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Sample records for access catalog opac

  1. Designing the OPAC User Interface to Improve Access and Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basista, Thomas; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of problems with retrieval of records in library online public access catalogs (OPACs) focuses on an ongoing research project at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP) that has been trying to improve subject retrieval vocabulary control using natural and thesaural language and on the design of a good graphical user interface.…

  2. URLs in the OPAC: Integrating or Disintegrating Research Libraries' Catalogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Gerald; Germain, Carol Anne; Van Ullen, Mary K.

    2003-01-01

    Research library catalogs serve as authoritative sources of access. The increasing practice of including Web sites in the catalog, resources not under the library's control, raises new issues of the catalog's accuracy and reliability. An analysis of ARL libraries' catalogs examined the persistence of cataloged URLs. Error rates ranged from a low…

  3. Hyping the OPAC: Adapting a Macintosh User Interface to the NOTIS Online Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antelman, Kristin

    1992-01-01

    Describes a Macintosh user interface to the NOTIS (Northwestern Online Total Integrated System) online public access catalog (OPAC) developed at the University of Delaware. Adaptation of the HyperCard-based interface from Cornell University, MacPAC, is described; testing and marketing is discussed; and future developments are addressed. (six…

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Opacities from the Opacity Project (Seaton+, 1995)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaton, M. J.; Yan, Y.; Mihalas, D.; Pradhan, A. K.

    1997-08-01

    1 CODES. ***** 1.1 Code rop.for ************ This code reads opacity files written in standard OP format. Its main purpose is to provide documentation on the contents of the files. This code, like the other codes provided, prompts for the name of the file (or files) to be read. The file names read in response to the prompt may have up to 128 characters. 1.2 Code opfit.for ************** This code reads opacity files in standard OP format, and provides for interpolation of opacities to any required values of temperature and mass-density. The method used is described in OPF. The code prompts for the name of a file giving all required control parameters. As an example, the file opfit.dat is provided (users will need to change directory names and file names). The use of opfit.for is illustrated using opfit.dat. Most users will probably want to adapt opfit.for for use as a subroutine in other codes. Timings for DEC 7000 ALPHA: 0.3 sec for data read and initialisations; then 0.0007 sec for each temperature-density point. Users who like OPAL formats should note that opfit.for has a facility to produce files of OP data in OPAL-type formats. 1.3 Code ixz.for ************ This code provides for interpolations to any required values of X and Z. See IXZ. It prompts for the name of a file giving all required control parameters. An example of such a file if provided, ixz.dat (the user will need to change directory and file names). The output files have names s92INT.'nnn'. The user specifies the first value of nnn, and the number of files to be produced. 2. DATA FILES ********** 2.1 Data files for solar metal-mix ****************************** Data for solar metal-mix s92 as defined in SYMP. These files are from version 2 runs of December 1994 (see IXZ for details on Version 2). There are 213 files with names s92.'nnn', 'nnn'=201 to 413. Each file occupies 83762 bytes. The file s92.version2 gives values of X (hydrogen mass-faction) and Z (metals mass-fraction) for each value of

  5. Online Public Access Catalog: The Google Maps of the Library World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Kieren

    2011-01-01

    What do Google Maps and a library's Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC) have in common? Google Maps provides users with all the information they need for a trip in one place; users can get directions and find out what attractions, hotels, and restaurants are close by. Librarians must find the ultimate OPAC that will provide, in one place, all the…

  6. Information Resources on Online Public Access Catalogs. A Selected ERIC Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Information Resources, Syracuse, NY.

    Sixteen articles, books, and reports published between 1978 and 1983 and cited in "Resources in Education" and "Current Index to Journals in Education" are listed in this bibliography on online public access catalogs (OPACs). Emphasis is on the movement toward computer-based alternatives to library card catalogs and user studies. Topics include…

  7. Bringing Federal Documents to the Forefront for Library Users: Selective Cataloging Using an OPAC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliva, Victor T.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the value of federal depository document titles and discuses reasons why many are worth cataloging. Several approaches to cataloging these titles to make them more readily accessible are profiled. The Adelphi University Library (New York) has devised a system, using Boolean logic and an online public access catalog to choose which titles…

  8. Knowing Where They Went: Six Years of Online Access Statistics via the Online Catalog for Federal Government Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Christopher C.

    2011-01-01

    As federal government information is increasingly migrating to online formats, libraries are providing links to this content via URLs or persistent URLs (PURLs) in their online public access catalogs (OPACs). Clickthrough statistics that accumulated as users visited links to online content in the University of Denver's library OPAC were gathered…

  9. Web OPAC Interfaces: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babu, B. Ramesh; O'Brien, Ann

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of Web-based online public access catalogs (OPACs) focuses on a review of six Web OPAC interfaces in use in academic libraries in the United Kingdom. Presents a checklist and guidelines of important features and functions that are currently available, including search strategies, access points, display, links, and layout. (Author/LRW)

  10. OPACs in the Clouds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Paula L.; Nero, Muriel D.

    2009-01-01

    In today's world of instant everything, everyone has been exposed to some form of Web 2.0 technology, and higher education is not exempt from its long reach. Libraries of all types are incorporating Web 2.0 features to attract users as well as to showcase library services. The Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC) has become more user-friendly with…

  11. Redundancy and Uniqueness of Subject Access Points in Online Catalogs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Hong; Lancaster, F. W.

    1998-01-01

    An analysis of 205 records in the OCLC Online Union Catalog (OLUC) found considerable duplication among subject access points provided by title, subject heading, and classification number fields. On average, only 4.12 unique access points were found per record. The results suggest that online catalogs might outperform card catalogs more in…

  12. Automating School Library Catalogs: A Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Catherine, Ed.

    This collection of 23 articles compiled from school library journals address the special needs that make automation problematic for school libraries. The articles are divided into five sections: an overview of OPAC (Online Public Access Catalog) development (4 titles); evaluating OPAC systems (4 titles); implementing OPAC systems (6 titles);…

  13. Open Access Metadata, Catalogers, and Vendors: The Future of Cataloging Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Emily Alinder

    2013-01-01

    The open access (OA) movement is working to transform scholarly communication around the world, but this philosophy can also apply to metadata and cataloging records. While some notable, large academic libraries, such as Harvard University, the University of Michigan, and the University of Cambridge, released their cataloging records under OA…

  14. Streamlining Maintenance and Access to a University's Academic Catalog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Blair

    2005-01-01

    Developing and maintaining an online version of a University's Academic Catalog has increasingly become a priority for enrollment management and IT staff. Many schools are now using the online version of their catalog as their primary working copy and are generating their print version periodically as needed. Managing and accessing this content…

  15. Multisensory Public Access Catalogs on CD-ROM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Nancy; Murphy, Brower

    1987-01-01

    BiblioFile Intelligent Catalog is a CD-ROM-based public access catalog system which incorporates graphics and sound to provide a multisensory interface and artificial intelligence techniques to increase search precision. The system can be updated frequently and inexpensively by linking hard disk drives to CD-ROM optical drives. (MES)

  16. Web-based OPACs: Between Tradition and Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moscoso, Purificacion; Ortiz-Repiso, Virginia

    1999-01-01

    Analyzes the change that Internet-based OPACs (Online Public Access Catalogs) have represented to the structure, administration, and maintenance of the catalogs, retrieval systems, and user interfaces. Examines the structure of databases and traditional principles that have governed systems development. Discusses repercussions of the application…

  17. Enhancing Access to Information: Designing Catalogs for the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyckoson, David A., Ed.

    This book addresses the problem of when a library has limited catalog access, and explores various technological methods to expand the catalog beyond its traditional boundaries. Fourteen chapters describe catalog projects in individual libraries: (1) "Enhancing Access to Information: Building Catalogs for the Future" (David A. Tyckoson); (2) "The…

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Opacity-sampling models of Mira variables (Ireland+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, M. J.; Scholz, M.; Wood, P. R.

    2012-05-01

    We present four model series of the CODEX dynamical opacity-sampling models of Mira variables with solar abundances, designed to have parameters similar to {omicron} Cet, R Leo and R Cas. We demonstrate that the CODEX models provide a clear physical basis for the molecular shell scenario used to explain interferometric observations of Mira variables. We show that these models generally provide a good match to photometry and interferometry at wavelengths between the near-infrared and the radio, and make the model outputs publicly available. These models also demonstrate that, in order to match visible and infrared observations, the Fe-poor silicate grains that form within 3 continuum radii must have small grain radii and therefore cannot drive the winds from O-rich Mira variables. (1 data file).

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Low temperature Rosseland opacities (Lederer+, 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederer, M. T.; Aringer, B.

    2008-11-01

    The database of Rosseland opacities consists of 14 files (kR_Z?E-?.dat), one for each metallicity. The available values of the metallicity are listed in the file kRZfCN.dat together with the respective enhancement factors for 12C and 14N. This file contains information equivalent to Table 3 from the paper. The data files consist of a header indicating the abundances used (Lodders, 2003ApJ...591.1220), the initial metallicity, the initial mass fractions for 12C, 14N and the alpha elements, and a look-up table for the actual data block. This block is made up of 63 rectangular data arrays where the logarithm of the Rosseland opacity (log{kappa}R [cm2/g]) is tabulated as a function of the logarithm of the gas temperature (logT [K]) and the logarithm of R (logR [g/cm3/K31018] with R={rho}/(T6)3 and T6=T/(106K)). The ranges covered are 3.2<=logT<=4.05 with a step size of 0.05, and -7.0<=logR<=1.0 with a step size of 0.5. The 63 tables result from the variation of the hydrogen mass fraction (X=0.5,0.7,0.8), and the mass fractions X(12C) [7 different values] and X(14N) [3 different values]. The tables are ordered such that the mass fraction X(12C) varies fastest followed by the hydrogen mass fraction and X(14N). The original files are available in files subdirectory. For future compatibility a data field for the alpha element enhancement factor was introduced in the look-up table. (4 data files).

  20. Documents to the People--Access through the Automated Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolner, Myrtle Smith; Kile, Barbara

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of the need for bibliographic control of U.S. government documents in depository libraries focuses on a project that upgraded the GPO/MARC bibliographic tapes to permit documents to be included in public access catalogs. The roles of the participants are described, including MARCIVE, Inc., Louisiana State University, Rice University,…

  1. From Catalog to Web: Desktop Access to Sandia Technical Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoecker, Nora K.; Alford, Dixie L.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the processes developed in the Sandia National Laboratories (a Department of Energy multiprogram national laboratory) Technical Library to provide and improve desktop access to Sandia-generated documents. Discusses procedures for cataloging these electronic reports, including identification of the bibliographic information and MARC tags…

  2. Extending the Online Public Access Catalog into the Microcomputer Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Brett

    1990-01-01

    Describes PCBIS, a database program for MS-DOS microcomputers that features a utility for automatically converting online public access catalog search results stored as text files into structured database files that can be searched, sorted, edited, and printed. Topics covered include the general features of the program, record structure, record…

  3. "Garbage" In, "Refuse and Refuse Disposal" Out: Making the Most of the Subject Authority File in OPAC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Marguerite E.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the difference in subject access in OPACs (online public access catalogs) between subject searching (authority, alphabetic, or controlled vocabulary) versus keyword searching (uncontrolled, free text, natural language vocabulary). Compares a query on the term "garbage" in two online catalogs and discusses results. (Author/LRW)

  4. We Never Have to Say Goodbye: Finding a Place for OPACS in Discovery Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, J. Greg

    2009-01-01

    It is easy to lament the shortcomings of traditional online public access catalogs (OPACs) in the Google Age. Users cannot, for example, usually input a snippet of a long-forgotten pop song's chorus into an online library catalog and almost instantly retrieve a relevant result along with hundreds of other options. On the other hand, should OPACs…

  5. From Access Points to Materials: A Transaction Log Analysis of Access Point Value for Online Catalog Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyly, Brendan J.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a study that investigated the value of various access points in online catalog records by determining their usefulness to searchers who requested location information for items. Results of a transaction log analysis of the Illinois Library Computer Systems Office online union catalog for 45 academic libraries are discussed. (LRW)

  6. Is There A Catalog in Your Future? Access to Information in the Year 2006.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Nancy J.

    1982-01-01

    Considers the impact of technological advancement upon the role and function of the library catalog in the future. The state of the art in library catalogs, the information environment in 2006, future information services, and subject access systems are among the topics addressed. A 31-item reference list is attached. (JL)

  7. Extending the OPAC: Creative Uses of Microcomputers To Enhance Library Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freivalds, Dace I.; Carson, Sylvia

    This report describes an online public access catalog (OPAC) developed at Pennsylvania State University which downloads, manages, and manipulates data once it has been retrieved. The paper begins with a list of the 12 features of the system, which is called MicroLIAS (Library Information Access System): (1) build and fully index any number of…

  8. The Monolingual Cataloging Monolith: A Barrier to Library Access for Readers of Spanish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Asserts that despite growing awareness of frontline public service concerns in accommodating Spanish speakers, little care is invested in the technical processing side of the library's responsibility to Spanish speakers. Examines the usefulness and accessibility of online public access catalogs for monolingual Spanish readers, focusing on records…

  9. The First Whole Library Catalog; Access to Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1973

    Films available from Films Incorporated are listed in this catalog under the following five headings: Art and Culture, Education and Information, Economy and Society, Health and Medicine, and the World Around Us. Each citation includes such data as the film's producer, director, cast, date, running time and whether it is in color, provides a…

  10. Selection of an Online Public Access Catalog: A Checklist Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Rourke, Victoria

    1987-01-01

    The development, field testing, and evaluation of a checklist approach to selecting an integrated library automation system are described, and recommendations for using this approach are outlined. The checklist, which is divided into five main sections of catalog features and functions, is appended. (Author/CLB)

  11. Records and Access: Museum Registration and Library Cataloging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierbaum, Esther Green

    1988-01-01

    Compares and contrasts museum registration and library cataloging processes, suggesting that differences in records management result from philosophical and historical differences. The feasibility and possible benefits of applying the competencies of library and information science to museum registration are discussed. (23 notes/references)…

  12. Testing a New Design for Subject Access to Online Catalogs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drabenstott, Karen M.; Weller, Marjorie S.

    Over the last decade, studies of online catalogs have revealed that they frequently discourage users. Subject queries often fail to produce retrievals or produce retrieval sets that are too large and unwieldy to be easily scanned. Research shows that users are seeking alternative approaches to those that manipulate the subject headings in catalog…

  13. Design Considerations for an OPAC Workstation: An Introduction to Specifications and a Model Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Ron G.

    1989-01-01

    Describes guidelines for an online public access catalog (OPAC) workstation that will support the terminal, printer, and other peripherals. Workstation dimensions, lighting, wire management, printer and paper, acoustical treatment, seating, storage for books and coats, wastebasket, and interior decoration are addressed. Flexibility and simplicity…

  14. What Our Screens Should Look Like: An Introduction to Effective OPAC Screens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shires, Nancy Lee; Olszak, Lydia P.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses basic principles of human-computer interface design that will be helpful to librarians involved in designing effective OPAC (Online Public Access Catalog) screens. Highlights include physical features; general principles; menu screens; commands; inquiry screens; messages, including help screens; and organizational considerations,…

  15. A Longitudinal Study of the Effects of OPAC Screen Changes on Searching Behavior and Searcher Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blecic, Deborah D.; Dorsch, Josephine L.; Koenig, Melissa H.; Bangalore, Nimala S.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a longitudinal study of four sets of OPAC (online public access catalog) transaction logs that examined the effects of screen changes in helping searchers improve their search behavior. Results show that while screen changes initially had a positive impact on search behavior, they were not always sustained over time. (Author/LRW)

  16. OPAL opacities

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, F.J.; Iglesias, C.A.

    1992-08-01

    We have continued to improve and update the OPAL opacity code. Addition of intermediate coupling has further increases the opacity over earlier LS coupling results. A corresponding states method has been used to extend the tables in both X and Z. This has allowed the calculation and distribution of extensive opacity tables for several different sets of metal abundance.

  17. Storing and Accessing the Largest Astronomical Catalogs with the SAI CAS Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koposov, S.; Bartunov, O.; Belinskiy, A.; Karpov, S.

    2007-10-01

    We present a new project -- SAI CAS (Sternberg Astronomical Institute Catalog Access Services). The goal of this project is to provide the Russian and international community with online access to major large astronomical catalogs (USNO-A2.0/B1.0, SDSS, 2MASS, GSC I/II, DENIS, UCAC) and provide tools and services facilitating scientific research using these catalogs. Currently SAI CAS is the largest astronomical data center in Russia. It provides primary services such as cone search, cross match between catalogs inside a region on the sky, and between system and user catalogs, etc. Several science projects in Russia already use SAI CAS. The SAI CAS project is based on open source software and is an open source itself. The system uses relational database storage (PostgreSQL), where all data and metadata are stored. The spatial searches and cross matches are performed using the Q3C plugin for PostgreSQL. Our system can be accessed via web-services (SOAP and simple HTTP POST/GET) and web interfaces. The SAI CAS project is located at http://vo.astronet.ru.

  18. Los Alamos opacity web page

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, N.H. Jr.; Clark, R.E.H.

    1998-02-01

    The Los Alamos opacity data base is now available on the World Wide Web at http://t4.lanl.gov. The data base contains both the original Astrophysical Opacity Library distributed worldwide in the 1980`s (for historical reference) and the new improved opacities from the Light Element Detailed Configuration OPacity (LEDCOP) code. Users can access the opacity data using the multigroup opacity code TOPS to obtain Rosseland and Planck gray opacities, group mean opacities over selected energy ranges, the monochromatic absorption coefficients and the average ionization over a wide range of temperatures and densities. As described in this paper, these quantities are available for all of the elements presently on the data base and TOPS will provide the same quantities for any arbitrary mixture of these elements.

  19. New Model for Multimedia Interfaces to Online Public Access Catalogues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pejtersen, Annelise Mark

    1992-01-01

    Describes the Book House, an interactive, multimedia online public access catalog (OPAC) developed in Denmark that uses icons, text, and animation. An alternative design model that addresses problems in OPACs is described; and database design, system navigation, use for fiction retrieval, and evaluation are discussed. (20 references) (MES)

  20. Searching for Information in an Online Public Access Catalogue (OPAC): The Impacts of Information Search Expertise on the use of Boolean Operators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinet, Jrme; Favart, Monik; Passerault, Jean-Michel

    2004-01-01

    Boolean systems still constitute most of the installed base of online public access catalogues (OPACs) in the French universities even if many studies have shown that Boolean operators are not frequently used by non-librarian users (by contrast with professional librarians). The first study examined the use of Boolean operators by French…

  1. Techniques to Improve Subject Retrieval in Online Catalogs: Flexible Access to Elements in the Bibliographic Record.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell, Tschera Harkness

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of improving subject access in online library catalogs focuses on a study that used a book description from "Book Review Digest" to evaluate the information on the bibliographic record found on the OCLC database. Matching by Library of Congress Subject Headings and by keywords in the title are discussed. (22 references) (LRW)

  2. The Purpose of the Cataloging for Matters of Equitable Access: Spanish-Language Cataloging and "Everyday" Approaches of Non-Native English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamich, Tom

    2009-01-01

    While teacher-librarians embrace the concept of equitable access when they select "multicultural" materials to include in their collections, plan special programs, and teach lessons on a variety of topics, what do they do to make equitable access a part of their online catalogs? Have they achieved (or nearly achieved) a consistent level of…

  3. OPAL opacities

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, F.J.; Iglesias, C.A. )

    1992-01-01

    Radiative transport is essential in determining the structure and evolution of a star. However, there are no direct measurements of the radiative opacity at stellar interior conditions so that stellar models must rely on theoretical results. Generally, the opacity calculations produced at Los Alamos have proven adequate to describe most features of stellar evolution. Nevertheless, many details remain unexplained. For example, pulsation properties of Cepheids, [delta] Scuti variables, and [beta] Cephei stars have eluded explanation. This situation has been altered with the introduction of new OPAL opacity calculations. The OPAL opacities show large increases compared to the Los Alamos results and have resolved pulsation problems. In addition, the OPAL opacities have made favorable impact on solar models, the critical mass limit for pulsationaly stable stars, convective core overshooting, and the lithium depletion problem in G Dwarfs in the Hyades. A brief description of the OPAL code will be presented along with results.

  4. Time for New OPAC Initiatives: An Overview of Landmarks in the Literature and Introduction to WordFocus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Joseph R.

    1997-01-01

    Libraries are moving into an era that incorporates improvements of a library's existing databases, embraces the research results of the information-seeking process, and makes fundamental improvements by adding new databases such as WordFocus. These new systems should convert the frustrated user of today's online public access catalog (OPAC) into…

  5. On-Line Catalog Evaluation Project. Data Analysis Plan, Version 2.2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Gary S.; And Others

    This document outlines the methodology to be used for analyzing and reporting data collected through questionnaires at the various libraries of the University of California in April and May of 1982, as the second phase of an online public access catalog (OPAC) evaluation project. It is noted that the project was designed to enable systems…

  6. On-Line Remote Catalog Access and Circulation Control System. Part I: Functional Specifications. Part II: User's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Business Machines Corp., Gaithersburg, MD. Data Processing Div.

    The Ohio State University Libraries On-line Remote Catalog Access and Circulation Control System (LCS) began on-line operations with the conversion of one department library in November 1970. By December all 26 libraries had been converted to the automated system and LCS was fully operational one month ahead of schedule. LCS is designed as a…

  7. Estimating Space Requirements for Microfilm Catalogs and CRT Access to Computer Data Bases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Peter K.

    While the majority of libraries continue to use cards as their primary medium for public catalogs, microform catalogs are gaining popularity because they are more economical, and some libraries may soon be using cathode ray tube (CRT) terminals for displaying catalog data. No definitive information prescribing the space and equipment needs for…

  8. Addressing the issue of cataloging and making chiropractic literature accessible: Part I: Defining the problem.

    PubMed

    Curl, D D; Antovich, T J

    1990-06-01

    Health science journals are a principle source of new knowledge for chiropractors, chiropractic faculty and students. Regrettably, clinically or educationally relevant articles (appearing in the nearly 20,000 journals annually) are often overlooked due to access difficulties. Innovations are needed to assist the reader to select articles relevant to chiropractic and reduce the time spent sorting through the volumes of literature. A review of the literature shows there is a trend toward database management for cataloging and accessibility of other, nonchiropractic, literature. Most notable of these is an endeavor by National Technical Information Service, commonly referred to as MEDLARS (Medline). It is interesting to note that a computer-assisted library database program does not exist on any chiropractic campus. This is in contrast with the trend on campuses of other health care fields. Manual search strategies within the chiropractic literature are time consuming, subject to a high failure rate, and even if the search produces citations, there is no assurance the journal can be accessed unless a chiropractic campus is nearby. Furthermore, difficulties exist when a chiropractic literature search is attempted in any computerized database, e.g., MEDLARS (Medline). Journals/articles that are unique to chiropractic (national, international or on the state level) are not specifically included in these computerized databases. Aside from these difficulties, there exists the problem of finding those articles that contain valid and relevant information from among those that are less valid or informative. PMID:2198323

  9. Patterns of Searching and Success Rates in an Online Public Access Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alzofon, Sammy R.; Van Pulis, Noelle

    1984-01-01

    A survey of 430 users of online catalog at Ohio State University Libraries found that most users are undergraduate students (68 percent) and that majority (95 percent) choose online catalog as first source of information. Fewer performed known-item searches and success rates were generally higher than reported in earlier studies. (8 references)…

  10. CD-ROM as an Online Public Access Catalogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akeroyd, John

    1988-01-01

    Discussion of the application of CD-ROM technology for online public access catalogs (OPACs) covers: (1) the production process; (2) costs; (3) advantages and disadvantages of using CD-ROM; (4) current CD-ROM applications; and (5) future developments. (5 references) (MES)

  11. Hands-On Instruction in an Electronic Classroom. A Final Report to the U.S. Dept. of Education of a Research and Development Grant Awarded To Establish a Fully-Equipped Electronic Training Room and Test the Effectiveness of Hands-On Instruction in Learning the NOTIS OPAC and Silver-Platter ERIC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggins, Marvin E.

    This document is the final report to the U.S. Department of Education of a research and development grant awarded to establish a fully equipped electronic training room and test the effectiveness of hands-on instruction in learning the NOTIS OPAC (online public access catalog) and the Silver-Platter ERIC database on CD-ROM. The purpose of the…

  12. A Common Ground: Communication and Alliance between Cataloger and Curator for Improved Access to Rare Books and Special Collections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Elaine Beckley; Wagner, Stephen C.

    2000-01-01

    Examines rare book cataloging from the perspectives of cataloger and curator; discusses the areas where a cataloger-curator alliance can affect cataloging, as well as relevant factors over which the two have little control; and promotes a concept of customized cataloging for special collections materials. (Contains 17 references.) (Author/MES)

  13. Opacity of stellar matter

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, F J

    1998-09-17

    New efforts to calculate opacity have produced significant improvements in the quality of stellar models. The most dramatic effect has been large opacity enhancements for stars subject to large amplitude pulsations. Significant improvement in helioseismic modeling has also been obtained. A description and comparisons of the new opacity efforts are give

  14. Updated opal opacities

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesias, C.A.; Rogers, F.J.

    1996-06-01

    The reexamination of astrophysical opacities has eliminated gross discrepancies between a variety of observations and theoretical calculations; thus allowing for more detailed tests of stellar models. A number of such studies indicate that model results are sensitive to modest changes in the opacity. Consequently, it is desirable to update available opacity databases with recent improvements in physics, refinements of element abundance, and other such factors affecting the results. Updated OPAL Rosseland mean opacities are presented. The new results have incorporated improvements in the physics and numerical procedures as well as corrections. The main opacity changes are increases of as much as 20{percent} for Population I stars due to the explicit inclusion of 19 metals (compared to 12 metals in the earlier calculations) with the other modifications introducing opacity changes smaller than 10{percent}. In addition, the temperature and density range covered by the updated opacity tables has been extended. As before, the tables allow accurate interpolation in density and temperature as well as hydrogen, helium, carbon, oxygen, and metal mass fractions. Although a specific metal composition is emphasized, opacity tables for different metal distributions can be made readily available. The updated opacities are compared to other work. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Astronomical Society.}

  15. Cataloging Internet resources.

    PubMed

    Flannery, M R

    1995-04-01

    The number of resources available on the Internet continues to expand exponentially, but finding appropriate resources is still a fragmented, hit-or-miss operation. Traditional library expertise in bibliographic description and access should be applied to the management of this emerging body of material. In the process, catalogers will be able to assess the adequacy of current tools (e.g., cataloging codes, machine-readable cataloging formats, integrated library systems) for providing access to Internet resources and will contribute credibly to design or redesign of access tools. This paper outlines the major issues that must be considered in cataloging electronic resources. PMID:7599587

  16. Perspectives on Map Cataloging and Classification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, John R.

    1981-01-01

    Presents an overview of the developments and dilemmas related to the cataloging and classification of maps, addressing the areas of online library systems, cooperative cataloging, descriptive cataloging, subject access, and the improvement of network capabilities. Seventeen references are cited. (FM)

  17. Electronic Journals in Aggregated Collections: Providing Access through the Catalog and a Cold Fusion Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Sue

    2005-01-01

    Patrons in academic libraries want convenient 24-hour access to full-text journals in a rapid, convenient manner. They want "anytime, anywhere" access to information and they do not want to enter a library to obtain it. This article describes how Eastern Washington University Libraries provide access to full-text journals through several…

  18. Investigation of the Searching Efficiency and Cost of Creating a Remote Access Catalog for the New York State Library. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckland, Lawrence F.; Madden, Mary

    From experimental work performed, and reported upon in this document, it is concluded that converting the New York State Library (NYSL) shelf list sample to machine readable form, and searching this shelf list using a remote access catalog are technically sound concepts though the capital costs of data conversion and system installation will be…

  19. The user friendly card catalog.

    PubMed

    Lee, S K; Ekstrand, N L

    1984-01-01

    The changing roles and relationships of professional staff in Reference and Cataloging departments in the catalog creation process are discussed. Specific examples are given for handling classification, subject headings and cross references. The article stresses the importance of interface between the two departments in making the catalog more accessible to the users of the library. PMID:10268036

  20. Federating Metadata Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baru, C.; Lin, K.

    2009-04-01

    The Geosciences Network project (www.geongrid.org) has been developing cyberinfrastructure for data sharing in the Earth Science community based on a service-oriented architecture. The project defines a standard "software stack", which includes a standardized set of software modules and corresponding service interfaces. The system employs Grid certificates for distributed user authentication. The GEON Portal provides online access to these services via a set of portlets. This service-oriented approach has enabled the GEON network to easily expand to new sites and deploy the same infrastructure in new projects. To facilitate interoperation with other distributed geoinformatics environments, service standards are being defined and implemented for catalog services and federated search across distributed catalogs. The need arises because there may be multiple metadata catalogs in a distributed system, for example, for each institution, agency, geographic region, and/or country. Ideally, a geoinformatics user should be able to search across all such catalogs by making a single search request. In this paper, we describe our implementation for such a search capability across federated metadata catalogs in the GEON service-oriented architecture. The GEON catalog can be searched using spatial, temporal, and other metadata-based search criteria. The search can be invoked as a Web service and, thus, can be imbedded in any software application. The need for federated catalogs in GEON arises because, (i) GEON collaborators at the University of Hyderabad, India have deployed their own catalog, as part of the iGEON-India effort, to register information about local resources for broader access across the network, (ii) GEON collaborators in the GEO Grid (Global Earth Observations Grid) project at AIST, Japan have implemented a catalog for their ASTER data products, and (iii) we have recently deployed a search service to access all data products from the EarthScope project in the US

  1. Molecular opacities for exoplanets

    PubMed Central

    Bernath, Peter F.

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of exoplanets are now possible by transit methods and direct emission. Spectroscopic requirements for exoplanets are reviewed based on existing measurements and model predictions for hot Jupiters and super-Earths. Molecular opacities needed to simulate astronomical observations can be obtained from laboratory measurements, ab initio calculations or a combination of the two approaches. This discussion article focuses mainly on laboratory measurements of hot molecules as needed for exoplanet spectroscopy. PMID:24664921

  2. Molecular opacities for exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Bernath, Peter F

    2014-04-28

    Spectroscopic observations of exoplanets are now possible by transit methods and direct emission. Spectroscopic requirements for exoplanets are reviewed based on existing measurements and model predictions for hot Jupiters and super-Earths. Molecular opacities needed to simulate astronomical observations can be obtained from laboratory measurements, ab initio calculations or a combination of the two approaches. This discussion article focuses mainly on laboratory measurements of hot molecules as needed for exoplanet spectroscopy.

  3. Stellar opacity validations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pennec, M.; Turck-Chièze, S.; Ribeyre, X.; Ducret, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    This paper focuses on the radiative transfer in stars where opacities seem to raise problems : β-Cephei and solar-type stars. We first concentrate on the iron bump (log T = 5.25), responsible for β-Cephei pulsations through the κ-mechanism. To discriminate between the different opacity calculations used to predict their oscillations, new well-qualified calculations are used and compared to OP calculations. In parallel with this theoretical work, an experiment has been conducted at LULI 2000 in 2011 on iron and nickel. We show that this extended study pushes for the revision of the tables in the conditions corresponding to the iron bump region, at least for nickel. We will then deal with the Sun case for which we are preparing an opacity experiment on a high-energy laser, in some conditions of the radiative zone (T = [2 - 15 ×10^{6} K] and ρ = [0.2 - 150 g/cm^{3}]). To reach these high temperatures and densities at LTE and validate or not plasma effects and line widths, we are exploring an approach called the Double Ablation Front, driven by plasma radiative effects. The 1D simulations performed with the code CHIC show that with this technique, we could reach conditions equivalent to the conditions of half of the solar radiative zone.

  4. NASA climate data catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reph, M. G.

    1984-01-01

    This document provides a summary of information available in the NASA Climate Data Catalog. The catalog provides scientific users with technical information about selected climate parameter data sets and the associated sensor measurements from which they are derived. It is an integral part of the Pilot Climate Data System (PCDS), an interactive, scientific management system for locating, obtaining, manipulating, and displaying climate research data. The catalog is maintained in a machine readable representation which can easily be accessed via the PCDS. The purposes, format and content of the catalog are discussed. Summarized information is provided about each of the data sets currently described in the catalog. Sample detailed descriptions are included for individual data sets or families of related data sets.

  5. Data Definition and the Decline of Cataloging Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burger, Robert H.

    1983-01-01

    Discussion of the process of library cataloging notes the 8th century cataloger, Alcuin; purpose of cataloging; bibliographic control; access to information; cataloging on OCLC; emphasis on the format in which cataloging information is communicated; lost precision; authority files; and recall versus precision. Seven references are included. (EJS)

  6. Computing NLTE Opacities -- Node Level Parallel Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, Daniel

    2015-09-11

    Presentation. The goal: to produce a robust library capable of computing reasonably accurate opacities inline with the assumption of LTE relaxed (non-LTE). Near term: demonstrate acceleration of non-LTE opacity computation. Far term (if funded): connect to application codes with in-line capability and compute opacities. Study science problems. Use efficient algorithms that expose many levels of parallelism and utilize good memory access patterns for use on advanced architectures. Portability to multiple types of hardware including multicore processors, manycore processors such as KNL, GPUs, etc. Easily coupled to radiation hydrodynamics and thermal radiative transfer codes.

  7. Evaluating Public Access On-Line Catalogs. Phase I: Development and Testing of Data Collection and Analysis Tools. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Ray R.

    This report outlines specifications for the online transaction monitoring and questionnaire administration features of the University of California's (UC) Prototype On-Line Catalog, known as MELVYL. The development and testing of these features by the UC Division of Library Automation (DLA) is also described. This document is the final report…

  8. Book Catalogs versus Card Catalogs *

    PubMed Central

    Pizer, Irwin H.

    1965-01-01

    The development of the library catalog in book form and its abandonment in favor of the card catalog are briefly traced. The advantages and disadvantages of both types of catalogs are enumerated, and several solutions which tried to combine the best features of both are discussed. The present trend back to the book catalog, made possible by recent advances in computer technology, is analyzed, advantages and disadvantages are compared, current examples are illustrated, and finally the computerized catalog is weighed against both the book and card catalog as to main features and practicality. PMID:14271116

  9. Downloading from the OPAC: The Innovative Interfaces Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spore, Stuart

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of downloading from online public access catalogs focuses on downloading to MS-DOS microcomputers from the INNOPAC online catalog system. Tools for capturing and postprocessing downloaded files are described, technical and institutional constraints on downloading are addressed, and an innovative program for overcoming such constraints…

  10. Light element opacities from ATOMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgan, J.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Magee, N. H.; Armstrong, G. S. J.; Abdallah, J.; Sherrill, M. E.; Fontes, C. J.; Zhang, H. L.; Hakel, P.

    2013-06-01

    We present new calculations of local-thermodynamic-equilibrium (LTE) light element opacities from the Los Alamos ATOMIC code. ATOMIC is a multi-purpose code that can generate LTE or non-LTE quantities of interest at various levels of approximation. A program of work is currently underway to compute new LTE opacity data for all elements H through Zn. New opacity tables for H through Ne are complete, and a new Fe opacity table will be available soon. Our calculations, which include fine-structure detail, represent a systematic improvement over previous Los Alamos opacity calculations using the LEDCOP legacy code. Our opacity calculations incorporate atomic structure data computed from the CATS code, which is based on Cowan's atomic structure codes, and photoionization cross section data computed from the Los Alamos ionization code GIPPER. We make use of a new equation-of-state (EOS) model based on the chemical picture. ATOMIC incorporates some physics packages from LEDCOP and also includes additional physical processes, such as improved free-free cross sections and additional scattering mechanisms. In this report, we briefly discuss the physics improvements included in our new opacity calculations and present comparisons of our new opacities with other work for C, O, and Fe at selected conditions.

  11. Helioseismic Tests of Radiative Opacities.

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, J. A.; Neuforge, C. M.; Keady, J. J.; Magee, N. H.; Bradley, P. A.

    2002-01-01

    During the past fifteen years, thousands of solar acoustic oscillation modes have been measured to remarkable precision, in many cases to within 0.01%. These frequencies have been used to infer the interior structure of the sun and test the physical input to solar models. Here we summarize the procedures, input physics and assumptions for calculating a standard solar evolution model. We compare the observed and calculated sound speed profile and oscillation frequencies of solar models calibrated using the new Los Alamos LEDCOP and Livermore OPAL Rosseland mean opacities for the same element mixture. We show that solar oscillations are extremely sensitive to opacities, with opacity differences of only a few percent producing an easily detectable effect on the sound speed and predicted frequencies. The oscillation data indicate that agreement would be improved by an opacity increase of several percent below the convection zone for both the LEDCOP and OPAL opacities.

  12. The Weakest Link: Library Catalogs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Terrence E., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Describes methods of correcting MARC records in online public access catalogs in school libraries. Highlights include in-house methods; professional resources; conforming to library cataloging standards; vendor services, including Web-based services; software specifically developed for record cleanup; and outsourcing. (LRW)

  13. THE IRON OPACITY PROJECT: High-Energy-Density Plasma Opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palay, E.; Orban, C.; Nahar, S.; Pradhan, A.; Pinnsonoault, M.; Bailey, J.

    2013-05-01

    Opacity governs radiation flow in plasma sources. Accurate opacities are needed to model unobservable laboratory and astrophysical conditions. High-energy-density (HED) plasma conditions prevalent in stellar interiors can now be recreated in the laboratory. The Z-pinch fusion device at the Sandia National Lab can reproduce temperatures and densities near the boundary where radiation transport changes from diffusion to convection inside the Sun. To benchmark theoretical opacities experiments are essential to resolve the outstanding discrepancy in solar abundances. The most common volatile elements C, N, O, Ne, etc. have been spectroscopically measured to be up to 50% lower than the standard abundances. This introduces conflict in the derived values of basic solar parameters such as the radiation/convection boundary, sound speed, and the primordial He abundance with precisely measured oscillations of the Sun through Helioseismology. A potential solution is increment of stellar opacities, which has inverse but complex relation with abundacnes, at least 30%. New iron opacity calculations include hitherto neglected atomic physics of fine structure and resonances which are largely treated as lines in existing opacities calculations. Preliminary results on radiative transitions in Ne Partial support: DOE,NSF.

  14. OPAL Opacities for astrophysical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesias, C.A.; Rogers, F.J.

    1991-05-01

    The OPAL opacity code developed at LLNL has been applied to astrophysical problems. The computed Rosseland mean opacities show significant differences when compared to the Los Alamos results. These differences have been traced to both atomic and equation of state improvements in the OPAL code. Furthermore, preliminary work suggest that the OPAL calculations considerably improve the agreement between observations and stellar models. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  15. ALICAT. The Online Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ok Park, Hye, Ed.; And Others

    This guide for users of the Adelphi University Libraries provides instructions for accessing the bibliographic records of the libraries' holdings, which have been stored online since 1968. The steps necessary to search the Adelphi Libraries Catalog Online (ALICAT) by author, title, subject, or call number are explained using text and…

  16. The Online Catalog: Issues in Planning and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Timothy F.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses key issues to be addressed in planning for introduction of online public access catalog in academic research library environment. Purpose of catalog, reasons to adopt catalog, user behavior, use of catalog records, authority control, shared or unique systems, and impact on staff are highlighted. Seventy-three sources are cited. (EJS)

  17. Integrating Electronic Resources into the Library Catalog: A Collaborative Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera, Gail; Aldana, Lynda

    2001-01-01

    Describes a project at the University of Mississippi Libraries to catalog purchased electronic resources so that access to these resources is available only via the Web-based library catalog. Discusses collaboration between cataloging and systems personnel; and describes the MARC catalog record field that contains the information needed to locate…

  18. Management of Opacities in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Ann; Deery, Chris

    2015-12-01

    Enamel opacities can appear as white, cream, yellow or brown patches. They can result from developmental or acquired conditions. The diagnosis, severity of the opacity and patient's desire for treatment guide the clinician when choosing the correct management option. Microabrasion is indicated for surface opacities, whereas bleaching can treat opacities deep within the tooth. When these techniques have failed to achieve the desired result, camouflaging the opacity with composite resin may be useful. Novel techniques, such as infiltrating or sealing the opacity, can alter enamel's refractive index, offering further treatment choices. CPD/Clinical Relevance: There are many conservative treatments available which can improve the appearance of enamel opacities. PMID:26856002

  19. Unifying Water Data Sources: How the CUAHSI Water Data Center is Enabling and Improving Access to a Growing Catalog of over 100 Data Providers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollak, J.; Berry, K.; Couch, A.; Arrigo, J.; Hooper, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    features of the CUAHSI-HIS which make it particularly appropriate for providing unified access to several sources of water data. A growing community of researchers and educators are employing these tools for education; including sharing best practices around creating modules, supporting researchers and educators in accessing the services, and cataloging and sharing modules. The CUAHSI WDC is a community governed organization. Our agenda is driven by the community's voice through a Board of Directors and committees that decide strategic direction (new products), tactical decisions (product improvement), and evaluation of usability. By providing the aforementioned services within a community driven framework, we believe the WDC is providing critical services that include improving water data discoverability, accessibility and usability within a sustainable governance structure.

  20. Relativistic opacities for astrophysical applications

    DOE PAGES

    Fontes, Christopher John; Fryer, Christopher Lee; Hungerford, Aimee L.; Hakel, Peter; Colgan, James Patrick; Kilcrease, David Parker; Sherrill, Manalo Edgar

    2015-06-29

    Here, we report on the use of the Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes to generate radiative opacities for the modeling of astrophysically relevant plasmas under local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions. The atomic structure calculations are carried out in fine-structure detail, including full configuration interaction. Three example applications are considered: iron opacities at conditions relevant to the base of the solar convection zone, nickel opacities for the modeling of stellar envelopes, and samarium opacities for the modeling of light curves produced by neutron star mergers. In the first two examples, comparisons are made between opacities that are generatedmore » with the fully and semi-relativistic capabilities in the Los Alamos suite of codes. As expected for these highly charged, iron-peak ions, the two methods produce reasonably similar results, providing confidence that the numerical methods have been correctly implemented. However, discrepancies greater than 10% are observed for nickel and investigated in detail. In the final application, the relativistic capability is used in a preliminary investigation of the complicated absorption spectrum associated with cold lanthanide elements.« less

  1. Online Catalogs in Secondary School Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Donald R.

    Computer/automated catalogs have been in use in secondary schools for some time and have numerous advantages. A public access catalog (PAC) allows networking with other libraries, use of the Boolean search function, and the retrieval of bibliographic citations from a variety of access points. Moreover, PAC's have recently become more user…

  2. The Visual Double Star Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Brian D.

    2015-08-01

    In visual double star work, production of the first comprehensive attempt to list all discovered pairs in his accessible sky was prepared by S.W. Burnham in 1906. A double star catalog for the southern hemisphere was prepared by R.T.A. Innes et al. in 1927 and the northern hemisphere catalog was updated by R.G. Aitken and E. Doolittle in 1932. Eventually, this led to Lick Observatory maintaining what became known as the Index Catalogue, an all-sky visual double star database.In 1964, under the aegis of Commission 26, the Lick double star database was transferred to the U.S. Naval Observatory where it was redesignated the Washington Double Star Catalog where it and it's ancillary catalogs, have been maintained for over half a century. The current statistics of the catalog and it's supplements are presented as are the enhancements currently under consideration.

  3. Enhancement of Mutual Discovery, Search, and Access of Data for Users of NASA and GEOSS-Cataloged Data Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, W. L.; Maidment, D. R.; Rodell, M.; Strub, R. F.; Arctur, D. K.; Ames, D. P.; Vollmer, B.; Seiler, E.

    2014-12-01

    An ongoing NASA-funded project has removed a longstanding barrier to accessing NASA data (i.e., accessing archived time-step array data as point-time series) for selected variables of the North American and Global Land Data Assimilation Systems (NLDAS and GLDAS, respectively) and other EOSDIS (Earth Observing System Data Information System) data sets. These time series ("data rods") are pre-generated or generated on-the-fly (OTF), leveraging the NASA Simple Subset Wizard (SSW), a gateway to NASA data centers. Data rods Web services are accessible through the CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System (HIS) and the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) but are not easily discoverable by users of other non-NASA data systems. The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) is a logical mechanism for providing access to the data rods, both pre-generated and OTF. There is an ongoing series of multi-organizational GEOSS Architecture Implementation Pilots, now in Phase-7 (AIP-7) and with a strong water sub-theme, that is aimed at the GEOSS Water Strategic Target "to produce [by 2015] comprehensive sets of data and information products to support decision-making for efficient management of the world's water resources, based on coordinated, sustained observations of the water cycle on multiple scales." The aim of this "GEOSS Water Services" project is to develop a distributed, global registry of water data, map, and modeling services catalogued using the standards and procedures of the Open Geospatial Consortium and the World Meteorological Organization. This project has already demonstrated that the GEOSS infrastructure can be leveraged to help provide access to time series of model grid information (e.g., NLDAS, GLDAS) or grids of information over a geographical domain for a particular time interval. A new NASA-funded project was begun, to expand on these early efforts to enhance the discovery, search, and access of NASA data by non

  4. THE CHANDRA SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Ian N.; Primini, Francis A.; Glotfelty, Kenny J.; Anderson, Craig S.; Bonaventura, Nina R.; Chen, Judy C.; Doe, Stephen M.; Evans, Janet D.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Galle, Elizabeth C.; Gibbs, Danny G.; Grier, John D.; Hain, Roger M.; Harbo, Peter N.; He Xiangqun; Karovska, Margarita; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Davis, John E.; Houck, John C.; Hall, Diane M.

    2010-07-15

    The Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) is a general purpose virtual X-ray astrophysics facility that provides access to a carefully selected set of generally useful quantities for individual X-ray sources, and is designed to satisfy the needs of a broad-based group of scientists, including those who may be less familiar with astronomical data analysis in the X-ray regime. The first release of the CSC includes information about 94,676 distinct X-ray sources detected in a subset of public Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer imaging observations from roughly the first eight years of the Chandra mission. This release of the catalog includes point and compact sources with observed spatial extents {approx}<30''. The catalog (1) provides access to the best estimates of the X-ray source properties for detected sources, with good scientific fidelity, and directly supports scientific analysis using the individual source data; (2) facilitates analysis of a wide range of statistical properties for classes of X-ray sources; and (3) provides efficient access to calibrated observational data and ancillary data products for individual X-ray sources, so that users can perform detailed further analysis using existing tools. The catalog includes real X-ray sources detected with flux estimates that are at least 3 times their estimated 1{sigma} uncertainties in at least one energy band, while maintaining the number of spurious sources at a level of {approx}<1 false source per field for a 100 ks observation. For each detected source, the CSC provides commonly tabulated quantities, including source position, extent, multi-band fluxes, hardness ratios, and variability statistics, derived from the observations in which the source is detected. In addition to these traditional catalog elements, for each X-ray source the CSC includes an extensive set of file-based data products that can be manipulated interactively, including source images, event lists, light curves, and spectra from each observation

  5. Messier Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    In the eighteenth century the French astronomer, Charles Messier (1730-1817), drew up a catalog of 109 of the brighter nebulae, clusters and galaxies. Objects in this catalog are denoted by the letter M followed by a number, for example, M31 is the Andromeda Galaxy. Messier's prime interest was comets. His purpose was to make comet hunting easier by tabulating permanent deep-sky objects that coul...

  6. Cataloging Administrators' Views on Cataloging Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryans, Cynthia C.

    1980-01-01

    Reports results of a survey of cataloging practitioners on their opinions on the (1) structure of the cataloging curriculum in graduate library school; (2) relationship of the use of computers in cataloging to the cataloging curriculum; and (3) adequacy of preparation of current graduates for positions as catalog librarians. (FM)

  7. Redesigning the OPAC: Moving outside the ILMS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokvitne, Lloyd O.

    2006-01-01

    The need to develop new OPACs that meet the needs of users better is becoming well acknowledged. How libraries can transform their OPACs to modern web friendly formats is not yet clear. This paper describes the State Library of Tasmania's experience in developing a new OPAC by exporting bibliographic data to a software package outside the ILMS.…

  8. In Search of a Really "Next Generation" Catalog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Ross

    2008-01-01

    Ever since North Carolina State University Libraries launched their Endeca-based OPAC replacement in the beginning of 2006, the library world has been completely obsessed with ditching their old, tired catalog interfaces (and with good reason) for the greener pastures of more sophisticated indexing, more accurate relevance ranking, dust jackets,…

  9. How Next-Gen R U? A Review of Academic OPACs in the United States and Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofmann, Melissa A.; Yang, Sharon Q.

    2011-01-01

    As a concept, the next-generation catalog (NGC) is not new to librarians, who have been wishing for better OPAC interfaces for their integrated library systems (ILSs). The NGC has been the focus of discussion for more than 5 years now, from the 2006 report of the implementation of Endeca at North Carolina State University, to Marshall Breeding's…

  10. New Dimensions for the Online Catalog: The Dartmouth College Library Experience [and] TOC/DOC at Caltech: Evolution of Citation Access Online [and] Locally Loaded Databases in Arizona State University's Online Catalog Using the CARL System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemperer, Katharina; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Each of three articles describes an academic library's online catalog that includes locally created databases. Topics covered include database and software selection; systems design and development; database producer negotiations; problems encountered during implementation; database loading; training and documentation; and future plans. (CLB)

  11. Iron opacity experiments for the solar interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, T.; Bailey, J. E.; Loisel, G.; Rochau, G. A.; Hansen, S. B.; Blancard, C.; Cosse, Ph.; Faussurier, G.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J.-C.; Pradhan, A. K.; Orban, C.; Pinsonneault, M.; Nahar, S. N.; Iglesias, C. A.; Wilson, B.; Colgan, J.; Fontes, C.; Kilcrease, D.; Sherrill, M.; Macfarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I.; Mancini, R. C.

    2014-10-01

    Iron opacity experiments near solar interior conditions are performed at SNL Z-machine to better constrain solar models. The SNL opacity science platform satisfies the many challenging requirements for opacity measurements and successfully determines iron opacities at multiple conditions. We found that the agreement between the modeled opacity and the measured opacity deteriorates as Te and ne are raised to approach solar interior conditions. While the inaccuracy of the modeled opacity partially resolves the solar abundance problem, the announcement of such discrepancies has a high impact on the astrophysics, atomic physics, and high energy density physics, and thus more scrutiny on the potential experimental flaws is critical. We report the synthetic investigation for potential sources of systematic uncertainties in the experiments. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. The Chandra Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ian N.; Primini, F. A.; Glotfelty, K. J.; Anderson, C. S.; Bonaventura, N. R.; Chen, J. C.; Davis, J. E.; Doe, S. M.; Evans, J. D.; Fabbiano, G.; Galle, E. C.; Gibbs, D. G., II; Grier, J. D.; Hain, R. M.; Hall, D. M.; Harbo, P. N.; He, X.; Houck, J. C.; Karovska, M.; Kashyap, V. L.; Lauer, J.; McCollough, M. L.; McDowell, J. C.; Miller, J. B.; Mitschang, A. W.; Morgan, D. L.; Mossman, A. E.; Nichols, J. S.; Nowak, M. A.; Plummer, D. A.; Refsdal, B. L.; Rots, A. H.; Siemiginowska, A.; Sundheim, B. A.; Tibbetts, M. S.; Van Stone, D. W.; Winkelman, S. L.; Zografou, P.

    2010-03-01

    The Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) is a general purpose virtual X-ray astrophysics facility that provides access to a carefully selected set of generally useful quantities for individual X-ray sources, and is designed to satisfy the needs of a broad-based group of scientists, including those who may be less familiar with astronomical data analysis in the X-ray regime. The first release of the CSC includes information about 94,676 distinct X-ray sources detected in a subset of public ACIS imaging observations from roughly the first eight years of the Chandra mission. This release of the catalog includes point and compact sources with observed spatial extents < 30". The catalog (1) provides access to estimates of the X-ray source properties for detected sources with good scientific fidelity; (2) facilitates analysis of a wide range of statistical properties for classes of X-ray sources; and (3) provides efficient access to calibrated observational data and ancillary data products for individual X-ray sources. The catalog includes real X-ray sources detected with flux estimates that are at least 3 times their estimated 1σ uncertainties in at least one energy band, while maintaining the number of spurious sources at a level of < 1 false source per field for a 100 ks observation. For each detected source, the CSC provides commonly tabulated quantities, including source position, extent, multi-band fluxes, hardness ratios, and variability statistics. In addition, for each X-ray source the CSC includes an extensive set of file-based data products that can be manipulated interactively, including source images, event lists, light curves, and spectra. Support for development of the CSC is provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration through the Chandra X-ray Center, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for and on behalf of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under contract NAS 8-03060.

  13. Line Broadening and the Solar Opacity Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krief, M.; Feigel, A.; Gazit, D.

    2016-06-01

    The calculation of line widths constitutes theoretical and computational challenges in the calculation of opacities of hot, dense plasmas. Opacity models use line broadening approximations that are untested at stellar interior conditions. Moreover, calculations of atomic spectra of the Sun indicate a large discrepancy in the K-shell line widths between several atomic codes and the Opacity-Project (OP). In this work, the atomic code STAR is used to study the sensitivity of solar opacities to line broadening. Variations in the solar opacity profile due to an increase of the Stark widths resulting from discrepancies with OP, are compared, in light of the solar opacity problem, with the required opacity variations of the present day Sun, as imposed by helioseismic and neutrino observations. The resulting variation profile is much larger than the discrepancy between different atomic codes, agrees qualitatively with the missing opacity profile, recovers about half of the missing opacity nearby the convection boundary, and has a little effect in the internal regions. Since it is hard to estimate quantitatively the uncertainty in the Stark widths, we show that an increase of all line widths by a factor of about ˜100 recovers quantitatively the missing opacity. These results emphasize the possibility that photoexcitation processes are not modeled properly, and more specifically, highlight the need for a better theoretical characterization of the line broadening phenomena at stellar interior conditions, and of the uncertainty due to the way it is implemented by atomic codes.

  14. Open-Source Tools for Enhancing Full-Text Searching of OPACs: Use of Koha, Greenstone and Fedora

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anuradha, K. T.; Sivakaminathan, R.; Kumar, P. Arun

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: There are many library automation packages available as open-source software, comprising two modules: staff-client module and online public access catalogue (OPAC). Although the OPAC of these library automation packages provides advanced features of searching and retrieval of bibliographic records, none of them facilitate full-text…

  15. SKYMAP system description: Star catalog data base generation and utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    The specifications, design, software description, and use of the SKYMAP star catalog system are detailed. The SKYMAP system was developed to provide an accurate and complete catalog of all stars with blue or visual magnitudes brighter than 9.0 for use by attitude determination programs. Because of the large number of stars which are brighter than 9.0 magnitude, efficient techniques of manipulating and accessing the data were required. These techniques of staged distillation of data from a Master Catalog to a Core Catalog, and direct access of overlapping zone catalogs, form the basis of the SKYMAP system. The collection and tranformation of data required to produce the Master Catalog data base is described. The data flow through the main programs and levels of star catalogs is detailed. The mathematical and logical techniques for each program and the format of all catalogs are documented.

  16. Biometrics between opacity and transparency.

    PubMed

    Gutwirth, Serge

    2007-01-01

    The overall aim of the democratic constitutional state is to protect a social order in which the individual liberty of the citizen is a major concern. As a consequence the democratic constitutional state should guarantee simultaneously and paradoxically a high level of individual freedom and an order in which such freedom is made possible and guaranteed. Biometrics provide a strong and expressive example both of the necessity to address the issue of opacity and transparency and the complexity of the process. Indeed, the large scale use of biometrics does not only question the position of the individual in society, but it also alters the architecture or nature of this society as such.

  17. Collections Define Cataloging's Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Betsy

    2007-01-01

    The role of catalogers within academic libraries is evolving to meet new demands and cultivating a broader understanding of cataloging--one that focuses on collections, not the catalog, and applies cataloger expertise across metadata activities. Working collaboratively as never before, catalogers are reinventing their place within the library.

  18. The International Reference Preparation for Opacity

    PubMed Central

    Maaløe, O.

    1955-01-01

    The International Reference Preparation for Opacity has been established by the WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization. The preparation is a suspension of Pyrex-glass particles of approximately the size of bacteria, and is similar to the standard for opacity used by the National Institutes of Health (Public Health Service), Bethesda, Md., USA (which have supplied it). The preparation, to which has been assigned an opacity of 10 International Units per millilitre, may be used for the direct visual estimation of the opacity of bacterial suspensions. It is held, for distribution to national laboratories for biological standards, by the Department of Biological Standards, Statens Seruminstitut, Copenhagen, Denmark. PMID:14379011

  19. Management of Catalogs at CDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landais, G.; Boch, T.; Brouty, M.; Guéhenneux, S.; Genova, F.; Lesteven, S.; Ochsenbein, F.; Ocvirk, P.; Perret, E.; Pineau, F.-X.; Simon, A.-C.; Vannier, P.

    2015-04-01

    VizieR (Ochsenbein et al. 2000) provides access to the most complete library of published astronomical catalogs (data tables and associated data) available online and organized in a self-documented database. (There were 11769 catalogs in November 2013.) Indexing the metadata in the VizieR search engine requires the expertise of scientists and documentalists for each catalog ingested. The metadata go into an efficient position search engine that is adapted to big data. (For instance, the GAIA simulation catalog has more than two billion objects). Information in VizieR tables is well described and can be retrieved easily. The search results provide visibility to catalogs with tools and protocols to disseminate data to the Virtual Observatory, thus giving scientists data that is reusable by dedicated tools (e.g. image vizualisation tools). Also, new functionality allows users to extract all photometric data in catalogs for a given position. Finally, it is also through cross-identification tools that the CDS becomes a partner in producing large data sets, such as GAIA.

  20. MC and A instrumentation catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Neymotin, L.; Sviridova, V.

    1998-06-01

    In 1981 and 1985, two editions of a catalog of non-destructive nuclear measurement instrumentation, and material control and surveillance equipment, were published by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The last edition of the catalog included one hundred and twenty-five entries covering a wide range of devices developed in the US and abroad. More than ten years have elapsed since the publication of the more recent Catalog. Devices described in it have undergone significant modifications, and new devices have been developed. Therefore, in order to assist specialists in the field of Material Control and Accounting (MC and A), a new catalog has been created. Work on this instrumentation catalog started in 1997 as a cooperative effort of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), operated by Brookhaven Science Associates under contract to the US Department of Energy, and the All-Russian Research Institute of Automatics (VNIIA), subordinate institute of the Atomic Energy Ministry of the Russian Federation, within the collaborative US-Russia Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC and A) Program. Most of the equipment included in the Catalog are non-destructive assay (NDA) measurement devices employed for purposes of accounting, confirmation, and verification of nuclear materials. Other devices also included in the Catalog are employed in the detection and deterrence of unauthorized access to or removal of nuclear materials (material control: containment and surveillance). Equipment found in the Catalog comprises either: (1) complete devices or systems that can be used for MC and A applications; or (2) parts or components of complete systems, such as multi-channel analyzers, detectors, neutron generators, and software. All devices are categorized by their status of development--from prototype to serial production.

  1. Printing and the Online Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Bennett J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses issues involved in offering printing for online library catalogs and weighs advantages and disadvantages of screen printing versus remote printing--speed, quality, privacy, convenience, noise, control, costs, accessibility and service. Additional technical issues discussed are buffered versus unbuffered asynchronous printer ports,…

  2. Cataloging of Original Materials in the 21st Century: Frequency and Preparation Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Cataloging and catalogers play an important role in the access to electronic catalogs for users at all levels. Two recent studies investigating the preparation of entry level library media specialists and the frequency they perform original cataloging led to a larger examination of the topic in the context of academic libraries. One factor has…

  3. Biometrics between opacity and transparency.

    PubMed

    Gutwirth, Serge

    2007-01-01

    The overall aim of the democratic constitutional state is to protect a social order in which the individual liberty of the citizen is a major concern. As a consequence the democratic constitutional state should guarantee simultaneously and paradoxically a high level of individual freedom and an order in which such freedom is made possible and guaranteed. Biometrics provide a strong and expressive example both of the necessity to address the issue of opacity and transparency and the complexity of the process. Indeed, the large scale use of biometrics does not only question the position of the individual in society, but it also alters the architecture or nature of this society as such. PMID:17536155

  4. The Need To Standardize Descriptive Cataloging *

    PubMed Central

    Truelson, Stanley D.

    1969-01-01

    Because there are too many ways to describe a book, its presence may not be discovered in a bibliography or catalog. Standardized descriptive cataloging is needed to solve this problem and also to eliminate wasteful duplication of cataloging. The Anglo-American Cataloging Rules and the COSATI Standard disagree on choice of main entry, and the Library of Congress does not follow the AACR all of the time. But the essence of standardized cataloging is widespread availability and general acceptance of the data, regardless of principles followed. Local adaptations in standard cataloging data are necesary, but those which affect all copies of a book, not just unique features of particular copies, must be made available for use by all libraries by correction of the standard cataloging data. The national structure for communicating standard cataloging data today is mainly printed tools, but tomorrow local library terminals on-line to a shared computer data bank may provide the instantaneous access needed. The problem of getting the wider community of library users to standardize their citation practices is more difficult to solve, but hope for improvement lies in making access to standard data easier. PMID:5782260

  5. Measuring visual opacity using digital imaging technology.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Michael J; Terry, Spencer H; Calidonna, Michael J; Stone, Daniel A; Kerch, Paul E; Rasmussen, Steven L

    2004-03-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Reference Method 9 (Method 9) is the preferred enforcement approach for verifying facility compliance with federal visible opacity standards. Supporters of Method 9 have cited its flexibility and low cost as important technological and economic advantages of the methodology. The Digital Opacity Compliance System (DOCS), an innovative technology that employs digital imaging technology for quantifying visible opacity, has been proposed as a technically defensible and economically competitive alternative to Method 9. Results from the field application of the DOCS at EPA-approved Method 9 smoke schools located in Ogden, UT, Augusta, GA, and Columbus, OH, demonstrated that, under clear sky conditions, the DOCS consistently met the opacity error rate established under Method 9. Application of hypothesis testing on the smoke school data set confirmed that the DOCS was equivalent to Method 9 under clear sky conditions. Under overcast sky conditions, human observers seemed to be more accurate than the DOCS in measuring opacity. However, within the smoke school environment, human observers routinely employ backgrounds other than sky (e.g., trees, telephone poles, billboards) to quantify opacity on overcast days. Under conditions that compel the use of sky as plume background (e.g., emission stacks having heights above the tree line), the DOCS appears to be a more accurate methodology for quantifying opacity than are human observers.

  6. Records for Electronic Databases in the Online Catalog at Middle Tennessee State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geckle, Beverly J.; Pozzebon, Mary Ellen; Williams, Jo

    2008-01-01

    This article recounts a project at the Middle Tennessee State University library to include records for electronic databases in the online catalog. Although electronic databases are accessible via the library's Databases A-Z list and related subject guides, cataloging these resources also provides access via the online catalog, allowing more of…

  7. Catalog Federation and Interoperability for Geoinformatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memon, A.; Lin, K.; Baru, C.

    2008-12-01

    With the increasing proliferation of online resources in the geosciences, including data, tools, and software services, there is also a proliferation of catalogs containing metadata that describe these resources. To realize the vision articulated in the NSF Workshop on Building a National Geoinformatics System, March 2007-where a user can sit at a terminal and easily search, discover, integrate and use distributed geoscience resources-it will be essential that a search request be able to traverse these multiple metadata catalogs. In this paper, we describe our effort at prototyping catalog interoperability across multiple metadata catalogs. An example of a metadata catalog is the one employed in the GEON Project (www.geongrid.org). The central GEON catalog can be searched using spatial, temporal, and other metadata-based search criteria. The search can be invoked as a Web service and, therefore, can be imbedded in any software application. There has been a requirement from some of the GEON collaborators (for example, at the University of Hyderabad, India and the Navajo Technical College, New Mexico) to deploy their own catalogs, to store information about their resources locally, while they publish some of this information for broader access and use. Thus, a search must now be able to span multiple, independent GEON catalogs. Next, some of our collaborators-e.g. GEO Grid (Global Earth Observations Grid) in Japan-are implementing the Catalog Services for the Web (CS-W) standard for their catalog, thereby requiring the search to span across catalogs implemented using the CS-W standard as well. Finally, we have recently deployed a search service to access all EarthScope data products, which are distributed across organizations in Seattle, WA (IRIS), Boulder, CO (UNAVCO), and Potsdam, Germany (ICDP/GFZ). This service essentially implements a virtual catalog (the actual catalogs and data are stored at the remote locations). So, there is the need to incorporate such 3rd

  8. Update on the OPAL opacity code

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, F.J.; Iglesias, C.A.; Wilson, B.G.

    1990-02-23

    Persisting discrepancies between theory and observation in a number of astrophysical properties has led to the conjecture that opacity databases may be inaccurate. The OPAL opacity code has been developed to address this question. The physical basis of OPAL removes several of the approximations present in past calculations. For example, it utilizes a much larger and more detailed set of atomic data than was used to construct the Los Alamos Astrophysical Library. This data is generated online, in LS or intermediate coupling, from prefitted analytic effective potentials and is of similar quality as single configuration, relativistic, self-consistent-field calculations. The OPAL code has been used to calculate opacities for the solar core and for Cepheid variable stars. In both cases, significant increases in the opacity compared to the Los Alamos Astrophysical Library were found. 37 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Update on the opal opacity code

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, F.J.; Iglesias, C.A.; Wilson, B.G. )

    1990-05-01

    Persisting discrepancies between theory and observation in a number of astrophysical properties has led to the conjecture that opacity databases may be inaccurate. The OPAL opacity code has been developed to address this question. The physical basis of OPAL removes several of the approximations present in past calculations. For example, it utilizes a much larger and more detailed set of atomic data than was used to construct the los Alamos Astrophysical Library. This data is generated online, in LS or intermediate coupling, from prefitted analytic effective potentials and is of similar quality as single configuration, relativistic, self-consistent-field calculations. The OPAL code has been used to calculate opacities for the solar core and for Cepheid variable stars. In both cases, significant increases in the opacity compared to the Los Alamos Astrophysical Library were found.

  10. The opacity of an expanding medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinnikov, S. I.

    1996-01-01

    Based on heuristic arguments, Karp et al. (1977) derived their well-known expression for the line opacity that allows for the effect of expansion. We use the general solution and Hilbert-type asymptotic expansions of the Boltzmann equation for photons to derive an expression for this "expansion opacity" rigorously. The difference between our result and the published results on this subject is discussed, as is the applicability of the expression for the expansion opacity to calculations of radiative transfer in a comoving frame in the moment approximation. For the zeroth moment (i.e., the energy equation), there is no need to take the expansion effect into account, and the absorption coefficient can be averaged just as in the case of a static medium. We also show how to properly average the expansion opacity in the flux equation.

  11. New Generation of Los Alamos Opacity Tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgan, James; Kilcrease, D. P.; Magee, N. H.; Sherrill, M. E.; Abdallah, J.; Hakel, P.; Fontes, C. J.; Guzik, J. A.; Mussack, K. A.

    2016-05-01

    We present a new generation of Los Alamos OPLIB opacity tables that have been computed using the ATOMIC code. Our tables have been calculated for all 30 elements from hydrogen through zinc and are publicly available through our website. In this poster we discuss the details of the calculations that underpin the new opacity tables. We also show several recent applications of the use of our opacity tables to solar modeling and other astrophysical applications. In particular, we demonstrate that use of the new opacities improves the agreement between solar models and helioseismology, but does not fully resolve the long-standing `solar abundance' problem. The Los Alamos National Laboratory is operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC5206NA25396.

  12. Modeling the SNL-Z Opacity Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrill, Manolo; Wilde, Bernhard; Peterson, Darrell; Urbatsch, Todd; Hakel, Peter; Fontes, Chris; Bailey, James; Rochau, Gregory

    2015-11-01

    Driven by the need to validate computed opacity tables used for radiation hydrodynamic simulations, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) have been involved in a collaboration to measure and characterize recorded opacities at the SNL-Z facility since 2009. The original success in measuring the spectral opacity of iron at a temperature of 156eV and at an electron density of 6.90x1021cm -3 (reported by J.E. Bailey et al. in PRL 99 265002 2007) led to an interest in expanding iron measurements to higher temperatures and densities to conditions consistent with those at the base of the convection zone of the Sun. To obtain these higher temperature/density conditions, the tamper masses that sandwich the metal foil of interest were increased. Several disturbing discrepancies exist between the higher temperature/density opacity measurements and theory and continue to be largely unresolved for the past several years (J. E. Bailey et al., NATURE 517 56 1 JAN. 2015). This continuing discrepancy has prompted LANL to perform detailed rad-hydro simulations of the SNL-Z opacity platform. In these simulations, both the dynamic hohlraum and the opacity target are modeled together. We report on the simulation methods and comparisons with dynamic hohlraum measurements that are used to assess the simulation fidelity.

  13. The OPAC Reborn: Electronic Content Belongs in the OPAC, at Least if We Want People to Find It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCracken, Peter

    2004-01-01

    One critical role of the catalog is to help librarians manage and track their inventory, whether it's books, videos, journals, microfilm reels, laptops, or even access to study rooms. The phrase, "if you can't track it, you don't own it," is quite real for the library that is trying to monitor thousands or millions of items. In the last decade,…

  14. Radiation Transport for Explosive Outflows: Opacity Regrouping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollaeger, Ryan T.; van Rossum, Daniel R.

    2014-10-01

    Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) are methods used to stochastically solve the radiative transport and diffusion equations, respectively. These methods combine into a hybrid transport-diffusion method we refer to as IMC-DDMC. We explore a multigroup IMC-DDMC scheme that in DDMC, combines frequency groups with sufficient optical thickness. We term this procedure "opacity regrouping." Opacity regrouping has previously been applied to IMC-DDMC calculations for problems in which the dependence of the opacity on frequency is monotonic. We generalize opacity regrouping to non-contiguous groups and implement this in SuperNu, a code designed to do radiation transport in high-velocity outflows with non-monotonic opacities. We find that regrouping of non-contiguous opacity groups generally improves the speed of IMC-DDMC radiation transport. We present an asymptotic analysis that informs the nature of the Doppler shift in DDMC groups and summarize the derivation of the Gentile-Fleck factor for modified IMC-DDMC. We test SuperNu using numerical experiments including a quasi-manufactured analytic solution, a simple 10 group problem, and the W7 problem for Type Ia supernovae. We find that opacity regrouping is necessary to make our IMC-DDMC implementation feasible for the W7 problem and possibly Type Ia supernova simulations in general. We compare the bolometric light curves and spectra produced by the SuperNu and PHOENIX radiation transport codes for the W7 problem. The overall shape of the bolometric light curves are in good agreement, as are the spectra and their evolution with time. However, for the numerical specifications we considered, we find that the peak luminosity of the light curve calculated using SuperNu is ~10% less than that calculated using PHOENIX.

  15. RADIATION TRANSPORT FOR EXPLOSIVE OUTFLOWS: OPACITY REGROUPING

    SciTech Connect

    Wollaeger, Ryan T.; Van Rossum, Daniel R. E-mail: daan@flash.uchicago.edu

    2014-10-01

    Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) are methods used to stochastically solve the radiative transport and diffusion equations, respectively. These methods combine into a hybrid transport-diffusion method we refer to as IMC-DDMC. We explore a multigroup IMC-DDMC scheme that in DDMC, combines frequency groups with sufficient optical thickness. We term this procedure ''opacity regrouping''. Opacity regrouping has previously been applied to IMC-DDMC calculations for problems in which the dependence of the opacity on frequency is monotonic. We generalize opacity regrouping to non-contiguous groups and implement this in SuperNu, a code designed to do radiation transport in high-velocity outflows with non-monotonic opacities. We find that regrouping of non-contiguous opacity groups generally improves the speed of IMC-DDMC radiation transport. We present an asymptotic analysis that informs the nature of the Doppler shift in DDMC groups and summarize the derivation of the Gentile-Fleck factor for modified IMC-DDMC. We test SuperNu using numerical experiments including a quasi-manufactured analytic solution, a simple 10 group problem, and the W7 problem for Type Ia supernovae. We find that opacity regrouping is necessary to make our IMC-DDMC implementation feasible for the W7 problem and possibly Type Ia supernova simulations in general. We compare the bolometric light curves and spectra produced by the SuperNu and PHOENIX radiation transport codes for the W7 problem. The overall shape of the bolometric light curves are in good agreement, as are the spectra and their evolution with time. However, for the numerical specifications we considered, we find that the peak luminosity of the light curve calculated using SuperNu is ∼10% less than that calculated using PHOENIX.

  16. French Tape Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaney, Robert, Comp.

    This tape catalog is a complete list of all French-related titles appearing in the National Center for Audio Tapes 1974-76 catalog. Wherever possible, each tape is briefly described. Price and ordering information is included. (PMP)

  17. The NLM Current Catalog*

    PubMed Central

    Wiggins, Emilie V.

    1969-01-01

    When the National Library of Medicine acquired a computer to augment its publication program, the intent was to present in one medium an index to journal articles and a catalog of books and new serial titles. The computer programs designed for indexing were unsatisfactory for cataloging, however; so two publications were issued, the Index Medicus and the NLM Current Catalog. The Current Catalog features separate name and subject sections, added volumes, and technical reports. The Express Cataloging Service was one of the first attempts to increase the speed and coverage of the Catalog. Shared cataloging with the Library of Congress, the Countway Library at Harvard, and the Upstate Medical Library in Syracuse, New York, have also contributed to the efforts toward improving this library service. An additional shared cataloging program, this time with the National Medical Audiovisual Center, is expected to be implemented shortly. PMID:5782262

  18. The NLM current catalog.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, E V

    1969-01-01

    When the National Library of Medicine acquired a computer to augment its publication program, the intent was to present in one medium an index to journal articles and a catalog of books and new serial titles. The computer programs designed for indexing were unsatisfactory for cataloging, however; so two publications were issued, the Index Medicus and the NLM Current Catalog. The Current Catalog features separate name and subject sections, added volumes, and technical reports. The Express Cataloging Service was one of the first attempts to increase the speed and coverage of the Catalog. Shared cataloging with the Library of Congress, the Countway Library at Harvard, and the Upstate Medical Library in Syracuse, New York, have also contributed to the efforts toward improving this library service. An additional shared cataloging program, this time with the National Medical Audiovisual Center, is expected to be implemented shortly. PMID:5782262

  19. Opacity of monodisperse sulfuric acid aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilat, Michael J.; Wilder, James M.

    The plume opacity and droplet diameters of a monodisperse sulfuric acid aerosol were calculated as a function of the initial H 2SO 4 concentration, initial H 2O concentration and final gas temperature after cooling from an original stack gas temperature of 300°C. Calculation assumptions include heterogeneous heteromolecular condensation of H 2SO 4 and H 2O onto monodisperse nuclei of 0.05 μm dia., three aerosol particle nuclei concentrations of 10 6, 10 7 and 10 8 cm -3 (at 300°C and 760 mm Hg); and a stack or plume diameter of 6 m. The calculated results show that for the conditions considered and with the stack temperatures in excess of 125°C, initial H 2SO 4 stack gas concentrations of 10ppm or less will result in calculated opacities of less than 20 % for a plume diameter of 6 m. The results show that the calculated opacity is significantly affected by the initial H 2SO 4 and initial H 2O concentrations and the final gas temperature. The increases in the calculated opacities upon cooling of the stack gases are similar in general to the increases in the measured opacities between instack and outstack reported by Nader and Conner (1978) for an oil-fired boiler.

  20. TOPS Opacities: Opacities of mixtures (calculated by TOPS« using LEDCOP« elemental opacities) and LEDCOP« Astrophysical Opacities mixed by TOPS«) from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The LANL T-4 Group develops methods for and perform calculations of atomic structure, scattering cross sections, opacities, exotic atoms, and quantum and nonlinear optics, including effects of high energy density environments and interaction with external electromagnetic fields. The Opacity databases allow User chosen mixtures and/or elements and provide precalculated astrophysical mixtures.

    The Astrophysical Opacity data base contains opacity information for all elements from hydrogen to zinc, over a temperature range from 0.5 eV to 100 keV and a density range from 10-10 to 10+9 gm/cc. Every element has approximately 1500 (T-h) points, where T is the temperature and h is the electron degeneracy parameter, which characterizes the electron pressure of the plasma at the ion-plasma boundary. [Copied from LANL T-4 Opacity Web Page, Norman H. Magee, Jr. (T-4) and Robert E. H. Clark (X-CI), a Theoretical Self-Assessment Special Feature, May,1999. See LA-UR-99-336] (Specialized Interface)

  1. OPACs and the Mobile Revolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liston, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    Since the turn of the century, one of the hottest topics in the IT world has been the coming mobile revolution. While there's been some arguing over the details, the fundamental tenet of the mobile revolution is that lots and lots of people will start accessing web content from handheld portable devices instead of using a traditional laptop or…

  2. Mars landing site catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The catalog was compiled from material provided by the planetary community for areas on Mars that are of potential interest for future exploration. The catalog has been edited for consistency insofar as practical; however, the proposed scientific objectives and characteristics have not been reviewed. This is a working catalog that is being revised, updated, and expanded continually.

  3. Automation and Cataloging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furuta, Kenneth; And Others

    1990-01-01

    These three articles address issues in library cataloging that are affected by automation: (1) the impact of automation and bibliographic utilities on professional catalogers; (2) the effect of the LASS microcomputer software on the cost of authority work in cataloging at the University of Arizona; and (3) online subject heading and classification…

  4. Arabic Online Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khurshid, Zahiruddin

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the processing of Arabic materials at the King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (Saudi Arabia) library and describes the creation of an Arabic online catalog that supplements the catalog for non-Arabic materials. User needs are reviewed, library automation is discussed, and search strategies in the Arabic catalog are described.…

  5. The OPAL opacity code: New results

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, F.J.; Iglesias, C.A.

    1994-12-31

    The OPAL code was developed to calculate the wide range of frequency-dependent and mean opacity data needed to model laboratory experiments and stellar interiors. We use parametric potentials to generate vastly more atomic data than used in earlier opacity work for all elements with atomic number less than 35. We have also developed an improved equation of state based on an activity expansion of the grand canonical partition function. We give herein a brief description of the OPAL code and present new results that include the effect of additional heavy elements compared to our earlier carbons. The importance of very heavy elements having atomic number greater than 30 is also discussed. We present some comparisons with recent results from the Opacity Project and some directions for future work.

  6. Crystalline corneal opacities in the Siberian Husky.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, A D; Waring, G O; Spangler, W L; Roth, A M

    1979-10-15

    Bilaterally symmetric opacities were detected in the corneal stroma of 78 (14%) of 560 Siberian Huskies, aged 7 months to 12 years, examined in ophthalmology screening clinics. The opacities were round or horizontally oval and consisted of a diffuse gray homogeneous haze in the anterior stroma or an array of fine polychromatic crystals in the posterior stroma, or both. The corneas were not inflamed. The frequency of occurrence and density of the opacities increased with age. Several affected dogs were closely related, but a specific inheritance pattern could not be established. Light and electron microscopy disclosed clusters of extracellular, thin, needle-shaped, crystalline clefts. Histochemical stains on frozen sections identified neutral fats, phospholipids, and cholesterol as components of the crystals.

  7. Online Catalog for Filament-Sigmoid Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merriot, Ivy; Pevtsov, A.; Martens, P.

    2007-05-01

    A new online catalog correlating H-alpha filaments with SXT sigmoids gives researchers, teachers and pre-college students the ability to access digital H-alpha images online that were previously available only at the physical location of the NSO at Sunspot, NM. This web-based catalog correlates SOHO's SXT sigmoids from 1993-1998 as described in a non-online catalog created by Zach Blehm under the direction of Richard Canfield, MSU-Bozeman, with H-alpha filament activity as described by Ivy Merriot under the direction of Alexei Pevtsov, NSO, and Petrus Martens, MSU-Bozeman. The H-alpha images were digitized from film archives of the Flare Patrol Telescope at Sunspot, NM. Use of the online catalog will be demonstrated at the poster site with critical comments encouraged.

  8. Mexican Earthquakes and Tsunamis Catalog Reviewed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Herrera, M. T.; Castillo-Aja, R.

    2015-12-01

    Today the availability of information on the internet makes online catalogs very easy to access by both scholars and the public in general. The catalog in the "Significant Earthquake Database", managed by the National Center for Environmental Information (NCEI formerly NCDC), NOAA, allows access by deploying tabular and cartographic data related to earthquakes and tsunamis contained in the database. The NCEI catalog is the product of compiling previously existing catalogs, historical sources, newspapers, and scientific articles. Because NCEI catalog has a global coverage the information is not homogeneous. Existence of historical information depends on the presence of people in places where the disaster occurred, and that the permanence of the description is preserved in documents and oral tradition. In the case of instrumental data, their availability depends on the distribution and quality of seismic stations. Therefore, the availability of information for the first half of 20th century can be improved by careful analysis of the available information and by searching and resolving inconsistencies. This study shows the advances we made in upgrading and refining data for the earthquake and tsunami catalog of Mexico since 1500 CE until today, presented in the format of table and map. Data analysis allowed us to identify the following sources of error in the location of the epicenters in existing catalogs: • Incorrect coordinate entry • Place name erroneous or mistaken • Too general data that makes difficult to locate the epicenter, mainly for older earthquakes • Inconsistency of earthquakes and the tsunami occurrence: earthquake's epicenter located too far inland reported as tsunamigenic. The process of completing the catalogs directly depends on the availability of information; as new archives are opened for inspection, there are more opportunities to complete the history of large earthquakes and tsunamis in Mexico. Here, we also present new earthquake and

  9. Starting Over: Current Issues in Online Catalog User Interface Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Walt

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of online catalogs focuses on issues in interface design. Issues addressed include understanding the user base; common user access (CUA) with personal computers; common command language (CCL); hyperlinks; screen design issues; differences from card catalogs; indexes; graphic user interfaces (GUIs); color; online help; and remote users.…

  10. Teaching the Cataloging of Non-Book Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Carolyn O.

    1978-01-01

    Courses in cataloging nonbook media should include diverse cataloging codes and a wide variety of media. Related areas of concern include the objectives of an access system for nonbook media and the means by which these objectives are achievable. Films are used to illustrate this approach. (Author/MBR)

  11. An Experiment in Enhancing Catalog Records at Carnegie Mellon University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalak, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    Describes an experimental project at Carnegie Mellon University to enhance catalog records in order to improve the quality of the records and access to resources. Criteria for selecting books for enhanced cataloging and implementation of enhancement procedures are discussed. Several sample screen displays are included. (Three references) (MES)

  12. Sources of Machine-Readable Cataloging and Retrospective Conversion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQueen, Judy; Boss, Richard W.

    1985-01-01

    This issue on current options in the area of machine-readable cataloging and retrospective conversion highlights generation and use of machine-readable bibliographic records, editing, standards, online and batch access, keying and coding, full-service cataloging and conversion, interlibrary loan, and authority control. Profiles of 22…

  13. Design of the opacity spectrometer for opacity measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, P. W.; Heeter, R. F.; Ahmed, M. F.; Dodd, E.; Huffman, E. J.; Liedahl, D. A.; King, J. A.; Opachich, Y. P.; Schneider, M. B.; Perry, T. S.

    2016-11-01

    Recent experiments at the Sandia National Laboratory Z facility have called into question models used in calculating opacity, of importance for modeling stellar interiors. An effort is being made to reproduce these results at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments require a new X-ray opacity spectrometer (OpSpec) spanning 540 eV-2100 eV with a resolving power E/ΔE > 700. The design of the OpSpec is presented. Photometric calculations based on expected opacity data are also presented. First use on NIF is expected in September 2016.

  14. Proceedings of the Preconference on Online Catalogs (Houston, Texas, March 31, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbin, John, Ed.

    The four papers in this collection discuss the planning, development, and use of online library catalogs. The first article on the requirements for online catalogs by Velma Veneziano describes such specific features as comprehensiveness, flexibility, affordability, availability, structured access, user friendliness, level of cataloging, and status…

  15. The Use of the Rare Book Cataloging Standards in the OCLC Database.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Mary Ann

    In order to produce adequate catalog records for rare books, catalogers concern themselves with detailed transcription of title page information and an exact description of the book. Another concern largely unknown in general cataloging is the tracing of special access points that relate the physical features of a book and terms for persons…

  16. Library Web OPACs in Pakistan: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahmood, Khalid

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to analyse features and functions of indigenously developed web-based catalogues of academic, special and national libraries of Pakistan. Design/methodology/approach: The assessment of 16 OPACs is based on a 91-item checklist developed with the help of previous studies conducted in other countries. Findings: The paper…

  17. THE IRON PROJECT & Iron Opacity Project: Evidence of increased opacity for solar plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eissner, W.; Hala, -; Nahar, S.; Pradhan, A.; Bailey, J.

    2015-05-01

    The recently reported measurement1 of opacity of iron plasma at high energy density similar to that in the solar convection zone near the boundary of radiative zone shows enhanced continuum, and the integrated opacity is about 7% higher than that from prediction using the existing Opacity Project (OP) data for photoionization and oscillator strengths. This agrees toward 15% increment of opacity needed to explain the lower abundance of elements determined by 3D spectral analysis of solar observation. However, our later large-scale calculations that included strong resonances due to excitations to highly excited cores states for Fe XVII indicated significant amount of opacity missing in the OP data. We will present our latest findings on the importance of highly excited states on the opacity and how proper inclusion of resonances could enhance the continuum. These will have important impact on the composition of the Sun, the benchmark for astronomical objects. We will also present in progress work under the Iron Project on the collision strengths of Si IX obtained using relativistic effects in the Breit-Pauli R-matrix method and transition probabilities of fine structure transitions in Ti I.*Partial support: NSF, DO.

  18. CD-ROM Catalog Production Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bills, Linda; Helgerson, Linda

    1989-01-01

    Compares database characteristics, access, display, editing, new records, hard copy products, hardware, and price of CD-ROM catalog production products from seven vendors: Gaylord Information Systems; General Research Corporation; The Library Corporation; OCLC; Solinet; Utlas; and the Western Library Network. (MES)

  19. A union catalog of monographs: another approach.

    PubMed

    Kronick, D A; Bowden, V M

    1978-07-01

    The rationale for and the production of the 1977 TALON Union Catalog of Monographs are described. The 158,859 records include the existing machine-readable records for six health sciences libraries plus the cataloging of six others, converted by matching other data bases and by keypunching. The method and costs of production are discussed. Use of Computer-Output-Microfiche (COM) significantly decreased the cost and time required for publication. The $.076 unit cost per entry, with both author and title access for the COM method, is almost one-half the unit cost for the previous method which offered only main-entry access. The TALON Catalog compares favorably with the Midwest Medical Union Catalog. The addition of the title index significantly increases its usefulness. However, the unique feature of the TALON Catalog may be its machine-readable form which offers the potential for quantitative analyses of health sciences library collections. Such data may be essential for rational management of limited library funds. PMID:678697

  20. A New Detailed Term Accounting Opacity Code: TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesias, C A; Chen, M H; Isaacs, W; Sonnad, V; Wilson, B G

    2004-04-28

    A new opacity code, TOPAZ, which explicitly includes configuration term structure in the bound-bound transitions is being developed. The goal is to extend the current capabilities of detailed term accounting opacity codes such as OPAL that are limited to lighter elements of astrophysical interest. At present, opacity calculations of heavier elements use statistical methods that rely on the presence of myriad spectral lines for accuracy. However, statistical approaches have been shown to be inadequate for astrophysical opacity calculations. An application of the TOPAZ code will be to study the limits of statistical methods. Comparisons of TOPAZ to other opacity codes as well as experiments are presented.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Iron Plasma Opacity Models

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A.; Hansen, S. B.; Nash, T. J.; Nielsen, D. S.; Lake, P. W.; Iglesias, C. A.; Mancini, R. C.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I.; Wang, P.; Blancard, C.; Cosse, Ph.; Faussurier, G.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J. C.; Abdallah, J. Jr.; Pradhan, A. K.; Nahar, S. N.

    2009-09-10

    Recent experiments extended iron opacity model tests to temperatures above 150 eV for the first time. The experiments use the Z Facility to volumetrically heat a CH-tamped Fe/Mg plasma using x-rays. The frequency dependent sample transmission is measured by viewing a backlight through the sample. The plasma conditions are inferred from the Mg K-shell absorption. The strategy for this research is to examine the underlying physics within Fe opacity models by comparisons with the measured transmission. Physics topics of interest include charge state distribution, energy level structure, and line broadening. In this talk we discuss methods to exploit the data and advance understanding for these topics. In addition, we review new experiments under way to further improve the data and to achieve higher energy density conditions.

  2. Fly ash system technology improves opacity

    SciTech Connect

    2007-06-15

    Unit 3 of the Dave Johnston Power Plant east of Glenrock, WY, USA had problems staying at or below the opacity limits set by the state. The unit makes use of a Lodge Cottrell precipitator. When the plant changed to burning Power River Basin coal, ash buildup became a significant issue as the fly ash control system was unable to properly evacuate hoppers on the unit. To overcome the problem, the PLC on the unit was replaced with a software optimization package called SmartAsh for the precipitator fly ash control system, at a cost of $500,000. After the upgrade, there have been no plugged hoppers and the opacity has been reduced from around 20% to 3-5%. 2 figs.

  3. The opacity of tablet film coatings.

    PubMed

    Rowe, R C

    1984-09-01

    The opacity of tablet film coatings containing a variety of pigments and fillers has been assessed using a contrast ratio defined as the ratio of the measured reflectance of the incident light when the film is placed on a black substrate to the measured reflectance of the incident light when the film is placed on a white substrate. Films pigmented with calcium carbonate, calcium sulphate or talc had very low contrast ratios and only the inclusion of titanium dioxide imparted opacity. Films pigmented with the coloured lake pigments had contrast ratios dependent on both the parent dye and the dye concentration with the contrast ratios decreasing blue greater than red greater than orange greater than yellow. Films pigmented with the synthetic iron oxides all had very high contrast ratios. The results are consistent with the known theories of light scattering and absorption and illustrate the potential of this accurate, rapid and simple technique in the optimization of film formulations during product development.

  4. Cataloging Practices in India: Efforts for Standardization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tikku, Upinder Kumar

    1984-01-01

    Surveys current cataloging practices in Indian libraries and discusses standardization in cataloging, types of catalogs, cataloging codes (Anglo-American and Ranganathan), subject headings, descriptive cataloging, and standardization efforts (international, United States, USSR, Great Britain, India). Footnotes are included. (EJS)

  5. Solar Interior: Equation of State and Opacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Däppen, W.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    In stellar models, the equation of state and opacity are, together with nuclear reaction rates, the fundamental material properties. The structure of a star is a result of (i) a balance of forces, (ii) a balance between the energy loss at the stellar surface and energy generation in the core and (iii) stationary energy transport between the core and the surface (see SOLAR INTERIOR: STANDARD MODEL...

  6. Pacifica Programs 1972 Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacifica Programs, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Audiotapes for alternative educational and cultural institutions have been selected from Pacifica's Tape Archives of over 10,000 programs for this third annual catalog. This 1972 catalog supercedes all previous Pacifica Tape Library publications, and includes many listings from previous years. The programs are listed under appropriate subject…

  7. Catalog of Research Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Board, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This catalog lists research reports, research notes, and other publications available from the College Board's website. The catalog briefly describes research publications available free of charge. Introduced in 1981, the Research Report series includes studies and reviews in areas such as college admission, special populations, subgroup…

  8. MDS MIC Catalog Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Vowell, C. W.; Smith, Byron; Darcy, Jeannette

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the inputs to the MDS Medical Information Communique (MIC) catalog. The purpose of the group is to provide input for updating the MDS MIC Catalog and to request that MMOP assign Action Item to other working groups and FSs to support the MITWG Process for developing MIC-DDs.

  9. On-Line Cataloging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OCLC Online Computer Library Center, Inc., Dublin, OH.

    The principal objective of the Ohio College Library Center is to lower the rate of rise of per-unit library costs while increasing the availability of library resources for use by patrons of participating libraries. A major procedural goal of the on-line cataloging system is to furnish cataloging personnel in individual libraries with…

  10. Enriching the Catalog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Roy

    2004-01-01

    After decades of costly and time-consuming effort, nearly all libraries have completed the retrospective conversion of their card catalogs to electronic form. However, bibliographic systems still are really not much more than card catalogs on wheels. Enriched content that Amazon.com takes for granted--such as digitized tables of contents, cover…

  11. Testing stellar opacities with laser facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pennec, Maëlle; TURCK-CHIEZE, Sylvaine; RIBEYRE, Xavier; DUCRET, Jean-Eric; SALMON, Sébastien; BLANCARD, Christophe; COSSE, Philippe; MONDET, Guillaume; FAUSSURIER, Gérald; CONSORTIUM, OPAC

    2015-08-01

    Helio and asteroseismology (SoHo, KEPLER...) have produced observed acoustic oscillations of thousands of stars which characteristics are deeply linked to the transport of radiation inside the stars. However, the comparisons of seismic data with model predictions have led to significant discrepancies, which could be due to a bad knowledge of production and transport of energy.β-Cephei are pulsating stars, progenitor of supernovae and thus deeply linked to our understanding of stellar medium enrichment. Their study has shown some difficulty to predict the observed oscillation modes, which are directly linked to an opacity bump of the elements of the iron group (Cr, Fe, Ni) at log T=5.25 (κ-mechanism). We will show that several parameters of the stars (mass, age, metallicity) have a great influence on the amplitude of the bump, which impact their structure. We will then present the final results of an experiment conducted at LULI 2000 in 2011 on Cr, Fe and Ni compared to several opacity codes. We will show how to improve the opacity in the range of temperature around log T= 5.3.The Sun is a privilege place to test and validate physics. Since the recent update of the solar composition, there is a well established large discrepancy (Turck-Chièze et al. 2001) between solar models and seismic data, visible on the solar sound speed profile comparison.An explanation could be that the calculations of energy transport are not correctly taken into account.Unfortunately, there are very few experiments to validate these calculations (Bailey et al. 2014). That's why we are proposing an opacity experiment on a high-energy laser like LMJ, in the conditions of the radiative zone. We are exploiting in that purpose an approach called the Double Ablation Front to reach these high temperatures and densities at LTE and validate or not plasma effects and line widths. We will show the principle of this technique and the results of our simulations on several elements.In the mean time

  12. BRORFELDE SCHMIDT CCD CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharias, N.; Finch, C.; Wycoff, G. L.; Einicke, O. H.; Augustesen, K.; Clausen, J. V.; Hoeg, E.

    2010-08-15

    The Brorfelde Schmidt CCD Catalog (BSCC) contains about 13.7 million stars, north of +49{sup 0} decl. with precise positions and V, R photometry. The catalog has been constructed from the reductions of 18,667 CCD frames observed with the Brorfelde Schmidt Telescope between 2000 and 2007. The Tycho-2 catalog was used for astrometric and photometric reference stars. Errors of individual positions are about 20-200 mas for stars in the R = 10-18 mag range. External comparisons with the Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey reveal possible small systematic errors in the BSCC of up to about 30 mas. The catalog is supplemented with J, H, and K{sub s} magnitudes from the 2MASS catalog.

  13. Galactic cold cores. V. Dust opacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juvela, M.; Ristorcelli, I.; Marshall, D. J.; Montillaud, J.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Ysard, N.; McGehee, P.; Paladini, R.; Pagani, L.; Malinen, J.; Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Lefèvre, C.; Tóth, L. V.; Montier, L. A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Martin, P.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The project Galactic Cold Cores has carried out Herschel photometric observations of interstellar clouds where the Planck satellite survey has located cold and compact clumps. The sources represent different stages of cloud evolution from starless clumps to protostellar cores and are located in different Galactic environments. Aims: We examine this sample of 116 Herschel fields to estimate the submillimetre dust opacity and to search for variations that might be attributed to the evolutionary stage of the sources or to environmental factors, including the location within the Galaxy. Methods: The submillimetre dust opacity was derived from Herschel data, and near-infrared observations of the reddening of background stars are converted into near-infrared optical depth. We investigated the systematic errors affecting these parameters and used modelling to correct for the expected biases. The ratio of 250 μm and J band opacities is correlated with the Galactic location and the star formation activity. We searched for local variations in the ratio τ(250 μm)/τ(J) using the correlation plots and opacity ratio maps. Results: We find a median ratio of τ(250 μm) /τ(J) = (1.6 ± 0.2) × 10-3, which is more than three times the mean value reported for the diffuse medium. Assuming an opacity spectral index β = 1.8 instead of β = 2.0, the value would be lower by ~ 30%. No significant systematic variation is detected with Galactocentric distance or with Galactic height. Examination of the τ(250 μm) /τ(J) maps reveals six fields with clear indications of a local increase of submillimetre opacity of up to τ(250 μm) /τ(J) ~ 4 × 10-3 towards the densest clumps. These are all nearby fields with spatially resolved clumps of high column density. Conclusions: We interpret the increase in the far-infrared opacity as a sign of grain growth in the densest and coldest regions of interstellar clouds. Planck (http://www.esa.int/Planck) is a project of the European

  14. Resources Guide for Outsourcing Cataloging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Wendy

    Outsourcing cataloging is becoming popular in the library profession, but a directory of cataloging agencies is still lacking. Only a few cataloging agencies are well-publicized, and it is hoped that this directory of 23 agencies will promote a competitive open market, thereby serving as a form of quality assurance. Cataloging services are divided…

  15. COSMIC: Software catalog 1991 edition diskette format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The PC edition of the annual COSMIC Software contains descriptions of the over 1,200 computer programs available for use within the United States as of January 1, 1991. By using the PC version of the catalog, it is possible to conduct extensive searches of the software inventory for programs that meet specific criteria. Elements such as program keywords, hardware specifications, source code languages, and title acronyms can be used for the basis of such searches. After isolating those programs that might be of best interest to the user, it is then possible to either view at the monitor, or generate a hardcopy listing of all information on those packages. In addition to the program elements that the user can search on, information such as total program size, distribution media, and program price, as well as extensive abstracts on the program, are also available to the user at this time. Another useful feature of the catalog allows for the retention of programs that meet certain search criteria between individual sessions of using the catalog. This allows users to save the information on those programs that are of interest to them in different areas of application. They can then recall a specific collection of programs for information retrieval or further search reduction if desired. In addition, this version of the catalog is adaptable to a network/shared resource environment, allowing multiple users access to a single copy of the catalog database simultaneously.

  16. Opacities in the massive stellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pennec, Maëlle; TURCK-CHIEZE, Sylvaine; SALMON, Sébastien; CONSORTIUM, OPAC

    2015-08-01

    Helio and asteroseismology (SoHo, CoRoT, KEPLER...) have produced observed acoustic oscillations of thousands of stars. The characteristics of these oscillations are deeply linked to the transport of radiation inside the stars. However, the comparisons of seismic data of Sun and stars with model predictions have led to significant discrepancies, which could be due to a bad knowledge of production and transport of energy.We will focus here on the case of β-Cephei.β-Cephei are pulsating stars, progenitor of supernovae and thus deeply linked to our understanding of stellar medium enrichment. Their study has shown some difficulty to predict the observed oscillation modes, which are directly linked to a bump of the opacity of the elements of the iron group (Cr, Fe, Ni) at log T=5.25 through their pulsating mechanism called the κ-mechanism. We will show that the different parameters of the stars (mass, age, metallicity) have a great influence on the amplitude of the bump, and then on the structure of the considered star.The mastery of the κ-mechanism that produces the pulsation of these stars supposes a fine determination of the peak opacity of the iron group in their envelope. We will present the final results of an experiment conducted at LULI 2000 in 2011 on Cr, Fe and Ni and compare them to OP and ATOMIC, SCO-RCG codes. We will show how to improve the opacity in the range of temperature around log T= 5.3.

  17. IPOPv2 online service for the generation of opacity tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delahaye, Franck; Zwölf, Carlo Maria; Zeippen, Claude J.; Mendoza, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    In the framework of the present phase - IPOPv2 - of the international Opacity Project (OP), a new web service has been implemented based on the latest release of the OP opacities. The user may construct online opacity tables to be conveniently included in stellar evolution codes in the format most commonly adopted by stellar physicists, namely the OPAL format. This facility encourages the use and comparison of both the OPAL and OP data sets in applications. The present service allows for the calculation of multi-element mixtures containing the 17 species (H, He, C, N, O, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe and Ni) considered by the OP, and underpins the latest release of OP opacities. This new service provides tables of Rosseland mean opacites using OP atomic data. We provide an alternative to the OPAL opacity services allowing direct comparison as well as study of the effect of uncertainties in stellar modeling due to mean opacities.

  18. Stellar-opacity calculations. I. Lecture 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, A.N.

    1983-03-14

    In this study of stellar structure, evolution, stability, and pulsation or explosion, there are three very vital pieces of physical information needed. We assume the composition is known from observations of assumption. To construct a model of a star we then need to know the nuclear generation rates which give the luminosity the star emits, the pressure and energy equation of state which determines the flow of radiation through the star. It is the equation of state and opacity that we will be discussing in the next two lectures.

  19. Encounters with the OPAC: On-Line Searching in Public Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slone, Deborah J.

    2000-01-01

    Reports on a qualitative study that explored strategies and behaviors of public library users during interaction with an online public access catalog, and users' confidence in finding needed information online. Discusses results of questionnaires, interviews, and observations that examined unknown-item searches, area searches, and known-item…

  20. Users Look at Online Catalogs. Part 2: Interacting with Online Catalogs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Ray R.

    This report focuses on a discussion of findings from analyses of computer transaction logs contributed by four of the online catalog systems used in the Public Access Project. It supplements the analyses of User and Non-User Questionnaires by providing analyses of data from the systems themselves. The four systems contributing data to this…

  1. Solar Opacity Calculations Using the Super-transition-array Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krief, M.; Feigel, A.; Gazit, D.

    2016-04-01

    A new opacity model has been developed based on the Super-Transition-Array (STA) method for the calculation of monochromatic opacities of plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The atomic code, named STAR (STA-Revised), is described and used to calculate spectral opacities for a solar model implementing the recent AGSS09 composition. Calculations are carried out throughout the solar radiative zone. The relative contributions of different chemical elements and atomic processes to the total Rosseland mean opacity are analyzed in detail. Monochromatic opacities and charge-state distributions are compared with the widely used Opacity Project (OP) code, for several elements near the radiation-convection interface. STAR Rosseland opacities for the solar mixture show a very good agreement with OP and the OPAL opacity code throughout the radiation zone. Finally, an explicit STA calculation was performed of the full AGSS09 photospheric mixture, including all heavy metals. It was shown that, due to their extremely low abundance, and despite being very good photon absorbers, the heavy elements do not affect the Rosseland opacity.

  2. Measurement of 460 GHz Atmospheric Opacity at Yangbajin Observing Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, M. F.; Yao, Q. J.; Li, S.; Luo, Z. Q.; Yang, J.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the observational condition of Yangbajin, the Portable Submillimeter Telescope (POST) is used to measure the atmospheric opacity at 460 GHz from November 2008 to December 2008. The result shows that the quartile of atmospheric opacity during the observing time at 460 GHz at Yangbajin Observatory is 1.25, 1.42 and 1.63 and the time proportion of atmospheric opacity less than 1 is about 3.4%. At last, we compare the submillimeter site conditions of Yangbajin with those of other submillimeter observatories in the world, and try to explore the possible causes that may influence the submillimeter atmospheric opacity.

  3. Measurements of 460 GHz Atmospheric Opacity at Yangbajing Observational Station†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming-feng, Zhou; Qi-jun, Yao; Sheng, Li; Zhi-quan, Luo; Ji, Yang

    2011-07-01

    In order to assess the submillimeter wave observational conditions of Yangbajin, a Portable Submillimeter Telescope (POST) is used to measure the zenith atmospheric opacity at 460 GHz from November 2008 to December 2008. The results show that the quartiles of atmospheric opacity during the observing time at 460 GHz at Yangbajin Observatory is 1.25, 1.42 and 1.63, and the time proportion of atmospheric opacity less than 1 is about 3.4%. At last, the submillimeter wave site conditions of Yangbajin with those of other submillimeter observatories in the world are compared, and the possible causes that may influence the submillimeter atmospheric opacity are explored.

  4. UV Opacity at Gale Crater from MSL/REMS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicente-Retortillo, Á.; Martinez, G.; Renno, N. O.; Lemmon, M. T.; Mason, E. L.; de la Torre-Juárez, M.

    2015-12-01

    We use the UV photodiode output currents (TELRDR products) measured by the REMS Ultraviolet Sensor to calculate UV opacities at Gale crater during the first 804 sols of the MSL mission. We propose a novel technique to calculate the atmospheric opacity that is not sensitive to the degradation of the sensor due to the deposition of dust on it. We estimate the diffuse and total radiation signals by analyzing the events in which the direct solar beam was temporarily blocked by the masthead or by the mast of the rover. Then we use a radiative transfer model based on the Monte-Carlo method to obtain the UV opacity from those measurements. We compare the UV opacities with the opacities derived from Mastcam observations at 880 nm. Both opacities follow a similar seasonal trend, with the UV opacity showing values generally lower than those at 880 nm. The difference between both opacities varies over the year, with the minimum difference occurring when both opacities show their annual lowest values (Ls ~ 130º). The temporal variation of this difference may be attributed to changes in the dust size distribution.

  5. New map data catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Map byproducts, including aerial photographs, color separations, map data in computer form, and other materials used in or produced during mapmaking, are described in a new catalog published by the U.S. Geological Survey.The 48-page hardcover catalog is the first listing of the unpublished USGS civilian cartographic holdings. It covers such items as mapping photographs, computer-enhanced LANDSAT pictures of Earth, cartographic data in computer form, microfilm and microfiche records, and a variety of features, including color separations, made in compiling and printing maps. The catalog also describes out-of-print maps available from USGS, along with land-use and land-cover maps, and other unusual items, such as slope maps and orthophotoquads. The catalog explains how to order advance copies of maps before they are published.

  6. Using small glass catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesar, John C.

    2000-07-01

    Changes in glass catalogs from the major manufacturers, Schott, Ohara, Hoya, Corning, and Summita, are a future certainty. The ongoing efforts of these companies to eliminate arsenic, lead, and other environmentally unfriendly materials may well have an additional effect on the size of their catalogs also. We should not assume a zero-sum game, however. Environmental concerns may not lead to permanently smaller catalogs, though many have speculated that in the near term this might be so. However, from the designer's perspective, very small, abbreviated class catalogs, constructed for special purposes, can speed the glass selection process. Several examples will be discussed, based on derivative libraries suggested by Zhang, Shannon, and Walker. Streamlined libraries tailored for special purposes can be used effectively in the latest lens design software. Future software tools may speed this selection process by the use of algorithms that treat the problem as a `black box' using logic tools derived from probability studies of the patent literature.

  7. 21st Century Cataloging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Roy

    1998-01-01

    Discusses how collections in the digital library, instead of traditional cataloging, call for metadata, structured information about information. Describes three categories of metadata information about digital resources: descriptive, structural, and administrative. Examines emerging standards for digital-library classification. (AEF)

  8. Research on Spectroscopy, Opacity, and Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor); Kurucz, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    I propose to continue providing observers with basic data for interpreting spectra from stars, novas, supernovas, clusters, and galaxies. These data will include allowed forbidden line lists both laboratory and computed, for the first five to ten ions of all atoms and for all relevant diatomic molecules. I will eventually expend to all ions of the first thirty elements to treat far UV end X-ray spectra, and for envelope opacities. I also include triatomic molecules providing by other researchers. I have made CDs with Partridge and Schwanke's water data for work on M stars.The luna data also serve as input to my model atmosphere and synthesis programs that generated energy distributions, photometry, limb darkening, and spectra that can be used for planning observations and for fitting observed spectra. The spectrum synthesis programs produce detailed plots with the line identified. Grids of stellar spectra can be used for radial velocity-, rotation-, or abundance templates and for population synthesis. I am fitting spectra of bright stars to test the data and to produce atlases to guide observer. For each star the whole spectrum is computed from the UV to the far IR. The line data, opacities, models, spectra, and programs are freely distributed on CDs and on my web site and represent a unique resource for many NASA programs.

  9. Spectrophotometric catalogs and databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnashev, V. I.; Burnasheva, B. A.

    2014-06-01

    An overview is given of different spectrophotometric catalogs, including a brief description of the applications of absolute spectrophotometry in evolutionary population synthesis. Observational data for different stars are given. A list of catalogs is presented, including those containing intrinsic energy distributions for stars of different temperatures and luminosities, spectrophotometric standards, extragalactic sources, and theoretically calculated spectra. A number of useful links and Internet resources are provided.

  10. HS3 Data Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emory, Amber Elizabeth; Chirica, Dan Cristian; Doyle, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This presentation covered the original plan for the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) Data Catalog available through the ESPO HS3 mission page (http://espo.nasa.gov/missions/hs3/) and provided examples of Model Products, Operational Products, and Research (Instrument) Products from the 2012 field campaign. The presentation also covered lessons learned and suggested improvements to the Data Catalog for the upcoming 2013 HS3 field campaign.

  11. NASA Headquarters training catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Headquarters training catalog is a comprehensive listing of all educational and employee development programs. This course catalog contains descriptions of course content, objectives, target audience, prerequisites, length of course, approximate number of times the course is offered per year, and cost of the course. Curriculum areas include graduate and undergraduate academic study; professional development program; and executive management, senior management, and supervisory development programs. Secretarial/clerical and general computer skills programs are also included.

  12. The RBV metadata catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, François; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Fleury, Laurence; Gaillardet, Jérôme; Nord, Guillaume

    2014-05-01

    RBV (Réseau des Bassins Versants) is an initiative to consolidate the national efforts made by more than 15 elementary observatories belonging to various French research institutions (CNRS, Universities, INRA, IRSTEA, IRD) that study river and drainage basins. RBV is a part of a global initiative to create a network of observatories for investigating Earth's surface processes. The RBV Metadata Catalogue aims to give an unified vision of the work produced by every observatory to both the members of the RBV network and any external person involved in this domain of research. Another goal is to share this information with other catalogues through the compliance with the ISO19115 standard and the INSPIRE directive and the ability of being harvested (globally or partially). Metadata management is heterogeneous among observatories. The catalogue is designed to face this situation with the following main features: -Multiple input methods: Metadata records in the catalog can either be entered with the graphical user interface, harvested from an existing catalogue or imported from information system through simplified web services. -Three hierachical levels: Metadata records may describe either an observatory in general, one of its experimental site or a dataset produced by instruments. -Multilingualism: Metadata can be entered in several configurable languages. The catalogue provides many other feature such as search and browse mechanisms to find or discover records. The RBV metadata catalogue associates a CSW metadata server (Geosource) and a JEE application. The CSW server is in charge of the persistence of the metadata while the JEE application both wraps CSW calls and define the user interface. The latter is built with the GWT Framework to offer a rich client application with a fully ajaxified navigation. The catalogue is accessible at the following address: http://portailrbv.sedoo.fr/ Next steps will target the following points: -Description of sensors in accordance

  13. A Modern Update and Usage of Historical Variable Star Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagnotta, Ashley; Graur, Or; Murray, Zachary; Kruk, Julia; Christie-Dervaux, Lucien; Chen, Dong Yi

    2015-01-01

    One of the earliest modern variable star catalogs was constructed by Henrietta Swan Leavitt during her tenure at the Harvard College Observatory (HCO) in the early 1900s. Originally published in 1908, Leavitt's catalog listed 1777 variables in the Magellanic Clouds (MCs). The construction and analysis of this catalog allowed her to subsequently discover the Cepheid period-luminosity relationship, now known as the Leavitt Law. The MC variable star catalogs were updated and expanded by Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin in 1966 and 1971. Although newer studies of the MC variables have been performed since then, the new information has not always been correlated with the old due to a lack of modern descriptors of the stars listed in the Harvard MC catalogs. We will discuss the history of MC variable star catalogs, especially those compiled using the HCO plates, as well as our modernized version of the Leavitt and Payne-Gaposchkin catalogs. Our modern catalog can be used in conjunction with the archival plates (primarily via the Digital Access to a Sky Century @ Harvard scanning project) to study the secular behavior of the MC variable stars over the past century.

  14. The Seamount Catalog in EarthRef.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keizer, P.; Koppers, A.; Staudigel, H.; Helly, J.

    2001-12-01

    Seamounts are prominent features on the ocean floor that provide us with important insights to geology, geochemistry, geophysics and paleoclimate. To make accessible a diverse set of seamount data we developed the Seamount Catalog on the EarthRef.org web site that is accessible via http://earthref.org/databases/SC/. The goal of our effort is to provide simple access to the widest possible variety in digital data files as related to seamount research in a geospatial context. Each seamount is described in terms of its location, basic morphological features, and the types of data available in the catalog. The Seamount Catalog includes a series of basic bathymetry maps, processed grid files and original multibeam data. At least one screen-optimized JPEG file is available for online viewing and the remaining (higher resolution) files are directly downloadable from the EarthRef.org web site. The grid files are based on multibeam bathymetry data merged with the predicted bathymetry database of Smith and Sandwell (1996; 1997). The Seamount Catalog data objects are extensively described in terms of metadata allowing for searches by location (lat/lon), region name, seamount name, sample name or reference. We hope to further develop the Seamount Catalog by adding geophysical and other seamount data, expanding its metadata catalog, working towards a metadata interchange format (*.mif) and establishing interoperability with other data bases. The geospatial character of the Seamount Catalog would allow for interoperability between existing geochemistry, paleomagnetic and biological (biota) databases. Data files available for downloading will be stored using the Storage Resource Broker technology (SRB) while the generated metadata will be stored in the Seamount Catalog itself. Such developments represent the first steps towards the creation of a digital seamount research environment that includes electronic access to data and ultimately also the tools for working with the data.

  15. Boo! Outsourcing from the Cataloging Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Janet Swan

    1998-01-01

    Examines long-accepted ways library cataloging departments have used outsourcing (cataloging records, card production, authority control, card filling, and retrospective conversion) and potential outsourcing activities (original cataloging, and copy cataloging). Discusses reasons why outsourcing is controversial. (PEN)

  16. Prologue for a synoptic catalog: combining a hospital library catalog and a bookseller's catalog.

    PubMed Central

    Colglazier, M L

    1996-01-01

    This article introduces the synoptic catalog, a computerized combination of a hospital library catalog and a bookseller's catalog. Majors Scientific Books and Richmond Memorial Hospital Libraries in Virginia collaborated to develop the model. A logical evolution in catalog theory and practice, the design expands the identification, collocation, and evaluation functions of the traditional library catalog. This article explains the procedures and specifications, including system requirements, record mapping, design details, scope, record transmission, timing, record importing, and file maintenance. The result is a single-interface catalog providing simultaneous and consistent searching of combined information databases. Bookseller records in the synoptic catalog can be modified to indicate library ownership. The synoptic catalog design supports cost-effective collection development and focuses on actual information needs of library users. This report discusses user convenience, budget requirements, publisher advertising, collection development, productivity, and library-bookseller relations. User response to the catalog has been favorable, but improvements are needed. PMID:8938329

  17. INTERPLAY OF NEUTRINO OPACITIES IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Eric J.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Hix, W. Raphael; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Bruenn, Stephen W.

    2012-11-20

    We have conducted a series of numerical experiments using spherically symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics with the code Agile-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of modern neutrino opacities on the development of supernova simulations. We test the effects of opacities by removing opacities or by undoing opacity improvements for individual opacities and groups of opacities. We find that improvements to electron capture (EC) on nuclei, namely EC on an ensemble of nuclei using modern nuclear structure models rather than the simpler independent-particle approximation (IPA) for EC on a mean nucleus, plays the most important role during core collapse of all tested neutrino opacities. Low-energy neutrinos emitted by modern nuclear EC preferentially escape during collapse without the energy downscattering on electrons required to enhance neutrino escape and deleptonization for the models with IPA nuclear EC. During shock breakout the primary influence on the emergent neutrinos arises from non-isoenergetic scattering (NIS) on electrons. For the accretion phase, NIS on free nucleons and pair emission by e {sup +} e {sup -} annihilation have the largest impact on the neutrino emission and shock evolution. Other opacities evaluated, including nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung and especially neutrino-positron scattering, have little measurable impact on neutrino emission or shock dynamics. Modern treatments of nuclear EC, e {sup +} e {sup -}-annihilation pair emission, and NIS on electrons and free nucleons are critical elements of core-collapse simulations of all dimensionality.

  18. Competing Triggers: Transparency and Opacity in Vowel Harmony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimper, Wendell A.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation takes up the issue of transparency and opacity in vowel harmony--that is, when a segment is unable to undergo a harmony process, will it be skipped over by harmony (transparent) or will it prevent harmony from propagating further (opaque)? I argue that the choice between transparency and opacity is best understood as a…

  19. Submillimeter fourier-transform spectrometer measurements of atmospheric opacity above mauna kea.

    PubMed

    Serabyn, E; Weisstein, E W; Lis, D C; Pardo, J R

    1998-04-20

    We present accurately calibrated submillimeter atmospheric transmission spectra obtained with a Fourier-transform spectrometer at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. These measurements cover the 0.9-0.3-mm wavelength range and are the first in a series aimed at defining the terrestrial long-wave atmospheric transmission curve. The 4.1-km altitude of the Mauna Kea site provides access to extremely low zenith water-vapor columns, permitting atmospheric observations at frequencies well above those possible from sea level. We describe the calibration procedures, present our first well-calibrated transmission spectra, and compare our results with those of a single-layer atmospheric transmission model, AT. With an empirical best-fit continuum opacity term included, this simple single-layer model provides a remarkably good fit to the opacity data for H(2)O line profiles described by either van Vleck-Weisskopf or kinetic shapes.

  20. Submillimeter fourier-transform spectrometer measurements of atmospheric opacity above mauna kea.

    PubMed

    Serabyn, E; Weisstein, E W; Lis, D C; Pardo, J R

    1998-04-20

    We present accurately calibrated submillimeter atmospheric transmission spectra obtained with a Fourier-transform spectrometer at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. These measurements cover the 0.9-0.3-mm wavelength range and are the first in a series aimed at defining the terrestrial long-wave atmospheric transmission curve. The 4.1-km altitude of the Mauna Kea site provides access to extremely low zenith water-vapor columns, permitting atmospheric observations at frequencies well above those possible from sea level. We describe the calibration procedures, present our first well-calibrated transmission spectra, and compare our results with those of a single-layer atmospheric transmission model, AT. With an empirical best-fit continuum opacity term included, this simple single-layer model provides a remarkably good fit to the opacity data for H(2)O line profiles described by either van Vleck-Weisskopf or kinetic shapes. PMID:18273141

  1. The NHGRI GWAS Catalog, a curated resource of SNP-trait associations.

    PubMed

    Welter, Danielle; MacArthur, Jacqueline; Morales, Joannella; Burdett, Tony; Hall, Peggy; Junkins, Heather; Klemm, Alan; Flicek, Paul; Manolio, Teri; Hindorff, Lucia; Parkinson, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) Catalog of Published Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) Catalog provides a publicly available manually curated collection of published GWAS assaying at least 100,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and all SNP-trait associations with P <1 × 10(-5). The Catalog includes 1751 curated publications of 11 912 SNPs. In addition to the SNP-trait association data, the Catalog also publishes a quarterly diagram of all SNP-trait associations mapped to the SNPs' chromosomal locations. The Catalog can be accessed via a tabular web interface, via a dynamic visualization on the human karyotype, as a downloadable tab-delimited file and as an OWL knowledge base. This article presents a number of recent improvements to the Catalog, including novel ways for users to interact with the Catalog and changes to the curation infrastructure.

  2. Hennepin County Library Automation Project: A Plan for the Next Steps in the Automation of the Public Catalog, Cataloging, Circulation Control, and Acquisitions. December 1987-June 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1989

    This four-part report describes the development of a plan for Hennepin County (Minnesota) Library's (HCL) next steps in the automation of operations including the public catalog, cataloging, circulation control, and acquisitions. The objectives of the plan were to improve patron access to materials and to provide for cost effective operations.…

  3. Cigarette smoke, asbestos, and small irregular opacities

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, W.

    1984-08-01

    The long-term inhalation of cigarette smoke is associated with the appearance of diffuse small irregular opacities of mild profusion on chest roentogenograms of some subjects in a limited number of reports. Human histologic and experimental animal studies have shown the presence of pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. The radiographic abnormalities may be explained by interstitial fibrosis, although bronchiolar wall thickening may also be involved. Because asbestos causes diffuse pulmonary fibrosis, the literature was reviewed for evidence concerning an interaction between cigarette smoke and asbestos in the frequency of pulmonary asbestosis. A majority of 14 prevalence studies and 7 cohort studies of asbestos workers with information on smoking habits have shown a positive interaction between the 2 agents. The interaction appears to be additive rather than synergistic. Smoking may exert an effect on the frequency of pulmonary asbestosis by increasing the effective fiber dose retained in the lungs through interference with clearance.

  4. An opacity-sampled treatment of water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, David R.; Augason, Gordon C.; Johnson, Hollis R.

    1989-01-01

    Although the bands of H2O are strong in the spectra of cool stars and calculations have repeatedly demonstrated their significance as opacity sources, only approximate opacities are currently available, due both to the difficulty of accounting for the millions of lines involved and to the inadequacy of laboratory and theoretical data. To overcome these obstacles, a new treatment is presented, based upon a statistical representation of the water vapor spectrum derived from available laboratory data. This statistical spectrum of water vapor employs an exponential distribution of line strengths and random positions of lines whose overall properties are forced to reproduce the mean opacities observed in the laboratory. The resultant data set is then treated by the opacity-sampling method exactly as are all other lines, both molecular and atomic. Significant differences are found between the results of this improved treatment and the results obtained with previous treatments of water-vapor opacity.

  5. The diffusion of radiation in moving media. IV. Flux vector, effective opacity, and expansion opacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrse, R.; Baschek, B.; von Waldenfels, W.

    2003-04-01

    For a given velocity and temperature field in a differentially moving 3D medium, the vector of the radiative flux is derived in the diffusion approximation. Due to the dependence of the velocity gradient on the direction, the associated effective opacity in general is a tensor. In the limit of small velocity gradients analytical expression are obtained which allow us to discuss the cases when the direction of the flux vector deviates from that of the temperature gradient. Furthermore the radiative flux is calculated for infinitely sharp, Poisson distributed spectral lines resulting in simple expressions that provide basic insight into the effect of the motions. In particular, it is shown how incomplete line lists affect the radiative flux as a function of the velocity gradient. Finally, the connection between our formalism and the concept of the expansion opacity introduced by Karp et al. (\\cite{karp}) is discussed.

  6. UPDATED NEARBY GALAXY CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Karachentsev, Igor D.; Makarov, Dmitry I.; Kaisina, Elena I.

    2013-04-15

    We present an all-sky catalog of 869 nearby galaxies having individual distance estimates within 11 Mpc or corrected radial velocities V{sub LG} < 600 km s{sup -1}. The catalog is a renewed and expanded version of the Catalog of Neighboring Galaxies by Karachentsev et al. It collects data on the following galaxy observables: angular diameters, apparent magnitudes in far-UV, B, and K{sub s} bands, H{alpha} and H I fluxes, morphological types, H I-line widths, radial velocities, and distance estimates. In this Local Volume (LV) sample, 108 dwarf galaxies still remain without measured radial velocities. The catalog yields also calculated global galaxy parameters: linear Holmberg diameter, absolute B magnitude, surface brightness, H I mass, stellar mass estimated via K-band luminosity, H I rotational velocity corrected for galaxy inclination, indicative mass within the Holmberg radius, and three kinds of ''tidal index,'' which quantify the local density environment. The catalog is supplemented with data based on the local galaxies, which presents their optical and available H{alpha} images, as well as other services. We briefly discuss the Hubble flow within the LV and different scaling relations that characterize galaxy structure and global star formation in them. We also trace the behavior of the mean stellar mass density, H I-mass density, and star formation rate density within the volume considered.

  7. Catalog of electronic data products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-07-01

    The catalog lists and describes the public-use data files produced by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). More than 500 public-use data files, representing most of the NCHS data collection programs, are available for purchase and use. Public-use data files are prepared and disseminated to speed and enhance access to the full scope of data. NCHS data systems include a national vital registration program; household interview and health examination surveys; surveys of hospitals, nursing homes, physicians, and other health care providers; and other periodic or occasional data collection activities to produce a wide spectrum of health and health-related data. NCHS data users encompass all levels of government, the academic and research communities, and business. The majority of the data files released by NCHS contain microdata to allow researchers to aggregate findings in whatever format appropriate for their analyses.

  8. Current Developments in Audiovisual Cataloging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Paul

    1985-01-01

    This paper highlights significant advances in audiovisual cataloging theory and practice: development of "Anglo-American Cataloging Rules" (second edition); revision of the MARC Films Format; and project to provide cataloging-in-publication for microcomputer software. Evolution of rules and practices as an outgrowth of needs of the community is…

  9. Online Catalog Study: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Elliot R.

    Following the closing of the National Library of Medicine's (NLM's) card catalog, a study was performed in 1982 to specify minimally acceptable requirements and capabilities for an NLM-based online catalog system and to evaluate the technical performance and user acceptance of available systems. Two prototype online catalog systems were selected…

  10. Catalog of infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, D. Y.; Schmitz, M.; Mead, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The infrared astronomical data base and its principal data product, the catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO), comprise a machine readable library of infrared (1 microns to 1000 microns astronomical observations. To date, over 1300 journal articles and 10 major survey catalogs are included in this data base, which contains about 55,000 individual observations of about 10,000 different infrared sources. Of these, some 8,000 sources are identifiable with visible objects, and about 2,000 do not have known visible counterparts.

  11. Catalog of infrared observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezari, D. Y.; Schmitz, M.; Mead, J. M.

    1984-05-01

    The infrared astronomical data base and its principal data product, the catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO), comprise a machine readable library of infrared (1 microns to 1000 microns astronomical observations. To date, over 1300 journal articles and 10 major survey catalogs are included in this data base, which contains about 55,000 individual observations of about 10,000 different infrared sources. Of these, some 8,000 sources are identifiable with visible objects, and about 2,000 do not have known visible counterparts.

  12. HELIOSEISMIC TESTS OF THE NEW LOS ALAMOS OPACITIES

    SciTech Connect

    J. GUZIK; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    We compare the helioseismic properties of two solar models, one calibrated with the OPAL opacities and the other with the recent Los Alamos LEDCOP opacities. We show that, in the radiative interior of the Sun, the small differences between the two sets of opacities (up to 6% near the base of the convection zone) lead to noticeable differences in the solar structure (up to 0.4% in sound speed), with the OPAL model being the closest to the helioseismic data. More than half of the difference between the two opacity sets results from the interpolation scheme and from the relatively widely spaced temperature grids used in the tables. The remaining 3% intrinsic difference between the OPAL and the LEDCOP opacities in the radiative interior of the Sun is well within the error bars on the opacity calculations resulting from the uncertainties on the physics. We conclude that the OPAL and LEDCOP opacity sets do about as well in the radiative interior of the Sun.

  13. NLTE opacities of mid- and high-Z cocktails

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrill, Manolo E; Abdallah, Joseph; Fontes, Christopher J; Kilcrease, David P; Zhang, Honglin

    2009-01-01

    In this work we report on the development of a new method for computing mi- and high-Z NLTE opacities. A study has been performed using this method to assess the EOS and opacity sensitivities to the radiation field for both single species Au and multi-species SnNb and U{sub 3}Au plasma cocktails with an emphasis on moderately to highly ionized systems. Developed as a benchmark tool, this capability will be used to assess both current and future in-line NLTE opacity capabilities.

  14. Patron Online Catalog Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorne, Rosemary; Whitlatch, Jo Bell

    1994-01-01

    Reports on studies conducted to provide an in-depth picture of online catalog use in three aspects of library research: (1) as part of the reference process; (2) as used by unassisted users; (3) as a step in obtaining documents. The research methodology is offered as a model for surveying other library services or products. (14 references) (KRN)

  15. AUDIOVISUAL SERVICES CATALOG.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockton Unified School District, CA.

    A CATALOG HAS BEEN PREPARED TO HELP TEACHERS SELECT AUDIOVISUAL MATERIALS WHICH MIGHT BE HELPFUL IN ELEMENTARY CLASSROOMS. INCLUDED ARE FILMSTRIPS, SLIDES, RECORDS, STUDY PRINTS, FILMS, TAPE RECORDINGS, AND SCIENCE EQUIPMENT. TEACHERS ARE REMINDED THAT THEY ARE NOT LIMITED TO USE OF THE SUGGESTED MATERIALS. APPROPRIATE GRADE LEVELS HAVE BEEN…

  16. Greenbook Abstract & Catalog--4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coole, Walter A.; And Others

    This catalog is the fourth in a series extending and updating teaching materials previously disseminated through the ERIC system, including the "Greenbook System" of training materials for higher education professionals (ED 103 083-084 and 148 438), Open Classroom Documentation, a procedural manual for an autoinstructional learning laboratory at…

  17. Cataloging Pirated Chinese Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Sze-Tseng

    1971-01-01

    Various types of pirated Chinese books are given with specific examples. The basic steps followed for the proper identification of these books is described, and remedies suggested in case the original is discovered after the book has been cataloged according to the information given by the book pirate. (13 references) (Author/NH)

  18. Map data catalog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1980-01-01

    - Explains how to order the products you need. Only a few of the products listed in this catalog are stocked. Most of them must be custom-produced to meet your particular requirement. Prices for the variety of products, formats and sizes are contained in a separate and periodically updated list. The price list is available free upon request from any NCIC office.

  19. Environmental Education Resource Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phoenix Union High School District, AZ.

    Prepared for the use of elementary and secondary school teachers, this catalog is designed to provide information about environmental education materials which will aid in classroom presentations and in curriculum development. Subject areas cover conservation and natural resources, ecology and ecosystems, environmental action and survival,…

  20. Outsourcing Cataloging: An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Vicki Toy

    1997-01-01

    Outsourcing library cataloging offers advantages and disadvantages. This article discusses case studies of outsourcing projects at Michigan State University, SUNY Binghamton, Loyola University, Truckee Meadows Community College, and Wright State University. Highlights the retrospective conversion and reclassification of the Mines/Engineering…

  1. FAA Film Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    Some 75 films from the U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Aviation Administration are listed in this catalog. Topics dealt with include aerodynamics, airports, aviation history and careers, flying clubs, navigation and weather. Most of the films are 16mm sound and color productions. Filmstrips requiring a 35mm projector and phonograph or…

  2. Research on Spectroscopy, Opacity, and Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurucz, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    I propose to continue providing observers with basic data for interpreting spectra from stars, novas, supernovas, clusters, and galaxies. These data will include allowed and forbidden line lists, both laboratory and computed, for the first five to ten ions of all atoms and for all relevant diatomic molecules. I will eventually expand to all ions of the first thirty elements to treat far UV and X-ray spectra, and for envelope opacities. I also include triatomic molecules provided by other researchers. I have also made CDs with Partridge and Schwenke's water data for work on UV stars. The line data also serve as input to my model atmosphere and synthesis programs that generate energy distributions, photometry, limb darkening, and spectra that can be used for planning observations and for fitting observed spectra. The spectrum synthesis programs produce detailed plots with the lines identified. Grids of stellar spectra can be used for radial velocity-, rotation-, or abundance templates and for population synthesis. I am fitting spectra of bright stars to test the data and to produce atlases to guide observers. For each star the whole spectrum is computed from the UV to the far IR. The line data, opacities, models, spectra, and programs are freely distributed on CDs and on my Web site and represent a unique resource for many NASA programs. I am now in full production of new line lists for atoms. I am computing all ions of all elements from H to Zn and the first 5 ions of all the heavier elements, about 800 ions. For each ion I treat as many as 61 even and 61 odd configurations, computing all energy levels and eigenvectors. The Hamiltonian is determined from a scaled-Hartree-Fock starting guess by least squares fitting the observed energy levels. The average energy of each configuration is used in computing scaled-Thomas-Fermi-Dirac wavefunctions for each configuration which in turn are used to compute allowed and forbidden transition integrals. These are multiplied

  3. Making the Transition to the SuperCatalog: ISU's Experience with LUIS II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, H. Scott; Ensor, Patricia L.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the development at Indiana State University of a SuperCatalog, a computerized library catalog that provides access to both library holdings and locally loaded commercial databases, including ERIC and Wilson indexes. Software is discussed; the impact on staff, users, interlibrary loan, and library instruction is examined; and future…

  4. Measuring Law Library Catalog Web Site Usability: A Web Analytic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fang, Wei; Crawford, Marjorie E.

    2008-01-01

    Although there is a proliferation of information available on the Web, and law professors, students, and other users have a variety of channels to locate information and complete their research activities, the law library catalog still remains an important source for offering users access to information that has been evaluated and cataloged by…

  5. Comparative pulsation calculations with OP and OPAL opacities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanbur, Shashi M.; Simon, Norman R.

    1994-01-01

    Comparative linear nonadiabatic pulsation calculations are presented using the OPAL and Opacity Project opacities. The two sets of opacities include effects due to intermediate coupling and fine structure as well as new abundances. We used two mass luminosity (M-L) relations, one standard (BIT), and one employing substantial convective core overshoot (COV). The two sets of opacities cannot be differentiated on the basis of the stellar pulsation calculations presented here. The BIT relation can model the beat and bump Cepheids with masses between 4 and 7 solar mass, while if the overshoot relation is used, masses between 2 and 6 solar mass are required. In the RR Lyrae regime, we find the inferred masses of globular cluster RRd stars to be little influenced by the choice of OPAL or OP. Finally, the limited modeling we have done is not able to constrain the Cepheid M-L relation based upon period ratios observed in the beat and bump stars.

  6. 40 CFR 75.14 - Specific provisions for monitoring opacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... performance specifications in Performance Specification 1 in appendix B to part 60 of this chapter. Any continuous opacity monitoring system previously certified to meet Performance Specification 1 shall be...

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: GUViCS. Ultraviolet Source Catalogs (Voyer+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voyer, E. N.; Boselli, A.; Boissier, S.; Heinis, S.; Cortese, L.; Ferrarese, L.; Cote, P.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Peng, E. W.; Zhang, H.; Liu, C.

    2014-07-01

    These catalogs are based on GALEX NUV and FUV source detections in and behind the Virgo Cluster. The detections are split into catalogs of extended sources and point-like sources. The UV Virgo Cluster Extended Source catalog (UV_VES.fit) provides the deepest and most extensive UV photometric data of extended galaxies in Virgo to date. If certain data is not available for a given source then a null value is entered (e.g. -999, -99). UV point-like sources are matched with SDSS, NGVS, and NED and the relevant photometry and further data from these databases/catalogs are provided in this compilation of catalogs. The primary GUViCS UV Virgo Cluster Point-Like Source catalog is UV_VPS.fit. This catalog provides the most useful GALEX pipeline NUV and FUV photometric parameters, and categorizes sources as stars, Virgo members, and background sources, when possible. It also provides identifiers for optical matches in the SDSS and NED, and indicates if a match exists in the NGVS, only if GUViCS-optical matches are one-to-one. NED spectroscopic redshifts are also listed for GUViCS-NED one-to-one matches. If certain data is not available for a given source a null value is entered. Additionally, the catalog is useful for quick access to optical data on one-to-one GUViCS-SDSS matches.The only parameter available in the catalog for UV sources that have multiple SDSS matches is the total number of multiple matches, i.e. SDSSNUMMTCHS. Multiple GUViCS sources matched to the same SDSS source are also flagged given a total number of matches, SDSSNUMMTCHS, of one. All other fields for multiple matches are set to a null value of -99. In order to obtain full optical SDSS data for multiply matched UV sources in both scenarios, the user can cross-correlate the GUViCS ID of the sources of interest with the full GUViCS-SDSS matched catalog in GUV_SDSS.fit. The GUViCS-SDSS matched catalog, GUV_SDSS.fit, provides the most relevant SDSS data on all GUViCS-SDSS matches, including one

  8. Mean gas opacity for circumstellar environments and equilibrium temperature degeneracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malygin, M. G.; Kuiper, R.; Klahr, H.; Dullemond, C. P.; Henning, Th.

    2014-08-01

    Context. In a molecular cloud dust opacity typically dominates over gas opacity, yet in the vicinities of forming stars dust is depleted, and gas is the sole provider of opacity. In the optically thin circumstellar environments the radiation temperature cannot be assumed to be equal to the gas temperature, hence the two-temperature Planck means are necessary to calculate the radiative equilibrium. Aims: By using the two-temperature mean opacity one does obtain the proper equilibrium gas temperature in a circumstellar environment, which is in a chemical equilibrium. A careful consideration of a radiative transfer problem reveals that the equilibrium temperature solution can be degenerate in an optically thin gaseous environment. Methods: We compute mean gas opacities based on the publicly available code DFSYNTHE by Kurucz and Castelli. We performed the calculations assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium and an ideal gas equation of state. The values were derived by direct integration of the high-resolution opacity spectrum. Results: We produced two sets of gas opacity tables: Rosseland means and two-temperature Planck means. For three metallicities [Me/H] = 0.0, ± 0.3 we covered the parameter range 3.48 ≤ log Trad [K] ≤ 4.48 in radiation temperature, 2.8 ≤ log Tgas [K] ≤ 6.0 in gas temperature, and -10 ≤ log P [dyn cm-2] ≤ 6 in gas pressure. We show that in the optically thin circumstellar environment for a given stellar radiation field and local gas density there are several equilibrium gas temperatures possible. Conclusions: We conclude that, in general, equilibrium gas temperature cannot be determined without treating the temperature evolution. The opacity tables are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/568/A91 as well as via http://www.mpia.de/~malygin

  9. Correlation of plume opacity with particles and sulfates from boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Lou, J.C.; Lee, M.; Chen, K.S.

    1997-07-01

    The effects of emission concentrations of particulate matters and sulfates on plume opacity are investigated by in situ measurements. The studies are conducted for three processes of two coal-fired plants and one oil-fired that are all equipped with electrostatic precipitators. Flue-gas sampling and analysis include the concentrations of particles and total water soluble sulfates, particle size distribution, and flue-gas composition; while in-stack and out-of-stack opacities are determined by a transmissometer and certified smoke inspectors, respectively. Experimental results show that plume opacity outside the stack linearly correlates well with the in-stack opacity. The mixing of hot flue gas with cold ambient air would result in the condensation of hygroscopic sulfuric acid aerosols and an increase about 1.6% out of typical 15--25% measured opacity. An empirical equation similar to the Beer-Lambert-Bouger form is derived for predicting the plume opacity in terms of the stack diameter and the concentrations of particles and total water soluble sulfates. Good comparisons are achieved between predictions by the empirical equation and other available field data.

  10. Decal Process Document and Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Decal Process Document and Catalog, JSC 27260 is the standard flight decal catalog, complete with illustrations and part numbers. As hardware developers identify labels that have common applicability across end items, these labels can be evaluated for "standard decal classification" and entered into the decal catalog for general use. The hardware developer must have a label design that meets current, applicable labeling requirements, and submit to the Decal Design and Production Facility (DDPF) as a standard label candidate. Upon approval, the label will be added to the decal catalog. The Decal Process Document and Catalog provides a selection of decals from which the NASA and NASA contractor customers can easily order. The decals shown in the catalog have been previously produced and have released engineering/fabrication drawings on file in the (DDPF). A released drawing is required before a decal can be produced or placed into the catalog. Some decals included in the catalog have a common applicability and are used in various NASA vehicles/habitats. It is the intent of the DDPF to maintain this catalog as a "living document" to which decals/placards can be added as they are repeatedly used. The advantage of identifYing flight decals in this catalog is that a released drawing is already in place, and the products will be flight certified.

  11. Geothermal innovative technologies catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Kenkeremath, D.

    1988-09-01

    The technology items in this report were selected on the basis of technological readiness and applicability to current technology transfer thrusts. The items include technologies that are considered to be within 2 to 3 years of being transferred. While the catalog does not profess to be entirely complete, it does represent an initial attempt at archiving innovative geothermal technologies with ample room for additions as they occur. The catalog itself is divided into five major functional areas: Exploration; Drilling, Well Completion, and Reservoir Production; Materials and Brine Chemistry; Direct Use; and Economics. Within these major divisions are sub-categories identifying specific types of technological advances: Hardware; Software; Data Base; Process/Procedure; Test Facility; and Handbook.

  12. Education programs catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    Since its formation in 1977, US DOE has been authorized to support education programs that help ensure an adequate supply of scientists, engineers, and technicians for energy-related research, production activities, and technology transfer. A national conference in 1989 produced a clear vision of the important role that DOE, its facilities, and its 169,000 Federal and contract employees can play in the educational life of their communities and the Nation. Many of the programs listed in this catalog are the result of this new vision; others have existed for many years. Purpose of this catalog is to make all DOE education efforts more widely known so that more teachers, students, and others can benefit. Supporting the hundreds of education programs (precollege, undergraduate, graduate, public) is the network of DOE national laboratories, technology centers, and other research facilities. Brief descriptions of each facility, its programs, and contact information for its education personnel are included.

  13. Landsat US standard catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The U.S. Standard Catalog lists imagery of the continental U.S., Alaska and Hawaii acquired by Landsat 1 and 2 which has been processed and input to the data files during the referenced month. Data, such as date acquired, cloud cover and image quality are given for each scene. The microfilm roll and frame on which the scene may be found is also given.

  14. Cataloging Expert Systems: Optimism and Frustrated Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olmstadt, William J.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses artificial intelligence and attempts to catalog expert systems. Topics include the nature of expertise; examples of cataloging expert systems; barriers to implementation; and problems, including total automation, cataloging expertise, priorities, and system design. (LRW)

  15. Film Catalog. John F. Kennedy Space Center. 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    Teachers from the United States and several other countries have access to the film library system of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This catalog contains the titles and abstracts for over 150 films that are available from NASA on topics regarding space flight, meteorology, astronomy, NASA programs, satellites, research,…

  16. User Instructions for Online Catalogs in ARL Libraries. Kit 93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC. Office of Management Studies.

    This collection of library documents which provide instructions for users of online public access catalogs in member libraries of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) contains: (1) a set of enhanced instructions for library users of Geac, a commercial online circulation system at the University of Arizona; (2) sets of materials of…

  17. A System for Cataloging and Classifying Visual Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Judith

    1979-01-01

    The system for cataloging and classifying visual materials developed for the University Archives of SUNY Buffalo is described. It incorporates the principles and guidelines of the AACR rules, offers degrees of access, depending on the size and complexity of the collection, permits implementation by nonprofessional staff, and provides inventory…

  18. Circulation System to Online Catalog: The Transition at OSU.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Pulis, Noelle

    This paper describes the development of an online public access catalog from a limited-purpose online circulation system at Ohio State University (OSU) and the negative and positive aspects of this transition. It is noted that the online system, known as the Library Control System (LCS), was designed to be fully operational in July 1982. Steps in…

  19. Government Publications in an Online Catalog: A Feasibility Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowerman, Roseann; Cady, Susan A.

    1984-01-01

    This investigation of utilization of machine-readable bibliographic records for government publications in online public access catalogs consists of a literature search, identification of applications of Government Printing Office (GPO) MARC tapes by bibliographic services and libraries, sampling GPO MARC test tape and profiling depository…

  20. Reinventing the Community College Catalog Using Hypertext for IBM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rock, Charles B.

    In an attempt to provide a more useful and economical alternative to the traditional college catalog, St Louis Community College at Florissant Valley (SCC), in Missouri, has developed a hyptertext program. The hypertext format links pools of information that can be accessed at the rate and depth of detail that the end user desires. The hypertext…

  1. CITE NLM: Natural-Language Searching in an Online Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doszkocs, Tamas E.

    1983-01-01

    The National Library of Medicine's Current Information Transfer in English public access online catalog offers unique subject search capabilities--natural-language query input, automatic medical subject headings display, closest match search strategy, ranked document output, dynamic end user feedback for search refinement. References, description…

  2. NOAA's Data Catalog and the Federal Open Data Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wengren, M. J.; de la Beaujardiere, J.

    2014-12-01

    The 2013 Open Data Policy Presidential Directive requires Federal agencies to create and maintain a 'public data listing' that includes all agency data that is currently or will be made publicly-available in the future. The directive requires the use of machine-readable and open formats that make use of 'common core' and extensible metadata formats according to the best practices published in an online repository called 'Project Open Data', to use open licenses where possible, and to adhere to existing metadata and other technology standards to promote interoperability. In order to meet the requirements of the Open Data Policy, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has implemented an online data catalog that combines metadata from all subsidiary NOAA metadata catalogs into a single master inventory. The NOAA Data Catalog is available to the public for search and discovery, providing access to the NOAA master data inventory through multiple means, including web-based text search, OGC CS-W endpoint, as well as a native Application Programming Interface (API) for programmatic query. It generates on a daily basis the Project Open Data JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) file required for compliance with the Presidential directive. The Data Catalog is based on the open source Comprehensive Knowledge Archive Network (CKAN) software and runs on the Amazon Federal GeoCloud. This presentation will cover topics including mappings of existing metadata in standard formats (FGDC-CSDGM and ISO 19115 XML ) to the Project Open Data JSON metadata schema, representation of metadata elements within the catalog, and compatible metadata sources used to feed the catalog to include Web Accessible Folder (WAF), Catalog Services for the Web (CS-W), and Esri ArcGIS.com. It will also discuss related open source technologies that can be used together to build a spatial data infrastructure compliant with the Open Data Policy.

  3. Interplay of Neutrino Opacities in Core-collapse Supernova Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Eric J; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Messer, Bronson; Hix, William Raphael; Bruenn, S. W.

    2012-01-01

    We have conducted a series of numerical experiments using spherically symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics with the code Agile-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of including, and improving, the calculation of neutrino opacities on the development of supernova simulations by removing, or replacing, each opacity individually, or removing opacities in groups. We find that during core collapse improvements to electron capture (EC) on nuclei, namely EC on an ensemble of nuclei based on the hybrid model, relative to the simpler independent-particle approximation (IPA) for a mean nucleus, plays the most important role of all tested neutrino opacities. Low-energy neutrinos emitted by nuclear EC preferentially escape during collapse leading to larger deleptonization of the collapsing core, without the energy downscattering via non-isoenergetic scattering (NIS) on electrons required for the models with IPA nuclear EC. During shock breakout the primary influence on the emergent neutrinos arises from NIS on electrons. For the accretion phase NIS on free nucleons and pair emission by $e^+e^-$-annihilation have the largest impact on the neutrino emission and shock evolution. Other opacities evaluated including nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung and especially neutrino-positron scattering have little measurable impact on neutrino emission or shock dynamics. Modern treatments of nuclear electron capture, $e^+e^-$-annihilation pair emission, and non-isoenergetic scattering on electrons and free nucleons are critical elements of core-collapse simulations of all dimensionality.

  4. Integration of hydrologic parameter ontology in CUAHSI HydroCatalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaslavsky, I.; Valentine, D. W.; Whitenack, T.; Piasecki, M.; Hooper, R. P.; Choi, Y.; Maidment, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    Nomenclatures of hydrologic parameters are large and very fragmented. One of the key goals of the CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System project (his.cuahsi.org) is to unify semantically diverse hydrologic observations and organize them so the data can be easily discovered, accessed and analyzed in different types of research scenarios, by different types of users. The core of the system is a hydrologic metadata catalog, which describes observational data available from multiple repositories via a standard set of CUAHSI water data web services. To address needs of different types of users, the HydroCatalog is being designed as a multi-level information system. At the lower level, a CUAHSI HIS time series catalog contains metadata about nearly 23 million time series from government and academic data sources (hiscentral.cuahsi.org). The time series representation organized by primary data sources is suitable for hydrologists and data managers who need to discover and access hydrologic observations in a format they were published, without additional interpretations or data conversions. However, such a representation doesn’t fully address data discovery and access needs of hydrologic analysts and modelers who prefer to work with curated and interpreted hydrologic data collections organized by thematic categories. Therefore, an additional layer of commonly requested hydrologic data products (“hydrologic themes”) is being constructed, where a theme represents a derived spatio-temporal aggregation of observational data. Information supporting semantics-based discovery is needed at both levels of the HydroCatalog. At the time series catalog level, the focus is on discovery of observations based on a community-curated hierarchy of hydrologic concepts, on associating variables with these concepts, and on translating concepts-based queries into queries specific to individual sources of primary data. At the theme catalog level, the variable-concept associations are used to

  5. A Computer Generated Audiovisuals Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogen, Betty

    Eccles Medical Sciences Library at the University of Utah has developed a computer-generated catalog for its audiovisual health and medical materials. The catalog contains four sections: (1) the main listing of type of media, with descriptions, call numbers, and Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) used for each item; (2) a listing by title, with call…

  6. Making a Library Catalog Adaptive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckland, Michael K.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes the design of a prototype adaptive online catalog that was implemented as a transparent workstation-based front end system to MELVYL, the online catalog for the University of California libraries. Problems with searching bibliographic retrieval systems are reviewed, including irrelevant retrievals and the inexperience of most users.…

  7. A catalog of stellar spectrophotometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, S. J.; Pyper, D. M.; Shore, S. N.; White, R. E.; Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A machine-readable catalog of stellar spectrophotometric measurements made with rotating grating scanner is introduced. Consideration is given to the processes by which the stellar data were collected and calibrated with the fluxes of Vega (Hayes and Latham, 1975). A sample page from the spectrophotometric catalog is presented.

  8. Venus cloud properties - Infrared opacity and mass mixing ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samuelson, R. E.; Hanel, R. A.; Herath, L. W.; Kunde, V. G.; Maguire, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    By using the Mariner 5 temperature profile and a homogeneous cloud model, and assuming that CO2 and cloud particles are the only opacity sources, the wavelength dependence of the Venus cloud opacity is inferred from the infrared spectrum of the planet between 450 and 1250 per cm. Volume extinction coefficients varying from 0.000005 to 0.000015 per cm, depending on the wavelength, are determined at the tropopause level of 6110 km. By using all available data, a cloud mass mixing ratio of approximately 0.000005 and a particle concentration of about 900 particles per cu cm at this level are also inferred. The derived cloud opacity compares favorably with that expected for a haze of droplets of a 75% aqueous solution of sulfuric acid.

  9. The violet and ultraviolet opacity problem for carbon stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Hollis R.; Luttermoser, Donald G.; Faulkner, Danny R.

    1988-01-01

    The paper considers the longstanding problem of the 'violet opacity' in cool carbon stars by testing, through synthetic spectra, many new and previously suggested opacity sources, based on currently available model atmospheres for carbon stars and M giant stars. While several bound-free edges of neutral metals are important opacity sources, those of Na I at at 2413 A, Mg I at 2514 A, and particularly Ca I at 2940 A are especially significant. Collectively, thousands of atomic lines are important, and the enormous line of Mg I at 2852 A influences the spectrum well into the visible. The pseudocontinuum of C3 and the photoionization continuum of CH both play noticeable but secondary roles. Synthetic spectra form the carbon star models with and without polyatomic molecules fit nicely the collected observations of the well-observed carbon star TX Psc.

  10. Fractal Particles: Titan's Thermal Structure and IR Opacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, C. P.; Rannou, P.; Guez, L.; Young, E. F.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Titan's haze particles are the principle opacity at solar wavelengths. Most past work in modeling these particles has assumed spherical particles. However, observational evidence strongly favors fractal shapes for the haze particles. We consider the implications of fractal particles for the thermal structure and near infrared opacity of Titan's atmosphere. We find that assuming fractal particles with the optical properties based on laboratory tholin material and with a production rate that allows for a match to the geometric albedo results in warmer troposphere and surface temperatures compared to spherical particles. In the near infrared (1-3 microns) the predicted opacity of the fractal particles is up to a factor of two less than for spherical particles. This has implications for the ability of Cassini to image Titan's surface at 1 micron.

  11. A Free and Open Source Web-based Data Catalog Evaluation Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, K.; Schweitzer, R.; Burger, E. F.

    2015-12-01

    For many years, the Unified Access Framework (UAF) project has worked to provide improved access to scientific data by leveraging widely used data standards and conventions. These standards include the Climate and Forecast (CF) metadata conventions, the Data Access Protocol (DAP) and various Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards such as WMS and WCS. The UAF has also worked to create a unified access point for scientific data access through THREDDS and ERDDAP catalogs. A significant effort was made by the UAF project to build a catalog-crawling tool that was designed to crawl remote catalogs, analyze their content and then build a clean catalog that 1) represented only CF compliant data; 2) provided a uniform set of access services and 3) where possible, aggregated data in time. That catalog is available at http://ferret.pmel.noaa.gov/geoide/geoIDECleanCatalog.html.Although this tool has proved immensely valuable in allowing the UAF project to create a high quality data catalog, the need for a catalog evaluation service or tool to operate on a more local level also exists. Many programs that generate data of interest to the public are recognizing the utility and power of using the THREDDS data server (TDS) to serve that data. However, for some groups that lack the resources to maintain dedicated IT personnel, it can be difficult to set up a properly configured TDS. The TDS catalog evaluating service that is under development and will be discussed in this presentation is an effort, through the UAF project, to bridge that gap. Based upon the power of the original UAF catalog cleaner, the web evaluator will have the ability to scan and crawl a local TDS catalog, evaluate the contents for compliance with CF standards, analyze the services offered, and identify datasets where possible temporal aggregation would benefit data access. The results of the catalog evaluator will guide the configuration of the dataset in TDS to ensure that it meets the standards as

  12. Infrared astronomical data base and catalog of infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, M.; Gezari, D. Y.; Mead, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center has developed a computer data base of infrared astronomical observations. The data base represents a machine-readable library of infrared observational data published in the relevant literature since 1960 for celestial sources outside the solar system. It likewise includes the contents of infrared surveys and catalogs. A catalog of infrared observations has been developed in both printed and magnetic-tape formats. The data base will be accessed through a bibliographic guide and an atlas of infrared source names and positions. Future plans also include two-dimensional graphical displays of infrared data and a user-interactive data terminal.

  13. Measuring the opacity of stellar interior matter in terrestrial laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, James

    2015-11-01

    How does energy propagate from the core to the surface of the Sun, where it emerges to warm the Earth? Nearly a century ago Eddington recognized that the attenuation of radiation by stellar matter controls the internal structure of stars like the sun. Opacities for high energy density (HED) matter are challenging to calculate because accurate and complete descriptions of the energy levels, populations, and plasma effects such as continuum lowering and line broadening are needed for partially ionized atoms. This requires approximations, in part because billions of bound-bound and bound-free electronic transitions can contribute to the opacity. Opacity calculations, however, have never been benchmarked against laboratory measurements at stellar interior conditions. Laboratory opacity measurements were limited in the past by the challenges of creating and diagnosing sufficiently large and uniform samples at the extreme conditions found inside stars. In research conducted over more than 10 years, we developed an experimental platform on the Z facility and measured wavelength-resolved iron opacity at electron temperatures Te = 156-195 eV and densities ne = 0.7-4.0 x 1022 cm-3 - conditions very similar to the radiation/convection boundary zone within the Sun. The wavelength-dependent opacity in the 975-1775 eV photon energy range is 30-400% higher than models predict. This raises questions about how well we understand the behavior of atoms in HED plasma. These measurements may also help resolve decade-old discrepancies between solar model predictions and helioseismic observations. This talk will provide an overview of the measurements, investigations of possible errors, and ongoing experiments aimed at testing hypotheses to resolve the model-data discrepancy. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. SOLAR MIXTURE OPACITY CALCULATIONS USING DETAILED CONFIGURATION AND LEVEL ACCOUNTING TREATMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Blancard, Christophe; Cosse, Philippe; Faussurier, Gerald

    2012-01-20

    An opacity model (OPAS) combining detailed configuration and level accounting treatments has been developed to calculate radiative opacity of plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The model is presented and used to compute spectral opacities of a solar mixture. Various density-temperature couples have been considered from the solar center up to the vicinity of the radiative/convective zone interface. For a given solar thermodynamic path, OPAS calculations are compared to Opacity Project (OP) and OPAL data. Rosseland mean opacity values are in very good agreement over all the considered solar thermodynamic path, while OPAS and OP spectral opacities of each element may vary considerably. Main sources of discrepancy are discussed.

  15. Infrared astronomical data base and catalog of infrared observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, M.; Gezari, D. Y.; Mead, J. M.

    A computer data base of infrared astronomical observations has been established at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. It contains a summary of all infrared (1-100 microns) observations of celestial sources outside the solar system, published in the major scientific journals since 1960, as well as the contents of infrared surveys and catalogs. A Catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO) has been developed from the data base in printed and magnetic tape versions. A bibliographic Guide to the Infrared Astronomical Literature, and an Altas of Infrared Source Names and Positions will be published in conjunction with the catalog. Future plans include development of an interactive data system at Goddard which will give a user direct access to the computerized data.

  16. Infrared astronomical data base and catalog of infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, M.; Gezari, D. Y.; Mead, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    A computer data base of infrared astronomical observations has been established at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. It contains a summary of all infrared (1-100 microns) observations of celestial sources outside the solar system, published in the major scientific journals since 1960, as well as the contents of infrared surveys and catalogs. A Catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO) has been developed from the data base in printed and magnetic tape versions. A bibliographic Guide to the Infrared Astronomical Literature, and an Altas of Infrared Source Names and Positions will be published in conjunction with the catalog. Future plans include development of an interactive data system at Goddard which will give a user direct access to the computerized data.

  17. Historic Cataloging Costs, Issues, and Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, George

    1989-01-01

    Reports research related to cataloging costs: (1) a comparison of length and complexity of Library of Congress cataloging copy between 1956 and 1981; (2) a survey of cataloging costs at academic libraries; and (3) cataloging costs and salaries since 1876 compared with the rate of inflation. The questionnaire and list of libraries surveyed are…

  18. The Gaia Attitude Star Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, R. L.

    2016-04-01

    We describe the Attitude Star Catalog produced for the Gaia mission. This catalog is being used by Gaia for the first on-ground attitude reconstruction. Originally it was simply a subset of the Initial Gaia Source List but this subset did not meet the isolation requirements and it contained a significant number of double entries. As a result during the commissioning phase of Gaia a new generation of this catalog, that better fulfills the attitude reconstruction requirements, was requested. Here we describe the production and properties of this new Attitude Star Catalog. The Attitude Star Catalog was made by combining 7 all sky catalogs and selecting entries based on magnitude, isolation and astrometric precision criteria. The catalog has 8173331 entries with estimates of the positions at 2000, proper motions and magnitudes (Gaia G, Gaia Grvs, red RF & blue BJ) in the magnitude range 7.0 < G < 13.4. It is publically available from the CDS Strasbourg and the IGSL web-site.

  19. FIRST NEW SOLAR MODELS WITH OPAS OPACITY TABLES

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pennec, M.; Turck-Chièze, S.; Salmon, S.

    2015-11-10

    Stellar seismology appears more and more as a powerful tool for a better determination of the fundamental properties of solar-type stars. However, the particular case of the Sun is still challenging. For about a decade now, the helioseismic sound-speed determination has continued to disagree with the standard solar model (SSM) prediction, questioning the reliability of this model. One of the sources of uncertainty could be in the treatment of the transport of radiation from the solar core to the surface. In this Letter, we use the new OPAS opacity tables, recently available for solar modeling, to address this issue. We discuss first the peculiarities of these tables, then we quantify their impact on the solar sound-speed and density profiles using the reduced OPAS tables taken on the grids of the OPAL ones. We use the two evolution codes, Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics and Code Liégeois d’Evolution Stellaire, that led to similar conclusions in the solar radiative zone. In comparison to commonly used OPAL opacity tables, the new solar models are computed for the most recent photospheric composition with OPAS tables and present improvements to the location of the base of the convective zone and to the description of the solar radiative zone in comparison to the helioseismic observations, even if the differences in the Rosseland mean opacity do not exceed 6%. We finally carry out a comparison to a solar model computed with the OP opacity tables.

  20. 40 CFR 75.14 - Specific provisions for monitoring opacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... monitoring opacity. (a) Coal-fired units and oil-fired units. The owner or operator shall meet the general... coal-fired or oil-fired unit, except as provided in paragraphs (b), (c), and (d) of this section and in... or operator can demonstrate that condensed water is present in the exhaust flue gas stream and...

  1. From Telecommunications to Networking: The MELVYL Online Union Catalog and the Development of Intercampus Networks at the University of California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Clifford A.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the history of the network that supports the MELVYL online union catalog, describes current technological and policy issues, and discusses the role the network plays in integrating local automation, the union catalog, access to resource databases, and other initiatives. Sidebars by Mark Needleman discuss the TCP/IP protocol suite, internet…

  2. Professional Literature on Cataloging--Then and Now.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boll, John J.

    1985-01-01

    This overview of literature pertaining to philosophies and crosscurrents of cataloging highlights literature of 1905, cataloging codes, serials and textbooks on cataloging, cataloging aids, and selected themes 1905-1985 (cataloging for small library, union lists and catalogs, classification, catalog use studies, subject retrieval systems,…

  3. NASA Video Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This issue of the NASA Video Catalog cites video productions listed in the NASA STI database. The videos listed have been developed by the NASA centers, covering Shuttle mission press conferences; fly-bys of planets; aircraft design, testing and performance; environmental pollution; lunar and planetary exploration; and many other categories related to manned and unmanned space exploration. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied by an abstract. The Table of Contents shows how the entries are arranged by divisions and categories according to the NASA Scope and Subject Category Guide. For users with specific information, a Title Index is available. A Subject Term Index, based on the NASA Thesaurus, is also included. Guidelines for usage of NASA audio/visual material, ordering information, and order forms are also available.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: c2d Spitzer final data release (DR4) (Evans+, 2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, N. J., II; Allen, L. E.; Blake, G. A.; Boogert, A. C. A.; Bourke, T.; Harvey, P. M.; Kessler, J. E.; Koerner, D. W.; Lee, C. W.; Mundy, L. G.; Myers, P. C.; Padgett, D. L.; Pontoppidan, K.; Sargent, A. I.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Young, C. H.; Young, K. E.

    2014-05-01

    This is the final delivery (DR4, Fall 2006 and Fall 2007) of the Spitzer Space Telescope "From Molecular Cores to Planet-Forming Disks" (c2d) Legacy Project. The data are also available as Enhanced Products from the Spitzer Science Center (SSC). c2d has delivered 867 catalogs. IRSA has merged these delivered catalogs into four groups - Clouds, Off-Cloud, Cores, Stars - and serves them through the general catalog search engine Gator. Many of the delivered catalogs, images and spectra are accessible through IRSA's general search service, Atlas. As a service to its users, the CDS has downloaded a dataset containing most of the c2d data (but not all columns) from the IRSA archive. The individual catalogs are listed below: C2D Fall '07 Full CLOUDS Catalog (CHA_II, LUP, OPH, PER, SER) C2D Fall '07 High Reliability (HREL) CLOUDS Catalog (CHA_II, LUP, OPH, PER, SER) C2D Fall '07 candidate Young Stellar Objects (YSO) CLOUDS Catalog (CHA_II, LUP, OPH, PER, SER) C2D Fall '07 Full OFF-CLOUD Catalog (CHA_II, LUP, OPH, PER, SER) C2D Fall '07 candidate Young Stellar Objects (YSO) OFF-CLOUD Catalog (CHA_II, LUP, OPH, PER, SER) C2D Fall '07 Full CORES Catalog C2D Fall '07 candidate Young Stellar Objects (YSO) CORES Catalog C2D Fall '07 Full STARS Catalog C2D Fall '07 candidate Young Stellar Objects (YSO) STARS Catalog These tables have been merged into a single table at CDS. All three SIRTF instruments (Infrared Array Camera [IRAC], Multiband Imaging Photometer for SIRTF [MIPS], and Infrared Spectrograph [IRS]) were used to observe sources that span the evolutionary sequence from molecular cores to protoplanetary disks, encompassing a wide range of cloud masses, stellar masses, and star-forming environments. (1 data file).

  5. Accurate Optical Reference Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, N.

    2006-08-01

    Current and near future all-sky astrometric catalogs on the ICRF are reviewed with the emphasis on reference star data at optical wavelengths for user applications. The standard error of a Hipparcos Catalogue star position is now about 15 mas per coordinate. For the Tycho-2 data it is typically 20 to 100 mas, depending on magnitude. The USNO CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC) observing program was completed in 2004 and reductions toward the final UCAC3 release are in progress. This all-sky reference catalogue will have positional errors of 15 to 70 mas for stars in the 10 to 16 mag range, with a high degree of completeness. Proper motions for the about 60 million UCAC stars will be derived by combining UCAC astrometry with available early epoch data, including yet unpublished scans of the complete set of AGK2, Hamburg Zone astrograph and USNO Black Birch programs. Accurate positional and proper motion data are combined in the Naval Observatory Merged Astrometric Dataset (NOMAD) which includes Hipparcos, Tycho-2, UCAC2, USNO-B1, NPM+SPM plate scan data for astrometry, and is supplemented by multi-band optical photometry as well as 2MASS near infrared photometry. The Milli-Arcsecond Pathfinder Survey (MAPS) mission is currently being planned at USNO. This is a micro-satellite to obtain 1 mas positions, parallaxes, and 1 mas/yr proper motions for all bright stars down to about 15th magnitude. This program will be supplemented by a ground-based program to reach 18th magnitude on the 5 mas level.

  6. The investigation of opacity in the JET tokomak divertor region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachin, Tracey

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate Lyman line absorption by deuterium atoms in the divertor region of the JET tokamak for four high density, low temperature, detached plasma pulses. A collisional radiative model of deuterium level populations has been used to estimate the extent of Lybeta radiative absorption in the divertor along the same line of sight as a VUV spectrometer. This uses a first order escape probability method to evaluate the line escape probabilities and gives a self consistent model of the level populations and radiation field. These results are compared with experimental measurements of the branching ratio of Lybeta to Dalpha from the VUV spectrometer and various visible diagnostics. Both the theoretical and experimental results agree that opacity reduces the level of Lybeta emission from the divertor plasma. The effects of opacity on the ionisation and power balance of the plasma are examined for various conditions. The results of this investigation are compared with other theoretical work in the field. It is shown that the levels of opacity are not great enough to significantly alter the ionisation and power balance of the plasma for the conditions presently being created within the JET tokamak. The population code requires information about the background plasma. This can be provided by either a fluid code or an 'onion-skin' plasma simulation. Both models are used in this investigation and their levels of accuracy are compared. Finally, a brief investigation into the level of opacity in a future tokamak, ITER, is carried out using predicted plasma profiles. It is shown that opacity levels in the divertor region of the ITER tokamak could match those of JET and by creating highly detached plasmas could easily exceed these levels.

  7. FOUR-YEAR INCIDENCE AND PROGRESSION OF LENS OPACITIES: THE LOS ANGELES LATINO EYE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Rohit; Richter, Grace M.; Torres, Mina; Foong, Athena W.P.; Choudhury, Farzana; Azen, Stanley P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the 4-year incidence and progression of lens opacities. Design Population-based longitudinal study. Methods 4,658 adult Latinos from Los Angeles County, were examined at baseline and 4-year follow-up. Examination included assessment of lens opacities using the Lens Opacities Classification System II (LOCS II). Incidences of cortical, nuclear, and posterior subcapsular opacities (with LOCS II scores ≥2) were defined as opacity development in persons without that opacity at baseline. Single and mixed opacities were defined in persons without any opacity at baseline. Incidence of all lens changes included development of at least one opacity or cataract surgery among those without any opacity at baseline. 4-year progressions were defined as increase of ≥2 in LOCS II score. Results The 4-year incidence of all lens opacities was 14.2%. 4-year incidence of cataract surgery was 1.48%. The incidences were 4.1% for cortical-only, 5.8% for nuclear-only, 0.5% for PSC-only, and 2.5% for mixed. The incidences for any opacities were 7.5% for cortical, 10.2% for nuclear, and 2.5% for PSC. Incidence increased with age (P<0.0001 for all). The progressions were 8.5% for cortical, 3.7% for nuclear, and 2.9% for PSC opacities. Conclusions Our Latino population had a higher incidence of nuclear than cortical opacities, but a greater progression of cortical than nuclear opacities. Incidence and progression of PSC was low. Additional understanding of the natural history and progression of various lens opacities will give us a better understanding of how and when to screen for, monitor, and treat cataracts. PMID:20181327

  8. Web-Based Online Public Access Catalogues of IIT Libraries in India: An Evaluative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madhusudhan, Margam; Aggarwal, Shalini

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to examine the various features and components of web-based online public access catalogues (OPACs) of IIT libraries in India with the help of a specially designed evaluation checklist. Design/methodology/approach: The various features of the web-based OPACs in six IIT libraries (IIT Delhi, IIT Bombay, IIT…

  9. Water Resources Division training catalog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hotchkiss, W.R.; Foxhoven, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    The National Training Center provides technical and management sessions nesessary for the conductance of the U.S. Geological Survey 's training programs. This catalog describes the facilities and staff at the Lakewood Training Center and describes Water Resources Division training courses available through the center. In addition, the catalog describes the procedures for gaining admission, formulas for calculating fees, and discussion of course evaluations. (USGS)

  10. Lunar soils grain size catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, John C.

    1993-01-01

    This catalog compiles every available grain size distribution for Apollo surface soils, trench samples, cores, and Luna 24 soils. Original laboratory data are tabled, and cumulative weight distribution curves and histograms are plotted. Standard statistical parameters are calculated using the method of moments. Photos and location comments describe the sample environment and geological setting. This catalog can help researchers describe the geotechnical conditions and site variability of the lunar surface essential to the design of a lunar base.

  11. EVIDENCE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGES IN THE SUBMILLIMETER DUST OPACITY

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter G.; Roy, Arabindo; Miville-Deschenes, Marc-Antoine; Bontemps, Sylvain; Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Klein, Jeff; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hughes, David H.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Olmi, Luca; Patanchon, Guillaume; and others

    2012-05-20

    The submillimeter opacity of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) in the Galactic plane has been quantified using a pixel-by-pixel correlation of images of continuum emission with a proxy for column density. We used multi-wavelength continuum data: three Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope bands at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m and one IRAS band at 100 {mu}m. The proxy is the near-infrared color excess, E(J - K{sub s}), obtained from the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Based on observations of stars, we show how well this color excess is correlated with the total hydrogen column density for regions of moderate extinction. The ratio of emission to column density, the emissivity, is then known from the correlations, as a function of frequency. The spectral distribution of this emissivity can be fit by a modified blackbody, whence the characteristic dust temperature T and the desired opacity {sigma}{sub e}(1200) at 1200 GHz or 250 {mu}m can be obtained. We have analyzed 14 regions near the Galactic plane toward the Vela molecular cloud, mostly selected to avoid regions of high column density (N{sub H} > 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}) and small enough to ensure a uniform dust temperature. We find {sigma}{sub e}(1200) is typically (2-4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -25} cm{sup 2} H{sup -1} and thus about 2-4 times larger than the average value in the local high Galactic latitude diffuse atomic ISM. This is strong evidence for grain evolution. There is a range in total power per H nucleon absorbed (and re-radiated) by the dust, reflecting changes in the strength of the interstellar radiation field and/or the dust absorption opacity. These changes in emission opacity and power affect the equilibrium T, which is typically 15 K, colder than at high latitudes. Our analysis extends, to higher opacity and lower temperature, the trend of increasing {sigma}{sub e}(1200) with decreasing T that was found at high latitudes. The recognition of changes in the emission opacity

  12. Astronomical catalog desk reference, 1994 edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Astronomical Catalog Desk Reference is designed to aid astronomers in locating machine readable catalogs in the Astronomical Data Center (ADC) archives. The key reference components of this document are as follows: A listing of shortened titles for all catalogs available from the ADC (includes the name of the lead author and year of publication), brief descriptions of over 300 astronomical catalogs, an index of ADC catalog numbers by subject keyword, and an index of ADC catalog numbers by author. The heart of this document is the set of brief descriptions generated by the ADC staff. The 1994 edition of the Astronomical Catalog Desk Reference contains descriptions for over one third of the catalogs in the ADC archives. Readers are encouraged to refer to this section for concise summaries of those catalogs and their contents.

  13. Analysis of the pre-retinal opacities in Gaucher Disease using spectral domain optical coherent tomography.

    PubMed

    Sheck, Leo H N; Wilson, Callum J; Vincent, Andrea L

    2012-12-01

    Fundal opacities have been reported in patients with Gaucher disease, a rare autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease, prior to the advent of optical coherent tomography. This report provides a detailed analysis of the fundal opacities in a 14-year-old girl with genetically proven Gaucher disease using spectral domain optical coherent tomography. It illustrates clearly that these opacities were pre-retinal opacities located at the vitreo-retinal interface associated with localized posterior vitreous detachments, rather than vitreous opacities as previously suggested in the literature. PMID:22950450

  14. Metal opacities and convective core overshooting in Population I stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.; Chin, Chao-Wen

    1991-01-01

    New stellar opacities computed by Rogers and Iglesias are found to lead to revised evolutionary models for stars of intermediate-to-high mass that show remarkably close agreement with observed stars, under otherwise standard physical assumptions. Most or all of the earlier discrepancies, except for the problem of predicted apsidal motion constants that are perhaps still too large, appear to have been resolved by using these new opacities with their increased metal line contribution. Thus, the implied interior metallicity of massive stars in the solar neighborhood now becomes 'normal'. Furthermore, the effective distance of convective overshooting beyond the classical convective core boundary is confirmed to be small and probably less than 0.2 times the local pressure scale height.

  15. Model-independent constraints on the cosmic opacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holanda, R. F. L.; Carvalho, J. C.; Alcaniz, J. S.

    2013-04-01

    We use current measurements of the expansion rate H(z) and cosmic background radiation bounds on the spatial curvature of the Universe to impose cosmological model-independent constraints on cosmic opacity. To perform our analyses, we compare opacity-free distance modulus from H(z) data with those from two type Ia supernovae compilations, namely, the Union2.1 plus the most distant spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia (SCP-0401 at z = 1.713) and two Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) subsamples. We find that a completely transparent universe is in full agreement with the Union 2.1 + SNe Ia SCP-0401 sample. For the SDSS compilations, such universe is compatible with observations at < 1.5σ level regardless the SNe Ia light-curve fitting used.

  16. Precise Opacities for Astrophysics (Fe and Ni) and ICF modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapisch, Marcel; Gilles, Dominique; Busquet, Michel

    2015-11-01

    Opacities of FeIII - FeXV at Te =15-20 eV and densities 1.e16-1.e23 cm-3 have been computed with an improved version of the HULLAC code. More than 109 transitions have been computed, with different ways to account for configuration interactions (CI). Spectra with CI limited to each non-relativistic configuration (CIinNRC) are compared to more extended full Relativistic CI (RCI). The effect of increasing the size of the CI basis is investigated. These comparisons enable optimizing the method for each temperature/density regime. With powerful computers, HULLAC -generated opacity databases could then be envisioned, bypassing the need for statistical approximations.

  17. Tunable Lattice-Induced Opacity for Matter Wave Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chen; Greene, Chris H.

    2014-03-01

    We describe the novel phenomena of lattice-induced opacity in the process of matter wave scattering from a two dimensional atomic lattice. As an analogue to the confinement-induced resonance, the two dimensional atomic lattice can be tuned to complete opacity to a normally incident low energy matter wave, by changing the s-wave scattering length between the matter wave and the atoms in the lattice. A scheme for a matter wave transistor is proposed based on the transmission-reflection properties of the matter wave through the atomic lattice. We also propose a matter wave cavity, constructed by two parallel 2D atomic lattices that are both opaque to the matter wave. In higher kinetic energy regimes of the matter wave, the two dimensional atomic lattice is shown to be a matter wave beam splitter and wave plate, with tunable peak intensity into different directions.

  18. [Glycosaminoglycans in subepithelial opacity after excimer laser keratectomy].

    PubMed

    Nakayasu, K; Gotoh, T; Ishikawa, T; Kanai, A

    1996-05-01

    We evaluated histochemically the characteristics of glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans in the corneal subepithelial opacity after excimer laser keratectomy on rabbit corneas. We also performed the same evaluations on the cornea after mechanical keratectomy. Twenty days after the operations, the area immediately subjacent to the epithelium showed strong staining with toluidine blue, alcian blue, and colloidal iron. However, after treatment with chondroitinase ABC or chondroitinase AC, alcian blue staining in this area decreased dramatically. Antilarge proteoglycan antibody also reacted strongly in this area. Histochemical and immunohistochemical examination of the cornea where mechanical keratectomy was done showed basically similar findings with the cornea of excimer laser keratectomy. These results suggest that large-molecula proteoglycans with chondroitine sulfate side chains become localized in the subepithelial area after two different kinds of keratectomies. We presume from histochemical and immunohistochemical observations that the subepithelial opacity observed after excimer laser keratectomy is not a special reaction to excimer laser but simply a corneal scar formed after stromal resection.

  19. Venus cloud properties: Infrared opacity and mass mixing ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samuelson, R. E.; Hanel, R. A.; Herath, L. W.; Kunde, V. G.; Maguire, W. C.

    1974-01-01

    By using the Mariner 5 temperature profile and a homogeneous cloud model, and assuming that CO2 and cloud particles are the only opacity sources, the wavelength dependence of the Venus cloud opacity is inferred from the infrared spectrum of the planet between 450 and 1250/cm. Justification for applying the homogeneous cloud model is found in the fact that numerous polarization and infrared data are mutually consistent within the framework of such a model; on the other hand, dense cloud models are not satisfactory. Volume extinction coefficients varying from 0.000005 to 0.000015/cm depending on the wavelength, are determined at the tropopause level of 6110 km. By using all available data, a cloud mass mixing ratio of approximately 0.000005 and a particle concentration of about 900 particles per cu cm at this level are also inferred. The derived cloud opacity compares favorably with that expected for a haze of droplets of a 75% aqueous solution of sulfuric acid.

  20. Iron-group opacities in the envelopes of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pennec, Maëlle; Turck-Chièze, Sylvaine

    2014-02-01

    β Cephei and SPB stars are pulsating stars for which the excitation of modes by the κ mechanism, due to the iron-group opacity peak, seems puzzling. We have first investigated the origins of the differences noticed between OP and OPAL iron and nickel opacity calculations (up to a factor 2), a fact which complicates the interpretation. To accomplish this task, new well-qualified calculations (SCO-RCG, HULLAC and ATOMIC) have been performed and compared to values of these tables, and most of the differences are now well understood. Next, we have exploited a dedicated experiment on chromium, iron and nickel, conducted at the LULI 2000 facilities. We found that, in the case of iron, detailed calculations (OP, ATOMIC and HULLAC) show good agreement, contrary to all of the non-detailed calculations. However, in the case of nickel, OP calculations show large discrepancies with the experiments but also with other codes. Thus, the opacity tables need to be revised in the thermodynamical conditions corresponding to the peak of the iron group. Consequently we study the evolution of this iron peak with changes in stellar mass, age, and metallicity to determine the relevant region where these tables should be revised.

  1. Effective Tree Scattering and Opacity at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurum, Mehmet; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Lang, Roger H.; Joseph, Alicia T.; Cosh, Michael H.; Jackson, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates vegetation effects at L-band by using a first-order radiative transfer (RT) model and truck-based microwave measurements over natural conifer stands to assess the applicability of the tau-omega) model over trees. The tau-omega model is a zero-order RT solution that accounts for vegetation effects with effective vegetation parameters (vegetation opacity and single-scattering albedo), which represent the canopy as a whole. This approach inherently ignores multiple-scattering effects and, therefore, has a limited validity depending on the level of scattering within the canopy. The fact that the scattering from large forest components such as branches and trunks is significant at L-band requires that zero-order vegetation parameters be evaluated (compared) along with their theoretical definitions to provide a better understanding of these parameters in the retrieval algorithms as applied to trees. This paper compares the effective vegetation opacities, computed from multi-angular pine tree brightness temperature data, against the results of two independent approaches that provide theoretical and measured optical depths. These two techniques are based on forward scattering theory and radar corner reflector measurements, respectively. The results indicate that the effective vegetation opacity values are smaller than but of similar magnitude to both radar and theoretical estimates. The effective opacity of the zero-order model is thus set equal to the theoretical opacity and an explicit expression for the effective albedo is then obtained from the zero- and first- order RT model comparison. The resultant albedo is found to have a similar magnitude as the effective albedo value obtained from brightness temperature measurements. However, it is less than half of that estimated using the theoretical calculations (0.5 - 0.6 for tree canopies at L-band). This lower observed albedo balances the scattering darkening effect of the large theoretical albedo

  2. The RBV metadata catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andre, Francois; Fleury, Laurence; Gaillardet, Jerome; Nord, Guillaume

    2015-04-01

    RBV (Réseau des Bassins Versants) is a French initiative to consolidate the national efforts made by more than 15 elementary observatories funded by various research institutions (CNRS, INRA, IRD, IRSTEA, Universities) that study river and drainage basins. The RBV Metadata Catalogue aims at giving an unified vision of the work produced by every observatory to both the members of the RBV network and any external person interested by this domain of research. Another goal is to share this information with other existing metadata portals. Metadata management is heterogeneous among observatories ranging from absence to mature harvestable catalogues. Here, we would like to explain the strategy used to design a state of the art catalogue facing this situation. Main features are as follows : - Multiple input methods: Metadata records in the catalog can either be entered with the graphical user interface, harvested from an existing catalogue or imported from information system through simplified web services. - Hierarchical levels: Metadata records may describe either an observatory, one of its experimental site or a single dataset produced by one instrument. - Multilingualism: Metadata can be easily entered in several configurable languages. - Compliance to standards : the backoffice part of the catalogue is based on a CSW metadata server (Geosource) which ensures ISO19115 compatibility and the ability of being harvested (globally or partially). On going tasks focus on the use of SKOS thesaurus and SensorML description of the sensors. - Ergonomy : The user interface is built with the GWT Framework to offer a rich client application with a fully ajaxified navigation. - Source code sharing : The work has led to the development of reusable components which can be used to quickly create new metadata forms in other GWT applications You can visit the catalogue (http://portailrbv.sedoo.fr/) or contact us by email rbv@sedoo.fr.

  3. Suggested Minimum Cataloging Standards for Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Sharon

    1979-01-01

    Notes problems with cataloging library materials in the small and medium sized public library and suggests interpretations of the Anglo-American cataloging rules, with recommendations for their adaptation to smaller libraries. (CWM)

  4. Improving Data Catalogs with Free and Open Source Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, R.; Hankin, S.; O'Brien, K.

    2013-12-01

    The Global Earth Observation Integrated Data Environment (GEO-IDE) is NOAA's effort to successfully integrate data and information with partners in the national US-Global Earth Observation System (US-GEO) and the international Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). As part of the GEO-IDE, the Unified Access Framework (UAF) is working to build momentum towards the goal of increased data integration and interoperability. The UAF project is moving towards this goal with an approach that includes leveraging well known and widely used standards, as well as free and open source software. The UAF project shares the widely held conviction that the use of data standards is a key ingredient necessary to achieve interoperability. Many community-based consensus standards fail, though, due to poor compliance. Compliance problems emerge for many reasons: because the standards evolve through versions, because documentation is ambiguous or because individual data providers find the standard inadequate as-is to meet their special needs. In addition, minimalist use of standards will lead to a compliant service, but one which is of low quality. In this presentation, we will be discussing the UAF effort to build a catalog cleaning tool which is designed to crawl THREDDS catalogs, analyze the data available, and then build a 'clean' catalog of data which is standards compliant and has a uniform set of data access services available. These data services include, among others, OPeNDAP, Web Coverage Service (WCS) and Web Mapping Service (WMS). We will also discuss how we are utilizing free and open source software and services to both crawl, analyze and build the clean data catalog, as well as our efforts to help data providers improve their data catalogs. We'll discuss the use of open source software such as DataNucleus, Thematic Realtime Environmental Distributed Data Services (THREDDS), ncISO and the netCDF Java Common Data Model (CDM). We'll also demonstrate how we are

  5. Searching the SOHO online catalogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, William; Yurow, Ron

    1994-01-01

    The SOHO on-line catalogs will contain information about the observations from several made or planned campaigns, that must be available to scientists who wish to use SOHO data. The World Wide Web (WWW) was chosen as the interface to the SOHO on-line catalogs, because it is easy to use, well suited to a geographically distributed user community, and freely available. Through the use of a forms-capable WWW client such as Mosaic or Lynx, a scientist will be able to browse through the catalogs of observations in a very simple, self explanatory way. Data files can then be selected from the returned lists for either immediate transferring or sending on tape by mail, with appropriate checks for whether data is in the public domain or not.

  6. The absolute spectrophotometric catalog by Anita Cochran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnashev, V. I.; Burnasheva, B. A.; Ruban, E. V.; Hagen-Torn, E. I.

    2014-06-01

    The absolute spectrophotometric catalog by Anita Cochran is presented in a machine-readable form. The catalog systematizes observations acquired at the McDonald Observatory in 1977-1978. The data are compared with other sources, in particular, the calculated broadband stellar magnitudes are compared with photometric observations by other authors, to show that the observational data given in the catalog are reliable and suitable for a variety of applications. Observations of variable stars of different types make Cochran's catalog especially valuable.

  7. The current catalog--how current?

    PubMed

    Sargent, C W

    1968-07-01

    NLM's Current Catalog has recently come in for some criticism. To be useful as a tool in acquisition and cataloging, currency in receipt of the Current Catalog is necessary. A survey of 263 titles with 1967 imprints, which were received by the Library of the Medical Sciences, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, was made to determine the correlation between the receipt of these books in the library and their appearance in the Current Catalog. PMID:5695111

  8. Air Quality Community Catalog and Rich Metadata for GEOSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, E. M.; Husar, R. B.; Falke, S. R.; Habermann, R. E.

    2009-04-01

    The GEOSS Air Quality Community of Practice (CoP) is developing a community catalog and community portals that will facilitate the discovery, access and usage of distributed air quality data. The catalog records contain fields common for all datasets, additional fields using ISO 19115 and a link to DataSpaces for additional, community-contributed metadata. Most fields for data discovery will be extracted from the OGC WMS/WCS GetCapabilities file. DataSpaces, wiki-based web pages, willinclude extended metadata, lineage and information for better understanding of the data. The value of the DataSpaces comes from the ability to connect the dataset community: users, mediators and providers through user feedback, discussion and other community contributed content. The community catalog will be harvested through the GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) and the GEO and community portals will facilitate finding and distributing AQ datasets. The Air Quality Community Catalog and Portal components are currently being tested as part of the GEOSS Architecture Implementation Pilot - II (AIP-II).

  9. The CSC-SDSS Cross-match Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rots, Arnold; Budavari, Tamas; Szalay, Alex; Hagler, Joan

    2009-09-01

    We have cross-matched the Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR-7 source catalog using a cross-matching algorithm developed by one of us (TB) and previously applied to a cross-match of SDSS with GALEX catalogs. It is a Bayesian method that takes into account the positions, position errors, as well as the detailed footprints of the catalogs, and provides a Bayesian Factor and an associated probablity for each match. Various tests indicate that cross-matches with probabilities >0.5 are solid and can be trusted; below that value the number of multiple matches increases rapidly. 9020 CSC sources are matched with sources that SDSS considers stars, 7852 with sources considered galaxies. Approximately 150 of these CSC sources appear in both categories. The total area of the footprint intersections is 132.86 square degrees, approximately 45% of the CSC coverage. Both projects, CXC and SDSS, will provide user access to the cross-match database.We shall present details of the cross-match, an interface to it, and some initial statistical science results. This work is supported by NASA contract NAS8-03060 (CXC) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Collaboration.

  10. Statistical analysis of the 'Almagest' star catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikov, V. V.; Nosovskii, G. V.; Fomenko, A. T.

    The star catalog contained in the 'Almagest', Ptolemy's classical work of astronomy, is examined. An analysis method is proposed which allows the identification of various types of errors committed by the observer. This method not only removes many of the contradictions contained in the catalog but also makes it possible to determine the time period during which the catalog was compiled.

  11. A System for Cataloging Computer Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Karl M., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    As a form of nonbook material, computer software can be cataloged and the collection managed by a library. The System Development Corporation (SDC) Technical Information Center has adapted the Anglo-American Cataloging Rules for descriptive cataloging of computer programs. (11 references) (Author/SJ)

  12. In the Iron Age of Cataloging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Houten, Stephen

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the questions and problems in library cataloging addressed through the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by Panizzi, Cutter, and Lubetzky; asks whether computerization represents an advance that will free catalogers from earlier difficulties; and discusses the ongoing relevance of the principles of cataloging. A reference list is…

  13. Cooperative Catalog Conversion Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peat, Marwick, Mitchell and Co., Washington, DC.

    Cost estimates provided by cataloging vendors during January 1981 are analyzed to identify the costs of catalog conversion options and alternatives to the card catalog for six Minnesota regional library systems. Following an executive summary of the study is a discussion of its background, scope, objectives, data gathering methodology, and…

  14. Notes for Serials Cataloging. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geer, Beverley, Ed.; Caraway, Beatrice L., Ed.

    Notes are indispensable to serials cataloging. Researchers, reference librarians, and catalogers regularly use notes on catalog records and, as the audience for these notes has expanded from the local library community to the global Internet community, the need for notes to be cogent, clear, and useful is greater than ever. This book is a…

  15. The Cataloging Internship in Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClellan, Edna

    1995-01-01

    Summarizes the history of library internships in cataloging. Reviews a survey of 112 academic practitioners and educators regarding the value of cataloging internships in the masters of library science program. Findings indicate that internships are needed to educate library students. Sample cataloging internship programs are appended. (JMV)

  16. Automated Network Catalog Products and Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Maurice J.

    1976-01-01

    Four categories of automated network catalog products and services are examined. The advantages and disadvantages of (1) the on-line cathode-ray-tube (CRT) display, (2) the line-printer produced card, (3) the photo-composed book catalog or catalog card, and (4) computer-based microforms are all reviewed. (Author)

  17. Viking orbiter stereo imaging catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blasius, K. R.; Vetrone, A. V.; Martin, M. D.

    1980-01-01

    The extremely long missions of the two Viking Orbiter spacecraft produced a wealth of photos of surface features. Many of which can be used to form stereo images allowing the earth-bound student of Mars to examine the subject in 3-D. This catalog is a technical guide to the use of stereo coverage within the complex Viking imaging data set. Since that data set is still growing (January, 1980, about 3 1/2 years after the mission began), a second edition of this catalog is planned with completion expected about November, 1980.

  18. Catalog It! A Guide to Cataloging School Library Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Allison G.; Riedling, Ann Marlow

    This book is designed for courses that prepare college and university students for undergraduate or graduate degrees in school library media. Its objectives are to present the theory and practice of cataloging and classification in the school library environment. The manual is divided into eight chapters. Chapter 1: A Brief History of Cataloging…

  19. URAT Parallax Catalog: the largest parallax catalog since Hipparcos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finch, Charlie T.; Zacharias, Norbert

    2016-05-01

    The first USNO Robotic Astrometric Telescope catalog (URAT1) was released in April 2015. For determining parallaxes we did go beyond that and utilize all Northern Hemisphere URAT observations. These data include all individual exposures from April 2012 to June 2015 giving a larger epoch baseline for determining parallaxes over the 2-year span of URAT1 published data. The URAT Parallax Catalog (UPC) is a supplement to 'Parallax Results From URAT Epoch Data' (Finch and Zacahrias 2016) where we explain the procedures and focus on stars with a parallax of 40 mas or larger. Here we release all significant parallaxes from the URAT northern epoch data.The UPC contains 112177 parallaxes covering the magnitude range 6.56 to 16.93 in the URAT band-pass north of -12.752 deg declination. The over 40 million formal URAT parallax solutions have been compared to entries in the Hipparcos Catalog, The Yale Parallax Catalog, (Finch and Zacharias 2016), MEarth parallaxes and SIMBAD database, respectively to obtain prior published parallaxes and star name information. We release the 58,677 URAT parallaxes which have a match to either of those catalogs without implementing any extra cuts. For the stars with no prior published parallax we implement a set of stringent cuts to reduce possible erroneous parallaxes resulting in over 53,000 new trigonometric parallaxes from URAT data alone with a high level of confidence. The average parallax precision is 10.8 mas and 4.3 mas for stars having a known parallax and stars without a prior known parallax respectively.

  20. Biomass Stoves and Lens Opacity and Cataract in Nepalese Women

    PubMed Central

    Pokhrel, Amod K.; Bates, Michael N.; Shrestha, Sachet P.; Bailey, Ian L.; DiMartino, Robert B.; Smith, Kirk R.; Joshi, N. D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cataract is the most prevalent cause of blindness in Nepal. Several epidemiologic studies have associated cataracts with use of biomass cookstoves. These studies, however, have had limitations, including potential control selection bias and limited adjustment for possible confounding. This study, in Pokhara city, in an area of Nepal where biomass cookstoves are widely used without direct venting of the smoke to the outdoors, focuses on pre-clinical measures of opacity, while avoiding selection bias and taking into account comprehensive data on potential confounding factors Methods Using a cross-sectional study design, severity of lenticular damage, judged on the LOCS III scales, was investigated in females (n=143), aged 20-65 years, without previously diagnosed cataract. Linear and logistic regression analyses were used to examine the relationships with stove type and length of use. Clinically significant cataract, used in the logistic regression models, was defined as a LOCS III score > 2. Results Using gas cookstoves as the reference group, logistic regression analysis for nuclear cataract showed the evidence of relationships with stove type: for biomass stoves, the odds ratio (OR) was 2.58 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22-5.46) and, for kerosene stoves, the OR was 5.18 (95% CI: 0.88-30.38). Similar results were found for nuclear color (LOCS III score > 2), but no association was found with cortical cataracts. Supporting a relationship between biomass stoves and nuclear cataract was a trend with years of exposure to biomass cookstoves (p=0.01). Linear regression analyses did not show clear evidence of an association between lenticular damage and stove types. Biomass fuel used for heating was not associated with any form of opacity. Conclusions This study provides support for associations of biomass and kerosene cookstoves with nuclear opacity and change in nuclear color. The novel associations with kerosene cookstove use deserve further investigation

  1. Second Line of Defense Master Spares Catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Dale L.; Muller, George; Mercier, Theresa M.; Brigantic, Robert T.; Perkins, Casey J.; Cooley, Scott K.

    2012-11-20

    This catalog is intended to be a comprehensive listing of repair parts, components, kits, and consumable items used on the equipment deployed at SLD sites worldwide. The catalog covers detection, CAS, network, ancillary equipment, and tools. The catalog is backed by a Master Parts Database which is used to generate the standard report views of the catalog. The master parts database is a relational database containing a record for every part in the master parts catalog along with supporting tables for normalizing fields in the records. The database also includes supporting queries, database maintenance forms, and reports.

  2. Catalog card production with a programmable terminal.

    PubMed

    McTigue, E; Robinson, M E; Saver, B; Schultz, C K

    1977-01-01

    Application of a programmable terminal and printer to the cataloging task of a small medical library is described. The application is independent of a computer; the terminal is used in "local" mode only. Full sets of catalog cards are produced, following a single typing of descriptive cataloging data and tracings. Books can be cataloged the same day they are received. Actual cost per book is just over a dollar, for equipment rental, card stock, and the cataloger's time at the console, after call number, tracings, and main entry for the book have been determined. PMID:831883

  3. Validating solar and solar-like star opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pennec, Maëlle; TURCK-CHIEZE, Sylvaine; RIBEYRE, Xavier; DUCRET, Jean-Eric; BLANCARD, Christophe; COSSE, Philippe; MONDET, Guillaume; FAUSSURIER, Gérald

    2015-08-01

    The Sun is, as being our closest star, a privilege place to test and validate physics. However, the solar physics is not yet completely understood. Indeed, since the recent update of the solar composition, there are differences between solar models and seismic data, visible on the solar sound speed profile comparison. This well established large discrepancy (Turck-Chièze et al. 2001, 2004, 2011, Christensen-Dalsgaard et al. 2009, Basu et al. 2015) could be linked to radiative transfer issue.Two directions of investigation are proposed. One possibility to explain this gap could be that the Sun produces slightly more energy that it liberates on its surface (around 5%). This energy could be transformed into macroscopic motions in the radiative zone, which are not taken into account in the solar standard model. Another explanation could be that the calculations of energy transport are not correctly taken into account either on the calculation of the Rosseland mean values or in the treatment of the radiative acceleration. This could have an impact on the determination of the internal solar abundances.Unfortunately, there are very few experiments to validate these calculations (Bailey et al. 2014). That's why we are proposing an opacity experiment on a high-energy laser like LMJ, in the conditions of the radiative zone (T=[2 - 15.106 K] and ρ=[0.2 - 150 g/cm3]). The aim is to measure the opacity of the most important contributors to the global opacity in this solar area : iron, oxygen and silicon. We are exploiting in that purpose a technical approach called the Double Ablation Front. During the laser-plasma interaction, the plasma radiative effects allow to reach these high temperatures and densities at LTE and validate or not plasma effects and line widths. We will show the principle of this technique and the results of our simulations on several elements.In the mean time, we are also exploiting new opacity calculations thanks to the OPAS code (Blancard et al. 2012

  4. Automated Cataloging. SPEC Kit 47.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC. Office of Management Studies.

    Results of a 1978 Association of Research Libraries (ARL) survey indicated that 68 (89%) of responding libraries utilized an automated cataloging system. Of those 68, 53 participated in the Ohio College Library Center (OCLC), five in BALLOTS, and the rest in other networks or local systems. At the beginning of this collection, a concise summary…

  5. Greenbook Abstract and Catalog--1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coole, Walter A.; Reitan, Henry M.

    This catalog is intended to be issued periodically as a means of extending and updating teaching materials which have been previously published through ERIC by these authors. The materials include the Alpha and Gamma levels of the "Greenbook System," pre-professional and entry in-service professional levels of an integrated sequence of five…

  6. Viking orbiter stereo imaging catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blasius, K. R.; Vertrone, A. V.; Lewis, B. H.; Martin, M. D.

    1982-01-01

    The extremely long mission of the two Viking Orbiter spacecraft produced a wealth of photos of surface features. Many of these photos can be used to form stereo images allowing the student of Mars to examine a subject in three dimensional. This catalog is a technical guide to the use of stereo coverage within the complex Viking imaging data set.

  7. Online Catalogs: Issues and Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bausser, Jaye

    This document explores the various issues and concerns related to the development of online systems in libraries and, in particular, online catalogs. Following a preface, foreword, and introduction, chapters are devoted to each of the following topics: (l) providing for special interests including the disabled; (2) authority control; (3) subject…

  8. Catalog of Viking mission data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vostreys, R. W. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    This catalog announces the present/expected availability of scientific data acquired by the Viking missions and contains descriptions of the Viking spacecraft, experiments, and data sets. An index is included listing the team leaders and team members for the experiments. Information on NSSDC facilities and ordering procedures, and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are included in the appendices.

  9. DISPERSION ANALYSIS OF RADIATION/THERMAL FRONTS WITH FULL RESOLVED SPECTRAL OPACITY VARIATION.

    SciTech Connect

    L. AUER; R. LOWRIE

    2000-12-01

    The radiation transport and linearized thermal energy equations have been analyzed to find the temporal dependence of the component modes in a radiation/thermal front. The fully resolved spectral variation of the opacity as a function of energy, as well as the exact time and angular dependence, is treated in this work. As we are able to study arbitrarily complicated opacity spectra, we stress the importance of the new results as a check on the effect of using opacity averages.

  10. MICROBASE: An integrated paleontological database and image cataloging system

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, R.C. ); Goodman, D.K. ); Couvering, J.V. ); Ford, L.N. Jr. ); Albert, N.R. )

    1991-08-01

    MICROBASE (MICROpaleontology dataBASE) is an integrated database and image retrieval system designed to increase the efficiency with which paleontologists access paleontological and biostratigraphic data. The project is funded by a consortium of oil companies and coordinated by the American Association of Stratigraphic Palynologists. MICROBASE is a PC-based MS DOS-compatible system operating under Microsoft Windows 3.0 that takes advantage of the latest developments in both analog (video) and digital technology. Images are captured using a video camera mounted on a microscope, or with high-resolution scanner for photographic source material. The image is saved either as digital file or as an analog frame on a Panasonic optical disk recorded (OMDR). The OMDR can store 108,000 images on the 12-in. disk with a retrieval and display time of less than 0.7 s. Microfossil data (nomenclature, synonymy, descriptions, stratigraphic distribution etc.) are stored as relational tables in an ORACLE DBMS (PALeontological CATalog, or PALCAT). These textural data are linked to multiple images for each taxon. MICROBASE is the first integrated and widely-supported system to electronically archive paleontological data, regardless of fossil group. It provides rapid, easy to access to paleontological data, resulting in standardized taxonomy, more efficient identification procedures, substantially reduced learning curves for persons unfamiliar with particular groups, and more effective retention of the cumulative expertise of experienced paleontologists. The Ellis and Messina Catalog of Foraminifera is the first paleontological catalog available on the MICROBASE system.

  11. Detailed Opacity Comparison for an Improved Stellar Modeling of the Envelopes of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turck-Chièze, S.; Le Pennec, M.; Ducret, J. E.; Colgan, J.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Fontes, C. J.; Magee, N.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    Seismic observations have led to doubts or ambiguities concerning the opacity calculations used in stellar physics. Here, we concentrate on the iron-group opacity peak, due to iron, nickel, and chromium, located around T = 200,000 K for densities from {10}-8 {to} {10}-4 {{g}} {{cm}}-3, which creates some convective layers in stellar radiative envelopes for masses between 3 and 18 {M}⊙ . These conditions were extensively studied in the 1980s. More recently, inconsistencies between OP and OPAL opacity calculations have complicated the interpretation of seismic observations as the iron-group opacity peak excites acoustic and gravity modes in SPB, β Cephei, and sdB stars. We investigate the reliability of the theoretical opacity calculations using the modern opacity codes ATOMIC and SCO-RCG. We show their temperature and density dependence for conditions that are achievable in the laboratory and equivalent to astrophysical conditions. We also compare new theoretical opacity spectra with OP spectra and quantify how different approximations impact the Rosseland mean calculations.This detailed study estimates new ATOMIC and SCO-RCG Rosseland mean values for astrophysical conditions which we compare to OP values. Some puzzling questions are still under investigation for iron, but we find a strong increase in the Rosseland mean nickel opacity of a factor between 2 and 6 compared to OP. This appears to be due to the use of extrapolated atomic data for the Ni opacity within the OP calculations. A study on chromium is also shown.

  12. Detailed Opacity Comparison for an Improved Stellar Modeling of the Envelopes of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turck-Chièze, S.; Le Pennec, M.; Ducret, J. E.; Colgan, J.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Fontes, C. J.; Magee, N.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    Seismic observations have led to doubts or ambiguities concerning the opacity calculations used in stellar physics. Here, we concentrate on the iron-group opacity peak, due to iron, nickel, and chromium, located around T = 200,000 K for densities from {10}-8 {to} {10}-4 {{g}} {{cm}}-3, which creates some convective layers in stellar radiative envelopes for masses between 3 and 18 {M}ȯ . These conditions were extensively studied in the 1980s. More recently, inconsistencies between OP and OPAL opacity calculations have complicated the interpretation of seismic observations as the iron-group opacity peak excites acoustic and gravity modes in SPB, β Cephei, and sdB stars. We investigate the reliability of the theoretical opacity calculations using the modern opacity codes ATOMIC and SCO-RCG. We show their temperature and density dependence for conditions that are achievable in the laboratory and equivalent to astrophysical conditions. We also compare new theoretical opacity spectra with OP spectra and quantify how different approximations impact the Rosseland mean calculations.This detailed study estimates new ATOMIC and SCO-RCG Rosseland mean values for astrophysical conditions which we compare to OP values. Some puzzling questions are still under investigation for iron, but we find a strong increase in the Rosseland mean nickel opacity of a factor between 2 and 6 compared to OP. This appears to be due to the use of extrapolated atomic data for the Ni opacity within the OP calculations. A study on chromium is also shown.

  13. Additional atmospheric opacity measurements at lambda = 1.1 mm from Mauna Kea Observatory, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, A.; De Zafra, R. L.; Barrett, J. W.; Solomon, P.; Connor, B.

    1987-01-01

    Atmospheric opacity values in the zenith direction are given for a wavelength of 1.1 mm (278 GHz) at the summit of Mauna Kea in the Hawaiian Islands. A total of 75 days is covered during the period 1983-1986. Observations were made on a quasi-continuous basis, with opacity measured every 20 minutes around the clock for significant periods of time. A conversion from opacity at lambda = 1.1 mm to the equivalent precipitable water vapor column is given from the measurements of Zammit and Ade (1981), from which opacities at other wavelengths may be derived.

  14. Wider pulsation instability regions for β Cephei and SPB stars calculated using new Los Alamos opacities

    DOE PAGES

    Walczak, Przemysław; Fontes, Christopher John; Colgan, James Patrick; Kilcrease, David Parker; Guzik, Joyce Ann

    2015-08-13

    Here, our goal is to test the newly developed OPLIB opacity tables from Los Alamos National Laboratory and check their influence on the pulsation properties of B-type stars. We calculated models using MESA and Dziembowski codes for stellar evolution and linear, nonadiabatic pulsations, respectively. We derived the instability domains of β Cephei and SPB-types for different opacity tables OPLIB, OP, and OPAL. As a result, the new OPLIB opacities have the highest Rosseland mean opacity coefficient near the so-called Z-bump. Therefore, the OPLIB instability domains are wider than in the case of OP and OPAL data.

  15. Galex Catalog And Atlas Of Our Local Group Of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madore, Barry

    The NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) mission contains the most comprehensive collection of ultraviolet imaging of Local Group galaxies likely to exist for decades. Unfortunately, this impressive resource will be under-utilized because the standard GALEX pipeline and source catalogs are not designed to properly measure point sources in crowded fields. We propose to solve this problem and unlock this great wealth of data obtained by NASA by constructing the GALEX Catalog and Atlas of Our Local Group Galaxies which shall include 49 GALEX observed Local Group members within 1.5 Mpc including the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds in their entirety. The PSF- fitting photometry method has already been tested and increases the number of detected point sources by 300% over the standard GALEX pipeline. Our catalogs will provide approximately 5-6 million point source measurements. We have also developed a novel method for producing wide field background-balanced mosaics of GALEX data. This has already been implemented for the Magellanic Clouds and the method will be applied to the other largest Local Group Members (M31 and M33). The Atlas images we produce will combine imaging data from all GALEX surveys to achieve maximum depth. Quality assurance of the images and catalogs will be done by the proposers in the course of undertaking a number of science-driven projects that require cross-matching the ultraviolet point sources of the Magellanic Clouds to similar resolution optical (MCPS) and infrared (SAGE) source catalogs. The Catalogs and Atlas (including the Magellanic Clouds cross-matched catalogs) will be made available to the astronomical community by providing them to the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST, the official GALEX archive) as a High Level Science Product as well as assimilated on an object-by- object basis into the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED) and thereby made immediately accessible in VO-compatible format. This program will enhance

  16. Light element opacities of astrophysical interest from ATOMIC

    SciTech Connect

    Colgan, J.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Magee, N. H. Jr.; Armstrong, G. S. J.; Abdallah, J. Jr.; Sherrill, M. E.; Fontes, C. J.; Zhang, H. L.; Hakel, P.

    2013-07-11

    We present new calculations of local-thermodynamic-equilibrium (LTE) light element opacities from the Los Alamos ATOMIC code for systems of astrophysical interest. ATOMIC is a multi-purpose code that can generate LTE or non-LTE quantities of interest at various levels of approximation. Our calculations, which include fine-structure detail, represent a systematic improvement over previous Los Alamos opacity calculations using the LEDCOP legacy code. The ATOMIC code uses ab-initio atomic structure data computed from the CATS code, which is based on Cowan's atomic structure codes, and photoionization cross section data computed from the Los Alamos ionization code GIPPER. ATOMIC also incorporates a new equation-of-state (EOS) model based on the chemical picture. ATOMIC incorporates some physics packages from LEDCOP and also includes additional physical processes, such as improved free-free cross sections and additional scattering mechanisms. Our new calculations are made for elements of astrophysical interest and for a wide range of temperatures and densities.

  17. New dust opacity mapping from Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, T. Z.; Richardson, M. I.

    1993-06-01

    Global dust opacity mapping for Mars has been carried forward using the approach described by Martin (1986) for Viking IR Thermal Mapper data. New maps are presented for the period from the beginning of Viking observations, until Ls 210 deg in 1979 (1.36 Mars years). This range includes the second and more extensive planet-encircling dust storm observed by Viking, known as storm 1977b. Improvements in approach result in greater time resolution and smaller noise than in the earlier work. A strong local storm event filled the Hellas basin at Ls 170 deg, prior to the 1977a storm. Dust is retained in equatorial regions following the 1977b storm far longer than in mid-latitudes. Minor dust events appear to raise the opacity in northern high latitudes during northern spring. Additional mapping with high time resolution has been done for the periods of time near the major storm origins in order to search for clues to the mechanism of storm initiation. The first evidence of the start of the 1977b storm is pushed back to Ls 274.2 deg, preceding signs of the storm in images by about 15 hours.

  18. Light element opacities of astrophysical interest from ATOMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgan, J.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Magee, N. H., Jr.; Armstrong, G. S. J.; Abdallah, J., Jr.; Sherrill, M. E.; Fontes, C. J.; Zhang, H. L.; Hakel, P.

    2013-07-01

    We present new calculations of local-thermodynamic-equilibrium (LTE) light element opacities from the Los Alamos ATOMIC code [1] for systems of astrophysical interest. ATOMIC is a multi-purpose code that can generate LTE or non-LTE quantities of interest at various levels of approximation. Our calculations, which include fine-structure detail, represent a systematic improvement over previous Los Alamos opacity calculations using the LEDCOP legacy code [2]. The ATOMIC code uses ab-initio atomic structure data computed from the CATS code, which is based on Cowan's atomic structure codes [3], and photoionization cross section data computed from the Los Alamos ionization code GIPPER [4]. ATOMIC also incorporates a new equation-of-state (EOS) model based on the chemical picture [5]. ATOMIC incorporates some physics packages from LEDCOP and also includes additional physical processes, such as improved free-free cross sections and additional scattering mechanisms. Our new calculations are made for elements of astrophysical interest and for a wide range of temperatures and densities.

  19. Expanded Subject Access to Reference Collection Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mischo, William H.

    1979-01-01

    Reports a computer assisted index emphasizing expanded subject access to the reference collection of the Iowa State University Library. The index displays abbreviated length records and complements existing catalogs. Limitations of subject access and a system for assigning subject descriptors are discussed. (Author/RAA)

  20. Access to Resources: The International Dimension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Line, Maurice B.

    1986-01-01

    Notes four Ages of Access to published knowledge--Individual, Local, National, and International--and considers impact of computers and electronic technology. Speed of access, automatic catalogs, digital text storage and transmission, need for observance of common standards and procedures, international cooperation, and worldwide system of…

  1. The Chandra Fornax Survey. II. The Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Karen; Zurek, D.; Scharf, C.

    2010-01-01

    The Fornax cluster of galaxies lies in the southern hemisphere and is second only to the richer and more well-studied Virgo cluster in its accessibility for high resolution multi-wavelength data collection. A deep \\emph{Chandra} survey of the inner one degree of this cluster was performed in 2003, with first results published in 2005 identifying 771 X-ray point sources. We present a catalog of these X-ray point sources. Possible and likely optical candidates were identified from ground-based, HST and GALEX images. This catalog will facilitate future investigations by enhancing our understanding of a cluster's fainter and smaller objects, calibrating distance rulers, and constraining cosmological models. This work was conducted by a Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) position at the American Museum of Natural History and funded by the NSF.

  2. Variable Stars from the MG-1 Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flurchick, K. M.; Griego, Ben; Culver, Roger B.

    2014-06-01

    This work describes the recent efforts at North Carolina A&T(NCAT) mining the MG catalogs for variable stars. NCAT is a node in both the GNAT network and the SKYNET collaboration which forms the basis of the collaboration including access to instruments. The initial data analysis to obtain the light curves (LC) for MG-1 has been performed and a number of candidate variable stars have been identified including brown dwarf stars, eclipsing binaries and long period variable stars.Many of the identified candidate variable stars are now the subject of coordinated multi-site follow-on observations to elucidate the details of the variability. The coordinated observing includes researchers in Australia, Arizona, Colorado and North Carolina. As a node in both the GNAT network and the SKYNET collaboration NCAT has access to a number of instruments. Much of the observational work is performed using the SKYNET node in Chile.For the North Carolina work reported here, the observational work and initial LC generation is performed using telescopes and applications from the SKYNET program. In this work the instrumentation, the LC analysis and status of the coordinated follow-on observations arepresented.

  3. The Chandra Source Catalog: Processing and Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Janet; Evans, Ian N.; Glotfelty, Kenny J.; Hain, Roger; Hall, Diane M.; Miller, Joseph B.; Plummer, David A.; Zografou, Panagoula; Primini, Francis A.; Anderson, Craig S.; Bonaventura, Nina R.; Chen, Judy C.; Davis, John E.; Doe, Stephen M.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Galle, Elizabeth C.; Gibbs, Danny G., II; Grier, John D.; Harbo, Peter N.; He, Xiang Qun (Helen); Houck, John C.; Karovska, Margarita; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Lauer, Jennifer; McCollough, Michael L.; McDowell, Jonathan C.; Mitschang, Arik W.; Morgan, Douglas L.; Mossman, Amy E.; Nichols, Joy S.; Nowak, Michael A.; Refsdal, Brian L.; Rots, Arnold H.; Siemiginowska, Aneta L.; Sundheim, Beth A.; Tibbetts, Michael S.; van Stone, David W.; Winkelman, Sherry L.

    2009-09-01

    Chandra Source Catalog processing recalibrates each observation using the latest available calibration data, and employs a wavelet-based source detection algorithm to identify all the X-ray sources in the field of view. Source properties are then extracted from each detected source that is a candidate for inclusion in the catalog. Catalog processing is completed by matching sources across multiple observations, merging common detections, and applying quality assurance checks. The Chandra Source Catalog processing system shares a common processing infrastructure and utilizes much of the functionality that is built into the Standard Data Processing (SDP) pipeline system that provides calibrated Chandra data to end-users. Other key components of the catalog processing system have been assembled from the portable CIAO data analysis package. Minimal new software tool development has been required to support the science algorithms needed for catalog production. Since processing pipelines must be instantiated for each detected source, the number of pipelines that are run during catalog construction is a factor of order 100 times larger than for SDP. The increased computational load, and inherent parallel nature of the processing, is handled by distributing the workload across a multi-node Beowulf cluster. Modifications to the SDP automated processing application to support catalog processing, and extensions to Chandra Data Archive software to ingest and retrieve catalog products, complete the upgrades to the infrastructure to support catalog processing.

  4. Evaluation of the efficiency and accuracy of new methods for atmospheric opacity and radiative transfer calculations in planetary general circulation model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zube, Nicholas Gerard; Zhang, Xi; Natraj, Vijay

    2016-10-01

    General circulation models often incorporate simple approximations of heating between vertically inhomogeneous layers rather than more accurate but computationally expensive radiative transfer (RT) methods. With the goal of developing a GCM package that can model both solar system bodies and exoplanets, it is vital to examine up-to-date RT models to optimize speed and accuracy for heat transfer calculations. Here, we examine a variety of interchangeable radiative transfer models in conjunction with MITGCM (Hill and Marshall, 1995). First, for atmospheric opacity calculations, we test gray approximation, line-by-line, and correlated-k methods. In combination with these, we also test RT routines using 2-stream DISORT (discrete ordinates RT), N-stream DISORT (Stamnes et al., 1988), and optimized 2-stream (Spurr and Natraj, 2011). Initial tests are run using Jupiter as an example case. The results can be compared in nine possible configurations for running a complete RT routine within a GCM. Each individual combination of opacity and RT methods is contrasted with the "ground truth" calculation provided by the line-by-line opacity and N-stream DISORT, in terms of computation speed and accuracy of the approximation methods. We also examine the effects on accuracy when performing these calculations at different time step frequencies within MITGCM. Ultimately, we will catalog and present the ideal RT routines that can replace commonly used approximations within a GCM for a significant increase in calculation accuracy, and speed comparable to the dynamical time steps of MITGCM. Future work will involve examining whether calculations in the spatial domain can also be reduced by smearing grid points into larger areas, and what effects this will have on overall accuracy.

  5. The Chandra Source Catalog: Processing and Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Janet; Evans, I. N.; Glotfelty, K. J.; Hain, R.; Hall, D. M.; Miller, J. B.; Plummer, D. A.; Zografou, P.

    2009-01-01

    Chandra Source Catalog processing recalibrates each observation using the latest available calibration data, and employs a wavelet-based source detection algorithm to identify all the X-ray sources in the field of view. Source properties are then extracted from each detected source that is a candidate for inclusion in the catalog. Catalog processing is completed by matching sources across multiple observations, merging common detections, and applying quality assurance checks. The Chandra Source Catalog processing system shares a common processing infrastructure and utilizes much of the functionality that is built into the Standard Data Processing (SDP) pipeline system that provides calibrated Chandra data to end-users. Other key components of the catalog processing system have been assembled from the portable CIAO data analysis package. Minimal new software tool development has been required to support the science algorithms needed for catalog production. Since processing pipelines must be instantiated for each detected source, the number of pipelines that are run during catalog construction is a factor of order 100 times larger than for SDP. The increased computational load, and inherent parallel nature of the processing, is handled by distributing the workload across a multi-node Beowulf cluster. Modifications to the SDP automated processing application to support catalog processing, and extensions to Chandra Data Archive software to ingest and retrieve catalog products, complete the upgrades to the infrastructure to support catalog processing. The end product is a catalog of Chandra sources, associated catalog user interfaces, and forthcoming data analysis tools, that will allow users to query the catalog, retrieve relevant data, and perform interactive scientific analysis on those results. This work is supported by NASA contract NAS8-03060 (CXC).

  6. Standard Cataloging for School and Public Libraries. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intner, Sheila S.; Weihs, Jean

    Introducing cataloging students, beginning catalogers, copy catalogers, and department administrators to the principles of cataloging, classification, and indexing, this revised text provides a simple, solid foundation for standard practices of cataloging and bibliographic control in the United States and Canada. The book reviews major…

  7. Catalog of databases and reports

    SciTech Connect

    Burtis, M.D.

    1997-04-01

    This catalog provides information about the many reports and materials made available by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Global Change Research Program (GCRP) and the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). The catalog is divided into nine sections plus the author and title indexes: Section A--US Department of Energy Global Change Research Program Research Plans and Summaries; Section B--US Department of Energy Global Change Research Program Technical Reports; Section C--US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Reports; Section D--Other US Department of Energy Reports; Section E--CDIAC Reports; Section F--CDIAC Numeric Data and Computer Model Distribution; Section G--Other Databases Distributed by CDIAC; Section H--US Department of Agriculture Reports on Response of Vegetation to Carbon Dioxide; and Section I--Other Publications.

  8. The NASA SBIR product catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilman, J. A.; Paige, J. B.; Schwenk, F. Carl

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this catalog is to assist small business firms in making the community aware of products emerging from their efforts in the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. It contains descriptions of some products that have advanced into Phase 3 and others that are identified as prospective products. Both lists of products in this catalog are based on information supplied by NASA SBIR contractors in responding to an invitation to be represented in this document. Generally, all products suggested by the small firms were included in order to meet the goals of information exchange for SBIR results. Of the 444 SBIR contractors NASA queried, 137 provided information on 219 products. The catalog presents the product information in the technology areas listed in the table of contents. Within each area, the products are listed in alphabetical order by product name and are given identifying numbers. Also included is an alphabetical listing of the companies that have products described. This listing cross-references the product list and provides information on the business activity of each firm. In addition, there are three indexes: one a list of firms by states, one that lists the products according to NASA Centers that managed the SBIR projects, and one that lists the products by the relevant Technical Topics utilized in NASA's annual program solicitation under which each SBIR project was selected.

  9. NASA SBIR product catalog, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This catalog is a partial list of products of NASA SBIR (Small Business Innovation Research) projects that have advanced to some degree into Phase 3. While most of the products evolved from work conducted during SBIR Phase 1 and 2, a few advanced to commercial status solely from Phase 1 activities. The catalog presents information provided to NASA by SBIR contractors who wished to have their products exhibited at Technology 2001, a NASA-sponsored technology transfer conference held in San Jose, California, on December 4, 5, and 6, 1991. The catalog presents the product information in the following technology areas: computer and communication systems; information processing and AI; robotics and automation; signal and image processing; microelectronics; electronic devices and equipment; microwave electronic devices; optical devices and lasers; advanced materials; materials processing; materials testing and NDE; materials instrumentation; aerodynamics and aircraft; fluid mechanics and measurement; heat transfer devices; refrigeration and cryogenics; energy conversion devices; oceanographic instruments; atmosphere monitoring devices; water management; life science instruments; and spacecraft electromechanical systems.

  10. Experimental investigation of opacity models for stellar interior, inertial fusion, and high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A.; Mancini, R. C.; Iglesias, C. A.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I. E.; Blancard, C.; Cosse, Ph.; Faussurier, G.

    2009-05-15

    Theoretical opacities are required for calculating energy transport in plasmas. In particular, understanding stellar interiors, inertial fusion, and Z pinches depends on the opacities of mid-atomic-number elements over a wide range of temperatures. The 150-300 eV temperature range is particularly interesting. The opacity models are complex and experimental validation is crucial. For example, solar models presently disagree with helioseismology and one possible explanation is inadequate theoretical opacities. Testing these opacities requires well-characterized plasmas at temperatures high enough to produce the ion charge states that exist in the sun. Typical opacity experiments heat a sample using x rays and measure the spectrally resolved transmission with a backlight. The difficulty grows as the temperature increases because the heating x-ray source must supply more energy and the backlight must be bright enough to overwhelm the plasma self-emission. These problems can be overcome with the new generation of high energy density (HED) facilities. For example, recent experiments at Sandia's Z facility [M. K. Matzen et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 055503 (2005)] measured the transmission of a mixed Mg and Fe plasma heated to 156{+-}6 eV. This capability will also advance opacity science for other HED plasmas. This tutorial reviews experimental methods for testing opacity models, including experiment design, transmission measurement methods, accuracy evaluation, and plasma diagnostics. The solar interior serves as a focal problem and Z facility experiments illustrate the techniques.

  11. The Epidemiology of Cosmetic Treatments for Corneal Opacities in a Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ki Cheol; Han, Young Keun; Wee, Won Ryang; Lee, Jin Hak

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To describe etiologies and clinical characteristics of corneal opacities leading patients to seek cosmetic treatments. Methods The medical records of 401 patients who presented for cosmetic improvement in corneal opacities between May 2004 and July 2007 were retrospectively reviewed. The following parameters were analyzed: age, gender, cause of corneal opacity, time course of the corneal disease, associated diseases, prior and current cosmetic treatments, visual acuity, location and depth of the corneal opacity, and the presence of either corneal neovascularization or band keratopathy. A single practitioner examined all patients. Results The most common causes of corneal opacity were ocular trauma (203 eyes, 50.6%), retinal disease (62 eyes, 15.5%), measles (38 eyes, 9.5%), and congenital etiologies (22 eyes, 5.5%). Prior treatments included iris colored contact lenses (125 eyes, 31.1%) and corneal tattooing (34 eyes, 8.46%). A total of 321 of 401 eyes underwent cosmetic treatment for corneal opacities. The most common treatment performed after the primary visit was corneal tattooing (261 eyes, 64.92%). Conclusions This is the first study to investigate the causes and clinical characteristics of patients presenting for cosmetic treatment of corneal opacities rather than for functional improvement. Various cosmetic interventions are available for patients with corneal opacities, and these should be individualized for the needs of each patient. PMID:20532140

  12. 40 CFR Figure 1 to Subpart Qqq of... - Data Summary Sheet for Determination of Average Opacity

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Data Summary Sheet for Determination of.... 63, Subpt. QQQ, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Subpart QQQ of Part 63—Data Summary Sheet for Determination of Average Opacity Clock time Number of converters blowing Converter aisle activity Average opacity for...

  13. Fac-Back-OPAC: An Open Source Interface to Your Library System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beccaria, Mike; Scott, Dan

    2007-01-01

    The new Fac-Back-OPAC (a faceted backup OPAC) is built on code that was originally developed by Casey Durfee in February 2007. It represents the convergence of two prominent trends in library tools: the decoupling of discovery tools from the traditional integrated library system (ILS) and the use of readily available open source components to…

  14. Web-Based OPACs in Indian Academic Libraries: A Functional Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapoor, Kanta; Goyal, O. P.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The paper seeks to provide a comparative analysis of the functionality of five web-based OPACs available in Indian academic libraries. Design/methodology/approach: Same-topic searches were carried out by three researchers on the web-based OPACs of Libsys, VTLS's iPortal, NewGenLib, Troodon, and Alice for Windows, implemented in five…

  15. Calculation of Transition Frequencies and Line Strengths of Water for Cool Star Opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S.; Tennyson, J.; Fernley, J.

    1992-03-01

    First principles calculations for water, using a number of electronic potential surfaces, are presented as a first step towards the computation of an accurate water opacity for cool stars such as M dwarfs. Key word : MOLECULAR PROCESSES - OPACITIES - STARS: ATMOSPHERES - STARS: LATE-TYPE - STARS: LOW-MASS

  16. 40 CFR 60.2255 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators? 60.2255 Section 60.2255 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY..., 2001 Air Curtain Incinerators § 60.2255 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators?...

  17. 40 CFR 60.2255 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators? 60.2255 Section 60.2255 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY..., 2001 Air Curtain Incinerators § 60.2255 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators?...

  18. 40 CFR 60.2865 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators? 60.2865 Section 60.2865 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Curtain Incinerators § 60.2865 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators? (a) Use Method...

  19. 40 CFR 60.2255 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators? 60.2255 Section 60.2255 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY..., 2001 Air Curtain Incinerators § 60.2255 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators?...

  20. 40 CFR 60.2865 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators? 60.2865 Section 60.2865 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Curtain Incinerators § 60.2865 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators? (a) Use Method...

  1. 40 CFR 60.2865 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators? 60.2865 Section 60.2865 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Curtain Incinerators § 60.2865 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators? (a) Use Method...

  2. An epidemiological study of lens opacities among steel workers

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, J.; Sweetnam, P. M.; Warner, C. G.; Graham, P. A.; Cochrane, A. L.

    1971-01-01

    Wallace, J., Sweetnam, P. M., Warner, C. G., Graham, P. A., and Cochrane, A. L. (1971).Brit. J. industr. Med.,28, 265-271. An epidemiological study of lens opacities among steel workers. To investigate the relationship between the prevalence of cataract and heat exposure, two groups of steel workers, differing widely in their heat exposure, were examined. Estimates of heat exposure were based on detailed industrial histories and (a) subjective estimates of heat exposure associated with various occupations and (b) actual measurements. Only two cases of cataract were found that would be generally accepted as `occupational' in origin, but a higher prevalence of the common form of cataract was found in the heat-exposed group than in the non-exposed group. PMID:5557847

  3. Galactic cold cores. VI. Dust opacity spectral index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juvela, M.; Demyk, K.; Doi, Y.; Hughes, A.; Lefèvre, C.; Marshall, D. J.; Meny, C.; Montillaud, J.; Pagani, L.; Paradis, D.; Ristorcelli, I.; Malinen, J.; Montier, L. A.; Paladini, R.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Rivera-Ingraham, A.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The Galactic Cold Cores project has carried out Herschel photometric observations of 116 fields where the Planck survey has found signs of cold dust emission. The fields contain sources in different environments and different phases of star formation. Previous studies have revealed variations in their dust submillimetre opacity. Aims: The aim is to measure the value of dust opacity spectral index and to understand its variations spatially and with respect to other parameters, such as temperature, column density, and Galactic location. Methods: The dust opacity spectral index β and the dust colour temperature T are derived using Herschel and Planck data. The relation between β and T is examined for the whole sample and inside individual fields. Results: Based on IRAS and Planck data, the fields are characterised by a median colour temperature of 16.1 K and a median opacity spectral index of β = 1.84. The values are not correlated with Galactic longitude. We observe a clear T-β anti-correlation. In Herschel observations, constrained at lower resolution by Planck data, the variations follow the column density structure and βFIR can rise to ~2.2 in individual clumps. The highest values are found in starless clumps. The Planck 217 GHz band shows a systematic excess that is not restricted to cold clumps and is thus consistent with a general flattening of the dust emission spectrum at millimetre wavelengths. When fitted separately below and above 700 μm, the median spectral index values are βFIR ~ 1.91 and β(mm) ~ 1.66. Conclusions: The spectral index changes as a function of column density and wavelength. The comparison of different data sets and the examination of possible error sources show that our results are robust. However, β variations are partly masked by temperature gradients and the changes in the intrinsic grain properties may be even greater. Planck http://www.esa.int/Planck is a project of the European Space Agency - ESA - with instruments

  4. Far infrared supplement: Catalog of infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, D. Y.; Schmitz, M.; Mead, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The Far Infrared Supplement: catalog of infrared observations summarizes all infrared astronomical observations at far infrared wavelengths published in the scientific literature between 1965 and 1982. The Supplement list contains 25% of the observations in the full catalog of infrared observations (C10), and essentially eliminates most visible stars from the listings. The Supplement is more compact than the main Catalog (it does not contain the bibliography and position index of the C10), and is intended for easy reference during astronomical observations.

  5. High temperature, high density opacity measurements using short pulse lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoarty, D. J.; James, S. F.; Brown, C. R. D.; Williams, B. M.; Guymer, T.; Hill, M.; Morton, J.; Chapman, D.; Shepherd, R.; Dunn, J.; Brown, G.; Schneider, M.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chung, H. K.; Harris, J. W. O.; Upcraft, L.; Smith, C. C.; Lee, R. W.

    2010-08-01

    Heating of thin foil targets by a high power laser at intensities of 1017 -1019W/cm2 has been studied as a method for producing high temperature, high density samples to investigate X-ray opacity and equation of state. The targets were plastic (parylene N) foils with a buried microdot of a sample material, which was either aluminium, germanium or a mixture of germanium and titanium mixture of germanium and titanium. L-shell and K-shell spectra were taken using crystal spectrometers recording onto film and an ultrafast X-ray streak camera coupled to a conical focussing crystal with a time resolution of 1ps. The conditions in the microdot were inferred by comparing the measured spectra to synthetic spectra produced by the time-dependent collisional-radiative (CR) models FLY and FLYCHK. The data were also compared to simulated spectra from a number of opacity codes assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). Temperature and density gradients were taken into account in the comparisons. The sample conditions, inferred from the CR modelling using FLYCHK, were 800±100eV and 1.5±0.5g/cc, in the germanium/titanium samples and 600+50/-150eV, 3-4g/cc in the pure germanium or aluminium samples. The higher densities were achieved by using a combination of long and short pulses to compress and heat the foils respectively. The experimental results and comparisons to predicted spectra are presented and discussed.

  6. Opacity Measurement and Theoretical Investigation of Hot Silicon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Gang; Yang, Jiamin; Zhang, Jiyan; Hu, Zhimin; Zhao, Yang; Qing, Bo; Yang, Guohong; Wei, Minxi; Yi, Rongqing; Song, Tianming; Li, Hang; Yuan, Zheng; Lv, Min; Meng, Xujun; Xu, Yan; Wu, Zeqing; Yan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We report on opacity measurements of a silicon (Si) plasma at a temperature of (72 ± 5) eV and a density of (6.0 ± 1.2) mg cm-3 in the photon energy range of 1790-1880 eV. A 23 μg cm-2 Si foil tamped by 50 μg cm-2 CH layers on each side was heated to a hot-dense plasma state by X-ray radiation emitted from a D-shaped gold cavity that was irradiated by intense lasers. Absorption lines of 1s - 2p transitions of Si xiii to Si ix ions have been measured using point-projection spectroscopy. The transmission spectrum of the silicon plasma was determined by comparing the light passing through the plasma to the light from the same shot passing by the plasma. The density of the Si plasma was determined experimentally by side-on radiography and the temperature was estimated from the radiation flux data. Radiative hydrodynamic simulations were performed to obtain the temporal evolutions of the density and temperature of the Si plasma. The experimentally obtained transmission spectra of the Si sample plasma have been reproduced using a detailed term account model with the local thermodynamic equilibrium approximation. The energy levels, oscillator strengths and photoionization cross-sections used in the calculation were generated by the flexible atomic code. The experimental transmission spectrum was compared with the theoretical calculation and good agreement was found. The present experimental spectrum and theoretical calculation were also compared with the new opacities available in the Los Alamos OPLIB database.

  7. Weapon container catalog. Volumes 1 & 2

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.A.; Higuera, M.C.

    1998-02-01

    The Weapon Container Catalog describes H-gear (shipping and storage containers, bomb hand trucks and the ancillary equipment required for loading) used for weapon programs and for special use containers. When completed, the catalog will contain five volumes. Volume 1 for enduring stockpile programs (B53, B61, B83, W62, W76, W78, W80, W84, W87, and W88) and Volume 2, Special Use Containers, are being released. The catalog is intended as a source of information for weapon program engineers and also provides historical information. The catalog also will be published on the SNL Internal Web and will undergo periodic updates.

  8. Science Fare: An Illustrated Guide and Catalog of Toys, Books, and Activities for Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saul, Wendy; Newman, Alan R.

    This book addresses some of the methods by which science can be made accessible to children, both in school and non-school settings. It contains information on effective science education for elementary school age children, and includes a catalog of books and other materials. Topics discussed in the book include: (1) planning; (2) approaches to…

  9. Selection and Cataloging of Adult Pornography Web Sites for Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilevko, Juris; Gottlieb, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    Pornography has become part of mainstream culture. As such, it has become a subject of academic research, and this, in turn, has implications for university libraries. Focusing on adult Internet pornography, this study suggests that academic libraries should provide access to adult pornographic Web sites by including them in their online catalogs.

  10. Cataloging, Processing, Administering AV Materials. A Model for Wisconsin Schools. Revised, 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Robert David, Ed.; And Others

    The Wisconsin Association of School Librarians has produced a manual for standardized processing of all nonprint media, based on two principles: (1) the media should be centralized, organized, and administered for maximum access; and (2) content is more important than form. Definitions, cataloging, processing, housing, circulation, and care are…

  11. Estimating the Number of PAC Terminals and Workstations for Library Online Catalogs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machovec, George S.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses factors to consider when estimating the number of public access terminals (PACs) or workstations needed in public and academic libraries for online catalogs, including building size and layout, physical facilities, resources available through the system, peripheral equipment, graphical user interfaces, remote users, system capacity, and…

  12. A Comparative Evaluation of the Technical Performance and User Acceptance of Two Prototype Online Catalog Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Elliot R.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes research strategy and methods of comparative evaluation conducted by the National Library of Medicine to assess user acceptance and technical performance of two prototype patron accessible online catalog systems within same operational environment. User acceptance studies included sample search experiment, comparison search experiment,…

  13. The Modeling and Simulation Catalog for Discovery, Knowledge and Reuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, George F. III; Greenberg, Brandi; Daehler-Wilking, Richard; Hunt, Steven

    2011-01-01

    The DoD M&S Steering Committee has noted that the current DoD and Service's modeling and simulation resource repository (MSRR) services are not up-to-date limiting their value to the using communities. However, M&S leaders and managers also determined that the Department needs a functional M&S registry card catalog to facilitate M&S tool and data visibility to support M&S activities across the DoD. The M&S Catalog will discover and access M&S metadata maintained at nodes distributed across DoD networks in a centrally managed, decentralized process that employs metadata collection and management. The intent is to link information stores, precluding redundant location updating. The M&S Catalog uses a standard metadata schemas based on the DoD's Net-Centric Data Strategy Community of Interest metadata specification. The Air Force, Navy and OSD (CAPE) have provided initial information to participating DoD nodes, but plans on the horizon are being made to bring in hundreds of source providers.

  14. USGS Science Data Catalog - Open Data Advances or Declines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frame, M. T.; Hutchison, V.; Zolly, L.; Wheeler, B.; Latysh, N.; Devarakonda, R.; Palanisamy, G.; Shrestha, B.

    2014-12-01

    The recent Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) White House Open Data Policies (2013) have required Federal agencies to establish formal catalogues of their science data holdings and make these data easily available on Web sites, portals, and applications. As an organization, the USGS has historically excelled at making its data holdings freely available on its various Web sites (i.e., National, Scientific Programs, or local Science Center). In response to these requirements, the USGS Core Science Analytics, Synthesis, and Libraries program, in collaboration with DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Mercury Consortium (funded by NASA, USGS, and DOE), and a number of other USGS organizations, established the Science Data Catalog (http://data.usgs.gov) cyberinfrastructure, content management processes/tools, and supporting policies. The USGS Science Data Catalog led the charge at USGS to improve the robustness of existing/future metadata collections; streamline and develop sustainable publishing to external aggregators (i.e., data.gov); and provide leadership to the U.S. Department of Interior in emerging Open Data policies, techniques, and systems. The session will discuss the current successes, challenges, and movement toward meeting these Open Data policies for USGS scientific data holdings. A retrospective look at the last year of implementation of these efforts within USGS will occur to determine whether these Open Data Policies are improving data access or limiting data availability. To learn more about the USGS Science Data Catalog, visit us at http://data.usgs.gov/info/about.html

  15. Collections and Services for the Spanish-Speaking: Accessibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marquis, Solina Kasten

    2003-01-01

    Discusses making public library collections accessible to Spanish-speaking users and describes the consequences that can result from inattention to linguistic and cultural accessibility. Topics include cataloging issues and solutions; labeling; shelving; signage; electronic access; Spanish language training for staff; intercultural communication;…

  16. 41 CFR 101-30.301 - Types of items to be cataloged.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CATALOG SYSTEM 30.3-Cataloging Items of Supply § 101-30.301 Types of items to be cataloged. Items of..., identified, classified, and numbered (cataloged) in the Federal Catalog System. Other locally purchased...

  17. 41 CFR 101-30.301 - Types of items to be cataloged.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CATALOG SYSTEM 30.3-Cataloging Items of Supply § 101-30.301 Types of items to be cataloged. Items of..., identified, classified, and numbered (cataloged) in the Federal Catalog System. Other locally purchased...

  18. 41 CFR 101-30.301 - Types of items to be cataloged.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CATALOG SYSTEM 30.3-Cataloging Items of Supply § 101-30.301 Types of items to be cataloged. Items of..., identified, classified, and numbered (cataloged) in the Federal Catalog System. Other locally purchased...

  19. 41 CFR 101-30.301 - Types of items to be cataloged.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CATALOG SYSTEM 30.3-Cataloging Items of Supply § 101-30.301 Types of items to be cataloged. Items of..., identified, classified, and numbered (cataloged) in the Federal Catalog System. Other locally purchased...

  20. 41 CFR 101-30.301 - Types of items to be cataloged.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CATALOG SYSTEM 30.3-Cataloging Items of Supply § 101-30.301 Types of items to be cataloged. Items of..., identified, classified, and numbered (cataloged) in the Federal Catalog System. Other locally purchased...

  1. WIFIRE Data Model and Catalog for Wildfire Data and Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altintas, I.; Crawl, D.; Cowart, C.; Gupta, A.; Block, J.; de Callafon, R.

    2014-12-01

    The WIFIRE project (wifire.ucsd.edu) is building an end-to-end cyberinfrastructure for real-time and data-driven simulation, prediction and visualization of wildfire behavior. WIFIRE may be used by wildfire management authorities in the future to predict wildfire rate of spread and direction, and assess the effectiveness of high-density sensor networks in improving fire and weather predictions. WIFIRE has created a data model for wildfire resources including sensed and archived data, sensors, satellites, cameras, modeling tools, workflows and social information including Twitter feeds. This data model and associated wildfire resource catalog includes a detailed description of the HPWREN sensor network, SDG&E's Mesonet, and NASA MODIS. In addition, the WIFIRE data-model describes how to integrate the data from multiple heterogeneous sources to provide detailed fire-related information. The data catalog describes 'Observables' captured by each instrument using multiple ontologies including OGC SensorML and NASA SWEET. Observables include measurements such as wind speed, air temperature, and relative humidity, as well as their accuracy and resolution. We have implemented a REST service for publishing to and querying from the catalog using Web Application Description Language (WADL). We are creating web-based user interfaces and mobile device Apps that use the REST interface for dissemination to wildfire modeling community and project partners covering academic, private, and government laboratories while generating value to emergency officials and the general public. Additionally, the Kepler scientific workflow system is instrumented to interact with this data catalog to access real-time streaming and archived wildfire data and stream it into dynamic data-driven wildfire models at scale.

  2. THE EXTENDED VIRGO CLUSTER CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Suk; Rey, Soo-Chang; Lee, Youngdae; Chung, Jiwon; Pak, Mina; Yi, Wonhyeong; Lee, Woong; Jerjen, Helmut; Lisker, Thorsten; Sung, Eon-Chang

    2015-01-01

    We present a new catalog of galaxies in the wider region of the Virgo cluster, based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog (EVCC) covers an area of 725 deg{sup 2} or 60.1 Mpc{sup 2}. It is 5.2 times larger than the footprint of the classical Virgo Cluster Catalog (VCC) and reaches out to 3.5 times the virial radius of the Virgo cluster. We selected 1324 spectroscopically targeted galaxies with radial velocities less than 3000 km s{sup –1}. In addition, 265 galaxies that have been overlooked in the SDSS spectroscopic survey but have available redshifts in the NASA Extragalactic Database are also included. Our selection process secured a total of 1589 galaxies, 676 of which are not included in the VCC. The certain and possible cluster members are defined by means of redshift comparison with a cluster infall model. We employed two independent and complementary galaxy classification schemes: the traditional morphological classification based on the visual inspection of optical images and a characterization of galaxies from their spectroscopic features. SDSS u, g, r, i, and z passband photometry of all EVCC galaxies was performed using Source Extractor. We compare the EVCC galaxies with the VCC in terms of morphology, spatial distribution, and luminosity function. The EVCC defines a comprehensive galaxy sample covering a wider range in galaxy density that is significantly different from the inner region of the Virgo cluster. It will be the foundation for forthcoming galaxy evolution studies in the extended Virgo cluster region, complementing ongoing and planned Virgo cluster surveys at various wavelengths.

  3. Ultraviolet light exposure and lens opacities: the Beaver Dam Eye Study.

    PubMed Central

    Cruickshanks, K J; Klein, B E; Klein, R

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Exposure to sunlight may be a risk factor for the development of cataract. The relationships between exposure to sunlight and to the ultraviolet-B (UVB) component of light and the prevalence of lens opacities were examined in the Beaver Dam Eye Study. METHODS. Persons 43 to 84 years of age residing in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, were examined using standardized photographic assessments of lens opacities. A questionnaire about medical history and exposure to light was administered. RESULTS. After adjusting for other risk factors, men who had higher levels of average annual ambient UVB light were 1.36 times more likely to have more severe cortical opacities than men with lower levels. However, UVB exposure was not found to be associated with nuclear sclerosis or posterior subcapsular opacities in men. Moreover, no associations with UVB exposure were found for women, who were less likely to be exposed to UVB. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to UVB light may be associated with the severity of cortical opacities in men. However, the lack of an association in women, the group more likely to have cortical opacities, suggests that other factors may be more important in the pathogenesis of lens opacities. PMID:1456342

  4. The statistical properties of stars and their dependence on metallicity: the effects of opacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bate, Matthew R.

    2014-07-01

    We report the statistical properties of stars and brown dwarfs obtained from four radiation hydrodynamical simulations of star cluster formation that resolve masses down to the opacity limit for fragmentation. The calculations are identical except for their dust and gas opacities. Assuming dust opacity is proportional to metallicity, the calculations span a range of metallicities from 1/100 to 3 times solar, although we emphasize that changing the metallicity has other thermodynamic effects that the calculations do not capture (e.g. on the thermal coupling between gas and dust). All four calculations produce stellar populations whose statistical properties are difficult to distinguish from observed stellar systems, and we find no significant dependence of stellar properties on opacity. The mass functions and properties of multiple stellar systems are consistent with each other. However, we find that protostellar mergers are more common with lower opacities. Combining the results from the three calculations with the highest opacities, we obtain a stellar population consisting of more than 500 stars and brown dwarfs. Many of the statistical properties of this population are in good agreement with those observed in our Galaxy, implying that gravity, hydrodynamics, and radiative feedback may be the primary ingredients for determining the statistical properties of low-mass stars. However, we do find indications that the calculations may be slightly too dissipative. Although further calculations will be required to understand all of the effects of metallicity on stellar properties, we conclude that stellar properties are surprisingly resilient to variations of the dust and gas opacities.

  5. Detailed investigations on radiative opacity and emissivity of tin plasmas in the extreme-ultraviolet region.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jiaolong; Gao, Cheng; Yuan, Jianmin

    2010-08-01

    Radiative opacity and emissivity of tin plasmas at average ionization degree of about 10 was investigated in detail by using a fully relativistic detailed level accounting approach, in which main physical effects on the opacity were carefully taken into account. Among these physical effects, configuration interaction, in particular core-valence electron correlations, plays an important role on the determination of accurate atomic data required in the calculation of opacity. It results in a strong narrowing of lines from all transition arrays and strong absorption is located in a narrow wavelength region of 12.5-14 nm for Sn plasmas. Using a complete accurate atomic data, we investigated the opacity of Sn plasmas at a variety of physical condition. Among the respective ions of Xe6+-Xe15+ , Xe10+ has the largest absorption cross section at 13.5 nm, while the favorable physical condition for maximal absorption at 13.5 nm do not mean that Xe10+ has the largest fraction. Comparison with other theoretical results showed that a complete set of consistent accurate atomic data, which lacks very much, is essential to predict accurate opacity. Our atomic model is useful and can be applied to interpret opacity experiments. Further benchmark experiments are urgently needed to clarify the physical effects on the opacity of Sn plasmas.

  6. The impact of enhanced iron opacity on massive star pulsations: updated instability strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravveji, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, Bailey et al. made a direct measurement of the iron opacity at the physical conditions of the solar tachocline. They found that the wavelength-integrated iron opacity is roughly 75 per cent higher than what the Opacity Project (OP) and OPAL models predict. Here, we compute new opacity tables with enhanced iron and nickel contributions to the Rosseland mean opacity by 75 per cent each, and compute three dense MESA grids of evolutionary models for Galactic O- and B-type stars covering from 2.5 to 25 M⊙ from zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) until Teff = 10 000 K after the core hydrogen exhaustion. We carry out non-adiabatic mode stability analysis with GYRE, and update the extension of the instability strips of heat-driven p- and g-mode pulsators, and the hybrid slowly pulsating B (SPB) - β Cep stars. We compare the position of two confirmed late O-type β Cep and eight confirmed hybrid B-type pulsators with the new instability domains, and justify that ˜75 per cent enhancement, only in iron opacity, is sufficient to consistently reproduce the observed position of these stars on the log Teff versus log g plane. We propose that this improvement in opacities be incorporated in the input physics of new stellar models.

  7. Using xRage to Model Heat Flow for Experiments to Measure Opacities in HED Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgin, L.; Vandervort, R.; Keiter, P.; Drake, R. P.; Mussack, K.; Orban, C.

    2015-11-01

    We are developing a NIF proposal to measure opacities of C, N and O at temperatures and densities relevant to the base of the solar convection zone. Our proposed experiments would provide the first opacity measurements for these elements within this HED regime. A critical feature of our experimental platform is a super-sonic radiation front propagating within the targets. Under these conditions, density remains constant across the radiation front for a couple nanoseconds, enabling a window during which the opacities of the hot and cold target may be measured simultaneously. Afterwards, hydrodynamic effects create temperature and density gradients, which would obfuscate analysis of opacity data. We are using xRage to simulate heat flow within our targets in order to estimate the time scale over which temperature and density gradients evolve. These simulations will better inform our target design and diagnostic requirements. If successful, our experiments could yield the data necessary to validate existing opacity models or provide physical insights to inform the development of new opacity models. Accurate opacity models are essential to the understanding of radiation transport within HED systems, with applications ranging from astrophysics to ICF. U.S. Department of Energy, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant #DE-NA0001840. Los Alamos National Laboratory, LA-UR-15-25490.

  8. Cataloging Production Standards in Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Philip M.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a survey of academic libraries which was conducted to determine what production standards are maintained for catalogers and paraprofessionals, and for each MARC format. The findings discussed include the impact on production standards of type of material (monographs, serials, other MARC formats); real time and offline cataloging; and…

  9. Cataloging. ERIC Processing Manual, Section V.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weller, Carolyn R., Ed.

    Rules and guidelines are provided for ERIC catalogers and editors engaged in capturing bibliographic data for the documents and journal articles entered into the ERIC database. A general discussion of the principles of ERIC cataloging, definitions used, use of mandatory vs. optional data elements, etc. is provided in the Introduction. The body…

  10. Automated Title Page Cataloging: A Feasibility Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weibel, Stuart; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes the design of a prototype rule-based system for the automation of descriptive cataloging from title pages. The discussion covers the results of tests of the prototype, major impediments to automatic cataloging from title pages, and prospects for further progress. The rules implemented in the prototype are appended. (16 references)…

  11. Abstracts and Indexes Cataloging Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robar, Terri J.; And Others

    Intended to provide guidelines for similar future undertakings, this report provides a comprehensive record of a serials cataloging project undertaken by the General Reference and Periodicals Department of the University of Miami's Otto G. Richter Library between January 1985 and August 1986. The project was designed to catalog the department's…

  12. DIRAC File Replica and Metadata Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Poss, S.

    2012-12-01

    File replica and metadata catalogs are essential parts of any distributed data management system, which are largely determining its functionality and performance. A new File Catalog (DFC) was developed in the framework of the DIRAC Project that combines both replica and metadata catalog functionality. The DFC design is based on the practical experience with the data management system of the LHCb Collaboration. It is optimized for the most common patterns of the catalog usage in order to achieve maximum performance from the user perspective. The DFC supports bulk operations for replica queries and allows quick analysis of the storage usage globally and for each Storage Element separately. It supports flexible ACL rules with plug-ins for various policies that can be adopted by a particular community. The DFC catalog allows to store various types of metadata associated with files and directories and to perform efficient queries for the data based on complex metadata combinations. Definition of file ancestor-descendent relation chains is also possible. The DFC catalog is implemented in the general DIRAC distributed computing framework following the standard grid security architecture. In this paper we describe the design of the DFC and its implementation details. The performance measurements are compared with other grid file catalog implementations. The experience of the DFC Catalog usage in the CLIC detector project are discussed.

  13. 19 CFR 127.26 - Catalogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Catalogs. 127.26 Section 127.26 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL ORDER, UNCLAIMED, AND ABANDONED MERCHANDISE Sale of Unclaimed and Abandoned Merchandise § 127.26 Catalogs....

  14. 19 CFR 127.26 - Catalogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Catalogs. 127.26 Section 127.26 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL ORDER, UNCLAIMED, AND ABANDONED MERCHANDISE Sale of Unclaimed and Abandoned Merchandise § 127.26 Catalogs....

  15. 19 CFR 127.26 - Catalogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Catalogs. 127.26 Section 127.26 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL ORDER, UNCLAIMED, AND ABANDONED MERCHANDISE Sale of Unclaimed and Abandoned Merchandise § 127.26 Catalogs....

  16. 19 CFR 127.26 - Catalogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catalogs. 127.26 Section 127.26 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL ORDER, UNCLAIMED, AND ABANDONED MERCHANDISE Sale of Unclaimed and Abandoned Merchandise § 127.26 Catalogs....

  17. 19 CFR 127.26 - Catalogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Catalogs. 127.26 Section 127.26 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL ORDER, UNCLAIMED, AND ABANDONED MERCHANDISE Sale of Unclaimed and Abandoned Merchandise § 127.26 Catalogs....

  18. Learning to Catalog: A Practitioner's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovacic, Ellen Siegel

    1987-01-01

    Based on personal experiences, both as a paraprofessional and as a professional, in cataloging various types of materials in very different library settings, this author identifies several variables that enter into the cataloging process and describes how learning is achieved. (Author/CLB)

  19. An Approach to Developing Computer Catalogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Robin W.; Elrod, J. McRee

    1973-01-01

    A method of developing computer catalogs is proposed which does not require unit card conversion but rather the accumulation of data from operating programs. It is proposed that the bibliographic and finding functions of the catalog be separated, with the latter being the first automated. (8 references) (Author)

  20. Short Films for Physics Teaching, A Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bluestone, Barbara Z.; Roth, Richard F.

    This annotated film catalog is a product of the Conference on Single Concept Films in College Physics Teaching sponsored by the Commission on College Physics. Both 8mm and 16mm single concept films are listed for physics and related disciplines. The catalog includes commercial, noncommercial, and foreign films. However, the film coverage was…

  1. Classification and Cataloging. Library Science 427.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Donald L.

    An introductory letter, a list of general instructions on how to proceed with a correspondence course, a syllabus with examples of title pages and catalog cards, and an examination request form are presented for a correspondence course in classification and cataloging offered by the University of New Mexico's Division of Continuing Education and…

  2. Quantifying the emission benefits of opacity testing and repair of heavy-duty diesel vehicles.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Robert L; Graboski, Michael S; Alleman, Teresa L; Alvarez, Javier R; Duleep, K G

    2003-02-01

    The objective of this study was to begin to quantify the benefits of a smoke opacity-based (SAE J1667 test) inspection and maintenance program. Twenty-six vehicles exhibiting visible smoke emissions were recruited: 14 pre-1991 vehicles and 12 1991 and later model year vehicles. Smoke opacity and regulated pollutant emissions via chassis dynamometer were measured, with testing conducted at 1609 m above sea level. Twenty of the vehicles were then repaired with the goal of lowering visible smoke emission, and the smoke opacity testing and pollutant emissions measurements were repeated. For the pre-1991 vehicles actually repaired, pre-repair smoke opacity averaged 39% and PM averaged 5.6 g/mi. NOx emissions averaged 22.1 g/mi. After repair, the average smoke opacity had declined to 26% and PM declined to 3.3 g/mi, while NOx emissions increased to 30.9 g/mi. For the 1991 and newer vehicles repaired, pre-repair smoke opacity averaged 59% and PM averaged 2.2 g/mi. NOx emissions averaged 12.1 g/mi. After repair, the average opacity had declined to 30% and PM declined to 1.3 g/mi, while NOx increased slightly to 14.4 g/mi. For vehicles failing the California opacity test at >55% for pre-1991 and >40% for 1991 and later model years, the changes in emissions exhibited a high degree of statistical significance. The average cost of repairs was 1088 dollars, and the average is very similar for both the pre-1991 and 1991+ model year groups. Smoke opacity was shown to be a relatively poor predictor of driving cycle PM emissions. Peak CO or peak CO and THC as measured during a snap-acceleration were much better predictors of driving cycle PM emissions. PMID:12630482

  3. Quantifying the emission benefits of opacity testing and repair of heavy-duty diesel vehicles.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Robert L; Graboski, Michael S; Alleman, Teresa L; Alvarez, Javier R; Duleep, K G

    2003-02-01

    The objective of this study was to begin to quantify the benefits of a smoke opacity-based (SAE J1667 test) inspection and maintenance program. Twenty-six vehicles exhibiting visible smoke emissions were recruited: 14 pre-1991 vehicles and 12 1991 and later model year vehicles. Smoke opacity and regulated pollutant emissions via chassis dynamometer were measured, with testing conducted at 1609 m above sea level. Twenty of the vehicles were then repaired with the goal of lowering visible smoke emission, and the smoke opacity testing and pollutant emissions measurements were repeated. For the pre-1991 vehicles actually repaired, pre-repair smoke opacity averaged 39% and PM averaged 5.6 g/mi. NOx emissions averaged 22.1 g/mi. After repair, the average smoke opacity had declined to 26% and PM declined to 3.3 g/mi, while NOx emissions increased to 30.9 g/mi. For the 1991 and newer vehicles repaired, pre-repair smoke opacity averaged 59% and PM averaged 2.2 g/mi. NOx emissions averaged 12.1 g/mi. After repair, the average opacity had declined to 30% and PM declined to 1.3 g/mi, while NOx increased slightly to 14.4 g/mi. For vehicles failing the California opacity test at >55% for pre-1991 and >40% for 1991 and later model years, the changes in emissions exhibited a high degree of statistical significance. The average cost of repairs was 1088 dollars, and the average is very similar for both the pre-1991 and 1991+ model year groups. Smoke opacity was shown to be a relatively poor predictor of driving cycle PM emissions. Peak CO or peak CO and THC as measured during a snap-acceleration were much better predictors of driving cycle PM emissions.

  4. Mixing length and opacity effects - Deep convective envelopes on the asymptotic giant branch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackmann, I.-Juliana; Boothroyd, Arnold I.

    1991-01-01

    We constructed detailed envelopes appropriate to stars on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) for a wide range of mixing length parameter values alpha, considering different opacities, stellar masses, luminosities, and chemical compositions. Due to the molecular opacities present in the new LAOL opacity tables, a given AGB effective temperature Te requires a mixing length parameter α more than twice as large as that necessary with the older Cox and Stewart opacities. For any set of molecular opacity tables, authors should normalize their value for α by matching observations of the Sun (radius and luminosity at the solar age) or by matching the observed positions of the lower main sequence and red giant branch in the H-R diagram. (For our LAOL opacities, our normalized value turned out to be α ≍ 2.1.) Although this normalization of the mixing length results in a solar convective envelope essentially independent of molecular opacities, this is not true on the AGB: different opacities result in different conditions at the base of the convective envelope on the AGB, even after this normalization. Reliable molecular opacities are imperative for stellar models on the AGB. The temperature TCE at the base of the convective envelope is strongly dependent on the envelope mass and on the luminosity, ranging between 105 K and 107 K for our normalized value of α ≍ 2.1: hot-bottom envelope burning seems not to be totally out of reach. The effect of the chemical composition on TCE is surprisingly small: changes in helium abundance Y have a completely negligible effect, and even a large change in metallicity from Z = 0.02 to 0.001 increases TCE by only a factor of 2. On the AGB, we find that Te ∝ α1/2and R ∝ 1/α.

  5. Catalog of Infrared Observations, Third Edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Schmitz, Marion; Pitts, Patricia S.; Mead, Jaylee M.

    1993-01-01

    The Far Infrared Supplement contains a subset of the data in the full Catalog of Infrared Observations (all observations at wavelengths greater than 4.6 microns). The Catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO), NASA RP-1294, is a compilation of infrared astronomical observational data obtained from an extensive literature search of scientific journals and major astronomical catalogs and surveys. The literature search is complete for years 1965 through 1990 in this Third Edition. The Catalog contains about 210,000 observations of roughly 20,000 individual sources and supporting appendices. The expanded Third Edition contains coded IRAS 4-band data for all CIO sources detected by IRAS. The appendices include an atlas of infrared source positions (also included in this volume), two bibliographies of Catalog listings, and an atlas of infrared spectral ranges. The complete CIO database is available to qualified users in printed, microfiche, and magnetic-tape formats.

  6. Catalog of infrared observations, third edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Schmitz, Marion; Pitts, Patricia S.; Mead, Jaylee M.

    1993-06-01

    The Far Infrared Supplement contains a subset of the data in the full Catalog of Infrared Observations (all observations at wavelengths greater than 4.6 microns). The Catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO), NASA RP-1294, is a compilation of infrared astronomical observational data obtained from an extensive literature search of scientific journals and major astronomical catalogs and surveys. The literature search is complete for years 1965 through 1990 in this Third Edition. The Catalog contains about 210,000 observations of roughly 20,000 individual sources and supporting appendices. The expanded Third Edition contains coded IRAS 4-band data for all CIO sources detected by IRAS. The appendices include an atlas of infrared source positions (also included in this volume), two bibliographies of Catalog listings, and an atlas of infrared spectral ranges. The complete CIO database is available to qualified users in printed, microfiche, and magnetic-tape formats.

  7. Treatment of atomic and molecular line blanketing by opacity sampling. [atmospheric optics - stellar atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. R.; Krupp, B. M.

    1975-01-01

    An opacity sampling (OS) technique for treating the radiative opacity of large numbers of atomic and molecular lines in cool stellar atmospheres is presented. Tests were conducted and results show that the structure of atmospheric models is accurately fixed by the use of 1000 frequency points, and 500 frequency points is often adequate. The effects of atomic and molecular lines are separately studied. A test model computed by using the OS method agrees very well with a model having identical atmospheric parameters computed by the giant line (opacity distribution function) method.

  8. Simple model atmospheres incorporating new opacities of VO and TiO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brett, J. M.

    1989-11-01

    The effect of the VO A-X, VO B-X and TiO-upsilon molecular band opacities upon the atmospheres of red giants is investigated by construction of plane-parallel straight mean opacity models. From these simple preliminary models a limited heating of the upper atmosphere is found producing a temperature rise of up to 100 K. This result and its effect upon computed bandstrengths suggests that these opacities should be included in more accurate model atmospheres of late M stars.

  9. CONCAM All-Sky Maps of Airglow and Opacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemiroff, R. J.; Shamir, L.; CONCAM Collaboration

    2003-12-01

    A major goal of the global CONtinuous CAMera (CONCAM) network is to support astronomical observing sites with real-time all-sky images and information. To date, this aim has been fulfilled mostly by CONCAM's role as an optical cloud monitor -- creating rapid ground-truth fisheye images that can be visually inspected so that real-time observing decisions can be made. These images are available immediately over the web through http://concam.net/, where they are also archived The high quality of raw CONCAM data, however, allows us to go further and build a data pipeline from which automated stellar photometry can be done for a few hundred of the brightest stars. When combined with CONCAM all-sky brightness data, we show that a simultaneous solution for sky opacity and emissivity is possible at stellar positions. These data can then be interpolated into all-sky maps. With current CONCAM3 equipment, maps with a broadband accuracy of about 0.25 magnitudes for altitudes above 25 degrees is demonstrated. Such maps might contribute to a more quantitative assessment of the brightness, clarity, and variability of the night sky background above the world's largest telescopes both in real time and in subsequent data reduction. Progress on creating these maps as part of the CONCAM data processing pipeline will be discussed.

  10. Homogenization in compiling ICRF combined catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco, F. J.; Martínez, M. J.; López, J. A.

    2013-10-01

    Context. The International Astronomical Union (IAU) recommendations regarding the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) realizations require the construction of radio sources catalogs obtained using very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) methods. The improvement of these catalogs is a necessary procedure for the further densification of the ICRF over the celestial sphere. Aims: The different positions obtained from several catalogs using common sources to the ICRF make it necessary to critically revise the different methods employed in improving the ICRF from several radio sources catalogs. In this sense, a revision of the analytical and the statistical methods is necessary in line with their advantages and disadvantages. We have a double goal: first, we propose an adequate treatment of the residual of several catalogs to obtain a homogeneous catalog; second, we attempt to discern whether a combined catalog is homogeneous. Methods: We define homogeneity as applied to our problem in a dual sense: the first deals with the spatial distribution of the data over the celestial sphere. The second has a statistical meaning, as we consider that homogeneity exists when the residual between a given catalog and the ICRF behaves as a unimodal pure Gaussian. We use a nonparametrical method, which enables us to homogeneously extend the statistical properties of the residual over the entire sphere. This intermediate adjustment allows for subsequent computation of the coefficients for any parametrical adjustment model that has a higher accuracy and greater stability, and it prevents problems related with direct adjustments using the models. On the other hand, the homogeneity of the residuals in a catalog is tested using different weights. Our procedure also serves to propose the most suitable weights to maintain homogeneity in the final results. We perform a test using the ICRF-Ext2, JPL, and USNO quasar catalogs. Results: We show that a combination of catalogs can only

  11. Solar neutrinos and the influence of radiative opacities on solar models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, T. R.; Ezer, D.; Stothers, R.

    1973-01-01

    Use of new radiative opacities based on the hot Thomas-Fermi model of the atom yields a predicted solar neutrino flux which is still considerably larger than the flux observed in Davis's Cl-37 experiment.

  12. Opacity calculations for ICF target physics using the ABAKO/RAPCAL code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mínguez, E.; Florido, R.; Rodriguez, R.; Gil, J. M.; Rubiano, J. G.; Mendoz, M. A.; Suárez, D.; Martel, P.

    2010-08-01

    In this work we present a set of atomic models (called ABAKO/RAPCAL), and its validation with experiments and with other NLTE models. We consider that our code permits the diagnosis and the determination of opacity data. A review of calculations and simulations for the validation of this set is presented.As an interesting product of these calculations, we can obtain accurate analytical formulas for Rosseland and Planck mean opacities. These formulas are useful for the use as input data in hydrodinamic simulations of targets where the computation task is so hard that in line computation with sophisticated opacity codes is prohibitive. Analytical opacities for several Z-plasmas are presented in this work.

  13. Large Enhancement in High-Energy Photoionization of Fe XVII and Missing Continuum Plasma Opacity.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Sultana N; Pradhan, Anil K

    2016-06-10

    Aimed at solving the outstanding problem of solar opacity, and radiation transport plasma models in general, we report substantial photoabsorption in the high-energy regime due to atomic core photoexcitations not heretofore considered. In extensive R-matrix calculations of unprecedented complexity for an important iron ion Fe xvii (Fe^{16+}), with a wave function expansion of 99 Fe xviii (Fe^{17+}) LS core states from n≤4 complexes (equivalent to 218 fine structure levels), we find (i) up to orders of magnitude enhancement in background photoionization cross sections, in addition to strongly peaked photo-excitation-of-core resonances not considered in current opacity models, and ii) demonstrate convergence with respect to successive core excitations. The resulting increase in the monochromatic continuum, and 35% in the Rosseland mean opacity, are compared with the "higher-than-predicted" iron opacity measured at the Sandia Z-pinch fusion device at solar interior conditions. PMID:27341239

  14. Large Enhancement in High-Energy Photoionization of Fe XVII and Missing Continuum Plasma Opacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.; Pradhan, Anil K.

    2016-06-01

    Aimed at solving the outstanding problem of solar opacity, and radiation transport plasma models in general, we report substantial photoabsorption in the high-energy regime due to atomic core photoexcitations not heretofore considered. In extensive R -matrix calculations of unprecedented complexity for an important iron ion Fe xvii (Fe16 + ), with a wave function expansion of 99 Fe xviii (Fe17 + ) LS core states from n ≤4 complexes (equivalent to 218 fine structure levels), we find (i) up to orders of magnitude enhancement in background photoionization cross sections, in addition to strongly peaked photo-excitation-of-core resonances not considered in current opacity models, and ii) demonstrate convergence with respect to successive core excitations. The resulting increase in the monochromatic continuum, and 35% in the Rosseland mean opacity, are compared with the "higher-than-predicted" iron opacity measured at the Sandia Z -pinch fusion device at solar interior conditions.

  15. Prevalence and risk factors of lens opacities in rural populations living at two different altitudes in China

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jia-Ming; Yang, De-Qi; Wang, Han; Xu, Jun; Gao, Qian; Hu, Li-Wen; Wang, Fang; Wang, Yang; Yan, Qi-Chang; Zhang, Jin-Song; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the prevalence of and risk factors for lens opacities in populations living at two different altitudes in China. METHODS A total of 813 subjects aged ≥40y in Lhasa (Tibet Autonomous Region, China. Altitude: 3658 m) and Shaoxing (Zhejiang Province, China. Altitude: 15 m) were underwent eye examinations and interviewed in this cross-sectional study. Participants' lens opacities were graded according to the Lens Opacities Classification System II (LOCS II) and the types of opacities with LOCS II scores ≥2 were determined. Univariate and stepwise logistic regression were used to evaluate the associations of independent risk factors with lens opacities. RESULTS Lens opacities were significantly more prevalent in the high-altitude than in the low-altitude area (χ2=10.54, P<0.001). Lens opacities appear to develop earlier in people living at high than at low altitude. The main types of lens opacity in Lhasa and Shaoxing were mixed (23.81%) and cortical (17.87%), respectively. Independent risk factors associated with all lens opacities were age, ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure, and educational level. Compared with participants aged 40-49y, the risk of lens opacities increased gradually from 2 to 85 times per 10y [odds ratio (OR)=2.168-84.731, P<0.05). The risk of lens opacities was about two times greater in participants with the highest UV exposure than in those with the lowest exposure (OR=2.606, P=0.001). Educational level was inversely associated with lens opacities; literacy deceased the risk by about 25% compared with illiteracy (OR=0.758, P=0.041). CONCLUSION Old age, higher UV exposure and lower educational level are important risk factors for the development of lens opacities. Lens opacities are more prevalent among high-altitude than low-altitude inhabitants. PMID:27162738

  16. A Catalog of Geologic Data for the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Mackley, Rob D.

    2005-08-01

    This revision of the geologic data catalog incorporates new boreholes drilled after September 2002 as well as other older wells, particularly from the 600 Area, omitted from the earlier catalogs. Additionally, borehole geophysical log data have been added to the catalog. This version of the geologic data catalog now contains 3,519 boreholes and is current with boreholes drilled as of November 2004.

  17. Specifications for a COM Catalog Designed for Government Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Nora S.; And Others

    Prepared in MARC format in accordance with the Ohio College Library Center (OCLC) standards, these specifications were developed at Colorado State University to catalog a group of government publications not listed in the Monthly Catalog of United States Publications. The resulting microfiche catalog produced through the OCLC Cataloging Subsystem…

  18. 41 CFR 101-30.603 - GSA Supply Catalog.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false GSA Supply Catalog. 101... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 30-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.6-GSA Section of the Federal Supply Catalog § 101-30.603 GSA Supply Catalog. (a) The GSA...

  19. 41 CFR 101-30.101-7 - Federal Catalog System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Federal Catalog System... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 30-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.1-General § 101-30.101-7 Federal Catalog System. Federal Catalog System means the single...

  20. 41 CFR 101-30.603 - GSA Supply Catalog.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true GSA Supply Catalog. 101... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 30-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.6-GSA Section of the Federal Supply Catalog § 101-30.603 GSA Supply Catalog. (a) The GSA...

  1. 41 CFR 101-30.603-2 - GSA Supply Catalog.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true GSA Supply Catalog. 101... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 30-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.6-GSA Section of the Federal Supply Catalog § 101-30.603-2 GSA Supply Catalog. The GSA...

  2. 41 CFR 101-30.603-2 - GSA Supply Catalog.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true GSA Supply Catalog. 101... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 30-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.6-GSA Section of the Federal Supply Catalog § 101-30.603-2 GSA Supply Catalog. The GSA...

  3. 41 CFR 101-30.101-7 - Federal Catalog System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Federal Catalog System... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 30-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.1-General § 101-30.101-7 Federal Catalog System. Federal Catalog System means the single...

  4. 41 CFR 101-30.603 - GSA Supply Catalog.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true GSA Supply Catalog. 101... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 30-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.6-GSA Section of the Federal Supply Catalog § 101-30.603 GSA Supply Catalog. (a) The GSA...

  5. 41 CFR 101-30.603-2 - GSA Supply Catalog.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true GSA Supply Catalog. 101... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 30-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.6-GSA Section of the Federal Supply Catalog § 101-30.603-2 GSA Supply Catalog. The GSA...

  6. 41 CFR 101-30.101-7 - Federal Catalog System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Federal Catalog System... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 30-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.1-General § 101-30.101-7 Federal Catalog System. Federal Catalog System means the single...

  7. 41 CFR 101-30.603 - GSA Supply Catalog.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true GSA Supply Catalog. 101... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 30-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.6-GSA Section of the Federal Supply Catalog § 101-30.603 GSA Supply Catalog. (a) The GSA...

  8. 41 CFR 101-30.603-2 - GSA Supply Catalog.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false GSA Supply Catalog. 101... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 30-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.6-GSA Section of the Federal Supply Catalog § 101-30.603-2 GSA Supply Catalog. The GSA...

  9. 41 CFR 101-30.101-7 - Federal Catalog System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Federal Catalog System... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 30-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.1-General § 101-30.101-7 Federal Catalog System. Federal Catalog System means the single...

  10. 41 CFR 101-30.101-7 - Federal Catalog System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Federal Catalog System... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 30-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.1-General § 101-30.101-7 Federal Catalog System. Federal Catalog System means the single...

  11. 41 CFR 101-30.603-2 - GSA Supply Catalog.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true GSA Supply Catalog. 101... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 30-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.6-GSA Section of the Federal Supply Catalog § 101-30.603-2 GSA Supply Catalog. The GSA...

  12. 41 CFR 101-30.603 - GSA Supply Catalog.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true GSA Supply Catalog. 101... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 30-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.6-GSA Section of the Federal Supply Catalog § 101-30.603 GSA Supply Catalog. (a) The GSA...

  13. Cataloging and Expert Systems: AACR2 as a Knowledge Base.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjerppe, Roland; Olander, Birgitta

    1989-01-01

    Describes a project that developed two expert systems for library cataloging using the second edition of the Anglo American Cataloging Rules (AACR2) as a knowledge base. The discussion covers cataloging as interpretation, the structure of AACR2, and the feasibility of using expert systems for cataloging in traditional library settings. (26…

  14. Cooperative Cataloging: LC Promotes Cooperation at Asian Materials Seminar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fineberg, Gail

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the Asian Materials Cataloging Seminar that the Library of Congress sponsored to promote the benefits of cooperative cataloging. Highlights include the Program for Cooperative Cataloging (PCC); high-quality, standardized, core-level cataloging records for Asian materials; name authority and subject authority programs; and the CONSER…

  15. Metadata and Trends of Cataloging in Thai Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siripan, Praditta

    This paper reports on trends in cataloging in Thai libraries, focusing on the use of information technology as a tool to accelerate the organization of resources, the benefit of cataloging resources available from the Internet, and cataloging policy for Internet resources. The introduction discusses cataloging Thai documents, managing foreign…

  16. Automated cataloging and characterization of space-derived data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, William J.; Roelofs, Larry; Goldberg, Michael

    1988-01-01

    One of the most significant technical issues that NASA must address and resolve is the problem of managing the enormous amounts of scientific and engineering data that will be generated by the next generation of remote sensing systems such as the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Earth Observing System (EOS). The amount of data these sensors are expected to produce will be orders of magnitude greater than NASA has ever experienced. Consequently new solutions must be developed for managing, accessing, and automatically inputting the data into a database in some expressive fashion that will provide a meaningful understanding and effective utilization of this data in a multidisciplinary environment. Presently, scientific data provided by satellites and other sources are processed, cataloged, and archived according to narrow mission or project-specific requirements with little regard to the semantics of the overall research. Scientists therefore lack knowledge of or access to potentially valuable data outside their own field. What is needed is an innovative approach that will allow collected data to be automatically cataloged, characterized, and managed in a domain-community. A concept and design approach that employs expert system-based knowledge controllers combined with advanced spatial database systems and graphical data structures is discussed.

  17. Automated cataloging and characterization of space-derived data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, William J.; Roelofs, Larry; Goldberg, Michael

    1988-01-01

    One of the most significant technical issues that NASA must address and resolve is the problem of managing the enormous amounts of scientific and engineering data that will be generated by the next generation of remote sensing systems such as the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Earth Observing System (EOS). The amount of data these sensors are expected to produce will be orders of magnitude greater than NASA has ever experienced. Consequently, new solutions must be developed for managing, accessing, and automatically inputting the data into a database in some expressive fashion that will provide a meaningful understanding and effective utilization of this data in a multidisciplinary environment. Presently, scientific data provided by satellites and other sources are processed, cataloged, and archived according to narrow mission or project-specific requirements with little regard to the semantics of the overall research. Scientists therefore lack knowledge of or access to potentially valuable data outside their own field. What is needed is an innovative approach that will allow collected data to be automatically cataloged, characterized, and managed in a domain-community. A concept and design approach that employs expert system-based knowledge controllers combined with advanced spatial database systems and graphical data structures is discussed.

  18. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE SECOND SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, P. L.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Antolini, E.; Bonamente, E.; Atwood, W. B.; Belfiore, A.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Bignami, G. F. E-mail: Gino.Tosti@pg.infn.it E-mail: tburnett@u.washington.edu; and others

    2012-04-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy {gamma}-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24 month period. The second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in five energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely {gamma}-ray-producing source classes.

  19. Fermi Large Area Telescope Second Source Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolan, P. L.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E; Bonnell, J.; Cannon, A.; Celik O.; Corbet, R.; Davis, D. S.; DeCesar, M. E.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Johnson, T. E.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E; Perkins, J. S.; Racusin, J. L; Scargle, J. D.; Stephens, T. E.; Thompson, D. J.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24-month period. The Second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in 5 energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 11eV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely gamma-ray-producing source classes.

  20. Molecular clouds in galaxies with different Z - Fragmentation of diffuse clouds driven by opacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franco, Jose; Cox, Donald P.

    1986-01-01

    Molecular clouds are formed from diffuse interstellar clouds when the external ultraviolet radiation field is prevented from penetrating into the cloud. The opacity is provided mainly by dust grains and the required column density to the cloud center is larger than about 5 x 10 to the 20th (solar Z/Z)/sq cm. This high-opacity criterion could have a significant impact on the radial trends observed in spiral galaxies, and on the distinctions between spiral and dwarf irregular galaxies.

  1. Early solar mass loss, opacity uncertainties, and the solar abundance problem

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, Joyce Ann; Keady, John; Kilcrease, David

    2009-01-01

    Solar models calibrated with the new element abundance mixture of Asplund et al. published in 2005 no longer produce good agreement with the sound speed, convection zone depth, and convection zone helium abundance inferred from solar oscillation data. Attempts to modify the input physics of the standard model, for example, by including enhanced diffusion, increased opacities, accretion, convective overshoot, or gravity waves have not restored the good agreement attained with the prior abundances. Here we present new models including early mass loss via a stronger solar wind. Early mass loss has been investigated prior to the solar abundance problem to deplete lithium and resolve the 'faint early sun problem'. We find that mass loss modifies the core structure and deepens the convection zone, and so improves agreement with oscillation data using the new abundances: however the amount of mass loss must be small to avoid destroying all of the surface lithium, and agreement is not fully restored. We also considered the prospects for increasing solar interior opacities. In order to increase mixture opacities by the 30% required to mitigate the abundance problem, the opacities of individual elements (e.g., O, N, C, and Fe) must be revised by a factor of two to three for solar interior conditions: we are investigating the possibility of broader calculated line wings for bound-bound transitions at the relevant temperatures to enhance opacity. We find that including all of the elements in the AGS05 opacity mixture (through uranium at atomic number Z=92) instead of only the 17 elements in the OPAL opacity mixture increases opacities by a negligible 0.2%.

  2. Alpha Dithering to Correct Low-Opacity 8 Bit Compositing Errors

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P L; Frank, R J; LaMar, E C

    2003-03-31

    This paper describes and analyzes a dithering technique for accurately specifying small values of opacity ({alpha}) that would normally not be possible because of the limited number of bits available in the alpha channel of graphics hardware. This dithering technique addresses problems related to compositing numerous low-opacity semitransparent polygons to create volumetric effects with graphics hardware. The paper also describes the causes and a possible solution to artifacts that arise from parallel or distributed volume rendering using bricking on multiple GPU's.

  3. Comparison of opacities measured by portable and cross-stack transmissometers at a coalfired power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steig, Tracey W.; Pilat, Michael J.

    Simultaneous measurements of the in-stack light transmittance with portable (short pathlength) and cross-stack transmissometers along with particle mass concentration and particle size distribution tests were conducted at a pulverized coal-fired boiler. The tests were performed on a large horizontal duct downstream of an electrostatic precipitator. The cross-stack transmissometer (one way pathlength of 6.15 m) was located horizontally across the center of the duct during the entire study. The portable transmissometer (one way pathlength of 1.27 m) was positioned horizontally at either the top, center or bottom sampling port. The one hour average opacities measured simultaneously with the portable and cross-stack transmissometers have correlation coefficients of the linear regression best fit lines in the 0.933-0.999 range compared to the one minute opacity correlation coefficients of 0.420-0.592. The higher correlation coefficients of the hourly averages are probably due to averaging the opacities over a time period longer than the precipitator rapping cycle of 12 min. The 1 min average cross-stack opacities were consistently greater than the portable opacities, probably caused by the cross-stack transmissometer seeing puffs of particles from the precipitator plate rapping. Vertical stratification of the particles was indicated by both the opacity and the particle mass concentration measurements.

  4. The effect of Livermore OPAL opacities on the evolutionary masses of RR Lyrae stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Sukyoung; Lee, Young-Wook; Demarque, Pierre

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of the new Livermore OPAL opacities on the evolution of horizontal-branch (HB) stars. This work was motivated by the recent stellar pulsation calculations using the new Livermore opacities, which suggest that the masses of double-mode RR Lyrae stars are 0.1-0.2 solar mass larger than those based on earlier opacities. Unlike the pulsation calculations, we find that the effect of opacity change on the evolution of HB stars is not significant. In particular, the effect of the mean masses of RR Lyrae stars is very small, showing a decrease of only 0.01-0.02 solar mass compared to the models based on old Cox-Stewart opacities. Consequently, with the new Livermore OPAL opacities, both the stellar pulsation and evolution models now predict approximately the same masses for the RR Lyrae stars. Our evolutionary models suggest that the mean masses of the RR Lyrae stars are about 0.76 and about 0.71 solar mass for M15 (Oosterhoff group II) and M3 (group I), respectively. If (alpha/Fe) = 0.4, these values are decreased by about 0.03 solar mass. Variations of the mean masses of RR Lyrae stars with HB morphology and metallicity are also presented.

  5. Evaluation of an opacity lensometer for determining corneal clarity following excimer laser photoablation

    SciTech Connect

    Andrade, H.A.; McDonald, M.B.; Liu, J.C.; Abdelmegeed, M.; Varnell, R.; Sunderland, G. )

    1990-09-01

    The appearance of haze in the central cornea following photoablation with a 193 nm excimer laser is an important factor in the postoperative course of this procedure. Data from 37 human eyes treated with photorefractive keratectomy, 4 eyes treated with phototherapeutic keratectomy, and 5 untreated eyes were used to evaluate the ability of a commercially available opacity lensometer to provide an objective measure of corneal clarity. We found that the opacity lensometer was able to detect light scattered from the cornea but was not sufficiently sensitive to distinguish reliably among excimer-treated eyes with degrees of corneal haze evaluated as clear, trace, or 1+ by slit-lamp microscope examination. In untreated, clear corneas, the values obtained with the opacity lensometer in eyes measured with and without a clear contact lens were within one unit of each other for any given eye, but values from eye to eye varied over a range of six units. In a test simulating different amounts of corneal haze using contact lenses evenly coated with nail polish enamel, the log-transformed opacity lensometer values varied directly with percent light scattering as determined by spectrophotometry. These results suggest that the opacity lensometer measurements are reliable and reproducible, but that in the human cornea something is being measured by the opacity lensometer that is not taken into account in clinical slit-lamp microscope evaluation. Overall, it appears that, in its present form, this instrument is not useful to measure corneal clarity after excimer laser photoablation.

  6. Comparison of Fe and Ni opacity calculations for a better understanding of pulsating stellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilles, D.; Turck-Chièze, S.; Loisel, G.; Piau, L.; Ducret, J.-E.; Poirier, M.; Blenski, T.; Thais, F.; Blancard, C.; Cossé, P.; Faussurier, G.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J. C.; Porcherot, Q.; Guzik, J. A.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Magee, N. H.; Harris, J.; Busquet, M.; Delahaye, F.; Zeippen, C. J.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.

    2011-12-01

    Opacity is an important ingredient of the evolution of stars. The calculation of opacity coefficients is complicated by the fact that the plasma contains partially ionized heavy ions that contribute to opacity dominated by H and He. Up to now, the astrophysical community has greatly benefited from the work of the contributions of Los Alamos [1], Livermore [2] and the Opacity Project (OP) [3]. However unexplained differences of up to 50% in the radiative forces and Rosseland mean values for Fe have been noticed for conditions corresponding to stellar envelopes. Such uncertainty has a real impact on the understanding of pulsating stellar envelopes, on the excitation of modes, and on the identification of the mode frequencies. Temperature and density conditions equivalent to those found in stars can now be produced in laboratory experiments for various atomic species. Recently the photo-absorption spectra of nickel and iron plasmas have been measured during the LULI 2010 campaign, for temperatures between 15 and 40 eV and densities of ˜3 mg/cm3. A large theoretical collaboration, the "OPAC", has been formed to prepare these experiments. We present here the set of opacity calculations performed by eight different groups for conditions relevant to the LULI 2010 experiment and to astrophysical stellar envelope conditions.

  7. Catalog of infrared observations. Part 2: Appendixes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Schmitz, Marion; Mead, Jaylee M.

    1987-01-01

    The Catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO) is a compilation of infrared astronomical observational data obtained from an extensive literature search of astronomical journals and major astronomical catalogs and surveys. The literature searches are complete for years 1965 to 1986. Supporting appendixes are published in this part. The appendices include an atlas of infrared source positions, two bibliographies of infrared literature upon which the search was based, and, keyed to the main Catalog listings (organized alphabetically by first author, and by date), an atlas of infrared spectral ranges, and IRAS data for the CIO sources. The complete CIO database is available to qualified users in printed microfiche and magnetic tape formats.

  8. Catalog of infrared observations. Part 2: Appendixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Schmitz, Marion; Mead, Jaylee M.

    1987-12-01

    The Catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO) is a compilation of infrared astronomical observational data obtained from an extensive literature search of astronomical journals and major astronomical catalogs and surveys. The literature searches are complete for years 1965 to 1986. Supporting appendixes are published in this part. The appendices include an atlas of infrared source positions, two bibliographies of infrared literature upon which the search was based, and, keyed to the main Catalog listings (organized alphabetically by first author, and by date), an atlas of infrared spectral ranges, and IRAS data for the CIO sources. The complete CIO database is available to qualified users in printed microfiche and magnetic tape formats.

  9. WGCEP Historical California Earthquake Catalog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Felzer, Karen R.; Cao, Tianqing

    2008-01-01

    This appendix provides an earthquake catalog for California and the surrounding area. Our goal is to provide a listing for all known M > 5.5 earthquakes that occurred from 1850-1932 and all known M > 4.0 earthquakes that occurred from 1932-2006 within the region of 31.0 to 43.0 degrees North and -126.0 to -114.0 degrees West. Some pre-1932 earthquakes 4 5, before the Northern California network was online. Some earthquakes from 1900-1932, and particularly from 1910-1932 are also based on instrumental readings, but the quality of the instrumental record and the resulting analysis are much less precise than for later listings. A partial exception is for some of the largest earthquakes, such as the San Francisco earthquake of April 18, 1906, for which global teleseismic records (Wald et al. 1993) and geodetic measurements (Thatcher et al. 1906) have been used to help determine magnitudes.

  10. NASA Video Catalog. Supplement 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This issue of the NASA Video Catalog cites video productions listed in the NASA STI Database. The videos listed have been developed by the NASA centers, covering Shuttle mission press conferences; fly-bys of planets; aircraft design, testing and performance; environmental pollution; lunar and planetary exploration; and many other categories related to manned and unmanned space exploration. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied by an abstract. The Table of Contents shows how the entries are arranged by divisions and categories according to the NASA Scope and Coverage Category Guide. For users with specific information, a Title Index is available. A Subject Term Index, based on the NASA Thesaurus, is also included. Guidelines for usage of NASA audio/visual material, ordering information, and order forms are also available.

  11. NASA Video Catalog. Supplement 12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This report lists 1878 video productions from the NASA STI Database. This issue of the NASA Video Catalog cites video productions listed in the NASA STI Database. The videos listed have been developed by the NASA centers, covering Shuttle mission press conferences; fly-bys of planets; aircraft design, testing and performance; environmental pollution; lunar and planetary exploration; and many other categories related to manned and unmanned space exploration. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied by an abstract. The listing of the entries is arranged by STAR categories. A complete Table of Contents describes the scope of each category. For users with specific information, a Title Index is available. A Subject Term Index, based on the NASA Thesaurus, is also included. Guidelines for usage of NASA audio/visual material, ordering information, and order forms are also available.

  12. Data catalog of satellite experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This catalog is divided into three sections: data description contains descriptions of data available at or through NSSDC as well as descriptions of the experiments and spacecraft from which the data originated; and supporting data contains brief descriptions of space environment models and programs distributed by NSSDC. Section 3 is a series of indexes that contain: (1) a listing of all spacecraft, experiment, and data descriptions presented in Section 1 plus tables indicating the period for which each spacecraft was operational; (2) an index of all spacecraft described here, identified by common names and alternate names; (3) a listing of the original experiment institutions for all experiments described; (4) a listing of the investigators associated with the experiments and their current affiliations; and (5) an index of all experiments sorted by phenomenon measured.

  13. NASA Video Catalog. Supplement 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This issue of the NASA Video Catalog cites video productions listed in the NASA STI Database. The videos listed have been developed by the NASA centers, covering Shuttle mission press conferences; fly-bys of planets; aircraft design, testing and performance; environmental pollution; lunar and planetary exploration; and many other categories related to manned and unmanned space exploration. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied by an abstract. The Table of Contents shows how the entries are arranged by divisions and categories according to the NASA Scope and Coverage Category Guide. For users with specific information, a Title Index is available. A Subject Term Index, based on the NASA Thesaurus, is also included. Guidelines for usage of NASA audio/visual material, ordering information, and order forms are also available.

  14. NASA Video Catalog. Supplement 14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This issue of the NASA Video Catalog cites video productions listed in the NASA STI Database. The videos listed have been developed by the NASA centers, covering Shuttle mission press conferences; fly-bys of planets; aircraft design, testing and performance; environmental pollution; lunar and planetary exploration; and many other categories related to manned and unmanned space exploration. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied by an abstract. The Table of Contents shows how the entries are arranged by divisions and categories according to the NASA Scope and Coverage Category Guide. For users with specific information, a Title Index is available. A Subject Term Index, based on the NASA Thesaurus, is also included. Guidelines for usage of NASA audio/visual material, ordering information, and order forms are also available.

  15. The effect of nanofiller on the opacity of experimental composites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Jin; Moon, Hyun-Jung; Lim, Bum-Soon; Lee, Yong-Keun; Rhee, Sang-Hoon; Yang, Heong-Cheol

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the nanofiller in experimental composites on opacity (contrast ratio). Thirteen experimental composites were prepared with three different sizes of fillers: barium glass minifiller (1 microm; 69-76 wt %), silica microfiller (0.04 microm; 0-6 wt %), and silica nanofiller (7 nm; 0-7 wt %). After disk-type specimens were irradiated with a halogen light curing unit at 500 mW/cm(2) for 30 s, the specimens were aged for 6 h at room conditions and were stored in deionized water for 1, 7, 14, 21, 28, 56, and 84 days. The contrast ratios of the specimens were measured as a function of aging period using a spectrophotometer. The distribution morphology of the filler particles in the resin matrix was also examined using energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy. The experimental composites that contained more than 3% nanofiller had significantly lower contrast ratios (p < 0.05). The composites that contained 6 wt % nanofiller had contrast ratios 34-65% lower than the composite that did not contain nanofiller. The values of the contrast ratio from the composites that excluded microfiller were lower than the values from the composites that included microfiller. From the comparison with the 3 different sizes of filler, the contrast ratio of the composite that contained 70 wt % minifiller and 6 wt % microfiller was the highest, the contrast ratio of the composite that contained only 76 wt % minifiller was the median value, and the contrast ratio of the composite that contained 70 wt % minifiller and 6 wt % nanofiller was the lowest. When the microfiller content was decreased from 6 wt % to 0 wt %, the contrast ratio decreased 6-9%. Energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy images indicated that the contrast ratio of experimental composites is related to the distribution morphology of the filler particles in the resin matrix.

  16. Graphical User Interfaces and Library Systems: End-User Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorn, Margaret; Marshall, Lucy

    1995-01-01

    Describes a study by Parke-Davis Pharmaceutical Research Library to determine user satisfaction with the graphical user interface-based (GUI) Dynix Marquis compared with the text-based Dynix Classic Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC). Results show that the GUI-based OPAC was preferred by endusers over the text-based OPAC. (eight references) (DGM)

  17. Subject Access Points in the MARC Record and Archival Finding Aid: Enough or Too Many?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Elizabeth; Czechowski, Leslie

    2007-01-01

    In this research project, the authors set out to discover the current practice in both the archival and cataloging worlds for usage of access points in descriptive records and to learn how archival descriptive practices fit into long-established library cataloging procedures and practices. A sample of archival finding aids and MARC records at 123…

  18. Online catalog of world-wide test sites for the post-launch characterization and calibration of optical sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, G.; Christopherson, J.B.; Stensaas, G.L.; Teillet, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    In an era when the number of Earth-observing satellites is rapidly growing and measurements from these sensors are used to answer increasingly urgent global issues, it is imperative that scientists and decision-makers can rely on the accuracy of Earth-observing data products. The characterization and calibration of these sensors are vital to achieve an integrated Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) for coordinated and sustained observations of Earth. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as a supporting member of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) and GEOSS, is working with partners around the world to establish an online catalog of prime candidate test sites for the post-launch characterization and calibration of space-based optical imaging sensors. The online catalog provides easy public Web site access to this vital information for the global community. This paper describes the catalog, the test sites, and the methodologies to use the test sites. It also provides information regarding access to the online catalog and plans for further development of the catalog in cooperation with calibration specialists from agencies and organizations around the world. Through greater access to and understanding of these vital test sites and their use, the validity and utility of information gained from Earth remote sensing will continue to improve. Copyright IAF/IAA. All rights reserved.

  19. Subject Access to Archival Materials Using LCSH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smiraglia, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    Discussion of subject access to archival materials focuses on the use of Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH). The process of subject analysis is described, an example of the depth of cataloging for archival materials is given, and the basic principles of syndetic structure of LCSH are explained. (five references) (LRW)

  20. National Water Quality Laboratory, 1995 services catalog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Timme, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    This Services Catalog contains information about field supplies and analytical services available from the National Water Quality Laboratory in Denver, Colo., and field supplies available from the Quality Water Service Unit in Ocala, Fla., to members of the U.S. Geological Survey. To assist personnel in the selection of analytical services, this catalog lists sample volume, required containers, applicable concentration range, detection level, precision of analysis, and preservation requirements for samples.

  1. CMR Catalog Service for the Web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Doug; Mitchell, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    With the impending retirement of Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) the Common Metadata Repository (CMR) was charged with providing a collection-level Catalog Service for the Web (CSW) that provided the same level of functionality as GCMD. This talk describes the capabilities of the CMR CSW API with particular reference to the support of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) Integrated Catalog (CWIC).

  2. A Catalog of Stellar Velocity Dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, Douglas B.

    1994-12-01

    A catalog of central velocity dispersion measurements is presented, current through September 1993. The catalog includes 2474 measurements of 1563 galaxies. A standard set of 86 galaxies is defined, consisting of galaxies with at least three, reliable, concordant measurements. All measurements are reduced to a normalized system using these standards. Measurements like these are useful in investigating luminosity-distance relations and ``second-parameter'' or fundamental plane problems in galactic dynamics.

  3. TRADEX autonomous catalog maintenance experiment (TRACM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Six, Stephen W.; LeClair, Raymond A.

    1996-10-01

    The TRADEX radar at the Kwajalein Missile Range (KMR) introduces a new debris characteriation capability to the space surveillance commuity. A single-sensor debris cataloging capability for small uncorrelated targets (UCTs) was recently demonstrated in a TRADEX autonomous catalog maintenance (TRACM) experiment. The experiment validated a number of new TRADEX space surveillance tools and integrated them with the unique Stare and Chase mode in which TRADEX finds and tracks small UCTs (objects less than 10 cm in diameter) at a rate of one new object per hour. Orbital elements for Stare and Chase acquisitions were determined from recorded track data and were of sufficient quality to permit re-acquisition by TRaDEX on subsequent passes. The experimental procedure is described and results are summarized in terms of successful re-tracks for objects maintained in a local proof-of-concept catalog. The catalog was established during the second half of a two month effort and individual debris objects were cataloged for up to 26 days. Comparison of TRADEX re-track performance for UCTs versus re-track performance for objects already cataloged by the space surveillance network (SSN) are also indicated. Conclusions and recommendations for further work are included.

  4. Georgia tech catalog of gravitational waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jani, Karan; Healy, James; Clark, James A.; London, Lionel; Laguna, Pablo; Shoemaker, Deirdre

    2016-10-01

    This paper introduces a catalog of gravitational waveforms from the bank of simulations by the numerical relativity effort at Georgia Tech. Currently, the catalog consists of 452 distinct waveforms from more than 600 binary black hole simulations: 128 of the waveforms are from binaries with black hole spins aligned with the orbital angular momentum, and 324 are from precessing binary black hole systems. The waveforms from binaries with non-spinning black holes have mass-ratios q = m 1/m 2 ≤ 15, and those with precessing, spinning black holes have q ≤ 8. The waveforms expand a moderate number of orbits in the late inspiral, the burst during coalescence, and the ring-down of the final black hole. Examples of waveforms in the catalog matched against the widely used approximate models are presented. In addition, predictions of the mass and spin of the final black hole by phenomenological fits are tested against the results from the simulation bank. The role of the catalog in interpreting the GW150914 event and future massive binary black-hole search in LIGO is discussed. The Georgia Tech catalog is publicly available at einstein.gatech.edu/catalog.

  5. A new in vitro method to evaluate radio-opacity of endodontic sealers

    PubMed Central

    Malka, V B; Hochscheidt, G L; Larentis, N L; Grecca, F S; Kopper, P M P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate a new method for assessing the radio-opacity of endodontic sealers and to compare radio-opacity values with a well-established standard method. Methods: The sealers evaluated in this study were AH Plus® (Dentsply DeTrey GmbH, Konstanz, Germany), Endo CPM Sealer (EGEO SRL, Buenos Aires, Argentina) and MTA Fillapex® (Angelus Dental Products Industry S/A, Londrina, Parana, Brazil). Two methods were used to evaluate radio-opacity: (D) standard discs and (S) a tissue simulator. For (D), ten standard discs were prepared for each sealer and were radiographed using Digora® phosphor storage plates (Soredex; Orion Corporation, Helsinki, Finland), alongside an aluminium stepwedge. For (S), polyethylene tubes filled with sealer (n = 10 for each) were radiographed inside the simulator as described. The digital images were analysed using Adobe Photoshop® software v. 10.0 (Adobe Systems, San Jose, CA). To compare the radio-opacity among the sealers, the data were analysed by ANOVA and Tukey's test, and to compare methods, they were analysed by the Mann–Whitney U test. To compare the data obtained from dentin and sealers in method (S), Student's paired t-test was used (=0.05). Results: In both methods, the sealers showed significant differences, according to the following decreasing order: AH Plus, MTA Fillapex and Endo CPM. In (D), MTA Fillapex and Endo CPM showed less radio-opacity than aluminium. For all of the materials, the radio-opacity was higher in (S) than in (D). Compared with dentin, all of the materials were more radio-opaque. Conclusions: The comparison of the two assessment methods for sealer radio-opacity testing validated the use of a tissue simulator block. PMID:25651275

  6. Iron Opacity Bump Changes the Stability and Structure of Accretion Disks in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan-Fei; Davis, Shane W.; Stone, James M.

    2016-08-01

    Accretion disks around supermassive black holes have regions where the Rosseland mean opacity can be larger than the electron scattering opacity due to the large number of bound–bound transitions in iron. We study the effects of this iron opacity “bump” on the thermal stability and vertical structure of radiation-pressure-dominated accretion disks, utilizing three-dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations in the local shearing box approximation. The simulations self-consistently calculate the heating due to MHD turbulence caused by magneto-rotational instability and radiative cooling by using the radiative transfer module based on a variable Eddington tensor in Athena. For a 5 × 108 solar mass black hole with ˜3% of the Eddington luminosity, a model including the iron opacity bump maintains its structure for more than 10 thermal times without showing significant signs of thermal runaway. In contrast, if only electron scattering and free–free opacity are included as in the standard thin disk model, the disk collapses on the thermal timescale. The difference is caused by a combination of (1) an anti-correlation between the total optical depth and the midplane pressure, and (2) enhanced vertical advective energy transport. These results suggest that the iron opacity bump may have a strong impact on the stability and structure of active galactic nucleus (AGN) accretion disks, and may contribute to a dependence of AGN properties on metallicity. Since this opacity is relevant primarily in UV emitting regions of the flow, it may help to explain discrepancies between observation and theory that are unique to AGNs.

  7. Lens opacity based modelling of the age-related straylight increase.

    PubMed

    Rozema, Jos J; Sanchez, Victoria; Artal, Natalia; Gramajo, Ana L; Torres, Eduardo; Luna, Jose D; Iribarren, Rafael; Tassignon, Marie-José; Juarez, Claudio P

    2015-12-01

    This work studies ethnic and geographical differences in the age-related straylight increase by means of a stochastic model and unpublished lens opacity data of 559 residents of Villa Maria (Argentina), as well as data of 912 Indonesian subjects published previously by Husain et al. For both cohorts the prevalence of each type and grade of lens opacity was determined as a function of age, from which a stochastic model was derived capable of simulating the lens opacity prevalence for both populations. These simulated lens opacity data were then converted to estimated straylight by means of an equation derived from previously recorded data of 107 eyes with varying degrees of cataract. Based on these opacity templates 2500 random sets of subject age and lens opacity data were generated by the stochastic model for each dataset, from which estimated straylight could be calculated. For the Argentinian data the estimated straylight was found to closely resemble the published models for age-related straylight increase. For younger eyes the straylight variation of the model was the same as what was previously published (in both cases ±0.200logunits), which doubled in size for older eyes. For the Indonesian data, however, this age-related straylight increase was found to be fundamentally different from the published age model. This suggests that current normative curves for age-related straylight increase may not always be appropriate for non-European populations, and that the inter-individual straylight variations in young, healthy eyes may possibly be due to variations in lens opacities.

  8. Experimental investigation of opacity models for stellar interiors, inertial fusion, and high energy density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, James

    2008-11-01

    Theoretical opacities are required for calculating energy transport in plasmas. In particular, understanding stellar interiors, inertial fusion, and Z-pinches depends on the opacities of mid-atomic-number elements in the 150-300 eV temperature range. These models are complex and experimental validation is crucial. For example, solar models presently disagree with helioseismology and one possible explanation is inadequate opacities. Testing these opacities requires a uniform plasma at temperatures high enough to produce the ion charge states that exist in the sun. Typical opacity experiments heat a sample using x-rays and measure the spectrally resolved transmission with a backlight. The difficulty grows as the temperature increases because the heating x-ray source must supply more energy and the backlighter source must be bright enough to overwhelm the plasma self emission. These problems were overcome using the dynamic hohlraum x-ray source at Sandia's Z facility to measure the transmission of a mixed Mg-Fe plasma heated above 150 eV. This capability will also advance opacity science for other high energy density plasmas. This tutorial describes opacity experiment challenges including accurate transmission measurements, plasma diagnostics, and quantitative model comparisons. The solar interior serves as a focal problem and Z facility experiments are used to illustrate the techniques. **In collaboration with C. Iglesias (LLNL), R. Mancini (U. Nevada), J.MacFarlane, I. Golovkin and P. Wang (Prism), C. Blancard, Ph. Cosse, G. Faussurier, F. Gilleron, and J.C. Pain (CEA), J. Abdallah Jr. (LANL), and G.A. Rochau and P.W. Lake (Sandia). ++Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Iron Opacity Bump Changes the Stability and Structure of Accretion Disks in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan-Fei; Davis, Shane W.; Stone, James M.

    2016-08-01

    Accretion disks around supermassive black holes have regions where the Rosseland mean opacity can be larger than the electron scattering opacity due to the large number of bound-bound transitions in iron. We study the effects of this iron opacity “bump” on the thermal stability and vertical structure of radiation-pressure-dominated accretion disks, utilizing three-dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations in the local shearing box approximation. The simulations self-consistently calculate the heating due to MHD turbulence caused by magneto-rotational instability and radiative cooling by using the radiative transfer module based on a variable Eddington tensor in Athena. For a 5 × 108 solar mass black hole with ˜3% of the Eddington luminosity, a model including the iron opacity bump maintains its structure for more than 10 thermal times without showing significant signs of thermal runaway. In contrast, if only electron scattering and free-free opacity are included as in the standard thin disk model, the disk collapses on the thermal timescale. The difference is caused by a combination of (1) an anti-correlation between the total optical depth and the midplane pressure, and (2) enhanced vertical advective energy transport. These results suggest that the iron opacity bump may have a strong impact on the stability and structure of active galactic nucleus (AGN) accretion disks, and may contribute to a dependence of AGN properties on metallicity. Since this opacity is relevant primarily in UV emitting regions of the flow, it may help to explain discrepancies between observation and theory that are unique to AGNs.

  10. The influence of urban area opacity on biologically active UV-B irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubarova, Nataly; Rozental', Victor

    2013-04-01

    The study of UV irradiance changes in urban area is an essential problem due to the significant effect of UV irradiance on human health which can be positive (vitamin D synthesis) and negative (erythema, skin cancer, eye damage). According to the results of several experiments within the Moscow megacity we studied the effects of urban area opacity on the different types of biologically active UV-B irradiance on the base of a specially developed mobile photometric complex snd additional measurements of the urban opacity by Nikon Fisheye Converter FC-E8. We analyzed both the level of erythemally-active irradiance and the UV eye damaging radiation using the broadband UVB-1 YES pyranometer calibrated against ultraviolet spectroradiometer Bentham DTM-300 of the Medical University of Innsbruck (courtesy of Dr. M.Blumthaler). In order to estimate the effects of the urban opacity the measurements were normalized on similar measurements at the Meteorological Observatory of Moscow State University with zero opacity. This ratio is defined as an urban radiative transmittance (URT). Different atmospheric conditions were considered. In cloudy conditions the effect of opacity on URT is much less than that in conditions when the sun disk is open from clouds. We revealed some spectral features in transmittance of biologically active UV-B irradiance which is characterized by higher URT variations in overcast cloudy conditions due to more intensive scattering and smaller direct solar radiation component. In the absence of cloudiness the effect of opacity was studied for open and screening solar disk conditions. We obtained much higher URT in UVB spectral region compared with that for total solar irradiance for screening solar disk conditions with a significant URT dependence on the opacity only in UVB spectral region. No URT dependence was obtained for total solar irradiance in these conditions. Some model calculations were fulfilled to match the experimental results.

  11. DART, a New Solution to Deploy and Access Astronomical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paioro, L.; Chiappetti, L.; Garilli, B.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Scodeggio, M.

    2008-08-01

    We present a new software solution, based on Java, which allows to deploy and access astronomical catalogs in relational database form, with their associated data products. It is already used to provide the public VVDS data via VO and manage zCosmos data within the Italian COSMOS community; it is also used as the second generation Web interface to the XMM-LSS master catalog. DART (Database Access and Retrieval Tool) supplies a Web interface which allows to query catalogs, filter data by conditions on the columns values (even complex expressions), view the results and export them in private user files; it is also possible to make simple plots or retrieve the related data products. The software supports access to more than one catalog at a time (e.g. for multi-band usage) either in parallel, or as a couple linked by pre-built correlation tables, or even viewing the result of an identification among several catalogs as a single virtual table. DART has been designed as a general tool capable of accessing any collection of astronomical database tables and related products. It is highly (and easily) customizable editing simple configuration files and (for an increased flexibility specially concerning data product access) populating appropriately a few administrative database tables. It supports ConeSearch, SSA and SIA Virtual Observatory protocols. DART will be soon released to the astronomical community from the PANDORA Web site (http://cosmos.iasf-milano.inaf.it/pandora/dart.html).

  12. The Complete College Catalog Book: A Guide to Catalog Processing and Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kacmarczyk, Ronald H.; Rickes, Persis C.

    A sourcebook on producing college catalogs is presented, with attention to marketing, information to be included in the catalog, presentation of the material, writing style, photographs, and assembling the finished publication. Marketing research is needed to promote the college effectively either to traditional students or to new segments of the…

  13. Night and Day: The Opacity of Clouds Measured by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, G. A.; Wilson, R. J.

    2006-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) [l] on the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft ranged to clouds over the course of nearly two Mars years [2] using an active laser ranging system. While ranging to the surface, the instrument was also able to measure the product of the surface reflectivity with the two-way atmospheric transmission at 1064 nm. Furthermore, the reflectivity has now been mapped over seasonal cycles using the passive radiometric capability built into MOLA [3]. Combining these measurements, the column opacity may be inferred. MOLA uniquely provides these measurements both night and day. This study examines the pronounced nighttime opacity of the aphelion season tropical water ice clouds, and the indiscernibly low opacity of the southern polar winter clouds. The water ice clouds (Figure 1) do not themselves trigger the altimeter but have measured opacities tau > 1.5 and are temporally and spatially correlated with temperature anomalies predicted by a Mars Global Circulation Model (MGCM) that incorporates cloud radiative effects [4]. The south polar CO2 ice clouds trigger the altimeter with a very high backscatter cross-section over a thickness of 3-9 m and are vertically dispersed over several km, but their total column opacities lie well below the MOLA measurement limit of tau = 0.7. These clouds correspond to regions of supercooled atmosphere that may form either very large specularly reflecting particles [2] or very compact, dense concentrations (>5x10(exp 6)/cu m) of 100-p particles

  14. The degree of roentgenographic parenchymal opacities attributable to smoking among asbestos-exposed subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhart, S.; Thornquist, M.; Omenn, G.S.; Goodman, G.; Feigl, P.; Rosenstock, L. )

    1990-05-01

    Considerable controversy surrounds the question of whether cigarette smoking has the potential to increase the prevalence of small opacities on chest roentgenographs among asbestos-exposed workers. To compare the relative contribution of smoking with other predictors of the presence of roentgenographic small opacities, we examined 661 men enrolled in a double-blind, randomized trial designed to assess the efficacy of vitamin A and beta-carotene in the prevention of lung cancer among workers with heavy occupational asbestos exposure. Subjects in the study population had a mean latency of 35 yr from first asbestos exposure and a mean of 28 yr in their trade. The prevalence of roentgenographic abnormalities consistent with asbestos exposure was 26% for pleural abnormalities alone, 10% for parenchymal abnormalities alone, and 20% for pleural and parenchymal abnormalities together. We investigated occupation, age, latency from first asbestos exposure, and smoking status as predictors of roentgenographic small opacities. Smoking history, independent of latency, contributed to the prevalence and extent of small opacities, but its effect was less than that of latency. We conclude, that in the setting of heavy occupational exposure to asbestos, cigarette smoking confers added risk for the development of roentgenographic small opacities.

  15. Gluon radiation off hard quarks in a nuclear environment: opacity expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2000-11-01

    We study the relation between the Baier-Dokshitzer-Mueller-Peigné-Schiff (BDMPS) and Zakharov formalisms for medium-induced gluon radiation off hard quarks, and the radiation off very few scattering centers. Based on the non-abelian Furry approximation for the motion of hard partons in a spatially extended colour field, we derive a compact diagrammatic and explicitly colour trivial expression for the N th order term of the k⊥ -differential gluon radiation cross section in an expansion in the opacity of the medium. Resumming this quantity to all orders in opacity, we obtain Zakharov's path-integral expression (supplemented with a regularization prescription). This provides a new proof of the equivalence of the BDMPS and Zakharov formalisms which extends previous arguments to the k⊥ -differential cross section. We give explicit analytical results up to third order in opacity for both the gluon radiation cross section of free incoming and of in-medium produced quarks. The N th order term in the opacity expansion of the radiation cross section is found to be a convolution of the radiation associated to N -fold rescattering and a readjustment of the probabilities that rescattering occurs with less than N scattering centers. Both informations can be disentangled by factorizing out of the radiation cross section a term which depends only on the mean free path of the projectile. This allows to infer analytical expressions for the totally coherent and totally incoherent limits of the radiation cross section to arbitrary orders in opacity.

  16. Catalog of Apollo experiment operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Thomas A.

    1994-01-01

    This catalog reviews Apollo mission reports, preliminary science reports, technical crew debriefings, lunar surface operations plans, and various relevant lunar experiment documents, collecting engineering- and operation-specific information by experiment. It is organized by discrete experimental and equipment items emplaced or operated on the lunar surface or at zero gravity during the Apollo missions. It also attempts to summarize some of the general problems encountered on the surface and provides guidelines for the design of future lunar surface experiments with an eye toward operations. Many of the problems dealt with on the lunar surface originated from just a few novel conditions that manifested themselves in various nasty ways. Low gravity caused cables to stick up and get caught on feet, and also made it easy for instruments to tip over. Dust was a problem and caused abrasion, visibility, and thermal control difficulties. Operating in a pressure suit limited a person's activity, especially in the hands. I hope to capture with this document some of the lessons learned from the Apollo era to make the jobs of future astronauts, principle investigators, engineers, and operators of lunar experiments more productive.

  17. LANDSAT: Non-US standard catalog no. N-33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A catalog used for dissemination of information regarding the availability of LANDSAT imagery is presented. The Image Processing Facility of the Goddard Space Flight Center, publishes a U.S. and a Non-U.S. Standard Catalog on a monthly schedule, and the catalogs identify imagery which has been processed and input to the data files during the referenced month. The U.S. Standard Catalog includes imagery covering the continental United States, Alaska and Hawaii; the Non-U.S. Catalog identifies all the remaining coverage. Imagery adjacent to the continental U.S. and Alaska borders is included in the U.S. Standard Catalog.

  18. Wider pulsation instability regions for β Cephei and SPB stars calculated using new Los Alamos opacities

    SciTech Connect

    Walczak, Przemysław; Fontes, Christopher John; Colgan, James Patrick; Kilcrease, David Parker; Guzik, Joyce Ann

    2015-08-13

    Here, our goal is to test the newly developed OPLIB opacity tables from Los Alamos National Laboratory and check their influence on the pulsation properties of B-type stars. We calculated models using MESA and Dziembowski codes for stellar evolution and linear, nonadiabatic pulsations, respectively. We derived the instability domains of β Cephei and SPB-types for different opacity tables OPLIB, OP, and OPAL. As a result, the new OPLIB opacities have the highest Rosseland mean opacity coefficient near the so-called Z-bump. Therefore, the OPLIB instability domains are wider than in the case of OP and OPAL data.

  19. Aspects of the Problems of Bibliographic Access to University Library Collections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguolu, C. C.

    1979-01-01

    Problems of providing bibliographic access to university library-based information sources are discussed with focus upon bibliographies, card and union catalogs, and library classification schemes. (Author/MBR)

  20. Ring Catalog: A resource for designing self-assembling RNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Parlea, Lorena; Bindewald, Eckart; Sharan, Rishabh; Bartlett, Nathan; Moriarty, Daniel; Oliver, Jerome; Afonin, Kirill A; Shapiro, Bruce A

    2016-07-01

    Designing self-assembling RNA ring structures based on known 3D structural elements connected via linker helices is a challenging task due to the immense number of motif combinations, many of which do not lead to ring-closure. We describe an in silico solution to this design problem by combinatorial assembly of RNA 3-way junctions, bulges, and kissing loops, and tabulating the cases that lead to ring formation. The solutions found are made available in the form of a web-accessible Ring Catalog. As an example of a potential use of this resource, we chose a predicted RNA square structure consisting of five RNA strands and demonstrate experimentally that the self-assembly of those five strands leads to the formation of a square-like complex. This is a demonstration of a novel "design by catalog" approach to RNA nano-structure generation. The URL https://rnajunction.ncifcrf.gov/ringdb can be used to access the resource.

  1. Historical geoscientific collections - requirements on digital cataloging and problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehling, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources maintains comprehensive geoscientific collections: the historical collections of Prussian Geological Survey in Berlin (19th and 20th century; about 2 mio specimen) and the geoscientific collections of the 20th century in Hannover (about 800.000 specimen). Nowadays, where financial support is strictly bound to efficiency and rentability on one side and the soaring (among young people - nearly exclusive) use of the web for the research, it is mandatory to provide the information about the available stock of specimen on the web. The digital cataloging has being carried out since 20 years: up to now about 40 % of the stock has been documented in 20 access-databases. The experiences of 20 years digital cataloging as well as the contact with professional users allow to formulate the requirements on a modern digital database with all accordingly problems. The main problems are different kinds of specimen: minerals, rocks, fossils, drill cores with diverging descriptions; obsolescent names of minerals, rocks and geographical sites; generations of various inventory numbers; inhomogeneous data (quantity and quality). Out of it result requirements to much, well educated manpower on the one side and an intelligent digital solution on the other side: it should have an internationally useable standard considering all the described local problems.

  2. Fermi Large Area Telescope Second Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, P. L.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bignami, G. F.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Campana, R.; Cañadas, B.; Cannon, A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Ceccanti, M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chipaux, R.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Corbet, R.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; Davis, D. S.; de Angelis, A.; DeCesar, M. E.; DeKlotz, M.; De Luca, A.; den Hartog, P. R.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Digel, S. W.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Enoto, T.; Escande, L.; Fabiani, D.; Falletti, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Iafrate, G.; Itoh, R.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, T. E.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Landriu, D.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lionetto, A. M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Marelli, M.; Massaro, E.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Minuti, M.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mongelli, M.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Pinchera, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Rousseau, R.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Salvetti, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sbarra, C.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Shrader, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stephens, T. E.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinebra, F.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Etten, A.; Van Klaveren, B.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wallace, E.; Wang, P.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.; Zimmer, S.

    2012-04-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy γ-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24 month period. The second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in five energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely γ-ray-producing source classes. We dedicate this paper to the memory of our colleague Patrick Nolan, who died on 2011 November 6. His career spanned much of the history of high-energy astronomy from space and his work on the Large Area Telescope (LAT) began nearly 20 years ago when it was just a concept. Pat was a central member in the operation of the LAT collaboration and he is greatly missed.

  3. Version 1 of the Hubble Source Catalog

    DOE PAGES

    Whitmore, Bradley C.; Allam, Sahar S.; Budavari, Tamas; Casertano, Stefano; Downes, Ronald A.; Donaldson, Thomas; Fall, S. Michael; Lubow, Stephen H.; Quick, Lee; Strolger, Louis -Gregory; et al

    2016-05-11

    The Hubble Source Catalog is designed to help optimize science from the Hubble Space Telescope by combining the tens of thousands of visit-based source lists in the Hubble Legacy Archive into a single master catalog. Version 1 of the Hubble Source Catalog includes WFPC2, ACS/WFC, WFC3/UVIS, and WFC3/IR photometric data generated using SExtractor software to produce the individual source lists. The catalog includes roughly 80 million detections of 30 million objects involving 112 different detector/filter combinations, and about 160 thousand HST exposures. Source lists from Data Release 8 of the Hubble Legacy Archive are matched using an algorithm developed by Budavari & Lubow (2012). The mean photometric accuracy for the catalog as a whole is better than 0.10 mag, with relative accuracy as good as 0.02 mag in certain circumstances (e.g., bright isolated stars). The relative astrometric residuals are typically within 10 mas, with a value for the mode (i.e., most common value) of 2.3 mas. The absolute astrometric accuracy is better thanmore » $$\\sim$$0.1 arcsec for most sources, but can be much larger for a fraction of fields that could not be matched to the PanSTARRS, SDSS, or 2MASS reference systems. In this paper we describe the database design with emphasis on those aspects that enable the users to fully exploit the catalog while avoiding common misunderstandings and potential pitfalls. Here, we provide usage examples to illustrate some of the science capabilities and data quality characteristics, and briefly discuss plans for future improvements to the Hubble Source Catalog.« less

  4. Version 1 of the Hubble Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Bradley C.; Allam, Sahar S.; Budavári, Tamás; Casertano, Stefano; Downes, Ronald A.; Donaldson, Thomas; Fall, S. Michael; Lubow, Stephen H.; Quick, Lee; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Wallace, Geoff; White, Richard L.

    2016-06-01

    The Hubble Source Catalog is designed to help optimize science from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) by combining the tens of thousands of visit-based source lists in the Hubble Legacy Archive (HLA) into a single master catalog. Version 1 of the Hubble Source Catalog includes WFPC2, ACS/WFC, WFC3/UVIS, and WFC3/IR photometric data generated using SExtractor software to produce the individual source lists. The catalog includes roughly 80 million detections of 30 million objects involving 112 different detector/filter combinations, and about 160,000 HST exposures. Source lists from Data Release 8 of the HLA are matched using an algorithm developed by Budavári & Lubow. The mean photometric accuracy for the catalog as a whole is better than 0.10 mag, with relative accuracy as good as 0.02 mag in certain circumstances (e.g., bright isolated stars). The relative astrometric residuals are typically within 10 mas, with a value for the mode (i.e., most common value) of 2.3 mas. The absolute astrometric accuracy is better than 0''\\hspace{-0.5em}. 1 for most sources, but can be much larger for a fraction of fields that could not be matched to the PanSTARRS, SDSS, or 2MASS reference systems. In this paper we describe the database design with emphasis on those aspects that enable the users to fully exploit the catalog while avoiding common misunderstandings and potential pitfalls. We provide usage examples to illustrate some of the science capabilities and data quality characteristics, and briefly discuss plans for future improvements to the Hubble Source Catalog.

  5. NASA scientific and technical publications: A catalog of Special Publications, Reference Publications, Conference Publications, and Technical Papers, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This catalog lists 239 citations of all NASA Special Publications, NASA Reference Publications, NASA Conference Publications, and NASA Technical Papers that were entered in the NASA scientific and technical information database during accession year 1987. The entries are grouped by subject category. Indexes of subject terms, personal authors, and NASA report numbers are provided.

  6. NASA scientific and technical publications: A catalog of special publications, reference publications, conference publications, and technical papers, 1991-1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This catalog lists 458 citations of all NASA Special Publications, NASA Reference Publications, NASA Conference Publications, and NASA Technical Papers that were entered into the NASA Scientific and Technical Information database during accession year 1991 through 1992. The entries are grouped by subject category. Indexes of subject terms, personal authors, and NASA report numbers are provided.

  7. Connecting NovaNET and PLATO to an External Database: The University of Illinois Library Online Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avner, Elaine; Avner, Allen

    This paper provides the documentation for the program that provides access to the University of Illinois Online Catalog (OLC), together with a script to be used with 17 slides explaining the development of the program. Advantages of connecting a database to a computer-assisted instruction (CAI) system are outlined and sources of additional…

  8. NASA scientific and technical publications: A catalog of special publications, reference publications, conference publications, and technical papers, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This catalog lists 190 citations of all NASA Special Publications, NASA Reference Publications, NASA Conference Publications, and NASA Technical Papers that were entered into the NASA scientific and technical information database during accession year 1989. The entries are grouped by subject category. Indexes of subject terms, personal authors, and NASA report numbers are provided.

  9. Colour stability, opacity and cross-link density of composites submitted to accelerated artificial aging.

    PubMed

    Mundim, Fabrício Mariano; Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri; Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca Roberti; Consani, Simonides

    2010-06-01

    The study evaluated the influence of accelerated artificial aging on colour stability, opacity and cross-link density of resin-based composites (RBCs). Seven specimens were obtained of five RBCs (Heliomolar, 4 Seasons, Tetric Evo Ceram, SR Adoro), which were submitted to colour stability and opacity analysis and cross-link density evaluation. All tests were performed before and after aging. After statistical analysis (one-way ANOVA; Tukey; p<0.05), it was observed that QuiXfil and SR Adoro presented colour alteration values above those that are clinically acceptable (deltaE=5.77 and 4.34 respectively) and the variation in opacity was lowest for SR Adoro. There was an increase in the cross-link density of all studied materials after aging.

  10. Physical and Chemical Processes Opacity Project: an Overview and Some Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, C.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. El Proyecto de la Opacidad es un esfuerzo internacional dedicado a calcular con precisi6n la gran cantidad de datos at6micos que se necesitan para estimar opacidades en los envolventes estelares. Describimos el panorama general del proyecto incluyendo aspectos astrofisicos, flsico-at6micos y computacionales. El volumen y calidad de los datos que se estan generando se puede apreciar en los resultados preliminares que se presentan. ABSTRACT The Opacity Project is an international effort dedicated to the calculation of the vast, accurate, atomic data required to estimate stellar envelope opacities. We give an overview of the project including astrophysical, atomic-physical and computational aspects. The volume and quality of the data which are being generated can be appreciated in the preliminary results that are presented. }% words: ATOMIC PROCESSES - OPACITIES - STARS-INThRIORS

  11. Theoretical and experimental activities on opacities for a good interpretation of seismic stellar probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turck-Chièze, S.; Loisel, G.; Gilles, D.; Thais, F.; Bastiani, S.; Blancard, C.; Busquet, M.; Caillaud, T.; Cosse, P.; Blenski, T.; Delahaye, F.; Educret, J.; Faussurier, G.; Gilleron, F.; Guzik, J.; Harris, J. W.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Magee, N. H.; Piau, L.; Pain, J. C.; Poirier, M.; Porcherot, Q.; Reverdin, C.; Silvert, V.; Villette, B.; Zeippen, C.

    2011-01-01

    Opacity calculations are basic ingredients of stellar modelling. They play a crucial role in the interpretation of acoustic modes detected by SoHO, COROT and KEPLER. In this review we present our activities on both theoretical and experimental sides. We show new calculations of opacity spectra and comparisons between eight groups who produce opacity spectra calculations in the domain where experiments are scheduled. Real differences are noticed with real astrophysical consequences when one extends helioseismology to cluster studies of different compositions. Two cases are considered presently: (1) the solar radiative zone and (2) the beta Cephei envelops. We describe how our experiments are performed and new preliminary results on nickel obtained in the campaign 2010 at LULI 2000 at Polytechnique.

  12. Models of H II regions - Heavy element opacity, variation of temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed set of H II region models that use the same physics and self-consistent input have been computed and are used to examine where in parameter space the effects of heavy element opacity is important. The models are briefly described, and tabular data for the input parameters and resulting properties of the models are presented. It is found that the opacities of C, Ne, O, and to a lesser extent N play a vital role over a large region of parameter space, while S and Ar opacities are negligible. The variation of the average electron temperature T(e) of the models with metal abundance, density, and T(eff) is investigated. It is concluded that by far the most important determinator of T(e) is metal abundance; an almost 7000 K difference is expected over the factor of 10 change from up to down abundances.

  13. Catalog of infrared observations. Part 1: Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Schmitz, Marion; Mead, Jaylee M.

    1987-01-01

    The Catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO) is a compilation of infrared astronomical observational data obtained from an extensive literature search of astronomical journals and major astronomical catalogs and surveys. The literature searches are complete for 1965 through 1986 in this Second Edition. The Catalog is published in two parts, with the observational data (roughly 200,000 observations of 20,000 individual sources) listed in Part I, and supporting appendices in Part II. The expanded Second Edition contains a new feature: complete IRAS 4-band data for all CIO sources detected, listed with the main Catalog observations, as well as in complete detail in the Appendix. The appendices include an atlas of infrared source positions, two bibliographies of infrared literature upon which the search was based, and, keyed to the main Catalog listings (organized alphabetically by author and then chronologically), an atlas of infrared spectral ranges, and IRAS data from the CIO sources. The complete CIO database is available to qualified users in printed microfiche and magnetic tape formats.

  14. Government documents and the online catalog.

    PubMed

    Lynch, F H; Lasater, M C

    1990-01-01

    Prior to planning for implementing the NOTIS system, the Vanderbilt Medical Center Library had not fully cataloged its government publications, and records for these materials were not in machine-readable format. A decision was made that patrons should need to look in only one place for all library materials, including the Health and Human Services Department publications received each year from the central library's Government Documents Unit. Beginning in 1985, these publications were added to the library's database, and the entire 7,200-piece collection is now in the online catalog. Working with these publications has taught the library much about the advantages and disadvantages of cataloging government documents in an online environment. It was found that OCLC cataloging copy is eventually available for most titles, although only about 10% of the records have MeSH headings. Staff time is the major expenditure; problems are caused by documents' irregular nature, frequent format changes, and difficult authority work. Since their addition to the online catalog, documents are used more and the library has better control. PMID:2295010

  15. SDSS DR7 WHITE DWARF CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman, S. J.; Nitta, A.; Kepler, S. O.; Pelisoli, Ingrid; Pecanha, Viviane; Costa, J. E. S.; Koester, D.; Krzesinski, J.; Dufour, P.; Lachapelle, F.-R.; Bergeron, P.; Yip, Ching-Wa; Harris, Hugh C.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Althaus, L.; Corsico, A.

    2013-01-15

    We present a new catalog of spectroscopically confirmed white dwarf stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 spectroscopic catalog. We find 20,407 white dwarf spectra, representing 19,712 stars, and provide atmospheric model fits to 14,120 DA and 1011 DB white dwarf spectra from 12,843 and 923 stars, respectively. These numbers represent more than a factor of two increase in the total number of white dwarf stars from the previous SDSS white dwarf catalogs based on DR4 data. Our distribution of subtypes varies from previous catalogs due to our more conservative, manual classifications of each star in our catalog, supplementing our automatic fits. In particular, we find a large number of magnetic white dwarf stars whose small Zeeman splittings mimic increased Stark broadening that would otherwise result in an overestimated log g if fit as a non-magnetic white dwarf. We calculate mean DA and DB masses for our clean, non-magnetic sample and find the DB mean mass is statistically larger than that for the DAs.

  16. STATISTICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE CHANDRA SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Primini, Francis A.; Evans, Ian N.; Glotfelty, Kenny J.; Anderson, Craig S.; Bonaventura, Nina R.; Chen, Judy C.; Doe, Stephen M.; Evans, Janet D.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Galle, Elizabeth C.; Gibbs, Danny G.; Grier, John D.; Hain, Roger M.; Harbo, Peter N.; He Xiangqun; Karovska, Margarita; Houck, John C.; Davis, John E.; Nowak, Michael A.; Hall, Diane M.

    2011-06-01

    The first release of the Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) contains {approx}95,000 X-ray sources in a total area of 0.75% of the entire sky, using data from {approx}3900 separate ACIS observations of a multitude of different types of X-ray sources. In order to maximize the scientific benefit of such a large, heterogeneous data set, careful characterization of the statistical properties of the catalog, i.e., completeness, sensitivity, false source rate, and accuracy of source properties, is required. Characterization efforts of other large Chandra catalogs, such as the ChaMP Point Source Catalog or the 2 Mega-second Deep Field Surveys, while informative, cannot serve this purpose, since the CSC analysis procedures are significantly different and the range of allowable data is much less restrictive. We describe here the characterization process for the CSC. This process includes both a comparison of real CSC results with those of other, deeper Chandra catalogs of the same targets and extensive simulations of blank-sky and point-source populations.

  17. Catalog of infrared observations. Part 1: Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Schmitz, Marion; Mead, Jaylee M.

    The Catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO) is a compilation of infrared astronomical observational data obtained from an extensive literature search of astronomical journals and major astronomical catalogs and surveys. The literature searches are complete for 1965 through 1986 in this Second Edition. The Catalog is published in two parts, with the observational data (roughly 200,000 observations of 20,000 individual sources) listed in Part I, and supporting appendices in Part II. The expanded Second Edition contains a new feature: complete IRAS 4-band data for all CIO sources detected, listed with the main Catalog observations, as well as in complete detail in the Appendix. The appendices include an atlas of infrared source positions, two bibliographies of infrared literature upon which the search was based, and, keyed to the main Catalog listings (organized alphabetically by author and then chronologically), an atlas of infrared spectral ranges, and IRAS data from the CIO sources. The complete CIO database is available to qualified users in printed microfiche and magnetic tape formats.

  18. Momentum deposition on Wolf-Rayet winds: Nonisotropic diffusion with effective gray opacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayley, Kenneth G.; Owocki, Stanley P.; Cranmer, Steven R.

    1995-01-01

    We derive the velocity and mass-loss rate of a steady state Wolf-Rayet (WR) wind, using a nonisotropic diffusion approximation applied to the transfer between strongly overlapping spectral lines. Following the approach of Friend & Castor (1983), the line list is assumed to approximate a statistically parameterized Poisson distribution in frequency, so that photon transport is controlled by an angle-dependent, effectively gray opacity. We show the nonisotropic diffusion approximation yields good agreement with more accurate numerical treatments of the radiative transfer, while providing analytic insight into wind driving by multiple scattering. We illustrate, in particular, that multiple radiative momentum deposition does not require that potons be repeatedly reflected across substantial distances within the spherical envelope, but indeed is greatest when photons undergo a nearly local diffusion, e.g., through scattering by many lines closely spaced in frequency. Our results reiterate the view that the so-called 'momentum problem' of Wolf-Rayet winds is better characterized as an 'opacity problem' of simply identfying enough lines. One way of increasing the number of thick lines in Wolf-Rayet winds is to transfer opacity from saturated to unsaturated lines, yielding a steeper opacity distribution than that found in OB winds. We discuss the implications of this perspective for extending our approach to W-R wind models that incorporate a more fundamental treatment of the ionization and excitation processes that determine the line opacity. In particular, we argue that developing statistical descriptions of the lines to allow an improved effective opacity for the line ensemble would offer several advantages for deriving such more fundamental W-R wind models.

  19. First-principles opacity table of warm dense deuterium for inertial-confinement-fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Collins, L. A.; Goncharov, V. N.; Boehly, T. R.; Epstein, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.

    2014-09-01

    Accurate knowledge of the optical properties of a warm dense deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture is important for reliable design of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions using radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. The opacity of a warm dense DT shell essentially determines how much radiation from hot coronal plasmas can be deposited in the DT fuel of an imploding capsule. Even for the simplest species of hydrogen, the accurate calculation of their opacities remains a challenge in the warm-dense matter regime because strong-coupling and quantum effects play an important role in such plasmas. With quantum-molecular-dynamics (QMD) simulations, we have derived a first-principles opacity table (FPOT) of deuterium (and the DT mixture by mass scaling) for a wide range of densities from ρD=0.5 to 673.518g/cm3 and temperatures from T=5000K up to the Fermi temperature TF for each density. Compared with results from the astrophysics opacity table (AOT) currently used in our hydrocodes, the FPOT of deuterium from our QMD calculations has shown a significant increase in opacity for strongly coupled and degenerate plasma conditions by a factor of 3-100 in the ICF-relevant photon-energy range. As conditions approach those of classical plasma, the opacity from the FPOT converges to the corresponding values of the AOT. By implementing the FPOT of deuterium and the DT mixture into our hydrocodes, we have performed radiation-hydrodynamics simulations for low-adiabat cryogenic DT implosions on the OMEGA laser and for direct-drive-ignition designs for the National Ignition Facility. The simulation results using the FPOT show that the target performance (in terms of neutron yield and energy gain) could vary from ˜10% up to a factor of ˜2 depending on the adiabat of the imploding DT capsule; the lower the adiabat, the more variation is seen in the prediction of target performance when compared to the AOT modeling.

  20. Sound speed and oscillation frequencies for a solar model evolved with Los Alamos ATOMIC opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzik, Joyce Ann; Fontes, Christopher; Walczak, Przemyslaw; Wood, Suzannah R.; Mussack, Katie

    2015-08-01

    Los Alamos has calculated a new generation of radiative opacities for elements with atomic number Z=1-30 with improved physics input, updated atomic data, and finer temperature grid to replace the Los Alamos LEDCOP opacities released in the year 2000. We calculate the evolution of a standard solar model including these new opacities, and compare with a model evolved using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory OPAL opacities released about 1996. We use the solar abundance mixture of Asplund, Grevesse, Sauval, and Scott (2009), including 2015 updates. The Los Alamos ATOMIC opacities (Colgan et al. 2013a,b) are somewhat higher than those of OPAL for temperatures and densities near the base of the solar convection zone. We compare the calculated nonadiabatic solar oscillation frequencies and solar interior sound speed to observed frequencies and helioseismic inferences. We discuss the potential for increased opacities to partially mitigate the ‘solar abundance problem’.References:J. Colgan, D.P. Kilcrease, N.H. Magee, Jr., G.S.J. Armstrong, J. Abdallah, Jr., M.E. Sherrill, C.J. Fontes, H.L. Zhang and P. Hakel, Eighth International Conference on Atomic and Molecular Data and their Applications: ICAMDATA, Gaithersburg, MD 2012, AIP Conf. Proc. No. 1545, (AIP, New York, 2013a), pp. 17-26.J. Colgan, D.P. Kilcrease, N.H. Magee, Jr, G.S.J. Armstrong, J. Abdallah, Jr., M.E. Sherrill, C.J. Fontes, H.L. Zhang and P. Hakel, High Energy Density Physics 9, 369 (2013b).

  1. Bubble formation of aqueous humor and lens opacity during chamber flight.

    PubMed

    Fang, H S; Chen, H M

    1984-10-01

    A transparent miniature decompression chamber was placed on the stage of a large-working zoom-stereo microscope so that the effect of decompression on the frog eye could be microscopically observed and photographed. It was found that chamber flight at a simulated altitude of 66,000 ft (20,117 m) or more caused bubble formation in aqueous humor and lens opacities in some of the experimental animals. On return to ground level, the bubbles either decreased in size or completely disappeared. The cataract could also regress after recompression to 1 atm. Such lens opacities may be termed altitude cataract, instead of asphyxial or anoxic cataract.

  2. Metal Hydride and Alkali Halide Opacities in Extrasolar Giant Planets and Cool Stellar Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weck, Philippe F.; Stancil, Phillip C.; Kirby, Kate; Schweitzer, Andreas; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    2006-01-01

    The lack of accurate and complete molecular line and continuum opacity data has been a serious limitation to developing atmospheric models of cool stars and Extrasolar Giant Planets (EGPs). We report our recent calculations of molecular opacities resulting from the presence of metal hydrides and alkali halides. The resulting data have been included in the PHOENIX stellar atmosphere code (Hauschildt & Baron 1999). The new models, calculated using spherical geometry for all gravities considered, also incorporate our latest database of nearly 670 million molecular lines, and updated equations of state.

  3. Intense ion beams as a tool for opacity measurements in warm dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Abdallah, Joseph; Tauschwiz, An; Jacoby, J; Maruhn, J A; Novikov, V G; Tauschwitz, A; Onkels, E; Wittle, K; Rosmej, F B; Schott, R

    2009-01-01

    Opacity measurements in warm dense matter (WDM) provide a valuable benchmark for the diverging theoretical models in this regime. Heating of thin foils with intense heavy-ion beams allows one to create isolated samples of warm dense matter suitable for experimental determination of frequency-dependent opacities. A prerequisite for the measurements is the isothermal expansion of the heated foil. Hydrodynamic simulations predict that this condition is fulfilled. The analysis shows that existing ion-beam accelerators are capable to contribute to this field of research.

  4. Opacity and atomic analysis of double pulse laser ablated Li plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumaran, V.; Joshi, H. C.; Kumar, Ajai

    2014-09-01

    Opacity effects for neutral and ionic emission lines of lithium have been investigated by Atomic Data Analysis Structure (ADAS). Line ratios and opacity corrected photon emissivity coefficients are calculated over a wide range of electron temperatures and densities. The experimentally measured temporal evolution of the line profiles of the over dense Li plasma formed in the double pulse laser ablation experiment have been explained using the ADAS analysis and the plasma parameters of the plasma plume under consideration have been estimated. These results could be projected as a diagnostic tool to estimate plasma parameters of an over dense lithium plasma.

  5. Corneal Opacity in a Participant of a 161-km Mountain Bike Race at High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Khodaee, Morteza; Torres, David R

    2016-06-01

    Visual dysfunction is a relatively uncommon complaint among athletes during ultraendurance races. The pathophysiology of most of these cases is unknown. Corneal opacity has been speculated as the etiology for most of reported cases. We are presenting a case of a 56-year-old man with a partial unilateral corneal opacity and edema at kilometer 150 of a 161-km mountain bike race in high altitude. He was not able to finish the race (12-hour cutoff) because of his visual symptoms. He completely recovered in 3 days with no sequelae. PMID:27095539

  6. Red giant model atmospheres. I. A grid of opacity sampled models

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, H.R.; Bernat, A.P.; Krupp, B.M.

    1980-03-01

    We present a grid of model atmospheres for the range 2500 K< or =T/sub eff/< or =4000 K and 0.0< or =log g< or =2.0. These models are computed under the classical assumptions but include detailed consideration of the bound-bound opacity due to atoms, CO, CN, C/sub 2/, TiO, CH, NH, MgH, and OH. Bound-bound opacity due to H/sub 2/O is included in the straight mean approximation.

  7. 41 CFR 101-30.101-5 - Cataloging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 30-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.1..., classifying, numbering, and publishing in the Federal Catalog System all items of personal property (items...

  8. 41 CFR 101-30.101-5 - Cataloging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 30-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.1..., classifying, numbering, and publishing in the Federal Catalog System all items of personal property (items...

  9. 41 CFR 101-30.101-5 - Cataloging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 30-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.1..., classifying, numbering, and publishing in the Federal Catalog System all items of personal property (items...

  10. 41 CFR 101-30.101-5 - Cataloging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 30-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.1..., classifying, numbering, and publishing in the Federal Catalog System all items of personal property (items...

  11. 41 CFR 101-30.101-5 - Cataloging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 30-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.1..., classifying, numbering, and publishing in the Federal Catalog System all items of personal property (items...

  12. Descriptive Cataloging: A Selected, Annotated Bibliography, 1984-1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, C. Donald; Jones, Ellen

    1986-01-01

    This annotated bibliography of materials published during 1984-1985 on descriptive cataloging covers bibliographic control, Anglo American Cataloging Rules, 2nd edition (AACR2), specific types of materials, authority control, retrospective conversion, management issues, expert systems, and manuals. (EM)

  13. TGCat : THE CHANDRA TRANSMISSION GRATING DATA CATALOG AND ARCHIVE

    SciTech Connect

    Huenemoerder, David P.; Dewey, Daniel; Nowak, Michael A.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Davis, John E.; Houck, John C.; Marshall, Herman L.; Noble, Michael S.; Canizares, Claude R.; Mitschang, Arik; Nichols, Joy S.; Morgan, Doug

    2011-04-15

    The Chandra Transmission Grating Data Archive and Catalog (TGCat) provides easy access to analysis-ready products, specifically, high-resolution X-ray count spectra and their corresponding calibrations. The web interface makes it easy to find observations of a particular object, type of object, or type of observation; to quickly assess the quality and potential usefulness of the spectra from pre-computed summary plots; or to customize a view with an interactive plotter, optionally combining spectra over multiple orders or observations. Data and responses can be downloaded as a package or as individual files, and the query results themselves can be retrieved as ASCII or Virtual Observatory tables. Portable reprocessing scripts used to create the archive and which use the Chandra X-ray Center's (CXC's) software and other publicly available software are also available, facilitating standard or customized reprocessing from Level 1 CXC archival data to spectra and responses with minimal user interaction.

  14. OrthoDB: the hierarchical catalog of eukaryotic orthologs.

    PubMed

    Kriventseva, Evgenia V; Rahman, Nazim; Espinosa, Octavio; Zdobnov, Evgeny M

    2008-01-01

    The concept of orthology is widely used to relate genes across different species using comparative genomics, and it provides the basis for inferring gene function. Here we present the web accessible OrthoDB database that catalogs groups of orthologous genes in a hierarchical manner, at each radiation of the species phylogeny, from more general groups to more fine-grained delineations between closely related species. We used a COG-like and Inparanoid-like ortholog delineation procedure on the basis of all-against-all Smith-Waterman sequence comparisons to analyze 58 eukaryotic genomes, focusing on vertebrates, insects and fungi to facilitate further comparative studies. The database is freely available at http://cegg.unige.ch/orthodb.

  15. A catalog of the mouse gut metagenome.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Liang; Feng, Qiang; Liang, Suisha; Sonne, Si Brask; Xia, Zhongkui; Qiu, Xinmin; Li, Xiaoping; Long, Hua; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Dongya; Liu, Chuan; Fang, Zhiwei; Chou, Joyce; Glanville, Jacob; Hao, Qin; Kotowska, Dorota; Colding, Camilla; Licht, Tine Rask; Wu, Donghai; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu; Liang, Qiaoyi; Li, Junhua; Jia, Huijue; Lan, Zhou; Tremaroli, Valentina; Dworzynski, Piotr; Nielsen, H Bjørn; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Doré, Joël; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Lin, John C; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Wang, Jun; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten

    2015-10-01

    We established a catalog of the mouse gut metagenome comprising ∼2.6 million nonredundant genes by sequencing DNA from fecal samples of 184 mice. To secure high microbiome diversity, we used mouse strains of diverse genetic backgrounds, from different providers, kept in different housing laboratories and fed either a low-fat or high-fat diet. Similar to the human gut microbiome, >99% of the cataloged genes are bacterial. We identified 541 metagenomic species and defined a core set of 26 metagenomic species found in 95% of the mice. The mouse gut microbiome is functionally similar to its human counterpart, with 95.2% of its Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) orthologous groups in common. However, only 4.0% of the mouse gut microbial genes were shared (95% identity, 90% coverage) with those of the human gut microbiome. This catalog provides a useful reference for future studies.

  16. Completion of Population of and Quality Assurance on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options Catalog.

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Laura L.; Barela, Amanda Crystal; Walkow, Walter M.; Schetnan, Richard Reed; Arnold, Matthew Brian

    2015-12-01

    An Evaluation and Screening team supporting the Fuel Cycle Technologies Program Office of the United States Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy is conducting an evaluation and screening of a comprehensive set of fuel cycle options. These options have been assigned to one of 40 evaluation groups, each of which has a representative fuel cycle option [Todosow 2013]. A Fuel Cycle Data Package System Datasheet has been prepared for each representative fuel cycle option to ensure that the technical information used in the evaluation is high-quality and traceable [Kim, et al., 2013]. The information contained in the Fuel Cycle Data Packages has been entered into the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options Catalog at Sandia National Laboratories so that it is accessible by the evaluation and screening team and other interested parties. In addition, an independent team at Savannah River National Laboratory has verified that the information has been entered into the catalog correctly. This report documents that the 40 representative fuel cycle options have been entered into the Catalog, and that the data entered into the catalog for the 40 representative options has been entered correctly.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: OGLE II SMC eclipsing binaries (Wyrzykowski+, 2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrzykowski, L.; Udalski, A.; Kubiak, M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Zebrun, K.; Soszinski, I.; Wozniak, P. R.; Pietrzynski, G.; Szewczyk, O.

    2009-03-01

    We present new version of the OGLE-II catalog of eclipsing binary stars detected in the Small Magellanic Cloud, based on Difference Image Analysis catalog of variable stars in the Magellanic Clouds containing data collected from 1997 to 2000. We found 1351 eclipsing binary stars in the central 2.4 square degree area of the SMC. 455 stars are newly discovered objects, not found in the previous release of the catalog. The eclipsing objects were selected with the automatic search algorithm based on the artificial neural network. The full catalog with individual photometry is accessible from the OGLE INTERNET archive, at ftp://sirius.astrouw.edu.pl/ogle/ogle2/var_stars/smc/ecl . Regular observations of the SMC fields started on June 26, 1997 and covered about 2.4 square degrees of central parts of the SMC. Reductions of the photometric data collected up to the end of May 2000 were performed with the Difference Image Analysis (DIA) package. (1 data file).

  18. 1990 National Water Quality Laboratory Services Catalog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pritt, Jeffrey; Jones, Berwyn E.

    1989-01-01

    PREFACE This catalog provides information about analytical services available from the National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) to support programs of the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey. To assist personnel in the selection of analytical services, the catalog lists cost, sample volume, applicable concentration range, detection level, precision of analysis, and preservation techniques for samples to be submitted for analysis. Prices for services reflect operationa1 costs, the complexity of each analytical procedure, and the costs to ensure analytical quality control. The catalog consists of five parts. Part 1 is a glossary of terminology; Part 2 lists the bottles, containers, solutions, and other materials that are available through the NWQL; Part 3 describes the field processing of samples to be submitted for analysis; Part 4 describes analytical services that are available; and Part 5 contains indices of analytical methodology and Chemical Abstract Services (CAS) numbers. Nomenclature used in the catalog is consistent with WATSTORE and STORET. The user is provided with laboratory codes and schedules that consist of groupings of parameters which are measured together in the NWQL. In cases where more than one analytical range is offered for a single element or compound, different laboratory codes are given. Book 5 of the series 'Techniques of Water Resources Investigations of the U.S. Geological Survey' should be consulted for more information about the analytical procedures included in the tabulations. This catalog supersedes U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 86-232 '1986-87-88 National Water Quality Laboratory Services Catalog', October 1985.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Environmental COntext (ECO) catalog (Moffett+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffett, A. J.; Kannappan, S. J.; Berlind, A. A.; Eckert, K. D.; Stark, D. V.; Hendel, D.; Norris, M. A.; Grogin, N. A.

    2016-02-01

    The ECO catalog represents a cross match between sources with measured redshifts found in the UZC (Updated Zwicky Catalog, Falco et al. 1999, J/PASP/111/438), SDSS (including data releases 6, 7, and 8; see II/294 and V/139), HyperLEDA (VII/237), RESOLVE (S. J. Kannappan et al. 2015, in preparation), GAMA (Driver et al. 2011, J/MNRAS/413/971), 2dF (Colless et al. 2001, VII/250), and 6dF (Jones et al. 2009, VII/259) catalogs with a 15" matching radius on sky. See section 2.1. (1 data file).

  20. CD-ROM Catalogs--The State of the Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beiser, Karl

    1988-01-01

    Reviews five CD-ROM catalogs: (1) Auto-Graphics Impact; (2) Brodart LePac; (3) GRC LaserGuide; (4) Library Corporation Intelligent Catalog; and (5) MARCIVE Pac. General guidelines for selecting a CD-ROM catalog are discussed, and vendor addresses and telephone numbers are listed. (MES)

  1. New Trends in Cataloging Rare and Special Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Deborah J.

    2003-01-01

    Reports on the American Library Association's efforts to update the Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (DCRM). Describes topics of working groups that include transcription of early letter forms, rare book cataloging of machine-press books, collection-level cataloging, problems and lacunae, and varieties of editions and issues and when to…

  2. 41 CFR 109-27.5006 - Stores catalogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Stores catalogs. 109-27... catalogs. A stores catalog for customer use that lists items available from stock shall be established for each stores operation. Exceptions to this requirement are authorized where establishment of a...

  3. 48 CFR 752.7022 - Conflicts between contract and catalog.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... and catalog. 752.7022 Section 752.7022 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL....7022 Conflicts between contract and catalog. For use in contracts for participant training with an educational institution. Conflicts Between Contract and Catalog (APR 1984) In the event of any...

  4. 48 CFR 752.7022 - Conflicts between contract and catalog.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... and catalog. 752.7022 Section 752.7022 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL....7022 Conflicts between contract and catalog. For use in contracts for participant training with an educational institution. Conflicts Between Contract and Catalog (APR 1984) In the event of any...

  5. 48 CFR 752.7022 - Conflicts between contract and catalog.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and catalog. 752.7022 Section 752.7022 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL....7022 Conflicts between contract and catalog. For use in contracts for participant training with an educational institution. Conflicts Between Contract and Catalog (APR 1984) In the event of any...

  6. 41 CFR 109-27.5006 - Stores catalogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stores catalogs. 109-27... catalogs. A stores catalog for customer use that lists items available from stock shall be established for each stores operation. Exceptions to this requirement are authorized where establishment of a...

  7. 48 CFR 752.7022 - Conflicts between contract and catalog.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and catalog. 752.7022 Section 752.7022 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL....7022 Conflicts between contract and catalog. For use in contracts for participant training with an educational institution. Conflicts Between Contract and Catalog (APR 1984) In the event of any...

  8. 48 CFR 752.7022 - Conflicts between contract and catalog.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and catalog. 752.7022 Section 752.7022 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL....7022 Conflicts between contract and catalog. For use in contracts for participant training with an educational institution. Conflicts Between Contract and Catalog (APR 1984) In the event of any...

  9. Cooperative Cataloging of Latin-American Books: The Unfulfilled Promise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grover, Mark L.

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of cooperative activities among libraries focuses on cataloging of Latin American materials among research libraries. Differences in motivation for cooperation in acquisitions and in cataloging are discussed; and a study is described that examined which libraries were providing online cataloging, and differences between OCLC and RLIN…

  10. Use Study of Online Cataloging in a Special Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knutson, Gunnar

    1984-01-01

    Statistical examination of original cataloging records of Chicago Municipal Reference Library as input into online OCLC union catalog reveals library's cataloging use rate as compared to nationwide average. Previous studies, methodology, and areas of high and low use (year of input, type of record, classification, length of monograph) are…

  11. A Converging Vision of Cataloging in the Electronic World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeng, Ling Hwey

    1996-01-01

    Traces the history of library cataloging from manual to electronic organization and reviews current attempts to organize electronic information. Highlights include characteristics of traditional cataloging, Internet indexing projects, cataloging Internet resources, defining the electronic unit of control, and visions for the future. (Author/LRW)

  12. A System for Analyzing Cataloging Rules: A Feasibility Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taniguchi, Shoichi

    1996-01-01

    Describes the development of a prototype system to analyze the ambiguity and complexity of cataloging rules to aid the quality control of cataloging standards. Highlights include AACR2 (Anglo-American Cataloging Rules, 2nd edition) rules, syntactic structure of rules, rule parsing, rule templates, relationships between rules, examples, and further…

  13. FLC/FEDLINK AACR 2 Cataloging Manual for Federal Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wajenberg, Arnold S.

    Intended as a guide for federal agency libraries in the application of the second edition of the Anglo-American Cataloging Rules and not to supersede them, the emphasis in this manual is on material and problems likely to be encountered by catalogers in the area of descriptive cataloging, and it includes the most recent Library of Congress rule…

  14. A New Catalog of Isolated Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Mata, J. A.; Hernández-Toledo, H. M.; Park, Changbom; Choi, Yun-Young

    2010-05-01

    We present a new catalog of isolated galaxies (coined as UNAM-KIAS) obtained through an automated systematic search. The 1520 isolated galaxies were found in ~ 1.4 steradians of the sky in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 (SDSS DR5) photometry. The selection algorithm was implemented from a variation of the criteria developed by Karachentseva (1973), with full redshift information. This new catalog is aimed to carry out comparative studies of environmental effects and constraining the currently competing scenarios of galaxy formation and evolution.

  15. Report on the Second Catalog Interoperability Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, James R.; James, Mary E.

    1988-01-01

    The events, resolutions, and recommendations of the Second Catalog Interoperability Workshop, held at JPL in January, 1988, are discussed. This workshop dealt with the issues of standardization and communication among directories, catalogs, and inventories in the earth and space science data management environment. The Directory Interchange Format, being constructed as a standard for the exchange of directory information among participating data systems, is discussed. Involvement in the Interoperability effort by NASA, NOAA, ISGS, and NSF is described, and plans for future interoperability considered. The NASA Master Directory prototype is presented and critiqued and options for additional capabilities debated.

  16. Safeguards instrumentation: a computer-based catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Fishbone, L.G.; Keisch, B.

    1981-08-01

    The information contained in this catalog is needed to provide a data base for safeguards studies and to help establish criteria and procedures for international safeguards for nuclear materials and facilities. The catalog primarily presents information on new safeguards equipment. It also describes entire safeguards systems for certain facilities, but it does not describe the inspection procedures. Because IAEA safeguards do not include physical security, devices for physical protection (as opposed to containment and surveillance) are not included. An attempt has been made to list capital costs, annual maintenance costs, replacement costs, and useful lifetime for the equipment. For equipment which is commercially available, representative sources have been listed whenever available.

  17. Cataloging the Youngest Protostars in NGC2264

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Jonathan; Brown, Arianna; Terebey, Susan; CSI2264

    2016-06-01

    Protostars are young stars in their earliest stages of development. We can determine the current stage of development of a young star depending on its relative brightness at varying wavelengths. Protostars are brightest at far-infrared wavelengths, typically peaking at 70-100um. A previous catalog of young stars in NGC 2264 is based on Spitzer data with 24um being the longest available wavelength data. Herschel data at 70um was used to improve the census of protostars. We found 11 new class 0 and 1 protostar candidates that were previously not found in the Spitzer catalog and are bright at 70um. We describe the properties of these candidates.

  18. Far infrared supplement: Catalog of infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, D. Y.; Schmitz, M.; Mead, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a new generation of orbital, airborne and ground-based infrared astronomical observatory facilities, including the infrared astronomical satellite (IRAS), the cosmic background explorer (COBE), the NASA Kuiper airborne observatory, and the NASA infrared telescope facility, intensified the need for a comprehensive, machine-readable data base and catalog of current infrared astronomical observations. The Infrared Astronomical Data Base and its principal data product, this catalog, comprise a machine-readable library of infrared (1 micrometer to 1000 micrometers) astronomical observations published in the scientific literature since 1965.

  19. 40 CFR 75.18 - Specific provisions for monitoring emissions from common and by-pass stacks for opacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... opacity monitoring system upon each common stack for the combined effluent. (b) Unit using bypass stack. Where any portion of the flue gases from an affected unit can be routed so as to bypass the installed... certified continuous opacity monitoring system on each bypass stack flue, duct, or stack gas stream...

  20. Student User Preferences for Features of Next-Generation OPACs: A Case Study of University of Sheffield International Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tam, Winnie; Cox, Andrew M.; Bussey, Andy

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify the features that international student users prefer for next generation OPACs. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 16 international students of the University of Sheffield were interviewed in July 2008 to explore their preferences among potential features in next generation OPACs. A…