments can be judiciously employed to precisely control energy levels. Conformation and intermolecular associations can be controlled by peripheral functionalization leading to optimization of crystallization length scales. In particular, the use of rhodanine end groups, coupled electronically through short bridged aromatic chains, has been a successful strategy, with promising device efficiencies attributed to high lying LUMO energy levels and subsequently large open circuit voltages. PMID:26505279

  6. On the effect of nuclear bridge modes on donor-acceptor electronic coupling in donor-bridge-acceptor molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Daly; Toroker, Maytal Caspary; Speiser, Shammai; Peskin, Uri

    2009-03-01

    We report a theoretical study of intra-molecular electronic coupling in a symmetric DBA (donor-bridge-acceptor) complex, in which a donor electronic site is coupled to an acceptor site by way of intervening orbitals of a molecular bridge unit. In the off-resonant (deep tunneling) regime of electronic transport, the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (MO's) of the DBA system are split into distinguishable donor/acceptor and bridge orbitals. The effect of geometrical changes at the bridge on the donor/acceptor electronic energy manifold is studied for local stretching and bending modes. It is demonstrated that the energy splitting in the manifold of donor/acceptor unoccupied MOs changes in response to such changes, as assumed in simple McConnell-type models. Limitations of the simple models are revealed where the electronic charging of the bridge orbitals correlates with increasing donor/acceptor orbital energy splitting only for stretching but not for bending bridge modes.

  7. Improving an organic photodiode by incorporating a tunnel barrier between the donor and acceptor layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, I. H.; Crone, B. K.

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate increased photocurrent quantum efficiency in a model donor/acceptor (tetracene/C60) photodiode by incorporating an insulating tunnel barrier between the tetracene and C60 layers. Photodiode efficiency results from the interplay of a number of processes which add to or subtract from the overall device efficiency. The positive rates are those of exciton dissociation and charge separation, the negative rates include exciton and charge transfer complex recombination. We show that by introducing a thin insulating layer between the donor and acceptor layers in a photodiode, we can modify the exciton dissociation and charge transfer complex recombination rates and improve device performance.

  8. Quantum computing with acceptor spins in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salfi, Joe; Tong, Mengyang; Rogge, Sven; Culcer, Dimitrie

    2016-06-01

    The states of a boron acceptor near a Si/SiO2 interface, which bind two low-energy Kramers pairs, have exceptional properties for encoding quantum information and, with the aid of strain, both heavy hole and light hole-based spin qubits can be designed. Whereas a light-hole spin qubit was introduced recently (arXiv:1508.04259), here we present analytical and numerical results proving that a heavy-hole spin qubit can be reliably initialised, rotated and entangled by electrical means alone. This is due to strong Rashba-like spin-orbit interaction terms enabled by the interface inversion asymmetry. Single qubit rotations rely on electric-dipole spin resonance (EDSR), which is strongly enhanced by interface-induced spin-orbit terms. Entanglement can be accomplished by Coulomb exchange, coupling to a resonator, or spin-orbit induced dipole-dipole interactions. By analysing the qubit sensitivity to charge noise, we demonstrate that interface-induced spin-orbit terms are responsible for sweet spots in the dephasing time {T}2* as a function of the top gate electric field, which are close to maxima in the EDSR strength, where the EDSR gate has high fidelity. We show that both qubits can be described using the same starting Hamiltonian, and by comparing their properties we show that the complex interplay of bulk and interface-induced spin-orbit terms allows a high degree of electrical control and makes acceptors potential candidates for scalable quantum computation in Si.

  9. Quantum computing with acceptor spins in silicon.

    PubMed

    Salfi, Joe; Tong, Mengyang; Rogge, Sven; Culcer, Dimitrie

    2016-06-17

    The states of a boron acceptor near a Si/SiO2 interface, which bind two low-energy Kramers pairs, have exceptional properties for encoding quantum information and, with the aid of strain, both heavy hole and light hole-based spin qubits can be designed. Whereas a light-hole spin qubit was introduced recently (arXiv:1508.04259), here we present analytical and numerical results proving that a heavy-hole spin qubit can be reliably initialised, rotated and entangled by electrical means alone. This is due to strong Rashba-like spin-orbit interaction terms enabled by the interface inversion asymmetry. Single qubit rotations rely on electric-dipole spin resonance (EDSR), which is strongly enhanced by interface-induced spin-orbit terms. Entanglement can be accomplished by Coulomb exchange, coupling to a resonator, or spin-orbit induced dipole-dipole interactions. By analysing the qubit sensitivity to charge noise, we demonstrate that interface-induced spin-orbit terms are responsible for sweet spots in the dephasing time [Formula: see text] as a function of the top gate electric field, which are close to maxima in the EDSR strength, where the EDSR gate has high fidelity. We show that both qubits can be described using the same starting Hamiltonian, and by comparing their properties we show that the complex interplay of bulk and interface-induced spin-orbit terms allows a high degree of electrical control and makes acceptors potential candidates for scalable quantum computation in Si.

  10. Studies on cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of cadmium nitrate and lead nitrate in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ruey H. Lin; Ching H. Lee; Wen K. Chen

    1994-12-31

    Cadmium nitrate decreased the viability of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells in a concentration-dependent manner; 50% inhibition (IC{sub 50}) was achieved at 0.015 mM. In contrast, lead nitrate appeared to be less toxic. Neither cadmium nitrate nor lead nitrate significantly increased frequencies of binucleated CHO cells with micronuclei (MN). However, both cadmium nitrate and lead nitrate could augment sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs). Cadmium nitrate induced SCEs with a potency approximately equal to that of mitomycin C and more than 10 times higher than lead nitrate. Cadmium nitrate also increased chromosome aberrations (CAs), which included breaks, acentrics, interchanges, and dicentrics of chromosomes. In addition, cadmium nitrate induced a decrease in the mitotic index (MI), but lead nitrate increased it. In summary, it appears that both of these two heavy metal salts have cytogenetic toxicities with different degrees of effects on the cytotoxicity, MN, CAs, and SCEs and CHO cells. However, SCE was the most sensitive endpoint for indicating mutagenetic effects of cadmium and lead in the present study. 31 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Competition between Methane and Alkylbenzenes for Electron Acceptors during Natural Attenuation of Crude Oil in the Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekins, B. A.; Amos, R. T.; Cozzarelli, I.; Voytek, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    At a crude-oil spill site near the town of Bemidji, MN, entrapped oil is present at residual saturations exceeding 10% in the vadose zone and floating at the water table at saturations of 30-60%. The degradable fraction of the light crude oil includes n-alkanes, aromatics, and alkyl-cyclohexanes. Together these compounds constitute a reduced carbon concentration at least 500 times greater than is present in the dissolved hydrocarbon groundwater plume comprised mainly of aromatics. Methanogenic degradation of the stationary oil body has been occurring for at least 20 years providing a continuous supply of methane emanating from the oil. Transport of methane away from the oil body occurs in both the vapor phase through the vadose zone and in the dissolved phase with the groundwater flow. Within the vadose zone the supply of oxygen and other electron acceptors from the surface is completely consumed by the process of methane oxidation in a zone 2-3 meters above the water table. In the groundwater, the 1 ppm contour of the methane plume extends beyond the 0.5 ppb contour for benzene, which is located at the aerobic/anaerobic boundary in the plume approximately 120 m downgradient of the oil body. Between 75 m and 120 m downgradient, methane concentrations decrease steadily from >0.6 mmol/L to <0.06 mmol/L, accompanied by increases in the δ13C-CH4 indicating that methane attenuation occurs through microbially-mediated oxidation. Anaerobic methane oxidation under iron-reducing conditions has recently been demonstrated by Beal et al. (Science, 325, 184, 2009) and is indicated at this site by several lines of evidence. In the methane oxidation zone, values of bioavailable Fe(III) extracted from the sediments averaged 8 mmol/kg (n=16), or >8 times the amount required to degrade 0.5 mmol methane, while all other electron acceptors together can account for complete oxidation of only 0.07 mmol (sulfate <0.06 mmol/L, dissolved oxygen <3 µmol/L, and nitrate <0.02 mmol

  12. New acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) type copolymers for efficient organic photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghomrasni, S.; Ayachi, S.; Alimi, K.

    2015-01-01

    Three new conjugated systems alternating acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) type copolymers have been investigated by means of Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Time-Dependent DFT (TD-DFT) at the 6-31g (d) level of theory. 4,4‧-Dimethoxy-chalcone, also called the 1,3-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (BMP), has been used as a common acceptor moiety. It forced intra-molecular S⋯O interactions through alternating oligo-thiophene derivatives: 4-AlkylThiophenes (4-ATP), 4-AlkylBithiophenes (4-ABTP) and 4-Thienylene Vinylene (4-TEV) as donor moieties. The band gap, HOMO and LUMO electron distributions as well as optical properties were analyzed for each molecule. The fully optimized resulting copolymers showed low band gaps (2.2-2.8 eV) and deep HOMO energy levels ranging from -4.66 to -4.86 eV. A broad absorption [300-900 nm] covering the solar spectrum and absorption maxima ranges from 486 to 604 nm. In addition, organic photovoltaic cells (OPCs) based on alternating copolymers in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) composites with the 1-(3-methoxycarbonyl) propyl-1-phenyl-[6,6]-C61 (PCBM), as an acceptor, have been optimized. Thus, the band gap decreased to 1.62 eV, the power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) were about 3-5% and the open circuit voltage Voc of the resulting molecules decreased from 1.50 to 1.27 eV.

  13. Efficient organic dye-sensitized solar cells: molecular engineering of donor-acceptor-acceptor cationic dyes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ming; Yang, Xichuan; Zhao, Jianghua; Chen, Cheng; Tan, Qin; Zhang, Fuguo; Sun, Licheng

    2013-12-01

    Three metal-free donor-acceptor-acceptor sensitizers with ionized pyridine and a reference dye were synthesized, and a detailed investigation of the relationship between the dye structure and the photophysical and photoelectrochemical properties and the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) is described. The ionization of pyridine results in a red shift of the absorption spectrum in comparison to that of the reference dye. This is mainly attributable to the ionization of pyridine increasing the electron-withdrawing ability of the total acceptor part. Incorporation of the strong electron-withdrawing units of pyridinium and cyano acrylic acid gives rise to optimized energy levels, resulting in a large response range of wavelengths. When attached to TiO2 film, the conduction band of TiO2 is negatively shifted to a different extent depending on the dye. This is attributed to the electron recombination rate between the TiO2 film and the electrolyte being efficiently suppressed by the introduction of long alkyl chains and thiophene units. DSSCs assembled using these dyes show efficiencies as high as 8.8 %.

  14. π-Extended rigid triptycene-trisaroylenimidazoles as electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Menke, Elisabeth H; Lami, Vincent; Vaynzof, Yana; Mastalerz, Michael

    2016-01-18

    Two soluble isomeric acceptor molecules based on a triptycene core, which is connected to three aroylenimidazole units are described. Due to the inherent threefold axis, the molecules are soluble and thus could be fully photophysically characterized in solution and film. Additionally, the preliminary results of these acceptors in organic photovoltaic devices with two different donor materials are reported.

  15. Prediction of the Intrinsic Hydrogen Bond Acceptor Strength of Chemical Substances from Molecular Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwöbel, Johannes; Ebert, Ralf-Uwe; Kühne, Ralph; Schüürmann, Gerrit

    2009-08-01

    Hydrogen bonding affects the partitioning of organic compounds between environmental and biological compartments as well as the three-dimensional shape of macromolecules. Using the semiempirical quantum chemical AM1 level of calculation, we have developed a model to predict the site-specific hydrogen bond (HB) acceptor strength from ground-state properties of the individual compounds. At present, the model parametrization is confined to compounds with one HB acceptor site of the following atom types: N, O, S, F, Cl, and Br that act as lone-pair HB acceptors, and π-electron (aromatic or conjugated) systems with the associated C atoms as particularly weak HB acceptors. The HB acceptor strength is expressed in terms of the Abraham parameter B and calculated from local molecular parameters, taking into account electrostatic, polarizability, and charge transfer contributions according to the Morokuma concept. For a data set of 383 compounds, the squared correlation coefficient r2 is 0.97 when electrostatic potential (ESP) derived net atomic charges are employed, and the root-mean-square (rms) error is 0.04 that is in the range of experimental uncertainty. The model is validated using an extended leave-50%-out approach, and its performance is comparatively analyzed with the ones of earlier introduced ab initio (HF/6-31G**) and density functional theory (B3LYP/6-31G**) models as well as of two increment methods with respect to the total compound set as well as HB acceptor type subsets. The discussion includes an explorative model application to amides and organophosphates that demonstrates the robustness of the approach, and further opportunities for model extensions.

  16. Charge Generation Pathways in Organic Solar Cells: Assessing the Contribution from the Electron Acceptor.

    PubMed

    Stoltzfus, Dani M; Donaghey, Jenny E; Armin, Ardalan; Shaw, Paul E; Burn, Paul L; Meredith, Paul

    2016-11-09

    Photocurrent generation in organic bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells is most commonly understood as a process which predominantly involves photoexcitation of the lower ionization potential species (donor) followed by electron transfer to the higher electron affinity material (acceptor) [i.e., photoinduced electron transfer (PET), which we term Channel I]. A mirror process also occurs in which photocurrent is generated through photoexcitation of the acceptor followed by hole transfer to the nonexcited donor or photoinduced hole transfer (PHT), which we term Channel II. The role of Channel II photocurrent generation has often been neglected due to overlap of the individual absorption spectra of the donor and acceptor materials that are commonly used. More recently Channel II charge generation has been explored for several reasons. First, many of the new high-efficiency polymeric donors are used as the minority component in bulk heterojunction blends, and therefore, the acceptor absorption is a significant fraction of the total; second, nonfullerene acceptors have been prepared, which through careful design, allow for spectral separation from the donor material, facilitating fundamental studies on charge generation. In this article, we review the methodologies for investigating the two charge generation channels. We also discuss the factors that affect charge generation via Channel I and II pathways, including energy levels of the materials involved, exciton diffusion, and other considerations. Finally, we take a comprehensive look at the nonfullerene acceptor literature and discuss what information about Channel I and Channel II can be obtained from the experiments conducted and what other experiments could be undertaken to provide further information about the operational efficiencies of Channels I and II.

  17. The role of deep acceptor centers in the oxidation of acceptor-doped wide-band-gap perovskites ABO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putilov, L. P.; Tsidilkovski, V. I.

    2017-03-01

    The impact of deep acceptor centers on defect thermodynamics and oxidation of wide-band-gap acceptor-doped perovskites without mixed-valence cations is studied. These deep centers are formed by the acceptor-bound small hole polarons whose stabilization energy can be high enough (significantly higher than the hole-acceptor Coulomb interaction energy). It is shown that the oxidation enthalpy ΔHox of oxide is determined by the energy εA of acceptor-bound states along with the formation energy EV of oxygen vacancies. The oxidation reaction is demonstrated to be either endothermic or exothermic, and the regions of εA and EV values corresponding to the positive or negative ΔHox are determined. The contribution of acceptor-bound holes to the defect thermodynamics strongly depends on the acceptor states depth εA: it becomes negligible at εA less than a certain value (at which the acceptor levels are still deep). With increasing εA, the concentration of acceptor-bound small hole polarons can reach the values comparable to the dopant content. The results are illustrated with the acceptor-doped BaZrO3 as an example. It is shown that the experimental data on the bulk hole conductivity of barium zirconate can be described both in the band transport model and in the model of hopping small polarons localized on oxygen ions away from the acceptor centers. Depending on the εA magnitude, the oxidation reaction can be either endothermic or exothermic for both mobility mechanisms.

  18. Acceptor impurity activation in III-nitride light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Römer, Friedhard Witzigmann, Bernd

    2015-01-12

    In this work, the role of the acceptor doping and the acceptor activation and its impact on the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of a Gallium Nitride (GaN) based multi-quantum well light emitting diode is studied by microscopic simulation. Acceptor impurities in GaN are subject to a high activation energy which depends on the presence of proximate dopant atoms and the electric field. A combined model for the dopant ionization and activation barrier reduction has been developed and implemented in a semiconductor carrier transport simulator. By model calculations, we demonstrate the impact of the acceptor activation mechanisms on the decay of the IQE at high current densities, which is known as the efficiency droop. A major contributor to the droop is the electron leakage which is largely affected by the acceptor doping.

  19. Organic Nitrate Therapy, Nitrate Tolerance, and Nitrate-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction: Emphasis on Redox Biology and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Organic nitrates, such as nitroglycerin (GTN), isosorbide-5-mononitrate and isosorbide dinitrate, and pentaerithrityl tetranitrate (PETN), when given acutely, have potent vasodilator effects improving symptoms in patients with acute and chronic congestive heart failure, stable coronary artery disease, acute coronary syndromes, or arterial hypertension. The mechanisms underlying vasodilation include the release of •NO or a related compound in response to intracellular bioactivation (for GTN, the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase [ALDH-2]) and activation of the enzyme, soluble guanylyl cyclase. Increasing cyclic guanosine-3′,-5′-monophosphate (cGMP) levels lead to an activation of the cGMP-dependent kinase I, thereby causing the relaxation of the vascular smooth muscle by decreasing intracellular calcium concentrations. The hemodynamic and anti-ischemic effects of organic nitrates are rapidly lost upon long-term (low-dose) administration due to the rapid development of tolerance and endothelial dysfunction, which is in most cases linked to increased intracellular oxidative stress. Enzymatic sources of reactive oxygen species under nitrate therapy include mitochondria, NADPH oxidases, and an uncoupled •NO synthase. Acute high-dose challenges with organic nitrates cause a similar loss of potency (tachyphylaxis), but with distinct pathomechanism. The differences among organic nitrates are highlighted regarding their potency to induce oxidative stress and subsequent tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. We also address pleiotropic effects of organic nitrates, for example, their capacity to stimulate antioxidant pathways like those demonstrated for PETN, all of which may prevent adverse effects in response to long-term therapy. Based on these considerations, we will discuss and present some preclinical data on how the nitrate of the future should be designed. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 899–942. PMID:26261901

  20. Organic Nitrate Therapy, Nitrate Tolerance, and Nitrate-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction: Emphasis on Redox Biology and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Daiber, Andreas; Münzel, Thomas

    2015-10-10

    Organic nitrates, such as nitroglycerin (GTN), isosorbide-5-mononitrate and isosorbide dinitrate, and pentaerithrityl tetranitrate (PETN), when given acutely, have potent vasodilator effects improving symptoms in patients with acute and chronic congestive heart failure, stable coronary artery disease, acute coronary syndromes, or arterial hypertension. The mechanisms underlying vasodilation include the release of •NO or a related compound in response to intracellular bioactivation (for GTN, the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase [ALDH-2]) and activation of the enzyme, soluble guanylyl cyclase. Increasing cyclic guanosine-3',-5'-monophosphate (cGMP) levels lead to an activation of the cGMP-dependent kinase I, thereby causing the relaxation of the vascular smooth muscle by decreasing intracellular calcium concentrations. The hemodynamic and anti-ischemic effects of organic nitrates are rapidly lost upon long-term (low-dose) administration due to the rapid development of tolerance and endothelial dysfunction, which is in most cases linked to increased intracellular oxidative stress. Enzymatic sources of reactive oxygen species under nitrate therapy include mitochondria, NADPH oxidases, and an uncoupled •NO synthase. Acute high-dose challenges with organic nitrates cause a similar loss of potency (tachyphylaxis), but with distinct pathomechanism. The differences among organic nitrates are highlighted regarding their potency to induce oxidative stress and subsequent tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. We also address pleiotropic effects of organic nitrates, for example, their capacity to stimulate antioxidant pathways like those demonstrated for PETN, all of which may prevent adverse effects in response to long-term therapy. Based on these considerations, we will discuss and present some preclinical data on how the nitrate of the future should be designed.

  1. Nitrate transport and signalling.

    PubMed

    Miller, Anthony J; Fan, Xiaorong; Orsel, Mathilde; Smith, Susan J; Wells, Darren M

    2007-01-01

    Physiological measurements of nitrate (NO(3)(-)) uptake by roots have defined two systems of high and low affinity uptake. In Arabidopsis, genes encoding both of these two uptake systems have been identified. Most is known about the high affinity transport system (HATS) and its regulation and yet measurements of soil NO(3)(-) show that it is more often available in the low affinity range above 1 mM concentration. Several different regulatory mechanisms have been identified for AtNRT2.1, one of the membrane transporters encoding HATS; these include feedback regulation of expression, a second component protein requirement for membrane targeting and phosphorylation, possibly leading to degradation of the protein. These various changes in the protein may be important for a second function in sensing NO(3)(-) availability at the surface of the root. Another transporter protein, AtNRT1.1 also has a role in NO(3)(-) sensing that, like AtNRT2.1, is independent of their transport function. From the range of concentrations present in the soil it is proposed that the NO(3)(-)-inducible part of HATS functions chiefly as a sensor for root NO(3)(-) availability. Two other key NO(3)(-) transport steps for efficient nitrogen use by crops, efflux across membranes and vacuolar storage and remobilization, are discussed. Genes encoding vacuolar transporters have been isolated and these are important for manipulating storage pools in crops, but the efflux system is yet to be identified. Consideration is given to how well our molecular and physiological knowledge can be integrated as well to some key questions and opportunities for the future.

  2. Nitrate removal using different carbon substrates in a laboratory model.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Seyyed Ebrahim; Heidarpour, Manouchehr; Mostafazadeh-Fard, Behrouz

    2011-01-01

    Agricultural fields have been frequently identified as major contributors of nitrate leaching into surface and ground waters. Tile drains can act as direct pathways, transferring leached nitrate to surface water. Bioreactor filters are useful for the removal of nitrate from drainage waters; however, these filters require an external carbon supply to sustain denitrification. In this study, four organic carbon sources including wood, barley straw, rice husks, and date palm leaf, were used to enhance denitrification and the effects of water velocity and influent nitrate concentration on the nitrate removal were evaluated. Cumulative nitrate removal was highest for the date palm leaf treatments and was lowest for the wood treatments. The effects were in decreasing order for date palm leaf, barley straw, rice husks, and wood, respectively. The performance of the biofilters improved with increasing influent nitrate concentration and decreasing water velocity, allowing for high nitrate removal rates to be achieved. The results showed that all of the treatments had reduced the effluent nitrate concentrations below the USEPA maximum contaminant level for drinking water of 45 mg L(-1) nitrate at the end of the study.

  3. Nitrate stimulation of indigenous nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidising bacterial community in wastewater anaerobic biofilms.

    PubMed

    Garcia-de-Lomas, Juan; Corzo, Alfonso; Carmen Portillo, M; Gonzalez, Juan M; Andrades, Jose A; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesáreo; Garcia-Robledo, Emilio

    2007-07-01

    The role of the nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidising bacteria (NR-SOB) in the nitrate-mediated inhibition of sulfide net production by anaerobic wastewater biofilms was analyzed in two experimental bioreactors, continuously fed with the primary effluent of a wastewater treatment plant, one used as control (BRC) and the other one supplemented with nitrate (BRN). This study integrated information from H(2)S and pH microelectrodes, RNA-based molecular techniques, and the time course of biofilm growth and bioreactors water phase. Biofilms were a net source of sulfide for the water phase (2.01 micromol S(2-)(tot)m(-2)s(-1)) in the absence of nitrate dosing. Nitrate addition effectively led to the cessation of sulfide release from biofilms despite which a low rate of net sulfate reduction activity (0.26 micromol S(2-)(tot)m(-2)s(-1)) persisted at a deep layer within the biofilm. Indigenous NR-SOB including Thiomicrospira denitrificans, Arcobacter sp., and Thiobacillus denitrificans were stimulated by nitrate addition resulting in the elimination of most sulfide from the biofilms. Active sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) represented comparable fractions of total metabolically active bacteria in the libraries obtained from BRN and BRC. However, we detected changes in the taxonomic composition of the SRB community suggesting its adaptation to a higher level of NR-SOB activity in the presence of nitrate.

  4. Acceptor and Excitation Density Dependence of the Ultrafast Polaron Absorption Signal in Donor-Acceptor Organic Solar Cell Blends.

    PubMed

    Zarrabi, Nasim; Burn, Paul L; Meredith, Paul; Shaw, Paul E

    2016-07-21

    Transient absorption spectroscopy on organic semiconductor blends for solar cells typically shows efficient charge generation within ∼100 fs, accounting for the majority of the charge carriers. In this Letter, we show using transient absorption spectroscopy on blends containing a broad range of acceptor content (0.01-50% by weight) that the rise of the polaron signal is dependent on the acceptor concentration. For low acceptor content (<10% by weight), the polaron signal rises gradually over ∼1 ps with most polarons generated after 200 fs, while for higher acceptor concentrations (>10%) most polarons are generated within 200 fs. The rise time in blends with low acceptor content was also found to be sensitive to the pump fluence, decreasing with increasing excitation density. These results indicate that the sub-100 fs rise of the polaron signal is a natural consequence of both the high acceptor concentrations in many donor-acceptor blends and the high excitation densities needed for transient absorption spectroscopy, which results in a short average distance between the exciton and the donor-acceptor interface.

  5. Nitrate Leaching Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrate (NO3) leaching is a significant nitrogen (N) loss process for agriculture that must be managed to minimize NO3 enrichment of groundwater and surface waters. Managing NO3 leaching should involve the application of basic principles of understanding the site’s hydrologic cycle, avoiding excess ...

  6. Toluene depletion in produced oil contributes to souring control in a field subjected to nitrate injection.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Akhil; Park, Hyung Soo; Nathoo, Safia; Gieg, Lisa M; Jack, Thomas R; Miner, Kirk; Ertmoed, Ryan; Benko, Aaron; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2012-01-17

    Souring in the Medicine Hat Glauconitic C field, which has a low bottom-hole temperature (30 °C), results from the presence of 0.8 mM sulfate in the injection water. Inclusion of 2 mM nitrate to decrease souring results in zones of nitrate-reduction, sulfate-reduction, and methanogenesis along the injection water flow path. Microbial community analysis by pyrosequencing indicated dominant community members in each of these zones. Nitrate breakthrough was observed in 2-PW, a major water- and sulfide-producing well, after 4 years of injection. Sulfide concentrations at four other production wells (PWs) also reached zero, causing the average sulfide concentration in 14 PWs to decrease significantly. Interestingly, oil produced by 2-PW was depleted of toluene, the preferred electron donor for nitrate reduction. 2-PW and other PWs with zero sulfide produced 95% water and 5% oil. At 2 mM nitrate and 5 mM toluene, respectively, this represents an excess of electron acceptor over electron donor. Hence, continuous nitrate injection can change the composition of produced oil and nitrate breakthrough is expected first in PWs with a low oil to water ratio, because oil from these wells is treated on average with more nitrate than is oil from PWs with a high oil to water ratio.

  7. Nitrates and Nitrites TNC Presentation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Nitrates and Nitrites Presentation gives an overview of nitrates and nitrites in drinking water, why it is important to monitor them and what to do in cases where the results exceed the maximum contaminant level (MCL).

  8. Anaerobic nonylphenol ethoxylate degradation coupled to nitrate reduction in a modified biodegradability batch test.

    PubMed

    Luppi, Lorena I; Hardmeier, Ivo; Babay, Paola A; Itria, Raúl F; Erijman, Leonardo

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this work was to elucidate the role of nitrate as a terminal electron acceptor on the biodegradation of NPEO. We have characterized the products of NPEO degradation by mixed microbial communities in anaerobic batch tests by means of HPLC, (1)H NMR and GC-MS. Anaerobic degradation of NPEO was strictly dependent on the presence of nitrate. Within seven days of anoxic incubation, NP2EO appeared as the major degradation product. After 21 days, NP was the main species detected, and was not degraded further even after 35 days. Nitrate concentration decreased in parallel with NPEO de-ethoxylation. A transient accumulation of nitrite was observed within the time period in which NP formation reached its maximum production. The observed generation of nonylphenol coupled to nitrate reduction suggests that the microbial consortium possessed an alternate pathway for the degradation of NPEO, which was not accessible under aerobic conditions.

  9. Donor–Acceptor Oligorotaxanes Made to Order

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Subhadeep; Coskun, Ali; Friedman, Douglas C.; Olson, Mark A.; Benitez, Diego; Tkatchouk, Ekaterina; Barin, Gokhan; Yang, Jeffrey; Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Goddard, William A.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2011-01-01

    Five donor–acceptor oligorotaxanes made up of dumbbells composed of tetraethylene glycol chains, interspersed with three and five 1,5-dioxynaphthalene units, and terminated by 2,6-diisopropylphenoxy stoppers, have been prepared by the threading of discrete numbers of cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) rings, followed by a kinetically controlled stoppering protocol that relies on click chemistry. The well-known copper(I)-catalyzed alkyne–azide cycloaddition between azide functions placed at the ends of the polyether chains and alkyne-bearing stopper precursors was employed during the final kinetically controlled template-directed synthesis of the five oligorotaxanes, which were characterized subsequently by ¹H NMR spectroscopy at low temperature (233 K) in deuterated acetonitrile. The secondary structures, as well as the conformations, of the five oligorotaxanes were unraveled by spectroscopic comparison with the dumbbell and ring components. By focusing attention on the changes in chemical shifts of some key probe protons, obtained from a wide range of low-temperature spectra, a picture emerges of a high degree of folding within the thread protons of the dumbbells of four of the five oligorotaxanes—the fifth oligorotaxane represents a control compound in effect—brought about by a combination of C[BOND]H···O and π–π stacking interactions between the π-electron-deficient bipyridinium units in the rings and the π-electron-rich 1,5-dioxynaphthalene units and polyether chains in the dumbbells. The secondary structures of a foldamer-like nature have received further support from a solid-state superstructure of a related [3]pseudorotaxane and density functional calculations performed thereon.

  10. Intramolecular charge transfer in donor-acceptor molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Slama-Schwok, A.; Blanchard-Desce, M.; Lehn, J.M. )

    1990-05-17

    The photophysical properties of donor-acceptor molecules, push-pull polyenes and carotenoids, have been studied by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The compounds bear various acceptor and donor groups, linked together by chains of different length and structure. The position of the absorption and fluorescence maxima and their variation in solvents of increasing polarity are in agreement with long-distance intramolecular charge-transfer processes, the linker acting as a molecular wire. The effects of the linker length and structure and of the nature of acceptor and donor are presented.

  11. Alteration of cartilage glycosaminoglycan protein acceptor by somatomedin and cortisol.

    PubMed

    Kilgore, B S; McNatt, M L; Meador, S; Lee, J A; Hughes, E R; Elders, M J

    1979-02-01

    The effect of somatomedin and cortisol on embryonic chick cartilage in vitro indicates that somatomedin stimulates 35SO4 uptake while cortisol decreases it with no effect on glycosaminoglycan turnover. Xylosyltransferase activity is increased in crude fractions of somatomedin-treated cartilage but decreased in cortisol-treated cartilage. By using a Smith-degraded proteoglycan as an exogenous acceptor, xylosyltransferase activities from both treatments were equivalent, suggesting that the enzyme was not rate limiting. The results of xylosyltransferase assays conducted by mixing enzyme and endogenous acceptor from control, cortisol-treated and somatomedin-treated cartilage, suggest both effects to be at the level of the acceptor protein.

  12. Efficient organic solar cells with helical perylene diimide electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yu; Trinh, M Tuan; Chen, Rongsheng; Wang, Wei; Khlyabich, Petr P; Kumar, Bharat; Xu, Qizhi; Nam, Chang-Yong; Sfeir, Matthew Y; Black, Charles; Steigerwald, Michael L; Loo, Yueh-Lin; Xiao, Shengxiong; Ng, Fay; Zhu, X-Y; Nuckolls, Colin

    2014-10-29

    We report an efficiency of 6.1% for a solution-processed non-fullerene solar cell using a helical perylene diimide (PDI) dimer as the electron acceptor. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealed both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor-acceptor interfaces, indicating that charge carriers are created from photogenerated excitons in both the electron donor and acceptor phases. Light-intensity-dependent current-voltage measurements suggested different recombination rates under short-circuit and open-circuit conditions.

  13. Three holes bound to a double acceptor - Be(+) in germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haller, E. E.; Mcmurray, R. E., Jr.; Falicov, L. M.; Haegel, N. M.; Hansen, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    A double acceptor binding three holes has been observed for the first time with photoconductive far-infrared spectroscopy in beryllium-doped germanium single crystals. This new center, Be(+), has a hole binding energy of about 5 meV and is only present when free holes are generated by ionization of either neutral shallow acceptors or neutral Be double acceptors. The Be(+) center thermally ionizes above 4 K. It disappears at a uniaxial stress higher than about a billion dyn/sq cm parallel to (111) as a result of the lifting of the valence-band degeneracy.

  14. Modeling the current and future role of particulate organic nitrates in the southeastern United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic nitrates are an important aerosol constituent in locations where biogenic hydrocarbon emissions mix with anthropogenic NOx sources. While regional and global chemical transport models may include a representation of organic aerosol from monoterpene reactions with nitrate ...

  15. Recent aspects of nitration: New preparative methods and mechanistic studies (A Review)

    PubMed Central

    Olah, George A.; Narang, Subhash C.; Olah, Judith A.; Lammertsma, Koop

    1982-01-01

    New preparative methods of electrophilic nitration and transfer nitration are reviewed, including reactions relating to the ambident reactivity of the nitronium ion. Recent aspects of the mechanism of electrophilic aromatic substitution are discussed.

  16. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section 126...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.28 Ammonium...

  17. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section 126...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.28 Ammonium...

  18. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section 126...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.28 Ammonium...

  19. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section 126...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.28 Ammonium...

  20. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section 126...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.28 Ammonium...

  1. Evaluation of nitrate and nitrite destruction/separation technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1997-08-29

    This report describes and evaluates four types of nitrate and nitrite destruction and separation technologies that could be used to treat the aqueous, alkaline, nitrate-bearing mixed waste that is generated by the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The technologies considered in this report include thermal, hydrothermal, chemical, and electrochemical technologies.

  2. Photochemical Production of Alkyl Nitrates in the Tropical Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, E. E.; Yvon-Lewis, S. A.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2005-12-01

    Alkyl nitrates are important to the tropospheric NOx/ozone cycle because they represent a significant fraction of the reactive nitrogen (NOy). Previous work has shown that there is an oceanic source of alkyl nitrates. A photochemical mechanism for the formation of alkyl nitrates in seawater has been proposed. This mechanism involves the reaction of ROO and NO, where ROO is an alkyl peroxy radical. ROO and NO radicals in seawater are derived from the photolysis of DOM and nitrite, respectively. In this study, the photochemical production of low molecular weight alkyl nitrates (C1-C3) was observed in shipboard incubation experiments in the tropical Pacific during the PHASE 1 cruise. Seawater samples from several regions, including high and low-chlorophyll areas, were collected and incubated. Alkyl nitrate production rates as high as 2 nM/hour were observed. The production rate of alkyl nitrates was clearly dependent upon the initial concentration of nitrite, most likely as the source for NO radicals. While the magnitude of production varied between sample locations, the ratios of the production rates of the various alkyl nitrates remained relatively constant. The observed production ratios of methyl, ethyl, isopropyl, and n-propyl nitrate were 5.9:1.0:0.1:0.2. These ratios presumably reflect the speciation of peroxy radicals formed in seawater, and the yield of alkyl nitrates from the ROO+NO reaction. The observed production rate ratios are similar to the concentration ratios of alkyl nitrates observed in ambient seawater and the overlying atmosphere during the study. A comparison of the measured production rates and the observed concentrations, suggests that photochemically produced alkyl nitrates are a major source of atmospheric alkyl nitrates in the surface ocean and marine atmosphere.

  3. Purification of alkali metal nitrates

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Gregory, Kevin M.

    1985-05-14

    A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

  4. Ammonium nitrate explosive systems

    DOEpatents

    Stinecipher, Mary M.; Coburn, Michael D.

    1981-01-01

    Novel explosives which comprise mixtures of ammonium nitrate and an ammonium salt of a nitroazole in desired ratios are disclosed. A preferred nitroazole is 3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole. The explosive and physical properties of these explosives may readily be varied by the addition of other explosives and oxidizers. Certain of these mixtures have been found to act as ideal explosives.

  5. Nitrogen is a deep acceptor in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Tarun, M. C.; Iqbal, M. Zafar; McCluskey, M. D.

    2011-04-14

    Zinc oxide is a promising material for blue and UV solid-state lighting devices, among other applications. Nitrogen has been regarded as a potential p-type dopant for ZnO. However, recent calculations indicate that nitrogen is a deep acceptor. This paper presents experimental evidence that nitrogen is, in fact, a deep acceptor and therefore cannot produce p-type ZnO. A broad photoluminescence (PL) emission band near 1.7 eV, with an excitation onset of ~2.2 eV, was observed, in agreement with the deep-acceptor model of the nitrogen defect. Thus the deep-acceptor behavior can be explained by the low energy of the ZnO valence band relative to the vacuum level.

  6. Nitrogen is a deep acceptor in ZnO

    DOE PAGES

    Tarun, M. C.; Iqbal, M. Zafar; McCluskey, M. D.

    2011-04-14

    Zinc oxide is a promising material for blue and UV solid-state lighting devices, among other applications. Nitrogen has been regarded as a potential p-type dopant for ZnO. However, recent calculations indicate that nitrogen is a deep acceptor. This paper presents experimental evidence that nitrogen is, in fact, a deep acceptor and therefore cannot produce p-type ZnO. A broad photoluminescence (PL) emission band near 1.7 eV, with an excitation onset of ~2.2 eV, was observed, in agreement with the deep-acceptor model of the nitrogen defect. Thus the deep-acceptor behavior can be explained by the low energy of the ZnO valence bandmore » relative to the vacuum level.« less

  7. Nitrate Storage and Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction by Eukaryotic Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Kamp, Anja; Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Stief, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The microbial nitrogen cycle is one of the most complex and environmentally important element cycles on Earth and has long been thought to be mediated exclusively by prokaryotic microbes. Rather recently, it was discovered that certain eukaryotic microbes are able to store nitrate intracellularly and use it for dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the absence of oxygen. The paradigm shift that this entailed is ecologically significant because the eukaryotes in question comprise global players like diatoms, foraminifers, and fungi. This review article provides an unprecedented overview of nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by diverse marine eukaryotes placed into an eco-physiological context. The advantage of intracellular nitrate storage for anaerobic energy conservation in oxygen-depleted habitats is explained and the life style enabled by this metabolic trait is described. A first compilation of intracellular nitrate inventories in various marine sediments is presented, indicating that intracellular nitrate pools vastly exceed porewater nitrate pools. The relative contribution by foraminifers to total sedimentary denitrification is estimated for different marine settings, suggesting that eukaryotes may rival prokaryotes in terms of dissimilatory nitrate reduction. Finally, this review article sketches some evolutionary perspectives of eukaryotic nitrate metabolism and identifies open questions that need to be addressed in future investigations. PMID:26734001

  8. Assessing the Role of Sewers and Atmospheric Deposition as Nitrate Contamination Sources to Urban Surface Waters using Stable Nitrate Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, M. T.; Elliott, E. M.

    2009-12-01

    Excess nitrate (NO3-) contributes to the overall degraded quality of streams in many urban areas. These systems are often dominated by impervious surfaces and storm sewers that can route atmospherically deposited nitrogen, from both wet and dry deposition, to waterways. Moreover, in densely populated watersheds there is the potential for interaction between urban waterways and sewer systems. The affects of accumulated nitrate in riverine and estuary systems include low dissolved oxygen, loss of species diversity, increased mortality of aquatic species, and general eutrophication of the waterbody. However, the dynamics of nitrate pollution from each source and it’s affect on urban waterways is poorly constrained. The isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate have been proven effective in helping to distinguish contamination sources to ground and surface waters. In order to improve our understanding of urban nitrate pollution sources and dynamics, we examined nitrate isotopes (δ15N and δ18O) in base- and stormflow samples collected over a two-year period from a restored urban stream in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (USA). Nine Mile Run drains a 1,600 hectare urban watershed characterized by 38% impervious surface cover. Prior work has documented high nitrate export from the watershed (~19 kg NO3- ha-1 yr-1). Potential nitrate sources to the watershed include observed sewer overflows draining directly to the stream, as well as atmospheric deposition (~23 kg NO3- ha-1 yr-1). In this and other urban systems with high percentages of impervious surfaces, there is likely minimal input from nitrate derived from soil or fertilizer. In this presentation, we examine spatial and temporal patterns in nitrate isotopic composition collected at five locations along Nine Mile Run characterized by both sanitary and combined-sewer cross-connections. Preliminary isotopic analysis of low-flow winter streamwater samples suggest nitrate export from Nine Mile Run is primarily influenced by

  9. Influence of competitive electron acceptors during reduction and effective immobilization of technetium by reduced nontronite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaisi, D. P.; Dong, H.; Heald, S. M.; Fredrickson, J. K.; Plymale, A. E.

    2006-12-01

    The reduction and immobilization of Tc(VII) by Fe(II) in nontronite (NAu-2) was studied in the presence of iron and manganese oxides and nitrate, the coexisting competitive terminal electron acceptors (TEAs) in several DOE subsurface contamination sites, to understand how these TEAs might inhibit Tc(VII) reduction or promote reoxidation of reduced Tc. Manganese oxides (birnessite and manganite) and iron oxides (goethite and hematite) were synthesized and their mineralogical, morphological and surface properties were characterized by XRD, SEM, and BET surface and pore area measurements, respectively. Batch Tc(VII) reduction experiments were performed at different concentrations of Tc and Fe(II) and competing electron acceptors were added at different times. Separate experiments performed with NAu-2 and a TEA only (in the absence of Tc) showed that that the electron transfer from Fe(II) in NAu-2 to manganese oxides was very fast, but the transfer from Fe(II) to nitrate was almost absent. The Tc(VII) reduction was enhanced when iron oxides (goethite and hematite) was added, irrespective of time, however the enhancement was low at later phases of Tc reduction. The addition of manganese oxides during Tc reduction stopped any additional Tc(VII) reduction, but reoxidation of already reduced Tc was not observed at low Tc concentration. In general, the extent of reoxidation of reduced Tc (by manganese oxide) in old samples was slow suggesting that the higher rate of particle aggregation in reduced NAu-2 inhibited the reoxidation of reduced Tc. However, Tc(IV) reoxidation was not observed in the presence of nitrate. The preliminary EXAFS analysis showed that a fraction of reduced Tc occurred as Tc-Fe complex in a ferrihydrite-like solid, in addition to separate TcO2.nH2O particles, which might have promoted additional NAu-2 particle aggregation and thereby incorporation of reduced Tc into NAu-2 aggregates. These results are promising for long-term in-situ immobilization of

  10. The effects of organic nitrates on osteoporosis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jamal, S A; Reid, L S; Hamilton, C J

    2013-03-01

    Current treatments for osteoporosis are limited by lack of effect on cortical bone, side effects, and, in some cases, cost. Organic nitrates, which act as nitric oxide donors, may be a potential alternative. This systematic review summarizes the clinical data that reports on the effects of organic nitrates and bone. Organic nitrates, which act as nitric oxide donors, are novel agents that have several advantages over the currently available treatments for osteoporosis. This systematic review summarizes the clinical data that reports on the effects of organic nitrates on bone. We searched Medline (1966 to November 2012), EMBASE (1980 to November 2012), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 11, 2012). Keywords included nitrates, osteoporosis, bone mineral density (BMD), and fractures. We identified 200 citations. Of these, a total of 29 were retrieved for more detailed evaluation and we excluded 19 manuscripts: 15 because they did not present original data and four because they did not provide data on the intervention or outcome of interest. As such, we included ten studies in literature review. Of these ten studies two were observational cohort studies reporting nitrate use was associated with increased BMD; two were case control studies reporting that use of nitrates were associated with lower risk of hip fracture; two were randomized controlled trials (RCT) comparing alendronate to organic nitrates for treatment of postmenopausal women and demonstrating that both agents increased lumbar spine BMD. The two largest RCT with the longest follow-up, both of which compared effects of organic nitrates to placebo on BMD in women without osteoporosis, reported conflicting results. Headaches were the most common adverse event among women taking nitrates. No studies have reported on fracture efficacy. Further research is needed before recommending organic nitrates for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  11. The Impact of Heterogeneity and Dark Acceptor States on FRET: Implications for Using Fluorescent Protein Donors and Acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Steven S.; Nguyen, Tuan A.; van der Meer, B. Wieb; Blank, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy is widely used to study protein interactions in living cells. Typically, spectral variants of the Green Fluorescent Protein (FPs) are incorporated into proteins expressed in cells, and FRET between donor and acceptor FPs is assayed. As appreciable FRET occurs only when donors and acceptors are within 10 nm of each other, the presence of FRET can be indicative of aggregation that may denote association of interacting species. By monitoring the excited-state (fluorescence) decay of the donor in the presence and absence of acceptors, dual-component decay analysis has been used to reveal the fraction of donors that are FRET positive (i.e., in aggregates)._However, control experiments using constructs containing both a donor and an acceptor FP on the same protein repeatedly indicate that a large fraction of these donors are FRET negative, thus rendering the interpretation of dual-component analysis for aggregates between separately donor-containing and acceptor-containing proteins problematic. Using Monte-Carlo simulations and analytical expressions, two possible sources for such anomalous behavior are explored: 1) conformational heterogeneity of the proteins, such that variations in the distance separating donor and acceptor FPs and/or their relative orientations persist on time-scales long in comparison with the excited-state lifetime, and 2) FP dark states. PMID:23152925

  12. Nitrate postdeposition processes in Svalbard surface snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björkman, Mats P.; Vega, Carmen P.; Kühnel, Rafael; Spataro, Francesca; Ianniello, Antonietta; Esposito, Giulio; Kaiser, Jan; Marca, Alina; Hodson, Andy; Isaksson, Elisabeth; Roberts, Tjarda J.

    2014-11-01

    The snowpack acts as a sink for atmospheric reactive nitrogen, but several postdeposition pathways have been reported to alter the concentration and isotopic composition of snow nitrate with implications for atmospheric boundary layer chemistry, ice core records, and terrestrial ecology following snow melt. Careful daily sampling of surface snow during winter (11-15 February 2010) and springtime (9 April to 5 May 2010) near Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard reveals a complex pattern of processes within the snowpack. Dry deposition was found to dominate over postdeposition losses, with a net nitrate deposition rate of (0.6 ± 0.2) µmol m-2 d-1 to homogeneous surface snow. At Ny-Ålesund, such surface dry deposition can either solely result from long-range atmospheric transport of oxidized nitrogen or include the redeposition of photolytic/bacterial emission originating from deeper snow layers. Our data further confirm that polar basin air masses bring 15N-depleted nitrate to Svalbard, while high nitrate δ(18O) values only occur in connection with ozone-depleted air, and show that these signatures are reflected in the deposited nitrate. Such ozone-depleted air is attributed to active halogen chemistry in the air masses advected to the site. However, here the Ny-Ålesund surface snow was shown to have an active role in the halogen dynamics for this region, as indicated by declining bromide concentrations and increasing nitrate δ(18O), during high BrO (low-ozone) events. The data also indicate that the snowpack BrO-NOx cycling continued in postevent periods, when ambient ozone and BrO levels recovered.

  13. 77 FR 21527 - Ammonium Nitrate From Russia: Correction to Notice of Opportunity To Request Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... International Trade Administration Ammonium Nitrate From Russia: Correction to Notice of Opportunity To Request... of the antidumping duty orders and inadvertently omitted Ammonium Nitrate from Russia, POR 5/2/2011-3... include the Ammonium Nitrate from Russia administrative review in the referenced notice. Dated: April...

  14. Assimilation of nitrate by yeasts.

    PubMed

    Siverio, José M

    2002-08-01

    Nitrate assimilation has received much attention in filamentous fungi and plants but not so much in yeasts. Recently the availability of classical genetic and molecular biology tools for the yeast Hansenula polymorpha has allowed the advance of the study of this metabolic pathway in yeasts. The genes YNT1, YNR1 and YNI1, encoding respectively nitrate transport, nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, have been cloned, as well as two other genes encoding transcriptional regulatory factors. All these genes lie closely together in a cluster. Transcriptional regulation is the main regulatory mechanism that controls the levels of the enzymes involved in nitrate metabolism although other mechanisms may also be operative. The process involved in the sensing and signalling of the presence of nitrate in the medium is not well understood. In this article the current state of the studies of nitrate assimilation in yeasts as well as possible venues for future research are reviewed.

  15. Analysis of nonlinear optical properties in donor–acceptor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Paul N.; Pachter, Ruth; Nguyen, Kiet A.

    2014-05-14

    Time-dependent density functional theory has been used to calculate nonlinear optical (NLO) properties, including the first and second hyperpolarizabilities as well as the two-photon absorption cross-section, for the donor-acceptor molecules p-nitroaniline and dimethylamino nitrostilbene, and for respective materials attached to a gold dimer. The CAMB3LYP, B3LYP, PBE0, and PBE exchange-correlation functionals all had fair but variable performance when compared to higher-level theory and to experiment. The CAMB3LYP functional had the best performance on these compounds of the functionals tested. However, our comprehensive analysis has shown that quantitative prediction of hyperpolarizabilities is still a challenge, hampered by inadequate functionals, basis sets, and solvation models, requiring further experimental characterization. Attachment of the Au{sub 2}S group to molecules already known for their relatively large NLO properties was found to further enhance the response. While our calculations show a modest enhancement for the first hyperpolarizability, the enhancement of the second hyperpolarizability is predicted to be more than an order of magnitude.

  16. Impact of Different In Vitro Electron Donor/Acceptor Conditions on Potential Chemolithoautotrophic Communities from Marine Pelagic Redoxclines

    PubMed Central

    Labrenz, Matthias; Jost, Günter; Pohl, Christa; Beckmann, Sabrina; Martens-Habbena, Willm; Jürgens, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    Anaerobic or microaerophilic chemolithoautotrophic bacteria have been considered to be responsible for CO2 dark fixation in different pelagic redoxclines worldwide, but their involvement in redox processes is still not fully resolved. We investigated the impact of 17 different electron donor/acceptor combinations in water of pelagic redoxclines from the central Baltic Sea on the stimulation of bacterial CO2 dark fixation as well as on the development of chemolithoautotrophic populations. In situ, the highest CO2 dark fixation rates, ranging from 0.7 to 1.4 μmol liter−1 day−1, were measured directly below the redoxcline. In enrichment experiments, chemolithoautotrophic CO2 dark fixation was maximally stimulated by the addition of thiosulfate, reaching values of up to 9.7 μmol liter−1 CO2 day−1. Chemolithoautotrophic nitrate reduction proved to be an important process, with rates of up to 33.5 μmol liter−1 NO3− day−1. Reduction of Fe(III) or Mn(IV) was not detected; nevertheless, the presence of these potential electron acceptors influenced the development of stimulated microbial assemblages. Potential chemolithoautotrophic bacteria in the enrichment experiments were displayed on 16S ribosomal complementary DNA single-strand-conformation polymorphism fingerprints and identified by sequencing of excised bands. Sequences were closely related to chemolithoautotrophic Thiomicrospira psychrophila and Maorithyas hadalis gill symbiont (both Gammaproteobacteria) and to an uncultured nitrate-reducing Helicobacteraceae bacterium (Epsilonproteobacteria). Our data indicate that this Helicobacteraceae bacterium could be of general importance or even a key organism for autotrophic nitrate reduction in pelagic redoxclines. PMID:16269695

  17. Tubulin nitration in human gliomas.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Gabriella; Di Cristo, Carlo; Monti, Gianluca; Amoresano, Angela; Columbano, Laura; Pucci, Pietro; Cioffi, Fernando A; Di Cosmo, Anna; Palumbo, Anna; d'Ischia, Marco

    2006-02-06

    Immunohistochemical and biochemical investigations showed that significant protein nitration occurs in human gliomas, especially in grade IV glioblastomas at the level of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes and neurones. Enhanced alpha-tubulin immunoreactivity was co-present in the same elements in the glioblastomas. Proteomic methodologies were employed to identify a nitrated protein band at 55 kDa as alpha-tubulin. Peptide mass fingerprinting procedures demonstrated that tubulin is nitrated at Tyr224 in grade IV tumour samples but is unmodified in grade I samples and in non-cancerous brain tissue. These results provide the first characterisation of endogenously nitrated tubulin from human tumour samples.

  18. Photooxidation of cellulose nitrate: new insights into degradation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Berthumeyrie, Sebastien; Collin, Steeve; Bussiere, Pierre-Olivier; Therias, Sandrine

    2014-05-15

    Cellulose nitrate (or nitrocellulose) has received considerable interest due to its uses in various applications, such as paints, photographic films and propellants. However, it is considered as one of the primary pollutants in the energetic material industries because it can be degraded to form polluting chemical species. In this work, the UV light degradation of cellulose nitrate films was studied under conditions of artificially accelerated photooxidation. To eliminate the reactivity of nitro groups, the degradation of ethylcellulose was also investigated. Infrared spectroscopy analyses of the chemical modifications caused by the photooxidation of cellulose nitrate films and the resulting formation of volatile products revealed the occurrence of de-nitration and the formation of oxidation photoproducts exhibiting lactone and anhydride functions. The impact of these chemical modifications on the mechanical and thermal properties of cellulose nitrate films includes embrittlement and lower temperatures of ignition when used as a propellant.

  19. Designer Metallic Acceptor-Containing Halogen Bonding: General Strategies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxing; Bowen, Kit H

    2017-03-13

    Being electrostatic interactions in nature, hydrogen bonding (HB) and halogen bonding (XB) are considered to be two parallel worlds. In principle, all the applications that HB has could also be applied to XB. However, there has been no report on a metallic XB acceptor but metal anions have been observed to be good HB acceptors. This missing mosaic piece of XB is because common metal anions are reactive for XB donors. In view of this, we propose two strategies for designing metallic acceptor-containing XB using ab initio calculations. The first one is to utilize a metal cluster anion with a high electron detachment energy, such as the superatom, Al13- as the XB acceptor. The second strategy is to design a ligand passivated/protected metal core while it still can maintain the negative charge; several exotic clusters, such as PtH5-, PtZnH5- and PtMgH5-, are utilized as examples. Based on these two strategies, we anticipate that more metallic acceptor-containing XB will be discovered.

  20. Electron acceptor-dependent respiratory and physiological stratifications in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yonggang; Xiang, Yinbo; Sun, Guoping; Wu, Wei-Min; Xu, Meiying

    2015-01-06

    Bacterial respiration is an essential driving force in biogeochemical cycling and bioremediation processes. Electron acceptors respired by bacteria often have solid and soluble forms that typically coexist in the environment. It is important to understand how sessile bacteria attached to solid electron acceptors respond to ambient soluble alternative electron acceptors. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) provide a useful tool to investigate this interaction. In MFCs with Shewanella decolorationis, azo dye was used as an alternative electron acceptor in the anode chamber. Different respiration patterns were observed for biofilm and planktonic cells, with planktonic cells preferred to respire with azo dye while biofilm cells respired with both the anode and azo dye. The additional azo respiration dissipated the proton accumulation within the anode biofilm. There was a large redox potential gap between the biofilms and anode surface. Changing cathodic conditions caused immediate effects on the anode potential but not on the biofilm potential. Biofilm viability showed an inverse and respiration-dependent profile when respiring with only the anode or azo dye and was enhanced when respiring with both simultaneously. These results provide new insights into the bacterial respiration strategies in environments containing multiple electron acceptors and support an electron-hopping mechanism within Shewanella electrode-respiring biofilms.

  1. Effect of geometry on the screened acceptor binding energy in a quantum wire

    SciTech Connect

    Shanthi, R. Vijaya Nithiananthi, P.

    2014-04-24

    The effect of various Geometries G(x, y) of the GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As Quantum wire like G{sub 1}: (L, L) {sub 2}: (L, L/2) {sub 3}: (L/2, L/4) on the binding energy of an on-center acceptor impurity has been investigated through effective mass approximation using variational technique. The observations were made including the effect of spatial dependent dielectric screening for different concentration of Al, at T=300K. The influence of spatial dielectric screening on different geometries of the wire has been compared and hence the behavior of the acceptor impurity in GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As Quantum wire has been discussed.

  2. A method to quantify FRET stoichiometry with phasor plot analysis and acceptor lifetime ingrowth.

    PubMed

    Chen, WeiYue; Avezov, Edward; Schlachter, Simon C; Gielen, Fabrice; Laine, Romain F; Harding, Heather P; Hollfelder, Florian; Ron, David; Kaminski, Clemens F

    2015-03-10

    FRET is widely used for the study of protein-protein interactions in biological samples. However, it is difficult to quantify both the FRET efficiency (E) and the affinity (Kd) of the molecular interaction from intermolecular FRET signals in samples of unknown stoichiometry. Here, we present a method for the simultaneous quantification of the complete set of interaction parameters, including fractions of bound donors and acceptors, local protein concentrations, and dissociation constants, in each image pixel. The method makes use of fluorescence lifetime information from both donor and acceptor molecules and takes advantage of the linear properties of the phasor plot approach. We demonstrate the capability of our method in vitro in a microfluidic device and also in cells, via the determination of the binding affinity between tagged versions of glutathione and glutathione S-transferase, and via the determination of competitor concentration. The potential of the method is explored with simulations.

  3. New opportunities in multiplexed optical bioanalyses using quantum dots and donor-acceptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Algar, W Russ; Krull, Ulrich J

    2010-11-01

    This review highlights recent trends in the development of multiplexed bioanalyses using quantum dot bioconjugates and donor-acceptor interactions. In these methods, multiple optical signals are generated in response to biorecognition through modulation of the photoluminescence of populations of quantum dots with different emission colors. The donor-acceptor interactions that have been used include fluorescence resonance energy transfer, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, charge transfer quenching, and quenching via proximal gold nanoparticles. Assays for the simultaneous detection of between two and eight target analytes have been developed, where spectral deconvolution is an important tool. Target analytes have included small molecules, nucleic acid sequences, and proteases. The unique optical properties of quantum dots offer several potential advantages in multiplexed detection, and a large degree of versatility, for example, one pot multiplexing at the ensemble level, where only wavelength discrimination is required to differentiate between detection channels. These methods are not being developed to compete with array-based technologies in terms of overall multiplexing capacity, but rather to enable new formats for multiplexed bioanalyses. In particular, quantum dot bioprobes based on donor-acceptor interactions are anticipated to provide future opportunities for multiplexed biosensing within living cells.

  4. Improving Photoconductance of Fluorinated Donors with Fluorinated Acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, Logan E.; Larson, Bryon; Oosterhout, Stefan; Owczarczyk, Zbyslaw; Olson, Dana C.; Kopidakis, Nikos; Boltalina, Olga V.; Strauss, Steven H.; Braunecker, Wade A.

    2016-11-21

    This work investigates the influence of fluorination of both donor and acceptor materials on the generation of free charge carriers in small molecule donor/fullerene acceptor BHJ OPV active layers. A fluorinated and non-fluorinated small molecule analogue were synthesized and their optoelectronic properties characterized. The intrinsic photoconductance of blends of these small molecule donors was investigated using time-resolved microwave conductivity. Blends of the two donor molecules with a traditional non-fluorinated fullerene (PC70BM) as well as a fluorinated fullerene (C60(CF3)2-1) were investigated using 5% and 50% fullerene loading. We demonstrate for the first time that photoconductance in a 50:50 donor:acceptor BHJ blend using a fluorinated fullerene can actually be improved relative to a traditional non-fluorinated fullerene by fluorinating the donor molecule as well.

  5. An overview of molecular acceptors for organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudhomme, Piétrick

    2013-07-01

    Organic solar cells (OSCs) have gained serious attention during the last decade and are now considered as one of the future photovoltaic technologies for low-cost power production. The first dream of attaining 10% of power coefficient efficiency has now become a reality thanks to the development of new materials and an impressive work achieved to understand, control and optimize structure and morphology of the device. But most of the effort devoted to the development of new materials concerned the optimization of the donor material, with less attention for acceptors which to date remain dominated by fullerenes and their derivatives. This short review presents the progress in the use of non-fullerene small molecules and fullerene-based acceptors with the aim of evaluating the challenge for the next generation of acceptors in organic photovoltaics.

  6. Gut inflammation provides a respiratory electron acceptor for Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Sebastian E.; Thiennimitr, Parameth; Winter, Maria G.; Butler, Brian P.; Huseby, Douglas L.; Crawford, Robert W.; Russell, Joseph M.; Bevins, Charles L.; Adams, L. Garry; Tsolis, Renée M.; Roth, John R.; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2010-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) causes acute gut inflammation by using its virulence factors to invade the intestinal epithelium and survive in mucosal macrophages. The inflammatory response enhances the transmission success of S. Typhimurium by promoting its outgrowth in the gut lumen through unknown mechanisms. Here we show that reactive oxygen species generated during inflammation reacted with endogenous, luminal sulphur compounds (thiosulfate) to form a new respiratory electron acceptor, tetrathionate. The genes conferring the ability to utilize tetrathionate as an electron acceptor produced a growth advantage for S. Typhimurium over the competing microbiota in the lumen of the inflamed gut. We conclude that S. Typhimurium virulence factors induce host-driven production of a new electron acceptor that allows the pathogen to use respiration to compete with fermenting gut microbes. Thus, the ability to trigger intestinal inflammation is crucial for the biology of this diarrhoeal pathogen. PMID:20864996

  7. Molybdenum effector of fumarate reductase repression and nitrate reductase induction in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Iuchi, S; Lin, E C

    1987-01-01

    In Escherichia coli the presence of nitrate prevents the utilization of fumarate as an anaerobic electron acceptor. The induction of the narC operon encoding the nitrate reductase is coupled to the repression of the frd operon encoding the fumarate reductase. This coupling is mediated by nitrate as an effector and the narL product as the regulatory protein (S. Iuchi and E. C. C. Lin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84:3901-3905, 1987). The protein-ligand complex appears to control narC positively but frd negatively. In the present study we found that a molybdenum coeffector acted synergistically with nitrate in the regulation of frd and narC. In chlD mutants believed to be impaired in molybdate transport (or processing), full repression of phi(frd-lac) and full induction of phi(narC-lac) by nitrate did not occur unless the growth medium was directly supplemented with molybdate (1 microM). This requirement was not clearly manifested in wild-type cells, apparently because it was met by the trace quantities of molybdate present as a contaminant in the mineral medium. In chlB mutants, which are known to accumulate the Mo cofactor because of its failure to be inserted as a prosthetic group into proteins such as nitrate reductase, nitrate repression of frd and induction of narC were also intensified by molybdate supplementation. In this case a deficiency of the molybdenum coeffector might have resulted from enhanced feedback inhibition of molybdate transport (or processing) by the elevated level of the unutilized Mo cofactor. In addition, mutations in chlE, which are known to block the synthesis of the organic moiety of the Mo cofactor, lowered the threshold concentration of nitrate (< 1 micromole) necessary for frd repression and narC induction. These changes could be explained simply by the higher intracellular nitrate attainable in cells lacking the ability to destroy the effector. PMID:3301812

  8. Acceptor specificity in the transglycosylation reaction using Endo-M.

    PubMed

    Tomabechi, Yusuke; Odate, Yuki; Izumi, Ryuko; Haneda, Katsuji; Inazu, Toshiyuki

    2010-11-22

    To determine the structural specificity of the glycosyl acceptor of the transglycosylation reaction using endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (ENGase) (EC 3.2.1.96) from Mucor hiemalis (Endo-M), several acceptor derivatives were designed and synthesized. The narrow regions of the 1,3-diol structure from the 4- to 6-hydroxy functions of GlcNAc were found to be essential for the transglycosylation reaction using Endo-M. Furthermore, it was determined that Endo-M strictly recognizes a 1,3-diol structure consisting of primary and secondary hydroxyl groups.

  9. Some History of Nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, Dennis W.

    2003-12-01

    The history of saltpeter is an interesting combination of chemistry, world trade, technology, politics, and warfare. Originally it was obtained from the dirt floors of stables, sheep pens, pigeon houses, caverns, and even peasants' cottages; any place manure and refuse accumulated in soil under dry conditions. When these sources became inadequate to meet demand it was manufactured on saltpeter plantations, located in dry climates, where piles of dirt, limestone, and manure were allowed to stand for three to five years while soil microbes oxidized the nitrogen to nitrate—an example of early bioengineering. Extensive deposits of sodium nitrate were mined in the Atacama Desert in northern Chile from 1830 until the mid 1920s when the mines were displaced by the Haber Ostwald process.

  10. Nitrate reductase from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Kerber, N L; Cardenas, J

    1982-01-01

    The facultative phototroph Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides DSM158 was incapable of either assimilating or dissimilating nitrate, although the organism could reduce it enzymatically to nitrite either anaerobically in the light or aerobically in the dark. Reduction of nitrate was mediated by a nitrate reductase bound to chromatophores that could be easily solubilized and functioned with chemically reduced viologens or photochemically reduced flavins as electron donors. The enzyme was solubilized, and some of its kinetic and molecular parameters were determined. It seemed to be nonadaptive, ammonia did not repress its synthesis, and its activity underwent a rapid decline when the cells entered the stationary growth phase. Studies with inhibitors and with metal antagonists indicated that molybdenum and possibly iron participate in the enzymatic reduction of nitrate. The conjectural significance of this nitrate reductase in phototrophic bacteria is discussed. PMID:6978883

  11. TREATMENT OF AMMONIUM NITRATE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Boyer, T.W.; MacHutchin, J.G.; Yaffe, L.

    1958-06-10

    The treatment of waste solutions obtained in the processing of neutron- irradiated uranium containing fission products and ammonium nitrate is described. The object of this process is to provide a method whereby the ammonium nitrate is destroyed and removed from the solution so as to permit subsequent concentration of the solution.. In accordance with the process the residual nitrate solutions are treated with an excess of alkyl acid anhydride, such as acetic anhydride. Preferably, the residual nitrate solution is added to an excess of the acetic anhydride at such a rate that external heat is not required. The result of this operation is that the ammonium nitrate and acetic anhydride react to form N/sub 2/ O and acetic acid.

  12. Amperometric nitrate biosensor based on Carbon nanotube/Polypyrrole/Nitrate reductase biofilm electrode.

    PubMed

    Can, Faruk; Korkut Ozoner, Seyda; Ergenekon, Pinar; Erhan, Elif

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the construction and characterization of an amperometric nitrate biosensor based on the Polypyrrole (PPy)/Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) film. Nitrate reductase (NR) was both entrapped into the growing PPy film and chemically immobilized via the carboxyl groups of CNTs to the CNT/PPy film electrode. The optimum amperometric response for nitrate was obtained in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (PBS), pH 7.5 including 0.1 M lithium chloride and 7 mM potassium ferricyanide with an applied potential of 0.13 V (vs. Ag/AgCl, 3 M NaCl). Sensitivity was found to be 300 nA/mM in a linear range of 0.44-1.45 mM with a regression coefficient of 0.97. The biosensor response showed a higher linear range in comparison to standard nitrate analysis methods which were tested in this study and NADH based nitrate biosensors. A minimum detectable concentration of 0.17 mM (S/N=3) with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 5.4% (n=7) was obtained for the biosensor. Phenol and glucose inhibit the electrochemical reaction strictly at a concentration of 1 μg/L and 20 mg/L, respectively. The biosensor response retained 70% of its initial response over 10 day usage period when used everyday.

  13. Nitrate behavior in ground water of the southeastern USA

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, B.T.

    1999-10-01

    Principal components analysis (PCA) was performed with water-quality data from studies conducted during 1993 to 1995 to explore potential nitrate-attenuation processes in ground waters of the southeastern USA. Nitrate reduction is an important attenuation process in selected areas of the Southeast. A nitrate-reduction component explains 23% of the total variance in the data and indicates that nitrate and dissolved oxygen (DO) are inversely related to ammonium, iron, manganese, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Additional components extracted by PCA include calcite dissolution (18% of variance explained) and phosphate dissolution (9% of variance explained). Reducing conditions in ground waters of the region influence nitrate behavior through bacterially mediated reduction in the presence of organic matter, and by inhibition of nitrate formation in anoxic ground water beneath forested areas. Component scores are consistent with observed water-quality conditions in the region. For example, median nitrate concentration in ground-water samples from the Albemarle-Pamlico Drainage Basin (ALBE) Coastal Plain is {lt}0.05 mg L{sup {minus}1}, median DOC concentration is 4.2 mg L{sup {minus}1}, and median DO concentration is 2.1 mg L{sup {minus}1}, consistent with denitrification. Nitrate reduction does not occur uniformly throughout the Southeast. Median DO concentrations in ground-water samples from the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin (ACFB) are 6.2 to 7.1 mg L{sup {minus}1}, and median nitrate concentrations are 0.61 to 2.2 mg L{sup {minus}1}, inconsistent with denitrification. Similarly, median DO concentration in samples from the Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain (GAFL) is 6.0 mg L{sup {minus}1} and median nitrate concentration is 5.8 mg L{sup {minus}1}.

  14. Effects of mineral dust on global atmospheric nitrate concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karydis, V. A.; Tsimpidi, A. P.; Pozzer, A.; Astitha, M.; Lelieveld, J.

    2016-02-01

    This study assesses the chemical composition and global aerosol load of the major inorganic aerosol components, focusing on mineral dust and aerosol nitrate. The mineral dust aerosol components (i.e., Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, Na+) and their emissions are included in the ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry model (EMAC). Gas/aerosol partitioning is simulated using the ISORROPIA-II thermodynamic equilibrium model that considers K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, NH4+, Na+, SO42-, NO3-, Cl-, and H2O aerosol components. Emissions of mineral dust are calculated online by taking into account the soil particle size distribution and chemical composition of different deserts worldwide. Presence of metallic ions can substantially affect the nitrate partitioning into the aerosol phase due to thermodynamic interactions. The model simulates highest fine aerosol nitrate concentration over urban and industrialized areas (1-3 µg m-3), while coarse aerosol nitrate is highest close to deserts (1-4 µg m-3). The influence of mineral dust on nitrate formation extends across southern Europe, western USA, and northeastern China. The tropospheric burden of aerosol nitrate increases by 44 % when considering interactions of nitrate with mineral dust. The calculated global average nitrate aerosol concentration near the surface increases by 36 %, while the coarse- and fine-mode concentrations of nitrate increase by 53 and 21 %, respectively. Other inorganic aerosol components are affected by reactive dust components as well (e.g., the tropospheric burden of chloride increases by 9 %, ammonium decreases by 41 %, and sulfate increases by 7 %). Sensitivity tests show that nitrate aerosol is most sensitive to the chemical composition of the emitted mineral dust, followed by the soil size distribution of dust particles, the magnitude of the mineral dust emissions, and the aerosol state assumption.

  15. Biological Redox Cycling Of Iron In Nontronite And Its Potential Application In Nitrate Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Linduo; Dong, Hailiang; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zeng, Qiang; Edelmann, Richard E.; Pentrak, Martin; Agrawal, Abinash

    2015-05-05

    Redox cycling of structural Fe in phyllosilicates provides a potential method to remediate nitrate contamination in natural environment. Past research has only studied chemical redox cycles or a single biologically mediated redox cycle of Fe in phyllosilicates. The objective of this research was to study three microbially driven redox cycles of Fe in one phyllosilicate, nontronite (NAu-2). During the reduction phase structural Fe(III) in NAu-2 served as electron acceptor, lactate as electron donor, AQDS as electron shuttle, and dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 as mediator in bicarbonate-buffered and PIPES-buffered media. During the oxidation phase, biogenic Fe(II) served an electron donor, nitrate as electron acceptor, and nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strain 2002 as mediator in the same media. For all three cycles, structural Fe in NAu-2 was able to reversibly undergo 3 redox cycles without significant reductive or oxidative dissolution. X-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed that NAu-2 was the dominant residual mineral throughout the 3 redox cycles with some dissolution textures but no significant secondary mineralization. Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that Fe(II) in bio-reduced samples likely occurred in two distinct environments, at edges and the interior of the NAu-2 structure. Nitrate was completely reduced to nitrogen gas under both buffer conditions and this extent and rate did not change with Fe redox cycles. Mössbauer spectroscopy further revealed that nitrate reduction was coupled to predominant/preferred oxidation of edge Fe(II). These results suggest that structural Fe in phyllosilicates may represent a renewable source to continuously remove nitrate in natural environments.

  16. Anaerobic Nitrate-Dependent Metal Bio-Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, K.; Knox, T.; Achenbach, L. A.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Direct biological oxidation of reduced metals (Fe(II) and U(IV)) coupled to nitrate reduction at circumneutral pH under anaerobic conditions has been recognized in several environments as well as pure culture. Several phylogentically diverse mesophilic bacteria have been described as capable of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation (NFOx). Our recent identification of a freshwater mesophilic, lithoautotroph, Ferrutens nitratireducens strain 2002, capable of growth through NFOx presents an opportunity to further study metal bio- oxidation. Continuing physiological studies revealed that in addition to Fe(II) oxidation, strain 2002 is capable of oxidizing U(IV) (4 μM) in washed cell suspensions with nitrate serving as the electron acceptor. Pasteurized cultures exhibited abiotic oxidation of 2 μM U(IV). Under growth conditions, strain 2002 catalyzed the oxidation of 12 μM U(IV) within a two week period. Cultures amended with sodium azide, an electron transport inhibitor, demonstrated limited oxidation (7 μM) similar to pasteurized cultures, supporting the direct role of electron transport in U(IV) bio-oxidation. The oxidation of U(IV) coupled denitrification at circumneutral pH would yield enough energy to support anaerobic microbial growth (ΔG°'= -460.36 kJ/mole). It is currently unknown whether or not strain 2002 can couple this metabolism to growth. The growth of F. nitratireducens strain 2002 utilizing Fe(II) as the sole electron donor was previously demonstrated. The amount of U(IV) (~12 μM) that strain 2002 oxidized under similar autotrophic growth conditions yields 0.0019 kJ, enough energy for the generation of ATP (5.3 x 10-20 kJ ATP-1), but not enough energy for cell replication as calculated for nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidizing conditions (0.096 kJ) assuming a similar metabolism. In addition to F. nitratireducens strain 2002, a nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidizing bacterium isolated from U contaminated groundwater, Diaphorobacter sp. strain

  17. Polar lipid fatty acids, LPS-hydroxy fatty acids, and respiratory quinones of three Geobacter strains, and variation with electron acceptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, David B.; Peacock, Aaron; Lovley, Derek; Woodard, Trevor L.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Long, Philip E.; White, David C.

    2009-02-01

    The polar lipid fatty acids, lipopolysaccharide hydroxy-fatty acids, and respiratory quinones of Geobacter metallireducens str. GS-15, Geobacter sulfurreducens str. PCA, and Geobacter bemidjiensis str. Bem are reported. Also, the lipids of G. metallireducens were compared when grown with Fe3+ or nitrate as electron acceptors and G. sulfurreducens with Fe3+ or fumarate. In all experiments, the most abundant polar lipid fatty acids were 14:0, i15:0, 16:1*7c, 16:1*5c, and 16:0; lipopolysaccharide hydroxyfatty acids were dominated by 3oh16:0, 3oh14:0, 9oh16:0, and 10oh16:0; and menaquinone-8 was the most abundant respiratory quinone. Some variation in lipid proWles with strain were observed, but not with electron acceptor.

  18. His166 is the Schiff base proton acceptor in attractant phototaxis receptor sensory rhodopsin I.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Jun; Takahashi, Hazuki; Furutani, Yuji; Sineshchekov, Oleg A; Spudich, John L; Kandori, Hideki

    2014-09-23

    Photoactivation of attractant phototaxis receptor sensory rhodopsin I (SRI) in Halobacterium salinarum entails transfer of a proton from the retinylidene chromophore's Schiff base (SB) to an unidentified acceptor residue on the cytoplasmic half-channel, in sharp contrast to other microbial rhodopsins, including the closely related repellent phototaxis receptor SRII and the outward proton pump bacteriorhodopsin, in which the SB proton acceptor is an aspartate residue salt-bridged to the SB in the extracellular (EC) half-channel. His166 on the cytoplasmic side of the SB in SRI has been implicated in the SB proton transfer reaction by mutation studies, and mutants of His166 result in an inverted SB proton release to the EC as well as inversion of the protein's normally attractant phototaxis signal to repellent. Here we found by difference Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy the appearance of Fermi-resonant X-H stretch modes in light-minus-dark difference spectra; their assignment with (15)N labeling and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrates that His166 is the SB proton acceptor during the photochemical reaction cycle of the wild-type SRI-HtrI complex.

  19. Molten nitrate salt technology development status report

    SciTech Connect

    Carling, R.W.; Kramer, C.M.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Nissen, D.A.; Goods, S.H.; Mar, R.W.; Munford, J.W.; Karnowsky, M.M.; Biefeld, R.N.; Norem, N.J.

    1981-03-01

    Recognizing thermal energy storage as potentially critical to the successful commercialization of solar thermal power systems, the Department of Energy (DOE) has established a comprehensive and aggressive thermal energy storage technology development program. Of the fluids proposed for heat transfer and energy storage molten nitrate salts offer significant economic advantages. The nitrate salt of most interest is a binary mixture of NaNO/sub 3/ and KNO/sub 3/. Although nitrate/nitrite mixtures have been used for decades as heat transfer and heat treatment fluids the use has been at temperatures of about 450/sup 0/C and lower. In solar thermal power systems the salts will experience a temperature range of 350 to 600/sup 0/C. Because central receiver applications place more rigorous demands and higher temperatures on nitrate salts a comprehensive experimental program has been developed to examine what effects, if any, the new demands and temperatures have on the salts. The experiments include corrosion testing, environmental cracking of containment materials, and determinations of physical properties and decomposition mechanisms. This report details the work done at Sandia National Laboratories in each area listed. In addition, summaries of the experimental programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of New York, EIC Laboratories, Inc., and the Norwegian Institute of Technology on molten nitrate salts are given. Also discussed is how the experimental programs will influence the near-term central receiver programs such as utility repowering/industrial retrofit and cogeneration. The report is designed to provide easy access to the latest information and data on molten NaNO/sub 3//KNO/sub 3/ for the designers and engineers of future central receiver projects.

  20. Plasma nitrate clearance in mice: modeling of the systemic production of nitrate following the induction of nitric oxide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Veszelovsky, E; Holford, N H; Thomsen, L L; Knowles, R G; Baguley, B C

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is produced in mammals by the enzyme NO synthase (NOS) in response to a number of agents, including the experimental antitumour agent flavone acetic acid (FAA) and the cytokine tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF). NO is converted rapidly in the presence of oxygen, water and haemoglobin to oxidation products, largely nitrate. To quantitate the production of nitric oxide it is necessary to know the clearance of nitrate. The concentration of nitrite and nitrate ion in the plasma of C3H and BDF1 (C57BL6 x DBA2) mice was assessed before and after injection of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. Nitrite was covered rapidly to nitrate and the kinetics of elimination of nitrate were determined. There was no significant difference between results obtained with different mouse strains, between levels of nitrite and nitrate, or between i.p. and i.v. administration, and the observations were therefore combined. The volume of distribution of nitrate was 0.71 +/- 0.04 l/kg and the clearance was 0.32 +/- 0.02 l/h-1/kg-1 (plasma half-life, 1.54 h). Using previously published data, we developed a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model that relates the production of TNF in response to administration of FAA, the enhancement of NOS activity in response to TNF, and the elevation of plasma nitrate in response to NO production. This information permits the prediction from observed plasma nitrate values of the amount of NOS induced in vivo.

  1. Three Redox States of a Diradical Acceptor-Donor-Acceptor Triad: Gating the Magnetic Coupling and the Electron Delocalization.

    PubMed

    Souto, Manuel; Lloveras, Vega; Vela, Sergi; Fumanal, Maria; Ratera, Imma; Veciana, Jaume

    2016-06-16

    The diradical acceptor-donor-acceptor triad 1(••), based on two polychlorotriphenylmethyl (PTM) radicals connected through a tetrathiafulvalene(TTF)-vinylene bridge, has been synthesized. The generation of the mixed-valence radical anion, 1(•-), and triradical cation species, 1(•••+), obtained upon electrochemical reduction and oxidation, respectively, was monitored by optical and ESR spectroscopy. Interestingly, the modification of electron delocalization and magnetic coupling was observed when the charged species were generated and the changes have been rationalized by theoretical calculations.

  2. Decarboxylative 1,4-Addition of α-Oxocarboxylic Acids with Michael Acceptors Enabled by Photoredox Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Zu; Shang, Rui; Cheng, Wan-Min; Fu, Yao

    2015-10-02

    Enabled by iridium photoredox catalysis, 2-oxo-2-(hetero)arylacetic acids were decarboxylatively added to various Michael acceptors including α,β-unsaturated ester, ketone, amide, aldehyde, nitrile, and sulfone at room temperature. The reaction presents a new type of acyl Michael addition using stable and easily accessible carboxylic acid to formally generate acyl anion through photoredox-catalyzed radical decarboxylation.

  3. Electron Acceptor-Electron Donor Interactions. XV and XVI.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    mixtures exhibit simple eutectic phase diagrams and the thermochromic effect is interpreted as a randomized structure in the liquid , whereas the solid is a...two-phase aggregate of isolated acceptor and onor crystals . The charge-transfer spectra of solutions of tungsten and molybdenum hexafluorides and iodine heptafluoride in n-hexane and cyclohexane were obtained.

  4. Poly(trifluoromethyl)azulenes: structures and acceptor properties.

    PubMed

    Clikeman, Tyler T; Bukovsky, Eric V; Kuvychko, Igor V; San, Long K; Deng, Shihu H M; Wang, Xue-Bin; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Strauss, Steven H; Boltalina, Olga V

    2014-06-14

    Six new poly(trifluoromethyl)azulenes prepared in a single high-temperature reaction exhibit strong electron accepting properties in the gas phase and in solution and demonstrate the propensity to form regular π-stacked columns in donor-acceptor crystals when mixed with pyrene as a donor.

  5. Nitrate concentrations under irrigated agriculture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaporozec, A.

    1983-01-01

    In recent years, considerable interest has been expressed in the nitrate content of water supplies. The most notable toxic effect of nitrate is infant methemoglobinemia. The risk of this disease increases significantly at nitrate-nitrogen levels exceeding 10 mg/l. For this reason, this concentration has been established as a limit for drinking water in many countries. In natural waters, nitrate is a minor ionic constituent and seldom accounts for more than a few percent of the total anions. However, nitrate in a significant concentration may occur in the vicinity of some point sources such as septic tanks, manure pits, and waste-disposal sites. Non-point sources contributing to groundwater pollution are numerous and a majority of them are related to agricultural activities. The largest single anthropogenic input of nitrate into the groundwater is fertilizer. Even though it has not been proven that nitrogen fertilizers are responsible for much of nitrate pollution, they are generally recognized as the main threat to groundwater quality, especially when inefficiently applied to irrigated fields on sandy soils. The biggest challenge facing today's agriculture is to maintain the balance between the enhancement of crop productivity and the risk of groundwater pollution. ?? 1982 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  6. Development of imide- and imidazole-containing electron acceptors for use in donor-acceptor conjugated compounds and polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Duo

    Conjugated organic compounds and polymers have attracted significant attention due to their potential application in electronic devices as semiconducting materials, such as organic solar cells (OSCs). In order to tune band gaps, donor-acceptor (D-A) structure is widely used, which has been proved to be one of the most effective strategies. This thesis consists of three parts: 1) design, syntheses and characterization of new weak acceptors based on imides and the systematic study of the structure-property relationship; (2) introduction of weak and strong acceptors in one polymer to achieve a broad coverage of light absorption and improve the power conversion efficiency (PCE); (3) modification of benzothiadiazole (BT) acceptor in order to increase the electron withdrawing ability. Imide-based electron acceptors, 4-(5-bromothiophen-2-y1)-2-(2-ethylhexyl)-9- phenyl- 1H-benzo[f]isoindole-1,3(2H)-dione (BIDO-1) and 4,9-bis(5-bromothiophen-2-yl)-2-(2-ethylhexyl)-benzo[f]isoindole-1,3-dione (BIDO-2), were designed and synthesized. In this design, naphthalene is selected as its main core to maintain a planar structure, and thienyl groups are able to facilitate the bromination reaction and lower the band gap. BIDO-1 and BIDO-2 were successfully coupled with different donors by both Suzuki cross-coupling and Stille cross-coupling reactions. Based on the energy levels and band gaps of the BIDO-containing compounds and polymers, BIDO-1 and BIDO-2 are proved to be weak electron acceptors. Pyromellitic diimide (PMDI) was also studied and found to be a stronger electron acceptor than BIDO . In order to obtain broad absorption coverage, both weak acceptor ( BIDO-2) and strong acceptor diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) were introduced in the same polymer. The resulting polymers show two absorption bands at 400 and 600 nm and two emission peaks at 500 and 680 nm. The band gaps of the polymers are around 1.6 eV, which is ideal for OSC application. The PCE of 1.17% was achieved. Finally

  7. Acceptor conductivity in bulk zinc oxide (0001) crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adekore, Bababunmi Tolu

    ZnO is a promising wide bandgap semiconductor. Its renowned and prominent properties as its bandgap of 3.37eV at 4.2K; its very high excitonic binding energy, 60meV; its high melting temperature, 2248K constitute the basis for the recently renewed and sustained scientific interests in the material. In addition to the foregoing, the availability of bulk substrates of industrially relevant sizes provides important opportunities such as homoepitaxial deposition of the material which is a technological asset in the production of efficient optoelectronic and electronic devices. The nemesis of wide bandgap materials cannot be more exemplified than in ZnO. The notorious limitation of asymmetric doping and the haunting plague of electrically active point defects dim the bright future of the material. In this case, the search for reliable and consistent acceptor conductivity in bulk substrates has been hitherto, unsuccessful. In the dissertation that now follows, our efforts have been concerted in the search for a reliable acceptor. We have carefully investigated the science of point defects in the material, especially those responsible for the high donor conductivity. We also investigated and herein report variety of techniques of introducing acceptors into the material. We employ the most relevant and informative characterization techniques in verifying both the intended conductivity and the response of intrinsic crystals to variation in temperature and strain. And finally we explain deviations, where they exist, from ideal acceptor characteristics. Our work on reliable acceptor has been articulated in four papers. The first establishing capacitance based methods of monitoring electrically active donor defects. The second investigates the nature of anion acceptors on the oxygen sublattice. A study similar to the preceding study was conducted for cation acceptors on the zinc sublattice and reported in the third paper. Finally, an analysis of the response of the crystal to

  8. Observations of fine and coarse particle nitrate at several rural locations in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taehyoung; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Ayres, Benjamin; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Malm, William C.; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    Nitrate comprises an important part of aerosol mass at many non-urban locations during some times of the year. Little is known, however, about the chemical form and size distribution of particulate nitrate in these environments. While submicron ammonium nitrate is often assumed to be the dominant species, this assumption is rarely tested. Properties of aerosol nitrate were characterized at several IMPROVE monitoring sites during a series of field studies. Study sites included Bondville, Illinois (February 2003), San Gorgonio Wilderness Area, California (April and July 2003), Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona (May 2003), Brigantine National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey (November 2003), and Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee (July/August 2004). Nitrate was found predominantly in submicron ammonium nitrate particles during the Bondville and San Gorgonio (April) campaigns. Coarse mode nitrate particles, resulting from reactions of nitric acid or its precursors with sea salt or soil dust, were more important at Grand Canyon and Great Smoky Mountains. Both fine and coarse mode nitrate were important during the studies at Brigantine and San Gorgonio (July). These results, which complement earlier findings about the importance of coarse particle nitrate at Yosemite and Big Bend National Parks, suggest a need to more closely examine common assumptions regarding the importance of ammonium nitrate at non-urban sites, to include pathways for coarse mode nitrate formation in regional models, and to consider impacts of coarse particle nitrate on visibility. Because coarse particle nitrate modes often extend well below 2.5 μm aerodynamic diameter, measurements of PM 2.5 nitrate in these environments should not automatically be assumed to contain only ammonium nitrate.

  9. Observations of Fine and Coarse Particle Nitrate at Several Rural Locations in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Taehyoung; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Ayres, Benjamin; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Malm, William C.; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    2008-04-01

    Nitrate comprises an important part of aerosol mass at many non-urban locations during some times of the year. Little is known, however, about the chemical form and size distribution of particulate nitrate in these environments. While submicron ammonium nitrate is often assumed to be the dominant species, this assumption is rarely tested. Properties of aerosol nitrate were characterized at several IMPROVE monitoring sites during a series of field studies. Study sites included Bondville, Illinois (February 2003), San Gorgonio Wilderness Area, California (April and July 2003), Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona (May 2003), Brigantine National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey (November 2003), and Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee (July/August 2004). Nitrate was found predominantly in submicron ammonium nitrate particles during the Bondville and San Gorgonio (April) campaigns. Coarse mode nitrate particles, resulting from reactions of nitric acid or its precursors with sea salt or soil dust, were more important at Grand Canyon and Great Smoky Mountains. Both fine and coarse mode nitrate were important during the studies at Brigantine and San Gorgonio (July). These results, which complement earlier findings about the importance of coarse particle nitrate at Yosemite and Big Bend National Parks, suggest a need to more closely examine common assumptions regarding the importance of ammonium nitrate at non-urban sites, to include pathways for coarse mode nitrate formation in regional models, and to consider impacts of coarse particle nitrate on visibility. Because coarse particle nitrate modes often extend well below 2.5 µm aerodynamic diameter, measurements of PM2.5 nitrate in these environments should not automatically be assumed to contain only ammonium nitrate.

  10. Tolerance of developing salmonid eggs and fry to nitrate exposure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kincheloe, John W.; Wedemeyer, Gary A.; Koch, David L.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reports on tests which show significant effects on early salmonid life stages of nitrates at levels commonly found in groundwaters in geographical areas that are influenced by fertilizer application. It has long been known, from fish cultural experience, that in certain site specific locations, chronic problems can be expected with salmonid egg development and early fry mortality. However, fingerlings which survive usually grow normally. A complete explanation is lacking although several environmental factors have been proposed to account for this phenomenon. One, which has so far received little attention, is that nitrate levels in the ground and surface waters of many areas have been increasing significantly over historical background levels. Ammonia, urea, and other potential sources of nitrate can enter natural waters from a variety of sources, such as domestic or industrial sewage, animal feedlots, or seepage and return flows from agricultural lands. The latter may be the largest contributor, since billions of tons of nitrate fertilizers are applied to agricultural crops on a worldwide basis each year. In addition, intensive forest management techniques include the aerial application of nitrate fertilizer to increase the yield of wood products, while range management practices call for use of nitrates to increase forage production. The nitrate that is not taken up by plants ultimately appears in ground or surface waters.

  11. Nitrite- and Nitrate-Dependent Methanotrophs - Environmental Detection and Relevance in Freshwater Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettwig, K. F.

    2014-12-01

    Humans continue to have an enormous impact on global C and N cycles. While a clear stimulation of methane emissions through human activities is evident, the role of also increasingly released nitrogenous compounds as electron acceptors for microbial methane oxidation is not well constrained. We have developed diverse methods for environmental detection of nitrate(NO3-)- and - predominantly - nitrite(NO2-)-dependent methanotrophs, which have been applied to several freshwater environments. In contrast to most metabolically flexible heterotrophic denitrifiers, the microorganisms responsible for methane-dependent nitrate/nitrite reduction seem to be specialized to use methane only, grow slowly and employ pathways different from each other and from model organisms, which necessitate new approaches for the assessment of their environmental relevance. Nitrite-dependent methane oxidation is carried out by bacteria of the NC10 phylum, whereas nitrate-dependent methane oxidizers are close relatives of methanogenic archaea and sulfate-dependent anaerobic methanotrophs (ANME-2). Laboratory enrichment cultures of the nitrite-reducing methanotroph Methylomirabilis oxyfera (NC10 phylum) have formed the basis for its genetic and physiological characterization and the development of several independent methods for its sensitive detection. M. oxyfera differs from all known microorganisms by encoding an incomplete denitrification pathway, in which the last 2 steps, the reduction of NO via N2O to N2, apparently is replaced by the dismutation of NO to N2 and O2. The intracellularly produced O2 is used for methane oxidation via a methane monooxygenase, analogously to the phylogenetically unrelated proteobacterial methanotrophs. But unlike in proteobacteria, C is not assimilated from methane, but rather CO2, with important consequences for the interpretation of environmental isotope labelling studies. In addition, M. oxyfera is characterized by a distinct PLFA profile, including

  12. The "silver-nitrate-oma".

    PubMed

    McBride, T J; Rand, B; Dhillon, S S

    2012-01-01

    This case report demonstrates and emphasises the unusual radiographic appearance of silver nitrate treatment in a 30-year-old patient, who subsequently underwent excision biopsy of a presumed potentially malignant lesion.

  13. Food sources of nitrates and nitrites: the physiologic context for potential health benefits.

    PubMed

    Hord, Norman G; Tang, Yaoping; Bryan, Nathan S

    2009-07-01

    The presence of nitrates and nitrites in food is associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal cancer and, in infants, methemoglobinemia. Despite the physiologic roles for nitrate and nitrite in vascular and immune function, consideration of food sources of nitrates and nitrites as healthful dietary components has received little attention. Approximately 80% of dietary nitrates are derived from vegetable consumption; sources of nitrites include vegetables, fruit, and processed meats. Nitrites are produced endogenously through the oxidation of nitric oxide and through a reduction of nitrate by commensal bacteria in the mouth and gastrointestinal tract. As such, the dietary provision of nitrates and nitrites from vegetables and fruit may contribute to the blood pressure-lowering effects of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet. We quantified nitrate and nitrite concentrations by HPLC in a convenience sample of foods. Incorporating these values into 2 hypothetical dietary patterns that emphasize high-nitrate or low-nitrate vegetable and fruit choices based on the DASH diet, we found that nitrate concentrations in these 2 patterns vary from 174 to 1222 mg. The hypothetical high-nitrate DASH diet pattern exceeds the World Health Organization's Acceptable Daily Intake for nitrate by 550% for a 60-kg adult. These data call into question the rationale for recommendations to limit nitrate and nitrite consumption from plant foods; a comprehensive reevaluation of the health effects of food sources of nitrates and nitrites is appropriate. The strength of the evidence linking the consumption of nitrate- and nitrite-containing plant foods to beneficial health effects supports the consideration of these compounds as nutrients.

  14. Vasodilator Therapy: Nitrates and Nicorandil.

    PubMed

    Tarkin, Jason M; Kaski, Juan Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Nitrates have been used to treat symptoms of chronic stable angina for over 135 years. These drugs are known to activate nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine-3',-5'-monophasphate (cGMP) signaling pathways underlying vascular smooth muscle cell relaxation, albeit many questions relating to how nitrates work at the cellular level remain unanswered. Physiologically, the anti-angina effects of nitrates are mostly due to peripheral venous dilatation leading to reduction in preload and therefore left ventricular wall stress, and, to a lesser extent, epicardial coronary artery dilatation and lowering of systemic blood pressure. By counteracting ischemic mechanisms, short-acting nitrates offer rapid relief following an angina attack. Long-acting nitrates, used commonly for angina prophylaxis are recommended second-line, after beta-blockers and calcium channel antagonists. Nicorandil is a balanced vasodilator that acts as both NO donor and arterial K(+) ATP channel opener. Nicorandil might also exhibit cardioprotective properties via mitochondrial ischemic preconditioning. While nitrates and nicorandil are effective pharmacological agents for prevention of angina symptoms, when prescribing these drugs it is important to consider that unwanted and poorly tolerated hemodynamic side-effects such as headache and orthostatic hypotension can often occur owing to systemic vasodilatation. It is also necessary to ensure that a dosing regime is followed that avoids nitrate tolerance, which not only results in loss of drug efficacy, but might also cause endothelial dysfunction and increase long-term cardiovascular risk. Here we provide an update on the pharmacological management of chronic stable angina using nitrates and nicorandil.

  15. NOx in the Atmosphere of Early Earth as Electron Acceptors for Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, M. L.; Charnay, B.; Gao, P.; Yung, Y. L.; Russell, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    We quantify the amount of NOx produced in the Hadean atmosphere and available in the Hadean ocean for the emergence of life. Atmospherically generated nitrate (NO3-) and nitrite (NO2-) are the most attractive high-potential electron acceptors for driving the highly endergonic reactions at the entry points to autotrophic metabolic pathways at submarine alkaline hydrothermal vents (Ducluzeau, 2008; Russell, 2014). The Hadean atmosphere, dominated by CO2 and N2, will produce nitric oxide (NO) when shocked by lightning and impacts (Ducluzeau, 2008; Nna Mvondo, 2001). Photochemical reactions involving NO and H2O vapor will then produce acids such as HNO3 and HNO2 that rain into the ocean and dissociate into NO3- and NO2-. Previous work suggests that 1018 g of NOx can be produced in a million years or so, satisfying the need for micromolar concentrations of NO3- and NO2- in the ocean (Ducluzeau, 2008). But because this number is controversial, we present new calculations based on a novel combination of early-Earth GCM and photochemical modeling, calculating the sources and sinks for fixed nitrogen. Finally, it is notable that lightning has been detected on Venus and Mars along with evidence of atmospheric NO; in the distant past, could NOx have been created and available for the emergence of life on numerous wet, rocky worlds?

  16. Anaerobic biodegradability of alkylphenols and fuel oxygenates in the presence of alternative electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Puig-Grajales, L; Tan, N G; van der Zee, F; Razo-Flores, E; Field, J A

    2000-11-01

    Alkylphenols and fuel oxygenates are important environmental pollutants produced by the petrochemical industry. A batch biodegradability test was conducted with selected ortho-substituted alkylphenols (2-cresol, 2,6-dimethylphenol and 2-ethylphenol), fuel oxygenates (methyl tert-butyl ether, ethyl tert-butyl ether and tert-amylmethyl ether) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) as model compounds. The ortho-substituted alkylphenols were not biodegraded after 100 days of incubation under methanogenic, sulfate-, or nitrate-reducing conditions. However, biodegradation of 2-cresol and 2-ethylphenol (150 mg l(-1)) was observed in the presence of Mn (IV) as electron acceptor. The biodegradation of these two compounds took place in less than 15 days and more than 90% removal was observed for both compounds. Mineralization was indicated since no UV-absorbing metabolites accumulated after 23 days of incubation. These alkylphenols were also slowly chemically oxidized by Mn (IV). No biodegradation of fuel oxygenates or TBA (1 g l(-1)) was observed after 80 or more days of incubation under methanogenic, Fe (III)-, or Mn (IV)-reducing conditions, suggesting that these compounds are recalcitrant under anaerobic conditions. The fuel oxygenates caused no toxicity towards acetoclastic methanogens activity in anaerobic granular sludge.

  17. Growth of Pseudomonas chloritidismutans AW-1(T) on n-alkanes with chlorate as electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Mehboob, Farrakh; Junca, Howard; Schraa, Gosse; Stams, Alfons J M

    2009-06-01

    Microbial (per)chlorate reduction is a unique process in which molecular oxygen is formed during the dismutation of chlorite. The oxygen thus formed may be used to degrade hydrocarbons by means of oxygenases under seemingly anoxic conditions. Up to now, no bacterium has been described that grows on aliphatic hydrocarbons with chlorate. Here, we report that Pseudomonas chloritidismutans AW-1(T) grows on n-alkanes (ranging from C7 until C12) with chlorate as electron acceptor. Strain AW-1(T) also grows on the intermediates of the presumed n-alkane degradation pathway. The specific growth rates on n-decane and chlorate and n-decane and oxygen were 0.5 +/- 0.1 and 0.4 +/- 0.02 day(-1), respectively. The key enzymes chlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase were assayed and found to be present. The oxygen-dependent alkane oxidation was demonstrated in whole-cell suspensions. The strain degrades n-alkanes with oxygen and chlorate but not with nitrate, thus suggesting that the strain employs oxygenase-dependent pathways for the breakdown of n-alkanes.

  18. Generality of Nitrate Removal in Streambed Sediment on the Southern Delmarva Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFadden, G.; Flewelling, S. A.; Herman, J. S.; Mills, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrogen fertilizers have accumulated in the unconfined Columbia aquifer on the Eastern Shore of Virginia (ESVA) and increased nitrate concentrations, which could potentially affect water quality in down-gradient surface-water bodies. The streambeds and riparian zones of the small, low-gradient ESVA streams appear to be attenuating the nitrate load of discharging groundwater via denitrification, thereby reducing groundwater nitrate concentrations by an order of magnitude or more in some cases. We measured concentrations of nitrate, chloride, and dissolved oxygen in sediment pore water as well as vertical head gradients and hydraulic conductivity in the streambed of four streams on the ESVA (Coal Kiln, Machipongo, Phillips Creek, and Parker Creek). Unlike measurements made in some other streams on the ESVA, the data did not show a consistent decrease in nitrate concentrations as groundwater discharged upward through the streambed. For Coal Kiln, Machipongo, and Phillips Creek, dissolved oxygen concentrations were consistently low (generally <3 mg/L) throughout sediment pore water, down to at least 60 cm (maximum depth of measurements). In Parker Creek, dissolved oxygen concentrations were higher and there was a general proportionality between nitrate and oxygen concentrations, consistent with microbially mediated redox reactions gradually shifting the electron acceptor from oxygen to nitrate as pore-water moved upward through the sediments. Whereas previous measurements at another stream (Cobb Mill Creek) on the ESVA indicated that denitrification occurred primarily in the upper 30-60 cm of the streambed sediment, the data from Coal Kiln, Machipongo, and Phillips Creek suggest that denitrification may also be important elsewhere in the catchment, perhaps deeper in the sediment profile. In Parker Creek, the streambed appeared to be reducing nitrate concentrations as groundwater discharged to the stream, however, the magnitude of nitrate removal during vertical flow

  19. Controlled field study on the use of nitrate and oxygen for bioremediation of a gasoline source zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barbaro, J.R.; Barker, J.F.

    2000-01-01

    Controlled releases of unleaded gasoline were utilized to evaluate the biotransformation of the soluble aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene isomers, trimethylbenzene isomers, and naphthalene) within a source zone using nitrate and oxygen as electron acceptors. Experiments were conducted within two 2 m ?? 2 m ?? 3.5 m deep sheet-piling cells. In each treatment cell, a gasoline-contaminated zone was created below the water table. Groundwater amended with electron acceptors was then flushed continuously through the cells for 174 day. Electron-acceptor utilization and hydrocarbon-metabolite formation were noted in both cells, indicating that some microbial activity had been induced in response to flushing. Relative to the cell residence time, nitrate utilization was slow and aromatic-hydrocarbon mass losses in response to microaerophilic dissolved oxygen addition were not obvious under these in situ conditions. There was relatively little biotransformation of the aromatic hydrocarbons over the 2-m flow path monitored in this experiment. A large denitrifying population capable of aromatic hydrocarbon biotransformation failed to develop within the gasoline source zone over a 14-mo period of nitrate exposure.

  20. Nitrate for biorestoration of an aquifer contaminated with jet fuel. Rept. for Jun 88-Sep 90

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchins, S.R.; Downs, W.C.; Smith, G.B.; Wilson, J.T.; Hendrix, D.J.

    1991-03-01

    There is little information available in the open literature on the performance of bioremediation at field scale. The report documents the rate and extent of treatment of a spill of JP-4 in a drinking-water aquifer, using nitrate as the primary electron acceptor for microbial respiration of the contaminant hydrocarbons. Nitrate has theoretical advantages over the more traditional electron acceptors used in the United States. It is much more soluble than oxygen, and less costly and less toxic than hydrogen peroxide. Ground water amended with nitrate and mineral nutrients was recirculated through a 10 m by 10 m study area. After 165 days the individual concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes were below 5 microgram/l in monitoring wells under the study area. The concentration of benzene was below 0.1 microgram/l. Some of the removal of alkylbenzenes may have been due to low concentrations of oxygen (0.5 mg/l) in the recirculation water.

  1. Biological redox cycling of iron in nontronite and its potential application in nitrate removal.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Linduo; Dong, Hailiang; Kukkadapu, Ravi K; Zeng, Qiang; Edelmann, Richard E; Pentrák, Martin; Agrawal, Abinash

    2015-05-05

    Biological redox cycling of structural Fe in phyllosilicates is an important but poorly understood process. The objective of this research was to study microbially mediated redox cycles of Fe in nontronite (NAu-2). During the reduction phase, structural Fe(III) in NAu-2 served as electron acceptor, lactate as electron donor, AQDS as electron shuttle, and dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 as mediator in bicarbonate- and PIPES-buffered media. During the oxidation phase, biogenic Fe(II) served as electron donor and nitrate as electron acceptor. Nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strain 2002 was added as mediator in the same media. For all three cycles, structural Fe in NAu-2 was able to reversibly undergo three redox cycles without significant dissolution. Fe(II) in bioreduced samples occurred in two distinct environments, at edges and in the interior of the NAu-2 structure. Nitrate reduction to nitrogen gas was coupled with oxidation of edge-Fe(II) and part of interior-Fe(II) under both buffer conditions, and its extent and rate did not change with Fe redox cycles. These results suggest that biological redox cycling of structural Fe in phyllosilicates is a reversible process and has important implications for biogeochemical cycles of carbon, nitrogen, and other nutrients in natural environments.

  2. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  3. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  4. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  5. 46 CFR 148.205 - Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 148... Materials § 148.205 Ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of ammonium nitrate and the following fertilizers composed of...

  6. Fused Nonacyclic Electron Acceptors for Efficient Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Shuixing; Zhao, Fuwen; Zhang, Qianqian; Lau, Tsz-Ki; Li, Tengfei; Liu, Kuan; Ling, Qidan; Wang, Chunru; Lu, Xinhui; You, Wei; Zhan, Xiaowei

    2017-01-25

    We design and synthesize four fused-ring electron acceptors based on 6,6,12,12-tetrakis(4-hexylphenyl)-indacenobis(dithieno[3,2-b;2',3'-d]thiophene) as the electron-rich unit and 1,1-dicyanomethylene-3-indanones with 0-2 fluorine substituents as the electron-deficient units. These four molecules exhibit broad (550-850 nm) and strong absorption with high extinction coefficients of (2.1-2.5) × 10(5) M(-1) cm(-1). Fluorine substitution downshifts the LUMO energy level, red-shifts the absorption spectrum, and enhances electron mobility. The polymer solar cells based on the fluorinated electron acceptors exhibit power conversion efficiencies as high as 11.5%, much higher than that of their nonfluorinated counterpart (7.7%). We investigate the effects of the fluorine atom number and position on electronic properties, charge transport, film morphology, and photovoltaic properties.

  7. An organic donor/acceptor lateral superlattice at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Otero, Roberto; Ecija, David; Fernandez, Gustavo; Gallego, José María; Sanchez, Luis; Martín, Nazario; Miranda, Rodolfo

    2007-09-01

    A precise control of the nanometer-scale morphology in systems containing mixtures of donor/acceptor molecules is a key factor to improve the efficiency of organic photovoltaic devices. Here we report on a scanning tunneling microscopy study of the first stages of growth of 2-[9-(1,3-dithiol-2-ylidene)anthracen-10(9H)-ylidene]-1,3-dithiole, as electron donor, and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester, as electron acceptor, on a Au(111) substrate under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Due to differences in bonding strength with the substrate and different interactions with the Au(111) herringbone surface reconstruction, mixed thin films spontaneously segregate into a lateral superlattice of interdigitated nanoscale stripes with a characteristic width of about 10-20 nm, a morphology that has been predicted to optimize the efficiency of organic solar cells.

  8. EXTRACTION OF URANYL NITRATE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Furman, N.H.; Mundy, R.J.

    1957-12-10

    An improvement in the process is described for extracting aqueous uranyl nitrate solutions with an organic solvent such as ether. It has been found that the organic phase will extract a larger quantity of uranyl nitrate if the aqueous phase contains in addition to the uranyl nitrate, a quantity of some other soluble nitrate to act as a salting out agent. Mentioned as suitable are the nitrates of lithium, calcium, zinc, bivalent copper, and trivalent iron.

  9. Cross-conjugated chromophores: synthesis of iso-polydiacetylenes with Donor/Acceptor substitution

    PubMed

    Ciulei; Tykwinski

    2000-11-16

    The iterative construction of cross-conjugated donor (D), acceptor (A), and donor-acceptor (D-A) substituted iso-polydiacetylene (iso-PDA) oligomers has been achieved utilizing palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling techniques. Structure-property relationships for these compounds have been analyzed for cross-conjugated pi-electronic communication as a result of contributions from donor, acceptor, or donor-acceptor functionalization.

  10. Autotrophic, hydrogen-oxidizing, denitrifying bacteria in groundwater, potential agents for bioremediation of nitrate contamination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Ceazan, M.L.; Brooks, M.H.

    1994-01-01

    Addition of hydrogen or formate significantly enhanced the rate of consumption of nitrate in slurried core samples obtained from an active zone of denitrification in a nitrate-contaminated sand and gravel aquifer (Cape Cod, Mass.). Hydrogen uptake by the core material was immediate and rapid, with an apparent K(m) of 0.45 to 0.60 ??M and a V(max) of 18.7 nmol cm-3 h-1 at 30??C. Nine strains of hydrogen-oxidizing denitrifying bacteria were subsequently isolated from the aquifer. Eight of the strains grew autotrophically on hydrogen with either oxygen or nitrate as the electron acceptor. One strain grew mixotrophically. All of the isolates were capable of heterotrophic growth, but none were similar to Paracoccus denitrificans, a well-characterized hydrogen-oxidizing denitrifier. The kinetics for hydrogen uptake during denitrification were determined for each isolate with substrate depletion progress curves; the K(m)s ranged from 0.30 to 3.32 ??M, with V(max)s of 1.85 to 13.29 fmol cell-1 h-1. Because these organisms appear to be common constituents of the in situ population of the aquifer, produce innocuous end products, and could be manipulated to sequentially consume oxygen and then nitrate when both were present, these results suggest that these organisms may have significant potential for in situ bioremediation of nitrate contamination in groundwater.

  11. The addition of organic carbon and nitrate affects reactive transport of heavy metals in sandy aquifers.

    PubMed

    Satyawali, Yamini; Seuntjens, Piet; Van Roy, Sandra; Joris, Ingeborg; Vangeel, Silvia; Dejonghe, Winnie; Vanbroekhoven, Karolien

    2011-04-25

    Organic carbon introduction in the soil to initiate remedial measures, nitrate infiltration due to agricultural practices or sulphate intrusion owing to industrial usage can influence the redox conditions and pH, thus affecting the mobility of heavy metals in soil and groundwater. This study reports the fate of Zn and Cd in sandy aquifers under a variety of plausible in-situ redox conditions that were induced by introduction of carbon and various electron acceptors in column experiments. Up to 100% Zn and Cd removal (from the liquid phase) was observed in all the four columns, however the mechanisms were different. Metal removal in column K1 (containing sulphate), was attributed to biological sulphate reduction and subsequent metal precipitation (as sulphides). In the presence of both nitrate and sulphate (K2), the former dominated the process, precipitating the heavy metals as hydroxides and/or carbonates. In the presence of sulphate, nitrate and supplemental iron (Fe(OH)(3)) (K3), metal removal was also due to precipitation as hydroxides and/or carbonates. In abiotic column, K4, (with supplemental iron (Fe(OH)(3)), but no nitrate), cation exchange with soil led to metal removal. The results obtained were modeled using the reactive transport model PHREEQC-2 to elucidate governing processes and to evaluate scenarios of organic carbon, sulphate and nitrate inputs.

  12. Autotrophic, Hydrogen-Oxidizing, Denitrifying Bacteria in Groundwater, Potential Agents for Bioremediation of Nitrate Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Richard L.; Ceazan, Marnie L.; Brooks, Myron H.

    1994-01-01

    Addition of hydrogen or formate significantly enhanced the rate of consumption of nitrate in slurried core samples obtained from an active zone of denitrification in a nitrate-contaminated sand and gravel aquifer (Cape Cod, Mass.). Hydrogen uptake by the core material was immediate and rapid, with an apparent Km of 0.45 to 0.60 μM and a Vmax of 18.7 nmol cm-3 h-1 at 30°C. Nine strains of hydrogen-oxidizing denitrifying bacteria were subsequently isolated from the aquifer. Eight of the strains grew autotrophically on hydrogen with either oxygen or nitrate as the electron acceptor. One strain grew mixotrophically. All of the isolates were capable of heterotrophic growth, but none were similar to Paracoccus denitrificans, a well-characterized hydrogen-oxidizing denitrifier. The kinetics for hydrogen uptake during denitrification were determined for each isolate with substrate depletion progress curves; the Kms ranged from 0.30 to 3.32 μM, with Vmaxs of 1.85 to 13.29 fmol cell-1 h-1. Because these organisms appear to be common constituents of the in situ population of the aquifer, produce innocuous end products, and could be manipulated to sequentially consume oxygen and then nitrate when both were present, these results suggest that these organisms may have significant potential for in situ bioremediation of nitrate contamination in groundwater. PMID:16349284

  13. Development of hydraulic properties and nitrate turnover processes in minerotrophic fen soil on differnet scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleimeier, Christian; Lennartz, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    Generally, it is recommended to remove the uppermost highly degraded peat layer from fens prior to rewetting to eliminate a potential source of organic pollutants for downstream water bodies. We investigated this material as a potential medium for denitrifying filters to further use the organic material. We are aiming to remove nitrate from tile drainage runoff at the outlet drainage dominated catchments to fullfill the requirements of the European Water Framework Directive. In a lysimeter scale long term mesocosm experiments we were aiming to reveal the peats behavior after disturbing and rewetting under constant flow conditions. Tracer experiments revealed a restructuring of the peat ending up at 20/80 percentage of mobile immobile pore volume. Additionally we observed the nitrate turnover. The turnover rate was determined by the hydraulic load. Absolute turnover rates were equal at lower and higher concentrations as well as flow rates, whereas the turnover reached higher percentages at lower concentrations. To further reveal the nitrate turnover processes flow through rector experiments were conducted in an anaerobic environment. We found that strongly reducing conditions can be created in peat even at the presence of nitrate. Thus we can conclude that the minerotrophic peat with its high iron and sulfur concentrations also enables autotrophic denitrification oxidizing iron and sulfur. While the conditions are favorable to re-reduce iron and sulfur,thus an electron shuttling system developed transporting electrons from the organic material as initial e- donor to nitrate as terminal e- acceptor.

  14. Perchlorate and Nitrate Remediation Efficiency and Microbial Diversity in a Containerized Wetland Bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jr., B D; Dibley, V; Pinkart, H; Legler, T

    2004-06-09

    We have developed a method to remove perchlorate (14 to 27 {micro}g/L) and nitrate (48 mg/L) from contaminated groundwater using a wetland bioreactor. The bioreactor has operated continuously in a remote field location for more than two years with a stable ecosystem of indigenous organisms. This study assesses the bioreactor for long-term perchlorate and nitrate remediation by evaluating influent and effluent groundwater for reduction-oxidation conditions and nitrate and perchlorate concentrations. Total community DNA was extracted and purified from 10-g sediment samples retrieved from vertical coring of the bioreactor during winter. Analysis by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of short, 16S rDNA, polymerase-chain-reaction products was used to identify dominant microorganisms. Bacteria genera identified were closely affiliated with bacteria widely distributed in soils, mud layers, and fresh water. Of the 17 dominant bands sequenced, most were gram negative and capable of aerobic or anaerobic respiration with nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor (Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Halomonas, and Nitrospira). Several identified genera (Rhizobium, Acinetobactor, and Xanthomonas) are capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen into a combined form (ammonia) usable by host plants. Isolates were identified from the Proteobacteria class, known for the ability to reduce perchlorate. Initial bacterial assessments of sediments confirm the prevalence of facultative anaerobic bacteria capable of reducing perchlorate and nitrate in situ.

  15. Free Carrier Generation in Organic Photovoltaic Bulk Heterojunctions of Conjugated Polymers with Molecular Acceptors: Planar versus Spherical Acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nardes, Alexandre M.; Ferguson, Andrew J.; Wolfer, Pascal; Gui, Kurt; Burn, Paul L.; Meredith, Paul; Kopidakis, Nikos

    2014-03-05

    We present a comparative study of the photophysical performance of the prototypical fullerene derivative PC61BM with a planar small-molecule acceptor in an organic photovoltaic device. The small-molecule planar acceptor is 2-[{7-(9,9-di-n-propyl-9H-fluoren-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazol-4-yl}methylene]malononitrile, termed K12. We discuss photoinduced free charge-carrier generation and transport in blends of PC61BM or K12 with poly(3-n-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), surveying literature results for P3HT:PC61BM and presenting new results on P3HT:K12. For both systems we also review previous work on film structure and correlate the structural and photophysical results. In both cases, a disordered mixed phase is formed between P3HT and the acceptor, although the photophysical properties of this mixed phase differ markedly for PC61BM and K12. In the case of PC61BM the mixed phase acts as a free carrier generation region that can efficiently shuttle carriers to the pure polymer and fullerene domains. As a result, the vast majority of excitons quenched in P3HT:PC61BM blends yield free carriers detected by the contactless time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) method. In contrast, approximately 85 % of the excitons quenched in P3HT:K12 do not result in free carriers over the nanosecond timescale of the TRMC experiment. We attribute this to poor electron-transport properties in the mixed P3HT:K12 phase. Here, we propose that the observed differences can be traced to the respective shapes of PC61BM and K12: the three-dimensional nature of the fullerene cage facilitates coupling between PC61BM molecules irrespective of their relative orientation, whereas for K12 strong electronic coupling is only expected for molecules oriented with their π systems parallel to each other. Comparison between the eutectic compositions of the P3HT:PC61BM and P3HT:K12 shows that the former contains enough fullerene to form a percolation pathway for electrons, whereas the latter contains a sub

  16. Income-generating activities for family planning acceptors.

    PubMed

    1989-07-01

    The Income Generating Activities program for Family Planning Acceptors was introduced in Indonesia in 1979. Capital input by the Indonesian National Family Planning Coordination Board and the UN Fund for Population Activities was used to set up small businesses by family planning acceptors. In 2 years, when the businesses become self-sufficient, the loans are repaid, and the money is used to set up new family planning acceptors in business. The program strengthens family planning acceptance, improves the status of women, and enhances community self-reliance. The increase in household income generated by the program raises the standards of child nutrition, encourages reliance on the survival of children, and decreases the value of large families. Approximately 18,000 Family Planning-Income Generating Activities groups are now functioning all over Indonesia, with financial assistance from the central and local governments, the World Bank, the US Agency for International Development, the UN Population Fund, the Government of the Netherlands, and the Government of Australia through the Association of South East Asian Nations.

  17. Design directed self-assembly of donor-acceptor polymers.

    PubMed

    Marszalek, Tomasz; Li, Mengmeng; Pisula, Wojciech

    2016-09-21

    Donor-acceptor polymers with an alternating array of donor and acceptor moieties have gained particular attention during recent years as active components of organic electronics. By implementation of suitable subunits within the conjugated backbone, these polymers can be made either electron-deficient or -rich. Additionally, their band gap and light absorption can be precisely tuned for improved light-harvesting in solar cells. On the other hand, the polymer design can also be modified to encode the desired supramolecular self-assembly in the solid-state that is essential for an unhindered transport of charge carriers. This review focuses on three major factors playing a role in the assembly of donor-acceptor polymers on surfaces which are (1) nature, geometry and substitution position of solubilizing alkyl side chains, (2) shape of the conjugated polymer defined by the backbone curvature, and (3) molecular weight which determines the conjugation length of the polymer. These factors adjust the fine balance between attractive and repulsive forces and ensure a close polymer packing important for an efficient charge hopping between neighboring chains. On the microscopic scale, an appropriate domain formation with a low density of structural defects in the solution deposited thin film is crucial for the charge transport. The charge carrier transport through such thin films is characterized by field-effect transistors as basic electronic elements.

  18. Quantum dots as FRET acceptors for highly sensitive multiplexing immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissler, Daniel; Hildebrandt, Niko; Charbonnière, Loïc J.; Ziessel, Raymond F.; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd

    2009-02-01

    Homogeneous immunoassays have the benefit that they do not require any time-consuming separation steps. FRET is one of the most sensitive homogeneous methods used for immunoassays. Due to their extremely strong absorption over a broad wavelength range the use of quantum dots as FRET acceptors allows for large Foerster radii, an important advantage for assays in the 5 to 10 nm distance range. Moreover, because of their size-tunable emission, quantum dots of different sizes can be used with a single donor for the detection of different analytes (multiplexing). As the use of organic dyes with short fluorescence decay times as donors is known to be inefficient with quantum dot acceptors, lanthanide complexes with long luminescence decays are very efficient alternatives. In this contribution we present the application of commercially available biocompatible CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots as multiplexing FRET acceptors together with a single terbium complex as donor in a homogeneous immunoassay system. Foerster radii of 10 nm and FRET efficiencies of 75 % are demonstrated. The high sensitivity of the terbium-toquantum dot FRET assay is shown by sub-100-femtomolar detection limits for two different quantum dots (emitting at 605 and 655 nm) within the same biotin-streptavidin assay. Direct comparison to the FRET immunoassay "gold standard" (FRET from Eu-TBP to APC) yields a three orders of magnitude sensitivity improvement, demonstrating the big advantages of quantum dots not only for multiplexing but also for highly sensitive nanoscale analysis.

  19. Fullerene derivatives as electron acceptors for organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Mi, Dongbo; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Hee Un; Xu, Fei; Hwang, Do-Hoon

    2014-02-01

    Energy is currently one of the most important problems humankind faces. Depletion of traditional energy sources such as coal and oil results in the need to develop new ways to create, transport, and store electricity. In this regard, the sun, which can be considered as a giant nuclear fusion reactor, represents the most powerful source of energy available in our solar system. For photovoltaic cells to gain widespread acceptance as a source of clean and renewable energy, the cost per watt of solar energy must be decreased. Organic photovoltaic cells, developed in the past two decades, have potential as alternatives to traditional inorganic semiconductor photovoltaic cells, which suffer from high environmental pollution and energy consumption during production. Organic photovoltaic cells are composed of a blended film of a conjugated-polymer donor and a soluble fullerene-derivative acceptor sandwiched between a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)-coated indium tin oxide positive electrode and a low-work-function metal negative electrode. Considerable research efforts aim at designing and synthesizing novel fullerene derivatives as electron acceptors with up-raised lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy, better light-harvesting properties, higher electron mobility, and better miscibility with the polymer donor for improving the power conversion efficiency of the organic photovoltaic cells. In this paper, we systematically review novel fullerene acceptors synthesized through chemical modification for enhancing the photovoltaic performance by increasing open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current, and fill factor, which determine the performance of organic photovoltaic cells.

  20. Donor acceptor electronic couplings in π-stacks: How many states must be accounted for?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voityuk, Alexander A.

    2006-04-01

    Two-state model is commonly used to estimate the donor-acceptor electronic coupling Vda for electron transfer. However, in some important cases, e.g. for DNA π-stacks, this scheme fails to provide accurate values of Vda because of multistate effects. The Generalized Mulliken-Hush method enables a multistate treatment of Vda. In this Letter, we analyze the dependence of calculated electronic couplings on the number of the adiabatic states included in the model. We suggest a simple scheme to determine this number. The superexchange correction of the two-state approximation is shown to provide good estimates of the electronic coupling.

  1. New Stable Isotopic Techniques of Nitrate Applied to Investigation of Estuarine Nitrate Sources in Elkhorn Slough, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wankel, S. D.; Paytan, A.; Kendall, C.

    2003-12-01

    Elkhorn Slough is a tidally flushed estuary with exceptionally high amounts of N loading within the watershed. The main sources of N are thought to be in the form of nitrate from surface water runoff, agricultural fields, dairy farms, and urban runoff. More poorly quantified sources of nitrate may also include significant groundwater discharge as well as tidal inputs from Monterey Bay. Traditional studies, involving natural abundance stable isotopes within the N cycle, have been limited to δ 15N and thus to a 'one-dimensional' perspective on N cycling. The use of a multiple isotope (δ 15N and δ 18O) model allows disentanglement of superimposed transformation processes. Furthermore, a dual isotope approach permits a more discrete characterization of these sources, with the goal of estimating their roles in the N budget of Elkhorn Slough. The isotopic values of nitrate from transects, conducted in the main channel of the slough during both flood and ebb tides, suggest mixing of a marine end member (δ 15N = +11.6%; δ 18O = +10%) with several other nitrate sources having discernable isotopic compositions. The Moss Landing Harbor, near the mouth of Elkhorn Slough, has very high nitrate concentrations (>200uM) and is likely a significant source of nitrate to the slough (δ 15N = +15.4%; δ 18O = +9.9%). With each rising tide, there is a distinct tidal bore from Monterey Bay also delivering nitrate (approx. 30uM) of a unique nitrate isotopic composition (δ 15N = +5.3%; δ 18O = +9.9%). During certain sample collections, nitrate from the head of the slough, with an isotopic composition of +5.2% (δ 15N ) and +22.0% (δ 18O), is suggestive of nitrification (δ 15N = +5.2%; δ 18O = +22.3%). Each of these estuarine members reflects both the composition of the original source of nitrate within the sub-watershed as well as the degree of transformation of these sources. The δ 18O value for marine nitrate in this system is markedly higher than has been reported in open

  2. EXAFS study of dopant ions with different charges in nanocrystalline anatase: evidence for space-charge segregation of acceptor ions.

    PubMed

    Knauth, Philippe; Chadwick, Alan V; Lippens, Pierre E; Auer, Gerhard

    2009-06-02

    Nanocrystalline TiO(2) (anatase) is an essential oxide for environment and energy applications. A combination of EXAFS spectroscopy and DFT calculations on a series of dopants with quite similar ion radius, but increasing ion charge, show boundary space charge segregation of acceptor cations. The picture illustrates the Fourier-transformed EXAFS spectrum for Sn(4+)-doped TiO(2).A series of dopants, including acceptor ions (Zn(2+), Y(3+)), isovalent ions (Zr(4+), Sn(4+)) as well as a donor ion (Nb(5+)), were studied by EXAFS spectroscopy in nanocrystalline TiO(2) anatase powders and nanoceramics. Similar results were found for nanocrystalline powders and nanocrystalline ceramics, made by hot-pressing the powders. Boundary segregation was observed for the acceptor ions yttrium and zinc, whereas tin, zirconium and niobium ions were placed on substitutional bulk sites and did not segregate, whatever their concentration. These results can be interpreted based on defect thermodynamics, in the framework of a space charge segregation model with positive boundary core, due to excess oxide ion vacancies, and negative space charge regions, where ionized acceptors are segregated.

  3. Spectrophotometric study of the charge-transfer and ion-pair complexation of methamphetamine with some acceptors.

    PubMed

    Shahdousti, Parvin; Aghamohammadi, Mohammad; Alizadeh, Naader

    2008-04-01

    The charge-transfer (CT) complexes of methamphetamine (MPA) as a n-donor with several acceptors including bromocresolgreen (BCG), bromocresolpurple (BCP), chlorophenolred (CPR), picric acid (PIC), and 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ) have been studied spectrophotometrically in chloroform solutions in order to obtain some information about their stoichiometry and stability of complexation. The oscillator strengths, transition dipole moments and resonance energy of the complex in the ground state for all complexes have been calculated. Vertical ionization potential of MPA and electron affinity of acceptors were determined by ab initio calculation. The acceptors were also used to utilize a simple and sensitive extraction-spectrophotometric method for the determination of MPA. The method is based on the formation of 1:1 ion-pair association complexes of MPA with BCG, BCP and PIC in chloroform medium. Beer's plots were obeyed in a general concentration range of 0.24-22 microg ml(-1) for the investigated drug with different acceptors. The proposed methods were applied successfully for the determination of MAP in pure and abuse drug with good accuracy and precision.

  4. Spectrophotometric study of the charge-transfer and ion-pair complexation of methamphetamine with some acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahdousti, Parvin; Aghamohammadi, Mohammad; Alizadeh, Naader

    2008-04-01

    The charge-transfer (CT) complexes of methamphetamine (MPA) as a n-donor with several acceptors including bromocresolgreen (BCG), bromocresolpurple (BCP), chlorophenolred (CPR), picric acid (PIC), and 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ) have been studied spectrophotometrically in chloroform solutions in order to obtain some information about their stoichiometry and stability of complexation. The oscillator strengths, transition dipole moments and resonance energy of the complex in the ground state for all complexes have been calculated. Vertical ionization potential of MPA and electron affinity of acceptors were determined by ab initio calculation. The acceptors were also used to utilize a simple and sensitive extraction-spectrophotometric method for the determination of MPA. The method is based on the formation of 1:1 ion-pair association complexes of MPA with BCG, BCP and PIC in chloroform medium. Beer's plots were obeyed in a general concentration range of 0.24-22 μg ml -1 for the investigated drug with different acceptors. The proposed methods were applied successfully for the determination of MAP in pure and abuse drug with good accuracy and precision.

  5. Nitrate transport is independent of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases in barley seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, R. L.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) has NADH-specific and NAD(P)H-bispecific nitrate reductase isozymes. Four isogenic lines with different nitrate reductase isozyme combinations were used to determine the role of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases on nitrate transport and assimilation in barley seedlings. Both nitrate reductase isozymes were induced by nitrate and were required for maximum nitrate assimilation in barley seedlings. Genotypes lacking the NADH isozyme (Az12) or the NAD(P)H isozyme (Az70) assimilated 65 or 85%, respectively, as much nitrate as the wild type. Nitrate assimilation by genotype (Az12;Az70) which is deficient in both nitrate reductases, was only 13% of the wild type indicating that the NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductase isozymes are responsible for most of the nitrate reduction in barley seedlings. For all genotypes, nitrate assimilation rates in the dark were about 55% of the rates in light. Hypotheses that nitrate reductase has direct or indirect roles in nitrate uptake were not supported by this study. Induction of nitrate transporters and the kinetics of net nitrate uptake were the same for all four genotypes indicating that neither nitrate reductase isozyme has a direct role in nitrate uptake in barley seedlings.

  6. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopes of Low-Level Nitrate in Groundwater For Environmental Forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.

    2009-05-01

    Sources of nitrate in water from human activities include fertilizers, animal feedlots, septic systems, wastewater treatment lagoons, animal wastes, industrial wastes and food processing wastes. Nitrogen and Oxygen isotopic analysis of nitrate in groundwater is essential to source identification and environmental forensics as nitrate from different sources carry distinctly different N and O isotopic compositions. Nitrate is extracted from groundwater samples and converted into AgNO3 using ion exchange techniques. The purified AgNO3 is then broken down into N2 and CO for N and O isotopic measurement. Since nitrate concentrations in natural ground waters are usually less than 2 mg/L, however, such method has been limited by minimum sample size it requires, in liters, which is highly nitrate concentration dependent. Here we report a TurboVap- Denitrifier method for N and O isotopic measurement of low-level dissolved nitrate, based on sample evaporation and isotopic analysis of nitrous oxide generated from nitrate by denitrifying bacteria that lack N2O- reductase activity. For most groundwater samples with mg/L-level of nitrate direct injection of water samples in mLs is applied. The volume of sample is adjusted according to its nitrate concentration to achieve a final sample size optimal for the system. For water samples with ug/L-level of nitrate, nitrate is highly concentrated using a TurboVap evaporator, followed by isotopic measurement with Denitrifier method. Benefits of TurboVap- Denitrifier method include high sensitivity and better precision in both isotopic data. This method applies to both freshwater and seawater. The analyses of isotopic reference materials in nitrate-free de-ionized water and seawater are included as method controls to correct for any blank effects. The isotopic data from groundwater and ocean profiles demonstrate the consistency of the data produced by the TurboVap-Denitrifier method.

  7. Reduction of nitrate in Shewanella

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Yang, Zamin Koo; Barua, Sumitra; Reed, SB; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrikson, JK; Tiedje, James; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-01-01

    In the genome of Shewanella oneidensis, a napDAGHB gene cluster encoding periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) and accessory proteins and an nrfA gene encoding periplasmic nitrite reductase (NrfA) have been identified. These two systems seem to be atypical because the genome lacks genes encoding cytoplasmic membrane electron transport proteins, NapC for NAP and NrfBCD/NrfH for NRF, respectively. Here, we present evidence that reduction of nitrate to ammonium in S. oneidensis is carried out by these atypical systems in a two-step manner. Transcriptional and mutational analyses suggest that CymA, a cytoplasmic membrane electron transport protein, is likely to be the functional replacement of both NapC and NrfH in S. oneidensis. Surprisingly, a strain devoid of napB encoding the small subunit of nitrate reductase exhibited the maximum cell density sooner than the wild type. Further characterization of this strain showed that nitrite was not detected as a free intermediate in its culture and NapB provides a fitness gain for S. oneidensis to compete for nitrate in the environments. On the basis results from mutational analyses of napA, napB, nrfA and napBnrfA in-frame deletion mutants, we propose that NapB is able to favor nitrate reduction by routing electrons to NapA exclusively.

  8. Thermophilic nitrate-reducing microorganisms prevent sulfate reduction in cold marine sediments incubated at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepomnyashchaya, Yana; Rezende, Julia; Hubert, Casey

    2014-05-01

    Hydrogen sulphide produced during metabolism of sulphate-reducing microorganisms (SRM) is toxic, corrosive and causes detrimental oil reservoir souring. During secondary oil recovery, injecting oil reservoirs with seawater that is rich in sulphate and that also cools high temperature formations provides favourable growth conditions for SRM. Nitrate addition can prevent metabolism of SRM by stimulating nitrate-reducing microorganisms (NRM). The investigations of thermophilic NRM are needed to develop mechanisms to control the metabolism of SRM in high temperature oil field ecosystems. We therefore established a model system consisting of enrichment cultures of cold surface marine sediments from the Baltic Sea (Aarhus Bay) that were incubated at 60°C. Enrichments contained 25 mM nitrate and 40 mM sulphate as potential electron acceptors, and a mixture of the organic substrates acetate, lactate, propionate, butyrate (5 mM each) and yeast extract (0.01%) as potential carbon sources and electron donors. Slurries were incubated at 60°C both with and without initial pasteurization at 80°C for 2 hours. In the enrichments containing both nitrate and sulphate, the concentration of nitrate decreased indicating metabolic activity of NRM. After a four-hour lag phase the rate of nitrate reduction increased and the concentration of nitrate dropped to zero after 10 hours of incubation. The concentration of nitrite increased as the reduction of nitrate progressed and reached 16.3 mM after 12 hours, before being consumed and falling to 4.4 mM after 19-day of incubation. No evidence for sulphate reduction was observed in these cultures during the 19-day incubation period. In contrast, the concentration of sulphate decreased up to 50% after one week incubation in controls containing only sulphate but no nitrate. Similar sulfate reduction rates were seen in the pasteurized controls suggesting the presence of heat resistant SRM, whereas nitrate reduction rates were lower in the

  9. Insights on Alterations to the Rumen Ecosystem by Nitrate and Nitrocompounds

    PubMed Central

    Latham, Elizabeth A.; Anderson, Robin C.; Pinchak, William E.; Nisbet, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate and certain short chain nitrocompounds and nitro-oxy compounds are being investigated as dietary supplements to reduce economic and environmental costs associated with ruminal methane emissions. Thermodynamically, nitrate is a preferred electron acceptor in the rumen that consumes electrons at the expense of methanogenesis during dissimilatory reduction to an intermediate, nitrite, which is primarily reduced to ammonia although small quantities of nitrous oxide may also be produced. Short chain nitrocompounds act as direct inhibitors of methanogenic bacteria although certain of these compounds may also consume electrons at the expense of methanogenesis and are effective inhibitors of important foodborne pathogens. Microbial and nutritional consequences of incorporating nitrate into ruminant diets typically results in increased acetate production. Unlike most other methane-inhibiting supplements, nitrate decreases or has no effect on propionate production. The type of nitrate salt added influences rates of nitrate reduction, rates of nitrite accumulation and efficacy of methane reduction, with sodium and potassium salts being more potent than calcium nitrate salts. Digestive consequences of adding nitrocompounds to ruminant diets are more variable and may in some cases increase propionate production. Concerns about the toxicity of nitrate's intermediate product, nitrite, to ruminants necessitate management, as animal poisoning may occur via methemoglobinemia. Certain of the naturally occurring nitrocompounds, such as 3-nitro-1-propionate or 3-nitro-1-propanol also cause poisoning but via inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase. Typical risk management procedures to avoid nitrite toxicity involve gradually adapting the animals to higher concentrations of nitrate and nitrite, which could possibly be used with the nitrocompounds as well. A number of organisms responsible for nitrate metabolism in the rumen have been characterized. To date a single rumen bacterium

  10. Concurrent microbial reduction of high concentrations of nitrate and perchlorate in an ion exchange membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Fox, Shalom; Bruner, Tali; Oren, Yoram; Gilron, Jack; Ronen, Zeev

    2016-09-01

    acceptors. Such a mechanism has important implications for controlling the bio-reduction reaction in the IEMB when using glycerol as a carbon source and allowing treating a complex contamination of high concentrations of perchlorate and nitrating in groundwater and successfully biodegrading them to non-hazardous components. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1881-1891. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Nitrate-Mediated Microbially Enhanced Oil Recovery (N-MEOR) from model upflow bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Gassara, Fatma; Suri, Navreet; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2017-02-15

    Microbially Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) can enhance oil production with less energy input and less costs than other technologies. The present study used different aqueous electron donors (acetate, glucose, molasses) and an aqueous electron acceptor (nitrate) to stimulate growth of heterotrophic nitrate reducing bacteria (hNRB) to improve production of oil. Initial flooding of columns containing heavy oil (viscosity of 3400cP at 20°C) with CSBK (Coleville synthetic brine medium) produced 0.5 pore volume (PV) of oil. Bioreactors were then inoculated with hNRB with 5.8g/L of molasses and 0, 10, 20, 40, 60 or 80mM nitrate, as well as with 17mM glucose or 57mM acetate and 80mM nitrate. During incubations no oil was produced in the bioreactors that received 5.8g/L of molasses and 0, 10, 20, 40 or 60mM nitrate. However, the bioreactors injected with 5.8g/L of molasses, 17mM glucose or 57mM acetate and 80mM nitrate produced 13.9, 11.3±3.1 and 17.8±6.6% of residual oil, respectively. The significant production of oil from these bioreactors may be caused by N2-CO2 gas production. Following continued injection with CSBK without nitrate, subsequent elution of significant residual oil (5-30%) was observed. These results also indicate possible involvement of fermentation products (organic acids, alcohols) to enhance heavy oil recovery.

  12. Intermittent Nitrate Use and Risk of Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Devyani; Peloquin, Christine; Kiel, Douglas P.; Neogi, Tuhina; Lu, Na; Zhang, Yuqing

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Nitrates, commonly used anti-anginal medications, also have beneficial effect on bone remodeling and bone density, particularly with intermittent use. However, their effect on fracture risk is not clear. We examined the relation of short-acting nitrate use (proxy for intermittent use) to the risk of hip fracture in a large cohort of older adults with ischemic heart disease. Materials and Methods Participants ≥ 60 years old with ischemic heart disease and without history of hip fracture from The Health Improvement Network (THIN), an electronic medical records database in the UK, were included. The association of incident (new) use of short-acting nitrate formulations (nitroglycerin sublingual/spray/ointment or ISDN injection/sprays) with incident (new-onset) hip fracture risk was examined by plotting Kaplan-Maier curves and calculating Hazard ratios (HR) using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Competing risk by death was analyzed in separate analyses. Results Among 14, 451 pairs of matched nitrate users and non-users (mean age 72±7.6, 41% women for each cohort), 573 fractures occurred during follow up (257 nitrate users; 316 non-users). Hip fracture risk was 33% lower among short-acting nitrate users compared with non-users (HR=0.67, 95% CI 0.53–0.85, p=0.0008). Competing risk analysis by death did not change effect estimates. Conclusion In this large population-based cohort of older adults with ischemic heart disease, we found significant reduction in hip fracture risk with use of short-acting nitrates (intermittent use). Future studies are warranted given the potential for nitrates to be potent, inexpensive and readily available anti-osteoporotic agents. PMID:27720852

  13. Real-time continuous nitrate monitoring in Illinois in 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, Kelly L.; Terrio, Paul J.; Straub, Timothy D.; Roseboom, Donald; Johnson, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    Many sources contribute to the nitrogen found in surface water in Illinois. Illinois is located in the most productive agricultural area in the country, and nitrogen fertilizer is commonly used to maximize corn production in this area. Additionally, septic/wastewater systems, industrial emissions, and lawn fertilizer are common sources of nitrogen in urban areas of Illinois. In agricultural areas, the use of fertilizer has increased grain production to meet the needs of a growing population, but also has resulted in increases in nitrogen concentrations in many streams and aquifers (Dubrovsky and others, 2010). The urban sources can increase nitrogen concentrations, too. The Federal limit for nitrate nitrogen in water that is safe to drink is 10 milligrams per liter (mg/L) (http://water.epa.gov/drink/contaminants/basicinformation/nitrate.cfm, accessed on May 24, 2013). In addition to the concern with nitrate nitrogen in drinking water, nitrogen, along with phosphorus, is an aquatic concern because it feeds the intensive growth of algae that are responsible for the hypoxic zone in the Gulf of Mexico. The largest nitrogen flux to the waters feeding the Gulf of Mexico is from Illinois (Alexander and others, 2008). Most studies of nitrogen in surface water and groundwater include samples for nitrate nitrogen collected weekly or monthly, but nitrate concentrations can change rapidly and these discrete samples may not capture rapid changes in nitrate concentrations that can affect human and aquatic health. Continuous monitoring for nitrate could inform scientists and water-resource managers of these changes and provide information on the transport of nitrate in surface water and groundwater.

  14. REMEDIATION OF NITRATE-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER USING A BIOBARRIER

    SciTech Connect

    B. STRIETELMEIR; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    A biobarrier system has been developed for use in remediating shallow alluvial groundwater. This barrier is made from highly porous materials that are relatively long-lasting, carbon-based (to supply a limiting nutrient in nitrate destruction, in most cases), and extremely inexpensive and easy to emplace. In a series of laboratory studies, we have determined the effectiveness of this barrier at destroying nitrate and perchlorate in groundwater from Mortandad Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This groundwater was obtained from a monitoring well, MCO-5, which is located in the flowpath of the discharge waters from the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF). Water with elevated nitrate levels has been discharged from this plant for many years, until recently when the nitrate levels have been brought under the discharge limits. However, the historical discharge has resulted in a nitrate plume in the alluvial groundwater in this canyon. The LANL Multi-Barrier project was initiated this past year to develop a system of barriers that would prevent the transport of radionuclides, metals, colloids and other contaminants, including nitrate and perchlorate, further down the canyon in order to protect populations down-gradient. The biobarrier. will be part of this Multi-Barrier system. We have demonstrated the destruction of nitrate at levels up to 6.5-9.7 mhl nitrate (400-600 mg/L), and that of perchlorate at levels of about 4.3 {micro}M perchlorate (350 ppb). We have quantified the populations of microorganisms present in the biofilm that develops on the biobarrier. The results of this research will be discussed along with other potential applications of this system.

  15. Occurrence of nitrate in Tanzanian groundwater aquifers: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elisante, Eliapenda; Muzuka, Alfred N. N.

    2015-03-01

    More than 25 % of Tanzanian depends on groundwater as the main source of water for drinking, irrigation and industrial activities. The current trend of land use may lead to groundwater contamination and thus increasing risks associated with the usage of contaminated water. Nitrate is one of the contaminants resulting largely from anthropogenic activities that may find its way to the aquifers and thus threatening the quality of groundwater. Elevated levels of nitrate in groundwater may lead to human health and environmental problems. The current trend of land use in Tanzania associated with high population growth, poor sanitation facilities and fertilizer usage may lead to nitrate contamination of groundwater. This paper therefore aimed at providing an overview of to what extent human activities have altered the concentration of nitrate in groundwater aquifers in Tanzania. The concentration of nitrate in Tanzanian groundwater is variable with highest values observable in Dar es Salaam (up to 477.6 mg/l), Dodoma (up to 441.1 mg/l), Tanga (above 100 mg/l) and Manyara (180 mg/l). Such high values can be attributed to various human activities including onsite sanitation in urban centres and agricultural activities in rural areas. Furthermore, there are some signs of increasing concentration of nitrate in groundwater with time in some areas in response to increased human activities. However, reports on levels and trends of nitrate in groundwater in many regions of the country are lacking. For Tanzania to appropriately address the issue of groundwater contamination, a deliberate move to determine nitrate concentration in groundwater is required, as well as protection of recharge basins and improvement of onsite sanitation systems.

  16. REMEDIATION OF NITRATE-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER USING A BIOBARRIER

    SciTech Connect

    B. STRIETELMEIER; M. ESPINOSA

    2001-01-01

    A biobarrier system has been developed for use in remediating shallow alluvial groundwater. This barrier is made from highly porous materials that are relatively long-lasting, carbon-based (to supply a limiting nutrient in nitrate destruction, in most cases), extremely inexpensive, and easy to replace. In a series of laboratory studies, we have determined the effectiveness of this barrier at destroying nitrate and perchlorate in groundwater from Mortandad Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This groundwater was obtained from a monitoring well, MCO-5, which is located in the flowpath of the discharge waters from the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF). Water with elevated nitrate levels was discharged from this plant for many years. Recently, the nitrate levels have been brought under the discharge limits. However, the historical discharge has resulted in a nitrate plume in the alluvial groundwater in this canyon. The LANL Multi-Barrier project was initiated in 1999 to develop a system of barriers that would prevent the transport of radionuclides, metals, colloids and other contaminants, including nitrate and perchlorate, further down the canyon in order to protect populations down-gradient. The biobarrier will be part of this Multi-Barrier system. We have demonstrated the destruction of nitrate at levels up to 6.5-9.7 mM nitrate (400-600 mg/L), and that of perchlorate at levels of about 4.3 {micro}M perchlorate (350 ppb). We have quantified the populations of microorganisms present in the biofilm that develops on the biobarrier. The results of this research will be discussed along with other potential applications of this system.

  17. Tidal pumping facilitates dissimilatory nitrate reduction in intertidal marshes

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yanling; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Liu, Zhanfei; Li, Xiaofei; Lin, Xianbiao; Yin, Guoyu; Gao, Juan; Yu, Chendi; Wang, Rong; Jiang, Xiaofen

    2016-01-01

    Intertidal marshes are alternately exposed and submerged due to periodic ebb and flood tides. The tidal cycle is important in controlling the biogeochemical processes of these ecosystems. Intertidal sediments are important hotspots of dissimilatory nitrate reduction and interacting nitrogen cycling microorganisms, but the effect of tides on dissimilatory nitrate reduction, including denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium, remains unexplored in these habitats. Here, we use isotope-tracing and molecular approaches simultaneously to show that both nitrate-reduction activities and associated functional bacterial abundances are enhanced at the sediment-tidal water interface and at the tide-induced groundwater fluctuating layer. This pattern suggests that tidal pumping may sustain dissimilatory nitrate reduction in intertidal zones. The tidal effect is supported further by nutrient profiles, fluctuations in nitrogen components over flood-ebb tidal cycles, and tidal simulation experiments. This study demonstrates the importance of tides in regulating the dynamics of dissimilatory nitrate-reducing pathways and thus provides new insights into the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen and other elements in intertidal marshes. PMID:26883983

  18. Electron capture dissociation mass spectrometry of tyrosine nitrated peptides.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew W; Mikhailov, Victor A; Iniesta, Jesus; Cooper, Helen J

    2010-02-01

    In vivo protein nitration is associated with many disease conditions that involve oxidative stress and inflammatory response. The modification involves addition of a nitro group at the position ortho to the phenol group of tyrosine to give 3-nitrotyrosine. To understand the mechanisms and consequences of protein nitration, it is necessary to develop methods for identification of nitrotyrosine-containing proteins and localization of the sites of modification. Here, we have investigated the electron capture dissociation (ECD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) behavior of 3-nitrotyrosine-containing peptides. The presence of nitration did not affect the CID behavior of the peptides. For the doubly-charged peptides, addition of nitration severely inhibited the production of ECD sequence fragments. However, ECD of the triply-charged nitrated peptides resulted in some singly-charged sequence fragments. ECD of the nitrated peptides is characterized by multiple losses of small neutral species including hydroxyl radicals, water and ammonia. The origin of the neutral losses has been investigated by use of activated ion (AI) ECD. Loss of ammonia appears to be the result of non-covalent interactions between the nitro group and protonated lysine side-chains.

  19. Tidal pumping facilitates dissimilatory nitrate reduction in intertidal marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yanling; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Liu, Zhanfei; Li, Xiaofei; Lin, Xianbiao; Yin, Guoyu; Gao, Juan; Yu, Chendi; Wang, Rong; Jiang, Xiaofen

    2016-02-01

    Intertidal marshes are alternately exposed and submerged due to periodic ebb and flood tides. The tidal cycle is important in controlling the biogeochemical processes of these ecosystems. Intertidal sediments are important hotspots of dissimilatory nitrate reduction and interacting nitrogen cycling microorganisms, but the effect of tides on dissimilatory nitrate reduction, including denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium, remains unexplored in these habitats. Here, we use isotope-tracing and molecular approaches simultaneously to show that both nitrate-reduction activities and associated functional bacterial abundances are enhanced at the sediment-tidal water interface and at the tide-induced groundwater fluctuating layer. This pattern suggests that tidal pumping may sustain dissimilatory nitrate reduction in intertidal zones. The tidal effect is supported further by nutrient profiles, fluctuations in nitrogen components over flood-ebb tidal cycles, and tidal simulation experiments. This study demonstrates the importance of tides in regulating the dynamics of dissimilatory nitrate-reducing pathways and thus provides new insights into the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen and other elements in intertidal marshes.

  20. Nitrate removal with lateral flow sulphur autotrophic denitrification reactor.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xiaomei; Shao, Mingfei; Li, Ji; Xie, Chuanbo

    2014-01-01

    An innovative lateral flow sulphur autotrophic denitrification (LFSAD) reactor was developed in this study; the treatment performance was evaluated and compared with traditional sulphur/limestone autotrophic denitrification (SLAD) reactor. Results showed that nitrite accumulation in the LFSAD reactor was less than 1.0 mg/L during the whole operation. Denitrification rate increased with the increased initial alkalinity and was approaching saturation when initial alkalinity exceeded 2.5 times the theoretical value. Higher influent nitrate concentration could facilitate nitrate removal capacity. In addition, denitrification efficiency could be promoted under an appropriate reflux ratio, and the highest nitrate removal percentage was achieved under reflux ratio of 200%, increased by 23.8% than that without reflux. Running resistance was only about 1/9 of that in SLAD reactor with equal amount of nitrate removed, which was the prominent excellence of the new reactor. In short, this study indicated that the developed reactor was feasible for nitrate removal from waters with lower concentrations, including contaminated surface water, groundwater or secondary effluent of municipal wastewater treatment with fairly low running resistance. The innovation in reactor design in this study may bring forth new ideas of reactor development of sulphur autotrophic denitrification for nitrate-contaminated water treatment.

  1. Method for producing and regenerating a synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor

    DOEpatents

    Lancet, M. S.; Curran, G. P.; Gorin, E.

    1982-05-18

    A method is described for producing a synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor by feeding a mixture of finely divided silica and at least one finely divided calcium compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate to a fluidized bed; operating the fluidized bed at suitable conditions to produce pellets of synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor and recovering the pellets of synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor from the fluidized bed. Optionally, spent synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor can be charged to the fluidized bed to produce regenerated pellets of synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor. 1 fig.

  2. Method for producing and regenerating a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor

    DOEpatents

    Lancet, Michael S [Pittsburgh, PA; Curran, George P [Pittsburgh, PA; Gorin, Everett [San Rafael, CA

    1982-01-01

    A method for producing a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor by feeding a mixture of finely divided silica and at least one finely divided calcium compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate to a fluidized bed; operating the fluidized bed at suitable conditions to produce pellets of synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor and recovering the pellets of synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor from the fluidized bed. Optionally, spent synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor can be charged to the fluidized bed to produce regenerated pellets of synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor.

  3. Naphthalenediimide-alt-Fused Thiophene D-A Copolymers for the Application as Acceptor in All-Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Xue, Lingwei; Yang, Yankang; Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Zhang, Jing; Gao, Liang; Bin, Haijun; Yang, YunXu; Li, Yongfang

    2016-10-06

    Three n-type alternating D-A copolymers based on a naphthalenediimide (NDI) acceptor (A) unit and three different donor (D) units with varied electron-donating strength including thiophene (P(NDI-T)), thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (P(NDI-TT)), and thieno[3,2-b;4,5-b]dithiophene (P(NDI-TDT)), were synthesized, for the application as acceptor materials in all-polymer solar cells (all-PSCs). The effect of the donor units of thiophene, thienothiophene (TT) and thienodithiophene (TDT) on the physicochemical and photovoltaic properties of the n-type D-A copolymers was systematically investigated. It was found that the absorption spectrum is red-shifted and the energy band gap (Eg ) is reduced for the NDI-based D-A copolymers with increasing number of thiophene rings in the thiophene or fused thiophene donor units. All-PSCs were fabricated with the medium band gap conjugated polymer J51 (Eg of ca 1.9 eV) as polymer donor and the n-type D-A copolymers as acceptor. The power conversion efficiency reached 2.59 %, 3.70 % and 5.10 % for the all-PSCs with P(NDI-T), P(NDI-TT), and P(NDI-TDT) as acceptor, respectively. The results indicate that a larger conjugated fused molecular plane with more thiophene rings as donor units in the NDI-based D-A copolymers is beneficial to reduce the band gap, broaden the absorption and enhance the photovoltaic performance of n-type D-A copolymer acceptors.

  4. Fragment charge difference method for estimating donor-acceptor electronic coupling: Application to DNA π-stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voityuk, Alexander A.; Rösch, Notker

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this communication is two-fold. We introduce the fragment charge difference (FCD) method to estimate the electron transfer matrix element HDA between a donor D and an acceptor A, and we apply this method to several aspects of hole transfer electronic couplings in π-stacks of DNA, including systems with several donor-acceptor sites. Within the two-state model, our scheme can be simplified to recover a convenient estimate of the electron transfer matrix element HDA=(1-Δq2)1/2(E2-E1)/2 based on the vertical excitation energy E2-E1 and the charge difference Δq between donor and acceptor. For systems with strong charge separation, Δq≳0.95, one should resort to the FCD method. As favorable feature, we demonstrate the stability of the FCD approach for systems which require an approach beyond the two-state model. On the basis of ab initio calculations of various DNA related systems, we compared three approaches for estimating the electronic coupling: the minimum splitting method, the generalized Mulliken-Hush (GMH) scheme, and the FCD approach. We studied the sensitivity of FCD and GMH couplings to the donor-acceptor energy gap and found both schemes to be quite robust; they are applicable also in cases where donor and acceptor states are off resonance. In the application to π-stacks of DNA, we demonstrated for the Watson-Crick pair dimer [(GC),(GC)] how structural changes considerably affect the coupling strength of electron hole transfer. For models of three Watson-Crick pairs, we showed that the two-state model significantly overestimates the hole transfer coupling whereas simultaneous treatment of several states leads to satisfactory results.

  5. Knock-Down of a Tonoplast Localized Low-Affinity Nitrate Transporter OsNPF7.2 Affects Rice Growth under High Nitrate Supply

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rui; Qiu, Diyang; Chen, Yi; Miller, Anthony J.; Fan, Xiaorong; Pan, Xiaoping; Zhang, Mingyong

    2016-01-01

    The large nitrate transporter 1/peptide transporter family (NPF) has been shown to transport diverse substrates, including nitrate, amino acids, peptides, phytohormones, and glucosinolates. However, the rice (Oryza sativa) root-specific family member OsNPF7.2 has not been functionally characterized. Here, our data show that OsNPF7.2 is a tonoplast localized low-affinity nitrate transporter, that affects rice growth under high nitrate supply. Expression analysis showed that OsNPF7.2 was mainly expressed in the elongation and maturation zones of roots, especially in the root sclerenchyma, cortex and stele. It was also induced by high concentrations of nitrate. Subcellular localization analysis showed that OsNPF7.2 was localized on the tonoplast of large and small vacuoles. Heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes suggested that OsNPF7.2 was a low-affinity nitrate transporter. Knock-down of OsNPF7.2 retarded rice growth under high concentrations of nitrate. Therefore, we deduce that OsNPF7.2 plays a role in intracellular allocation of nitrate in roots, and thus influences rice growth under high nitrate supply. PMID:27826301

  6. Nitrate Trends in Minnesota Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wall, Dave; Christopherson, Dave; Lorenz, Dave; Martin, Gary

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess long-term trends (30 to 35 years) of flow-adjusted concentrations of nitrite+nitrate-N (hereinafter referred to as nitrate) in a way that would allow us to discern changing trends. Recognizing that these trends are commonly different from one river to another river and from one part of the state to another, our objective was to examine as many river monitoring sites across the state as possible for which sufficient long term streamflow and concentration data were available.

  7. A review of nitrates in drinking water: maternal exposure and adverse reproductive and developmental outcomes.

    PubMed

    Manassaram, Deana M; Backer, Lorraine C; Moll, Deborah M

    2006-03-01

    In this review we present an update on maternal exposure to nitrates in drinking water in relation to possible adverse reproductive and developmental effects, and also discuss nitrates in drinking water in the United States. The current standard for nitrates in drinking water is based on retrospective studies and approximates a level that protects infants from methemoglobinemia, but no safety factor is built into the standard. The current standard applies only to public water systems. Drinking water source was related to nitrate exposure (i.e., private systems water was more likely than community system water to have nitrate levels above the maximum contaminant limit). Animal studies have found adverse reproductive effects resulting from higher doses of nitrate or nitrite. The epidemiologic evidence of a direct exposure-response relationship between drinking water nitrate level and adverse reproductive effect is still not clear. However, some reports have suggested an association between exposure to nitrates in drinking water and spontaneous abortions, intrauterine growth restriction, and various birth defects. Uncertainties in epidemiologic studies include the lack of individual exposure assessment that would rule out confounding of the exposure with some other cause. Nitrates may be just one of the contaminants in drinking water contributing to adverse outcomes. We conclude that the current literature does not provide sufficient evidence of a causal relationship between exposure to nitrates in drinking water and adverse reproductive effects. Future studies incorporating individual exposure assessment about users of private wells--the population most at risk--should be considered.

  8. A Review of Nitrates in Drinking Water: Maternal Exposure and Adverse Reproductive and Developmental Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Manassaram, Deana M.; Backer, Lorraine C.; Moll, Deborah M.

    2006-01-01

    In this review we present an update on maternal exposure to nitrates in drinking water in relation to possible adverse reproductive and developmental effects, and also discuss nitrates in drinking water in the United States. The current standard for nitrates in drinking water is based on retrospective studies and approximates a level that protects infants from methemoglobinemia, but no safety factor is built into the standard. The current standard applies only to public water systems. Drinking water source was related to nitrate exposure (i.e., private systems water was more likely than community system water to have nitrate levels above the maximum contaminant limit). Animal studies have found adverse reproductive effects resulting from higher doses of nitrate or nitrite. The epidemiologic evidence of a direct exposure–response relationship between drinking water nitrate level and adverse reproductive effect is still not clear. However, some reports have suggested an association between exposure to nitrates in drinking water and spontaneous abortions, intrauterine growth restriction, and various birth defects. Uncertainties in epidemiologic studies include the lack of individual exposure assessment that would rule out confounding of the exposure with some other cause. Nitrates may be just one of the contaminants in drinking water contributing to adverse outcomes. We conclude that the current literature does not provide sufficient evidence of a causal relationship between exposure to nitrates in drinking water and adverse reproductive effects. Future studies incorporating individual exposure assessment about users of private wells—the population most at risk—should be considered. PMID:16507452

  9. Nitrate transport and signalling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Krapp, Anne; David, Laure C; Chardin, Camille; Girin, Thomas; Marmagne, Anne; Leprince, Anne-Sophie; Chaillou, Sylvain; Ferrario-Méry, Sylvie; Meyer, Christian; Daniel-Vedele, Françoise

    2014-03-01

    Plants have developed adaptive responses allowing them to cope with nitrogen (N) fluctuation in the soil and maintain growth despite changes in external N availability. Nitrate is the most important N form in temperate soils. Nitrate uptake by roots and its transport at the whole-plant level involves a large panoply of transporters and impacts plant performance. Four families of nitrate-transporting proteins have been identified so far: nitrate transporter 1/peptide transporter family (NPF), nitrate transporter 2 family (NRT2), the chloride channel family (CLC), and slow anion channel-associated homologues (SLAC/SLAH). Nitrate transporters are also involved in the sensing of nitrate. It is now well established that plants are able to sense external nitrate availability, and hence that nitrate also acts as a signal molecule that regulates many aspects of plant intake, metabolism, and gene expression. This review will focus on a global picture of the nitrate transporters so far identified and the recent advances in the molecular knowledge of the so-called primary nitrate response, the rapid regulation of gene expression in response to nitrate. The recent discovery of the NIN-like proteins as master regulators for nitrate signalling has led to a new understanding of the regulation cascade.

  10. Anaerobic, nitrate-dependent oxidation of pyrite nanoparticles by Thiobacillus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Julian; Lee, Keun-Young; Jordan, Guntram; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2012-02-21

    Pyrite is a key mineral in the global biogeochemical cycles of sulfur and iron, yet its anaerobic microbial oxidation has eluded geochemists and microbiologists for decades. Recent reports indicated that anaerobic oxidation of pyrite is occurring, but the mechanism remains unclear. Here, we provide evidence for the capability of Thiobacillus denitrificans to anaerobically oxidize a putatively nanosized pyrite particle fraction with nitrate as electron acceptor. Nanosized pyrite was readily oxidized to ferric iron and sulfate with a rate of 10.1 μM h(-1). The mass balance of pyrite oxidation and nitrate reduction revealed a closed recovery of the electrons. This substantiates a further "missing lithotrophy" in the global cycles of sulfur and iron and emphasizes the high reactivity of nanominerals in the environment.

  11. Anaerobic taurine oxidation: a novel reaction by a nitrate-reducing Alcaligenes sp.

    PubMed

    Denger, K; Laue, H; Cook, A M

    1997-06-01

    Enrichment cultures were prepared under strictly anoxic conditions in medium representing fresh water and containing an organosulfonate as electron donor and carbon source, and nitrate as electron acceptor. The inoculum was from the anaerobic digestor of two communal sewage works. The natural organosulfonates 2-aminoethanesulfonate (taurine), DL-2-amino-3-sulfopropionate (cysteate) and 2-hydroxyethanesulfonate (isethionate) all gave positive enrichments, whereas unsubstituted alkanesulfonates, such as methanesulfonate and arenesulfonates, gave no enrichment. Two representative enrichments were used to obtain pure cultures, and strains NKNTAU (utilizing taurine) and NKNIS (utilizing isethionate) were isolated. Strain NKNTAU was examined in detail. Out of 18 tested organosulfonates, it utilized only one, taurine, and was identified as a novel Alcaligenes sp., a facultatively anaerobic bacterium. Carbon from taurine was converted to cell material and carbon dioxide. The amino group was released as ammonium ion and the sulfonate moiety was recovered as sulfate. Nitrate was reduced to nitrogen gas.

  12. (Per)Chlorate-Reducing Bacteria Can Utilize Aerobic and Anaerobic Pathways of Aromatic Degradation with (Per)Chlorate as an Electron Acceptor

    PubMed Central

    Carlström, Charlotte I.; Loutey, Dana; Bauer, Stefan; Clark, Iain C.; Rohde, Robert A.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Lucas, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The pathways involved in aromatic compound oxidation under perchlorate and chlorate [collectively known as (per)chlorate]-reducing conditions are poorly understood. Previous studies suggest that these are oxygenase-dependent pathways involving O2 biogenically produced during (per)chlorate respiration. Recently, we described Sedimenticola selenatireducens CUZ and Dechloromarinus chlorophilus NSS, which oxidized phenylacetate and benzoate, two key intermediates in aromatic compound catabolism, coupled to the reduction of perchlorate or chlorate, respectively, and nitrate. While strain CUZ also oxidized benzoate and phenylacetate with oxygen as an electron acceptor, strain NSS oxidized only the latter, even at a very low oxygen concentration (1%, vol/vol). Strains CUZ and NSS contain similar genes for both the anaerobic and aerobic-hybrid pathways of benzoate and phenylacetate degradation; however, the key genes (paaABCD) encoding the epoxidase of the aerobic-hybrid phenylacetate pathway were not found in either genome. By using transcriptomics and proteomics, as well as by monitoring metabolic intermediates, we investigated the utilization of the anaerobic and aerobic-hybrid pathways on different electron acceptors. For strain CUZ, the results indicated utilization of the anaerobic pathways with perchlorate and nitrate as electron acceptors and of the aerobic-hybrid pathways in the presence of oxygen. In contrast, proteomic results suggest that strain NSS may use a combination of the anaerobic and aerobic-hybrid pathways when growing on phenylacetate with chlorate. Though microbial (per)chlorate reduction produces molecular oxygen through the dismutation of chlorite (ClO2−), this study demonstrates that anaerobic pathways for the degradation of aromatics can still be utilized by these novel organisms. PMID:25805732

  13. Investigating nitrate-dependent humic substance oxidation and in-service K-12 teachers' understanding of microbiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Nastassia N.

    2011-12-01

    Humic substances (HS) are the humified portions of totally decomposed soil organic matter that are ubiquitous in nature. Although these substances have been studied for more than 200 years, neither their metabolic capabilities nor a specific chemical structure has yet to be determined. HS have been studied as a carbon source in many environments where they are degraded; however, previous studies have shown that some microorganisms are capable of utilizing humic substances as electron acceptors and electron donors in anaerobic respiration. Even though there have been humic-reducing and humic-oxidizing microorganisms isolated and studied in recent years, the mechanism of humics metabolism and its interaction in the natural environment are not well understood. However, it is known that the continuous change in the redox state of HS is important to the cycling of iron, stability of nitrogen and carbon, and the mobility and bioavailability of inorganic and organic environmental pollutants. In this study, microbial communities were examined to evaluate the community dynamics of nitrate-dependent HS-oxidizing populations and to provide a snapshot of the phylogenetic diversity of these microorganisms. Column studies were performed using nitrate as the sole electron acceptor and the following as the electron donors in different columns: reduced humic acids, oxidized humic acids, and acetate as the control. Liquid buffered media was added to a separate column to serve as an additional control. Polymerase chain reactions of the 16S rRNA genes using DNA from the column studies were performed and analyzed by constructing 16S rDNA clone libraries and by performing denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Clones from the library have been sequenced and analyzed to paint a phylogenetic picture of the microbial community under the various conditions. Results indicate that the majority of the clones were assigned to four well-characterized divisions, the Acidobacteria, the

  14. Effect of dissolved oxygen on elemental sulfur generation in sulfide and nitrate removal process: characterization, pathway, and microbial community analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Tingting; Zhou, Jiti

    2016-03-01

    Microaerobic bioreactor treatment for enriched sulfide and nitrate has been demonstrated as an effective strategy to improve the efficiencies of elemental sulfur (S(0)) generation, sulfide oxidation, and nitrate reduction. However, there is little detailed information for the effect and mechanism of dissolved oxygen (DO) on the variations of microbial community in sulfur generation, sulfide oxidation, and nitrate reduction systems. Polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) was employed to evaluate the variations of microbial community structures in a sulfide oxidation and nitrate reduction reactor under different DO conditions (DO 0-0.7 mg · L(-1)). Experimental results revealed that the activity of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) and nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) could be greatly stimulated in 0.1-0.3 mg-DO · L(-1). However, when the DO concentration was further elevated to more than 0.5 mg · L(-1), the abundance of NRB was markedly decreased, while the heterotrophic microorganisms, especially carbon degradation species, were enriched. The reaction pathways for sulfide and nitrate removal under microaerobic conditions were also deduced by combining batch experiments with functional species analysis. It was likely that the oxidation of sulfide to sulfur could be performed by both aerobic heterotrophic SOB and sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification bacteria with oxygen and nitrate as terminal electron acceptor, respectively. The nitrate could be reduced to nitrite by both autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification, and then the generated nitrite could be completely converted to nitrogen gas via heterotrophic denitrification. This study provides new insights into the impacts of microaerobic conditions on the microbial community functional structures of sulfide-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing, and sulfur-producing bioreactors, which revealing the potential linkage between functional microbial communities and

  15. Chemopreventive Agents from Physalis minima Function as Michael Reaction Acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Men, Ruizhi; Li, Ning; Ding, Chihong; Tang, Yingzhan; Xing, Yachao; Ding, Wanjing; Ma, Zhongjun

    2016-01-01

    Background: The fruits of some varieties of genus Physalis have been used as delicious fruits and functional food in the Northeast of China. Materials and Methods: To reveal the functional material basis, we performed bioactivity-guided phytochemical research and chemopreventive effect assay of the constituents from Physalis minima. Results: It was demonstrated that the ethyl acetate extract of P. minima L. (EEPM) had potential quinone reductase (QR) inducing activity with induction ratio (IR, QR induction activity) value of 1.47 ± 0.24, and glutathione binding property as potential Michael reaction acceptors (with an α, β-unsaturated ketone moiety). Furthermore, bioactivity-guided phytochemical research led eight compounds (1–8), which were elucidated as 3-isopropyl-5-acetoxycyclohexene-2-one-1 (1), isophysalin B (2), physalin G (3), physalin D (4), physalin I (5), physordinose B (6), stigmasterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (7) and 5α-6β-dihydroxyphysalin R (8) on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analyses and HRESIMS. Then, isophysalin B (2) and physordinose B (6) showed significant QR inducing activity with IR value of 2.80 ± 0.19 and 2.38 ± 0.46, respectively. SUMMARY An ultra-performance liquid chromatographic method with glutathione as the substrate was used to detect the Michael reaction acceptors in extracts of Physalis minima (EPM)We investigated the chemical constituents of EPM guided by biological activity methodIsophysalin B (1) and physordinose B (6) showed strong quinone reductase inducing activity with induction ratio values of 2.80 ± 0.19 and 2.38 ± 0.46This study generated useful information for consumers and many encourage researchers to utilize edible fruits from Physalis as a source of phytochemicals Abbreviations used: EPM: Extracts of Physalis minima, EEPM: Ethyl acetate extract of Physalis minima L., GSH: Glutathione, MRAs: Michael reaction acceptors, QR: Quinone reductase. PMID:27279713

  16. Short-term effects of a high nitrate diet on nitrate metabolism in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Bondonno, Catherine P; Liu, Alex H; Croft, Kevin D; Ward, Natalie C; Puddey, Ian B; Woodman, Richard J; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2015-03-12

    Dietary nitrate, through the enterosalivary nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway, can improve blood pressure and arterial stiffness. How long systemic nitrate and nitrite remain elevated following cessation of high nitrate intake is unknown. In 19 healthy men and women, the time for salivary and plasma nitrate and nitrite to return to baseline after 7 days increased nitrate intake from green leafy vegetables was determined. Salivary and plasma nitrate and nitrite was measured at baseline [D0], end of high nitrate diet [D7], day 9 [+2D], day 14 [+7D] and day 21 [+14D]. Urinary nitrite and nitrate was assessed at D7 and +14D. Increased dietary nitrate for 7 days resulted in a more than fourfold increase in saliva and plasma nitrate and nitrite (p < 0.001) measured at [D7]. At [+2D] plasma nitrite and nitrate had returned to baseline while saliva nitrate and nitrite were more than 1.5 times higher than at baseline levels. By [+7D] all metabolites had returned to baseline levels. The pattern of response was similar between men and women. Urinary nitrate and nitrate was sevenfold higher at D7 compared to +14D. These results suggest that daily ingestion of nitrate may be required to maintain the physiological changes associated with high nitrate intake.

  17. Electrospun cellulose nitrate and polycaprolactone blended nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nartker, Steven; Hassan, Mohamed; Stogsdill, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Pure cellulose nitrate (CN) and blends of CN and polycaprolactone were electrospun to form nonwoven mats. Polymers were dissolved in a mixed solvent system of tetrahydrofuran and N,N-dimethylformamide. The concentrations were varied to obtain sub-micron and nanoscale fiber mats. Fiber mats were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, contact angle analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis. The fiber morphology, surface chemistry and contact angle data show that these electrospun materials are suitable for applications including biosensing, biomedical and tissue engineering.

  18. The preservation of long-range transported nitrate in snow at Summit, Greenland (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, M. G.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrate is one of the major anions found in polar and alpine snow, both today and in the past. Deposition of nitrate to snow surfaces results from reactions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) with oxidants in the atmosphere, resulting in the production of HNO3 that is incorporated into precipitation or reacts on the surface of particles. Several factors motivate studying nitrate concentration in ice cores including reconstructing past levels of NOx, tropospheric oxidant concentrations and natural variability in NOx sources. The link between the atmospheric concentration of NOx and nitrate concentration in ice core records is problematic because post-depositional processing, such as photolysis and evaporation, can impact the concentration of nitrate in snow. Recent work has shown that the isotopic ratios of nitrate (15N/14N, 18O/16O, 17O/16O) can be a powerful tool for tracing post-depositional loss of nitrate from surface snow. The isotopic composition of nitrate has been shown to contain information about the source of the nitrate (i.e, NOx sources) and the oxidation processes that convert NOx to nitrate in the atmosphere prior to deposition. Results from a number of studies at Summit, Greenland reveal limited loss of nitrate from surface snow during highly photoactive periods, and the oxygen isotopic signatures in snow nitrate appear to be representative of atmospheric deposition of nitrate from outside of Summit. Higher than expected oxygen isotope ratios (18O/16O, 17O/16O) found in Summit summertime nitrate were expected to be dependent upon local photochemistry in which nitrate in the snow is photolyzed to NOx that is then oxidized above the snow by BrO to reform nitrate (i.e., BrONO2). However, the oxygen isotopic composition of nitrate collected at high time resolution in surface snow does not show any link to local gas phase concentrations of a number of species, including BrO. Furthermore, the combination of nitrogen and oxygen isotope data reveals interesting

  19. Transglucosylation with 6'-chloro-6'-deoxysucrose and immobilized isomaltulose-producing microorganisms using 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxolane-4-methanol and its related compounds as acceptors. Steric and chemical requirement of the glucosyl acceptor.

    PubMed

    Kakinuma, H; Tsuchiya, Y; Tanaka, M; Horito, S; Hashimoto, H

    1994-11-15

    Enantioselective and diastereoselective alpha-D-glucosylation of 2,3-O-isopropylidene-erythritol was observed in transglucosylation with a synthetic donor using three kinds of immobilized isomaltulose-producing microorganisms. Several related compounds, including an 2,3-O-isopropylidenated aldotetrose dimethyl dithioacetal and an aldotetronic acid ester were also glucosylated in moderate or good yield, depending on the microorganism utilized. Steric as well as functional group factors are discussed in relation to the substrate specificity of the glucosyl acceptor.

  20. Respiratory Ammonification of Nitrate Coupled to Anaerobic Oxidation of Elemental Sulfur in Deep-Sea Autotrophic Thermophilic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Slobodkina, Galina B.; Mardanov, Andrey V.; Ravin, Nikolai V.; Frolova, Anastasia A.; Chernyh, Nikolay A.; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A.; Slobodkin, Alexander I.

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory ammonification of nitrate is the microbial process that determines the retention of nitrogen in an ecosystem. To date, sulfur-dependent dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium has been demonstrated only with sulfide as an electron donor. We detected a novel pathway that couples the sulfur and nitrogen cycles. Thermophilic anaerobic bacteria Thermosulfurimonas dismutans and Dissulfuribacter thermophilus, isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents, grew autotrophically with elemental sulfur as an electron donor and nitrate as an electron acceptor producing sulfate and ammonium. The genomes of both bacteria contain a gene cluster that encodes a putative nitrate ammonification enzyme system. Nitrate reduction occurs via a Nap-type complex. The reduction of produced nitrite to ammonium does not proceed via the canonical Nrf system because nitrite reductase NrfA is absent in the genomes of both microorganisms. The genome of D. thermophilus encodes a complete sulfate reduction pathway, while the Sox sulfur oxidation system is missing, as shown previously for T. dismutans. Thus, in high-temperature environments, nitrate ammonification with elemental sulfur may represent an unrecognized route of primary biomass production. Moreover, the anaerobic oxidation of sulfur compounds coupled to growth has not previously been demonstrated for the members of Thermodesulfobacteria or Deltaproteobacteria, which were considered exclusively as participants of the reductive branch of the sulfur cycle. PMID:28194142

  1. Application of nitrate to enhance biodegradation of gasoline components in soil by indigenous microorganisms under anoxic condition.

    PubMed

    Yang, Su-Cai; Song, Yun; Wang, Dong; Wei, Wen-Xia; Yang, Yan; Men, Bin; Li, Jia-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic/anoxic biodegradation of hydrocarbons offers an attractive approach to the removal of these compounds from polluted environments such as aquifers, aquatic sediments, submerged soils and subsurface soils. The application of nitrate was investigated to accelerate the degradation of gasoline components such as mono-aromatic hydrocarbons and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in soil by indigenous microorganisms under anoxic condition. The addition of nitrate had little effect on the degradation of mono-aromatic hydrocarbons m- & p-xylene, o-xylene, sec-butylbenzene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, but facilitated the degradation of TPH (C6-C12) and mono-aromatic hydrocarbons toluene and ethylbenzene markedly. Furthermore, the more nitrate added, the higher the percentage of toluene, ethylbenzene and TPH (C6-C12) degraded after 180 days of anoxic incubation. Microorganisms capable of degrading toluene, ethylbenzene and TPH (C6-C12) with nitrate as the electron acceptor under anaerobic/anoxic condition are composed predominantly of Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma- or Delta-proteobacteria. Beta- and Gamma-proteobacteria were the main components of indigenous microorganisms, and accounted for 83-100% of the total amount of indigenous microorganisms in soil used in this study. Furthermore, the total amount of indigenous microorganisms increased with nitrate added. The addition of nitrate stimulated the growth of indigenous microorganisms, and therefore facilitated the degradation of toluene, ethylbenzene and TPH (C6-C12).

  2. Iron corrosion induced by nonhydrogenotrophic nitrate-reducing Prolixibacter sp. strain MIC1-1.

    PubMed

    Iino, Takao; Ito, Kimio; Wakai, Satoshi; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Ohkuma, Moriya; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2015-03-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of metallic materials imposes a heavy economic burden. The mechanism of MIC of metallic iron (Fe(0)) under anaerobic conditions is usually explained as the consumption of cathodic hydrogen by hydrogenotrophic microorganisms that accelerates anodic Fe(0) oxidation. In this study, we describe Fe(0) corrosion induced by a nonhydrogenotrophic nitrate-reducing bacterium called MIC1-1, which was isolated from a crude-oil sample collected at an oil well in Akita, Japan. This strain requires specific electron donor-acceptor combinations and an organic carbon source to grow. For example, the strain grew anaerobically on nitrate as a sole electron acceptor with pyruvate as a carbon source and Fe(0) as the sole electron donor. In addition, ferrous ion and l-cysteine served as electron donors, whereas molecular hydrogen did not. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain MIC1-1 was a member of the genus Prolixibacter in the order Bacteroidales. Thus, Prolixibacter sp. strain MIC1-1 is the first Fe(0)-corroding representative belonging to the phylum Bacteroidetes. Under anaerobic conditions, Prolixibacter sp. MIC1-1 corroded Fe(0) concomitantly with nitrate reduction, and the amount of iron dissolved by the strain was six times higher than that in an aseptic control. Scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed that microscopic crystals of FePO4 developed on the surface of the Fe(0) foils, and a layer of FeCO3 covered the FePO4 crystals. We propose that cells of Prolixibacter sp. MIC1-1 accept electrons directly from Fe(0) to reduce nitrate.

  3. Biological denitrification of high concentration nitrate waste

    DOEpatents

    Francis, Chester W.; Brinkley, Frank S.

    1977-01-01

    Biological denitrification of nitrate solutions at concentrations of greater than one kilogram nitrate per cubic meter is accomplished anaerobically in an upflow column having as a packing material a support for denitrifying bacteria.

  4. A Novel Chemical Nitrate Destruction Process

    SciTech Connect

    Dziewinski, J.; Marczak, S.

    1999-03-01

    Nitrates represent one of the most significant pollutant discharged to the Baltic Sea by the Sliiamae hydrometallurgical plant. This article contains a brief overview of the existing nitrate destruction technologies followed by the description of a new process developed by the authors. The new chemical process for nitrate destruction is cost effective and simple to operate. It converts the nitrate to nitrogen gas which goes to the atmosphere.

  5. Nitrate removal by nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation in an upflow denitrifying biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Wang, Hongyu; Yang, Kai; Sun, Yuchong; Tian, Jun

    2015-01-01

    A continuous upflow biofilm reactor packed with ceramsite was constructed for nitrate removal under an anaerobic atmosphere without an organic carbon source. Denitrifying bacteria, Pseudomonas sp. W1, Pseudomonas sp. W2 and Microbacterium sp. W5, were added to the bioreactor as inocula. Nitrate concentration, nitrite accumulation and nitrogen removal efficiency in the effluent were investigated under various conditions set by several parameters including pH, hydraulic retention time (HRT), ratios of carbon to nitrogen (C/N) and temperature. The results illustrated that the maximum removal efficiency of nitrogen was 85.39%, under optimum reaction parameters, approximately pH 6.5-7, HRT = 48 hours and C/N = 13.1:1 at temperature of 30 °C, which were determined by experiment.

  6. Distant electric coupling between nitrate reduction and sulphide oxidation investigated by an improved nitrate microscale biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzocchi, U.; Revsbech, N. P.; Nielsen, L. P.; Risgaard-Petersen, N.

    2012-04-01

    Bacteria are apparently able to transmit electrons to other bacteria (Summers et al. 2010) or to electrodes (Malvankar et al. 2011) by some kind of nanowires (Reguera et al. 2005, Gorbi et al. 2006). Lately it has been shown that such transfer may occur over distances of centimetres in sediments, thereby coupling sulphide oxidation in deeper layers with oxygen reduction near the surface (Nielsen 2011). The finding of these long-distance electrical connections originated from analysis of O2, H2S, and pH profiles measured with microsensors. Nitrate is thermodynamically almost as good an electron acceptor as O2, and we therefore set up an experiment to investigate whether long-distance electron transfer also happens with NO3-. Aquaria were filled with sulphidic marine sediment from Aarhus Bay that was previously used to show long-distance electron transfer to O2. The aquaria were equipped with a lid so that they could be completely filled without a gas phase. Anoxic seawater with 300 μM NO3- was supplied at a constant rate resulting in a steady state concentration in the aquatic phase of 250 μM NO3-. The reservoir with the nitrate-containing water was kept anoxic by bubbling it with a N2/CO2 mixture and was kept at an elevated temperature. The water was cooled on the way to the aquaria to keep the water in the aquaria undersaturated with gasses, so that bubble formation by denitrification in the sediment could be minimised. Profiles of NO3-, H2S, and pH were measured as a function of time (2 months) applying commercial sensors for H2S and pH and an improved microscale NO3- biosensor developed in our laboratory. The penetration of NO3- in the sediment was 4-5 mm after 2 months, whereas sulphide only could be detected below 8-9 mm depth. The electron acceptor and electron donor were thus separated by 4-5 mm, indicating long distance electron transfer. A pH maximum of about 8.6 pH units at the NO3- reduction zone similar to a pH maximum observed in the O2 reduction

  7. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  8. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  9. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  10. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  11. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  12. Donor-acceptor complexation and dehydrogenation chemistry of aminoboranes.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Adam C; Sabourin, Kyle J; McDonald, Robert; Ferguson, Michael J; Rivard, Eric

    2012-12-03

    A series of formal donor-acceptor adducts of aminoborane (H(2)BNH(2)) and its N-substituted analogues (H(2)BNRR') were prepared: LB-H(2)BNRR'(2)-BH(3) (LB = DMAP, IPr, IPrCH(2) and PCy(3); R and R' = H, Me or tBu; IPr = [(HCNDipp)(2)C:] and Dipp = 2,6-iPr(2)C(6)H(3)). To potentially access complexes of molecular boron nitride, LB-BN-LA (LA = Lewis acid), preliminary dehydrogenation chemistry involving the parent aminoborane adducts LB-H(2)BNH(2)-BH(3) was investigated using [Rh(COD)Cl](2), CuBr, and NiBr(2) as dehydrogenation catalysts. In place of isolating the intended dehydrogenated BN donor-acceptor complexes, the formation of borazine was noted as a major product. Attempts to prepare the fluoroarylborane-capped aminoborane complexes, LB-H(2)BNH(2)-B(C(6)F(5))(3), are also described.

  13. Conductivity of a Weyl semimetal with donor and acceptor impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, Ya. I.; Syzranov, S. V.

    2015-05-01

    We study transport in a Weyl semimetal with donor and acceptor impurities. At sufficiently high temperatures transport is dominated by electron-electron interactions, while the low-temperature resistivity comes from the scattering of quasiparticles on screened impurities. Using the diagrammatic technique, we calculate the conductivity σ (T ,ω ,nA,nD) in the impurities-dominated regime as a function of temperature T , frequency ω , and the concentrations nA and nD of acceptors and donors and discuss the crossover behavior between the regimes of low and high temperatures and impurity concentrations. In a sufficiently compensated material [| nA-nD|≪ (nA+nD) ] with a small effective fine structure constant α ,σ (ω ,T ) ∝T2/(T-2-i ω .const) in a wide interval of temperatures. For very low temperatures, or in the case of an uncompensated material, the transport is effectively metallic. We discuss experimental conditions necessary for realizing each regime.

  14. Dissimilatory reduction of extracellular electron acceptors in anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Richter, Katrin; Schicklberger, Marcus; Gescher, Johannes

    2012-02-01

    An extension of the respiratory chain to the cell surface is necessary to reduce extracellular electron acceptors like ferric iron or manganese oxides. In the past few years, more and more compounds were revealed to be reduced at the surface of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, and the list does not seem to have an end so far. Shewanella as well as Geobacter strains are model organisms to discover the biochemistry that enables the dissimilatory reduction of extracellular electron acceptors. In both cases, c-type cytochromes are essential electron-transferring proteins. They make the journey of respiratory electrons from the cytoplasmic membrane through periplasm and over the outer membrane possible. Outer membrane cytochromes have the ability to catalyze the last step of the respiratory chains. Still, recent discoveries provided evidence that they are accompanied by further factors that allow or at least facilitate extracellular reduction. This review gives a condensed overview of our current knowledge of extracellular respiration, highlights recent discoveries, and discusses critically the influence of different strategies for terminal electron transfer reactions.

  15. Post-translational Regulation of Nitrate Reductase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrate reductase (NR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, which is the first step in the nitrate assimilation pathway, but can also reduce nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule that is thought to mediate a wide array of of developmental and physiological processes...

  16. Modeling nitrate removal in a denitrification bed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Denitrification beds are being promoted to reduce nitrate concentrations in agricultural drainage water to alleviate the adverse environmental effects associated with nitrate pollution in surface water. In this system, water flows through a trench filled with a carbon media where nitrate is transfor...

  17. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... follows: (1) As a preservative and color fixative, with or without sodium nitrite, in smoked,...

  18. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... follows: (1) As a preservative and color fixative, with or without sodium nitrite, in smoked,...

  19. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... follows: (1) As a preservative and color fixative, with or without sodium nitrite, in smoked,...

  20. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified foods in accordance with...

  1. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... follows: (1) As a preservative and color fixative, with or without sodium nitrite, in smoked,...

  2. Nitration of Naphthol: A Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowery, Dwight F.

    1982-01-01

    Products of nitrations, upon distillation or steam distillation, may produce dermatitis in some students. A procedure for nitration of beta-naphthol producing a relatively non-volatile product not purified by steam distillation is described. Nitration of alpha-naphthol by the same procedure yields Martius Yellow dye which dyes wool yellow or…

  3. Method of producing thin cellulose nitrate film

    DOEpatents

    Lupica, S.B.

    1975-12-23

    An improved method for forming a thin nitrocellulose film of reproducible thickness is described. The film is a cellulose nitrate film, 10 to 20 microns in thickness, cast from a solution of cellulose nitrate in tetrahydrofuran, said solution containing from 7 to 15 percent, by weight, of dioctyl phthalate, said cellulose nitrate having a nitrogen content of from 10 to 13 percent.

  4. Efflux Of Nitrate From Hydroponically Grown Wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. C.; Aslam, M.; Ward, M. R.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experiments to measure influx, and efflux of nitrate from hydroponically grown wheat seedlings. Ratio between efflux and influx greater in darkness than in light; increased with concentration of nitrate in nutrient solution. On basis of experiments, authors suggest nutrient solution optimized at lowest possible concentration of nitrate.

  5. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used as a...

  6. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely...

  7. 76 FR 70366 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... SECURITY Office of the Secretary 6 CFR Part 31 RIN 1601-AA52 Ammonium Nitrate Security Program AGENCY... ``Ammonium Nitrate Security Program,'' which was published in the Federal Register on August 3, 2011. The... 62311). Under the proposed Ammonium Nitrate Security Program, the DHS will regulate the sale...

  8. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely...

  9. 76 FR 62311 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Office of the Secretary 6 CFR Part 31 RIN 1601-AA52 Ammonium Nitrate Security...), entitled ``Ammonium Nitrate Security Program,'' which was published in the Federal Register on August 3... of ammonium nitrate pursuant to section 563 of the Fiscal Year 2008 Department of Homeland...

  10. 76 FR 11273 - Ammonium Nitrate From Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-01

    ... COMMISSION Ammonium Nitrate From Russia AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of a five-year review concerning the suspended investigation on ammonium nitrate from Russia... investigation on ammonium nitrate from Russia would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of...

  11. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used as a curing agent in the processing of...

  12. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely...

  13. 76 FR 47238 - Ammonium Nitrate From Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... COMMISSION Ammonium Nitrate From Russia Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... order on ammonium nitrate from Russia would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material... Commission are contained in USITC Publication 4249 (August 2011), entitled Ammonium Nitrate from...

  14. The excited states of stilbene and stilbenoid donor-acceptor dye systems. A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettig, Wolfgang; Strehmel, Bernd; Majenz, Wilfried

    1993-07-01

    Semiempirical calculations within the CNDO/S framework are used to characterize the nature of the "phantom-singlet" excited state P * (double-bond twisted geometry) of stilbene and stilbenoid donor-acceptor dye systems including the laser dyes DCM and DASPMI. P * is highly polar (closed shell "hole-pair" nature) for weakly perturbed stilbenes but for larger donor-acceptor strength, the order of ground and excited state is reversed, and P * becomes of small polarity ("dot-dot" nature), fully consistent with the established model of biradicaloid states. For stilbene, a slight geometric symmetry reduction is necessary in order to localize the orbitals on the subunits. Only then are the calculated results consistent with those for methyl-substituted stilbene. The localized orbital description of twisted stilbene shows that P * contains negligible doubly excited character and possesses a very small gap to the ground state contrary to what is stated in the previous literature. The planar systems are also investigated and correlated with Dähne's triad rule of polymethine systems.

  15. Cholesterol acceptor capacity is preserved by different mechanisms in preterm and term fetuses.

    PubMed

    Pecks, Ulrich; Mohaupt, Markus G; Hütten, Matthias C; Maass, Nicolai; Rath, Werner; Escher, Geneviève

    2014-02-01

    Fetal serum cholesterol and lipoprotein concentrations differ between preterm and term born neonates. An imbalance of the flow of cholesterol from the sites of synthesis or efflux from cells of peripheral organs to the liver, the reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), is linked to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Preterm delivery is a risk factor for the development of CVD. Thus, we hypothesized that RCT is affected by a diminished cholesterol acceptor capacity in preterm as compared to term fetuses. Cholesterol efflux assays were performed in RAW264.7, HepG2, and HUVEC cell lines. In the presence and absence of ABC transporter overexpression by TO-901317, umbilical cord sera of preterm and term born neonates (n = 28 in both groups) were added. Lipid components including high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), apolipoprotein A1, and apolipoprotein E were measured and related to fractional cholesterol efflux values. We found overall, fractional cholesterol efflux to remain constant between the study groups, and over gestational ages at delivery, respectively. However, correlation analysis revealed cholesterol efflux values to be predominantly related to HDL concentration at term, while in preterm neonates, cholesterol efflux was mainly associated with LDL In conclusion cholesterol acceptor capacity during fetal development is kept in a steady state with different mechanisms and lipid fractions involved at distinct stages during the second half of fetal development. However, RCT mechanisms in preterm neonates seem not to be involved in the development of CVD later in life suggesting rather changes in the lipoprotein pattern causative.

  16. Exploring the transferase activity of Ffase from Schwanniomyces occidentalis, a β-fructofuranosidase showing high fructosyl-acceptor promiscuity.

    PubMed

    Piedrabuena, David; Míguez, Noa; Poveda, Ana; Plou, Francisco J; Fernández-Lobato, María

    2016-10-01

    The β-fructofuranosidase from the yeast Schwanniomyces occidentalis (Ffase) produces the prebiotic sugars 6-kestose and 1-kestose by transfructosylation of sucrose, which makes it of biotechnological interest. In this study, the hydrolase and transferase activity of this enzyme was kinetically characterized and its potential to synthesize new fructosylated products explored. A total of 40 hydroxylated compounds were used as potential fructosyl-acceptor alternatives to sucrose. Only 17 of them, including some monosaccharides, disaccharides, and oligosaccharides as well as alditols and glycosides were fructosylated. The best alternative acceptors were the alditols. The major transfer product of the reaction including mannitol was purified and characterized as 1-O-β-D-fructofuranosyl-D-mannitol, whose maximum concentration reached 44 g/L, representing about 7.3 % of total compounds in the mixture and 89 % of all products generated by transfructosylation. The reactions including erythritol produced 35 g/L of an isomer mixture comprising 1- and 4-O-β-D-fructofuranosyl-D-erythritol. In addition, Ffase produced 24 g/L of the disaccharide blastose by direct fructosylation of glucose, which makes it the first enzyme characterized from yeast showing this ability. Thus, novel fructosylated compounds with potential applications in food and pharmaceutical industries can be obtained due to the Ffase fructosyl-acceptor promiscuity.

  17. Nitrate vulnerability projections from Bayesian inference of multiple groundwater age tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alikhani, Jamal; Deinhart, Amanda L.; Visser, Ate; Bibby, Richard K.; Purtschert, Roland; Moran, Jean E.; Massoudieh, Arash; Esser, Bradley K.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrate is a major source of contamination of groundwater in the United States and around the world. We tested the applicability of multiple groundwater age tracers (3H, 3He, 4He, 14C, 13C, and 85Kr) in projecting future trends of nitrate concentration in 9 long-screened, public drinking water wells in Turlock, California, where nitrate concentrations are increasing toward the regulatory limit. Very low 85Kr concentrations and apparent 3H/3He ages point to a relatively old modern fraction (40-50 years), diluted with pre-modern groundwater, corroborated by the onset and slope of increasing nitrate concentrations. An inverse Gaussian-Dirac model was chosen to represent the age distribution of the sampled groundwater at each well. Model parameters were estimated using a Bayesian inference, resulting in the posterior probability distribution - including the associated uncertainty - of the parameters and projected nitrate concentrations. Three scenarios were considered, including combined historic nitrate and age tracer data, the sole use of nitrate and the sole use of age tracer data. Each scenario was evaluated based on the ability of the model to reproduce the data and the level of reliability of the nitrate projections. The tracer-only scenario closely reproduced tracer concentrations, but not observed trends in the nitrate concentration. Both cases that included nitrate data resulted in good agreement with historical nitrate trends. Use of combined tracers and nitrate data resulted in a narrower range of projections of future nitrate levels. However, use of combined tracer and nitrate resulted in a larger discrepancy between modeled and measured tracers for some of the tracers. Despite nitrate trend slopes between 0.56 and 1.73 mg/L/year in 7 of the 9 wells, the probability that concentrations will increase to levels above the MCL by 2040 are over 95% for only two of the wells, and below 15% in the other wells, due to a leveling off of reconstructed historical

  18. Decomposition and Stability Studies of TAGN (Triaminoguanidium Nitrate)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    and atomic absorption spectroscopy . TAGN (Triaminoquanidinium Nitrate), DAGN (Diaminoquanidinium Nitrate), Thermal analysis, Mass Spectroscopy, RDX (Trinitrotriazacyclohexane), Decomposition chemistry.

  19. Binding characteristics of homogeneous molecularly imprinted polymers for acyclovir using an (acceptor-donor-donor)-(donor-acceptor-acceptor) hydrogen-bond strategy, and analytical applications for serum samples.

    PubMed

    Wu, Suqin; Tan, Lei; Wang, Ganquan; Peng, Guiming; Kang, Chengcheng; Tang, Youwen

    2013-04-12

    This paper demonstrates a novel approach to assembling homogeneous molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) based on mimicking multiple hydrogen bonds between nucleotide bases by preparing acyclovir (ACV) as a template and using coatings grafted on silica supports. (1)H NMR studies confirmed the AAD-DDA (A for acceptor, D for donor) hydrogen-bond array between template and functional monomer, while the resultant monodisperse molecularly imprinted microspheres (MIMs) were evaluated using a binding experiment, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and solid phase extraction. The Langmuir isothermal model and the Langmuir-Freundlich isothermal model suggest that ACV-MIMs have more homogeneous binding sites than MIPs prepared through normal imprinting. In contrast to previous MIP-HPLC columns, there were no apparent tailings for the ACV peaks, and ACV-MIMs had excellent specific binding properties with a Ka peak of 3.44 × 10(5)M(-1). A complete baseline separation is obtained for ACV and structurally similar compounds. This work also successfully used MIMs as a specific sorbent for capturing ACV from serum samples. The detection limit and mean recovery of ACV was 1.8 ng/mL(-1) and 95.6%, respectively, for molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction coupled with HPLC. To our knowledge, this was the first example of MIPs using AAD-DDA hydrogen bonds.

  20. Continuous flow nitration in miniaturized devices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review highlights the state of the art in the field of continuous flow nitration with miniaturized devices. Although nitration has been one of the oldest and most important unit reactions, the advent of miniaturized devices has paved the way for new opportunities to reconsider the conventional approach for exothermic and selectivity sensitive nitration reactions. Four different approaches to flow nitration with microreactors are presented herein and discussed in view of their advantages, limitations and applicability of the information towards scale-up. Selected recent patents that disclose scale-up methodologies for continuous flow nitration are also briefly reviewed. PMID:24605161

  1. Nitrated fatty acids: synthesis and measurement.

    PubMed

    Woodcock, Steven R; Bonacci, Gustavo; Gelhaus, Stacy L; Schopfer, Francisco J

    2013-06-01

    Nitrated fatty acids are the product of nitrogen dioxide reaction with unsaturated fatty acids. The discovery of peroxynitrite and peroxidase-induced nitration of biomolecules led to the initial reports of endogenous nitrated fatty acids. These species increase during ischemia/reperfusion, but concentrations are often at or near the limits of detection. Here, we describe multiple methods for nitrated fatty acid synthesis and sample extraction from complex biological matrices and a rigorous method of qualitative and quantitative detection of nitrated fatty acids by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. In addition, optimized instrument conditions and caveats regarding data interpretation are discussed.

  2. Nitrated fatty acids: Synthesis and measurement

    PubMed Central

    Woodcock, Steven R.; Bonacci, Gustavo; Gelhaus, Stacy L.; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrated fatty acids are the product of nitrogen dioxide reaction with unsaturated fatty acids. The discovery of peroxynitrite and peroxidase-induced nitration of biomolecules led to the initial reports of endogenous nitrated fatty acids. These species increase during ischemia reperfusion, but concentrations are often at or near the limits of detection. Here, we describe multiple methods for nitrated fatty acid synthesis, sample extraction from complex biological matrices, and a rigorous method of qualitative and quantitative detection of nitrated fatty acids by LC-MS. In addition, optimized instrument conditions and caveats regarding data interpretation are discussed. PMID:23200809

  3. Theory of Triplet Excitation Transfer in the Donor-Oxygen-Acceptor System: Application to Cytochrome b6f

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Elmar G.; Robert, Bruno; Lin, Sheng Hsien; Valkunas, Leonas

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical consideration is presented of the triplet excitation dynamics in donor-acceptor systems in conditions where the transfer is mediated by an oxygen molecule. It is demonstrated that oxygen may be involved in both real and virtual intramolecular triplet-singlet conversions in the course of the process under consideration. Expressions describing a superexchange donor-acceptor coupling owing to a participation of the bridging twofold degenerate oxygen’s virtual singlet state are derived and the transfer kinetics including the sequential (hopping) and coherent (distant) routes are analyzed. Applicability of this theoretical description to the pigment-protein complex cytochrome b6f, by considering the triplet excitation transfer from the chlorophyll a molecule to distant β-carotene, is discussed. PMID:26488665

  4. 'Low-acid' sulfide oxidation using nitrate-enriched groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donn, Michael; Boxall, Naomi; Reid, Nathan; Meakin, Rebecca; Gray, David; Kaksonen, Anna; Robson, Thomas; Shiers, Denis

    2016-04-01

    where pH remains neutral. The "low-acid" oxidation of sulfides with nitrate as an electron acceptor has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale. In 90-day microcosm respirometry experiments, we exposed a mixture of pulverized quartz and pyrite -rich ore to natural, high-nitrate groundwater and inoculated the microcosms with a culture of aerobic and anaerobic nitrate-dependent iron and sulfur-oxidising microorganisms, which were enriched from ore, groundwater and activated waste water. Incubations were performed under both oxic and anoxic conditions, in addition to abiotic controls. Initial results show that oxidation of the sulfides under nitrate-rich and microbially enhanced conditions does produce less acid than the same material under oxic conditions, and to some degree can match the models as long as oxygen ingress can be controlled. These results are the focus of further research into how this process can be enhanced and whether it can be applied in the field. Nitrate-driven oxidation of sulfides could potentially be used as a new approach to reduce acid generation and leaching of contaminants from waste dumps, in a passive or actively managed process designed to deplete and/or ameliorate (i.e. through surface passivation) the mineralogical hazard. Developing our understanding of biological aspects of these processes may also allow testing of longer-term "bio-caps" for various tailings and dump materials.

  5. It is rocket science - why dietary nitrate is hard to 'beet'! Part II: further mechanisms and therapeutic potential of the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway.

    PubMed

    Mills, Charlotte Elizabeth; Khatri, Jibran; Maskell, Perry; Odongerel, Chimed; Webb, Andrew James

    2017-01-01

    Dietary nitrate (found in green leafy vegetables such as rocket and in beetroot) is now recognized to be an important source of nitric oxide, via the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway. Dietary nitrate confers several cardiovascular beneficial effects on blood pressure, platelets, endothelial function, mitochondrial efficiency and exercise. Having described key twists and turns in the elucidation of the pathway and the underlying mechanisms in Part I, we explore the more recent developments which have served to confirm mechanisms, extend our understanding, and discover new properties and potential therapeutic uses of the pathway in Part II. Even the established dependency on low oxygen states for bioactivation of nitrite has recently been challenged. Dietary nitrate appears to be an important component of 'healthy diets', such as the DASH diet to lower blood pressure and the Mediterranean diet, with its potential to lower cardiovascular risk, possibly through beneficial interactions with a range of other constituents. The World Cancer Research Foundation report strong evidence for vegetables including spinach and lettuce (high nitrate-containing) decreasing cancer risk (mouth, pharynx, larynx, oesophagus and stomach), summarized in a 'Nitrate-Cancer Risk Veg-Table'. The European Space Agency recommends that beetroot, lettuce, spinach and rocket (high-nitrate vegetables) are grown to provide food for long-term space missions. Nitrate, an ancient component of rocket fuel, could support sustainable crops for healthy humans.

  6. Antiinflammatory actions of inorganic nitrate stabilize the atherosclerotic plaque

    PubMed Central

    Khambata, Rayomand S.; Ghosh, Suborno M.; Rathod, Krishnaraj S.; Thevathasan, Tharssana; Filomena, Federica; Xiao, Qingzhong; Ahluwalia, Amrita

    2017-01-01

    Reduced bioavailable nitric oxide (NO) plays a key role in the enhanced leukocyte recruitment reflective of systemic inflammation thought to precede and underlie atherosclerotic plaque formation and instability. Recent evidence demonstrates that inorganic nitrate (NO3−) through sequential chemical reduction in vivo provides a source of NO that exerts beneficial effects upon the cardiovascular system, including reductions in inflammatory responses. We tested whether the antiinflammatory effects of inorganic nitrate might prove useful in ameliorating atherosclerotic disease in Apolipoprotein (Apo)E knockout (KO) mice. We show that dietary nitrate treatment, although having no effect upon total plaque area, caused a reduction in macrophage accumulation and an elevation in smooth muscle accumulation within atherosclerotic plaques of ApoE KO mice, suggesting plaque stabilization. We also show that in nitrate-fed mice there is reduced systemic leukocyte rolling and adherence, circulating neutrophil numbers, neutrophil CD11b expression, and myeloperoxidase activity compared with wild-type littermates. Moreover, we show in both the ApoE KO mice and using an acute model of inflammation that this effect upon neutrophils results in consequent reductions in inflammatory monocyte expression that is associated with elevations of the antiinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10. In summary, we demonstrate that inorganic nitrate suppresses acute and chronic inflammation by targeting neutrophil recruitment and that this effect, at least in part, results in consequent reductions in the inflammatory status of atheromatous plaque, and suggest that this effect may have clinical utility in the prophylaxis of inflammatory atherosclerotic disease. PMID:28057862

  7. Evaluating Ammonium, Nitrate and Sulfate Aerosols in 3-Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezuman, K.; Bauer, S.; Tsigaridis, K.

    2015-12-01

    The spatial distribution of aerosols and their chemical composition dictates whether they would have a cooling or a warming effect on the climate system. Hence, properly modeling the 3-dimensonal distribution of aerosols is a crucial step for coherent climate simulations. Since surface networks only give 2-D data, and most satellites supply integrated column information, it is thus important to integrate aircraft measurements in climate model evaluation. In this study, the vertical distribution of ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate, is constrained against a collection of 14 AMS flight campaigns, and surface measurements from 2000-2010 in the USA and Europe. GISS modelE2, one of the only models to include nitrate aerosol in CIMP5, is used with multiple aerosol microphysics (MATRIX, OMA) and thermodynamic (ISORROPIA-II, EQSAM) configurations. Our results show that the MATRIX microphysical scheme improves the model performance for sulfate and that there is a systematic underestimation of ammonium and nitrate over the USA and Europe. In terms of gaseous precursors, underestimation of nitrate and ammonium is likely tied to ammonia emissions uncertainties, while nitric acid concentrations are largely overestimated in the higher levels of the model, influenced by strong strat-trop exchange. At high altitudes, nitrate formation is calculated to be ammonia limited, whose profile measurements are scarce.

  8. Summary of Remediated Nitrate Salt Surrogate Formulation and Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Geoffrey Wayne; Leonard, Philip; Hartline, Ernest Leon; Tian, Hongzhao

    2016-05-05

    High Explosives Science and Technology (M-7) completed all required formulation and testing of Remediated Nitrate Salt (RNS) surrogates on April 27, 2016 as specified in PLAN-TA9-2443 Rev B, "Remediated Nitrate Salt (RNS) Surrogate Formulation and Testing Standard Procedure", released February 16, 2016. This report summarizes the results of the work and also includes additional documentation required in that test plan. All formulation and testing was carried out according to PLAN-TA9-2443 Rev B. The work was carried out in three rounds, with the full matrix of samples formulated and tested in each round. Results from the first round of formulation and testing were documented in memorandum M7-J6-6042, " Results from First Round of Remediated Nitrate Salt Surrogate Formulation and Testing." Results from the second round of formulation and testing were documented in M7-16-6053 , "Results from the Second Round of Remediated Nitrate Salt Surrogate Formulation and Testing." Initial results from the third round were documented in M7-16-6057, "Initial Results from the Third Round of Remediated Nitrate Salt Formulation and Testing."

  9. Molten nitrate salt technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carling, R. W.

    1981-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of the experimental programs underway in support of the Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Thermal Applications (TESSTA) program. The experimental programs are concentrating on molten nitrate salts which have been proposed as heat transfer and energy storage medium. The salt composition of greatest interest is drawsalt, nominally a 50-50 molar mixture of NaNO3 and KNO3 with a melting point of 220 C. Several technical uncertainties have been identified that must be resolved before nitrate based solar plants can be commercialized. Research programs at Sandia National Laboratories, universities, and industrial suppliers have been implemented to resolve these technical uncertainties. The experimental programs involve corrosion, decomposition, physical properties, and environmental cracking. Summaries of each project and how they impact central receiver applications such as the repowering/industrial retrofit and cogeneration program are presented.

  10. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunuwille, M.; Yoo, C. S.

    2014-05-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) has often subjected to uses in improvised explosive devices, due to its wide availability as a fertilizer and its capability of becoming explosive with slight additions of organic and inorganic compounds. Yet, the origin of enhanced energetic properties of impure AN (or AN mixtures) is neither chemically unique nor well understood -resulting in rather catastrophic disasters in the past1 and thereby a significant burden on safety in using ammonium nitrates even today. To remedy this situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN at high pressure and temperature, using diamond anvil cells and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present results confirm the recently proposed phase IV-to-IV' transition above 17 GPa2 and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400 °C.

  11. Intracellular Nitrate of Marine Diatoms as a Driver of Anaerobic Nitrogen Cycling in Sinking Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Kamp, Anja; Stief, Peter; Bristow, Laura A.; Thamdrup, Bo; Glud, Ronnie N.

    2016-01-01

    Diatom-bacteria aggregates are key for the vertical transport of organic carbon in the ocean. Sinking aggregates also represent pelagic microniches with intensified microbial activity, oxygen depletion in the center, and anaerobic nitrogen cycling. Since some of the aggregate-forming diatom species store nitrate intracellularly, we explored the fate of intracellular nitrate and its availability for microbial metabolism within anoxic diatom-bacteria aggregates. The ubiquitous nitrate-storing diatom Skeletonema marinoi was studied as both axenic cultures and laboratory-produced diatom-bacteria aggregates. Stable 15N isotope incubations under dark and anoxic conditions revealed that axenic S. marinoi is able to reduce intracellular nitrate to ammonium that is immediately excreted by the cells. When exposed to a light:dark cycle and oxic conditions, S. marinoi stored nitrate intracellularly in concentrations >60 mmol L-1 both as free-living cells and associated to aggregates. Intracellular nitrate concentrations exceeded extracellular concentrations by three orders of magnitude. Intracellular nitrate was used up within 2–3 days after shifting diatom-bacteria aggregates to dark and anoxic conditions. Thirty-one percent of the diatom-derived nitrate was converted to nitrogen gas, indicating that a substantial fraction of the intracellular nitrate pool of S. marinoi becomes available to the aggregate-associated bacterial community. Only 5% of the intracellular nitrate was reduced to ammonium, while 59% was recovered as nitrite. Hence, aggregate-associated diatoms accumulate nitrate from the surrounding water and sustain complex nitrogen transformations, including loss of fixed nitrogen, in anoxic, pelagic microniches. Additionally, it may be expected that intracellular nitrate not converted before the aggregates have settled onto the seafloor could fuel benthic nitrogen transformations. PMID:27847498

  12. A new class of organic nitrates: investigations on bioactivation, tolerance and cross-tolerance phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Schuhmacher, S; Schulz, E; Oelze, M; König, A; Roegler, C; Lange, K; Sydow, L; Kawamoto, T; Wenzel, P; Münzel, T; Lehmann, J; Daiber, A

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The chronic use of organic nitrates is limited by serious side effects including oxidative stress, nitrate tolerance and/or endothelial dysfunction. The side effects and potency of nitroglycerine depend on mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2). We sought to determine whether this concept can be extended to a new class of organic nitrates with amino moieties (aminoalkyl nitrates). Experimental approach: Vasodilator potency of the organic nitrates, in vitro tolerance and in vivo tolerance (after continuous infusion for 3 days) were assessed in wild-type and ALDH-2 knockout mice by isometric tension studies. Mitochondrial oxidative stress was analysed by L-012-dependent chemiluminescence and protein tyrosine nitration. Key results: Aminoethyl nitrate (AEN) showed an almost similar potency to glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), even though it is only a mononitrate. AEN-dependent vasodilatation was mediated by cGMP and nitric oxide. In contrast to triethanolamine trinitrate (TEAN) and GTN, AEN bioactivation did not depend on ALDH-2 and caused no in vitro tolerance. In vivo treatment with TEAN and GTN, but not with AEN, induced cross-tolerance to acetylcholine (ACh)-dependent and GTN-dependent relaxation. Although all nitrates tested induced tolerance to themselves, only TEAN and GTN significantly increased mitochondrial oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions and implications: The present results demonstrate that not all high potency nitrates are bioactivated by ALDH-2 and that high potency of a given nitrate is not necessarily associated with induction of oxidative stress or nitrate tolerance. Obviously, there are distinct pathways for bioactivation of organic nitrates, which for AEN may involve xanthine oxidoreductase rather than P450 enzymes. PMID:19563531

  13. Pollution of drinking water with nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Cabel, B.; Kozicki, R.; Lahl, U.; Podbielshi, A.; Stachel, B.; Struss, S.

    1982-01-01

    The main sources of nitrate in man are food and drinking water. The legislature in West Germany intends to lower the permitted level of nitrate in drinking water from the present 90 mg/l to 50 mg/l in 1982. The European Community has issued a directive that recommends a level of only 25 mg/l, and for babies 10 mg/l nitrate should not be exceeded. At present, nitrate cannot be removed from raw water at an acceptable cost. The problem of high nitrate content is mainly one of drinking water generation from ground water. Several analyses indicate rising concentrations of nitrate in ground water in different regions of West Germany, especially in the last few years. The following sources of nitrate-contamination of ground water aquifers in West are discussed: natural sources; over-manuring of agricultural areas with natural organic fertilizers; over-manuring of agricultural areas with synthetic fertilizers.

  14. Nitrate Utilization by the Diatom Skeletonema costatum

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Juan L.; Llama, Maria J.; Cadenas, Eduardo

    1978-01-01

    Nitrate uptake has been studied in nitrogen-deficient cells of the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum. When these cells are incubated in the presence of nitrate, this ion is quickly taken up from the medium, and nitrite is excreted by the cells. Nitrite is excreted following classical saturation kinetics, its rate being independent of nitrate concentration in the incubation medium for nitrate concentration values higher than 3 micromolar. Nitrate uptake shows mixed-transfer kinetics, which can be attributed to the simultaneous contributions of mediated and diffusion transfer. Cycloheximide and p-hydroxymercuribenzoate inhibit the carrier-mediated contribution to nitrate uptake, without affecting the diffusion component. When cells are preincubated with nitrate, the net nitrogen uptake is increased. PMID:16660652

  15. Distinct Signaling Pathways and Transcriptome Response Signatures Differentiate Ammonium- and Nitrate-supplied Plants

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Kurt; Cakmak, Turgay; Cooper, Andrew; Lager, Ida; Rasmusson, Allan G.; Escobar, Matthew A.

    2010-01-01

    Nitrogen is the only macronutrient that is commonly available to plants in both oxidized and reduced forms, mainly nitrate and ammonium. The physiological and molecular effects of nitrate supply have been well studied, but comparatively little is known about ammonium nutrition and its differential effects on cell function and gene expression. We have used a physiologically realistic hydroponic growth system to compare the transcriptomes and redox status of the roots of ammonium- and nitrate-supplied Arabidopsis thaliana plants. While ~60% of nitrogen-regulated genes displayed common responses to both ammonium and nitrate, significant “nitrate-specific” and “ammonium-specific” gene sets were identified. Pathways involved in cytokinin response and reductant generation/distribution were specifically altered by nitrate, while a complex biotic stress response and changes in nodulin gene expression were characteristic of ammonium-supplied plants. Nitrate supply was associated with a rapid decrease in H2O2 production, potentially due to an increased export of reductant from the mitochondrial matrix. The underlying basis of the nitrate- and ammonium-specific patterns of gene expression appears to be different signals elaborated from each nitrogen source, including alterations in extracellular pH that are associated with ammonium uptake, downstream metabolites in the ammonium assimilation pathway, and the presence or absence of the nitrate ion. PMID:20444219

  16. Nitrate addition has minimal short-term impacts on greenland ice sheet supraglacial prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Karen A; Stibal, Marek; Chrismas, Nathan; Box, Jason; Jacobsen, Carsten S

    2017-04-01

    Tropospheric nitrate levels are predicted to increase throughout the 21(st) century, with potential effects on terrestrial ecosystems, including the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS). This study considers the impacts of elevated nitrate concentrations on the abundance and composition of dominant bulk and active prokaryotic communities sampled from in situ nitrate fertilization plots on the GrIS surface. Nitrate concentrations were successfully elevated within sediment-filled meltwater pools, known as cryoconite holes; however, nitrate additions applied to surface ice did not persist. Estimated bulk and active cryoconite community cell abundance was unaltered by nitrate additions when compared to control holes using a quantitative PCR approach, and nitrate was found to have a minimal affect on the dominant 16S rRNA gene-based community composition. Together, these results indicate that sampled cryoconite communities were not nitrate limited at the time of sampling. Instead, temporal changes in biomass and community composition were more pronounced. As these in situ incubations were short (6 weeks), and the community composition across GrIS surface ice is highly variable, we suggest that further efforts should be considered to investigate the potential long-term impacts of increased nitrate across the GrIS.

  17. Molten nitrate salt materials studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carling, R. M.

    1981-03-01

    An overview of the experimental programs underway in support of the Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Thermal Applications (TESSTA) program is presented. The experimental programs are concentrating on molten nitrate salts which were proposed as heat transfer and energy storage medium. The experimental programs involve corrosion, decomposition, physical properties, and environmental cracking. Summaries of each project and how they impact central receiver applications are presented.

  18. Containment of biogenic sulfide production in continuous up-flow packed-bed bioreactors with nitrate or nitrite.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Casey; Nemati, Mehdi; Jenneman, Gary; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2003-01-01

    Produced water from the Coleville oil field in Saskatchewan, Canada was used to inoculate continuous up-flow packed-bed bioreactors. When 7.8 mM sulfate and 25 mM lactate were present in the in-flowing medium, H(2)S production (souring) by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) was prevented by addition of 17.5 mM nitrate or 20 mM nitrite. Changing the sulfate or lactate concentration of the in-flowing medium indicated that the concentrations of nitrate or nitrite required for containment of souring decreased proportionally with a lowered concentration of the electron donor lactate, while the sulfate concentration of the medium had no effect. Microbial communities were dominated by SRB. Nitrate addition did not give rise to changes in community composition, indicating that lactate oxidation and H(2)S removal were caused by the combined action of SRB and nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB). Apparently the nitrite concentrations formed by these NR-SOB did not inhibit the SRB sufficiently to cause community shifts. In contrast, significant community shifts were observed upon direct addition of high concentrations (20 mM) of nitrite. Strains NO3A and NO2B, two newly isolated, nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) emerged as major community members. These were found to belong to the epsilon-division of the Proteobacteria, to be most closely related to Campylobacter lari, and to oxidize lactate with nitrate or nitrite as the electron acceptor. Thus the mechanism of microbial H(2)S removal in up-flow packed-bed bioreactors depended on whether nitrate (SRB/NR-SOB) or nitrite (SRB/NR-SOB as well as NRB) was used. However, the amount of nitrate or nitrite needed to completely remove H(2)S was dictated by the electron donor (lactate) concentration, irrespective of mechanism.

  19. Electrochemical reduction of nitrate in the presence of an amide

    DOEpatents

    Dziewinski, Jacek J.; Marczak, Stanislaw

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of nitrates in aqueous solutions thereof in the presence of amides to gaseous nitrogen (N.sub.2) is described. Generally, electrochemical reduction of NO.sub.3 proceeds stepwise, from NO.sub.3 to N.sub.2, and subsequently in several consecutive steps to ammonia (NH.sub.3) as a final product. Addition of at least one amide to the solution being electrolyzed suppresses ammonia generation, since suitable amides react with NO.sub.2 to generate N.sub.2. This permits nitrate reduction to gaseous nitrogen to proceed by electrolysis. Suitable amides include urea, sulfamic acid, formamide, and acetamide.

  20. Two acceptor levels and hopping conduction in Mn-doped GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajikawa, Yasutomo

    2017-01-01

    By analysing the experimental data of the temperature-dependent Hall-effect measurements, an additional acceptor level has been confirmed to exist in Mn-doped p-GaAs besides the isolated substitutional Mn acceptor level. It is found that, in most of the investigated samples, the room-temperature hole concentration is governed by the additional acceptor level rather than the isolated substitutional Mn acceptor level. The concentration of the additional acceptor level is found to increase almost in proportion to the square of the concentration of the isolated substitutional Mn acceptors, suggesting that the additional acceptor level is related to Mn dimers. This suggests that the ferromagnetism observed in more heavily Mn-doped GaAs may be attributed to Mn clusters. For some of the samples in which the characteristic of nearest-neighbour hopping conduction in the substitutional Mn acceptor impurity band is evident, the hopping activation energy is deduced and is proved to increase in proportion to the cube root of the concentration of the substitutional Mn acceptors.

  1. Protected sphingosine from phytosphingosine as an efficient acceptor in glycosylation reaction.

    PubMed

    Di Benedetto, Roberta; Zanetti, Luca; Varese, Monica; Rajabi, Mehdi; Di Brisco, Riccardo; Panza, Luigi

    2014-02-07

    A convenient, simple, and high-yielding five-step synthesis of a sphingosine acceptor from phytosphingosine is reported, and its behavior in glycosylation reactions is described. Different synthetic paths to sphingosine acceptors using tetrachlorophthalimide as a protecting group for the sphingosine amino function and different glycosylation methods have been explored. Among the acceptors tested, the easiest accessible acceptor, unprotected on the two hydroxyl groups in positions 1 and 3, was regioselectively glycosylated on the primary position, the regioselectivity depending on the donor used.

  2. Process for gasification using a synthetic CO/sub 2/ acceptor

    SciTech Connect

    Lancet, M.S.; Curran, G.P.

    1980-11-04

    Conoco's gasification process uses a synthetic CO/sub 2/ acceptor consisting essentially of at least one calcium compound (either calcium oxide or calcium carbonate) supported in a refractory carrier matrix having the general formula Ca/sub 5/(SiO/sub 4/)/sub 2/CO/sub 3/. The synthetic acceptor is more effective than a natural calcium oxide acceptor during the gasification process because the thermally stable matrix causes the calcium compounds to remain in discrete particles that tend to reactivate with each passage through the process. This eliminates the need for large quantities of fresh makeup acceptor materials.

  3. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  4. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  5. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  6. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  7. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  8. Catalyzed reduction of nitrate in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, P.A.

    1994-08-01

    Sodium nitrate and other nitrate salts in wastes is a major source of difficulty for permanent disposal. Reduction of nitrate using aluminum metal has been demonstrated, but NH{sub 3}, hydrazine, or organic compounds containing oxygen would be advantageous for reduction of nitrate in sodium nitrate solutions. Objective of this seed money study was to determine minimum conditions for reduction. Proposed procedure was batchwise heating of aqueous solutions in closed vessels with monitoring of temperatures and pressures. A simple, convenient apparatus and procedure were demonstrated for observing formation of gaseous products and collecting samples for analyses. The test conditions were 250{degree}C and 1000 psi max. Any useful reduction of sodium nitrate to sodium hydroxide as the primary product was not found. The nitrate present at pHs < 4 as HNO{sub 3} or NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} is easily decomposed, and the effect of nitromethane at these low pHs was confirmed. When acetic acid or formic acid was added, 21 to 56% of the nitrate in sodium nitrate solutions was reduced by methanol or formaldehyde. With hydrazine and acetic acid, 73 % of the nitrate was decomposed to convert NaNO{sub 3} to sodium acetate. With hydrazine and formic acid, 36% of the nitrate was decomposed. If these products are more acceptable for final disposal than sodium nitrate, the reagents are cheap and the conversion conditions would be practical for easy use. Ammonium acetate or formate salts did not significantly reduce nitrate in sodium nitrate solutions.

  9. Uranyl Nitrate Flow Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd-Lively, Jennifer L

    2008-10-01

    The objectives of the work discussed in this report were to: (1) develop a flow loop that would simulate the purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP); (2) develop a test plan that would simulate normal operation and disturbances that could be anticipated in an NUCP; (3) use the flow loop to test commercially available flowmeters for use as safeguards monitors; and (4) recommend a flowmeter for production-scale testing at an NUCP. There has been interest in safeguarding conversion plants because the intermediate products [uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}), uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}), and uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6})] are all suitable uranium feedstocks for producing special nuclear materials. Furthermore, if safeguards are not applied virtually any nuclear weapons program can obtain these feedstocks without detection by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Historically, IAEA had not implemented safeguards until the purified UF{sub 6} product was declared as feedstock for enrichment plants. H. A. Elayat et al. provide a basic definition of a safeguards system: 'The function of a safeguards system on a chemical conversion plant is in general terms to verify that no useful nuclear material is being diverted to use in a nuclear weapons program'. The IAEA now considers all highly purified uranium compounds as candidates for safeguarding. DOE is currently interested in 'developing instruments, tools, strategies, and methods that could be of use to the IAEA in the application of safeguards' for materials found in the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle-prior to the production of the uranium hexafluoride or oxides that have been the traditional starting point for IAEA safeguards. Several national laboratories, including Oak Ridge, Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Brookhaven, have been involved in developing tools or techniques for safeguarding conversion plants. This study

  10. Spectroscopy of donor-pi-acceptor complexes for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himpsel, F. J.; Zegkinoglou, I.; Johnson, P. S.; Pemmaraju, C. D.; Prendergast, D.; Ragoussi, M.-E.; de la Torre, G.; Pickup, D. F.; Ortega, J. E.

    2014-03-01

    A recent improvement in the design of dye sensitized solar cells has been the combination of light absorbing, electron-donating, and electron-withdrawing groups within the same sensitizer molecule. This dye architecture has contributed to increase the energy conversion efficiency, leading to record efficiency values. Here we investigate a zinc(II)-porphyrin-based complex with triphenylamine donor groups and carboxyl linkers for the attachment to an oxide acceptor. The unoccupied orbitals of these three moieties are probed by element-selective X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the N 1s, C 1s, and Zn 2p edges, complemented by time-dependent density functional theory. The attachment of electron-donating groups to the porphyrin ring significantly delocalizes the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the molecule. This leads to a spatial separation between the HOMO and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO), reducing the recombination rate of photoinduced electrons and holes.

  11. Pigment-acceptor-catalyst triads for photochemical hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Kitamoto, Kyoji; Sakai, Ken

    2014-04-25

    In order to solve the problems of global warming and shortage of fossil fuels, researchers have been endeavoring to achieve artificial photosynthesis: splitting water into H2 and O2 under solar light illumination. Our group has recently invented a unique system that drives photoinduced water reduction through "Z-scheme" photosynthetic pathways. Nevertheless, that system still suffered from a low turnover number (TON) of the photocatalytic cycle (TON=4.1). We have now found and describe herein a new methodology to make significant improvements in the TON, up to around TON=14-27. For the new model systems reported herein, the quantum efficiency of the second photoinduced step in the Z-scheme photosynthesis is dramatically improved by introducing multiviologen tethers to temporarily collect the high-energy electron generated in the first photoinduced step. These are unique examples of "pigment-acceptor-catalyst triads", which demonstrate a new effective type of artificial photosynthesis.

  12. Donor-acceptor pair recombination in gallium sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydinli, A.; Gasanly, N. M.; Gökşen, K.

    2000-12-01

    Low temperature photoluminescence of GaS single crystals shows three broad emission bands below 2.4 eV. Temperature and excitation light intensity dependencies of these bands reveal that all of them originate from close donor-acceptor pair recombination processes. Temperature dependence of the peak energies of two of these bands in the visible range follow, as expected, the band gap energy shift of GaS. However, the temperature dependence of the peak energy of the third band in the near infrared shows complex behavior by blueshifting at low temperatures followed by a redshift at intermediate temperatures and a second blueshift close to room temperature, which could only be explained via a configuration coordinate model. A simple model calculation indicates that the recombination centers are most likely located at the nearest neighbor lattice or interstitial sites.

  13. Recent advances in photoinduced donor/acceptor copolymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jönsson, S.; Viswanathan, K.; Hoyle, C. E.; Clark, S. C.; Miller, C.; Morel, F.; Decker, C.

    1999-05-01

    Photoinitiated free radical polymerization of donor (D)/acceptor (A) type monomers has gained considerable interest due to the possibility to efficiently photopolymerize non-acrylate based systems. Furthermore, this photoinduced alternating copolymerization can be accomplished without the presence of a conventional free radical generating photoinitiator. In the past, we have shown that the structural influences in the direct photolysis of N-Alkyl and N-Arylmaleimides as well as their corresponding ground state charge transfer complexes (CTC) with suitable donors have carefully been investigated. For certain combinations of A and D type monomers, a direct photolysis of the ground state complex or the excitation of the acceptor, followed by the formation of an exciplex, has been shown to initiate the copolymerization. Herein, we show that the main route of initiation is based on inter or intra molecular H-abstraction from an excited state maleimide, whereby no exciplex formation takes place. H-abstraction will predominantly take place in systems where easily abstractable hydrogens are present. Our laser flash photolysis investigation, ESR [1] (A. Hiroshi, I. Takasi, T. Nosi, Macromol. Chem. 190 (1989) 2821) and phosphorescence emissions [2,3] (K.S. Chen, T. Foster, J.K.S. Wan, J. Phys. Chem. 84 (1980) 2473; C.J. Seliskar, S.P. McGlynn, J. Chem. Phys. 55 (1971) 4337) studies show that triplet excited states of N-alkyl substituted maleimides (RMI), which are well known strong precursors for direct H-abstractions from aliphatic ethers and secondary alcohols, are formed upon excitation. Rates of copolymerization and degrees of conversion for copolymerization of maleimide/vinyl ether pairs in air and nitrogen have been measured as a function of hydrogen abstractability of the excited triplet state MI as well as the influence of concentration and hydrogen donating effect of the hydrogen donor.

  14. Therapeutic effects of inorganic nitrate and nitrite in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Omar, S A; Webb, A J; Lundberg, J O; Weitzberg, E

    2016-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is generated endogenously by NO synthases to regulate a number of physiological processes including cardiovascular and metabolic functions. A decrease in the production and bioavailability of NO is a hallmark of many major chronic diseases including hypertension, ischaemia-reperfusion injury, atherosclerosis and diabetes. This NO deficiency is mainly caused by dysfunctional NO synthases and increased scavenging of NO by the formation of reactive oxygen species. Inorganic nitrate and nitrite are emerging as substrates for in vivo NO synthase-independent formation of NO bioactivity. These anions are oxidation products of endogenous NO generation and are also present in the diet, with green leafy vegetables having a high nitrate content. The effects of nitrate and nitrite are diverse and include vasodilatation, improved endothelial function, enhanced mitochondrial efficiency and reduced generation of reactive oxygen species. Administration of nitrate or nitrite in animal models of cardiovascular disease shows promising results, and clinical trials are currently ongoing to investigate the therapeutic potential of nitrate and nitrite in hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, peripheral artery disease and myocardial infarction. In addition, the nutritional aspects of the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway are interesting as diets suggested to protect against cardiovascular disease, such as the Mediterranean diet, are especially high in nitrate. Here, we discuss the potential therapeutic opportunities for nitrate and nitrite in prevention and treatment of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

  15. Optimization of a uranyl nitrate passive neutron counter

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Eric Benton; Bracken, David; West, James; Freeman, Corey; Newell, Matthew R; Bourret, Steven C; Rothrock, Richard B; Ladd - Lively, Jennifer L; Schuh, Denise

    2010-01-01

    Safeguarding natural uranium as it enters the fuel cycle has become a priority for the safeguards community in recent years. Uranyl nitrate is a material of interest in this endeavor because it is normally a step in the process from converting uranium ores to more concentrated forms like UO{sub 2} and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. This paper will detail the improvements and design optimizations made for a uranyl nitrate neutron detector. The original design of the detector was based on standard neutron counter designs and featured 2 rings of He-3 tubes fully moderated and shielded from background. Several areas for enhancement were identified after months of testing in three different locations. An operating uranyl nitrate facility was included as one of the test locations. Three significant upgrades to the counter addressed in the redesign were: real time background detection, counter reliability improvements, and optimization of the detector design for the detection of neutrons emitted by the uranyl nitrate flowing through the monitored process pipe. The optimized detector design includes significant electronics upgrades, the ability to detect neutrons (background and signal) with 36 degree spatial resolution around the process pipe for signal and 45 degree spatial resolution for background, inner and outer rings of He-3 tubes for real time background corrections, and notably more reliable cabling. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) modeling was used to optimize the signal (neutrons from uranyl nitrate in the monitored process pipe) to noise (background neutrons from all sources) ratio of the inner ring of He-3 tubes. Additionally, MCNP modeling maximized noise to signal on the outer ring of He-3 tubes. Details of the detector optimization as well as all the additional detector enhancements will be discussed. The neutron counter will be field tested on the Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  16. Crystallization of sodium nitrate from radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Krapukhin, V.B.; Krasavina, E.P. Pikaev, A.K.

    1997-07-01

    From the 1940s to the 1980s, the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IPC/RAS) conducted research and development on processes to separate acetate and nitrate salts and acetic acid from radioactive wastes by crystallization. The research objective was to decrease waste volumes and produce the separated decontaminated materials for recycle. This report presents an account of the IPC/RAS experience in this field. Details on operating conditions, waste and product compositions, decontamination factors, and process equipment are described. The research and development was generally related to the management of intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The waste solutions resulted from recovery and processing of uranium, plutonium, and other products from irradiated nuclear fuel, neutralization of nuclear process solutions after extractant recovery, regeneration of process nitric acid, equipment decontamination, and other radiochemical processes. Waste components include nitric acid, metal nitrate and acetate salts, organic impurities, and surfactants. Waste management operations generally consist of two stages: volume reduction and processing of the concentrates for storage, solidification, and disposal. Filtration, coprecipitation, coagulation, evaporation, and sorption were used to reduce waste volume. 28 figs., 40 tabs.

  17. Rovibronic Variational Calculations of the Nitrate Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changala, Bryan; Baraban, Joshua H.; Stanton, John F.

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, sophisticated diabatic Hamiltonians have been developed in order to understand the low-energy vibronic level structure of the nitrate radical (NO_3), which exhibits strong coupling between the ~X and doubly degenerate ~B states. Previous studies have reproduced the observed vibronic level positions up to 2000 wn~above the zero-point level, yet the rotational structure has remained uninvestigated with ab initio methods. In this talk, we present calculations of the N≥0 rovibronic structure of low-lying vibronic states of NO_3, in which complicated rovibrational and Coriolis interactions have been observed. Our results include calculations using both adiabatic and diabatic Hamiltonians, enabling a direct comparison between the two. We discuss extensions of our treatment to include spin-orbit and spin-rotation effects.

  18. Mesophilic, Circumneutral Anaerobic Iron Oxidation as a Remediation Mechanism for Radionuclides, Nitrate and Perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, S.; Thrash, J. C.; Coates, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    Iron oxidation is a novel anaerobic metabolism where microorganisms obtain reducing equivalents from the oxidization of Fe(II) and assimilate carbon from organic carbon compounds or CO2. Recent evidence indicates that in combination with the activity of dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, anaerobic microbial Fe(II) oxidation can also contribute to the global iron redox cycle. Studies have also proved that Fe(II)- oxidation is ubiquitous in diverse environments and produce a broad range of insoluble iron forms as end products. These biogenic Fe(III)-oxides and mixed valence Fe minerals have a very high adsorption capacity of heavy metals and radionuclides. Adsorption and immobilization by these biogenic Fe phases produced at circumneutral pH, is now considered a very effective mode of remediation of radionuclides like Uranium, especially under variable redox conditions. By coupling soluble and insoluble Fe(II) oxidation with nitrate and perchlorate as terminal electron acceptors in-situ, anaerobic Fe-oxidation can also be used for environmental cleanup of Fe through Fe-mineral precipitation, as well as nitrate and perchlorate through reduction. Coupling of Fe as the sole electron and energy source to the reduction of perchlorate or nitrate boosts the metabolism without building up biomass hence also taking care of biofouling. To understand the mechanisms by which microorganisms can grow at circumneutral pH by mesophilic, anaerobic iron oxidation and the ability of microorganisms to reduce nitrate and perchlorate coupled to iron oxidation recent work in our lab involved the physiological characterization of Dechlorospirillum strain VDY which was capable of anaerobic iron-oxidation with either nitrate or perchlorate serving as terminal electron acceptor. Under non-growth conditions, VDY oxidized 3mM Fe(II) coupled to nitrate reduction, and 2mM Fe(II) coupled to perchlorate reduction, in 24 hours. It contained a copy of the RuBisCO cbbM subunit gene which was

  19. Fast photolysis of carbonyl nitrates from isoprene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Jean-Francois; Peeters, Jozef; Stavrakou, Trisevgeni

    2014-05-01

    We show that photolysis is, by far, the major atmospheric sink of isoprene-derived carbonyl nitrates. Empirical evidence from published laboratory studies on the absorption cross sections and photolysis rates of α-nitrooxy ketones suggests that the presence of the nitrate group (i) greatly enhances the absorption cross sections, and (ii) facilitates dissociation to a point that the photolysis quantum yield is close to unity, with O-NO2 dissociation as the likely major channel. On this basis, we provide new recommendations for estimating the cross sections and photolysis rates of carbonyl nitrates. The newly estimated photorates are validated using a chemical box model against measured temporal profiles of carbonyl nitrates in an isoprene oxidation experiment by Paulot et al. (2009). The comparisons for ethanal nitrate and for the sum of methacrolein- and methylvinylketone nitrates strongly supports our assumptions of large cross section enhancements and a near-unit quantum yield for these compounds. These findings have significant atmospheric implications, as carbonyl nitrates constitute an important component of the total organic nitrate pool over vegetated areas: the photorates of key carbonyl nitrates from isoprene are estimated to be typically between ~3 and 20 times higher than their sink due to reaction with OH in relevant atmospheric conditions. Moreover, since the reaction is expected to release NO2, photolysis is especially effective in depleting the total organic nitrate pool.

  20. Efficiency improvement of new Tetrathienoacene-based dyes by enhancing donor, acceptor and bridge units, a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Tavangar, Zahra; Zareie, Nazanin

    2016-10-05

    A series of metal free Tetrathienoacene-based (TTA-based) organic dyes are designed and investigated as sensitizers for application in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Density function theory and time dependent density function theory calculations were performed on these dyes at vacuum and orthodichlorobenzene as the solvent. Effects of changing π-conjugation bridges and different functional groups in acceptor and donor units were investigated. UV-Vis absorption spectra were simulated to show the wavelength shifting and absorption properties. Inserting nitro and acyl chloride functional groups in acceptor and NH2 in donor units leads to the reduction of HOMO-LUMO gap by lowering the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy level and raising the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy level and the increase in effective parameters in DSSC' efficiency. The results show that changing spacer units from thiophene to furan has a great effect on electronic structure and absorption spectra. Investigation of the electron distributions of frontier orbitals shows the HOMO and LUMO localization in donor and acceptor, respectively. Some key parameters that were studied here include light harvesting efficiency, free energy of electron injection and open circuit photo-voltage.

  1. Efficiency improvement of new Tetrathienoacene-based dyes by enhancing donor, acceptor and bridge units, a theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavangar, Zahra; Zareie, Nazanin

    2016-10-01

    A series of metal free Tetrathienoacene-based (TTA-based) organic dyes are designed and investigated as sensitizers for application in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Density function theory and time dependent density function theory calculations were performed on these dyes at vacuum and orthodichlorobenzene as the solvent. Effects of changing π-conjugation bridges and different functional groups in acceptor and donor units were investigated. UV-Vis absorption spectra were simulated to show the wavelength shifting and absorption properties. Inserting nitro and acyl chloride functional groups in acceptor and NH2 in donor units leads to the reduction of HOMO-LUMO gap by lowering the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy level and raising the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy level and the increase in effective parameters in DSSC' efficiency. The results show that changing spacer units from thiophene to furan has a great effect on electronic structure and absorption spectra. Investigation of the electron distributions of frontier orbitals shows the HOMO and LUMO localization in donor and acceptor, respectively. Some key parameters that were studied here include light harvesting efficiency, free energy of electron injection and open circuit photo-voltage.

  2. Shared-intermediates in the biosynthesis of thio-cofactors: Mechanism and functions of cysteine desulfurases and sulfur acceptors.

    PubMed

    Black, Katherine A; Dos Santos, Patricia C

    2015-06-01

    Cysteine desulfurases utilize a PLP-dependent mechanism to catalyze the first step of sulfur mobilization in the biosynthesis of sulfur-containing cofactors. Sulfur activation and integration into thiocofactors involve complex mechanisms and intricate biosynthetic schemes. Cysteine desulfurases catalyze sulfur-transfer reactions from l-cysteine to sulfur acceptor molecules participating in the biosynthesis of thio-cofactors, including Fe-S clusters, thionucleosides, thiamin, biotin, and molybdenum cofactor. The proposed mechanism of cysteine desulfurases involves the PLP-dependent cleavage of the C-S bond from l-cysteine via the formation of a persulfide enzyme intermediate, which is considered the hallmark step in sulfur mobilization. The subsequent sulfur transfer reaction varies with the class of cysteine desulfurase and sulfur acceptor. IscS serves as a mecca for sulfur incorporation into a network of intertwined pathways for the biosynthesis of thio-cofactors. The involvement of a single enzyme interacting with multiple acceptors, the recruitment of shared-intermediates partaking roles in multiple pathways, and the participation of Fe-S enzymes denote the interconnectivity of pathways involving sulfur trafficking. In Bacillus subtilis, the occurrence of multiple cysteine desulfurases partnering with dedicated sulfur acceptors partially deconvolutes the routes of sulfur trafficking and assigns specific roles for these enzymes. Understanding the roles of promiscuous vs. dedicated cysteine desulfurases and their partnership with shared-intermediates in the biosynthesis of thio-cofactors will help to map sulfur transfer events across interconnected pathways and to provide insight into the hierarchy of sulfur incorporation into biomolecules. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fe/S proteins: Analysis, structure, function, biogenesis and diseases.

  3. Contrasting performance of donor-acceptor copolymer pairs in ternary blend solar cells and two-acceptor copolymers in binary blend solar cells.

    PubMed

    Khlyabich, Petr P; Rudenko, Andrey E; Burkhart, Beate; Thompson, Barry C

    2015-02-04

    Here two contrasting approaches to polymer-fullerene solar cells are compared. In the first approach, two distinct semi-random donor-acceptor copolymers are blended with phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) to form ternary blend solar cells. The two poly(3-hexylthiophene)-based polymers contain either the acceptor thienopyrroledione (TPD) or diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP). In the second approach, semi-random donor-acceptor copolymers containing both TPD and DPP acceptors in the same polymer backbone, termed two-acceptor polymers, are blended with PC61BM to give binary blend solar cells. The two approaches result in bulk heterojunction solar cells that have the same molecular active-layer components but differ in the manner in which these molecular components are mixed, either by physical mixing (ternary blend) or chemical "mixing" in the two-acceptor (binary blend) case. Optical properties and photon-to-electron conversion efficiencies of the binary and ternary blends were found to have similar features and were described as a linear combination of the individual components. At the same time, significant differences were observed in the open-circuit voltage (Voc) behaviors of binary and ternary blend solar cells. While in case of two-acceptor polymers, the Voc was found to be in the range of 0.495-0.552 V, ternary blend solar cells showed behavior inherent to organic alloy formation, displaying an intermediate, composition-dependent and tunable Voc in the range from 0.582 to 0.684 V, significantly exceeding the values achieved in the two-acceptor containing binary blend solar cells. Despite the differences between the physical and chemical mixing approaches, both pathways provided solar cells with similar power conversion efficiencies, highlighting the advantages of both pathways toward highly efficient organic solar cells.

  4. Induction of the Nitrate Assimilation nirA Operon and Protein-Protein Interactions in the Maturation of Nitrate and Nitrite Reductases in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Frías, José E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nitrate is widely used as a nitrogen source by cyanobacteria, in which the nitrate assimilation structural genes frequently constitute the so-called nirA operon. This operon contains the genes encoding nitrite reductase (nirA), a nitrate/nitrite transporter (frequently an ABC-type transporter; nrtABCD), and nitrate reductase (narB). In the model filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, which can fix N2 in specialized cells termed heterocysts, the nirA operon is expressed at high levels only in media containing nitrate or nitrite and lacking ammonium, a preferred nitrogen source. Here we examined the genes downstream of the nirA operon in Anabaena and found that a small open reading frame of unknown function, alr0613, can be cotranscribed with the operon. The next gene in the genome, alr0614 (narM), showed an expression pattern similar to that of the nirA operon, implying correlated expression of narM and the operon. A mutant of narM with an insertion mutation failed to produce nitrate reductase activity, consistent with the idea that NarM is required for the maturation of NarB. Both narM and narB mutants were impaired in the nitrate-dependent induction of the nirA operon, suggesting that nitrite is an inducer of the operon in Anabaena. It has previously been shown that the nitrite reductase protein NirA requires NirB, a protein likely involved in protein-protein interactions, to attain maximum activity. Bacterial two-hybrid analysis confirmed possible NirA-NirB and NarB-NarM interactions, suggesting that the development of both nitrite reductase and nitrate reductase activities in cyanobacteria involves physical interaction of the corresponding enzymes with their cognate partners, NirB and NarM, respectively. IMPORTANCE Nitrate is an important source of nitrogen for many microorganisms that is utilized through the nitrate assimilation system, which includes nitrate/nitrite membrane transporters and the nitrate and nitrite reductases. Many

  5. Scaling laws for charge transfer in multiply bridged donor/acceptor molecules in a dissipative environment.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Randall H; Wasielewski, Michael R; Ratner, Mark A

    2007-10-31

    The ability of multiple spatial pathways to sum coherently and facilitate charge transfer is examined theoretically. The role of multiple spatial pathways in mediating charge transfer has been invoked several times in the recent literature while discussing charge transfer in proteins, while multiple spatial pathways are known to contribute to charge transport in metal-molecule-metal junctions. We look at scaling laws for charge transfer in donor-bridge-acceptor (D-B-A) molecules and show that these scaling laws change significantly when environment-induced dephasing is included. In some cases, D-B-A systems are expected to show no enhancement in the rate of charge transfer with the addition of multiple degenerate pathways. The origins of these different scaling laws are investigated by looking at which Liouville space pathways are active in different dephasing regimes.

  6. Kinetics analysis of a salt-tolerant perchlorate-reducing bacterium: effects of sodium, magnesium, and nitrate.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yeyuan; Roberts, Deborah J

    2013-08-06

    Salt-tolerant perchlorate-reducing bacteria can be used to regenerate ion-exchange brines or resins exhausted with perchlorate. A salt-tolerant perchlorate-reducing Marinobacter vinifirmus strain P4B1 was recently purified. This study determined the effects of Na(+) and Mg(2+) concentrations on the perchlorate reduction rate of P4B1. The results showed that strain P4B1 could utilize perchlorate and grow in the presence of 1.8% to 10.2% NaCl. Lower NaCl concentrations allowed faster perchlorate reduction. The addition of Mg(2+) to the culture showed significant effects on perchlorate reduction when perchlorate was the sole electron acceptor. A molar Mg(2+)/Na(+) ratio of ∼0.11 optimized perchlorate degradation and cell growth. When perchlorate and nitrate were both present, nitrate reduction did not start significantly until perchlorate was below 100 mg/L. Tests with washed cell suspensions indicated that strain P4B1 had both perchlorate and nitrate reduction enzymes. When the culture was exposed to both perchlorate and nitrate, the nitrate reduction enzyme activity was low. The maximum specific substrate utilization rate (Vm) and the half saturation coefficient (KS) for P4B1 (30 g/L NaCl) determined in this study were 0.049 ± 0.003 mg ClO4(-)/mg VSS-h and 18 ± 4 mg ClO4(-)/L, respectively.

  7. Ultrafast electron transfer in all-carbon-based SWCNT-C60 donor-acceptor nanoensembles connected by poly(phenylene-ethynylene) spacers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrejón, Myriam; Gobeze, Habtom B.; Gómez-Escalonilla, María J.; Fierro, José Luis G.; Zhang, Minfang; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio; D'Souza, Francis; Langa, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    Building all-carbon based functional materials for light energy harvesting applications could be a solution to tackle and reduce environmental carbon output. However, development of such all-carbon based donor-acceptor hybrids and demonstration of photoinduced charge separation in such nanohybrids is a challenge since in these hybrids part of the carbon material should act as an electron donating or accepting photosensitizer while the second part should fulfil the role of an electron acceptor or donor. In the present work, we have successfully addressed this issue by synthesizing covalently linked all-carbon-based donor-acceptor nanoensembles using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as the donor and C60 as the acceptor. The donor-acceptor entities in the nanoensembles were connected by phenylene-ethynylene spacer units to achieve better electronic communication and to vary the distance between the components. These novel SWCNT-C60 nanoensembles have been characterized by a number of techniques, including TGA, FT-IR, Raman, AFM, absorbance and electrochemical methods. The moderate number of fullerene addends present on the side-walls of the nanotubes largely preserved the electronic structure of the nanotubes. The thermodynamic feasibility of charge separation in these nanoensembles was established using spectral and electrochemical data. Finally, occurrence of ultrafast electron transfer from the excited nanotubes in these donor-acceptor nanohybrids has been established by femtosecond transient absorption studies, signifying their utility in building light energy harvesting devices.Building all-carbon based functional materials for light energy harvesting applications could be a solution to tackle and reduce environmental carbon output. However, development of such all-carbon based donor-acceptor hybrids and demonstration of photoinduced charge separation in such nanohybrids is a challenge since in these hybrids part of the carbon material should act as an

  8. Fresh look at electron-transfer mechanisms via the donor/acceptor bindings in the critical encounter complex.

    PubMed

    Rosokha, Sergiy V; Kochi, Jay K

    2008-05-01

    . First, Q < 1 identifies one extreme mechanism owing to slow electron-transfer rates that result from the dominance of the intrinsic activation barrier (lambdaT) between the encounter and successor complexes. At the other extreme of Q > or = 1, the overwhelming dominance of the resonance stabilization (H(DA)) predicts the odd-electron mobility between the donor and acceptor to occur without an activation barrier such that bimolecular electron transfer is coincident with their diffusional encounter. In between lies a potentially infinite set of states, 0 < Q < 1 with opposing attractive and destabilizing forces that determine the location of the bound transition states along the reaction coordinate. Three prototypical potential-energy surfaces evolve as a result of progressively increasing the donor/acceptor bindings (H(DA)) extant in the precursor complex (at constant lambdaT). In these cases, the "outer-sphere" mechanism is limited by the weak donor/acceptor coupling that characterizes the now classical Marcus outer-sphere mechanism. Next, the "inner-sphere" mechanism derives from moderate (localized) donor/acceptor bindings and includes the mechanistic concept of the bridged-activated complex introduced by Taube for a wide variety of ligand-based redox dyads. Finally, the "interior" mechanism is also another subclass of the Taube (inner-sphere) classification, and it lies at the other extreme of very fast electron-transfer rate processes (heretofore unrecognized), arising from the spontaneous annihilation of the donor/acceptor dyad to the delocalized (electron-transfer) complex as it descends barrierlessly into the chemical "black hole" that is rate-limited solely by diffusion.

  9. Nitrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... or interactions with other medicines and vitamin or herbal supplements. This information should not be used as medical ... your doctor about every medicine and vitamin or herbal supplement that you are taking, so he or she ...

  10. Isolation and characterization of Alicycliphilus denitrificans strain BC, which grows on benzene with chlorate as the electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Weelink, Sander A B; Tan, Nico C G; ten Broeke, Harm; van den Kieboom, Corné; van Doesburg, Wim; Langenhoff, Alette A M; Gerritse, Jan; Junca, Howard; Stams, Alfons J M

    2008-11-01

    A bacterium, strain BC, was isolated from a benzene-degrading chlorate-reducing enrichment culture. Strain BC degrades benzene in conjunction with chlorate reduction. Cells of strain BC are short rods that are 0.6 microm wide and 1 to 2 microm long, are motile, and stain gram negative. Strain BC grows on benzene and some other aromatic compounds with oxygen or in the absence of oxygen with chlorate as the electron acceptor. Strain BC is a denitrifying bacterium, but it is not able to grow on benzene with nitrate. The closest cultured relative is Alicycliphilus denitrificans type strain K601, a cyclohexanol-degrading nitrate-reducing betaproteobacterium. Chlorate reductase (0.4 U/mg protein) and chlorite dismutase (5.7 U/mg protein) activities in cell extracts of strain BC were determined. Gene sequences encoding a known chlorite dismutase (cld) were not detected in strain BC by using the PCR primers described in previous studies. As physiological and biochemical data indicated that there was oxygenation of benzene during growth with chlorate, a strategy was developed to detect genes encoding monooxygenase and dioxygenase enzymes potentially involved in benzene degradation in strain BC. Using primer sets designed to amplify members of distinct evolutionary branches in the catabolic families involved in benzene biodegradation, two oxygenase genes putatively encoding the enzymes performing the initial successive monooxygenations (BC-BMOa) and the cleavage of catechol (BC-C23O) were detected. Our findings suggest that oxygen formed by dismutation of chlorite can be used to attack organic molecules by means of oxygenases, as exemplified with benzene. Thus, aerobic pathways can be employed under conditions in which no external oxygen is supplied.

  11. Formate Metabolism in Shewanella oneidensis Generates Proton Motive Force and Prevents Growth without an Electron Acceptor

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Aunica L.; Brutinel, Evan D.; Joo, Heena; Maysonet, Rebecca; VanDrisse, Chelsey M.; Kotloski, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that thrives in redox-stratified environments due to its ability to utilize a wide array of terminal electron acceptors. Conversely, the electron donors utilized by S. oneidensis are more limited and include products of primary fermentation such as lactate, pyruvate, formate, and hydrogen. Lactate, pyruvate, and hydrogen metabolisms in S. oneidensis have been described previously, but little is known about the role of formate oxidation in the ecophysiology of these bacteria. Formate is produced by S. oneidensis through pyruvate formate lyase during anaerobic growth on carbon sources that enter metabolism at or above the level of pyruvate, and the genome contains three gene clusters predicted to encode three complete formate dehydrogenase complexes. To determine the contribution of each complex to formate metabolism, strains lacking one, two, or all three annotated formate dehydrogenase gene clusters were generated and examined for growth rates and yields on a variety of carbon sources. Here, we report that formate oxidation contributes to both the growth rate and yield of S. oneidensis through the generation of proton motive force. Exogenous formate also greatly accelerated growth on N-acetylglucosamine, a carbon source normally utilized very slowly by S. oneidensis under anaerobic conditions. Surprisingly, deletion of all three formate dehydrogenase gene clusters enabled growth of S. oneidensis using pyruvate in the absence of a terminal electron acceptor, a mode of growth never before observed in these bacteria. Our results demonstrate that formate oxidation is a fundamental strategy under anaerobic conditions for energy conservation in S. oneidensis. IMPORTANCE Shewanella species have garnered interest in biotechnology applications for their ability to respire extracellular terminal electron acceptors, such as insoluble iron oxides and electrodes. While much effort has gone into studying the

  12. Dichotomous Role of Exciting the Donor or the Acceptor on Charge Generation in Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Koen H; Wijpkema, Alexandra S G; van Franeker, Jacobus J; Wienk, Martijn M; Janssen, René A J

    2016-08-10

    In organic solar cells, photoexcitation of the donor or acceptor phase can result in different efficiencies for charge generation. We investigate this difference for four different 2-pyridyl diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) polymer-fullerene solar cells. By comparing the external quantum efficiency spectra of the polymer solar cells fabricated with either [60]PCBM or [70]PCBM fullerene derivatives as acceptor, the efficiency of charge generation via donor excitation and acceptor excitation can both be quantified. Surprisingly, we find that to make charge transfer efficient, the offset in energy between the HOMO levels of donor and acceptor that govern charge transfer after excitation of the acceptor must be larger by ∼0.3 eV than the offset between the corresponding two LUMO levels when the donor is excited. As a consequence, the driving force required for efficient charge generation is significantly higher for excitation of the acceptor than for excitation of the donor. By comparing charge generation for a total of 16 different DPP polymers, we confirm that the minimal driving force, expressed as the photon energy loss, differs by about 0.3 eV for exciting the donor and exciting the acceptor. Marcus theory may explain the dichotomous role of exciting the donor or the acceptor on charge generation in these solar cells.

  13. The Abundance and Activity of Nitrate-Reducing Microbial Populations in Estuarine Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardarelli, E.; Francis, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Estuaries are productive ecosystems that ameliorate nutrient and metal contaminants from surficial water supplies. At the intersection of terrestrial and aquatic environments, estuarine sediments host major microbially-mediated geochemical transformations. These include denitrification (the conversion of nitrate to nitrous oxide and/or dinitrogen) and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA). Denitrification has historically been seen as the predominant nitrate attenuation process and functions as an effective sink for nitrate. DNRA has previously been believed to be a minor nitrate reduction process and transforms nitrate within the ecosystem to ammonium, a more biologically available N species. Recent studies have compared the two processes in coastal environments and determined fluctuating environmental conditions may suppress denitrification, supporting an increased role for DNRA in the N cycle. Nitrate availability and salinity are factors thought to influence the membership of the microbial communities present, and the nitrate reduction process that predominates. The aim of this study is to investigate how nitrate concentration and salinity alter the transcript abundances of N cycling functional gene markers for denitrification (nirK, nirS) and DNRA (nrfA) in estuarine sediments at the mouth of the hypernutrified Old Salinas River, CA. Short-term whole core incubations amended with artificial freshwater/artificial seawater (2 psu, 35 psu) and with varying NO3- concentrations (200mM, 2000mM) were conducted to assess the activity as well as the abundance of the nitrate-reducing microbial populations present. Gene expression of nirK, nirS, and nrfA at the conclusion of the incubations was quantified using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). High abundances of nirK, nirS, and nrfA under particular conditions coupled with the resulting geochemical data ultimately provides insight onto how the aforementioned factors

  14. Effects of Atmospheric Nitrate on an Upland Stream of the Northeastern USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebestyen, S. D.; Shanley, J. B.; Boyer, E. W.; Kendall, C.

    2009-05-01

    Excess nitrogen cascades through terrestrial biogeochemical cycles and affects stream nitrate concentrations in upland forests where atmospheric deposition is an important source of anthropogenic nitrogen. We will discuss approaches including high-frequency sampling, isotopic tracers, and end-member mixing analysis that can be used to decipher the sources, transformations, and hydrological processes that affect nitrate transport through forested upland catchments to streams. We present results of studies at the Sleepers River Research Watershed in Vermont, USA, a site where we have intensively measured stream nitrate concentrations during baseflow and stormflow. Stream nitrate concentrations are typically low and nearly 75% of annual inorganic N inputs from atmospheric deposition are retained within the catchment. However, high concentrations and stream loadings of nitrate occur during storm events due to source variation and hydrological flushing of nitrate from catchment soils. Using isotopic tracers and end-member mixing analysis, we have quantified source inputs of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate and show that this stream is directly affected by nitrogen pollution. Using a long-term record of stream hydrochemistry and our findings on event- scale nitrate flushing dynamics, we then explore how stream nitrate loading may respond to anthropogenic climate forcing during the next century. Results suggest that stream runoff and nitrate loadings will change during future emission scenarios (i.e. longer growing seasons and higher winter precipitation rates). Understanding the timing and magnitude of hydrological and hydrochemical responses is important because climate change effects on catchment hydrology may alter how nitrate is retained, produced, and hydrologically flushed in headwater ecosystems with implications for aquatic metabolism, nutrient export from catchments, and downstream eutrophication.

  15. Potential importance of physiologically diverse benthic foraminifera in sedimentary nitrate storage and respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, Joan M.; Casciotti, Karen L.; McIlvin, Matthew R.; Beaudoin, David J.; Visscher, Pieter T.; Edgcomb, Virginia P.

    2012-09-01

    Until recently, the process of denitrification (conversion of nitrate or nitrite to gaseous products) was thought to be performed exclusively by prokaryotes and fungi. The finding that foraminifera perform complete denitrification could impact our understanding of nitrate removal in sediments as well as our understanding of eukaryotic respiration, especially if it is widespread. However, details of this process and the subcellular location of these reactions in foraminifera remain uncertain. For example, prokaryotic endobionts, rather than the foraminifer proper, could perform denitrification, as has been shown recently in an allogromiid foraminifer. Here, intracellular nitrate concentrations and isotope ratios (δ15NNO3 and δ18ONO3) were measured to assess the nitrate dynamics in four benthic foraminiferal species (Bolivina argentea, Buliminella tenuata, Fursenkoina cornuta, Nonionella stella) with differing cellular architecture and associations with microbial endobionts, recovered from Santa Barbara Basin, California. Cellular nitrate concentrations were high (12-217 mM) in each species, and intracellular nitrate often had elevated δ15NNO3 and δ18ONO3 values. Experiments including suboxic and anoxic incubations of B. argentea revealed a decrease in intracellular nitrate concentration and an increase in δ15NNO3 and δ18ONO3over time, indicating nitrate respiration and/or denitrification within the foraminifera. Results illustrate that nitrate reduction occurs in a range of foraminiferal species, including some possessing endobionts (including a chloroplast-sequestering species) and others lacking endobionts, implying that microbial associates may not solely be responsible for this process in foraminifera. Furthermore, we show that benthic foraminifera may represent important reservoirs of nitrate storage in sediments, as well as mediators of its removal.

  16. Nitrate removal in deep sediments of a nitrogen-rich river network: A test of a conceptual model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stelzer, Robert S.; Bartsch, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Many estimates of nitrogen removal in streams and watersheds do not include or account for nitrate removal in deep sediments, particularly in gaining streams. We developed and tested a conceptual model for nitrate removal in deep sediments in a nitrogen-rich river network. The model predicts that oxic, nitrate-rich groundwater will become depleted in nitrate as groundwater upwelling through sediments encounters a zone that contains buried particulate organic carbon, which promotes redox conditions favorable for nitrate removal. We tested the model at eight sites in upwelling reaches of lotic ecosystems in the Waupaca River Watershed that varied by three orders of magnitude in groundwater nitrate concentration. We measured denitrification potential in sediment core sections to 30 cm and developed vertical nitrate profiles to a depth of about 1 m with peepers and piezometer nests. Denitrification potential was higher, on average, in shallower core sections. However, core sections deeper than 5 cm accounted for 70%, on average, of the depth-integrated denitrification potential. Denitrification potential increased linearly with groundwater nitrate concentration up to 2 mg NO3-N/L but the relationship broke down at higher concentrations (> 5 mg NO3-N/L), a pattern that suggests nitrate saturation. At most sites groundwater nitrate declined from high concentrations at depth to much lower concentrations prior to discharge into the surface water. The profiles suggested that nitrate removal occurred at sediment depths between 20 and 40 cm. Dissolved oxygen concentrations were much higher in deep sediments than in pore water at 5 cm sediment depth at most locations. The substantial denitrification potential in deep sediments coupled with the declines in nitrate and dissolved oxygen concentrations in upwelling groundwater suggest that our conceptual model for nitrate removal in deep sediments is applicable to this river network. Our results suggest that nitrate removal rates

  17. Rise-Time of FRET-Acceptor Fluorescence Tracks Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Lindhoud, Simon; Westphal, Adrie H.; van Mierlo, Carlo P. M.; Visser, Antonie J. W. G.; Borst, Jan Willem

    2014-01-01

    Uniform labeling of proteins with fluorescent donor and acceptor dyes with an equimolar ratio is paramount for accurate determination of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiencies. In practice, however, the labeled protein population contains donor-labeled molecules that have no corresponding acceptor. These FRET-inactive donors contaminate the donor fluorescence signal, which leads to underestimation of FRET efficiencies in conventional fluorescence intensity and lifetime-based FRET experiments. Such contamination is avoided if FRET efficiencies are extracted from the rise time of acceptor fluorescence upon donor excitation. The reciprocal value of the rise time of acceptor fluorescence is equal to the decay rate of the FRET-active donor fluorescence. Here, we have determined rise times of sensitized acceptor fluorescence to study the folding of double-labeled apoflavodoxin molecules and show that this approach tracks the characteristics of apoflavodoxinʼs complex folding pathway. PMID:25535076

  18. Vacancy-Induced Electronic Structure Variation of Acceptors and Correlation with Proton Conduction in Perovskite Oxides.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Sung; Jang, Ahreum; Choi, Si-Young; Jung, WooChul; Chung, Sung-Yoon

    2016-10-17

    In most proton-conducing perovskite oxides, the electrostatic attraction between negatively charged acceptor dopants and protonic defects having a positive charge is known to be a major cause of retardation of proton conduction, a phenomenon that is generally referred to as proton trapping. We experimentally show that proton trapping can be suppressed by clustering of positively charged oxygen vacancies to acceptors in BaZrO3-δ and BaCeO3-δ . In particular, to ensure the vacancy-acceptor association is effective against proton trapping, the valence electron density of acceptors should not significantly vary when the oxygen vacancies cluster, based on the weak hybridization between the valence d or p orbitals of acceptors and the 2p orbitals of oxygen.

  19. The activation energy for Mg acceptor in the Ga-rich InGaN alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chuan-Zhen; Wei, Tong; Chen, Li-Ying; Wang, Sha-Sha; Wang, Jun

    2017-02-01

    The activation energy for Mg acceptor in InxGa1-xN alloys is investigated. It is found that there are three factors to influence the activation energy for Mg acceptor. One is the stronger dependence of the VBM of InxGa1-xN depending on In content than that of the Mg acceptor energy level. The other is the concentration of Mg acceptors. Another is the extending of the valence band-tail states into the band gap. In addition, a model based on modifying the effective mass model is developed. It is found that the model can describe the activation energy for Mg acceptor in the Ga-rich InxGa1-xN alloys well after considering the influence of the valence band-tail states.

  20. The distribution and modeling of nitrate transport in the Carson Valley alluvial aquifer, Douglas County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naranjo, Ramon C.; Welborn, Toby L.; Rosen, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    The distribution of nitrate as nitrogen (referred to herein as nitrate-N) concentrations in groundwater was determined by collecting more than 200 samples from 8 land-use categories: single family residential, multifamily residential, rural (including land use for agriculture), vacant land, commercial, industrial, utilities, and unclassified. Nitrate-N concentrations ranged from below detection (less than 0.05 milligrams per liter) to 18 milligrams per liter. The results of nitrate-N concentrations that were sampled from three wells equalled or exceeded the maximum contaminant level of 10 milligrams per liter set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Nitrate-N concentrations in sampled wells showed a positive correlation between elevated nitrate-N concentrations and the percentage of single-family land use and septic-system density. Wells sampled in other land-use categories did not have any correlation to nitrate-N concentrations. In areas with greater than 50-percent single-family land use, nitrate-N concentrations were two times greater than in areas with less than 50 percent single-family land use. Nitrate-N concentrations in groundwater near septic systems that had been used more than 20 years were more than two times greater than in areas where septic systems had been used less than 20 years. Lower nitrate-N concentrations in the areas where septic systems were less than 20 years old probably result from temporary storage of nitrogen leaching from septic systems into the unsaturated zone. In areas where septic systems are abundant, nitrate-N concentrations were predicted to 2059 by using numerical models within the Ruhenstroth and Johnson Lane subdivisions in the Carson Valley. Model results indicated that nitrate-N concentrations will continue to increase and could exceed the maximum contaminant level over extended areas inside and outside the subdivisions. Two modeling scenarios were used to simulate future transport as a result of removal of septic

  1. Nitrogen-isotope ratios of nitrate in ground water under fertilized fields, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flipse, W.J.; Bonner, F.T.

    1985-01-01

    Ground-water samples from two heavily fertilized sites in Suffolk County, New York, were collected through the 1978 growing season and analyzed for nitrate-N concentrations and nitrogen-isotope ratios. Six wells were at a potato farm; six were on a golf course. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the 15N/14N ratios (??15N values) of fertilizer are increased during transit from land surface to ground water to an extent which would preclude use of this ratio to distinguish agricultural from animal sources of nitrate in ground water. Ground water at both sites contained a greater proportion of 15N than the fertilizers being applied. At the potato farm, the average ??15N value of the fertilizers was 0.2???; the average ??15N value of the ground-water nitrate was 6.2???. At the golf course, the average ??15N value of the fertilizers was -5.9???, and that of ground-water nitrate was 6.5???. The higher ??15N values of ground-water nitrate are probably caused by isotopic fractionation during the volatile loss of ammonia from nitrogen applied in reduced forms (NH4+ and organic-N). The ??15N values of most ground-water samples from both areas were less than 10???, the upper limit of the range characteristic of agricultural sources of nitrate; these sources include both fertilizer nitrate and nitrate derived from increased mineralization of soil nitrogen through cultivation. Previous studies have shown that the ??15N values of nitrate derived from human or animal waste generally exceed 10???. The nitrogen-isotope ratios of fertilizer-derived nitrate were not altered to an extent that would make them indistinguishable from animal-waste-derived nitrates in ground water.Ground-water samples from two heavily fertilized sites in Suffolk County, New York, were collected through the 1978 growing season and analyzed for nitrate-N concentrations and nitrogen-isotope ratios. Six wells were at a potato farm; six were on a golf course. The purpose of this study was to

  2. Herbicide residues and nitrate concentration in tubers of table potatoes.

    PubMed

    Zarzecka, Krystyna; Gugała, Marek; Mystkowska, Iwona

    2010-01-01

    This study examined Wiking-cultivar table potato tubers in a field experiment conducted between 2002 and 2004 using a rye complex soil. The experimental factors included (a) two methods of tillage, including traditional and simplified, as well as (b) seven methods of cultivation with the use of herbicides as follows: 1, control without herbicides; 2, Plateen 41.5 WG; 3, Plateen 41.5 WG + Fusilade Forte 150 EC; 4, Plateen 41.5 WG + Fusilade Forte 150 EC + adjuvant Atpolan 80 EC; 5, Barox 460 SL; 6, Barox 460 SL + Fusilade Forte 150 EC; and 7, Barox 460 SL + Fusilade Forte 150 EC + adjuvant Atpolan 80 EC. Determination of residues was performed using high-performance liquid and gas chromatography. Only trace quantities of bentazone (Barox 460 SL) were found in potato tubers, amounts that fell below the maximum residue limit (MRL). The nitrate content of potato tubers was determined using a nitrate ion-selective electrode and silver chloride reference electrode. The nitrate content in fresh matter of unpeeled and peeled tubers depended significantly only on weather conditions in the years of study. In contrast, agrotechnical procedures such as methods of tillage and cultivation did not significantly affect potato tuber nitrate content.

  3. Groundwater nitrate contamination: factors and indicators.

    PubMed

    Wick, Katharina; Heumesser, Christine; Schmid, Erwin

    2012-11-30

    Identifying significant determinants of groundwater nitrate contamination is critical in order to define sensible agri-environmental indicators that support the design, enforcement, and monitoring of regulatory policies. We use data from approximately 1200 Austrian municipalities to provide a detailed statistical analysis of (1) the factors influencing groundwater nitrate contamination and (2) the predictive capacity of the Gross Nitrogen Balance, one of the most commonly used agri-environmental indicators. We find that the percentage of cropland in a given region correlates positively with nitrate concentration in groundwater. Additionally, environmental characteristics such as temperature and precipitation are important co-factors. Higher average temperatures result in lower nitrate contamination of groundwater, possibly due to increased evapotranspiration. Higher average precipitation dilutes nitrates in the soil, further reducing groundwater nitrate concentration. Finally, we assess whether the Gross Nitrogen Balance is a valid predictor of groundwater nitrate contamination. Our regression analysis reveals that the Gross Nitrogen Balance is a statistically significant predictor for nitrate contamination. We also show that its predictive power can be improved if we account for average regional precipitation. The Gross Nitrogen Balance predicts nitrate contamination in groundwater more precisely in regions with higher average precipitation.

  4. Trend Analyses of Nitrate in Danish Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, B.; Thorling, L.; Dalgaard, T.; Erlandsen, M.

    2012-04-01

    This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis of distribution, trends and trend reversals in the groundwater nitrate concentration. Secondly, knowledge about the N surplus in Danish agriculture since 1950 is used as an indicator of the potential loss of N. Thirdly, groundwater recharge CFC (Chlorofluorocarbon) age determination allows linking of the first two dataset. The development in the nitrate concentration of oxic groundwater clearly mirrors the development in the national agricultural N surplus, and a corresponding trend reversal is found in groundwater. Regulation and technical improvements in the intensive farming in Denmark have succeeded in decreasing the N surplus by 40% since the mid 1980s while at the same time maintaining crop yields and increasing the animal production of especially pigs. Trend analyses prove that the youngest (0-15 years old) oxic groundwater shows more pronounced significant downward nitrate trends (44%) than the oldest (25-50 years old) oxic groundwater (9%). This amounts to clear evidence of the effect of reduced nitrate leaching on groundwater nitrate concentrations in Denmark. Are the Danish groundwater monitoring strategy obtimal for detection of nitrate trends? Will the nitrate concentrations in Danish groundwater continue to decrease or are the Danish nitrate concentration levels now appropriate according to the Water Framework Directive?

  5. Measurement of isoprene nitrates by GCMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Graham P.; Hiatt-Gipson, Glyn D.; Bew, Sean P.; Reeves, Claire E.

    2016-09-01

    According to atmospheric chemistry models, isoprene nitrates play an important role in determining the ozone production efficiency of isoprene; however this is very poorly constrained through observations as isoprene nitrates have not been widely measured. Measurements have been severely restricted largely due to a limited ability to measure individual isoprene nitrate isomers. An instrument based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GCMS) and the associated calibration methods are described for the speciated measurements of individual isoprene nitrate isomers. Five of the primary isoprene nitrates which formed in the presence of NOx by reaction of isoprene with the hydroxyl radical (OH) in the Master Chemical Mechanism are identified using known isomers on two column phases and are fully separated on the Rtx-200 column. Three primary isoprene nitrates from the reaction of isoprene with the nitrate radical (NO3) are identified after synthesis from the already identified analogous hydroxy nitrate. A Tenax adsorbent-based trapping system allows the analysis of the majority of the known hydroxy and carbonyl primary isoprene nitrates, although not the (1,2)-IN isomer, under field-like levels of humidity and showed no impact from typical ambient concentrations of NOx and ozone.

  6. Fast photolysis of carbonyl nitrates from isoprene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, J.-F.; Peeters, J.; Stavrakou, T.

    2013-11-01

    Photolysis is shown to be a major sink for isoprene-derived carbonyl nitrates, which constitute an important component of the total organic nitrate pool over vegetated areas. Empirical evidence from published laboratory studies on the absorption cross sections and photolysis rates of α-nitrooxy ketones suggests that the presence of the nitrate group (i) greatly enhances the absorption cross sections, and (ii) facilitates dissociation to a point that the photolysis quantum yield is close to unity, with O-NO2 dissociation as the likely major channel. On this basis, we provide new recommendations for estimating the cross sections and photolysis rates of carbonyl nitrates. The newly estimated photorates are validated using a chemical box model against measured temporal profiles of carbonyl nitrates in an isoprene oxidation experiment by Paulot et al. (2009). The comparisons for ethanal nitrate and for the sum of methacrolein- and methylvinylketone nitrates strongly supports our assumptions of large cross section enhancements and a near-unit quantum yield for these compounds. These findings have significant atmospheric implications: the photorates of key carbonyl nitrates from isoprene are estimated to be typically between ~3 and 20 times higher than their sink due to reaction with OH in relevant atmospheric conditions. Moreover, since the reaction is expected to release NO2, photolysis is especially effective in depleting the total organic nitrate pool.

  7. Fast photolysis of carbonyl nitrates from isoprene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, J.-F.; Peeters, J.; Stavrakou, T.

    2014-03-01

    Photolysis is shown to be a major sink for isoprene-derived carbonyl nitrates, which constitute an important component of the total organic nitrate pool over vegetated areas. Empirical evidence from published laboratory studies on the absorption cross sections and photolysis rates of α-nitrooxy ketones suggests that the presence of the nitrate group (i) greatly enhances the absorption cross sections and (ii) facilitates dissociation to a point that the photolysis quantum yield is close to unity, with O-NO2 dissociation as a likely major channel. On this basis, we provide new recommendations for estimating the cross sections and photolysis rates of carbonyl nitrates. The newly estimated photo rates are validated using a chemical box model against measured temporal profiles of carbonyl nitrates in an isoprene oxidation experiment by Paulot et al. (2009). The comparisons for ethanal nitrate and for the sum of methacrolein- and methyl vinyl ketone nitrates strongly supports our assumptions of large cross-section enhancements and a near-unit quantum yield for these compounds. These findings have significant atmospheric implications: the photorates of key carbonyl nitrates from isoprene are estimated to be typically between ~ 3 and 20 times higher than their sink due to reaction with OH in relevant atmospheric conditions. Moreover, since the reaction is expected to release NO2, photolysis is especially effective in depleting the total organic nitrate pool.

  8. Removal of gadolinium nitrate from heavy water

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W.

    2000-03-22

    Work was conducted to develop a cost-effective process to purify 181 55-gallon drums containing spent heavy water moderator (D2O) contaminated with high concentrations of gadolinium nitrate, a chemical used as a neutron poison during former nuclear reactor operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These drums also contain low level radioactive contamination, including tritium, which complicates treatment options. Presently, the drums of degraded moderator are being stored on site. It was suggested that a process utilizing biological mechanisms could potentially lower the total cost of heavy water purification by allowing the use of smaller equipment with less product loss and a reduction in the quantity of secondary waste materials produced by the current baseline process (ion exchange).

  9. RIXS of Ammonium Nitrate using OCEAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinson, John; Jach, Terrence; Mueller, Matthias; Unterumsberger, Rainer; Beckhoff, Burkhard

    The ocean code allows for calculations of near-edge x-ray spectroscopies using a GW/Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) approach. Here we present an extension of the code for calculating resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS). Recent work has shown that peak-specific broadening of nitrogen K α emission in nitrates is due to a valence-band lifetime that is an order of magnitude shorter than that of the nitrogen 1s hole, an inversion of the usual assumption that valence holes have longer lifetimes than core-level holes. Using the BSE, including GW corrections to the DFT energies, as implemented in ocean we are able to compare calculations of RIXS with measured spectra of the same. By utilizing an approach free from fitting parameters we are able to identify the origins of various broadening effects observed in experiment.

  10. Optimization of enhanced bioelectrical reactor with electricity from microbial fuel cells for groundwater nitrate removal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ye; Zhang, Baogang; Tian, Caixing; Feng, Chuanping; Wang, Zhijun; Cheng, Ming; Hu, Weiwu

    2016-01-01

    Factors influencing the performance of a continual-flow bioelectrical reactor (BER) intensified by microbial fuel cells for groundwater nitrate removal, including nitrate load, carbon source and hydraulic retention time (HRT), were investigated and optimized by response surface methodology (RSM). With the target of maximum nitrate removal and minimum intermediates accumulation, nitrate load (for nitrogen) of 60.70 mg/L, chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 849.55 mg/L and HRT of 3.92 h for the BER were performed. COD was the dominant factor influencing performance of the system. Experimental results indicated the undistorted simulation and reliable optimized values. These demonstrate that RSM is an effective method to evaluate and optimize the nitrate-reducing performance of the present system and can guide mathematical models development to further promote its practical applications.

  11. Spectrophotometric determination of serum nitrite and nitrate by copper-cadmium alloy.

    PubMed

    Sastry, K V H; Moudgal, R P; Mohan, J; Tyagi, J S; Rao, G S

    2002-07-01

    A macro and micro assay for the spectrophotometric determination of serum nitrite and nitrate was developed. Nitrite/nitrate in biological samples can be estimated in a single step by this method. The principle of the assay is the reduction of nitrate by copper-cadmium alloy, followed by color development with Griess reagent (sulfanilamide and N-naphthylethylenediamine) in acidic medium. This assay is sensitive to 1 microM nitrate and is suitable for different biological fluids, including sera with a high lipid concentration. The copper-cadmium alloy used in the present method is easy to prepare and can completely reduce nitrate to nitrite in an hour. The present method provides a simple, cost-effective assay for the estimation of stable oxidation products of nitric oxide in biological samples.

  12. Oxidation and mobilization of selenium by nitrate in irrigation drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, W.G.

    1999-01-01

    Selenium (Se) can be oxidized by nitrate (NO3-) from irrigation on Cretaceous marine shale in western Colorado. Dissolved Se concentrations are positively correlated with dissolved NO3- concentrations in surface water and ground water samples from irrigated areas. Redox conditions dominate in the mobilization of Se in marine shale hydrogeologic settings; dissolved Se concentrations increase with increasing platinum-electrode potentials. Theoretical calculations for the oxidation of Se by NO3- and oxygen show favorable Gibbs free energies for the oxidation of Se by NO3-, indicating NO3- can act as an electron acceptor for the oxidation of Se. Laboratory batch experiments were performed by adding Mancos Shale samples to zero- dissolved-oxygen water containing 0, 5, 50, and 100 mg/L NO3- as N (mg N/L). Samples were incubated in airtight bottles at 25??C for 188 d; samples collected from the batch experiment bottles show increased Se concentrations over time with increased NO3- concentrations. Pseudo first-order rate constants for NO3- oxidation of Se ranged from 0.0007 to 0.0048/d for 0 to 100 mg N/L NO3- concentrations, respectively. Management of N fertilizer applications in Cretaceous shale settings might help to control the oxidation and mobilization of Se and other trace constituents into the environment.

  13. Phase Diagram of Ammonium Nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-06-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) has often been subjected to uses in improvised explosive devices, due to its wide availability as a fertilizer and its capability of becoming explosive with slight additions of organic and inorganic compounds. Yet, the origin of enhanced energetic properties of impure AN (or AN mixtures) is neither chemically unique nor well understood - resulting in rather catastrophic disasters in the past1 and thereby a significant burden on safety, in using ammonium nitrates even today. To remedy this situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN, in different chemical environments, at high pressure and temperature, using diamond anvil cells and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present results confirm the recently proposed phase IV-to-IV' transition above 15 GPa2 and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 673 K. The present study has been supported by the U.S. DHS under Award Number 2008-ST-061-ED0001.

  14. Chronic nitrate enrichment decreases severity and induces protection against an infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Smallbone, Willow; Cable, Jo; Maceda-Veiga, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    Excessive fertilisation is one of the most pernicious forms of global change resulting in eutrophication. It has major implications for disease control and the conservation of biodiversity. Yet, the direct link between nutrient enrichment and disease remains largely unexplored. Here, we present the first experimental evidence that chronic nitrate enrichment decreases severity and induces protection against an infectious disease. Specifically, this study shows that nitrate concentrations ranging between 50 and 250mgNO3(-)/l reduce Gyrodactylus turnbulli infection intensity in two populations of Trinidadian guppies Poecilia reticulata, and that the highest nitrate concentration can even clean the parasites from the fish. This added to the fact that host nitrate pre-exposure altered the fish epidermal structure and reduced parasite intensity, suggests that nitrate protected the host against the disease. Nitrate treatments also caused fish mortality. As we used ecologically-relevant nitrate concentrations, and guppies are top-consumers widely used for mosquito bio-control in tropical and often nutrient-enriched waters, our results can have major ecological and social implications. In conclusion, this study advocates reducing nitrate level including the legislative threshold to protect the aquatic biota, even though this may control an ectoparasitic disease.

  15. Modeling nitrate-nitrogen load reduction strategies for the des moines river, iowa using SWAT

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, K.E.; Wolter, C.F.

    2009-01-01

    The Des Moines River that drains a watershed of 16,175 km2 in portions of Iowa and Minnesota is impaired for nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate) due to concentrations that exceed regulatory limits for public water supplies. The Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was used to model streamflow and nitrate loads and evaluate a suite of basin-wide changes and targeting configurations to potentially reduce nitrate loads in the river. The SWAT model comprised 173 subbasins and 2,516 hydrologic response units and included point and nonpoint nitrogen sources. The model was calibrated for an 11-year period and three basin-wide and four targeting strategies were evaluated. Results indicated that nonpoint sources accounted for 95% of the total nitrate export. Reduction in fertilizer applications from 170 to 50 kg/ha achieved the 38% reduction in nitrate loads, exceeding the 34% reduction required. In terms of targeting, the most efficient load reductions occurred when fertilizer applications were reduced in subbasins nearest the watershed outlet. The greatest load reduction for the area of land treated was associated with reducing loads from 55 subbasins with the highest nitrate loads, achieving a 14% reduction in nitrate loads achieved by reducing applications on 30% of the land area. SWAT model results provide much needed guidance on how to begin implementing load reduction strategies most efficiently in the Des Moines River watershed. ?? 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  16. Application of classification-tree methods to identify nitrate sources in ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spruill, T.B.; Showers, W.J.; Howe, S.S.

    2002-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine if nitrate sources in ground water (fertilizer on crops, fertilizer on golf courses, irrigation spray from hog (Sus scrofa) wastes, and leachate from poultry litter and septic systems) could be classified with 80% or greater success. Two statistical classification-tree models were devised from 48 water samples containing nitrate from five source categories. Model I was constructed by evaluating 32 variables and selecting four primary predictor variables (??15N, nitrate to ammonia ratio, sodium to potassium ratio, and zinc) to identify nitrate sources. A ??15N value of nitrate plus potassium 18.2 indicated inorganic or soil organic N. A nitrate to ammonia ratio 575 indicated nitrate from golf courses. A sodium to potassium ratio 3.2 indicated spray or poultry wastes. A value for zinc 2.8 indicated poultry wastes. Model 2 was devised by using all variables except ??15N. This model also included four variables (sodium plus potassium, nitrate to ammonia ratio, calcium to magnesium ratio, and sodium to potassium ratio) to distinguish categories. Both models were able to distinguish all five source categories with better than 80% overall success and with 71 to 100% success in individual categories using the learning samples. Seventeen water samples that were not used in model development were tested using Model 2 for three categories, and all were correctly classified. Classification-tree models show great potential in identifying sources of contamination and variables important in the source-identification process.

  17. Interaction of nitrate and folate on the risk of breast cancer among postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Inoue-Choi, Maki; Ward, Mary H; Cerhan, James R; Weyer, Peter J; Anderson, Kristin E; Robien, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Ingested nitrate can be endogenously reduced to nitrite, which may form N-nitroso compounds, known potent carcinogens. However, some studies have reported no or inverse associations between dietary nitrate intake and cancer risk. These associations may be confounded by a protective effect of folate, which plays a vital role in DNA repair. We evaluated the interaction of dietary and water nitrate intake with total folate intake on breast cancer risk in the Iowa Women's Health Study. Dietary intake was assessed at study baseline. Nitrate intake from public water was assessed using a historical database on Iowa municipal water supplies. After baseline exclusions, 34,388 postmenopausal women and 2,875 incident breast cancers were included. Overall, neither dietary nor water nitrate was associated with breast cancer risk. Among those with folate intake ≥400 μg/day, breast cancer risk was significantly increased in public water users with the highest nitrate quintile (HR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.05-1.87) and private well users (HR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.05-1.82) compared to public water users with the lowest nitrate quintile; in contrast, there was no association among those with lower folate intake. Our findings do not support a previous report of increased risk of breast cancer among individuals with high dietary nitrate but low folate intake.

  18. Recurrent diarrhea in children living in areas with high levels of nitrate in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S K; Gupta, R C; Gupta, A B; Seth, A K; Bassin, J K; Gupta, A; Sharma, M L

    2001-01-01

    Given that there was documented evidence of an association between diarrhea and high nitrate ingestion, the authors examined drinking water nitrate concentration and its possible correlation(s) with methemoglobin levels, cytochrome b5 reductase activity, and recurrent diarrhea. In addition, the authors studied histopathological changes in the intestines of rabbits in an animal model. Five village areas were studied, and nitrate concentrations (expressed in mg of nitrate per liter of water) of 26, 45, 95, 220, and 459 existed in the respective villages. The study included 88 randomly selected children who were 8 yr of age or younger; they represented 10% of the total population of each of the areas. Detailed histories of recurrent diarrhea were noted, and medical examinations were conducted. Cytochrome b5 reductase activity and methemoglobin levels were estimated biochemically. Collected data were analyzed statistically with Microsoft Excel software. In addition, the authors exposed rabbits to various levels of nitrate, and histopathological changes of the stomach and intestine (small and large) were evaluated. There was a strong relationship between nitrate concentration and recurrent diarrhea; 80% of the recurrent diarrhea cases were explained by nitrate concentration alone. In the rabbit intestines, lymphocytic infiltration and hyperplasia characterized the submucosa as nitrate concentrations increased.

  19. The origin of high-nitrate ground waters in the Australian arid zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, C. J.; Jacobson, G.; Smith, G. D.

    1992-08-01

    Nitrate concentrations beyond the drinking-water limit of 10 mg1 -1 NO 3-N, are common in Australian arid-zone ground waters and are often associated with otherwise potable waters. In some aquifers nitrate-N concentrations of up to 80 mg1 -1 have been found, and this is a severe constraint on water supply development for small settlements. Water-bore data indicate a correlation of high-nitrate ground waters with shallow unconfined aquifers. Aguifer hydrochemistry indicats that these ground waters were emplaced by episodic Holocene recharge events in an otherwise arid climate regime. Nitrate has been flushed through the unsaturated zone which apparently lacks denitrification activity. The nitrate originates by near-surface biological fixation and contributing organisms include cyanobacteria in soil crusts and bacteria in termite mounds with the highest soil nitrate concentrations found in the outer skin of termite mounds. Bacteria associated with the termites appear to fix nitrogen, which eventually appears in an inorganic form, principally as ammonia. Nitrate is produced by bacterial oxidation of the ammonia, and is leached to the outside of the termite mound by capillary action. Diffuse recharge from extreme rainfall events then flushes this nitrate to the water table.

  20. Modeling the Current and Future Roles of Particulate Organic Nitrates in the Southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Pye, Havala O T; Luecken, Deborah J; Xu, Lu; Boyd, Christopher M; Ng, Nga L; Baker, Kirk R; Ayres, Benjamin R; Bash, Jesse O; Baumann, Karsten; Carter, William P L; Edgerton, Eric; Fry, Juliane L; Hutzell, William T; Schwede, Donna B; Shepson, Paul B

    2015-12-15

    Organic nitrates are an important aerosol constituent in locations where biogenic hydrocarbon emissions mix with anthropogenic NOx sources. While regional and global chemical transport models may include a representation of organic aerosol from monoterpene reactions with nitrate radicals (the primary source of particle-phase organic nitrates in the Southeast United States), secondary organic aerosol (SOA) models can underestimate yields. Furthermore, SOA parametrizations do not explicitly take into account organic nitrate compounds produced in the gas phase. In this work, we developed a coupled gas and aerosol system to describe the formation and subsequent aerosol-phase partitioning of organic nitrates from isoprene and monoterpenes with a focus on the Southeast United States. The concentrations of organic aerosol and gas-phase organic nitrates were improved when particulate organic nitrates were assumed to undergo rapid (τ = 3 h) pseudohydrolysis resulting in nitric acid and nonvolatile secondary organic aerosol. In addition, up to 60% of less oxidized-oxygenated organic aerosol (LO-OOA) could be accounted for via organic nitrate mediated chemistry during the Southern Oxidants and Aerosol Study (SOAS). A 25% reduction in nitrogen oxide (NO + NO2) emissions was predicted to cause a 9% reduction in organic aerosol for June 2013 SOAS conditions at Centreville, Alabama.

  1. Ultrafast exciton dissociation at donor/acceptor interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grancini, G.; Fazzi, D.; Binda, M.; Maiuri, M.; Petrozza, A.; Criante, L.; Perissinotto, S.; Egelhaaf, H.-J.; Brida, D.; Cerullo, G.; Lanzani, G.

    2013-09-01

    Charge generation at donor/acceptor interface is a highly debated topic in the organic photovoltaics (OPV) community. The primary photoexcited state evolution happens in few femtosecond timescale, thus making very intriguing their full understanding. In particular charge generation is believed to occur in < 200 fs, but no clear picture emerged so far. In this work we reveal for the first time the actual charge generation mechanism following in real time the exciton dissociation mechanism by means of sub-22 fs pump-probe spectroscopy. We study a low-band-gap polymer: fullerene interface as an ideal system for OPV. We demonstrate that excitons dissociation leads, on a timescale of 20-50 fs, to two byproducts: bound interfacial charge transfer states (CTS) and free charges. The branching ratio of their formation depends on the excess photon energy provided. When high energy singlet polymer states are excited, well above the optical band gap, an ultrafast hot electron transfer happens between the polymer singlet state and the interfacial hot CTS* due to the high electronic coupling between them. Hot exciton dissociation prevails then on internal energy dissipation that occurs within few hundreds of fs. By measuring the internal quantum efficiency of a prototypical device a rising trend with energy is observed, thus indicating that hot exciton dissociation effectively leads to a higher fraction of free charges.

  2. Potassium acceptor doping of ZnO crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Parmar, Narendra S. Lynn, K. G.; Corolewski, Caleb D.; McCluskey, Matthew D.

    2015-05-15

    ZnO bulk single crystals were doped with potassium by diffusion at 950°C. Positron annihilation spectroscopy confirms the filling of zinc vacancies and a different trapping center for positrons. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements show the diffusion of potassium up to 10 μm with concentration ∼1 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3}. IR measurements show a local vibrational mode (LVM) at 3226 cm{sup −1}, at a temperature of 9 K, in a potassium doped sample that was subsequently hydrogenated. The LVM is attributed to an O–H bond-stretching mode adjacent to a potassium acceptor. When deuterium substitutes for hydrogen, a peak is observed at 2378 cm{sup −1}. The O-H peak is much broader than the O-D peak, perhaps due to an unusually low vibrational lifetime. The isotopic frequency ratio is similar to values found in other hydrogen complexes. Potassium doping increases the resistivity up to 3 orders of magnitude at room temperature. The doped sample has a donor level at 0.30 eV.

  3. Poly(trifluoromethyl)azulenes: structures and acceptor properties

    SciTech Connect

    Clikeman, Tyler T.; Bukovsky, Eric V.; Kuvychko, Igor V.; San, Long K.; Deng, Shihu; Wang, Xue B.; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Strauss, Steven H.; Boltalina, Olga V.

    2014-07-10

    Azulene is a non-alternant, non-benzenoid aromatic hydrocarbon with an intense blue colour, a dipole moment of 1.0 D,1 positive electron affinity, and an “anomalous” emission from the second excited state in violation of Kasha’s rule.2,3 Azulene’s unique properties have potential uses in molecular switches,4,5 molecular diodes,6 organic photovoltaics,7 and charge transfer complexes.8-12 Introduction of electron-withdrawing groups to the azulenic core, such as CN,8,13,14 halogens,15-19 and CF3,20,21 can enhance certain electrical and photophysical properties. In this work, we report six new trifluoromethyl derivatives of azulene (AZUL), three isomers of AZUL(CF3)3 and three isomers of AZUL(CF3)4, and the first X-ray structure of a π-stacked donor-acceptor complex of a trifluoromethyl azulene with donor pyrene.

  4. Arabidopsis Nitrate Transporter NRT1.9 Is Important in Phloem Nitrate Transport[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Yun; Tsay, Yi-Fang

    2011-01-01

    This study of the Arabidopsis thaliana nitrate transporter NRT1.9 reveals an important function for a NRT1 family member in phloem nitrate transport. Functional analysis in Xenopus laevis oocytes showed that NRT1.9 is a low-affinity nitrate transporter. Green fluorescent protein and β-glucuronidase reporter analyses indicated that NRT1.9 is a plasma membrane transporter expressed in the companion cells of root phloem. In nrt1.9 mutants, nitrate content in root phloem exudates was decreased, and downward nitrate transport was reduced, suggesting that NRT1.9 may facilitate loading of nitrate into the root phloem and enhance downward nitrate transport in roots. Under high nitrate conditions, the nrt1.9 mutant showed enhanced root-to-shoot nitrate transport and plant growth. We conclude that phloem nitrate transport is facilitated by expression of NRT1.9 in root companion cells. In addition, enhanced root-to-shoot xylem transport of nitrate in nrt1.9 mutants points to a negative correlation between xylem and phloem nitrate transport. PMID:21571952

  5. Challenges with nitrate therapy and nitrate tolerance: prevalence, prevention, and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Thadani, Udho

    2014-08-01

    Nitrate therapy has been an effective treatment for ischemic heart disease for over 100 years. The anti-ischemic and exercise-promoting benefits of sublingually administered nitrates are well established. Nitroglycerin is indicated for the relief of an established attack of angina and for prophylactic use, but its effects are short lived. In an effort to increase the duration of beneficial effects, long-acting orally administered and topical applications of nitrates have been developed; however, following their continued or frequent daily use, patients soon develop tolerance to these long-acting nitrate preparations. Once tolerance develops, patients begin losing the protective effects of the long-acting nitrate therapy. By providing a nitrate-free interval, or declining nitrate levels at night, one can overcome or reduce the development of tolerance, but cannot provide 24-h anti-anginal and anti-ischemic protection. In addition, patients may be vulnerable to occurrence of rebound angina and myocardial ischemia during periods of absent nitrate levels at night and early hours of the morning, and worsening of exercise capacity prior to the morning dose of the medication. This has been a concern with nitroglycerin patches but not with oral formulations of isosorbide-5 mononitrates, and has not been adequately studied with isosorbide dinitrate. This paper describes problems associated with nitrate tolerance, reviews mechanisms by which nitrate tolerance and loss of efficacy develop, and presents strategies to avoid nitrate tolerance and maintain efficacy when using long-acting nitrate formulations.

  6. REDUCTION OF NITRATE THROUGH THE USE OF NITRATE REDUCTASE FOR THE SMARTCHEM AUTOANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The standard method for the determination of nitrate in drinking water, USEPA Method 353.2 “Determination of Nitrate-Nitrite by Automated Colorimetry,” employs cadmium as the reductant for the conversion of nitrate to nitrite. The nitrite is then analyzed colorimetrically by way ...

  7. Alkyl Nitrates and Oxidized Volatile Organic Compounds during NACHTT: Influence on Reactive Chlorine Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarthout, R.; Sive, B. C.; Russo, R. S.; Zhou, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested that reactive chlorine species can contribute substantially to the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere and also influence tropospheric ozone chemistry in areas far from dominant marine sources. The photochemical processing of polluted air masses containing can potentially affect the formation of chlorine radical (Cl) through various processes involving hydrocarbons and NOx (NO + NO2). Organic peroxy radicals can react with nitric oxide (NO) to form alkyl nitrates or to produce nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs), including alcohols, aldehydes and ketones. Aldehydes can further react with NO2 to form peroxyacyl nitrates (PAN). Alkyl nitrates and PAN can serve as reservoirs for long range transport of NOx and can influence Cl production in remote areas. In order to further elucidate the influence of OVOCs and alkyl nitrates on chlorine activation processes, whole air samples were collected hourly during the Nitrogen, Aerosol Composition and Halogens on a Tall Tower (NACHTT) campaign at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory in Erie, Colorado from February 18 through March 11, 2011. Profile samples up to 250 m were also collected throughout the campaign. Samples were analyzed for a comprehensive suite of volatile organic compounds, including OVOCs and C1 to C5 alkyl nitrates, using a five channel gas chromatographic analytical system. Alkyl nitrates and OVOCs were abundant throughout the campaign. Total alkyl nitrate mixing ratios ranged from 13 to 227 pptv with 2-butyl nitrate and 2-propyl nitrate accounting for over half of this total. Ethanol was the most abundant OVOC followed by methanol with median mixing ratios of 8.5 ppbv and 5.6 ppbv, respectively. This presentation will focus on the influence the observed alkyl nitrate and OVOC mixing ratios and air mass photochemical processing on Cl cycling.

  8. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Nitric Acid, Nitrates, and Nitro Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretherick, Leslie

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are the potential hazards associated with nitric acid, inorganic and organic nitrate salts, alkyl nitrates, acyl nitrates, aliphatic nitro compounds, aromatic nitro compounds, and nitration reactions. (CW)

  9. Regulation of nitrate assimilation in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Yoshitake; Shi, Wei; Takatani, Nobuyuki; Aichi, Makiko; Maeda, Shin-ichi; Watanabe, Satoru; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Omata, Tatsuo

    2011-02-01

    Nitrate assimilation by cyanobacteria is inhibited by the presence of ammonium in the growth medium. Both nitrate uptake and transcription of the nitrate assimilatory genes are regulated. The major intracellular signal for the regulation is, however, not ammonium or glutamine, but 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG), whose concentration changes according to the change in cellular C/N balance. When nitrogen is limiting growth, accumulation of 2-OG activates the transcription factor NtcA to induce transcription of the nitrate assimilation genes. Ammonium inhibits transcription by quickly depleting the 2-OG pool through its metabolism via the glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase cycle. The P(II) protein inhibits the ABC-type nitrate transporter, and also nitrate reductase in some strains, by an unknown mechanism(s) when the cellular 2-OG level is low. Upon nitrogen limitation, 2-OG binds to P(II) to prevent the protein from inhibiting nitrate assimilation. A pathway-specific transcriptional regulator NtcB activates the nitrate assimilation genes in response to nitrite, either added to the medium or generated intracellularly by nitrate reduction. It plays an important role in selective activation of the nitrate assimilation pathway during growth under a limited supply of nitrate. P(II) was recently shown to regulate the activity of NtcA negatively by binding to PipX, a small coactivator protein of NtcA. On the basis of accumulating genome information from a variety of cyanobacteria and the molecular genetic data obtained from the representative strains, common features and group- or species-specific characteristics of the response of cyanobacteria to nitrogen is summarized and discussed in terms of ecophysiological significance.

  10. Role of Bradyrhizobium japonicum cytochrome c550 in nitrite and nitrate respiration.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Emilio; Bedmar, Eulogio J; Richardson, David J; Delgado, María J

    2008-02-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum cytochrome c(550), encoded by cycA, has been previously suggested to play a role in denitrification, the respiratory reduction of nitrate to dinitrogen. However, the exact role of this cytochrome in the denitrification process is unknown. This study shows that cytochrome c(550) is involved in electron transfer to the copper-containing nitrite reductase of B. japonicum, as revealed by the inability of a cycA mutant strain to consume nitrite and, consequently, to grow under denitrifying conditions with nitrite as the electron acceptor. Mutation of cycA had no apparent effect on methylviologen-dependent nitrite reductase activity. However, succinate-dependent nitrite reduction was largely inhibited, suggesting that c(550) is the in vivo electron donor to copper-containing nitrite reductase. In addition, this study demonstrates that a cytochrome c(550) mutation has a negative effect on expression of the periplasmic nitrate reductase. This phenotype can be rescued by extending the growth period of the cells. A model is proposed whereby a mutation in cycA reduces expression of the cbb(3)-type oxidase, affecting oxygen consumption rate by the cells and consequently preventing maximal expression of the periplasmic nitrate reductase during the first days of the growth period.

  11. Rates of primary electron transfer reactions in the photosystem I reaction center reconstituted with different quinones as the secondary acceptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kumazaki, Shigeichi; Kandori, Hideki; Yoshihara, Keitaro ); Iwaki, Masayo; Itoh, Shigeru ); Ikegamu, Isamu )

    1994-10-27

    Rates of sequential electron transfer reactions from the primary electron donor chlorophyll dimer (P700) to the electron acceptor chlorophyll a-686 (A[sub 0]) and to the secondary acceptor quinone (Q[sub [phi

  12. Gene and protein expression profiles of Shewanella oneidensis during anaerobic growth with different electron acceptors.

    SciTech Connect

    Beliaev, A. S.; Thompson, D. K.; Khare, T.; Lim, H.; Brandt, C. C.; Li, G.; Murray, A. E.; Heidelberg, J. F.; Giometti, C. S.; Yates, J., III; Nealson, K. H.; Tiedje, J. M.; Zhou, J.; Biosciences Division; ORNL; Scripps Research Inst.; Michigan State Univ.; The Inst. for Genomic Research; Jet Propulsion Laboratory; California Inst. of Tech.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in mRNA and protein expression profiles of Shewanella oneidenesis MR-1 during switch from aerobic to fumarate-, Fe(III)-, or nitrate-reducing conditions were examined using DNA microarrays and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE). In response to changes in growth conditions, 121 of the 691 arrayed genes displayed at least a two-fold difference in transcript abundance as determined by microarray analysis. Genes involved in aerobic respiration encoding cytochrome c and d oxidases and TCA cycle enzymes were repressed under anaerobic conditions. Genes induced during anaerobic respiration included those involved in cofactor biosynthesis and assembly (moaACE, ccmHF, nosD, cysG), substrate transport (cysUP, cysTWA, dcuB), and anaerobic energy metabolism (dmsAB, psrC, pshA, hyaABC, hydA). Transcription of genes encoding a periplasmic nitrate reductase (napBHGA), cytochrome c{sub 552}, and prismane was elevated 8- to 56-fold in response to the presence of nitrate, while cymA, ifcA, and frdA were specifically induced three- to eightfold under fumarate-reducing conditions. The mRNA levels for two oxidoreductase-like genes of unknown function and several cell envelope genes involved in multidrug resistance increased two- to fivefold specifically under Fe(III)-reducing conditions. Analysis of protein expression profiles under aerobic and anaerobic conditions revealed 14 protein spots that showed significant differences in abundance on 2-D gels. Protein identification by mass spectrometry indicated that the expression of prismane, dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase, and alcaligin siderophore biosynthesis protein correlated with the microarray data.

  13. Nitrate Reduction Functional Genes and Nitrate Reduction Potentials Persist in Deeper Estuarine Sediments. Why?

    PubMed Central

    Papaspyrou, Sokratis; Smith, Cindy J.; Dong, Liang F.; Whitby, Corinne; Dumbrell, Alex J.; Nedwell, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) are processes occurring simultaneously under oxygen-limited or anaerobic conditions, where both compete for nitrate and organic carbon. Despite their ecological importance, there has been little investigation of how denitrification and DNRA potentials and related functional genes vary vertically with sediment depth. Nitrate reduction potentials measured in sediment depth profiles along the Colne estuary were in the upper range of nitrate reduction rates reported from other sediments and showed the existence of strong decreasing trends both with increasing depth and along the estuary. Denitrification potential decreased along the estuary, decreasing more rapidly with depth towards the estuary mouth. In contrast, DNRA potential increased along the estuary. Significant decreases in copy numbers of 16S rRNA and nitrate reducing genes were observed along the estuary and from surface to deeper sediments. Both metabolic potentials and functional genes persisted at sediment depths where porewater nitrate was absent. Transport of nitrate by bioturbation, based on macrofauna distributions, could only account for the upper 10 cm depth of sediment. A several fold higher combined freeze-lysable KCl-extractable nitrate pool compared to porewater nitrate was detected. We hypothesised that his could be attributed to intracellular nitrate pools from nitrate accumulating microorganisms like Thioploca or Beggiatoa. However, pyrosequencing analysis did not detect any such organisms, leaving other bacteria, microbenthic algae, or foraminiferans which have also been shown to accumulate nitrate, as possible candidates. The importance and bioavailability of a KCl-extractable nitrate sediment pool remains to be tested. The significant variation in the vertical pattern and abundance of the various nitrate reducing genes phylotypes reasonably suggests differences in their activity throughout the sediment column. This

  14. Physiological and metabolic analysis of nitrate reduction on poly-gamma-glutamic acid synthesis in Bacillus licheniformis WX-02.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Gou, Xiangyong; Long, Dan; Ji, Zhixia; Hu, Lifang; Xu, Dihong; Liu, Jun; Chen, Shouwen

    2014-11-01

    Nitrate is an important nitrogen source for organism, but whether and how nitrate improves poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) production of bacterial is not clear. The effect of nitrate on γ-PGA production of Bacillus licheniformis WX-02 was investigated. By addition of 50 mmol/L nitrate, the γ-PGA yield reached 12.3 ± 0.21 g/L, which increased 2.3-fold compared to the control. The mechanism of enhanced γ-PGA production was further investigated by analysis of nitrate reduction, physiology, pyruvate overflow metabolism and energy synthesis. Nitrate reduction was only carried out in the middle stage of γ-PGA fermentation. The result of consumption of nutrients showed that glucose uptake was not effected and the L-glutamic acid utilization efficiency increased from 48.3 to 77.0 %. The date of overflow metabolism obtained from high-performance liquid chromatography showed that the metabolism of pyruvate, formate, lactate and acetoin was both heightened by nitrate reduction, while the 2,3-butanediol biosynthesis was decreased. Meanwhile, the change of energy indicated that more ATP was synthesized during nitrate reduction. In summary, nitrate was a positive effector of γ-PGA biosynthesis in B. licheniformis WX-02 and nitrate reduction affected multi-metabolism pathways, including glycolysis, overflow metabolism and energy metabolism.

  15. Added value of total serum nitrate/nitrite for prediction of cardiovascular disease in middle east caucasian residents in Tehran.

    PubMed

    Hadaegh, Farzad; Asgari, Samaneh; Bozorgmanesh, Mohammadreza; Jeddi, Sajad; Azizi, Fereidoun; Ghasemi, Asghar

    2016-04-01

    Data on the association between serum nitrate/nitrite and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is controversial; the aim of this study was to examine the potential utility of serum nitrate/nitrite in prediction of CVD. A total of 2443 adult participants, free from CVD at baseline were included. The probability of developing CVD was estimated by incorporating traditional CVD risk factors into a logistic regression model in the presence of serum nitrate/nitrite. The probability of CVD was calculated using Ln-transformed CVD risk factors as a covariate in the presence of Ln-transformed nitrate/nitrite in the final model. The added value of nitrate/nitrite was estimated using receiver operating characteristic curves and the net reclassification index (NRI). During follow-up, 169 events occurred. The multivariate odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for each 1 unit of increase in the Ln-transformed traditional risk factors and Ln-transformed nitrate/nitrite, were 3.20 (2.67-3.84) and 1.35 (1.01-1.80) for incident CVD, respectively. The areas under the curves of discrimination for models with and without nitrate/nitrite were not significantly different; however, incorporating nitrate/nitrite to the traditional CVD risk model can help appropriately reclassify over 6% of individuals at risk. In conclusion, serum nitrate/nitrite levels were independently associated with incident CVD. Measurement of serum nitrate/nitrite provided information beyond individual data on risk factors and improved prediction of CVD.

  16. Temporal patterns of tyrosine nitration in embryo heart development

    PubMed Central

    Viera, Liliana; Radmilovich, Milka; Vargas, Marcelo R.; Dennys, Cassandra N.; Wilson, Landon; Barnes, Stephen; Franco, Maria Clara; Beckman, Joseph S.; Estévez, Alvaro G.

    2012-01-01

    Tyrosine nitration is a biomarker for the production of peroxynitrite and other reactive nitrogen species. Nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity is present in many pathological conditions including several cardiac diseases. Because the events observed during heart failure may recapitulate some aspects of development, we tested whether nitrotyrosine is present during normal development of the rat embryo heart and its potential relationship in cardiac remodeling through apoptosis. Nitric oxide (NO) production is highly dynamic during development, but whether peroxynitrite and nitrotyrosine are formed during normal embryonic development has received little attention. Rat embryo hearts exhibited strong nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity in endocardial and myocardial cells of the atria and ventricles from E12 to E18. After E18, nitrotyrosine staining faded and disappeared entirely by birth. Tyrosine nitration in the myocardial tissue coincided with elevated protein expression of nitric oxide synthases (eNOS and iNOS). The immunoreactivity for these NOS isoforms remained elevated even after nitrotyrosine had disappeared. Tyrosine nitration did not correlate with cell death or proliferation of cardiac cells. Analysis of tryptic peptides by MALDI-TOF shows that nitration occurs in actin, myosin, and the mitochondrial ATP synthase alpha chain. These results suggest that reactive nitrogen species are not restricted to pathological conditions but may play a role during normal embryonic development. PMID:23195686

  17. Dietary Nitrate, Nitric Oxide, and Cardiovascular Health.

    PubMed

    Bondonno, Catherine P; Croft, Kevin D; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2016-09-09

    Emerging evidence strongly suggests that dietary nitrate, derived in the diet primarily from vegetables, could contribute to cardiovascular health via effects on nitric oxide (NO) status. NO plays an essential role in cardiovascular health. It is produced via the classical L-arginine-NO-synthase pathway and the recently discovered enterosalivary nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway. The discovery of this alternate pathway has highlighted dietary nitrate as a candidate for the cardioprotective effect of a diet rich in fruit and vegetables. Clinical trials with dietary nitrate have observed improvements in blood pressure, endothelial function, ischemia-reperfusion injury, arterial stiffness, platelet function, and exercise performance with a concomitant augmentation of markers of NO status. While these results are indicative of cardiovascular benefits with dietary nitrate intake, there is still a lingering concern about nitrate in relation to methemoglobinemia, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. It is the purpose of this review to present an overview of NO and its critical role in cardiovascular health; to detail the observed vascular benefits of dietary nitrate intake through effects on NO status as well as to discuss the controversy surrounding the possible toxic effects of nitrate.

  18. COMPARTMENTAL MODEL OF NITRATE RETENTION IN STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A compartmental modeling approach is presented to route nitrate retention along a cascade of stream reach sections. A process transfer function is used for transient storage equations with first order reaction terms to represent nitrate uptake in the free stream, and denitrifica...

  19. Intravesical silver nitrate for refractory hemorrhagic cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Brian D.; Boorjian, Stephen A.; Ziegelmann, Matthew J.; Joyce, Daniel D.; Linder, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hemorrhagic cystitis is a challenging clinical entity with limited evidence available to guide treatment. The use of intravesical silver nitrate has been reported, though supporting literature is sparse. Here, we sought to assess outcomes of patients treated with intravesical silver nitrate for refractory hemorrhagic cystitis. Material and methods We identified nine patients with refractory hemorrhagic cystitis treated at our institution with intravesical silver nitrate between 2000–2015. All patients had failed previous continuous bladder irrigation with normal saline and clot evacuation. Treatment success was defined as requiring no additional therapy beyond normal saline irrigation after silver nitrate instillation prior to hospital discharge. Results Median patient age was 80 years (IQR 73, 82). Radiation was the most common etiology for hemorrhagic cystitis 89% (8/9). Two patients underwent high dose (0.1%–0.4%) silver nitrate under anesthesia, while the remaining seven were treated with doses from 0.01% to 0.1% via continuous bladder irrigation for a median of 3 days (range 2–4). All nine patients (100%) had persistent hematuria despite intravesical silver nitrate therapy, requiring additional interventions and red blood cell transfusion during the hospitalization. There were no identified complications related to intravesical silver nitrate instillation. Conclusion Although well tolerated, we found that intravesical silver nitrate was ineffective for bleeding control, suggesting a limited role for this agent in the management of patients with hemorrhagic cystitis. PMID:27635296

  20. NITRATE CONTAMINATION OF GROUND WATER (GW-761)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The occurrence of nitrate and related compounds in ground water is discussed from the perspectives of its natural as well as anthropogenic origins. A brief explanation of the nitrogen cycle touches on the production as well as utilization of ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, and nitrog...

  1. The contributions of nitrate uptake and efflux to isotope fractionation during algal nitrate assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karsh, K. L.; Trull, T. W.; Sigman, D. M.; Thompson, P. A.; Granger, J.

    2014-05-01

    In order to strengthen environmental application of nitrate N and O isotopes, we measured the N and O isotopic fractionation associated with cellular nitrate uptake and efflux in the nitrate-assimilating marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii. We isolated nitrate uptake and efflux from nitrate reduction by growing the cells in the presence of tungsten, which substitutes for molybdenum in assimilatory nitrate reductase, yielding an inactive enzyme. After growth on ammonium and then N starvation, cells were exposed to nitrate. Numerical models fit to the evolution of intracellular nitrate concentration and N and O isotopic composition yielded distinct N isotope effects (15ɛ) for nitrate uptake and nitrate efflux (2.0 ± 0.3‰ and 1.2 ± 0.4‰, respectively). The O isotope effects (18ɛ) for nitrate uptake and nitrate efflux were indistinguishable (2.8 ± 0.6‰), yielding a ratio of O to N isotopic fractionation for uptake of 1.4 ± 0.4 and for efflux of 2.3 ± 0.9. The 15ɛ for nitrate uptake can account for at most 40% of the organism-level N isotope effect (15ɛorg) measured in laboratory studies of T. weissflogii and in the open ocean (typically 5‰ or greater). This observation supports previous evidence that most isotope fractionation during nitrate assimilation is due to intracellular nitrate reduction, with nitrate efflux allowing the signal to be communicated to the environment. An O to N fractionation ratio (18ɛorg:15ɛorg) of ˜1 has been measured for nitrate assimilation in algal cultures and linked to the N and O isotope effects of nitrate reductase. Our results suggest that the ratios of O to N fractionation for both nitrate uptake and efflux may be distinct from a ratio of 1, to a degree that could cause the net 18ɛorg:15ɛorg to rise appreciably above 1 when 15ɛorg is low (e.g., yielding a ratio of 1.1 when 15ɛorg is 5‰). However, field and culture studies have consistently measured nearly equivalent fractionation of N and O isotopes in

  2. Fluorinated arene, imide and unsaturated pyrrolidinone based donor acceptor conjugated polymers: Synthesis, structure-property and device studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liyanage, Arawwawala Don Thilanga

    After the discovery of doped polyacetylene, organic semiconductor materials are widely studied as high impending active components in consumer electronics. They have received substantial consideration due to their potential for structural tailoring, low cost, large area and mechanically flexible alternatives to common inorganic semiconductors. To acquire maximum use of these materials, it is essential to get a strong idea about their chemical and physical nature. Material chemist has an enormous role to play in this novel area, including development of efficient synthetic methodologies and control the molecular self-assembly and (opto)-electronic properties. The body of this thesis mainly focuses on the substituent effects: how different substituents affect the (opto)-electronic properties of the donor-acceptor (D-A) conjugated polymers. The main priority goes to understand, how different alkyl substituent effect to the polymer solubility, crystallinity, thermal properties (e.g.: glass transition temperature) and morphological order. Three classes of D-A systems were extensively studied in this work. The second chapter mainly focuses on the synthesis and structure-property study of fluorinated arene (TFB) base polymers. Here we used commercially available 1,4-dibromo-2,3,5,6-tetrafluorobenzene (TFB) as the acceptor material and prepare several polymers using 3,3'-dialkyl(3,3'-R2T2) or 3,3'-dialkoxy bithiophene (3,3'-RO2T2) units as electron donors. A detail study was done using 3,3'-bithiophene donor units incorporating branched alkoxy-functionalities by systematic variation of branching position and chain length. The study allowed disentangling the branching effects on (i) aggregation tendency, intermolecular arrangement, (iii) solid state optical energy gaps, and (iv) electronic properties in an overall consistent picture, which might guide future polymer synthesis towards optimized materials for opto-electronic applications. The third chapter mainly focused on

  3. Synthesis and electrochemical studies of charge-transfer complexes of thiazolidine-2,4-dione with σ and π acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Prashant; Kumar, Pradeep; Katyal, Anju; Kalra, Rashmi; Dass, Sujata K.; Prakash, Satya; Chandra, Ramesh

    2010-03-01

    In the present work, we report the synthesis and characterization of novel charge-transfer complexes of thiazolidine-2,4-dione (TZD) with sigma acceptor (iodine) and pi acceptors (chloranil, dichlorodicyanoquinone, picric acid and duraquinone). We also evaluated their thermal and electrochemical properties and we conclude that these complexes are frequency dependent. Charge-transfer complex between thiazolidine-2,4-dione and iodine give best conductivity. In conclusion, complex with sigma acceptors are more conducting than with pi acceptors.

  4. Nitrate-nitrogen levels in rural drinking water: Is there an association with age-related macular degeneration?

    PubMed

    Klein, Barbara E K; McElroy, Jane A; Klein, Ronald; Howard, Kerri P; Lee, Kristine E

    2013-01-01

    We examined the association of nitrate-nitrogen exposure from rural private drinking water and incidence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). All participants in the Beaver Dam Eye Study (53916 improvement plan code) completed a questionnaire and had an ocular examination including standardized, graded fundus photographs at five examinations. Only information from rural residents in that study are included in this report. Data from an environmental monitoring study with probabilistic-based agro-chemical sampling, including nitrate-nitrogen, of rural private drinking water were available. Incidence of early AMD was associated with elevated nitrate-nitrogen levels in rural private drinking water supply (10.0% for low, 19.2% for medium, and 26.1% for high nitrate-nitrogen level in the right eye). The odds ratios (ORs) were 1.77 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.12-2.78) for medium and 2.88 (95% CI: 1.59-5.23) for high nitrate-nitrogen level. Incidence of late AMD was increased for those with medium or high levels of nitrate-nitrogen compared to low levels (2.3% for low and 5.1% for the medium or high nitrate-nitrogen level, for the right eye). The OR for medium or high nitrate-nitrogen groups was 2.80 (95% CI: 1.07-7.31) compared to the low nitrate-nitrogen group.

  5. Bacterial Nitration of 4-Chlorobiphenyl

    PubMed Central

    Sylvestre, Michel; Massé, Robert; Messier, François; Fauteux, Johanne; Bisaillon, Jean-Guy; Beaudet, Réjean

    1982-01-01

    In the course of a study dealing with the biodegradation of 4-chlorobiphenyl by strain B-206, we noticed that the gram-negative bacterium accumulated different metabolic intermediates depending on the nitrogen source of the medium. Hence, in the presence of nitrate, strain B-206 produced four compounds which were identified as 2- and 4-hydroxy-4′-chlorobiphenyl and 2- and 4-hydroxy-mononitro-4′-chlorobiphenyl. The accumulation of these compounds in the culture medium indicated the presence of a monooxygenase in strain B-206 leading to the production of arene oxide intermediates. The possible transformation of 4-chlorobiphenyl to an arene oxide by this bacterial strain is a matter of concern because of the high reactivity of these arene oxides with biological material. PMID:16346111

  6. Global distribution of peroxyacetyl nitrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, H. B.; Salas, L. J.; Viezee, W.

    1986-01-01

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) atmospheric concentration samples were collected hourly from an ocean vessel 50 mi off the continental coast traveling from Seattle to Chile in 1984. Air concentration data for PAN and light hydrocarbons (LHC) were also taken by aircraft in the same period over Wyoming and Colorado and over the eastern Pacific. The PAN concentrations were higher and more variable in the Northern Hemisphere than in the Southern Hemisphere, increased with altitude, and were higher in the winter than in summer. The summer PAN concentrations were higher in the continental troposphere than in the marine troposphere. The results show that photochemical models of the atmosphere which do not account for the reaction between nonmethane hydrocarbons and PAN will probably overestimate the abundances of NO(x) and HNO3. The collection of further PAN concentration data is recommended as a means to characterizing the moderating role of PAN in the photochemistry of the troposphere.

  7. PREPARATION OF DIBASIC ALUMINUM NITRATE

    DOEpatents

    Gresky, A.T.; Nurmi, E.O.; Foster, D.L.; Wischow, R.P.; Savolainen, J.E.

    1960-04-01

    A method is given for the preparation and recovery of basic aluminum nltrates having an OH: Al ratio of at least two, comprising two steps. First, metallic aluminum is dissolved in aqueous Al(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/, in the presence of a small quantity of elemental or ionic mercury, to increase its Al: NO/sub 3/ ratio into the range 1 to 1.2. The resulting aqueous solution is then added to an excess of a special organic solvent, typically a mixture of five parts methanol and six parts diethyl ether, whereupon the basic aluminum nitrate, e.g. Al/sub 6/(OH)/sub 13/-(NO/sub 3/)/sub 5/, recoverably precipitates.

  8. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-12-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) is a fertilizer, yet becomes an explosive upon a small addition of chemical impurities. The origin of enhanced chemical sensitivity in impure AN (or AN mixtures) is not well understood, posing significant safety issues in using AN even today. To remedy the situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN and its mixtures with hexane (ANFO-AN mixed with fuel oil) and Aluminum (Ammonal) at high pressures and temperatures, using diamond anvil cells (DAC) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that pure AN decomposes to N2, N2O, and H2O at the onset of the melt, whereas the mixtures, ANFO and Ammonal, decompose at substantially lower temperatures. The present results also confirm the recently proposed phase IV-IV' transition above 17 GPa and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400°C.

  9. Use of nitrates in ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Giuseppe, Cocco; Paul, Jerie; Hans-Ulrich, Iselin

    2015-01-01

    Short-acting nitrates are beneficial in acute myocardial ischemia. However, many unresolved questions remain about the use of long-acting nitrates in stable ischemic heart disease. The use of long-acting nitrates is weakened by the development of endothelial dysfunction and tolerance. Also, we currently ignore whether lower doses of transdermal nitroglycerin would be better than those presently used. Multivariate analysis data from large nonrandomized studies suggested that long-acting nitrates increase the incidence of acute coronary syndromes, while data from another multivariate study indicate that they have positive effects. Because of methodological differences and open questions, the two studies cannot be compared. A study in Japanese patients with vasospastic angina has shown that, when compared with calcium antagonists, long-acting nitrates do not improve long-term prognosis and that the risk for cardiac adverse events increases with the combined therapy. We have many unanswered questions.

  10. Efficient syntheses of climate relevant isoprene nitrates and (1R,5S)-(-)-myrtenol nitrate.

    PubMed

    Bew, Sean P; Hiatt-Gipson, Glyn D; Mills, Graham P; Reeves, Claire E

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the chemoselective synthesis of several important, climate relevant isoprene nitrates using silver nitrate to mediate a 'halide for nitrate' substitution. Employing readily available starting materials, reagents and Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons chemistry the synthesis of easily separable, synthetically versatile 'key building blocks' (E)- and (Z)-3-methyl-4-chlorobut-2-en-1-ol as well as (E)- and (Z)-1-((2-methyl-4-bromobut-2-enyloxy)methyl)-4-methoxybenzene has been achieved using cheap, 'off the shelf' materials. Exploiting their reactivity we have studied their ability to undergo an 'allylic halide for allylic nitrate' substitution reaction which we demonstrate generates (E)- and (Z)-3-methyl-4-hydroxybut-2-enyl nitrate, and (E)- and (Z)-2-methyl-4-hydroxybut-2-enyl nitrates ('isoprene nitrates') in 66-80% overall yields. Using NOESY experiments the elucidation of the carbon-carbon double bond configuration within the purified isoprene nitrates has been established. Further exemplifying our 'halide for nitrate' substitution chemistry we outline the straightforward transformation of (1R,2S)-(-)-myrtenol bromide into the previously unknown monoterpene nitrate (1R,2S)-(-)-myrtenol nitrate.

  11. 70. INTERIOR VIEW OF AMMONIUM NITRATE HOUSE, LOOKING AT AMMONIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    70. INTERIOR VIEW OF AMMONIUM NITRATE HOUSE, LOOKING AT AMMONIUM NITRATE IN STORAGE. APRIL 18, 1919. - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  12. Nitrate dynamics within a stream-lake network through time and space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loken, L. C.; Crawford, J. T.; Childress, E. S.; Casson, N. J.; Stanley, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrate dynamics in streams are governed by biology, hydrology, and geomorphology, and the ability to parse these drivers apart has improved with the development of accurate high-frequency sensors. By combining a stationary Eulerian and a quasi-Lagrangian sensor platform, we investigated the timing of nitrate flushing and identified locations of elevated biogeochemical cycling along a stream-lake network in Northern Wisconsin, USA. Two years of continuous oxygen, carbon dioxide, and discharge measurements were used to compute gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) downstream of a wetland reach of Allequash Creek. Metabolic rates and flow patterns were compared with nitrate concentrations measured every 30 minutes using an optical sensor. Additionally, we floated a sensor array from the headwater spring ponds through a heterogeneous stream reach consisting of wetlands, beaver ponds, forested segments, and two lakes. Two distinct temporal patterns of stream nitrate concentrations were observed. During high flow events such as spring snowmelt and summer rain events, nitrate concentrations increased from ~5 μM (baseflow) to 12 μM, suggesting flushing from catchment sources. During baseflow conditions, nitrate followed a diel cycle with a 0.3-1.0 μM daytime draw down. Daily nitrate reduction was positively correlated with GPP calculated from oxygen and carbon dioxide records. Lastly, spatial analyses revealed lowest nitrate concentrations in the wetland reach, approximately 2-3 μM lower than the upstream spring ponds, and downstream lakes and forested reaches. This snapshot implies greater nitrate removal potential in the wetland reach likely driven by denitrification in organic rich sediments and macrophyte uptake in the open canopy stream segment. Taken together the temporal and spatial results show the dynamics of hydrology, geomorphology, and biology to influence nitrate delivery and variability in ecosystem processing through a stream

  13. The effect of environmental and therapeutic concentrations of antibiotics on nitrate reduction rates in river sediment.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chen; Dinh, Quoc Tuc; Chevreuil, Marc; Garnier, Josette; Roose-Amsaleg, Céline; Labadie, Pierre; Laverman, Anniet M

    2013-07-01

    The use of antibiotics in both human and veterinary medicine has led to increased presence of these compounds and antibiotic resistance in the environment. In this study, the effect of low, environmentally relevant (mg L(-1)) concentrations of vancomycin (VA), flumequine (FLU), and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) on nitrate reduction rates was studied in river sediments. Nitrate reduction rates were determined by supplying intact sediments for several weeks with both nitrate and antibiotics (ng L(-1), μg L(-1), and mg L(-1) concentrations), including a non-amended control. Furthermore the concentrations of the three investigated antibiotics were measured in the initial (natural) sediments and the sediments supplied with the antibiotics. The antibiotic concentrations in the sediments decreased (on average 62% for FLU and 93% for SMX) during the experiments, indicating loss of antibiotics due to sorption or (bio) degradation. Nitrate reduction rates were not affected by environmental concentrations of VA, FLU and SMX. FLU and SMX only partially inhibited nitrate reduction rates at high, therapeutic concentrations by 41 and 39% respectively. The three tested antibiotics significantly enhanced the production of nitrite, an intermediate in dissimilatory nitrate reduction. Nitrite production increased 1.9 and 1.4 fold for environmental VA concentrations (107 and 187 μg L(-1) respectively), application of 58 mg L(-1) SMX resulted in a 7.5 fold increase and augmented 16 and 8.5 fold in the presence of respectively 13 μg L(-1) and 52 mg L(-1) FLU. Even though inhibition of nitrate reduction rates was observed at therapeutic antibiotic concentrations, nitrate reduction proceeded under all experimental conditions, indicating the presence of resistance toward these antibiotics among the nitrate reducing bacteria. The accumulation of nitrite suggests that the nitrite reduction step was more affected than the overall nitrate reduction process.

  14. California GAMA Special Study: An isotopic and dissolved gas investigation of nitrate source and transport to a public supply well in California's Central Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, M J; Moran, J E; Esser, B K; Roberts, S K; Hillegonds, D J

    2010-04-14

    This study investigates nitrate contamination of a deep municipal drinking water production well in Ripon, CA to demonstrate the utility of natural groundwater tracers in constraining the sources and transport of nitrate to deep aquifers in the Central Valley. The goal of the study was to investigate the origin (source) of elevated nitrate and the potential for the deep aquifer to attenuate anthropogenic nitrate. The site is ideal for such an investigation. The production well is screened from 165-325 feet below ground surface and a number of nearby shallow and deep monitoring wells were available for sampling. Furthermore, potential sources of nitrate contamination to the well had been identified, including a fertilizer supply plant located approximately 1000 feet to the east and local almond groves. A variety of natural isotopic and dissolved gas tracers including {sup 3}H-{sup 3}He groundwater age and the isotopic composition of nitrate are applied to identify nitrate sources and to characterize nitrate transport. An advanced method for sampling production wells is employed to help identify contaminant contributions from specific screen intervals. Nitrate transport: Groundwater nitrate at this field site is not being actively denitrified. Groundwater parameters indicate oxic conditions, the dissolved gas data shows no evidence for excess nitrogen as the result of denitrification, and nitrate-N and -O isotope compositions do not display patterns typical of denitrification. Contaminant nitrate source: The ambient nitrate concentration in shallow groundwater at the Ripon site ({approx}12 mg/L as nitrate) is typical of shallow groundwaters affected by recharge from agricultural and urban areas. Nitrate concentrations in Ripon City Well 12 (50-58 mg/L as nitrate) are significantly higher than these ambient concentrations, indicating an additional source of anthropogenic nitrate is affecting groundwater in the capture zone of this municipal drinking water well. This

  15. Optical spectroscopy of single beryllium acceptors in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, P. V.; Kokurin, I. A.; Klimko, G. V.; Ivanov, S. V.; Ivánov, Yu. L.; Koenraad, P. M.; Silov, A. Yu.; Averkiev, N. S.

    2016-09-01

    We carry out microphotoluminescence measurements of an acceptor-bound exciton (A0X ) recombination in the applied magnetic field with a single impurity resolution. In order to describe the obtained spectra we develop a theoretical model taking into account a quantum well (QW) confinement, an electron-hole and hole-hole exchange interaction. By means of fitting the measured data with the model we are able to study the fine structure of individual acceptors inside the QW. The good agreement between our experiments and the model indicates that we observe single acceptors in a pure two-dimensional environment whose states are unstrained in the QW plain.

  16. Bacterial manganese reduction and growth with manganese oxide as the sole electron acceptor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Charles R.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    1988-01-01

    Microbes that couple growth to the reduction of manganese could play an important role in the biogeochemistry of certain anaerobic environments. Such a bacterium, Alteromonas putrefaciens MR-1, couples its growth to the reduction of manganese oxides only under anaerobic conditions. The characteristics of this reduction are consistent with a biological, and not an indirect chemical, reduction of manganese, which suggest that this bacterium uses manganic oxide as a terminal electron acceptor. It can also utilize a large number of other compounds as terminal electron acceptors; this versatility could provide a distinct advantage in environments where electron-acceptor concentrations may vary.

  17. Additive methane-mitigating effect between linseed oil and nitrate fed to cattle.

    PubMed

    Guyader, J; Eugène, M; Meunier, B; Doreau, M; Morgavi, D P; Silberberg, M; Rochette, Y; Gerard, C; Loncke, C; Martin, C

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to test the effect of linseed oil and nitrate fed alone or in combination on methane (CH4) emissions and diet digestibility in cows. The experiment was conducted as a 2 × 2 factorial design using 4 multiparous nonlactating Holstein cows (initial BW 656 ± 31 kg). Each experimental period lasted 5 wk, with measures performed in the final 3 wk (wk 3 to 5). Diets given on a DM basis were 1) control (CON; 50% natural grassland hay and 50% concentrate), 2) CON with 4% linseed oil (LIN), 3) CON with 3% calcium nitrate (NIT), and 4) CON with 4% linseed oil plus 3% calcium nitrate (LIN+NIT). Diets were offered twice daily and were formulated to deliver similar amounts (DM basis) of CP (12.2%), starch (25.5%), and NDF (39.5%). Feed offer was restricted to 90% of voluntary intake (12.4 kg DMI/d). Total tract digestibility and N balance were determined from total feces and urine collected separately for 6 d during wk 4. Daily CH4 emissions were quantified using open chambers for 4 d during wk 5. Rumen fermentation and microbial parameters were analyzed from samples taken before and 3 h after the morning feeding. Rumen concentrations of dissolved hydrogen (H2) were measured continuously up to 6 h after feeding using a H2 sensor. Compared with the CON diet linseed oil and nitrate decreased (P < 0.01) CH4 emissions (g/kg DMI) by 17 and 22%, respectively, when fed alone and by 32% when combined. The LIN diet reduced CH4 production throughout the day, increased (P = 0.02) propionate proportion, and decreased (P = 0.03) ruminal protozoa concentration compared with CON diet. The NIT diet strongly reduced CH4 production 3 h after feeding, with a simultaneous increase in rumen dissolved H2 concentration, suggesting that nitrate does not act only as an electron acceptor. As a combined effect, linseed plus nitrate also increased H2 concentrations in the rumen. Diets had no effect (P > 0.05) on total tract digestibility of nutrients, except linseed oil

  18. Molecular Signals Controlling the Inhibition of Nodulation by Nitrate in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    van Noorden, Giel E.; Verbeek, Rob; Dinh, Quy Dung; Jin, Jian; Green, Alexandra; Ng, Jason Liang Pin; Mathesius, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    The presence of nitrogen inhibits legume nodule formation, but the mechanism of this inhibition is poorly understood. We found that 2.5 mM nitrate and above significantly inhibited nodule initiation but not root hair curling in Medicago trunatula. We analyzed protein abundance in M. truncatula roots after treatment with either 0 or 2.5 mM nitrate in the presence or absence of its symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti after 1, 2 and 5 days following inoculation. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry was used to identify 106 differentially accumulated proteins responding to nitrate addition, inoculation or time point. While flavonoid-related proteins were less abundant in the presence of nitrate, addition of Nod gene-inducing flavonoids to the Sinorhizobium culture did not rescue nodulation. Accumulation of auxin in response to rhizobia, which is also controlled by flavonoids, still occurred in the presence of nitrate, but did not localize to a nodule initiation site. Several of the changes included defense- and redox-related proteins, and visualization of reactive oxygen species indicated that their induction in root hairs following Sinorhizobium inoculation was inhibited by nitrate. In summary, the presence of nitrate appears to inhibit nodulation via multiple pathways, including changes to flavonoid metabolism, defense responses and redox changes. PMID:27384556

  19. Site selectivity for protein tyrosine nitration: insights from features of structure and topological network.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shangli; Lian, Baofeng; Liang, Juan; Shi, Ting; Xie, Lu; Zhao, Yi-Lei

    2013-11-01

    Tyrosine nitration is a covalent post-translational modification, which regulates protein functions such as hindering tyrosine phosphorylation and affecting essential signal transductions in cells. Based on up-to-date proteomics data, tyrosine nitration appears to be a highly selective process since not all tyrosine residues in proteins or all proteins are nitrated in vivo. Quite a few investigations included the protein structural information from the RCSB PDB database, where near 100,000 high-quality three-dimensional structures are available. In this work, we analyzed the local protein structures and amino acid topological networks of the nitrated and non-nitrated tyrosine sites in nitrated proteins, including neighboring atomic distribution, amino acid pair (AAP) and amino acid triangle (AAT). It has been found that aromatic and aliphatic residues, particularly with large volume, aromatic, aliphatic, or acidic side chains, are disfavored for the nitration. After integrating these structural features and topological network features with traditional sequence features, the predictive model achieves a sensitivity of 63.30% and a specificity of 92.24%, resulting in a much better accuracy compared to the previous models with only protein sequence information. Our investigation implies that the site selectivity may stem from a more open, hydrophilic and high-pH chemical environment around the tyrosine residue.

  20. Structural basis for dynamic mechanism of nitrate/nitrite antiport by NarK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Masahiro; Takeda, Hironori; Kato, Hideaki E.; Doki, Shintaro; Ito, Koichi; Maturana, Andrés D.; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Nureki, Osamu

    2015-05-01

    NarK belongs to the nitrate/nitrite porter (NNP) family in the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) and plays a central role in nitrate uptake across the membrane in diverse organisms, including archaea, bacteria, fungi and plants. Although previous studies provided insight into the overall structure and the substrate recognition of NarK, its molecular mechanism, including the driving force for nitrate transport, remained elusive. Here we demonstrate that NarK is a nitrate/nitrite antiporter, using an in vitro reconstituted system. Furthermore, we present the high-resolution crystal structures of NarK from Escherichia coli in the nitrate-bound occluded, nitrate-bound inward-open and apo inward-open states. The integrated structural, functional and computational analyses reveal the nitrate/nitrite antiport mechanism of NarK, in which substrate recognition is coupled to the transport cycle by the concomitant movement of the transmembrane helices and the key tyrosine and arginine residues in the substrate-binding site.

  1. Structural basis for dynamic mechanism of nitrate/nitrite antiport by NarK

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Masahiro; Takeda, Hironori; Kato, Hideaki E.; Doki, Shintaro; Ito, Koichi; Maturana, Andrés D.; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Nureki, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    NarK belongs to the nitrate/nitrite porter (NNP) family in the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) and plays a central role in nitrate uptake across the membrane in diverse organisms, including archaea, bacteria, fungi and plants. Although previous studies provided insight into the overall structure and the substrate recognition of NarK, its molecular mechanism, including the driving force for nitrate transport, remained elusive. Here we demonstrate that NarK is a nitrate/nitrite antiporter, using an in vitro reconstituted system. Furthermore, we present the high-resolution crystal structures of NarK from Escherichia coli in the nitrate-bound occluded, nitrate-bound inward-open and apo inward-open states. The integrated structural, functional and computational analyses reveal the nitrate/nitrite antiport mechanism of NarK, in which substrate recognition is coupled to the transport cycle by the concomitant movement of the transmembrane helices and the key tyrosine and arginine residues in the substrate-binding site. PMID:25959928

  2. Mesomeric and twisted intramolecular-charge-transfer states as a key to polarity-dependent fluorescence of donor acceptor-substituted aryl pyrenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekhtyar, M.; Rettig, W.; Weigel, W.

    2008-03-01

    Computational study by the AM1 method has been performed for pyrene-based donor-acceptor-substituted systems, with the aim to elucidate the origin of their polarity-dependent fluorescence governed by mesomeric and twisted internal-charge-transfer (MICT and TICT, resp.) states. Using theoretical methods, principal relationships have been established between the constitution of arylpyrene derivatives (donor-acceptor strength of substituents, the substitution pattern, sterical hindrance, inclusion of additional aryl spacers between the donor and acceptor moieties, etc.) and environmental effects (solvent polarity and external electric field strength), and the properties of the MICT and TICT states (energy, localization, dipole moment, allowedness). These relationships have been compared to the experimental fluorescence properties. The substituent-induced donor-acceptor difference has been varied in a continuous way in both directions by employing point charges in the molecular surrounding ("sparkles"). A remarkable feature of the phenylpyrene molecule has thus been revealed: it can exist in two MICT and two TICT states, the CT states in each pair being oppositely polarized and much the same in energy. It is shown, moreover, that the quantum-chemically calculated trends in MICT and TICT energies in the families of related compounds can be qualitatively judged from simple MO considerations including the analysis of frontier MO energies and shapes for the isolated molecular subunits. The approach employed is, therefore, applicable as a first-step tool in the design of compounds with the desired features of polarity-sensitive fluorescence.

  3. Ignition requirements for organic-nitrate propagating reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Meacham, J.E.

    1997-09-25

    As part of the Organic Safety Project at the Hanford Site, theoretical and experimental investigations were performed at Fauske and Associates, Inc. to assess the ignition energy requirements for organic-nitrate propagating reactions. Theoretical considerations suggest that a minimum ignition energy requirement in excess of 1 J is required to produce sustained condensed-phase combustion with a stoichiometric organic-nitrate mixture in the absence of moisture and other diluents. This value is three to four orders of magnitude larger than that required to initiate combustion with flammable gas mixtures. It also is consistent with the finding that organic-nitrate mixtures are generally insensitive to spark, impact, shock, or friction. The necessary large ignition energy also is consistent with the extremely low burn velocities, 10 3 to 10 4 meters per second (m/s), characteristic of condensed-phase organic-nitrate propagating reactions. Experimental evaluations were made of the following ignition sources: hot metal spheres, electrically heated Nichrome wire coils, Watlow heaters, electric matches, and an arc welder. Results indicate that hot metal pieces are the most effective ignition source where the energy approaches the theoretical estimate of the minimum ignition energy requirement. However, the energy requirements increase rapidly with all ignition sources tested as deviations from dry stoichiometric conditions increase including lower fuel concentrations and increasing water concentrations. At the lower combustion limit and in the absence of water, the ignition energy requirement is well above 1000 J. For a stoichiometric organic-nitrate mixture with 10 weight percent (wt%) moisture, using hot metal spheres, the lowest ignition requirement also is measured to be above 1000 J. The use of electrically heated wire coils or Watlow heaters increases the value to above 10,000 J.

  4. Nitrate in watersheds: straight from soils to streams?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sudduth, Elizabeth B.; Perakis, Steven S.; Bernhardt, Emily S.

    2013-01-01

    Human activities are rapidly increasing the global supply of reactive N and substantially altering the structure and hydrologic connectivity of managed ecosystems. There is long-standing recognition that N must be removed along hydrologic flowpaths from uplands to streams, yet it has proven difficult to assess the generality of this removal across ecosystem types, and whether these patterns are influenced by land-use change. To assess how well upland nitrate (NO3-) loss is reflected in stream export, we gathered information from >50 watershed biogeochemical studies that reported nitrate concentrations ([NO3-]) for stream water and for either upslope soil solution or groundwater NO3- to examine whether stream export of NO3- accurately reflects upland NO3- losses. In this dataset, soil solution and streamwater [NO3-] were correlated across 40 undisturbed forest watersheds, with streamwater [NO3-] typically half (median = 50%) soil solution [NO3-]. A similar relationship was seen in 10 disturbed forest watersheds. However, for 12 watersheds with significant agricultural or urban development, the intercept and slope were both significantly higher than the relationship seen in forest watersheds. Differences in concentration between soil solution or groundwater and stream water may be attributed to biological uptake, microbial processes including denitrification, and/or preferential flow routing. The results of this synthesis are consistent with the hypotheses that undisturbed watersheds have a significant capacity to remove nitrate after it passes below the rooting zone and that land use changes tend to alter the efficiency or the length of watershed flowpaths, leading to reductions in nitrate removal and increased stream nitrate concentrations.

  5. Observation of nitrate coatings on atmospheric mineral dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. J.; Shao, L. Y.

    2009-03-01

    Nitrate compounds have received much attention because of their ability to alter the hygroscopic properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of mineral dust particles in the atmosphere. However, very little is known about specific characteristics of ambient nitrate-coated mineral particles on an individual particle scale. In this study, sample collection was conducted during brown haze and dust episodes between 24 May and 21 June 2007 in Beijing, northern China. Sizes, morphologies, and compositions of 332 mineral dust particles together with their coatings were analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalyses. Structures of some mineral particles were verified using selected-area electron diffraction (SAED). TEM observation indicates that approximately 90% of the collected mineral particles are covered by visible coatings in haze samples whereas only 5% are coated in the dust sample. 92% of the analyzed mineral particles are covered with Ca-, Mg-, and Na-rich coatings, and 8% are associated with K- and S-rich coatings. The majority of coatings contain Ca, Mg, O, and N with minor amounts of S and Cl, suggesting that they are possibly nitrates mixed with small amounts of sulfates and chlorides. These nitrate coatings are strongly correlated with the presence of alkaline mineral components (e.g., calcite and dolomite). CaSO4 particles with diameters from 10 to 500 nm were also detected in the coatings including Ca(NO3)2 and Mg(NO3)2. Our results indicate that mineral particles in brown haze episodes were involved in atmospheric heterogeneous reactions with two or more acidic gases (e.g., SO2, NO2, HCl, and HNO3). Mineral particles that acquire hygroscopic nitrate coatings tend to be more spherical and larger, enhancing their light scattering and CCN activity, both of which have cooling effects on the climate.

  6. Results from Second Round of Remediated Nitrate Salt Surrogate Formulation and Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Geoffrey Wayne; Leonard, Philip; Hartline, Ernest Leon; Tian, Hongzhao

    2016-04-04

    High Explosives and Technology (M-7) completed the second round of formulation and testing of Remediated Nitrate Salt (RNS) surrogates on March 17, 2016. This report summarizes the results of the work and also includes additional documentation required under test plan PLAN-TA9-2443 Rev B, "Remediated Nitrate Salt (RNS) Surrogate Formulation and Testing Standard Procedure", released February 16, 2016. All formulation and testing was carried out according to PLAN-TA9-2443 Rev B. Results from the first round of formulation and testing were documented in memorandum M7-16-6042, "Results from First Round of Remediated Nitrate Salt Surrogate Formulation and Testing."

  7. Co-Occurrence of Nitrate Reduction and Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane in Gulf of Mexico Cold Seep Habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, L.; Joye, S. B.

    2014-12-01

    Cold seeps are abundant in the Gulf of Mexico; they are fuelled by methane gas and hydrocarbon seepage at the seafloor and support diverse chemosynthetic microbial communities. Microorganisms form the base of the food chain at cold seeps, and high rates of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) are characteristic of these methane-rich environments. While sulfate is often the electron acceptor for AOM in cold seep environments, recent evidence suggests that AOM can also be coupled to nitrate reduction. Little is known about nitrogen cycling in these habitats, though recent work indicates that denitrification is an important process in oily and gassy seep sediments. The co-occurrence of nitrate reduction and AOM suggests a potential coupling between the two processes in our study area. We used stable isotope (15N) tracer techniques to measure the capacity of Northern Gulf of Mexico cold seep sediments to reduce nitrate by denitrification and anammox. These measurements were made in surface and sub-surface sediments in conjunction with measurements of AOM, and with quantification of various geochemical and molecular characteristics. Here, we present our measurements of denitrification and anammox capacity in the context of environmental characteristics. Additionally, we examine spatial trends in the co-occurrence of AOM and nitrate reduction in these sediments.

  8. Functional citric acid cycle in an arcA mutant of Escherichia coli during growth with nitrate under anoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Prohl, C; Wackwitz, B; Vlad, D; Unden, G

    1998-07-01

    The operation of the citric acid cycle of Escherichia coli during nitrate respiration (anoxic conditions) was studied by measuring end products and enzyme activities. Excretion of products other than CO2, such as acetate or ethanol, was taken as an indication for a non-functional cycle. From glycerol, approximately 0.3 mol acetate was produced; the residual portion was completely oxidized, indicating the presence of a partially active citric acid cycle. In an arcA mutant devoid of the transcriptional regulator ArcA, glycerol was completely oxidized with nitrate as an electron acceptor, demonstrating derepression and function of the complete pathway. Glucose, on the other hand, was excreted mostly as acetate by the wild-type and by the arcA mutant. During growth on glucose, but not on glycerol, activities of succinate dehydrogenase and of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase were missing nearly completely. Thus, the previously described strong repression of the citric acid cycle during nitrate respiration occurs only during growth on glucose and is the effect of anaerobic and, more important, of glucose repression. In Pseudomonas fluorescens (but not Pseudomonas stutzeri), a similar decrease of citric acid cycle function during anaerobic growth with nitrate was found, indicating a broad distribution of this regulatory principle.

  9. Effect of nitrates on biotransformation of phosphogypsum and phenol uptake in cultures of autochthonous sludge microflora from petroleum refining wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Włodzimierz; Przytocka-Jusiak, Magdalena; Błaszczyk, Mieczysław; Hołub, Wojciech; Wolicka, Dorota; Wesołowska, Iwona

    2002-01-01

    The effect of nitrates on the biotransformation of phosphogypsum at 30 degrees C in stationary cultures of anaerobic, heterogeneous microflora growing in medium with phenol (250-1,000 mg/L) as sole carbon source was studied. The microorganisms used in this study were isolated from sludge in biological petroleum-refining wastewater treatment plant. Phosphogypsum (a waste product in the chemical industry that contains approximately 95% CaSO4) was added in amount of 5 g/L, the source of nitrates was KNO3 in concentration equivalent to that of phenol (250-1,000 mg N-NO3/L). The presence of nitrates in heterogeneous cultures has an inhibitory effect on the process of phosphogypsum biotransformation and stimulates the uptake of phenol. We have found that in cultures in medium containing phenol, phosphogypsum and nitrates at least three physiological groups of microorganisms were present. These were phenol-biodegrading microorganisms not requiring an external electron acceptor, sulfate-reducing bacteria biodegrading phenol or intermediate products of its breakdown and denitrifying bacteria not utilising phenol as a carbon source. On solid medium these bacteria together formed heterogeneous single colonies. In spite of repeated attempts we were unable to isolate pure strains and the only result of these measures was loss of denitrification ability in medium with phenol.

  10. Heterotrophic and elemental-sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification processes for simultaneous nitrate and Cr(VI) reduction.

    PubMed

    Sahinkaya, Erkan; Kilic, Adem

    2014-03-01

    Nitrate and chromate can be present together in water resources as nitrate is a common co-contaminant in surface and ground waters. This study aims at comparatively evaluating simultaneous chromate and nitrate reduction in heterotrophic and sulfur-based autotrophic denitrifying column bioreactors. In sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification process, elemental sulfur and nitrate act as an electron donor and an acceptor, respectively, without requirement of organic supplementation. Autotrophic denitrification was complete and not adversely affected by chromate up to 0.5 mg/L. Effluent chromate concentration was <50 μg/L provided that influent chromate concentration was ≤0.5 mg/L. Heterotrophic denitrification performance was not adversely affected even at 20 mg/L chromate and complete chromate reduction was attained up to 10 mg/L. Although autotrophic denitrification rate was much lower compared with heterotrophic one, it may be preferred in drinking water treatment due to the elimination of organic supplementation and the risk of treated effluent contamination.

  11. Selection of the acceptor medium in in vitro measurements of drug release from dermatological ointments.

    PubMed

    Gloor, M; Shabafrouz, H

    1983-01-01

    Comparative measurements of in vitro agent release using hydrophilic, intermediate, and lipophilic acceptor phases and in vivo measurements of the blanching effect with triamcinolone acetonide are reported. White petrolatum, wool alcohols ointment, and polyethylene glycol ointment served as donator phases. The results demonstrate that the lipophilic acceptor phase (isopropyl palmitate) is most representative for the in vivo acceptor phase. Conclusions cannot be drawn regarding in vivo effectiveness from measurements of agent release to the hydrophilic (phosphate buffer, pH 6) and intermediate (n-octanol) acceptor phases. In vitro measurements of agent release have a screening character and must usually be supplemented by very elaborate penetration models of the human skin for a definitive evaluation of an ointment.

  12. Reversal-bounded multipushdown machines. [Turing acceptors for context free languages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, B. S.; Book, R. V.

    1974-01-01

    Several representations of the recursively enumerable (r.e.) sets are presented. The first states that every r.e. set is the homomorphic image of the intersection of two linear context-free languages. The second states that every r.e. set is accepted by an on-line Turing acceptor with two pushdown stores such that in every computation, each pushdown store can make at most one reversal (that is, one change from 'pushing' to 'popping'). It is shown that this automata theoretic representation cannot be strengthened by restricting the acceptors to be deterministic multitape, nondeterministic one-tape, or nondeterministic multicounter acceptors. This provides evidence that reversal bounds are not a natural measure of computational complexity for multitape Turing acceptors.

  13. Panchromatic donor-acceptor-donor conjugated oligomers for dye-sensitized solar cell applications.

    PubMed

    Stalder, Romain; Xie, Dongping; Islam, Ashraful; Han, Liyuan; Reynolds, John R; Schanze, Kirk S

    2014-06-11

    We report on a sexithienyl and two donor-acceptor-donor oligothiophenes, employing benzothiadiazole and isoindigo as electron-acceptors, each functionalized with a phosphonic acid group for anchoring onto TiO2 substrates as light-harvesting molecules for dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). These dyes absorb light to wavelengths as long as 700 nm, as their optical HOMO/LUMO energy gaps are reduced from 2.40 to 1.77 eV with increasing acceptor strength. The oligomers were adsorbed onto mesoporous TiO2 films on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO)/glass substrates and incorporated into DSSCs, which show AM1.5 power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) ranging between 2.6% and 6.4%. This work demonstrates that the donor-acceptor-donor (D-A-D) molecular structures coupled to phosphonic acid anchoring groups, which have not been used in DSSCs, can lead to high PCEs.

  14. Interface-induced heavy-hole/light-hole splitting of acceptors in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Mol, J. A.; Salfi, J.; Simmons, M. Y.; Rogge, S.; Rahman, R.; Hsueh, Y.; Klimeck, G.; Miwa, J. A.

    2015-05-18

    The energy spectrum of spin-orbit coupled states of individual sub-surface boron acceptor dopants in silicon have been investigated using scanning tunneling spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures. The spatially resolved tunnel spectra show two resonances, which we ascribe to the heavy- and light-hole Kramers doublets. This type of broken degeneracy has recently been argued to be advantageous for the lifetime of acceptor-based qubits [R. Ruskov and C. Tahan, Phys. Rev. B 88, 064308 (2013)]. The depth dependent energy splitting between the heavy- and light-hole Kramers doublets is consistent with tight binding calculations, and is in excess of 1 meV for all acceptors within the experimentally accessible depth range (<2 nm from the surface). These results will aid the development of tunable acceptor-based qubits in silicon with long coherence times and the possibility for electrical manipulation.

  15. Preparation and spectroscopic studies on charge-transfer complexes of 2-hydroxypyridine with electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaballa, Akmal S.

    2013-07-01

    The CT-interactions of electron acceptors such as iodine (I2), chloranilic acid (H2CA) and 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone (DDQ) with 2-hydroxypyridine (HPyO) have been investigated in the defined solvent. The data indicate the formation of CT-complexes with the general formula [(HPyO)(acceptor)]. The 1:1 stoichiometry of the (HPyO)-acceptors were based on elemental analysis, IR spectra and thermogravimetric analysis of the solid CT-complexes along with the photometric titration measurements for the reactions. The formation constants (KCT) for the CT-complexes are shown to be strongly dependent on the type and structure of the electron acceptors. Factors affecting the CT-processes are discussed.

  16. Preparation and spectroscopic studies on charge-transfer complexes of famciclovir drug with different electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaballa, Akmal S.; Teleb, Said M.; Nour, El-Metwally

    2012-09-01

    The CT-interaction of electron acceptors such as chloranilic acid (H2CA), 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone (DDQ) and and 7,7',8,8'-tetracyano-p-quinodimethane (TCNQ) with the antiviral drug famciclovir (FCV) have been investigated spectrophotometrically in the defined solvent. The data indicate the formation of CT-complexes with the general formula [(FCV)(acceptor)]. The 1:1 stoichiometry of the (FCV)-acceptors were based on elemental analysis, IR spectra and thermogravimetric analysis of the solid CT-complexes along with the photometric titration measurements for the reactions. The formation constants (KCT) for the CT-complexes are shown to be strongly dependent on the type and structure of the electron acceptor. Factors affecting the CT-processes such as redox potentials and steric hinderance of reactants are discussed.

  17. Disassembly of micelles to impart donor and acceptor gradation to enhance organic solar cell efficiency.

    PubMed

    Arulkashmir, Arulraj; Krishnamoorthy, Kothandam

    2016-02-28

    A transparent, conducting and low surface energy surface was prepared by disassembly of anionic micelles, which altered the orientation of the donor polymer and imparted gradation between the donor and acceptor. This configuration increased the solar cell device efficiency.

  18. Time-resolved spectroscopy of the fluorescence quenching of a donor — acceptor pair by halothane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Draxler, S.; Lippitsch, M. E.

    1992-04-01

    Donor (anthracene) sensitized acceptor (perylene) fluorescence is quenched more efficiently by halothane than is intrinsic perylene fluorescence. The underlying process of dynamic fluorescence quenching is investigated by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

  19. Modeling nitrate removal in a denitrification bed.

    PubMed

    Ghane, Ehsan; Fausey, Norman R; Brown, Larry C

    2015-03-15

    Denitrification beds are promoted to reduce nitrate load in agricultural subsurface drainage water to alleviate the adverse environmental effects associated with nitrate pollution of surface water. In this system, drainage water flows through a trench filled with a carbon media where nitrate is transformed into nitrogen gas under anaerobic conditions. The main objectives of this study were to model a denitrification bed treating drainage water and evaluate its adverse greenhouse gas emissions. Field experiments were conducted at an existing denitrification bed. Evaluations showed very low greenhouse gas emissions (mean N2O emission of 0.12 μg N m(-2) min(-1)) from the denitrification bed surface. Field experiments indicated that nitrate removal rate was described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics with the Michaelis-Menten constant of 7.2 mg N L(-1). We developed a novel denitrification bed model based on the governing equations for water flow and nitrate removal kinetics. The model evaluation statistics showed satisfactory prediction of bed outflow nitrate concentration during subsurface drainage flow. The model can be used to design denitrification beds with efficient nitrate removal which in turn leads to enhanced drainage water quality.

  20. Evaluation of Nitrate Concentrations and Sources in the Elk Creek Watershed, Southwestern Ohio, 2003-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schumann, Thomas L.; Pletsch, Bruce A.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrate concentrations exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level of 10 milligrams per liter have been reported in ground water near the City of Trenton, Ohio, in the southern part of the Elk Creek watershed. A study of nitrate concentrations and sources in surface and ground water within the Elk Creek watershed was conducted during 2003 and 2004. Nitrate concentrations in the Elk Creek watershed range from less than 0.06 to 11 milligrams per liter. The likely sources of elevated nitrate in the ground water near the City of Trenton appear to be soil organic matter and ammonia fertilizer. Land use is predominantly (93 percent) agricultural, with no identified point sources of nitrate. Likely sources of nitrate in the surface water appear to be manure and septic system effluent, soil organic matter, and ammonia fertilizer. Water-quality constituents, including nitrate, were sampled in water from 38 wells and at 6 surface-water sites. The wells were all shallow (less than 105 feet deep), with open intervals in aquifers of glacial origin, that include tills, outwash, and alluvium. Nitrate concentrations (median of 0.06 milligrams per liter) in the ground water of the upper section of the watershed were lower than those in the lower section of the watershed (median of 4.2 milligrams per liter). Nitrate was analyzed for nitrogen and oxygen isotope values. The d15N and d18O range from -22.36 to +32.29 per mil, and -6.27 to +17.72 per mil, respectively. A positive correlation of d15N and d18O enrichment indicates that denitrification is a prevalent process within the watershed.

  1. The use of chlorate, nitrate, and perchlorate to promote crude oil mineralization in salt marsh sediments.

    PubMed

    Brundrett, Maeghan; Horita, Juske; Anderson, Todd; Pardue, John; Reible, Danny; Jackson, W Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Due to the high volume of crude oil released by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the salt marshes along the gulf coast were contaminated with crude oil. Biodegradation of crude oil in salt marshes is primarily limited by oxygen availability due to the high organic carbon content of the soil, high flux rate of S(2-), and saturated conditions. Chlorate, nitrate, and perchlorate were evaluated for use as electron acceptors in comparison to oxygen by comparing oil transformation and mineralization in mesocosms consisting of oiled salt marsh sediment from an area impacted by the BP Horizon oil spill. Mineralization rates were determined by measuring CO2 production and δ (13)C of the produced CO2 and compared to transformation evaluated by measuring the alkane/hopane ratios over a 4-month period. Total alkane/hopane ratios decreased (~55-70 %) for all treatments in the following relative order: aerated ≈ chlorate > nitrate > perchlorate. Total CO2 produced was similar between treatments ranging from 550-700 mg CO2-C. The δ (13)C-CO2 values generally ranged between the indigenous carbon and oil values (-17 and -27‰, respectively). Oil mineralization was greatest for the aerated treatments and least for the perchlorate amended. Our results indicate that chlorate has a similar potential as oxygen to support oil mineralization in contaminated salt marshes, but nitrate and perchlorate were less effective. The use of chlorate as a means to promote oil mineralization in situ may be a promising means to remediate contaminated salt marshes while preventing unwanted secondary impacts related to nutrient management as in the case of nitrate amendments.

  2. ABAB Phthalocyanines: Scaffolds for Building Unprecedented Donor–π–Acceptor Chromophores

    PubMed Central

    Fazio, Ettore; Jaramillo‐García, Javier; Medel, María; Urbani, Maxence; Grätzel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Unique donor–π–acceptor phthalocyanines have been synthesized through the asymmetric functionalization of an ABAB phthalocyanine, crosswise functionalized with two iodine atoms through Pd‐catalyzed cross‐coupling reactions with adequate electron‐donor and electron‐acceptor moieties. These push–pull molecules have been optically and electrochemically characterized, and their ability to perform as chromophores for dye‐sensitized solar cells has been tested. PMID:28168157

  3. Process for gasification using a synthetic CO/sub 2/ acceptor

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, G.P.; Lancet, M.S.

    1980-11-04

    A gasification process is disclosed using a synthetic CO/sub 2/ acceptor consisting essentially of at least one compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate supported in a refractory carrier matrix, the carrier having the general formula Ca/sub 5/(SiO/sub 4/)/sub 2/CO/sub 3/. A method for producing the synthetic CO/sub 2/ acceptor is also disclosed.

  4. An Electron Acceptor with Porphyrin and Perylene Bisimides for Efficient Non-Fullerene Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Andong; Li, Cheng; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Jianqi; Wang, Zhaohui; Wei, Zhixiang; Li, Weiwei

    2017-03-01

    A star-shaped electron acceptor based on porphyrin as a core and perylene bisimide as end groups was constructed for application in non-fullerene organic solar cells. The new conjugated molecule exhibits aligned energy levels, good electron mobility, and complementary absorption with a donor polymer. These advantages facilitate a high power conversion efficiency of 7.4 % in non-fullerene solar cells, which represents the highest photovoltaic performance based on porphyrin derivatives as the acceptor.

  5. Ternary Organic Solar Cells Based on Two Compatible Nonfullerene Acceptors with Power Conversion Efficiency >10.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Guo, Yuan; Yi, Yuanping; Huo, Lijun; Xue, Xiaonan; Sun, Xiaobo; Fu, Huiting; Xiong, Wentao; Meng, Dong; Wang, Zhaohui; Liu, Feng; Russell, Thomas P; Sun, Yanming

    2016-12-01

    Two different nonfullerene acceptors and one copolymer are used to fabricate ternary organic solar cells (OSCs). The two acceptors show unique interactions that reduce crystallinity and form a homogeneous mixed phase in the blend film, leading to a high efficiency of ≈10.3%, the highest performance reported for nonfullerene ternary blends. This work provides a new approach to fabricate high-performance OSCs.

  6. ABAB Phthalocyanines: Scaffolds for Building Unprecedented Donor-π-Acceptor Chromophores.

    PubMed

    Fazio, Ettore; Jaramillo-García, Javier; Medel, María; Urbani, Maxence; Grätzel, Michael; Nazeerudin, Mohammad K; de la Torre, Gema; Torres, Tomas

    2017-02-01

    Unique donor-π-acceptor phthalocyanines have been synthesized through the asymmetric functionalization of an ABAB phthalocyanine, crosswise functionalized with two iodine atoms through Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions with adequate electron-donor and electron-acceptor moieties. These push-pull molecules have been optically and electrochemically characterized, and their ability to perform as chromophores for dye-sensitized solar cells has been tested.

  7. Electron Donor-Acceptor Quenching and Photoinduced Electron Transfer for Coumarin Dyes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-31

    Mechanism of cousarin photodegradation . Ithe behavior of eoiuma dyes is water ad In aqueous detergent media,. and the effsects of medism aud, additives on...D-i36 345 ELECTRON DONOR-ACCEPTOR UENCHING AND PHOTOINDUCED i/i Ai ELECTRON TRANSFER FOR COUMARIN DYES (U) BOSTON UNIY MR DEPT OF CHEMISTRY G JONES...TYPE OF REPORT & PEIOD COVERED Electron Donor-acceptor Quenching and Photo- Technical, 1/1/82-10/31/82 induced Electron Transfer for Coumarin Dyes S

  8. Process for gasification using a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor

    DOEpatents

    Lancet, Michael S.; Curran, George P.

    1980-01-01

    A gasification process is disclosed using a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor consisting essentially of at least one compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate supported in a refractory carrier matrix, the carrier having the general formula Ca.sub.5 (SiO.sub.4).sub.2 CO.sub.3. A method for producing the synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor is also disclosed.

  9. Quantifying the influence of halogens on nitrate photochemistry at Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fibiger, D.; Hastings, M. G.; Dibb, J. E.; Corr, C. A.; Huey, L. G.

    2011-12-01

    Concentrations of bromine oxide (BrO) >0.5 pptv have been detected regularly above the snowpack at Summit, Greenland [72°35'N, 38°25'W] during the spring and early summer. BrO often shows a diurnal cycle, with concentrations reaching as high as 10 pptv shortly after solar noon, although more typically found to be between 0.5 - 3.0 pptv. Our goal is to investigate the influence of BrO on the formation of nitrate (i.e. via BrONO2) based upon the oxygen isotopic composition of atmospheric and snow nitrate. Increased understanding of local nitrate post-depositional processing compared to transported nitrate will improve our ability to interpret nitrate in snow and ice core records. Deposition of nitrate results from reactions of NOx (NO and NO2) with oxidants in the atmosphere. The major oxidants in tropospheric nitrate formation, e.g. ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH), have distinctive isotopic compositions such that their relative contribution to NOx oxidation can be quantified based on Δ17O (Δ17O = δ17O - .52δ18O) of nitrate. In particular, O3 has a unique "mass independent fractionation" signature with Δ17O = 25-35% (per mil); BrO, formed from Br reacting with O3, is expected to carry a Δ17O = 30-42% (Morin et al., ACP, 2007); while OH has a Δ17O of 0%. Models of local photochemical post-depositional processing of NO3- utilizing the Δ17O of nitrate at Summit, Greenland cannot fully explain observed values (Kunasek et al., JGR, 2008; Jarvis et al., GRL, 2008). These O-D models do not include bromine chemistry. In a campaign consisting of two springtime (May-June) field seasons at Summit, Greenland, atmospheric and surface snow measurements were made to quantify the effect of bromine on the formation of atmospheric nitrate. Further, we look to use Δ17O of NO3- to investigate the influence of BrO on locally processed nitrate versus nitrate transported to Summit. Gas phase BrO, NO, NOy and soluble Br, NO3-, and NO2- were measured concurrently. In addition

  10. Groundwater Head Control of Catchment Nitrate Export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musolff, A.; Schmidt, C.; Rode, M.; Fleckenstein, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Elevated nutrient fluxes from agricultural catchments affect downstream water resources. A method to assess nutrient fluxes is the evaluation of the export regime. The export regime classifies the relation between concentration and discharge and integrates mobilization as well as retention processes. Solutes can be exported chemostatically (variance of concentration << variance of discharge) or chemodynamically (variance of concentration ≥ variance of discharge). Starting point of this study is the evaluation of export regimes of nitrate in a series of neighboring sub-catchments of the Central German River Bode catchment. We found an accretion pattern of nitrate with increasing concentration when discharge is increasing and thus a chemodynamic export regime. Here we follow a nested approach and have a closer look at the controls of nitrate export in the small (1.4 km2) headwater catchment of the Sauerbach stream. The Sauerbach catchment is dominated by agricultural land use and is characterized by tile drains. We hypothesize that discharge as well as nitrate export is controlled by the groundwater head variability over time. To that end we follow a joint data analysis of discharge, groundwater heads and nitrate concentrations in groundwater, tile drains and surface water. At the gauging station the nitrate export is chemodynamic exhibiting the typical accretion pattern also found at the larger scale. Our data analysis shows that nitrate export regime is in two ways controlled by the depth to groundwater and the groundwater head variability: Discharge increases with increasing groundwater heads due to the activation of tile drains. On the other hand, depth to groundwater and passage through the unsaturated zone is the major control of aquifer nitrate concentration. At wells with larger depth to groundwater nitrate concentrations are significantly lower than at more shallow wells indicating retention processes in the unsaturated zone. Therefore the concentration in

  11. Nitrogen sources and cycling in the San Francisco Bay estuary: A nitrate dual isotopic composition approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wankel, Scott D.; Kendall, C.; Francis, C.A.; Paytan, A.

    2006-01-01

    We used the dual isotopic composition of nitrate (??15N and ??18O) within the estuarine system of San Francisco (SF) Bay, California, to explore the utility of this approach for tracing sources and cycling of nitrate (NO3-). Surface water samples from 49 sites within the estuary were sampled during July-August 2004. Spatial variability in the isotopic composition suggests that there are multiple sources of nitrate to the bay ecosystem including seawater, several rivers and creeks, and sewage effluent. The spatial distribution of nitrate from these sources is heavily modulated by the hydrodynamics of the estuary. Mixing along the estuarine salinity gradient is the main control on the spatial variations in isotopic composition of nitrate within the northern arm of SF Bay. However, the nitrate isotopic composition in the southern arm of SF Bay exhibited a combination of source mixing and phytoplankton drawdown due mostly to the long residence time during the summer study period. Very low ?? 18ONO3 values (as low as -5.0???) at the Sacramento-San Joaquin River delta region give rise to a wide range of ??18ONO3 values in the SF Bay system. The range in ??18ONO3 values is more than twice that of (??15NNO3, suggesting that ??18O NO3 is an even more sensitive tool for tracing nitrate sources and cycling than ??15NNO3. ?? 2006, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  12. Compost product optimization for surface water nitrate treatment in biofiltration applications.

    PubMed

    Alcala, Martin; Jones, Kim D; Ren, Jianhong; Andreassen, Thomas E

    2009-09-01

    Compost based material has been proposed for use as media for biofiltration for environmental restoration in many areas to remediate contaminated water and soil. The objective of this project was to develop techniques to produce compost products for nitrate removal in storm water biofiltration applications, from typical solid waste materials. Compost products were manufactured from different feedstocks and evaluated for their nitrate removal efficiencies. Three different compost products manufactured from varying feedstock amounts of wood chips and grass clippings, along with some dry compost material from the City of Brownsville Municipal Landfill Facility (BMLF), were evaluated using column studies. Indicators of the compost product's quality included moisture % content, pH, and conductivity measurements. The columns were loaded with water containing at least 13.5mg/L nitrate-nitrogen and effluent water from the columns was tested to determine the nitrate reduction for the different products. All of the manufactured compost products and the BMLF material removed some nitrate. The project demonstrated that compost product materials can be effectively used for some nitrate removal for surface water quality improvement and that compost product feedstocks and blends can influence the materials capability for nitrate removal.

  13. On the mechanism by which dietary nitrate improves human skeletal muscle function

    PubMed Central

    Affourtit, Charles; Bailey, Stephen J.; Jones, Andrew M.; Smallwood, Miranda J.; Winyard, Paul G.

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic nitrate is present at high levels in beetroot and celery, and in green leafy vegetables such as spinach and lettuce. Though long believed inert, nitrate can be reduced to nitrite in the human mouth and, further, under hypoxia and/or low pH, to nitric oxide. Dietary nitrate has thus been associated favorably with nitric-oxide-regulated processes including blood flow and energy metabolism. Indeed, the therapeutic potential of dietary nitrate in cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome—both aging-related medical disorders—has attracted considerable recent research interest. We and others have shown that dietary nitrate supplementation lowers the oxygen cost of human exercise, as less respiratory activity appears to be required for a set rate of skeletal muscle work. This striking observation predicts that nitrate benefits the energy metabolism of human muscle, increasing the efficiency of either mitochondrial ATP synthesis and/or of cellular ATP-consuming processes. In this mini-review, we evaluate experimental support for the dietary nitrate effects on muscle bioenergetics and we critically discuss the likelihood of nitric oxide as the molecular mediator of such effects. PMID:26283970

  14. Rare-earth oxide nanostructures: rules of rare-earth nitrate thermolysis in octadecylamine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dingsheng; Wang, Zhongying; Zhao, Peng; Zheng, Wen; Peng, Qing; Liu, Liqin; Chen, Xueyuan; Li, Yadong

    2010-04-01

    The decomposed regularity of rare-earth nitrates in octadecylamine (ODA) is discussed. The experimental results show that these nitrates can be divided into four types. For rare-earth nitrates with larger RE(3+) ions (RE=rare earth, La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd), the decomposed products exhibited platelike nanostructures. For those with smaller RE(3+) ions (RE=Y, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb), the decomposed products exhibited beltlike nanostructures. For terbium nitrate with a middle RE(3+) ion, the decomposed product exhibited a rodlike nanostructure. The corresponding rare-earth oxides, with the same morphologies as their precursors, could be obtained when these decomposed products were calcined. For cerium nitrate, which showed the greatest differences, flowerlike cerium oxide could be obtained directly from decomposition of the nitrate without further calcination. This regularity is explained on the basis of the lanthanide contraction. Owing to their differences in electron configuration, ionic radius, and crystal structure, such a nitrate family therefore shows different thermolysis properties. In addition, the potential application of these as-obtained rare-earth oxides as catalysts and luminescent materials was investigated. The advantages of this method for rare-earth oxides includes simplicity, high yield, low cost, and ease of scale-up, which are of great importance for their industrial applications.

  15. CCL2 nitration is a negative regulator of chemokine-mediated inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Catriona E.; Thompson, Sarah; O’Boyle, Graeme; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Sheerin, Neil S.; Ali, Simi; Kirby, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Chemokines promote leukocyte recruitment during inflammation. The oxidative burst is an important effector mechanism, this leads to the generation of reactive nitrogen species (RNS), including peroxynitrite (ONOO). The current study was performed to determine the potential for nitration to alter the chemical and biological properties of the prototypical CC chemokine, CCL2. Immunofluorescence was performed to assess the presence of RNS in kidney biopsies. Co-localisation was observed between RNS-modified tyrosine residues and the chemokine CCL2 in diseased kidneys. Nitration reduced the potential of CCL2 to stimulate monocyte migration in diffusion gradient chemotaxis assays (p < 0.05). This was consistent with a trend towards reduced affinity of the nitrated chemokine for its cognate receptor CCR2b. The nitrated chemokine was unable to induce transendothelial monocyte migration in vitro and failed to promote leukocyte recruitment when added to murine air pouches (p < 0.05). This could potentially be attributed to reduced glycosaminoglycan binding ability, as surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy showed that nitration reduced heparan sulphate binding by CCL2. Importantly, intravenous administration of nitrated CCL2 also inhibited the normal recruitment of leukocytes to murine air pouches filled with unmodified CCL2. Together these data suggest that nitration of CCL2 during inflammation provides a mechanism to limit and resolve acute inflammation. PMID:28290520

  16. A review of nitrates in drinking water: maternal exposure and adverse reproductive and developmental outcomes.

    PubMed

    Manassaram, Deana M; Backer, Lorraine C; Moll, Deborah M

    2007-01-01

    In this review, we present an update on maternal exposure to nitrates in drinking water in relation to possible adverse reproductive and developmental effects, and discuss nitrates in drinking water in the United States. The current standard for nitrates in drinking water is based on retrospective studies and approximates a level that protects infants from methemoglobinemia, but no safety factor is built into the standard. The current standard applies only to public water systems. Animal studies have found adverse reproductive effects resulting from higher doses of nitrate or nitrite. The epidemiologic evidence of a direct exposure-response relationship between drinking water nitrate level and adverse reproductive effect is still not clear. However, some reports have suggested an association between exposure to nitrates in drinking water and spontaneous abortions, intrauterine growth restriction, and various birth defects. Uncertainties in epidemiologic studies include the lack of individual exposure assessment that would rule out confounding of the exposure with some other cause. We conclude that the current literature does not provide sufficient evidence of a causal relationship between exposure to nitrates in drinking water and adverse reproductive effects.

  17. CCL2 nitration is a negative regulator of chemokine-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Barker, Catriona E; Thompson, Sarah; O'Boyle, Graeme; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Sheerin, Neil S; Ali, Simi; Kirby, John A

    2017-03-14

    Chemokines promote leukocyte recruitment during inflammation. The oxidative burst is an important effector mechanism, this leads to the generation of reactive nitrogen species (RNS), including peroxynitrite (ONOO). The current study was performed to determine the potential for nitration to alter the chemical and biological properties of the prototypical CC chemokine, CCL2. Immunofluorescence was performed to assess the presence of RNS in kidney biopsies. Co-localisation was observed between RNS-modified tyrosine residues and the chemokine CCL2 in diseased kidneys. Nitration reduced the potential of CCL2 to stimulate monocyte migration in diffusion gradient chemotaxis assays (p < 0.05). This was consistent with a trend towards reduced affinity of the nitrated chemokine for its cognate receptor CCR2b. The nitrated chemokine was unable to induce transendothelial monocyte migration in vitro and failed to promote leukocyte recruitment when added to murine air pouches (p < 0.05). This could potentially be attributed to reduced glycosaminoglycan binding ability, as surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy showed that nitration reduced heparan sulphate binding by CCL2. Importantly, intravenous administration of nitrated CCL2 also inhibited the normal recruitment of leukocytes to murine air pouches filled with unmodified CCL2. Together these data suggest that nitration of CCL2 during inflammation provides a mechanism to limit and resolve acute inflammation.

  18. Soil nitrate reducing processes - drivers, mechanisms for spatial variation, and significance for nitrous oxide production.

    PubMed

    Giles, Madeline; Morley, Nicholas; Baggs, Elizabeth M; Daniell, Tim J

    2012-01-01

    The microbial processes of denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) are two important nitrate reducing mechanisms in soil, which are responsible for the loss of nitrate ([Formula: see text]) and production of the potent greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N(2)O). A number of factors are known to control these processes, including O(2) concentrations and moisture content, N, C, pH, and the size and community structure of nitrate reducing organisms responsible for the processes. There is an increasing understanding associated with many of these controls on flux through the nitrogen cycle in soil systems. However, there remains uncertainty about how the nitrate reducing communities are linked to environmental variables and the flux of products from these processes. The high spatial variability of environmental controls and microbial communities across small sub centimeter areas of soil may prove to be critical in determining why an understanding of the links between biotic and abiotic controls has proved elusive. This spatial effect is often overlooked as a driver of nitrate reducing processes. An increased knowledge of the effects of spatial heterogeneity in soil on nitrate reduction processes will be fundamental in understanding the drivers, location, and potential for N(2)O production from soils.

  19. Alkyl nitrate (C1-C3) depth profiles in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, E. E.; Yvon-Lewis, S. A.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports the first depth profile measurements of methyl, ethyl, isopropyl and n-propyl nitrates in the tropical Pacific Ocean. Depth profile measurements were made at 22 stations during the Project Halocarbon Air Sea Exchange cruise, in warm pool, equatorial, subequatorial, and gyre waters. The highest concentrations, up to several hundred pM of methyl nitrate, were observed in the central Pacific within 8 degrees of the equator. In general, alkyl nitrate levels were highest in the surface mixed layer, and decreased with depth below the mixed layer. The spatial distribution of the alkyl nitrates suggests that there is a strong source associated with biologically productive ocean regions, that is characterized by high ratios of methyl:ethyl nitrate. However, the data do not allow discrimination between direct biological emissions and photochemistry as production mechanisms. Alkyl nitrates were consistently detectable at several hundred meters depth. On the basis of the estimated chemical loss rate of these compounds, we conclude that deep water alkyl nitrates must be produced in situ. Possible sources include free radical processes initiated by radioactive decay or cosmic rays, enzymatically mediated reactions involving bacteria, or unidentified chemical mechanisms involving dissolved organic matter.

  20. Influence of Acidity on Uranyl Nitrate Association in Aqueous Solutions: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect

    de Almeida, Valmor F; Cui, Shengting; Khomami, Bamin; Ye, Xianggui; Smith, Rodney Bryan

    2010-01-01

    Uranyl ion complexation with water and nitrate is a key aspect of the uranium/plutonium extraction process. We have carried out a molecular dynamics simulation study to investigate this complexation process, including the molecular composition of the various complex species, the corresponding structure, and the equilibrium distribution of the complexes. The observed structures of the complexes suggest that in aqueous solution, uranyls are generally hydrated by 5 water molecules in the equatorial plane. When associating with nitrate ions, a water molecule is replaced by a nitrate ion, preserving the five-fold coordination and planar symmetry. Analysis of the pair correlation function between uranyl and nitrate suggests that nitrates bind to uranyl in aqueous solution mainly in a monodentate mode, although a small portion of bidentates occur. Dynamic association and dissociation between uranyls and nitrates take place in aqueous solution with a substantial amount of fluctuation in the number of various uranyl nitrate species. The average number of the uranyl mononitrate complexes shows a dependence on acid concentration consistent with equilibrium-constant analysis, namely, the concentration of [UO2NO3]+ increases with nitric acid concentration.

  1. Soil nitrate reducing processes – drivers, mechanisms for spatial variation, and significance for nitrous oxide production

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Madeline; Morley, Nicholas; Baggs, Elizabeth M.; Daniell, Tim J.

    2012-01-01

    The microbial processes of denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) are two important nitrate reducing mechanisms in soil, which are responsible for the loss of nitrate (NO3−) and production of the potent greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N2O). A number of factors are known to control these processes, including O2 concentrations and moisture content, N, C, pH, and the size and community structure of nitrate reducing organisms responsible for the processes. There is an increasing understanding associated with many of these controls on flux through the nitrogen cycle in soil systems. However, there remains uncertainty about how the nitrate reducing communities are linked to environmental variables and the flux of products from these processes. The high spatial variability of environmental controls and microbial communities across small sub centimeter areas of soil may prove to be critical in determining why an understanding of the links between biotic and abiotic controls has proved elusive. This spatial effect is often overlooked as a driver of nitrate reducing processes. An increased knowledge of the effects of spatial heterogeneity in soil on nitrate reduction processes will be fundamental in understanding the drivers, location, and potential for N2O production from soils. PMID:23264770

  2. Study of characteristics of condom-acceptors using condom as first choice and alternative method of contraception in 1981-1987 at the NPFDB, GHKL.

    PubMed

    Low Boon Song

    1990-06-01

    Factors influencing condom acceptance were studied and compared in 2 groups of condom-acceptors--those using condoms as a 1st method of contraception and those using condoms as an alternative method of contraception. Data was obtained by reviewing the condom-acceptor cards during 1981-1987 at the General Hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 208 cards for the 1st group and 230 for the 2nd group were included in the study. Statistical analysis was conducted to determine characteristics influencing condom-use. AGe of wife, duration of marriage, number of living children, wife's level of education and socioeconomic status were identified as factors influencing condom acceptance. No significant difference was observed between the 2 group concerning their purpose of contraception. Age of wife had a significant influence on the use of condoms as contraception. Age of wife had a significant influence on the use of condoms as contraception; 74.5% of group 1 users were 31 years and 56.5% of group 2 users were 30 years. A very significant relationship also exist between condom use and duration of marriage and number of living children; condom-acceptors using condoms as the 1st method of contraception did so within 9 years of marriage (85.6%) and practiced condom use when they had 2 of children (73.6%) while those who used condoms subsequently were married 10 years (46.5%) and did so after having 3 or children (57.8%). Significant differences were observed between groups in higher socioeconomic status and higher level of education. With 7 or more years of education, a significant proportion of condom-acceptors used condoms as a 1st method of contraception as compared with those who used it as a subsequent method of contraception. For the higher socioeconomic, a significant number of acceptors used condoms as a 1st method of contraception.

  3. Beyond Fullerenes: Designing Alternative Molecular Electron Acceptors for Solution-Processable Bulk Heterojunction Organic Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Sauvé, Geneviève; Fernando, Roshan

    2015-09-17

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) are promising candidates for providing a low cost, widespread energy source by converting sunlight into electricity. Solution-processable active layers have predominantly consisted of a conjugated polymer donor blended with a fullerene derivative as the acceptor. Although fullerene derivatives have been the acceptor of choice, they have drawbacks such as weak visible light absorption and poor energy tuning that limit overall efficiencies. This has recently fueled new research to explore alternative acceptors that would overcome those limitations. During this exploration, one question arises: what are the important design principles for developing nonfullerene acceptors? It is generally accepted that acceptors should have high electron affinity, electron mobility, and absorption coefficient in the visible and near-IR region of the spectra. In this Perspective, we argue that alternative molecular acceptors, when blended with a conjugated polymer donor, should also have large nonplanar structures to promote nanoscale phase separation, charge separation and charge transport in blend films. Additionally, new material design should address the low dielectric constant of organic semiconductors that have so far limited their widespread application.

  4. A new classification of the amino acid side chains based on doublet acceptor energy levels.

    PubMed Central

    Sneddon, S F; Morgan, R S; Brooks, C L

    1988-01-01

    We describe a new classification of the amino acid side chains based on the potential energy level at which each will accept an extra (doublet) electron. The doublet acceptor energy level, and the doublet acceptor orbital were calculated using semiempirical INDO/2-UHF molecular orbital theory. The results of these calculations show that the side chains fall into four groups. We have termed these groups repulsive, insulating, semiconducting, and attractive in accordance with where each lies on the relative energy scale. We use this classification to examine the role of residues between the donor and acceptor in modulating the rate and mechanism of electron transfer in proteins. With the calculated acceptor levels, we construct a potential barrier for those residues between the donor and acceptor. It is the area beneath this barrier that determines the decay of electronic coupling between donor and acceptor, and thus the transfer rate. We have used this schematic approach to characterize the four electron transfer pathways in myoglobin recently studied by Mayo et al. (Mayo, S.L., W.R. Ellis, R.J. Crutchley, and H.B. Gray. 1986. Science [Wash. DC]. 233:948-952). PMID:3342271

  5. Molecular helices as electron acceptors in high-performance bulk heterojunction solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Yu M. Zhong; Nam, Chang -Yong; Trinh, M. Tuan; ...

    2015-09-18

    Despite numerous organic semiconducting materials synthesized for organic photovoltaics in the past decade, fullerenes are widely used as electron acceptors in highly efficient bulk-heterojunction solar cells. None of the non-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells have achieved efficiencies as high as fullerene-based solar cells. Design principles for fullerene-free acceptors remain unclear in the field. Here we report examples of helical molecular semiconductors as electron acceptors that are on par with fullerene derivatives in efficient solar cells. We achieved an 8.3% power conversion efficiency in a solar cell, which is a record high for non-fullerene bulk heterojunctions. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealedmore » both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor–acceptor interfaces. Atomic force microscopy reveals a mesh-like network of acceptors with pores that are tens of nanometres in diameter for efficient exciton separation and charge transport. As a result, this study describes a new motif for designing highly efficient acceptors for organic solar cells.« less

  6. Molecular helices as electron acceptors in high-performance bulk heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yu; Trinh, M. Tuan; Chen, Rongsheng; Purdum, Geoffrey E.; Khlyabich, Petr P.; Sezen, Melda; Oh, Seokjoon; Zhu, Haiming; Fowler, Brandon; Zhang, Boyuan; Wang, Wei; Nam, Chang-Yong; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Black, Charles T.; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Loo, Yueh-Lin; Ng, Fay; Zhu, X.-Y.; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-09-01

    Despite numerous organic semiconducting materials synthesized for organic photovoltaics in the past decade, fullerenes are widely used as electron acceptors in highly efficient bulk-heterojunction solar cells. None of the non-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells have achieved efficiencies as high as fullerene-based solar cells. Design principles for fullerene-free acceptors remain unclear in the field. Here we report examples of helical molecular semiconductors as electron acceptors that are on par with fullerene derivatives in efficient solar cells. We achieved an 8.3% power conversion efficiency in a solar cell, which is a record high for non-fullerene bulk heterojunctions. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealed both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor-acceptor interfaces. Atomic force microscopy reveals a mesh-like network of acceptors with pores that are tens of nanometres in diameter for efficient exciton separation and charge transport. This study describes a new motif for designing highly efficient acceptors for organic solar cells.

  7. Molecular helices as electron acceptors in high-performance bulk heterojunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yu; Trinh, M Tuan; Chen, Rongsheng; Purdum, Geoffrey E; Khlyabich, Petr P; Sezen, Melda; Oh, Seokjoon; Zhu, Haiming; Fowler, Brandon; Zhang, Boyuan; Wang, Wei; Nam, Chang-Yong; Sfeir, Matthew Y; Black, Charles T; Steigerwald, Michael L; Loo, Yueh-Lin; Ng, Fay; Zhu, X-Y; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-09-18

    Despite numerous organic semiconducting materials synthesized for organic photovoltaics in the past decade, fullerenes are widely used as electron acceptors in highly efficient bulk-heterojunction solar cells. None of the non-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells have achieved efficiencies as high as fullerene-based solar cells. Design principles for fullerene-free acceptors remain unclear in the field. Here we report examples of helical molecular semiconductors as electron acceptors that are on par with fullerene derivatives in efficient solar cells. We achieved an 8.3% power conversion efficiency in a solar cell, which is a record high for non-fullerene bulk heterojunctions. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealed both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor-acceptor interfaces. Atomic force microscopy reveals a mesh-like network of acceptors with pores that are tens of nanometres in diameter for efficient exciton separation and charge transport. This study describes a new motif for designing highly efficient acceptors for organic solar cells.

  8. Differences in gene expression of human xylosyltransferases and determination of acceptor specificities for various proteoglycans

    SciTech Connect

    Roch, Christina; Kuhn, Joachim; Kleesiek, Knut; Goetting, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The xylosyltransferase (XT) isoforms XT-I and XT-II initiate the posttranslational glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis. Here, we determined the relative expression of both isoforms in 33 human cell lines. The majority of tested cell lines showed dominant XYLT2 gene expression, while only in 23132/87, JAR, NCI-H510A and THP-1 was the XT-I mRNA expression higher. Nearly equal expression levels were detected in six cell lines. Additionally, to shed light on putative differences in acceptor specificities the acceptor properties of potential acceptor sequences were determined. Peptides were expressed as glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins containing putative or known GAG attachment sites of in vivo proteoglycans. Kinetic analysis showed that K{sub m} and V{sub max} values for XT-I mediated xylosylation were slightly higher than those for XT-II, and that XT-I showed a lesser stringency concerning the acceptor sequence. Mutagenesis of the bikunin peptide sequence in the G-S-G attachment site and flanking regions generated potential acceptor molecules. Here, mutations on the N-terminal side and the attachment site were found to be more susceptible to a loss of acceptor function than mutations in the C-terminus. Altogether the known consensus sequence a-a-a-a-G-S-G-a-a/G-a ('a' representing Asp or Glu) for XT-I mediated xylosylation could be approved and additionally extended to apply to XT-II as well.

  9. Transglucosylation potential of six sucrose phosphorylases toward different classes of acceptors.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Dirk; Verhaeghe, Tom F; Roman, Bart I; Stevens, Christian V; Desmet, Tom; Soetaert, Wim

    2011-09-27

    In this study, the transglucosylation potential of six sucrose phosphorylase (SP) enzymes has been compared using eighty putative acceptors from different structural classes. To increase the solubility of hydrophobic acceptors, the addition of various co-solvents was first evaluated. All enzymes were found to retain at least 50% of their activity in 25% dimethylsulfoxide, with the enzymes from Bifidobacterium adolescentis and Streptococcus mutans being the most stable. Screening of the enzymes' specificity then revealed that the vast majority of acceptors are transglucosylated very slowly by SP, at a rate that is comparable to the contaminating hydrolytic reaction. The enzyme from S. mutans displayed the narrowest acceptor specificity and the one from Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B1355 the broadest. However, high activity could only be detected on l-sorbose and l-arabinose, besides the native acceptors d-fructose and phosphate. Improving the affinity for alternative acceptors by means of enzyme engineering will, therefore, be a major challenge for the commercial exploitation of the transglucosylation potential of sucrose phosphorylase.

  10. Molecular helices as electron acceptors in high-performance bulk heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu M. Zhong; Nam, Chang -Yong; Trinh, M. Tuan; Chen, Rongsheng; Purdum, Geoffrey E.; Khlyabich, Petr P.; Sezen, Melda; Oh, Seokjoon; Zhu, Haiming; Fowler, Brandon; Zhang, Boyuan; Wang, Wei; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Black, Charles T.; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Loo, Yueh -Lin; Ng, Fay; Zhu, X. -Y.; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-09-18

    Despite numerous organic semiconducting materials synthesized for organic photovoltaics in the past decade, fullerenes are widely used as electron acceptors in highly efficient bulk-heterojunction solar cells. None of the non-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells have achieved efficiencies as high as fullerene-based solar cells. Design principles for fullerene-free acceptors remain unclear in the field. Here we report examples of helical molecular semiconductors as electron acceptors that are on par with fullerene derivatives in efficient solar cells. We achieved an 8.3% power conversion efficiency in a solar cell, which is a record high for non-fullerene bulk heterojunctions. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealed both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor–acceptor interfaces. Atomic force microscopy reveals a mesh-like network of acceptors with pores that are tens of nanometres in diameter for efficient exciton separation and charge transport. As a result, this study describes a new motif for designing highly efficient acceptors for organic solar cells.

  11. Evidence on Anaerobic Methane Oxidation (AOM) in a boreal cultivated peatland with natural and added electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorodnikov, Maxim; Silvennoinen, Hanna; Martikainen, Pertti; Dörsch, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is a process of methane (CH4) consumption under anoxic conditions driven by microorganisms, which oxidize CH4 with various alternate electron acceptors (AEA): sulfate, nitrate, nitrite, metals-(Fe, Mn, Cu), organic compounds. AOM is common in marine ecosystems, where microbial sulfate reduction (SR) consumes most of the CH4 produced in sediments. Despite the global significance of AOM, the exact mechanisms and relevance of the process in terrestrial ecosystems are almost unknown. In the current study the occurrence of AOM was tested for two organic soil horizons (30 and 40 cm depth) and one mineral sub-soil (sand, 50 cm depth) of a cultivated boreal peatland (Linnansuo, Eastern Finland, energy crop Phalaris arundinacea - reed canarygrass) under controlled conditions with the addition of 13C-labeled CH4 and two common AEAs - SO4-2 and Fe+3. Concentrations of CH4, CO2 and O2 were continuously measured during 10 days of incubation and CO2 was sampled periodically under anaerobic conditions for stable 13C analysis. Oxygen dynamics revealed negligible O2 contamination during incubation and its trace amounts (0.05-0.8% from the atmospheric) were accounted in the net CH4 uptake. Application of 13C-enriched CH4 (4.9 atom%) allowed to track the label in CO2 as the end-product of AOM. The highest 13CO2 enrichment (up to 60‰) was observed in mineral sub-soil, however AOM was quantitatively more pronounced in the upper 30 cm horizon (2.1 vs. 0.2 μg CO2 g soil DW-1 in the 50 cm sub-soil). The highest AOM rate of 8.9 ng CO2 g soil DW-1 h-1 was estimated for the control treatment where no AEAs were added indicating sufficient amount of naturally available AEAs, likely organic compounds. This rate was 50 times more intensive (on the C basis) than the CH4 production potential of the same soil. In contrast, external AEAs decreased AOM rates but added Fe+3 stimulated decomposition of native SOM (as seen from the most depleted 13CO2 signatures

  12. It is rocket science - why dietary nitrate is hard to 'beet'! Part I: twists and turns in the realization of the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Jibran; Mills, Charlotte Elizabeth; Maskell, Perry; Odongerel, Chimed; Webb, Andrew James

    2017-01-01

    Dietary nitrate (found in green leafy vegetables, such as rocket, and in beetroot) is now recognized to be an important source of nitric oxide (NO), via the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway. Dietary nitrate confers several cardiovascular beneficial effects on blood pressure, platelets, endothelial function, mitochondrial efficiency and exercise. While this pathway may now seem obvious, its realization followed a rather tortuous course over two decades. Early steps included the discovery that nitrite was a source of NO in the ischaemic heart but this appeared to have deleterious effects. In addition, nitrate-derived nitrite provided a gastric source of NO. However, residual nitrite was not thought to be absorbed systemically. Nitrite was also considered to be physiologically inert but potentially carcinogenic, through N-nitrosamine formation. In Part 1 of a two-part Review on the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway we describe key twists and turns in the elucidation of the pathway and the underlying mechanisms. This provides the critical foundation for the more recent developments in the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway which are covered in Part 2.

  13. Effect of nitrate-based bioremediation on contaminant distribution and sediment toxicity-column study

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchins, S.R.; Bantle, J.A.; Schrock, E.J.

    1998-03-01

    A laboratory column study was set up to evaluate changes in contaminant distribution and sediment toxicity following nitrate-based bioremediation and to correlate toxicity reduction with loss of fuel components. Glass columns were packed with sediment from an aquifer that had been contaminated with JP-4 jet fuel and were remediated using feed solution containing 20 mg/L NO{sub 3}-N. Column influents and effluents were monitored for BTEXTMB (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, trimethylbenzenes), electron acceptors, nutrients, and dissolved gases. Duplicate columns were sacrificed after 1, 4, and 7 months, and core material was analyzed for chemical constituents. In addition, core material was evaluated for toxicity using FETAX, a developmental toxicity test employing frog embryos.

  14. N and O Isotopes of Nitrate in the GISP2 Ice Core: Implications for the Interpretation of Ice-Core Nitrate Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanter, M.; Steig, E. J.; Sigman, D. M.

    2001-05-01

    Nitrate (NO3-) is a "reversibly deposited" species in snow: following deposition at the snow surface, nitrate is re-mobilized and a significant amount is re-emitted to the atmosphere. Post-depositional processing of nitrate, including evaporation/sublimation and photolysis, impacts the final concentrations that are archived in the ice core record. Measurement of the isotopic composition of nitrate offers a potentially powerful tool for determining how these variables affect the record of nitrate concentrations. A new method [Andreani et al., Eos Trans. AGU, 80(49), OS189, 1999; Sigman et al., submitted to Anal. Chem., 2001] allows for high-resolution analysis of the N and O isotopes of nitrate in firn and glacial ice. Results of the N isotopic analysis of nitrate in the GISP2 ice core show values of δ 15N-NO3- in the range of -1.4 to 26 per mil through the last 36,000 years. The δ 15N-NO3- is highly correlated (r2 ~0.7) with accumulation rate, consistent with the comparison of nitrate-δ 15N and accumulation rate from alpine and polar sites by Freyer et al. [Tellus 48B, 1996]. For the upper 20 m of firn, results to date show that δ 15N and δ 18O of nitrate are not correlated, with δ 15N (ranging from -1.4 to 4.2 per mil) generally increasing with depth to 20 m and δ 18O (ranging from 48 to 69 per mil) generally decreasing. The high values of δ 18O in the firn are consistent with modern measurements of δ 18O-NO3- in precipitation. These high values probably result from of the interaction of NOx and O3 in the atmosphere prior to deposition of NO3-, a conclusion that is supported by the observation of mass independent behavior of 17O in atmospheric nitrate [Galanter et al., Eos Trans. AGU, 81(48), F191, 2000; Michalski, G. and Thiemens, M. H., Eos Trans. AGU, 81 (48), F120, 2000]. Though there may be several possible explanations for the difference in the firn trends of δ 15N and δ 18O, an intriguing prospect is that it reflects a combination of NO3- loss by

  15. Global distribution of peroxyacetyl nitrate.

    PubMed

    Singh, H B; Salas, L J; Viezee, W

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) have a central role in the chemistry of the atmosphere, especially in key processes relating to ozone, hydroxyl-radical (OH) and acid formation. High reactivity of NOx (lifetime of 0.5-2 days) precludes hemispheric-scale transport and it has been proposed that non-methane hydrocarbons present in the troposphere can transform NOx into its organic forms principally as peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN). PAN is highly stable in the colder regions of the middle and upper troposphere and can provide a mechanism for NOx storage and transport. Once transported, PAN and its homologues can easily release free NOx in warmer atmospheric conditions. PAN is probably ubiquitous and its concentrations could exceed those of NOx in clean tropospheric conditions. Here we present the first view of the global distribution of PAN based on extensive shipboard and aircraft measurements. PAN is more abundant in the Northern than in the Southern Hemisphere and in the continental than in the marine troposphere. In contrast to its behaviour in polluted atmospheres, PAN mixing ratios in winter greatly exceed those in summer. These measurements provide a basis for assessing the significance of PAN as a reservoir of NOx and for extending and validating reactive nitrogen chemistry theory in the troposphere.

  16. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-12-07

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) is a fertilizer, yet becomes an explosive upon a small addition of chemical impurities. The origin of enhanced chemical sensitivity in impure AN (or AN mixtures) is not well understood, posing significant safety issues in using AN even today. To remedy the situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN and its mixtures with hexane (ANFO–AN mixed with fuel oil) and Aluminum (Ammonal) at high pressures and temperatures, using diamond anvil cells (DAC) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that pure AN decomposes to N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, and H{sub 2}O at the onset of the melt, whereas the mixtures, ANFO and Ammonal, decompose at substantially lower temperatures. The present results also confirm the recently proposed phase IV-IV{sup ′} transition above 17 GPa and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400°C.

  17. Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in Atmospheric Aerosols: Recycling of Nitric Acid and Formation of Organic Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander

    2014-03-25

    Atmospheric particles often include a complex mixture of nitrate and secondary organic materials accumulated within the same individual particles. Nitrate as an important inorganic component can be chemically formed in the atmosphere. For instance, formation of sodium nitrate (NaNO3) and calcium nitrate Ca(NO3)2 when nitrogen oxide and nitric acid (HNO3) species react with sea salt and calcite, respectively. Organic acids contribute a significant fraction of photochemically formed secondary organics that can condense on the preexisting nitrate-containing particles. Here, we present a systematic microanalysis study on chemical composition of laboratory generated particles composed of water soluble organic acids and nitrates (i.e. NaNO3 and Ca(NO3)2) investigated using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and Fourier transform infrared micro-spectroscopy (micro-FTIR). The results show that water-soluble organic acids can react with nitrates releasing gaseous HNO3 during dehydration process. These reactions are attributed to acid displacement of nitrate with weak organic acids driven by the evaporation of HNO3 into gas phase due to its relatively high volatility. The reactions result in significant nitrate depletion and formation of organic salts in mixed organic acids/nitrate particles that in turn may affect their physical and chemical properties relevant to atmospheric environment and climate. Airborne nitrate concentrations are estimated by thermodynamic calculations corresponding to various nitrate depletions in selected organic acids of atmospheric relevance. The results indicate a potential mechanism of HNO3 recycling, which may further affect concentrations of gas- and aerosol-phase species in the atmosphere and the heterogeneous reaction chemistry between them.

  18. A multi-tracer approach to assess fingerprints of nitrate in an aquifer under agriculturally used land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasten-Zapata, Ernesto; Ledesma-Ruiz, Rogelio; Ramirez, Aldo; Harter, Thomas; Mahlknecht, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    To effectively manage groundwater quality it is essential to understand sources of contamination and underground processes. The objective of the study was to identify sources and fate of nitrate pollution occurring in an aquifer underneath a sub-humid to humid region in NE Mexico which provides 10% of national citrus production. Nitrate isotopes and halide ratios were applied to understand nitrate sources and transformations in relation to land use/land cover. It was found that the study area is subject to diverse nitrate sources including organic waste and wastewater, synthetic fertilizers and soil processes. Animal manure and sewage from septic tanks were the causes of groundwater nitrate pollution within orchards and vegetable agriculture. Dairy activities within a radius of 1,000m from a sampling point increased nitrate pollution. Leachates from septic tanks incited nitrate pollution in residential areas. Soil nitrogen and animal waste were the sources of nitrate in groundwater under shrubland and grassland. Partial denitrification processes were evidenced. The denitrification process helped to attenuate nitrate concentration in the agricultural lands and grassland particularly during summer months.

  19. Severe and mild phenotypes in Pfeiffer syndrome with splice acceptor mutations in exon IIIc of FGFR2.

    PubMed

    Teebi, Ahmad S; Kennedy, Shelley; Chun, Kathy; Ray, Peter N

    2002-01-01

    Pfeiffer syndrome is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Three clinical subtypes have been delineated based on the severity of acrocephalysyndactyly and associated manifestations. Severe cases are usually sporadic and caused by a number of different mutations in exons IIIa and IIIc of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) gene. Mild cases are either sporadic or familial and are caused by mutations in FGFR2 or FGFR1, respectively. We report on two individuals with different novel de novo mutations in FGFR2. The first is a 17-year-old male who has a severe phenotype, within the spectrum of subtype 1 including severe ocular proptosis, elbow ankylosis, visceral anomalies, and normal intelligence. This patient was found to have a novel complex mutation at the 3' acceptor site of exon IIIc of FGFR2, denoted as C952-3 del10insACC. The other patient, a 2-year-old female, has a mild phenotype, typical of the classic subtype 1 including brachycephaly with coronal synostosis and hypertelorism. She was also found to have a mutation at the 3' acceptor site (the same splice site) of exon IIIc of FGFR2, a point mutation designated as 952-1G-->A. Speculation on the molecular mechanisms that cause severe and mild phenotypes is presented in relation to these two cases.

  20. Central action of dendrotoxin: selective reduction of a transient K conductance in hippocampus and binding to localized acceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Halliwell, J V; Othman, I B; Pelchen-Matthews, A; Dolly, J O

    1986-01-01

    Dendrotoxin, a small single-chain protein from the venom of Dendroaspis angusticeps, is highly toxic following intracerebroventricular injection into rats. Voltage-clamp analysis of CA1 neurons in hippocampal slices, treated with tetrodotoxin, revealed that nanomolar concentrations of dendrotoxin reduce selectively a transient, voltage-dependent K conductance. Epileptiform activity known to be induced by dendrotoxin can be attributed to such an action. Membrane currents not affected directly by the toxin include (i) Ca-activated K conductance; (ii) noninactivating voltage-dependent K conductance; (iii) inactivating and noninactivating Ca conductances; (iv) persistent inward (anomalous) rectifier current. Persistence of the effects of the toxin when Cd was included to suppress spontaneous transmitter release indicates a direct action on the neuronal membrane. Using biologically active, 125I-labeled dendrotoxin, protein acceptor sites of high affinity were detected on cerebrocortical synaptosomal membranes and sections of rat brain. In hippocampus, toxin binding was shown autoradiographically to reside in synapse-rich and white matter regions, with lower levels in cell body layers. This acceptor is implicated in the action of toxin because its affinities for dendrotoxin congeners are proportional to their central neurotoxicities and potencies in reducing the transient, voltage-dependent K conductance. Images PMID:2417246