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Sample records for access catalog opac

  1. A Comparison of Keyword Subject Searching on Six British University OPACs Online Public Access Catalogs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aanonson, John

    1987-01-01

    Compares features of online public access catalogs (OPACs) at six British universities: (1) Cambridge; (2) Hull; (3) Newcastle; (4) Surrey; (5) Sussex; and (6) York. Results of keyword subject searches on two topics performed on each of the OPACs are reported and compared. Six references are listed. (MES)

  2. Catalog Use Studies--Since the Introduction of Online Interactive Catalogs: Impact on Design for Subject Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, Pauline A.; Markey, Karen

    1983-01-01

    This review of the transition from library card catalogs to online public access catalogs (OPAC) (1981-1982) discusses methods employed by online catalog use studies (self-administered questionnaires, OPAC transaction logs, focused-group interviews, feature analysis, online search and retrieval experiments) and new directions for OPAC research…

  3. URLs in the OPAC: Integrating or Disintegrating Research Libraries' Catalogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Gerald; Germain, Carol Anne; Van Ullen, Mary K.

    2003-01-01

    Research library catalogs serve as authoritative sources of access. The increasing practice of including Web sites in the catalog, resources not under the library's control, raises new issues of the catalog's accuracy and reliability. An analysis of ARL libraries' catalogs examined the persistence of cataloged URLs. Error rates ranged from a low…

  4. Searching the Online Public Access Catalog. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchionini, Gary; Gattone, Dean

    A study of ways in which users conduct subject searches with an online public access catalog (OPAC) was performed at the College Park Campus of the University of Maryland. Both process (search patterns) and product (search results) variables were examined with respect to individual characteristics of 39 volunteers, many of whom were master's level…

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Opacities from the Opacity Project (Seaton+, 1995)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaton, M. J.; Yan, Y.; Mihalas, D.; Pradhan, A. K.

    1997-08-01

    1 CODES. ***** 1.1 Code rop.for ************ This code reads opacity files written in standard OP format. Its main purpose is to provide documentation on the contents of the files. This code, like the other codes provided, prompts for the name of the file (or files) to be read. The file names read in response to the prompt may have up to 128 characters. 1.2 Code opfit.for ************** This code reads opacity files in standard OP format, and provides for interpolation of opacities to any required values of temperature and mass-density. The method used is described in OPF. The code prompts for the name of a file giving all required control parameters. As an example, the file opfit.dat is provided (users will need to change directory names and file names). The use of opfit.for is illustrated using opfit.dat. Most users will probably want to adapt opfit.for for use as a subroutine in other codes. Timings for DEC 7000 ALPHA: 0.3 sec for data read and initialisations; then 0.0007 sec for each temperature-density point. Users who like OPAL formats should note that opfit.for has a facility to produce files of OP data in OPAL-type formats. 1.3 Code ixz.for ************ This code provides for interpolations to any required values of X and Z. See IXZ. It prompts for the name of a file giving all required control parameters. An example of such a file if provided, ixz.dat (the user will need to change directory and file names). The output files have names s92INT.'nnn'. The user specifies the first value of nnn, and the number of files to be produced. 2. DATA FILES ********** 2.1 Data files for solar metal-mix ****************************** Data for solar metal-mix s92 as defined in SYMP. These files are from version 2 runs of December 1994 (see IXZ for details on Version 2). There are 213 files with names s92.'nnn', 'nnn'=201 to 413. Each file occupies 83762 bytes. The file s92.version2 gives values of X (hydrogen mass-faction) and Z (metals mass-fraction) for each value of

  6. Online Public Access Catalog: The Google Maps of the Library World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Kieren

    2011-01-01

    What do Google Maps and a library's Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC) have in common? Google Maps provides users with all the information they need for a trip in one place; users can get directions and find out what attractions, hotels, and restaurants are close by. Librarians must find the ultimate OPAC that will provide, in one place, all the…

  7. Guidelines for OPAC Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yee, Martha M.

    This paper describes the IFLA (International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions) guidelines for librarians charged with customizing OPAC (online public access catalog) software and vendors and producers of this software. The guidelines are intended to apply to all types of catalog, including World Wide Web-based catalogs, GUI…

  8. Bringing Federal Documents to the Forefront for Library Users: Selective Cataloging Using an OPAC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliva, Victor T.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the value of federal depository document titles and discuses reasons why many are worth cataloging. Several approaches to cataloging these titles to make them more readily accessible are profiled. The Adelphi University Library (New York) has devised a system, using Boolean logic and an online public access catalog to choose which titles…

  9. Subject Access in the Online Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandel, Carol A.

    This review of the research on subject access to library collections focuses on the problems of and prospects for improved online subject access to library collections. Summaries of the general findings of studies on library catalog use and catalog users and some reasons for the frequent failure of subject searches in library catalogs are followed…

  10. Knowing Where They Went: Six Years of Online Access Statistics via the Online Catalog for Federal Government Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Christopher C.

    2011-01-01

    As federal government information is increasingly migrating to online formats, libraries are providing links to this content via URLs or persistent URLs (PURLs) in their online public access catalogs (OPACs). Clickthrough statistics that accumulated as users visited links to online content in the University of Denver's library OPAC were gathered…

  11. Keyword/Boolean Searching on an Online Public Access Catalog: Patrons and Their Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ensor, Pat

    This report presents the results of a study which explored how patron perceptions and demographics related to keyword/Boolean searching on Indiana State University's (ISU) Library User Information System (LUIS), the online public access catalog (OPAC). Two general theses guide the study: (1) whether the use or non-use of keyword searching on LUIS…

  12. Build Your Own CD Public Access Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegarty, Kevin

    1988-01-01

    Description of the development of a CD-ROM public access catalog at the Tacoma (Washington) Public Library covers: (1) costs; (2) pros and cons; (3) access time; (4) updates; (5) linking with the circulation system; (6) vendor selection; (7) compact disc interactive; and (8) digital video interactive. (MES)

  13. OPACs in the Clouds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Paula L.; Nero, Muriel D.

    2009-01-01

    In today's world of instant everything, everyone has been exposed to some form of Web 2.0 technology, and higher education is not exempt from its long reach. Libraries of all types are incorporating Web 2.0 features to attract users as well as to showcase library services. The Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC) has become more user-friendly with…

  14. The GUI OPAC: Approach with Caution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildreth, Charles R.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the graphical user interface (GUI) online public access catalog (OPAC), a user interface that uses images to represent options. Topics include user interface design for information retrieval; designing effective bibliographic displays, including subject headings; two design principles; and what GUIs can bring to OPACs. (LRW)

  15. Automating School Library Catalogs: A Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Catherine, Ed.

    This collection of 23 articles compiled from school library journals address the special needs that make automation problematic for school libraries. The articles are divided into five sections: an overview of OPAC (Online Public Access Catalog) development (4 titles); evaluating OPAC systems (4 titles); implementing OPAC systems (6 titles);…

  16. Open Access Metadata, Catalogers, and Vendors: The Future of Cataloging Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Emily Alinder

    2013-01-01

    The open access (OA) movement is working to transform scholarly communication around the world, but this philosophy can also apply to metadata and cataloging records. While some notable, large academic libraries, such as Harvard University, the University of Michigan, and the University of Cambridge, released their cataloging records under OA…

  17. Subject Access in Online Catalogs: A Design Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Marcia J.

    1986-01-01

    Presents a model for the design of online catalog subject access based on three principles: the uncertainty of subject indexing, the need for greater variety in searcher's queries, and the complexity of the search process. The proposed system is based on existing Library of Congress subject cataloging. (EM)

  18. Streamlining Maintenance and Access to a University's Academic Catalog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Blair

    2005-01-01

    Developing and maintaining an online version of a University's Academic Catalog has increasingly become a priority for enrollment management and IT staff. Many schools are now using the online version of their catalog as their primary working copy and are generating their print version periodically as needed. Managing and accessing this content…

  19. Multisensory Public Access Catalogs on CD-ROM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Nancy; Murphy, Brower

    1987-01-01

    BiblioFile Intelligent Catalog is a CD-ROM-based public access catalog system which incorporates graphics and sound to provide a multisensory interface and artificial intelligence techniques to increase search precision. The system can be updated frequently and inexpensively by linking hard disk drives to CD-ROM optical drives. (MES)

  20. Creating Automated Bibliographies Using Internet-Accessible Online Library Catalogs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Christopher C.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses online library catalogs that are accessible via the Internet and describes their use to create bibliographies using EndNote software. Three catalogs are described that need no further editing; two are described that need some editing; examples of records are given; and the systems are compared. (LRW)

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Opacity-sampling models of Mira variables (Ireland+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, M. J.; Scholz, M.; Wood, P. R.

    2012-05-01

    We present four model series of the CODEX dynamical opacity-sampling models of Mira variables with solar abundances, designed to have parameters similar to {omicron} Cet, R Leo and R Cas. We demonstrate that the CODEX models provide a clear physical basis for the molecular shell scenario used to explain interferometric observations of Mira variables. We show that these models generally provide a good match to photometry and interferometry at wavelengths between the near-infrared and the radio, and make the model outputs publicly available. These models also demonstrate that, in order to match visible and infrared observations, the Fe-poor silicate grains that form within 3 continuum radii must have small grain radii and therefore cannot drive the winds from O-rich Mira variables. (1 data file).

  2. Enhancing Access to Information: Designing Catalogs for the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyckoson, David A., Ed.

    This book addresses the problem of when a library has limited catalog access, and explores various technological methods to expand the catalog beyond its traditional boundaries. Fourteen chapters describe catalog projects in individual libraries: (1) "Enhancing Access to Information: Building Catalogs for the Future" (David A. Tyckoson);…

  3. User Problems with Access to Fictional Characters and Personal Names in Online Public Access Catalogs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yee, Martha M.; Soto, Raymond

    1991-01-01

    Describes a survey of reference librarians in libraries with online public access catalogs that was conducted to determine what types of searches patrons would use to look for names of fictional characters. Name, subject, and author indexes are discussed, and implications for cataloging using the MARC format are suggested. (10 references) (LRW)

  4. Documents to the People--Access through the Automated Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolner, Myrtle Smith; Kile, Barbara

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of the need for bibliographic control of U.S. government documents in depository libraries focuses on a project that upgraded the GPO/MARC bibliographic tapes to permit documents to be included in public access catalogs. The roles of the participants are described, including MARCIVE, Inc., Louisiana State University, Rice University,…

  5. From Catalog to Web: Desktop Access to Sandia Technical Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoecker, Nora K.; Alford, Dixie L.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the processes developed in the Sandia National Laboratories (a Department of Energy multiprogram national laboratory) Technical Library to provide and improve desktop access to Sandia-generated documents. Discusses procedures for cataloging these electronic reports, including identification of the bibliographic information and MARC tags…

  6. Training Concerns for an Online Public Access Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockman, Ilene F.; Adalian, Paul T., Jr.

    This report is designed to raise issues and concerns which will affect the successful implementation of an education and training program once an online public access catalog (OLPAC) has been installed in the Kennedy Library at California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly), San Luis Obispo. Information presented in the document was gathered…

  7. Modifying the Existing Campus Building for Accessibility: Accessible Products Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotler, Stephen Richard

    This catalog is intended to assist architects and college administrators to select products that help physically handicapped people lead lives free of architectural barriers. The product information, obtained directly from the manufacturers, is listed on comparative matrix sheets, that can be used to achieve the design recommendations. Products of…

  8. "Garbage" In, "Refuse and Refuse Disposal" Out: Making the Most of the Subject Authority File in OPAC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Marguerite E.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the difference in subject access in OPACs (online public access catalogs) between subject searching (authority, alphabetic, or controlled vocabulary) versus keyword searching (uncontrolled, free text, natural language vocabulary). Compares a query on the term "garbage" in two online catalogs and discusses results. (Author/LRW)

  9. The Monolingual Cataloging Monolith: A Barrier to Library Access for Readers of Spanish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Asserts that despite growing awareness of frontline public service concerns in accommodating Spanish speakers, little care is invested in the technical processing side of the library's responsibility to Spanish speakers. Examines the usefulness and accessibility of online public access catalogs for monolingual Spanish readers, focusing on records…

  10. ATLAS, an integrated structural analysis and design system. Volume 4: Random access file catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, F. P., Jr. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    A complete catalog is presented for the random access files used by the ATLAS integrated structural analysis and design system. ATLAS consists of several technical computation modules which output data matrices to corresponding random access file. A description of the matrices written on these files is contained herein.

  11. The First Whole Library Catalog; Access to Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1973

    Films available from Films Incorporated are listed in this catalog under the following five headings: Art and Culture, Education and Information, Economy and Society, Health and Medicine, and the World Around Us. Each citation includes such data as the film's producer, director, cast, date, running time and whether it is in color, provides a…

  12. Searching for Information in an Online Public Access Catalogue (OPAC): The Impacts of Information Search Expertise on the use of Boolean Operators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinet, Jrme; Favart, Monik; Passerault, Jean-Michel

    2004-01-01

    Boolean systems still constitute most of the installed base of online public access catalogues (OPACs) in the French universities even if many studies have shown that Boolean operators are not frequently used by non-librarian users (by contrast with professional librarians). The first study examined the use of Boolean operators by French…

  13. Storing and Accessing the Largest Astronomical Catalogs with the SAI CAS Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koposov, S.; Bartunov, O.; Belinskiy, A.; Karpov, S.

    2007-10-01

    We present a new project -- SAI CAS (Sternberg Astronomical Institute Catalog Access Services). The goal of this project is to provide the Russian and international community with online access to major large astronomical catalogs (USNO-A2.0/B1.0, SDSS, 2MASS, GSC I/II, DENIS, UCAC) and provide tools and services facilitating scientific research using these catalogs. Currently SAI CAS is the largest astronomical data center in Russia. It provides primary services such as cone search, cross match between catalogs inside a region on the sky, and between system and user catalogs, etc. Several science projects in Russia already use SAI CAS. The SAI CAS project is based on open source software and is an open source itself. The system uses relational database storage (PostgreSQL), where all data and metadata are stored. The spatial searches and cross matches are performed using the Q3C plugin for PostgreSQL. Our system can be accessed via web-services (SOAP and simple HTTP POST/GET) and web interfaces. The SAI CAS project is located at http://vo.astronet.ru.

  14. Another Look at "SourceOECD": Providing Access to Online Publications through the Library Catalog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragains, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    "SourceOECD," the online/print subscription service of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, is examined. Solutions for providing access in library online catalogs are described, as are recent technical improvements to the online subscription service.

  15. Old Solutions in A New Age: Cataloging and the Future of Access to Government Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutto, Dena Holiman

    1996-01-01

    Discusses cataloging in light of continuing needs and developments in access to government information. Recommends ways the library community, government information providers, and automation specialists can cooperatively reexamine bibliographic standards; expand tape loading to non-U.S. depository collections; link bibliographic databases with…

  16. A Study of Six Online Public Access Catalogs: A Review of Findings. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Joseph R.

    Results from one of a series of cooperative projects to study public access to online catalogs are discussed. This report focuses on a survey of 1,152 users and 1,315 non-users of six computer systems at seven libraries, with library participants including (1) Claremont Colleges Library, which uses the Claremont Total Library System; (2) the…

  17. Does It Make a Sound: Are Open Access Monographs Discoverable in Library Catalogs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCollough, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    This article describes an exploratory study examining the common perception among library-based publishers that open access academic publications (especially monographs) are not readily discoverable in library catalogs. Using titles from the Michigan Publishing imprint, digital culture books, the study provides an empirical basis for evaluating…

  18. Time for New OPAC Initiatives: An Overview of Landmarks in the Literature and Introduction to WordFocus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Joseph R.

    1997-01-01

    Libraries are moving into an era that incorporates improvements of a library's existing databases, embraces the research results of the information-seeking process, and makes fundamental improvements by adding new databases such as WordFocus. These new systems should convert the frustrated user of today's online public access catalog (OPAC) into…

  19. The Purpose of the Cataloging for Matters of Equitable Access: Spanish-Language Cataloging and "Everyday" Approaches of Non-Native English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamich, Tom

    2009-01-01

    While teacher-librarians embrace the concept of equitable access when they select "multicultural" materials to include in their collections, plan special programs, and teach lessons on a variety of topics, what do they do to make equitable access a part of their online catalogs? Have they achieved (or nearly achieved) a consistent level of…

  20. Radiative opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaton, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    An overview of opacity calculations performed during the past decade is presented. Attention is given to envelopes and interiors, equations of state, atomic data, line profiles, and mesh points. Results for a Cepheid model are presented. The solar radiative interior, solar abundances, hydrogen and helium, and contributions from the different elements are discussed. Work over the past decade has led to major revisions in envelope opacities, by factors as large as 3 or 4. There are also some revisions in results for deeper layers, which are important but not so pronounced. A comparison of the work of two opacity research groups, OPAL from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the international OP project, is given.

  1. An Investigation of the Effectiveness of an Online Catalog in Providing Bibliographic Access to Children in a Public Library Setting. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonds, Leslie; And Others

    This study evaluated the use of an online catalog by 33 children in the fourth, sixth, and eighth grades. As a basis of comparison, the children's ability to use the card catalog was also evaluated. Touch screen terminals were used to access a CLSI catalog. A specific set of tests was developed to determine if children have the necessary…

  2. Memorandum "Open Metadata". Open Access to Documentation Forms and Item Catalogs in Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Dugas, M; Jöckel, K-H; Friede, T; Gefeller, O; Kieser, M; Marschollek, M; Ammenwerth, E; Röhrig, R; Knaup-Gregori, P; Prokosch, H-U

    2015-01-01

    At present, most documentation forms and item catalogs in healthcare are not accessible to the public. This applies to assessment forms of routine patient care as well as case report forms (CRFs) of clinical and epidemiological studies. On behalf of the German chairs for Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology six recommendations to developers and users of documentation forms in healthcare were developed. Open access to medical documentation forms could substantially improve information systems in healthcare and medical research networks. Therefore these forms should be made available to the scientific community, their use should not be unduly restricted, they should be published in a sustainable way using international standards and sources of documentation forms should be referenced in scientific publications.

  3. The Relationship Between Card Catalog Access Points and the Recorded Use of Education Books in a University Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Pal V.

    1982-01-01

    Investigates relationship between number of card catalog access points provided for a group of randomly selected education book titles in academic library and number of times the same titles circulated in specified period of time. Research method, sample selection, and data collection and analysis are discussed. Twelve references are provided.…

  4. Comparative Study of Periodical Literature Indexing: Print versus Electronic Access. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowry, Charles B.

    This 2-year project at the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) was conducted to determine the feasibility of providing online periodical indexing to the journal holdings of the UTA libraries by demonstrating an extended use of the libraries' NOTIS Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC) to provide better access to local resources. Three approaches…

  5. Providing access to satellite imagery through OGC catalog service interfaces in support of the Global Earth Observation System of Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yuqi; Di, Liping

    2011-04-01

    The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) architecture requires supporting discovery and access to large volumes of Earth Observation data. To support this application requirement in a polar ecosystem scenario, the project constructed a metadata catalog service for pre-collected orthorectified Landsat satellite images with global coverage. This study investigates the characteristics and challenges in building Open Geospatial Consortium Inc. (OGC) catalog service. It further presents a general lightweight XML adapter for relational tables, followed by a general OGC catalog service solution based on this adapter. This adapter relies on two configuration files to make the core software modules independent of the underlying metadata database structure. One configuration file identifies how XML schema is mapped into relational schema, and the other represents the XML output template. At runtime, this adapter internally employs a two-step mechanism: XQuery processing and XML publication. In the XQuery processing step, metadata discovery requests are interpreted, resulting in an SQL query clause. In the XML publication step, this SQL query and other dynamically generated queries are executed to generate the output according to the predefined XML template. Successful application of this OGC catalog service solution in the GEOSS AIP-2 polar ecosystem scenario is presented, followed by an analysis on its advantages and limitations.

  6. Opacity of stellar matter

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, F J

    1998-09-17

    New efforts to calculate opacity have produced significant improvements in the quality of stellar models. The most dramatic effect has been large opacity enhancements for stars subject to large amplitude pulsations. Significant improvement in helioseismic modeling has also been obtained. A description and comparisons of the new opacity efforts are give

  7. Accessing, Mining, and Archiving an On-line Database -- The APS Catalog of the POSS I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, R. M.; Cabanela, J. E.; Kriessler, J.

    2000-12-01

    The APS Catalog of the POSS I is an on-line database of over 100 million stars and galaxies (http://aps.umn.edu). A unique subset of this database with over 218,000 galaxies within 30 degrees of the North Galactic Pole, the MAPS-NGP, is now available at our web site. This diameter--selected catalog (>= 10 arcsec) is the deepest galaxy catalog constructed over such a large area of the sky (3000 sq. degrees). The MAPS-NGP includes many additional parameters for the galaxy images not available in the APS Catalog. Working with members of our computer science department, we have developed a morphological classifier for galaxies that divides our galaxy type into three classes -- early, intermediate, and late. We have applied data mining techniques to identify the most useful image parameters for input into a neural network and decision--tree based classifier pipeline. We are also archiving the APS Catalog for distribution to astronomical data centers including NASA's ADC and SIMBAD at CDS. The extragalactic subset will be integrated into the NASA/IPAC extragalactic database(NED). The MAPS-NGP has already been provided to NED. The APS is supported by NASA's Applied Information Systems Research Program.

  8. Low Temperature Rosseland Opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, D. R.

    1994-05-01

    A new, comprehensive set of low temperature opacity data for atoms and molecules has been assembled. From this basic data set, Rosseland and Planck mean opacities have been computed for temperatures between 12,500 K and 700 K. In addition to the standard continuous absorbers, atomic line absorption (with more than 8 million lines), molecular line absorption (with nearly 60 million lines), and grain absorption and scattering (by silicates, iron, carbon, and SiC) have been included. The absorption due to lines is computed monochromatically and included in the mean with the Opacity Sampling technique. Grains are assumed to form in chemical equilibrium and to form into a continuous distribution of ellipsoids which are randomly oriented. Agreement of these opacities with other recent tabulations of opacities (including OP (M. J. Seaton 1994, MNRAS, 266, 805) and OPAL (F. J. Rogers & C. A. Iglesias 1992, ApJS, 79, 507)) for temperatures above 5,000 K is excellent. It is shown that opacities which neglect molecules become unreliable for temperatures below 5,000 K. Similarly, grains must be included in the computation for temperatures below 1,000 - 1,700 K, depending upon the density. Opacity tables can be prepared for a wide variety of chemical compositions, and will be provided upon request. This research is supported by NSF grant AST-9217946.

  9. Electronic Journals in Aggregated Collections: Providing Access through the Catalog and a Cold Fusion Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Sue

    2005-01-01

    Patrons in academic libraries want convenient 24-hour access to full-text journals in a rapid, convenient manner. They want "anytime, anywhere" access to information and they do not want to enter a library to obtain it. This article describes how Eastern Washington University Libraries provide access to full-text journals through several…

  10. OPserver: opacities and radiative accelerations on demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, C.; González, J.; Seaton, M. J.; Buerger, P.; Bellorín, A.; Meléndez, M.; Rodríguez, L. S.; Delahaye, F.; Zeippen, C. J.; Palacios, E.; Pradhan, A. K.

    2009-05-01

    We report on developments carried out within the Opacity Project (OP) to upgrade atomic database services to comply with e-infrastructure requirements. We give a detailed description of an interactive, online server for astrophysical opacities, referred to as OPserver, to be used in sophisticated stellar modelling where Rosseland mean opacities and radiative accelerations are computed at every depth point and each evolution cycle. This is crucial, for instance, in chemically peculiar stars and in the exploitation of the new asteroseismological data. OPserver, downloadable with the new OPCD_3.0 release from the Centre de Données Astronomiques de Strasbourg, France, computes mean opacities and radiative data for arbitrary chemical mixtures from the OP monochromatic opacities. It is essentially a client-server network restructuring and optimization of the suite of codes included in the earlier OPCD_2.0 release. The server can be installed locally or, alternatively, accessed remotely from the Ohio Supercomputer Center, Columbus, Ohio, USA. The client is an interactive web page or a subroutine library that can be linked to the user code. The suitability of this scheme in grid computing environments is emphasized, and its extension to other atomic database services for astrophysical purposes is discussed.

  11. Universe opacity and EBL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavryčuk, Václav

    2017-02-01

    The observed extragalactic background light (EBL) is affected by light attenuation due to absorption of light by galactic and intergalactic dust in the Universe. Even galactic opacity of 10-20 per cent and minute universe intergalactic opacity of 0.01 mag h Gpc-1 at the local Universe have a significant impact on the EBL because obscuration of galaxies and density of intergalactic dust increase with redshift as (1 + z)3. Consequently, intergalactic opacity increases and the Universe becomes considerably opaque at z > 3. Adopting realistic values for galactic and intergalactic opacity, the estimates of the EBL for the expanding dusty universe are close to observations. The luminosity density evolution fits well measurements. The model reproduces a steep increase of the luminosity density at z < 2, its maximum at z = 2-3, and its decrease at higher redshifts. The increase of the luminosity density at low z is not produced by the evolution of the star formation rate but by the fact that the Universe occupied a smaller volume in previous epochs. The decline of the luminosity density at high z originates in the opacity of the Universe. The calculated bolometric EBL ranges from 100 to 200 nW m-2 sr-1 and is within the limits of 40 and 200 nW m-2 sr-1 of current EBL observations. The model predicts 98 per cent of the EBL coming from radiation of galaxies at z < 3.5. Accounting for light extinction by intergalactic dust implies that the Universe was probably more opaque than dark for z > 3.5.

  12. Molecular opacities for exoplanets

    PubMed Central

    Bernath, Peter F.

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of exoplanets are now possible by transit methods and direct emission. Spectroscopic requirements for exoplanets are reviewed based on existing measurements and model predictions for hot Jupiters and super-Earths. Molecular opacities needed to simulate astronomical observations can be obtained from laboratory measurements, ab initio calculations or a combination of the two approaches. This discussion article focuses mainly on laboratory measurements of hot molecules as needed for exoplanet spectroscopy. PMID:24664921

  13. Molecular opacities for exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Bernath, Peter F

    2014-04-28

    Spectroscopic observations of exoplanets are now possible by transit methods and direct emission. Spectroscopic requirements for exoplanets are reviewed based on existing measurements and model predictions for hot Jupiters and super-Earths. Molecular opacities needed to simulate astronomical observations can be obtained from laboratory measurements, ab initio calculations or a combination of the two approaches. This discussion article focuses mainly on laboratory measurements of hot molecules as needed for exoplanet spectroscopy.

  14. Stellar opacity validations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pennec, M.; Turck-Chièze, S.; Ribeyre, X.; Ducret, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    This paper focuses on the radiative transfer in stars where opacities seem to raise problems : β-Cephei and solar-type stars. We first concentrate on the iron bump (log T = 5.25), responsible for β-Cephei pulsations through the κ-mechanism. To discriminate between the different opacity calculations used to predict their oscillations, new well-qualified calculations are used and compared to OP calculations. In parallel with this theoretical work, an experiment has been conducted at LULI 2000 in 2011 on iron and nickel. We show that this extended study pushes for the revision of the tables in the conditions corresponding to the iron bump region, at least for nickel. We will then deal with the Sun case for which we are preparing an opacity experiment on a high-energy laser, in some conditions of the radiative zone (T = [2 - 15 ×10^{6} K] and ρ = [0.2 - 150 g/cm^{3}]). To reach these high temperatures and densities at LTE and validate or not plasma effects and line widths, we are exploring an approach called the Double Ablation Front, driven by plasma radiative effects. The 1D simulations performed with the code CHIC show that with this technique, we could reach conditions equivalent to the conditions of half of the solar radiative zone.

  15. Federating Metadata Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baru, C.; Lin, K.

    2009-04-01

    The Geosciences Network project (www.geongrid.org) has been developing cyberinfrastructure for data sharing in the Earth Science community based on a service-oriented architecture. The project defines a standard "software stack", which includes a standardized set of software modules and corresponding service interfaces. The system employs Grid certificates for distributed user authentication. The GEON Portal provides online access to these services via a set of portlets. This service-oriented approach has enabled the GEON network to easily expand to new sites and deploy the same infrastructure in new projects. To facilitate interoperation with other distributed geoinformatics environments, service standards are being defined and implemented for catalog services and federated search across distributed catalogs. The need arises because there may be multiple metadata catalogs in a distributed system, for example, for each institution, agency, geographic region, and/or country. Ideally, a geoinformatics user should be able to search across all such catalogs by making a single search request. In this paper, we describe our implementation for such a search capability across federated metadata catalogs in the GEON service-oriented architecture. The GEON catalog can be searched using spatial, temporal, and other metadata-based search criteria. The search can be invoked as a Web service and, thus, can be imbedded in any software application. The need for federated catalogs in GEON arises because, (i) GEON collaborators at the University of Hyderabad, India have deployed their own catalog, as part of the iGEON-India effort, to register information about local resources for broader access across the network, (ii) GEON collaborators in the GEO Grid (Global Earth Observations Grid) project at AIST, Japan have implemented a catalog for their ASTER data products, and (iii) we have recently deployed a search service to access all data products from the EarthScope project in the US

  16. Computing NLTE Opacities -- Node Level Parallel Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, Daniel

    2015-09-11

    Presentation. The goal: to produce a robust library capable of computing reasonably accurate opacities inline with the assumption of LTE relaxed (non-LTE). Near term: demonstrate acceleration of non-LTE opacity computation. Far term (if funded): connect to application codes with in-line capability and compute opacities. Study science problems. Use efficient algorithms that expose many levels of parallelism and utilize good memory access patterns for use on advanced architectures. Portability to multiple types of hardware including multicore processors, manycore processors such as KNL, GPUs, etc. Easily coupled to radiation hydrodynamics and thermal radiative transfer codes.

  17. NASA climate data catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reph, M. G.

    1984-01-01

    This document provides a summary of information available in the NASA Climate Data Catalog. The catalog provides scientific users with technical information about selected climate parameter data sets and the associated sensor measurements from which they are derived. It is an integral part of the Pilot Climate Data System (PCDS), an interactive, scientific management system for locating, obtaining, manipulating, and displaying climate research data. The catalog is maintained in a machine readable representation which can easily be accessed via the PCDS. The purposes, format and content of the catalog are discussed. Summarized information is provided about each of the data sets currently described in the catalog. Sample detailed descriptions are included for individual data sets or families of related data sets.

  18. Evaluating Public Access On-Line Catalogs. Phase I: Development and Testing of Data Collection and Analysis Tools. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Ray R.

    This report outlines specifications for the online transaction monitoring and questionnaire administration features of the University of California's (UC) Prototype On-Line Catalog, known as MELVYL. The development and testing of these features by the UC Division of Library Automation (DLA) is also described. This document is the final report…

  19. Helioseismic Tests of Radiative Opacities.

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, J. A.; Neuforge, C. M.; Keady, J. J.; Magee, N. H.; Bradley, P. A.

    2002-01-01

    During the past fifteen years, thousands of solar acoustic oscillation modes have been measured to remarkable precision, in many cases to within 0.01%. These frequencies have been used to infer the interior structure of the sun and test the physical input to solar models. Here we summarize the procedures, input physics and assumptions for calculating a standard solar evolution model. We compare the observed and calculated sound speed profile and oscillation frequencies of solar models calibrated using the new Los Alamos LEDCOP and Livermore OPAL Rosseland mean opacities for the same element mixture. We show that solar oscillations are extremely sensitive to opacities, with opacity differences of only a few percent producing an easily detectable effect on the sound speed and predicted frequencies. The oscillation data indicate that agreement would be improved by an opacity increase of several percent below the convection zone for both the LEDCOP and OPAL opacities.

  20. THE IRON OPACITY PROJECT: High-Energy-Density Plasma Opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palay, E.; Orban, C.; Nahar, S.; Pradhan, A.; Pinnsonoault, M.; Bailey, J.

    2013-05-01

    Opacity governs radiation flow in plasma sources. Accurate opacities are needed to model unobservable laboratory and astrophysical conditions. High-energy-density (HED) plasma conditions prevalent in stellar interiors can now be recreated in the laboratory. The Z-pinch fusion device at the Sandia National Lab can reproduce temperatures and densities near the boundary where radiation transport changes from diffusion to convection inside the Sun. To benchmark theoretical opacities experiments are essential to resolve the outstanding discrepancy in solar abundances. The most common volatile elements C, N, O, Ne, etc. have been spectroscopically measured to be up to 50% lower than the standard abundances. This introduces conflict in the derived values of basic solar parameters such as the radiation/convection boundary, sound speed, and the primordial He abundance with precisely measured oscillations of the Sun through Helioseismology. A potential solution is increment of stellar opacities, which has inverse but complex relation with abundacnes, at least 30%. New iron opacity calculations include hitherto neglected atomic physics of fine structure and resonances which are largely treated as lines in existing opacities calculations. Preliminary results on radiative transitions in Ne Partial support: DOE,NSF.

  1. Research on Spectroscopy, Opacity, and Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurucz, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    To make my calculations more readily accessible I have set up a web site cfaku5.harvard.edu that can also be accessed by FTP. it has 5 9GB disks that hold all of my atomic and diatomic molecular data, my tables of distribution function opacities, my grids of model atmospheres, colors, fluxes, etc, my program that are ready for distribution, most of my recent papers. Atlases and computed spectra will be added as they are completed. New atomic and molecular calculations will be added as they are completed. I got my atomic programs that had been running on a Cray at the San Diego Supercomputer Center to run on my Vaxes and Alpha. I started with Ni and Co because there were new laboratory analyses that included isotopic and hyperfine splitting. Those calculations are described in the appended abstract for the 6th Atomic Spectroscopy and oscillator Strengths meeting in Victoria last summer. A surprising finding is that quadrupole transitions have been grossly in error because mixing with higher levels has not been included. I now have enough memory in my Alpha to treat 3000 x 3000 matrices. I now include all levels up through n=9 for Fe I and 11, the spectra for which the most information is available. I am finishing those calculations right now. After Fe I and Fe 11, all other spectra are "easy", and I will be in mass production. ATL;LS12, my opacity sampling program for computing models with arbitrary abundances, has been put on the web server. I wrote a new distribution function opacity program for workstations that replaces the one I used on the Cray at the San Diego Supercomputer Center. Each set of abundances would take 100 Cray hours costing $100,000. 1 ran 25 cases. Each of my opacity CDs contains three abundances. I have a new program -iinning on the Alpha that takes about a week. I am going to have to get a faster processor or I will have to dedicate a whole workstation just to opacities.

  2. NASA Space Science Resource Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teays, T.

    2000-05-01

    The NASA Office of Space Science Resource Catalog provides a convenient online interface for finding space science products for use in classrooms, science museums, planetariums, and many other venues. Goals in developing this catalog are: (1) create a cataloging system for all NASA OSS education products, (2) develop a system for characterizing education products which is meaningful to a large clientele, (3) develop a mechanism for evaluating products, (4) provide a user-friendly interface to search and access the data, and (5) provide standardized metadata and interfaces to other cataloging and library systems. The first version of the catalog is being tested at the spring 2000 conventions of the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) and will be released in summer 2000. The catalog may be viewed at the Origins Education Forum booth.

  3. Research on Spectroscopy, Opacity, and Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurucz, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    A web site has been set up to make the calculations accessible; (i.e., cfakus.harvard.edu) This data can also be accessed by FTP. It has all of the atomic and diatomic molecular data, tables of distribution function opacities, grids of model atmospheres, colors, fluxes, etc, programs that are ready for distribution, and most of recent papers developed during this grant. Atlases and computed spectra will be added as they are completed. New atomic and molecular calculations will be added as they are completed. The atomic programs that had been running on a Cray at the San Diego Supercomputer Center can now run on the Vaxes and Alpha. The work started with Ni and Co because there were new laboratory analyses that included isotopic and hyperfine splitting. Those calculations are described in the appended abstract for the 6th Atomic Spectroscopy and oscillator Strengths meeting in Victoria last summer. A surprising finding is that quadrupole transitions have been grossly in error because mixing with higher levels has not been included. All levels up through n=9 for Fe I and II, the spectra for which the most information is available, are now included. After Fe I and Fe II, all other spectra are "easy". ATLAS12, the opacity sampling program for computing models with arbitrary abundances, has been put on the web server. A new distribution function opacity program for workstations that replaces the one used on the Cray at the San Diego Supercomputer Center has been written. Each set of abundances would take 100 Cray hours costing $100,000.

  4. Relativistic opacities for astrophysical applications

    DOE PAGES

    Fontes, Christopher John; Fryer, Christopher Lee; Hungerford, Aimee L.; ...

    2015-06-29

    Here, we report on the use of the Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes to generate radiative opacities for the modeling of astrophysically relevant plasmas under local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions. The atomic structure calculations are carried out in fine-structure detail, including full configuration interaction. Three example applications are considered: iron opacities at conditions relevant to the base of the solar convection zone, nickel opacities for the modeling of stellar envelopes, and samarium opacities for the modeling of light curves produced by neutron star mergers. In the first two examples, comparisons are made between opacities that are generatedmore » with the fully and semi-relativistic capabilities in the Los Alamos suite of codes. As expected for these highly charged, iron-peak ions, the two methods produce reasonably similar results, providing confidence that the numerical methods have been correctly implemented. However, discrepancies greater than 10% are observed for nickel and investigated in detail. In the final application, the relativistic capability is used in a preliminary investigation of the complicated absorption spectrum associated with cold lanthanide elements.« less

  5. Relativistic opacities for astrophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, C. J.; Fryer, C. L.; Hungerford, A. L.; Hakel, P.; Colgan, J.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Sherrill, M. E.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the use of the Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes to generate radiative opacities for the modeling of astrophysically relevant plasmas under local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions. The atomic structure calculations are carried out in fine-structure detail, including full configuration interaction. Three example applications are considered: iron opacities at conditions relevant to the base of the solar convection zone, nickel opacities for the modeling of stellar envelopes, and samarium opacities for the modeling of light curves produced by neutron star mergers. In the first two examples, comparisons are made between opacities that are generated with the fully and semi-relativistic capabilities in the Los Alamos suite of codes. As expected for these highly charged, iron-peak ions, the two methods produce reasonably similar results, providing confidence that the numerical methods have been correctly implemented. However, discrepancies greater than 10% are observed for nickel and investigated in detail. In the final application, the relativistic capability is used in a preliminary investigation of the complicated absorption spectrum associated with cold lanthanide elements.

  6. Relativistic opacities for astrophysical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fontes, Christopher John; Fryer, Christopher Lee; Hungerford, Aimee L.; Hakel, Peter; Colgan, James Patrick; Kilcrease, David Parker; Sherrill, Manalo Edgar

    2015-06-29

    Here, we report on the use of the Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes to generate radiative opacities for the modeling of astrophysically relevant plasmas under local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions. The atomic structure calculations are carried out in fine-structure detail, including full configuration interaction. Three example applications are considered: iron opacities at conditions relevant to the base of the solar convection zone, nickel opacities for the modeling of stellar envelopes, and samarium opacities for the modeling of light curves produced by neutron star mergers. In the first two examples, comparisons are made between opacities that are generated with the fully and semi-relativistic capabilities in the Los Alamos suite of codes. As expected for these highly charged, iron-peak ions, the two methods produce reasonably similar results, providing confidence that the numerical methods have been correctly implemented. However, discrepancies greater than 10% are observed for nickel and investigated in detail. In the final application, the relativistic capability is used in a preliminary investigation of the complicated absorption spectrum associated with cold lanthanide elements.

  7. Unifying Water Data Sources: How the CUAHSI Water Data Center is Enabling and Improving Access to a Growing Catalog of over 100 Data Providers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollak, J.; Berry, K.; Couch, A.; Arrigo, J.; Hooper, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    features of the CUAHSI-HIS which make it particularly appropriate for providing unified access to several sources of water data. A growing community of researchers and educators are employing these tools for education; including sharing best practices around creating modules, supporting researchers and educators in accessing the services, and cataloging and sharing modules. The CUAHSI WDC is a community governed organization. Our agenda is driven by the community's voice through a Board of Directors and committees that decide strategic direction (new products), tactical decisions (product improvement), and evaluation of usability. By providing the aforementioned services within a community driven framework, we believe the WDC is providing critical services that include improving water data discoverability, accessibility and usability within a sustainable governance structure.

  8. Online Catalogs in Secondary School Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Donald R.

    Computer/automated catalogs have been in use in secondary schools for some time and have numerous advantages. A public access catalog (PAC) allows networking with other libraries, use of the Boolean search function, and the retrieval of bibliographic citations from a variety of access points. Moreover, PAC's have recently become more user…

  9. Group B streptococcal opacity variants.

    PubMed Central

    Pincus, S H; Cole, R L; Wessels, M R; Corwin, M D; Kamanga-Sollo, E; Hayes, S F; Cieplak, W; Swanson, J

    1992-01-01

    Colony opacity variants were detected for type III group B streptococci (GBS). Transparent colonies predominate in the parent GBS, with occasional colonies having opaque portions. Two stable opaque variants (1.1 and 1.5) were compared with three transparent clones (1.2, 1.3, and 1.4). All grew well on blood agar and on GC medium, but variant 1.1 failed to grow on Todd-Hewitt medium. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that colony opacity correlated with bacterial aggregation status, with opaque variants forming longer and more organized chains. Opaque-transparent switches were observed in both directions for most variants, with transparent to opaque noted most frequently, but 1.5 did not switch at all. Switching of the opacity phenotype was observed both in vitro and in neonatal mice. Relationships between colony opacity and several cell surface phenomena were explored. (i) Opaque variant 1.1 had two surface proteins (46 and 75 kDa) that were either unique or greatly overexpressed. (ii) Variant 1.1 was deficient in type III polysaccharide, while 1.5 lacked group B antigen. Diminished capsular polysaccharide of variant 1.1 was reflected in reduced negative electrophoretic mobility and in increased buoyant density. (iii) Transparent variant colonies growing closest to a penicillin disk were opaque, but colonial variants did not differ in their sensitivity to penicillin. These data indicate that GBS can exist in both opaque and transparent forms, with opaque appearance occurring by multiple routes. Opaque variants grow poorly on Todd-Hewitt medium generally used for isolation of GBS, so any possible relationships between opacity variation and pathogenesis of GBS infection are unknown. Images PMID:1592825

  10. The Visual Double Star Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Brian D.

    2015-08-01

    In visual double star work, production of the first comprehensive attempt to list all discovered pairs in his accessible sky was prepared by S.W. Burnham in 1906. A double star catalog for the southern hemisphere was prepared by R.T.A. Innes et al. in 1927 and the northern hemisphere catalog was updated by R.G. Aitken and E. Doolittle in 1932. Eventually, this led to Lick Observatory maintaining what became known as the Index Catalogue, an all-sky visual double star database.In 1964, under the aegis of Commission 26, the Lick double star database was transferred to the U.S. Naval Observatory where it was redesignated the Washington Double Star Catalog where it and it's ancillary catalogs, have been maintained for over half a century. The current statistics of the catalog and it's supplements are presented as are the enhancements currently under consideration.

  11. Redesigning the OPAC: Moving outside the ILMS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokvitne, Lloyd O.

    2006-01-01

    The need to develop new OPACs that meet the needs of users better is becoming well acknowledged. How libraries can transform their OPACs to modern web friendly formats is not yet clear. This paper describes the State Library of Tasmania's experience in developing a new OPAC by exporting bibliographic data to a software package outside the ILMS.…

  12. Enhancement of Mutual Discovery, Search, and Access of Data for Users of NASA and GEOSS-Cataloged Data Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, W. L.; Maidment, D. R.; Rodell, M.; Strub, R. F.; Arctur, D. K.; Ames, D. P.; Vollmer, B.; Seiler, E.

    2014-12-01

    An ongoing NASA-funded project has removed a longstanding barrier to accessing NASA data (i.e., accessing archived time-step array data as point-time series) for selected variables of the North American and Global Land Data Assimilation Systems (NLDAS and GLDAS, respectively) and other EOSDIS (Earth Observing System Data Information System) data sets. These time series ("data rods") are pre-generated or generated on-the-fly (OTF), leveraging the NASA Simple Subset Wizard (SSW), a gateway to NASA data centers. Data rods Web services are accessible through the CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System (HIS) and the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) but are not easily discoverable by users of other non-NASA data systems. The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) is a logical mechanism for providing access to the data rods, both pre-generated and OTF. There is an ongoing series of multi-organizational GEOSS Architecture Implementation Pilots, now in Phase-7 (AIP-7) and with a strong water sub-theme, that is aimed at the GEOSS Water Strategic Target "to produce [by 2015] comprehensive sets of data and information products to support decision-making for efficient management of the world's water resources, based on coordinated, sustained observations of the water cycle on multiple scales." The aim of this "GEOSS Water Services" project is to develop a distributed, global registry of water data, map, and modeling services catalogued using the standards and procedures of the Open Geospatial Consortium and the World Meteorological Organization. This project has already demonstrated that the GEOSS infrastructure can be leveraged to help provide access to time series of model grid information (e.g., NLDAS, GLDAS) or grids of information over a geographical domain for a particular time interval. A new NASA-funded project was begun, to expand on these early efforts to enhance the discovery, search, and access of NASA data by non

  13. Messier Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    In the eighteenth century the French astronomer, Charles Messier (1730-1817), drew up a catalog of 109 of the brighter nebulae, clusters and galaxies. Objects in this catalog are denoted by the letter M followed by a number, for example, M31 is the Andromeda Galaxy. Messier's prime interest was comets. His purpose was to make comet hunting easier by tabulating permanent deep-sky objects that coul...

  14. How Next-Gen R U? A Review of Academic OPACs in the United States and Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofmann, Melissa A.; Yang, Sharon Q.

    2011-01-01

    As a concept, the next-generation catalog (NGC) is not new to librarians, who have been wishing for better OPAC interfaces for their integrated library systems (ILSs). The NGC has been the focus of discussion for more than 5 years now, from the 2006 report of the implementation of Endeca at North Carolina State University, to Marshall Breeding's…

  15. Iron opacity experiments for the solar interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, T.; Bailey, J. E.; Loisel, G.; Rochau, G. A.; Hansen, S. B.; Blancard, C.; Cosse, Ph.; Faussurier, G.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J.-C.; Pradhan, A. K.; Orban, C.; Pinsonneault, M.; Nahar, S. N.; Iglesias, C. A.; Wilson, B.; Colgan, J.; Fontes, C.; Kilcrease, D.; Sherrill, M.; Macfarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I.; Mancini, R. C.

    2014-10-01

    Iron opacity experiments near solar interior conditions are performed at SNL Z-machine to better constrain solar models. The SNL opacity science platform satisfies the many challenging requirements for opacity measurements and successfully determines iron opacities at multiple conditions. We found that the agreement between the modeled opacity and the measured opacity deteriorates as Te and ne are raised to approach solar interior conditions. While the inaccuracy of the modeled opacity partially resolves the solar abundance problem, the announcement of such discrepancies has a high impact on the astrophysics, atomic physics, and high energy density physics, and thus more scrutiny on the potential experimental flaws is critical. We report the synthetic investigation for potential sources of systematic uncertainties in the experiments. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. In Search of a Really "Next Generation" Catalog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Ross

    2008-01-01

    Ever since North Carolina State University Libraries launched their Endeca-based OPAC replacement in the beginning of 2006, the library world has been completely obsessed with ditching their old, tired catalog interfaces (and with good reason) for the greener pastures of more sophisticated indexing, more accurate relevance ranking, dust jackets,…

  17. Line Broadening and the Solar Opacity Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krief, M.; Feigel, A.; Gazit, D.

    2016-06-01

    The calculation of line widths constitutes theoretical and computational challenges in the calculation of opacities of hot, dense plasmas. Opacity models use line broadening approximations that are untested at stellar interior conditions. Moreover, calculations of atomic spectra of the Sun indicate a large discrepancy in the K-shell line widths between several atomic codes and the Opacity-Project (OP). In this work, the atomic code STAR is used to study the sensitivity of solar opacities to line broadening. Variations in the solar opacity profile due to an increase of the Stark widths resulting from discrepancies with OP, are compared, in light of the solar opacity problem, with the required opacity variations of the present day Sun, as imposed by helioseismic and neutrino observations. The resulting variation profile is much larger than the discrepancy between different atomic codes, agrees qualitatively with the missing opacity profile, recovers about half of the missing opacity nearby the convection boundary, and has a little effect in the internal regions. Since it is hard to estimate quantitatively the uncertainty in the Stark widths, we show that an increase of all line widths by a factor of about ˜100 recovers quantitatively the missing opacity. These results emphasize the possibility that photoexcitation processes are not modeled properly, and more specifically, highlight the need for a better theoretical characterization of the line broadening phenomena at stellar interior conditions, and of the uncertainty due to the way it is implemented by atomic codes.

  18. Open-Source Tools for Enhancing Full-Text Searching of OPACs: Use of Koha, Greenstone and Fedora

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anuradha, K. T.; Sivakaminathan, R.; Kumar, P. Arun

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: There are many library automation packages available as open-source software, comprising two modules: staff-client module and online public access catalogue (OPAC). Although the OPAC of these library automation packages provides advanced features of searching and retrieval of bibliographic records, none of them facilitate full-text…

  19. Design Parameter Studies of Emission-Based Iron Opacity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Madison E.; London, Richard A.; Goluoglu, Sedat; Whitley, Heather D.

    2016-10-01

    Opacity is a critical parameter in the transport of radiation in systems such as inertial confinement fusion capsules and stars. The resolution of current disagreements between solar models and helioseismological observations would benefit from experimental validation of theoretical opacity models. Short pulse lasers can be used to heat targets to higher temperatures and densities than long pulse lasers and pulsed power machines, thus potentially enabling access to x-ray emission spectra at conditions relevant to solar models. The radiation-hydrodynamic code HYDRA is used to investigate the effects of modifying laser energy, laser pulse length, and target dimensions on the plasma conditions, x-ray emission, and inferred opacity of a buried layer iron target. The accuracy of the opacity inference is sensitive to tamper emission and optical depth effects. An example design that reaches temperatures and densities relevant to the radiative zone of the sun while reducing optical depth and tamper emission effects will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC.

  20. SKYMAP system description: Star catalog data base generation and utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    The specifications, design, software description, and use of the SKYMAP star catalog system are detailed. The SKYMAP system was developed to provide an accurate and complete catalog of all stars with blue or visual magnitudes brighter than 9.0 for use by attitude determination programs. Because of the large number of stars which are brighter than 9.0 magnitude, efficient techniques of manipulating and accessing the data were required. These techniques of staged distillation of data from a Master Catalog to a Core Catalog, and direct access of overlapping zone catalogs, form the basis of the SKYMAP system. The collection and tranformation of data required to produce the Master Catalog data base is described. The data flow through the main programs and levels of star catalogs is detailed. The mathematical and logical techniques for each program and the format of all catalogs are documented.

  1. Computational Design of Short Pulse Laser Driven Iron Opacity Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Madison E.; London, Richard A.; Goluoglu, Sedat; Whitley, Heather D.

    2015-11-01

    Opacity is a critical parameter in the transport of radiation in systems such as inertial confinement fusion capsules and stars. The resolution of current disagreements between solar models and helioseismological observations would benefit from experimental validation of theoretical opacity models. Short pulse lasers can be used to heat targets to higher temperatures and densities than long pulse lasers and pulsed power machines, thus potentially enabling access to emission spectra at conditions relevant to solar models. In order to ensure that the relevant plasma conditions are accessible and that an emission measurement is practical, we use computational design of experiments to optimize the target characteristics and laser conditions. Radiation-hydrodynamic modeling, using HYDRA, is used to investigate the effects of modifying laser irradiance, target dimensions, and dopant dilution on the plasma conditions and emission of an iron opacity target. Several optimized designs reaching temperatures and densities relevant to the radiative zone of the sun will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC.

  2. Management of Catalogs at CDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landais, G.; Boch, T.; Brouty, M.; Guéhenneux, S.; Genova, F.; Lesteven, S.; Ochsenbein, F.; Ocvirk, P.; Perret, E.; Pineau, F.-X.; Simon, A.-C.; Vannier, P.

    2015-04-01

    VizieR (Ochsenbein et al. 2000) provides access to the most complete library of published astronomical catalogs (data tables and associated data) available online and organized in a self-documented database. (There were 11769 catalogs in November 2013.) Indexing the metadata in the VizieR search engine requires the expertise of scientists and documentalists for each catalog ingested. The metadata go into an efficient position search engine that is adapted to big data. (For instance, the GAIA simulation catalog has more than two billion objects). Information in VizieR tables is well described and can be retrieved easily. The search results provide visibility to catalogs with tools and protocols to disseminate data to the Virtual Observatory, thus giving scientists data that is reusable by dedicated tools (e.g. image vizualisation tools). Also, new functionality allows users to extract all photometric data in catalogs for a given position. Finally, it is also through cross-identification tools that the CDS becomes a partner in producing large data sets, such as GAIA.

  3. MC and A instrumentation catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Neymotin, L.; Sviridova, V.

    1998-06-01

    In 1981 and 1985, two editions of a catalog of non-destructive nuclear measurement instrumentation, and material control and surveillance equipment, were published by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The last edition of the catalog included one hundred and twenty-five entries covering a wide range of devices developed in the US and abroad. More than ten years have elapsed since the publication of the more recent Catalog. Devices described in it have undergone significant modifications, and new devices have been developed. Therefore, in order to assist specialists in the field of Material Control and Accounting (MC and A), a new catalog has been created. Work on this instrumentation catalog started in 1997 as a cooperative effort of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), operated by Brookhaven Science Associates under contract to the US Department of Energy, and the All-Russian Research Institute of Automatics (VNIIA), subordinate institute of the Atomic Energy Ministry of the Russian Federation, within the collaborative US-Russia Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC and A) Program. Most of the equipment included in the Catalog are non-destructive assay (NDA) measurement devices employed for purposes of accounting, confirmation, and verification of nuclear materials. Other devices also included in the Catalog are employed in the detection and deterrence of unauthorized access to or removal of nuclear materials (material control: containment and surveillance). Equipment found in the Catalog comprises either: (1) complete devices or systems that can be used for MC and A applications; or (2) parts or components of complete systems, such as multi-channel analyzers, detectors, neutron generators, and software. All devices are categorized by their status of development--from prototype to serial production.

  4. Fe XVII Opacity at Solar Interior Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, Carlos A.; Hansen, Stephanie B.

    2017-02-01

    A recent study of Fe xvii R-matrix calculations aimed at resolving outstanding opacity problems claimed that substantial photon absorption from atomic core ionization processes was not previously considered. It is shown, however, that major opacity models already include cross-sections that are equivalent to the enhancements reported by the R-matrix method. Furthermore, the R-matrix calculations neglected important cross-sections that help to explain why the resultant opacity is lower than other models in the spectral range measured in transmission experiments relevant to the solar interior.

  5. New experimental possibilities for measuring radiative opacity under conditions in the Sun's interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, S. J.

    2005-12-01

    Opacity experiments that have been conducted to date using long-pulse (nanosecond) high-power lasers have reached conditions similar in density and temperature to those found in the outer part of the radiative flow region of the Sun. Experiments using short-pulse (picosecond) lasers are beginning to give access to conditions halfway to the Sun's centre. In this paper we describe a preliminary design of an opacity experiment that uses a combination of long and short-pulse laser beams to compress and heat the plasma and thereby access conditions similar to those at the centre of the Sun.

  6. The opacity of an expanding medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinnikov, S. I.

    1996-01-01

    Based on heuristic arguments, Karp et al. (1977) derived their well-known expression for the line opacity that allows for the effect of expansion. We use the general solution and Hilbert-type asymptotic expansions of the Boltzmann equation for photons to derive an expression for this "expansion opacity" rigorously. The difference between our result and the published results on this subject is discussed, as is the applicability of the expression for the expansion opacity to calculations of radiative transfer in a comoving frame in the moment approximation. For the zeroth moment (i.e., the energy equation), there is no need to take the expansion effect into account, and the absorption coefficient can be averaged just as in the case of a static medium. We also show how to properly average the expansion opacity in the flux equation.

  7. X ray opacity in cluster cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Michael W.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1993-01-01

    We have calculated the emergent x-ray properties for a set of spherically symmetric, steady-state cluster cooling flow models including the effects of radiative transfer. Opacity due to resonant x-ray lines, photoelectric absorption, and electron scattering have been included in these calculations, and homogeneous and inhomogeneous gas distributions were considered. The effects of photoionization opacity are small for both types of models. In contrast, resonant line optical depths can be quite high in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous models. The presence of turbulence in the gas can significantly lower the line opacity. We find that integrated x-ray spectra for the flow cooling now are only slightly affected by radiative transfer effects. However x-ray line surface brightness profiles can be dramatically affected by radiative transfer. Line profiles are also strongly affected by transfer effects. The combined effects of opacity and inflow cause many of the lines in optically thick models to be asymmetrical.

  8. Summary of Fe opacity measurement platform

    SciTech Connect

    Nagayama, Taisuke

    2016-05-01

    This powerpoint presentation goes over the Fe opacity measurement platform, including how the experiment works, what can be gathered from the measurements, what can be gathered from the simulations, and the limitations of the experiment.

  9. 40 CFR 63.1653 - Opacity standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Opacity standards. No owner or operator shall cause emissions exiting from a shop due solely to operations... during any performance test, with the following exceptions: (a) Visible particulate emissions from a...

  10. Centralized automated cataloging of health science materials in the MLC/SUNY/OCLC shared cataloging service.

    PubMed

    Raper, J E

    1977-04-01

    Since February 1976, The Medical Library Center of New York, with the assistance of the SUNY/OCLC Network, has offered, on a subscription basis, a centralized automated cataloging service to health science libraries in the greater metropolitan New York area. By using workforms and prints of OCLC record (amended by the subscribing participants), technical services personnel at the center have fed cataloging data, via a CRT terminal, into the OCLC system, which provides (1) catalog cards, received in computer filing order; (2) book card, spine, and pocket labels; (3) accessions lists; and (4) data for eventual production of book catalogs and union catalogs. The experience of the center in the development, implementation, operation, and budgeting of its shared cataloging service is discussed.

  11. Modeling the SNL-Z Opacity Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrill, Manolo; Wilde, Bernhard; Peterson, Darrell; Urbatsch, Todd; Hakel, Peter; Fontes, Chris; Bailey, James; Rochau, Gregory

    2015-11-01

    Driven by the need to validate computed opacity tables used for radiation hydrodynamic simulations, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) have been involved in a collaboration to measure and characterize recorded opacities at the SNL-Z facility since 2009. The original success in measuring the spectral opacity of iron at a temperature of 156eV and at an electron density of 6.90x1021cm -3 (reported by J.E. Bailey et al. in PRL 99 265002 2007) led to an interest in expanding iron measurements to higher temperatures and densities to conditions consistent with those at the base of the convection zone of the Sun. To obtain these higher temperature/density conditions, the tamper masses that sandwich the metal foil of interest were increased. Several disturbing discrepancies exist between the higher temperature/density opacity measurements and theory and continue to be largely unresolved for the past several years (J. E. Bailey et al., NATURE 517 56 1 JAN. 2015). This continuing discrepancy has prompted LANL to perform detailed rad-hydro simulations of the SNL-Z opacity platform. In these simulations, both the dynamic hohlraum and the opacity target are modeled together. We report on the simulation methods and comparisons with dynamic hohlraum measurements that are used to assess the simulation fidelity.

  12. Records for Electronic Databases in the Online Catalog at Middle Tennessee State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geckle, Beverly J.; Pozzebon, Mary Ellen; Williams, Jo

    2008-01-01

    This article recounts a project at the Middle Tennessee State University library to include records for electronic databases in the online catalog. Although electronic databases are accessible via the library's Databases A-Z list and related subject guides, cataloging these resources also provides access via the online catalog, allowing more of…

  13. The OPAC Reborn: Electronic Content Belongs in the OPAC, at Least if We Want People to Find It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCracken, Peter

    2004-01-01

    One critical role of the catalog is to help librarians manage and track their inventory, whether it's books, videos, journals, microfilm reels, laptops, or even access to study rooms. The phrase, "if you can't track it, you don't own it," is quite real for the library that is trying to monitor thousands or millions of items. In the last decade,…

  14. RADIATION TRANSPORT FOR EXPLOSIVE OUTFLOWS: OPACITY REGROUPING

    SciTech Connect

    Wollaeger, Ryan T.; Van Rossum, Daniel R. E-mail: daan@flash.uchicago.edu

    2014-10-01

    Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) are methods used to stochastically solve the radiative transport and diffusion equations, respectively. These methods combine into a hybrid transport-diffusion method we refer to as IMC-DDMC. We explore a multigroup IMC-DDMC scheme that in DDMC, combines frequency groups with sufficient optical thickness. We term this procedure ''opacity regrouping''. Opacity regrouping has previously been applied to IMC-DDMC calculations for problems in which the dependence of the opacity on frequency is monotonic. We generalize opacity regrouping to non-contiguous groups and implement this in SuperNu, a code designed to do radiation transport in high-velocity outflows with non-monotonic opacities. We find that regrouping of non-contiguous opacity groups generally improves the speed of IMC-DDMC radiation transport. We present an asymptotic analysis that informs the nature of the Doppler shift in DDMC groups and summarize the derivation of the Gentile-Fleck factor for modified IMC-DDMC. We test SuperNu using numerical experiments including a quasi-manufactured analytic solution, a simple 10 group problem, and the W7 problem for Type Ia supernovae. We find that opacity regrouping is necessary to make our IMC-DDMC implementation feasible for the W7 problem and possibly Type Ia supernova simulations in general. We compare the bolometric light curves and spectra produced by the SuperNu and PHOENIX radiation transport codes for the W7 problem. The overall shape of the bolometric light curves are in good agreement, as are the spectra and their evolution with time. However, for the numerical specifications we considered, we find that the peak luminosity of the light curve calculated using SuperNu is ∼10% less than that calculated using PHOENIX.

  15. TOPS Opacities: Opacities of mixtures (calculated by TOPS« using LEDCOP« elemental opacities) and LEDCOP« Astrophysical Opacities mixed by TOPS«) from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The LANL T-4 Group develops methods for and perform calculations of atomic structure, scattering cross sections, opacities, exotic atoms, and quantum and nonlinear optics, including effects of high energy density environments and interaction with external electromagnetic fields. The Opacity databases allow User chosen mixtures and/or elements and provide precalculated astrophysical mixtures.

    The Astrophysical Opacity data base contains opacity information for all elements from hydrogen to zinc, over a temperature range from 0.5 eV to 100 keV and a density range from 10-10 to 10+9 gm/cc. Every element has approximately 1500 (T-h) points, where T is the temperature and h is the electron degeneracy parameter, which characterizes the electron pressure of the plasma at the ion-plasma boundary. [Copied from LANL T-4 Opacity Web Page, Norman H. Magee, Jr. (T-4) and Robert E. H. Clark (X-CI), a Theoretical Self-Assessment Special Feature, May,1999. See LA-UR-99-336] (Specialized Interface)

  16. OPACs and the Mobile Revolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liston, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    Since the turn of the century, one of the hottest topics in the IT world has been the coming mobile revolution. While there's been some arguing over the details, the fundamental tenet of the mobile revolution is that lots and lots of people will start accessing web content from handheld portable devices instead of using a traditional laptop or…

  17. Methane Opacities in T Dwarf Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homeier, D.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Allard, F.

    2003-01-01

    We present the current status of PHOENIX model atmospheres for dwarfs of spectral type T, typical for older field brown dwarfs and low-mass brown dwarfs. In comparison to warmer L dwarf atmosphers, the spectral features of these objects can largely be reproduced by treating the influence of dust in the limiting case of complete settling, i. e. neglecting the dust opacity (Cond models). One major challenge in modelling cool brown dwarf atmospheres is the correct treatment of the molecular lines of H2O and CH4. These are the dominant opacity sources in the IR and responsible for the very blue colours of T dwarfs in the near infrared. Reliable opacity data for these absorbers are thus mandatory for a correct determination of the temperature structure as well as for detailed modelling of the characteristic absorption features in the H and K bands, which are the defining criteria of spectral class T. Line lists extracted from low temperature atmospheric databases such as HITRAN and GEISA are generally strongly limited to lower-state energies. To overcome these limits, a new list of line-by-line predictions for the methane opacities from the four lowest vibrational states has been computed with the Spherical Top Database System (STDS). Improvements of these line lists have been achieved thanks to recent successes in the experimental calibration of the molecular parameter describing the vibrational and rotational bands in the spherical top model. This allowed extrapolations to higher rotational states than previously possible. As a result our opacity sampling models now allow a much more complete reproduction of the strong features occuring in the temperature regimes of brown dwarf atmospheres. A more diffuse background opacity remains due to the extremely high line density from higher vibrational states, which at this time can be described only partly by statistical models.

  18. Accessibility

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Federal laws, including Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, mandate that people with disabilities have access to the same information that someone without a disability would have. 508 standards cover electronic and information technology (EIT) products.

  19. Design of the opacity spectrometer for opacity measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, P. W.; Heeter, R. F.; Ahmed, M. F.; Dodd, E.; Huffman, E. J.; Liedahl, D. A.; King, J. A.; Opachich, Y. P.; Schneider, M. B.; Perry, T. S.

    2016-11-01

    Recent experiments at the Sandia National Laboratory Z facility have called into question models used in calculating opacity, of importance for modeling stellar interiors. An effort is being made to reproduce these results at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments require a new X-ray opacity spectrometer (OpSpec) spanning 540 eV-2100 eV with a resolving power E/ΔE > 700. The design of the OpSpec is presented. Photometric calculations based on expected opacity data are also presented. First use on NIF is expected in September 2016.

  20. Design of the opacity spectrometer for opacity measurements at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Ross, P W; Heeter, R F; Ahmed, M F; Dodd, E; Huffman, E J; Liedahl, D A; King, J A; Opachich, Y P; Schneider, M B; Perry, T S

    2016-11-01

    Recent experiments at the Sandia National Laboratory Z facility have called into question models used in calculating opacity, of importance for modeling stellar interiors. An effort is being made to reproduce these results at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments require a new X-ray opacity spectrometer (OpSpec) spanning 540 eV-2100 eV with a resolving power E/ΔE > 700. The design of the OpSpec is presented. Photometric calculations based on expected opacity data are also presented. First use on NIF is expected in September 2016.

  1. Mars landing site catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The catalog was compiled from material provided by the planetary community for areas on Mars that are of potential interest for future exploration. The catalog has been edited for consistency insofar as practical; however, the proposed scientific objectives and characteristics have not been reviewed. This is a working catalog that is being revised, updated, and expanded continually.

  2. Arabic Online Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khurshid, Zahiruddin

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the processing of Arabic materials at the King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (Saudi Arabia) library and describes the creation of an Arabic online catalog that supplements the catalog for non-Arabic materials. User needs are reviewed, library automation is discussed, and search strategies in the Arabic catalog are described.…

  3. Automation and Cataloging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furuta, Kenneth; And Others

    1990-01-01

    These three articles address issues in library cataloging that are affected by automation: (1) the impact of automation and bibliographic utilities on professional catalogers; (2) the effect of the LASS microcomputer software on the cost of authority work in cataloging at the University of Arizona; and (3) online subject heading and classification…

  4. The opacity of grains in protoplanetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movshovitz, N.; Podolak, M.

    2008-03-01

    We have computed the size distribution of silicate grains in the outer radiative region of the envelope of a protoplanet evolving according to the scenario of Pollack et al. [Pollack, J.B., Hubickyj, O., Bodenheimer, P., Lissauer, J.J., Podolak, M., Greenzweig, Y., 1996. Icarus 124, 62-85]. Our computation includes grain growth due to Brownian motion and overtake of smaller grains by larger ones. We also include the input of new grains due to the breakup of planetesimals in the atmosphere. We follow the procedure of Podolak [Podolak, M., 2003. Icarus 165, 428-437], but have speeded it up significantly. This allows us to test the sensitivity of the code to various parameters. We have also made a more careful estimate of the resulting grain opacity. We find that the grain opacity is of the order of 10 cmg throughout most of the outer radiative zone as Hubickyj et al. [Hubickyj, O., Bodenheimer, P., Lissauer, J.J., 2005. Icarus 179, 415-431] assumed for their low opacity case, but near the outer edge of the envelope, the opacity can increase to ˜1 cmg. We discuss the effect of this on the evolution of the models.

  5. Alternative Metal Hot Cutting Operations for Opacity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TDS-NAVFAC-EXWC-EV-1509 October 2014 Alternative Metal Hot Cutting...demonstration (see Figure 1) and validation. Figure 1: Demonstration of alternative gasified hot - cutting fuel. PROPOSED BENEFITS 1...1205, March 2012. Alternative Metal Hot Cutting Operations for Opacity, TR-NAVFAC-EXWC-EV-1409, November 2014. POINTS OF CONTACT To acquire

  6. Detailed opacity calculations for stellar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pain, Jean-Christophe; Gilleron, Franck

    2016-10-01

    We present a state of the art of precise spectral opacity calculations illustrated by stellar applications. The essential role of laboratory experiments to check the quality of the computed data is underlined. We review some X-ray and XUV laser and Z-pinch photo-absorption measurements as well as X-ray emission spectroscopy experiments of hot dense plasmas produced by ultra-high-intensity laser interaction. The measured spectra are systematically compared with the fine-structure opacity code SCO-RCG. Focus is put on iron, due to its crucial role in the understanding of asteroseismic observations of Beta Cephei-type and Slowly Pulsating B stars, as well as in the Sun. For instance, in Beta Cephei-type stars (which should not be confused with Cepheid variables), the iron-group opacity peak excites acoustic modes through the kappa-mechanism. A particular attention is paid to the higher-than-predicted iron opacity measured on Sandia's Z facility at solar interior conditions (boundary of the convective zone). We discuss some theoretical aspects such as orbital relaxation, electron collisional broadening, ionic Stark effect, oscillator-strength sum rules, photo-ionization, or the ``filling-the-gap'' effect of highly excited states.

  7. Online Catalog for Filament-Sigmoid Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merriot, Ivy; Pevtsov, A.; Martens, P.

    2007-05-01

    A new online catalog correlating H-alpha filaments with SXT sigmoids gives researchers, teachers and pre-college students the ability to access digital H-alpha images online that were previously available only at the physical location of the NSO at Sunspot, NM. This web-based catalog correlates SOHO's SXT sigmoids from 1993-1998 as described in a non-online catalog created by Zach Blehm under the direction of Richard Canfield, MSU-Bozeman, with H-alpha filament activity as described by Ivy Merriot under the direction of Alexei Pevtsov, NSO, and Petrus Martens, MSU-Bozeman. The H-alpha images were digitized from film archives of the Flare Patrol Telescope at Sunspot, NM. Use of the online catalog will be demonstrated at the poster site with critical comments encouraged.

  8. The BeppoSAX WWW catalog browser.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giommi, P.; Antonelli, L. A.; Fiore, F.; Matteuzzi, A.; Signorile, S.

    The authors present a WWW/Netscape catalog browser that has been recently developed at the BeppoSAX Science Data Center (SDC). This tool was developed with the main aim of supporting the BeppoSAX users' community in the preparation of observation proposals and as a general tool to facilitate astronomical data analysis. The SDC WWW-browser is an on-line facility that gives access to over 130 catalogs of astronomical sources, mission logs, proposals lists and other tables related to the BeppoSAX project. The capabilities of this tool range from standard multi-catalog searches to more advanced queries such as search by object class, with cross-correlation of the resulting list with any of the available catalogs. The resulting output can be retrieved as html tables or in a variety of graphical ways.

  9. Starting Over: Current Issues in Online Catalog User Interface Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Walt

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of online catalogs focuses on issues in interface design. Issues addressed include understanding the user base; common user access (CUA) with personal computers; common command language (CCL); hyperlinks; screen design issues; differences from card catalogs; indexes; graphic user interfaces (GUIs); color; online help; and remote users.…

  10. THE IRON PROJECT & Iron Opacity Project: Evidence of increased opacity for solar plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eissner, W.; Hala, -; Nahar, S.; Pradhan, A.; Bailey, J.

    2015-05-01

    The recently reported measurement1 of opacity of iron plasma at high energy density similar to that in the solar convection zone near the boundary of radiative zone shows enhanced continuum, and the integrated opacity is about 7% higher than that from prediction using the existing Opacity Project (OP) data for photoionization and oscillator strengths. This agrees toward 15% increment of opacity needed to explain the lower abundance of elements determined by 3D spectral analysis of solar observation. However, our later large-scale calculations that included strong resonances due to excitations to highly excited cores states for Fe XVII indicated significant amount of opacity missing in the OP data. We will present our latest findings on the importance of highly excited states on the opacity and how proper inclusion of resonances could enhance the continuum. These will have important impact on the composition of the Sun, the benchmark for astronomical objects. We will also present in progress work under the Iron Project on the collision strengths of Si IX obtained using relativistic effects in the Breit-Pauli R-matrix method and transition probabilities of fine structure transitions in Ti I.*Partial support: NSF, DO.

  11. Mexican Earthquakes and Tsunamis Catalog Reviewed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Herrera, M. T.; Castillo-Aja, R.

    2015-12-01

    Today the availability of information on the internet makes online catalogs very easy to access by both scholars and the public in general. The catalog in the "Significant Earthquake Database", managed by the National Center for Environmental Information (NCEI formerly NCDC), NOAA, allows access by deploying tabular and cartographic data related to earthquakes and tsunamis contained in the database. The NCEI catalog is the product of compiling previously existing catalogs, historical sources, newspapers, and scientific articles. Because NCEI catalog has a global coverage the information is not homogeneous. Existence of historical information depends on the presence of people in places where the disaster occurred, and that the permanence of the description is preserved in documents and oral tradition. In the case of instrumental data, their availability depends on the distribution and quality of seismic stations. Therefore, the availability of information for the first half of 20th century can be improved by careful analysis of the available information and by searching and resolving inconsistencies. This study shows the advances we made in upgrading and refining data for the earthquake and tsunami catalog of Mexico since 1500 CE until today, presented in the format of table and map. Data analysis allowed us to identify the following sources of error in the location of the epicenters in existing catalogs: • Incorrect coordinate entry • Place name erroneous or mistaken • Too general data that makes difficult to locate the epicenter, mainly for older earthquakes • Inconsistency of earthquakes and the tsunami occurrence: earthquake's epicenter located too far inland reported as tsunamigenic. The process of completing the catalogs directly depends on the availability of information; as new archives are opened for inspection, there are more opportunities to complete the history of large earthquakes and tsunamis in Mexico. Here, we also present new earthquake and

  12. The Emerging Global Bibliographic Network: The Era of International Standardization in the Development of Cataloging Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrum, John D., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the growing interdependence of catalogers to provide uniform bibliographic control and access. Topics include the international applications of AACR2 (Anglo American Cataloging Rules 2); the PCC (Program for Cooperative Cataloging); ISBD (International Standard Bibliographic Description); and activities of IFLA (International Federation…

  13. A New Detailed Term Accounting Opacity Code: TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesias, C A; Chen, M H; Isaacs, W; Sonnad, V; Wilson, B G

    2004-04-28

    A new opacity code, TOPAZ, which explicitly includes configuration term structure in the bound-bound transitions is being developed. The goal is to extend the current capabilities of detailed term accounting opacity codes such as OPAL that are limited to lighter elements of astrophysical interest. At present, opacity calculations of heavier elements use statistical methods that rely on the presence of myriad spectral lines for accuracy. However, statistical approaches have been shown to be inadequate for astrophysical opacity calculations. An application of the TOPAZ code will be to study the limits of statistical methods. Comparisons of TOPAZ to other opacity codes as well as experiments are presented.

  14. Fly ash system technology improves opacity

    SciTech Connect

    2007-06-15

    Unit 3 of the Dave Johnston Power Plant east of Glenrock, WY, USA had problems staying at or below the opacity limits set by the state. The unit makes use of a Lodge Cottrell precipitator. When the plant changed to burning Power River Basin coal, ash buildup became a significant issue as the fly ash control system was unable to properly evacuate hoppers on the unit. To overcome the problem, the PLC on the unit was replaced with a software optimization package called SmartAsh for the precipitator fly ash control system, at a cost of $500,000. After the upgrade, there have been no plugged hoppers and the opacity has been reduced from around 20% to 3-5%. 2 figs.

  15. Diurnal Variation of Martian Dust Opacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, T. Z.; Tamppari, L. K.

    2005-08-01

    Recent MER Spirit rover observations of dust devils crossing the plains of Gusev crater demonstrate the similarity of that Martian desert to terrestrial sites. Near-surface thermal contrast builds during the day and promotes growth of dust- raising vortices. Evidence for corresponding transient thermal behavior has been shown in MER MiniTES profiles. How prevalent is such dust activity? Is the raised dust sufficient to modify the column dust opacity? The answers have implications for mission operations as well as for atmospheric science. We have expanded the scope of diurnal dust monitoring by going back to Viking Orbiter IR Thermal Mapper data, for which highly elliptical orbits gave good diurnal coverage (Martin, T., Icarus 45, p. 427, 1981). We examine the Spirit site and equatorial regions of similar surface character. Dust opacity is inferred from IRTM data by comparing brightness temperature within the 6-8 um range (T7), as continuum, with that in the 8-10 um band (T9), where silicate dust absorption and emission is stronger. During the daytime, when the surface is warmer than overlying dust, the spectral contrast in these two bands allows computation of opacity if a thermal profile is assumed. This research was funded by the JPL Research and Technology development program and carried out by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology.

  16. Testing stellar opacities with laser facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pennec, Maëlle; TURCK-CHIEZE, Sylvaine; RIBEYRE, Xavier; DUCRET, Jean-Eric; SALMON, Sébastien; BLANCARD, Christophe; COSSE, Philippe; MONDET, Guillaume; FAUSSURIER, Gérald; CONSORTIUM, OPAC

    2015-08-01

    Helio and asteroseismology (SoHo, KEPLER...) have produced observed acoustic oscillations of thousands of stars which characteristics are deeply linked to the transport of radiation inside the stars. However, the comparisons of seismic data with model predictions have led to significant discrepancies, which could be due to a bad knowledge of production and transport of energy.β-Cephei are pulsating stars, progenitor of supernovae and thus deeply linked to our understanding of stellar medium enrichment. Their study has shown some difficulty to predict the observed oscillation modes, which are directly linked to an opacity bump of the elements of the iron group (Cr, Fe, Ni) at log T=5.25 (κ-mechanism). We will show that several parameters of the stars (mass, age, metallicity) have a great influence on the amplitude of the bump, which impact their structure. We will then present the final results of an experiment conducted at LULI 2000 in 2011 on Cr, Fe and Ni compared to several opacity codes. We will show how to improve the opacity in the range of temperature around log T= 5.3.The Sun is a privilege place to test and validate physics. Since the recent update of the solar composition, there is a well established large discrepancy (Turck-Chièze et al. 2001) between solar models and seismic data, visible on the solar sound speed profile comparison.An explanation could be that the calculations of energy transport are not correctly taken into account.Unfortunately, there are very few experiments to validate these calculations (Bailey et al. 2014). That's why we are proposing an opacity experiment on a high-energy laser like LMJ, in the conditions of the radiative zone. We are exploiting in that purpose an approach called the Double Ablation Front to reach these high temperatures and densities at LTE and validate or not plasma effects and line widths. We will show the principle of this technique and the results of our simulations on several elements.In the mean time

  17. CD-ROM Catalog Production Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bills, Linda; Helgerson, Linda

    1989-01-01

    Compares database characteristics, access, display, editing, new records, hard copy products, hardware, and price of CD-ROM catalog production products from seven vendors: Gaylord Information Systems; General Research Corporation; The Library Corporation; OCLC; Solinet; Utlas; and the Western Library Network. (MES)

  18. Master data directories and Catalog Interoperability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    While the 'Catalog Interoperability' (CI) project began as a NASA effort to facilitate identification, location, and access to data of interest to space and earth sciences researchers, it now has a membership encompassing numerous U.S. and international agencies as well as academic institutions. CI is creating a global network of interconnected directory, catalog, and inventory systems. Its directories contain brief summary information about data sets, and can either furnish automated links to other information systems yielding greater detail on matters of interest or indicate to whom requests for additional information can go.

  19. IPOPv2 online service for the generation of opacity tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delahaye, Franck; Zwölf, Carlo Maria; Zeippen, Claude J.; Mendoza, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    In the framework of the present phase - IPOPv2 - of the international Opacity Project (OP), a new web service has been implemented based on the latest release of the OP opacities. The user may construct online opacity tables to be conveniently included in stellar evolution codes in the format most commonly adopted by stellar physicists, namely the OPAL format. This facility encourages the use and comparison of both the OPAL and OP data sets in applications. The present service allows for the calculation of multi-element mixtures containing the 17 species (H, He, C, N, O, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe and Ni) considered by the OP, and underpins the latest release of OP opacities. This new service provides tables of Rosseland mean opacites using OP atomic data. We provide an alternative to the OPAL opacity services allowing direct comparison as well as study of the effect of uncertainties in stellar modeling due to mean opacities.

  20. HOMOGENEOUS CATALOGS OF EARTHQUAKES*

    PubMed Central

    Knopoff, Leon; Gardner, J. K.

    1969-01-01

    The usual bias in earthquake catalogs against shocks of small magnitudes can be removed by testing the randomness of the magnitudes of successive shocks. The southern California catalog, 1933-1967, is found to be unbiased in the sense of the test at magnitude 4 or above; the cutoff is improved to M = 3 for the subcatalog 1953-1967. PMID:16578700

  1. The Eppelsheimer Subject Catalog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Gordon

    1971-01-01

    Since 1945, a method of catalog classification, originally devised by H.W. Eppelsheimer for the Mainz City Library, has found wide acceptance. It is a complex of catalogs which combines features of both subject classification and alphabetical subject indexing. (25 references) (Author/NH)

  2. MDS MIC Catalog Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Vowell, C. W.; Smith, Byron; Darcy, Jeannette

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the inputs to the MDS Medical Information Communique (MIC) catalog. The purpose of the group is to provide input for updating the MDS MIC Catalog and to request that MMOP assign Action Item to other working groups and FSs to support the MITWG Process for developing MIC-DDs.

  3. Decision Points in Cataloging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright, Franklyn F.

    Libraries are frequently faced with policy decisions which can affect the quality and cost of library services for years to come. This point can be illustrated by citing examples of decisions made at the University of Wisconsin Library in the areas of: (1) conforming to national cataloging standards; (2) producing catalog cards in-house; and (3)…

  4. Catalog of Research Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Board, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This catalog lists research reports, research notes, and other publications available from the College Board's website. The catalog briefly describes research publications available free of charge. Introduced in 1981, the Research Report series includes studies and reviews in areas such as college admission, special populations, subgroup…

  5. Enriching the Catalog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Roy

    2004-01-01

    After decades of costly and time-consuming effort, nearly all libraries have completed the retrospective conversion of their card catalogs to electronic form. However, bibliographic systems still are really not much more than card catalogs on wheels. Enriched content that Amazon.com takes for granted--such as digitized tables of contents, cover…

  6. Quantification of Plume Opacity by Digital Photography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    uiuc.edu. Environ. Sci. Technol. 2007, 41, 928-935 928 9 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY / VOL. 41, NO. 3, 2007 10.1021/es061277n CCC: $37.00...for area B) ) f(log(PVA)) - f(log(PVB)) VOL. 41, NO. 3, 2007 / ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY 9 929 the camera, in terms of pixel values caused by...Nt2 N (6) Opacity ) 1 - Np N 1 - K (7) 930 9 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY / VOL. 41, NO. 3, 2007 mined by the location of the camera to obtain the

  7. Probing model-independent cosmic opacity and its spatial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun

    2016-11-01

    Cosmic opacity and its spatial distribution have been constrained with a model independent method. The average opacity of the universe is not zero, but can be zero in the 1σ error range. The best-fit value of the spatial distribution of cosmic opacity is not a constant as the redshift varies, though a homogeneous and transparent universe is favored in the 2σ error range.

  8. Z39.50 and the OPAC Network in Europe (ONE) Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Neil

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the use of the Z39.50 standard for information retrieval in the British Library's efforts toward networked information retrieval and online public access catalogs in cooperation with the European Union and other countries. OSI (open systems interconnection) and project ONE (a collaborative project in the European Union) are explained.…

  9. SOLAR OPACITY CALCULATIONS USING THE SUPER-TRANSITION-ARRAY METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Krief, M.; Feigel, A.; Gazit, D.

    2016-04-10

    A new opacity model has been developed based on the Super-Transition-Array (STA) method for the calculation of monochromatic opacities of plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The atomic code, named STAR (STA-Revised), is described and used to calculate spectral opacities for a solar model implementing the recent AGSS09 composition. Calculations are carried out throughout the solar radiative zone. The relative contributions of different chemical elements and atomic processes to the total Rosseland mean opacity are analyzed in detail. Monochromatic opacities and charge-state distributions are compared with the widely used Opacity Project (OP) code, for several elements near the radiation–convection interface. STAR Rosseland opacities for the solar mixture show a very good agreement with OP and the OPAL opacity code throughout the radiation zone. Finally, an explicit STA calculation was performed of the full AGSS09 photospheric mixture, including all heavy metals. It was shown that, due to their extremely low abundance, and despite being very good photon absorbers, the heavy elements do not affect the Rosseland opacity.

  10. UV Opacity at Gale Crater from MSL/REMS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicente-Retortillo, Á.; Martinez, G.; Renno, N. O.; Lemmon, M. T.; Mason, E. L.; de la Torre-Juárez, M.

    2015-12-01

    We use the UV photodiode output currents (TELRDR products) measured by the REMS Ultraviolet Sensor to calculate UV opacities at Gale crater during the first 804 sols of the MSL mission. We propose a novel technique to calculate the atmospheric opacity that is not sensitive to the degradation of the sensor due to the deposition of dust on it. We estimate the diffuse and total radiation signals by analyzing the events in which the direct solar beam was temporarily blocked by the masthead or by the mast of the rover. Then we use a radiative transfer model based on the Monte-Carlo method to obtain the UV opacity from those measurements. We compare the UV opacities with the opacities derived from Mastcam observations at 880 nm. Both opacities follow a similar seasonal trend, with the UV opacity showing values generally lower than those at 880 nm. The difference between both opacities varies over the year, with the minimum difference occurring when both opacities show their annual lowest values (Ls ~ 130º). The temporal variation of this difference may be attributed to changes in the dust size distribution.

  11. The Chandra Source Catalog: User Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaventura, Nina; Evans, I. N.; Harbo, P. N.; Rots, A. H.; Tibbetts, M. S.; Van Stone, D. W.; Zografou, P.; Anderson, C. S.; Chen, J. C.; Davis, J. E.; Doe, S. M.; Evans, J. D.; Fabbiano, G.; Galle, E.; Gibbs, D. G.; Glotfelty, K. J.; Grier, J. D.; Hain, R.; Hall, D. M.; He, X.; Houck, J. C.; Karovska, M.; Lauer, J.; McCollough, M. L.; McDowell, J. C.; Miller, J. B.; Mitschang, A. W.; Morgan, D. L.; Nichols, J. S.; Nowak, M. A.; Plummer, D. A.; Primini, F. A.; Refsdal, B. L.; Siemiginowska, A. L.; Sundheim, B. A.; Winkelman, S. L.

    2009-01-01

    The Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) is the definitive catalog of all X-ray sources detected by Chandra. The CSC is presented to the user in two tables: the Master Chandra Source Table and the Table of Individual Source Observations. Each distinct X-ray source identified in the CSC is represented by a single master source entry and one or more individual source entries. If a source is unaffected by confusion and pile-up in multiple observations, the individual source observations are merged to produce a master source. In each table, a row represents a source, and each column a quantity that is officially part of the catalog. The CSC contains positions and multi-band fluxes for the sources, as well as derived spatial, spectral, and temporal source properties. The CSC also includes associated source region and full-field data products for each source, including images, photon event lists, light curves, and spectra. The master source properties represent the best estimates of the properties of a source, and are presented in the following categories: Position and Position Errors, Source Flags, Source Extent and Errors, Source Fluxes, Source Significance, Spectral Properties, and Source Variability. The CSC Data Access GUI provides direct access to the source properties and data products contained in the catalog. The user may query the catalog database via a web-style search or an SQL command-line query. Each query returns a table of source properties, along with the option to browse and download associated data products. The GUI is designed to run in a web browser with Java version 1.5 or higher, and may be accessed via a link on the CSC website homepage (http://cxc.harvard.edu/csc/). As an alternative to the GUI, the contents of the CSC may be accessed directly through a URL, using the command-line tool, cURL. Support: NASA contract NAS8-03060 (CXC).

  12. Research on Spectroscopy, Opacity, and Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor); Kurucz, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    I propose to continue providing observers with basic data for interpreting spectra from stars, novas, supernovas, clusters, and galaxies. These data will include allowed forbidden line lists both laboratory and computed, for the first five to ten ions of all atoms and for all relevant diatomic molecules. I will eventually expend to all ions of the first thirty elements to treat far UV end X-ray spectra, and for envelope opacities. I also include triatomic molecules providing by other researchers. I have made CDs with Partridge and Schwanke's water data for work on M stars.The luna data also serve as input to my model atmosphere and synthesis programs that generated energy distributions, photometry, limb darkening, and spectra that can be used for planning observations and for fitting observed spectra. The spectrum synthesis programs produce detailed plots with the line identified. Grids of stellar spectra can be used for radial velocity-, rotation-, or abundance templates and for population synthesis. I am fitting spectra of bright stars to test the data and to produce atlases to guide observer. For each star the whole spectrum is computed from the UV to the far IR. The line data, opacities, models, spectra, and programs are freely distributed on CDs and on my web site and represent a unique resource for many NASA programs.

  13. An Open Catalog for Supernova Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillochon, James; Parrent, Jerod; Kelley, Luke Zoltan; Margutti, Raffaella

    2017-01-01

    We present the Open Supernova Catalog, an online collection of observations and metadata for presently 36,000+ supernovae and related candidates. The catalog is freely available on the web (https://sne.space), with its main interface having been designed to be a user-friendly, rapidly searchable table accessible on desktop and mobile devices. In addition to the primary catalog table containing supernova metadata, an individual page is generated for each supernova, which displays its available metadata, light curves, and spectra spanning X-ray to radio frequencies. The data presented in the catalog is automatically rebuilt on a daily basis and is constructed by parsing several dozen sources, including the data presented in the supernova literature and from secondary sources such as other web-based catalogs. Individual supernova data is stored in the hierarchical, human- and machine-readable JSON format, with the entirety of each supernova’s data being contained within a single JSON file bearing its name. The setup we present here, which is based on open-source software maintained via git repositories hosted on github, enables anyone to download the entirety of the supernova data set to their home computer in minutes, and to make contributions of their own data back to the catalog via git. As the supernova data set continues to grow, especially in the upcoming era of all-sky synoptic telescopes, which will increase the total number of events by orders of magnitude, we hope that the catalog we have designed will be a valuable tool for the community to analyze both historical and contemporary supernovae.

  14. COSMIC: Software catalog 1991 edition diskette format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The PC edition of the annual COSMIC Software contains descriptions of the over 1,200 computer programs available for use within the United States as of January 1, 1991. By using the PC version of the catalog, it is possible to conduct extensive searches of the software inventory for programs that meet specific criteria. Elements such as program keywords, hardware specifications, source code languages, and title acronyms can be used for the basis of such searches. After isolating those programs that might be of best interest to the user, it is then possible to either view at the monitor, or generate a hardcopy listing of all information on those packages. In addition to the program elements that the user can search on, information such as total program size, distribution media, and program price, as well as extensive abstracts on the program, are also available to the user at this time. Another useful feature of the catalog allows for the retention of programs that meet certain search criteria between individual sessions of using the catalog. This allows users to save the information on those programs that are of interest to them in different areas of application. They can then recall a specific collection of programs for information retrieval or further search reduction if desired. In addition, this version of the catalog is adaptable to a network/shared resource environment, allowing multiple users access to a single copy of the catalog database simultaneously.

  15. The guide star catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasker, Barry M.; Jenkner, Helmut; Russell, Jane L.

    1987-01-01

    Part 1 of the catalog presents an astronomical overview of the Guide Star Catalog, together with its history, the properties of its current implementation, and the prospects for enhancement. Part 2 presents the algorithms used in photometric and astrometric calibration of the catalog, as well as the analyses of the related errors. Part 3 presents the current structure and content, as well as future enhancements in this area. An overview of the forthcoming publications is given, both with regard to scientific papers and electronic media.

  16. Users Look at Online Catalogs. Part 2: Interacting with Online Catalogs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Ray R.

    This report focuses on a discussion of findings from analyses of computer transaction logs contributed by four of the online catalog systems used in the Public Access Project. It supplements the analyses of User and Non-User Questionnaires by providing analyses of data from the systems themselves. The four systems contributing data to this…

  17. Submillimeter fourier-transform spectrometer measurements of atmospheric opacity above mauna kea.

    PubMed

    Serabyn, E; Weisstein, E W; Lis, D C; Pardo, J R

    1998-04-20

    We present accurately calibrated submillimeter atmospheric transmission spectra obtained with a Fourier-transform spectrometer at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. These measurements cover the 0.9-0.3-mm wavelength range and are the first in a series aimed at defining the terrestrial long-wave atmospheric transmission curve. The 4.1-km altitude of the Mauna Kea site provides access to extremely low zenith water-vapor columns, permitting atmospheric observations at frequencies well above those possible from sea level. We describe the calibration procedures, present our first well-calibrated transmission spectra, and compare our results with those of a single-layer atmospheric transmission model, AT. With an empirical best-fit continuum opacity term included, this simple single-layer model provides a remarkably good fit to the opacity data for H(2)O line profiles described by either van Vleck-Weisskopf or kinetic shapes.

  18. Competing Triggers: Transparency and Opacity in Vowel Harmony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimper, Wendell A.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation takes up the issue of transparency and opacity in vowel harmony--that is, when a segment is unable to undergo a harmony process, will it be skipped over by harmony (transparent) or will it prevent harmony from propagating further (opaque)? I argue that the choice between transparency and opacity is best understood as a…

  19. INTERPLAY OF NEUTRINO OPACITIES IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Eric J.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Hix, W. Raphael; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Bruenn, Stephen W.

    2012-11-20

    We have conducted a series of numerical experiments using spherically symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics with the code Agile-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of modern neutrino opacities on the development of supernova simulations. We test the effects of opacities by removing opacities or by undoing opacity improvements for individual opacities and groups of opacities. We find that improvements to electron capture (EC) on nuclei, namely EC on an ensemble of nuclei using modern nuclear structure models rather than the simpler independent-particle approximation (IPA) for EC on a mean nucleus, plays the most important role during core collapse of all tested neutrino opacities. Low-energy neutrinos emitted by modern nuclear EC preferentially escape during collapse without the energy downscattering on electrons required to enhance neutrino escape and deleptonization for the models with IPA nuclear EC. During shock breakout the primary influence on the emergent neutrinos arises from non-isoenergetic scattering (NIS) on electrons. For the accretion phase, NIS on free nucleons and pair emission by e {sup +} e {sup -} annihilation have the largest impact on the neutrino emission and shock evolution. Other opacities evaluated, including nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung and especially neutrino-positron scattering, have little measurable impact on neutrino emission or shock dynamics. Modern treatments of nuclear EC, e {sup +} e {sup -}-annihilation pair emission, and NIS on electrons and free nucleons are critical elements of core-collapse simulations of all dimensionality.

  20. Interplay of Neutrino Opacities in Core-collapse Supernova Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentz, Eric J.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Hix, W. Raphael; Bruenn, Stephen W.

    2012-11-01

    We have conducted a series of numerical experiments using spherically symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics with the code Agile-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of modern neutrino opacities on the development of supernova simulations. We test the effects of opacities by removing opacities or by undoing opacity improvements for individual opacities and groups of opacities. We find that improvements to electron capture (EC) on nuclei, namely EC on an ensemble of nuclei using modern nuclear structure models rather than the simpler independent-particle approximation (IPA) for EC on a mean nucleus, plays the most important role during core collapse of all tested neutrino opacities. Low-energy neutrinos emitted by modern nuclear EC preferentially escape during collapse without the energy downscattering on electrons required to enhance neutrino escape and deleptonization for the models with IPA nuclear EC. During shock breakout the primary influence on the emergent neutrinos arises from non-isoenergetic scattering (NIS) on electrons. For the accretion phase, NIS on free nucleons and pair emission by e + e - annihilation have the largest impact on the neutrino emission and shock evolution. Other opacities evaluated, including nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung and especially neutrino-positron scattering, have little measurable impact on neutrino emission or shock dynamics. Modern treatments of nuclear EC, e + e --annihilation pair emission, and NIS on electrons and free nucleons are critical elements of core-collapse simulations of all dimensionality.

  1. A Modern Update and Usage of Historical Variable Star Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagnotta, Ashley; Graur, Or; Murray, Zachary; Kruk, Julia; Christie-Dervaux, Lucien; Chen, Dong Yi

    2015-01-01

    One of the earliest modern variable star catalogs was constructed by Henrietta Swan Leavitt during her tenure at the Harvard College Observatory (HCO) in the early 1900s. Originally published in 1908, Leavitt's catalog listed 1777 variables in the Magellanic Clouds (MCs). The construction and analysis of this catalog allowed her to subsequently discover the Cepheid period-luminosity relationship, now known as the Leavitt Law. The MC variable star catalogs were updated and expanded by Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin in 1966 and 1971. Although newer studies of the MC variables have been performed since then, the new information has not always been correlated with the old due to a lack of modern descriptors of the stars listed in the Harvard MC catalogs. We will discuss the history of MC variable star catalogs, especially those compiled using the HCO plates, as well as our modernized version of the Leavitt and Payne-Gaposchkin catalogs. Our modern catalog can be used in conjunction with the archival plates (primarily via the Digital Access to a Sky Century @ Harvard scanning project) to study the secular behavior of the MC variable stars over the past century.

  2. Calculation of Free-Free Opacities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Maiden, D.; Ritchie, A. B., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Free-free absorption is an important contribution to the opacity for radiation transport through hot materials Temperatures can be as high as several keV, such that it becomes a computational challenge to solve the Schrodinger equation efficiently for rapidly oscillating continuum functions for high angular momenta. Several groups\\footnots, including ours, have studied the phase amplitude solution (PAS) of the Schrodinger equation, in which one solves equations for the wave function amplitude and phase, which are: smooth functions of the electron energy. It is also important to have an accurate Schroudinger benchmark for the development of the PAS method. We present results for dipole matrix elements, Gaunt factors, and cross sections for the absorption of radiation at various energies for Cs XIX at temperature=100 eV and density=0.187 g/cc for our newly developed PAS and Schrodinger benchmark.

  3. An opacity-sampled treatment of water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, David R.; Augason, Gordon C.; Johnson, Hollis R.

    1989-01-01

    Although the bands of H2O are strong in the spectra of cool stars and calculations have repeatedly demonstrated their significance as opacity sources, only approximate opacities are currently available, due both to the difficulty of accounting for the millions of lines involved and to the inadequacy of laboratory and theoretical data. To overcome these obstacles, a new treatment is presented, based upon a statistical representation of the water vapor spectrum derived from available laboratory data. This statistical spectrum of water vapor employs an exponential distribution of line strengths and random positions of lines whose overall properties are forced to reproduce the mean opacities observed in the laboratory. The resultant data set is then treated by the opacity-sampling method exactly as are all other lines, both molecular and atomic. Significant differences are found between the results of this improved treatment and the results obtained with previous treatments of water-vapor opacity.

  4. A NEW GENERATION OF LOS ALAMOS OPACITY TABLES

    SciTech Connect

    Colgan, J.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Magee, N. H.; Sherrill, M. E.; Abdallah, J. Jr.; Hakel, P.; Fontes, C. J.; Guzik, J. A.; Mussack, K. A.

    2016-02-01

    We present a new, publicly available set of Los Alamos OPLIB opacity tables for the elements hydrogen through zinc. Our tables are computed using the Los Alamos ATOMIC opacity and plasma modeling code, and make use of atomic structure calculations that use fine-structure detail for all the elements considered. Our equation of state model, known as ChemEOS, is based on the minimization of free energy in a chemical picture and appears to be a reasonable and robust approach to determining atomic state populations over a wide range of temperatures and densities. In this paper we discuss in detail the calculations that we have performed for the 30 elements considered, and present some comparisons of our monochromatic opacities with measurements and other opacity codes. We also use our new opacity tables in solar modeling calculations and compare and contrast such modeling with previous work.

  5. A New Generation of Los Alamos Opacity Tables

    SciTech Connect

    Colgan, James Patrick; Kilcrease, David Parker; Magee, Jr., Norman H.; Sherrill, Manolo Edgar; Abdallah, Joseph; Hakel, Peter; Fontes, Christopher John; Guzik, Joyce Ann; Mussack Tamashiro, Kathleen Anita

    2016-01-26

    We present a new, publicly available, set of Los Alamos OPLIB opacity tables for the elements hydrogen through zinc. Our tables are computed using the Los Alamos ATOMIC opacity and plasma modeling code, and make use of atomic structure calculations that use fine-structure detail for all the elements considered. Our equation-of-state (EOS) model, known as ChemEOS, is based on the minimization of free energy in a chemical picture and appears to be a reasonable and robust approach to determining atomic state populations over a wide range of temperatures and densities. In this paper we discuss in detail the calculations that we have performed for the 30 elements considered, and present some comparisons of our monochromatic opacities with measurements and other opacity codes. We also use our new opacity tables in solar modeling calculations and compare and contrast such modeling with previous work.

  6. A New Generation of Los Alamos Opacity Tables

    DOE PAGES

    Colgan, James Patrick; Kilcrease, David Parker; Magee, Jr., Norman H.; ...

    2016-01-26

    We present a new, publicly available, set of Los Alamos OPLIB opacity tables for the elements hydrogen through zinc. Our tables are computed using the Los Alamos ATOMIC opacity and plasma modeling code, and make use of atomic structure calculations that use fine-structure detail for all the elements considered. Our equation-of-state (EOS) model, known as ChemEOS, is based on the minimization of free energy in a chemical picture and appears to be a reasonable and robust approach to determining atomic state populations over a wide range of temperatures and densities. In this paper we discuss in detail the calculations thatmore » we have performed for the 30 elements considered, and present some comparisons of our monochromatic opacities with measurements and other opacity codes. We also use our new opacity tables in solar modeling calculations and compare and contrast such modeling with previous work.« less

  7. The diffusion of radiation in moving media. IV. Flux vector, effective opacity, and expansion opacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrse, R.; Baschek, B.; von Waldenfels, W.

    2003-04-01

    For a given velocity and temperature field in a differentially moving 3D medium, the vector of the radiative flux is derived in the diffusion approximation. Due to the dependence of the velocity gradient on the direction, the associated effective opacity in general is a tensor. In the limit of small velocity gradients analytical expression are obtained which allow us to discuss the cases when the direction of the flux vector deviates from that of the temperature gradient. Furthermore the radiative flux is calculated for infinitely sharp, Poisson distributed spectral lines resulting in simple expressions that provide basic insight into the effect of the motions. In particular, it is shown how incomplete line lists affect the radiative flux as a function of the velocity gradient. Finally, the connection between our formalism and the concept of the expansion opacity introduced by Karp et al. (\\cite{karp}) is discussed.

  8. Opacity spectrometer design for opacity measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, P. W.; Ahmed, M. F.; Bailey, J. E.; Dunham, G. S.; Emig, J. A.; Heeter, R. F.; Huffman, E. J.; Perry, T. S.; Opachich, Y. P.; Liedahl, D. A.; Schneider, M.; Stone, G. F.

    2015-08-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Opacity Spectrometer (OpSpec) is a modular spectrometer designed initially for opacity experiments on NIF. The design of the OpSpec is presented in light of the requirements and constraints. Potential dispersing elements and detector configurations are presented, and the advantages and disadvantages of each configuration are discussed. The full OpSpec design covers the energy range from approximately 550 eV to 2 keV. The energy resolution of the OpSpec is E/ΔE > 500. Applications of the OpSpec are discussed, including relevant astrophysical applications for NIF experiments, and will compliment recently published work on the Z machine. (Bailey, et al., Nature 517, 56-59 (2015).) This work was done by National Security Technologies, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  9. The RBV metadata catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, François; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Fleury, Laurence; Gaillardet, Jérôme; Nord, Guillaume

    2014-05-01

    RBV (Réseau des Bassins Versants) is an initiative to consolidate the national efforts made by more than 15 elementary observatories belonging to various French research institutions (CNRS, Universities, INRA, IRSTEA, IRD) that study river and drainage basins. RBV is a part of a global initiative to create a network of observatories for investigating Earth's surface processes. The RBV Metadata Catalogue aims to give an unified vision of the work produced by every observatory to both the members of the RBV network and any external person involved in this domain of research. Another goal is to share this information with other catalogues through the compliance with the ISO19115 standard and the INSPIRE directive and the ability of being harvested (globally or partially). Metadata management is heterogeneous among observatories. The catalogue is designed to face this situation with the following main features: -Multiple input methods: Metadata records in the catalog can either be entered with the graphical user interface, harvested from an existing catalogue or imported from information system through simplified web services. -Three hierachical levels: Metadata records may describe either an observatory in general, one of its experimental site or a dataset produced by instruments. -Multilingualism: Metadata can be entered in several configurable languages. The catalogue provides many other feature such as search and browse mechanisms to find or discover records. The RBV metadata catalogue associates a CSW metadata server (Geosource) and a JEE application. The CSW server is in charge of the persistence of the metadata while the JEE application both wraps CSW calls and define the user interface. The latter is built with the GWT Framework to offer a rich client application with a fully ajaxified navigation. The catalogue is accessible at the following address: http://portailrbv.sedoo.fr/ Next steps will target the following points: -Description of sensors in accordance

  10. HS3 Data Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emory, Amber Elizabeth; Chirica, Dan Cristian; Doyle, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This presentation covered the original plan for the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) Data Catalog available through the ESPO HS3 mission page (http://espo.nasa.gov/missions/hs3/) and provided examples of Model Products, Operational Products, and Research (Instrument) Products from the 2012 field campaign. The presentation also covered lessons learned and suggested improvements to the Data Catalog for the upcoming 2013 HS3 field campaign.

  11. The Seamount Catalog in EarthRef.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keizer, P.; Koppers, A.; Staudigel, H.; Helly, J.

    2001-12-01

    Seamounts are prominent features on the ocean floor that provide us with important insights to geology, geochemistry, geophysics and paleoclimate. To make accessible a diverse set of seamount data we developed the Seamount Catalog on the EarthRef.org web site that is accessible via http://earthref.org/databases/SC/. The goal of our effort is to provide simple access to the widest possible variety in digital data files as related to seamount research in a geospatial context. Each seamount is described in terms of its location, basic morphological features, and the types of data available in the catalog. The Seamount Catalog includes a series of basic bathymetry maps, processed grid files and original multibeam data. At least one screen-optimized JPEG file is available for online viewing and the remaining (higher resolution) files are directly downloadable from the EarthRef.org web site. The grid files are based on multibeam bathymetry data merged with the predicted bathymetry database of Smith and Sandwell (1996; 1997). The Seamount Catalog data objects are extensively described in terms of metadata allowing for searches by location (lat/lon), region name, seamount name, sample name or reference. We hope to further develop the Seamount Catalog by adding geophysical and other seamount data, expanding its metadata catalog, working towards a metadata interchange format (*.mif) and establishing interoperability with other data bases. The geospatial character of the Seamount Catalog would allow for interoperability between existing geochemistry, paleomagnetic and biological (biota) databases. Data files available for downloading will be stored using the Storage Resource Broker technology (SRB) while the generated metadata will be stored in the Seamount Catalog itself. Such developments represent the first steps towards the creation of a digital seamount research environment that includes electronic access to data and ultimately also the tools for working with the data.

  12. Hennepin County Library Automation Project: A Plan for the Next Steps in the Automation of the Public Catalog, Cataloging, Circulation Control, and Acquisitions. December 1987-June 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1989

    This four-part report describes the development of a plan for Hennepin County (Minnesota) Library's (HCL) next steps in the automation of operations including the public catalog, cataloging, circulation control, and acquisitions. The objectives of the plan were to improve patron access to materials and to provide for cost effective operations.…

  13. Boo! Outsourcing from the Cataloging Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Janet Swan

    1998-01-01

    Examines long-accepted ways library cataloging departments have used outsourcing (cataloging records, card production, authority control, card filling, and retrospective conversion) and potential outsourcing activities (original cataloging, and copy cataloging). Discusses reasons why outsourcing is controversial. (PEN)

  14. Prologue for a synoptic catalog: combining a hospital library catalog and a bookseller's catalog.

    PubMed Central

    Colglazier, M L

    1996-01-01

    This article introduces the synoptic catalog, a computerized combination of a hospital library catalog and a bookseller's catalog. Majors Scientific Books and Richmond Memorial Hospital Libraries in Virginia collaborated to develop the model. A logical evolution in catalog theory and practice, the design expands the identification, collocation, and evaluation functions of the traditional library catalog. This article explains the procedures and specifications, including system requirements, record mapping, design details, scope, record transmission, timing, record importing, and file maintenance. The result is a single-interface catalog providing simultaneous and consistent searching of combined information databases. Bookseller records in the synoptic catalog can be modified to indicate library ownership. The synoptic catalog design supports cost-effective collection development and focuses on actual information needs of library users. This report discusses user convenience, budget requirements, publisher advertising, collection development, productivity, and library-bookseller relations. User response to the catalog has been favorable, but improvements are needed. PMID:8938329

  15. Rosseland and Flux Mean Opacities for Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poutanen, Juri

    2017-02-01

    Rosseland mean opacity plays an important role in theories of stellar evolution and X-ray burst models. In the high-temperature regime, when most of the gas is completely ionized, the opacity is dominated by Compton scattering. Our aim here is to critically evaluate previous works on this subject and to compute the exact Rosseland mean opacity for Compton scattering over a broad range of temperature and electron degeneracy parameter. We use relativistic kinetic equations for Compton scattering and compute the photon mean free path as a function of photon energy by solving the corresponding integral equation in the diffusion limit. As a byproduct we also demonstrate the way to compute photon redistribution functions in the case of degenerate electrons. We then compute the Rosseland mean opacity as a function of temperature and electron degeneracy and present useful approximate expressions. We compare our results to previous calculations and find a significant difference in the low-temperature regime and strong degeneracy. We then proceed to compute the flux mean opacity in both free-streaming and diffusion approximations, and show that the latter is nearly identical to the Rosseland mean opacity. We also provide a simple way to account for the true absorption in evaluating the Rosseland and flux mean opacities.

  16. HELIOSEISMIC TESTS OF THE NEW LOS ALAMOS OPACITIES

    SciTech Connect

    J. GUZIK; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    We compare the helioseismic properties of two solar models, one calibrated with the OPAL opacities and the other with the recent Los Alamos LEDCOP opacities. We show that, in the radiative interior of the Sun, the small differences between the two sets of opacities (up to 6% near the base of the convection zone) lead to noticeable differences in the solar structure (up to 0.4% in sound speed), with the OPAL model being the closest to the helioseismic data. More than half of the difference between the two opacity sets results from the interpolation scheme and from the relatively widely spaced temperature grids used in the tables. The remaining 3% intrinsic difference between the OPAL and the LEDCOP opacities in the radiative interior of the Sun is well within the error bars on the opacity calculations resulting from the uncertainties on the physics. We conclude that the OPAL and LEDCOP opacity sets do about as well in the radiative interior of the Sun.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SPM 4.0 Catalog (Girard+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, T. M.; van Altena, W. F.; Zacharias, N.; Vieira, K.; Casetti-Dinescu, D. I.; Castillo, D.; Herrera, D.; Lee, Y. S.; Beers, T. C.; Monet, D. G.; Lopez, C. E.

    2011-03-01

    The SPM4 Catalog contains absolute proper motions, celestial coordinates, and B,V photometry for 103,319,647 stars and galaxies between the south celestial pole and -20 degrees declination. The catalog is roughly complete to V=17.5. It is based on photographic and CCD observations taken with the Yale Southern Observatory's double-astrograph at Cesco Observatory in El Leoncito, Argentina. The first-epoch survey, taken from 1965 to 1979, was entirely photographic. The second-epoch survey is approximately 1/3 photographic (taken from 1988 to 1998) and 2/3 CCD-based (taken from 2004 through 2008). Full details about the creation of the SPM4.0 catalog can be found in the paper, and also in the document "spm4_doc.txt" file which describes the original files, accessible from http://www.astro.yale.edu/astrom/spm4cat/ (2 data files).

  18. NLTE opacities of mid- and high-Z cocktails

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrill, Manolo E; Abdallah, Joseph; Fontes, Christopher J; Kilcrease, David P; Zhang, Honglin

    2009-01-01

    In this work we report on the development of a new method for computing mi- and high-Z NLTE opacities. A study has been performed using this method to assess the EOS and opacity sensitivities to the radiation field for both single species Au and multi-species SnNb and U{sub 3}Au plasma cocktails with an emphasis on moderately to highly ionized systems. Developed as a benchmark tool, this capability will be used to assess both current and future in-line NLTE opacity capabilities.

  19. Monochromatic, Rosseland mean, and Planck mean opacity routine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, D.

    2006-11-01

    Several FORTRAN77 codes were developed to compute frequency-dependent, Rosseland and Planck mean opacities of gas and dust in protoplanetary disks. The opacities can be computed for an ensemble of dust grains having various compositions (ices, silicates, organics, etc), sizes, topologies (homogeneous/composite aggregates, homogeneous/layered/composite spheres, etc.), porosities, and dust-to-gas ratio. Several examples are available. In addition, a very fast opacity routine to be used in modeling of the radiative transfer in hydro simulations of disks is available upon request (10^8 routine calls require about 30s on Pentium 4 3.0GHz).

  20. Catalog of electronic data products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-07-01

    The catalog lists and describes the public-use data files produced by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). More than 500 public-use data files, representing most of the NCHS data collection programs, are available for purchase and use. Public-use data files are prepared and disseminated to speed and enhance access to the full scope of data. NCHS data systems include a national vital registration program; household interview and health examination surveys; surveys of hospitals, nursing homes, physicians, and other health care providers; and other periodic or occasional data collection activities to produce a wide spectrum of health and health-related data. NCHS data users encompass all levels of government, the academic and research communities, and business. The majority of the data files released by NCHS contain microdata to allow researchers to aggregate findings in whatever format appropriate for their analyses.

  1. Research on Spectroscopy, Opacity, and Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurucz, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    I propose to continue providing observers with basic data for interpreting spectra from stars, novas, supernovas, clusters, and galaxies. These data will include allowed and forbidden line lists, both laboratory and computed, for the first five to ten ions of all atoms and for all relevant diatomic molecules. I will eventually expand to all ions of the first thirty elements to treat far UV and X-ray spectra, and for envelope opacities. I also include triatomic molecules provided by other researchers. I have also made CDs with Partridge and Schwenke's water data for work on UV stars. The line data also serve as input to my model atmosphere and synthesis programs that generate energy distributions, photometry, limb darkening, and spectra that can be used for planning observations and for fitting observed spectra. The spectrum synthesis programs produce detailed plots with the lines identified. Grids of stellar spectra can be used for radial velocity-, rotation-, or abundance templates and for population synthesis. I am fitting spectra of bright stars to test the data and to produce atlases to guide observers. For each star the whole spectrum is computed from the UV to the far IR. The line data, opacities, models, spectra, and programs are freely distributed on CDs and on my Web site and represent a unique resource for many NASA programs. I am now in full production of new line lists for atoms. I am computing all ions of all elements from H to Zn and the first 5 ions of all the heavier elements, about 800 ions. For each ion I treat as many as 61 even and 61 odd configurations, computing all energy levels and eigenvectors. The Hamiltonian is determined from a scaled-Hartree-Fock starting guess by least squares fitting the observed energy levels. The average energy of each configuration is used in computing scaled-Thomas-Fermi-Dirac wavefunctions for each configuration which in turn are used to compute allowed and forbidden transition integrals. These are multiplied

  2. Progress Report on the USNO-B Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monet, D. G.

    2000-12-01

    The USNO-B catalog is the extension of the USNO-A catalog that includes proper motions and star/galaxy classifications. The task of compiling this catalog is difficult because the centers of the POSS-I and POSS-II surveys are different (6-degree vs. 5-degree), and this means that the errors of the astrometric solutions that unbend the Schmidt plates must be well understood and small. To verify the reduction algorithms, the Yellow Sky (YS) catalog is being prepared. This is being compiled from the yellow exposures taken as part of the Lick Northern Proper Motion (NPM) Survey and the Yale/San Juan Southern Proper Motion (SPM) Survey. Since the systematic errors of the astrographs and Schmidt telescopes are expected to be quite different, the intercomparison of the YS catalog and the Schmidt plate solutions should provide the best available test of astrometric accuracy. This paper will discuss the compilation of the intermediate catalogs and present some of the intercomparisons. There are no plans for the public release of YS as a separate catalog. Access to the NPM and SPM plates has been provided through the kindness of the astrometric groups at the Lick and Yale observatories, and all plates have been digitized and reduced by the U.S. Naval Observatory's Precision Measuring Machine (PMM).

  3. Online Catalog Study: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Elliot R.

    Following the closing of the National Library of Medicine's (NLM's) card catalog, a study was performed in 1982 to specify minimally acceptable requirements and capabilities for an NLM-based online catalog system and to evaluate the technical performance and user acceptance of available systems. Two prototype online catalog systems were selected…

  4. Comparative pulsation calculations with OP and OPAL opacities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanbur, Shashi M.; Simon, Norman R.

    1994-01-01

    Comparative linear nonadiabatic pulsation calculations are presented using the OPAL and Opacity Project opacities. The two sets of opacities include effects due to intermediate coupling and fine structure as well as new abundances. We used two mass luminosity (M-L) relations, one standard (BIT), and one employing substantial convective core overshoot (COV). The two sets of opacities cannot be differentiated on the basis of the stellar pulsation calculations presented here. The BIT relation can model the beat and bump Cepheids with masses between 4 and 7 solar mass, while if the overshoot relation is used, masses between 2 and 6 solar mass are required. In the RR Lyrae regime, we find the inferred masses of globular cluster RRd stars to be little influenced by the choice of OPAL or OP. Finally, the limited modeling we have done is not able to constrain the Cepheid M-L relation based upon period ratios observed in the beat and bump stars.

  5. A new generation of Los Alamos opacity tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgan, J.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Magee, N. H.; Abdallah, J.; Sherrill, M. E.; Fontes, C. J.; Hakel, P.; Guzik, J. A.; Mussack, K. A.; Walczak, P.

    2017-03-01

    We review a recently completed set of Los Alamos OPLIB opacity tables for the elements hydrogen through zinc. Our tables have been computed using the Los Alamos ATOMIC code, which makes use of atomic structure calculations that include fine-structure detail for all the elements considered. We utilize an equation-of-state model, known as ChemEOS, that is based on the minimization of free energy in a chemical picture. Recent publications by us have compared our calculations to available experimental opacity data and to other opacity calculations. Our tables are publicly available via our website, and have already been used in solar modeling calculations as well as the modeling of pulsating B-type stars. This proceedings submission will give an overview of our opacity calculations and briefly review the conclusions from the astrophysical modeling.

  6. Opacity Experiments At The National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, T. S.; Kline, J. L.; Flippo, K. A.; Sherrill, M. E.; Dodd, E. S.; Devolder, B. G.; Urbatsch, T. J.; Heeter, R. F.; Schneider, M. B.; Liedahl, D. A.; Wilson, B. G.; Iglesias, C. A.; Opachich, Y. P.; Ross, P. W.; Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A.

    2016-10-01

    X-ray opacities are essential to the radiation-hydrodynamic simulations used to model astrophysical systems or inertial confinement fusion experiments. Recent opacity experiments have shown up to a factor of two discrepancy between theory and experiment. To address this issue a new experimental opacity platform is being developed on the NIF to crosscheck the recent results. The first experiments, starting in 2017, will begin by measuring the opacity of iron at a temperature of 160 eV and an electron density of 7x1021 cm-3. This and several following presentations will describe this effort. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Los Alamos National Lab under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  7. Catalog of infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, D. Y.; Schmitz, M.; Mead, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The infrared astronomical data base and its principal data product, the catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO), comprise a machine readable library of infrared (1 microns to 1000 microns astronomical observations. To date, over 1300 journal articles and 10 major survey catalogs are included in this data base, which contains about 55,000 individual observations of about 10,000 different infrared sources. Of these, some 8,000 sources are identifiable with visible objects, and about 2,000 do not have known visible counterparts.

  8. Work-Op IV summary: lessons from iron opacities

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, S J; Iglesias, C A; Minguez, E; Serduke, F J D

    1999-04-16

    The fourth international LTE opacity workshop and code comparison study, WorkOp-IV, was held in Madrid in 1997. Results of this workshop are summarized with a focus on iron opacities. In particular, the astrophysically important photon absorption region between 50 and 80 eV is emphasized for a sequence of iron plasmas at densities and temperatures that produce nearly the same average ionization stage (Z* {approximately} 8.6). Experimental data that addressed this spectral region is also reviewed.

  9. Computational design of short pulse laser driven iron opacity experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Martin, M. E.; London, R. A.; Goluoglu, S.; ...

    2017-02-23

    Here, the resolution of current disagreements between solar parameters calculated from models and observations would benefit from the experimental validation of theoretical opacity models. Iron's complex ionic structure and large contribution to the opacity in the radiative zone of the sun make iron a good candidate for validation. Short pulse lasers can be used to heat buried layer targets to plasma conditions comparable to the radiative zone of the sun, and the frequency dependent opacity can be inferred from the target's measured x-ray emission. Target and laser parameters must be optimized to reach specific plasma conditions and meet x-ray emissionmore » requirements. The HYDRA radiation hydrodynamics code is used to investigate the effects of modifying laser irradiance and target dimensions on the plasma conditions, x-ray emission, and inferred opacity of iron and iron-magnesium buried layer targets. It was determined that plasma conditions are dominantly controlled by the laser energy and the tamper thickness. The accuracy of the inferred opacity is sensitive to tamper emission and optical depth effects. Experiments at conditions relevant to the radiative zone of the sun would investigate the validity of opacity theories important to resolving disagreements between solar parameters calculated from models and observations.« less

  10. Investigating the Effect of Cosmic Opacity on Standard Candles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.; Yu, H.; Wang, F. Y.

    2017-02-01

    Standard candles can probe the evolution of dark energy over a large redshift range. But the cosmic opacity can degrade the quality of standard candles. In this paper, we use the latest observations, including Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) from the “joint light-curve analysis” sample and Hubble parameters, to probe the opacity of the universe. A joint fitting of the SNe Ia light-curve parameters, cosmological parameters, and opacity is used in order to avoid the cosmological dependence of SNe Ia luminosity distances. The latest gamma-ray bursts are used in order to explore the cosmic opacity at high redshifts. The cosmic reionization process is considered at high redshifts. We find that the sample supports an almost transparent universe for flat ΛCDM and XCDM models. Meanwhile, free electrons deplete photons from standard candles through (inverse) Compton scattering, which is known as an important component of opacity. This Compton dimming may play an important role in future supernova surveys. From analysis, we find that about a few per cent of the cosmic opacity is caused by Compton dimming in the two models, which can be corrected.

  11. Computational design of short pulse laser driven iron opacity experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, M. E.; London, R. A.; Goluoglu, S.; Whitley, H. D.

    2017-02-01

    The resolution of current disagreements between solar parameters calculated from models and observations would benefit from the experimental validation of theoretical opacity models. Iron's complex ionic structure and large contribution to the opacity in the radiative zone of the sun make iron a good candidate for validation. Short pulse lasers can be used to heat buried layer targets to plasma conditions comparable to the radiative zone of the sun, and the frequency dependent opacity can be inferred from the target's measured x-ray emission. Target and laser parameters must be optimized to reach specific plasma conditions and meet x-ray emission requirements. The HYDRA radiation hydrodynamics code is used to investigate the effects of modifying laser irradiance and target dimensions on the plasma conditions, x-ray emission, and inferred opacity of iron and iron-magnesium buried layer targets. It was determined that plasma conditions are dominantly controlled by the laser energy and the tamper thickness. The accuracy of the inferred opacity is sensitive to tamper emission and optical depth effects. Experiments at conditions relevant to the radiative zone of the sun would investigate the validity of opacity theories important to resolving disagreements between solar parameters calculated from models and observations.

  12. Opacity spectra of silicon and carbon in ICF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benredjem, D.; Calisti, A.; Ferri, S.; Gilleron, F.; Mondet, G.; Pain, J.-C.

    2017-03-01

    The knowledge of opacity is very important when one investigates the radiative properties of ICF and astrophysical plasmas. Germanium and silicon are good candidates as dopants in the ablator of some ICF schemes (LMJ in France, NIF at Livermore). In this work we calculate the opacity spectra of silicon and carbon mixtures. Two competitive methods were used. The first one is based on a detailed line calculation in which the atomic database is provided by the MCDF code. A lineshape code based on a fast algorithm was then adapted to the calculation of opacity profiles. All major line broadening mechanisms, including Zeeman splitting and Stark effect, are taken into account. This approach provides accurate opacity spectra but becomes rapidly prohibitive when the number of lines is large. To account for systems involving many ionic stages and thousands of lines, a second approach combines detailed line calculations and statistical calculations. This approach necessitates much smaller calculation times than the first one and is then more appropriate for extensive calculations. The monochromatic opacity and the Rosseland and Planck mean opacities are calculated for relevant densities and temperatures.

  13. CLSI On-Line Public Catalog Keyboard Terminal Manual: Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Chico.

    This training manual developed by the Public Access Subcommittee of the Reference Department of Meriam Library (California State University, Chico) provides instructions for using the library's online public catalog by means of a keyboard terminal. An introduction describes the Boolean searching capability of the online catalog and gives examples…

  14. Making the Transition to the SuperCatalog: ISU's Experience with LUIS II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, H. Scott; Ensor, Patricia L.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the development at Indiana State University of a SuperCatalog, a computerized library catalog that provides access to both library holdings and locally loaded commercial databases, including ERIC and Wilson indexes. Software is discussed; the impact on staff, users, interlibrary loan, and library instruction is examined; and future…

  15. Measuring Law Library Catalog Web Site Usability: A Web Analytic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fang, Wei; Crawford, Marjorie E.

    2008-01-01

    Although there is a proliferation of information available on the Web, and law professors, students, and other users have a variety of channels to locate information and complete their research activities, the law library catalog still remains an important source for offering users access to information that has been evaluated and cataloged by…

  16. The Whole Word Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Rosellen, Ed.; And Others

    This catalog, addressed to teachers of writing in the elementary and high schools, consists of (1) suggested assignments to stimulate creative writing, (2) descriptions of materials and assignment references that might be used with the assignments, (3) a list of books and magazines containing anthologies of writing by young people, and (4)…

  17. AUDIOVISUAL SERVICES CATALOG.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockton Unified School District, CA.

    A CATALOG HAS BEEN PREPARED TO HELP TEACHERS SELECT AUDIOVISUAL MATERIALS WHICH MIGHT BE HELPFUL IN ELEMENTARY CLASSROOMS. INCLUDED ARE FILMSTRIPS, SLIDES, RECORDS, STUDY PRINTS, FILMS, TAPE RECORDINGS, AND SCIENCE EQUIPMENT. TEACHERS ARE REMINDED THAT THEY ARE NOT LIMITED TO USE OF THE SUGGESTED MATERIALS. APPROPRIATE GRADE LEVELS HAVE BEEN…

  18. Book Catalog Use Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacco, Concetta N.

    1973-01-01

    Technological developments of the past twenty years have resulted in renewed interest in book-form catalogs. Users were surveyed at two libraries to determine that their satisfaction with bibliographical data, entry points, and physical form. (17 references) (Author/DH)

  19. FAA Film Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    Some 75 films from the U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Aviation Administration are listed in this catalog. Topics dealt with include aerodynamics, airports, aviation history and careers, flying clubs, navigation and weather. Most of the films are 16mm sound and color productions. Filmstrips requiring a 35mm projector and phonograph or…

  20. Rural Thinking Skills Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruse, Janice

    This catalog aims to help educators locate materials which will assist them in effectively teaching thinking skills. Research for Better Schools (RBS) serves as the lead educational laboratory for the Department of Education's national project on thinking skills. A total of 248 resources, including pamphlets, documents of activities, computer…

  1. INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CATALOG.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Vocational Agriculture Instructional Materials Service, Columbus.

    THE TITLE, IDENTIFICATION NUMBER, DATE OF PUBLICATION, PAGINATION, A BRIEF DESCRIPTION, AND PRICE ARE GIVEN FOR EACH OF THE INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS AND AUDIOVISUAL AIDS INCLUDED IN THIS CATALOG. TOPICS COVERED ARE FIELD CORPS, HORTICULTURE, ANIMAL SCIENCE, SOILS, AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING, AND FARMING PROGRAMS. AN ORDER FORM IS INCLUDED. (JM)

  2. Environmental Education Resource Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phoenix Union High School District, AZ.

    Prepared for the use of elementary and secondary school teachers, this catalog is designed to provide information about environmental education materials which will aid in classroom presentations and in curriculum development. Subject areas cover conservation and natural resources, ecology and ecosystems, environmental action and survival,…

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: GUViCS. Ultraviolet Source Catalogs (Voyer+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voyer, E. N.; Boselli, A.; Boissier, S.; Heinis, S.; Cortese, L.; Ferrarese, L.; Cote, P.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Peng, E. W.; Zhang, H.; Liu, C.

    2014-07-01

    These catalogs are based on GALEX NUV and FUV source detections in and behind the Virgo Cluster. The detections are split into catalogs of extended sources and point-like sources. The UV Virgo Cluster Extended Source catalog (UV_VES.fit) provides the deepest and most extensive UV photometric data of extended galaxies in Virgo to date. If certain data is not available for a given source then a null value is entered (e.g. -999, -99). UV point-like sources are matched with SDSS, NGVS, and NED and the relevant photometry and further data from these databases/catalogs are provided in this compilation of catalogs. The primary GUViCS UV Virgo Cluster Point-Like Source catalog is UV_VPS.fit. This catalog provides the most useful GALEX pipeline NUV and FUV photometric parameters, and categorizes sources as stars, Virgo members, and background sources, when possible. It also provides identifiers for optical matches in the SDSS and NED, and indicates if a match exists in the NGVS, only if GUViCS-optical matches are one-to-one. NED spectroscopic redshifts are also listed for GUViCS-NED one-to-one matches. If certain data is not available for a given source a null value is entered. Additionally, the catalog is useful for quick access to optical data on one-to-one GUViCS-SDSS matches.The only parameter available in the catalog for UV sources that have multiple SDSS matches is the total number of multiple matches, i.e. SDSSNUMMTCHS. Multiple GUViCS sources matched to the same SDSS source are also flagged given a total number of matches, SDSSNUMMTCHS, of one. All other fields for multiple matches are set to a null value of -99. In order to obtain full optical SDSS data for multiply matched UV sources in both scenarios, the user can cross-correlate the GUViCS ID of the sources of interest with the full GUViCS-SDSS matched catalog in GUV_SDSS.fit. The GUViCS-SDSS matched catalog, GUV_SDSS.fit, provides the most relevant SDSS data on all GUViCS-SDSS matches, including one

  4. Decal Process Document and Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Decal Process Document and Catalog, JSC 27260 is the standard flight decal catalog, complete with illustrations and part numbers. As hardware developers identify labels that have common applicability across end items, these labels can be evaluated for "standard decal classification" and entered into the decal catalog for general use. The hardware developer must have a label design that meets current, applicable labeling requirements, and submit to the Decal Design and Production Facility (DDPF) as a standard label candidate. Upon approval, the label will be added to the decal catalog. The Decal Process Document and Catalog provides a selection of decals from which the NASA and NASA contractor customers can easily order. The decals shown in the catalog have been previously produced and have released engineering/fabrication drawings on file in the (DDPF). A released drawing is required before a decal can be produced or placed into the catalog. Some decals included in the catalog have a common applicability and are used in various NASA vehicles/habitats. It is the intent of the DDPF to maintain this catalog as a "living document" to which decals/placards can be added as they are repeatedly used. The advantage of identifYing flight decals in this catalog is that a released drawing is already in place, and the products will be flight certified.

  5. Interplay of Neutrino Opacities in Core-collapse Supernova Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Eric J; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Messer, Bronson; Hix, William Raphael; Bruenn, S. W.

    2012-01-01

    We have conducted a series of numerical experiments using spherically symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics with the code Agile-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of including, and improving, the calculation of neutrino opacities on the development of supernova simulations by removing, or replacing, each opacity individually, or removing opacities in groups. We find that during core collapse improvements to electron capture (EC) on nuclei, namely EC on an ensemble of nuclei based on the hybrid model, relative to the simpler independent-particle approximation (IPA) for a mean nucleus, plays the most important role of all tested neutrino opacities. Low-energy neutrinos emitted by nuclear EC preferentially escape during collapse leading to larger deleptonization of the collapsing core, without the energy downscattering via non-isoenergetic scattering (NIS) on electrons required for the models with IPA nuclear EC. During shock breakout the primary influence on the emergent neutrinos arises from NIS on electrons. For the accretion phase NIS on free nucleons and pair emission by $e^+e^-$-annihilation have the largest impact on the neutrino emission and shock evolution. Other opacities evaluated including nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung and especially neutrino-positron scattering have little measurable impact on neutrino emission or shock dynamics. Modern treatments of nuclear electron capture, $e^+e^-$-annihilation pair emission, and non-isoenergetic scattering on electrons and free nucleons are critical elements of core-collapse simulations of all dimensionality.

  6. Eye Lens Opacities Among Physicians Occupationally Exposed to Ionizing Radiation.

    PubMed

    Auvinen, Anssi; Kivelä, Tero; Heinävaara, Sirpa; Mrena, Samy

    2015-08-01

    We compared the frequency of lens opacities among physicians with and without occupational exposure to ionizing radiation, and estimated dose-response between cumulative dose and opacities. We conducted ophthalmologic examinations of 21 physicians with occupational exposure to radiation and 16 unexposed physicians. Information on cumulative radiation doses (mean 111 mSv) was based on dosimeter readings recorded in a national database on occupational exposures. Lens changes were evaluated using the Lens Opacities Classification System II, with an emphasis on posterior subcapsular (PSC) and cortical changes. Among the exposed physicians, the prevalences of cortical and PSC changes were both 11% (3/21), and the corresponding frequencies in the unexposed group were 44% (n = 7) and 6% (n = 1). For dose-response analysis, the data were pooled with 29 exposed physicians from our previous study. No association of either type of lens changes with cumulative recorded dose was observed. Our findings do not indicate an increased frequency of lens opacities in physicians with occupational exposure to ionizing radiation. However, the subjects in this study have received relatively low doses and therefore the results do not exclude small increases in lens opacities or contradict the studies reporting increases among interventional cardiologists with materially higher cumulative doses.

  7. Education programs catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    Since its formation in 1977, US DOE has been authorized to support education programs that help ensure an adequate supply of scientists, engineers, and technicians for energy-related research, production activities, and technology transfer. A national conference in 1989 produced a clear vision of the important role that DOE, its facilities, and its 169,000 Federal and contract employees can play in the educational life of their communities and the Nation. Many of the programs listed in this catalog are the result of this new vision; others have existed for many years. Purpose of this catalog is to make all DOE education efforts more widely known so that more teachers, students, and others can benefit. Supporting the hundreds of education programs (precollege, undergraduate, graduate, public) is the network of DOE national laboratories, technology centers, and other research facilities. Brief descriptions of each facility, its programs, and contact information for its education personnel are included.

  8. Geothermal innovative technologies catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Kenkeremath, D.

    1988-09-01

    The technology items in this report were selected on the basis of technological readiness and applicability to current technology transfer thrusts. The items include technologies that are considered to be within 2 to 3 years of being transferred. While the catalog does not profess to be entirely complete, it does represent an initial attempt at archiving innovative geothermal technologies with ample room for additions as they occur. The catalog itself is divided into five major functional areas: Exploration; Drilling, Well Completion, and Reservoir Production; Materials and Brine Chemistry; Direct Use; and Economics. Within these major divisions are sub-categories identifying specific types of technological advances: Hardware; Software; Data Base; Process/Procedure; Test Facility; and Handbook.

  9. Landsat US standard catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The U.S. Standard Catalog lists imagery of the continental U.S., Alaska and Hawaii acquired by Landsat 1 and 2 which has been processed and input to the data files during the referenced month. Data, such as date acquired, cloud cover and image quality are given for each scene. The microfilm roll and frame on which the scene may be found is also given.

  10. Design And First Use of the NIF Opacity Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. A.; Ross, P. W.; Huffman, E. J.; Opachich, Y. P.; Heeter, R. F.; Ahmed, M.; Liedahl, D. A.; Schneider, M. B.; Dodd, E.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.; Lopez, F. E.; Archuleta, T. N.; Perry, T. S.

    2016-10-01

    Recent experiments at the Sandia Z facility have raised questions about models used in calculating L-shell opacities of mid-Z elements. A platform is being developed to check these results at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The NIF experiments require a new X-ray opacity spectrometer (OpSpec) for the iron L-shell X-ray band, spanning photon energies from 540 eV - 2100 eV with a resolving power E/ ΔE >700. The design of the OpSpec and photometric calculations based on expected opacity data are also presented. First use on NIF is expected in September 2016. This work was performed by National Security Technologies, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy. DOE/NV/25946-2891.

  11. Infrared Opacities in Dense Atmospheres of Cool White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, P. M.; Blouin, S.; Dufour, P.

    2017-03-01

    Dense, He-rich atmospheres of cool white dwarfs represent a challenge to the modeling. This is because these atmospheres are constituted of a dense fluid in which strong multi-atomic interactions determine their physics and chemistry. Therefore, the ideal-gas-based description of absorption is no longer adequate, which makes the opacities of these atmospheres difficult to model. This is illustrated with severe problems in fitting the spectra of cool, He-rich stars. Good description of the infrared (IR) opacity is essential for proper assignment of the atmospheric parameters of these stars. Using methods of computational quantum chemistry we simulate the IR absorption of dense He/H media. We found a significant IR absorption from He atoms (He-He-He CIA opacity) and a strong pressure distortion of the H2-He collision-induced absorption (CIA). We discuss the implication of these results for the interpretation of the spectra of cool stars.

  12. Fractal Particles: Titan's Thermal Structure and IR Opacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, C. P.; Rannou, P.; Guez, L.; Young, E. F.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Titan's haze particles are the principle opacity at solar wavelengths. Most past work in modeling these particles has assumed spherical particles. However, observational evidence strongly favors fractal shapes for the haze particles. We consider the implications of fractal particles for the thermal structure and near infrared opacity of Titan's atmosphere. We find that assuming fractal particles with the optical properties based on laboratory tholin material and with a production rate that allows for a match to the geometric albedo results in warmer troposphere and surface temperatures compared to spherical particles. In the near infrared (1-3 microns) the predicted opacity of the fractal particles is up to a factor of two less than for spherical particles. This has implications for the ability of Cassini to image Titan's surface at 1 micron.

  13. OKAPI: Evaluating and Enhancing an Experimental Online Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Stephen

    1987-01-01

    Describes the design and operation of a prototype online catalog; reviews research which evaluated the system in terms of types of searches and success rates; and offers suggestions for enhancing subject access, including automatic stemming, synonym tables and cross-reference lists, and relevance feedback mechanisms. (CLB)

  14. Circulation System to Online Catalog: The Transition at OSU.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Pulis, Noelle

    This paper describes the development of an online public access catalog from a limited-purpose online circulation system at Ohio State University (OSU) and the negative and positive aspects of this transition. It is noted that the online system, known as the Library Control System (LCS), was designed to be fully operational in July 1982. Steps in…

  15. Film Catalog. John F. Kennedy Space Center. 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    Teachers from the United States and several other countries have access to the film library system of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This catalog contains the titles and abstracts for over 150 films that are available from NASA on topics regarding space flight, meteorology, astronomy, NASA programs, satellites, research,…

  16. CITE NLM: Natural-Language Searching in an Online Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doszkocs, Tamas E.

    1983-01-01

    The National Library of Medicine's Current Information Transfer in English public access online catalog offers unique subject search capabilities--natural-language query input, automatic medical subject headings display, closest match search strategy, ranked document output, dynamic end user feedback for search refinement. References, description…

  17. Landmarks of Science: Microforms Cataloging Project, September 1981-December 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Orden, Richard

    To improve bibliographic access to the individual works contained in "Landmarks of Science" and "Landmarks II," two comprehensive microform collections of materials related to the history of science, the staff of the University of Utah Libraries cataloged the individual titles. Staff members with backgrounds in Renaissance…

  18. Measuring the opacity of stellar interior matter in terrestrial laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, James

    2015-11-01

    How does energy propagate from the core to the surface of the Sun, where it emerges to warm the Earth? Nearly a century ago Eddington recognized that the attenuation of radiation by stellar matter controls the internal structure of stars like the sun. Opacities for high energy density (HED) matter are challenging to calculate because accurate and complete descriptions of the energy levels, populations, and plasma effects such as continuum lowering and line broadening are needed for partially ionized atoms. This requires approximations, in part because billions of bound-bound and bound-free electronic transitions can contribute to the opacity. Opacity calculations, however, have never been benchmarked against laboratory measurements at stellar interior conditions. Laboratory opacity measurements were limited in the past by the challenges of creating and diagnosing sufficiently large and uniform samples at the extreme conditions found inside stars. In research conducted over more than 10 years, we developed an experimental platform on the Z facility and measured wavelength-resolved iron opacity at electron temperatures Te = 156-195 eV and densities ne = 0.7-4.0 x 1022 cm-3 - conditions very similar to the radiation/convection boundary zone within the Sun. The wavelength-dependent opacity in the 975-1775 eV photon energy range is 30-400% higher than models predict. This raises questions about how well we understand the behavior of atoms in HED plasma. These measurements may also help resolve decade-old discrepancies between solar model predictions and helioseismic observations. This talk will provide an overview of the measurements, investigations of possible errors, and ongoing experiments aimed at testing hypotheses to resolve the model-data discrepancy. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. NOAA's Data Catalog and the Federal Open Data Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wengren, M. J.; de la Beaujardiere, J.

    2014-12-01

    The 2013 Open Data Policy Presidential Directive requires Federal agencies to create and maintain a 'public data listing' that includes all agency data that is currently or will be made publicly-available in the future. The directive requires the use of machine-readable and open formats that make use of 'common core' and extensible metadata formats according to the best practices published in an online repository called 'Project Open Data', to use open licenses where possible, and to adhere to existing metadata and other technology standards to promote interoperability. In order to meet the requirements of the Open Data Policy, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has implemented an online data catalog that combines metadata from all subsidiary NOAA metadata catalogs into a single master inventory. The NOAA Data Catalog is available to the public for search and discovery, providing access to the NOAA master data inventory through multiple means, including web-based text search, OGC CS-W endpoint, as well as a native Application Programming Interface (API) for programmatic query. It generates on a daily basis the Project Open Data JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) file required for compliance with the Presidential directive. The Data Catalog is based on the open source Comprehensive Knowledge Archive Network (CKAN) software and runs on the Amazon Federal GeoCloud. This presentation will cover topics including mappings of existing metadata in standard formats (FGDC-CSDGM and ISO 19115 XML ) to the Project Open Data JSON metadata schema, representation of metadata elements within the catalog, and compatible metadata sources used to feed the catalog to include Web Accessible Folder (WAF), Catalog Services for the Web (CS-W), and Esri ArcGIS.com. It will also discuss related open source technologies that can be used together to build a spatial data infrastructure compliant with the Open Data Policy.

  20. The Catalog Takes to the Highway.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesbro, Melinda

    1999-01-01

    Discusses new developments in online library catalogs, including Web-based catalogs; interconnectivity within the library; interconnectivity between libraries; graphical user interfaces; pricing models; and a checklist of questions to ask when purchasing a new online catalog. (LRW)

  1. Cataloging Expert Systems: Optimism and Frustrated Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olmstadt, William J.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses artificial intelligence and attempts to catalog expert systems. Topics include the nature of expertise; examples of cataloging expert systems; barriers to implementation; and problems, including total automation, cataloging expertise, priorities, and system design. (LRW)

  2. Ultra-dense Hot Low Z Line Transition Opacity Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvan, P.; Mínguez, E.; Gil, J. M.; Rodríguez, R.; Rubiano, J. G.; Martel, P.; Angelo, P.; Schott, R.; Philippe, F.; Leboucher-Dalimier, E.; Mancini, R.; Calisti, A.

    2002-12-01

    In this work two atomic physics models (the IDEFIX code using the dicenter model and the code based on parametric potentials ANALOP) have been used to calculate the opacities for bound-bound transitions in hot ultra-dense, low Z plasmas. These simulations are in connection with experiments carried out at LULI during the last two years, focused on bound-bound radiation. In this paper H-like opacities for aluminum and fluorine plasmas have been simulated, using both theoretical models, in a wide range of densities and temperatures higher than 200 eV.

  3. Version 1 of the Hubble Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Bradley

    2015-08-01

    The Hubble Source Catalog (HSC) is designed to help optimize science from the Hubble Space Telescope by combining the tens of thousands of visit-based Hubble Legacy Archive (HLA - available at http://hla.stsci.edu) source lists into a single master catalog. The HSC includes ACS/WFC, WFPC2, and WFC3 source lists generated using the Source Extractor software (Bertin & Arnouts 1996). The current version of the catalog includes roughly 80 million detections of 30 million objects involving 112 different detector/filter combinations and about 50 thousand HST exposures cross-matched using the technique described in Budavari & Lubow (2012). The astrometric residuals for HSC objects are typically within 10 mas and the magnitude residuals between repeat measurements are generally within 0.10 mag. Version 1 of the HSC was released on February 25, 2015. The primary ways to access the HSC are the MAST Discovery Portal (http://mast.stsci.edu), and a CasJobs capability for advanced searches. Detailed use cases and videos are available to help researchers get started. The HSC will be an important reference for future telescopes, such as the James Webb Space Telescope and survey programs such as Pan-STARRS and LSST. The URL for the HSC is http://archive.stsci.edu/hst/hsc/ .

  4. The Chandra Source Catalog : Google Earth Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glotfelty, Kenny; McLaughlin, W.; Evans, I.; Evans, J.; Anderson, C. S.; Bonaventura, N. R.; Davis, J. E.; Doe, S. M.; Fabbiano, G.; Galle, E. C.; Gibbs, D. G., II; Grier, J. D.; Hain, R.; Hall, D. M.; Harbo, P. N.; He, H.; Houck, J. C.; Karovska, M.; Kashyap, V. L.; Lauer, J.; McCollough, M. L.; McDowell, J. C.; Miller, J. B.; Mitschang, A. W.; Morgan, D. L.; Mossman, A. E.; Nichols, J. S.; Nowak, M. A.; Plummer, D. A.; Primini, F. A.; Refsdal, B. L.; Rots, A. R.; Siemiginowska, A. L.; Sundheim, B. A.; Tibbetts, M. S.; van Stone, D. W.; Winkelman, S. L.; Zografou, P.

    2009-09-01

    The Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) contains multi-resolution, exposure corrected, background subtracted, full-field images that are stored as individual FITS files and as three-color JPEG files. In this poster we discuss how we took these data and were able to, with relatively minimal effort, convert them for use with the Google Earth application in its ``Sky'' mode. We will highlight some of the challenges which include converting the data to the required Mercator projection, reworking the 3-color algorithm for pipeline processing, and ways to reduce the data volume through re-binning, using color-maps, and special Keyhole Markup Language (kml) tags to only load images on-demand. The result is a collection of some 11,000 3-color images that are available for all the individual observation in the CSC Release 1. We also have made available all ˜4000 Field-of-View outlines (with per-chip regions), which turns out are trivial to produce starting with a simple dmlist command. In the first week of release, approximately 40% of the images have been accessed at least once through some 50,000 individual web hits which have served over 4Gb of data to roughly 750 users in 60+ countries. We will also highlight some future directions we are exploring, including real-time catalog access to individual source properties and eventual access to file based products such as FITS images, spectra, and light-curves.

  5. A Free and Open Source Web-based Data Catalog Evaluation Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, K.; Schweitzer, R.; Burger, E. F.

    2015-12-01

    For many years, the Unified Access Framework (UAF) project has worked to provide improved access to scientific data by leveraging widely used data standards and conventions. These standards include the Climate and Forecast (CF) metadata conventions, the Data Access Protocol (DAP) and various Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards such as WMS and WCS. The UAF has also worked to create a unified access point for scientific data access through THREDDS and ERDDAP catalogs. A significant effort was made by the UAF project to build a catalog-crawling tool that was designed to crawl remote catalogs, analyze their content and then build a clean catalog that 1) represented only CF compliant data; 2) provided a uniform set of access services and 3) where possible, aggregated data in time. That catalog is available at http://ferret.pmel.noaa.gov/geoide/geoIDECleanCatalog.html.Although this tool has proved immensely valuable in allowing the UAF project to create a high quality data catalog, the need for a catalog evaluation service or tool to operate on a more local level also exists. Many programs that generate data of interest to the public are recognizing the utility and power of using the THREDDS data server (TDS) to serve that data. However, for some groups that lack the resources to maintain dedicated IT personnel, it can be difficult to set up a properly configured TDS. The TDS catalog evaluating service that is under development and will be discussed in this presentation is an effort, through the UAF project, to bridge that gap. Based upon the power of the original UAF catalog cleaner, the web evaluator will have the ability to scan and crawl a local TDS catalog, evaluate the contents for compliance with CF standards, analyze the services offered, and identify datasets where possible temporal aggregation would benefit data access. The results of the catalog evaluator will guide the configuration of the dataset in TDS to ensure that it meets the standards as

  6. Formation of Jupiter using opacities based on detailed grain physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movshovitz, Naor; Bodenheimer, Peter; Podolak, Morris; Lissauer, Jack J.

    2010-10-01

    Numerical simulations, based on the core-nucleated accretion model, are presented for the formation of Jupiter at 5.2 AU in three primordial disks with three different assumed values of the surface density of solid particles. The grain opacities in the envelope of the protoplanet are computed using a detailed model that includes settling and coagulation of grains and that incorporates a recalculation of the grain size distribution at each point in time and space. We generally find lower opacities than the 2% of interstellar values used in previous calculations (Hubickyj, O., Bodenheimer, P., Lissauer, J.J. [2005]. Icarus 179, 415-431; Lissauer, J.J., Hubickyj, O., D'Angelo, G., Bodenheimer, P. [2009]. Icarus 199, 338-350). These lower opacities result in more rapid heat loss from and more rapid contraction of the protoplanetary envelope. For a given surface density of solids, the new calculations result in a substantial speedup in formation time as compared with those previous calculations. Formation times are calculated to be 1.0, 1.9, and 4.0 Myr, and solid core masses are found to be 16.8, 8.9, and 4.7 M⊕, for solid surface densities, σ, of 10, 6, and 4 g cm -2, respectively. For σ = 10 and σ = 6 g cm -2, respectively, these formation times are reduced by more than 50% and more than 80% compared with those in a previously published calculation with the old approximation to the opacity.

  7. 40 CFR 75.14 - Specific provisions for monitoring opacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Specific provisions for monitoring opacity. 75.14 Section 75.14 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING Monitoring Provisions § 75.14 Specific provisions...

  8. FIRST NEW SOLAR MODELS WITH OPAS OPACITY TABLES

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pennec, M.; Turck-Chièze, S.; Salmon, S.

    2015-11-10

    Stellar seismology appears more and more as a powerful tool for a better determination of the fundamental properties of solar-type stars. However, the particular case of the Sun is still challenging. For about a decade now, the helioseismic sound-speed determination has continued to disagree with the standard solar model (SSM) prediction, questioning the reliability of this model. One of the sources of uncertainty could be in the treatment of the transport of radiation from the solar core to the surface. In this Letter, we use the new OPAS opacity tables, recently available for solar modeling, to address this issue. We discuss first the peculiarities of these tables, then we quantify their impact on the solar sound-speed and density profiles using the reduced OPAS tables taken on the grids of the OPAL ones. We use the two evolution codes, Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics and Code Liégeois d’Evolution Stellaire, that led to similar conclusions in the solar radiative zone. In comparison to commonly used OPAL opacity tables, the new solar models are computed for the most recent photospheric composition with OPAS tables and present improvements to the location of the base of the convective zone and to the description of the solar radiative zone in comparison to the helioseismic observations, even if the differences in the Rosseland mean opacity do not exceed 6%. We finally carry out a comparison to a solar model computed with the OP opacity tables.

  9. 40 CFR 75.14 - Specific provisions for monitoring opacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... or operator can demonstrate that condensed water is present in the exhaust flue gas stream and would... calendar year. (d) Diesel-fired units and dual-fuel reciprocating engine units. The owner or operator of an affected diesel-fired unit or a dual-fuel reciprocating engine unit is exempt from the opacity...

  10. First New Solar Models with OPAS Opacity Tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pennec, M.; Turck-Chièze, S.; Salmon, S.; Blancard, C.; Cossé, P.; Faussurier, G.; Mondet, G.

    2015-11-01

    Stellar seismology appears more and more as a powerful tool for a better determination of the fundamental properties of solar-type stars. However, the particular case of the Sun is still challenging. For about a decade now, the helioseismic sound-speed determination has continued to disagree with the standard solar model (SSM) prediction, questioning the reliability of this model. One of the sources of uncertainty could be in the treatment of the transport of radiation from the solar core to the surface. In this Letter, we use the new OPAS opacity tables, recently available for solar modeling, to address this issue. We discuss first the peculiarities of these tables, then we quantify their impact on the solar sound-speed and density profiles using the reduced OPAS tables taken on the grids of the OPAL ones. We use the two evolution codes, Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics and Code Liégeois d’Evolution Stellaire, that led to similar conclusions in the solar radiative zone. In comparison to commonly used OPAL opacity tables, the new solar models are computed for the most recent photospheric composition with OPAS tables and present improvements to the location of the base of the convective zone and to the description of the solar radiative zone in comparison to the helioseismic observations, even if the differences in the Rosseland mean opacity do not exceed 6%. We finally carry out a comparison to a solar model computed with the OP opacity tables.

  11. "Where's the Catalog?" An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockman, Ilene F.

    1979-01-01

    Introduces three papers presented at the RASD (Reference and Adult Services Division) Catalog Use Committee program--"Where's the Catalog? Automation, AACR 2, and the User"--held at the 1979 American Library Association Annual Conference. The papers address the program's challenges from different perspectives. (Author)

  12. A catalog of stellar spectrophotometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, S. J.; Pyper, D. M.; Shore, S. N.; White, R. E.; Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A machine-readable catalog of stellar spectrophotometric measurements made with rotating grating scanner is introduced. Consideration is given to the processes by which the stellar data were collected and calibrated with the fluxes of Vega (Hayes and Latham, 1975). A sample page from the spectrophotometric catalog is presented.

  13. FTS measurements of submillimeter-wave opacity at Pampa la Bola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Akihiro; Matsushita, Satoki

    1998-07-01

    The first measurement of submillimeter-wave atmospheric opacity spectra at the Pampa la Bola site (Northern Chile, Atacama 4800 m altitude) has been performed during the winter season using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). Atmospheric emission spectra, as a function of airmass, were measured under various weather conditions. Atmospheric opacity was evaluated from sky temperature at zenith as well as from tipping measurements, which are independent measure but give consistent results. The FTS opacity measurements also show good match with 220 GHz radiometer measurements. Correlations between millimeter-wave and submillimeter-wave opacities get worse when 220 GHz opacity is larger than 0.1. Deviations from the opacity correlation at each frequency show good correlations themselves but have different relative variations at each frequency. This indicates that atmospheric transparency cannot be characterized only by millimeter-wave opacity buy requires simultaneous opacity measurements at millimeter and submillimeter-wavelengths.

  14. Space surveillance satellite catalog maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Phoebe A.

    1990-04-01

    The United States Space Command (USSPACECOM) is a Unified Command of the Department of Defense with headquarters at Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado Springs, Co. One of the responsibilities of USSPACECOM is to detect, track, identify, and maintain a catalog of all manmade objects in earth orbit. This satellite catalog is the most important tool for space surveillance. The purpose of this paper is threefold. First, to identify why the command does the job of satellite catalog maintenance. Second, to describe what the satellite catalog is and how it is maintained. Third, and finally, to identify the questions that must be addressed if this command is to track small space object debris. This paper's underlying rationale is to describe our catalog maintenance services so that the members of our community can use them with assurance.

  15. Pulsations of B star models by an opacity mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, A.N. ); Morgan, S.M. . Dept. of Astronomy)

    1990-01-01

    The pulsation mechanism for B stars has been sought for 30 years. No proposed radial or nonradial mechanism, either deeply seated or in the surface layers, has been successful in explaining all the observational details. Perhaps the missing piece in the puzzle is the opacity of the stellar material. Many times the first author has tried to make unconventional surface compositions give instability, but none were ever found. We now propose that the sudden appearance of a tremendous number of iron lines, as the temperature rises above about 150,000 K, gives a high sensitivity of the opacity to temperature at the very low densities found in these blue giants. Opacities need to increase quickly to a factor of three or more above the Cox-Tabor (1976) values in the range around 200,000 K. These increases are the same needed to decrease theoretical period ratios of double-mode Cepheids and {delta} Scuti variables to agree better with observations for conventional yellow giant masses. The reason why not all B stars pulsate is that a slight primordial deficit in the iron abundance in the surface layer (1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} of the mass) can reduce the opacity and its sensitivity to temperature. A slight amount of iron concentration by radiative levitation could make a star pulsate even if it did not originally have enough primordial iron to cause this opacity mechanism to operate. Then any slow slight mixing caused by the unstable nonradial pulsations could restabilize the pulsations as actually observed in {alpha} Vir and {beta} CMa. Rapid levitation and mixing for the very luminous B stars with their very low density envelopes could even explain the puzzling luminous blue variables with this standard {kappa} mechanism. Large amplitude pulsations like those seen in BW Vul would indicate a somewhat larger iron abundance compared to all other B stars.

  16. A Comprehensive Opacities/Atomic Database for the Analysis of Astrophysical Spectra and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pradhan, Anil K. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The main goals of this ADP award have been accomplished. The electronic database TOPBASE, consisting of the large volume of atomic data from the Opacity Project, has been installed and is operative at a NASA site at the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics Science Research Center (HEASRC) at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The database will be continually maintained and updated by the PI and collaborators. TOPBASE is publicly accessible from IP: topbase.gsfc.nasa.gov. During the last six months (since the previous progress report), considerable work has been carried out to: (1) put in the new data for low ionization stages of iron: Fe I - V, beginning with Fe II, (2) high-energy photoionization cross sections computed by Dr. Hong Lin Zhang (consultant on the Project) were 'merged' with the current Opacity Project data and input into TOPbase; (3) plans laid out for a further extension of TOPbase to include TIPbase, the database for collisional data to complement the radiative data in TOPbase.

  17. FOUR-YEAR INCIDENCE AND PROGRESSION OF LENS OPACITIES: THE LOS ANGELES LATINO EYE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Rohit; Richter, Grace M.; Torres, Mina; Foong, Athena W.P.; Choudhury, Farzana; Azen, Stanley P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the 4-year incidence and progression of lens opacities. Design Population-based longitudinal study. Methods 4,658 adult Latinos from Los Angeles County, were examined at baseline and 4-year follow-up. Examination included assessment of lens opacities using the Lens Opacities Classification System II (LOCS II). Incidences of cortical, nuclear, and posterior subcapsular opacities (with LOCS II scores ≥2) were defined as opacity development in persons without that opacity at baseline. Single and mixed opacities were defined in persons without any opacity at baseline. Incidence of all lens changes included development of at least one opacity or cataract surgery among those without any opacity at baseline. 4-year progressions were defined as increase of ≥2 in LOCS II score. Results The 4-year incidence of all lens opacities was 14.2%. 4-year incidence of cataract surgery was 1.48%. The incidences were 4.1% for cortical-only, 5.8% for nuclear-only, 0.5% for PSC-only, and 2.5% for mixed. The incidences for any opacities were 7.5% for cortical, 10.2% for nuclear, and 2.5% for PSC. Incidence increased with age (P<0.0001 for all). The progressions were 8.5% for cortical, 3.7% for nuclear, and 2.9% for PSC opacities. Conclusions Our Latino population had a higher incidence of nuclear than cortical opacities, but a greater progression of cortical than nuclear opacities. Incidence and progression of PSC was low. Additional understanding of the natural history and progression of various lens opacities will give us a better understanding of how and when to screen for, monitor, and treat cataracts. PMID:20181327

  18. Enhancing Access to Space Science Literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigwood, D. P.

    2006-03-01

    By participating in the Name Authority Program Component and Subject Authority Cooperative Program of the Program for Cooperative Cataloging of the Library of Congress even the smallest libraries can enhance access to the space science literature.

  19. Web-Based Online Public Access Catalogues of IIT Libraries in India: An Evaluative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madhusudhan, Margam; Aggarwal, Shalini

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to examine the various features and components of web-based online public access catalogues (OPACs) of IIT libraries in India with the help of a specially designed evaluation checklist. Design/methodology/approach: The various features of the web-based OPACs in six IIT libraries (IIT Delhi, IIT Bombay, IIT…

  20. CEOS WGISS Integrated Catalog, A Catalog for Earth Observation Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enloe, Y.; Yapur, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) was formed in 1984 to coordinate the world's civil space-borne observations of the Earth. More recently, CEOS and its member agencies have committed to provide the implementation of the space-based component of the Group on Earth Observation (GEO) Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) Common Infrastructure (GCI). In the case of CEOS, there are a number of challenges in directly connecting the components and services of its member agencies to the GCI. In many cases, the existing catalog systems of the member agencies do not support the OGC Catalog Service for the Web (CSW) that has been selected as the standard for the GCI. Another challenge is related to the fact that collections of satellite data products are extremely large and constantly growing with millions of individual products. Harvesting the associated metadata into the clearinghouse of the GCI is not a practical alternative. In addition, the collection/granule hierarchy and unique spatial/temporal characteristics of satellite data and the user registration and asynchronous access requirements of the agency systems pose additional challenges. The CEOS approach has been to design and implement a CEOS WGISS Integrated Catalog (CWIC) that will serve as a community catalog of the products and services that are offered through its member's systems. CWIC will be based on a distributed search architecture and serve as a gateway between the GEO portal or community portals and clients and the CEOS agency systems. CWIC will receive standard search queries from these portals or clients all using the GEO supported catalog standard, the OGC CSW 2.0.2 and the WGISS Search Criteria for granule search and translate them into the native protocols of the underlying catalogs. Likewise, the result sets from the CEOS agency catalogs will be converted to the form that will be compatible with the portals and clients. The CWIC data provider partners include NOAA

  1. From Telecommunications to Networking: The MELVYL Online Union Catalog and the Development of Intercampus Networks at the University of California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Clifford A.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the history of the network that supports the MELVYL online union catalog, describes current technological and policy issues, and discusses the role the network plays in integrating local automation, the union catalog, access to resource databases, and other initiatives. Sidebars by Mark Needleman discuss the TCP/IP protocol suite, internet…

  2. Standards for Cataloging Nonprint Materials. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinly, William J.; And Others

    Rules and procedures for cataloging non-print media are provided in this manual of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology. The first section on cataloging rules covers all elements which should appear on the catalog card. After some comments on entries, the arrangement of catalog elements, and style, the elements of the…

  3. The very high energy source catalog at the ASI Science Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carosi, Alessandro; Lucarelli, Fabrizio; Antonelli, Lucio A.; Giommi, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    The increasing number of Very High Energy (VHE) sources discovered by the current generation of Cherenkov telescopes made particularly relevant the creation of a dedicated source catalogs as well as the cross-correlation of VHE and lower energy bands data in a multi-wavelength framework. The "TeGeV Catalog" hosted at the ASI Science Data Center (ASDC) is a catalog of VHE sources detected by ground-based Cherenkov detectors. The TeGeVcat collects all the relevant information publicly available about the observed GeV/TeV sources. The catalog contains also information about public light curves while the available spectral data are included in the ASDC SED Builder tool directly accessible from the TeGeV catalogue web page. In this contribution we will report a comprehensive description of the catalog and the related tools.

  4. EVIDENCE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGES IN THE SUBMILLIMETER DUST OPACITY

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter G.; Roy, Arabindo; Miville-Deschenes, Marc-Antoine; Bontemps, Sylvain; Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Klein, Jeff; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hughes, David H.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Olmi, Luca; Patanchon, Guillaume; and others

    2012-05-20

    The submillimeter opacity of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) in the Galactic plane has been quantified using a pixel-by-pixel correlation of images of continuum emission with a proxy for column density. We used multi-wavelength continuum data: three Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope bands at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m and one IRAS band at 100 {mu}m. The proxy is the near-infrared color excess, E(J - K{sub s}), obtained from the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Based on observations of stars, we show how well this color excess is correlated with the total hydrogen column density for regions of moderate extinction. The ratio of emission to column density, the emissivity, is then known from the correlations, as a function of frequency. The spectral distribution of this emissivity can be fit by a modified blackbody, whence the characteristic dust temperature T and the desired opacity {sigma}{sub e}(1200) at 1200 GHz or 250 {mu}m can be obtained. We have analyzed 14 regions near the Galactic plane toward the Vela molecular cloud, mostly selected to avoid regions of high column density (N{sub H} > 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}) and small enough to ensure a uniform dust temperature. We find {sigma}{sub e}(1200) is typically (2-4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -25} cm{sup 2} H{sup -1} and thus about 2-4 times larger than the average value in the local high Galactic latitude diffuse atomic ISM. This is strong evidence for grain evolution. There is a range in total power per H nucleon absorbed (and re-radiated) by the dust, reflecting changes in the strength of the interstellar radiation field and/or the dust absorption opacity. These changes in emission opacity and power affect the equilibrium T, which is typically 15 K, colder than at high latitudes. Our analysis extends, to higher opacity and lower temperature, the trend of increasing {sigma}{sub e}(1200) with decreasing T that was found at high latitudes. The recognition of changes in the emission opacity

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: c2d Spitzer final data release (DR4) (Evans+, 2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, N. J., II; Allen, L. E.; Blake, G. A.; Boogert, A. C. A.; Bourke, T.; Harvey, P. M.; Kessler, J. E.; Koerner, D. W.; Lee, C. W.; Mundy, L. G.; Myers, P. C.; Padgett, D. L.; Pontoppidan, K.; Sargent, A. I.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Young, C. H.; Young, K. E.

    2014-05-01

    This is the final delivery (DR4, Fall 2006 and Fall 2007) of the Spitzer Space Telescope "From Molecular Cores to Planet-Forming Disks" (c2d) Legacy Project. The data are also available as Enhanced Products from the Spitzer Science Center (SSC). c2d has delivered 867 catalogs. IRSA has merged these delivered catalogs into four groups - Clouds, Off-Cloud, Cores, Stars - and serves them through the general catalog search engine Gator. Many of the delivered catalogs, images and spectra are accessible through IRSA's general search service, Atlas. As a service to its users, the CDS has downloaded a dataset containing most of the c2d data (but not all columns) from the IRSA archive. The individual catalogs are listed below: C2D Fall '07 Full CLOUDS Catalog (CHA_II, LUP, OPH, PER, SER) C2D Fall '07 High Reliability (HREL) CLOUDS Catalog (CHA_II, LUP, OPH, PER, SER) C2D Fall '07 candidate Young Stellar Objects (YSO) CLOUDS Catalog (CHA_II, LUP, OPH, PER, SER) C2D Fall '07 Full OFF-CLOUD Catalog (CHA_II, LUP, OPH, PER, SER) C2D Fall '07 candidate Young Stellar Objects (YSO) OFF-CLOUD Catalog (CHA_II, LUP, OPH, PER, SER) C2D Fall '07 Full CORES Catalog C2D Fall '07 candidate Young Stellar Objects (YSO) CORES Catalog C2D Fall '07 Full STARS Catalog C2D Fall '07 candidate Young Stellar Objects (YSO) STARS Catalog These tables have been merged into a single table at CDS. All three SIRTF instruments (Infrared Array Camera [IRAC], Multiband Imaging Photometer for SIRTF [MIPS], and Infrared Spectrograph [IRS]) were used to observe sources that span the evolutionary sequence from molecular cores to protoplanetary disks, encompassing a wide range of cloud masses, stellar masses, and star-forming environments. (1 data file).

  6. NASA Video Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This issue of the NASA Video Catalog cites video productions listed in the NASA STI database. The videos listed have been developed by the NASA centers, covering Shuttle mission press conferences; fly-bys of planets; aircraft design, testing and performance; environmental pollution; lunar and planetary exploration; and many other categories related to manned and unmanned space exploration. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied by an abstract. The Table of Contents shows how the entries are arranged by divisions and categories according to the NASA Scope and Subject Category Guide. For users with specific information, a Title Index is available. A Subject Term Index, based on the NASA Thesaurus, is also included. Guidelines for usage of NASA audio/visual material, ordering information, and order forms are also available.

  7. Cosmic Dust Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, J.; Watts, L.; Thomas-Keprta, K.; Wentworth, S.; Dodson, A.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1997-07-01

    Since May 1981, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has used aircraft to collect cosmic dust (CD) particles from Earth's stratosphere. Specially designed dust collectors are prepared for flight and processed after flight in an ultraclean (Class-100) laboratory constructed for this purpose at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas. Particles are individually retrieved from the collectors, examined and cataloged, and then made available to the scientific community for research. Cosmic dust thereby joins lunar samples and meteorites as an additional source of extraterrestrial materials for scientific study. This catalog summarizes preliminary observations on 468 particles retrieved from collection surfaces L2021 and L2036. These surfaces were flat plate Large Area Collectors (with a 300 cm2 surface area each) which was coated with silicone oil (dimethyl siloxane) and then flown aboard a NASA ER-2 aircraft during a series of flights that were made during January and February of 1994 (L2021) and June 7 through July 5 of 1994 (L2036). Collector L2021 was flown across the entire southern margin of the US (California to Florida), and collector L2036 was flown from California to Wallops Island, VA and on to New England. These collectors were installed in a specially constructed wing pylon which ensured that the necessary level of cleanliness was maintained between periods of active sampling. During successive periods of high altitude (20 km) cruise, the collectors were exposed in the stratosphere by barometric controls and then retracted into sealed storage container-s prior to descent. In this manner, a total of 35.8 hours of stratospheric exposure was accumulated for collector L2021, and 26 hours for collector L2036.

  8. Design of Initial Opacity Platform at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeter, R. F.; Ahmed, M. F.; Ayers, S. L.; Emig, J. A.; Iglesias, C. A.; Liedahl, D. A.; Schneider, M. B.; Wilson, B. G.; Huffman, E. J.; King, J. A.; Opachich, Y. P.; Ross, P. W.; Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A.; Craxton, R. S.; Garcia, E. M.; McKenty, P. W.; Zhang, R.; Cardenas, T.; Devolder, B. G.; Dodd, E. S.; Kline, J. L.; Sherrill, M. E.; Perry, T. S.

    2016-10-01

    The absorption and re-emission of x-rays by partly stripped ions plays a critical role in stars and in many laboratory plasmas. A NIF Opacity Platform has been designed to resolve a persistent disagreement between theory and experiments on the Sandia Z facility, studying iron in conditions closely related to the solar radiation-convection transition boundary. A laser heated hohlraum ``oven'' will produce iron plasmas at temperatures >150 eV and electron densities >=7x1021/cm3, and be probed with continuum X-rays from a capsule implosion backlighter source. The resulting X-ray transmission spectra will be recorded on a specially designed Opacity Spectrometer. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Metal opacities and convective core overshooting in Population I stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.; Chin, Chao-Wen

    1991-01-01

    New stellar opacities computed by Rogers and Iglesias are found to lead to revised evolutionary models for stars of intermediate-to-high mass that show remarkably close agreement with observed stars, under otherwise standard physical assumptions. Most or all of the earlier discrepancies, except for the problem of predicted apsidal motion constants that are perhaps still too large, appear to have been resolved by using these new opacities with their increased metal line contribution. Thus, the implied interior metallicity of massive stars in the solar neighborhood now becomes 'normal'. Furthermore, the effective distance of convective overshooting beyond the classical convective core boundary is confirmed to be small and probably less than 0.2 times the local pressure scale height.

  10. Model-independent constraints on the cosmic opacity

    SciTech Connect

    Holanda, R.F.L.; Carvalho, J.C.; Alcaniz, J.S. E-mail: carvalho@dfte.ufrn.br

    2013-04-01

    We use current measurements of the expansion rate H(z) and cosmic background radiation bounds on the spatial curvature of the Universe to impose cosmological model-independent constraints on cosmic opacity. To perform our analyses, we compare opacity-free distance modulus from H(z) data with those from two type Ia supernovae compilations, namely, the Union2.1 plus the most distant spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia (SCP-0401 at z = 1.713) and two Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) subsamples. We find that a completely transparent universe is in full agreement with the Union 2.1 + SNe Ia SCP-0401 sample. For the SDSS compilations, such universe is compatible with observations at < 1.5σ level regardless the SNe Ia light-curve fitting used.

  11. Atmospheric opacity at 2 - 48 GHz using radiosonde measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehto, H. J.

    Two sets of equations for calculating the atmospheric opacity in the frequency range 2 - 48 GHz are given. The first set of equations is based on ground observations of meteorological parameters and direct measurements of tropospheric conditions obtained from balloon soundings, which are made two to four times a day around the world. The total estimated error of this method is ±10% under good conditions. If strong weather fronts or high mountains occur between the observatory and the sounding station extra caution should be taken. The second, less accurate set of equations is used when no sounding data is available. In this case the atmosphere is assumed to have exponential distributions in pressure, absolute temperature and dew point. The estimated formal error of this method is ±20%. The author also gives instructions to decode the WMO RAOB-RAWIN radiosonde code, so that the opacity may be calculated in real time.

  12. FTS Measurements of Submillimeter-Wave Atmospheric Opacity at Pampa la Bola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Akihiro; Matsushita, Satoki

    1998-06-01

    The first measurements of submillimeter-wave atmospheric opacity spectra at the Pampa la Bola site (Northern Chile, Atacama, 4800 m altitude) have been performed during the winter season using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). Atmospheric emission spectra, as a function of airmass, were measured under various weather conditions. Atmospheric opacity was evaluated from sky temperature at the zenith as well as from tipping measurements, which are independent measures but give consistent results. Correlation diagrams between 220 GHz and 345 GHz, 410 GHz, 492 GHz, 675 GHz, 691 GHz, 809 GHz, 875 GHz are shown. Correlations between millimeter-wave and submillimeter-wave opacities get worse when 220 GHz opacity is larger than 0.1. Deviations from the opacity correlation at each frequency show good correlations themselves, but have different relative variations at each frequency. This indicates that atmospheric transparency cannot be characterized only by millimeter-wave opacity, but requires simultaneous opacity measurements at millimeter and submillimeter-wavelengths.

  13. Controlled opacity in a class of nonlinear dielectric media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittencourt, E.; Camargo, G. H. S.; De Lorenci, V. A.; Klippert, R.

    2017-03-01

    Motivated by new technologies for designing and tailoring metamaterials, we seek properties for certain classes of nonlinear optical materials that allow room for a reversibly controlled opacity-to-transparency phase transition through the application of external electromagnetic fields. We examine some mathematically simple models for the dielectric parameters of the medium and compute the relevant geometric quantities that describe the speed and polarization of light rays.

  14. Chlorpromazine-induced skin pigmentation with corneal and lens opacities.

    PubMed

    Huff, Laura S; Prado, Renata; Pederson, Jon F; Dunnick, Cory A; Lucas, Lisa M

    2014-05-01

    Chlorpromazine is known to cause abnormal oculocutaneous pigmentation in sun-exposed areas. We present the case of a psychiatric patient who developed blue-gray pigmentation of the skin as well as corneal and lens opacities following 7 years of chlorpromazine treatment. Ten months after discontinuation of chlorpromazine, the skin discoloration and anterior lens deposits showed partial improvement, but the corneal deposits remained unchanged. A review of the literature on the reversibility of chlorpromazine-induced abnormal oculocutaneous pigmentation also is provided.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CANDELS multiwavelength catalog (Galametz+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galametz, A.; Grazian, A.; Fontana, A.; Ferguson, H. C.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Barro, G.; Castellano, M.; Dahlen, T.; Donley, J. L.; Faber, S. M.; Grogin, N.; Guo, Y.; Huang, K.-H.; Kocevski, D. D.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Lee, K.-S.; McGrath, E. J.; Peth, M.; Willner, S. P.; Almaini, O.; Cooper, M.; Cooray, A.; Conselice, C. J.; Dickinson, M.; Dunlop, J. S.; Fazio, G. G.; Foucaud, S.; Gardner, J. P.; Giavalisco, M.; Hathi, N. P.; Hartley, W. G.; Koo, D. C.; Lai, K.; de Mello, D. F.; McLure, R. J.; Lucas, R. A.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.; Santini, P.; Simpson, C.; Sommariva, V.; Targett, T.; Weiner, B. J.; Wuyts, S.; CANDELS Team

    2013-06-01

    The present multiwavelength catalog is based on public data in the CANDELS UDS field (J2000 position: 02:17:37.5-05:12:00) located within the original UDS field. It includes: * CANDELS HST/ACS (F606W, F814W) and HST/WFC3 (F125W, F160W); Grogin et al. 2011ApJS..197...35G, Koekemoer et al. 2011ApJS..197...36K. * CFHT U-band (UKIDSS; Almaini et al. in prep.), * SUBARU B, V, Rc, i', z' (SXDS; Furusawa et al. 2008, Cat. J/ApJS/176/1) * VLT/HAWK-I Y and Ks bands (HUGS; Fontana et al. in prep.) * UKIRT/WFCam J, H, K (UKIDSS DR8; Almaini et al. in prep.) * Spitzer/IRAC SEDS 3.6 and 4.5um (SEDS; Ashby et al. 2013ApJ...769...80A) * Spitzer/IRAC SpUDS 5.8, 8.0um (PI: J. Dunlop). The catalog is F160W-selected and contains 35932 sources over an area of 201.7 square arcmin and includes radio and X-ray detected sources and spectroscopic redshifts available for 210 sources. The full official CANDELS UDS catalog (which contains some extra columns including additional SExtractor parameters derived from the F160W image) can be found on the CANDELS website at: http://candels.ucolick.org/data_access/UDS.html (1 data file).

  16. The EOSTA model for opacities and EOS calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barshalom, Avraham; Oreg, Joseph

    2007-11-01

    The EOSTA model developed recently combines the STA and INFERNO models to calculate opacities and EOS on the same footing. The quantum treatment of the plasma continuum and the inclusion of the resulted shape resonances yield a smooth behavior of the EOS and opacity global quantities vs density and temperature. We will describe the combined model and focus on its latest improvements. In particular we have extended the use of the special representation of the relativistic virial theorem to obtain an exact differential equation for the free energy. This equation, combined with a boundary condition at the zero pressure point, serves to advance the LDA EOS results significantly. The method focuses on applicability to high temperature and high density plasmas, warm dens matter etc. but applies at low temperatures as well treating fluids and even solids. Excellent agreement is obtained with experiments covering a wide range of density and temperature. The code is now used to create EOS and opacity databases for the use of hydro-dynamical simulations.

  17. Venus cloud properties: Infrared opacity and mass mixing ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samuelson, R. E.; Hanel, R. A.; Herath, L. W.; Kunde, V. G.; Maguire, W. C.

    1974-01-01

    By using the Mariner 5 temperature profile and a homogeneous cloud model, and assuming that CO2 and cloud particles are the only opacity sources, the wavelength dependence of the Venus cloud opacity is inferred from the infrared spectrum of the planet between 450 and 1250/cm. Justification for applying the homogeneous cloud model is found in the fact that numerous polarization and infrared data are mutually consistent within the framework of such a model; on the other hand, dense cloud models are not satisfactory. Volume extinction coefficients varying from 0.000005 to 0.000015/cm depending on the wavelength, are determined at the tropopause level of 6110 km. By using all available data, a cloud mass mixing ratio of approximately 0.000005 and a particle concentration of about 900 particles per cu cm at this level are also inferred. The derived cloud opacity compares favorably with that expected for a haze of droplets of a 75% aqueous solution of sulfuric acid.

  18. Water Resources Division training catalog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hotchkiss, W.R.; Foxhoven, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    The National Training Center provides technical and management sessions nesessary for the conductance of the U.S. Geological Survey 's training programs. This catalog describes the facilities and staff at the Lakewood Training Center and describes Water Resources Division training courses available through the center. In addition, the catalog describes the procedures for gaining admission, formulas for calculating fees, and discussion of course evaluations. (USGS)

  19. Lunar soils grain size catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, John C.

    1993-01-01

    This catalog compiles every available grain size distribution for Apollo surface soils, trench samples, cores, and Luna 24 soils. Original laboratory data are tabled, and cumulative weight distribution curves and histograms are plotted. Standard statistical parameters are calculated using the method of moments. Photos and location comments describe the sample environment and geological setting. This catalog can help researchers describe the geotechnical conditions and site variability of the lunar surface essential to the design of a lunar base.

  20. Effective Tree Scattering and Opacity at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurum, Mehmet; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Lang, Roger H.; Joseph, Alicia T.; Cosh, Michael H.; Jackson, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates vegetation effects at L-band by using a first-order radiative transfer (RT) model and truck-based microwave measurements over natural conifer stands to assess the applicability of the tau-omega) model over trees. The tau-omega model is a zero-order RT solution that accounts for vegetation effects with effective vegetation parameters (vegetation opacity and single-scattering albedo), which represent the canopy as a whole. This approach inherently ignores multiple-scattering effects and, therefore, has a limited validity depending on the level of scattering within the canopy. The fact that the scattering from large forest components such as branches and trunks is significant at L-band requires that zero-order vegetation parameters be evaluated (compared) along with their theoretical definitions to provide a better understanding of these parameters in the retrieval algorithms as applied to trees. This paper compares the effective vegetation opacities, computed from multi-angular pine tree brightness temperature data, against the results of two independent approaches that provide theoretical and measured optical depths. These two techniques are based on forward scattering theory and radar corner reflector measurements, respectively. The results indicate that the effective vegetation opacity values are smaller than but of similar magnitude to both radar and theoretical estimates. The effective opacity of the zero-order model is thus set equal to the theoretical opacity and an explicit expression for the effective albedo is then obtained from the zero- and first- order RT model comparison. The resultant albedo is found to have a similar magnitude as the effective albedo value obtained from brightness temperature measurements. However, it is less than half of that estimated using the theoretical calculations (0.5 - 0.6 for tree canopies at L-band). This lower observed albedo balances the scattering darkening effect of the large theoretical albedo

  1. Astronomical catalog desk reference, 1994 edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Astronomical Catalog Desk Reference is designed to aid astronomers in locating machine readable catalogs in the Astronomical Data Center (ADC) archives. The key reference components of this document are as follows: A listing of shortened titles for all catalogs available from the ADC (includes the name of the lead author and year of publication), brief descriptions of over 300 astronomical catalogs, an index of ADC catalog numbers by subject keyword, and an index of ADC catalog numbers by author. The heart of this document is the set of brief descriptions generated by the ADC staff. The 1994 edition of the Astronomical Catalog Desk Reference contains descriptions for over one third of the catalogs in the ADC archives. Readers are encouraged to refer to this section for concise summaries of those catalogs and their contents.

  2. Comparison of Services for the Monthly Catalog of United States Government Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernon, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Compares five services that offer mediated access to the Monthly Catalog of United States Government Publications--Auto-Graphics, Brodart, Information Access (two services), and LSSI--on 14 points ranging from basic cost and type of media (microfiche, microfilm, laser optical disk, optical disk) to special features or enhancements. (CLB)

  3. Small satellite debris catalog maintenance issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Phoebe A.

    1991-01-01

    The United States Space Command (USSPACECOM) is a unified command of the Department of Defense, and one of its tasks is to detect, track, identify, and maintain a catalog of all man-made objects in Earth orbit. This task is called space surveillance, and the most important tool for space surveillance is the satellite catalog. The command's reasons for performing satellite catalog maintenance is presented. A satellite catalog is described, and small satellite-debris catalog-maintenance issues are identified. The underlying rationale is to describe the catalog maintenance services so that the members of the community can use them with assurance.

  4. Improving Data Catalogs with Free and Open Source Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, R.; Hankin, S.; O'Brien, K.

    2013-12-01

    The Global Earth Observation Integrated Data Environment (GEO-IDE) is NOAA's effort to successfully integrate data and information with partners in the national US-Global Earth Observation System (US-GEO) and the international Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). As part of the GEO-IDE, the Unified Access Framework (UAF) is working to build momentum towards the goal of increased data integration and interoperability. The UAF project is moving towards this goal with an approach that includes leveraging well known and widely used standards, as well as free and open source software. The UAF project shares the widely held conviction that the use of data standards is a key ingredient necessary to achieve interoperability. Many community-based consensus standards fail, though, due to poor compliance. Compliance problems emerge for many reasons: because the standards evolve through versions, because documentation is ambiguous or because individual data providers find the standard inadequate as-is to meet their special needs. In addition, minimalist use of standards will lead to a compliant service, but one which is of low quality. In this presentation, we will be discussing the UAF effort to build a catalog cleaning tool which is designed to crawl THREDDS catalogs, analyze the data available, and then build a 'clean' catalog of data which is standards compliant and has a uniform set of data access services available. These data services include, among others, OPeNDAP, Web Coverage Service (WCS) and Web Mapping Service (WMS). We will also discuss how we are utilizing free and open source software and services to both crawl, analyze and build the clean data catalog, as well as our efforts to help data providers improve their data catalogs. We'll discuss the use of open source software such as DataNucleus, Thematic Realtime Environmental Distributed Data Services (THREDDS), ncISO and the netCDF Java Common Data Model (CDM). We'll also demonstrate how we are

  5. The Kepler Input Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, D. W.; Brown, T. M.; Monet, D. G.; Everett, M.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Hergenrother, C. W.

    2005-12-01

    The Kepler mission will monitor 170,000 planet-search targets during the first year, and 100,000 after that. The Kepler Input Catalog (KIC) will be used to select optimum targets for the search for habitable earth-like transiting planets. The KIC will include all known catalogued stars in an area of about 177 square degrees centered at RA 19:22:40 and Dec +44:30 (l=76.3 and b=+13.5). 2MASS photometry will be supplemented with new ground-based photometry obtained in the SDSS g, r, i, and z bands plus a custom filter centered on the Mg b lines, using KeplerCam on the 48-inch telescope at the Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins, Arizona. The photometry will be used to estimate stellar characteristics for all stars brighter than K 14.5 mag. The KIC will include effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, reddening, distance, and radius estimates for these stars. The CCD images are pipeline processed to produce instrumental magnitudes at PSI. The photometry is then archived and transformed to the SDSS system at HAO, where the astrophysical analysis of the stellar characteristics is carried out. The results are then merged with catalogued data at the USNOFS to produce the KIC. High dispersion spectroscopy with Hectochelle on the MMT will be used to supplement the information for many of the most interesting targets. The KIC will be released before launch for use by the astronomical community and will be available for queries over the internet. Support from the Kepler mission is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. The RBV metadata catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andre, Francois; Fleury, Laurence; Gaillardet, Jerome; Nord, Guillaume

    2015-04-01

    RBV (Réseau des Bassins Versants) is a French initiative to consolidate the national efforts made by more than 15 elementary observatories funded by various research institutions (CNRS, INRA, IRD, IRSTEA, Universities) that study river and drainage basins. The RBV Metadata Catalogue aims at giving an unified vision of the work produced by every observatory to both the members of the RBV network and any external person interested by this domain of research. Another goal is to share this information with other existing metadata portals. Metadata management is heterogeneous among observatories ranging from absence to mature harvestable catalogues. Here, we would like to explain the strategy used to design a state of the art catalogue facing this situation. Main features are as follows : - Multiple input methods: Metadata records in the catalog can either be entered with the graphical user interface, harvested from an existing catalogue or imported from information system through simplified web services. - Hierarchical levels: Metadata records may describe either an observatory, one of its experimental site or a single dataset produced by one instrument. - Multilingualism: Metadata can be easily entered in several configurable languages. - Compliance to standards : the backoffice part of the catalogue is based on a CSW metadata server (Geosource) which ensures ISO19115 compatibility and the ability of being harvested (globally or partially). On going tasks focus on the use of SKOS thesaurus and SensorML description of the sensors. - Ergonomy : The user interface is built with the GWT Framework to offer a rich client application with a fully ajaxified navigation. - Source code sharing : The work has led to the development of reusable components which can be used to quickly create new metadata forms in other GWT applications You can visit the catalogue (http://portailrbv.sedoo.fr/) or contact us by email rbv@sedoo.fr.

  7. Solar-terrestrial data access distribution and archiving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    It is recommended that a central data catalog and data access network (CDC/DAN) for solar-terrestrial research be established, initially as a NASA pilot program. The system is envisioned to be flexible and to evolve as funds permit, starting from a catalog to an access network for high-resolution data. The report describes the various functional requirements for the CDC/DAN, but does not specify the hardware and software architectures as these are constantly evolving. The importance of a steering committee, working with the CDC/DAN organization, to provide scientific guidelines for the data catalog and for data storage, access, and distribution is also stressed.

  8. DISPERSION ANALYSIS OF RADIATION/THERMAL FRONTS WITH FULL RESOLVED SPECTRAL OPACITY VARIATION.

    SciTech Connect

    L. AUER; R. LOWRIE

    2000-12-01

    The radiation transport and linearized thermal energy equations have been analyzed to find the temporal dependence of the component modes in a radiation/thermal front. The fully resolved spectral variation of the opacity as a function of energy, as well as the exact time and angular dependence, is treated in this work. As we are able to study arbitrarily complicated opacity spectra, we stress the importance of the new results as a check on the effect of using opacity averages.

  9. Re-examination of Stellar Interior Opacities and the Solar Abundances Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Anil Kumar; Nahar, S. N.; Pinsonneault, M.; Bailey, J. E.

    2011-01-01

    New solar abundances (Asplund etal., ARAA, 47, 522, 2009) are widely discordant with the 'standard' abundances. It has been suggested that a marginal, but significant, enahancement in stellar interior opacities might resolve the issue, which otherwise results in discrepancies of up to 50% in light elements such as C, N, O and Ne. We report on theoretical and experimental investigations of stellar interior opacities in general, and the the solar radiative/convection zone boundary in particular. We especially examine the atomic physics employed in existing opacities calculations, such as the Opacity Project and OPAL, and find that fundamental processes may not have been accounted for accurately; to wit: the assumption that autoionizing resonances can be treated as lines. It is well known that inner-shell electronic transitions in complex atomic species, such as Iron, account for most of the opacity. But they generally lie in the bound-free continuum and should be resolved as freqency dependent resonance profiles in photoionization cross sections, rather than considered as bound-bound transitions in opacities calculations. Recent work shows that there may be sufficient and significant uncertainty in current opacities, at least at the level of 10% in Rosseland Mean Opacities, to address if not resolve the solar abundances problem, given the inverse correlation between opacities and abundances. Simultaneously with our theoretical investigation, there is a major experimental effort to measure monochromatic opaciites for the first time in stellar interior conditions. The inertial confinement fusion Z-pinch facility at the Sandia National Laboratory is now capable of producing plasmas at conditions prevalent at the boundary of the convection zone (BCZ) in the Sun. Preliminary measurements of monochromatic opacity of iron ions, the primary determinant of effective opacity, differ from theoretical models. We present first results from a new high-precision opacities code

  10. Searching the SOHO online catalogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, William; Yurow, Ron

    1994-01-01

    The SOHO on-line catalogs will contain information about the observations from several made or planned campaigns, that must be available to scientists who wish to use SOHO data. The World Wide Web (WWW) was chosen as the interface to the SOHO on-line catalogs, because it is easy to use, well suited to a geographically distributed user community, and freely available. Through the use of a forms-capable WWW client such as Mosaic or Lynx, a scientist will be able to browse through the catalogs of observations in a very simple, self explanatory way. Data files can then be selected from the returned lists for either immediate transferring or sending on tape by mail, with appropriate checks for whether data is in the public domain or not.

  11. Additional atmospheric opacity measurements at lambda = 1.1 mm from Mauna Kea Observatory, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, A.; De Zafra, R. L.; Barrett, J. W.; Solomon, P.; Connor, B.

    1987-01-01

    Atmospheric opacity values in the zenith direction are given for a wavelength of 1.1 mm (278 GHz) at the summit of Mauna Kea in the Hawaiian Islands. A total of 75 days is covered during the period 1983-1986. Observations were made on a quasi-continuous basis, with opacity measured every 20 minutes around the clock for significant periods of time. A conversion from opacity at lambda = 1.1 mm to the equivalent precipitable water vapor column is given from the measurements of Zammit and Ade (1981), from which opacities at other wavelengths may be derived.

  12. Wider pulsation instability regions for β Cephei and SPB stars calculated using new Los Alamos opacities

    DOE PAGES

    Walczak, Przemysław; Fontes, Christopher John; Colgan, James Patrick; ...

    2015-08-13

    Here, our goal is to test the newly developed OPLIB opacity tables from Los Alamos National Laboratory and check their influence on the pulsation properties of B-type stars. We calculated models using MESA and Dziembowski codes for stellar evolution and linear, nonadiabatic pulsations, respectively. We derived the instability domains of β Cephei and SPB-types for different opacity tables OPLIB, OP, and OPAL. As a result, the new OPLIB opacities have the highest Rosseland mean opacity coefficient near the so-called Z-bump. Therefore, the OPLIB instability domains are wider than in the case of OP and OPAL data.

  13. Verification of smoke plume opacity model on a TI-59 calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowen, Stanton J.; Ensor, David S.; Sparks, Leslie E.

    A smoke plume opacity model previously developed by the authors for a programmable calculator was tested with laboratory and field data. This model is based on Mie theory calculation of light scattering of small spherical particles. This model has been tested with two data sets; the first data set includes emissions from a laboratory-scale electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and the second data set originates from a study on a high efficiency ESP downstream of a pulverized coal-fired 520 MW boiler. The predicted opacity agreed well with measured opacity. The model predicts opacity within the accuracy of the input measurements, approximately 25 per cent.

  14. Detailed Opacity Comparison for an Improved Stellar Modeling of the Envelopes of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turck-Chièze, S.; Le Pennec, M.; Ducret, J. E.; Colgan, J.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Fontes, C. J.; Magee, N.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    Seismic observations have led to doubts or ambiguities concerning the opacity calculations used in stellar physics. Here, we concentrate on the iron-group opacity peak, due to iron, nickel, and chromium, located around T = 200,000 K for densities from {10}-8 {to} {10}-4 {{g}} {{cm}}-3, which creates some convective layers in stellar radiative envelopes for masses between 3 and 18 {M}⊙ . These conditions were extensively studied in the 1980s. More recently, inconsistencies between OP and OPAL opacity calculations have complicated the interpretation of seismic observations as the iron-group opacity peak excites acoustic and gravity modes in SPB, β Cephei, and sdB stars. We investigate the reliability of the theoretical opacity calculations using the modern opacity codes ATOMIC and SCO-RCG. We show their temperature and density dependence for conditions that are achievable in the laboratory and equivalent to astrophysical conditions. We also compare new theoretical opacity spectra with OP spectra and quantify how different approximations impact the Rosseland mean calculations.This detailed study estimates new ATOMIC and SCO-RCG Rosseland mean values for astrophysical conditions which we compare to OP values. Some puzzling questions are still under investigation for iron, but we find a strong increase in the Rosseland mean nickel opacity of a factor between 2 and 6 compared to OP. This appears to be due to the use of extrapolated atomic data for the Ni opacity within the OP calculations. A study on chromium is also shown.

  15. The Integrated Library: Encouraging Access to Multimedia Materials. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weihs, Jean

    This guide argues that cataloging rules for all materials, both book and nonbook, should be based on the same principles so that all catalog records can be in one file. The guidance in this book applies to collections that are directly accessible to the public where archival conservation plays little role. It is written for libraries that…

  16. Computer Software Cataloging: Techniques and Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzberlein, Deanne

    1986-01-01

    Examples of catalog entries for microcomputer software data files are given in three sections: educational software (elementary and secondary level, college level); educational game software; business-related software. Catalog record elements, simplification methods for cataloging of machine-readable data files, and future considerations are…

  17. Cooperative Catalog Conversion Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peat, Marwick, Mitchell and Co., Washington, DC.

    Cost estimates provided by cataloging vendors during January 1981 are analyzed to identify the costs of catalog conversion options and alternatives to the card catalog for six Minnesota regional library systems. Following an executive summary of the study is a discussion of its background, scope, objectives, data gathering methodology, and…

  18. Iranian National Union Catalog Description and Regulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, John F.

    This outline of how to establish and maintain an Asian national union catalog contains basic instruction for the staff and for the participating libraries of one of West Asia's largest union catalogs. It has been prepared to: (1) define and clarify the purposes of the Iranian National Union Catalog; (2) explain the policies and procedures under…

  19. CORC--Cooperative Online Resource Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickey, Thomas B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes OCLC's CORC (Cooperative Online Resource Catalog) that is being developed to explore the cooperative creation of a catalog of Internet resources that will support both MARC and less formal metadata. Explains the catalog design which will allow dynamic generation of Web pages with resources for integration with libraries' portal pages.…

  20. Notes for Serials Cataloging. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geer, Beverley, Ed.; Caraway, Beatrice L., Ed.

    Notes are indispensable to serials cataloging. Researchers, reference librarians, and catalogers regularly use notes on catalog records and, as the audience for these notes has expanded from the local library community to the global Internet community, the need for notes to be cogent, clear, and useful is greater than ever. This book is a…

  1. Standards for Cataloging Nonprint Materials. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinly, William J.; And Others

    Rules for cataloging non-print media are presented. The publication is devoted exclusively to cataloging standards since coding of many non-print media is included in the Library of Congress MARC system. All elements which should appear on the cataloging card are identified; the elements of the description are described with the MARC format in…

  2. Viking orbiter stereo imaging catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blasius, K. R.; Vetrone, A. V.; Martin, M. D.

    1980-01-01

    The extremely long missions of the two Viking Orbiter spacecraft produced a wealth of photos of surface features. Many of which can be used to form stereo images allowing the earth-bound student of Mars to examine the subject in 3-D. This catalog is a technical guide to the use of stereo coverage within the complex Viking imaging data set. Since that data set is still growing (January, 1980, about 3 1/2 years after the mission began), a second edition of this catalog is planned with completion expected about November, 1980.

  3. Iron Opacity Platform Performance Characterization at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opachich, Y. P.; Ross, P. W.; Heeter, R. F.; Barrios, M. A.; Liedahl, D. A.; May, M. J.; Schneider, M. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Garcia, E. M.; McKenty, P. W.; Zhang, R.; Weaver, J. L.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.; Perry, T. S.; Los Alamos National Laboratory Collaboration; Naval Research Laboratory Collaboration; University of Rochester LaboratoryLaser Energetics Collaboration; Lawrence Livermore National Lab Collaboration; National Security Technologies, LLC Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    A high temperature opacity platform has been fielded at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The platform will be used to study opacity in iron at a temperature of 160 eV. The platform uses a 6 mm diameter hohlraum driven by 128 laser beams with 530 kJ of energy in a 3 ns pulse to heat an iron sample. Absorption spectra of the heated sample are generated with a broadband pulsed X-ray backlighter produced by imploding a vacuum-filled CH shell. The shell is 2 mm in diameter and 20 microns thick, driven by 64 beams with 250 kJ in a 2.5 ns pulse. The hohlraum and backlighter performance have both been investigated recently and will be discussed in this presentation. This work was performed by National Security Technologies, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy. DOE/NV/25946-2892.

  4. Transient asymptomatic pulmonary opacities occurring during osimertinib treatment

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, Sinead A.; Sachs, Peter B.; Camidge, D. Ross

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Osimertinib is an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Inhibitor licensed for the treatment of EGFR mutant, T790M positive, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Previously unreported, common, transient asymptomatic pulmonary opacities (TAPOs) were noted at the University of Colorado in patients during osimertinib therapy. Methods CT imaging and clinical notes of NSCLC patients treated at the University of Colorado with osimertinib were retrospectively reviewed. Results Seven of twenty patients (35%), developed TAPOs while on osimertinib. The radiological patterns seen included ground-glass opacities with/without nodular consolidation. The median time to first lesion development was 8.7 weeks (range: 1.6 – 43 weeks) and 6 weeks (range: 1 – 11 weeks) to resolution during continued osimertinib. Conclusions TAPOs may be a previously unrecognized, benign feature associated with osimertinib therapy, which may be mistaken for isolated pulmonary progression or the beginning of more severe pneumonitis. If new onset pulmonary lesions, especially those associated with ground-glass appearances, are asymptomatic, localized and there is no evidence of disease progression elsewhere it may be reasonable to continue treatment with osimertinib and monitor these lesions for resolution. PMID:27618759

  5. Light element opacities of astrophysical interest from ATOMIC

    SciTech Connect

    Colgan, J.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Magee, N. H. Jr.; Armstrong, G. S. J.; Abdallah, J. Jr.; Sherrill, M. E.; Fontes, C. J.; Zhang, H. L.; Hakel, P.

    2013-07-11

    We present new calculations of local-thermodynamic-equilibrium (LTE) light element opacities from the Los Alamos ATOMIC code for systems of astrophysical interest. ATOMIC is a multi-purpose code that can generate LTE or non-LTE quantities of interest at various levels of approximation. Our calculations, which include fine-structure detail, represent a systematic improvement over previous Los Alamos opacity calculations using the LEDCOP legacy code. The ATOMIC code uses ab-initio atomic structure data computed from the CATS code, which is based on Cowan's atomic structure codes, and photoionization cross section data computed from the Los Alamos ionization code GIPPER. ATOMIC also incorporates a new equation-of-state (EOS) model based on the chemical picture. ATOMIC incorporates some physics packages from LEDCOP and also includes additional physical processes, such as improved free-free cross sections and additional scattering mechanisms. Our new calculations are made for elements of astrophysical interest and for a wide range of temperatures and densities.

  6. TIPTOPbase: the Iron Project and the Opacity Project Atomic Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Claudio; Nahar, Sultana; Pradhan, Anil; Seaton, Micheal; Zeippen, Claude

    2001-05-01

    The Opacity Project, the IRON Project, and the RmaX Network (The Opacity Project Team, Vol.1,2), IOPP, Bristol (1995,1996); Hummer et al., Astron. Astrophys. 279, 298 (1993) are international computational efforts concerned with the production of high quality atomic data for astrophysical applications. Research groups from Canada, France, Germany, UK, USA and Venezuela are involved. Extensive data sets containing accurate energy levels, f-values, A-values, photoionisation cross sections, collision strengths, recombination rates, and opacitites have been computed for cosmically abundant elements using state-of-the-art atomic physics codes. Their volume, completeness and overall accuracy are presently unmatched in the field of laboratory astrophysics. Some of the data sets have been available since 1993 from a public on-line database service referred to as TOPbase (Cunto et al Astron. Astrophys. 275), L5 (1993), ( http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/OP.html at CDS France, and http://heasarc.gsfc.nasa.gov/topbase, at NSAS USA). We are currently involved in a major effort to scale the existing database services to develop a robust platform for the high-profile dissemination of atomic data to the scientific community within the next 12 months. (Partial support from the NSF and NASA is acknowledged.)

  7. Modernizing the Harvard Observatory Catalog of Variable Stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Zachary; Kruk, Julia; Christie-Dervaux, Lucien; Chen, Dong Yi; Graur, Or; Pagnotta, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    We have modernized the Harvard College Observatory's catalog of variable stars in the Magellanic Clouds, compiled by Henrietta Swan Leavitt in 1908 and expanded by Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin in 1966 and 1971. This catalog was originally used by Leavitt in 1912 to formulate the period-luminosity relation for Cepheid variable stars, one of the most important rungs on the extragalactic distance ladder. Many of the stars were identified in current catalogs by only their Harvard Variable number, without coordinates or magnitudes. We have digitized the variable-star catalog and converted the coordinates of the 2,184 variable stars from the Harvard College Observatory's now-defunct planar-grid system to the spherical Equatorial coordinate system. Our modernized version of the catalog will allow for more efficient use of the Harvard archival plates currently being scanned by the Digital Access to a Sky Century @ Harvard (DASCH) project. The combination of DASCH and our catalog allows users to readily access more than a century's worth of data on the variable stars in the Magellanic Clouds, leading to such projects as studying the long-term evolution of variable stars.

  8. Catalog It! A Guide to Cataloging School Library Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Allison G.; Riedling, Ann Marlow

    This book is designed for courses that prepare college and university students for undergraduate or graduate degrees in school library media. Its objectives are to present the theory and practice of cataloging and classification in the school library environment. The manual is divided into eight chapters. Chapter 1: A Brief History of Cataloging…

  9. Enhancing Subject Access in Online Systems: The Year's Work in Subject Analysis, 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Arlene G.

    1992-01-01

    Review of the 1991 literature on subject access in online systems discusses users and subject searching; subject access in online catalogs, including improvement of the database, search processing, the user interface, and user understanding; subject cataloging and indexing; information retrieval; thesaurus and indexing approaches; classification;…

  10. Second Line of Defense Master Spares Catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Dale L.; Muller, George; Mercier, Theresa M.; Brigantic, Robert T.; Perkins, Casey J.; Cooley, Scott K.

    2012-11-20

    This catalog is intended to be a comprehensive listing of repair parts, components, kits, and consumable items used on the equipment deployed at SLD sites worldwide. The catalog covers detection, CAS, network, ancillary equipment, and tools. The catalog is backed by a Master Parts Database which is used to generate the standard report views of the catalog. The master parts database is a relational database containing a record for every part in the master parts catalog along with supporting tables for normalizing fields in the records. The database also includes supporting queries, database maintenance forms, and reports.

  11. Evaluation of the efficiency and accuracy of new methods for atmospheric opacity and radiative transfer calculations in planetary general circulation model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zube, Nicholas Gerard; Zhang, Xi; Natraj, Vijay

    2016-10-01

    General circulation models often incorporate simple approximations of heating between vertically inhomogeneous layers rather than more accurate but computationally expensive radiative transfer (RT) methods. With the goal of developing a GCM package that can model both solar system bodies and exoplanets, it is vital to examine up-to-date RT models to optimize speed and accuracy for heat transfer calculations. Here, we examine a variety of interchangeable radiative transfer models in conjunction with MITGCM (Hill and Marshall, 1995). First, for atmospheric opacity calculations, we test gray approximation, line-by-line, and correlated-k methods. In combination with these, we also test RT routines using 2-stream DISORT (discrete ordinates RT), N-stream DISORT (Stamnes et al., 1988), and optimized 2-stream (Spurr and Natraj, 2011). Initial tests are run using Jupiter as an example case. The results can be compared in nine possible configurations for running a complete RT routine within a GCM. Each individual combination of opacity and RT methods is contrasted with the "ground truth" calculation provided by the line-by-line opacity and N-stream DISORT, in terms of computation speed and accuracy of the approximation methods. We also examine the effects on accuracy when performing these calculations at different time step frequencies within MITGCM. Ultimately, we will catalog and present the ideal RT routines that can replace commonly used approximations within a GCM for a significant increase in calculation accuracy, and speed comparable to the dynamical time steps of MITGCM. Future work will involve examining whether calculations in the spatial domain can also be reduced by smearing grid points into larger areas, and what effects this will have on overall accuracy.

  12. Subject Access in the Small Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turock, Betty J.; Shelton, Hildred C.

    This pilot study on the subject access problems of patrons of small to medium size libraries was designed to measure the extent to which users' vocabularies matched the search vocabulary of bibliographic records in the card catalog, and to enhance subject access by develooping a microcomputer system which integrated Library of Congress Subject…

  13. Notions Catalog. Polish Functional Grammar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woytak, Lidia

    The Polish notions catalog systematizes a variety of informational codes used in Polish, resulting in lists of notions, each presented from a structural perspective. Where applicable, they are accompanied by a morphological component, structural chart, semantic description, frequentative expressions, and related vocabulary items. The notions…

  14. Technology and the Online Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Peter S.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses trends in computer technology and their use for library catalogs, noting the concept of bandwidth (describes quantity of information transmitted per given unit of time); computer hardware differences (micros, minis, maxis); distributed processing systems and databases; optical disk storage; networks; transmission media; and terminals.…

  15. Viking orbiter stereo imaging catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blasius, K. R.; Vertrone, A. V.; Lewis, B. H.; Martin, M. D.

    1982-01-01

    The extremely long mission of the two Viking Orbiter spacecraft produced a wealth of photos of surface features. Many of these photos can be used to form stereo images allowing the student of Mars to examine a subject in three dimensional. This catalog is a technical guide to the use of stereo coverage within the complex Viking imaging data set.

  16. Catalog of Viking mission data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vostreys, R. W. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    This catalog announces the present/expected availability of scientific data acquired by the Viking missions and contains descriptions of the Viking spacecraft, experiments, and data sets. An index is included listing the team leaders and team members for the experiments. Information on NSSDC facilities and ordering procedures, and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are included in the appendices.

  17. Catalog of Educational Multimedia Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Technical Information Service (DOC), Springfield, VA.

    This catalog lists 276 audiovisual educational materials for sale through the National Technical Information Service. Materials are arranged by subject category: Administration; Black and Women's Studies--Biography, In the Military, and History & Culture; Counseling--Career Counseling; Drug Prevention; Health & Safety; History--Early & American…

  18. Greenbook Abstract and Catalog--3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coole, Walter A.

    This catalog is the third in a series extending and updating teaching materials previously disseminated through the ERIC system, including the "Greenbook System" of training materials for higher education professionals (ED 103 083 and 084), Open Classroom Documentation, a procedural manual for an autoinstructional learning laboratory at…

  19. Opacity Build-up in Impulsive Relativistic Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Granot, Jonathan; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Silva, Eduardo do Couto e

    2007-09-28

    Opacity effects in relativistic sources of high-energy gamma-rays, such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) or Blazars, can probe the Lorentz factor of the outflow as well as the distance of the emission site from the source, and thus help constrain the composition of the outflow (protons, pairs, magnetic field) and the emission mechanism. Most previous works consider the opacity in steady state. Here we study the effects of the time dependence of the opacity to pair production ({gamma}{gamma} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) in an impulsive relativistic source, which may be relevant for the prompt gamma-ray emission in GRBs or flares in Blazars. We present a simple, yet rich, semi-analytic model for the time and energy dependence of the optical depth, {tau}{gamma}{gamma}, in which a thin spherical shell expands ultra-relativistically and emits isotropically in its own rest frame over a finite range of radii, R{sub 0} {le} R {le} R{sub 0}+{Delta}R. This is particularly relevant for GRB internal shocks. We find that in an impulsive source ({Delta}R {approx}< R{sub 0}), while the instantaneous spectrum (which is typically hard to measure due to poor photon statistics) has an exponential cutoff above the photon energy {var_epsilon}1(T) where t{gamma}{gamma}({var_epsilon}1) = 1, the time integrated spectrum (which is easier to measure) has a power-law high-energy tail above the photon energy {var_epsilon}1* {approx} {var_epsilon}1({Delta}T) where {Delta}T is the duration of the emission episode. Furthermore, photons with energies {var_epsilon} > {var_epsilon}1* are expected to arrive mainly near the onset of the spike in the light curve or flare, which corresponds to the short emission episode. This arises since in such impulsive sources it takes time to build-up the (target) photon field, and thus the optical depth {tau}{gamma}{gamma}({var_epsilon}) initially increases with time and {var_epsilon}1(T) correspondingly decreases with time, so that photons of energy {var_epsilon} > {var

  20. A higher-than-predicted measurement of iron opacity at solar interior temperatures.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J E; Nagayama, T; Loisel, G P; Rochau, G A; Blancard, C; Colgan, J; Cosse, Ph; Faussurier, G; Fontes, C J; Gilleron, F; Golovkin, I; Hansen, S B; Iglesias, C A; Kilcrease, D P; MacFarlane, J J; Mancini, R C; Nahar, S N; Orban, C; Pain, J-C; Pradhan, A K; Sherrill, M; Wilson, B G

    2015-01-01

    Nearly a century ago it was recognized that radiation absorption by stellar matter controls the internal temperature profiles within stars. Laboratory opacity measurements, however, have never been performed at stellar interior conditions, introducing uncertainties in stellar models. A particular problem arose when refined photosphere spectral analysis led to reductions of 30-50 per cent in the inferred amounts of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen in the Sun. Standard solar models using the revised element abundances disagree with helioseismic observations that determine the internal solar structure using acoustic oscillations. This could be resolved if the true mean opacity for the solar interior matter were roughly 15 per cent higher than predicted, because increased opacity compensates for the decreased element abundances. Iron accounts for a quarter of the total opacity at the solar radiation/convection zone boundary. Here we report measurements of wavelength-resolved iron opacity at electron temperatures of 1.9-2.3 million kelvin and electron densities of (0.7-4.0) × 10(22) per cubic centimetre, conditions very similar to those in the solar region that affects the discrepancy the most: the radiation/convection zone boundary. The measured wavelength-dependent opacity is 30-400 per cent higher than predicted. This represents roughly half the change in the mean opacity needed to resolve the solar discrepancy, even though iron is only one of many elements that contribute to opacity.

  1. Fac-Back-OPAC: An Open Source Interface to Your Library System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beccaria, Mike; Scott, Dan

    2007-01-01

    The new Fac-Back-OPAC (a faceted backup OPAC) is built on code that was originally developed by Casey Durfee in February 2007. It represents the convergence of two prominent trends in library tools: the decoupling of discovery tools from the traditional integrated library system (ILS) and the use of readily available open source components to…

  2. Measurement of Opacity and Particulate Emissions With an On-Stack Transmissometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beutner, Heinz P.

    1974-01-01

    An on-stack transmissometer system, that is designed to provide a precision measurement of the opacity of visible emissions, is described. The sources of error in opacity measurements with regard to recent Environmental Protection Agency emission monitoring requirements and planned specifications are discussed. (Author/BT)

  3. Web-Based OPACs in Indian Academic Libraries: A Functional Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapoor, Kanta; Goyal, O. P.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The paper seeks to provide a comparative analysis of the functionality of five web-based OPACs available in Indian academic libraries. Design/methodology/approach: Same-topic searches were carried out by three researchers on the web-based OPACs of Libsys, VTLS's iPortal, NewGenLib, Troodon, and Alice for Windows, implemented in five…

  4. 40 CFR 60.2255 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators? 60.2255 Section 60.2255 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY..., 2001 Air Curtain Incinerators § 60.2255 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators?...

  5. 40 CFR 60.2865 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators? 60.2865 Section 60.2865 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Curtain Incinerators § 60.2865 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators? (a) Use Method...

  6. 40 CFR 60.2865 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators? 60.2865 Section 60.2865 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Curtain Incinerators § 60.2865 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators? (a) Use Method...

  7. 40 CFR 60.2255 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators? 60.2255 Section 60.2255 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY..., 2001 Air Curtain Incinerators § 60.2255 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators?...

  8. 40 CFR 60.2255 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators? 60.2255 Section 60.2255 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY..., 2001 Air Curtain Incinerators § 60.2255 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators?...

  9. 40 CFR 60.2865 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators? 60.2865 Section 60.2865 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Curtain Incinerators § 60.2865 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators? (a) Use Method...

  10. The Chandra Fornax Survey. II. The Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Karen; Zurek, D.; Scharf, C.

    2010-01-01

    The Fornax cluster of galaxies lies in the southern hemisphere and is second only to the richer and more well-studied Virgo cluster in its accessibility for high resolution multi-wavelength data collection. A deep \\emph{Chandra} survey of the inner one degree of this cluster was performed in 2003, with first results published in 2005 identifying 771 X-ray point sources. We present a catalog of these X-ray point sources. Possible and likely optical candidates were identified from ground-based, HST and GALEX images. This catalog will facilitate future investigations by enhancing our understanding of a cluster's fainter and smaller objects, calibrating distance rulers, and constraining cosmological models. This work was conducted by a Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) position at the American Museum of Natural History and funded by the NSF.

  11. Galactic cold cores. VI. Dust opacity spectral index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juvela, M.; Demyk, K.; Doi, Y.; Hughes, A.; Lefèvre, C.; Marshall, D. J.; Meny, C.; Montillaud, J.; Pagani, L.; Paradis, D.; Ristorcelli, I.; Malinen, J.; Montier, L. A.; Paladini, R.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Rivera-Ingraham, A.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The Galactic Cold Cores project has carried out Herschel photometric observations of 116 fields where the Planck survey has found signs of cold dust emission. The fields contain sources in different environments and different phases of star formation. Previous studies have revealed variations in their dust submillimetre opacity. Aims: The aim is to measure the value of dust opacity spectral index and to understand its variations spatially and with respect to other parameters, such as temperature, column density, and Galactic location. Methods: The dust opacity spectral index β and the dust colour temperature T are derived using Herschel and Planck data. The relation between β and T is examined for the whole sample and inside individual fields. Results: Based on IRAS and Planck data, the fields are characterised by a median colour temperature of 16.1 K and a median opacity spectral index of β = 1.84. The values are not correlated with Galactic longitude. We observe a clear T-β anti-correlation. In Herschel observations, constrained at lower resolution by Planck data, the variations follow the column density structure and βFIR can rise to ~2.2 in individual clumps. The highest values are found in starless clumps. The Planck 217 GHz band shows a systematic excess that is not restricted to cold clumps and is thus consistent with a general flattening of the dust emission spectrum at millimetre wavelengths. When fitted separately below and above 700 μm, the median spectral index values are βFIR ~ 1.91 and β(mm) ~ 1.66. Conclusions: The spectral index changes as a function of column density and wavelength. The comparison of different data sets and the examination of possible error sources show that our results are robust. However, β variations are partly masked by temperature gradients and the changes in the intrinsic grain properties may be even greater. Planck http://www.esa.int/Planck is a project of the European Space Agency - ESA - with instruments

  12. Opacity measurements in shock-generated argon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D.

    1993-07-01

    Dense plasmas having uniform and constant density and temperature are generated by passage of a planar shock wave through gas. The opacity of the plasma is accurately measured versus wavelength by recording the risetime of emitted light. This technique is applicable to a wide variety of species and plasma conditions. Initial experiments in argon have produced plasmas with 2 eV temperatures, 0.004--0.04 g/cm{sup 3} densities, and coupling parameters {Gamma} {approximately}0.3--0.7. Measurements in visible light are compared with calculations using the HOPE code. An interesting peak in the capacity at 400 nm is observed for the first time and is identified with the 4s-5p transition in excited neutral argon atoms.

  13. Limestone/adipic acid FGD and stack opacity reduction pilot plant tests at Big Rivers

    SciTech Connect

    Laslo, D.; Bakke, E.; Chisholm, E.

    1984-01-01

    Big Rivers Electric Corporation (BREC) contracted Peabody Process Systems, Inc. (PPSI) to install a flue gas cleaning (FGC) pilot plant at the BREC R.D. Green Station Unit No. 2 located at Sebree, KY. A six month test program was completed demonstrating technology for: alternatives to using lime as an alkali; methods for improving cake dewatering; identification of the causes of high stack opacity; and methods for the reduction of high stack opacity. This paper presents highlights extracted from the reports submitted by PPSI to BREC on this test program. BREC was primarily interested in reduction of operating costs, if possible, by using an alkali less expensive than lime, and by improving the poor dewatering characteristic inherent in a dolomitic lime system. BREC was also within compliance for particulate emissions and opacity in the duct after the dry electrostatic precipitator, but not in compliance with the stack opacity regulation, and therefore wanted to investigate methods for stack opacity reduction.

  14. Comparing Two Opacity Models in Monte Carlo Radiative Heat Transfer: Computational Efficiency and Parallel Load Balancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Mathew A.; Palmer, Todd S.

    2013-09-01

    Thermal heating from radiative heat transfer can have a significant effect on combustion systems. A variety of models have been developed to represent the strongly varying opacities found in combustion gases (Goutiere et al., 2000). This work evaluates the computational efficiency and load balance issues associated with two opacity models implemented in a 3D parallel Monte Carlo solver: the spectral-line-based weighted sum of gray gases (SLW) (Denison and Webb, 1993) and the spectral line-by-line (LBL) (Wang and Modest, 2007) opacity models. The parallel performance of the opacity models is evaluated using the Su and Olson (1999) frequency-dependent semi-analytic benchmark problem. Weak scaling, strong scaling, and history scaling studies were performed and comparisons were made for each opacity model. Comparisons of load balance sensitivities to these types of scaling were also evaluated. It was found that the SLW model has some attributes that might be valuable in a select set of parallel problems.

  15. Opacity Measurement and Theoretical Investigation of Hot Silicon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Gang; Yang, Jiamin; Zhang, Jiyan; Hu, Zhimin; Zhao, Yang; Qing, Bo; Yang, Guohong; Wei, Minxi; Yi, Rongqing; Song, Tianming; Li, Hang; Yuan, Zheng; Lv, Min; Meng, Xujun; Xu, Yan; Wu, Zeqing; Yan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We report on opacity measurements of a silicon (Si) plasma at a temperature of (72 ± 5) eV and a density of (6.0 ± 1.2) mg cm-3 in the photon energy range of 1790-1880 eV. A 23 μg cm-2 Si foil tamped by 50 μg cm-2 CH layers on each side was heated to a hot-dense plasma state by X-ray radiation emitted from a D-shaped gold cavity that was irradiated by intense lasers. Absorption lines of 1s - 2p transitions of Si xiii to Si ix ions have been measured using point-projection spectroscopy. The transmission spectrum of the silicon plasma was determined by comparing the light passing through the plasma to the light from the same shot passing by the plasma. The density of the Si plasma was determined experimentally by side-on radiography and the temperature was estimated from the radiation flux data. Radiative hydrodynamic simulations were performed to obtain the temporal evolutions of the density and temperature of the Si plasma. The experimentally obtained transmission spectra of the Si sample plasma have been reproduced using a detailed term account model with the local thermodynamic equilibrium approximation. The energy levels, oscillator strengths and photoionization cross-sections used in the calculation were generated by the flexible atomic code. The experimental transmission spectrum was compared with the theoretical calculation and good agreement was found. The present experimental spectrum and theoretical calculation were also compared with the new opacities available in the Los Alamos OPLIB database.

  16. OPACITY MEASUREMENT AND THEORETICAL INVESTIGATION OF HOT SILICON PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Gang; Yang, Jiamin; Zhang, Jiyan; Hu, Zhimin; Zhao, Yang; Qing, Bo; Yang, Guohong; Wei, Minxi; Yi, Rongqing; Song, Tianming; Li, Hang; Yuan, Zheng; Lv, Min; Meng, Xujun; Xu, Yan; Wu, Zeqing; Yan, Jun E-mail: zhimin.hu@yahoo.com

    2016-01-01

    We report on opacity measurements of a silicon (Si) plasma at a temperature of (72 ± 5) eV and a density of (6.0 ± 1.2) mg cm{sup −3} in the photon energy range of 1790–1880 eV. A 23 μg cm{sup −2} Si foil tamped by 50 μg cm{sup −2} CH layers on each side was heated to a hot-dense plasma state by X-ray radiation emitted from a D-shaped gold cavity that was irradiated by intense lasers. Absorption lines of 1s − 2p transitions of Si xiii to Si ix ions have been measured using point-projection spectroscopy. The transmission spectrum of the silicon plasma was determined by comparing the light passing through the plasma to the light from the same shot passing by the plasma. The density of the Si plasma was determined experimentally by side-on radiography and the temperature was estimated from the radiation flux data. Radiative hydrodynamic simulations were performed to obtain the temporal evolutions of the density and temperature of the Si plasma. The experimentally obtained transmission spectra of the Si sample plasma have been reproduced using a detailed term account model with the local thermodynamic equilibrium approximation. The energy levels, oscillator strengths and photoionization cross-sections used in the calculation were generated by the flexible atomic code. The experimental transmission spectrum was compared with the theoretical calculation and good agreement was found. The present experimental spectrum and theoretical calculation were also compared with the new opacities available in the Los Alamos OPLIB database.

  17. Prevalence of Lens Opacities in Adult Chinese Americans: The Chinese American Eye Study (CHES)

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Rohit; Sun, Jie; Torres, Mina; Wu, Shuang; Hsu, Chunyi; Azen, Stanley Paul; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We determined the age- and sex-specific prevalence of posterior subcapsular (PSC), nuclear, cortical, and mixed lens opacities in a population-based sample of Chinese-American adults. Methods A population-based sample of Chinese-Americans 50 years and older, from 10 census tracts in Monterey Park, CA, USA, underwent a detailed interview and a comprehensive clinical examination that included assessment of different types of lens opacities by the slit-lamp–based Lens Opacities Classification System II (LOCS II). All lens changes (including pseudophakia/aphakia), PSC, nuclear, and/or cortical opacities, were evaluated and graded. Results Of the 5782 eligible subjects, 4582 (79.2%) Chinese Americans aged 50 years and older completed a comprehensive eye examination. Of the participants with LOCS II grading (n = 4234/4582, 92%), 3.0% had PSC opacities, 38.1% had nuclear opacities, and 23.4% had cortical opacities. The prevalence of all lens changes was 48.0% for all age groups and was higher by 10-year increasing age groups (P < 0.0001). The prevalence of visual impairment in the better-seeing eye with cortical only, nuclear only, PSC only, and mixed opacities was 3.9%, 5.0%, 14.3%, and 9.4%, respectively. A total of 454 (9.9%) individuals had undergone cataract extraction in at least one eye. Conclusions Chinese Americans have a high prevalence of visual impairment associated with lens opacities, and a high prevalence of nuclear opacities. Public health policies and programs designed to improve cataract detection and treatment could help reduce the burden of visual impairment in Chinese Americans. PMID:27936471

  18. Cataloging and indexing - The development of the Space Shuttle mission data base and catalogs from earth observations hand-held photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Raymond M.; Willis, Kimberly J.; Daley, William J.; Brumbaugh, Fred R.; Bremer, Jeffrey M.

    1992-01-01

    All earth-looking photographs acquired by Space Shuttle astronauts are identified, located, and catalogued after each mission. The photographs have been entered into a computerized database at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The database in its two modes - computer and catalog - is organized and presented to provide a scope and level of detail designed to be useful in Earth science activities, resource management, environmental studies, and public affairs. The computerized database can be accessed free through standard communication networks 24 hours a day, and the catalogs are distributed throughout the world. Photograph viewing centers are available in the United States, and photographic copies can be obtained through government-supported centers.

  19. The Chandra Source Catalog: Processing and Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Janet; Evans, Ian N.; Glotfelty, Kenny J.; Hain, Roger; Hall, Diane M.; Miller, Joseph B.; Plummer, David A.; Zografou, Panagoula; Primini, Francis A.; Anderson, Craig S.; Bonaventura, Nina R.; Chen, Judy C.; Davis, John E.; Doe, Stephen M.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Galle, Elizabeth C.; Gibbs, Danny G., II; Grier, John D.; Harbo, Peter N.; He, Xiang Qun (Helen); Houck, John C.; Karovska, Margarita; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Lauer, Jennifer; McCollough, Michael L.; McDowell, Jonathan C.; Mitschang, Arik W.; Morgan, Douglas L.; Mossman, Amy E.; Nichols, Joy S.; Nowak, Michael A.; Refsdal, Brian L.; Rots, Arnold H.; Siemiginowska, Aneta L.; Sundheim, Beth A.; Tibbetts, Michael S.; van Stone, David W.; Winkelman, Sherry L.

    2009-09-01

    Chandra Source Catalog processing recalibrates each observation using the latest available calibration data, and employs a wavelet-based source detection algorithm to identify all the X-ray sources in the field of view. Source properties are then extracted from each detected source that is a candidate for inclusion in the catalog. Catalog processing is completed by matching sources across multiple observations, merging common detections, and applying quality assurance checks. The Chandra Source Catalog processing system shares a common processing infrastructure and utilizes much of the functionality that is built into the Standard Data Processing (SDP) pipeline system that provides calibrated Chandra data to end-users. Other key components of the catalog processing system have been assembled from the portable CIAO data analysis package. Minimal new software tool development has been required to support the science algorithms needed for catalog production. Since processing pipelines must be instantiated for each detected source, the number of pipelines that are run during catalog construction is a factor of order 100 times larger than for SDP. The increased computational load, and inherent parallel nature of the processing, is handled by distributing the workload across a multi-node Beowulf cluster. Modifications to the SDP automated processing application to support catalog processing, and extensions to Chandra Data Archive software to ingest and retrieve catalog products, complete the upgrades to the infrastructure to support catalog processing.

  20. The Chandra Source Catalog: Processing and Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Janet; Evans, I. N.; Glotfelty, K. J.; Hain, R.; Hall, D. M.; Miller, J. B.; Plummer, D. A.; Zografou, P.

    2009-01-01

    Chandra Source Catalog processing recalibrates each observation using the latest available calibration data, and employs a wavelet-based source detection algorithm to identify all the X-ray sources in the field of view. Source properties are then extracted from each detected source that is a candidate for inclusion in the catalog. Catalog processing is completed by matching sources across multiple observations, merging common detections, and applying quality assurance checks. The Chandra Source Catalog processing system shares a common processing infrastructure and utilizes much of the functionality that is built into the Standard Data Processing (SDP) pipeline system that provides calibrated Chandra data to end-users. Other key components of the catalog processing system have been assembled from the portable CIAO data analysis package. Minimal new software tool development has been required to support the science algorithms needed for catalog production. Since processing pipelines must be instantiated for each detected source, the number of pipelines that are run during catalog construction is a factor of order 100 times larger than for SDP. The increased computational load, and inherent parallel nature of the processing, is handled by distributing the workload across a multi-node Beowulf cluster. Modifications to the SDP automated processing application to support catalog processing, and extensions to Chandra Data Archive software to ingest and retrieve catalog products, complete the upgrades to the infrastructure to support catalog processing. The end product is a catalog of Chandra sources, associated catalog user interfaces, and forthcoming data analysis tools, that will allow users to query the catalog, retrieve relevant data, and perform interactive scientific analysis on those results. This work is supported by NASA contract NAS8-03060 (CXC).

  1. 3.5 Year Monitoring of 225 GHz Opacity at the Summit of Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Satoki; Asada, Keiichi; Martin-Cocher, Pierre L.; Chen, Ming-Tang; Ho, Paul T. P.; Inoue, Makoto; Koch, Patrick M.; Paine, Scott N.; Turner, David D.

    2017-02-01

    We present the 3.5 years monitoring results of 225 GHz opacity at the summit of the Greenland ice sheet (Greenland Summit Camp) at an altitude of 3200 m using a tipping radiometer. We chose this site as our submillimeter telescope (Greenland Telescope) site, because conditions are expected to have low submillimeter opacity and because its location offers favorable baselines to existing submillimeter telescopes for global-scale Very Long Baseline Interferometry. The site shows a clear seasonal variation with the average opacity lower by a factor of two during winter. The 25%, 50%, and 75% quartiles of the 225 GHz opacity during the winter months of November through April are 0.046, 0.060, and 0.080, respectively. For the winter quartiles of 25% and 50%, the Greenland site is about 10%-30% worse than the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) or the South Pole sites. Estimated atmospheric transmission spectra in winter season are similar to the ALMA site at lower frequencies (\\lt 450 GHz), which are transparent enough to perform astronomical observations almost all of the winter time with opacities \\lt 0.5, but 10%-25% higher opacities at higher frequencies (\\gt 450 GHz) than those at the ALMA site. This is due to the lower altitude of the Greenland site and the resulting higher line wing opacity from pressure-broadened saturated water lines in addition to higher dry air continuum absorption at higher frequencies. Nevertheless, half of the winter time at the Greenland Summit Camp can be used for astronomical observations at frequencies between 450 GHz and 1000 GHz with opacities \\lt 1.2, and 10% of the time show \\gt 10 % transmittance in the THz (1035 GHz, 1350 GHz, and 1500 GHz) windows. Summer season is good for observations at frequencies lower than 380 GHz. One major advantage of the Greenland Summit Camp site in winter is that there is no diurnal variation due to the polar night condition, and therefore the durations of low-opacity conditions

  2. 40 CFR 62.15215 - What is required for my continuous opacity monitoring system and how are the data used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... opacity monitoring system and how are the data used? 62.15215 Section 62.15215 Protection of Environment... required for my continuous opacity monitoring system and how are the data used? (a) Install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a continuous opacity monitoring system. (b) Install, evaluate, and operate...

  3. 40 CFR 60.1270 - What is required for my continuous opacity monitoring system and how are the data used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... opacity monitoring system and how are the data used? 60.1270 Section 60.1270 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1270 What is required for my continuous opacity monitoring system and how... system. (b) Install, evaluate, and operate each continuous opacity monitoring system according to §...

  4. 40 CFR 62.15215 - What is required for my continuous opacity monitoring system and how are the data used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... opacity monitoring system and how are the data used? 62.15215 Section 62.15215 Protection of Environment... required for my continuous opacity monitoring system and how are the data used? (a) Install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a continuous opacity monitoring system. (b) Install, evaluate, and operate...

  5. 40 CFR 60.1270 - What is required for my continuous opacity monitoring system and how are the data used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... opacity monitoring system and how are the data used? 60.1270 Section 60.1270 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1270 What is required for my continuous opacity monitoring system and how... system. (b) Install, evaluate, and operate each continuous opacity monitoring system according to §...

  6. 40 CFR 62.15215 - What is required for my continuous opacity monitoring system and how are the data used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... opacity monitoring system and how are the data used? 62.15215 Section 62.15215 Protection of Environment... required for my continuous opacity monitoring system and how are the data used? (a) Install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a continuous opacity monitoring system. (b) Install, evaluate, and operate...

  7. 40 CFR 60.1760 - What is required for my continuous opacity monitoring system and how are the data used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... opacity monitoring system and how are the data used? 60.1760 Section 60.1760 Protection of Environment... continuous opacity monitoring system and how are the data used? (a) Install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a continuous opacity monitoring system. (b) Install, evaluate, and operate each continuous...

  8. 40 CFR 60.1760 - What is required for my continuous opacity monitoring system and how are the data used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... opacity monitoring system and how are the data used? 60.1760 Section 60.1760 Protection of Environment... continuous opacity monitoring system and how are the data used? (a) Install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a continuous opacity monitoring system. (b) Install, evaluate, and operate each continuous...

  9. 40 CFR 60.1270 - What is required for my continuous opacity monitoring system and how are the data used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... opacity monitoring system and how are the data used? 60.1270 Section 60.1270 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1270 What is required for my continuous opacity monitoring system and how... system. (b) Install, evaluate, and operate each continuous opacity monitoring system according to §...

  10. 40 CFR 62.15215 - What is required for my continuous opacity monitoring system and how are the data used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... opacity monitoring system and how are the data used? 62.15215 Section 62.15215 Protection of Environment... required for my continuous opacity monitoring system and how are the data used? (a) Install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a continuous opacity monitoring system. (b) Install, evaluate, and operate...

  11. 40 CFR 60.1760 - What is required for my continuous opacity monitoring system and how are the data used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... opacity monitoring system and how are the data used? 60.1760 Section 60.1760 Protection of Environment... continuous opacity monitoring system and how are the data used? (a) Install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a continuous opacity monitoring system. (b) Install, evaluate, and operate each continuous...

  12. 40 CFR 62.15215 - What is required for my continuous opacity monitoring system and how are the data used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... opacity monitoring system and how are the data used? 62.15215 Section 62.15215 Protection of Environment... required for my continuous opacity monitoring system and how are the data used? (a) Install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a continuous opacity monitoring system. (b) Install, evaluate, and operate...

  13. 40 CFR 60.1760 - What is required for my continuous opacity monitoring system and how are the data used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... opacity monitoring system and how are the data used? 60.1760 Section 60.1760 Protection of Environment... continuous opacity monitoring system and how are the data used? (a) Install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a continuous opacity monitoring system. (b) Install, evaluate, and operate each continuous...

  14. 40 CFR 60.1270 - What is required for my continuous opacity monitoring system and how are the data used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... opacity monitoring system and how are the data used? 60.1270 Section 60.1270 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1270 What is required for my continuous opacity monitoring system and how... system. (b) Install, evaluate, and operate each continuous opacity monitoring system according to §...

  15. 40 CFR 60.1270 - What is required for my continuous opacity monitoring system and how are the data used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... opacity monitoring system and how are the data used? 60.1270 Section 60.1270 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1270 What is required for my continuous opacity monitoring system and how... system. (b) Install, evaluate, and operate each continuous opacity monitoring system according to §...

  16. 40 CFR 60.1760 - What is required for my continuous opacity monitoring system and how are the data used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... opacity monitoring system and how are the data used? 60.1760 Section 60.1760 Protection of Environment... continuous opacity monitoring system and how are the data used? (a) Install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a continuous opacity monitoring system. (b) Install, evaluate, and operate each continuous...

  17. Catalog of databases and reports

    SciTech Connect

    Burtis, M.D.

    1997-04-01

    This catalog provides information about the many reports and materials made available by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Global Change Research Program (GCRP) and the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). The catalog is divided into nine sections plus the author and title indexes: Section A--US Department of Energy Global Change Research Program Research Plans and Summaries; Section B--US Department of Energy Global Change Research Program Technical Reports; Section C--US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Reports; Section D--Other US Department of Energy Reports; Section E--CDIAC Reports; Section F--CDIAC Numeric Data and Computer Model Distribution; Section G--Other Databases Distributed by CDIAC; Section H--US Department of Agriculture Reports on Response of Vegetation to Carbon Dioxide; and Section I--Other Publications.

  18. Brorfelde Schmidt CCD Catalog (BSCC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-23

    reference stars. Errors of individual positions are about 20 to 200 mas for stars in the R = 10 to 18 mag range. External comparisons with 2MASS and SDSS ...description of the resulting cat- alog. External comparisons were performed with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey ( SDSS ) release 7 data (www.sdss.org/DR7...with 2MASS and SDSS reveal possible small systematic errors in the BSCC of up to about 30 mas. The catalog is supplemented with J, H, and Ks

  19. The NASA SBIR product catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilman, J. A.; Paige, J. B.; Schwenk, F. Carl

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this catalog is to assist small business firms in making the community aware of products emerging from their efforts in the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. It contains descriptions of some products that have advanced into Phase 3 and others that are identified as prospective products. Both lists of products in this catalog are based on information supplied by NASA SBIR contractors in responding to an invitation to be represented in this document. Generally, all products suggested by the small firms were included in order to meet the goals of information exchange for SBIR results. Of the 444 SBIR contractors NASA queried, 137 provided information on 219 products. The catalog presents the product information in the technology areas listed in the table of contents. Within each area, the products are listed in alphabetical order by product name and are given identifying numbers. Also included is an alphabetical listing of the companies that have products described. This listing cross-references the product list and provides information on the business activity of each firm. In addition, there are three indexes: one a list of firms by states, one that lists the products according to NASA Centers that managed the SBIR projects, and one that lists the products by the relevant Technical Topics utilized in NASA's annual program solicitation under which each SBIR project was selected.

  20. NASA SBIR product catalog, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This catalog is a partial list of products of NASA SBIR (Small Business Innovation Research) projects that have advanced to some degree into Phase 3. While most of the products evolved from work conducted during SBIR Phase 1 and 2, a few advanced to commercial status solely from Phase 1 activities. The catalog presents information provided to NASA by SBIR contractors who wished to have their products exhibited at Technology 2001, a NASA-sponsored technology transfer conference held in San Jose, California, on December 4, 5, and 6, 1991. The catalog presents the product information in the following technology areas: computer and communication systems; information processing and AI; robotics and automation; signal and image processing; microelectronics; electronic devices and equipment; microwave electronic devices; optical devices and lasers; advanced materials; materials processing; materials testing and NDE; materials instrumentation; aerodynamics and aircraft; fluid mechanics and measurement; heat transfer devices; refrigeration and cryogenics; energy conversion devices; oceanographic instruments; atmosphere monitoring devices; water management; life science instruments; and spacecraft electromechanical systems.

  1. The impact of enhanced iron opacity on massive star pulsations: updated instability strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravveji, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, Bailey et al. made a direct measurement of the iron opacity at the physical conditions of the solar tachocline. They found that the wavelength-integrated iron opacity is roughly 75 per cent higher than what the Opacity Project (OP) and OPAL models predict. Here, we compute new opacity tables with enhanced iron and nickel contributions to the Rosseland mean opacity by 75 per cent each, and compute three dense MESA grids of evolutionary models for Galactic O- and B-type stars covering from 2.5 to 25 M⊙ from zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) until Teff = 10 000 K after the core hydrogen exhaustion. We carry out non-adiabatic mode stability analysis with GYRE, and update the extension of the instability strips of heat-driven p- and g-mode pulsators, and the hybrid slowly pulsating B (SPB) - β Cep stars. We compare the position of two confirmed late O-type β Cep and eight confirmed hybrid B-type pulsators with the new instability domains, and justify that ˜75 per cent enhancement, only in iron opacity, is sufficient to consistently reproduce the observed position of these stars on the log Teff versus log g plane. We propose that this improvement in opacities be incorporated in the input physics of new stellar models.

  2. Sound speed and oscillation frequencies for solar models evolved with Los Alamos ATOMIC opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzik, Joyce A.; Fontes, C. J.; Walczak, P.; Wood, S. R.; Mussack, K.; Farag, E.

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has calculated a new generation of radiative opacities (OPLIB data using the ATOMIC code) for elements with atomic number Z = 1-30 with improved physics input, updated atomic data, and finer temperature grid to replace the Los Alamos LEDCOP opacities released in the year 2000. We calculate the evolution of standard solar models including these new opacities, and compare with models evolved using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory OPAL opacities (Iglesias & Rogers 1996). We use the solar abundance mixture of Asplund et al. 2009. The Los Alamos ATOMIC opacities (Colgan et al. 2013a, 2013b, 2015) have steeper opacity derivatives than those of OPAL for temperatures and densities of the solar interior radiative zone. We compare the calculated nonadiabatic solar oscillation frequencies and solar interior sound speed to observed frequencies and helioseismic inferences. The calculated sound-speed profiles are similar for models evolved using either the updated Iben evolution code (see Guzik & Mussack 2010), or the MESA evolution code (Paxton et al. 2015). The LANL ATOMIC opacities partially mitigate the `solar abundance problem'.

  3. The statistical properties of stars and their dependence on metallicity: the effects of opacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bate, Matthew R.

    2014-07-01

    We report the statistical properties of stars and brown dwarfs obtained from four radiation hydrodynamical simulations of star cluster formation that resolve masses down to the opacity limit for fragmentation. The calculations are identical except for their dust and gas opacities. Assuming dust opacity is proportional to metallicity, the calculations span a range of metallicities from 1/100 to 3 times solar, although we emphasize that changing the metallicity has other thermodynamic effects that the calculations do not capture (e.g. on the thermal coupling between gas and dust). All four calculations produce stellar populations whose statistical properties are difficult to distinguish from observed stellar systems, and we find no significant dependence of stellar properties on opacity. The mass functions and properties of multiple stellar systems are consistent with each other. However, we find that protostellar mergers are more common with lower opacities. Combining the results from the three calculations with the highest opacities, we obtain a stellar population consisting of more than 500 stars and brown dwarfs. Many of the statistical properties of this population are in good agreement with those observed in our Galaxy, implying that gravity, hydrodynamics, and radiative feedback may be the primary ingredients for determining the statistical properties of low-mass stars. However, we do find indications that the calculations may be slightly too dissipative. Although further calculations will be required to understand all of the effects of metallicity on stellar properties, we conclude that stellar properties are surprisingly resilient to variations of the dust and gas opacities.

  4. Cross-Matching of Very Large Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynov, M. V.; Bodryagin, D. V.

    Modern astronomical catalogs and sky surveys, that contain billions of objects, belong to the "big data" data class. Existing available services have limited functionality and do not include all required and available catalogs. The software package ACrId (Astronomical Cross Identification) for cross-matching large astronomical catalogs, which uses an sphere pixelation algorithm HEALPix, ReiserFS file system and JSON-type text files for storage, has been developed at the Research Institution "Mykolaiv Astronomical Observatory".

  5. Far infrared supplement: Catalog of infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, D. Y.; Schmitz, M.; Mead, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The Far Infrared Supplement: catalog of infrared observations summarizes all infrared astronomical observations at far infrared wavelengths published in the scientific literature between 1965 and 1982. The Supplement list contains 25% of the observations in the full catalog of infrared observations (C10), and essentially eliminates most visible stars from the listings. The Supplement is more compact than the main Catalog (it does not contain the bibliography and position index of the C10), and is intended for easy reference during astronomical observations.

  6. Selection and Cataloging of Adult Pornography Web Sites for Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilevko, Juris; Gottlieb, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    Pornography has become part of mainstream culture. As such, it has become a subject of academic research, and this, in turn, has implications for university libraries. Focusing on adult Internet pornography, this study suggests that academic libraries should provide access to adult pornographic Web sites by including them in their online catalogs.

  7. Schools of Choice: An Annotated Catalog of Key Choice Elements: Open Enrollment, Diversity and Empowerment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakland Univ., Rochester, MI. School of Human and Educational Services.

    This catalog, an outcome of the Project To Access Choice in Education (PACE), lists examples of public schools throughout the nation offering choices in education. "Schools of Choice" are defined as those offering one or more of the following three dynamics: (1) open enrollment, the freedom for families to choose the elementary or secondary…

  8. Science Fare: An Illustrated Guide and Catalog of Toys, Books, and Activities for Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saul, Wendy; Newman, Alan R.

    This book addresses some of the methods by which science can be made accessible to children, both in school and non-school settings. It contains information on effective science education for elementary school age children, and includes a catalog of books and other materials. Topics discussed in the book include: (1) planning; (2) approaches to…

  9. Cataloging, Processing, Administering AV Materials. A Model for Wisconsin Schools. Revised, 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Robert David, Ed.; And Others

    The Wisconsin Association of School Librarians has produced a manual for standardized processing of all nonprint media, based on two principles: (1) the media should be centralized, organized, and administered for maximum access; and (2) content is more important than form. Definitions, cataloging, processing, housing, circulation, and care are…

  10. Using EPIC to search the OCLC Online Union Catalog in a health sciences library.

    PubMed

    Richwine, P W

    1991-01-01

    EPIC is a service that provides keyword or subject access to the OCLC Online Union Catalog (OLUC). This capability increases the success rate for title location as well as the potential uses of the OLUC. The features of the EPIC system, application of these features to the OLUC, and specific uses in health sciences libraries are described in this article.

  11. CLSI On-Line Public Catalog Touch Terminal Manual: Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Chico.

    This training manual developed by the Public Access Subcommittee of the Reference Department of Meriam Library (California State University, Chico) provides instructions for using the library's online public catalog by means of a touch terminal which accepts commands in the form of a touch on a particular part of the terminal screen. Author and…

  12. Quantifying the emission benefits of opacity testing and repair of heavy-duty diesel vehicles.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Robert L; Graboski, Michael S; Alleman, Teresa L; Alvarez, Javier R; Duleep, K G

    2003-02-01

    The objective of this study was to begin to quantify the benefits of a smoke opacity-based (SAE J1667 test) inspection and maintenance program. Twenty-six vehicles exhibiting visible smoke emissions were recruited: 14 pre-1991 vehicles and 12 1991 and later model year vehicles. Smoke opacity and regulated pollutant emissions via chassis dynamometer were measured, with testing conducted at 1609 m above sea level. Twenty of the vehicles were then repaired with the goal of lowering visible smoke emission, and the smoke opacity testing and pollutant emissions measurements were repeated. For the pre-1991 vehicles actually repaired, pre-repair smoke opacity averaged 39% and PM averaged 5.6 g/mi. NOx emissions averaged 22.1 g/mi. After repair, the average smoke opacity had declined to 26% and PM declined to 3.3 g/mi, while NOx emissions increased to 30.9 g/mi. For the 1991 and newer vehicles repaired, pre-repair smoke opacity averaged 59% and PM averaged 2.2 g/mi. NOx emissions averaged 12.1 g/mi. After repair, the average opacity had declined to 30% and PM declined to 1.3 g/mi, while NOx increased slightly to 14.4 g/mi. For vehicles failing the California opacity test at >55% for pre-1991 and >40% for 1991 and later model years, the changes in emissions exhibited a high degree of statistical significance. The average cost of repairs was 1088 dollars, and the average is very similar for both the pre-1991 and 1991+ model year groups. Smoke opacity was shown to be a relatively poor predictor of driving cycle PM emissions. Peak CO or peak CO and THC as measured during a snap-acceleration were much better predictors of driving cycle PM emissions.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The 2WHSP catalog (Chang+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y.-L.; Arsioli, B.; Giommi, P.; Padovani, P.

    2016-09-01

    The 2WHSP catalog is a multi-frequency catalog of HSP. It contains 1691 sources, 288 of which are newly identified HSPs, 540 are previously known HSPs, 814 are HSP candidates, 45 are HSP blazars taken from the 2FHL catalog, and 4 from TeVcat. (1 data file).

  14. Weapon container catalog. Volumes 1 & 2

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.A.; Higuera, M.C.

    1998-02-01

    The Weapon Container Catalog describes H-gear (shipping and storage containers, bomb hand trucks and the ancillary equipment required for loading) used for weapon programs and for special use containers. When completed, the catalog will contain five volumes. Volume 1 for enduring stockpile programs (B53, B61, B83, W62, W76, W78, W80, W84, W87, and W88) and Volume 2, Special Use Containers, are being released. The catalog is intended as a source of information for weapon program engineers and also provides historical information. The catalog also will be published on the SNL Internal Web and will undergo periodic updates.

  15. Systematic measurements of opacity dependence on temperature, density, and atomic number at stellar interior conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, James; Nagayama, T.; Loisel, G. P.; Rochau, G. A.; Blancard, C.; Colgan, J.; Cosse, Ph.; Faussurier, G.; Fontes, C. J.; Golovkin, I.; Hansen, S. B.; Iglesias, C. A.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Macfarlane, J. J.; Mancini, R. C.; Nahar, S. N.; Orban, C.; Pradhan, A. K.; Sherrill, M.; Wilson, B. G.; Pain, J. C.; Gilleron, F.

    2016-10-01

    Model predictions for iron opacity are notably different from measurements performed at conditions similar to the boundary between the solar radiation and convection zone. New measurements at the Sandia Z facility with chromium, iron, and nickel are providing a systematic study of how opacity changes with temperature, density, and atomic number. These measurements help further evaluate possibilities for experiment errors and help constrain hypotheses for opacity model refinements. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. USGS Science Data Catalog - Open Data Advances or Declines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frame, M. T.; Hutchison, V.; Zolly, L.; Wheeler, B.; Latysh, N.; Devarakonda, R.; Palanisamy, G.; Shrestha, B.

    2014-12-01

    The recent Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) White House Open Data Policies (2013) have required Federal agencies to establish formal catalogues of their science data holdings and make these data easily available on Web sites, portals, and applications. As an organization, the USGS has historically excelled at making its data holdings freely available on its various Web sites (i.e., National, Scientific Programs, or local Science Center). In response to these requirements, the USGS Core Science Analytics, Synthesis, and Libraries program, in collaboration with DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Mercury Consortium (funded by NASA, USGS, and DOE), and a number of other USGS organizations, established the Science Data Catalog (http://data.usgs.gov) cyberinfrastructure, content management processes/tools, and supporting policies. The USGS Science Data Catalog led the charge at USGS to improve the robustness of existing/future metadata collections; streamline and develop sustainable publishing to external aggregators (i.e., data.gov); and provide leadership to the U.S. Department of Interior in emerging Open Data policies, techniques, and systems. The session will discuss the current successes, challenges, and movement toward meeting these Open Data policies for USGS scientific data holdings. A retrospective look at the last year of implementation of these efforts within USGS will occur to determine whether these Open Data Policies are improving data access or limiting data availability. To learn more about the USGS Science Data Catalog, visit us at http://data.usgs.gov/info/about.html

  17. The Modeling and Simulation Catalog for Discovery, Knowledge and Reuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, George F. III; Greenberg, Brandi; Daehler-Wilking, Richard; Hunt, Steven

    2011-01-01

    The DoD M&S Steering Committee has noted that the current DoD and Service's modeling and simulation resource repository (MSRR) services are not up-to-date limiting their value to the using communities. However, M&S leaders and managers also determined that the Department needs a functional M&S registry card catalog to facilitate M&S tool and data visibility to support M&S activities across the DoD. The M&S Catalog will discover and access M&S metadata maintained at nodes distributed across DoD networks in a centrally managed, decentralized process that employs metadata collection and management. The intent is to link information stores, precluding redundant location updating. The M&S Catalog uses a standard metadata schemas based on the DoD's Net-Centric Data Strategy Community of Interest metadata specification. The Air Force, Navy and OSD (CAPE) have provided initial information to participating DoD nodes, but plans on the horizon are being made to bring in hundreds of source providers.

  18. WIFIRE Data Model and Catalog for Wildfire Data and Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altintas, I.; Crawl, D.; Cowart, C.; Gupta, A.; Block, J.; de Callafon, R.

    2014-12-01

    The WIFIRE project (wifire.ucsd.edu) is building an end-to-end cyberinfrastructure for real-time and data-driven simulation, prediction and visualization of wildfire behavior. WIFIRE may be used by wildfire management authorities in the future to predict wildfire rate of spread and direction, and assess the effectiveness of high-density sensor networks in improving fire and weather predictions. WIFIRE has created a data model for wildfire resources including sensed and archived data, sensors, satellites, cameras, modeling tools, workflows and social information including Twitter feeds. This data model and associated wildfire resource catalog includes a detailed description of the HPWREN sensor network, SDG&E's Mesonet, and NASA MODIS. In addition, the WIFIRE data-model describes how to integrate the data from multiple heterogeneous sources to provide detailed fire-related information. The data catalog describes 'Observables' captured by each instrument using multiple ontologies including OGC SensorML and NASA SWEET. Observables include measurements such as wind speed, air temperature, and relative humidity, as well as their accuracy and resolution. We have implemented a REST service for publishing to and querying from the catalog using Web Application Description Language (WADL). We are creating web-based user interfaces and mobile device Apps that use the REST interface for dissemination to wildfire modeling community and project partners covering academic, private, and government laboratories while generating value to emergency officials and the general public. Additionally, the Kepler scientific workflow system is instrumented to interact with this data catalog to access real-time streaming and archived wildfire data and stream it into dynamic data-driven wildfire models at scale.

  19. Measurement of atmospheric opacity at 278 GHz at McMurdo Station, Antarctica in austral spring seasons, 1986 and 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Zafra, R. L.; Jaramillo, M.; Barrett, J.; Emmons, L. K.; Parrish, A.

    1990-01-01

    A quasi-continuous record is presented of atmospheric opacity measured at 278 GHz (1.1 mm wavelength) from the McMurdo Station (Antarctica) during austral spring seasons of 1986 (August 30 - October 30) and 1987 (September 4 - October 13) with measurements taken every 20 minutes (except during storms or other periods of high opacity). All data are reduced to represent opacity in the zenith direction. It was found that, during much of September, the two successive years differed considerably in tropospheric opacity. In 1986, water vapor and attendant opacity were generally lower, due to low tropospheric temperatures. Measured opacities were found to be higher than would be expected from the empirical relationships representing opacity as a function of water vapor column density at mm-wavelengths, as proposed by Rice and Ade (1979), Zammit and Ade (1981), and Liebe (1985).

  20. Solar neutrinos and the influence of radiative opacities on solar models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, T. R.; Ezer, D.; Stothers, R.

    1973-01-01

    Use of new radiative opacities based on the hot Thomas-Fermi model of the atom yields a predicted solar neutrino flux which is still considerably larger than the flux observed in Davis's Cl-37 experiment.

  1. Effects of Nongray Opacity on Radiatively Driven Wolf-Rayet Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onifer, A. J.; Gayley, K. G.

    2002-05-01

    Wolf-Rayet winds are characterized by their large momentum fluxes, and simulations of radiation driving have been increasingly successful in modeling these winds. Simple analytic approaches that help understand the most critical processes for copious momentum deposition already exist in the effectively gray approximation, but these have not been extended to more realistic nongray opacities. With this in mind, we have developed a simplified theory for describing the interaction of the stellar flux with nongray wind opacity. We replace the detailed line list with a set of statistical parameters that are sensitive not only to the strength but also the wavelength distribution of lines, incorporating as a free parameter the rate of photon frequency redistribution. We label the resulting flux-weighted opacity the statistical Sobolev- Rosseland (SSR) mean, and explore how changing these various statistical parameters affects the flux/opacity interaction. We wish to acknowledge NSF grant AST-0098155

  2. Large Enhancement in High-Energy Photoionization of Fe XVII and Missing Continuum Plasma Opacity.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Sultana N; Pradhan, Anil K

    2016-06-10

    Aimed at solving the outstanding problem of solar opacity, and radiation transport plasma models in general, we report substantial photoabsorption in the high-energy regime due to atomic core photoexcitations not heretofore considered. In extensive R-matrix calculations of unprecedented complexity for an important iron ion Fe xvii (Fe^{16+}), with a wave function expansion of 99 Fe xviii (Fe^{17+}) LS core states from n≤4 complexes (equivalent to 218 fine structure levels), we find (i) up to orders of magnitude enhancement in background photoionization cross sections, in addition to strongly peaked photo-excitation-of-core resonances not considered in current opacity models, and ii) demonstrate convergence with respect to successive core excitations. The resulting increase in the monochromatic continuum, and 35% in the Rosseland mean opacity, are compared with the "higher-than-predicted" iron opacity measured at the Sandia Z-pinch fusion device at solar interior conditions.

  3. Large Enhancement in High-Energy Photoionization of Fe XVII and Missing Continuum Plasma Opacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.; Pradhan, Anil K.

    2016-06-01

    Aimed at solving the outstanding problem of solar opacity, and radiation transport plasma models in general, we report substantial photoabsorption in the high-energy regime due to atomic core photoexcitations not heretofore considered. In extensive R -matrix calculations of unprecedented complexity for an important iron ion Fe xvii (Fe16 + ), with a wave function expansion of 99 Fe xviii (Fe17 + ) LS core states from n ≤4 complexes (equivalent to 218 fine structure levels), we find (i) up to orders of magnitude enhancement in background photoionization cross sections, in addition to strongly peaked photo-excitation-of-core resonances not considered in current opacity models, and ii) demonstrate convergence with respect to successive core excitations. The resulting increase in the monochromatic continuum, and 35% in the Rosseland mean opacity, are compared with the "higher-than-predicted" iron opacity measured at the Sandia Z -pinch fusion device at solar interior conditions.

  4. Data access service of China-VO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Jian; Zhao, Yong-Heng; Cui, Chen-Zhou

    2004-09-01

    With the development of technologies and the implementation of large quantity of astronomical observation projects, astronomy faces data avalanche and has entered an information era. A basic aim of the Virtual Observatory is to provide uniform access to highly distributed, complicated, huge astronomical datasets, and to realize federation of global astronomical data resources, so that astronomers can obtain required data efficiently and conveniently for their research. China Virtual Observatory (China-VO) project designs and implements astronomical data access services based on Grid technology, and provides uniform interface to Grid client application. In this paper, we introduce the data access service toolkit development using Globus Toolkit, the Grid services encapsulation of catalogs according to the latest astronomical data standards recommended by International Virtual Observatory Alliance, the implements of catalog Cone Search access service. Furthermore, we also introduce how to construct other Grid services using above data access services.

  5. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Soo-Chang

    2015-08-01

    We present a new catalog of galaxies in the wider region of the Virgo cluster, based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog (EVCC) covers an area of 725 deg2 or 60.1 Mpc2. It is 5.2 times larger than the footprint of the classical Virgo Cluster Catalog (VCC) and reaches out to 3.5 times the virial radius of the Virgo cluster. We selected 1324 spectroscopically targeted galaxies with radial velocities less than 3000 km s-1. In addition, 265 galaxies that have been overlooked in the SDSS spectroscopic survey but have available redshifts in the NASA Extragalactic Database are also included. Our selection process secured a total of 1589 galaxies, 676 of which are not included in the VCC. The certain and possible cluster members are defined by means of redshift comparison with a cluster infall model. We employed two independent and complementary galaxy classification schemes: the traditional morphological classification based on the visual inspection of optical images and a characterization of galaxies from their spectroscopic features. SDSS u, g, r, i, and z passband photometry of all EVCC galaxies was performed using Source Extractor. We compare the EVCC galaxies with the VCC in terms of morphology, spatial distribution, and luminosity function. The EVCC defines a comprehensive galaxy sample covering a wider range in galaxy density that is significantly different from the inner region of the Virgo cluster. It will be the foundation for forthcoming galaxy evolution studies in the extended Virgo cluster region, complementing ongoing and planned Virgo cluster surveys at various wavelengths.

  6. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Suk; Rey, Soo-Chang; Jerjen, Helmut; Lisker, Thorsten; Sung, Eon-Chang; Lee, Youngdae; Chung, Jiwon; Pak, Mina; Yi, Wonhyeong; Lee, Woong

    2014-12-01

    We present a new catalog of galaxies in the wider region of the Virgo cluster, based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog (EVCC) covers an area of 725 deg2 or 60.1 Mpc2. It is 5.2 times larger than the footprint of the classical Virgo Cluster Catalog (VCC) and reaches out to 3.5 times the virial radius of the Virgo cluster. We selected 1324 spectroscopically targeted galaxies with radial velocities less than 3000 km s-1. In addition, 265 galaxies that have been overlooked in the SDSS spectroscopic survey but have available redshifts in the NASA Extragalactic Database are also included. Our selection process secured a total of 1589 galaxies, 676 of which are not included in the VCC. The certain and possible cluster members are defined by means of redshift comparison with a cluster infall model. We employed two independent and complementary galaxy classification schemes: the traditional morphological classification based on the visual inspection of optical images and a characterization of galaxies from their spectroscopic features. SDSS u, g, r, i, and z passband photometry of all EVCC galaxies was performed using Source Extractor. We compare the EVCC galaxies with the VCC in terms of morphology, spatial distribution, and luminosity function. The EVCC defines a comprehensive galaxy sample covering a wider range in galaxy density that is significantly different from the inner region of the Virgo cluster. It will be the foundation for forthcoming galaxy evolution studies in the extended Virgo cluster region, complementing ongoing and planned Virgo cluster surveys at various wavelengths.

  7. THE EXTENDED VIRGO CLUSTER CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Suk; Rey, Soo-Chang; Lee, Youngdae; Chung, Jiwon; Pak, Mina; Yi, Wonhyeong; Lee, Woong; Jerjen, Helmut; Lisker, Thorsten; Sung, Eon-Chang

    2015-01-01

    We present a new catalog of galaxies in the wider region of the Virgo cluster, based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog (EVCC) covers an area of 725 deg{sup 2} or 60.1 Mpc{sup 2}. It is 5.2 times larger than the footprint of the classical Virgo Cluster Catalog (VCC) and reaches out to 3.5 times the virial radius of the Virgo cluster. We selected 1324 spectroscopically targeted galaxies with radial velocities less than 3000 km s{sup –1}. In addition, 265 galaxies that have been overlooked in the SDSS spectroscopic survey but have available redshifts in the NASA Extragalactic Database are also included. Our selection process secured a total of 1589 galaxies, 676 of which are not included in the VCC. The certain and possible cluster members are defined by means of redshift comparison with a cluster infall model. We employed two independent and complementary galaxy classification schemes: the traditional morphological classification based on the visual inspection of optical images and a characterization of galaxies from their spectroscopic features. SDSS u, g, r, i, and z passband photometry of all EVCC galaxies was performed using Source Extractor. We compare the EVCC galaxies with the VCC in terms of morphology, spatial distribution, and luminosity function. The EVCC defines a comprehensive galaxy sample covering a wider range in galaxy density that is significantly different from the inner region of the Virgo cluster. It will be the foundation for forthcoming galaxy evolution studies in the extended Virgo cluster region, complementing ongoing and planned Virgo cluster surveys at various wavelengths.

  8. Early solar mass loss, opacity uncertainties, and the solar abundance problem

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, Joyce Ann; Keady, John; Kilcrease, David

    2009-01-01

    Solar models calibrated with the new element abundance mixture of Asplund et al. published in 2005 no longer produce good agreement with the sound speed, convection zone depth, and convection zone helium abundance inferred from solar oscillation data. Attempts to modify the input physics of the standard model, for example, by including enhanced diffusion, increased opacities, accretion, convective overshoot, or gravity waves have not restored the good agreement attained with the prior abundances. Here we present new models including early mass loss via a stronger solar wind. Early mass loss has been investigated prior to the solar abundance problem to deplete lithium and resolve the 'faint early sun problem'. We find that mass loss modifies the core structure and deepens the convection zone, and so improves agreement with oscillation data using the new abundances: however the amount of mass loss must be small to avoid destroying all of the surface lithium, and agreement is not fully restored. We also considered the prospects for increasing solar interior opacities. In order to increase mixture opacities by the 30% required to mitigate the abundance problem, the opacities of individual elements (e.g., O, N, C, and Fe) must be revised by a factor of two to three for solar interior conditions: we are investigating the possibility of broader calculated line wings for bound-bound transitions at the relevant temperatures to enhance opacity. We find that including all of the elements in the AGS05 opacity mixture (through uranium at atomic number Z=92) instead of only the 17 elements in the OPAL opacity mixture increases opacities by a negligible 0.2%.

  9. Penetrating keratoplasty restoring vision in an unusual case of corneal opacity following exposure to Euphorbia latex.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Jayanta; Choudhury, Somnath; Lahiri, Kapildeb; Savale, Smruti; Banerjee, Monideepa; Datta, Himadri

    2015-10-01

    The milky sap of the Euphorbia plant is highly toxic and causes inflammation to the skin and eyes. Damage to the eye ranges from superficial epithelial defects, keratoconjunctivitis, mild to moderate corneal edema, anterior uveitis, Descemet membrane folds, raised intraocular pressure and rarely corneal opacity in severe untreated cases. Here we report a case of visual restoration by optical penetrating keratoplasty in a patient with severe corneal opacity following exposure to Euphorbia latex.

  10. Early Solar Mass Loss, Opacity Uncertainties, and the Solar Abundance Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzik, Joyce Ann; Keady, J. J.; Kilcrease, D. P.

    2009-09-01

    Solar models calibrated with the new element abundance mixture of Asplund et al. published in 2005 no longer produce good agreement with the sound speed, convection zone depth, and convection zone helium abundance inferred from solar oscillation data. Attempts to modify the input physics of the standard model, for example, by including enhanced diffusion, increased opacities, accretion, convective overshoot, or gravity waves have not restored the good agreement attained with the prior abundances. Here we present new models including early mass loss via a stronger solar wind. Early mass loss has been investigated prior to the solar abundance problem to deplete lithium and resolve the `faint early sun problem'. We find that mass loss modifies the core structure and deepens the convection zone, and so improves agreement with oscillation data using the new abundances; however the amount of mass loss must be small to avoid destroying all of the surface lithium, and agreement is not fully restored. We also considered the prospects for increasing solar interior opacities. In order to increase mixture opacities by the 30% required to mitigate the abundance problem, the opacities of individual elements (e.g., O, N, C, and Fe) must be revised by a factor of two to three for solar interior conditions; we are investigating the possibility of broader calculated line wings for bound-bound transitions at the relevant temperatures to enhance opacity. We find that including all of the elements in the AGS05 opacity mixture (through uranium at atomic number Z = 92) instead of only the 17 elements in the OPAL opacity mixture increases opacities by a negligible 0.2%.

  11. Experimental design to measure oxygen opacity at high density and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiter, Paul; Turck-Chieze, S.; Colgan, J.; Ducret, J.-E.; Fontes, C. J.; Guzik, J. A.; Kilcrease, D. P.; La Pennec, M.; Mancini, R. C.; Mussack, K.; Orban, C.; Perry, T. S.; Poole, P. L.; Trantham, Matt

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, there has been a debate over the abundances of heavy elements (Z >2) in the solar interior. Recent solar atmosphere models [Asplund 2009] find a significantly lower abundance for C, N, and O compared to models used roughly a decade ago. This discrepancy has led to an investigation of opacities through laboratory experiments and improved opacity models for many of the larger contributors to the sun's opacity, including iron and oxygen. Recent opacity measurements of iron disagree with opacity model predictions [Bailey et al., 2015]. Although these results are still controversial, repeated scrutiny of the experiment and data has not produced a conclusive reason for the discrepancy. New models have been implemented in the ATOMIC opacity code for C, O and Fe to address the solar abundance issue [Colgan, 2013]. Armstrong et al. [2014] have also implemented changes in the ATOMIC code for low-Z elements. However, no data currently exists to test the low-Z material models in the regime relevant to the solar convection zone. We present an experimental design using the opacity platform developed at the National Ignition Facility to study the oxygen opacity at densities and temperatures near the solar convection zone conditions. This work is funded by the U.S. DOE, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in HEDPLP, Grant No. DE-NA0001840, and the NLUF Program, Grant No. DE-NA0000850, and through LLE, University of Rochester by the NNSA/OICF under Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  12. Non-LTE H2+ as the source of missing opacity in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swamy, K. S. K.; Stecher, T. P.

    1974-01-01

    The population of the various vibrational levels of the H2+ molecule has been calculated from the consideration of formation and destruction mechanisms. The resulting population is used in calculating the total absorption due to H2+ and is compared with the other known sources of opacity at several optical depths of the solar atmosphere. It is shown that the absorption due to H2+ can probably account for the missing ultraviolet opacity in the solar atmosphere.

  13. Efficacy of Systemic Vitamin C Supplementation in Reducing Corneal Opacity Resulting from Infectious Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yong-Wun; Yoo, Woong-Sun; Kim, Seong-Jae; Chung, In-Young; Seo, Seong-Wook; Yoo, Ji-Myong

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to determine the effect of vitamin C supplementation on reducing the size of corneal opacity resulting from infectious keratitis. The study included 82 patients (82 affected eyes), admitted for infectious keratitis from January 2009 to August 2013, who were followed for more than 3 months. Patients were divided into control, oral vitamin C (3 g/d), and intravenous vitamin C (20 g/d) groups during hospitalization. Corneal opacity sizes were measured using anterior segment photographs and Image J program (version 1.27; National Institutes of Health, Jinju, South Korea) at admission, discharge, and final follow-up. The corneal opacity size used for analysis was the measured opacity size divided by the size of the whole cornea. The corneal opacity size decreased by 0.03 ± 0.10 in the oral vitamin C group, 0.07 ± 0.22 in the intravenous vitamin C group, and 0.02 ± 0.15 in the control group. Intravenous vitamin C reduced the corneal opacity size more than oral vitamin C (P = 0.043). Intravenous vitamin C produced greater reduction in corneal opacity size in younger patients (P = 0.015) and those with a hypopyon (P = 0.036). Systemic vitamin C supplementation reduced the size of corneal opacity resulting from infectious keratitis. Intravenous vitamin C was more beneficial than oral supplementation, especially in younger patients and those with hypopyon. PMID:25415664

  14. Free-free opacity in dense plasmas with an average atom model

    DOE PAGES

    Shaffer, Nathaniel R.; Ferris, Natalie G.; Colgan, James Patrick; ...

    2017-02-28

    A model for the free-free opacity of dense plasmas is presented. The model uses a previously developed average atom model, together with the Kubo-Greenwood model for optical conductivity. This, in turn, is used to calculate the opacity with the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations. Furthermore, comparisons to other methods for dense deuterium results in excellent agreement with DFT-MD simulations, and reasonable agreement with a simple Yukawa screening model corrected to satisfy the conductivity sum rule.

  15. The College Catalog as a Contract.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherry, Robert L., Jr.; Geary, John P.

    1992-01-01

    Examines whether the college catalog and language therein constitute a legally binding contract between college and student. Categorizes catalog litigation by cases involving dismissal, granting of degrees, tuition, admission, and course offerings. The courts appear to agree that the student-college relationship is contractual in nature and that…

  16. Design for an Adaptive Library Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckland, Michael K.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes OASIS, a prototype adaptive online catalog implemented as a front end to the University of California MELVYL catalog. Topics addressed include the concept of adaptive retrieval systems, strategic search commands, feedback, prototyping using a front-end, the problem of excessive retrieval, commands to limit or increase search results, and…

  17. Short Films for Physics Teaching, A Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bluestone, Barbara Z.; Roth, Richard F.

    This annotated film catalog is a product of the Conference on Single Concept Films in College Physics Teaching sponsored by the Commission on College Physics. Both 8mm and 16mm single concept films are listed for physics and related disciplines. The catalog includes commercial, noncommercial, and foreign films. However, the film coverage was…

  18. DIRAC File Replica and Metadata Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Poss, S.

    2012-12-01

    File replica and metadata catalogs are essential parts of any distributed data management system, which are largely determining its functionality and performance. A new File Catalog (DFC) was developed in the framework of the DIRAC Project that combines both replica and metadata catalog functionality. The DFC design is based on the practical experience with the data management system of the LHCb Collaboration. It is optimized for the most common patterns of the catalog usage in order to achieve maximum performance from the user perspective. The DFC supports bulk operations for replica queries and allows quick analysis of the storage usage globally and for each Storage Element separately. It supports flexible ACL rules with plug-ins for various policies that can be adopted by a particular community. The DFC catalog allows to store various types of metadata associated with files and directories and to perform efficient queries for the data based on complex metadata combinations. Definition of file ancestor-descendent relation chains is also possible. The DFC catalog is implemented in the general DIRAC distributed computing framework following the standard grid security architecture. In this paper we describe the design of the DFC and its implementation details. The performance measurements are compared with other grid file catalog implementations. The experience of the DFC Catalog usage in the CLIC detector project are discussed.

  19. Cataloging. ERIC Processing Manual, Section V.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weller, Carolyn R., Ed.

    Rules and guidelines are provided for ERIC catalogers and editors engaged in capturing bibliographic data for the documents and journal articles entered into the ERIC database. A general discussion of the principles of ERIC cataloging, definitions used, use of mandatory vs. optional data elements, etc. is provided in the Introduction. The body…

  20. Catalog of School Reform Models. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    This catalog describes 44 school-reform models. It was prepared for the U.S. Department of Education in direct response to the Comprehensive School Reform Demonstration program. The catalog's purpose is to aid schools, school districts, and states as they investigate external models that can be incorporated into comprehensive school-reform…

  1. Language and Cultural Minorities Resource Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agell, Charlotte, Comp.; And Others

    The revised and expanded 1992 version of the catalog lists almost 1,000 print and nonprint materials for use in elementary and secondary schools with linguistic minorities. The catalog contains 20 sections: Afghan; Asian and refugee; bilingual education; Chinese; civil rights; Poland; English as a Second Language (ESL); ESL instructional…

  2. Automated Title Page Cataloging: A Feasibility Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weibel, Stuart; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes the design of a prototype rule-based system for the automation of descriptive cataloging from title pages. The discussion covers the results of tests of the prototype, major impediments to automatic cataloging from title pages, and prospects for further progress. The rules implemented in the prototype are appended. (16 references)…

  3. The effect of Livermore OPAL opacities on the evolutionary masses of RR Lyrae stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Sukyoung; Lee, Young-Wook; Demarque, Pierre

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of the new Livermore OPAL opacities on the evolution of horizontal-branch (HB) stars. This work was motivated by the recent stellar pulsation calculations using the new Livermore opacities, which suggest that the masses of double-mode RR Lyrae stars are 0.1-0.2 solar mass larger than those based on earlier opacities. Unlike the pulsation calculations, we find that the effect of opacity change on the evolution of HB stars is not significant. In particular, the effect of the mean masses of RR Lyrae stars is very small, showing a decrease of only 0.01-0.02 solar mass compared to the models based on old Cox-Stewart opacities. Consequently, with the new Livermore OPAL opacities, both the stellar pulsation and evolution models now predict approximately the same masses for the RR Lyrae stars. Our evolutionary models suggest that the mean masses of the RR Lyrae stars are about 0.76 and about 0.71 solar mass for M15 (Oosterhoff group II) and M3 (group I), respectively. If (alpha/Fe) = 0.4, these values are decreased by about 0.03 solar mass. Variations of the mean masses of RR Lyrae stars with HB morphology and metallicity are also presented.

  4. Dust opacities inside the dust devil column in the Taklimakan Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Zhaopeng; Han, Yongxiang; Zhao, Tianliang; Liu, Feng; Liu, Chong; Rood, Mark J.; Yang, Xinghua; He, Qing; Lu, Huichao

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of dust aerosols in dust devils (DDs) is quantitatively characterized here based on a field observation. We applied the digital optical method (DOM) with digital still cameras to quantify the opacity of the DDs in the Taklimakan Desert, China. This study presents the following unique and important results: (1) the distinct horizontal distributions of opacity proved the existence of DDs' eye, similarly to the eye of tropical cyclone; (2) the opacity of the DDs decreases with increasing height; however, the dust aerosols do appear to settle out, and the relatively calm eye leads to a minimum in dust opacity at the eye; (3) the horizontal distribution of opacity is quasi-symmetric with a bimodal across the eye of the DDs, which could be resulted from the ambient air conditions; and (4) a new method is developed for characterizing the three-dimensional structure of DDs based on the observed two-dimensional opacity provided by DOM. This study not only proposes a highly reliable, low-cost and efficient methodology to capture the optical structure of DDs, but it could also provide the information on estimation of dust emissions driven by DDs.

  5. Validation of the digital opacity compliance system under regulatory enforcement conditions.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Michael J; Rasmussen, Steve L; Stone, Daniel A; Palmer, Glenn R; Wander, Joseph D

    2006-09-01

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Emission Measurement Center in conjunction with EPA Regions VI and VIII, the state of Utah, and the U.S. Department of Defense have conducted a series of long-term pilot and field tests to determine the accuracy and reliability of a visible opacity monitoring system consisting of a conventional digital camera and a separate computer software application for plume opacity determination. This technology, known as the Digital Opacity Compliance System (DOCS), has been successfully demonstrated at EPA-sponsored Method-9 "smoke schools", as well as at a number of government and commercially operated industrial facilities. Results from the current DOCS regulatory pilot study demonstrated that, under regulatory enforcement conditions, the average difference in opacity measurement between the DOCS technology and EPA Reference Method 9 (Method 9) was 1.12%. This opacity difference, which was computed from the evaluation of 241 regulated air sources, was found to be statistically significant at the 99% confidence level. In evaluating only those sources for which a nonzero visible opacity level was recorded, the

  6. Catalog of Infrared Observations, Third Edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Schmitz, Marion; Pitts, Patricia S.; Mead, Jaylee M.

    1993-01-01

    The Far Infrared Supplement contains a subset of the data in the full Catalog of Infrared Observations (all observations at wavelengths greater than 4.6 microns). The Catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO), NASA RP-1294, is a compilation of infrared astronomical observational data obtained from an extensive literature search of scientific journals and major astronomical catalogs and surveys. The literature search is complete for years 1965 through 1990 in this Third Edition. The Catalog contains about 210,000 observations of roughly 20,000 individual sources and supporting appendices. The expanded Third Edition contains coded IRAS 4-band data for all CIO sources detected by IRAS. The appendices include an atlas of infrared source positions (also included in this volume), two bibliographies of Catalog listings, and an atlas of infrared spectral ranges. The complete CIO database is available to qualified users in printed, microfiche, and magnetic-tape formats.

  7. Functional Characterization of Antibodies against Neisseria gonorrhoeae Opacity Protein Loops

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Jessica G.; Jerse, Ann E.

    2009-01-01

    Background The development of a gonorrhea vaccine is challenged by the lack of correlates of protection. The antigenically variable neisserial opacity (Opa) proteins are expressed during infection and have a semivariable (SV) and highly conserved (4L) loop that could be targeted in a vaccine. Here we compared antibodies to linear (Ablinear) and cyclic (Abcyclic) peptides that correspond to the SV and 4L loops and selected hypervariable (HV2) loops for surface-binding and protective activity in vitro and in vivo. Methods/Findings AbSV cyclic bound a greater number of different Opa variants than AbSV linear, including variants that differed by seven amino acids. Antibodies to the 4L peptide did not bind Opa-expressing bacteria. AbSV cyclic and AbHV2 cyclic, but not AbSV linear or AbHV2 linear agglutinated homologous Opa variants, and AbHV2BD cyclic but not AbHV2BD linear blocked the association of OpaB variants with human endocervical cells. Only AbHV2BD linear were bactericidal against the serum resistant parent strain. Consistent with host restrictions in the complement cascade, the bactericidal activity of AbHV2BD linear was increased 8-fold when rabbit complement was used. None of the antibodies was protective when administered vaginally to mice. Antibody duration in the vagina was short-lived, however, with <50% of the antibodies recovered 3 hrs post-administration. Conclusions We conclude that an SV loop-specific cyclic peptide can be used to induce antibodies that recognize a broad spectrum of antigenically distinct Opa variants and have agglutination abilities. HV2 loop-specific cyclic peptides elicited antibodies with agglutination and adherence blocking abilities. The use of human complement when testing the bactericidal activity of vaccine-induced antibodies against serum resistant gonococci is also important. PMID:19956622

  8. Exploring central opacity and asymptotic scenarios in elastic hadron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagundes, D. A.; Menon, M. J.; Silva, P. V. R. G.

    2016-02-01

    In the absence of a global description of the experimental data on elastic and soft diffractive scattering from the first principles of QCD, model-independent analyses may provide useful phenomenological insights for the development of the theory in the soft sector. With that in mind, we present an empirical study on the energy dependence of the ratio X between the elastic and total cross sections; a quantity related to the evolution of the hadronic central opacity. The dataset comprises all the experimental information available on proton-proton and antiproton-proton scattering in the c.m. energy interval 5 GeV-8 TeV. Generalizing previous works, we discuss four model-independent analytical parameterizations for X, consisting of sigmoid functions composed with elementary functions of the energy and three distinct asymptotic scenarios: either the standard black disk limit or scenarios above or below that limit. Our two main conclusions are the following: (1) although consistent with the experimental data, the black disk does not represent an unique solution; (2) the data reductions favor a semi-transparent scenario, with asymptotic average value for the ratio X bar = 0.30 ± 0.12. In this case, within the uncertainty, the asymptotic regime may already be reached around 1000 TeV. We present a comparative study of the two scenarios, including predictions for the inelastic channel (diffraction dissociation) and the ratio associated with the total cross-section and the elastic slope. Details on the selection of our empirical ansatz for X and physical aspects related to a change of curvature in this quantity at 80-100 GeV, indicating the beginning of a saturation effect, are also presented and discussed.

  9. Graphical User Interfaces and Library Systems: End-User Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorn, Margaret; Marshall, Lucy

    1995-01-01

    Describes a study by Parke-Davis Pharmaceutical Research Library to determine user satisfaction with the graphical user interface-based (GUI) Dynix Marquis compared with the text-based Dynix Classic Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC). Results show that the GUI-based OPAC was preferred by endusers over the text-based OPAC. (eight references) (DGM)

  10. Overview of Graphical User Interfaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulser, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    Discussion of graphical user interfaces for online public access catalogs (OPACs) covers the history of OPACs; OPAC front-end design, including examples from Indiana University and the University of Illinois; and planning and implementation of a user interface. (10 references) (EA)

  11. A Catalog of Geologic Data for the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Mackley, Rob D.

    2005-08-01

    This revision of the geologic data catalog incorporates new boreholes drilled after September 2002 as well as other older wells, particularly from the 600 Area, omitted from the earlier catalogs. Additionally, borehole geophysical log data have been added to the catalog. This version of the geologic data catalog now contains 3,519 boreholes and is current with boreholes drilled as of November 2004.

  12. Specifications for a COM Catalog Designed for Government Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Nora S.; And Others

    Prepared in MARC format in accordance with the Ohio College Library Center (OCLC) standards, these specifications were developed at Colorado State University to catalog a group of government publications not listed in the Monthly Catalog of United States Publications. The resulting microfiche catalog produced through the OCLC Cataloging Subsystem…

  13. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE SECOND SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, P. L.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Antolini, E.; Bonamente, E.; Atwood, W. B.; Belfiore, A.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Bignami, G. F. E-mail: Gino.Tosti@pg.infn.it E-mail: tburnett@u.washington.edu; and others

    2012-04-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy {gamma}-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24 month period. The second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in five energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely {gamma}-ray-producing source classes.

  14. Fermi Large Area Telescope Second Source Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolan, P. L.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E; Bonnell, J.; Cannon, A.; Celik O.; Corbet, R.; Davis, D. S.; DeCesar, M. E.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Johnson, T. E.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E; Perkins, J. S.; Racusin, J. L; Scargle, J. D.; Stephens, T. E.; Thompson, D. J.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24-month period. The Second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in 5 energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 11eV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely gamma-ray-producing source classes.

  15. The catalogCleaner: Separating the Sheep from the Goats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, K.; Hankin, S. C.; Schweitzer, R.; Koyuk, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Global Earth Observation Integrated Data Environment (GEO-IDE) is NOAA's effort to successfully integrate data and information with partners in the national US-Global Earth Observation System (US-GEO) and the international Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). As part of the GEO-IDE, the Unified Access Framework (UAF) is working to build momentum towards the goal of increased data integration and interoperability. The UAF project is moving towards this goal with an approach that includes leveraging well known and widely used standards and focusing initially on well understood data types, such as gridded data from climate models. This phased approach serves to engage data providers and users and also has a high probability of demonstrable successes. The UAF project shares the widely held conviction that the use of data standards is a key ingredient necessary to achieve interoperability. Many community-based consensus standards fail, though, due to poor compliance. Compliance problems emerge for many reasons: because the standards evolve through versions, because documentation is ambiguous or because individual data providers find the standard inadequate as-is to meet their special needs. In addition, minimalist use of standards will lead to a compliant service, but one which is of low quality. For example, serving five hundred individual files from a single climate model might be compliant, but enhancing the service so that those files are all aggregated together into one virtual dataset and available through a single access URL provides a much more useful service. The UAF project began showcasing the advantages of providing compliant data by manually building a master catalog generated from hand-picked THREDDS servers. With an understanding that educating data managers to provide standards compliant data and metadata can take years, the UAF project wanted to continue increasing the volume of data served through the master catalog as much as

  16. Risk Factors for Incident Cortical, Nuclear, Posterior Subcapsular, and Mixed Lens Opacities: The Los Angeles Latino Eye Study

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Grace M.; Choudhury, Farzana; Torres, Mina; Azen, Stanley P.; Varma, Rohit

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To identify socio-demographic and biological risk factors associated with the 4-year incidence of nuclear, cortical, posterior sub-capsular (PSC), and mixed lens opacities. Design Population-based, longitudinal study. Participants Four thousand six hundred fifty-eight Latinos 40 years and older from 6 census tracts in Los Angeles, California. Methods Participants underwent an interview and detailed eye examination, including best-corrected visual acuity and slit-lamp assessment of lens opacities using the Lens Opacities Classification System II at baseline and again 4 years later. Each opacity type was defined in persons with a LOCS II score of 2 or more. Univariate and forward stepwise logistic regression analyses were used to identify independent baseline risk factors associated with 4-year incidence of nuclear only, cortical only, PSC only, and mixed (when more than one opacity type developed in a person) lens opacities. These comprised 4 mutually exclusive groups, and were based on person rather than eye. Main Outcome Measures Odds ratios for independent risk factors associated with 4-year incidence of nuclear-only, cortical-only, PSC-only, and mixed lens opacities. Results Of the 3471 participants with gradable lenses in the same eye at baseline and 4-year follow-up, 200 (5.8%) had incident nuclear-only opacities, 151(4.1%) had incident cortical-only opacities, 16 (0.5%) had incident PSC-only lens opacities, and 88 (2.5%) had mixed lens opacities. Independent baseline risk factors for incident nuclear-only lens opacities included older age, current smoking, and presence of diabetes. Independent risk factors for incident cortical-only lens opacities included older age and having diabetes at baseline. Female gender was an independent risk factor for incident PSC-only lens opacities. Older age, and presence of diabetes at baseline exam were independent risk factors for incident mixed lens opacities. Specifically, in diabetics, higher levels of hemoglobin

  17. Experimental Validation of Modeled Fe Opacities at Conditions Approaching the Base of the Solar Convection Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, Taisuke

    2013-10-01

    Knowledge of the Sun is a foundation for other stars. However, after the solar abundance revision in 2005, standard solar models disagree with helioseismic measurements particularly at the solar convection zone base (CZB, r ~ 0 . 7 ×RSun) [Basu, et al., Physics Reports 457, 217 (2008)]. One possible explanation is an underestimate in the Fe opacity at the CZB [Bailey et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 058101 (2009)]. Modeled opacities are important physics inputs for plasma simulations (e.g. standard solar models). However, modeled opacities are not experimentally validated at high temperatures because of three challenging criteria required for reliable opacity measurements: 1) smooth and strong backlighter, 2) plasma condition uniformity, and 3) simultaneous measurements of plasma condition and transmission. Fe opacity experiments are performed at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Z-machine aiming at conditions close to those at the CZB (i.e. Te = 190 eV, ne = 1 ×1023 cm-3). To verify the quality of the experiments, it is critical to investigate how well the three requirements are satisfied. The smooth and strong backlighter is provided by the SNL Z-pinch dynamic hohlraum. Fe plasma condition is measured by mixing Mg into the Fe sample and employing Mg K-shell line transmission spectroscopy. Also, an experiment is designed and performed to measure the level of non-uniformity in the Fe plasma by mixing Al and Mg dopants on the opposite side of the Fe sample and analyzing their spectra. We will present quantitative results on these investigations as well as the comparison of the measured opacity to modeled opacities. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Lens opacity based modelling of the age-related straylight increase.

    PubMed

    Rozema, Jos J; Sanchez, Victoria; Artal, Natalia; Gramajo, Ana L; Torres, Eduardo; Luna, Jose D; Iribarren, Rafael; Tassignon, Marie-José; Juarez, Claudio P

    2015-12-01

    This work studies ethnic and geographical differences in the age-related straylight increase by means of a stochastic model and unpublished lens opacity data of 559 residents of Villa Maria (Argentina), as well as data of 912 Indonesian subjects published previously by Husain et al. For both cohorts the prevalence of each type and grade of lens opacity was determined as a function of age, from which a stochastic model was derived capable of simulating the lens opacity prevalence for both populations. These simulated lens opacity data were then converted to estimated straylight by means of an equation derived from previously recorded data of 107 eyes with varying degrees of cataract. Based on these opacity templates 2500 random sets of subject age and lens opacity data were generated by the stochastic model for each dataset, from which estimated straylight could be calculated. For the Argentinian data the estimated straylight was found to closely resemble the published models for age-related straylight increase. For younger eyes the straylight variation of the model was the same as what was previously published (in both cases ±0.200logunits), which doubled in size for older eyes. For the Indonesian data, however, this age-related straylight increase was found to be fundamentally different from the published age model. This suggests that current normative curves for age-related straylight increase may not always be appropriate for non-European populations, and that the inter-individual straylight variations in young, healthy eyes may possibly be due to variations in lens opacities.

  19. The influence of urban area opacity on biologically active UV-B irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubarova, Nataly; Rozental', Victor

    2013-04-01

    The study of UV irradiance changes in urban area is an essential problem due to the significant effect of UV irradiance on human health which can be positive (vitamin D synthesis) and negative (erythema, skin cancer, eye damage). According to the results of several experiments within the Moscow megacity we studied the effects of urban area opacity on the different types of biologically active UV-B irradiance on the base of a specially developed mobile photometric complex snd additional measurements of the urban opacity by Nikon Fisheye Converter FC-E8. We analyzed both the level of erythemally-active irradiance and the UV eye damaging radiation using the broadband UVB-1 YES pyranometer calibrated against ultraviolet spectroradiometer Bentham DTM-300 of the Medical University of Innsbruck (courtesy of Dr. M.Blumthaler). In order to estimate the effects of the urban opacity the measurements were normalized on similar measurements at the Meteorological Observatory of Moscow State University with zero opacity. This ratio is defined as an urban radiative transmittance (URT). Different atmospheric conditions were considered. In cloudy conditions the effect of opacity on URT is much less than that in conditions when the sun disk is open from clouds. We revealed some spectral features in transmittance of biologically active UV-B irradiance which is characterized by higher URT variations in overcast cloudy conditions due to more intensive scattering and smaller direct solar radiation component. In the absence of cloudiness the effect of opacity was studied for open and screening solar disk conditions. We obtained much higher URT in UVB spectral region compared with that for total solar irradiance for screening solar disk conditions with a significant URT dependence on the opacity only in UVB spectral region. No URT dependence was obtained for total solar irradiance in these conditions. Some model calculations were fulfilled to match the experimental results.

  20. Iron Opacity Bump Changes the Stability and Structure of Accretion Disks in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan-Fei; Davis, Shane W.; Stone, James M.

    2016-08-01

    Accretion disks around supermassive black holes have regions where the Rosseland mean opacity can be larger than the electron scattering opacity due to the large number of bound-bound transitions in iron. We study the effects of this iron opacity “bump” on the thermal stability and vertical structure of radiation-pressure-dominated accretion disks, utilizing three-dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations in the local shearing box approximation. The simulations self-consistently calculate the heating due to MHD turbulence caused by magneto-rotational instability and radiative cooling by using the radiative transfer module based on a variable Eddington tensor in Athena. For a 5 × 108 solar mass black hole with ˜3% of the Eddington luminosity, a model including the iron opacity bump maintains its structure for more than 10 thermal times without showing significant signs of thermal runaway. In contrast, if only electron scattering and free-free opacity are included as in the standard thin disk model, the disk collapses on the thermal timescale. The difference is caused by a combination of (1) an anti-correlation between the total optical depth and the midplane pressure, and (2) enhanced vertical advective energy transport. These results suggest that the iron opacity bump may have a strong impact on the stability and structure of active galactic nucleus (AGN) accretion disks, and may contribute to a dependence of AGN properties on metallicity. Since this opacity is relevant primarily in UV emitting regions of the flow, it may help to explain discrepancies between observation and theory that are unique to AGNs.

  1. Experimental investigation of opacity models for stellar interiors, inertial fusion, and high energy density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, James

    2008-11-01

    Theoretical opacities are required for calculating energy transport in plasmas. In particular, understanding stellar interiors, inertial fusion, and Z-pinches depends on the opacities of mid-atomic-number elements in the 150-300 eV temperature range. These models are complex and experimental validation is crucial. For example, solar models presently disagree with helioseismology and one possible explanation is inadequate opacities. Testing these opacities requires a uniform plasma at temperatures high enough to produce the ion charge states that exist in the sun. Typical opacity experiments heat a sample using x-rays and measure the spectrally resolved transmission with a backlight. The difficulty grows as the temperature increases because the heating x-ray source must supply more energy and the backlighter source must be bright enough to overwhelm the plasma self emission. These problems were overcome using the dynamic hohlraum x-ray source at Sandia's Z facility to measure the transmission of a mixed Mg-Fe plasma heated above 150 eV. This capability will also advance opacity science for other high energy density plasmas. This tutorial describes opacity experiment challenges including accurate transmission measurements, plasma diagnostics, and quantitative model comparisons. The solar interior serves as a focal problem and Z facility experiments are used to illustrate the techniques. **In collaboration with C. Iglesias (LLNL), R. Mancini (U. Nevada), J.MacFarlane, I. Golovkin and P. Wang (Prism), C. Blancard, Ph. Cosse, G. Faussurier, F. Gilleron, and J.C. Pain (CEA), J. Abdallah Jr. (LANL), and G.A. Rochau and P.W. Lake (Sandia). ++Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Microbial identification by mass cataloging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhengdong; Jackson, George W; Fox, George E; Willson, Richard C

    2006-01-01

    Background The public availability of over 180,000 bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences has facilitated microbial identification and classification using hybridization and other molecular approaches. In their usual format, such assays are based on the presence of unique subsequences in the target RNA and require a prior knowledge of what organisms are likely to be in a sample. They are thus limited in generality when analyzing an unknown sample. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of catalogs of masses to characterize the bacterial 16S rRNA(s) in any sample. Sample nucleic acids are digested with a nuclease of known specificity and the products characterized using mass spectrometry. The resulting catalogs of masses can subsequently be compared to the masses known to occur in previously-sequenced 16S rRNAs allowing organism identification. Alternatively, if the organism is not in the existing database, it will still be possible to determine its genetic affinity relative to the known organisms. Results Ribonuclease T1 and ribonuclease A digestion patterns were calculated for 1,921 complete 16S rRNAs. Oligoribonucleotides generated by RNase T1 of length 9 and longer produce sufficient diversity of masses to be informative. In addition, individual fragments or combinations thereof can be used to recognize the presence of specific organisms in a complex sample. In this regard, 140 strains out of 1,921 organisms (7.3%) could be identified by the presence of a unique RNase T1-generated oligoribonucleotide mass. Combinations of just two and three oligoribonucleotide masses allowed 54% and 72% of the specific strains to be identified, respectively. An initial algorithm for recovering likely organisms present in complex samples is also described. Conclusion The use of catalogs of compositions (masses) of characteristic oligoribonucleotides for microbial identification appears extremely promising. RNase T1 is more useful than ribonuclease A in generating characteristic

  3. Online catalog of world-wide test sites for the post-launch characterization and calibration of optical sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, G.; Christopherson, J.B.; Stensaas, G.L.; Teillet, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    In an era when the number of Earth-observing satellites is rapidly growing and measurements from these sensors are used to answer increasingly urgent global issues, it is imperative that scientists and decision-makers can rely on the accuracy of Earth-observing data products. The characterization and calibration of these sensors are vital to achieve an integrated Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) for coordinated and sustained observations of Earth. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as a supporting member of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) and GEOSS, is working with partners around the world to establish an online catalog of prime candidate test sites for the post-launch characterization and calibration of space-based optical imaging sensors. The online catalog provides easy public Web site access to this vital information for the global community. This paper describes the catalog, the test sites, and the methodologies to use the test sites. It also provides information regarding access to the online catalog and plans for further development of the catalog in cooperation with calibration specialists from agencies and organizations around the world. Through greater access to and understanding of these vital test sites and their use, the validity and utility of information gained from Earth remote sensing will continue to improve. Copyright IAF/IAA. All rights reserved.

  4. Catalog of infrared observations. Part 2: Appendixes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Schmitz, Marion; Mead, Jaylee M.

    1987-01-01

    The Catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO) is a compilation of infrared astronomical observational data obtained from an extensive literature search of astronomical journals and major astronomical catalogs and surveys. The literature searches are complete for years 1965 to 1986. Supporting appendixes are published in this part. The appendices include an atlas of infrared source positions, two bibliographies of infrared literature upon which the search was based, and, keyed to the main Catalog listings (organized alphabetically by first author, and by date), an atlas of infrared spectral ranges, and IRAS data for the CIO sources. The complete CIO database is available to qualified users in printed microfiche and magnetic tape formats.

  5. NASA Video Catalog. Supplement 12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This report lists 1878 video productions from the NASA STI Database. This issue of the NASA Video Catalog cites video productions listed in the NASA STI Database. The videos listed have been developed by the NASA centers, covering Shuttle mission press conferences; fly-bys of planets; aircraft design, testing and performance; environmental pollution; lunar and planetary exploration; and many other categories related to manned and unmanned space exploration. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied by an abstract. The listing of the entries is arranged by STAR categories. A complete Table of Contents describes the scope of each category. For users with specific information, a Title Index is available. A Subject Term Index, based on the NASA Thesaurus, is also included. Guidelines for usage of NASA audio/visual material, ordering information, and order forms are also available.

  6. WGCEP Historical California Earthquake Catalog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Felzer, Karen R.; Cao, Tianqing

    2008-01-01

    This appendix provides an earthquake catalog for California and the surrounding area. Our goal is to provide a listing for all known M > 5.5 earthquakes that occurred from 1850-1932 and all known M > 4.0 earthquakes that occurred from 1932-2006 within the region of 31.0 to 43.0 degrees North and -126.0 to -114.0 degrees West. Some pre-1932 earthquakes 4 5, before the Northern California network was online. Some earthquakes from 1900-1932, and particularly from 1910-1932 are also based on instrumental readings, but the quality of the instrumental record and the resulting analysis are much less precise than for later listings. A partial exception is for some of the largest earthquakes, such as the San Francisco earthquake of April 18, 1906, for which global teleseismic records (Wald et al. 1993) and geodetic measurements (Thatcher et al. 1906) have been used to help determine magnitudes.

  7. Data catalog of satellite experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This catalog is divided into three sections: data description contains descriptions of data available at or through NSSDC as well as descriptions of the experiments and spacecraft from which the data originated; and supporting data contains brief descriptions of space environment models and programs distributed by NSSDC. Section 3 is a series of indexes that contain: (1) a listing of all spacecraft, experiment, and data descriptions presented in Section 1 plus tables indicating the period for which each spacecraft was operational; (2) an index of all spacecraft described here, identified by common names and alternate names; (3) a listing of the original experiment institutions for all experiments described; (4) a listing of the investigators associated with the experiments and their current affiliations; and (5) an index of all experiments sorted by phenomenon measured.

  8. NASA Video Catalog. Supplement 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This issue of the NASA Video Catalog cites video productions listed in the NASA STI Database. The videos listed have been developed by the NASA centers, covering Shuttle mission press conferences; fly-bys of planets; aircraft design, testing and performance; environmental pollution; lunar and planetary exploration; and many other categories related to manned and unmanned space exploration. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied by an abstract. The Table of Contents shows how the entries are arranged by divisions and categories according to the NASA Scope and Coverage Category Guide. For users with specific information, a Title Index is available. A Subject Term Index, based on the NASA Thesaurus, is also included. Guidelines for usage of NASA audio/visual material, ordering information, and order forms are also available.

  9. The degree of roentgenographic parenchymal opacities attributable to smoking among asbestos-exposed subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhart, S.; Thornquist, M.; Omenn, G.S.; Goodman, G.; Feigl, P.; Rosenstock, L. )

    1990-05-01

    Considerable controversy surrounds the question of whether cigarette smoking has the potential to increase the prevalence of small opacities on chest roentgenographs among asbestos-exposed workers. To compare the relative contribution of smoking with other predictors of the presence of roentgenographic small opacities, we examined 661 men enrolled in a double-blind, randomized trial designed to assess the efficacy of vitamin A and beta-carotene in the prevention of lung cancer among workers with heavy occupational asbestos exposure. Subjects in the study population had a mean latency of 35 yr from first asbestos exposure and a mean of 28 yr in their trade. The prevalence of roentgenographic abnormalities consistent with asbestos exposure was 26% for pleural abnormalities alone, 10% for parenchymal abnormalities alone, and 20% for pleural and parenchymal abnormalities together. We investigated occupation, age, latency from first asbestos exposure, and smoking status as predictors of roentgenographic small opacities. Smoking history, independent of latency, contributed to the prevalence and extent of small opacities, but its effect was less than that of latency. We conclude, that in the setting of heavy occupational exposure to asbestos, cigarette smoking confers added risk for the development of roentgenographic small opacities.

  10. Iron and Nickel spectral opacity calculations in conditions relevant for pulsating stellar envelopes and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilles, D.; Turck-Chièze, S.; Busquet, M.; Thais, F.; Loisel, G.; Piau, L.; Ducret, J. E.; Blenski, T.; Blancard, C.; Cossé, P.; Faussurier, G.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J. C.; Porcherot, Q.; Guzik, J. A.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Magee, N. H.; Harris, J.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Delahaye, F.; Zeippen, C. J.

    2013-11-01

    Seismology of stars is strongly developing. To address this question we have formed an international collaboration, OPAC, to perform specific experimental measurements, compare opacity calculations, and improve the opacity calculations in stellar codes [1]. We consider the following opacity codes: SCO, CASSANDRA, STA, OPAS, LEDCOP, OP, SCO-RCG. Their comparison has shown large differences for Fe and Ni in equivalent conditions of envelopes of type II supernova precursors, temperatures between 15 and 40 eV and densities of a few mg/cm3 [2-4]. LEDCOP, OPAS, SCO-RCG structure codes and STA give similar results and differ from OP ones for the lower temperatures and for spectral interval values [3]. In this work we discuss the role of Configuration Interaction (CI) and the influence of the number of used configurations. We present and include in the opacity code comparisons new HULLAC-v9 calculations [5, 6] that include full CI. To illustrate the importance of this effect we compare different CI approximations (modes) available in HULLAC-v9 [7]. These results are compared to previous predictions and to experimental data. Differences with OP results are discussed.

  11. The LIBS Internet Access Software: An Overview and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanton, Deidre E.; Hooper, Todd

    1992-01-01

    Describes and evaluates LIBS Internet Access Software (also called Sonoma Software), which offers automatic Telnet connection to remote library catalogs, databases, information services, campuswide information services, and other wide-area information access tools. Instructions for obtaining and installing the software are given, and a comparison…

  12. Collision-Resolution Algorithms and Random-Access Communications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    DOCUMENTATION PAGE BEFORE COMPLETING FORM 2GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER S. TYPJLCI REPORT IS PUMAERED -- COMMNIC ~fus S.PERFORMING...performance of random-access algorithms that in- corporate these algorithms. The first and most important of these is the con- ditional mean CRI

  13. Wider pulsation instability regions for β Cephei and SPB stars calculated using new Los Alamos opacities

    SciTech Connect

    Walczak, Przemysław; Fontes, Christopher John; Colgan, James Patrick; Kilcrease, David Parker; Guzik, Joyce Ann

    2015-08-13

    Here, our goal is to test the newly developed OPLIB opacity tables from Los Alamos National Laboratory and check their influence on the pulsation properties of B-type stars. We calculated models using MESA and Dziembowski codes for stellar evolution and linear, nonadiabatic pulsations, respectively. We derived the instability domains of β Cephei and SPB-types for different opacity tables OPLIB, OP, and OPAL. As a result, the new OPLIB opacities have the highest Rosseland mean opacity coefficient near the so-called Z-bump. Therefore, the OPLIB instability domains are wider than in the case of OP and OPAL data.

  14. Dataset for Alaska marine fish ecology catalog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorsteinson, Lyman K.

    2017-01-01

    This collection of GIS layers was prepared for the report Alaska Arctic Marine Fish Ecology Catalog (U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2016–5038). The layers display geographic distribution and sampling locations for Arctic marine fish species in the region of United States sectors of the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Certain diadromous species (for example, Pacific salmon, char, and whitefishes) are treated as marine fishes (McDowall, 1987) because much of their life cycle is in marine and brackish environments. This synthesis of information is meant to provide current information and understanding of this fauna and its relative vulnerability to changing Arctic conditions.There are 104 species in the collection - some species have both polygon and point data layers. The report (SIR 2016-5038) also describes for each species its names - species, common, and colloquial; ecological role; physical description/attributes; range (geographic); relative abundance; depth range; habitats and life history; behavior; populations or stocks, reproduction, food and feeding, biological interactions, resilience, traditional and cultural importance, commercial fisheries, potential effects of climate change, areas for future research, cited references, and bibliography.  The published report has one map for each species showing the polygon and point data as well as land and relevant administrative boundaries. Although some of the species also have an inland water presence, this report was concerned only with their marine conditions; therefore, the land component (from the original sources) has been clipped and removed. The distribution areas may be greater in extent than that shown in the report map bounding box limits. Distributions of marine fishes are shown in adjacent Arctic seas where reliable data are available. The report can be accessed at: https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20165038This metadata document describes the collection of species data layers. Each

  15. National Water Quality Laboratory, 1995 services catalog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Timme, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    This Services Catalog contains information about field supplies and analytical services available from the National Water Quality Laboratory in Denver, Colo., and field supplies available from the Quality Water Service Unit in Ocala, Fla., to members of the U.S. Geological Survey. To assist personnel in the selection of analytical services, this catalog lists sample volume, required containers, applicable concentration range, detection level, precision of analysis, and preservation requirements for samples.

  16. Efficient Algorithms for Creating Product Catalogs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-11-10

    multiple mailings are allowed, i.e., multiple catalogs can be sent to each customer. Catalog creation has important applications for e - commerce and...being gathered and warehoused by commercial enterprises. The large quantities of historical customer data and the emergence of e - commerce have...brick-and-mortar retailers and mail-order companies, as well as for new e - commerce companies. In particular, the solution to the single-mailing problem

  17. CMR Catalog Service for the Web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Doug; Mitchell, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    With the impending retirement of Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) the Common Metadata Repository (CMR) was charged with providing a collection-level Catalog Service for the Web (CSW) that provided the same level of functionality as GCMD. This talk describes the capabilities of the CMR CSW API with particular reference to the support of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) Integrated Catalog (CWIC).

  18. Survey and Merging of Sunspot Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefevre, Laure; Clette, Frédéric

    2014-02-01

    In view of the construction of new sunspot-based activity indices and proxies, we conducted a comprehensive survey of all existing catalogs providing detailed parameters of photospheric features over long time intervals. Although there are a fair number of such catalogs, a global evaluation showed that they suffer from multiple limitations: finite or fragmented time coverage, limited temporal overlap between catalogs, and, more importantly, a mismatch in contents and conventions. Starting from the existing material, we demonstrate how the information from parallel catalogs can be merged to form a much more comprehensive record of sunspots and sunspot groups. To do this, we use the uniquely detailed Debrecen Photoheliographic Data (DPD), which is already a composite of several ground-based observatories and of SOHO data, and the USAF/Mount Wilson catalog from the Solar Observing Optical Network (SOON). We also outline our cross-identification method, which was needed to match the non-overlapping solar active-region nomenclature. This proved to be the most critical and subtle step when working with multiple catalogs. This effort, focused here first on the last two solar cycles, should lead to a better central database that collects all available sunspot group parameters to address future solar-cycle studies beyond the traditional sunspot-index time series [ R i].

  19. Georgia tech catalog of gravitational waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jani, Karan; Healy, James; Clark, James A.; London, Lionel; Laguna, Pablo; Shoemaker, Deirdre

    2016-10-01

    This paper introduces a catalog of gravitational waveforms from the bank of simulations by the numerical relativity effort at Georgia Tech. Currently, the catalog consists of 452 distinct waveforms from more than 600 binary black hole simulations: 128 of the waveforms are from binaries with black hole spins aligned with the orbital angular momentum, and 324 are from precessing binary black hole systems. The waveforms from binaries with non-spinning black holes have mass-ratios q = m 1/m 2 ≤ 15, and those with precessing, spinning black holes have q ≤ 8. The waveforms expand a moderate number of orbits in the late inspiral, the burst during coalescence, and the ring-down of the final black hole. Examples of waveforms in the catalog matched against the widely used approximate models are presented. In addition, predictions of the mass and spin of the final black hole by phenomenological fits are tested against the results from the simulation bank. The role of the catalog in interpreting the GW150914 event and future massive binary black-hole search in LIGO is discussed. The Georgia Tech catalog is publicly available at einstein.gatech.edu/catalog.

  20. Models of H II regions - Heavy element opacity, variation of temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed set of H II region models that use the same physics and self-consistent input have been computed and are used to examine where in parameter space the effects of heavy element opacity is important. The models are briefly described, and tabular data for the input parameters and resulting properties of the models are presented. It is found that the opacities of C, Ne, O, and to a lesser extent N play a vital role over a large region of parameter space, while S and Ar opacities are negligible. The variation of the average electron temperature T(e) of the models with metal abundance, density, and T(eff) is investigated. It is concluded that by far the most important determinator of T(e) is metal abundance; an almost 7000 K difference is expected over the factor of 10 change from up to down abundances.

  1. The hybrid detailed / statistical opacity code SCO-RCG: New developments and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pain, J.-C.; Gilleron, F.; Porcherot, Q.; Blenski, T.

    2017-03-01

    We present the hybrid opacity code SCO-RCG which combines statistical approaches with fine-structure calculations. Radial integrals needed for the computation of detailed transition arrays are calculated by the code SCO (Super-configuration Code for Opacity), which calculates atomic structure at finite temperature and density, taking into account plasma effects on the wave-functions. Levels and spectral lines are then computed by an adapted RCG routine of R. D. Cowan. SCO-RCG now includes the Partially Resolved Transition Array model, which allows one to replace a complex transition array by a small-scale detailed calculation preserving energy and variance of the genuine transition array and yielding improved high-order moments. An approximate method for studying the impact of strong magnetic field on opacity and emissivity was also recently implemented.

  2. Physical and Chemical Processes Opacity Project: an Overview and Some Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, C.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. El Proyecto de la Opacidad es un esfuerzo internacional dedicado a calcular con precisi6n la gran cantidad de datos at6micos que se necesitan para estimar opacidades en los envolventes estelares. Describimos el panorama general del proyecto incluyendo aspectos astrofisicos, flsico-at6micos y computacionales. El volumen y calidad de los datos que se estan generando se puede apreciar en los resultados preliminares que se presentan. ABSTRACT The Opacity Project is an international effort dedicated to the calculation of the vast, accurate, atomic data required to estimate stellar envelope opacities. We give an overview of the project including astrophysical, atomic-physical and computational aspects. The volume and quality of the data which are being generated can be appreciated in the preliminary results that are presented. }% words: ATOMIC PROCESSES - OPACITIES - STARS-INThRIORS

  3. Stargate: An Open Stellar Catalog for NASA Exoplanet Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Angelle

    NASA is invested in a number of space- and ground-based efforts to find extrasolar planets around nearby stars with the ultimate goal of discovering an Earth 2.0 viable for searching for bio-signatures in its atmosphere. With both sky-time and funding resources extremely precious it is crucial that the exoplanet community has the most efficient and functional tools for choosing which stars to observe and then deriving the physical properties of newly discovered planets via the properties of their host stars. Historically, astronomers have utilized a piecemeal set of archives such as SIMBAD, the Washington Double Star Catalog, various exoplanet encyclopedias and electronic tables from the literature to cobble together stellar and planetary parameters in the absence of corresponding images and spectra. The mothballed NStED archive was in the process of collecting such data on nearby stars but its course may have changed if it comes back to NASA mission specific targets and NOT a volume limited sample of nearby stars. This means there is void. A void in the available set of tools many exoplanet astronomers would appreciate to create comprehensive lists of the stellar parameters of stars in our local neighborhood. Also, we need better resources for downloading adaptive optics images and published spectra to help confirm new discoveries and find ideal target stars. With so much data being produced by the stellar and exoplanet community we have decided to propose for the creation of an open access archive in the spirit of the open exoplanet catalog and the Kepler Community Follow-up Program. While we will highly regulate and constantly validate the data being placed into our archive the open nature of its design is intended to allow the database to be updated quickly and have a level of versatility which is necessary in today's fast moving, big data exoplanet community. Here, we propose to develop the Stargate Open stellar catalog for NASA exoplanet exploration.

  4. Momentum deposition on Wolf-Rayet winds: Nonisotropic diffusion with effective gray opacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayley, Kenneth G.; Owocki, Stanley P.; Cranmer, Steven R.

    1995-01-01

    We derive the velocity and mass-loss rate of a steady state Wolf-Rayet (WR) wind, using a nonisotropic diffusion approximation applied to the transfer between strongly overlapping spectral lines. Following the approach of Friend & Castor (1983), the line list is assumed to approximate a statistically parameterized Poisson distribution in frequency, so that photon transport is controlled by an angle-dependent, effectively gray opacity. We show the nonisotropic diffusion approximation yields good agreement with more accurate numerical treatments of the radiative transfer, while providing analytic insight into wind driving by multiple scattering. We illustrate, in particular, that multiple radiative momentum deposition does not require that potons be repeatedly reflected across substantial distances within the spherical envelope, but indeed is greatest when photons undergo a nearly local diffusion, e.g., through scattering by many lines closely spaced in frequency. Our results reiterate the view that the so-called 'momentum problem' of Wolf-Rayet winds is better characterized as an 'opacity problem' of simply identfying enough lines. One way of increasing the number of thick lines in Wolf-Rayet winds is to transfer opacity from saturated to unsaturated lines, yielding a steeper opacity distribution than that found in OB winds. We discuss the implications of this perspective for extending our approach to W-R wind models that incorporate a more fundamental treatment of the ionization and excitation processes that determine the line opacity. In particular, we argue that developing statistical descriptions of the lines to allow an improved effective opacity for the line ensemble would offer several advantages for deriving such more fundamental W-R wind models.

  5. Momentum deposition on Wolf-Rayet winds: Nonisotropic diffusion with effective gray opacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayley, Kenneth G.; Owocki, Stanley P.; Cranmer, Steven R.

    1995-03-01

    We derive the velocity and mass-loss rate of a steady state Wolf-Rayet (WR) wind, using a nonisotropic diffusion approximation applied to the transfer between strongly overlapping spectral lines. Following the approach of Friend & Castor (1983), the line list is assumed to approximate a statistically parameterized Poisson distribution in frequency, so that photon transport is controlled by an angle-dependent, effectively gray opacity. We show the nonisotropic diffusion approximation yields good agreement with more accurate numerical treatments of the radiative transfer, while providing analytic insight into wind driving by multiple scattering. We illustrate, in particular, that multiple radiative momentum deposition does not require that photons be repeatedly reflected across substantial distances within the spherical envelope, but indeed is greatest when photons undergo a nearly local diffusion, e.g., through scattering by many lines closely spaced in frequency. Our results reiterate the view that the so-called 'momentum problem' of Wolf-Rayet winds is better characterized as an 'opacity problem' of simply identifying enough lines. One way of increasing the number of thick lines in Wolf-Rayet winds is to transfer opacity from saturated to unsaturated lines, yielding a steeper opacity distribution than that found in OB winds. We discuss the implications of this perspective for extending our approach to W-R wind models that incorporate a more fundamental treatment of the ionization and excitation processes that determine the line opacity. In particular, we argue that developing statistical descriptions of the lines to allow an improved effective opacity for the line ensemble would offer several advantages for deriving such more fundamental W-R wind models.

  6. Sound speed and oscillation frequencies for a solar model evolved with Los Alamos ATOMIC opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzik, Joyce Ann; Fontes, Christopher; Walczak, Przemyslaw; Wood, Suzannah R.; Mussack, Katie

    2015-08-01

    Los Alamos has calculated a new generation of radiative opacities for elements with atomic number Z=1-30 with improved physics input, updated atomic data, and finer temperature grid to replace the Los Alamos LEDCOP opacities released in the year 2000. We calculate the evolution of a standard solar model including these new opacities, and compare with a model evolved using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory OPAL opacities released about 1996. We use the solar abundance mixture of Asplund, Grevesse, Sauval, and Scott (2009), including 2015 updates. The Los Alamos ATOMIC opacities (Colgan et al. 2013a,b) are somewhat higher than those of OPAL for temperatures and densities near the base of the solar convection zone. We compare the calculated nonadiabatic solar oscillation frequencies and solar interior sound speed to observed frequencies and helioseismic inferences. We discuss the potential for increased opacities to partially mitigate the ‘solar abundance problem’.References:J. Colgan, D.P. Kilcrease, N.H. Magee, Jr., G.S.J. Armstrong, J. Abdallah, Jr., M.E. Sherrill, C.J. Fontes, H.L. Zhang and P. Hakel, Eighth International Conference on Atomic and Molecular Data and their Applications: ICAMDATA, Gaithersburg, MD 2012, AIP Conf. Proc. No. 1545, (AIP, New York, 2013a), pp. 17-26.J. Colgan, D.P. Kilcrease, N.H. Magee, Jr, G.S.J. Armstrong, J. Abdallah, Jr., M.E. Sherrill, C.J. Fontes, H.L. Zhang and P. Hakel, High Energy Density Physics 9, 369 (2013b).

  7. Determining Visible Opacity of Emissions Using the Digital Opacity Compliance System II: Look Out EPA Method 9, Here Comes the Digital Equivalent (Finally)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-16

    Fugitive Emissions ODR Test 5 5 07 Validating Opacity Dissipation Rate Calculations Crusher - ODR 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 T=0 T=1/2 T=1 Time O p a c it y...Aggregate (Method 9 - DOCS) 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 6 11 16 21 26 31 36 41 46 Observation S t d v M9 CA Method Std Dev DOCS CA MethodStd Dev Crusher (Method 9

  8. Opacity and atomic analysis of double pulse laser ablated Li plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumaran, V.; Joshi, H. C.; Kumar, Ajai

    2014-09-01

    Opacity effects for neutral and ionic emission lines of lithium have been investigated by Atomic Data Analysis Structure (ADAS). Line ratios and opacity corrected photon emissivity coefficients are calculated over a wide range of electron temperatures and densities. The experimentally measured temporal evolution of the line profiles of the over dense Li plasma formed in the double pulse laser ablation experiment have been explained using the ADAS analysis and the plasma parameters of the plasma plume under consideration have been estimated. These results could be projected as a diagnostic tool to estimate plasma parameters of an over dense lithium plasma.

  9. Metal Hydride and Alkali Halide Opacities in Extrasolar Giant Planets and Cool Stellar Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weck, Philippe F.; Stancil, Phillip C.; Kirby, Kate; Schweitzer, Andreas; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    2006-01-01

    The lack of accurate and complete molecular line and continuum opacity data has been a serious limitation to developing atmospheric models of cool stars and Extrasolar Giant Planets (EGPs). We report our recent calculations of molecular opacities resulting from the presence of metal hydrides and alkali halides. The resulting data have been included in the PHOENIX stellar atmosphere code (Hauschildt & Baron 1999). The new models, calculated using spherical geometry for all gravities considered, also incorporate our latest database of nearly 670 million molecular lines, and updated equations of state.

  10. Cataloging Standards and Machine Translation: A Study of Reformatted ISBD Records in an Online Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wool, Gregory J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes a study conducted at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln library that investigated the impact of automated display on catalog records by comparing the card and online versions of records created according to ISBD (International Standard Bibliographic Description) conventions. The development of a new cataloging code is recommended.…

  11. NASA scientific and technical publications: A catalog of Special Publications, Reference Publications, Conference Publications, and Technical Papers, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This catalog lists 239 citations of all NASA Special Publications, NASA Reference Publications, NASA Conference Publications, and NASA Technical Papers that were entered in the NASA scientific and technical information database during accession year 1987. The entries are grouped by subject category. Indexes of subject terms, personal authors, and NASA report numbers are provided.

  12. NASA scientific and technical publications: A catalog of special publications, reference publications, conference publications, and technical papers, 1991-1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This catalog lists 458 citations of all NASA Special Publications, NASA Reference Publications, NASA Conference Publications, and NASA Technical Papers that were entered into the NASA Scientific and Technical Information database during accession year 1991 through 1992. The entries are grouped by subject category. Indexes of subject terms, personal authors, and NASA report numbers are provided.

  13. NASA scientific and technical publications: A catalog of special publications, reference publications, conference publications, and technical papers, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This catalog lists 190 citations of all NASA Special Publications, NASA Reference Publications, NASA Conference Publications, and NASA Technical Papers that were entered into the NASA scientific and technical information database during accession year 1989. The entries are grouped by subject category. Indexes of subject terms, personal authors, and NASA report numbers are provided.

  14. LANDSAT: Non-US standard catalog no. N-33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A catalog used for dissemination of information regarding the availability of LANDSAT imagery is presented. The Image Processing Facility of the Goddard Space Flight Center, publishes a U.S. and a Non-U.S. Standard Catalog on a monthly schedule, and the catalogs identify imagery which has been processed and input to the data files during the referenced month. The U.S. Standard Catalog includes imagery covering the continental United States, Alaska and Hawaii; the Non-U.S. Catalog identifies all the remaining coverage. Imagery adjacent to the continental U.S. and Alaska borders is included in the U.S. Standard Catalog.

  15. Historical geoscientific collections - requirements on digital cataloging and problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehling, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources maintains comprehensive geoscientific collections: the historical collections of Prussian Geological Survey in Berlin (19th and 20th century; about 2 mio specimen) and the geoscientific collections of the 20th century in Hannover (about 800.000 specimen). Nowadays, where financial support is strictly bound to efficiency and rentability on one side and the soaring (among young people - nearly exclusive) use of the web for the research, it is mandatory to provide the information about the available stock of specimen on the web. The digital cataloging has being carried out since 20 years: up to now about 40 % of the stock has been documented in 20 access-databases. The experiences of 20 years digital cataloging as well as the contact with professional users allow to formulate the requirements on a modern digital database with all accordingly problems. The main problems are different kinds of specimen: minerals, rocks, fossils, drill cores with diverging descriptions; obsolescent names of minerals, rocks and geographical sites; generations of various inventory numbers; inhomogeneous data (quantity and quality). Out of it result requirements to much, well educated manpower on the one side and an intelligent digital solution on the other side: it should have an internationally useable standard considering all the described local problems.

  16. Catalog of Apollo experiment operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Thomas A.

    1994-01-01

    This catalog reviews Apollo mission reports, preliminary science reports, technical crew debriefings, lunar surface operations plans, and various relevant lunar experiment documents, collecting engineering- and operation-specific information by experiment. It is organized by discrete experimental and equipment items emplaced or operated on the lunar surface or at zero gravity during the Apollo missions. It also attempts to summarize some of the general problems encountered on the surface and provides guidelines for the design of future lunar surface experiments with an eye toward operations. Many of the problems dealt with on the lunar surface originated from just a few novel conditions that manifested themselves in various nasty ways. Low gravity caused cables to stick up and get caught on feet, and also made it easy for instruments to tip over. Dust was a problem and caused abrasion, visibility, and thermal control difficulties. Operating in a pressure suit limited a person's activity, especially in the hands. I hope to capture with this document some of the lessons learned from the Apollo era to make the jobs of future astronauts, principle investigators, engineers, and operators of lunar experiments more productive.

  17. Version 1 of the Hubble Source Catalog

    DOE PAGES

    Whitmore, Bradley C.; Allam, Sahar S.; Budavari, Tamas; ...

    2016-05-11

    The Hubble Source Catalog is designed to help optimize science from the Hubble Space Telescope by combining the tens of thousands of visit-based source lists in the Hubble Legacy Archive into a single master catalog. Version 1 of the Hubble Source Catalog includes WFPC2, ACS/WFC, WFC3/UVIS, and WFC3/IR photometric data generated using SExtractor software to produce the individual source lists. The catalog includes roughly 80 million detections of 30 million objects involving 112 different detector/filter combinations, and about 160 thousand HST exposures. Source lists from Data Release 8 of the Hubble Legacy Archive are matched using an algorithm developed by Budavari & Lubow (2012). The mean photometric accuracy for the catalog as a whole is better than 0.10 mag, with relative accuracy as good as 0.02 mag in certain circumstances (e.g., bright isolated stars). The relative astrometric residuals are typically within 10 mas, with a value for the mode (i.e., most common value) of 2.3 mas. The absolute astrometric accuracy is better thanmore » $$\\sim$$0.1 arcsec for most sources, but can be much larger for a fraction of fields that could not be matched to the PanSTARRS, SDSS, or 2MASS reference systems. In this paper we describe the database design with emphasis on those aspects that enable the users to fully exploit the catalog while avoiding common misunderstandings and potential pitfalls. Here, we provide usage examples to illustrate some of the science capabilities and data quality characteristics, and briefly discuss plans for future improvements to the Hubble Source Catalog.« less

  18. Version 1 of the Hubble Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Bradley C.; Allam, Sahar S.; Budavári, Tamás; Casertano, Stefano; Downes, Ronald A.; Donaldson, Thomas; Fall, S. Michael; Lubow, Stephen H.; Quick, Lee; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Wallace, Geoff; White, Richard L.

    2016-06-01

    The Hubble Source Catalog is designed to help optimize science from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) by combining the tens of thousands of visit-based source lists in the Hubble Legacy Archive (HLA) into a single master catalog. Version 1 of the Hubble Source Catalog includes WFPC2, ACS/WFC, WFC3/UVIS, and WFC3/IR photometric data generated using SExtractor software to produce the individual source lists. The catalog includes roughly 80 million detections of 30 million objects involving 112 different detector/filter combinations, and about 160,000 HST exposures. Source lists from Data Release 8 of the HLA are matched using an algorithm developed by Budavári & Lubow. The mean photometric accuracy for the catalog as a whole is better than 0.10 mag, with relative accuracy as good as 0.02 mag in certain circumstances (e.g., bright isolated stars). The relative astrometric residuals are typically within 10 mas, with a value for the mode (i.e., most common value) of 2.3 mas. The absolute astrometric accuracy is better than 0''\\hspace{-0.5em}. 1 for most sources, but can be much larger for a fraction of fields that could not be matched to the PanSTARRS, SDSS, or 2MASS reference systems. In this paper we describe the database design with emphasis on those aspects that enable the users to fully exploit the catalog while avoiding common misunderstandings and potential pitfalls. We provide usage examples to illustrate some of the science capabilities and data quality characteristics, and briefly discuss plans for future improvements to the Hubble Source Catalog.

  19. Version 1 of the Hubble Source Catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Whitmore, Bradley C.; Allam, Sahar S.; Budavari, Tamas; Casertano, Stefano; Downes, Ronald A.; Donaldson, Thomas; Fall, S. Michael; Lubow, Stephen H.; Quick, Lee; Strolger, Louis -Gregory; Wallace, Geoff; White, Richard L.

    2016-05-11

    The Hubble Source Catalog is designed to help optimize science from the Hubble Space Telescope by combining the tens of thousands of visit-based source lists in the Hubble Legacy Archive into a single master catalog. Version 1 of the Hubble Source Catalog includes WFPC2, ACS/WFC, WFC3/UVIS, and WFC3/IR photometric data generated using SExtractor software to produce the individual source lists. The catalog includes roughly 80 million detections of 30 million objects involving 112 different detector/filter combinations, and about 160 thousand HST exposures. Source lists from Data Release 8 of the Hubble Legacy Archive are matched using an algorithm developed by Budavari & Lubow (2012). The mean photometric accuracy for the catalog as a whole is better than 0.10 mag, with relative accuracy as good as 0.02 mag in certain circumstances (e.g., bright isolated stars). The relative astrometric residuals are typically within 10 mas, with a value for the mode (i.e., most common value) of 2.3 mas. The absolute astrometric accuracy is better than $\\sim$0.1 arcsec for most sources, but can be much larger for a fraction of fields that could not be matched to the PanSTARRS, SDSS, or 2MASS reference systems. In this paper we describe the database design with emphasis on those aspects that enable the users to fully exploit the catalog while avoiding common misunderstandings and potential pitfalls. Here, we provide usage examples to illustrate some of the science capabilities and data quality characteristics, and briefly discuss plans for future improvements to the Hubble Source Catalog.

  20. 40 CFR 75.18 - Specific provisions for monitoring emissions from common and by-pass stacks for opacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emissions from common and by-pass stacks for opacity. 75.18 Section 75.18 Protection of Environment... Provisions § 75.18 Specific provisions for monitoring emissions from common and by-pass stacks for opacity... emissions pass through the bypass stack. Method 9 shall be used in accordance with the applicable...

  1. Student User Preferences for Features of Next-Generation OPACs: A Case Study of University of Sheffield International Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tam, Winnie; Cox, Andrew M.; Bussey, Andy

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify the features that international student users prefer for next generation OPACs. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 16 international students of the University of Sheffield were interviewed in July 2008 to explore their preferences among potential features in next generation OPACs. A…

  2. Influence of the atmospheric opacity cycle on the near surface environment of Gale Crater on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre Juarez, Manuel; Gomez-Elvira, Javier; Guzewich, Scott David; Lemmon, Mark T.; Martinez, German; Mason, Emily; Navarro, Sara; Newman, Claire E.; Smith, Michael D.; Retortillo, Alvaro de Vicente

    2016-10-01

    The Mars atmospheric dust changes the capacity of the atmosphere to absorb solar radiation or release outgoing thermal infrared radiation. This alters the atmospheric heat exchange fluxes and can interfere with the global circulation. The response of near surface pressure, temperature and winds has been characterized at the higher northern latitudes of 45 degree N at the Viking landing sites. The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) on Curiosity allows a similar characterization at near-equatorial latitudes of 4.5 degree S. Using MCAM-880 nm opacities as a measure of local atmospheric dust load, we analyze the response of changes in surface variables measured by REMS and compare to those observed by Viking. As on Viking, diurnal and semidiurnal pressure tide amplitudes track very closely the atmospheric opacity and the mean daily pressure shows the increased wave activity. Temperature tides show a more complex response that combines its sensitivity to changes in dust and cloud opacities. Differences in UV opacities for the REMS set of finite spectral windows are explored during the dust and clear seasons.

  3. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Fffff of... - Continuous Compliance With Emission and Opacity Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... once per steel production cycle; and b. Maintaining the opacity (for any set of 3-minute averages) of... than 20 percent may occur once per steel production cycle; and c. Conducting subsequent performance... Integrated Iron and Steel Manufacturing Facilities Pt. 63, Subpt. FFFFF, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart FFFFF...

  4. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Fffff of... - Continuous Compliance With Emission and Opacity Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... once per steel production cycle; and b. Maintaining the opacity (for any set of 3-minute averages) of... than 20 percent may occur once per steel production cycle; and c. Conducting subsequent performance... Integrated Iron and Steel Manufacturing Facilities Pt. 63, Subpt. FFFFF, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart FFFFF...

  5. Impact of Internet Search Engines on OPAC Users: A Study of Punjabi University, Patiala (India)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Shiv

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to study the impact of internet search engine usage with special reference to OPAC searches in the Punjabi University Library, Patiala, Punjab (India). Design/methodology/approach: The primary data were collected from 352 users comprising faculty, research scholars and postgraduate students of the university. A…

  6. An Experimental Concept to Measure Opacities Under Solar-relevant Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiter, Paul; Mussack, K.; Klein, S.

    2013-06-01

    Recent solar abundance models (Asplund 2009) use a significantly lower abundance for C, N, O compared to models used roughly a decade ago. Although the models used now are much more sophisticated than before, a discrepancy still exists between the abundances in the models and the abundances determined by helioseismic inferences. Agreement can be obtained by ad hoc adjustments to the opacity of high-Z (Z > 2) elements ranging from a few percent in the solar interior to as much as 30% just below the convection zone (CZ). Although many of the opacity models are thought to agree within a few percent, a recent element-by-element study (Blancard 2012) indicates a larger disagreement between models for certain elements. Experimental opacity measurements for these elements in the regimes of interest will provide valuable information to help resolve these discrepancies. We will present an experimental platform designed to measure the opacity of C, N, and O and discuss the achievable parameter regime. We will also briefly discuss how this platform can be extended to include other high-Z elements.

  7. An experimental concept to measure opacities under solar-relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiter, Paul A.; Mussack, Katie; Klein, Sallee R.

    2013-06-01

    Recent solar abundance models (Asplund 2009) use a significantly lower abundance for C, N, O compared to models used roughly a decade ago. Although the models used now are much more sophisticated than before, a discrepancy still exists between the abundances in the models and the abundances determined by helioseismic measurements. Agreement can be obtained by ad hoc adjustments to the opacity of high-Z (Z > 2) elements ranging from a few percent in the solar interior to as much as 30 just below the convection zone (CZ). Although many of the opacity models are thought to agree within a few percent, a recent element-by-element study (Blancard 2012) indicates a larger disagreement between models for certain elements. Experimental opacity measurements for these elements in the regimes of interest will provide valuable information to help resolve these discrepancies. We will present an experimental platform designed to measure the opacity of C, N, and O and discuss the achievable parameter regime. We will also briefly discuss how this platform can be extended to include other high-Z elements.

  8. 77 FR 13977 - Quality Assurance Requirements for Continuous Opacity Monitoring Systems at Stationary Sources

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-08

    ... final rule titled, ``Quality Assurance Requirements for Continuous Opacity Monitoring Systems at Stationary Sources,'' that were published in the Federal Register on February 14, 2012. The 30-day comment... Systems at Stationary Sources AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Direct final...

  9. Opportunities for Laboratory Opacity Chemistry Studies to Facilitate Characterization of Young Giant Planets and Brown Dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark; Freedman, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    The thermal emission spectra of young giant planets is shaped by the opacity of atoms and molecules residing in their atmospheres. While great strides have been made in improving the opacities of important molecules, particularly NH3 and CH4, at high temperatures, much more work is needed to understand the opacity and chemistry of atomic Na and K. The highly pressure broadened fundamental band of Na and K in the optical stretches into the near-infrared, strongly influencing the shape of the Y and K spectral bands. Since young giant planets are bright in these bands it is important to understand the influences on the spectral shape. Discerning gravity and atmospheric composition is difficult, if not impossible, without both good atomic opacities as well as an excellent understanding of the relevant atmospheric chemistry. Since Na and K condense at temperatures near 500 to 600 K, the chemistry of the condensation process must be well understood as well, particularly any disequilibrium chemical pathways. Comparisons of the current generation of sophisticated atmospheric models and available data, however, reveal important shortcomings in the models. We will review the current state of observations and theory of young giant planets and will discuss these and other specific examples where improved laboratory measurements for alkali compounds have the potential of substantially improving our understanding of these atmospheres.

  10. 77 FR 18709 - Quality Assurance Requirements for Continuous Opacity Monitoring Systems at Stationary Sources

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ...: Ms. Lula H. Melton, U.S. EPA, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, Air Quality Assessment... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 60 RIN 2060-AH23 Quality Assurance Requirements for Continuous Opacity Monitoring... final rule. SUMMARY: The EPA published a direct final rule titled ``Quality Assurance Requirements...

  11. A scheme to produce high density and high temperature plasma for opacity measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yan; Wu, SiZhong; Zheng, WuDi

    2015-04-15

    The opacity of shock-compressed material is of general scientific interest for astrophysical plasmas and for inertial confinement fusion research. A proposal is suggested to produce high temperature plasma with density around 1 g/cm{sup −3}. Two types of opacity target (the sandwich target and the foam enhanced sandwich target) are investigated numerically. The foam enhanced sandwich target has structure of foam–solid-sample-solid-foam. The foam will increase laser absorption efficiency and the ablating pressure. Hydrodynamic simulations confirm that the laser can be fully absorbed by the under-critical-density foam and a faster shock is produced inside the CH layer. High intensity lasers heat opacity target from both sides. The CH layers must be thick enough to keep the laser away from the sample. The laser-driven shocks move inward and collide at the center. Part of their kinetic energy is converted into internal energy and high density and high temperature local thermodynamic equilibrium sample plasma is produced. The plasma produced by laser heating the foam enhanced sandwich target has higher sample temperature than by laser heating the sandwich target. It may be useful for measuring the opacity of shock compressed material in laboratory.

  12. 77 FR 8160 - Quality Assurance Requirements for Continuous Opacity Monitoring Systems at Stationary Sources

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    .... SUMMARY: The EPA is taking direct final action to establish quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC.... Procedure 3 establishes quality assurance and quality control procedures for continuous opacity monitoring... applicability of Procedure 3? The purpose of Procedure 3 is to establish quality assurance and quality...

  13. 77 FR 8209 - Quality Assurance Requirements for Continuous Opacity Monitoring Systems at Stationary Sources

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    .... SUMMARY: The EPA is proposing to establish quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) procedures for... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 60 RIN 2060-AH23 Quality Assurance Requirements for Continuous Opacity Monitoring... Register. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Lula H. Melton, U.S. EPA, Office of Air Quality Planning...

  14. 40 CFR 60.2865 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators? 60.2865 Section 60.2865 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Construction On or Before November 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators § 60.2865 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators? (a) Use Method 9 of appendix A of this part to determine...

  15. 40 CFR 60.2255 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators? 60.2255 Section 60.2255 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Performance for Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units Air Curtain Incinerators § 60.2255 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators? (a) Use Method 9 of appendix A of this...

  16. 40 CFR 60.2255 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators? 60.2255 Section 60.2255 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Performance for Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units Air Curtain Incinerators § 60.2255 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators? (a) Use Method 9 of appendix A of this...

  17. 40 CFR 60.2865 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators? 60.2865 Section 60.2865 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Construction On or Before November 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators § 60.2865 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators? (a) Use Method 9 of appendix A of this part to determine...

  18. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Fffff of... - Emission and Opacity Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....01 gr/dscf. 7. Each casthouse at an existing blast furnace a. You must not cause to be discharged to... that exit any opening in the casthouse or structure housing the blast furnace that exhibit opacity greater than 20 percent (6-minute average). 8. Each casthouse at a new blast furnace a. You must not...

  19. SDSS DR7 WHITE DWARF CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman, S. J.; Nitta, A.; Kepler, S. O.; Pelisoli, Ingrid; Pecanha, Viviane; Costa, J. E. S.; Koester, D.; Krzesinski, J.; Dufour, P.; Lachapelle, F.-R.; Bergeron, P.; Yip, Ching-Wa; Harris, Hugh C.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Althaus, L.; Corsico, A.

    2013-01-15

    We present a new catalog of spectroscopically confirmed white dwarf stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 spectroscopic catalog. We find 20,407 white dwarf spectra, representing 19,712 stars, and provide atmospheric model fits to 14,120 DA and 1011 DB white dwarf spectra from 12,843 and 923 stars, respectively. These numbers represent more than a factor of two increase in the total number of white dwarf stars from the previous SDSS white dwarf catalogs based on DR4 data. Our distribution of subtypes varies from previous catalogs due to our more conservative, manual classifications of each star in our catalog, supplementing our automatic fits. In particular, we find a large number of magnetic white dwarf stars whose small Zeeman splittings mimic increased Stark broadening that would otherwise result in an overestimated log g if fit as a non-magnetic white dwarf. We calculate mean DA and DB masses for our clean, non-magnetic sample and find the DB mean mass is statistically larger than that for the DAs.

  20. Catalog of infrared observations. Part 1: Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Schmitz, Marion; Mead, Jaylee M.

    1987-01-01

    The Catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO) is a compilation of infrared astronomical observational data obtained from an extensive literature search of astronomical journals and major astronomical catalogs and surveys. The literature searches are complete for 1965 through 1986 in this Second Edition. The Catalog is published in two parts, with the observational data (roughly 200,000 observations of 20,000 individual sources) listed in Part I, and supporting appendices in Part II. The expanded Second Edition contains a new feature: complete IRAS 4-band data for all CIO sources detected, listed with the main Catalog observations, as well as in complete detail in the Appendix. The appendices include an atlas of infrared source positions, two bibliographies of infrared literature upon which the search was based, and, keyed to the main Catalog listings (organized alphabetically by author and then chronologically), an atlas of infrared spectral ranges, and IRAS data from the CIO sources. The complete CIO database is available to qualified users in printed microfiche and magnetic tape formats.

  1. Government documents and the online catalog.

    PubMed

    Lynch, F H; Lasater, M C

    1990-01-01

    Prior to planning for implementing the NOTIS system, the Vanderbilt Medical Center Library had not fully cataloged its government publications, and records for these materials were not in machine-readable format. A decision was made that patrons should need to look in only one place for all library materials, including the Health and Human Services Department publications received each year from the central library's Government Documents Unit. Beginning in 1985, these publications were added to the library's database, and the entire 7,200-piece collection is now in the online catalog. Working with these publications has taught the library much about the advantages and disadvantages of cataloging government documents in an online environment. It was found that OCLC cataloging copy is eventually available for most titles, although only about 10% of the records have MeSH headings. Staff time is the major expenditure; problems are caused by documents' irregular nature, frequent format changes, and difficult authority work. Since their addition to the online catalog, documents are used more and the library has better control.

  2. Effect of position and time held in that position on ground-glass opacity in computed tomography images of dogs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Kwon; Park, Seungjo; Cheon, Byunggyu; Moon, Sohyeon; Hong, Sunghwa; Cho, Hyun; Chang, Dongwoo; Choi, Jihye

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate effects of position, time in that position, and positive end-expiratory pressure on ground-glass opacity caused by physiologic atelectasis on lung CT images and to determine effects of recumbency position before CT. ANIMALS 6 healthy Beagles. PROCEDURES In a crossover study, dogs were placed in 4 positions (sternal, dorsal, right lateral, and left lateral recumbency) for 2 holding times (30 and 60 minutes). Dogs were then repositioned in sternal recumbency, and CT was performed at 2 positive end-expiratory pressures (0 and 15 mm Hg). Location, distribution, and degree of ground-glass opacities were evaluated on lung CT images. Volume and mean density of the lungs and ground-glass opacities as well as maximum density of ground-glass opacities were evaluated. RESULTS Ground-glass opacities were mainly observed in parts of the lungs that were dependent during the various positions before CT, except for sternal recumbency. Opacities were reversible and decreased or disappeared after lung inflation. Ground-glass opacities were observed most frequently and had greatest severity when dogs were positioned in left lateral recumbency before CT. Ground-glass opacities were negligible for dogs positioned in sternal recumbency before CT. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Location and reversibility of ground-glass opacities may help clinicians distinguish whether they are attributable to atelectasis or a result of pathological changes. Dogs should be positioned in sternal recumbency to minimize the occurrence of ground-glass opacities, particularly when several procedures are performed before CT, which increases the time that a dog will remain in the same position.

  3. On-the-fly Catalogs for Time-Domain Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budavári, T.; Szalay, A. S.

    2014-05-01

    The next-generation repeatedly covering the accessible sky many times require new observational strategies. Individual exposures are noisy, which is why the images are traditionally coadded to obtain deeper and the pipelines perform forced photometry to establish the lightcurves. Here we explore an alternative online solution where the catalogs are extracted for each individual observation with a low threshold well under the noise level and the false detections are weeded out incrementally. We find that the probability of detecting real objects is comparable in the coadds and our statistical methodology. Using a Bayesian approach we distinguishing between noise peaks and true objects based on the measured fluxes and optionally their celestial coordinates. The performance is demonstrated on simulations that mimic the characteristics of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  4. A Novel Technique to Calculate UV Opacity at Gale Crater from MSL/REMS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicente-Retortillo, Álvaro; Martínez, Germán M.; Renno, Nilton O.; Lemmon, Mark T.; Mason, Emily L.; de la Torre-Juárez, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) on board the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission carries a UV sensor that for the first time is measuring the solar radiation at the surface of Mars in six bands between 200 and 380 nm [1]. Here we present a novel methodology to calculate the atmospheric opacity by using the UV photodiode output currents measured by this sensor (TELRDR products) and ancillary (ADR) data. We estimate the diffuse and total radiation signals by analyzing the events in which the direct solar beam was temporarily blocked by the masthead or by the mast of the rover. Then we use a radiative transfer model with updated radiative properties of the Martian aerosols ([2], [3]) based on the Monte-Carlo method to retrieve the UV opacity from those measurements. Therefore, this methodology is not sensitive to the degradation of the sensor due to the deposition of dust on it. In addition, by using TELRDR and ADR data, inconsistencies in the processed reduced data (ENVRDR and MODRDR products, in units of W/m2) found when the solar zenith angle relative to REMS rover frame is above 30° are avoided. In order to validate our technique, we compare the UV opacities with those derived from Mastcam observations at 880 nm. We find that both opacities show a good agreement and follow a similar seasonal trend, with the UV opacity showing values generally lower than at 880 nm. The difference between both opacities varies over the year, with the minimum difference occurring during the first half of the winter, when both opacities show their annual lowest values. The temporal variation of this difference may be used to analyze changes in the dust size distribution. [1] Gómez-Elvira, J., Armiens, C., Castañer, L., Domínguez, M., Genzer, M. et al. REMS: the environmental sensor suite for the Mars Science Laboratory rover. Space Sci. Rev., 170 (1-4), 583-640, 2012. [2] Vicente-Retortillo, A., Valero, F., Vázquez, L. and Martínez, G. M. A model to calculate

  5. United States Strategic Military Access in Northeast Africa.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    STATES STRATEGIC MILITARY ACCESS IN NORTHEAST AFRICA * by CD Harold L. Bakken L.J December 1984 Thesis Advisor: M. W. Clough * Approved for public release...ACCESSION NO. 3 RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (..nd Subtitlej S TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED United States Strategic Military Access Master’s Thesis ...the state of israel and other important friendly nations in the region. 3. To check the spread of Soviet influence in this strategic region and, by

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: OGLE II SMC eclipsing binaries (Wyrzykowski+, 2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrzykowski, L.; Udalski, A.; Kubiak, M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Zebrun, K.; Soszinski, I.; Wozniak, P. R.; Pietrzynski, G.; Szewczyk, O.

    2009-03-01

    We present new version of the OGLE-II catalog of eclipsing binary stars detected in the Small Magellanic Cloud, based on Difference Image Analysis catalog of variable stars in the Magellanic Clouds containing data collected from 1997 to 2000. We found 1351 eclipsing binary stars in the central 2.4 square degree area of the SMC. 455 stars are newly discovered objects, not found in the previous release of the catalog. The eclipsing objects were selected with the automatic search algorithm based on the artificial neural network. The full catalog with individual photometry is accessible from the OGLE INTERNET archive, at ftp://sirius.astrouw.edu.pl/ogle/ogle2/var_stars/smc/ecl . Regular observations of the SMC fields started on June 26, 1997 and covered about 2.4 square degrees of central parts of the SMC. Reductions of the photometric data collected up to the end of May 2000 were performed with the Difference Image Analysis (DIA) package. (1 data file).

  7. Completion of Population of and Quality Assurance on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options Catalog.

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Laura L.; Barela, Amanda Crystal; Walkow, Walter M.; Schetnan, Richard Reed; Arnold, Matthew Brian

    2015-12-01

    An Evaluation and Screening team supporting the Fuel Cycle Technologies Program Office of the United States Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy is conducting an evaluation and screening of a comprehensive set of fuel cycle options. These options have been assigned to one of 40 evaluation groups, each of which has a representative fuel cycle option [Todosow 2013]. A Fuel Cycle Data Package System Datasheet has been prepared for each representative fuel cycle option to ensure that the technical information used in the evaluation is high-quality and traceable [Kim, et al., 2013]. The information contained in the Fuel Cycle Data Packages has been entered into the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options Catalog at Sandia National Laboratories so that it is accessible by the evaluation and screening team and other interested parties. In addition, an independent team at Savannah River National Laboratory has verified that the information has been entered into the catalog correctly. This report documents that the 40 representative fuel cycle options have been entered into the Catalog, and that the data entered into the catalog for the 40 representative options has been entered correctly.

  8. Autofluorescence imaging of macular pigment: influence and correction of ocular media opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Obana, Akira; Gohto, Yuko; Seto, Takahiko; Gellermann, Werner

    2014-09-01

    The healthy adult human retina contains in its macular region a high concentration of blue-light absorbing carotenoid compounds, known as macular pigment (MP). Consisting of the carotenoids lutein, zeaxanthin, and meso-zeaxanthin, the MP is thought to shield the vulnerable tissue layers in the retina from light-induced damage through its function as an optical attenuator and to protect the tissue cells within its immediate vicinity through its function as a potent antioxidant. Autofluorescence imaging (AFI) is emerging as a viable optical method for MP screening of large subject populations, for tracking of MP changes over time, and for monitoring MP uptake in response to dietary supplementation. To investigate the influence of ocular media opacities on AFI-based MP measurements, in particular, the influence of lens cataracts, we conducted a clinical trial with a large subject population (93 subjects) measured before and after cataract surgery. General AFI image contrast, retinal blood vessel contrast, and presurgery lens opacity scores [Lens Opacities Classification System III (LOCS III)] were investigated as potential predictors for image degradation. These clinical results show that lens cataracts can severely degrade the achievable pixel contrasts in the AFI images, which results in nominal MP optical density levels that are artifactually reduced. While LOCS III scores and blood vessel contrast are found to be only a weak predictor for this effect, a strong correlation exists between the reduction factor and the image contrast, which can be quantified via pixel intensity histogram parameters. Choosing the base width of the histogram, the presence or absence of ocular media opacities can be determined and, if needed, the nominal MP levels can be corrected with factors depending on the strength of the opacity.

  9. Cataloging audiovisual materials: a new dimension.

    PubMed Central

    Knotts, M A; Mueller, D

    1975-01-01

    A new more comprehensive system for cataloging audiovisual materials is described. Existing audiovisual cataloging systems contain mostly descriptive information, publishers' or producers' summaries, and order information. This paper discusses the addition of measurable learning objectives to this standard information, thereby enabling the potential user to determine what can be learned from a particular audiovisual unit. The project included media in nursing only. A committee of faculty and students from the University of Alabama in Birmingham School of Nursing reviewed the materials. The system was field-tested at nursing schools throughout Alabama; the schools offered four different types of programs. The system and its sample product, the AVLOC catalog, were also evaluated by medical librarians, media specialists, and other nursing instructors throughout the United States. PMID:50106

  10. 1990 National Water Quality Laboratory Services Catalog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pritt, Jeffrey; Jones, Berwyn E.

    1989-01-01

    PREFACE This catalog provides information about analytical services available from the National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) to support programs of the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey. To assist personnel in the selection of analytical services, the catalog lists cost, sample volume, applicable concentration range, detection level, precision of analysis, and preservation techniques for samples to be submitted for analysis. Prices for services reflect operationa1 costs, the complexity of each analytical procedure, and the costs to ensure analytical quality control. The catalog consists of five parts. Part 1 is a glossary of terminology; Part 2 lists the bottles, containers, solutions, and other materials that are available through the NWQL; Part 3 describes the field processing of samples to be submitted for analysis; Part 4 describes analytical services that are available; and Part 5 contains indices of analytical methodology and Chemical Abstract Services (CAS) numbers. Nomenclature used in the catalog is consistent with WATSTORE and STORET. The user is provided with laboratory codes and schedules that consist of groupings of parameters which are measured together in the NWQL. In cases where more than one analytical range is offered for a single element or compound, different laboratory codes are given. Book 5 of the series 'Techniques of Water Resources Investigations of the U.S. Geological Survey' should be consulted for more information about the analytical procedures included in the tabulations. This catalog supersedes U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 86-232 '1986-87-88 National Water Quality Laboratory Services Catalog', October 1985.

  11. Fermi Large Area Telescope First Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Belli, F.; Berenji, B.; Bisello, D.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Busetto, G.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Campana, R.; Canadas, B.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Ceccanti, M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Cillis, A. N.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Corbet, R.; Davis, D. S.; DeKlotz, M.; den Hartog, P. R.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Luca, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Dormody, M.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Fabiani, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Healey, S. E.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Iafrate, G.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Landriu, D.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S.-H.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lionetto, A. M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Marangelli, B.; Marelli, M.; Massaro, E.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Minuti, M.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mongelli, M.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakajima, H.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pinchera, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Poupard, L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Ray, P. S.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Rea, N.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ripken, J.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Salvetti, D.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Scolieri, G.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Starck, J.-L.; Stephens, T. E.; Striani, E.; Strickman, M. S.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinebra, F.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Van Etten, A.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wallace, E.; Wang, P.; Watters, K.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2010-06-01

    We present a catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), during the first 11 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. The First Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL) contains 1451 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range. Source detection was based on the average flux over the 11 month period, and the threshold likelihood Test Statistic is 25, corresponding to a significance of just over 4σ. The 1FGL catalog includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and power-law spectral fits as well as flux measurements in five energy bands for each source. In addition, monthly light curves are provided. Using a protocol defined before launch we have tested for several populations of gamma-ray sources among the sources in the catalog. For individual LAT-detected sources we provide firm identifications or plausible associations with sources in other astronomical catalogs. Identifications are based on correlated variability with counterparts at other wavelengths, or on spin or orbital periodicity. For the catalogs and association criteria that we have selected, 630 of the sources are unassociated. Care was taken to characterize the sensitivity of the results to the model of interstellar diffuse gamma-ray emission used to model the bright foreground, with the result that 161 sources at low Galactic latitudes and toward bright local interstellar clouds are flagged as having properties that are strongly dependent on the model or as potentially being due to incorrectly modeled structure in the Galactic diffuse emission.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Environmental COntext (ECO) catalog (Moffett+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffett, A. J.; Kannappan, S. J.; Berlind, A. A.; Eckert, K. D.; Stark, D. V.; Hendel, D.; Norris, M. A.; Grogin, N. A.

    2016-02-01

    The ECO catalog represents a cross match between sources with measured redshifts found in the UZC (Updated Zwicky Catalog, Falco et al. 1999, J/PASP/111/438), SDSS (including data releases 6, 7, and 8; see II/294 and V/139), HyperLEDA (VII/237), RESOLVE (S. J. Kannappan et al. 2015, in preparation), GAMA (Driver et al. 2011, J/MNRAS/413/971), 2dF (Colless et al. 2001, VII/250), and 6dF (Jones et al. 2009, VII/259) catalogs with a 15" matching radius on sky. See section 2.1. (1 data file).

  13. CD-ROM Catalogs--The State of the Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beiser, Karl

    1988-01-01

    Reviews five CD-ROM catalogs: (1) Auto-Graphics Impact; (2) Brodart LePac; (3) GRC LaserGuide; (4) Library Corporation Intelligent Catalog; and (5) MARCIVE Pac. General guidelines for selecting a CD-ROM catalog are discussed, and vendor addresses and telephone numbers are listed. (MES)

  14. The Catalog in the Courtroom: From Shield to Sword?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, David

    1985-01-01

    Legal issues concerning the content and use of the college catalog are reviewed, including the catalog's changing role as a consumer document, misrepresentation, violation of statute, breach of contract, court interpretations, and remedies. Colleges are cautioned to take great care in using catalogs, for legal and administrative reasons. (MSE)

  15. Automated Cataloging of Technical Reports Via Optical Scanning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiles, Helen J.; Maier, Joan M.

    1972-01-01

    A system for automated cataloging of technical reports was established during 1971. The twice-per-month output is an updated book catalog, an announcement bulletin, demand bibliographies, and an SDI notification system. Benefits include a 600 percent increase in report usage and a 10 percent decrease in catalog maintenance. (Author/NH)

  16. The Theoretical Astrophysical Observatory: Cloud-based Mock Galaxy Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernyk, Maksym; Croton, Darren J.; Tonini, Chiara; Hodkinson, Luke; Hassan, Amr H.; Garel, Thibault; Duffy, Alan R.; Mutch, Simon J.; Poole, Gregory B.; Hegarty, Sarah

    2016-03-01

    We introduce the Theoretical Astrophysical Observatory (TAO), an online virtual laboratory that houses mock observations of galaxy survey data. Such mocks have become an integral part of the modern analysis pipeline. However, building them requires expert knowledge of galaxy modeling and simulation techniques, significant investment in software development, and access to high performance computing. These requirements make it difficult for a small research team or individual to quickly build a mock catalog suited to their needs. To address this TAO offers access to multiple cosmological simulations and semi-analytic galaxy formation models from an intuitive and clean web interface. Results can be funnelled through science modules and sent to a dedicated supercomputer for further processing and manipulation. These modules include the ability to (1) construct custom observer light cones from the simulation data cubes; (2) generate the stellar emission from star formation histories, apply dust extinction, and compute absolute and/or apparent magnitudes; and (3) produce mock images of the sky. All of TAO’s features can be accessed without any programming requirements. The modular nature of TAO opens it up for further expansion in the future.

  17. THE THEORETICAL ASTROPHYSICAL OBSERVATORY: CLOUD-BASED MOCK GALAXY CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Bernyk, Maksym; Croton, Darren J.; Tonini, Chiara; Hodkinson, Luke; Hassan, Amr H.; Garel, Thibault; Duffy, Alan R.; Mutch, Simon J.; Poole, Gregory B.; Hegarty, Sarah

    2016-03-15

    We introduce the Theoretical Astrophysical Observatory (TAO), an online virtual laboratory that houses mock observations of galaxy survey data. Such mocks have become an integral part of the modern analysis pipeline. However, building them requires expert knowledge of galaxy modeling and simulation techniques, significant investment in software development, and access to high performance computing. These requirements make it difficult for a small research team or individual to quickly build a mock catalog suited to their needs. To address this TAO offers access to multiple cosmological simulations and semi-analytic galaxy formation models from an intuitive and clean web interface. Results can be funnelled through science modules and sent to a dedicated supercomputer for further processing and manipulation. These modules include the ability to (1) construct custom observer light cones from the simulation data cubes; (2) generate the stellar emission from star formation histories, apply dust extinction, and compute absolute and/or apparent magnitudes; and (3) produce mock images of the sky. All of TAO’s features can be accessed without any programming requirements. The modular nature of TAO opens it up for further expansion in the future.

  18. Far infrared supplement: Catalog of infrared observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Schmitz, Marion; Mead, Jaylee M.

    1982-10-01

    The development of a new generation of orbital, airborne and ground-based infrared astronomical observatory facilities, including the infrared astronomical satellite (IRAS), the cosmic background explorer (COBE), the NASA Kuiper airborne observatory, and the NASA infrared telescope facility, intensified the need for a comprehensive, machine-readable data base and catalog of current infrared astronomical observations. The Infrared Astronomical Data Base and its principal data product, this catalog, comprise a machine-readable library of infrared (1 micrometer to 1000 micrometers) astronomical observations published in the scientific literature since 1965.

  19. Safeguards instrumentation: a computer-based catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Fishbone, L.G.; Keisch, B.

    1981-08-01

    The information contained in this catalog is needed to provide a data base for safeguards studies and to help establish criteria and procedures for international safeguards for nuclear materials and facilities. The catalog primarily presents information on new safeguards equipment. It also describes entire safeguards systems for certain facilities, but it does not describe the inspection procedures. Because IAEA safeguards do not include physical security, devices for physical protection (as opposed to containment and surveillance) are not included. An attempt has been made to list capital costs, annual maintenance costs, replacement costs, and useful lifetime for the equipment. For equipment which is commercially available, representative sources have been listed whenever available.

  20. Far infrared supplement: Catalog of infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, D. Y.; Schmitz, M.; Mead, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a new generation of orbital, airborne and ground-based infrared astronomical observatory facilities, including the infrared astronomical satellite (IRAS), the cosmic background explorer (COBE), the NASA Kuiper airborne observatory, and the NASA infrared telescope facility, intensified the need for a comprehensive, machine-readable data base and catalog of current infrared astronomical observations. The Infrared Astronomical Data Base and its principal data product, this catalog, comprise a machine-readable library of infrared (1 micrometer to 1000 micrometers) astronomical observations published in the scientific literature since 1965.

  1. Report on the Second Catalog Interoperability Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, James R.; James, Mary E.

    1988-01-01

    The events, resolutions, and recommendations of the Second Catalog Interoperability Workshop, held at JPL in January, 1988, are discussed. This workshop dealt with the issues of standardization and communication among directories, catalogs, and inventories in the earth and space science data management environment. The Directory Interchange Format, being constructed as a standard for the exchange of directory information among participating data systems, is discussed. Involvement in the Interoperability effort by NASA, NOAA, ISGS, and NSF is described, and plans for future interoperability considered. The NASA Master Directory prototype is presented and critiqued and options for additional capabilities debated.

  2. Investigation of the value of a photographic tool to measure self-perception of enamel opacities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The standard measurement of oral conditions that are mainly of cosmetic concern can be carried out by a trained clinical professional, or they can be assessed and reported by the individuals who may have the condition or be aware of others who have it. Enamel opacities of anterior teeth are examples of such a condition. At a public health level the interest is only about opacities that are of aesthetic concern, so the need for an index that records opacities that the public perceive to be a problem is clear. Measurement methods carried out by highly trained professionals, using unnatural conditions are not indicated at this level. This study reports on the testing of a novel epidemiological tool that aims to report on the prevalence and impact of self-perceived enamel opacities in a population of young adolescents. Methods A dental health survey was carried out using a random sample of 12-year-old school pupils during 2008/09 by Primary Care Organisations (PCOs) in England. This included the use of a novel self-perception tool which aimed to measure individual’s self-perception of the presence and impact of enamel opacities to produce population measures. This tool comprised questions asking about the presence of white marks on their teeth and whether these marks bothered the volunteers and a sheet of grouped photographs of anterior teeth showing opacities ranging from TF 0, TF 1–2 to TF 2–3. Volunteers were asked which of the groups of photographs looked more like their own teeth. Examining teams from a convenience sample of 3 PCOs from this survey agreed to undertake additional measurements to assess the value of the self-perception tool. Volunteer pupils were asked the questions on a second occasion, some time after the first and clinical examiners recorded their assessments of the most closely matching set of photographs of the volunteers on two occasions. Results The tool was feasible to use, with 74% of pupils making a response to the first

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalog of strong MgII absorbers (Lawther+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawther, D.; Paarup, T.; Schmidt, M.; Vestergaard, M.; Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D.

    2012-08-01

    Here we present a catalog of strong (rest equivalent width Wr> intervening Mg II absorbers in the SDSS Data Release 7 quasar catalog (2010AJ....139.2360S, Cat. VII/260). The intervening absorbers were found by a semi-automatic algorithm written in IDL - for details of the algorithm see section 2 of our paper. A subset of the absorbers have been visually inspected - see the MAN_OK flag in the catalog. The number of sightlines searched, tabulated by absorber redshift, i.e. g(z), is available as an ASCII table (for S/N>8 and S/N>15). All analysis in our paper is based on the SNR>8 coverage, and considers only sight-lines towards non-BAL quasars. Any questions regarding the catalog should be sent to Daniel Lawther (unclellama(at)gmail.com). (3 data files).

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Binary star discoveries in the URAT1 catalog (Nicholson, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, M. P.

    2015-05-01

    Astrometric and photometric data are presented for 9450 common proper motion binary star system using results from the first U.S. Naval Observatory Astrometric Robotic Telescope Catalog (URAT1) (1 data file).

  5. An ab initio HCN/HNC rotational-vibrational line list and opacity function for astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Gregory John

    HCN/HNC is an important molecule which is found throughout the universe. For example HCN/HNC is known to exist in comets, planetary atmospheres and the interstellar medium. HCN is also an important opacity source in carbon rich stars (C-stars). HCN masers have been observed in the circumstellar material around these C-stars and also in galaxies. Jorgensen and co-workers investigated model carbon star atmospheres in which they included HCN as an opacity source. They found that including a HCN opacity function had a remarkable effect: the atmosphere expanded by five times and the pressure of the atmosphere in the surface layers dropped by one or two orders of magnitude. This suggests that a full and detailed treatment of the rotational-vibrational spectrum of HCN/HNC could have a profound effect on the models of carbon stars, this provides the main motivation in this work. The temperatures of the stars in which HCN is an important opacity source Teff = 2000 - 3000 K. If HCN and HNC are in thermodynamic equilibrium it would be expected that HNC as well as HCN are found in significant populations. The transition dipoles of the fundamental bands of HNC are more than twice as strong as their HCN counter parts. These factors mean that both HCN and HNC will be considered, which makes a semiglobal treatment of the [H,C,N] system necessary. In this thesis an ab initio HCN/HNC linelist, from which accurate spectra and opacity functions can be calculated, is computed. Within this thesis I present least squares fits for ab initio semiglobal potential energy, dipole moment, relativistic correction and adiabatic correction surfaces. The potential energy surface (PES) is morphed for HNC geometries of the potential to improve the HNC representation of the surface. The PES and dipole moment surface (DMS) are used to perform quantum mechanical nuclear motion (rotational-vibrational) calculations with the DVR3D suite of codes. Preliminary calculations are made to optimise a ro

  6. First-principles opacity table of warm dense deuterium for inertial-confinement-fusion applications.

    PubMed

    Hu, S X; Collins, L A; Goncharov, V N; Boehly, T R; Epstein, R; McCrory, R L; Skupsky, S

    2014-09-01

    Accurate knowledge of the optical properties of a warm dense deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture is important for reliable design of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions using radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. The opacity of a warm dense DT shell essentially determines how much radiation from hot coronal plasmas can be deposited in the DT fuel of an imploding capsule. Even for the simplest species of hydrogen, the accurate calculation of their opacities remains a challenge in the warm-dense matter regime because strong-coupling and quantum effects play an important role in such plasmas. With quantum-molecular-dynamics (QMD) simulations, we have derived a first-principles opacity table (FPOT) of deuterium (and the DT mixture by mass scaling) for a wide range of densities from ρ(D)=0.5 to 673.518g/cm(3) and temperatures from T=5000K up to the Fermi temperature T(F) for each density. Compared with results from the astrophysics opacity table (AOT) currently used in our hydrocodes, the FPOT of deuterium from our QMD calculations has shown a significant increase in opacity for strongly coupled and degenerate plasma conditions by a factor of 3-100 in the ICF-relevant photon-energy range. As conditions approach those of classical plasma, the opacity from the FPOT converges to the corresponding values of the AOT. By implementing the FPOT of deuterium and the DT mixture into our hydrocodes, we have performed radiation-hydrodynamics simulations for low-adiabat cryogenic DT implosions on the OMEGA laser and for direct-drive-ignition designs for the National Ignition Facility. The simulation results using the FPOT show that the target performance (in terms of neutron yield and energy gain) could vary from ∼10% up to a factor of ∼2 depending on the adiabat of the imploding DT capsule; the lower the adiabat, the more variation is seen in the prediction of target performance when compared to the AOT modeling.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Galactic O star catalog (Maiz-apellaniz+, 2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiz-Apellaniz, J.; Walborn, N. R.; Galue, H. A.; Wei, L. H.

    2004-04-01

    We have produced a catalog of 378 Galactic O stars with accurate spectral classifications that is complete for V<8 but includes many fainter stars. The catalog provides cross-identifications with other sources; coordinates (obtained in most cases from Tycho-2 data); astrometric distances for 24 of the nearest stars; optical (Tycho-2, Johnson, and Stroemgren) and NIR photometry; group membership, runaway character, and multiplicity information; and a Web-based version with links to on-line services. (9 data files).

  8. Earth Science Enterprise: 2002 Education Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwerin, Theresa, Ed.

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) aims to understand Earth systems from every component including land surface, oceans, atmosphere, ice sheets, and biota from an interdisciplinary approach. This catalog provides information on ESE programs and resources for all educational audiences including…

  9. Managing Cataloging Statistics with a Spreadsheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Judith M.

    1995-01-01

    Presents aspects of Pullen Library's move from manual to automated management of cataloging statistics, and offers advice to libraries in similar situations. The difficulties included staff resistance, finding the right software package, and spreadsheet training; and the advantage was that the Quattro Pro program reduces complicated spreadsheets…

  10. Evaluating Patron Use of an Online Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Marilyn; Shupe, Barbara

    1995-01-01

    Describes a study conducted to investigate patron use of the online catalog at New York's Nassau Community College. Provides findings related to the number and types of patrons using information terminals, time required for searches, preferred methods for learning to use the terminal, and the most common searches. (MAB)

  11. Cataloging Sound Recordings Using Archival Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, David H.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the processing and cataloging of archival sound recording collections. The use of "Anglo American Cataloguing Rules, 2nd edition" (AACR 2) and "Archives, Personal Papers and Manuscripts" (APPM) is explained, the MARC format for Archival and Manuscripts Control (AMC) is described, finding aids and subject indexing are…

  12. Microforms; Catalog of Publications 1972-1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1972

    Among the wide variety of materials available in mocroform edition from the National Cash Register (NCR)/Microcard Editions are papal documents, transcription of the Nuremberg trials, the complete works of Swinburne, and the complete files of many magazines, including many nineteenth century magazines. This catalog indexes offerings alphabetically…

  13. Annotated Catalog of Bilingual Vocational Training Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda (L.) and Associates, Bethesda, MD.

    This catalog contains annotations for 170 bilingual vocational training materials. Most of the materials are written in English, but materials written in 13 source languages and directed toward speakers of 17 target languages are provided. Annotations are provided for the following different types of documents: administrative, assessment and…

  14. Tween Consumers: Catalog Clothing Purchase Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Linda; Douglas, Sara; Schimmel, Julie

    1998-01-01

    Catalog shopping behavior of younger and older adolescents was compared. Results indicated that "tweens" were more concerned with style, brand name, and fashion than were older students. This supports previous findings indicating that the tween years are a time when peer pressure and "fitting in" are very important. (Author/EMK)

  15. Catalog of Programmed Instructional Material, Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Naval Research, Washington, DC. Personnel and Training Branch.

    A supplement to the NavPers 93826 Catalog of Programed Instructional Material provides a full description of instructional material programed within the Navy since April, 1967. Summaries are given of all courses, including information on the specific learners for whom the course's instruction is intended, the type of program, the projected time…

  16. Will Your Catalog Stand FTC Scrutiny?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Louis W.

    1976-01-01

    In light of recent court rulings and Federal Trade Commission (FTC) hearings regarding unfair methods of competition and deceptive advertising, a content analysis was conducted of 20 randomly selected college catalogs from 2-year and 4-year, public and private institutions. Four types of misrepresentations were identified including institutional…

  17. LANDSAT non-US standard catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The Non-U.S. Standard Catalog lists imagery acquired by LANDSAT 1 and LANDSAT 2 which has been processed and input to the data files during the referenced month. Data, such as data acquired, cloud cover and image quality are given for each scene. The microfilm roll and frame on which the scene may be found is also given.

  18. Landsat non-US standard catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The Non-U.S. Standard Catalog lists Non-U.S. imagery acquired by Landsat 1 and 2 which was processed and input to the data files during the referenced month. Data, such as date acquired, cloud cover and image quality are given for each scene. The microfilm roll and frame on which the scene may be found are also given.

  19. The Esalen Catalog, 1993-1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esalen Inst., Big Sur, CA.

    This document consists of a compilation of the 14 issues of "The Esalen Catalog" published during the 5-year period 1993-1997. An earlier compilation (ED 347 118 in the ERIC database) covering the 30-year period 1962-1992, describes the geographic location, history, and purpose of the Esalen Institute. Esalen provides a forum in which…

  20. Cataloging the Net: Can We Do It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oder, Norman

    1998-01-01

    Discusses possibilities for cataloging Internet resources and the role that the library profession can play. Topics include the Dublin Core metadata; public library projects (Michigan Electronic Library "MEL" and Librarians' Index to the Internet "LII"); academic library projects (INFOMINE, Scout Report); commercial sites…

  1. NASA Earth Science Enterprise 2000 Education Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwerin, Theresa

    The National Aeronautical Space Administration's (NASA) Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) produces a wide range of products for teachers and students and supports educational activities for all grade levels in cooperation with the NASA Headquarters Education Division. This catalog presents the diverse educational programs, products, and resources…

  2. Rates inferred from the space debris catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-08-01

    Collision and fragmentation rates are inferred from the AFSPC space debris catalog and compare with estimates from other treatments. The collision rate is evaluated without approximation. The fragmentation rate requires additional empirical assessments. The number of fragments per collision is low compared to analytic and numerical treatments, is peaked low, and falls rapidly with altitude.

  3. NASA's Earth Science Enterprise: 1998 Education Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This catalog presents a reference guide to NASA Earth science education programs and products. The topics include: 1) Student Support (Elementary and Secondary, Undergraduate and Graduate, Postgraduate, and Postdoctorate); 2) Teacher/Faculty Preparation and Enhancement; 3) Systemic Change; 4) Curriculum Support; and 5) Resources.

  4. OSHA Training Institute Catalog of Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Fredric C., Comp.

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration Training Institute's series of courses for 1978 is presented in this catalog. Most courses are designed for occupational safety or health professionals who are federal or state employees; two are available for personnel from the private sector. The schedule includes courses required for newly hired…

  5. Catalog of Programming 1993-94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Native American Public Broadcasting Consortium, Lincoln, NE.

    This catalog indexes and describes over 175 Native American programs produced for public television and available on video to public television stations, schools, libraries, and educational users. Introductory pages describe the development of the Native American Public Broadcasting Consortium and present brief biographies of nine Native American…

  6. Catalog of Audiovisual Materials Related to Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Joe, Ed.; Henderson, Jim, Ed.

    An annotated listing of a variety of audiovisual formats on content related to the social-rehabilitation process is provided. The materials in the listing were selected from a collection of over 200 audiovisual catalogs. The major portion of the materials has not been screened. The materials are classified alphabetically by the following subject…

  7. NASA's Earth Science Enterprise: 1998 Education Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The goals of the Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) are to expand the scientific knowledge of the Earth system; to widely disseminate the results of the expanded knowledge; and to enable the productive use of this knowledge. This catalog provides information about the Earth Science education programs and the resources available for elementary through university levels.

  8. Defense Management Education and Training Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manpower and Reserve Affairs (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This catalog provides information on a wide variety of courses, programs, and school made available by Department of Defense organizations. The program consists of eighteen primarily service-operated schools offering joint training in management covering a wide variety of subjects including automatic data processing, production management,…

  9. Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R): Building a Reference Cruise Catalog for the Research Fleet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arko, R. A.; Clark, P. D.; Chandler, C. L.; Smith, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    The Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) program is developing infrastructure to ensure the underway sensor data from NSF-supported oceanographic research vessels are routinely and consistently documented, preserved in long-term archives, and disseminated to the science community. A core element of this infrastructure is a master catalog of research vessels, cruises, sensor systems, underway datasets, navigation products, field reports, event logs, file formats, people, organizations, and funding awards that is maintained uniformly across the research fleet. All NSF-supported vessel operators now submit their underway cruise data and documentation directly to R2R, per the revised Division of Ocean Sciences (OCE) Sample and Data Policy published in 2011. R2R ingests this content into the fleet catalog, assigning globally unique and persistent identifiers at the cruise, dataset, and file (granule) levels. The catalog is aligned with community-standard vocabularies, working collaboratively with the NOAA Data Centers, UNOLS Office, and pan-European SeaDataNet project; and includes links to related data at other inter/national repositories. In response to community demand, we are extending the catalog to include instrument-specific metadata such as installation details, patch tests, and calibration results. The entire R2R catalog is published on the Web as "Linked Data", making it easily accessible to encourage integration with other repositories. Selected content is also published in formal metadata records according to ISO and W3C standards, suitable for submission to long-term archives. We are deploying both faceted (classification/filter) and Web map-based browse and search interfaces.

  10. The Hubble Space Telescope UV Legacy Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters. VIII. Preliminary Public Catalog Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, M.; Bellini, A.; Anderson, J.; Piotto, G.; Bedin, L. R.; van der Marel, R. P.; Milone, A. P.; Brown, T. M.; Cool, A. M.; King, I. R.; Sarajedini, A.; Granata, V.; Cassisi, S.; Aparicio, A.; Hidalgo, S.; Ortolani, S.; Nardiello, D.

    2017-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) UV Legacy Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters (GO-13297) has been specifically designed to complement the existing F606W and F814W observations of the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Globular Cluster Survey (GO-10775) by observing the most accessible 47 of the previous survey’s 65 clusters in three WFC3/UVIS filters F275W, F336W, and F438W. The new survey also adds super-solar metallicity open cluster NGC 6791 to increase the metallicity diversity. The combined survey provides a homogeneous 5-band data set that can be used to pursue a broad range of scientific investigations. In particular, the chosen UV filters allow the identification of multiple stellar populations by targeting the regions of the spectrum that are sensitive to abundance variations in C, N, and O. In order to provide the community with uniform preliminary catalogs, we have devised an automated procedure that performs high-quality photometry on the new UV observations (along with similar observations of seven other programs in the archive). This procedure finds and measures the potential sources on each individual exposure using library point-spread functions and cross-correlates these observations with the original ACS-Survey catalog. The catalog of 57 clusters we publish here will be useful to identify stars in the different stellar populations, in particular for spectroscopic follow-up. Eventually, we will construct a more sophisticated catalog and artificial-star tests based on an optimal reduction of the UV survey data, but the catalogs presented here give the community the chance to make early use of this HST Treasury survey.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Skymap Star Catalog - Version 3.7 (Slater+ 1992)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, M.; Hashmall, J.

    1995-09-01

    The original version has been improved and updated with corrections several times. Version 3.7 incorporates known errors documented previously in SKYMAP Error Reports. Magnitude errors discovered in SKYMAP Version 3.6 were corrected. Other minor catalog corrections, including the deletion of five duplicate entries and the addition of two stars, were also performed. The original catalog was compiled by D. M. Gottlieb of Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) under contract to NASA. The compilation and statistics of the catalog are described by Gottlieb (1978), while the source referenced above describes in detail the contents of the current version and the derivation of values not available observationally. * IMPORTANT NOTE: THIS CATALOG WAS NOT COMPILED TO PROVIDE THE MOST ACCURATE AND RELIABLE DATA AT THE ASTRONOMICAL RESEARCH LEVEL. THE DERIVATIONS OF TWO-DIMENSIONAL MK TYPES FROM ONE-DIMENSIONAL DATA, UBV VALUES FROM PHOTOVISUAL AND PHOTOGRAPHIC MAGNITUDES, AND STELLAR DISTANCES FROM MAGNITUDES AND SPECTRAL TYPES ARE EXTREMELY UNCERTAIN, SO THESE DATA SHOULD NOT BE USED WITHOUT CAREFUL SCRUTINY. THE VARIOUS FLAGS ASSOCIATED WITH CATALOG DATA SHOULD BE RETAINED WITH THE DATA AT ALL TIMES OR GROSS MISINTERPRETATIONS MAY RESULT. USERS OF THIS CATALOG SHOULD KEEP THESE FACTS IN MIND CONSTANTLY. (1 data file).

  12. THE CHANDRA VARIABLE GUIDE STAR CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, Joy S.; Lauer, Jennifer L.; Morgan, Douglas L.; Sundheim, Beth A.; Henden, Arne A.; Huenemoerder, David P.; Martin, Eric

    2010-06-15

    Variable stars have been identified among the optical-wavelength light curves of guide stars used for pointing control of the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We present a catalog of these variable stars along with their light curves and ancillary data. Variability was detected to a lower limit of 0.02 mag amplitude in the 4000-10000 A range using the photometrically stable Aspect Camera on board the Chandra spacecraft. The Chandra Variable Guide Star Catalog (VGUIDE) contains 827 stars, of which 586 are classified as definitely variable and 241 are identified as possibly variable. Of the 586 definite variable stars, we believe 319 are new variable star identifications. Types of variables in the catalog include eclipsing binaries, pulsating stars, and rotating stars. The variability was detected during the course of normal verification of each Chandra pointing and results from analysis of over 75,000 guide star light curves from the Chandra mission. The VGUIDE catalog represents data from only about 9 years of the Chandra mission. Future releases of VGUIDE will include newly identified variable guide stars as the mission proceeds. An important advantage of the use of space data to identify and analyze variable stars is the relatively long observations that are available. The Chandra orbit allows for observations up to 2 days in length. Also, guide stars were often used multiple times for Chandra observations, so many of the stars in the VGUIDE catalog have multiple light curves available from various times in the mission. The catalog is presented as both online data associated with this paper and as a public Web interface. Light curves with data at the instrumental time resolution of about 2 s, overplotted with the data binned at 1 ks, can be viewed on the public Web interface and downloaded for further analysis. VGUIDE is a unique project using data collected during the mission that would otherwise be ignored. The stars available for use as Chandra guide stars are

  13. Earth Resources Technology Satellite: US standard catalog No. U-12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    To provide dissemination of information regarding the availability of Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS) imagery, a U.S. Standard Catalog is published on a monthly schedule. The catalogs identify imagery which has been processed and input to the data files during the preceding month. The U.S. Standard Catalog includes imagery covering the Continental United States, Alaska, and Hawaii. As a supplement to these catalogs, an inventory of ERTS imagery on 16 millimeter microfilm is available. The catalogs consist of four parts: (1) annotated maps which graphically depict the geographic areas covered by the imagery listed in the current catalog, (2) a computer-generated listing organized by observation identification number (D) with pertinent information on each image, (3) a computer listing of observations organized by longitude and latitude, and (4) observations which have had changes made in their catalog information since the original entry in the data base.

  14. New Catalog of Resources Enables Paleogeosciences Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingo, R. C.; Horlick, K. A.; Anderson, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The 21st century promises a new era for scientists of all disciplines, the age where cyber infrastructure enables research and education and fuels discovery. EarthCube is a working community of over 2,500 scientists and students of many Earth Science disciplines who are looking to build bridges between disciplines. The EarthCube initiative will create a digital infrastructure that connects databases, software, and repositories. A catalog of resources (databases, software, repositories) has been produced by the Research Coordination Network for Paleogeosciences to improve the discoverability of resources. The Catalog is currently made available within the larger-scope CINERGI geosciences portal (http://hydro10.sdsc.edu/geoportal/catalog/main/home.page). Other distribution points and web services are planned, using linked data, content services for the web, and XML descriptions that can be harvested using metadata protocols. The databases provide searchable interfaces to find data sets that would otherwise remain dark data, hidden in drawers and on personal computers. The software will be described in catalog entries so just one click will lead users to methods and analytical tools that many geoscientists were unaware of. The repositories listed in the Paleogeosciences Catalog contain physical samples found all across the globe, from natural history museums to the basements of university buildings. EarthCube has over 250 databases, 300 software systems, and 200 repositories which will grow in the coming year. When completed, geoscientists across the world will be connected into a productive workflow for managing, sharing, and exploring geoscience data and information that expedites collaboration and innovation within the paleogeosciences, potentially bringing about new interdisciplinary discoveries.

  15. THE SIMPLE SURVEY: OBSERVATIONS, REDUCTION, AND CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Damen, M.; Franx, M.; Taylor, E. N.; Labbe, I.; Van Dokkum, P. G.; Muzzin, A.; Brandt, W. N.; Dickinson, M.; Gawiser, E.; Illingworth, G. D.; Marchesini, D.; Papovich, C.; Rix, H.-W.

    2011-01-20

    We present the Spitzer IRAC/MUSYC Public Legacy Survey in the Extended CDF-South (SIMPLE), which consists of deep IRAC observations covering the {approx}1600 arcmin{sup 2} area surrounding GOODS-S. The limiting magnitudes of the SIMPLE IRAC mosaics typically are 23.8, 23.6, 21.9, and 21.7, at 3.6 {mu}m, 4.5 {mu}m, 5.8 {mu}m, and 8.0 {mu}m, respectively (5{sigma} total point source magnitudes in AB). The SIMPLE IRAC images are combined with the 10' x 15' GOODS IRAC mosaics in the center. We give detailed descriptions of the observations, data reduction, and properties of the final images, as well as the detection and photometry methods used to build a catalog. Using published optical and near-infrared data from the Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC), we construct an IRAC-selected catalog, containing photometry in UBVRIz'JHK, [3.6 {mu}m], [4.5 {mu}m], [5.8 {mu}m], and [8.0 {mu}m]. The catalog contains 43,782 sources with S/N >5 at 3.6 {mu}m, 19,993 of which have 13-band photometry. We compare this catalog to the publicly available MUSYC and FIREWORKS catalogs and discuss the differences. Using a high signal-to-noise sub-sample of 3391 sources with ([3.6] + [4.5])/2 < 21.2, we investigate the star formation rate history of massive galaxies out to z {approx} 1.8. We find that at z {approx} 1.8 at least 30% {+-} 7% of the most massive galaxies (M{sub *} >10{sup 11} M{sub sun}) are passively evolving, in agreement with earlier results from surveys covering less area.

  16. Interactive Boundary Detection for Automatic Definition of 2D Opacity Transfer Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauberger, Martin; Overhoff, Heinrich Martin

    In computer assisted diagnostics nowadays, high-value 3-D visualization intake a supporting role to the traditional 2-D slice wise visualization. 3-D visualization may create intuitive visual appearances of the spatial relations of anatomical structures, based upon transfer functions mapping data values to visual parameters, e.g. color or opacity. Manual definition of these transfer functions however requires expert knowledge and can be tedious. In this paper an approach to automatizing 2-D opacity transfer function definition is presented. Upon few parameters characterizing the image volume and an user-depicted area of interest, the procedure detects organ surfaces automatically, upon which transfer functions may automatically be defined. Parameter setting still requires experience about the imaging properties of modalities, and improper setting can cause falsely detected organ surfaces. Procedure tests with CT and MRI image volumes show, that real time structure detection is even possible for noisy image volumes.

  17. Radiative ablation with two ionizing fronts when opacity displays a sharp absorption edge.

    PubMed

    Poujade, Olivier; Bonnefille, Max; Vandenboomgaerde, Marc

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of a strong flux of photons with matter through an ionizing front (I-front) is an ubiquitous phenomenon in the context of astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) where intense sources of radiation put matter into motion. When the opacity of the irradiated material varies continuously in the radiation spectral domain, only one single I-front is formed. In contrast, as numerical simulations tend to show, when the opacity of the irradiated material presents a sharp edge in the radiation spectral domain, a second I-front (an edge front) can form. A full description of the mechanism behind the formation of this edge front is presented in this article. It allows us to understand extra shocks (edge-shocks), displayed by ICF simulations, that might affect the robustness of the design of fusion capsules in actual experiments. Moreover, it may have consequences in various domains of astrophysics where ablative flows occur.

  18. PARALLEL IMPLEMENTATION OF THE TOPAZ OPACITY CODE: ISSUES IN LOAD-BALANCING

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnad, V; Iglesias, C A

    2008-05-12

    The TOPAZ opacity code explicitly includes configuration term structure in the calculation of bound-bound radiative transitions. This approach involves myriad spectral lines and requires the large computational capabilities of parallel processing computers. It is important, however, to make use of these resources efficiently. For example, an increase in the number of processors should yield a comparable reduction in computational time. This proportional 'speedup' indicates that very large problems can be addressed with massively parallel computers. Opacity codes can readily take advantage of parallel architecture since many intermediate calculations are independent. On the other hand, since the different tasks entail significantly disparate computational effort, load-balancing issues emerge so that parallel efficiency does not occur naturally. Several schemes to distribute the labor among processors are discussed.

  19. Preview of the BATSE Earth Occultation Catalog of Low Energy Gamma Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Wilson, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; McCollough, M. L.; Robinson, C. R.; Sahi, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Zhang, S. N.

    1999-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) has been detecting and monitoring point sources in the high energy sky since 1991. Although BATSE is best known for gamma ray bursts, it also monitors the sky for longer-lived sources of radiation. Using the Earth occultation technique to extract flux information, a catalog is being prepared of about 150 sources potential emission in the large area detectors (20-1000 keV). The catalog will contain light curves, representative spectra, and parametric data for black hole and neutron star binaries, active galaxies, and super-nova remnants. In this preview, we present light curves for persistent and transient sources, and also show examples of what type of information can be obtained from the BATSE Earth occultation database. Options for making the data easily accessible as an "on line" WWW document are being explored.

  20. Arteriovenous Access

    PubMed Central

    MacRae, Jennifer M.; Dipchand, Christine; Oliver, Matthew; Moist, Louise; Yilmaz, Serdar; Lok, Charmaine; Leung, Kelvin; Clark, Edward; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kappel, Joanne; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Luscombe, Rick; Miller, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Complications of vascular access lead to morbidity and may reduce quality of life. In this module, we review both infectious and noninfectious arteriovenous access complications including neuropathy, aneurysm, and high-output access. For the challenging patients who have developed many complications and are now nearing their last vascular access, we highlight some potentially novel approaches. PMID:28270919